Science.gov

Sample records for high-contrast imaging technique

  1. Angular Differential Imaging: a Powerful High-Contrast Imaging Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Marois, C; Lafreniere, D; Doyon, R; Macintosh, B; Nadeau, D

    2005-11-07

    Angular differential imaging is a high-contrast imaging technique that reduces speckle noise from quasi-static optical aberrations and facilitates the detection of faint nearby companions. A sequence of images is acquired with an altitude/azimuth telescope, the instrument rotator being turned off. This keeps the instrument and telescope optics aligned, stabilizes the instrumental PSF and allows the field of view to rotate with respect to the instrument. For each image, a reference PSF obtained from other images of the sequence is subtracted. All residual images are then rotated to align the field and are median combined. Observed performances are reported for Gemini Altair/NIRI data. Inside the speckle dominated region of the PSF, it is shown that quasi-static PSF noise can be reduced by a factor {approx}5 for each image subtraction. The combination of all residuals then provides an additional gain of the order of the square root of the total number of images acquired. To our knowledge, this is the first time an acquisition strategy and reduction pipeline designed for speckle attenuation and high contrast imaging is demonstrated to significantly get better detection limits with longer integration times at all angular separations. A PSF noise attenuation of 100 was achieved from 2-hour long sequences of images of Vega, reaching a 5-sigma contrast of 20 magnitudes for separations greater than 7''. This technique can be used with currently available instruments to search for {approx} 1 M{sub Jup} exoplanets with orbits of radii between 50 and 300 AU around nearby young stars. The possibility of combining the technique with other high-contrast imaging methods is briefly discussed.

  2. Analysis of High Contrast Imaging Techniques for Space Based Direct Planetary Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Gezari, Dan Y.; Nisenson, P.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We report on our ongoing investigations of a number of techniques for direct detection and imaging of Earth-like planets around nearby stellar sources. Herein, we give a quantitative analysis of these techniques and compare and contrast them via computer simulations. The techniques we will be reporting on are Bracewell Interferometry, Nisenson Apodized Square Aperture, and Coronagraphic masking techniques. We parameterize our results with respect to wavelength, aperture size, effects of mirror speckle, both mid- and high-spatial frequency, detector and photon noise as well pointing error. The recent numerous detections of Jupiter and Saturn like planets has driven a resurgence in research of space based high contrast imaging techniques for direct planetary imaging. Work is currently ongoing for concepts for NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder mission and a number of study teams have been funded. The authors are members of one team.

  3. The maturing of high contrast imaging and starlight suppression techniques for future NASA exoplanet characterization missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulter, Daniel R.; Gallagher, David B.; Siegler, Nicholas; Shaklan, Stuart; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Traub, Wesley A.

    2016-07-01

    Over 3000 exoplanets and hundreds of exoplanetary systems have been detected to date and we are now rapidly moving toward an era where the focus is shifting from detection to direct imaging and spectroscopic characterization of these new worlds and their atmospheres. NASA is currently studying several exoplanet characterization mission concepts for the 2020 Decadal Survey ranging from probe class to flagships. Detailed and comprehensive exoplanet characterization, particularly of exo-Earths, leading to assessment of habitability, or indeed detection of life, will require significant advances beyond the current state-of-the-art in high contrast imaging and starlight suppression techniques which utilize specially shaped precision optical elements to block the light from the parent star while controlling scattering and diffraction thus revealing and enabling spectroscopic study of the orbiting exoplanets in reflected light. In this paper we describe the two primary high contrast starlight suppression techniques currently being pursued by NASA: 1) coronagraphs (including several design variations) and 2) free-flying starshades. These techniques are rapidly moving from the technology development phase to the design and engineering phase and we discuss the prospects and projected performance for future exoplanet characterization missions utilizing these techniques coupled with large aperture telescopes in space.

  4. Orbital Differential Imaging: a new high-contrast post-processing technique for direct imaging of exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Males, Jared R.; Belikov, Ruslan; Bendek, Eduardo

    2015-09-01

    Current post-processing techniques in high contrast imaging depend on some source of diversity between the exoplanet signal and the residual star light at that location. The two main techniques are angular differential imaging (ADI), which makes use of parallactic sky rotation to separate planet from star light, and spectral differential imaging (SDI), which makes use of differences in the spectrum of planet and star light and the wavelength dependence of the point spread function (PSF). Here we introduce our technique for exploiting another source of diversity: orbital motion. Given repeated observations of an exoplanetary system with sufficiently short orbital periods, the motion of the planets allows us to discriminate them from the PSF. In addition to using powerful PSF subtraction algorithms, such an observing strategy enables temporal filtering. Once an orbit is determined, the planet can be "de-orbited" to further increase the signal-to-noise ratio. We call this collection of techniques Orbital Differential Imaging (ODI). Here we present the motivation for this technique, present a noise model, and present results from simulations. We believe ODI will be an enabling technique for imaging Earth-like planets in the habitable zones of Sun-like stars with dedicated space missions.

  5. High-contrast imaging testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K; Silva, D; Poyneer, L; Macintosh, B; Bauman, B; Palmer, D; Remington, T; Delgadillo-Lariz, M

    2008-01-23

    Several high-contrast imaging systems are currently under construction to enable the detection of extra-solar planets. In order for these systems to achieve their objectives, however, there is considerable developmental work and testing which must take place. Given the need to perform these tests, a spatially-filtered Shack-Hartmann adaptive optics system has been assembled to evaluate new algorithms and hardware configurations which will be implemented in these future high-contrast imaging systems. In this article, construction and phase measurements of a membrane 'woofer' mirror are presented. In addition, results from closed-loop operation of the assembled testbed with static phase plates are presented. The testbed is currently being upgraded to enable operation at speeds approaching 500 hz and to enable studies of the interactions between the woofer and tweeter deformable mirrors.

  6. High-contrast active cavitation imaging technique based on multiple bubble wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shukuan; Xu, Shanshan; Liu, Runna; Hu, Hong; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, a unique method that combines the ultrafast active cavitation imaging technique with multiple bubble wavelet transform (MBWT) for improving cavitation detection contrast was presented. The bubble wavelet was constructed by the modified Keller-Miksis equation that considered the mutual effect among bubbles. A three-dimensional spatial model was applied to simulate the spatial distribution of multiple bubbles. The effects of four parameters on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of cavitation images were evaluated, including the following: initial radii of bubbles, scale factor in the wavelet transform, number of bubbles, and the minimum inter-bubble distance. And the other two spatial models and cavitation bubble size distributions were introduced in the MBWT method. The results suggested that in the free-field experiments, the averaged SNR of images acquired by the MBWT method was improved by 7.16 ± 0.09 dB and 3.14 ± 0.14 dB compared with the values of images acquired by the B-mode and single bubble wavelet transform (SBWT) methods. In addition, in the tissue experiments, the averaged cavitation-to-tissue ratio of cavitation images acquired by the MBWT method was improved by 4.69 ± 0.25 dB and 1.74± 0.29 dB compared with that of images acquired by B-mode and SBWT methods.

  7. NASA High Contrast Imaging for Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    Described is NASA's ongoing program for the detection and characterization of exosolar planets via high-contrast imaging. Some of the more promising proposed techniques under assessment may enable detection of life outside our solar system. In visible light terrestrial planets are approximately 10(exp -10) dimmer than the parent star. Issues such as diffraction, scatter, wavefront, amplitude and polarization all contribute to a reduction in contrast. An overview of the techniques will be discussed.

  8. NASA High Contrast Imaging for Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    Described is NASA's ongoing program for the detection and characterization of exosolar planets via high-contrast imaging. Some of the more promising proposed techniques under assessment may enable detection of life outside our solar system. In visible light terrestrial planets are approximately 10(exp -10) dimmer than the parent star. Issues such as diffraction, scatter, wavefront, amplitude and polarization all contribute to a reduction in contrast. An overview of the techniques will be discussed.

  9. The TRENDS High-Contrast Imaging Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepp, Justin

    2014-08-01

    We have established a multi-disciplinary program that combines precise Doppler measurements with high-contrast imaging. Using long-term RV accelerations (or 'trends'), we take a much-needed short-cut for identifying promising high-contrast imaging targets. The goal of this project is to directly detect and characterize the companions responsible for accelerating their host stars. By working at the interface of two powerful and complementary planet detection techniques, we are able to construct 3d-orbits, calculate dynamical masses, and explicitly calibrate theoretical atmospheric models for substellar objects in a regime where they currently break-down (low temperatures). Using a sample of non-detections, the TRENDS program also provides the ability to robustly determine the occurrence rate of giant planets from 0-20 AU through statistical inference.

  10. New Techniques for High-Contrast Imaging with ADI: The ACORNS-ADI SEEDS Data Reduction Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Timothy D.; McElwain, Michael W.; Turner, Edwin L.; Abe, L.; Brandner, W.; Carson, J.; Egner, S.; Feldt, M.; Golota, T.; Grady, C. A.; Guyon, O.; Hashimoto, J.; Hayano, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Hayashi, S.; Henning, T.; Hodapp, K. W.; Ishil, M.; Lye, M.; Janson, M.; Kandori, R.; Knapp, G. R.; Kudo, T.; Kusakabe, N.; Kuzuhara, M.

    2012-01-01

    We describe Algorithms for Calibration, Optimized Registration, and Nulling the Star in Angular Differential Imaging (ACORNS-ADI), a new, parallelized software package to reduce high-contrast imaging data, and its application to data from the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks (SEEDS) survey. We implement seyeral new algorithms, includbg a method to centroid saturated images, a trimmed mean for combining an image sequence that reduces noise by up to approx 20%, and a robust and computationally fast method to compute the sensitivitv of a high-contrast obsen-ation everywhere on the field-of-view without introducing artificial sources. We also include a description of image processing steps to remove electronic artifacts specific to Hawaii2-RG detectors like the one used for SEEDS, and a detailed analysis of the Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI) algorithm commonly used to reduce high-contrast imaging data. ACORNS-ADI is efficient and open-source, and includes several optional features which may improve performance on data from other instruments. ACORNS-ADI is freely available for download at www.github.com/t-brandt/acorns_-adi under a BSD license

  11. NEW TECHNIQUES FOR HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING WITH ADI: THE ACORNS-ADI SEEDS DATA REDUCTION PIPELINE

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Timothy D.; Turner, Edwin L.; McElwain, Michael W.; Grady, C. A.; Abe, L.; Brandner, W.; Feldt, M.; Henning, T.; Carson, J.; Egner, S.; Golota, T.; Guyon, O.; Hayano, Y.; Hayashi, S.; Ishii, M.; Goto, M.; Hashimoto, J.; Hayashi, M.; Iye, M.; Hodapp, K. W.; and others

    2013-02-20

    We describe Algorithms for Calibration, Optimized Registration, and Nulling the Star in Angular Differential Imaging (ACORNS-ADI), a new, parallelized software package to reduce high-contrast imaging data, and its application to data from the SEEDS survey. We implement several new algorithms, including a method to register saturated images, a trimmed mean for combining an image sequence that reduces noise by up to {approx}20%, and a robust and computationally fast method to compute the sensitivity of a high-contrast observation everywhere on the field of view without introducing artificial sources. We also include a description of image processing steps to remove electronic artifacts specific to Hawaii2-RG detectors like the one used for SEEDS, and a detailed analysis of the Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI) algorithm commonly used to reduce high-contrast imaging data. ACORNS-ADI is written in python. It is efficient and open-source, and includes several optional features which may improve performance on data from other instruments. ACORNS-ADI requires minimal modification to reduce data from instruments other than HiCIAO. It is freely available for download at www.github.com/t-brandt/acorns-adi under a Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) license.

  12. TECHNIQUES FOR HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING IN MULTI-STAR SYSTEMS. I. SUPER-NYQUIST WAVEFRONT CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S.; Belikov, R.; Bendek, E.

    2015-09-01

    Direct imaging of extra-solar planets is now a reality with the deployment and commissioning of the first generation of specialized ground-based instruments (GPI, SPHERE, P1640, and SCExAO). These systems allow of planets 10{sup 7} times fainter than their host star. For space-based missions (EXCEDE, EXO-C, EXO-S, WFIRST), various teams have demonstrated laboratory contrasts reaching 10{sup −10} within a few diffraction limits from the star. However, all of these current and future systems are designed to detect faint planets around a single host star, while most non-M-dwarf stars such as Alpha Centauri belong to multi-star systems. Direct imaging around binaries/multiple systems at a level of contrast allowing detection of Earth-like planets is challenging because the region of interest is contaminated by the host star's companion in addition to the host itself. Generally, the light leakage is caused by both diffraction and aberrations in the system. Moreover, the region of interest usually falls outside the correcting zone of the deformable mirror (DM) with respect to the companion. Until now, it has been thought that removing the light of a companion star is too challenging, leading to the exclusion of many binary systems from target lists of direct imaging coronographic missions. In this paper, we will show new techniques for high-contrast imaging of planets around multi-star systems and detail the Super-Nyquist Wavefront Control (SNWC) method, which allows wavefront errors to be controlled beyond the nominal control region of the DM. Our simulations have demonstrated that, with SNWC, raw contrasts of at least 5 × 10{sup −9} in a 10% bandwidth are possible.

  13. Techniques for High-contrast Imaging in Multi-star Systems. I. Super-Nyquist Wavefront Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S.; Belikov, R.; Bendek, E.

    2015-09-01

    Direct imaging of extra-solar planets is now a reality with the deployment and commissioning of the first generation of specialized ground-based instruments (GPI, SPHERE, P1640, and SCExAO). These systems allow of planets 107 times fainter than their host star. For space-based missions (EXCEDE, EXO-C, EXO-S, WFIRST), various teams have demonstrated laboratory contrasts reaching 10-10 within a few diffraction limits from the star. However, all of these current and future systems are designed to detect faint planets around a single host star, while most non-M-dwarf stars such as Alpha Centauri belong to multi-star systems. Direct imaging around binaries/multiple systems at a level of contrast allowing detection of Earth-like planets is challenging because the region of interest is contaminated by the host star's companion in addition to the host itself. Generally, the light leakage is caused by both diffraction and aberrations in the system. Moreover, the region of interest usually falls outside the correcting zone of the deformable mirror (DM) with respect to the companion. Until now, it has been thought that removing the light of a companion star is too challenging, leading to the exclusion of many binary systems from target lists of direct imaging coronographic missions. In this paper, we will show new techniques for high-contrast imaging of planets around multi-star systems and detail the Super-Nyquist Wavefront Control (SNWC) method, which allows wavefront errors to be controlled beyond the nominal control region of the DM. Our simulations have demonstrated that, with SNWC, raw contrasts of at least 5 × 10-9 in a 10% bandwidth are possible.

  14. A High-precision Technique to Correct for Residual Atmospheric Dispersion in High-contrast Imaging Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, P.; Guyon, O.; Jovanovic, N.; Lozi, J.; Martinache, F.; Minowa, Y.; Kudo, T.; Takami, H.; Hayano, Y.; Narita, N.

    2016-12-01

    Direct detection and spectroscopy of exoplanets requires high-contrast imaging. For habitable exoplanets in particular, located at a small angular separation from the host star, it is crucial to employ small inner working angle (IWA) coronagraphs that efficiently suppress starlight. These coronagraphs, in turn, require careful control of the wavefront that directly impacts their performance. For ground-based telescopes, atmospheric refraction is also an important factor, since it results in a smearing of the point-spread function (PSF), that can no longer be efficiently suppressed by the coronagraph. Traditionally, atmospheric refraction is compensated for by an atmospheric dispersion compensator (ADC). ADC control relies on an a priori model of the atmosphere whose parameters are solely based on the pointing of the telescope, which can result in imperfect compensation. For a high-contrast instrument like the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) system, which employs very small IWA coronagraphs, refraction-induced smearing of the PSF has to be less than 1 mas in the science band for optimum performance. In this paper, we present the first on-sky measurement and correction of residual atmospheric dispersion. Atmospheric dispersion is measured from the science image directly, using an adaptive grid of artificially introduced speckles as a diagnostic to feedback to the telescope’s ADC. With our current setup, we were able to reduce the initial residual atmospheric dispersion from 18.8 mas to 4.2 in broadband light (y- to H-band) and to 1.4 mas in the H-band only. This work is particularly relevant to the upcoming extremely large telescopes (ELTs) that will require fine control of their ADC to reach their full high-contrast imaging potential.

  15. High-contrast imaging with METIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Absil, Olivier; Agócs, Tibor; Pantin, Eric; Quanz, Sascha; Stuik, Remko; Snik, Frans; Brandl, Bernhard

    2016-08-01

    The Mid-infrared E-ELT Imager and Spectrograph (METIS) for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) consists of diffraction-limited imagers that cover 3 to 14 microns with medium resolution (R 5000) long slit spectroscopy, and an integral field spectrograph for high spectral resolution spectroscopy (R 100,000) over the L and M bands. One of the science cases that METIS addresses is the characterization of faint circumstellar material and exoplanet companions through imaging and spectroscopy. We present our approach for high contrast imaging with METIS, covering diffraction suppression with coronagraphs, the removal of slowly changing optical aberrations with focal plane wavefront sensing, interferometric imaging with sparse aperture masks, and observing strategies for both the imagers and IFU image slicers.

  16. HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING VIA MODAL CONVERGENCE OF DEFORMABLE MIRROR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Feiling

    2012-06-01

    For extremely high contrast imaging, such as direct observation of faint stellar companions, an adaptive optics system is required to produce low-halo and low-speckle regions in the focal plane. A method for deformable mirror control is proposed to achieve this goal. The method relies on a modal convergence of the deformable mirror driven by a focal-plane metric. The modal sets are derived from the Walsh functions. The Walsh-function modes serve two purposes: the expansion of the actuator displacements and the expansion of the phase functions. Taking advantage of the unique properties of the modal functions, a universal control algorithm is devised for the realization of high-contrast focal planes with and without the help of conventional coronagraphy. Numerical modeling is conducted to simulate complete imaging systems under various scenarios. It is shown that the proposed method reliably produces high-contrast focal planes using either a segmented or a membrane mirror. In the presence of random aberration the method is shown to be able to maintain high-contrast focal planes. Requiring neither retrieval of electric fields nor detailed knowledge of the deformable mirrors, this technique may allow high-contrast imaging in real time.

  17. Laboratory Demonstrations of High-contrast Imaging for Space Coronagraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trauger, John; Giveon, Amir; Gordon, Brian; Kern, Brian; Krist, John; Kuhnert, Andreas; Moody, Dwight; Traub, Wes; Wilson, Dan

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of the High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) in the design and improvement of space coronagraphs. The objectives of the work are to: (1) Advance the technology readiness of space coronagraph hardware, techniques, algorithms, and predictive models; (2) Provide proof-of-concept demonstrations of coronagraph techniques; and (3) Support collaborations across the exoplanet community in pursuit of the optimal space coronagraph architecture.

  18. The ZIMPOL high contrast imaging polarimeter for SPHERE: polarimetric high contrast commissioning results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelfsema, Ronald; Bazzon, Andreas; Schmid, Hans Martin; Pragt, Johan; Govaert, Alain; Gisler, Daniel; Dominik, Carsten; Baruffolo, Andrea; Beuzit, Jean-Luc; Costille, Anne; Dohlen, Kjetil; Downing, Mark; Elswijk, Eddy; de Haan, Menno; Hubin, Norbert; Kasper, Markus; Keller, Christoph; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Mouillet, David; Pavlov, Alexey; Puget, Pascal; Salasnich, Bernardo; Sauvage, Jean-Francois; Wildi, Francois

    2016-07-01

    SPHERE (Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet Research) is a second generation VLT instrument aimed at the direct detection of exo-planets. It has received its first light in May 2014. ZIMPOL (Zurich Imaging Polarimeter) is the imaging polarimeter subsystem of the SPHERE instrument. It's capable of both high accuracy and high sensitivity polarimetry but can also be used as a classical imager. It is located behind an extreme AO system and a stellar coronagraph. ZIMPOL operates at visible wavelengths which is best suited to detect the very faint reflected and hence polarized visible light from extra solar planets. During the SPHERE fourth commissioning period (October 2014) we have made deep coronagraphic observations of the bright star alpha Gru (mR = 1.75) to assess the high contrast polarimetric performance of SPHERE-ZIMPOL. We have integrated on the target for a total time of about 45 minutes during the meridian transit in the Very Broad Band filter (600 - 900 nm) with a classical Lyot coronagraph with 3 λ/D radius focal mask. We reduce the data by a combination of Polarized Background subtraction, Polarimetric Differential Imaging (PDI) and Angular Differential Imaging (ADI). We reach contrasts of 10-6 and 10-7 at a radial distances of respectively 7 and 14 lambda/D from the PSF core. At these radial distances we are respectively a factor of 10 and 2 above the photon noise limit. We discuss our results by considering the temporal and spatial speckle behavior close to the PSF core in combination with low order polarimetric aberrations.

  19. Confidence Level and Sensitivity Limits in High Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Marois, C

    2007-11-07

    In long adaptive optics corrected exposures, exoplanet detections are currently limited by speckle noise originating from the telescope and instrument optics, and it is expected that such noise will also limit future high-contrast imaging instruments for both ground and space-based telescopes. Previous theoretical analysis have shown that the time intensity variations of a single speckle follows a modified Rician. It is first demonstrated here that for a circular pupil this temporal intensity distribution also represents the speckle spatial intensity distribution at a fix separation from the point spread function center; this fact is demonstrated using numerical simulations for coronagraphic and non-coronagraphic data. The real statistical distribution of the noise needs to be taken into account explicitly when selecting a detection threshold appropriate for some desired confidence level. In this paper, a technique is described to obtain the pixel intensity distribution of an image and its corresponding confidence level as a function of the detection threshold. Using numerical simulations, it is shown that in the presence of speckles noise, a detection threshold up to three times higher is required to obtain a confidence level equivalent to that at 5{sigma} for Gaussian noise. The technique is then tested using TRIDENT CFHT and angular differential imaging NIRI Gemini adaptive optics data. It is found that the angular differential imaging technique produces quasi-Gaussian residuals, a remarkable result compared to classical adaptive optic imaging. A power-law is finally derived to predict the 1-3 x 10{sup -7} confidence level detection threshold when averaging a partially correlated non-Gaussian noise.

  20. Confidence Level and Sensitivity Limits in High Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Marois, C; LaFreniere, D; Macintosh, B; Doyon, R

    2008-06-02

    In long adaptive optics corrected exposures, exoplanet detections are currently limited by speckle noise originating from the telescope and instrument optics, and it is expected that such noise will also limit future high-contrast imaging instruments for both ground and space-based telescopes. Previous theoretical analysis have shown that the time intensity variations of a single speckle follows a modified Rician. It is first demonstrated here that for a circular pupil this temporal intensity distribution also represents the speckle spatial intensity distribution at a fix separation from the point spread function center; this fact is demonstrated using numerical simulations for coronagraphic and non-coronagraphic data. The real statistical distribution of the noise needs to be taken into account explicitly when selecting a detection threshold appropriate for some desired confidence level. In this paper, a technique is described to obtain the pixel intensity distribution of an image and its corresponding confidence level as a function of the detection threshold. Using numerical simulations, it is shown that in the presence of speckles noise, a detection threshold up to three times higher is required to obtain a confidence level equivalent to that at 5{sigma} for Gaussian noise. The technique is then tested using TRIDENT CFHT and angular differential imaging NIRI Gemini adaptive optics data. It is found that the angular differential imaging technique produces quasi-Gaussian residuals, a remarkable result compared to classical adaptive optic imaging. A power-law is finally derived to predict the 1-3 x 10{sup -7} confidence level detection threshold when averaging a partially correlated non-Gaussian noise.

  1. Vortex Image Processing (VIP) package for high-contrast direct imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Gonzalez, C.; Absil, O.; Wertz, O.

    2016-05-01

    VIP is a Python instrument-agnostic toolbox featuring a flexible framework for reproducible and robust data reduction. VIP currently supports three high-contrast imaging observational techniques: angular, reference-star and multi-spectral differential imaging. The code can be downloaded from our git repository on Github: http://github.com/vortex-exoplanet/VIP

  2. Confidence Level and Sensitivity Limits in High-Contrast Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marois, Christian; Lafrenière, David; Macintosh, Bruce; Doyon, René

    2008-01-01

    In long adaptive optics corrected exposures, exoplanet detections are currently limited by speckle noise originating from the telescope and instrument optics, and it is expected that such noise will also limit future high-contrast imaging instruments for both ground- and space-based telescopes. Previous theoretical analyses have shown that the time intensity variations of a single speckle follow a modified Rician. It is first demonstrated here that for a circular pupil, this temporal intensity distribution also represents the speckle spatial intensity distribution at a fixed separation from the point-spread function center; this fact is demonstrated using numerical simulations for coronagraphic and noncoronagraphic data. The real statistical distribution of the noise needs to be taken into account explicitly when selecting a detection threshold appropriate for some desired confidence level (CL). In this paper, a technique is described to obtain the pixel intensity distribution of an image and its corresponding CL as a function of the detection threshold. Using numerical simulations, it is shown that in the presence of speckle noise, a detection threshold up to 3 times higher is required to obtain a CL equivalent to that at 5 σ for Gaussian noise. The technique is then tested on data acquired by simultaneous spectral differential imaging with TRIDENT and by angular differential imaging with NIRI. It is found that the angular differential imaging technique produces quasi-Gaussian residuals, a remarkable result compared to classical adaptive optic imaging. Finally, a power law is derived to predict the 1 - 3 × 10-7 CL detection threshold when averaging a partially correlated non-Gaussian noise. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of

  3. Optimal Phase Masks for High Contrast Imaging Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruane, Garreth J.

    2016-05-01

    Phase-only optical elements can provide a number of important functions for high-contrast imaging. This thesis presents analytical and numerical optical design methods for accomplishing specific tasks, the most significant of which is the precise suppression of light from a distant point source. Instruments designed for this purpose are known as coronagraphs. Here, advanced coronagraph designs are presented that offer improved theoretical performance in comparison to the current state-of-the-art. Applications of these systems include the direct imaging and characterization of exoplanets and circumstellar disks with high sensitivity. Several new coronagraph designs are introduced and, in some cases, experimental support is provided. In addition, two novel high-contrast imaging applications are discussed: the measurement of sub-resolution information using coronagraphic optics and the protection of sensors from laser damage. The former is based on experimental measurements of the sensitivity of a coronagraph to source displacement. The latter discussion presents the current state of ongoing theoretical work. Beyond the mentioned applications, the main outcome of this thesis is a generalized theory for the design of optical systems with one of more phase masks that provide precise control of radiation over a large dynamic range, which is relevant in various high-contrast imaging scenarios. The optimal phase masks depend on the necessary tasks, the maximum number of optics, and application specific performance measures. The challenges and future prospects of this work are discussed in detail.

  4. The V-SHARK high contrast imager at LBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedichini, F.; Ambrosino, F.; Centrone, M.; Farinato, J.; Li Causi, G.; Pinna, E.; Puglisi, A.; Stangalini, M.; Testa, V.

    2016-08-01

    In the framework of the SHARK project the visible channel is a novel instrument synergic to the NIR channel and exploiting the performances of the LBT XAO at visible wavelengths. The status of the project is presented together with the design study of this innovative instrument optimized for high contrast imaging by means of high frame rate. Its expected results will be presented comparing the simulations with the real data of the "Forerunner" experiment taken at 630nm.

  5. Image quality and high contrast improvements on VLT/NACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, Julien H. V.; O'Neal, Jared; Mawet, Dimitri; Kasper, Markus; Zins, Gérard; Neichel, Benoît; Kolb, Johann; Christiaens, Valentin; Tourneboeuf, Martin

    2012-07-01

    NACO is the famous and versatile diffraction limited NIR imager and spectrograph at the VLT with which ESO celebrated 10 years of Adaptive Optics. Since two years a substantial effort has been put in understanding and fixing issues that directly affect the image quality and the high contrast performances of the instrument. Experiments to compensate the non-common-path aberrations and recover the highest possible Strehl ratios have been carried out successfully and a plan is hereafter described to perform such measurements regularly. The drift associated to pupil tracking since 2007 was fixed in october 2011. NACO is therefore even more suited for high contrast imaging and can be used with coronagraphic masks in the image plane. Some contrast measurements are shown and discussed. The work accomplished on NACO will serve as reference for the next generation instruments on the VLT, especially the ones working at the diffraction limit and making use of angular differential imaging (i.e. SPHERE, VISIR, and possibly ERIS).

  6. Advances in engineering of high contrast CARS imaging endoscopes

    PubMed Central

    Deladurantaye, Pascal; Paquet, Alex; Paré, Claude; Zheng, Huimin; Doucet, Michel; Gay, David; Poirier, Michel; Cormier, Jean-François; Mermut, Ozzy; Wilson, Brian C.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    The translation of CARS imaging towards real time, high resolution, chemically selective endoscopic tissue imaging applications is limited by a lack of sensitivity in CARS scanning probes sufficiently small for incorporation into endoscopes. We have developed here a custom double clad fiber (DCF)-based CARS probe which is designed to suppress the contaminant Four-Wave-Mixing (FWM) background generated within the fiber and integrated it into a fiber based scanning probe head of a few millimeters in diameter. The DCF includes a large mode area (LMA) core as a first means of reducing FWM generation by ~3 dB compared to commercially available, step-index single mode fibers. A micro-fabricated miniature optical filter (MOF) was grown on the distal end of the DCF to block the remaining FWM background from reaching the sample. The resulting probe was used to demonstrate high contrast images of polystyrene beads in the forward-CARS configuration with > 10 dB suppression of the FWM background. In epi-CARS geometry, images exhibited lower contrast due to the leakage of MOF-reflected FWM from the fiber core. Improvements concepts for the fiber probe are proposed for high contrast epi-CARS imaging to enable endoscopic implementation in clinical tissue assessment contexts, particularly in the early detection of endoluminal cancers and in tumor margin assessment. PMID:25401538

  7. High Contrast Imaging with the JWST NIRCAM Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Joseph J.; Beichman, Charles; Basinger, Scott A.; Horner, Scott; Meyer, Michael; Redding, David C.; Rieke, Marcia; Trauger, John T.

    2005-01-01

    Relative to ground-based telescopes, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will have a substantial sensitivity advantage in the 2.2-5pm wavelength range where brown dwarfs and hot Jupiters are thought to have significant brightness enhancements. To facilitate high contrast imaging within this band, the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCAM) will employ a Lyot coronagraph with an array of band-limited image-plane occulting spots. In this paper, we provide the science motivation for high contrast imaging with NIRCAM, comparing its expected performance to that of the Keck, Gemini and 30 m (TMT) telescopes equipped with Adaptive Optics systems of different capabilities. We then describe our design for the NIRCAM coronagraph that enables imaging over the entire sensitivity range of the instrument while providing significant operational flexibility. We describe the various design tradeoffs that were made in consideration of alignment and aberration sensitivities and present contrast performance in the presence of JWST's expected optical aberrations. Finally we show an example of a that can provide 10-5 companion sensitivity at sub-arcsecond separations.

  8. The CHARIS IFS for high contrast imaging at Subaru

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groff, Tyler D.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Limbach, Mary Anne; Galvin, Michael; Carr, Michael A.; Knapp, Gillian; Brandt, Timothy; Loomis, Craig; Jarosik, Norman; Mede, Kyle; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Coronagraphic High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (CHARIS) is an integral field spectrograph (IFS) being built for the Subaru telescope. CHARIS will take spectra of brown dwarfs and hot Jovian planets in the coronagraphic image provided by the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) and AO188 adaptive optics systems. The system is designed to detect objects five orders of magnitude dimmer than their parent star down to an 80 milliarcsecond inner working angle. For characterization, CHARIS has a high-resolution prism providing an average spectral resolution of R82, R69, and R82 in J, H, and K bands respectively. The so-called discovery mode uses a second low-resolution prism with an average spectral resolution of R19 spanning 1.15-2.37 microns (J+H+K bands). This is unique compared to other high contrast IFS designs. It augments low inner working angle performance by reducing the separation at which we can rely on spectral differential imaging. The principal challenge for a high-contrast IFS is quasi-static speckles, which cause undue levels of spectral crosstalk. CHARIS has addressed this through several key design aspects that should constrain crosstalk between adjacent spectral features to be below 1%. Sitting on the Nasmyth platform, the alignment between the lenslet array, prism, and detector will be highly stable, key for the performance of the data pipeline. Nearly every component has arrived and the project is entering its final build phase. Here we review the science case, the resulting design, status of final construction, and lessons learned that are directly applicable to future exoplanet instruments.

  9. The CHARIS IFS for high contrast imaging at Subaru

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groff, Tyler D.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Limbach, Mary Anne; Galvin, Michael; Carr, Michael A.; Knapp, Gillian; Brandt, Timothy; Loomis, Craig; Jarosik, Norman; Mede, Kyle; McElwain, Michael William; Leviton, Douglas B.; Miller, Kevin H.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Guyon, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Takato, Naruhisa; Hayashi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    The Coronagraphic High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (CHARIS) is an integral field spectrograph (IFS) being built for the Subaru telescope. CHARIS will take spectra of brown dwarfs and hot Jovian planets in the coronagraphic image provided by the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) and AO188 adaptive optics systems. The system is designed to detect objects five orders of magnitude dimmer than their parent star down to an 80 milliarcsecond inner working angle. For characterization, CHARIS has a high-resolution prism providing an average spectral resolution of R82, R69, and R82 in J, H, and K bands respectively. The so-called discovery mode uses a second low-resolution prism with an average spectral resolution of R19 spanning 1.15-2.37 microns (J+H+K bands). This is unique compared to other high contrast IFS designs. It augments low inner working angle performance by reducing the separation at which we can rely on spectral differential imaging. The principal challenge for a high-contrast IFS is quasi-static speckles, which cause undue levels of spectral crosstalk. CHARIS has addressed this through several key design aspects that should constrain crosstalk between adjacent spectral features to be below 1%. Sitting on the Nasmyth platform, the alignment between the lenslet array, prism, and detector will be highly stable, key for the performance of the data pipeline. Nearly every component has arrived and the project is entering its final build phase. Here we review the science case, the resulting design, status of final construction, and lessons learned that are directly applicable to future exoplanet instruments.

  10. High Contrast Imaging Testbed for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowmman, Andrew E.; Trauger, John T.; Gordon, Brian; Green, Joseph J.; Moody, Dwight; Niessner, Albert F.; Shi, Fang

    2004-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission is planning to launch a visible coronagraphic space telescope in 2014. To achieve TPF science goals, the coronagraph must have extreme levels of wavefront correction (less than 1 Angstrom rms over controllable spatial frequencies) and stability to get the necessary suppression of diffracted starlight (approximately l0(exp -10)) contrast at an angular separation approximately 4 (lamda)/D). TPF Coronagraph's primary platform for experimentation is the High Contrast Imaging Testbed, which will provide laboratory validation of key technologies as well as demonstration of a flight-traceable approach to implementation. Precision wavefront control in the testbed is provided by a high actuator density deformable mirror. Diffracted light control is achieved through use of occulting or apodizing masks and stops. Contrast measurements will establish the technical feasibility of TPF requirements, while model and error budget validation will demonstrate implementation viability. This paper describes the current testbed design, development approach, and recent experimental results.

  11. High contrast imaging in the presence of a bright background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Rastegar, Jahangir; Feng, Dake

    2015-05-01

    An adaptive spatial filtering technique is described for enhancing image contrast of objects viewed against the background of an intense light source, both in the transmitting and reflecting imaging modes. The spatial distribution of the source captured in the back focal plane of the imaging lens corresponds to the angular distribution of the source. The measured distribution of energy is used to adaptively control the transmittance of a spatial light modulator positioned in the back focal plane of the imaging lens. The spatial light modulator blocks the transmission of the high energy hot spots through to the image plane. Subsequently the image formed by the objective lens is free of the bright background. Thus, the digital image capture system can use the full dynamic range of the detector and the analog to digital converter, giving rise to a captured image with the highest contrast possible. Contrast enhanced images of MEMS accelerometer are presented.

  12. High Contrast Ultrafast Imaging of the Human Heart

    PubMed Central

    Papadacci, Clement; Pernot, Mathieu; Couade, Mathieu; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickael

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive ultrafast imaging for human cardiac applications is a big challenge to image intrinsic waves such as electromechanical waves or remotely induced shear waves in elastography imaging techniques. In this paper we propose to perform ultrafast imaging of the heart with adapted sector size by using diverging waves emitted from a classical transthoracic cardiac phased array probe. As in ultrafast imaging with plane wave coherent compounding, diverging waves can be summed coherently to obtain high-quality images of the entire heart at high frame rate in a full field-of-view. To image shear waves propagation at high SNR, the field-of-view can be adapted by changing the angular aperture of the transmitted wave. Backscattered echoes from successive circular wave acquisitions are coherently summed at every location in the image to improve the image quality while maintaining very high frame rates. The transmitted diverging waves, angular apertures and subapertures size are tested in simulation and ultrafast coherent compounding is implemented on a commercial scanner. The improvement of the imaging quality is quantified in phantom and in vivo on human heart. Imaging shear wave propagation at 2500 frame/s using 5 diverging waves provides a strong increase of the Signal to noise ratio of the tissue velocity estimates while maintaining a high frame rate. Finally, ultrafast imaging with a 1 to 5 diverging waves is used to image the human heart at a frame rate of 900 frames/s over an entire cardiac cycle. Thanks to spatial coherent compounding, a strong improvement of imaging quality is obtained with a small number of transmitted diverging waves and a high frame rate, which allows imaging the propagation of electromechanical and shear waves with good image quality. PMID:24474135

  13. High-Contrast NIR Polarization Imaging of MWC480

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElwain, M. W.; Kusakabe, N.; Hashimoto, J.; Kudo, T.; Kandori, R.; Miyama, S.; Morino, J.-I.; Suto, H.; Suzuki, R.; Tamura, M.; hide

    2012-01-01

    One of the key predictions of modeling from the IR excess of Herbig Ae stars is that for protoplanetary disks, where significant grain growth and settling has occurred, the dust disk has flattened to the point that it can be partially or largely shadowed by the innermost material at or near the dust sublimation radius. When the self-shadowing has already started, the outer disk is expected to be detected in scattered light only in the exceptional cases that the scale height of the dust disk at the sublimation radius is smaller than usual. High-contrast imaging combined with the IR spectral energy distribution allow us to measure the degree of flattening of the disk, as well as to determine the properties of the outer disk. We present polarimetric differential imaging in H band obtained with Subaru/HiCIAO of one such system, MWC 480. The HiCIAO data were obtained at a historic minimum of the NIR excess. The disk is detected in scattered light from 0".2-1"0 (27.4-137 AU). Together with the marginal detection of the disk from 1998 February 24 by HST / NICMOS, our data constrain the opening half angle for the disk to lie between 1.3 <= Theta <=2.2 deg. When compared with similar measures in CO for the gas disk from the literature, the dust disk subtends only approx 30% of the gas disk scale height (H/R approx 0. 03). Such a dust disk is a factor of 5-7 flatter than transitional disks, which have structural signatures that giant planets have formed.

  14. Development of bolometric tomography technique for high-contrast radiation distribution in toroidal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Ryuichi; Mukai, Kiyofumi; Peterson, Byron J.; Fukumoto, Masakatsu; Hoshino, Kazuo

    2017-09-01

    An extended Computed Tomography (CT) technique with a priori information based on Phillips-Tikhonov regularization has been developed to handle a high-contrast radiation distribution, which can result in large reconstruction errors in the region where radiation intensity is low, with few line of sight (LOS) data. Reference profiles generated from LOS data for every time slice are employed as the a priori information. In the extended technique, the weighting parameter for the reference profile is automatically determined from the LOS data, to avoid an inappropriate reference. The extended technique has been examined with a reconstruction test with the previously designed CT system using an infrared imaging video bolometer in JT-60SA. In the reconstructed profile of the high-contrast radiation distribution, the extended technique shows improvement of the weak radiation region, such as the scrape-off layer, without the deterioration of the strong radiation region, such as around the divertor. The results indicate that the extended CT technique can help to handle a high-contrast radiation distribution with few LOS data.

  15. VIP: Vortex Image Processing Package for High-contrast Direct Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Gonzalez, Carlos Alberto; Wertz, Olivier; Absil, Olivier; Christiaens, Valentin; Defrère, Denis; Mawet, Dimitri; Milli, Julien; Absil, Pierre-Antoine; Van Droogenbroeck, Marc; Cantalloube, Faustine; Hinz, Philip M.; Skemer, Andrew J.; Karlsson, Mikael; Surdej, Jean

    2017-07-01

    We present the Vortex Image Processing (VIP) library, a python package dedicated to astronomical high-contrast imaging. Our package relies on the extensive python stack of scientific libraries and aims to provide a flexible framework for high-contrast data and image processing. In this paper, we describe the capabilities of VIP related to processing image sequences acquired using the angular differential imaging (ADI) observing technique. VIP implements functionalities for building high-contrast data processing pipelines, encompassing pre- and post-processing algorithms, potential source position and flux estimation, and sensitivity curve generation. Among the reference point-spread function subtraction techniques for ADI post-processing, VIP includes several flavors of principal component analysis (PCA) based algorithms, such as annular PCA and incremental PCA algorithms capable of processing big datacubes (of several gigabytes) on a computer with limited memory. Also, we present a novel ADI algorithm based on non-negative matrix factorization, which comes from the same family of low-rank matrix approximations as PCA and provides fairly similar results. We showcase the ADI capabilities of the VIP library using a deep sequence on HR 8799 taken with the LBTI/LMIRCam and its recently commissioned L-band vortex coronagraph. Using VIP, we investigated the presence of additional companions around HR 8799 and did not find any significant additional point source beyond the four known planets. VIP is available at http://github.com/vortex-exoplanet/VIP and is accompanied with Jupyter notebook tutorials illustrating the main functionalities of the library.

  16. High contrast two-photon imaging of fingermarks

    PubMed Central

    Stoltzfus, Caleb R.; Rebane, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Optically-acquired fingermarks are widely used as evidence across law enforcement agencies as well as in the courts of law. A common technique for visualizing latent fingermarks on nonporous surfaces consists of cyanoacrylate fuming of the fingerprint material, followed by impregnation with a fluorescent dye, which under ultra violet (UV) illumination makes the fingermarks visible and thus accessible for digital recording. However, there exist critical circumstances, when the image quality is compromised due to high background scattering, high auto-fluorescence of the substrate material, or other detrimental photo-physical and photo-chemical effects such as light-induced damage to the sample. Here we present a novel near-infrared (NIR), two-photon induced fluorescence imaging modality, which significantly enhances the quality of the fingermark images, especially when obtained from highly reflective and/or scattering surfaces, while at the same time reducing photo-damage to sensitive forensic samples. PMID:27053515

  17. High contrast two-photon imaging of fingermarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltzfus, Caleb R.; Rebane, Aleksander

    2016-04-01

    Optically-acquired fingermarks are widely used as evidence across law enforcement agencies as well as in the courts of law. A common technique for visualizing latent fingermarks on nonporous surfaces consists of cyanoacrylate fuming of the fingerprint material, followed by impregnation with a fluorescent dye, which under ultra violet (UV) illumination makes the fingermarks visible and thus accessible for digital recording. However, there exist critical circumstances, when the image quality is compromised due to high background scattering, high auto-fluorescence of the substrate material, or other detrimental photo-physical and photo-chemical effects such as light-induced damage to the sample. Here we present a novel near-infrared (NIR), two-photon induced fluorescence imaging modality, which significantly enhances the quality of the fingermark images, especially when obtained from highly reflective and/or scattering surfaces, while at the same time reducing photo-damage to sensitive forensic samples.

  18. High contrast two-photon imaging of fingermarks.

    PubMed

    Stoltzfus, Caleb R; Rebane, Aleksander

    2016-04-07

    Optically-acquired fingermarks are widely used as evidence across law enforcement agencies as well as in the courts of law. A common technique for visualizing latent fingermarks on nonporous surfaces consists of cyanoacrylate fuming of the fingerprint material, followed by impregnation with a fluorescent dye, which under ultra violet (UV) illumination makes the fingermarks visible and thus accessible for digital recording. However, there exist critical circumstances, when the image quality is compromised due to high background scattering, high auto-fluorescence of the substrate material, or other detrimental photo-physical and photo-chemical effects such as light-induced damage to the sample. Here we present a novel near-infrared (NIR), two-photon induced fluorescence imaging modality, which significantly enhances the quality of the fingermark images, especially when obtained from highly reflective and/or scattering surfaces, while at the same time reducing photo-damage to sensitive forensic samples.

  19. Exploring Planetary System Evolution Through High-Contrast Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Thomas; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Kalas, Paul; Graham, James R.; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Gpies Team

    2015-01-01

    Direct imaging of circumstellar disks provides unique information about planetary system construction and evolution. Several hundred nearby main-sequence stars are known to host debris disks, which are produced by mutual collisions of orbiting planetesimals during a phase thought to coincide with terrestrial planet formation. Therefore, detection of the dust in such systems through scattered near-infrared starlight offers a view of the circumstellar environment during the epoch of planet assembly. We have used ground-based coronagraphic angular differential imaging (ADI) with Keck NIRC2 and Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) to investigate disk structures that may act as signposts of planets. ADI and its associated image processing algorithms (e.g., LOCI) are powerful tools for suppressing the stellar PSF and quasistatic speckles that can contaminate disk signal. However, ADI PSF-subtraction also attenuates disk surface brightness in a spatially- and parameter-dependent manner, thereby biasing photometry and compromising inferences regarding the physical processes responsible for the dust distribution. To account for this disk "self-subtraction," we developed a novel technique to forward model the disk structure and compute a self-subtraction map for a given ADI-processed image. Applying this method to NIRC2 near-IR imaging of the HD 32297 debris disk, we combined the high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of ADI data with unbiased photometry to measure midplane curvature in the edge-on disk and a break in the disk's radial brightness profile. Such a break may indicate the location of a planetesimal ring that is a source of the light-scattering micron-sized grains. For the HD 61005 debris disk, we examined similar data together with GPI 1.6-micron polarization data and detected the dust ring's swept-back morphology, brightness asymmetry, stellocentric offset, and inner clearing. To study the physical mechanism behind these features, we explored how eccentricity and mutual

  20. K-Stacker, a new way of detecting and characterizing exoplanets with high contrast imaging instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Coroller, H.; Nowak, M.; Arnold, L.; Dohlen, K.; Fusco, T.; Sauvage, J. F.; Vigan, A.

    2015-10-01

    This year, a second generation of coronagraphs dedicated to high-contrast direct imaging of exoplanets is starting operations. Among them, SPHERE, installed at the focus of the UT3 Very Large Telescope, reaches unprecedented contrast ratios up to 10^{-6} - 10^{-7}, using eXtreme Adaptive Optics, Angular Differential Imaging (ADI) and Spectral Differential Imaging (SDI) techniques. In this paper, we present a new method called Keplerian-Stacker that improves the detection limit of high contrast instruments like SPHERE, by up to a factor of 10. It consists of observing a star on a long enough period to let a hypothetical planet around that star move along its orbit. Even if in each individual observation taken during one night, we do not detect anything, we show that it is possible, using an optimization algorithm, to re-center the images according to keplerian motions (ex: 10-100 images taken over a long period of typically 1-10 years) and detect planets otherwise unreachable. This method can be used in combination with the ADI technics (or possibly any other high contrast data reduction method) to improve the Signal to Noise Ratio in each individual image, and to further improve the global detection limit. It also directly provides orbital parameters of the detected planets, as a by-product of the optimization algorithm.

  1. A Multiwavelength Differential Imaging Experiment for the High Contrast Imaging Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biller, Beth; Trauger, John; Moody, Dwight; Close, Laird; Kuhnert, Andreas; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Traub, Wesley A.; Kern, Brian

    2009-07-01

    We discuss the results of a multiwavelength differential imaging lab experiment with the High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The HCIT combines a Lyot coronagraph with a Xinetics deformable mirror in a vacuum environment to simulate a space telescope in order to test technologies and algorithms for a future exoplanet coronagraph mission. At present, ground-based telescopes have achieved significant attenuation of speckle noise using the technique of spectral differential imaging (SDI). We test whether ground-based SDI can be generalized to a nonsimultaneous spectral differential imaging technique (NSDI) for a space mission. In our lab experiment, a series of five filter images centered around the O2(A) absorption feature at 0.762 μm were acquired at nominal contrast values of 10-6, 10-7, 10-8, and 10-9. Outside the dark hole, single differences of images improve contrast by a factor of ∼6. Inside the dark hole, we found significant speckle chromatism as a function of wavelength offset from the nulling wavelength, leading to a contrast degradation by a factor of 7.2 across the entire ∼80 nm bandwidth. This effect likely stems from the chromatic behavior of the current occulter. New, less chromatic occulters are currently in development; we expect that these new occulters will resolve the speckle chromatism issue.

  2. Demonstration of symmetric dark holes using two deformable mirrors at the high-contrast imaging testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggs, A. J. Eldorado; Groff, Tyler D.; Carlotti, Alexis; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Cady, Eric J.; Kern, Brian D.; Kuhnert, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    The High Contrast Imaging Laboratory (HCIL) at Princeton has developed several important algorithms and technologies for space-based coronagraphy missions to detect earth-like exoplanets. Before June 2013 the HCIL was the only facility with two deformable mirrors (DMs) in series for focal plane wavefront control, which allows for quasi-static speckle correction on both sides of the image plane. From June through August 2013, the High- Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) at JPL had a second DM installed. In this paper we report on the results of our Technology Development for Exoplanet Missions project to achieve high contrast in two symmetric dark holes using a shaped pupil (SP) coronagraph at the HCIT. Our previous experiment with a similar SP at the HCIT in 2007 yielded single-sided dark holes. That experiment utilized an iterative, batch-process wavefront estimator and Electric Field Conjugation for wavefront control. Our current tests use the faster Kalman filter estimator and the stroke minimization control algorithm. We use the same ripple-style SPs as in the previous HCIT experiment because that mask manufacturing technique proved successful. Our tests of symmetric dark holes in monochromatic light at the HCIT demonstrate Princeton's steady improvements in wavefront control and estimation techniques for a space-based coronagraphy mission.

  3. Achieving High Contrast for Exoplanet Imaging with a Kalman Filter and Stroke Minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldorado Riggs, A. J.; Groff, T. D.; Kasdin, N. J.; Carlotti, A.; Vanderbei, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    High contrast imaging requires focal plane wavefront control and estimation to correct aberrations in an optical system; non-common path errors prevent the use of conventional estimation with a separate wavefront sensor. The High Contrast Imaging Laboratory (HCIL) at Princeton has led the development of several techniques for focal plane wavefront control and estimation. In recent years, we developed a Kalman filter for optimal wavefront estimation. Our Kalman filter algorithm is an improvement upon DM Diversity, which requires at least two images pairs each iteration and does not utilize any prior knowledge of the system. The Kalman filter is a recursive estimator, meaning that it uses the data from prior estimates along with as few as one new image pairs per iteration to update the electric field estimate. Stroke minimization has proven to be a feasible controller for achieving high contrast. While similar to a variation of Electric Field Conjugation (EFC), stroke minimization achieves the same contrast with less stroke on the DMs. We recently utilized these algorithms to achieve high contrast for the first time in our experiment at the High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Our HCIT experiment was also the first demonstration of symmetric dark hole correction in the image plane using two DMs--this is a major milestone for future space missions. Our ongoing work includes upgrading our optimal estimator to include an estimate of the incoherent light in the system, which allows for simultaneous estimation of the light from a planet along with starlight. The two-DM experiment at the HCIT utilized a shaped pupil coronagraph. Those tests utilized ripple style, free-standing masks etched out of silicon, but our current work is in designing 2-D optimized reflective shaped pupils. In particular, we have created several designs for the AFTA telescope, whose pupil presents major hurdles because of its atypical pupil obstructions. Our

  4. High Contrast Internal and External Coronagraph Masks Produced by Various Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatha; Wilson, Daniel; White, Victor; Muller, Richard; Dickie, Matthew; Yee, Karl; Ruiz, Ronald; Shaklan, Stuart; Cady, Eric; Kern, Brian; Belikov, Ruslan; Guyon, Olivier; Kasdin, N. Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Masks for high contrast internal and external coronagraphic imaging require a variety of masks depending on different architectures to suppress star light. Various fabrication technologies are required to address a wide range of needs including gradient amplitude transmission, tunable phase profiles, ultra-low reflectivity, precise small scale features, and low-chromaticity. We present the approaches employed at JPL to produce pupil plane and image plane coronagraph masks, and lab-scale external occulter type masks by various techniques including electron beam, ion beam, deep reactive ion etching, and black silicon technologies with illustrative examples of each. Further development is in progress to produce circular masks of various kinds for obscured aperture telescopes.

  5. High Contrast Imaging in the Visible: First Experimental Results at the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedichini, F.; Stangalini, M.; Ambrosino, F.; Puglisi, A.; Pinna, E.; Bailey, V.; Carbonaro, L.; Centrone, M.; Christou, J.; Esposito, S.; Farinato, J.; Fiore, F.; Giallongo, E.; Hill, J. M.; Hinz, P. M.; Sabatini, L.

    2017-08-01

    In 2014 February, the System for High contrast And coronography from R to K at VISual bands (SHARK-VIS) Forerunner, a high contrast experimental imager operating at visible wavelengths, was installed at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). Here we report on the first results obtained by recent on-sky tests. These results show the extremely good performance of the LBT Extreme Adaptive Optics (ExAO) system at visible wavelengths, both in terms of spatial resolution and contrast achieved. Similarly to what was done by Amara & Quanz (2012), we used the SHARK-VIS Forerunner data to quantitatively assess the contrast enhancement. This is done by injecting several different synthetic faint objects in the acquired data and applying the angular differential imaging (ADI) technique. A contrast of the order of 5 × 10-5 is obtained at 630 nm for angular separations from the star larger than 100 mas. These results are discussed in light of the future development of SHARK-VIS and compared to those obtained by other high contrast imagers operating at similar wavelengths.

  6. High contrast imaging of exoplanets on ELTs using a super-Nyquist wavefront control scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerard, Benjamin L.; Marois, Christian

    2016-07-01

    One of the key science goals for extremely large telescopes (ELTs) is the detailed characterization of already known directly imaged exoplanets. The typical adaptive optics (AO) Nyquist control region for ELTs is 0.4 arcseconds, placing many already known directly imaged planets outside the DM control region and not allowing any standard wavefront control scheme to remove speckles that would allow higher SNR images/spectra to be acquired. This can be fixed with super-Nyquist wavefront control (SNWFC), using a sine wave phase plate to allow for wavefront control outside the central DM Nyquist region. We demonstrate that SNWFC is feasible through a simple, deterministic, non-coronagraphic, super-Nyquist speckle nulling technique in the adaptive optics laboratory at the National Research Council of Canada. We also present results in simulation of how SNWFC using the self coherent camera (SCC) can be used for high contrast imaging. This technique could be implemented on future high contrast imaging instruments to improve contrast outside the standard central dark hole for higher SNR characterization of exoplanets.

  7. Coronagraphic phase diversity: a simple focal plane sensor for high-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Sauvage, J-F; Mugnier, L; Paul, B; Villecroze, R

    2012-12-01

    Exoplanet direct imaging is a challenging goal of today's astronomical instrumentation. Several high-contrast imaging instruments dedicated to this task are currently being integrated; they are ultimately limited by the presence of quasi-static speckles in the imaging focal plane. These speckles originate in residual quasi-static optical aberrations, which must be measured and compensated for, typically at a nanometric level. We present a novel focal plane wavefront sensor (WFS) designed for this particular application. It is an extension of the phase diversity technique to coronagraphic imaging. This sensor requires no dedicated hardware and uses only two scientific images differing from a known aberration, which can be conveniently introduced by the adaptive optics subsystem. The aberrations are therefore calibrated all the way down to the scientific camera, without any differential aberrations between the sensor and the scientific camera. We show the potential of this WFS by means of simulations, and we perform a preliminary experimental validation.

  8. Performance Sensitivity Studies on the PIAA Implementation of the High-Contrast Imaging Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Lou, John; Shaklan, Stuart; Levine, Marie

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the sensitivity studies on the Phase-Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA), or pupil mapping using the High-Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT). PIAA is a promising technique in high-dynamic range stellar coronagraph. This presentation reports on the investigation of the effects of the phase and rigid-body errors of various optics on the narrowband contrast performance of the PIAA/HCIT hybrid system. The results have shown that the 2-step wavefront control method utilizing 2-DMs is quite effective in compensating the effects of realistic phase and rigid-body errors of various optics

  9. Monochromatic verification of high-contrast imaging with an occulter.

    PubMed

    Sirbu, Dan; Kasdin, N Jeremy; Vanderbei, Robert J

    2013-12-30

    One of the most promising concepts of starlight suppression for direct imaging of exoplanets is flying a specially-shaped external occulter in formation with a space telescope. Here we present contrast performance verification of an occulter design scaled to laboratory-size using Fresnel numbers corresponding to the space design. Experimental design innovations include usage of an expanding beam to minimize phase aberrations, and an outer ring to minimize hard-edge diffraction effects. The apodizing performance of the optimized occulter edge is compared with a baseline case of a circular occulter and shown to result in contrast improvements. Experimental results in red monochromatic light show that the achieved laboratory contrast exceeds ten orders of magnitude, but with differences from the theoretical diffraction analysis limited by specular reflection from the mask edges.

  10. Recursive starlight and bias estimation for high-contrast imaging with an extended Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggs, A. J. Eldorado; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Groff, Tyler D.

    2016-01-01

    For imaging faint exoplanets and disks, a coronagraph-equipped observatory needs focal plane wavefront correction to recover high contrast. The most efficient correction methods iteratively estimate the stellar electric field and suppress it with active optics. The estimation requires several images from the science camera per iteration. To maximize the science yield, it is desirable both to have fast wavefront correction and to utilize all the correction images for science target detection. Exoplanets and disks are incoherent with their stars, so a nonlinear estimator is required to estimate both the incoherent intensity and the stellar electric field. Such techniques assume a high level of stability found only on space-based observatories and possibly ground-based telescopes with extreme adaptive optics. In this paper, we implement a nonlinear estimator, the iterated extended Kalman filter (IEKF), to enable fast wavefront correction and a recursive, nearly-optimal estimate of the incoherent light. In Princeton's High Contrast Imaging Laboratory, we demonstrate that the IEKF allows wavefront correction at least as fast as with a Kalman filter and provides the most accurate detection of a faint companion. The nonlinear IEKF formalism allows us to pursue other strategies such as parameter estimation to improve wavefront correction.

  11. Super-nonlinear fluorescence microscopy for high-contrast deep tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lu; Zhu, Xinxin; Chen, Zhixing; Min, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy (TPFM) offers the highest penetration depth with subcellular resolution in light microscopy, due to its unique advantage of nonlinear excitation. However, a fundamental imaging-depth limit, accompanied by a vanishing signal-to-background contrast, still exists for TPFM when imaging deep into scattering samples. Formally, the focusing depth, at which the in-focus signal and the out-of-focus background are equal to each other, is defined as the fundamental imaging-depth limit. To go beyond this imaging-depth limit of TPFM, we report a new class of super-nonlinear fluorescence microscopy for high-contrast deep tissue imaging, including multiphoton activation and imaging (MPAI) harnessing novel photo-activatable fluorophores, stimulated emission reduced fluorescence (SERF) microscopy by adding a weak laser beam for stimulated emission, and two-photon induced focal saturation imaging with preferential depletion of ground-state fluorophores at focus. The resulting image contrasts all exhibit a higher-order (third- or fourth- order) nonlinear signal dependence on laser intensity than that in the standard TPFM. Both the physical principles and the imaging demonstrations will be provided for each super-nonlinear microscopy. In all these techniques, the created super-nonlinearity significantly enhances the imaging contrast and concurrently extends the imaging depth-limit of TPFM. Conceptually different from conventional multiphoton processes mediated by virtual states, our strategy constitutes a new class of fluorescence microscopy where high-order nonlinearity is mediated by real population transfer.

  12. Analytic diffraction analysis of a 32-m telescope with hexagonal segments for high-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Sabatke, Erin; Burge, James; Sabatke, Derek

    2005-03-10

    Large segmented telescopes cannot be modeled accurately with fast-Fourier-transform techniques since small features such as gaps between the segments will be inadequately sampled. An analytic Fourier-transform method can be used to model any pupil configuration with straight edges, including tolerance analysis and some types of apodization. We analytically investigated a 32-m segmented primary with 18 hexagonal segments for high-contrast imaging. There are significant regions in the image in which extrasolar planets could be detected. However, the hexagonal profile of the pupil was not as useful as expected. The gaps between the segments, the secondary obscuration, and the secondary spiders must be as small as possible and their edges must be apodized. Apodizing the edges of the individual segments reduced the useful regions in the image since the gaps appeared to be wider.

  13. Miniaturized selective plane illumination microscopy for high-contrast in vivo fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, Christoph J; Voigt, Fabian; Helmchen, Fritjof

    2010-05-01

    Light-sheet-based fluorescence imaging techniques rely on simultaneous excitation of a single optical plane and thus permit high-contrast optically sectioned imaging of extended tissue samples. Here, we introduce a miniaturized fiber-optic implementation of a selective plane-illumination microscope (miniSPIM). The excitation light was delivered through a single-mode optical fiber, and a light-sheet was created with a cylindrical gradient-index lens and a right-angle microprism. Fluorescence emission was collected orthogonally to the light-sheet through a gradient-index lens assembly and a coherent fiber bundle. The end face of the fiber bundle was imaged onto a charge-coupled device camera. The spatial resolutions of the miniSPIM were 3.2 microm laterally and 5.1 microm axially. Images of fluorescent beads and neurons in mouse neocortex exhibited superior axial resolution and contrast in the miniSPIM-mode compared to images recorded in epi-illumination mode. The miniSPIM may thus enable novel in vivo imaging approaches.

  14. High-contrast Imaging with an Arbitrary Aperture: Active Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo, Laurent; Norman, Colin

    2013-06-01

    We present a new method to achieve high-contrast images using segmented and/or on-axis telescopes. Our approach relies on using two sequential deformable mirrors (DMs) to compensate for the large amplitude excursions in the telescope aperture due to secondary support structures and/or segment gaps. In this configuration the parameter landscape of DM surfaces that yield high-contrast point-spread functions is not linear, and nonlinear methods are needed to find the true minimum in the optimization topology. We solve the highly nonlinear Monge-Ampere equation that is the fundamental equation describing the physics of phase-induced amplitude modulation. We determine the optimum configuration for our two sequential DM system and show that high-throughput and high-contrast solutions can be achieved using realistic surface deformations that are accessible using existing technologies. We name this process Active Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities (ACAD). We show that for geometries similar to the James Webb Space Telescope, ACAD can attain at least 10-7 in contrast and an order of magnitude higher for both the future extremely large telescopes and on-axis architectures reminiscent of the Hubble Space Telescope. We show that the converging nonlinear mappings resulting from our DM shapes actually damp near-field diffraction artifacts in the vicinity of the discontinuities. Thus, ACAD actually lowers the chromatic ringing due to diffraction by segment gaps and struts while not amplifying the diffraction at the aperture edges beyond the Fresnel regime. This outer Fresnel ringing can be mitigated by properly designing the optical system. Consequently, ACAD is a true broadband solution to the problem of high-contrast imaging with segmented and/or on-axis apertures. We finally show that once the nonlinear solution is found, fine tuning with linear methods used in wavefront control can be applied to further contrast by another order of magnitude. Generally speaking, the

  15. High-contrast imaging with an arbitrary aperture: Active compensation of aperture discontinuities

    SciTech Connect

    Pueyo, Laurent; Norman, Colin

    2013-06-01

    We present a new method to achieve high-contrast images using segmented and/or on-axis telescopes. Our approach relies on using two sequential deformable mirrors (DMs) to compensate for the large amplitude excursions in the telescope aperture due to secondary support structures and/or segment gaps. In this configuration the parameter landscape of DM surfaces that yield high-contrast point-spread functions is not linear, and nonlinear methods are needed to find the true minimum in the optimization topology. We solve the highly nonlinear Monge-Ampere equation that is the fundamental equation describing the physics of phase-induced amplitude modulation. We determine the optimum configuration for our two sequential DM system and show that high-throughput and high-contrast solutions can be achieved using realistic surface deformations that are accessible using existing technologies. We name this process Active Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities (ACAD). We show that for geometries similar to the James Webb Space Telescope, ACAD can attain at least 10{sup –7} in contrast and an order of magnitude higher for both the future extremely large telescopes and on-axis architectures reminiscent of the Hubble Space Telescope. We show that the converging nonlinear mappings resulting from our DM shapes actually damp near-field diffraction artifacts in the vicinity of the discontinuities. Thus, ACAD actually lowers the chromatic ringing due to diffraction by segment gaps and struts while not amplifying the diffraction at the aperture edges beyond the Fresnel regime. This outer Fresnel ringing can be mitigated by properly designing the optical system. Consequently, ACAD is a true broadband solution to the problem of high-contrast imaging with segmented and/or on-axis apertures. We finally show that once the nonlinear solution is found, fine tuning with linear methods used in wavefront control can be applied to further contrast by another order of magnitude. Generally speaking

  16. Survey of Experimental Results in High-Contrast Imaging for Future Exoplanet Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, P. R.; Belikov, R.; Cash, W.; Clampin, M.; Glassman, T.; Guyon, O.; Kasdin, N. J.; Kern, B. D.; Lyon, R.; Mawet, D.; hide

    2013-01-01

    We present and compare experimental results in high contrast imaging representing the state of the art in coronagraph and starshade technology. These experiments have been undertaken with the goal of demonstrating the capability of detecting Earth-like planets around nearby Sun-like stars. The contrast of an Earth seen in reflected light around a Sun-like star would be about 1.2 x 10(exp -10). Several of the current candidate technologies now yield raw contrasts of 1.0 x 10(exp -9) or better, and so should enable the detection of Earths, assuming a gain in sensitivity in post-processing of a factor of 10. We present results of coronagraph and starshade experiments conducted at visible and infrared wavelengths. Cross-sections of dark fields are directly compared as a function of field angle and bandwidth. The strength and differences of the techniques are compared.

  17. Survey of Experimental Results in High-Contrast Imaging for Future Exoplanet Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, P. R.; Belikov, R.; Cash, W.; Clampin, M.; Glassman, T.; Guyon, O.; Kasdin, N. J.; Kern, B. D.; Lyon, R.; Mawet, D.; Moody, D.; Samuele, R.; Serabyn, E.; Sirbu, D.; Trauger, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present and compare experimental results in high contrast imaging representing the state of the art in coronagraph and starshade technology. These experiments have been undertaken with the goal of demonstrating the capability of detecting Earth-like planets around nearby Sun-like stars. The contrast of an Earth seen in reflected light around a Sun-like star would be about 1.2 x 10(exp -10). Several of the current candidate technologies now yield raw contrasts of 1.0 x 10(exp -9) or better, and so should enable the detection of Earths, assuming a gain in sensitivity in post-processing of a factor of 10. We present results of coronagraph and starshade experiments conducted at visible and infrared wavelengths. Cross-sections of dark fields are directly compared as a function of field angle and bandwidth. The strength and differences of the techniques are compared.

  18. Laboratory test of a polarimetry imaging subtraction system for the high-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Jiangpei; Ren, Deqing; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhang, Xi; Li, Rong

    2012-09-01

    We propose a polarimetry imaging subtraction test system that can be used for the direct imaging of the reflected light from exoplanets. Such a system will be able to remove the speckle noise scattered by the wave-front error and thus can enhance the high-contrast imaging. In this system, we use a Wollaston Prism (WP) to divide the incoming light into two simultaneous images with perpendicular linear polarizations. One of the images is used as the reference image. Then both the phase and geometric distortion corrections have been performed on the other image. The corrected image is subtracted with the reference image to remove the speckles. The whole procedure is based on an optimization algorithm and the target function is to minimize the residual speckles after subtraction. For demonstration purpose, here we only use a circular pupil in the test without integrating of our apodized-pupil coronagraph. It is shown that best result can be gained by inducing both phase and distortion corrections. Finally, it has reached an extra contrast gain of 50-times improvement in average, which is promising to be used for the direct imaging of exoplanets.

  19. Wavefront Amplitude Variation of TPF's High Contrast Imaging Testbed: Modeling and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Fang; Lowman, Andrew E.; Moody, Dwight C.; Niessner, Albert F.; Trauger, John T.

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of wavefront amplitude is as important as the knowledge of phase for a coronagraphic high contrast imaging system. Efforts have been made to understand various contributions of the amplitude variation in Terrestrial Planet Finder's (TPF) High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT). Modeling of HCIT with as-built mirror surfaces has shown an amplitude variation of 1.3% due to the phase-amplitude mixing for the testbed's front-end optics. Experimental measurements on the testbed have shown the amplitude variation is about 2.5% with the testbed's illumination pattern has a major contribution as the low order amplitude variation.

  20. Artificial Incoherent Speckles Enable Precision Astrometry and Photometry in High-contrast Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, N.; Guyon, O.; Martinache, F.; Pathak, P.; Hagelberg, J.; Kudo, T.

    2015-11-01

    State-of-the-art coronagraphs employed on extreme adaptive optics enabled instruments are constantly improving the contrast detection limit for companions at ever-closer separations from the host star. In order to constrain their properties and, ultimately, compositions, it is important to precisely determine orbital parameters and contrasts with respect to the stars they orbit. This can be difficult in the post-coronagraphic image plane, as by definition the central star has been occulted by the coronagraph. We demonstrate the flexibility of utilizing the deformable mirror in the adaptive optics system of the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics system to generate a field of speckles for the purposes of calibration. Speckles can be placed up to 22.5 λ/D from the star, with any position angle, brightness, and abundance required. Most importantly, we show that a fast modulation of the added speckle phase, between 0 and π, during a long science integration renders these speckles effectively incoherent with the underlying halo. We quantitatively show for the first time that this incoherence, in turn, increases the robustness and stability of the adaptive speckles, which will improve the precision of astrometric and photometric calibration procedures. This technique will be valuable for high-contrast imaging observations with imagers and integral field spectrographs alike.

  1. ARTIFICIAL INCOHERENT SPECKLES ENABLE PRECISION ASTROMETRY AND PHOTOMETRY IN HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, N.; Guyon, O.; Pathak, P.; Kudo, T.; Martinache, F.; Hagelberg, J.

    2015-11-10

    State-of-the-art coronagraphs employed on extreme adaptive optics enabled instruments are constantly improving the contrast detection limit for companions at ever-closer separations from the host star. In order to constrain their properties and, ultimately, compositions, it is important to precisely determine orbital parameters and contrasts with respect to the stars they orbit. This can be difficult in the post-coronagraphic image plane, as by definition the central star has been occulted by the coronagraph. We demonstrate the flexibility of utilizing the deformable mirror in the adaptive optics system of the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics system to generate a field of speckles for the purposes of calibration. Speckles can be placed up to 22.5 λ/D from the star, with any position angle, brightness, and abundance required. Most importantly, we show that a fast modulation of the added speckle phase, between 0 and π, during a long science integration renders these speckles effectively incoherent with the underlying halo. We quantitatively show for the first time that this incoherence, in turn, increases the robustness and stability of the adaptive speckles, which will improve the precision of astrometric and photometric calibration procedures. This technique will be valuable for high-contrast imaging observations with imagers and integral field spectrographs alike.

  2. High-contrast imaging in the cloud with klipReduce and Findr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haug-Baltzell, Asher; Males, Jared R.; Morzinski, Katie M.; Wu, Ya-Lin; Merchant, Nirav; Lyons, Eric; Close, Laird M.

    2016-08-01

    Astronomical data sets are growing ever larger, and the area of high contrast imaging of exoplanets is no exception. With the advent of fast, low-noise detectors operating at 10 to 1000 Hz, huge numbers of images can be taken during a single hours-long observation. High frame rates offer several advantages, such as improved registration, frame selection, and improved speckle calibration. However, advanced image processing algorithms are computationally challenging to apply. Here we describe a parallelized, cloud-based data reduction system developed for the Magellan Adaptive Optics VisAO camera, which is capable of rapidly exploring tens of thousands of parameter sets affecting the Karhunen-Loève image processing (KLIP) algorithm to produce high-quality direct images of exoplanets. We demonstrate these capabilities with a visible wavelength high contrast data set of a hydrogen-accreting brown dwarf companion.

  3. Managing the optical wavefront for high contrast exoplanet imaging with the WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauger, John T.; Krist, John E.; Moody, Dwight

    2016-01-01

    The prospect of extreme high contrast astronomical imaging from space has inspired developments of new coronagraph methods for exoplanet imaging and spectroscopy. However, the requisite contrast, at levels of a billion to one or better for the direct imaging of cool mature exoplanets in reflected visible starlight, leads to challenging new requirements on the stability and control of the optical wavefront at levels currently beyond the reach of ground based telescopes. We briefly review the designs, laboratory validations, and science prospects for direct imaging and spectroscopic characterization of exoplanet systems with an actively corrected Lyot coronagraph. We review exoplanet science performance predicted for NASA's WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph. Together with a pair of deformable mirrors for optical wavefront control, the Lyot coronagraph creates high contrast dark fields of view extending to angular separations within 0.1 arcsec from the central star at visible wavelengths. Performance metrics are presented, including image contrast and spectral bandwidth, and laboratory validation experience.

  4. Estimation of chromatic errors from broadband images for high contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirbu, Dan; Belikov, Ruslan

    2015-09-01

    Usage of an internal coronagraph with an adaptive optical system for wavefront correction for direct imaging of exoplanets is currently being considered for many mission concepts, including as an instrument addition to the WFIRST-AFTA mission to follow the James Web Space Telescope. The main technical challenge associated with direct imaging of exoplanets with an internal coronagraph is to effectively control both the diffraction and scattered light from the star so that the dim planetary companion can be seen. For the deformable mirror (DM) to recover a dark hole region with sufficiently high contrast in the image plane, wavefront errors are usually estimated using probes on the DM. To date, most broadband lab demonstrations use narrowband filters to estimate the chromaticity of the wavefront error, but this reduces the photon flux per filter and requires a filter system. Here, we propose a method to estimate the chromaticity of wavefront errors using only a broadband image. This is achieved by using special DM probes that have sufficient chromatic diversity. As a case example, we simulate the retrieval of the spectrum of the central wavelength from broadband images for a simple shaped- pupil coronagraph with a conjugate DM and compute the resulting estimation error.

  5. Combining high-dispersion spectroscopy with high contrast imaging: Probing rocky planets around our nearest neighbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snellen, I.; de Kok, R.; Birkby, J. L.; Brandl, B.; Brogi, M.; Keller, C.; Kenworthy, M.; Schwarz, H.; Stuik, R.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Ground-based high-dispersion (R ~ 100 000) spectroscopy (HDS) is proving to be a powerful technique with which to characterize extrasolar planets. The planet signal is distilled from the bright starlight, combining ral and time-differential filtering techniques. In parallel, high-contrast imaging (HCI) is developing rapidly, aimed at spatially separating the planet from the star. While HDS is limited by the overwhelming noise from the host star, HCI is limited by residual quasi-static speckles. Both techniques currently reach planet-star contrast limits down to ~10-5, albeit for very different types of planetary systems. Aims: In this work, we discuss a way to combine HDS and HCI (HDS+HCI). For a planet located at a resolvable angular distance from its host star, the starlight can be reduced up to several orders of magnitude using adaptive optics and/or coronography. In addition, the remaining starlight can be filtered out using high-dispersion spectroscopy, utilizing the significantly different (or Doppler shifted) high-dispersion spectra of the planet and star. In this way, HDS+HCI can in principle reach contrast limits of ~10-5 × 10-5, although in practice this will be limited by photon noise and/or sky-background. In contrast to current direct imaging techniques, such as Angular Differential Imaging and Spectral Differential Imaging, it will work well at small working angles and is much less sensitive to speckle noise. For the discovery of previously unknown planets HDS+HCI requires a high-contrast adaptive optics system combined with a high-dispersion R ~ 100 000 integral field spectrograph (IFS). This combination currently does not exist, but is planned for the European Extremely Large Telescope. Methods: We present simulations of HDS+HCI observations with the E-ELT, both probing thermal emission from a planet at infrared wavelengths, and starlight reflected off a planet atmosphere at optical wavelengths. For the infrared simulations we use the

  6. Closed Loop, DM Diversity-based, Wavefront Correction Algorithm for High Contrast Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Give'on, Amir; Belikov, Ruslan; Shaklan, Stuart; Kasdin, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    High contrast imaging from space relies on coronagraphs to limit diffraction and a wavefront control systems to compensate for imperfections in both the telescope optics and the coronagraph. The extreme contrast required (up to 10(exp -10) for terrestrial planets) puts severe requirements on the wavefront control system, as the achievable contrast is limited by the quality of the wavefront. This paper presents a general closed loop correction algorithm for high contrast imaging coronagraphs by minimizing the energy in a predefined region in the image where terrestrial planets could be found. The estimation part of the algorithm reconstructs the complex field in the image plane using phase diversity caused by the deformable mirror. This method has been shown to achieve faster and better correction than classical speckle nulling.

  7. Image Formation in High Contrast Optical Systems: The Role of Polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, James B.

    2004-01-01

    To find evidence of life in the Universe outside our solar system is one of the most compelling and visionary adventures of the 21st century. The technologies to create the telescopes and instruments that will enable this discovery are now within the grasp of mankind. Direct imaging of a very faint planet around a neighboring bright star requires high contrast or a hypercontrast optical imaging system capable of controlling unwanted radiation within the system to one part in ten to the 11th. This paper identifies several physical phenomena that affect image quality in high contrast imaging systems. Polarization induced at curved metallic surfaces and by anisotropy in the deposition process (Smith-Purcell effect) along with beam shifts introduced by the Goos-Hachen effect are discussed. A typical configuration is analyzed, and technical risk mitigation concepts are discussed.

  8. Closed Loop, DM Diversity-based, Wavefront Correction Algorithm for High Contrast Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Give'on, Amir; Belikov, Ruslan; Shaklan, Stuart; Kasdin, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    High contrast imaging from space relies on coronagraphs to limit diffraction and a wavefront control systems to compensate for imperfections in both the telescope optics and the coronagraph. The extreme contrast required (up to 10(exp -10) for terrestrial planets) puts severe requirements on the wavefront control system, as the achievable contrast is limited by the quality of the wavefront. This paper presents a general closed loop correction algorithm for high contrast imaging coronagraphs by minimizing the energy in a predefined region in the image where terrestrial planets could be found. The estimation part of the algorithm reconstructs the complex field in the image plane using phase diversity caused by the deformable mirror. This method has been shown to achieve faster and better correction than classical speckle nulling.

  9. High-contrast imaging of mycobacterium tuberculosis using third-harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bo Ram; Lee, Eungjang; Park, Seung-Han

    2015-07-01

    Nonlinear optical microcopy has become an important tool in investigating biomaterials due to its various advantages such as label-free imaging capabilities. In particular, it has been shown that third-harmonic generation (THG) signals can be produced at interfaces between an aqueous medium (e.g. cytoplasm, interstitial fluid) and a mineralized lipidic surface. In this work, we have demonstrated that label-free high-contrast THG images of the mycobacterium tuberculosis can be obtained using THG microscopy.

  10. High-Contrast Imaging using Adaptive Optics for Extrasolar Planet Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Julia Wilhelmsen

    2006-01-01

    Direct imaging of extrasolar planets is an important, but challenging, next step in planetary science. Most planets identified to date have been detected indirectly--not by emitted or reflected light but through the effect of the planet on the parent star. For example, radial velocity techniques measure the doppler shift in the spectrum of the star produced by the presence of a planet. Indirect techniques only probe about 15% of the orbital parameter space of our solar system. Direct methods would probe new parameter space, and the detected light can be analyzed spectroscopically, providing new information about detected planets. High contrast adaptive optics systems, also known as Extreme Adaptive Optics (ExAO), will require contrasts of between 10-6 and 10-7 at angles of 4-24 λ/D on an 8-m class telescope to image young Jupiter-like planets still warm with the heat of formation. Contrast is defined as the intensity ratio of the dark wings of the image, where a planet might be, to the bright core of the star. Such instruments will be technically challenging, requiring high order adaptive optics with > 2000 actuators and improved diffraction suppression. Contrast is ultimately limited by residual static wavefront errors, so an extrasolar planet imager will require wavefront control with an accuracy of better than 1 nm rms within the low- to mid-spatial frequency range. Laboratory demonstrations are critical to instrument development. The ExAO testbed at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics was designed with low wavefront error and precision optical metrology, which is used to explore contrast limits and develop the technology needed for an extrasolar planet imager. A state-of-the-art, 1024-actuator micro-electrical-mechanical-systems (MEMS) deformable mirror was installed and characterized to provide active wavefront control and test this novel technology. I present 6.5 x 10-8 contrast measurements with a prolate shaped pupil and

  11. Extreme AO: The future of high-contrast imaging with adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macintosh, B.

    2001-05-01

    Title: Extreme AO: The future of high-contrast-imaging with adaptive optics. Adaptive optics (AO) partially cancels wavefront aberrations caused by atmospheric turbulence and can allow ground-basd telescope to reach their full diffraction-limited resolution. A fundamental limitation of all AO systems is that they have little effect on the atmospheric scattered light halo beyond a control radius roughly given by the wavelength of interest divided by the effective actuator spaceing d; for typical modern AO systems, d=60 cm and the control radius is about 0.6 arcseconds at H band. AO can still enhance contrast even beyond this radius, especially for point-source companions, by concentrating the light from the companion into a diffraction-limited spike, but the residual light remains a limitation on our ability to carry out high-contrast imaging from the ground. We will discuss potential improvements to AO over the next decade and the science they will enable. First, in the near term, high-order AO systems will soon be operational on most 8-10 m telescopes; such systems are theoretically capable of directly detecting extrasolar planets in wide (20-150 AU) orbits, and the capabilities and limitations of these systems will be discussed. Second, in the moderate term, new instrument technologies could substantially increase the performance of these systems, including exotic phase-based coronagraphs or "dark speckle" techniques. Third, it will soon be possible to construct "extreme" adaptive optics (EAO) systems, with many thousand actuators and d=5-20cm, capable of more deeply surpressing the atmospheric halo out to a much larger radius than current systems. Coronagraphs and EAO will substantially increase our sensitivity to diffuse circumstellar dust and could conceivably reach the contrast levels necessary to see giant plants around a handful of nearby stars. Finally, within a decade construction should be underway on next-generation extremely large (25-100 m) telescopes

  12. Phase Quantization Study of Spatial Light Modulator for Extreme High-contrast Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Jiangpei; Ren, Deqing

    2016-11-01

    Direct imaging of exoplanets by reflected starlight is extremely challenging due to the large luminosity ratio to the primary star. Wave-front control is a critical technique to attenuate the speckle noise in order to achieve an extremely high contrast. We present a phase quantization study of a spatial light modulator (SLM) for wave-front control to meet the contrast requirement of detection of a terrestrial planet in the habitable zone of a solar-type star. We perform the numerical simulation by employing the SLM with different phase accuracy and actuator numbers, which are related to the achievable contrast. We use an optimization algorithm to solve the quantization problems that is matched to the controllable phase step of the SLM. Two optical configurations are discussed with the SLM located before and after the coronagraph focal plane mask. The simulation result has constrained the specification for SLM phase accuracy in the above two optical configurations, which gives us a phase accuracy of 0.4/1000 and 1/1000 waves to achieve a contrast of 10-10. Finally, we have demonstrated that an SLM with more actuators can deliver a competitive contrast performance on the order of 10-10 in comparison to that by using a deformable mirror.

  13. End-to-end simulation of high-contrast imaging systems: methods and results for the PICTURE mission family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Ewan S.; Hewasawam, Kuravi; Mendillo, Christopher B.; Cahoy, Kerri L.; Cook, Timothy A.; Finn, Susanna C.; Howe, Glenn A.; Kuchner, Marc J.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Marinan, Anne D.; Mawet, Dimitri; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    2015-09-01

    We describe a set of numerical approaches to modeling the performance of space flight high-contrast imaging payloads. Mission design for high-contrast imaging requires numerical wavefront error propagation to ensure accurate component specifications. For constructed instruments, wavelength and angle-dependent throughput and contrast models allow detailed simulations of science observations, allowing mission planners to select the most productive science targets. The PICTURE family of missions seek to quantify the optical brightness of scattered light from extrasolar debris disks via several high-contrast imaging techniques: sounding rocket (the Planet Imaging Concept Testbed Using a Rocket Experiment) and balloon flights of a visible nulling coronagraph, as well as a balloon flight of a vector vortex coronagraph (the Planetary Imaging Concept Testbed Using a Recoverable Experiment - Coronagraph, PICTURE-C). The rocket mission employs an on-axis 0.5m Gregorian telescope, while the balloon flights will share an unobstructed off-axis 0.6m Gregorian. This work details the flexible approach to polychromatic, end-to-end physical optics simulations used for both the balloon vector vortex coronagraph and rocket visible nulling coronagraph missions. We show the preliminary PICTURE-C telescope and vector vortex coronagraph design will achieve 10-8 contrast without post-processing as limited by realistic optics, but not considering polarization or low-order errors. Simulated science observations of the predicted warm ring around Epsilon Eridani illustrate the performance of both missions.

  14. Behavior of imperfect band-limited coronagraphic masks in a high-contrast imaging system.

    PubMed

    Sidick, Erkin; Wilson, Daniel W

    2007-03-20

    We investigate the behavior of imperfect band-limited occulting masks in a high-contrast imaging system through modeling and simulations. Grayscale masks having 1D Sinc(2) (linear-Sinc(2)) amplitude transmission coefficient (Sinc(4) intensity transmittance) profiles as well as optical density and wavelength-dependent parasitic phases are considered occulters. We compare the behaviors of several, slightly different occulter transmittance profiles by evaluating the contrast performance of the high-contrast imaging testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). These occulters include a measured occulter, a standard Sinc(2) occulter, and several of its variations. We show that when an occulting mask has a parasitic phase, a modified Sinc(2) transmittance profile works much better than the standard Sinc(2) mask. We examine the impact of some fabrication errors of the occulter on the HCIT's contrast performance. We find through modeling and simulations that starlight suppression by a factor of more than 10(10) is achievable at least monochromatically on the HCIT with the occulting mask and the optics currently being used on the testbed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that we investigate the behavior of a real (or fabricated) focal plane occulting mask in a high-contrast imaging system. We also briefly describe the approach used at JPL in fabricating a grayscale occulting mask and characterizing its transmittance and phase profiles.

  15. High contrast imaging at the LBT: the LEECH exoplanet imaging survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skemer, Andrew J.; Hinz, Philip; Esposito, Simone; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Defrère, Denis; Bailey, Vanessa; Leisenring, Jarron; Apai, Daniel; Biller, Beth; Bonnefoy, Mickaël.; Brandner, Wolfgang; Buenzli, Esther; Close, Laird; Crepp, Justin; De Rosa, Robert J.; Desidera, Silvano; Eisner, Josh; Fortney, Jonathan; Henning, Thomas; Hofmann, Karl-Heinz; Kopytova, Taisiya; Maire, Anne-Lise; Males, Jared R.; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Morzinski, Katie; Oza, Apurva; Patience, Jenny; Rajan, Abhijith; Rieke, George; Schertl, Dieter; Schlieder, Joshua; Su, Kate; Vaz, Amali; Ward-Duong, Kimberly; Weigelt, Gerd; Woodward, Charles E.; Zimmerman, Neil

    2014-07-01

    In Spring 2013, the LEECH (LBTI Exozodi Exoplanet Common Hunt) survey began its ~130-night campaign from the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) atop Mt Graham, Arizona. This survey benefits from the many technological achievements of the LBT, including two 8.4-meter mirrors on a single fixed mount, dual adaptive secondary mirrors for high Strehl performance, and a cold beam combiner to dramatically reduce the telescope's overall background emissivity. LEECH neatly complements other high-contrast planet imaging efforts by observing stars at L' (3.8 μm), as opposed to the shorter wavelength near-infrared bands (1-2.4 μm) of other surveys. This portion of the spectrum offers deep mass sensitivity, especially around nearby adolescent (~0.1-1 Gyr) stars. LEECH's contrast is competitive with other extreme adaptive optics systems, while providing an alternative survey strategy. Additionally, LEECH is characterizing known exoplanetary systems with observations from 3-5μm in preparation for JWST.

  16. Optimal pupil apodizations of arbitrary apertures for high-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Carlotti, A; Vanderbei, R; Kasdin, N J

    2011-12-19

    In the context of exoplanet direct detection and characterization, where high-contrast imaging is mandatory, we present fully optimized two-dimensional pupil apodizations for which no specific geometric constraints are put on the pupil plane apodization, apart from the shape of the aperture itself. Masks for circular and segmented apertures are displayed, with and without a central obstruction and spiders. We can now optimize apodizers for any aperture shape, and examples of optimal masks are shown for the Subaru telescope, the Space Infrared telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) and the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Several high-contrast regions are considered with different sizes, positions, shapes and contrasts. It is interesting to note that all the masks that result from these optimizations tend to have a binary transmission profile.

  17. Improved high-contrast imaging with on-axis telescopes using a multistage vortex coronagraph.

    PubMed

    Mawet, Dimitri; Serabyn, Eugene; Wallace, J Kent; Pueyo, Laurent

    2011-04-15

    The vortex coronagraph is one of the most promising coronagraphs for high-contrast imaging because of its simplicity, small inner working angle, high throughput, and clear off-axis discovery space. However, as with most coronagraphs, centrally obscured on-axis telescopes degrade contrast. Based on the remarkable ability of vortex coronagraphs to move light between the interior and exterior of pupils, we propose a method based on multiple vortices, that without sacrificing throughput, reduces the residual light leakage to (a/A)(n), with n ≥ 4, and a and A being the radii of the central obscuration and primary mirror, respectively. This method thus enables high contrasts to be reached even with an on-axis telescope.

  18. Microwave-induced thermoacoustic scanning CT for high-contrast and noninvasive breast cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Nie, Liming; Xing, Da; Zhou, Quan; Yang, Diwu; Guo, Hua

    2008-09-01

    A fast thermoacoustic computed tomography system with a multielement linear transducer array was developed to image biological tissues with circular scanning. The spatial resolution of the imaging system and the spectra of the thermoacoustic signals were analyzed. A modified integration backprojection algorithm using velocity potential was employed to recover the direct energy deposition distribution, signal processing methods, and reconstruction algorithms were validated by imaging a phantom. The differences of the microwave-frequency dielectric properties between malignant and normal adipose-dominated tissues in the breast are considerable, and the absorption contrast can reach as large as 6:1 at 1.2 GHz. An experiment of human breast tissue with a tumor was performed with this system; the thermoacoustic images reconstructed by a limited-field-filtered backprojection algorithm and a modified integration backprojection algorithm were also compared with a mammogram. Our results show that the system can provide a rapid and noninvasive approach for high-contrast breast cancer imaging.

  19. High-contrast imaging through scattering media using structured illumination and Fourier filtering.

    PubMed

    Berrocal, Edouard; Pettersson, Sven-Göran; Kristensson, Elias

    2016-12-01

    We show in this Letter a novel approach for high-contrast imaging through scattering media by combining structured illumination and Fourier filtering (SIF). To assess the image contrast enhancement at different image spatial frequencies, the modulation transfer function is calculated for four detection schemes: (1) no filtering, (2) Fourier filtering, (3) structured illumination, and (4) SIF filtering. A scattering solution consisting of D=7.3  μm polystyrene spheres immersed in distilled water and illuminated at λ=671  nm is used here. We demonstrate the possibility of obtaining, with SIF, an image contrast up to 60% at an optical depth of OD=10, improving the contrast by a factor of 40 over conventional transmission imaging.

  20. High Contrast Imaging with Spitzer: Constraining the Frequency of Giant Planets out to 1000 au Separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkan, Stephen; Janson, Markus; Carson, Joseph C.

    2016-06-01

    We report results of a re-analysis of archival Spitzer IRAC direct imaging surveys encompassing a variety of nearby stars. Our sample is generated from the combined observations of 73 young stars (median age, distance, spectral type = 85 Myr, 23.3 pc, G5) and 48 known exoplanet host stars with unconstrained ages (median distance, spectral type = 22.6 pc, G5). While the small size of Spitzer provides a lower resolution than 8 m class AO-assisted ground-based telescopes, which have been used for constraining the frequency of 0.5-13 M J planets at separations of 10-102 au, its exquisite infrared sensitivity provides the ability to place unmatched constraints on the planetary populations at wider separations. Here we apply sophisticated high-contrast techniques to our sample in order to remove the stellar point-spread function and to open up sensitivity to planetary mass companions down to 5″ separations. This enables sensitivity to 0.5-13 M J planets at physical separations on the order of 102-103 au, allowing us to probe a parameter space that has not previously been systematically explored to any similar degree of sensitivity. Based on a color and proper motion analysis, we do not record any planetary detections. Exploiting this enhanced survey sensitivity, employing Monte Carlo simulations with a Bayesian approach, and assuming a mass distribution of {dn}/{dm}\\propto {m}-1.31, we constrain (at 95% confidence) a population of 0.5-13 M J planets at separations of 100-1000 au with an upper frequency limit of 9%.

  1. The SCExAO high contrast imager: transitioning from commissioning to science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, N.; Guyon, O.; Lozi, J.; Currie, T.; Hagelberg, J.; Norris, B.; Singh, G.; Pathak, P.; Doughty, D.; Goebel, S.; Males, J.; Kuhn, J.; Serabyn, E.; Tuthill, P.; Schworer, G.; Martinache, F.; Kudo, T.; Kawahara, H.; Kotani, T.; Ireland, M.; Feger, T.; Rains, A.; Bento, J.; Schwab, C.; Coutts, D.; Cvetojevic, N.; Gross, S.; Arriola, A.; Lagadec, T.; Kasdin, J.; Groff, T.; Mazin, B.; Minowa, Y.; Takato, N.; Tamura, M.; Takami, H.; Hayashi, M.

    2016-07-01

    SCExAO is the premier high-contrast imaging platform for the Subaru Telescope. It offers high Strehl ratios at near-IR wavelengths (y-K band) with stable pointing and coronagraphs with extremely small inner working angles, optimized for imaging faint companions very close to the host. In the visible, it has several interferometric imagers which offer polarimetric and spectroscopic capabilities. A recent addition is the RHEA spectrograph enabling spatially resolved high resolution spectroscopy of the surfaces of giant stars, for example. New capabilities on the horizon include post-coronagraphic spectroscopy, spectral differential imaging, nulling interferometry as well as an integral field spectrograph and an MKID array. Here we present the new modules of SCExAO, give an overview of the current commissioning status of each of the modules and present preliminary results.

  2. Performance Sensitivity Studies on the PIAA Implementation of the High-Contrast Imaging Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Lou, John Z.; Shaklan, Stuart; Levine, Marie

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the dependence of the High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) coronagraph system performance on the rigid-body perturbations of various optics. The structural design of the optical system as well as the parameters of various optical elements used in the analysis are drawn from those of the PIAA/HCIT system that have been and will be implemented, and the simulation takes into account the surface errors of various optics. In this paper, we report our findings when the input light is a narrowband beam.

  3. Fundamental limitations of high contrast imaging set by small sample statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Mawet, D.; Milli, J.; Wahhaj, Z.; Pelat, D.; Absil, O.; Delacroix, C.; Boccaletti, A.; Kasper, M.; Kenworthy, M.; Marois, C.; Mennesson, B.; Pueyo, L.

    2014-09-10

    In this paper, we review the impact of small sample statistics on detection thresholds and corresponding confidence levels (CLs) in high-contrast imaging at small angles. When looking close to the star, the number of resolution elements decreases rapidly toward small angles. This reduction of the number of degrees of freedom dramatically affects CLs and false alarm probabilities. Naively using the same ideal hypothesis and methods as for larger separations, which are well understood and commonly assume Gaussian noise, can yield up to one order of magnitude error in contrast estimations at fixed CL. The statistical penalty exponentially increases toward very small inner working angles. Even at 5-10 resolution elements from the star, false alarm probabilities can be significantly higher than expected. Here we present a rigorous statistical analysis that ensures robustness of the CL, but also imposes a substantial limitation on corresponding achievable detection limits (thus contrast) at small angles. This unavoidable fundamental statistical effect has a significant impact on current coronagraphic and future high-contrast imagers. Finally, the paper concludes with practical recommendations to account for small number statistics when computing the sensitivity to companions at small angles and when exploiting the results of direct imaging planet surveys.

  4. High-contrast imager for complex aperture telescopes (HiCAT): 1. testbed design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N'Diaye, Mamadou; Choquet, Elodie; Pueyo, Laurent; Elliot, Erin; Perrin, Marshall D.; Wallace, J. Kent; Groff, Tyler; Carlotti, Alexis; Mawet, Dimitri; Sheckells, Matt; Shaklan, Stuart; Macintosh, Bruce; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Soummer, Rémi

    2013-09-01

    Searching for nearby habitable worlds with direct imaging and spectroscopy will require a telescope large enough to provide angular resolution and sensitivity to planets around a significant sample of stars. Segmented telescopes are a compelling option to obtain such large apertures. However, these telescope designs have a complex geometry (central obstruction, support structures, segmentation) that makes high-contrast imaging more challenging. We are developing a new high-contrast imaging testbed at STScI to provide an integrated solution for wavefront control and starlight suppression on complex aperture geometries. We present our approach for the testbed optical design, which defines the surface requirements for each mirror to minimize the amplitude-induced errors from the propagation of out-of-pupil surfaces. Our approach guarantees that the testbed will not be limited by these Fresnel propagation effects, but only by the aperture geometry. This approach involves iterations between classical ray-tracing optical design optimization, and end-to-end Fresnel propagation with wavefront control (e.g. Electric Field Conjugation / Stroke Minimization). The construction of the testbed is planned to start in late Fall 2013.

  5. Fundamental Limitations of High Contrast Imaging Set by Small Sample Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawet, D.; Milli, J.; Wahhaj, Z.; Pelat, D.; Absil, O.; Delacroix, C.; Boccaletti, A.; Kasper, M.; Kenworthy, M.; Marois, C.; Mennesson, B.; Pueyo, L.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we review the impact of small sample statistics on detection thresholds and corresponding confidence levels (CLs) in high-contrast imaging at small angles. When looking close to the star, the number of resolution elements decreases rapidly toward small angles. This reduction of the number of degrees of freedom dramatically affects CLs and false alarm probabilities. Naively using the same ideal hypothesis and methods as for larger separations, which are well understood and commonly assume Gaussian noise, can yield up to one order of magnitude error in contrast estimations at fixed CL. The statistical penalty exponentially increases toward very small inner working angles. Even at 5-10 resolution elements from the star, false alarm probabilities can be significantly higher than expected. Here we present a rigorous statistical analysis that ensures robustness of the CL, but also imposes a substantial limitation on corresponding achievable detection limits (thus contrast) at small angles. This unavoidable fundamental statistical effect has a significant impact on current coronagraphic and future high-contrast imagers. Finally, the paper concludes with practical recommendations to account for small number statistics when computing the sensitivity to companions at small angles and when exploiting the results of direct imaging planet surveys.

  6. High-contrast multilayer imaging of biological organisms through dark-field digital refocusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faridian, Ahmad; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2013-08-01

    We have developed an imaging system to extract high contrast images from different layers of biological organisms. Utilizing a digital holographic approach, the system works without scanning through layers of the specimen. In dark-field illumination, scattered light has the main contribution in image formation, but in the case of coherent illumination, this creates a strong speckle noise that reduces the image quality. To remove this restriction, the specimen has been illuminated with various speckle-fields and a hologram has been recorded for each speckle-field. Each hologram has been analyzed separately and the corresponding intensity image has been reconstructed. The final image has been derived by averaging over the reconstructed images. A correlation approach has been utilized to determine the number of speckle-fields required to achieve a desired contrast and image quality. The reconstructed intensity images in different object layers are shown for different sea urchin larvae. Two multimedia files are attached to illustrate the process of digital focusing.

  7. High-Contrast Imaging of Epsilon Eridani with Ground-Based Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuki, T.; Yamada, T.; Carson, J. C.; Kuzuhara, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Nishikawa, J.; Sitko, M. L.; Kudo, T.; Kusakabe, N.; Hashimoto, J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Epsilon Eridani is one of the nearest solar-type stars. Its proximity and relatively young age allow high-contrast imaging observations to achieve sensitivities to planets at narrow separations down to an inner radius of approximately 5 AU. Previous observational studies of the system report a dust disk with asymmetric morphology as well as a giant planet with large orbital eccentricity, which may require another massive companion to induce the peculiar morphology and to enhance the large orbital eccentricity. In this paper, we report results from deep high-contrast imaging observations to detect the previously reported planet and search for other unseen less massive companions with Subaru/HiCIAO, Gemini-South/NICI, and VLT/NACO. No positive detection was made, but high-contrast measurements with the CH4S narrow-band filter of HiCIAO achieved sensitivities at 14.7 mag differential magnitude level, at an angular separation of 1.0''. In terms of planetary mass, as determined by cooling evolutionary models, the highest sensitivities were achieved by the Lp broad-band filter of NACO, resulting in sensitivities corresponding to 1.8, 2.8, and 4.5 M(sub jup) at the projected separation of 3 AU, if 200, 400, and 800 Myr is assumed for the age of the system, respectively. We also discuss origins of the dust disk from the detection sensitivity in the planetary mass and find that a less massive eccentric planet is preferred for disk stirring, which is consistent with the orbital parameters of epsilon Eri b claimed from the previous long-term radial velocity monitoring.

  8. Low-Cost High-Precision PIAA Optics for High Contrast Imaging with Exo-Planet Coronagraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Shaklan, Stuart B.; Pueyo, Laurent; Wilson, Daniel W.; Guyon, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    PIAA optics for high contrast imaging present challenges in manufacturing and testing due to their large surface departures from aspheric profiles at the aperture edges. With smaller form factors and consequent smaller surface deformations (<50 microns), fabrication of these mirrors with diamond turning followed by electron beam lithographic techniques becomes feasible. Though such a design reduces the system throughput to approx.50%, it still provides good performance down to 2 lambda/D inner working angle. With new achromatic focal plane mask designs, the system performance can be further improved. We report on the design, expected performance, fabrication challenges, and initial assessment of such novel PIAA optics.

  9. Low-Cost High-Precision PIAA Optics for High Contrast Imaging with Exo-Planet Coronagraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Shaklan, Stuart B.; Pueyo, Laurent; Wilson, Daniel W.; Guyon, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    PIAA optics for high contrast imaging present challenges in manufacturing and testing due to their large surface departures from aspheric profiles at the aperture edges. With smaller form factors and consequent smaller surface deformations (<50 microns), fabrication of these mirrors with diamond turning followed by electron beam lithographic techniques becomes feasible. Though such a design reduces the system throughput to approx.50%, it still provides good performance down to 2 lambda/D inner working angle. With new achromatic focal plane mask designs, the system performance can be further improved. We report on the design, expected performance, fabrication challenges, and initial assessment of such novel PIAA optics.

  10. High-contrast Imager for Complex Aperture Telescopes (HICAT): II. Design overview and first light results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N'Diaye, Mamadou; Choquet, Elodie; Egron, Sylvain; Pueyo, Laurent; Leboulleux, Lucie; Levecq, Olivier; Perrin, Marshall D.; Elliot, Erin; Wallace, J. Kent; Hugot, Emmanuel; Marcos, Michel; Ferrari, Marc; Long, Chris A.; Anderson, Rachel; DiFelice, Audrey; Soummer, Rémi

    2014-08-01

    We present a new high-contrast imaging testbed designed to provide complete solutions in wavefront sensing, control and starlight suppression with complex aperture telescopes. The testbed was designed to enable a wide range of studies of the effects of such telescope geometries, with primary mirror segmentation, central obstruction, and spiders. The associated diffraction features in the point spread function make high-contrast imaging more challenging. In particular the testbed will be compatible with both AFTA-like and ATLAST-like aperture shapes, respectively on-axis monolithic, and on-axis segmented telescopes. The testbed optical design was developed using a novel approach to define the layout and surface error requirements to minimize amplitude­ induced errors at the target contrast level performance. In this communication we compare the as-built surface errors for each optic to their specifications based on end-to-end Fresnel modelling of the testbed. We also report on the testbed optical and optomechanical alignment performance, coronagraph design and manufacturing, and preliminary first light results.

  11. High-contrast imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy observation of exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji; Mawet, Dimitri; Hu, Renyu; Benneke, Björn

    2016-08-01

    Detection and characterization of exoplanets faces challenges of smaller angular separation and high contrast between exoplanets and their host stars. High contrast imaging (HCI) instruments equipped with coronagraphs are built to meet these challenges, providing a way of spatially suppressing and separating stellar flux from that of a planet. Another way of separating stellar flux can be achieved by high-resolution spectroscopy (HRS), exploiting the fact that spectral features are different between a star and a planet. Observing exoplanets with HCI+HRS will achieve a higher contrast than the spatial or the spectroscopic method alone, improving the sensitivity to planet detection and enabling the study of the physical and chemical processes. Here, we simulate the performance of a HCI+HRS instrument (i.e., the upgrade Keck NIRSPEC and the fiber injection unit) to study its potential in detecting and characterizing currently known directly imaged planets. The simulation considers the spectral information content of an exoplanet, telescope and instrument specifications and realistic noise sources. The result of the simulation helps to set system requirement and informs designs at system-level. We also perform a trade study for a HCI+HRS instrument for a space mission to study an Earth-like planet orbiting a Sun-like star at 10 pc.

  12. High contrast imaging through adaptive transmittance control in the focal plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Rastegar, Jahangir; Feng, Dake

    2016-05-01

    High contrast imaging, in the presence of a bright background, is a challenging problem encountered in diverse applications ranging from the daily chore of driving into a sun-drenched scene to in vivo use of biomedical imaging in various types of keyhole surgeries. Imaging in the presence of bright sources saturates the vision system, resulting in loss of scene fidelity, corresponding to low image contrast and reduced resolution. The problem is exacerbated in retro-reflective imaging systems where the light sources illuminating the object are unavoidably strong, typically masking the object features. This manuscript presents a novel theoretical framework, based on nonlinear analysis and adaptive focal plane transmittance, to selectively remove object domain sources of background light from the image plane, resulting in local and global increases in image contrast. The background signal can either be of a global specular nature, giving rise to parallel illumination from the entire object surface or can be represented by a mosaic of randomly orientated, small specular surfaces. The latter is more representative of real world practical imaging systems. Thus, the background signal comprises of groups of oblique rays corresponding to distributions of the mosaic surfaces. Through the imaging system, light from group of like surfaces, converges to a localized spot in the focal plane of the lens and then diverges to cast a localized bright spot in the image plane. Thus, transmittance of a spatial light modulator, positioned in the focal plane, can be adaptively controlled to block a particular source of background light. Consequently, the image plane intensity is entirely due to the object features. Experimental image data is presented to verify the efficacy of the methodology.

  13. High contrast imaging and thickness determination of graphene with in-column secondary electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kochat, Vidya; Nath Pal, Atindra; Sneha, E. S.; Ghosh, Arindam; Sampathkumar, Arjun; Gairola, Anshita; Shivashankar, S. A.; Raghavan, Srinivasan

    2011-07-01

    We report a new method for quantitative estimation of graphene layer thicknesses using high contrast imaging of graphene films on insulating substrates with a scanning electron microscope. By detecting the attenuation of secondary electrons emitted from the substrate with an in-column low-energy electron detector, we have achieved very high thickness-dependent contrast that allows quantitative estimation of thickness up to several graphene layers. The nanometer scale spatial resolution of the electron micrographs also allows a simple structural characterization scheme for graphene, which has been applied to identify faults, wrinkles, voids, and patches of multilayer growth in large-area chemical vapor deposited graphene. We have discussed the factors, such as differential surface charging and electron beam induced current, that affect the contrast of graphene images in detail.

  14. High-contrast imaging with an arbitrary aperture: active correction of aperture discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo, Laurent; Norman, Colin; Soummer, Rémi; Perrin, Marshall; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Choquet, Elodie

    2013-09-01

    We present a new method to achieve high-contrast images using segmented and/or on-axis telescopes. Our approach relies on using two sequential Deformable Mirrors to compensate for the large amplitude excursions in the telescope aperture due to secondary support structures and/or segment gaps. In this configuration the parameter landscape of Deformable Mirror Surfaces that yield high contrast Point Spread Functions is not linear, and non-linear methods are needed to find the true minimum in the optimization topology. We solve the highly non-linear Monge-Ampere equation that is the fundamental equation describing the physics of phase induced amplitude modulation. We determine the optimum configuration for our two sequential Deformable Mirror system and show that high-throughput and high contrast solutions can be achieved using realistic surface deformations that are accessible using existing technologies. We name this process Active Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities (ACAD). We show that for geometries similar to JWST, ACAD can attain at least 10-7 in contrast and an order of magnitude higher for future Extremely Large Telescopes, even when the pupil features a missing segment" . We show that the converging non-linear mappings resulting from our Deformable Mirror shapes actually damp near-field diffraction artifacts in the vicinity of the discontinuities. Thus ACAD actually lowers the chromatic ringing due to diffraction by segment gaps and strut's while not amplifying the diffraction at the aperture edges beyond the Fresnel regime and illustrate the broadband properties of ACAD in the case of the pupil configuration corresponding to the Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets. Since details about these telescopes are not yet available to the broader astronomical community, our test case is based on a geometry mimicking the actual one, to the best of our knowledge.

  15. A simple approach to characterizing block copolymer assemblies: graphene oxide supports for high contrast multi-technique imaging†

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Joseph P.; Sanchez, Ana M.; Petzetakis, Nikos; Smart, Thomas P.; Epps, Thomas H.; Portman, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Block copolymers are well-known to self-assemble into a range of 3-dimensional morphologies. However, due to their nanoscale dimensions, resolving their exact structure can be a challenge. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a powerful technique for achieving this, but for polymeric assemblies chemical fixing/staining techniques are usually required to increase image contrast and protect specimens from electron beam damage. Graphene oxide (GO) is a robust, water-dispersable, and nearly electron transparent membrane: an ideal support for TEM. We show that when using GO supports no stains are required to acquire high contrast TEM images and that the specimens remain stable under the electron beam for long periods, allowing sample analysis by a range of electron microscopy techniques. GO supports are also used for further characterization of assemblies by atomic force microscopy. The simplicity of sample preparation and analysis, as well as the potential for significantly increased contrast background, make GO supports an attractive alternative for the analysis of block copolymer assemblies. PMID:24049544

  16. Characterisation of a turbulent module for the MITHIC high-contrast imaging testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigan, A.; Postnikova, M.; Caillat, A.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Dohlen, K.; El Hadi, K.; Fusco, T.; Lamb, M.; N'Diaye, M.

    2016-07-01

    Future high-contrast imagers on ground-based extremely large telescopes will have to deal with the segmentation of the primary mirrors. Residual phase errors coming from the phase steps at the edges of the segments will have to be minimized in order to reach the highest possible wavefront correction and thus the best contrast performance. To study these effects, we have developed the MITHIC high-contrast testbed, which is designed to test various strategies for wavefront sensing, including the Zernike sensor for Extremely accurate measurements of Low-level Differential Aberrations (ZELDA) and COronagraphic Focal-plane wave-Front Estimation for Exoplanet detection (COFFEE). We recently equipped the bench with a new atmospheric turbulence simulation module that offers both static phase patterns representing segmented primary mirrors and continuous phase strips representing atmospheric turbulence filtered by an AO or an XAO system. We present a characterisation of the module using different instruments and wavefront sensors, and the first coronagraphic measurements obtained on MITHIC.

  17. High-contrast imaging at small separations: impact of the optical configuration of two deformable mirrors on dark holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, M.; Abe, L.; Martinez, P.; Baudoz, P.; Gouvret, C.; Vakili, F.

    2017-07-01

    The direct detection and characterization of exoplanets will be a major scientific driver over the next decade, involving the development of very large telescopes that require high-contrast imaging close to the optical axis. Some complex techniques have been developed to improve the performance at small separations (coronagraphy, wavefront shaping, etc.). In this paper, we study some of the fundamental limitations of high contrast at the instrument design level, for cases that use a combination of a coronagraph and two deformable mirrors for wavefront shaping. In particular, we focus on small-separation point-source imaging (around 1 λ/D). First, we analytically or semi-analytically analyse the impact of several instrument design parameters: actuator number, deformable mirror locations and optic aberrations (level and frequency distribution). Second, we develop an in-depth Monte Carlo simulation to compare the performance of dark hole correction using a generic test-bed model to test the Fresnel propagation of multiple randomly generated optic static phase errors. We demonstrate that imaging at small separations requires a large setup and small dark hole size. The performance is sensitive to the amount of optic aberration and the spatial frequency distribution but shows a weak dependence on the actuator number or setup architecture when the dark hole is sufficiently small (from 1 to ≲ 5 λ/D).

  18. High-contrast imaging and interferometry mission concepts for the characterization of exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, P. R.

    2014-03-01

    This review paper describes space-based high-contrast imaging mission concepts that have been developed for NASA and ESA for the detection and characterization of exoplanets. This effort will be put in the context of other ground and space-based exoplanet missions. Concepts for coronagraphs, starshades, and interferometers are described along with their predicted science yield and technology challenges. This will include concepts for flagship and probe-scale missions that have been developed over the past 20 years. Particular emphasis will be placed on the current state of the art in starlight suppression technology and the technology gaps that must yet be filled. The coronagraph instrument for the AFTA-WFIRST mission will be described, and a roadmap for future mission and technology development will be presented.

  19. Integrated Wavefront Correction and Bias Estimation for the High-Contrast Imaging of Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggs, A. J. Eldorado

    Just over two decades ago the first planet outside our solar system was found, and thousands more have been discovered since. Nearly all these exoplanets were indirectly detected by sensing changes in their host stars' light. However, exoplanets must be directly imaged to determine their atmospheric compositions and the orbital parameters unavailable from only indirect detections. The main challenge of direct imaging is to observe stellar companions much fainter than the star and at small angular separations. Coronagraphy is one method of suppressing stellar diffraction to provide high star-to-planet contrast, but coronagraphs are extremely sensitive to quasi-static aberrations in the optical system. Active correction of the stellar wavefront is performed with deformable mirrors to recover high-contrast regions in the image. Estimation and control of the stellar electric field is performed iteratively in the camera's focal plane to avoid non-common path aberrations arising from a separate pupil sensor. Estimation can thus be quite time consuming because it requires several high-contrast intensity images per correction iteration. This thesis focuses on efficient focal plane wavefront correction (FPWC) for coronagraphy. Time is a precious commodity for a space telescope, so there is a strong incentive to reduce the total exposure time required for focal plane wavefront estimation. Much of our work emphasizes faster, more robust estimation via Kalman filtering, which optimally combines prior data with new measurements. The other main contribution of this thesis is a paradigm shift in the use of estimation images. Time for FPWC has generally been considered to be lost overhead, but we demonstrate that estimation images can be used for the detection and characterization of exoplanets and disks. These science targets are incoherent with their host stars, so we developed and implemented an iterated extended Kalman filter (IEKF) for simultaneous estimation of the stellar

  20. Mathematical and computational modeling of a ferrofluid deformable mirror for high-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmer, Aaron J.; Griffiths, Ian M.; Groff, Tyler D.; Rousing, Andreas W.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy

    2016-07-01

    Deformable mirrors (DMs) are an enabling and mission-critical technology in any coronagraphic instrument designed to directly image exoplanets. A new ferro fluid deformable mirror technology for high-contrast imaging is currently under development at Princeton, featuring a flexible optical surface manipulated by the local electromagnetic and global hydraulic actuation of a reservoir of ferro fluid. The ferro fluid DM is designed to prioritize high optical surface quality, high-precision/low-stroke actuation, and excellent low-spatial-frequency performance - capabilities that meet the unique demands of high-contrast coronagraphy in a space-based platform. To this end, the ferro-fluid medium continuously supports the DM face sheet, a configuration that eliminates actuator print-through (or, quilting) by decoupling the nominal surface figure from the geometry of the actuator array. The global pressure control allows independent focus actuation. In this paper we describe an analytical model for the quasi-static deformation response of the DM face sheet to both magnetic and pressure actuation. These modeling efforts serve to identify the key design parameters and quantify their contributions to the DM response, model the relationship between actuation commands and DM surface-profile response, and predict performance metrics such as achievable spatial resolution and stroke precision for specific actuator configurations. Our theoretical approach addresses the complexity of the boundary conditions associated with mechanical mounting of the face sheet, and makes use of asymptotic approximations by leveraging the three distinct length scales in the problem - namely, the low-stroke ( nm) actuation, face sheet thickness ( mm), and mirror diameter (cm). In addition to describing the theoretical treatment, we report the progress of computational multi physics simulations which will be useful in improving the model fidelity and in drawing conclusions to improve the design.

  1. An optimal point spread function subtraction algorithm for high-contrast imaging: a demonstration with angular differential imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lafreniere, D; Marois, C; Doyon, R; Artigau, E; Nadeau, D

    2006-09-19

    Direct imaging of exoplanets is limited by bright quasi-static speckles in the point spread function (PSF) of the central star. This limitation can be reduced by subtraction of reference PSF images. We have developed an algorithm to construct an optimal reference PSF image from an arbitrary set of reference images. This image is built as a linear combination of all available images and is optimized independently inside multiple subsections of the image to ensure that the absolute minimum residual noise is achieved within each subsection. The algorithm developed is completely general and can be used with many high contrast imaging observing strategies, such as angular differential imaging (ADI), roll subtraction, spectral differential imaging, reference star observations, etc. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated for ADI data. It is shown that for this type of data the new algorithm provides a gain in sensitivity by up 22 to a factor 3 at small separation over the algorithm previously used.

  2. High contrast reflectance imaging of simulated lesions on tooth occlusal surfaces at near-IR wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Fried, William A; Fried, Daniel; Chan, Kenneth H; Darling, Cynthia L

    2013-10-01

    In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that high contrast images of tooth demineralization can be acquired in the near-infrared (near-IR) without the interference of stain. The purpose of this study is to compare the lesion contrast in reflectance at near-IR wavelengths coincident with high water absorption with those in the visible, the near-IR at 1,300 nm and with fluorescence measurements for early lesions in occlusal surfaces. Twenty-four human molars were used in this in vitro study. Teeth were painted with an acid-resistant varnish, leaving a 4 × 4 mm window in the occlusal surface of each tooth exposed for demineralization. Artificial lesions were produced in the exposed windows after 1- and 2-day exposure to a demineralizing solution at pH 4.5. Lesions were imaged using near-IR reflectance at three wavelengths, 1,300, 1,460, and 1,600 nm using a high definition InGaAs camera. Visible light reflectance, and fluorescence with 405 nm excitation and detection at wavelengths greater than 500 nm were also used to acquire images for comparison. Crossed polarizers were used for reflectance measurements to reduce interference from specular reflectance. The contrast of both the 1- and 2-day lesions were significantly higher (P < 0.05) for near-IR reflectance imaging at 1,460 and 1,600 nm than it was for near-IR reflectance imaging at 1,300 nm, visible reflectance imaging, and fluorescence. The markedly higher contrast at 1,460 and 1,600 nm wavelengths, coincident with higher water absorption, suggest that these wavelengths are better suited than 1,300 nm for imaging early/shallow demineralization on tooth surfaces. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. An Off-Axis Four-Quadrant Phase Mask (FQPM) Coronagraph for Palomar: High-Contrast Near Bright Stars Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haguenauer, Pierre; Serabyn, Eugene; Bloemhof, Eric E.; Troy, Mitchell; Wallace, James K.; Koresko, Chris D.; Mennesson, Bertrand

    2005-01-01

    Direct detection of planets around nearby stars requires the development of high-contrast imaging techniques because of the high difference between their respective fluxes. This led us to test a new coronagraphic approach based on the use of phase mask instead of dark occulting ones. Combined with high-level wavefront correction on an unobscured off-axis section of a large telescope, this method allows imaging very close to the star. Calculations indicate that for a given ground-based on-axis telescope, use of such an off-axis coronagraph provides a near-neighbor detection capability superior to that of a traditional coronagraph utilizing the full telescope aperture. Setting up a laboratory experiment working in near infrared allowed us to demonstrate the principle of the method, and a rejection of 2000:1 has already been achieved.

  4. High-contrast Imaging of Intermediate-mass Giants with Long-term Radial Velocity Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Tsuguru; Sato, Bun'ei; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Narita, Norio; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.; Uyama, Taichi; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hashimoto, Jun; Omiya, Masashi; Harakawa, Hiroki; Abe, Lyu; Ando, Hiroyasu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph C.; Currie, Thayne; Egner, Sebastian; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol A.; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Hełminiak, Krzysztof G.; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Ida, Shigeru; Ishii, Miki; Itoh, Yoichi; Iye, Masanori; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Janson, Markus; Kambe, Eiji; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kokubo, Eiichiro; Kwon, Jungmi; Matsuo, Taro; Mayama, Satoshi; McElwain, Michael W.; Mede, Kyle; Miyama, Shoken; Morino, Jun-Ichi; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Serabyn, Eugene; Suenaga, Takuya; Suto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takami, Michihiro; Takato, Naruhisa; Takeda, Yoichi; Terada, Hiroshi; Thalmann, Christian; Turner, Edwin L.; Watanabe, Makoto; Wisniewski, John; Yamada, Toru; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Takami, Hideki; Usuda, Tomonori; Tamura, Motohide

    2016-07-01

    A radial velocity (RV) survey for intermediate-mass giants has been in operation for over a decade at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory (OAO). The OAO survey has revealed that some giants show long-term linear RV accelerations (RV trends), indicating the presence of outer companions. Direct-imaging observations can help clarify what objects generate these RV trends. We present the results of high-contrast imaging observations of six intermediate-mass giants with long-term RV trends using the Subaru Telescope and HiCIAO camera. We detected co-moving companions to γ Hya B ({0.61}-0.14+0.12{M}⊙ ), HD 5608 B (0.10+/- 0.01{M}⊙ ), and HD 109272 B (0.28+/- 0.06{M}⊙ ). For the remaining targets (ι Dra, 18 Del, and HD 14067), we exclude companions more massive than 30-60 M Jup at projected separations of 1″-7″. We examine whether these directly imaged companions or unidentified long-period companions can account for the RV trends observed around the six giants. We find that the Kozai mechanism can explain the high eccentricity of the inner planets ι Dra b, HD 5608 b, and HD 14067 b.

  5. High-Contrast Imaging of Intermediate-Mass Giants with Long-Term Radial Velocity Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Tsuguru; Sato, Bun'ei; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Narita, Norio; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Uyama, Taichi; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hashimoto, Jun; Omiya, Masashi; hide

    2016-01-01

    A radial velocity (RV) survey for intermediate-mass giants has been operated for over a decade at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory (OAO). The OAO survey has revealed that some giants show long-term linear RV accelerations (RV trends), indicating the presence of outer companions. Direct imaging observations can help clarify what objects generate these RV trends. We present the results of high-contrast imaging observations of six intermediate-mass giants with long-term RV trends using the Subaru Telescope and HiCIAO camera. We detected co-moving companions to gamma Hya B (0.61+0.12 -0.14 Stellar Mass), HD 5608 B (0.10 +/- 0.01 Stellar Mass), and HD 109272 B (0.28 +/- 0.06 Stellar Mass). For the remaining targets( Dra, 18 Del, and HD 14067) we exclude companions more massive than 30-60 M(sub Jup) at projected separations of 1''-7''. We examine whether these directly imaged companions or unidentified long-period companions can account for the RV trends observed around the six giants. We find that the Kozai mechanism can explain the high eccentricity of the inner planets Dra b, HD 5608 b, and HD 14067 b.

  6. High-contrast imaging of ɛ Eridani with ground-based instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuki, T.; Yamada, T.; Carson, J. C.; Kuzuhara, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Nishikawa, J.; Sitko, M. L.; Kudo, T.; Kusakabe, N.; Hashimoto, J.; Abe, L.; Brander, W.; Brandt, T. D.; Egner, S.; Feldt, M.; Goto, M.; Grady, C. A.; Guyon, O.; Hayano, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Hayashi, S. S.; Henning, T.; Hodapp, K. W.; Ishii, M.; Iye, M.; Janson, M.; Kandori, R.; Knapp, G. R.; Kwon, J.; Matsuo, T.; McElwain, M. W.; Miyama, S.; Morino, J.; Moro-Martin, A.; Nishimura, T.; Pyo, T.; Serabyn, E.; Suenaga, T.; Suto, H.; Suzuki, R.; Takahashi, Y. H.; Takami, M.; Takato, N.; Terada, H.; Thalmann, C.; Turner, E. L.; Watanabe, M.; Wisniewski, J.; Takami, H.; Usuda, T.; Tamura, M.

    2016-11-01

    ɛ Eridani is one of the nearest solar-type stars. Its proximity and relatively young age allow high-contrast imaging observations to achieve sensitivities to planets at narrow separations down to an inner radius of 5 AU. Previous observational studies of the system report a dust disk with asymmetric morphology as well as a giant planet with large orbital eccentricity, which may require another massive companion to induce the peculiar morphology and to enhance the large orbital eccentricity. In this paper, we report results from deep high-contrastimaging observations to detect the previously reported planet and search for other unseen less massive companions with Subaru/HiCIAO, Gemini-South/NICI, and VLT/NACO. No positive detection was made, but high-contrast measurements with the CH4S narrow-band filter of HiCIAO achieved sensitivities at 14.7 mag differential magnitude level, at an angular separation of 1.0″. In terms of planetary mass, as determined by cooling evolutionary models, the highest sensitivities were achieved by the Lp broad-band filter of NACO, resulting in sensitivities corresponding to 1.8, 2.8, and 4.5 Mjup at the projected separation of 3 AU, if 200, 400, and 800 Myr is assumed for the age of the system, respectively. We also discuss origins of the dust disk from the detection sensitivity in the planetary mass and find that a less massive eccentric planet is preferred for disk stirring, which is consistent with the orbital parameters of ɛ Eri b claimed from the previous long-term radial velocity monitoring.

  7. Starlight demonstration of the Dragonfly instrument: an integrated photonic pupil-remapping interferometer for high-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, N.; Tuthill, P. G.; Norris, B.; Gross, S.; Stewart, P.; Charles, N.; Lacour, S.; Ams, M.; Lawrence, J. S.; Lehmann, A.; Niel, C.; Robertson, J. G.; Marshall, G. D.; Ireland, M.; Fuerbach, A.; Withford, M. J.

    2012-11-01

    In the two decades since the first extra-solar planet was discovered, the detection and characterization of extra-solar planets has become one of the key endeavours in all of modern science. Recently, direct detection techniques such as interferometry or coronagraphy have received growing attention because they reveal the population of exoplanets inaccessible to Doppler or transit techniques, and moreover they allow the faint signal from the planet itself to be investigated. Next-generation stellar interferometers are increasingly incorporating photonic technologies due to the increase in fidelity of the data generated. Here, we report the design, construction and commissioning of a new high-contrast imager, the integrated pupil-remapping interferometer, an instrument we expect will find application in the detection of young faint companions in the nearest star-forming regions. The laboratory characterization of the instrument demonstrated high-visibility fringes on all interferometer baselines in addition to stable closure phase signals. We also report the first successful on-sky experiments with the prototype instrument at the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian Telescope. Performance metrics recovered were consistent with ideal device behaviour after accounting for expected levels of decoherence and signal loss from the uncompensated seeing. The prospect of complete Fourier coverage coupled with the current performance metrics means that this photonically enhanced instrument is well positioned to contribute to the science of high-contrast companions.

  8. THE TRENDS HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING SURVEY. II. DIRECT DETECTION OF THE HD 8375 TERTIARY

    SciTech Connect

    Crepp, Justin R.; Johnson, John Asher; Yantek, Scott M.; Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoff W.; Isaacson, Howard; Fischer, Debra A.; Wright, Jason T.; Feng Ying

    2013-07-01

    We present the direct imaging detection of a faint tertiary companion to the single-lined spectroscopic binary HD 8375 AB. Initially noticed as an 53 m s{sup -1} yr{sup -1} Doppler acceleration by Bowler et al., we have obtained high-contrast adaptive optics observations at Keck using NIRC2 that spatially resolve HD 8375 C from its host(s). Astrometric measurements demonstrate that the companion shares a common proper-motion. We detect orbital motion in a clockwise direction. Multiband relative photometry measurements are consistent with an early M-dwarf spectral type ({approx}M1V). Our combined Doppler and imaging observations place a lower-limit of m {>=} 0.297 M{sub Sun} on its dynamical mass. We also provide a refined orbit for the inner pair using recent radial velocity measurements obtained with the High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer. HD 8375 is one of many triple-star systems that are apparently missing in the solar neighborhood.

  9. The inner environment of Z Canis Majoris: High-contrast imaging polarimetry with NaCo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canovas, H.; Perez, S.; Dougados, C.; de Boer, J.; Ménard, F.; Casassus, S.; Schreiber, M. R.; Cieza, L. A.; Caceres, C.; Girard, J. H.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Z CMa is a binary composed of an embedded Herbig Be and an FU Ori class star separated by ~100 au. Observational evidence indicates a complex environment in which each star has a circumstellar disk and drives a jet, and the whole system is embedded in a large dusty envelope. Aims: We aim to probe the circumbinary environment of Z CMa in the inner 400 au in scattered light. Methods: We use high-contrast imaging polarimetry with VLT/NaCo at the H and Ks bands. Results: The central binary is resolved in both bands. The polarized images show three bright and complex structures: a common dust envelope, a sharp extended feature previously reported in direct light, and an intriguing bright clump located 0.3 arcsec south of the binary, which appears spatially connected to the sharp extended feature. Conclusions: We detect orbital motion when compared to previous observations, and report a new outburst driven by the Herbig star. Our observations reveal the complex inner environment of Z CMa in unprecedented detail and contrast. Based on observations made with the VLT, program 094.C-0416(A).

  10. Lyot-plane phase masks for improved high-contrast imaging with a vortex coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruane, G. J.; Huby, E.; Absil, O.; Mawet, D.; Delacroix, C.; Carlomagno, B.; Swartzlander, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    Context. The vortex coronagraph is an optical instrument that precisely removes on-axis starlight allowing for high contrast imaging at small angular separation from the star, a crucial capability for direct detection and characterization of exoplanets and circumstellar disks. Telescopes with aperture obstructions, such as secondary mirrors and spider support structures, require advanced coronagraph designs to provide adequate starlight suppression. Aims: We introduce a phase-only Lyot-plane optic to the vortex coronagraph, which offers improved contrast performance on telescopes with complicated apertures. Potential solutions for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) are described. Methods: Adding a Lyot-plane phase mask relocates residual starlight away from a region of the image plane, thereby reducing stellar noise and improving sensitivity to off-axis companions. The phase mask is calculated using an iterative phase retrieval algorithm. Results: Numerically, we achieve a contrast on the order of 10-6 for a companion with angular displacement as small as 4λ/D with an E-ELT type aperture. Even in the presence of aberrations, improved performance is expected compared to either a conventional vortex coronagraph or an optimized pupil plane phase element alone.

  11. A demonstration test of the dual-beam polarimetry differential imaging system for the high-contrast observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Jiangpei; Ren, Deqing; Zhu, Yongtian; Wang, Xue; Zhang, Xi; Li, Rong

    2012-09-01

    We propose a dual-beam polarimetry differential imaging test system that can be used for the direct imaging of the exoplanets. The system is composed of a liquid crystal variable retarder (LCVR) in the pupil to switch between two orthogonal polarized states, and a Wollaston prism (WP) that will be inserted before the final focal focus of the system to create two polarized images for the differential subtraction. Such a system can work separately or be integrated in the coronagraph system to enhance the high-contrast imaging. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed system, here we show the initial test result both with and without integrating our developed coronagraph. A unique feature for this system is that each channel can subtract with itself by using the retarder to rotate the planet's polarization orientation, which has the best performance according to our lab test results. Finally, it is shown that the polarimetry differential imaging system is a promising technique and can be used for the direct imaging observation of reflected lights from the exoplanets.

  12. The trends high-contrast imaging survey. IV. The occurrence rate of giant planets around M dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Montet, Benjamin T.; Crepp, Justin R.; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    2014-01-20

    Doppler-based planet surveys have discovered numerous giant planets but are incomplete beyond several AU. At larger star-planet separations, direct planet detection through high-contrast imaging has proven successful, but this technique is sensitive only to young planets and characterization relies upon theoretical evolution models. Here we demonstrate that radial velocity measurements and high-contrast imaging can be combined to overcome these issues. The presence of widely separated companions can be deduced by identifying an acceleration (long-term trend) in the radial velocity of a star. By obtaining high spatial resolution follow-up imaging observations, we rule out scenarios in which such accelerations are caused by stellar binary companions with high statistical confidence. We report results from an analysis of Doppler measurements of a sample of 111 M-dwarf stars with a median of 29 radial velocity observations over a median time baseline of 11.8 yr. By targeting stars that exhibit a radial velocity acceleration ({sup t}rend{sup )} with adaptive optics imaging, we determine that 6.5% ± 3.0% of M-dwarf stars host one or more massive companions with 1 < m/M{sub J} < 13 and 0 < a < 20 AU. These results are lower than analyses of the planet occurrence rate around higher-mass stars. We find the giant planet occurrence rate is described by a double power law in stellar mass M and metallicity F ≡ [Fe/H] such that f(M,F)=0.039{sub −0.028}{sup +0.056}M{sup 0.8{sub −}{sub 0}{sub .}{sub 9}{sup +{sup 1{sup .{sup 1}}}}}10{sup (3.8±1.2)F}. Our results are consistent with gravitational microlensing measurements of the planet occurrence rate; this study represents the first model-independent comparison with microlensing observations.

  13. Broadband Performance of TPF's High-contrast Imaging Testbed: Modeling and Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Kuhnert, Andreas C.; Trauger, John T.

    2006-01-01

    The broadband performance of the high-contrast imaging testbed (HCIT) at JPL is investigated through optical modeling and simulations. The analytical tool is an optical simulation algorithm developed by combining the HCIT's optical model with a speckle-nulling algorithm that operates directly on coronagraphic images, an algorithm identical to the one currently being used on the HCIT to actively suppress scattered light via a deformable mirror. It is capable of performing full three-dimensional end-to-end near-field diffraction analysis on the HCIT's optical system. By conducting speckle-nulling optimization, we clarify the HCIT's capability and limitations in terms of its broadband contrast performance under various realistic conditions. Considered cases include non-ideal occulting masks, such as a mask with optical density and wavelength dependent parasitic phase-delay errors (i.e., a not band-limited occulting mask) and the one with an optical-density profile corresponding to a measured, non-standard profile, as well as the independently measured phase errors of all optics. Most of the information gathered on the HCIT's optical components through measurement and characterization over the last several years at JPL has been used in this analysis to make the predictions as accurate as possible. The best contrast values predicted so far by our simulations obtainable on the HCIT illuminated with a broadband light having a bandwidth of 80nm and centered at 800nm wavelength are Cm=1.1x10-8 (mean) and C4=4.9x10-8 (at 4(lamda)/D), respectively. In this paper we report our preliminary findings about the broadband light performance of the HCIT.

  14. HIGH-CONTRAST NEAR-INFRARED POLARIZATION IMAGING OF MWC480

    SciTech Connect

    Kusakabe, N.; Hashimoto, J.; Kudo, T.; Grady, C. A.; Sitko, M. L.; Werren, C.; Day, A. N.; Beerman, L. C.; Fukagawa, M.; Muto, T.; Wisniewski, J. P.; Min, M.; Mayama, S.; Lynch, D. K.; Russell, R. W.; Brafford, S. M.; Kuzuhara, M.; Brandt, T. D.; Abe, L.; Brandner, W.; and others

    2012-07-10

    One of the key predictions of modeling from the IR excess of Herbig Ae stars is that for protoplanetary disks, where significant grain growth and settling has occurred, the dust disk has flattened to the point that it can be partially or largely shadowed by the innermost material at or near the dust sublimation radius. When the self-shadowing has already started, the outer disk is expected to be detected in scattered light only in the exceptional cases when the scale height of the dust disk at the sublimation radius is smaller than usual. High-contrast imaging combined with the IR spectral energy distribution allow us to measure the degree of flattening of the disk, as well as to determine the properties of the outer disk. We present polarimetric differential imaging in the H band obtained with Subaru/HiCIAO of one such system, MWC 480. The HiCIAO data were obtained at a historic minimum of the NIR excess. The disk is detected in scattered light from 0.''2 to 1.''0 (27.4-137 AU). Together with the marginal detection of the disk from 1998 February 24 by Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS, our data constrain the opening half-angle for the disk to lie between 1.{sup 0}3 {<=}{theta} {<=} 2.{sup 0}2. When compared with similar measures in CO for the gas disk from the literature, the dust disk subtends only {approx}30% of the gas disk scale height (H/R {approx} 0.03). Such a dust disk is a factor of 5-7 flatter than transitional disks, which have structural signatures that giant planets have formed.

  15. High contrast optical imaging methods for image guided laser ablation of dental caries lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaMantia, Nicole R.; Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Simon, Jacob C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Laser based methods are well suited for automation and can be used to selectively remove dental caries to minimize the loss of healthy tissues and render the underlying enamel more resistant to acid dissolution. The purpose of this study was to determine which imaging methods are best suited for image-guided ablation of natural non-cavitated carious lesions on occlusal surfaces. Multiple caries imaging methods were compared including near-IR and visible reflectance and quantitative light fluorescence (QLF). In order for image-guided laser ablation to be feasible, chemical and physical modification of tooth surfaces due to laser irradiation cannot greatly reduce the contrast between sound and demineralized dental hard tissues. Sound and demineralized surfaces of 48 extracted human molar teeth with non-cavitated lesions were examined. Images were acquired before and after laser irradiation using visible and near-IR reflectance and QLF at several wavelengths. Polarization sensitive-optical coherence tomography was used to confirm that lesions were present. The highest contrast was attained at 1460-nm and 1500-1700-nm, wavelengths coincident with higher water absorption. The reflectance did not decrease significantly after laser irradiation for those wavelengths.

  16. The Various Challenges of Subtracting Speckles and Planet Detection/Characterization in High Contrast Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marois, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Significant progresses have been achieved over the last 20 years in the field of speckle subtraction and planet detection. From the early days of simple “reference star subtraction”, astronomers are now using more advance observing techniques, such as the SDI and ADI, that are combined with complex image processing algorithms to gain more than two orders of magnitude of contrast. I will review the various observing techniques and algorithms now used in the field, as well as the various challenges when trying to optimize the speckle subtraction to maximize planet detection and characterization. In addition, I will review the difficult problem of identifying faint planets in noisy speckle-limited images.

  17. High-contrast subcutaneous vein detection and localization using multispectral imaging

    PubMed Central

    Behrooz, Ali; Morris, Michael; Adibi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Multispectral imaging has shown promise in subcutaneous vein detection and localization in human subjects. While many limitations of single-wavelength methods are addressed in multispectral vein detection methods, their performance is still limited by artifacts arising from background skin reflectance and optimality of postprocessing algorithms. We propose a background removal technique that enhances the contrast and performance of multispectral vein detection. We use images acquired at visible wavelengths as reference for removing skin reflectance background from subcutaneous structures in near-infrared images. Results are validated by experiments on human subjects. PMID:23649005

  18. High-contrast subcutaneous vein detection and localization using multispectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fengtao; Behrooz, Ali; Morris, Michael; Adibi, Ali

    2013-05-01

    Multispectral imaging has shown promise in subcutaneous vein detection and localization in human subjects. While many limitations of single-wavelength methods are addressed in multispectral vein detection methods, their performance is still limited by artifacts arising from background skin reflectance and optimality of postprocessing algorithms. We propose a background removal technique that enhances the contrast and performance of multispectral vein detection. We use images acquired at visible wavelengths as reference for removing skin reflectance background from subcutaneous structures in near-infrared images. Results are validated by experiments on human subjects.

  19. Nulling interferometers for space-based high contrast visible imaging and measurement of exoplanetary environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Brian Andrew

    an orbital platform, robust optical systems are necessary. A novel feature of the nuller described in this work is its monolithic design, which greatly enhances optical stability, the primary obstacle plaguing all high-contrast imaging efforts. Additional design benefits include theoretical achromatic performance and an inner working angle that is 2-4 times smaller than other coronagraph designs, enabling its use with proportionally smaller telescopes.

  20. High-contrast coherent terahertz imaging of porcine tissue via swept-frequency feedback interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yah Leng; Taimre, Thomas; Bertling, Karl; Dean, Paul; Indjin, Dragan; Valavanis, Alexander; Khanna, Suraj P.; Lachab, Mohammad; Schaider, Helmut; Prow, Tarl W.; Peter Soyer, H.; Wilson, Stephen J.; Linfield, Edmund H.; Giles Davies, A.; Rakić, Aleksandar D.

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the interrogation of biological tissue at terahertz (THz) frequencies, largely due to the contrast in the optical properties of different biological tissues which occur in this electro-magnetic radiation band. Of particular interest are THz biomedical images, which have the potential to highlight different information than those acquired in other frequency bands, thereby providing an augmented picture of biological structures. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of an interferometric biological imaging technique using a THz quantum cascade laser (QCL) operating at 2.59 THz to perform coherent imaging of porcine tissue samples. We show the potential of this new THz biomedical imaging technique for in vivo studies, by virtue of its reflection geometry and useful tissue penetration depth enabled by the large THz powers emitted by the quantum cascade laser used in this work. The observed clustering of interferometric tissue signatures opens a pathway towards automatic techniques for the discrimination of healthy tissue types for the study of normal physiology and possible therapeutic approaches. PMID:25426324

  1. High-contrast and low-computational complexity medical ultrasound imaging using beamspace capon method.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Shigeaki; Taki, Hirofumi; Sato, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Several adaptive beamforming techniques have been proposed to improve the quality of medical ultrasound images. The beamspace (BS) Capon method is one common method used to depict high-resolution images with low computational complexity. However, the complexity is not low enough for real-time imaging in clinical situations because the conventional BS Capon method employs a time-delay process and a transition process from elementspace signal processing to BS signal processing at all points of interest. Thus, we propose a technique that replaces the time-delay process using a steering vector. In addition, the Capon method employs a spatial averaging (SA) technique to stabilize the estimation in intensity. However, when the averaging size is not adequate, the estimated intensity might be smaller than that given by the delay-and-sum (DAS) method. Because most medical diagnoses are presented based on the estimation of intensity acquired by the DAS beamformer, accurate estimation of intensity is also required. Therefore, we propose a compensation technique that uses both small and large sizes for SA. In an experiment, the -6 dB beam width, sidelobe level, and estimation error in the intensity of the proposed method were 0.17 mm, -27 dB, and 0.92 dB, respectively, where those of the conventional BS Capon method were 0.29 mm, -22 dB, and 8.1 dB. The complexity of the proposed method is one-fourteenth that of the conventional method. Compared with conventional methods, the proposed method succeeded in depicting a higher-contrast image with accurate intensity estimation and lower computational complexity.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 2MASS J16042165-2130284 high-contrast images (Canovas+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canovas, H.; Hardy, A.; Zurlo, A.; Wahhaj, Z.; Schreiber, M. R.; Vigan, A.; Villaver, E.; Olofsson, J.; Meeus, G.; Menard, F.; Caceres, C.; Cieza, L. A.; Garufi, A.

    2016-10-01

    The article describes high-contrast images of the protoplanetary disk 2MASS J16042165-2130284, obtained with the Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet REsearch (SPHERE). * Fig1.fits: It corresponds to Fig. 1 of the article. The file contains the Angular Differential Imaging (ADI) + Principal Component Analysis (PCA) image of the disk in K1 band, showing no point sources inside of the disk cavity from ~22 au onwards. * Fig4_ifs.fits: It corresponds to Fig. 4 (IFS part) of the article. The datacube contains the 3 IFS broadband images, corresponding to the Y [*,*, 0], J [*,*,1], H [*,*,2] bands. * Fig4_ird.fits: It corresponds to Fig. 4 (IRDIS part) of the article. The datacube contains the 2 IRDIS images (220x220pix), corresponding to the K1 [*,*, 0], and K2 [*,*,1] bands. (2 data files).

  3. High contrast imaging with an arbitrary aperture: active correction of aperture discontinuities: fundamental limits and practical trades offs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo, Laurent; Norman, Colin Arthur; Soummer, Remi; Perrin, Marshall D.; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Choquet, Elodie

    2015-01-01

    In a recent paper we discussed a new method to achieve high-contrast images using segmented and/or on-axis telescopes. Our approach, named Active Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities (ACAD) relies on two sequential Deformable Mirrors to compensate for the large amplitude excursions in the telescope aperture due to secondary support structures and/or segment gaps. In this configuration the parameter landscape of Deformable Mirror Surfaces that yield high contrast Point Spread Functions is not linear, and non-linear methods are needed to find the true minimum. In particular we showed that broadband high contrast solutions can be achieved using realistic surface deformations that are accessible using existing technologies for a variety of telescope pupil geometries. In this paper we first focus on the fundamental limits and practical trade-offs associated with ACAD. In a first part we will study the fundamental limits and practical tradeoffs associated with ACAD, regardless of the downstream coronagraphic architecture. The mathematical techniques to finding ACAD DM shapes require to solve a complex differential equation. We will first discuss the scaling laws underlying this non-linear solution and their impact of DM placement and geometry wishing the optical design of an instrument. We will then consider the sensitivity to low order aberrations: in principle an ACAD solution that comprises large strokes will be more sensitive to these aberrations than one with smaller strokes. As a consequence, we will quantify this sensitive both using analytical models and numerical simulations. We will present diffractive end to end simulations and quantify the ultimate contrast and bandwidth achievable with ACAD, which can be reached by superposing using a classical linear wavefront control algorithms on top of the Monge Ampere solution. Finally, recent work has shown that coronagraph designs can also accommodate for secondary support structures and/or segments gaps, at a

  4. Frustrated FRET for high-contrast high-resolution two-photon imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fang; Wei, Lu; Chen, Zhixing; Min, Wei

    2013-06-17

    Two-photon fluorescence microscopy has become increasingly popular in biomedical research as it allows high-resolution imaging of thick biological specimen with superior contrast and penetration than confocal microscopy. However, two-photon microscopy still faces two fundamental limitations: 1) image-contrast deterioration with imaging depth due to out-of-focus background and 2) diffraction-limited spatial resolution. Herein we propose to create and detect high-order (more than quadratic) nonlinear signals by harnessing the frustrated fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) effect within a specially designed donor-acceptor probe pair. Two distinct techniques are described. In the first method, donor fluorescence generated by a two-photon laser at the focus is preferentially switched on and off by a modulated and focused one-photon laser beam that is able to block FRET via direct acceptor excitation. The resulting image, constructed from the enhanced donor fluorescence signal, turns out to be an overall three-photon process. In the second method, a two-photon laser at a proper wavelength is capable of simultaneously exciting both the donor and the acceptor. By sinusoidally modulating the two-photon excitation laser at a fundamental frequency ω, an overall four-photon signal can be isolated by demodulating the donor fluorescence at the third harmonic frequency 3ω. We show that both the image contrast and the spatial resolution of the standard two-photon fluorescence microscopy can be substantially improved by virtue of the high-order nonlinearity. This frustrated FRET approach represents a strategy that is based on extracting the inherent nonlinear photophysical response of the specially designed imaging probes.

  5. High Contrast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenman, Geri

    2002-01-01

    Presents an art lesson in which drawing students learn to use scratchboard to create a picture of a skeleton part that they find interesting. Describes how the students create pictures using this technique. Includes a list of materials and objectives. (CMK)

  6. High Contrast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenman, Geri

    2002-01-01

    Presents an art lesson in which drawing students learn to use scratchboard to create a picture of a skeleton part that they find interesting. Describes how the students create pictures using this technique. Includes a list of materials and objectives. (CMK)

  7. Pair-Wise, Deformable Mirror, Image Plane-Based Diversity Electric Field Estimation for High Contrast Coronagraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Give'on, Amir; Kern, Brian D.; Shaklan, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe the complex electric field reconstruction from image plane intensity measurements for high contrast coronagraphic imaging. A deformable mirror (DM) surface is modied with pairs of complementary shapes to create diversity in the image plane of the science camera where the intensity of the light is measured. Along with the Electric Field Conjugation correction algorithm, this estimation method has been used in various high contrast imaging testbeds to achieve the best contrasts to date both in narrow and in broad band light. We present the basic methodology of estimation in easy to follow list of steps, present results from HCIT and raise several open quations we are confronted with using this method.

  8. Pair-Wise, Deformable Mirror, Image Plane-Based Diversity Electric Field Estimation for High Contrast Coronagraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Give'on, Amir; Kern, Brian D.; Shaklan, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe the complex electric field reconstruction from image plane intensity measurements for high contrast coronagraphic imaging. A deformable mirror (DM) surface is modied with pairs of complementary shapes to create diversity in the image plane of the science camera where the intensity of the light is measured. Along with the Electric Field Conjugation correction algorithm, this estimation method has been used in various high contrast imaging testbeds to achieve the best contrasts to date both in narrow and in broad band light. We present the basic methodology of estimation in easy to follow list of steps, present results from HCIT and raise several open quations we are confronted with using this method.

  9. Electric Field Reconstruction in the Image Plane of a High-Contrast Coronagraph Using a Set of Pinholes around the Lyot Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giveona, Amir; Shaklan, Stuart; Kern, Brian; Noecker, Charley; Kendrick, Steve; Wallace, Kent

    2012-01-01

    In a setup similar to the self coherent camera, we have added a set of pinholes in the diffraction ring of the Lyot plane in a high-contrast stellar Lyot coronagraph. We describe a novel complex electric field reconstruction from image plane intensity measurements consisting of light in the coronagraph's dark hole interfering with light from the pinholes. The image plane field is modified by letting light through one pinhole at a time. In addition to estimation of the field at the science camera, this method allows for self-calibration of the probes by letting light through the pinholes in various permutations while blocking the main Lyot opening. We present results of estimation and calibration from the High Contrast Imaging Testbed along with a comparison to the pair-wise deformable mirror diversity based estimation technique. Tests are carried out in narrow-band light and over a composite 10% bandpass.

  10. Electric Field Reconstruction in the Image Plane of a High-Contrast Coronagraph Using a Set of Pinholes around the Lyot Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giveona, Amir; Shaklan, Stuart; Kern, Brian; Noecker, Charley; Kendrick, Steve; Wallace, Kent

    2012-01-01

    In a setup similar to the self coherent camera, we have added a set of pinholes in the diffraction ring of the Lyot plane in a high-contrast stellar Lyot coronagraph. We describe a novel complex electric field reconstruction from image plane intensity measurements consisting of light in the coronagraph's dark hole interfering with light from the pinholes. The image plane field is modified by letting light through one pinhole at a time. In addition to estimation of the field at the science camera, this method allows for self-calibration of the probes by letting light through the pinholes in various permutations while blocking the main Lyot opening. We present results of estimation and calibration from the High Contrast Imaging Testbed along with a comparison to the pair-wise deformable mirror diversity based estimation technique. Tests are carried out in narrow-band light and over a composite 10% bandpass.

  11. High-Contrast Reflectance Imaging of Composite Restorations Color-Matched to Tooth Structure at 1000-2300-nm.

    PubMed

    Fried, William A; Simon, Jacob C; Darling, Cynthia L; Le, Oanh; Fried, Daniel

    2017-01-28

    A major advantage of composite restoration materials is that they can be color matched to the tooth. However, this presents a challenge when composites fail and they need to be replaced. Dentists typically spend more time repairing and replacing composites than placing new restorations. We have shown in previous studies that high-contrast images of composite can be acquired in occlusal transmission mode at near-IR wavelengths coincident with higher water absorption. The purpose of this study was to determine if similar high-contrast images can be acquired in reflectance mode at longer wavelengths where water absorption is even higher. Extracted human teeth with existing composite restoration (n=14) were imaged at wavelengths from 900-2300 using an extended range InGaAs camera. Our results indicate that NIR wavelengths longer than 1400-nm coincident with higher water absorption yield the highest contrast between dental composites and tooth structure in reflectance.

  12. High-contrast reflectance imaging of composite restorations color-matched to tooth structure at 1000-2300-nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, William A.; Simon, Jacob C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Le, Oanh; Fried, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    A major advantage of composite restoration materials is that they can be color matched to the tooth. However, this presents a challenge when composites fail and they need to be replaced. Dentists typically spend more time repairing and replacing composites than placing new restorations. We have shown in previous studies that high-contrast images of composite can be acquired in occlusal transmission mode at near-IR wavelengths coincident with higher water absorption. The purpose of this study was to determine if similar high-contrast images can be acquired in reflectance mode at longer wavelengths where water absorption is even higher. Extracted human teeth with existing composite restoration (n=14) were imaged at wavelengths from 900-2300 using an extended range InGaAs camera. Our results indicate that NIR wavelengths longer than 1400-nm coincident with higher water absorption yield the highest contrast between dental composites and tooth structure in reflectance.

  13. Super-Gaussian apodization in ground based telescopes for high contrast coronagraph imaging.

    PubMed

    Cagigas, Miguel A; Valle, Pedro J; Cagigal, Manuel P

    2013-05-20

    We introduce the use of Super-Gaussian apodizing functions in the telescope pupil plane and/or the coronagraph Lyot plane to improve the imaging contrast in ground-based coronagraphs. We describe the properties of the Super-Gaussian function, we estimate its second-order moment in the pupil and Fourier planes and we check it as an apodizing function. We then use Super-Gaussian function to apodize the telescope pupil, the coronagraph Lyot plane or both of them. The result is that a proper apodizing masks combination can reduce the exoplanet detection distance up to a 45% with respect to the classic Lyot coronagraph, for moderately aberrated wavefronts. Compared to the prolate spheroidal function the Super-Gaussian apodizing function allows the planet light up to 3 times brighter. An extra help to increase the extinction rate is to perform a frame selection (Lucky Imaging technique). We show that a selection of the 10% best frames will reduce up to a 20% the detection angular distance when using the classic Lyot coronagraph but that the reduction is only around the 5% when using an apodized coronagraph.

  14. Digital adaptive coronagraphy using SLMs: promising prospects of a novel approach, including high-contrast imaging of multiple stars systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, Jonas; Patapis, Polychronis

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a new technological framework for high-contrast coronagraphy, namely digital adaptive coronagraphy (DAC) using spatial light modulators (SLMs), taking advantage of recent advances in this technology. We present proof-of-principle experimental results in the visible, using a transmissive twisted nematic liquid crystal SLM display to show that SLMs can be successfully implemented as focal-plane phase-mask coronagraphs (4QPM, 8OPM,...), and that the technology is essentially in place to address realistic instrumental configurations. We explore a specific application where SLM-based adaptive coronagraphy might be particularly competitive, which is direct imaging of multiple stars systems, by simultaneously nulling multiple point sources in the field. Using a simple approach to compute a brightness-weighted synthetized coronagraphic phase map, we show that in the case of binaries the contrast gain over using a regular phase map can exceed 4 stellar magnitudes for a 1:1 binaries down to separation as close as 1 λ/D. Thanks to video-rate update frequency of the SLM, the technique is in principle compatible with sky rotation in the case of altitude-azimuth telescope mounts, and can address multiple target configurations with no actual mechanical or hardware change.

  15. High-order myopic coronagraphic phase diversity (COFFEE) for wave-front control in high-contrast imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, B.; Mugnier, L. M.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Ferrari, M.; Dohlen, K.

    2013-12-01

    The estimation and compensation of quasi-static aberrations is mandatory to reach the ultimate performance of high-contrast imaging systems. COFFEE is a focal plane wave-front sensing method that consists in the extension of phase diversity to high-contrast imaging systems. Based on a Bayesian approach, it estimates the quasi-static aberrations from two focal plane images recorded from the scientific camera itself. In this paper, we present COFFEE's extension which allows an estimation of low and high order aberrations with nanometric precision for any coronagraphic device. The performance is evaluated by realistic simulations, performed in the SPHERE instrument framework. We develop a myopic estimation that allows us to take into account an imperfect knowledge on the used diversity phase. Lastly, we evaluate COFFEE's performance in a compensation process, to optimize the contrast on the detector, and show it allows one to reach the 10^-6 contrast required by SPHERE at a few resolution elements from the star. Notably, we present a non-linear energy minimization method which can be used to reach very high contrast levels (better than 10^-7 in a SPHERE-like context)

  16. High-order myopic coronagraphic phase diversity (COFFEE) for wave-front control in high-contrast imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Paul, B; Mugnier, L M; Sauvage, J-F; Dohlen, K; Ferrari, M

    2013-12-30

    The estimation and compensation of quasi-static aberrations is mandatory to reach the ultimate performance of high-contrast imaging systems. COFFEE is a focal plane wave-front sensing method that consists in the extension of phase diversity to high-contrast imaging systems. Based on a Bayesian approach, it estimates the quasi-static aberrations from two focal plane images recorded from the scientific camera itself. In this paper, we present COFFEE's extension which allows an estimation of low and high order aberrations with nanometric precision for any coronagraphic device. The performance is evaluated by realistic simulations, performed in the SPHERE instrument framework. We develop a myopic estimation that allows us to take into account an imperfect knowledge on the used diversity phase. Lastly, we evaluate COFFEE's performance in a compensation process, to optimize the contrast on the detector, and show it allows one to reach the 10(-6) contrast required by SPHERE at a few resolution elements from the star. Notably, we present a non-linear energy minimization method which can be used to reach very high contrast levels (better than 10(7) in a SPHERE-like context).

  17. Fundamental gain in high-contrast imaging with the large binocular telescope interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, Fabien; Esposito, Simone; Puglisi, Alfio; Riccardi, Armando; Pinna, Enrico; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Hill, John; Hinz, Philip

    2016-08-01

    Numerical simulations for the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer have shown a fundamental gain in contrast when using two 8m adaptive optics telescopes instead of one, assuming a high Strehl and a cophasing mode. The global gain is improved by a factor 2 in contrast by using the long exposures and by a factor of 10 in contrast by using the short exposures. Indeed, fringes are still present in the short exposure, contrary to the long exposure where the fringes are blurred. Thus, there is some gain in grouping some short exposures with high gain G. This makes the LBTI well suitable for the Angular Differential Imaging technique. A planet will be alternatively located in the dark fringes (G ≈ 10 to 100) and/or in the dark rings (G ≈ 4 to 20). A rotation of 15° is sufficient to pass through at least one gain zone. The LBTI can provide in the visible wavelengths not only high angular resolution (≈ 6:5mas at 750nm) and high sensitivity (by a factor 4), but also a gain in contrast (by a factor 10 to 100) compared to the stand-alone adaptive optics used on each LBT aperture.

  18. The SEEDS High-Contrast Imaging Survey of Exoplanets Around Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uyama, Taichi; Hashimoto, Jun; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Mayama, Satoshi; Akiyama, Eiji; Currie, Thayne; Livingston, John; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph C.; Egner, Sebastian; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol A.; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Ishii, Miki; Iye, Masanori; Janson, Markus; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kwon, Jungmi; Matsuo, Taro; Mcelwain, Michael W.; Miyama, Shoken; Morino, Jun-Ichi; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Serabyn, Eugene; Suenaga, Takuya; Suto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.; Takami, Michihiro; Takato, Naruhisa; Terada, Hiroshi; Thalmann, Christian; Turner, Edwin L.; Watanabe, Makoto; Wisniewski, John; Yamada, Toru; Takami, Hideki; Usuda, Tomonori; Tamura, Motohide

    2017-03-01

    We present high-contrast observations of 68 young stellar objects (YSOs) that have been explored as part of the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru (SEEDS) survey on the Subaru telescope. Our targets are very young (<10 Myr) stars, which often harbor protoplanetary disks where planets may be forming. We achieve a typical contrast of ∼10‑4–10‑5.5 at an angular distance of 1″ from the central star, corresponding to typical mass sensitivities (assuming hot-start evolutionary models) of ∼10 M J at 70 au and ∼6 M J at 140 au. We detected a new stellar companion to HIP 79462 and confirmed the substellar objects GQ Lup b and ROXs 42B b. An additional six companion candidates await follow-up observations to check for common proper motion. Our SEEDS YSO observations probe the population of planets and brown dwarfs at the very youngest ages; these may be compared to the results of surveys targeting somewhat older stars. Our sample and the associated observational results will help enable detailed statistical analyses of giant planet formation.

  19. GRAPHIC: The Geneva Reduction and Analysis Pipeline for High-contrast Imaging of planetary Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelberg, Janis; Ségransan, Damien; Udry, Stéphane; Wildi, François

    2014-01-01

    We present a new analysis and reduction pipeline for the detection of planetary companions using Angular Differential Imaging. The pipeline uses Fourier transforms for image shifting and rotation in order to achieve very low signal loss. Furthermore it is parallelised in order to run on computer clusters of up to 1024 cores. The pipeline was developed in Geneva for the ongoing direct imaging campaign for stars with radial velocity drifts in the HARPS and CORALIE radial-velocity planet-search surveys. In addition to that, a disk mode has been implemented in the context of observations of the protoplanetary disk around HD142527.

  20. MicroCT for comparative morphology: simple staining methods allow high-contrast 3D imaging of diverse non-mineralized animal tissues.

    PubMed

    Metscher, Brian D

    2009-06-22

    Comparative, functional, and developmental studies of animal morphology require accurate visualization of three-dimensional structures, but few widely applicable methods exist for non-destructive whole-volume imaging of animal tissues. Quantitative studies in particular require accurately aligned and calibrated volume images of animal structures. X-ray microtomography (microCT) has the potential to produce quantitative 3D images of small biological samples, but its widespread use for non-mineralized tissues has been limited by the low x-ray contrast of soft tissues. Although osmium staining and a few other techniques have been used for contrast enhancement, generally useful methods for microCT imaging for comparative morphology are still lacking. Several very simple and versatile staining methods are presented for microCT imaging of animal soft tissues, along with advice on tissue fixation and sample preparation. The stains, based on inorganic iodine and phosphotungstic acid, are easier to handle and much less toxic than osmium, and they produce high-contrast x-ray images of a wide variety of soft tissues. The breadth of possible applications is illustrated with a few microCT images of model and non-model animals, including volume and section images of vertebrates, embryos, insects, and other invertebrates. Each image dataset contains x-ray absorbance values for every point in the imaged volume, and objects as small as individual muscle fibers and single blood cells can be resolved in their original locations and orientations within the sample. With very simple contrast staining, microCT imaging can produce quantitative, high-resolution, high-contrast volume images of animal soft tissues, without destroying the specimens and with possibilities of combining with other preparation and imaging methods. Such images are expected to be useful in comparative, developmental, functional, and quantitative studies of morphology.

  1. The coronagraphic Modal Wavefront Sensor: a hybrid focal-plane sensor for the high-contrast imaging of circumstellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilby, M. J.; Keller, C. U.; Snik, F.; Korkiakoski, V.; Pietrow, A. G. M.

    2017-01-01

    The raw coronagraphic performance of current high-contrast imaging instruments is limited by the presence of a quasi-static speckle (QSS) background, resulting from instrumental Non-Common Path Errors (NCPEs). Rapid development of efficient speckle subtraction techniques in data reduction has enabled final contrasts of up to 10-6 to be obtained, however it remains preferable to eliminate the underlying NCPEs at the source. In this work we introduce the coronagraphic Modal Wavefront Sensor (cMWS), a new wavefront sensor suitable for real-time NCPE correction. This combines the Apodizing Phase Plate (APP) coronagraph with a holographic modal wavefront sensor to provide simultaneous coronagraphic imaging and focal-plane wavefront sensing with the science point-spread function. We first characterise the baseline performance of the cMWS via idealised closed-loop simulations, showing that the sensor is able to successfully recover diffraction-limited coronagraph performance over an effective dynamic range of ±2.5 radians root-mean-square (rms) wavefront error within 2-10 iterations, with performance independent of the specific choice of mode basis. We then present the results of initial on-sky testing at the William Herschel Telescope, which demonstrate that the sensor is capable of NCPE sensing under realistic seeing conditions via the recovery of known static aberrations to an accuracy of 10 nm (0.1 radians) rms error in the presence of a dominant atmospheric speckle foreground. We also find that the sensor is capable of real-time measurement of broadband atmospheric wavefront variance (50% bandwidth, 158 nm rms wavefront error) at a cadence of 50 Hz over an uncorrected telescope sub-aperture. When combined with a suitable closed-loop adaptive optics system, the cMWS holds the potential to deliver an improvement of up to two orders of magnitude over the uncorrected QSS floor. Such a sensor would be eminently suitable for the direct imaging and spectroscopy of

  2. Measurements of incoherent light and background structure at exo-Earth detection levels in the High Contrast Imaging Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cady, Eric; Shaklan, Stuart

    2014-08-01

    A major component of the estimation and correction of starlight at very high contrasts is the creation of a dark hole: a region in the vicinity of the core of the stellar point spread function (PSF) where speckles in the PSF wings have been greatly attenuated, up to a factor of 1010 for the imaging of terrestrial exoplanets. At these very high contrasts, removing these speckles requires distinguishing between light from the stellar PSF scattered by instrument imperfections, which may be partially corrected across a broad band using deformable mirrors in the system, from light from other sources which generally may not. These other sources may be external or internal to the instrument (e.g. planets, exozodiacal light), but in either case, their distinguishing characteristic is their inability to interfere coherently with the PSF. In the following we discuss the estimation, structure, and expected origin of this incoherent" signal, primarily in the context of a series of experiments made with a linear band-limited mask in Jan-Mar 2013. We find that the incoherent" signal at moderate contrasts is largely estimation error of the coherent signal, while at very high contrasts it represents a true floor which is stable over week-timescales.

  3. Asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM) for ultrafast high-contrast cellular imaging in flow

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Terence T. W.; Lau, Andy K. S.; Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Tang, Matthew Y. H.; Robles, Joseph D. F.; Wei, Xiaoming; Chan, Antony C. S.; Tang, Anson H. L.; Lam, Edmund Y.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Chan, Godfrey C. F.; Shum, Ho Cheung; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2014-01-01

    Accelerating imaging speed in optical microscopy is often realized at the expense of image contrast, image resolution, and detection sensitivity – a common predicament for advancing high-speed and high-throughput cellular imaging. We here demonstrate a new imaging approach, called asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM), which can deliver ultrafast label-free high-contrast flow imaging with well delineated cellular morphological resolution and in-line optical image amplification to overcome the compromised imaging sensitivity at high speed. We show that ATOM can separately reveal the enhanced phase-gradient and absorption contrast in microfluidic live-cell imaging at a flow speed as high as ~10 m/s, corresponding to an imaging throughput of ~100,000 cells/sec. ATOM could thus be the enabling platform to meet the pressing need for intercalating optical microscopy in cellular assay, e.g. imaging flow cytometry – permitting high-throughput access to the morphological information of the individual cells simultaneously with a multitude of parameters obtained in the standard assay. PMID:24413677

  4. The Architecture of the LkCa 15 Transitional Disk Revealed By High-Contrast Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thalmann, C.; Mulders, G. D.; Hodapp, K.; Janson, M.; Grady, C.A.; Min, M.; de Juan Ovelar, M.; Carson, J.; Brandt, T.; Bonnefoy, M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present four new epochs of Ks-band images of the young pre-transitional disk around LkCa 15 and perform extensive forward modeling to derive the physical parameters of the disk. We find indications of strongly anisotropic scattering (Henyey-Greenstein g = 0.67 (+0.18/-0.11)) and a significantly tapered gap edge ("round wall") but see no evidence that the inner disk, whose existence is predicted by the spectral energy distribution, shadows the outer regions of the disk visible in our images.We marginally confirm the existence of an offset between the disk center and the star along the line of nodes; however, the magnitude of this offset (x = 27 (+19/-20) mas) is notably lower than that found in our earlier H-band images. Intriguingly, we also find an offset of y = 69 (+49/-25) mas perpendicular to the line of nodes at high significance. If confirmed by future observations, this would imply a highly elliptical - or otherwise asymmetric - disk gap with an effective eccentricity of e ˜ 0.3. Such asymmetry would most likely be the result of dynamical sculpting by one or more unseen planets in the system. Finally, we find that the bright arc of scattered light we see in direct imaging observations originates from the near side of the disk and appears brighter than the far side because of strong forward scattering.

  5. The Architecture of the LkCa 15 Transitional Disk Revealed by High-contrast Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thalmann, C.; Mulders, G. D.; Hodapp, K.; Janson, M.; Grady, C. A.; Min, M.; deJuanOvelar, M.; Carson, J.; Brandt, T.; Bonnefoy, M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present four new epochs of Ks-band images of the young pre-transitional disk around LkCa 15, and perform extensive forward modeling to derive the physical parameters of the disk. We find indications of strongly anisotropic scattering (Henyey-Greenstein g = 0.67+0.18 -0.11) and a significantly tapered gap edge ('round wall'), but see no evidence that the inner disk, whose existence is predicted by the spectral energy distribution, shadows the outer regions of the disk visible in our images. We marginally confirm the existence of an offset between the disk center and the star along the line of nodes; however, the magnitude of this offset (x = 27+19 -20 mas) is notably lower than that found in our earlier H-band images (Thalmann et al. 2010). Intriguingly, we also find, at high significance, an offset of y = 69+49 -25 mas perpendicular to the line of nodes. If confirmed by future observations, this would imply a highly elliptical- or otherwise asymmetric-disk gap with an effective eccentricity of e ˜ 0.3. Such asymmetry would most likely be the result of dynamical sculpting by one or more unseen planets in the system. Finally, we find that the bright arc of scattered light we see in direct imaging observations originates from the near side of the disk, and appears brighter than the far side because of strong forward scattering.

  6. Coupling high spatial and spectral resolution with high contrast imaging to characterize exoplanets with a hypertelescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, F.

    2010-10-01

    A hypertelescope can provide direct snapshot images by using a large optical stellar interferometer, an efficient cophasing system and a pupil densifier to combine the beams. With an appropriate array configuration, the pupil densification optimizes the imaging properties by concentrating most of the light in the central interference peak, allowing stellar coronography for planet finding and characterization. A concept proposed in the framework of the VLTI (Lardiere 2005) can be extrapolated to future large interferometric arrays. The optical scheme consists on a reconfiguration with single-mode fibers and an amplitude apodization of the entrance pupil, and an extinction of the on-axis star by using a phase or amplitude mask located on the central interference peak of the image and a Lyot-stop in the relayed pupil plan. Then the pupil can be rearranged to its original configuration in order to restore the entire field. Moreover, a known planet outside the field of view can be recentered by introducing static staircase pistons between the beams with internal delay-lines. Finally, the photons of the planet are reimaged in a focal plane coupled with a spectrometer. We discuss here on the technical design and performance of such kind of device to enhance the exoplanet imaging capabilites of a large interferometer.

  7. Progress towards an electro-acoustic resonance technique for determining quantitative material and geometrical properties in high contrast multi-layer elastic structures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Karl

    2005-04-01

    High contrast multilayered elastic structures continue to be problematic for ultrasonic inspection. Large acoustic material impedance mismatches, refraction, reverberation, multiple echoes, and high elastic attenuations are just some of the issues one is faced with standard high frequency (1-20 MHz) pulse echo detection and imaging methods. In this presentation, we will present progress towards developing a low frequency resonance technique that operates in the 20 to 70 kHz regime. The technique is based on a direct correlation between the electrical impedance of a standard electro-acoustic transducer and the mechanical loading it experiences when placed in contact with a layered elastic structure. Preliminary experimental and theoretical results are in good agreement.

  8. Diamond Turned High Precision PIAA Optics and Four Mirror PIAA System for High Contrast Imaging of Exo-planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Cady, Eric; Pueyo, Laurent; Ana, Xin; Shaklan, Stuart; Guyon, Olivier; Belikov, Ruslan

    2011-01-01

    Off-axis, high-sag PIAA optics for high contrast imaging present challenges in manufacturing and testing. With smaller form factors and consequently smaller surface deformations (< 80 microns), diamond turned fabrication of these mirrors becomes feasible. Though such a design reduces the system throughput, it still provides 2(lambda)D inner working angle. We report on the design, fabrication, measurements, and initial assessment of the novel PIAA optics in a coronagraph testbed. We also describe, for the first time, a four mirror PIAA coronagraph that relaxes apodizer requirements and significantly improves throughput while preserving the low-cost benefits.

  9. High-contrast fluorescence imaging based on the polarization dependence of the fluorescence enhancement using an optical interference mirror slide.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Mitsuru; Akimoto, Takuo

    2015-01-01

    High-contrast fluorescence imaging using an optical interference mirror (OIM) slide that enhances the fluorescence from a fluorophore located on top of the OIM surface is reported. To enhance the fluorescence and reduce the background light of the OIM, transverse-electric-polarized excitation light was used as incident light, and the transverse-magnetic-polarized fluorescence signal was detected. As a result, an approximate 100-fold improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio was achieved through a 13-fold enhancement of the fluorescence signal and an 8-fold reduction of the background light.

  10. Diamond Turned High Precision PIAA Optics and Four Mirror PIAA System for High Contrast Imaging of Exo-planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Cady, Eric; Pueyo, Laurent; Ana, Xin; Shaklan, Stuart; Guyon, Olivier; Belikov, Ruslan

    2011-01-01

    Off-axis, high-sag PIAA optics for high contrast imaging present challenges in manufacturing and testing. With smaller form factors and consequently smaller surface deformations (< 80 microns), diamond turned fabrication of these mirrors becomes feasible. Though such a design reduces the system throughput, it still provides 2(lambda)D inner working angle. We report on the design, fabrication, measurements, and initial assessment of the novel PIAA optics in a coronagraph testbed. We also describe, for the first time, a four mirror PIAA coronagraph that relaxes apodizer requirements and significantly improves throughput while preserving the low-cost benefits.

  11. Stochastic parallel gradient descent based adaptive optics used for a high contrast imaging coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Bing; Ren, De-Qing; Zhang, Xi

    2011-08-01

    An adaptive optics (AO) system based on a stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm is proposed to reduce the speckle noises in the optical system of a stellar coronagraph in order to further improve the contrast. The principle of the SPGD algorithm is described briefly and a metric suitable for point source imaging optimization is given. The feasibility and good performance of the SPGD algorithm is demonstrated by an experimental system featured with a 140-actuator deformable mirror and a Hartmann-Shark wavefront sensor. Then the SPGD based AO is applied to a liquid crystal array (LCA) based coronagraph to improve the contrast. The LCA can modulate the incoming light to generate a pupil apodization mask of any pattern. A circular stepped pattern is used in our preliminary experiment and the image contrast shows improvement from 10-3 to 10-4.5 at an angular distance of 2λ/D after being corrected by SPGD based AO.

  12. High-Contrast Near-Infrared Imaging Polarimetry of the Protoplanetary Disk around RY Tau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takami, Michihiro; Karr, Jennifer L.; Hashimoto, Jun; Kim, Hyosun; Wisenewski, John; Henning, Thomas; Grady, Carol; Kandori, Ryo; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Chou, Mei-yin; Itoh, Yoichi; Momose, Mumetake; Mayama, Satoshi; Currie, Thayne; Follette, Katherine B.; Kwon, Jungmi; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph; Egner, Sebastian E.; McElwain, Michael W.; Serabyn, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    We present near-infrared coronagraphic imaging polarimetry of RY Tau. The scattered light in the circumstellar environment was imaged at H-band at a high resolution (approx. 0.05) for the first time, using Subaru-HiCIAO. The observed polarized intensity (PI) distribution shows a butterfly-like distribution of bright emission with an angular scale similar to the disk observed at millimeter wavelengths. This distribution is offset toward the blueshifted jet, indicating the presence of a geometrically thick disk or a remnant envelope, and therefore the earliest stage of the Class II evolutionary phase. We perform comparisons between the observed PI distribution and disk models with: (1) full radiative transfer code, using the spectral energy distribution (SED) to constrain the disk parameters; and (2) monochromatic simulations of scattered light which explore a wide range of parameters space to constrain the disk and dust parameters. We show that these models cannot consistently explain the observed PI distribution, SED, and the viewing angle inferred by millimeter interferometry. We suggest that the scattered light in the near-infrared is associated with an optically thin and geometrically thick layer above the disk surface, with the surface responsible for the infrared SED. Half of the scattered light and thermal radiation in this layer illuminates the disk surface, and this process may significantly affect the thermal structure of the disk.

  13. HIGH-CONTRAST NEAR-INFRARED IMAGING POLARIMETRY OF THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK AROUND RY TAU

    SciTech Connect

    Takami, Michihiro; Karr, Jennifer L.; Kim, Hyosun; Chou, Mei-Yin; Hashimoto, Jun; Kandori, Ryo; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Kwon, Jungmi; Wisniewski, John; Henning, Thomas; Brandner, Wolfgang; Grady, Carol A.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Itoh, Yoichi; Momose, Munetake; Mayama, Satoshi; Currie, Thayne; Follette, Katherine B.; Abe, Lyu; and others

    2013-08-01

    We present near-infrared coronagraphic imaging polarimetry of RY Tau. The scattered light in the circumstellar environment was imaged at the H band at a high resolution ({approx}0.''05) for the first time, using Subaru/HiCIAO. The observed polarized intensity (PI) distribution shows a butterfly-like distribution of bright emission with an angular scale similar to the disk observed at millimeter wavelengths. This distribution is offset toward the blueshifted jet, indicating the presence of a geometrically thick disk or a remnant envelope, and therefore the earliest stage of the Class II evolutionary phase. We perform comparisons between the observed PI distribution and disk models with (1) full radiative transfer code, using the spectral energy distribution (SED) to constrain the disk parameters; and (2) monochromatic simulations of scattered light which explore a wide range of parameters space to constrain the disk and dust parameters. We show that these models cannot consistently explain the observed PI distribution, SED, and the viewing angle inferred by millimeter interferometry. We suggest that the scattered light in the near-infrared is associated with an optically thin and geometrically thick layer above the disk surface, with the surface responsible for the infrared SED. Half of the scattered light and thermal radiation in this layer illuminates the disk surface, and this process may significantly affect the thermal structure of the disk.

  14. High contrast air-coupled acoustic imaging with zero group velocity lamb modes.

    PubMed

    Holland, Stephen D; Chimenti, D E

    2004-04-01

    The well known zero in the group velocity of the first-order symmetric (S1) plate wave mode has been exploited in air-coupled ultrasonic imaging to obtain significantly higher sensitivity than can be achieved in conventional air-coupled scanning. At the zero group velocity point at the frequency minimum of the S1 mode, a broad range of wavenumbers couple into the first-order symmetric mode at nearly a constant frequency, greatly enhancing transmission at that frequency. Coupled energy remains localized near the coupling point because the group velocity is zero. We excite the mode with a broadband, focussing, air-coupled transducer at the frequency of the zero group velocity point in the S1 mode. By exploiting the efficient coupling at the zero group velocity frequency, we have easily imaged a single layer of Scotch tape attached to a 6.4-mm thick Plexiglas plate and 3.2-mm Teflon inserts in a composite laminate.

  15. High contrast imaging with the JWST-NIRSpec Integral Field Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ygouf, Marie; Beichman, Charles A.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Roellig, Thomas L.; NIRCam GTO

    2017-06-01

    With its integral field unit, the near-infrared spectrograph NIRSpec on JWST will allow to measure high-resolution spectra into the 3-5 μm range with an increased sensitivity over ground-based systems. This capability will considerably extend our knowledge of brown dwarfs and bright exoplanets at large separations from their host star. But because there is not any coronagraph on NIRSpec, the performance in term of contrast at close separation will be extremely limited. In this communication, we explore possibilities to further push this limitation by comparing different observing strategies and associated post-processing techniques.

  16. Laboratory Demonstration of High Contrast Imaging in Multi-Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Ruslan; Bendek, Eduardo; Pluzhnik, Eugene; Sirbu, Dan; Thomas, Sandrine

    2017-01-01

    We show laboratory results advancing the technology readiness of a method to directly image planets and disks in multi-star systems such as Alpha Centauri. This method works with almost any coronagraph (or external occulter with a DM) and requires little or no change to existing and mature hardware. Because of the ubiquity of multistar systems, this method potentially multiplies the science yield of many missions and concepts such as WFIRST, Exo-C/S, HabEx, LUVOIR, and potentially enables the detection of Earth-like planets (if they exist) around our nearest neighbor star, Alpha Centauri, with a small and low-cost space telescope such as ACESat.We identified two main challenges associated with double-star (or multi-star) systems and methods to solve them. “Multi-Star Wavefront Control” (MSWC) enables the independent suppression of starlight from more than one star, and Super-Nyquist Wavefront Control (SNWC) enables extending MSWC to the case where star separation is beyond the Nyquist limit of the deformable mirror (DM).Our lab demonstrations were conducted at the Ames Coronagraph Experiment (ACE) laboratory and proved the basic principles of both MSWC and SNWC. They involved a 32x32 deformable mirror but no coronagraph for simplicity. We used MSWC to suppress starlight independently from two stars by at least an order of magnitude, in monochromatic as well as broadband light as broad as 50%. We also used SNWC to suppress starlight at separations as far as 100 λ/D from the star, surpassing the Nyquist limit of the DM.

  17. High-Contrast Imaging and Wavefront Control with a PIAA Coronagraph: Laboratory System Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyon, Olivier; Pluzhnik, Eugene; Martinache, Frantz; Totems, Julien; Tanaka, Shinichiro; Matsuo, Taro; Blain, Celia; Belikov, Ruslan

    2010-01-01

    The Phase-Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) coronagraph is a high-performance coronagraph concept able to work at small angular separation with little loss in throughput. We present results obtained with a laboratory PIAA system including active wavefront control. The system has a 94.3% throughput (excluding coating losses) and operates in air with monochromatic light. Our testbed achieved a 2.27 × 10-7 raw contrast between 1.65λ/D (inner working angle of the coronagraph configuration tested) and 4.4λ/D (outer working angle). Through careful calibration, we were able to separate this residual light into a dynamic coherent component (turbulence, vibrations) at 4.5 × 10-8 contrast and a static incoherent component (ghosts and/or polarization mismatch) at 1.6 × 10-7 contrast. Pointing errors are controlled at the 10-3λ/D level using a dedicated low-order wavefront sensor. While not sufficient for direct imaging of Earthlike planets from space, the 2.27 × 10-7 raw contrast achieved already exceeds requirements for a ground-based extreme adaptive optics system aimed at direct detection of more massive exoplanets. We show that over a 4 hr period, averaged wavefront errors have been controlled to the 3.5 × 10-9 contrast level. This result is particularly encouraging for ground-based extreme-AO systems relying on long-term stability and absence of static wavefront errors to recover planets much fainter than the fast boiling speckle halo.

  18. Effects of diffraction and static wavefront errors on high-contrast imaging from the Thirty Meter Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troya, Mitchell; Chananb, Gary; Crossfielda, Ian; Dumonta, Philip; Green, Joseph J.; Macintosh, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    High-contrast imaging, particularly direct detection of extrasolar planets, is a major science driver for the next generation of extremely large telescopes such as the segmented Thirty Meter Telescope. This goal requires more than merely diffraction-limited imaging, but also attention to residual scattered light from wavefront errors and diffraction effects at the contrast level of 10-8-10-9. Using a wave-optics simulation of adaptive optics and a diffraction suppression system we investigate diffraction from the segmentation geometry, intersegment gaps, obscuration by the secondary mirror and its supports. We find that the large obscurations pose a greater challenge than the much smaller segment gaps. In addition the impact of wavefront errors from the primary mirror, including segment alignment and figure errors, are analyzed. Segment-to-segment reflectivity variations and residual segment figure error will be the dominant error contributors from the primary mirror. Strategies to mitigate these errors are discussed.

  19. New circumstellar structure in the T Tauri system. A near-infrared high-contrast imaging study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, M.; Santhakumari, K. K. R.; Herbst, T. M.; Köhler, R.

    2016-09-01

    Aims: The immediate vicinity of T Tauri was observed with the new high-contrast imaging instrument SPHERE at the VLT to resolve remaining mysteries of the system, such as the putative small edge-on disk around T Tauri Sa and the assignment of the complex outflow patterns to the individual stars. Methods: We used SPHERE IRDIS narrow-band classical imaging in Paβ, Brγ, and the ν = 1-0 S(1) line of H2, as well as in the nearby continua to obtain high spatial resolution and high-contrast images over the near-infrared spectral range. Line maps were created by subtracting the nearby continuum. We also reanalyzed coronagraphic data taken with SPHERE's integral field spectrograph in J- and H-band with the goal of obtaining a precise extinction estimate to T Tauri Sb, and of verifying the recently reported claim of another stellar or substellar object in the system. Results: A previously unknown coiling structure is observed southwest of the stars in reflected light, which points to the vicinity of T Tauri N. We map the circumbinary emission from T Tauri S in J- and H-band scattered light for the first time, showing a morphology that differs significantly from that observed in K-band. Molecular Hydrogen emission is found southwest of the stars, near the coiling structure. We also detect the H2 emitting region T Tauri NW. The motion of T Tauri NW with respect to T Tauri N and S between previous images and our 2014 data provides strong evidence that the southeast-northwest outflow triggering T Tauri NW is likely to be associated with T Tauri S. We also present accurate relative photometry of the stars, which confirms that T Tauri Sa is brightening again. Our analysis rules out the presence of the recently proposed companion to T Tauri N with high confidence.

  20. Laboratory validation of the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph in broadband light at the high-contrast imaging THD testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorme, J. R.; N'Diaye, M.; Galicher, R.; Dohlen, K.; Baudoz, P.; Caillat, A.; Rousset, G.; Soummer, R.; Dupuis, O.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Specific high-contrast imaging instruments are mandatory to characterize circumstellar disks and exoplanets around nearby stars. Coronagraphs are commonly used in these facilities to reject the diffracted light of an observed star and enable direct imaging and spectroscopy of its circumstellar environment. One important property of the coronagraph is to be able to work in broadband light. Aims: Among several proposed coronagraphs, the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph is a promising solution for starlight rejection in broadband light. In this paper, we perform the first validation of this concept in laboratory. Methods: First, we consider the principle of the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph. Then, we describe the high-contrast imaging THD testbed, the manufacturing of the components, and the quality control procedures. Finally, we study the sensitivity of our coronagraph to low-order aberrations (inner working angle and defocus) and estimate its contrast performance. Our experimental broadband light results are compared with numerical simulations to check agreement with the performance predictions. Results: With the manufactured prototype and using a dark hole technique based on the self-coherent camera, we obtain contrast levels down to 2 × 10-8 between 5 and 17λ0/D in monochromatic light (640 nm). We also reach contrast levels of 4 × 10-8 between 7 and 17λ0/D in broadband (λ0 = 675 nm, Δλ = 250 and Δλ/λ0 = 40%), which demonstrates the excellent chromatic performance of the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph. Conclusions: The performance reached by the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph is promising for future high-contrast imaging instruments that aim to detect and spectrally characterize old or light gaseous planets.

  1. Estimates of the Planet Yield from Ground-based High-contrast Imaging Observations as a Function of Stellar Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepp, Justin R.; Johnson, John Asher

    2011-06-01

    We use Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the number of extrasolar planets that are directly detectable in the solar neighborhood using current and forthcoming high-contrast imaging instruments. Our calculations take into consideration the important factors that govern the likelihood for imaging a planet, including the statistical properties of stars in the solar neighborhood, correlations between star and planet properties, observational effects, and selection criteria. We consider several different ground-based surveys, both biased and unbiased, and express the resulting planet yields as a function of stellar mass. Selecting targets based on their youth and visual brightness, we find that strong correlations between star mass and planet properties are required to reproduce high-contrast imaging results to date (i.e., HR 8799, β Pic). Using the most recent empirical findings for the occurrence rate of gas-giant planets from radial velocity (RV) surveys, our simulations indicate that naive extrapolation of the Doppler planet population to semimajor axes accessible to high-contrast instruments provides an excellent agreement between simulations and observations using present-day contrast levels. In addition to being intrinsically young and sufficiently bright to serve as their own beacon for adaptive optics correction, A-stars have a high planet occurrence rate and propensity to form massive planets in wide orbits, making them ideal targets. The same effects responsible for creating a multitude of detectable planets around massive stars conspire to reduce the number orbiting low-mass stars. However, in the case of a young stellar cluster, where targets are approximately the same age and situated at roughly the same distance, MK-stars can easily dominate the number of detections because of an observational bias related to small number statistics. The degree to which low-mass stars produce the most planet detections in this special case depends upon whether multiple

  2. ESTIMATES OF THE PLANET YIELD FROM GROUND-BASED HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING OBSERVATIONS AS A FUNCTION OF STELLAR MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Crepp, Justin R.; Johnson, John Asher

    2011-06-01

    We use Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the number of extrasolar planets that are directly detectable in the solar neighborhood using current and forthcoming high-contrast imaging instruments. Our calculations take into consideration the important factors that govern the likelihood for imaging a planet, including the statistical properties of stars in the solar neighborhood, correlations between star and planet properties, observational effects, and selection criteria. We consider several different ground-based surveys, both biased and unbiased, and express the resulting planet yields as a function of stellar mass. Selecting targets based on their youth and visual brightness, we find that strong correlations between star mass and planet properties are required to reproduce high-contrast imaging results to date (i.e., HR 8799, {beta} Pic). Using the most recent empirical findings for the occurrence rate of gas-giant planets from radial velocity (RV) surveys, our simulations indicate that naive extrapolation of the Doppler planet population to semimajor axes accessible to high-contrast instruments provides an excellent agreement between simulations and observations using present-day contrast levels. In addition to being intrinsically young and sufficiently bright to serve as their own beacon for adaptive optics correction, A-stars have a high planet occurrence rate and propensity to form massive planets in wide orbits, making them ideal targets. The same effects responsible for creating a multitude of detectable planets around massive stars conspire to reduce the number orbiting low-mass stars. However, in the case of a young stellar cluster, where targets are approximately the same age and situated at roughly the same distance, MK-stars can easily dominate the number of detections because of an observational bias related to small number statistics. The degree to which low-mass stars produce the most planet detections in this special case depends upon whether

  3. High-contrast imager for Complex Aperture Telescopes (HiCAT). 4. Status and wavefront control development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leboulleux, Lucie; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Riggs, A. J. E.; Egron, Sylvain; Mazoyer, Johan; Pueyo, Laurent; Choquet, Elodie; Perrin, Marshall D.; Kasdin, Jeremy; Sauvage, Jean-François; Fusco, Thierry; Soummer, Rémi

    2016-07-01

    Segmented telescopes are a possible approach to enable large-aperture space telescopes for the direct imaging and spectroscopy of habitable worlds. However, the increased complexity of their aperture geometry, due to their central obstruction, support structures and segment gaps, makes high-contrast imaging very challenging. The High-contrast imager for Complex Aperture Telescopes (HiCAT) was designed to study and develop solutions for such telescope pupils using wavefront control and starlight suppression. The testbed design has the flexibility to enable studies with increasing complexity for telescope aperture geometries starting with off-axis telescopes, then on-axis telescopes with central obstruction and support structures (e.g. the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope [WFIRST]), up to on-axis segmented telescopes e.g. including various concepts for a Large UV, Optical, IR telescope (LUVOIR), such as the High Definition Space Telescope (HDST). We completed optical alignment in the summer of 2014 and a first deformable mirror was successfully integrated in the testbed, with a total wavefront error of 13nm RMS over a 18mm diameter circular pupil in open loop. HiCAT will also be provided with a segmented mirror conjugated with a shaped pupil representing the HDST configuration, to directly study wavefront control in the presence of segment gaps, central obstruction and spider. We recently applied a focal plane wavefront control method combined with a classical Lyot coronagraph on HiCAT, and we found limitations on contrast performance due to vibration effect. In this communication, we analyze this instability and study its impact on the performance of wavefront control algorithms. We present our Speckle Nulling code to control and correct for wavefront errors both in simulation mode and on testbed mode. This routine is first tested in simulation mode without instability to validate our code. We then add simulated vibrations to study the degradation of contrast

  4. In vivo high-contrast imaging of deep posterior eye by 1-um swept source optical coherence tomography and scattering optical coherence angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuno, Yoshiaki; Hong, Youngjoo; Makita, Shuichi; Yamanari, Masahiro; Akiba, Masahiro; Miura, Masahiro; Yatagai, Toyohiko

    2007-05-01

    Retinal, choroidal and scleral imaging by using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) with a 1-μm band probe light, and high-contrast and three-dimensional (3D) imaging of the choroidal vasculature are presented. This SS-OCT has a measurement speed of 28,000 A-lines/s, a depth resolution of 10.4 μm in tissue, and a sensitivity of 99.3 dB. Owing to the high penetration of the 1-μm probe light and the high sensitivity of the system, the in vivo sclera of a healthy volunteer can be observed. A software-based algorithm of scattering optical coherence angiography (S-OCA) is developed for the high-contrast and 3D imaging of the choroidal vessels. The S-OCA is used to visualize the 3D choroidal vasculature of the in vivo human macula and the optic nerve head. Comparisons of S-OCA with several other angiography techniques including Doppler OCA, Doppler OCT, fluorescein angiography, and indocyanine green angiography are also presented.

  5. Performance of a precision high-density deformable mirror for extremely high contrast imaging astronomy from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauger, John T.; Moody, Dwight; Gordon, Brian; Gürsel, Yekta; Ealey, Mark A.; Bagwell, Roger B.

    2003-02-01

    Active wavefront correction of a space telescope provides a technology path for extremely high contrast imaging astronomy at levels well beyond the capabilities of current telescope systems. A precision deformable mirror technology intended specifically for wavefront correction in a visible/near-infrared space telescope has been developed at Xinetics and extensively tested at JPL over the past several years. Active wavefront phase correction has been demonstrated to 1 Angstrom rms over the spatial frequency range accessible to a mirror with an array of actuators on a 1 mm pitch. It is based on a modular electroceramic design that is scalable to 1000s of actuator elements coupled to the surface of a thin mirror facesheet. It is controlled by a low-power multiplexed driver system. Demonstrated surface figure control, high actuator density, and low power dissipation are described. Performance specifications are discussed in the context of the Eclipse point design for a coronagraphic space telescope.

  6. Active Optics for high contrast imaging:Super smooth off-axis parabolas for ELTs XAO instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugot, Emmanuel; Laslandes, Marie; Ferrari, Marc; Dohlen, Kjetil; El hadi, Kacem

    2011-09-01

    In the context of direct imaging of exoplanets using XAO, the main limitations in images are due to residual quasi-static speckles induced by atmospheric phase residuals and instrumental static and quasi-static aberrations not corrected by AO: the post-coronagraphic image quality is directly linked to the power spectral density (PSD) of the optical train before the coronagraph. In this context, the potential of Stress Polishing has been demonstrated at LAM after the delivery of the three toric mirrors (TMs) for the VLT-SPHERE instrument. The extreme optical quality of such aspherical optics is obtained thanks to the spherical polishing of warped mirrors using full sized tools, avoiding the generation of high spatial frequency ripples due to classical sub-aperture tool marks. Furthermore, sub-nanometric roughnesses have been obtained thanks to a super smoothing method. Work is ongoing at LAM in order to improve this manufacturing method to cover a wide range of off-axis aspherics, with a reduction of the manufacturing time and cost. Smart warping structures are designed in order to bend the mirrors with a combination of focus, astigmatism and coma. This development will allow the stress polishing of supersmooth OAP for XAO optical relays improving the wavefront quality and in this way the high contrast level of future exoplanet imagers.

  7. Laboratory demonstration of high-contrast imaging at inner working angles 2 λ/D and better

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Ruslan; Pluzhnik, Eugene; Witteborn, Fred C.; Greene, Thomas P.; Lynch, Dana H.; Zell, Peter T.; Guyon, Olivier

    2011-10-01

    Coronagraph technology is advancing and promises to enable direct imaging and spectral characterization of extrasolar Earth-like planets in the 2020 decade with a telescope as small as 1.5m. A small Explorer-sized telescope can also be launched in the 2010 decade capable of seeing debris disks as dim as tens of zodis and potentially a few large planets. The Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) coronagraph makes such aggressive performance possible, providing high throughput and high contrast close to the diffraction limit. We report on the latest results from a testbed at NASA Ames that is focused on developing and testing the PIAA coronagraph. This laboratory facility was built in 2008 and is designed to be flexible, operated in an actively thermally stabilized air environment, and to complement collaborative efforts at NASA JPL's High Contrast Imaging Testbed. For our wavefront control we are using small Micro-Electro- Mechanical-System deformable mirrors (MEMS DMs), which promise to reduce the size of the beam and overall instrument, a consideration that becomes very important for small telescopes. We describe our lab progress and results, which include (as of August 2011): the demonstration of 1.9x10-8 average raw contrast in a dark zone from 2.0 - 3.4 λ/D and of 1.2x10-6 contrast from 1.5-2.0 λ/D (in monochromatic light); the testing of the next-generation reflective PIAA mirror set built by Tinsley and designed for broadband; and finally, discuss our most important past limiting factors as well as expected future ones.

  8. THE TRENDS HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING SURVEY. I. THREE BENCHMARK M DWARFS ORBITING SOLAR-TYPE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Crepp, Justin R.; Johnson, John Asher; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Yantek, Scott M.; Delaney, Colleen R.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoff W.; Isaacson, Howard T.; Fischer, Debra A.; Wright, Jason T.

    2012-12-10

    We present initial results from a new high-contrast imaging program dedicated to stars that exhibit long-term Doppler radial velocity accelerations (or ''trends''). The goal of the TRENDS (TaRgetting bENchmark-objects with Doppler Spectroscopy) imaging survey is to directly detect and study the companions responsible for accelerating their host star. In this first paper of the series, we report the discovery of low-mass stellar companions orbiting HD 53665, HD 68017, and HD 71881 using NIRC2 adaptive optics (AO) observations at Keck. Follow-up imaging demonstrates association through common proper motion. These comoving companions have red colors with estimated spectral types of K7-M0, M5, and M3-M4, respectively. We determine a firm lower limit to their mass from Doppler and astrometric measurements. In the near future, it will be possible to construct three-dimensional orbits and calculate the dynamical mass of HD 68017 B and possibly HD 71881 B. We already detect astrometric orbital motion of HD 68017 B, which has a projected separation of 13.0 AU. Each companion is amenable to AO-assisted direct spectroscopy. Further, each companion orbits a solar-type star, making it possible to infer metallicity and age from the primary. Such benchmark objects are essential for testing theoretical models of cool dwarf atmospheres.

  9. High-contrast imaging of Sirius A with VLT/SPHERE: looking for giant planets down to one astronomical unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigan, A.; Gry, C.; Salter, G.; Mesa, D.; Homeier, D.; Moutou, C.; Allard, F.

    2015-11-01

    Sirius has always attracted a lot of scientific interest, especially after the discovery of a companion white dwarf at the end of the 19th century. Very early on, the existence of a potential third body was put forward to explain some of the observed properties of the system. We present new coronagraphic observations obtained with VLT/SPHERE (Very Large Telescope/Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet REsearch) that explore, for the very first time, the innermost regions of the system down to 0.2 arcsec(0.5 au) from Sirius A. Our observations cover the near-infrared from 0.95 to 2.3 μm and they offer the best on-sky contrast ever reached at these angular separations. After detailing the steps of our SPHERE/IRDIFS data analysis, we present a robust method to derive detection limits for multispectral data from high-contrast imagers and spectrographs. In terms of raw performance, we report contrasts of 14.3 mag at 0.2 arcsec, ˜16.3 mag in the 0.4-1.0 arcsec range and down to 19 mag at 3.7 arcsec. In physical units, our observations are sensitive to giant planets down to 11 MJup at 0.5 au, 6-7 MJup in the 1-2 au range and ˜4 MJup at 10 au. Despite the exceptional sensitivity of our observations, we do not report the detection of additional companions around Sirius A. Using a Monte Carlo orbital analysis, we show that we can reject, with about 50 per cent probability, the existence of an 8 MJup planet orbiting at 1 au.

  10. High-Contrast 3.8 Micron Imaging of the Brown Dwarf/Planet-Mass Companion to GJ 758

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, Thayne; Bailey, Vanessa; Fabrycky, Daniel; Murray-Clay, Ruth; Rodigas, Timothy; Hinz, Phil

    2010-01-01

    We present L' band (3.8 Micron) MMT/Clio high-contrast imaging data for the nearby star GJ 758, which was recently reported by Thalmann et al. (2009) to have one -- possibly two-- faint comoving companions (GJ 7588 and "C", respectively). GJ 758B is detected in two distinct datasets. Additionally, we report a \\textit(possible) detection of the object identified by Thalmann et al as "GJ 758C" in our more sensitive dataset, though it is likely a residual speckle. However, if it is the same object as that reported by Thalmann et al. it cannot be a companion in a bound orbit. GJ 758B has a H-L'color redder than nearly all known L--T8 dwarfs. Based on comparisons with the COND evolutionary models, GJ 758B has Te approx. 560 K (+150 K, -90 K) and a mass ranging from approx. 10-20 Mj if it is approx. 1 Gyr old to approx. 25-40 Mj if it is 8.7 Gyr old. GJ 758B is likely in a highly eccentric orbit, e approx. 0.73 (+0.12,-0.21), with a semimajor axis of approx. 44 AU (+32 AU, -14 AU). Though GJ 758B is sometimes discussed within the context of exoplanet direct imaging, its mass is likely greater than the deuterium-burning limit and its formation may resemble that of binary stars rather than that of jovian-mass planets.

  11. High-Contrast 3.8 Micron Imaging of the Brown Dwarf/Planet-Mass Companion to GJ 758

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, Thayne M.; Bailey, Vanessa; Fabrycky, Daniel; Murray-Clay, Ruth; Rodigas, Timothy; Hinz, Phil

    2011-01-01

    We present L' band (3.8 Micron) MMT/Clio high-contrast imaging data for the nearby star GJ 758, which was recently reported by Thalmann et al. (2009) to have one - possibly two - faint comoving companions (GJ 7588 and "C", respectively). GJ 758B is detected in two distinct datasets. Additionally, we report a \\textit{possible} detection of the object identified by Thalmann et al as "GJ 758C" in our more sensitive dataset, though it is likely a residual speckle. However, if it is the same object as that reported by Thalmann et al. it cannot be a companion in a bound orbit. GJ 7588 has a H-L' color redder than nearly all known L-T8 dwarfs. 8ased on comparisons with the COND evolutionary models, GJ 7588 has Te approx. 560 K (+150 K, -90 K) and a mass ranging from approx.10-20 Mj if it is approx.1 Gyr old to approx. 25-40 Mj if it is 8.7 Gyr old. GJ 7588 is likely in a highly eccentric orbit, e approx. 0.73 (+0.12,-0.21), with a semimajor axis of approx. 44 AU (+32 AU, -14 AU). Though GJ 7588 is sometimes discussed within the context of exoplanet direct imaging, its mass is likely greater than the deuterium-burning limit and its formation may resemble that of binary stars rather than that of jovian-mass planets.

  12. High-Contrast 3.8 Micron Imaging of the Brown Dwarf/Planet-Mass Companion to GJ 758

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, Thayne; Bailey, Vanessa; Fabrycky, Daniel; Murray-Clay, Ruth; Rodigas, Timothy; Hinz, Phil

    2010-01-01

    We present L' band (3.8 Micron) MMT/Clio high-contrast imaging data for the nearby star GJ 758, which was recently reported by Thalmann et al. (2009) to have one -- possibly two-- faint comoving companions (GJ 7588 and "C", respectively). GJ 758B is detected in two distinct datasets. Additionally, we report a \\textit(possible) detection of the object identified by Thalmann et al as "GJ 758C" in our more sensitive dataset, though it is likely a residual speckle. However, if it is the same object as that reported by Thalmann et al. it cannot be a companion in a bound orbit. GJ 758B has a H-L'color redder than nearly all known L--T8 dwarfs. Based on comparisons with the COND evolutionary models, GJ 758B has Te approx. 560 K (+150 K, -90 K) and a mass ranging from approx. 10-20 Mj if it is approx. 1 Gyr old to approx. 25-40 Mj if it is 8.7 Gyr old. GJ 758B is likely in a highly eccentric orbit, e approx. 0.73 (+0.12,-0.21), with a semimajor axis of approx. 44 AU (+32 AU, -14 AU). Though GJ 758B is sometimes discussed within the context of exoplanet direct imaging, its mass is likely greater than the deuterium-burning limit and its formation may resemble that of binary stars rather than that of jovian-mass planets.

  13. Short Term Reproducibility of a High Contrast 3-D Isotropic Optic Nerve Imaging Sequence in Healthy Controls.

    PubMed

    Harrigan, Robert L; Smith, Alex K; Mawn, Louise A; Smith, Seth A; Landman, Bennett A

    2016-02-27

    The optic nerve (ON) plays a crucial role in human vision transporting all visual information from the retina to the brain for higher order processing. There are many diseases that affect the ON structure such as optic neuritis, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and multiple sclerosis. Because the ON is the sole pathway for visual information from the retina to areas of higher level processing, measures of ON damage have been shown to correlate well with visual deficits. Increased intracranial pressure has been shown to correlate with the size of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) surrounding the ON. These measures are generally taken at an arbitrary point along the nerve and do not account for changes along the length of the ON. We propose a high contrast and high-resolution 3-D acquired isotropic imaging sequence optimized for ON imaging. We have acquired scan-rescan data using the optimized sequence and a current standard of care protocol for 10 subjects. We show that this sequence has superior contrast-to-noise ratio to the current standard of care while achieving a factor of 11 higher resolution. We apply a previously published automatic pipeline to segment the ON and CSF sheath and measure the size of each individually. We show that these measures of ON size have lower short-term reproducibility than the population variance and the variability along the length of the nerve. We find that the proposed imaging protocol is (1) useful in detecting population differences and local changes and (2) a promising tool for investigating biomarkers related to structural changes of the ON.

  14. Short Term Reproducibility of a High Contrast 3-D Isotropic Optic Nerve Imaging Sequence in Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Harrigan, Robert L.; Smith, Alex K.; Mawn, Louise A.; Smith, Seth A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-01-01

    The optic nerve (ON) plays a crucial role in human vision transporting all visual information from the retina to the brain for higher order processing. There are many diseases that affect the ON structure such as optic neuritis, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and multiple sclerosis. Because the ON is the sole pathway for visual information from the retina to areas of higher level processing, measures of ON damage have been shown to correlate well with visual deficits. Increased intracranial pressure has been shown to correlate with the size of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) surrounding the ON. These measures are generally taken at an arbitrary point along the nerve and do not account for changes along the length of the ON. We propose a high contrast and high-resolution 3-D acquired isotropic imaging sequence optimized for ON imaging. We have acquired scan-rescan data using the optimized sequence and a current standard of care protocol for 10 subjects. We show that this sequence has superior contrast-to-noise ratio to the current standard of care while achieving a factor of 11 higher resolution. We apply a previously published automatic pipeline to segment the ON and CSF sheath and measure the size of each individually. We show that these measures of ON size have lower short-term reproducibility than the population variance and the variability along the length of the nerve. We find that the proposed imaging protocol is (1) useful in detecting population differences and local changes and (2) a promising tool for investigating biomarkers related to structural changes of the ON. PMID:27175048

  15. Short term reproducibility of a high contrast 3-D isotropic optic nerve imaging sequence in healthy controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrigan, Robert L.; Smith, Alex K.; Mawn, Louise A.; Smith, Seth A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The optic nerve (ON) plays a crucial role in human vision transporting all visual information from the retina to the brain for higher order processing. There are many diseases that affect the ON structure such as optic neuritis, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and multiple sclerosis. Because the ON is the sole pathway for visual information from the retina to areas of higher level processing, measures of ON damage have been shown to correlate well with visual deficits. Increased intracranial pressure has been shown to correlate with the size of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) surrounding the ON. These measures are generally taken at an arbitrary point along the nerve and do not account for changes along the length of the ON. We propose a high contrast and high-resolution 3-D acquired isotropic imaging sequence optimized for ON imaging. We have acquired scan-rescan data using the optimized sequence and a current standard of care protocol for 10 subjects. We show that this sequence has superior contrast-to-noise ratio to the current standard of care while achieving a factor of 11 higher resolution. We apply a previously published automatic pipeline to segment the ON and CSF sheath and measure the size of each individually. We show that these measures of ON size have lower short- term reproducibility than the population variance and the variability along the length of the nerve. We find that the proposed imaging protocol is (1) useful in detecting population differences and local changes and (2) a promising tool for investigating biomarkers related to structural changes of the ON.

  16. Experimental study of the low-order wavefront sensor for the high-contrast coronagraphic imager EXCEDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozi, Julien; Belikov, Ruslan; Schneider, Glenn; Guyon, Olivier; Pluzhnik, Eugene; Thomas, Sandrine J.; Martinache, Frantz

    2013-09-01

    The mission EXCEDE (EXoplanetary Circumstellar Environments and Disk Explorer), selected by NASA for technology development, is designed to study the formation, evolution and architectures of exoplanetary systems and characterize circumstellar environments into stellar habitable zones. It is composed of a 0.7 m telescope equipped with a Phase-Induced Amplitude Apodization Coronagraph (PIAA-C) and a 2000-element MEMS deformable mirror, capable of raw contrasts of 10-6 at 1.2 λ/D and 10-7 above 2 λ/D. One of the key challenges to achieve those contrasts is to remove low-order aberrations, using a Low-Order WaveFront Sensor (LOWFS). An experiment simulating the starlight suppression system is currently developed at NASA Ames Research Center, and includes a LOWFS controlling tip/tilt modes in real time at 500 Hz. The LOWFS allowed us to reduce the tip/tilt disturbances to 10-3 λ/D rms, enhancing the previous contrast by a decade, to 8×10-7 between 1.2 and 2 λ/D. A Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller is currently implemented to improve even more that result by reducing residual vibrations. This testbed shows that a good knowledge of the low-order disturbances is a key asset for high contrast imaging, whether for real-time control or for post processing.

  17. HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING SEARCH FOR PLANETS AND BROWN DWARFS AROUND THE MOST MASSIVE STARS IN THE SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD

    SciTech Connect

    Janson, Markus; Bonavita, Mariangela; Jayawardhana, Ray; Klahr, Hubert; Lafreniere, David; Zinnecker, Hans

    2011-08-01

    There has been a long-standing discussion in the literature as to whether core accretion or disk instability is the dominant mode of planet formation. Over the last decade, several lines of evidence have been presented showing that core accretion is most likely the dominant mechanism for the close-in population of planets probed by radial velocity and transits. However, this does not by itself prove that core accretion is the dominant mode for the total planet population, since disk instability might conceivably produce and retain large numbers of planets in the far-out regions of the disk. If this is a relevant scenario, then the outer massive disks of B-stars should be among the best places for massive planets and brown dwarfs to form and reside. In this study, we present high-contrast imaging of 18 nearby massive stars of which 15 are in the B2-A0 spectral-type range and provide excellent sensitivity to wide companions. By comparing our sensitivities to model predictions of disk instability based on physical criteria for fragmentation and cooling, and using Monte Carlo simulations for orbital distributions, we find that {approx}85% of such companions should have been detected in our images on average. Given this high degree of completeness, stringent statistical limits can be set from the null-detection result, even with the limited sample size. We find that <30% of massive stars form and retain disk instability planets, brown dwarfs, and very low mass stars of <100 M{sub jup} within 300 AU, at 99% confidence. These results, combined with previous findings in the literature, lead to the conclusion that core accretion is likely the dominant mode of planet formation.

  18. Technological progress of a ferrofluid deformable mirror with tunable nominal optical power for high-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmer, Aaron J.; Groff, Tyler D.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Echeverri, Daniel; Cleff, Isabel R.

    2015-09-01

    The success of a space-borne direct-imaging mission pursuing earth-sized exoplanets in the habitable zone hinges on the ability to achieve high contrast over a maximum field of view. Coronagraphic instruments designed to address this challenge suffer from optical aberrations and rely on focal-plane wavefront control to suppress the resulting speckles and widen the search area. Even small-featured quasi-static speckles--which may obscure or be confused with a planet--must be suppressed to the order of 10-10 over the search region, placing extreme demands on the deformable mirrors (DMs) used to implement the closed-loop control, both in wavefront requirements and actuation resolution. The ideal DM for focal-plane wavefront control has high surface quality and is capable of high-precision, low-stroke actuation. Conventional mirror technologies such as MEMS DMs, with heritage in ground-based adaptive optics instruments that correct for dynamic atmosphere-induced aberrations, are nominally at and provide high-stroke, high-resolution control but at a cost of precision and surface quality. We present a new technology currently under development at Princeton, which features a ferrofluid-supported optical surface with local magnetic actuation. The actuation is transferred to the optical surface through a liquid medium which continuously supports it, decoupling the nominal surface profile from the actuator configuration and eliminating quilting. Additionally, the device carries tunable nominal optical power via regulation of the ferrofluid pressure, permitting a degree of high-fidelity low-order wavefront control impossible with current instrumentation. We report on the continuing technological growth of the prototype device, including progress with actuation, metrology, and modeling of the DM response.

  19. The TRENDS High-contrast Imaging Survey. VI. Discovery of a Mass, Age, and Metallicity Benchmark Brown Dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepp, Justin R.; Gonzales, Erica J.; Bechter, Eric B.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Johnson, John Asher; Piskorz, Danielle; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard

    2016-12-01

    The mass and age of substellar objects are degenerate parameters leaving the evolutionary state of brown dwarfs ambiguous without additional information. Theoretical models are normally used to help distinguish between old, massive brown dwarfs and young, low-mass brown dwarfs but these models have yet to be properly calibrated. We have carried out an infrared high-contrast imaging program with the goal of detecting substellar objects as companions to nearby stars to help break degeneracies in inferred physical properties such as mass, age, and composition. Rather than using imaging observations alone, our targets are pre-selected based on the existence of dynamical accelerations informed from years of stellar radial velocity (RV) measurements. In this paper, we present the discovery of a rare benchmark brown dwarf orbiting the nearby (d = 18.69 ± 0.19 pc), solar-type (G9V) star HD 4747 ([Fe/H] = -0.22 ± 0.04) with a projected separation of only ρ = 11.3 ± 0.2 au (θ = 0.″6). Precise Doppler measurements taken over 18 years reveal the companion’s orbit and allow us to place strong constraints on its mass using dynamics (m\\sin i=55.3+/- 1.9{M}{{Jup}}). Relative photometry (ΔK s = 9.05 ± 0.14, {M}{Ks}=13.00+/- 0.14, {K}s-L\\prime =1.34+/- 0.46) indicates that HD 4747 B is most likely a late-type L-dwarf and, if near the L/T transition, an intriguing source for studying cloud physics, variability, and polarization. We estimate a model-dependent mass of m={72}-13+3 {M}{{Jup}} for an age of {3.3}-1.9+2.3 Gyr based on gyrochronology. Combining astrometric measurements with RV data, we calculate the companion dynamical mass (m=60.2+/- 3.3{M}{{Jup}}) and orbit (e = 0.740 ± 0.002) directly. As a new mass, age, and metallicity benchmark, HD 4747 B will serve as a laboratory for precision astrophysics to test theoretical models that describe the emergent radiation of brown dwarfs.

  20. Investigation of high-contrast velocity selective optical pumping resonance at the cycling transition of Cs using fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Saswati; Ray, Biswajit; Ghosh, Pradip Narayan; Cartaleva, Stefka; Slavov, Dimitar

    2015-12-01

    A high contrast (∼48%) Velocity Selective Optical Pumping (VSOP) resonance at the closed transition Fg=4→Fe=5 of Cs-D2 line is obtained in the fluorescence signal under co-propagating pump-probe configuration. We use a 5.2 μm cell operating at reduced temperature (∼55 °C) and the intensity of the pump-laser is kept lower than that of the probe-laser. The observed sharp narrow structure is suitable for side-arms frequency-locking of the cooling- (i.e. probe-) laser in a cold atom experiment, with possibility for "-Γ" to "-4Γ" red-detuning and "+Γ" to "+10Γ" blue-detuning using the standard properties of the commercially available electronics. We have developed a theoretical model corresponding to the thin cell, incorporating the atomic time-of-flight dependent optical pumping decay rate to describe the dimensional anisotropy of the thin cell. The model shows good qualitative agreement with the observation and simulates as well the cases of cells with smaller thickness. It also describes correctly the temperature dependence of the line broadening and shows the potential for further optimization and red-shift detuning above "-4Γ". It may be of interest for further development of miniaturized modules, like the recently developed portable small magneto-optical traps.

  1. Rational design, synthesis and characterization of highly fluorescent optical switches for high-contrast optical lock-in detection (OLID) imaging microscopy in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Petchprayoon, Chutima; Yan, Yuling; Mao, Shu; Marriott, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    A major challenge in cell biology is to elucidate molecular mechanisms that underlie the spatio-temporal control of cellular processes. These studies require microscope imaging techniques and associated optical probes that provide high-contrast and high-resolution images of specific proteins and their complexes. Auto-fluorescence however, can severely compromise image contrast and represents a fundamental limitation for imaging proteins within living cells. We have previously shown that optical switch probes and optical lock-in detection (OLID) image microscopy improve image contrast in high background environments. Here, we present the design, synthesis and characterization of amino- reactive and cell permeable optical switches that integrate the highly fluorescent fluorophore, tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) and spironaphthoxazine (NISO), a highly efficient optical switch. The NISO moiety in TMR-NISO undergoes rapid and reversible, excited-state driven transitions between a colorless spiro (SP)-state and a colored merocyanine (MC)-state in response to irradiation with 365 nm and >530 nm light. In the MC-state, the TMR (donor) emission is almost completely extinguished by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to the MC probe (acceptor), whereas in the colorless SP-state, the quantum yield for TMR fluorescence is maximal. Irradiation of TMR-NISO with a defined sequence of 365 nm and 546 nm manipulates the levels of SP and MC with concomitant modulation of FRET efficiency and the TMR fluorescence signal. High fidelity optical switching of TMR fluorescence is shown for TMR-NISO probes in vitro and for membrane permeable TMR-NISO within living cells. PMID:20674372

  2. Atmospheric characterization of Proxima b by coupling the SPHERE high-contrast imager to the ESPRESSO spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovis, C.; Snellen, I.; Mouillet, D.; Pepe, F.; Wildi, F.; Astudillo-Defru, N.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Bonfils, X.; Cheetham, A.; Conod, U.; Delfosse, X.; Ehrenreich, D.; Figueira, P.; Forveille, T.; Martins, J. H. C.; Quanz, S. P.; Santos, N. C.; Schmid, H.-M.; Ségransan, D.; Udry, S.

    2017-03-01

    Context. The temperate Earth-mass planet Proxima b is the closest exoplanet to Earth and represents what may be our best ever opportunity to search for life outside the Solar System. Aims: We aim at directly detecting Proxima b and characterizing its atmosphere by spatially resolving the planet and obtaining high-resolution reflected-light spectra. Methods: We propose to develop a coupling interface between the SPHERE high-contrast imager and the new ESPRESSO spectrograph, both installed at ESO VLT. The angular separation of 37 mas between Proxima b and its host star requires the use of visible wavelengths to spatially resolve the planet on a 8.2-m telescope. At an estimated planet-to-star contrast of 10-7 in reflected light, Proxima b is extremely challenging to detect with SPHERE alone. However, the combination of a 103-104 contrast enhancement from SPHERE to the high spectral resolution of ESPRESSO can reveal the planetary spectral features and disentangle them from the stellar ones. Results: We find that significant but realistic upgrades to SPHERE and ESPRESSO would enable a 5σ detection of the planet and yield a measurement of its true mass and albedo in 20-40 nights of telescope time, assuming an Earth-like atmospheric composition. Moreover, it will be possible to probe the O2 bands at 627, 686 and 760 nm, the water vapour band at 717 nm, and the methane band at 715 nm. In particular, a 3.6σ detection of O2 could be made in about 60 nights of telescope time. Those would need to be spread over three years considering optimal observability conditions for the planet. Conclusions: The very existence of Proxima b and the SPHERE-ESPRESSO synergy represent a unique opportunity to detect biosignatures on an exoplanet in the near future. It is also a crucial pathfinder experiment for the development of extremely large telescopes and their instruments, in particular the E-ELT and its high-resolution visible and near-IR spectrograph.

  3. High-contrast fluorescence microscopy for a biomolecular analysis based on polarization techniques using an optical interference mirror slide.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Mitsuru; Akimoto, Takuo

    2014-12-01

    Fluorescence microscopy with an improved contrast for fluorescence images is developed using an optical interference mirror (OIM) slide, which can enhance the fluorescence from a fluorophore as a result of the double interference of the excitation light and emission light. To improve the contrast of a fluorescence image using an OIM slide, a linearly-polarized excitation light was employed, and the fluorescence emission polarized perpendicular to the polarization of the excitation light was detected. The image contrast with this optical system was improved 110-fold for rhodamine B spotted on the OIM, in comparison with a glass slide using a general fluorescence microscopy optical system. Moreover, a 24-fold improvement of the image contrast was achieved for the detection of Cy3-labeled streptavidin bound to immobilize biotin.

  4. SEARCHING FOR YOUNG JUPITER ANALOGS AROUND AP COL: L-BAND HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING OF THE CLOSEST PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Quanz, Sascha P.; Avenhaus, Henning; Meyer, Michael R.; Crepp, Justin R.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Janson, Markus

    2012-08-01

    The nearby M-dwarf AP Col was recently identified by Riedel et al. as a pre-main-sequence star (age 12-50 Myr) situated only 8.4 pc from the Sun. The combination of its youth, distance, and intrinsically low luminosity make it an ideal target to search for extrasolar planets using direct imaging. We report deep adaptive optics observations of AP Col taken with VLT/NACO and Keck/NIRC2 in the L band. Using aggressive speckle suppression and background subtraction techniques, we are able to rule out companions with mass m {>=} 0.5-1 M{sub Jup} for projected separations a > 4.5 AU, and m {>=} 2 M{sub Jup} for projected separations as small as 3 AU, assuming an age of 40 Myr using the COND theoretical evolutionary models. Using a different set of models, the mass limits increase by a factor of {approx}>2. The observations presented here are the deepest mass-sensitivity limits yet achieved within 20 AU on a star with direct imaging. While Doppler radial velocity surveys have shown that Jovian bodies with close-in orbits are rare around M-dwarfs, gravitational microlensing studies predict that 17{sup +6}{sub -9}% of these stars host massive planets with orbital separations of 1-10 AU. Sensitive high-contrast imaging observations, like those presented here, will help to validate results from complementary detection techniques by determining the frequency of gas giant planets on wide orbits around M-dwarfs.

  5. Dual Inversion Recovery Ultrashort Echo Time (DIR UTE) Imaging: Creating High Contrast for Short-T2 Species

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jiang; Takahashi, Atsushi M.; Bae, Won C.; Chung, Christine B.; Bydder, Graeme M.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of short-T2 species requires not only a short echo time (TE) but also efficient suppression of long-T2 species in order to maximize the short-T2 contrast and dynamic range. This paper introduces a method of long-T2 suppression using two long adiabatic inversion pulses. The first adiabatic inversion pulse inverts the magnetization of long-T2 water and the second one inverts that of fat. Short-T2 species experience a significant transverse relaxation during the long adiabatic inversion process, and are minimally affected by the inversion pulses. Data acquisition with a short TE of 8 μs starts following a time delay of TI1 for the inverted water magnetization to reach a null point, and a time delay of TI2 for the inverted fat magnetization to reach a null point. The suppression of long-T2 species depends on proper combination of TI1, TI2 and TR. It is insensitive to RF inhomogeneities because of the adiabatic inversion pulses. The feasibility of this dual inversion recovery ultrashort TE (DIR UTE) technique was demonstrated on phantoms, cadaveric specimens and healthy volunteers using a clinical 3T scanner. High image contrast was achieved for the deep radial and calcified layers of articular cartilage, cortical bone and the Achilles tendon. PMID:20099332

  6. Three-photon luminescence of gold nanorods and its applications for high contrast tissue and deep in vivo brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaowei; Xi, Wang; Cai, Fuhong; Zhao, Xinyuan; Xu, Zhengping; Qian, Jun; He, Sailing

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles can be used as contrast agents for bio-imaging applications. Here we studied multi-photon luminescence (MPL) of gold nanorods (GNRs), under the excitation of femtosecond (fs) lasers. GNRs functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules have high chemical and optical stability, and can be used as multi-photon luminescent nanoprobes for deep in vivo imaging of live animals. We have found that the depth of in vivo imaging is dependent upon the transmission and focal capability of the excitation light interacting with the GNRs. Our study focused on the comparison of MPL from GNRs with two different aspect ratios, as well as their ex vivo and in vivo imaging effects under 760 nm and 1000 nm excitation, respectively. Both of these wavelengths were located at an optically transparent window of biological tissue (700-1000 nm). PEGylated GNRs, which were intravenously injected into mice via the tail vein and accumulated in major organs and tumor tissue, showed high image contrast due to distinct three-photon luminescence (3PL) signals upon irradiation of a 1000 nm fs laser. Concerning in vivo mouse brain imaging, the 3PL imaging depth of GNRs under 1000 nm fs excitation could reach 600 μm, which was approximately 170 μm deeper than the two-photon luminescence (2PL) imaging depth of GNRs with a fs excitation of 760 nm.

  7. Simultaneous ultra-high contrast imaging and determination of time-dependent, non-common path aberrations in the presence of detector noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazin, Richard A.

    2014-07-01

    Ground-based ultra-high contrast imaging, as required for direct imaging of exoplanets and other solar systems, is limited by difficulty of separating the planetary emission from the effects of optical aberrations that are not compensated by the adaptive optics (AO) system, so-called non-common path aberrations" (NCPAs). Simultaneous (~ millisecond) exposures by the science camera and the AO system enable the use of "phase diversity" to estimate both the NCPAs and the scene via a processing procedure first described by the author (R. Frazin 2013, ApJ, 767, article id. 21).This method is fully compatible with more standard concepts used in long-exposure high-contrast imaging, such as angular differential imaging and spectral deconvolution. Long-exposure methods find time-dependent NCPAs, such as those caused by vibrations, particularly challenging. Here, an NCPA of the form of α cos(k•r-ωt + ∂) is considered. It is shown that, when sampled at millisecond time-scales, the image plane data are sensitive to arg(α), ∂ and ω, and, therefore such NCPAs can be simultaneously estimated with the scene. Simulations of observations with ms exposure times are reported. These simulations include substantial detector noise and a sinusoidal NCPA that places a speckle exactly at the location of a planet. Simulations show that the effects of detector noise can be mitigated by mixing exposures of various lengths, allowing estimation of the planet's brightness.

  8. Fast high-contrast imaging of animal development with scanned light sheet-based structured illumination microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Philipp J.; Schmidt, Annette D.; Santella, Anthony; Khairy, Khaled; Bao, Zhirong; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Stelzer, Ernst H.K.

    2015-01-01

    Recording light microscopic images of large, non-transparent specimens, such as developing multi-cellular organisms, is complicated by decreased contrast due to light scattering. Early zebrafish development can be captured by standard light sheet microscopy; however, new imaging strategies are required to obtain high-quality data of late development or of less transparent organisms. We combined Digital Scanned Laser Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (DSLM) with incoherent structured illumination microscopy and created structured illumination patterns with continuously adjustable frequencies (DSLM-SI). Our method discriminates the specimen-related scattered background from signal fluorescence, thereby removing out-of-focus light and optimizing the contrast of in-focus structures. DSLM-SI provides rapid control of the illumination pattern, exceptional imaging quality and high imaging speeds. We performed long-term imaging of zebrafish development for 58 hours and fast multiple-view imaging of early Drosophila development. We reconstructed cell positions over time from the Drosophila DSLM-SI data and created a Fly Digital Embryo. PMID:20601950

  9. High-contrast imaging of the close environment of HD 142527. VLT/NaCo adaptive optics thermal and angular differential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rameau, J.; Chauvin, G.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Thébault, P.; Milli, J.; Girard, J. H.; Bonnefoy, M.

    2012-10-01

    Context. It has long been suggested that circumstellar disks surrounding young stars may be the signposts of planets, and even more so since the recent discoveries of embedded substellar companions. According to models, the planet-disk interaction may create large structures, gaps, rings, or spirals in the disk. In that sense, the Herbig star HD 142527 is particularly compelling, as its massive disk displays intriguing asymmetries that suggest the existence of a dynamical peturber of unknown nature. Aims: Our goal was to obtain deep thermal images of the close circumstellar environment of HD 142527 to re-image the reported close-in structures (cavity, spiral arms) of the disk and to search for stellar and substellar companions that could be connected to their presence. Methods: We obtained high-contrast images with the NaCo adaptive optics system at the Very Large Telescope in L'-band. We applied different analysis strategies using both classical PSF-subtraction and angular differential imaging to probe for any extended structures or point-like sources. Results: The circumstellar environment of HD 142527 is revealed at an unprecedented spatial resolution down to the subarcsecond level for the first time at 3.8 μm. Our images reveal important radial and azimuthal asymmetries that invalidate an elliptical shape for the disk. It instead suggests a bright inhomogeneous spiral arm plus various fainter spiral arms. We also confirm an inner cavity down to 30 AU and two important dips at position angles of 0 and 135 deg. The detection performance in angular differential imaging enables exploration of the planetary mass regime for projected physical separations as close as 40 AU. Use of our detection map together with Monte Carlo simulations sets stringent constraints on the presence of planetary mass, brown dwarf or stellar companions as a function of the semi-major axis. They severely limit any presence of massive giant planets with semi-major axis beyond 50 AU, i

  10. High Contrast CRT.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    form brown sulfides or sulfates. By con- trast, No. 1720 glass does not acquire a brown coloration . How- ever, preliminary tests with 1723 glass show...TR-77-2639-F NL -mmo mhhmhul IIII,. BwII ---- i 11111--- IIIIIN III i 8’ II.I25 .11111 I .6 MCROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU Of...High Contrast Displays Two- Color CRT Laminar Flow Electron Gun Thin Film Phosphor Color Penetration Tube 2% AS~iTACT (ConIlm. a" Pove.. 0fdo if

  11. High contrast tumor imaging with radio-labeled antibody Fab fragments tailored for optimized pharmacokinetics via PASylation

    PubMed Central

    Mendler, Claudia T; Friedrich, Lars; Laitinen, Iina; Schlapschy, Martin; Schwaiger, Markus; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Skerra, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Although antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) of antibodies constitute established tracers for in vivo radiodiagnostics, their functionality is hampered by a very short circulation half-life. PASylation, the genetic fusion with a long, conformationally disordered amino acid chain comprising Pro, Ala and Ser, provides a convenient way to expand protein size and, consequently, retard renal filtration. Humanized αHER2 and αCD20 Fabs were systematically fused with 100 to 600 PAS residues and produced in E. coli. Cytofluorimetric titration analysis on tumor cell lines confirmed that antigen-binding activities of the parental antibodies were retained. The radio-iodinated PASylated Fabs were studied by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and biodistribution analysis in mouse tumor xenograft models. While the unmodified αHER2 and αCD20 Fabs showed weak tumor uptake (0.8% and 0.2% ID/g, respectively; 24 h p.i.) tumor-associated radioactivity was boosted with increasing PAS length (up to 9 and 26-fold, respectively), approaching an optimum for Fab-PAS400. Remarkably, 6- and 5-fold higher tumor-to-blood ratios compared with the unmodified Fabs were measured in the biodistribution analysis (48 h p.i.) for αHER2 Fab-PAS100 and Fab-PAS200, respectively. These findings were confirmed by PET studies, showing high imaging contrast in line with tumor-to-blood ratios of 12.2 and 5.7 (24 h p.i.) for αHER2 Fab-PAS100 and Fab-PAS200. Even stronger tumor signals were obtained with the corresponding αCD20 Fabs, both in PET imaging and biodistribution analysis, with an uptake of 2.8% ID/g for Fab-PAS100 vs. 0.24% ID/g for the unmodified Fab. Hence, by engineering Fabs via PASylation, plasma half-life can be tailored to significantly improve tracer uptake and tumor contrast, thus optimally matching reagent/target interactions. PMID:25484039

  12. High contrast tumor imaging with radio-labeled antibody Fab fragments tailored for optimized pharmacokinetics via PASylation.

    PubMed

    Mendler, Claudia T; Friedrich, Lars; Laitinen, Iina; Schlapschy, Martin; Schwaiger, Markus; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Skerra, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Although antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) of antibodies constitute established tracers for in vivo radiodiagnostics, their functionality is hampered by a very short circulation half-life. PASylation, the genetic fusion with a long, conformationally disordered amino acid chain comprising Pro, Ala and Ser, provides a convenient way to expand protein size and, consequently, retard renal filtration. Humanized αHER2 and αCD20 Fabs were systematically fused with 100 to 600 PAS residues and produced in E. coli. Cytofluorimetric titration analysis on tumor cell lines confirmed that antigen-binding activities of the parental antibodies were retained. The radio-iodinated PASylated Fabs were studied by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and biodistribution analysis in mouse tumor xenograft models. While the unmodified αHER2 and αCD20 Fabs showed weak tumor uptake (0.8% and 0.2% ID/g, respectively; 24 h p.i.) tumor-associated radioactivity was boosted with increasing PAS length (up to 9 and 26-fold, respectively), approaching an optimum for Fab-PAS400. Remarkably, 6- and 5-fold higher tumor-to-blood ratios compared with the unmodified Fabs were measured in the biodistribution analysis (48 h p.i.) for αHER2 Fab-PAS100 and Fab-PAS200, respectively. These findings were confirmed by PET studies, showing high imaging contrast in line with tumor-to-blood ratios of 12.2 and 5.7 (24 h p.i.) for αHER2 Fab-PAS100 and Fab-PAS200. Even stronger tumor signals were obtained with the corresponding αCD20 Fabs, both in PET imaging and biodistribution analysis, with an uptake of 2.8% ID/g for Fab-PAS100 vs. 0.24% ID/g for the unmodified Fab. Hence, by engineering Fabs via PASylation, plasma half-life can be tailored to significantly improve tracer uptake and tumor contrast, thus optimally matching reagent/target interactions.

  13. Designing and testing the coronagraphic Modal Wavefront Sensor: a fast non-common path error sensor for high-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilby, M. J.; Keller, C. U.; Haffert, S.; Korkiakoski, V.; Snik, F.; Pietrow, A. G. M.

    2016-07-01

    Non-Common Path Errors (NCPEs) are the dominant factor limiting the performance of current astronomical high-contrast imaging instruments. If uncorrected, the resulting quasi-static speckle noise floor limits coronagraph performance to a raw contrast of typically 10-4, a value which does not improve with increasing integration time. The coronagraphic Modal Wavefront Sensor (cMWS) is a hybrid phase optic which uses holographic PSF copies to supply focal-plane wavefront sensing information directly from the science camera, whilst maintaining a bias-free coronagraphic PSF. This concept has already been successfully implemented on-sky at the William Herschel Telescope (WHT), La Palma, demonstrating both real-time wavefront sensing capability and successful extraction of slowly varying wavefront errors under a dominant and rapidly changing atmospheric speckle foreground. In this work we present an overview of the development of the cMWS and recent first light results obtained using the Leiden EXoplanet Instrument (LEXI), a high-contrast imager and high-dispersion spectrograph pathfinder instrument for the WHT.

  14. EDITORIAL: Imaging Systems and Techniques Imaging Systems and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giakos, George; Yang, Wuqiang; Petrou, M.; Nikita, K. S.; Pastorino, M.; Amanatiadis, A.; Zentai, G.

    2011-10-01

    wide spectrum of technological areas, such as medical imaging, pharmaceutical industry, analytical instrumentation, aerospace, remote sensing, lidars and ladars, surveillance, national defense, corrosion imaging and monitoring, sub-terrestrial and marine imaging. The complexity of the involved imaging scenarios, and demanding design parameters such as speed, signal-to-noise ratio, high specificity, high contrast and spatial resolution, high-scatter rejection, complex background and harsh environment, necessitate the development of a multifunctional, scalable and efficient imaging suite of sensors, solutions driven by innovation, operating on diverse detection and imaging principles. Finally, pattern recognition and image processing algorithms can significantly contribute to enhanced detection and imaging, including object classification, clustering, feature selection, texture analysis, segmentation, image compression and color representation under complex imaging scenarios, with applications in medical imaging, remote sensing, aerospace, radars, defense and homeland security. We feel confident that the exciting new contributions of this special feature on Imaging Systems and Techniques will appeal to the technical community. We would like to thank all authors as well as all anonymous reviewers and the MST Editorial Board, Publisher and staff for their tremendous efforts and invaluable support to enhance the quality of this significant endeavor.

  15. Imaging technologies and techniques.

    PubMed

    Rafter, Patrick; Phillips, Patrick; Vannan, Mani A

    2004-05-01

    Equipment manufacturers provide contrast-specific detection techniques that have excellent sensitivity and excellent agent-to-tissue specificity along with helpful tools that improve workflow efficiency dramatically. Excellent contrast agents have been approved for LV opacification and are available worldwide. Techniques designed for low-MI imaging offer real-time acquisition capabilities and lead to faster examinations. Techniques designed for medium-MI imaging offer better sensitivity than low-MI techniques while maintaining the benefit of rapid image acquisition. Techniques designed for high-MI imaging offer the best sensitivity with longer acquisition times. These techniques are viable means for imaging contrast agents tailored to clinical needs. Progress by contrast agent manufacturers, equipment manufacturers, and physicians will continue to drive improvements in the areas of detection and clinical workflow for improved patient care.

  16. A new scheme for real-time high-contrast imaging in lung cancer radiotherapy: a proof-of-concept study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hao; Tian, Zhen; Shao, Yiping; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun

    2016-03-01

    Visualization of anatomy in real time is of critical importance for motion management in lung cancer radiotherapy. To achieve real-time, and high-contrast in-treatment imaging, we propose a novel scheme based on the measurement of Compton scatter photons. In our method, a slit x-ray beam along the superior-inferior direction is directed to the patient, (intersecting the lung region at a 2D plane) containing most of the tumor motion trajectory. X-ray photons are scattered off this plane primarily due to the Compton interaction. An imager with a pinhole or a slat collimator is placed at one side of the plane to capture the scattered photons. The resulting image, after correcting for incoming fluence inhomogeneity, x-ray attenuation, scatter angle variation, and outgoing beam geometry, represents the linear attenuation coefficient of Compton scattering. This allows the visualization of the anatomy on this plane. We performed Monte Carlo simulation studies both on a phantom and a patient for proof-of-principle purposes. In the phantom case, a small tumor-like structure could be clearly visualized. The contrast-resolution calculated using tumor/lung as foreground/background for kV fluoroscopy, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), and scattering image were 0.037, 0.70, and 0.54, respectively. In the patient case, tumor motion could be clearly observed in the scatter images. Imaging dose to the voxels directly exposed by the slit beam was ~0.4 times of that under a single CBCT projection. These studies demonstrated the potential feasibility of the proposed imaging scheme to capture the instantaneous anatomy of a patient on a 2D plane with a high image contrast. Clear visualization of the tumor motion may facilitate marker-less tumor tracking.

  17. Experimental study of a low-order wavefront sensor for a high-contrast coronagraphic imager at 1.2 lambda/D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozi, Julien; Belikov, Ruslan; Schneider, Glenn; Guyon, Olivier; Pluzhnik, Eugene; Thomas, Sandrine; Martinache, Frantz

    2013-12-01

    High-contrast imaging will be a challenge for future ELTs, because their vibrations create low-order aberrations - mostly tip/tilt - that reduce coronagraphic performances at 1.2 lambda/D and above. A Low-Order WaveFront Sensor (LOWFS) is essential to measure and control those aberrations. An experiment simulating a starlight suppression system is currently developed at NASA Ames Research Center, and includes a LOWFS controlling tip/tilt modes in real time at 500 Hz. The LOWFS allowed us to reduce the tip/tilt disturbances to 1e-3 lambda/D rms, enhancing the previous contrast by a decade, to 8e-7 between 1.2 and 2 lambda/D. A Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller is currently implemented to improve even more that result by reducing residual vibrations. This testbed is developed for the mission EXCEDE (EXoplanetary Circumstellar Environments and Disk Explorer), selected by NASA for technology development, and designed to study the formation, evolution and architectures of exoplanetary systems and characterize circumstellar environments into stellar habitable zones. It is composed of a 0.7 m telescope equipped with a Phase-Induced Amplitude Apodization Coronagraph (PIAA-C) and a 2000-element MEMS deformable mirror, capable of raw contrasts of 1e-6 at 1.2 lambda/D and 1e-7 above 2 lambda/D. Although the testbed simulates space conditions, its LOWFS has the same design than on the SCExAO instrument at Subaru telescope, with whom it shares the same kind of problematic. Experimental results show that a good knowledge of the low-order disturbances is a key asset for high contrast imaging, whether for real-time control or for post processing, both in space and on ground telescopes.

  18. Detection of breast cancer by soft-copy reading of digital mammograms: comparison between a routine image-processing parameter and high-contrast parameters.

    PubMed

    Kamitani, Takeshi; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Soeda, Hiroyasu; Matsuo, Yoshio; Okafuji, Takashi; Sakai, Shuji; Setoguchi, Taro; Hatakenaka, Masamitsu; Ishii, Nobuhide; Honda, Hiroshi

    2010-02-01

    Recent studies have reported the clinical usefulness of the soft-copy reading of mammograms. However, image-processing parameters for soft-copy reading of digital mammograms have not been established. To compare observer performance in detecting breast cancer by soft-copy reading of digital mammograms using a routine image-processing parameter versus each of several high-contrast parameters. The mammograms of 154 breasts, including 48 abnormal breasts with breast cancer and 106 normal breasts, were examined. Cancers were classified into 34 mass-dominant cancers, 11 microcalcification-dominant cancers, two cancers showing only architectural distortion, and one cancer without abnormal findings. All mammograms were performed using a computed radiography (CR) system. Each image was processed using GA (1.2), which was the contrast parameter recommended by the manufacturer for hard-copy film, GA (1.4), GA (1.6), and GA (1.8). These images were displayed on 5-megapixel (M) liquid-crystal display monitors. Five experienced radiologists classified them into BI-RADS category 1-2 or 3-5, and were also asked to rate the images on a scale of 0 to 100 for the likelihood of the presence of masses and microcalcifications in each breast. In mass-dominant cancers of dense breast tissue, the mean sensitivities of GA (1.2), GA (1.4), GA (1.6), and GA (1.8) were 32.7, 38.2, 36.4, and 40.0, and the A(Z) values were 0.67, 0.73, 0.71, and 0.73, respectively; in microcalcification-dominant cancers, the mean sensitivities were 80.0, 74.5, 80.0, and 78.2, respectively; however, there were no significant differences among them. High-contrast parameters tended to show relatively high sensitivity and A(Z) values in the detection of masses in dense breast tissue, but relatively low sensitivity for microcalcifications.

  19. Multimodality imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Sopena, Ramón; Bartumeus, Paula; Sopena, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    In multimodality imaging, the need to combine morphofunctional information can be approached by either acquiring images at different times (asynchronous), and fused them through digital image manipulation techniques or simultaneously acquiring images (synchronous) and merging them automatically. The asynchronous post-processing solution presents various constraints, mainly conditioned by the different positioning of the patient in the two scans acquired at different times in separated machines. The best solution to achieve consistency in time and space is obtained by the synchronous image acquisition. There are many multimodal technologies in molecular imaging. In this review we will focus on those multimodality image techniques more commonly used in the field of diagnostic imaging (SPECT-CT, PET-CT) and new developments (as PET-MR). The technological innovations and development of new tracers and smart probes are the main key points that will condition multimodality image and diagnostic imaging professionals' future. Although SPECT-CT and PET-CT are standard in most clinical scenarios, MR imaging has some advantages, providing excellent soft-tissue contrast and multidimensional functional, structural and morphological information. The next frontier is to develop efficient detectors and electronics systems capable of detecting two modality signals at the same time. Not only PET-MR but also MR-US or optic-PET will be introduced in clinical scenarios. Even more, MR diffusion-weighted, pharmacokinetic imaging, spectroscopy or functional BOLD imaging will merge with PET tracers to further increase molecular imaging as a relevant medical discipline. Multimodality imaging techniques will play a leading role in relevant clinical applications. The development of new diagnostic imaging research areas, mainly in the field of oncology, cardiology and neuropsychiatry, will impact the way medicine is performed today. Both clinical and experimental multimodality studies, in

  20. Functional Supramolecular Polymers: A Fluorescent Microfibrous Network in a Supramolecular Hydrogel for High-Contrast Live Cell-Material Imaging in 3D Environments.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shu-Min; Wu, Fang-Yi; Cheng, Hsun; Huang, Yu-Tang; Hsieh, Yi-Ru; Tseng, Dion Tzu-Huan; Yeh, Mei-Yu; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Lin, Hsin-Chieh

    2016-09-01

    A new bottom-up strategy based on aromatic peptide amphiphile is developed for a high-contrast visualization of 3D live cell-material imaging-something that has been difficult to achieve previously because of the problems associated with the diffraction of light by the nanosized peptide materials and the aggregation-caused quenching of aggregated π-conjugated fluorophores in the nanostructures. This study reports an example of a novel supramolecular hydrogelator, naphthaleneimide-phenylalanine (NI-Phe), which forms a self-supporting hydrogel displaying a unique microfibrous network and promising aggregation-induced emission characteristics at pH 7.4. The storage modulus of the NI-Phe gel supports the mass of a cell for 3D cell culturing. This work illustrates a new dopant-free supramolecular approach, complementary to well-established doping procedures that should facilitate the development of live cell imaging in 3D scaffolding materials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Image compression technique

    DOEpatents

    Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

    1997-03-25

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace`s equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image. 16 figs.

  2. Image compression technique

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Chi-Yung; Petrich, Loren I.

    1997-01-01

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace's equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image.

  3. HIGH-CADENCE, HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING FOR EXOPLANET MAPPING: OBSERVATIONS OF THE HR 8799 PLANETS WITH VLT/SPHERE SATELLITE-SPOT-CORRECTED RELATIVE PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Apai, Dániel; Skemer, Andrew; Hanson, Jake R.; Kasper, Markus; Lagrange, Anne-Marie; Bonnefoy, Mickaël; Biller, Beth A.; Buenzli, Esther; Vigan, Arthur

    2016-03-20

    Time-resolved photometry is an important new probe of the physics of condensate clouds in extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs. Extreme adaptive optics systems can directly image planets, but precise brightness measurements are challenging. We present VLT/SPHERE high-contrast, time-resolved broad H-band near-infrared photometry for four exoplanets in the HR 8799 system, sampling changes from night to night over five nights with relatively short integrations. The photospheres of these four planets are often modeled by patchy clouds and may show large-amplitude rotational brightness modulations. Our observations provide high-quality images of the system. We present a detailed performance analysis of different data analysis approaches to accurately measure the relative brightnesses of the four exoplanets. We explore the information in satellite spots and demonstrate their use as a proxy for image quality. While the brightness variations of the satellite spots are strongly correlated, we also identify a second-order anti-correlation pattern between the different spots. Our study finds that KLIP reduction based on principal components analysis with satellite-spot-modulated artificial-planet-injection-based photometry leads to a significant (∼3×) gain in photometric accuracy over standard aperture-based photometry and reaches 0.1 mag per point accuracy for our data set, the signal-to-noise ratio of which is limited by small field rotation. Relative planet-to-planet photometry can be compared between nights, enabling observations spanning multiple nights to probe variability. Recent high-quality relative H-band photometry of the b–c planet pair agrees to about 1%.

  4. Renal imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Hierholzer, K; Hierholzer, J

    1997-01-01

    The ancient approach to obtain an image of the kidneys (and other internal organs) was 'section-inspection-imaging' by drawing, painting, sculpturing, and modelling. The present study follows chronologically the development and use of sectioning techniques from ancient (often forbidden) methods to modern microdissection and maceration of silicone-rubber-injected tubules. Inspection evolved from the use of the naked eye to magnifying lenses, microscopes and finally electron microscopy. Pertinent examples such as the description of the kidneys as the site of urine formation, the visualization of loop structures in the renal medulla and the imaging of tight junction strands are discussed. Inspection or visualization of renal structure and function has been revolutionized by modern noninvasive techniques, such as X-ray imaging, imaging by radioisotopes, ultrasound, computer tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance. Pertinent examples are given demonstrating the potency of the various techniques. The contribution of computerized data evaluation is discussed. The development of micropuncture and microperfusion techniques has opened the field for direct imaging not only of renal (sub)structural details but also of functional parameters such as transtubular reabsorption rates, single glomerular capillary filtration and conductance of the paracellular pathway. We focus particularly on techniques specifically designed to visualize renal hemodynamic and transport parameters.

  5. The moving group targets of the seeds high-contrast imaging survey of exoplanets and disks: Results and observations from the first three years

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Timothy D.; Turner, Edwin L.; Janson, M.; Knapp, G. R.; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; McElwain, Michael W.; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Carson, J.; Biller, B.; Bonnefoy, M.; Brandner, W.; Wisniewski, John P.; Hashimoto, J.; Matsuo, T.; Dressing, C.; Moro-Martín, A.; Kudo, T.; Kusakabe, N.; Abe, L.; and others

    2014-05-01

    We present results from the first three years of observations of moving group (MG) targets in the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru (SEEDS) high-contrast imaging survey of exoplanets and disks using the Subaru telescope. We achieve typical contrasts of ∼10{sup 5} at 1'' and ∼10{sup 6} beyond 2'' around 63 proposed members of nearby kinematic MGs. We review each of the kinematic associations to which our targets belong, concluding that five, β Pictoris (∼20 Myr), AB Doradus (∼100 Myr), Columba (∼30 Myr), Tucana-Horogium (∼30 Myr), and TW Hydrae (∼10 Myr), are sufficiently well-defined to constrain the ages of individual targets. Somewhat less than half of our targets are high-probability members of one of these MGs. For all of our targets, we combine proposed MG membership with other age indicators where available, including Ca II HK emission, X-ray activity, and rotation period, to produce a posterior probability distribution of age. SEEDS observations discovered a substellar companion to one of our targets, κ And, a late B star. We do not detect any other substellar companions, but do find seven new close binary systems, of which one still needs to be confirmed. A detailed analysis of the statistics of this sample, and of the companion mass constraints given our age probability distributions and exoplanet cooling models, will be presented in a forthcoming paper.

  6. The Moving Group Targets of the Seeds High-Contrast Imaging Survey of Exoplanets and Disks: Results and Observations from the First Three Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Timothy D.; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; McElwain, Michael W.; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Wisniewski, John P.; Turner, Edwin L.; Carson, J.; Matsuo, T.; Biller, B.; Bonnefoy, M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present results from the first three years of observations of moving group (MG) targets in the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru (SEEDS) high-contrast imaging survey of exoplanets and disks using the Subaru telescope. We achieve typical contrasts of (is) approximately10(exp 5) at 1" and (is) approximately 10(exp 6) beyond 2" around 63 proposed members of nearby kinematic MGs. We review each of the kinematic associations to which our targets belong, concluding that five, beta Pictoris ((is) approximately 20 Myr), AB Doradus ((is) approximately 100 Myr), Columba ((is) approximately 30 Myr), Tucana-Horogium ((is) approximately 30 Myr), and TW Hydrae ((is) approximately 10 Myr), are sufficiently well-defined to constrain the ages of individual targets. Somewhat less than half of our targets are high-probability members of one of these MGs. For all of our targets, we combine proposed MG membership with other age indicators where available, including Ca ii HK emission, X-ray activity, and rotation period, to produce a posterior probability distribution of age. SEEDS observations discovered a substellar companion to one of our targets, kappa And, a late B star. We do not detect any other substellar companions, but do find seven new close binary systems, of which one still needs to be confirmed. A detailed analysis of the statistics of this sample, and of the companion mass constraints given our age probability distributions and exoplanet cooling models, will be presented in a forthcoming paper.

  7. The Moving Group Targets of the SEEDS High-contrast Imaging Survey of Exoplanets and Disks: Results and Observations from the First Three Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Timothy D.; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; McElwain, Michael W.; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Wisniewski, John P.; Turner, Edwin L.; Carson, J.; Matsuo, T.; Biller, B.; Bonnefoy, M.; Dressing, C.; Janson, M.; Knapp, G. R.; Moro-Martín, A.; Thalmann, C.; Kudo, T.; Kusakabe, N.; Hashimoto, J.; Abe, L.; Brandner, W.; Currie, T.; Egner, S.; Feldt, M.; Golota, T.; Goto, M.; Grady, C. A.; Guyon, O.; Hayano, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Hayashi, S.; Henning, T.; Hodapp, K. W.; Ishii, M.; Iye, M.; Kandori, R.; Kwon, J.; Mede, K.; Miyama, S.; Morino, J.-I.; Nishimura, T.; Pyo, T.-S.; Serabyn, E.; Suenaga, T.; Suto, H.; Suzuki, R.; Takami, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Takato, N.; Terada, H.; Tomono, D.; Watanabe, M.; Yamada, T.; Takami, H.; Usuda, T.; Tamura, M.

    2014-05-01

    We present results from the first three years of observations of moving group (MG) targets in the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru (SEEDS) high-contrast imaging survey of exoplanets and disks using the Subaru telescope. We achieve typical contrasts of ~105 at 1'' and ~106 beyond 2'' around 63 proposed members of nearby kinematic MGs. We review each of the kinematic associations to which our targets belong, concluding that five, β Pictoris (~20 Myr), AB Doradus (~100 Myr), Columba (~30 Myr), Tucana-Horogium (~30 Myr), and TW Hydrae (~10 Myr), are sufficiently well-defined to constrain the ages of individual targets. Somewhat less than half of our targets are high-probability members of one of these MGs. For all of our targets, we combine proposed MG membership with other age indicators where available, including Ca II HK emission, X-ray activity, and rotation period, to produce a posterior probability distribution of age. SEEDS observations discovered a substellar companion to one of our targets, κ And, a late B star. We do not detect any other substellar companions, but do find seven new close binary systems, of which one still needs to be confirmed. A detailed analysis of the statistics of this sample, and of the companion mass constraints given our age probability distributions and exoplanet cooling models, will be presented in a forthcoming paper.

  8. Tailoring Directive Gain for High-Contrast, Wide-Viewing-Angle Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using Speckle Image Holograpy Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Ou, Qing-Dong; Shen, Su; Zhou, Yun; Fan, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Jun; Tang, Jian-Xin

    2016-08-31

    Holography metasurfaces have been used to control the propagation of light to an unprecedented level, exhibiting the immense potential for light steering in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Here, a new approach to tailoring directive gain for high contrast, wide-viewing-angle OLEDs is proposed by implementing a spcekle image holography (SIH) metasurface. The experimental and theoretical results provide the direct proofs that the SIH metasurface can play very important roles not only in releasing the trapped energy flow insides the devices but also in tailoring the wavefronts to the preferred patterns due to its "regional orientation" k-vectors patterns. The resulting power efficiency and external quantum efficiency of the OLEDs using a SIH metasurface are 1.97 and 1.95 times that of the reference device with a standard architecture. Furthermore, the wavefronts of emitted light are delicately modulated in a polarization-independent manner, yielding 2.5 times higher contrast ratio compared to the reference device. This unique engineered directive gain property is also well-retained for the viewing angles varing from normal to titled ±60° without spectral distortion. These results enrich the understanding of light wavefronts control in OLEDs and highlight its potential application in display as well as light steering for other optoelectronics.

  9. Three-Photon Luminescence of Gold Nanorods Excited by 1040 nm Femtosecond Laser for High Contrast Tissue and In Vivo Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shaowei; Zhao, Xinyuan; Zhang, Hequn; Cai, Fuhong; Qian, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Gold Nanorods (GNRs) with tunable aspect ratios can strongly absorb and scatter light in the NIR region due to their localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) property, and have been demonstrated to exhibit strong plasmon enhanced multiphoton luminescence (MPL) with brightness many times stronger than the conventional organic chromophores. In this study, we synthesized GNRs with longitudinal LSPR peak at 1036 nm to match our home-built light source 1040 nm femtosecond laser, which locates in the “optical window” where the tissue absorbs relatively little light. PEGylated GNRs with great biocompatibility were intravenously injected through the tail vein into mice. Excited by 1040 nm laser, the GNRs exhibit bright three-photon luminescence (3PL) signals while circulating in the blood vessels. The use of GNRs as bright contrast agents for 3PL imaging of mouse ear blood vessels in vivo was demonstrated. And GNRs targeted in tissues can be excited by 1040 nm laser and could be clearly visualized with no autofluorescence background. These results indicated that 3PL of GNRs is very promising for deep in vivo bioimaging and assessing the distribution of GNRs in tissues with high contrast.

  10. The Potential of High-Contrast Coronagraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serabyn, E.

    2008-01-01

    The direct detection of faint companions near much brighter stars requires the development of very high-contrast, small field-of-view detection techniques, and the past decade has seen remarkable conceptual and instrumental progress in this area. New coronagraphic techniques are being developed and deployed, as are extreme adaptive optics (ExAO) systems that will enable the advantageous exploitation of these new techniques. This paper provides a short overview of promising high contrast coronagraphic techniques, as well as recent examples of ExAO coronagraphy and transit measurements obtained with the ExAO-level "well-corrected subaperture" at Palomar.

  11. HIGH-CONTRAST 3.8 {mu}m IMAGING OF THE BROWN DWARF/PLANET-MASS COMPANION TO GJ 758

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, Thayne; Bailey, Vanessa; Rodigas, Timothy; Hinz, Phil; Fabrycky, Daniel; Murray-Clay, Ruth

    2010-10-01

    We present L'-band (3.8 {mu}m) MMT/Clio high-contrast imaging data for the nearby star GJ 758, which was recently reported by Thalmann et al. to have one -- possibly two -- faint comoving companions (GJ 758B and 'C', respectively). GJ 758B is detected in two distinct data sets. Additionally, we report a possible detection of the object identified by Thalmann et al. as 'GJ 758C' in our more sensitive data set, though it is likely a residual speckle. However, if it is the same object as that reported by Thalmann et al. it cannot be a companion in a bound orbit. GJ 758B has an H - L' color redder than nearly all known L-T8 dwarfs. Based on comparisons with the COND evolutionary models, GJ 758B has T {sub e} {approx} 560 K{sup +150K}{sub -90 K}{sup +150 K) and a mass ranging from {approx}10-20 M{sub J} if it is {approx}1 Gyr old to {approx} 25-40 M{sub J} if it is 8.7 Gyr old. GJ 758B is likely in a highly eccentric orbit, e {approx} 0.73{sup +0.12}{sub -0.21}, with a semimajor axis of {approx}44 AU{sup +32 AU){sub -14 AU}. Though GJ 758B is sometimes discussed within the context of exoplanet direct imaging, its mass is likely greater than the deuterium-burning limit and its formation may resemble that of binary stars rather than that of Jovian-mass planets.

  12. MID-INFRARED HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING OF HD 114174 B: AN APPARENT AGE DISCREPANCY IN A ''SIRIUS-LIKE'' BINARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Christopher T.; Crepp, Justin R.; Skemer, Andrew; Hinz, Philip M.; Bailey, Vanessa P.; Defrere, Denis; Leisenring, Jarron; Gianninas, Alexandros; Kilic, Mukremin; Skrutskie, Michael; Esposito, Simone; Puglisi, Alfio

    2014-03-10

    We present new observations of the faint ''Sirius-like'' companion discovered to orbit HD 114174. Previous attempts to image HD 114174 B at mid-infrared wavelengths using NIRC2 at Keck have resulted in a non-detection. Our new L'-band observations taken with the Large Binocular Telescope and L/M-band InfraRed Camera recover the companion (ΔL = 10.15 ± 0.15 mag, ρ = 0.''675 ± 0.''016) with a high signal-to-noise ratio (10σ). This measurement represents the deepest L' high-contrast imaging detection at subarcsecond separations to date, including extrasolar planets. We confirm that HD 114174 B has near-infrared colors consistent with the interpretation of a cool white dwarf (WD; J – L' = 0.76 ± 0.19 mag, K – L' = 0.64 ± 0.20). New model fits to the object's spectral energy distribution indicate a temperature T {sub eff} = 4260 ± 360 K, surface gravity log g = 7.94 ± 0.03, a cooling age t{sub c} ≈ 7.8 Gyr, and mass M = 0.54 ± 0.01 M {sub ☉}. We find that the cooling ages given by theoretical atmospheric models do not agree with the age of HD 114174 A derived from both isochronological and gyrochronological analyses. We speculate on possible scenarios to explain the apparent age discrepancy between the primary and secondary. HD 114174 B is a nearby benchmark WD that will ultimately enable a dynamical mass estimate through continued Doppler and astrometric monitoring. Efforts to characterize its physical properties in detail will test theoretical atmospheric models and improve our understanding of WD evolution, cooling, and progenitor masses.

  13. Scalp imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otberg, Nina; Shapiro, Jerry; Lui, Harvey; Wu, Wen-Yu; Alzolibani, Abdullateef; Kang, Hoon; Richter, Heike; Lademann, Jürgen

    2017-05-01

    Scalp imaging techniques are necessary tools for the trichological practice and for visualization of permeation, penetration and absorption processes into and through the scalp and for the research on drug delivery and toxicology. The present letter reviews different scalp imaging techniques and discusses their utility. Moreover, two different studies on scalp imaging techniques are presented in this letter: (1) scalp imaging with phototrichograms in combination with laser scanning microscopy, and (2) follicular measurements with cyanoacrylate surface replicas and light microscopy in combination with laser scanning microscopy. The experiments compare different methods for the determination of hair density on the scalp and different follicular measures. An average terminal hair density of 132 hairs cm-2 was found in 6 Caucasian volunteers and 135 hairs cm-2 in 6 Asian volunteers. The area of the follicular orifices accounts to 16.3% of the skin surface on average measured with laser scanning microscopy images. The potential volume of the follicular infundibulum was calculated based on the laser scanning measurements and is found to be 4.63 mm3 per cm2 skin on average. The experiments show that hair follicles are quantitatively relevant pathways and potential reservoirs for topically applied drugs and cosmetics.

  14. [Progress in imaging techniques].

    PubMed

    Mishima, Kazuaki; Otsuka, Tsukasa

    2013-05-01

    Today it is common to perform real-time diagnosis and treatment via live broadcast as a method of education and to spread new technology for diagnosis and therapy in medical fields. Live medical broadcasts have developed along with broadcast technology. In the early days, live video feeds were sent from operating rooms to classrooms and lecture halls in universities and hospitals. However, the development of imaging techniques and communication networks enabled live broadcasts that bi-directionally link operating rooms and meeting halls during scientific meetings and live demonstration courses. Live broadcasts therefore became an important method for education and the dissemination of new medical technologies. The development of imaging techniques has contributed to more realistic live broadcasts through such innovative techniques as three-dimensional viewing and higher-definition 4K technology. In the future, live broadcasts will be transmitted on personal computers using regular Internet connections. In addition to the enhancement of image delivery technology, it will also be necessary to examine the entire image delivery environment carefully, including issues of security and privacy of personal information.

  15. Brain Vascular Imaging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Laviña, Bàrbara

    2016-01-01

    Recent major improvements in a number of imaging techniques now allow for the study of the brain in ways that could not be considered previously. Researchers today have well-developed tools to specifically examine the dynamic nature of the blood vessels in the brain during development and adulthood; as well as to observe the vascular responses in disease situations in vivo. This review offers a concise summary and brief historical reference of different imaging techniques and how these tools can be applied to study the brain vasculature and the blood-brain barrier integrity in both healthy and disease states. Moreover, it offers an overview on available transgenic animal models to study vascular biology and a description of useful online brain atlases. PMID:28042833

  16. The SEEDS High-Contrast Imaging Survey: Exoplanet and Brown Dwarf Survey for Nearby Young Stars Dated with Gyrochronology and Activity Age Indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Tamura, Motohide; Helminiak, Kris; Mede, Kyle; Brandt, Timothy; Janson, Markus; Kandori, Ryo; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hashimoto, Jun

    2015-12-01

    The SEEDS campaign has successfully discovered and characterized exoplanets, brown dwarfs, and circumstellar disks since it began in 2009, via the direct imaging technique. The survey has targeted nearby young stars, as well as stars associated to star-forming regions, the Pleiades open cluster, moving groups, and debris disks. We selected the nearby young stars that have been dated with age indicators based on stellar rotation periods (i.e., gyrochronology) and chromoshperic/coronal activities. Of these, nearly 40 were observed, with ages mainly between 100 and 1000 Myr and distances less than 40 pc. Our observations typically attain the contrast of ~6 x 10-6 at 1'' and better than ~1 x 10-6 beyond 2'', enabling us to detect a planetary-mass companion even around such old stars. Indeed, the SEEDS team reported the discovery that the nearby Sun-like star GJ 504 hosts a Jovian companion GJ 504b, which has a mass of 3-8.5 Jupiter masses that is inferred according to the hot-start cooling models and our estimated system age of 100-510 Myr. The remaining observations out of the selected ~40 stars have resulted in no detection of additional planets or brown dwarf companions. Meanwhile, we have newly imaged a low-mass stellar companion orbiting the G-type star HIP 10321, for which the presence of companion was previously announced via radial velocity technique. The astrometry and radial velocity measurements are simultaneously analyzed to determine the orbit, providing constraints on the dynamical mass of both objects and stellar evolution models. Here we summarize our direct imaging observations for the nearby young stars dated with gyrochrolorogy and activity age indicators. Furthermore, we report the analysis for the HIP 10321 system with the imaged low-mass companion.

  17. High-contrast three-dimensional imaging of the Arabidopsis leaf enables the analysis of cell dimensions in the epidermis and mesophyll

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite the wide spread application of confocal and multiphoton laser scanning microscopy in plant biology, leaf phenotype assessment still relies on two-dimensional imaging with a limited appreciation of the cells' structural context and an inherent inaccuracy of cell measurements. Here, a successful procedure for the three-dimensional imaging and analysis of plant leaves is presented. Results The procedure was developed based on a range of developmental stages, from leaf initiation to senescence, of soil-grown Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. Rigorous clearing of tissues, made possible by enhanced leaf permeability to clearing agents, allowed the optical sectioning of the entire leaf thickness by both confocal and multiphoton microscopy. The superior image quality, in resolution and contrast, obtained by the latter technique enabled the three-dimensional visualisation of leaf morphology at the individual cell level, cell segmentation and the construction of structural models. Image analysis macros were developed to measure leaf thickness and tissue proportions, as well as to determine for the epidermis and all layers of mesophyll tissue, cell density, volume, length and width. For mesophyll tissue, the proportion of intercellular spaces and the surface areas of cells were also estimated. The performance of the procedure was demonstrated for the expanding 6th leaf of the Arabidopsis rosette. Furthermore, it was proven to be effective for leaves of another dicotyledon, apple (Malus domestica Borkh.), which has a very different cellular organisation. Conclusions The pipeline for the three-dimensional imaging and analysis of plant leaves provides the means to include variables on internal tissues in leaf growth studies and the assessment of leaf phenotypes. It also allows the visualisation and quantification of alterations in leaf structure alongside changes in leaf functioning observed under environmental constraints. Data obtained using this procedure

  18. Non-destructive imaging of fragments of historical beeswax seals using high-contrast X-ray micro-radiography and micro-tomography with large area photon-counting detector array.

    PubMed

    Karch, Jakub; Bartl, Benjamin; Dudak, Jan; Zemlicka, Jan; Krejci, Frantisek

    2016-12-01

    Historical beeswax seals are unique cultural heritage objects. Unfortunately, a number of historical sealing waxes show a porous structure with a strong tendency to stratification and embrittlement, which makes these objects extremely prone to mechanical damage. The understanding of beeswax degradation processes therefore plays an important role in the preservation and consequent treatment of these objects. Conventional methods applied for the investigation of beeswax materials (e.g. gas chromatography) are of a destructive nature or bring only limited information about the sample surface (microscopic techniques). Considering practical limitations of conventional methods and ethical difficulties connected with the sampling of the historical material, radiation imaging methods such as X-ray micro-tomography presents a promising non-destructive tool for the onward scientific research in this field. In this contribution, we present the application of high-contrast X-ray micro-radiography and micro-tomography for the investigation of beeswax seal fragments. The method is based on the application of the large area photon-counting detector recently developed at our institute. The detector combines the advantages of single-photon counting technology with a large field of view. The method, consequently, enables imaging of relatively large objects with high geometrical magnification. In the reconstructed micro-tomographies of investigated historical beeswax seals, we are able to reveal morphological structures such as stratification, micro-cavities and micro-fractures with spatial resolution down to 5μm non-destructively and with high imaging quality. The presented work therefore demonstrates that a combination of state-of-the-art hybrid pixel semiconductor detectors and currently available micro-focus x-ray sources makes it possible to apply X-ray micro-radiography and micro-tomography as a valuable non-destructive tool for volumetric beeswax seal morphological studies

  19. Image processing techniques for acoustic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Brian P.

    1991-06-01

    The primary goal of this research is to test the effectiveness of various image processing techniques applied to acoustic images generated in MATLAB. The simulated acoustic images have the same characteristics as those generated by a computer model of a high resolution imaging sonar. Edge detection and segmentation are the two image processing techniques discussed in this study. The two methods tested are a modified version of the Kalman filtering and median filtering.

  20. Nondestructive Acoustic Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Volker

    Acoustic imaging techniques are used in the field of nondestructive testing of technical components to measure defects such as lack of side wall fusion or cracks in welded joints. Data acquisition is performed by a remote-controlled manipulator and a PC for the mass storage of the high-frequency time-of-flight data at each probe position. The quality of the acoustic images and the interpretation relies on the proper understanding of the transmitted wave fronts and the arrangement of the probes in pulse-echo mode or in pitch-and-catch arrangement. The use of the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique allows the depth-dependent resolution to be replaced by a depth-independent resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio to be improved. Examples with surface-connected cracks are shown to demonstrate the improved features. The localization accuracy could be improved by entering 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional reconstructed data into the environment of a 3-dimensional CAD drawing. The propagation of ultrasonic waves through austenitic welds is disturbed by the anisotropic and inhomogeneous structure of the material. The effect is more or less severe depending upon the longitudinal or shear wave modes. To optimize the performance of an inspection software tool, a 3-dimensional CAD-Ray program has been implemented, where the shape of the inhomogeneous part of a weld can be simulated together with the grain structure based on the elastic constants. Ray-tracing results are depicted for embedded and for surface-connected defects.

  1. Development of a fast Monte Carlo code for dose calculation in treatment planning and feasibility study of high contrast portal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbari, Keivan

    A fast and accurate treatment planning system is essential for radiation therapy and Monte Carlo (MC) techniques produce the most accurate results for dose calculation in treatment planning. In this work, we developed a fast Monte Carlo code based on pre-calculated data (PMC, Pre-calculated Monte Carlo) for applications in radiation therapy treatment planning. The PMC code takes advantage of large available memory in current computer hardware for extensive generation of pre-calculated data. Primary tracks of electrons are generated in the middle of homogeneous materials (water, air, bone, lung) and with energies between 0.2 and 18 MeV using the EGSnrc code. Secondary electrons are not transported but their position, energy, charge and direction are saved and used as a primary particle. Based on medium type and incident electron energy, a track is selected from the pre-calculated set. The performance of the method is tested in various homogeneous and heterogeneous configurations and the results were generally within 2% compared to EGSnrc but with a 40-60 times speed improvement. The limitations of various techniques for the improvement of speed and accuracy of particle transport have been evaluated. We studied the obstacles for further increased speed ups in voxel based geometries by including ray-tracing and particle fluence information in the pre-generated track information. The latter method leads to speed-increases of about a factor of 500 over EGSnrc for voxel-based geometries. In both approaches, no physical calculation is carried out during the runtime phase after the pre-generated data has been stored even in the presence of heterogeneities. The pre-calculated data is generated for each particular material and this improves the performance of the pre-calculated Monte Carlo code both in terms of accuracy and speed. The PMC is also extended for proton transport in radiation therapy. The pre-calculated data is based on tracks of 1000 primary protons using

  2. Radiologic imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Bushong, S.C. ); Eastman, T.R. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors focus on the subject of clinical radiographic technique. Emphasizing correct radiographic technique, it's heavily illustrated with radiographs that demonstrate proper exposure and show what happens when exposure variables are changed. A key feature is a discussion and evaluation of radiographic technique charts. Basic technique charts are provided for every body part examined.

  3. Hybrid ultrasound imaging techniques (fusion imaging).

    PubMed

    Sandulescu, Daniela Larisa; Dumitrescu, Daniela; Rogoveanu, Ion; Saftoiu, Adrian

    2011-01-07

    Visualization of tumor angiogenesis can facilitate non-invasive evaluation of tumor vascular characteristics to supplement the conventional diagnostic imaging goals of depicting tumor location, size, and morphology. Hybrid imaging techniques combine anatomic [ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] and molecular (single photon emission CT and positron emission tomography) imaging modalities. One example is real-time virtual sonography, which combines ultrasound (grayscale, colour Doppler, or dynamic contrast harmonic imaging) with contrast-enhanced CT/MRI. The benefits of fusion imaging include an increased diagnostic confidence, direct comparison of the lesions using different imaging modalities, more precise monitoring of interventional procedures, and reduced radiation exposure.

  4. High-Resolution, High-Contrast Ultrasound Imaging Using a Prototype Dual-Frequency Transducer: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, Ryan; Lukacs, Marc; Lee, Mike; Cherin, Emmanuel; Foster, F. Stuart; Dayton, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    With recent advances in animal models of disease, there has been great interest in capabilities for high-resolution contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging. Microbubble contrast agents are unique in that they scatter broadband ultrasound energy because of their nonlinear behavior. For optimal response, it is desirable to excite the microbubbles near their resonant frequency. To date, this has been challenging with high-frequency imaging systems because most contrast agents are resonant at frequencies in the order of several megahertz. Our team has developed a unique dual-frequency confocal transducer which enables low-frequency excitation of bubbles near their resonance with one element, and detection of their emitted high-frequency content with the second element. Using this imaging approach, we have attained an average 12.3 dB improvement in contrast-to-tissue ratios over fundamental mode imaging, with spatial resolution near that of the high-frequency element. Because this detection method does not rely on signal decorrelation, it is not susceptible to corruption by tissue motion. This probe demonstrates contrast imaging capability with significant tissue suppression, enabling high-resolution contrast-enhanced images of microvascular blood flow. Additionally, this probe can readily produce radiation force on flowing contrast agents, which may be beneficial for targeted imaging or therapy. PMID:20679006

  5. Sensor image prediction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenger, A. J.; Stone, W. R.; Berry, L.; Murray, T. J.

    1981-02-01

    The preparation of prediction imagery is a complex, costly, and time consuming process. Image prediction systems which produce a detailed replica of the image area require the extensive Defense Mapping Agency data base. The purpose of this study was to analyze the use of image predictions in order to determine whether a reduced set of more compact image features contains enough information to produce acceptable navigator performance. A job analysis of the navigator's mission tasks was performed. It showed that the cognitive and perceptual tasks he performs during navigation are identical to those performed for the targeting mission function. In addition, the results of the analysis of his performance when using a particular sensor can be extended to the analysis of this mission tasks using any sensor. An experimental approach was used to determine the relationship between navigator performance and the type of amount of information in the prediction image. A number of subjects were given image predictions containing varying levels of scene detail and different image features, and then asked to identify the predicted targets in corresponding dynamic flight sequences over scenes of cultural, terrain, and mixed (both cultural and terrain) content.

  6. Pushing the limits of high contrast with STIS/BAR5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debes, John H.; Ren, Bin

    2017-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) contains the only currently operating coronagraph in space that is not trained on the sun. We demonstrate the high contrast capabilities of the newly commissioned BAR5 occulter. We discuss the latest procedures in obtaining high contrast imaging of circumstellar disks and faint point sources with STIS and present results from a recent calibration program that demonstrates better than 10-6 point-source contrast at sub-arcsecond inner working angles, and better than 10-5 point-source contrast beyond 0.25‧‧. These results are obtained by a combination of sub-pixel grid dithers, multiple spacecraft orientations, and post-processing. Some of these same techniques will be employed by future coronagraphic missions. We present sample science cases for high contrast imaging in the visible with these newly demonstrated capabilities.

  7. A computational hyperspectral imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Nasim; Azari, Mohammad; Abolbashari, Mehrdad; Farahi, Faramarz

    2016-03-01

    A novel spectral imaging technique is introduced based on a highly dispersive imaging lens system. The chromatic aberration of the lens system is utilized to spread the spectral content of the object over a focal distance. Two three-dimensional surface reconstruction algorithms, depth from focus and depth from defocus, are applied to images captured by dispersive lens system. Using these algorithms, the spectral imager is able to relate either the location of focused image or the amount of defocus at the imaging detector to the spectral content of the object. A spectral imager with ~5 nm spectral resolution is designed based on this technique. The spectral and spatial resolutions of the introduced technique are independent and can be improved simultaneously. Simulation and experimental results are presented.

  8. Simultaneous acquisition of high-contrast and quantitative liver T1 images using 3D phase-sensitive inversion recovery: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Maruyama, Hirotoshi; Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Ishimori, Yoshiyuki

    2017-08-01

    Background Tumor-to-liver contrast is low in images of chronically diseased livers because gadolinium-based hepatocyte-specific contrast agents (Gd-EOB-DTPA) accumulate less to hepatocytes. Purpose To determine whether phase-sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) could improve the T1 contrasts of Gd-based contrast agents and liver parenchyma and simultaneously provide accurate T1 values for abdominal organs. Material and Methods The image contrasts of phantoms with different Gd concentrations that were obtained using PSIR were compared to conventional turbo field echo (TFE) results. T1 value was estimated using PSIR by performing iterations to investigate the two IR magnetization evolutions. The estimated T1 values were validated using IR-spin echo (IR-SE) and Look-Locker (L-L) sequences. In an in vivo study, the liver-to-spleen and liver-to-muscle contrasts of the PSIR and TFE images of seven volunteers were compared, as were the T1 values of liver parenchyma, spleen, and muscle obtained using PSIR and L-L sequences. Results The PSIR images showed T1 contrasts higher than those in the TFE results. The PSIR and IR-SE T1 values were linearly correlated. Additionally, the R1 estimated using PSIR were correlated with those measured using IR-SE and L-L. In the in vivo study, the liver-to-spleen and liver-to-muscle contrasts of PSIR were significantly higher than those obtained using TFE. T1 values of abdominal organs obtained using PSIR and L-L were clearly correlated. Conclusion PSIR may be capable of improving liver image T1 contrasts when Gd-based contrast agents are employed and simultaneously yielding accurate T1 values of abdominal organs.

  9. Derivation of realistic surface and particulate scatter transfer functions and their application to incoherent imaging of high-contrast fine-detail scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greynolds, Alan W.

    2016-09-01

    Previous research on optical surface scatter either assumed for the ACV (Auto-Covariance function) a simple analytical but unrealistic Gaussian form or depended on intensive numerical integrations. Measurements of polished optical surfaces indicate they accurately follow a simple inverse power law for the BSDF (Bi-directional Scatter Distribution Function) and the related PSD (Power Spectral Density) of their random height variations, i.e. they are fractal-like. By applying the appropriate limits to the scale-invariant (no intrinsic correlation length) PSD, a general analytic form for the corresponding ACV and STF (Surface or Scatter Transfer Function) can be derived. Combined with other Fourier-Bessel transform pairs, it's possible to accurately simulate the effect of not only diffraction and aberrations such as defocus (via the system OTF or Optical Transfer Function) but also surface and particulate scatter on the incoherent imaging of highcontrast fine-detail scenes. Simple examples of Gaussian and point objects are first presented followed by application to digital cameras that require integrating the aerial image over each pixel's active area. The needed subsampling for a camera with over ten million pixels (each only few microns in size) requires two-dimensional FFTs (Fast Fourier Transforms) of many gigabytes to accurately perform the detailed imaging calculations.

  10. Eye Redness Image Processing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnan, M. R. H. Mohd; Zain, Azlan Mohd; Haron, Habibollah; Alwee, Razana; Zulfaezal Che Azemin, Mohd; Osman Ibrahim, Ashraf

    2017-09-01

    The use of photographs for the assessment of ocular conditions has been suggested to further standardize clinical procedures. The selection of the photographs to be used as scale reference images was subjective. Numerous methods have been proposed to assign eye redness scores by computational methods. Image analysis techniques have been investigated over the last 20 years in an attempt to forgo subjective grading scales. Image segmentation is one of the most important and challenging problems in image processing. This paper briefly outlines the comprehensive of image processing and the implementation of image segmentation in eye redness.

  11. Multiple rings in the transition disk and companion candidates around RX J1615.3-3255. High contrast imaging with VLT/SPHERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, J.; Salter, G.; Benisty, M.; Vigan, A.; Boccaletti, A.; Pinilla, P.; Ginski, C.; Juhasz, A.; Maire, A.-L.; Messina, S.; Desidera, S.; Cheetham, A.; Girard, J. H.; Wahhaj, Z.; Langlois, M.; Bonnefoy, M.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Buenzli, E.; Chauvin, G.; Dominik, C.; Feldt, M.; Gratton, R.; Hagelberg, J.; Isella, A.; Janson, M.; Keller, C. U.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Lannier, J.; Menard, F.; Mesa, D.; Mouillet, D.; Mugrauer, M.; Peretti, S.; Perrot, C.; Sissa, E.; Snik, F.; Vogt, N.; Zurlo, A.; SPHERE Consortium

    2016-11-01

    Context. The effects of a planet sculpting the disk from which it formed are most likely to be found in disks that are in transition between being classical protoplanetary and debris disks. Recent direct imaging of transition disks has revealed structures such as dust rings, gaps, and spiral arms, but an unambiguous link between these structures and sculpting planets is yet to be found. Aims: We aim to find signs of ongoing planet-disk interaction and study the distribution of small grains at the surface of the transition disk around RX J1615.3-3255 (RX J1615). Methods: We observed RX J1615 with VLT/SPHERE. From these observations, we obtained polarimetric imaging with ZIMPOL (R'-band) and IRDIS (J), and IRDIS (H2H3) dual-band imaging with simultaneous spatially resolved spectra with the IFS (YJ). Results: We image the disk for the first time in scattered light and detect two arcs, two rings, a gap and an inner disk with marginal evidence for an inner cavity. The shapes of the arcs suggest that they are probably segments of full rings. Ellipse fitting for the two rings and inner disk yield a disk inclination i = 47 ± 2° and find semi-major axes of 1.50 ± 0.01'' (278 au), 1.06 ± 0.01'' (196 au) and 0.30 ± 0.01'' (56 au), respectively. We determine the scattering surface height above the midplane, based on the projected ring center offsets. Nine point sources are detected between 2.1'' and 8.0'' separation and considered as companion candidates. With NACO data we recover four of the nine point sources, which we determine to be not co-moving, and therefore unbound to the system. Conclusions: We present the first detection of the transition disk of RX J1615 in scattered light. The height of the rings indicate limited flaring of the disk surface, which enables partial self-shadowing in the disk. The outermost arc either traces the bottom of the disk or it is another ring with semi-major axis ≳ 2.35'' (435 au). We explore both scenarios, extrapolating the complete

  12. A UNIFORM ANALYSIS OF 118 STARS WITH HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING: LONG-PERIOD EXTRASOLAR GIANT PLANETS ARE RARE AROUND SUN-LIKE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Eric L.; Close, Laird M.

    2010-07-10

    We expand on the results of Nielsen et al., using the null result for giant extrasolar planets around the 118 target stars from the Very Large Telescope (VLT) NACO H- and Ks-band planet search (conducted by Masciadri and collaborators in 2003 and 2004), the VLT and MMT Simultaneous Differential Imager survey, and the Gemini Deep Planet Survey to set constraints on the population of giant extrasolar planets. Our analysis is extended to include the planet luminosity models of Fortney et al., as well as the correlation between stellar mass and frequency of giant planets found by Johnson et al. Doubling the sample size of FGKM stars strengthens our conclusions: a model for extrasolar giant planets with power laws for mass and semimajor axis as given by Cumming et al. cannot, with 95% confidence, have planets beyond 65 AU, compared to the value of 94 AU reported by Nielsen et al., using the models of Baraffe et al. When the Johnson et al. correction for stellar mass (which gives fewer Jupiter-mass companions to M stars with respect to solar-type stars) is applied, however, this limit moves out to 82 AU. For the relatively new Fortney et al. models, which predict fainter planets across most of parameter space, these upper limits, with and without a correction for stellar mass, are 182 and 234 AU, respectively.

  13. Simultaneous multislice (SMS) imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Markus; Breuer, Felix; Koopmans, Peter J.; Poser, Benedikt A.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous multislice imaging (SMS) using parallel image reconstruction has rapidly advanced to become a major imaging technique. The primary benefit is an acceleration in data acquisition that is equal to the number of simultaneously excited slices. Unlike in‐plane parallel imaging this can have only a marginal intrinsic signal‐to‐noise ratio penalty, and the full acceleration is attainable at fixed echo time, as is required for many echo planar imaging applications. Furthermore, for some implementations SMS techniques can reduce radiofrequency (RF) power deposition. In this review the current state of the art of SMS imaging is presented. In the Introduction, a historical overview is given of the history of SMS excitation in MRI. The following section on RF pulses gives both the theoretical background and practical application. The section on encoding and reconstruction shows how the collapsed multislice images can be disentangled by means of the transmitter pulse phase, gradient pulses, and most importantly using multichannel receiver coils. The relationship between classic parallel imaging techniques and SMS reconstruction methods is explored. The subsequent section describes the practical implementation, including the acquisition of reference data, and slice cross‐talk. Published applications of SMS imaging are then reviewed, and the article concludes with an outlook and perspective of SMS imaging. Magn Reson Med 75:63–81, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Medicine in Resonance. PMID:26308571

  14. Simultaneous multislice (SMS) imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Barth, Markus; Breuer, Felix; Koopmans, Peter J; Norris, David G; Poser, Benedikt A

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous multislice imaging (SMS) using parallel image reconstruction has rapidly advanced to become a major imaging technique. The primary benefit is an acceleration in data acquisition that is equal to the number of simultaneously excited slices. Unlike in-plane parallel imaging this can have only a marginal intrinsic signal-to-noise ratio penalty, and the full acceleration is attainable at fixed echo time, as is required for many echo planar imaging applications. Furthermore, for some implementations SMS techniques can reduce radiofrequency (RF) power deposition. In this review the current state of the art of SMS imaging is presented. In the Introduction, a historical overview is given of the history of SMS excitation in MRI. The following section on RF pulses gives both the theoretical background and practical application. The section on encoding and reconstruction shows how the collapsed multislice images can be disentangled by means of the transmitter pulse phase, gradient pulses, and most importantly using multichannel receiver coils. The relationship between classic parallel imaging techniques and SMS reconstruction methods is explored. The subsequent section describes the practical implementation, including the acquisition of reference data, and slice cross-talk. Published applications of SMS imaging are then reviewed, and the article concludes with an outlook and perspective of SMS imaging. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Automated medical image segmentation techniques

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neeraj; Aggarwal, Lalit M.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate segmentation of medical images is a key step in contouring during radiotherapy planning. Computed topography (CT) and Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are the most widely used radiographic techniques in diagnosis, clinical studies and treatment planning. This review provides details of automated segmentation methods, specifically discussed in the context of CT and MR images. The motive is to discuss the problems encountered in segmentation of CT and MR images, and the relative merits and limitations of methods currently available for segmentation of medical images. PMID:20177565

  16. Automated medical image segmentation techniques.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neeraj; Aggarwal, Lalit M

    2010-01-01

    Accurate segmentation of medical images is a key step in contouring during radiotherapy planning. Computed topography (CT) and Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are the most widely used radiographic techniques in diagnosis, clinical studies and treatment planning. This review provides details of automated segmentation methods, specifically discussed in the context of CT and MR images. The motive is to discuss the problems encountered in segmentation of CT and MR images, and the relative merits and limitations of methods currently available for segmentation of medical images.

  17. Urologic imaging and interventional techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    This book provides an overview of all imaging modalities and invasive techniques of the genitourinary system. Three general chapters discuss ionic and nonionic contrast media, the management of reactions to contrast media, and radiation doses from various uroradiologic procedures. Chapters are devoted to intravenous pyelography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, nuclear medicine, lymphography, arteriography, and venography. Two chapters discuss the pediatric applications of uroradiology and ultrasound. Two chapters integrate the various imaging techniques of the upper and lower genitourinary systems into an algorithmic approach for various pathologic entities.

  18. EDITORIAL: Imaging systems and techniques Imaging systems and techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wuqiang; Giakos, George; Nikita, Konstantina; Pastorino, Matteo; Karras, Dimitrios

    2009-10-01

    The papers in this special issue focus on providing the state-of-the-art approaches and solutions to some of the most challenging imaging areas, such as the design, development, evaluation and applications of imaging systems, measuring techniques, image processing algorithms and instrumentation, with an ultimate aim of enhancing the measurement accuracy and image quality. This special issue explores the principles, engineering developments and applications of new imaging systems and techniques, and encourages broad discussion of imaging methodologies, shaping the future and identifying emerging trends. The multi-faceted field of imaging requires drastic adaptation to the rapid changes in our society, economy, environment and technological evolution. There is an urgent need to address new problems, which tend to be either static but complex, or dynamic, e.g. rapidly evolving with time, with many unknowns, and to propose innovative solutions. For instance, the battles against cancer and terror, monitoring of space resources and enhanced awareness, management of natural resources and environmental monitoring are some of the areas that need to be addressed. The complexity of the involved imaging scenarios and demanding design parameters, e.g. speed, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), specificity, contrast, spatial resolution, scatter rejection, complex background and harsh environments, necessitate the development of a multi-functional, scalable and efficient imaging suite of sensors, solutions driven by innovation, and operation on diverse detection and imaging principles. Efficient medical imaging techniques capable of providing physiological information at the molecular level present another important research area. Advanced metabolic and functional imaging techniques, operating on multiple physical principles, and using high-resolution, high-selectivity nano-imaging methods, quantum dots, nanoparticles, biomarkers, nanostructures, nanosensors, micro-array imaging chips

  19. Morphological image processing techniques in thermographic imaging.

    PubMed

    Schulze, M A; Pearce, J A

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical morphology is a set algebra that defines some important new techniques in image processing. Morphological filters are closely related to order statistic and other nonlinear filters, but they are uniquely sensitive to shape. A morphological filter will preserve shapes similar to its structuring element shape while modifying dissimilar shapes. Most morphological filters are effective at removing both linear and nonlinear noise processes. However, the standard morphological operators introduce a statistical and deterministic bias to images. Fortunately, these operators exist in complementary pairs that are equally and oppositely biased. One way to alleviate the bias is to average the two complementary operators. The filters formed by such averages are the midrange filter (basic operators), the pseudomedian filter (singly compound operators) and the LOCO filter (doubly compound operators). In thermographic imaging, one often wishes to find exact temperatures or accurate isothermal contours. Therefore, techniques used to remove sensor noise and scanning artifact should not introduce bias. The LOCO filter that we have devised provides the shape control and noise suppression of morphological techniques without biasing the image. We will demonstrate the effects of different structuring element shapes on thermographic images of tissue heated by laser irradiation and electrosurgery.

  20. Diagnostic cardiology: Noninvasive imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Come, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 23 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The chest x-ray and cardiac series; Computed tomographic scanning of the heart, coronary arteries, and great vessels; Digital subtraction angiography in the assessment of cardiovascular disease; Magnetic resonance: technique and cardiac applications; Basics of radiation physics and instrumentation; and Nuclear imaging: the assessment of cardiac performance.

  1. Deep, high contrast microscopic cell imaging using three-photon luminescence of β-(NaYF4:Er(3+)/NaYF4) nanoprobe excited by 1480-nm CW laser of only 1.5-mW.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Wu, Ruitao; Li, Nana; Zhang, Xin; Zhan, Qiuqiang; He, Sailing

    2015-05-01

    It is challenging to achieve deep microscopic imaging for the strong scattering in biotissue. An efficient three-photon luminescence can effectively increase the penetration depth. Here we report that β-NaYF4: Er(3+)/NaYF4 UCNPs were excited by a 1480-nm CW-laser and emitted 543/653-nm light through a three-photon process. With the merit of the hexagonal crystal phase, sub-milliwatt laser power was utilized to excite the UCNP-probed cells to minimize the heating effect. The polymer-coated UCNPs were shown to be harmless to cells. The deep, high contrast in vitro microscopic imaging was implemented through an artificial phantom. Imaging depth of 800 μm was achieved using only 1.5 mW excitation and a 0.7 NA objective. The green/red emission intensities ratio after penetrating the phantom was studied, indicating that longer emission wavelength is preferred for deep multiphoton microscopy. The proposed and demonstrated β-UCNPs would have great potential in three-photon microscopy.

  2. Deep, high contrast microscopic cell imaging using three-photon luminescence of β-(NaYF4:Er3+/NaYF4) nanoprobe excited by 1480-nm CW laser of only 1.5-mW

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Wu, Ruitao; Li, Nana; Zhang, Xin; Zhan, Qiuqiang; He, Sailing

    2015-01-01

    It is challenging to achieve deep microscopic imaging for the strong scattering in biotissue. An efficient three-photon luminescence can effectively increase the penetration depth. Here we report that β-NaYF4: Er3+/NaYF4 UCNPs were excited by a 1480-nm CW-laser and emitted 543/653-nm light through a three-photon process. With the merit of the hexagonal crystal phase, sub-milliwatt laser power was utilized to excite the UCNP-probed cells to minimize the heating effect. The polymer-coated UCNPs were shown to be harmless to cells. The deep, high contrast in vitro microscopic imaging was implemented through an artificial phantom. Imaging depth of 800 μm was achieved using only 1.5 mW excitation and a 0.7 NA objective. The green/red emission intensities ratio after penetrating the phantom was studied, indicating that longer emission wavelength is preferred for deep multiphoton microscopy. The proposed and demonstrated β-UCNPs would have great potential in three-photon microscopy. PMID:26137385

  3. The Leiden EXoplanet Instrument (LEXI): a high-contrast high-dispersion spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haffert, S. Y.; Wilby, M. J.; Keller, C. U.; Snellen, I. A. G.

    2016-08-01

    The Leiden EXoplanet Instrument (LEXI) will be the first instrument designed for high-contrast, high-dispersion integral field spectroscopy at optical wavelengths. High-contrast imaging (HCI) and high-dispersion spectroscopy (HDS) techniques are used to reach contrasts of 10-7. LEXI will be a bench-mounted, high dispersion integral field spectrograph that will record spectra in a small area around the star with high spatial resolution and high dynamic range. A prototype is being setup to The Leiden EXoplanet Instrument (LEXI) will be the first instrument designed for high-contrast, high-dispersion integral field spectroscopy at optical wavelengths. High-contrast imaging (HCI) and high-dispersion spectroscopy (HDS) techniques are used to reach contrasts of 10-7. LEXI will be a bench-mounted, high dispersion integral field spectrograph that will record spectra in a small area around the star with high spatial resolution and high dynamic range. A prototype is being setup to test the combination of HCI+HDS and its first light is expected in 2016.

  4. A dual-view digital tomosynthesis imaging technique for improved chest imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Yuncheng; Lai, Chao-Jen; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) has been shown to be useful for reducing the overlapping of abnormalities with anatomical structures at various depth levels along the posterior–anterior (PA) direction in chest radiography. However, DTS provides crude three-dimensional (3D) images that have poor resolution in the lateral view and can only be displayed with reasonable quality in the PA view. Furthermore, the spillover of high-contrast objects from off-fulcrum planes generates artifacts that may impede the diagnostic use of the DTS images. In this paper, the authors describe and demonstrate the use of a dual-view DTS technique to improve the accuracy of the reconstructed volume image data for more accurate rendition of the anatomy and slice images with improved resolution and reduced artifacts, thus allowing the 3D image data to be viewed in views other than the PA view. Methods: With the dual-view DTS technique, limited angle scans are performed and projection images are acquired in two orthogonal views: PA and lateral. The dual-view projection data are used together to reconstruct 3D images using the maximum likelihood expectation maximization iterative algorithm. In this study, projection images were simulated or experimentally acquired over 360° using the scanning geometry for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). While all projections were used to reconstruct CBCT images, selected projections were extracted and used to reconstruct single- and dual-view DTS images for comparison with the CBCT images. For realistic demonstration and comparison, a digital chest phantom derived from clinical CT images was used for the simulation study. An anthropomorphic chest phantom was imaged for the experimental study. The resultant dual-view DTS images were visually compared with the single-view DTS images and CBCT images for the presence of image artifacts and accuracy of CT numbers and anatomy and quantitatively compared with root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD) values

  5. Neurophysiological imaging techniques in dementia.

    PubMed

    Comi, G; Leocani, L

    1999-01-01

    Neurophysiological methods, such as electroencephalography (EEG) and event-related potentials, are useful tools in the investigation of brain cognitive function in normal and pathological conditions, with an excellent time resolution when compared to that of other functional imaging techniques. Advanced techniques using a high number of EEG channels also enable a good spatial resolution to be achieved. This, together with the possibility of integration with other anatomical and functional images, may increase the ability to localize brain functions. Spectral analysis of the resting EEG, which gives information on the integrity of the cortical and subcortical networks involved in the generation of cortical rhythms, has the limitation of low sensitivity and specificity for the type of cognitive impairment. In almost all types of dementia, decreased power of the high frequencies is indeed observed in mild stages, accompanied by increased power of the slow rhythms in the more advanced phases. The sensitivity for the detection of spectral abnormalities is improved by studying centroid modifications. More specific information on the type of dementia can be provided by coherence analysis of the resting EEG, a measure of functional cortico-cortical connections, which has different abnormal patterns in Alzheimer's disease, cerebrovascular dementia and dementia associated with multiple sclerosis. Another tool for improving the assessment of demented patients is the study of EEG activity related to particular tasks, such as event-related potentials and event-related desynchronization/synchronization of the EEG, which allow the study of brain activation during cognitive and motor tasks.

  6. Imaging techniques for myocardial inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, J.B.; Henkin, R.E.; Robinson, J.A.

    1986-03-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DC) represents a heterogeneous group of disorders which results in morbidity and mortality in young individuals. Recent evidence suggests that a subset of these patients have histologic evidence of myocarditis which is potentially treatable with immunosuppression. The identification of myocardial inflammation may therefore lead to development of therapeutic regimens designed to treat the cause rather than the effect of the myocardial disease. Ultimately, this may result in improvement in the abysmal prognosis of DC. The currently accepted technique for identification of active myocardial inflammation is endomyocardial biopsy. This technique is not perfect, however, since pathologic standards for the diagnosis of myocarditis have not been established. Furthermore, focal inflammation may give rise to sampling error. The inflammation-avid radioisotope gallium-67 citrate has been used as an adjunct to biopsy improving the yield of myocarditis from 7 percent to 36 percent. Serial imaging correlates well to biopsy results. Future studies are designed to study the applicability of lymphocyte labelling techniques to myocardial inflammatory disease.

  7. Imaging techniques in biology and medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Swenberg, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    This book serves as an introduction to some aspects of imaging techniques as utilized in biology and medicine. Techniques presented include image processing, ultrasound, radiotracers, autoradiography, computed tomography, and MRI (all major imaging techniques). The underlying mathematics and physics are kept to a minimum.

  8. Tooling Techniques Enhance Medical Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    mission. The manufacturing techniques developed to create the components have yielded innovations advancing medical imaging, transportation security, and even energy efficiency.

  9. Bayes Syndrome and Imaging Techniques.

    PubMed

    Betancor, Ivan Hernandez; Izquierdo-Gomez, Maria Manuela; Niebla, Javier Garcia; Laynez-Cerdeña, Ignacio; Garcia-Gonzalez, Martin Jesus; Barragan-Acea, Antonio; Iribarren-Sarriá, Jose Luis; Jimenez-Rivera, Juan Jose; Lacalzada-Almeida, Juan

    2017-07-13

    Interatrial block (IAB) is due to disruption in the Bachmann region (BR). According to whether interatrial electrical conduction is delayed or completely blocked through the BR, it can be classified as IAB of first, second or third degree. On the surface electrocardiogram, a P wave ≥ 120 ms (partial IAB) is observed or associated to the prolongation of the P wave with a biphasic (positive / negative) morphology in the inferior leads (advanced IAB). Bayes syndrome is defined as an advanced IAB associated with atrial arrhythmia, more specifically atrial fibrillation. The purpose of this review is to describe the latest evidence about an entity considered an anatomical and electrical substrate with its own name, which may be a predictor of supraventricular arrhythmia and cardioembolic cerebrovascular accidents, as well as the role of new imaging techniques, such as echocardiographic strain and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, in characterizing atrial alterations associated with this syndrome and generally in the study of anatomy and atrial function. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Bone fragility and imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    D’Elia, Giovanni; Caracchini, Giuseppe; Cavalli, Loredana; Innocenti, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Bone fragility is a silent condition that increases bone fracture risk, enhanced by low bone mass and microarchitecture deterioration of bone tissue that lead to osteoporosis. Fragility fractures are the major clinical manifestation of osteoporosis. A large body of epidemiological data indicates that the current standard for predicting fragility fracture risk is an areal BMD (aBMD) measurement by DXA. Although mineral density measurements assess the quantity of bone, the quality of the tissue is an important predictor of fragility. Thus, bone strength is explained not only by BMD but also by macrostructural and microstructural characteristics of bone tissue. Imaging diagnostics, through the use of X-rays, DXA, Ultrasonography, CT and MR, provides methods for diagnosis and characterization of fractures, and semi- and quantitative methods for assessment of bone consistency and strength, that become precious for bone fragility clinical management if they are integrated by clinical risk factors. The last employment of sophisticated non-invasively imaging techniques in clinical research as high-resolution CT (hrCT), microCT (μ-CT), high-resolution MR (hrMR) and, microRM (μRM), combined with finite element analysis methods, open to new challenges in a better bone strength assessment to enhance the comprehension of biomechanical parameters and the prediction of fragility fractures. PMID:22461252

  11. Clouds of high contrast on Uranus.

    PubMed

    Karkoschka, E

    1998-04-24

    Near-infrared images of Uranus taken with the Hubble Space Telescope in July and October 1997 revealed discrete clouds with contrasts exceeding 10 times the highest contrast observed before with other techniques. At visible wavelengths, these 10 clouds had lower contrasts than clouds seen by Voyager 2 in 1986. Uranus' rotational rates for southern latitudes were identical in 1986 and 1997. Clouds in northern latitudes rotate slightly more slowly than clouds in opposite southern latitudes.

  12. Image Transmission via Spread Spectrum Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-01

    Images From Remote Piloted Vehicles, Coding Techniques For RPV and SAR Images, Image Coding Techniques, Stochastic Image Models and Hybrid Coding...FAST COSINE TRANSFORM. . . 125 APPENDIX E: STUDY OF HUMAN FACTORS INVOLVED WITH VIEWING COMPRESSED IMAGES FROM REMOTE PILOTED VEHICLES...Program was accomplished in 1977. A complete flyable system was produced by RCA and delivered to Harris Corp for integration into an AQUILA remotely

  13. Imaging Techniques in Endodontics: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Deepak, B. S.; Subash, T. S.; Narmatha, V. J.; Anamika, T.; Snehil, T. K.; Nandini, D. B.

    2012-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the relevance of imaging techniques such as, computed tomography, cone beam computed tomography, and ultrasound, to endodontic practice. Many limitations of the conventional radiographic techniques have been overcome by the newer methods. Advantages and disadvantages of various imaging techniques in endodontic practice are also discussed. PMID:22530184

  14. Digital image registration by correlation techniques.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, D. J.; Mccormack, D. S.; Lee, G. M.

    1972-01-01

    This study considers the translation problem associated with digital image registration and develops a means for comparing commonly used correlation techniques. Using suitably defined constraints, an optimum and four suboptimum registration techniques are defined and evaluated. A computational comparison is made and Gaussian image statistics are used to compare the selected techniques in terms of radial position location error.

  15. Access Techniques for Document Image Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Frank L.; Thoma, George R.

    1990-01-01

    Describes access and retrieval techniques implemented as part of a research and development program in electronic imaging applied to document storage and retrieval at the National Library of Medicine. Design considerations for large image databases are discussed. (six references) (EAM)

  16. Medical imaging techniques: implications for nursing care.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Alison

    The four basic techniques of medical imaging are X-ray, ultrasound, magnetic resonance and radionuclide. This article describes imaging techniques that display anatomical structure and those that are better at showing the physiological function of organs and tissues. Safety and preparation relating to nursing practice are discussed. Understanding the purpose and limitations of the different imaging techniques is important for providing best patient care.

  17. Prewarping techniques in imaging: applications in nanotechnology and biotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonawala, Amyn; Milanfar, Peyman

    2005-03-01

    In all imaging systems, the underlying process introduces undesirable distortions that cause the output signal to be a warped version of the input. When the input to such systems can be controlled, pre-warping techniques can be employed which consist of systematically modifying the input such that it cancels out (or compensates for) the process losses. In this paper, we focus on the mask (reticle) design problem for 'optical micro-lithography', a process similar to photographic printing used for transferring binary circuit patterns onto silicon wafers. We use a pixel-based mask representation and model the above process as a cascade of convolution (aerial image formation) and thresholding (high-contrast recording) operations. The pre-distorted mask is obtained by minimizing the norm of the difference between the 'desired' output image and the 'reproduced' output image. We employ the regularization framework to ensure that the resulting masks are close-to-binary as well as simple and easy to fabricate. Finally, we provide insight into two additional applications of pre-warping techniques. First is 'e-beam lithography', used for fabricating nano-scale structures, and second is 'electronic visual prosthesis' which aims at providing limited vision to the blind by using a prosthetic retinally implanted chip capable of electrically stimulating the retinal neuron cells.

  18. Interframe Adaptive Data Compression Techniques for Images.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    1.3.1 Predictive Coding Techniques 8 1.3.2 Transform Coding Techniques 15 1.3.3 Hybrid Coding Techniques 17 1.4 Research Objectives 18 1.5 Description ...Chemical Plant Images 82 4.2.3 X-ray Projection Images 83 V INTERFRAME HYBRID CODING SCHEMES 91 5.1 Adaptive Interframe Hybrid Coding Scheme 95 5.2 Hybrid...Images 99 5.4.2 Chemical Plant Images 109 5.4.3 Angiocardiogram Images .7 777 T- - . vi Page VI DATA COMPRESSION FOR NOISY CHANNELS 117 6.1 Channel

  19. Dual-source parallel radiofrequency excitation ACR phantom magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T: Assessment of the effect of image quality on high-contrast spatial resolution, percent signal ghosting, and low-contrast object detectability in comparison with conventional single-source transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyung-Bae; Park, Yong-Sung; Choe, Bo-Young

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess dual-source parallel radiofrequency (RF) excitation American College of Radiology (ACR) phantom magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 3T compared with conventional single-source RF transmission and compared with the standard ACR MRI phantom test. We used a 3T MR scanner equipped with dual-source parallel RF excitation and an 8-channel head phased array coil. We employed T1- and T2-weighted fast spin echo (FSE) pulse sequences for an assessment of the impact of image quality on high-contrast spatial resolution, percent signal ghosting and low-contrast object detectability following the ACR MRI quality control (QC) manual. With geometric accuracy and identical slice locations, dual RFs using dual-source parallel RF excitation MR showed an advantage over single RF using dual-source parallel RF excitation MR and conventional MR in terms of high-contrast spatial resolution (p < 0.010), percent signal ghosting (p < 0.010), and low-contrast object detectability (p < 0.010). The quality of the image from the dual-source parallel RF excitation MR equipment was superior to that of the image from conventional MR equipment for the ACR phantom. We need to pursue dual-source parallel RF excitation MR studies involving various clinical cases.

  20. Psychophysical rating of image compression techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Charles S.; Hitchner, Lewis E.; Watson, Andrew B.

    1989-01-01

    Image compression schemes abound with little work which compares their bit-rate performance based on subjective fidelity measures. Statistical measures of image fidelity, such as squared error measures, do not necessarily correspond to subjective measures of image fidelity. Most previous comparisons of compression techniques have been based on these statistical measures. A psychophysical method has been used to estimate, for a number of compression techniques, a threshold bit-rate yielding a criterion level of performance in discriminating original and compressed images. The compression techniques studied include block truncation, Laplacian pyramid, block discrete cosine transform, with and without a human visual system scaling, and cortex transform coders.

  1. Psychophysical rating of image compression techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Charles S.; Hitchner, Lewis E.; Watson, Andrew B.

    1989-01-01

    Image compression schemes abound with little work which compares their bit-rate performance based on subjective fidelity measures. Statistical measures of image fidelity, such as squared error measures, do not necessarily correspond to subjective measures of image fidelity. Most previous comparisons of compression techniques have been based on these statistical measures. A psychophysical method has been used to estimate, for a number of compression techniques, a threshold bit-rate yielding a criterion level of performance in discriminating original and compressed images. The compression techniques studied include block truncation, Laplacian pyramid, block discrete cosine transform, with and without a human visual system scaling, and cortex transform coders.

  2. NMR imaging techniques and applications: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottomley, Paul A.

    1982-09-01

    Over the past ten years, a variety of techniques have been proposed and demonstrated that enable the spatial discrimination and mapping of nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) signals in heterogeneous objects. These NMR imaging techniques are currently finding useful application in clinical medicine and physiological chemistry, where their noninvasive, apparently hazard-free nature, and the sensitivity of the NMR signal to the state of biological tissue, are key advantages. This article reviews the historical development, the conceptual basis, and the applications of the various NMR imaging techniques. Qualitative descriptions and illustrations of each technique and an outline of imaging instrumentation are provided. Proton NMR imaging, in medicine, of pathological states such as cancer, imaging of relaxation time, chemical shift and flow parameters, imaging of nuclei other than hydrogen, and potential hazards are discussed and demonstrated with examples.

  3. Three dimensional scattering center imaging techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younger, P. R.; Burnside, W. D.

    1991-01-01

    Two methods to image scattering centers in 3-D are presented. The first method uses 2-D images generated from Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR) measurements taken by two vertically offset antennas. This technique is shown to provide accurate 3-D imaging capability which can be added to an existing ISAR measurement system, requiring only the addition of a second antenna. The second technique uses target impulse responses generated from wideband radar measurements from three slightly different offset antennas. This technique is shown to identify the dominant scattering centers on a target in nearly real time. The number of measurements required to image a target using this technique is very small relative to traditional imaging techniques.

  4. Imaging techniques: Nanoparticle atoms pinpointed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farle, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The locations of atoms in a metallic alloy nanoparticle have been determined using a combination of electron microscopy and image simulation, revealing links between the particle's structure and magnetic properties. See Letter p.75

  5. Ultra high speed image processing techniques. [electronic packaging techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, T.; Hoeschele, D. F.; Connery, R.; Ehland, J.; Billings, J.

    1981-01-01

    Packaging techniques for ultra high speed image processing were developed. These techniques involve the development of a signal feedthrough technique through LSI/VLSI sapphire substrates. This allows the stacking of LSI/VLSI circuit substrates in a 3 dimensional package with greatly reduced length of interconnecting lines between the LSI/VLSI circuits. The reduced parasitic capacitances results in higher LSI/VLSI computational speeds at significantly reduced power consumption levels.

  6. Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography with High-Contrast Dielectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurge, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography (ECVT) system has been designed to complement the tools created to sense the presence of water in nonconductive spacecraft materials, by helping to not only find the approximate location of moisture but also its quantity and depth. The ECVT system has been created for use with a new image reconstruction algorithm capable of imaging high-contrast dielectric distributions. Rather than relying solely on mutual capacitance readings as is done in traditional electrical capacitance tomography applications, this method reconstructs high-resolution images using only the self-capacitance measurements. The image reconstruction method assumes that the material under inspection consists of a binary dielectric distribution, with either a high relative dielectric value representing the water or a low dielectric value for the background material. By constraining the unknown dielectric material to one of two values, the inverse math problem that must be solved to generate the image is no longer ill-determined. The image resolution becomes limited only by the accuracy and resolution of the measurement circuitry. Images were reconstructed using this method with both synthetic and real data acquired using an aluminum structure inserted at different positions within the sensing region. The cuboid geometry of the system has two parallel planes of 16 conductors arranged in a 4 4 pattern. The electrode geometry consists of parallel planes of copper conductors, connected through custom-built switch electronics, to a commercially available capacitance to digital converter. The figure shows two 4 4 arrays of electrodes milled from square sections of copper-clad circuit-board material and mounted on two pieces of glass-filled plastic backing, which were cut to approximately square shapes, 10 cm on a side. Each electrode is placed on 2.0-cm centers. The parallel arrays were mounted with the electrode arrays approximately 3 cm apart. The open ends

  7. Electronic imaging system and technique

    DOEpatents

    Bolstad, Jon O.

    1987-01-01

    A method and system for viewing objects obscurred by intense plasmas or flames (such as a welding arc) includes a pulsed light source to illuminate the object, the peak brightness of the light reflected from the object being greater than the brightness of the intense plasma or flame; an electronic image sensor for detecting a pulsed image of the illuminated object, the sensor being operated as a high-speed shutter; and electronic means for synchronizing the shutter operation with the pulsed light source.

  8. Electronic imaging system and technique

    DOEpatents

    Bolstad, J.O.

    1984-06-12

    A method and system for viewing objects obscurred by intense plasmas or flames (such as a welding arc) includes a pulsed light source to illuminate the object, the peak brightness of the light reflected from the object being greater than the brightness of the intense plasma or flame; an electronic image sensor for detecting a pulsed image of the illuminated object, the sensor being operated as a high-speed shutter; and electronic means for synchronizing the shutter operation with the pulsed light source.

  9. An accurate registration technique for distorted images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delapena, Michele; Shaw, Richard A.; Linde, Peter; Dravins, Dainis

    1990-01-01

    Accurate registration of International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) images is crucial because the variability of the geometrical distortions that are introduced by the SEC-Vidicon cameras ensures that raw science images are never perfectly aligned with the Intensity Transfer Functions (ITFs) (i.e., graded floodlamp exposures that are used to linearize and normalize the camera response). A technique for precisely registering IUE images which uses a cross correlation of the fixed pattern that exists in all raw IUE images is described.

  10. High contrast en bloc staining of neuronal tissue for field emission scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Juan C.; Kasthuri, Narayanan; Hayworth, Kenneth; Schalek, Richard; Lichtman, Jeff W.; Smith, Stephen J; Buchanan, JoAnn

    2013-01-01

    Conventional heavy metal post staining methods on thin sections lend contrast but often cause contamination. To avoid this problem, we tested several en bloc staining techniques to contrast tissue in serial sections mounted on solid substrates for examination by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). Because FESEM section imaging requires that specimens have higher contrast and greater electrical conductivity than transmission electron microscope (TEM) samples, our technique utilizes osmium impregnation (OTO) to make the samples conductive while heavily staining membranes for segmentation studies. Combining this step with other classic heavy metal en bloc stains including uranyl acetate, lead aspartate, copper sulfate and lead citrate produced clean, highly contrasted TEM and SEM samples of insect, fish, and mammalian nervous system. This protocol takes 7–15 days to prepare resin embedded tissue, cut sections and produce serial section images. PMID:22240582

  11. Image processing technique for arbitrary image positioning in holographic stereogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Der-Kuan; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Honda, Toshio; Ohyama, Nagaaki

    1990-12-01

    In a one-step holographic stereogram, if the series of original images are used just as they are taken from perspective views, three-dimensional images are usually reconstructed in back of the hologram plane. In order to enhance the sense of perspective of the reconstructed images and minimize blur of the interesting portions, we introduce an image processing technique for making a one-step flat format holographic stereogram in which three-dimensional images can be observed at an arbitrary specified position. Experimental results show the effect of the image processing. Further, we show results of a medical application using this image processing.

  12. Improvement of ultrasound speckle image velocimetry using image enhancement techniques.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Eunseop; Nam, Kweon-Ho; Paeng, Dong-Guk; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-based techniques have been developed and widely used in noninvasive measurement of blood velocity. Speckle image velocimetry (SIV), which applies a cross-correlation algorithm to consecutive B-mode images of blood flow has often been employed owing to its better spatial resolution compared with conventional Doppler-based measurement techniques. The SIV technique utilizes speckles backscattered from red blood cell (RBC) aggregates as flow tracers. Hence, the intensity and size of such speckles are highly dependent on hemodynamic conditions. The grayscale intensity of speckle images varies along the radial direction of blood vessels because of the shear rate dependence of RBC aggregation. This inhomogeneous distribution of echo speckles decreases the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a cross-correlation analysis and produces spurious results. In the present study, image-enhancement techniques such as contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE), min/max technique, and subtraction of background image (SB) method were applied to speckle images to achieve a more accurate SIV measurement. A mechanical sector ultrasound scanner was used to obtain ultrasound speckle images from rat blood under steady and pulsatile flows. The effects of the image-enhancement techniques on SIV analysis were evaluated by comparing image intensities, velocities, and cross-correlation maps. The velocity profiles and wall shear rate (WSR) obtained from RBC suspension images were compared with the analytical solution for validation. In addition, the image-enhancement techniques were applied to in vivo measurement of blood flow in human vein. The experimental results of both in vitro and in vivo SIV measurements show that the intensity gradient in heterogeneous speckles has substantial influence on the cross-correlation analysis. The image-enhancement techniques used in this study can minimize errors encountered in ultrasound SIV measurement in which RBCs are used as flow

  13. Plenoptic Ophthalmoscopy: A Novel Imaging Technique.

    PubMed

    Adam, Murtaza K; Aenchbacher, Weston; Kurzweg, Timothy; Hsu, Jason

    2016-11-01

    This prospective retinal imaging case series was designed to establish feasibility of plenoptic ophthalmoscopy (PO), a novel mydriatic fundus imaging technique. A custom variable intensity LED array light source adapter was created for the Lytro Gen1 light-field camera (Lytro, Mountain View, CA). Initial PO testing was performed on a model eye and rabbit fundi. PO image acquisition was then performed on dilated human subjects with a variety of retinal pathology and images were subjected to computational enhancement. The Lytro Gen1 light-field camera with custom LED array captured fundus images of eyes with diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, retinal detachment, and other diagnoses. Post-acquisition computational processing allowed for refocusing and perspective shifting of retinal PO images, resulting in improved image quality. The application of PO to image the ocular fundus is feasible. Additional studies are needed to determine its potential clinical utility. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:1038-1043.].

  14. FPGA implementation of image enhancement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Karan; Jain, Aditya; Srivastava, Atul Kumar

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this paper is designing, modeling, simulation and synthesis of four Image Enhancement techniques on FPGA. Image Enhancement Algorithms can be classified as point processing Techniques, in which operation is done on pixel level and Spatial Filtering Technique, in which operation is performed within neighborhood of a pixel. Algorithms of all the techniques are studied and hardware circuits are realized for them. Then hardware logic is modeled in Matlab Simulink using Xilinx System Generator Block set and synthesized onto Virtex4 xc4vsx35-10ff668 FPGA chip. Using hardware co-simulation feature of FPGA kit, the algorithms developed are validated.

  15. Advances in Imaging Techniques and Genetically Encoded Probes for Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengbo; Gong, Xiaojing; Lin, Riqiang; Liu, Feng; Chen, Jingqin; Wang, Zhiyong; Song, Liang; Chu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a rapidly emerging biomedical imaging modality that is capable of visualizing cellular and molecular functions with high detection sensitivity and spatial resolution in deep tissue. Great efforts and progress have been made on the development of various PA imaging technologies with improved resolution and sensitivity over the past two decades. Various PA probes with high contrast have also been extensively developed, with many important biomedical applications. In comparison with chemical dyes and nanoparticles, genetically encoded probes offer easier labeling of defined cells within tissues or proteins of interest within a cell, have higher stability in vivo, and eliminate the need for delivery of exogenous substances. Genetically encoded probes have thus attracted increasing attention from researchers in engineering and biomedicine. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of the existing PA imaging technologies and genetically encoded PA probes, and describe further improvements in PA imaging techniques and the near-infrared photochromic protein BphP1, the most sensitive genetically encoded probe thus far, as well as the potential biomedical applications of BphP1-based PA imaging in vivo. PMID:27877244

  16. A comparison of image inpainting techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaojie; Shu, Chang

    2015-03-01

    Image inpainting is an important research topic in the field of image processing. The objective of inpainting is to "guess" the lost information according to surrounding image information, which can be applied in old photo restoration, object removal and demosaicing. Based on the foundation of previous literature of image inpainting and image modeling, this paper provides an overview of the state-of-art image inpainting methods. This survey first covers mathematics models of inpainting and different kinds of image impairment. Then it goes to the main components of an image, the structure and the texture, and states how these inpainting models and algorithms deal with the two separately, using PDE's method, exemplar-based method and etc. Afterwards sparse-representation-based inpainting and related techniques are introduced. Experimental analysis will be presented to evaluate the relative merits of different algorithms, with the measure of Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR) as well as direct visual perception.

  17. Enhanced integral imaging system using image floating technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Sung-Wook; Kim, Joohwan; Lee, Byoungho

    2005-09-01

    Enhanced integral imaging system based on the image floating method is proposed. The integral imaging is one of the most promising methods among the autostereoscopic displays and the integrated image has the volumetric characteristics unlike the other stereoscopic images. The image floating is a common 3D display technique, which uses a big convex lens or a concave mirror to exhibit the image of a real object to the observer. The image floating method can be used to emphasize the viewing characteristics of the volumetric image and the noise image which is located on the fixed plane can be eliminated by the floating lens through the control of the focal length. In this paper, the solution of the seam noise and the image flipping of the integral imaging system is proposed using the image floating method. Moreover, the advanced techniques of the integral imaging system can be directly applied to the proposed system. The proposed system can be successfully applied to many 3D applications such as 3D television.

  18. High efficiency upconversion nanophosphors for high-contrast bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkahtani, Masfer H.; Alghannam, Fahad S.; Sanchez, Carlos; Gomes, Carmen L.; Liang, Hong; Hemmer, Philip R.

    2016-12-01

    Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) are of interest because they allow suppression of tissue autofluorescence and are therefore visible deep inside biological tissue. Compared to upconversion dyes, UCNPs have a lower pump intensity threshold, better photostability, and less toxicity. Recently, YVO4: Er+3, Yb+3 nanoparticles were shown to exhibit strong up-conversion luminescence with a relatively low 10 kW cm-2 excitation intensity even in water, which makes them excellent bio-imaging candidates. Herein, we investigate their use as internal probes in insects by injecting YVO4 : Er+3, Yb+3 nanoparticles into fire ants as a biological model, and obtain 2D optical images with 980 nm illumination. High-contrast images with high signal-to-noise ratio are observed by detecting the up-conversion fluorescence as the excitation laser is scanned.

  19. High efficiency upconversion nanophosphors for high-contrast bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Alkahtani, Masfer H; Alghannam, Fahad S; Sanchez, Carlos; Gomes, Carmen L; Liang, Hong; Hemmer, Philip R

    2016-12-02

    Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) are of interest because they allow suppression of tissue autofluorescence and are therefore visible deep inside biological tissue. Compared to upconversion dyes, UCNPs have a lower pump intensity threshold, better photostability, and less toxicity. Recently, YVO4: Er(+3), Yb(+3) nanoparticles were shown to exhibit strong up-conversion luminescence with a relatively low 10 kW cm(-2) excitation intensity even in water, which makes them excellent bio-imaging candidates. Herein, we investigate their use as internal probes in insects by injecting YVO4 : Er(+3), Yb(+3) nanoparticles into fire ants as a biological model, and obtain 2D optical images with 980 nm illumination. High-contrast images with high signal-to-noise ratio are observed by detecting the up-conversion fluorescence as the excitation laser is scanned.

  20. High-contrast mapping of basal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Yaroslavsky, Anna N; Patel, Rakesh; Salomatina, Elena; Li, Chunqiang; Lin, Charles; Al-Arashi, Munir; Neel, Victor

    2012-02-15

    Because of low optical contrast in the visible spectral range, accurate detection of basal cell carcinomas (BCC) remains a challenging problem. In this letter, we experimentally demonstrate that reflectance confocal imaging in the vicinity of 1300 nm can be used for the detection of BCC without exogenous contrast agents. We present high-contrast reflectance confocal images of thick fresh skin tissues with clearly delineated cancer and discuss possible reasons for causing decreased scattering of BCC. Comparison with histopathology confirms that tumors scatter less and exhibit lower pixel values in the images, as compared to benign skin structures. The results demonstrate the feasibility of real-time noninvasive detection of BCC using intrinsic differences in scattering between tumors and normal skin.

  1. Image processing techniques for digital orthophotoquad production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hood, Joy J.; Ladner, L. J.; Champion, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    Orthophotographs have long been recognized for their value as supplements or alternatives to standard maps. Recent trends towards digital cartography have resulted in efforts by the US Geological Survey to develop a digital orthophotoquad production system. Digital image files were created by scanning color infrared photographs on a microdensitometer. Rectification techniques were applied to remove tile and relief displacement, thereby creating digital orthophotos. Image mosaicking software was then used to join the rectified images, producing digital orthophotos in quadrangle format.

  2. Superresolution imaging: a survey of current techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristóbal, G.; Gil, E.; Šroubek, F.; Flusser, J.; Miravet, C.; Rodríguez, F. B.

    2008-08-01

    Imaging plays a key role in many diverse areas of application, such as astronomy, remote sensing, microscopy, and tomography. Owing to imperfections of measuring devices (e.g., optical degradations, limited size of sensors) and instability of the observed scene (e.g., object motion, media turbulence), acquired images can be indistinct, noisy, and may exhibit insuffcient spatial and temporal resolution. In particular, several external effects blur images. Techniques for recovering the original image include blind deconvolution (to remove blur) and superresolution (SR). The stability of these methods depends on having more than one image of the same frame. Differences between images are necessary to provide new information, but they can be almost unperceivable. State-of-the-art SR techniques achieve remarkable results in resolution enhancement by estimating the subpixel shifts between images, but they lack any apparatus for calculating the blurs. In this paper, after introducing a review of current SR techniques we describe two recently developed SR methods by the authors. First, we introduce a variational method that minimizes a regularized energy function with respect to the high resolution image and blurs. In this way we establish a unifying way to simultaneously estimate the blurs and the high resolution image. By estimating blurs we automatically estimate shifts with subpixel accuracy, which is inherent for good SR performance. Second, an innovative learning-based algorithm using a neural architecture for SR is described. Comparative experiments on real data illustrate the robustness and utilization of both methods.

  3. Image registration techniques for multimodal sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altinalev, Tevfik; Cetin, Enis A.; Yardimci, Yasemin C.

    2002-08-01

    Image registration refers to the problem of spatially aligning two or more images. A challenging problem in this area is the registration of images obtained by different types of sensors. In general such images have different gray level characteristics and commonly used techniques such as those based on area correlations cannot be applied directly. On the other hand, contours representing the region boundaries are preserved in most cases. Therefore, contour based registration techniques are applicable to multimodal sensors. In this paper, various registration techniques based on subband decomposition and projection along x and y directions are introduced. The effect of binarization is investigated. Unknown translation and scaling parameters are computed using cross-correlation methods over the projections. Performance of the algorithms is compared.

  4. Ultrasonic imaging techniques for breast cancer detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, N. R.; Marquez, J. D.; Prewett, E. M.; Claytor, T. N.; Nadler, B. R.; Huang, L.

    2006-01-01

    Improving the resolution and specificity of current ultrasonic imaging technology can enhance its relevance to detection of early-stage breast cancers. Ultrasonic evaluation of breast lesions is desirable because it is quick, inexpensive, and does not expose the patient to potentially harmful ionizing radiation. Improved image quality and resolution enables earlier detection and more accurate diagnoses of tumors, thus reducing the number of biopsies performed, increasing treatment options, and lowering mortality, morbidity, and remission percentages. In this work, a novel ultrasonic imaging reconstruction method that exploits straight-ray migration is described. This technique, commonly used in seismic imaging, accounts for scattering more accurately than standard ultrasonic approaches, thus providing superior image resolution. A breast phantom with various inclusions is imaged using a pulse-echo approach. The data are processed using the ultrasonic migration method and results are compared to standard linear ultrasound and to x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans. For an ultrasonic frequency of 2.25 MHz, imaged inclusions and features of approximately 1mm are resolved, although better resolution is expected with minor modifications. Refinement of this application using other imaging techniques such as time-reversal mirrors (TRM), synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), decomposition of the time reversal operator (DORT), and factorization methods is also briefly discussed.

  5. Ultrasonic Imaging Techniques for Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulding, N. R.; Marquez, J. D.; Prewett, E. M.; Claytor, T. N.; Nadler, B. R.

    2008-02-01

    Improving the resolution and specificity of current ultrasonic imaging technology is needed to enhance its relevance to breast cancer detection. A novel ultrasonic imaging reconstruction method is described that exploits classical straight-ray migration. This novel method improves signal processing for better image resolution and uses novel staging hardware options using a pulse-echo approach. A breast phantom with various inclusions is imaged using the classical migration method and is compared to standard computed tomography (CT) scans. These innovative ultrasonic methods incorporate ultrasound data acquisition, beam profile characterization, and image reconstruction. For an ultrasonic frequency of 2.25 MHz, imaged inclusions of approximately 1 cm are resolved and identified. Better resolution is expected with minor modifications. Improved image quality and resolution enables earlier detection and more accurate diagnoses of tumors thus reducing the number of biopsies performed, increasing treatment options, and lowering remission percentages. Using these new techniques the inclusions in the phantom are resolved and compared to the results of standard methods. Refinement of this application using other imaging techniques such as time-reversal mirrors (TRM), synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), decomposition of the time reversal operator (DORT), and factorization methods is also discussed.

  6. Robust document image binarization technique for degraded document images.

    PubMed

    Su, Bolan; Lu, Shijian; Tan, Chew Lim

    2013-04-01

    Segmentation of text from badly degraded document images is a very challenging task due to the high inter/intra-variation between the document background and the foreground text of different document images. In this paper, we propose a novel document image binarization technique that addresses these issues by using adaptive image contrast. The adaptive image contrast is a combination of the local image contrast and the local image gradient that is tolerant to text and background variation caused by different types of document degradations. In the proposed technique, an adaptive contrast map is first constructed for an input degraded document image. The contrast map is then binarized and combined with Canny's edge map to identify the text stroke edge pixels. The document text is further segmented by a local threshold that is estimated based on the intensities of detected text stroke edge pixels within a local window. The proposed method is simple, robust, and involves minimum parameter tuning. It has been tested on three public datasets that are used in the recent document image binarization contest (DIBCO) 2009 & 2011 and handwritten-DIBCO 2010 and achieves accuracies of 93.5%, 87.8%, and 92.03%, respectively, that are significantly higher than or close to that of the best-performing methods reported in the three contests. Experiments on the Bickley diary dataset that consists of several challenging bad quality document images also show the superior performance of our proposed method, compared with other techniques.

  7. Review: Magnetic resonance imaging techniques in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging the eye with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved difficult due to the eye’s propensity to move involuntarily over typical imaging timescales, obscuring the fine structure in the eye due to the resulting motion artifacts. However, advances in MRI technology help to mitigate such drawbacks, enabling the acquisition of high spatiotemporal resolution images with a variety of contrast mechanisms. This review aims to classify the MRI techniques used to date in clinical and preclinical ophthalmologic studies, describing the qualitative and quantitative information that may be extracted and how this may inform on ocular pathophysiology. PMID:23112569

  8. Techniques for molecular imaging probe design.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Fred; Kelly, Kimberly A

    2011-12-01

    Molecular imaging allows clinicians to visualize disease-specific molecules, thereby providing relevant information in the diagnosis and treatment of patients. With advances in genomics and proteomics and underlying mechanisms of disease pathology, the number of targets identified has significantly outpaced the number of developed molecular imaging probes. There has been a concerted effort to bridge this gap with multidisciplinary efforts in chemistry, proteomics, physics, material science, and biology--all essential to progress in molecular imaging probe development. In this review, we discuss target selection, screening techniques, and probe optimization with the aim of developing clinically relevant molecularly targeted imaging agents.

  9. Techniques for Molecular Imaging Probe Design

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Fred; Kelly, Kimberly A.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular imaging allows clinicians to visualize disease specific molecules, thereby providing relevant information in the diagnosis and treatment of patients. With advances in genomics and proteomics and underlying mechanisms of disease pathology, the number of targets identified has significantly outpaced the number of developed molecular imaging probes. There has been a concerted effort to bridge this gap with multidisciplinary efforts in chemistry, proteomics, physics, material science, and biology; all essential to progress in molecular imaging probe development. In this review, we will discuss target selection, screening techniques and probe optimization with the aim of developing clinically relevant molecularly targeted imaging agents. PMID:22201532

  10. Geometric assessment of image quality using digital image registration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tisdale, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    Image registration techniques were developed to perform a geometric quality assessment of multispectral and multitemporal image pairs. Based upon LANDSAT tapes, accuracies to a small fraction of a pixel were demonstrated. Because it is insensitive to the choice of registration areas, the technique is well suited to performance in an automatic system. It may be implemented at megapixel-per-second rates using a commercial minicomputer in combination with a special purpose digital preprocessor.

  11. Comparison of various enhanced radar imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Inder J.; Gandhe, Avinash

    1998-09-01

    Recently, many techniques have been proposed to enhance the quality of radar images obtained using SAR and/or ISAR. These techniques include spatially variant apodization (SVA), adaptive sidelobe reduction (ASR), the Capon method, amplitude and phase estimation of sinusoids (APES) and data extrapolation. SVA is a special case of ASR; whereas the APES algorithm is similar to the Capon method except that it provides a better amplitude estimate. In this paper, the ASR technique, the APES algorithm and data extrapolation are used to generate radar images of two experimental targets and an airborne target. It is shown that although for ideal situations (point targets) the APES algorithm provides the best radar images (reduced sidelobe level and sharp main lobe), its performance degrades quickly for real world targets. The ASR algorithm gives radar images with low sidelobes but at the cost of some loss of information about the target. Also, there is not much improvement in radar image resolution. Data extrapolation, on the other hand, improves image resolution. In this case one can reduce the sidelobes by using non-uniform weights. Any loss in the radar image resolution due to non-uniform weights can be compensated by further extrapolating the scattered field data.

  12. Update on imaging techniques in oculoplastics

    PubMed Central

    Cetinkaya, Altug

    2012-01-01

    Imaging is a beneficial aid to the oculoplastic surgeon especially in orbital and lacrimal disorders when the pathology is not visible from outside. It is a powerful tool that may be benefited in not only diagnosis but also management and follow-up. The most common imaging modalities required are CT and MRI, with CT being more frequently ordered by oculoplastic surgeons. Improvements in technology enabled the acquisition times to shorten incredibly. Radiologists can now obtain images with superb resolution, and isolate the site and tissue of interest from other structures with special techniques. Better contrast agents and 3D imaging capabilities make complicated cases easier to identify. Color Doppler imaging is becoming more popular both for research and clinical purposes. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) added so much to the vascular system imaging recently. Although angiography is still the gold standard, new software and techniques rendered MRA as valuable as angiography in most circumstances. Stereotactic navigation, although in use for a long time, recently became the focus of interest for the oculoplastic surgeon especially in orbital decompressions. Improvements in radiology and nuclear medicine techniques of lacrimal drainage system imaging provided more detailed analysis of the system. PMID:23961020

  13. Interpretation techniques. [image enhancement and pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragg, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    The image enhancement and geometric correction and registration techniques developed and/or demonstrated on ERTS data are relatively mature and greatly enhance the utility of the data for a large variety of users. Pattern recognition was improved by the use of signature extension, feature extension, and other classification techniques. Many of these techniques need to be developed and generalized to become operationally useful. Advancements in the mass precision processing of ERTS were demonstrated, providing the hope for future earth resources data to be provided in a more readily usable state. Also in evidence is an increasing and healthy interaction between the techniques developers and the user/applications investigators.

  14. Interpretation techniques. [image enhancement and pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragg, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    The image enhancement and geometric correction and registration techniques developed and/or demonstrated on ERTS data are relatively mature and greatly enhance the utility of the data for a large variety of users. Pattern recognition was improved by the use of signature extension, feature extension, and other classification techniques. Many of these techniques need to be developed and generalized to become operationally useful. Advancements in the mass precision processing of ERTS were demonstrated, providing the hope for future earth resources data to be provided in a more readily usable state. Also in evidence is an increasing and healthy interaction between the techniques developers and the user/applications investigators.

  15. Investigating CBIR Techniques for Cervicographic Images

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Zhiyun; Antani, Sameer; Long, L. Rodney; Jeronimo, Jose; Thoma, George R.

    2007-01-01

    The National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) are creating a digital archive of 100,000 cervicographic images and clinical and diagnostic data obtained through two major longitudinal studies. In addition to developing tools for Web access to these data, we are conducting research in Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) techniques for retrieving visually similar and pathologically relevant images. The resulting system of tools is expected to greatly benefit medical education and research into uterine cervical cancer which is the second most common cancer affecting women worldwide. Our current prototype system with fundamental CBIR functions operates on a small test subset of images and retrieves relevant cervix images containing tissue regions similar in color, texture, size, and/or location to a query image region marked by the user. Initial average precision result for retrieval by color of acetowhite lesions is 52%, and for the columnar epithelium is 64.2%, respectively. PMID:18693952

  16. Digital Imaging Techniques for Radiotherapy Treatment Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leszczynski, Konrad Wojciech

    The curative effect of ionizing radiation depends strongly upon the precision with which dose is delivered to the prescribed target volume. The requirement for high geometric accuracy in patient positioning is even more stringent where complex treatment techniques are used, such as conformal, dynamic arc or truly 3-D (non-coplanar) beams. It is expected that digital on-line portal imaging devices will play a key role in the monitoring of radiation therapy treatments. Different approaches to on-line portal image acquisition have been compared, and the basic imaging properties of a video portal imager have been evaluated and discussed in this thesis. Analysis of the system performance indicates the most efficient ways to effect improvements in spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. Digital image processing techniques for noise suppression and contrast enhancement have been developed and implemented in order to facilitate visual analysis of on-line portal images. Results obtained with phantom and clinical images indicate that improvement in image quality can be achieved using adaptive filtering and local histogram modification. A novel study of observer performance with on-line portal images showed that enhancement of contrast by selective local histogram modification significantly improves perceptibility of anatomical landmarks and assures higher accuracy in quantitative computer-assisted treatment verification. Fully automated treatment verification is the ultimate goal of on-line digital portal imaging. It should include analysis of size and shape of the radiation field as well as evaluation of placement of the field with respect to the internal anatomy of the patient. A computerized technique, has been developed, for extraction of the treatment field edges and for parametrization of the field, and examples of its application to automated analysis of size and shape of the radiation field are presented.

  17. A summary of image segmentation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spirkovska, Lilly

    1993-01-01

    Machine vision systems are often considered to be composed of two subsystems: low-level vision and high-level vision. Low level vision consists primarily of image processing operations performed on the input image to produce another image with more favorable characteristics. These operations may yield images with reduced noise or cause certain features of the image to be emphasized (such as edges). High-level vision includes object recognition and, at the highest level, scene interpretation. The bridge between these two subsystems is the segmentation system. Through segmentation, the enhanced input image is mapped into a description involving regions with common features which can be used by the higher level vision tasks. There is no theory on image segmentation. Instead, image segmentation techniques are basically ad hoc and differ mostly in the way they emphasize one or more of the desired properties of an ideal segmenter and in the way they balance and compromise one desired property against another. These techniques can be categorized in a number of different groups including local vs. global, parallel vs. sequential, contextual vs. noncontextual, interactive vs. automatic. In this paper, we categorize the schemes into three main groups: pixel-based, edge-based, and region-based. Pixel-based segmentation schemes classify pixels based solely on their gray levels. Edge-based schemes first detect local discontinuities (edges) and then use that information to separate the image into regions. Finally, region-based schemes start with a seed pixel (or group of pixels) and then grow or split the seed until the original image is composed of only homogeneous regions. Because there are a number of survey papers available, we will not discuss all segmentation schemes. Rather than a survey, we take the approach of a detailed overview. We focus only on the more common approaches in order to give the reader a flavor for the variety of techniques available yet present enough

  18. Functional magnetic resonance imaging: imaging techniques and contrast mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Howseman, A M; Bowtell, R W

    1999-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a widely used technique for generating images or maps of human brain activity. The applications of the technique are widespread in cognitive neuroscience and it is hoped they will eventually extend into clinical practice. The activation signal measured with fMRI is predicated on indirectly measuring changes in the concentration of deoxyhaemoglobin which arise from an increase in blood oxygenation in the vicinity of neuronal firing. The exact mechanisms of this blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast are highly complex. The signal measured is dependent on both the underlying physiological events and the imaging physics. BOLD contrast, although sensitive, is not a quantifiable measure of neuronal activity. A number of different imaging techniques and parameters can be used for fMRI, the choice of which depends on the particular requirements of each functional imaging experiment. The high-speed MRI technique, echo-planar imaging provides the basis for most fMRI experiments. The problems inherent to this method and the ways in which these may be overcome are particularly important in the move towards performing functional studies on higher field MRI systems. Future developments in techniques and hardware are also likely to enhance the measurement of brain activity using MRI. PMID:10466145

  19. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques.

    PubMed

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient's response-guided refraction) is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper's main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques--including Jackson's Cross-Cylinder test (JCC)--relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software's usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training.

  20. Red flag imaging techniques in Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Payal; Canto, Marcia Irene

    2013-07-01

    The key to detection and treatment of early neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus (BE) is thorough and careful inspection of the Barrett's segment. The greatest role for red flag techniques is to help identify neoplastic lesions for targeted biopsy and therapy. High-definition white light endoscopy (HD-WLE) can potentially improve endoscopic imaging of BE compared with standard endoscopy, but little scientific evidence supports this. The addition of autofluorescence imaging to HD-WLE and narrow band imaging increases sensitivity and the false-positive rate without significantly improving overall detection of BE-related neoplasia.

  1. Digital imaging techniques in experimental stress analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, W. H.; Ranson, W. F.

    1982-01-01

    Digital imaging techniques are utilized as a measure of surface displacement components in laser speckle metrology. An image scanner which is interfaced to a computer records and stores in memory the laser speckle patterns of an object in a reference and deformed configuration. Subsets of the deformed images are numerically correlated with the references as a measure of surface displacements. Discrete values are determined around a closed contour for plane problems which then become input into a boundary integral equation method in order to calculate surface traction in the contour. Stresses are then calculated within this boundary. The solution procedure is illustrated by a numerical example of a case of uniform tension.

  2. High contrast computed tomography with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itai, Yuji; Takeda, Tohoru; Akatsuka, Takao; Maeda, Tomokazu; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Uchida, Akira; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Kazama, Masahiro; Wu, Jin; Ando, Masami

    1995-02-01

    This article describes a new monochromatic x-ray CT system using synchrotron radiation with applications in biomedical diagnosis which is currently under development. The system is designed to provide clear images and to detect contrast materials at low concentration for the quantitative functional evaluation of organs in correspondence with their anatomical structures. In this system, with x-ray energy changing from 30 to 52 keV, images can be obtained to detect various contrast materials (iodine, barium, and gadolinium), and K-edge energy subtraction is applied. Herein, the features of the new system designed to enhance the advantages of SR are reported. With the introduction of a double-crystal monochromator, the high-order x-ray contamination is eliminated. The newly designed CCD detector with a wide dynamic range of 60 000:1 has a spatial resolution of 200 μm. The resulting image quality, which is expected to show improved contrast and spatial resolution, is currently under investigation.

  3. Surface definition technique for clinical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wen-gen; Simovsky, Ilya; Li, Andrew; Kramer, David M.; Kaufman, Leon; Rhodes, Michael L.

    1991-05-01

    Surface descriptions are difficult to specify. Though image processing techniques are well established to generate nearly any planar or three-dimensionally curved surface, methods to describe such complex shapes are often disorienting. Even the best intentioned interface for surface description can confuse a seasoned user. This paper introduces a surface definition technique that is simple, accurate and intuitive for the needs of routine medical image analysis. We describe a procedure to define a curved surface based on surface intersection points in a series of parallel images. In this medical context, points selected describe a surface that contains pathology of diagnostic interest. Using this technique diagnostic views are generated that conform to natural anatomic shape, physicians are no longer restricted to orthogonal or even single curve surfaces. This user interface provides analytic descriptions to produce surface views that use a Fourier-shift technique for reconstruction. Surfaces through a volume are produced with resolution equal to that of the original data set. Example images are illustrated.

  4. Retinal Imaging Techniques for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening

    PubMed Central

    Goh, James Kang Hao; Cheung, Carol Y.; Sim, Shaun Sebastian; Tan, Pok Chien; Tan, Gavin Siew Wei; Wong, Tien Yin

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus, demand for diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening platforms is steeply increasing. Early detection and treatment of DR are key public health interventions that can greatly reduce the likelihood of vision loss. Current DR screening programs typically employ retinal fundus photography, which relies on skilled readers for manual DR assessment. However, this is labor-intensive and suffers from inconsistency across sites. Hence, there has been a recent proliferation of automated retinal image analysis software that may potentially alleviate this burden cost-effectively. Furthermore, current screening programs based on 2-dimensional fundus photography do not effectively screen for diabetic macular edema (DME). Optical coherence tomography is becoming increasingly recognized as the reference standard for DME assessment and can potentially provide a cost-effective solution for improving DME detection in large-scale DR screening programs. Current screening techniques are also unable to image the peripheral retina and require pharmacological pupil dilation; ultra-widefield imaging and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, which address these drawbacks, possess great potential. In this review, we summarize the current DR screening methods using various retinal imaging techniques, and also outline future possibilities. Advances in retinal imaging techniques can potentially transform the management of patients with diabetes, providing savings in health care costs and resources. PMID:26830491

  5. Imaging Instrumentation and Techniques for Precision Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parodi, Katia; Parodi, Katia; Thieke, Christian; Thieke, Christian

    Over the last decade, several technological advances have considerably improved the achievable precision of dose delivery in radiation therapy. Clinical exploitation of the superior tumor-dose conformality offered by modern radiotherapy techniques like intensity-modulated radiotherapy and ion beam therapy requires morphological and functional assessment of the tumor during the entire therapy chain from treatment planning to beam application and treatment response evaluation. This chapter will address the main rationale and role of imaging in state-of-the-art external beam radiotherapy. Moreover, it will present the status of novel imaging instrumentation and techniques being nowadays introduced in clinical use or still under development for image guidance and, ultimately, dose guidance of precision radiotherapy.

  6. Generative technique for dynamic infrared image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Cao, Zhiguo; Zhang, Tianxu

    2001-09-01

    The generative technique of the dynamic infrared image was discussed in this paper. Because infrared sensor differs from CCD camera in imaging mechanism, it generates the infrared image by incepting the infrared radiation of scene (including target and background). The infrared imaging sensor is affected deeply by the atmospheric radiation, the environmental radiation and the attenuation of atmospheric radiation transfers. Therefore at first in this paper the imaging influence of all kinds of the radiations was analyzed and the calculation formula of radiation was provided, in addition, the passive scene and the active scene were analyzed separately. Then the methods of calculation in the passive scene were provided, and the functions of the scene model, the atmospheric transmission model and the material physical attribute databases were explained. Secondly based on the infrared imaging model, the design idea, the achievable way and the software frame for the simulation software of the infrared image sequence were introduced in SGI workstation. Under the guidance of the idea above, in the third segment of the paper an example of simulative infrared image sequences was presented, which used the sea and sky as background and used the warship as target and used the aircraft as eye point. At last the simulation synthetically was evaluated and the betterment scheme was presented.

  7. Advanced automated char image analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Wu; Edward Lester; Michael Cloke

    2006-05-15

    Char morphology is an important characteristic when attempting to understand coal behavior and coal burnout. In this study, an augmented algorithm has been proposed to identify char types using image analysis. On the basis of a series of image processing steps, a char image is singled out from the whole image, which then allows the important major features of the char particle to be measured, including size, porosity, and wall thickness. The techniques for automated char image analysis have been tested against char images taken from ICCP Char Atlas as well as actual char particles derived from pyrolyzed char samples. Thirty different chars were prepared in a drop tube furnace operating at 1300{sup o}C, 1% oxygen, and 100 ms from 15 different world coals sieved into two size fractions (53-75 and 106-125 {mu}m). The results from this automated technique are comparable with those from manual analysis, and the additional detail from the automated sytem has potential use in applications such as combustion modeling systems. Obtaining highly detailed char information with automated methods has traditionally been hampered by the difficulty of automatic recognition of individual char particles. 20 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Techniques for millimetre-wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettington, Alan H.; Dunn, Dennis; Alexander, Naomi E.; Wabby, Anas; Chen, Chun-Hong

    2004-12-01

    This paper reviews the formation of an image with coherent and incoherent radiation. It discusses the various mm-wave methods for electronic beam-forming and beam-steering such as phased array, leaky-wave antennas, up-conversion, tapped delay lines and digital beam-forming techniques. These methods are related in the paper to their optical analogues of beam-forming and steering by a lens and the measurement of the aperture function in the case of holography. It concludes that digital techniques will be used in the future when the cost of receivers is reduced but that at present opto-mechanical techniques are more cost effective. A high efficiency, compact opto-mechanical system is described. This is able to operate at any wavelength and be active or passive. Typical 94GHz images are presented.

  9. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M. Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient’s response-guided refraction) is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper’s main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques—including Jackson’s Cross-Cylinder test (JCC)—relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software’s usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training. PMID:26938648

  10. Network asymptotics for high contrast impedance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Borcea, L.; Papanicolaou, G.C.; Berryman, J.G.

    1996-05-01

    Fluid contaminant plumes underground are often electrically conducting and, therefore, can be imaged using electrical impedance tomography. The authors introduce an output least-squares method for impedance tomography problems that have regions of high conductivity surrounded by regions of lower conductivity. The high conductivity is modeled on network approximation results from an asymptotic analysis and its recovery is based on this model. The smoothly varying part of the conductivity is recovered by a linearization process as is usual. The authors present the results of several numerical experiments that illustrate the performance of the method.

  11. Adrenal imaging (Part 1): Imaging techniques and primary cortical lesions

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Ananya; Das, Chandan J.; Dhamija, Ekta; Kumar, Rakesh; Gupta, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal glands can be affected by a variety of lesions. Adrenal lesions can either be primary, of adrenal origin, or secondary to other pathologies. Primary adrenal lesions can further be either of cortical or medullary origin. Functioning adrenal lesions can also give clues to the histologic diagnosis and direct workup. Over the years, various imaging techniques have been developed that have increased diagnostic accuracy and helped in better characterization of adrenal lesions non-invasively. In the first part of the two part series, we review adrenal imaging techniques and adrenal cortical tumors such as adenomas, adrenocortical tumors, adrenal hyperplasia and oncocytomas. PMID:25593820

  12. Image processing techniques for passive millimeter-wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettington, Alan H.; Gleed, David G.

    1998-08-01

    We present our results on the application of image processing techniques for passive millimeter-wave imaging and discuss possible future trends. Passive millimeter-wave imaging is useful in poor weather such as in fog and cloud. Its spatial resolution, however, can be restricted due to the diffraction limit of the front aperture. Its resolution may be increased using super-resolution techniques but often at the expense of processing time. Linear methods may be implemented in real time but non-linear methods which are required to restore missing spatial frequencies are usually more time consuming. In the present paper we describe fast super-resolution techniques which are potentially capable of being applied in real time. Associated issues such as reducing the influence of noise and improving recognition capability will be discussed. Various techniques have been used to enhance passive millimeter wave images giving excellent results and providing a significant quantifiable increase in spatial resolution. Examples of applying these techniques to imagery will be given.

  13. Multi-wavelength VCSEL arrays using high-contrast gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglund, Erik; Gustavsson, Johan S.; Sorin, Wayne V.; Bengtsson, Jörgen; Fattal, David; Haglund, Àsa; Tan, Michael; Larsson, Anders

    2017-02-01

    The use of a high-contrast grating (HCG) as the top mirror in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) allows for setting the resonance wavelength by the grating parameters in a post-epitaxial growth fabrication process. Using this technique, we demonstrate electrically driven multi-wavelength VCSEL arrays at 980 nm wavelength. The VCSELs are GaAs-based and the suspended GaAs HCGs were fabricated using electron-beam lithography, dry etching and selective removal of an InGaP sacrificial layer. The air-coupled cavity design enabled 4-channel arrays with 5 nm wavelength spacing and sub-mA threshold currents thanks to the high HCG reflectance.

  14. 800-MeV magnetic-focused flash proton radiography for high-contrast imaging of low-density biologically-relevant targets using an inverse-scatter collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Matthew S.; Allison, Jason; Espinoza, Camilo; Goett, John Jerome; Hogan, Gary; Hollander, Brian; Kwiatkowski, Kris; Lopez, Julian; Mariam, Fesseha; Martinez, Michael; Medina, Jason; Medina, Patrick; Merrill, Frank E.; Morley, Deborah; Morris, Chris; Murray, Matthew; Nedrow, Paul; Saunders, Alexander; Schurman, Tamsen; Sisneros, Thomas; Tainter, Amy; Trouw, Frans; Tupa, Dale; Tybo, Josh; Wilde, Carl

    2016-03-01

    Proton radiography shows great promise as a tool to guide proton beam therapy (PBT) in real time. Here, we demonstrate two ways in which the technology may progress towards that goal. Firstly, with a proton beam that is 800 MeV in energy, target tissue receives a dose of radiation with very tight lateral constraint. This could present a benefit over the traditional treatment energies of ~200 MeV, where up to 1 cm of lateral tissue receives scattered radiation at the target. At 800 MeV, the beam travels completely through the object with minimal deflection, thus constraining lateral dose to a smaller area. The second novelty of this system is the utilization of magnetic quadrupole refocusing lenses that mitigate the blur caused by multiple Coulomb scattering within an object, enabling high resolution imaging of thick objects, such as the human body. This system is demonstrated on ex vivo salamander and zebrafish specimens, as well as on a realistic hand phantom. The resulting images provide contrast sufficient to visualize thin tissue, as well as fine detail within the target volumes, and the ability to measure small changes in density. Such a system, combined with PBT, would enable the delivery of a highly specific dose of radiation that is monitored and guided in real time.

  15. In vitro imaging techniques in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Långström, Bengt; Andrén, Per E; Lindhe, Orjan; Svedberg, Marie; Hall, Håkan

    2007-01-01

    Neurodegeneration induces various changes in the brain, changes that may be investigated using neuroimaging techniques. The in vivo techniques are useful for the visualization of major changes, and the progressing abnormalities may also be followed longitudinally. However, to study and quantify minor abnormalities, neuroimaging of postmortem brain tissue is used. These in vitro methods are complementary to the in vivo techniques and contribute to the knowledge of pathophysiology and etiology of the neurodegenerative diseases. In vitro radioligand autoradiography has given great insight in the involvement of different neuronal receptor systems in these diseases. Data on the dopamine and cholinergic systems in neurodegeneration are discussed in this review. Also, the amyloid plaques are studied using in vitro radioligand autoradiography. Using one of the newer methods, imaging matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry, the distribution of a large number of peptides and proteins may be detected in vitro on brain cryosections. In this overview, we describe in vitro imaging techniques in the neurodegenerative diseases as a complement to in vivo positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography imaging.

  16. Combining calcium imaging with other optical techniques.

    PubMed

    Canepari, Marco; Zecevic, Dejan; Vogt, Kaspar E; Ogden, David; De Waard, Michel

    2013-12-01

    Ca(2+) imaging is a commonly used approach for measuring Ca(2+) signals at high spatial resolution. The method is often combined with electrode recordings to correlate electrical and chemical signals or to investigate Ca(2+) signals following an electrical stimulation. To obtain information on electrical activity at the same spatial resolution, Ca(2+) imaging must be combined with membrane potential imaging. Similarly, stimulation of subcellular compartments requires photostimulation. Thus, combining Ca(2+) imaging with an additional optical technique facilitates the study of a number of physiological questions. The aim of this article is to introduce some basic principles regarding the combination of Ca(2+) imaging with other optical techniques. We discuss the design of the optics, the design of experimental protocols, the optical characteristics of Ca(2+) indicators used in combination with an optical probe, and the affinity of the Ca(2+) indicator in relation to the type of measurement. This information will enable the reader to devise an optimal strategy for combined optical experiments.

  17. Feasibility study of hidden flow imaging based on laser speckle technique using multiperspectives contrast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abookasis, David; Moshe, Tomer

    2014-11-01

    This paper demonstrates the insertion of lens array in the front of a CCD camera in a laser speckle imaging (LSI) like-technique to acquire multiple speckle reflectance projections for imaging blood flow in an intact biological tissue. In some of LSI applications, flow imaging is obtained by thinning or removing of the upper tissue layers to access blood vessels. In contrast, with the proposed approach flow imaging can be achieved while the tissue is intact. In the system, each lens from an hexagonal lens array observed the sample from slightly different perspectives and captured with a CCD camera. In the computer, these multiview raw images are converted to speckled contrast maps. Then, a self-deconvolution shift-and-add algorithm is employed for processing yields high contrast flow information. The method is experimentally validated first with a plastic tube filled with scattering liquid running at different controlled flow rates hidden in a biological tissue and then extensively tested for imaging of cerebral blood flow in an intact rodent head experience different conditions. A total of fifteen mice were used in the experiments divided randomly into three groups as follows: Group 1 (n=5) consisted of injured mice experience hypoxic ischemic brain injury monitored for ~40 min. Group 2 (n=5) injured mice experience anoxic brain injury monitored up to 20 min. Group 3 (n=5) experience functional activation monitored up to ~35 min. To increase tissue transparency and the penetration depth of photons through head tissue layers, an optical clearing method was employed. To our knowledge, this work presents for the first time the use of lens array in LSI scheme.

  18. Vascular Imaging Techniques of the Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Maria Isabel; Barnaure, Isabelle; Gariani, Joanna; Boto, José; Pellaton, Alain; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Kulcsar, Zsolt

    2017-04-01

    The various imaging techniques used to depict vascular lesions of the spinal cord are described in this article with particular emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), vascular sequences, and advantages of high-field MRI. Technical vascular protocols are discussed in computed tomography, MRI, and conventional angiography. The diverse magnetic resonance angiography protocols are presented as well as their findings, specificities, and pitfalls. A review of the vascular anatomy and the most common pathologies analyzed by magnetic resonance angiography and conventional angiography is described.

  19. Image Recognition Techniques for Gamma Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vlachos, D. S.; Tsabaris, C. G.

    2007-12-26

    Photons, after generated from a radioactive source and before they deposit their energy in a photo detector, are subsequent to multiple scattering mechanisms. As a result, the measured energy from the photo detector is different from the energy the photon had when generated. This is known as folding of the photon energy. Moreover, statistical fluctuation inside the detector contribute to energy folding. In this work, a new method is presented for unfolding the gamma ray spectrum. The method uses a 2-dimensional representation of the measured spectrum (image) and then uses image recognition techniques, and especially differential edge detection, to generate the original spectrum.

  20. Study of quality perception in medical images based on comparison of contrast enhancement techniques in mammographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheus, B.; Verçosa, L. B.; Barufaldi, B.; Schiabel, H.

    2014-03-01

    With the absolute prevalence of digital images in mammography several new tools became available for radiologist; such as CAD schemes, digital zoom and contrast alteration. This work focuses in contrast variation and how the radiologist reacts to these changes when asked to evaluated image quality. Three contrast enhancing techniques were used in this study: conventional equalization, CCB Correction [1] - a digitization correction - and value subtraction. A set of 100 images was used in tests from some available online mammographic databases. The tests consisted of the presentation of all four versions of an image (original plus the three contrast enhanced images) to the specialist, requested to rank each one from the best up to worst quality for diagnosis. Analysis of results has demonstrated that CCB Correction [1] produced better images in almost all cases. Equalization, which mathematically produces a better contrast, was considered the worst for mammography image quality enhancement in the majority of cases (69.7%). The value subtraction procedure produced images considered better than the original in 84% of cases. Tests indicate that, for the radiologist's perception, it seems more important to guaranty full visualization of nuances than a high contrast image. Another result observed is that the "ideal" scanner curve does not yield the best result for a mammographic image. The important contrast range is the middle of the histogram, where nodules and masses need to be seen and clearly distinguished.

  1. [Imaging techniques in modern trauma diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Vogl, T J; Eichler, K; Marzi, I; Wutzler, S; Zacharowski, K; Frellessen, C

    2017-08-17

    Modern trauma room management requires interdisciplinary teamwork and synchronous communication between a team of anaesthesists, surgeons and radiologists. As the length of stay in the trauma room influences morbidity and mortality of a severely injured person, optimizing time is one of the main targets. With the direct involvement of modern imaging techniques the injuries caused by trauma should be detected within a very short period of time in order to enable a priority-orientated treatment. Radiology influences structure and process quality, management and development of trauma room algorithms regarding the use of imaging techniques. For the individual case interventional therapy methods can be added. Based on current data and on the Frankfurt experience the current diagnostic concepts of trauma diagnostics are presented.

  2. [Imaging techniques in modern trauma diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Vogl, T J; Eichler, K; Marzi, I; Wutzler, S; Zacharowski, K; Frellessen, C

    2017-05-01

    Modern trauma room management requires interdisciplinary teamwork and synchronous communication between a team of anaesthesists, surgeons and radiologists. As the length of stay in the trauma room influences morbidity and mortality of a severely injured person, optimizing time is one of the main targets. With the direct involvement of modern imaging techniques the injuries caused by trauma should be detected within a very short period of time in order to enable a priority-orientated treatment. Radiology influences structure and process quality, management and development of trauma room algorithms regarding the use of imaging techniques. For the individual case interventional therapy methods can be added. Based on current data and on the Frankfurt experience the current diagnostic concepts of trauma diagnostics are presented.

  3. [Imaging techniques in modern trauma diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Vogl, T J; Eichler, K; Marzi, I; Wutzler, S; Zacharowski, K; Frellessen, C

    2017-09-21

    Modern trauma room management requires interdisciplinary teamwork and synchronous communication between a team of anaesthesists, surgeons and radiologists. As the length of stay in the trauma room influences morbidity and mortality of a severely injured person, optimizing time is one of the main targets. With the direct involvement of modern imaging techniques the injuries caused by trauma should be detected within a very short period of time in order to enable a priority-orientated treatment. Radiology influences structure and process quality, management and development of trauma room algorithms regarding the use of imaging techniques. For the individual case interventional therapy methods can be added. Based on current data and on the Frankfurt experience the current diagnostic concepts of trauma diagnostics are presented.

  4. Imaging In focus: Reflected light imaging: Techniques and applications.

    PubMed

    Guggenheim, Emily J; Lynch, Iseult; Rappoport, Joshua Z

    2017-02-01

    Reflectance imaging is a broad term that describes the formation of images by the detection of illumination light that is back-scattered from reflective features within a sample. Reflectance imaging can be performed in a variety of different configurations, such as confocal, oblique angle illumination, structured illumination, interferometry and total internal reflectance, permitting a plethora of biomedical applications. Reflectance imaging has proven indispensable for critical investigations into the safety and understanding of biomedically and environmentally relevant nano-materials, an area of high priority and investment. The non-destructive in vivo imaging ability of reflectance techniques permits alternative diagnostic strategies that may eventually facilitate the eradication of some invasive biopsy procedures. Reflectance can also provide additional structural information and clarity necessary in fluorescent based in vivo studies. Near-coverslip interrogation techniques, such as reflectance interferometry and total internal reflection, have provided a label free means to investigate cell-surface contacts, cell motility and vesicle trafficking in vivo and in vitro. Other key advances include the ability to acquire superresolution reflectance images providing increased spatial resolution.

  5. Lunar surface chemistry: A new imaging technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andre, C.G.; Bielefeld, M.J.; Eliason, E.; Soderblom, L.A.; Adler, I.; Philpotts, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Detailed chemical maps of the lunar surface have been constructed by applying a new weighted-filter imaging technique to Apollo 15 and Apollo 16 x-ray fluorescence data. The data quality improvement is amply demonstrated by (i) modes in the frequency distribution, representing highland and mare soil suites, which are not evident before data filtering and (ii) numerous examples of chemical variations which are correlated with small-scale (about 15 kilometer) lunar topographic features.

  6. Imaging Body Fat: Techniques and Cardiometabolic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H.; Chen, Y. E; Eitzman, D.T.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a world-wide epidemic and is associated with multiple comorbidities. The mechanisms underlying the relationship between obesity and adverse health outcomes remain poorly understood. This may be due to several factors including the crude measures used to estimate adiposity, the striking heterogeneity between adipose tissue depots, and the influence of fat accumulation in multiple organs. In order to advance our understanding of fat stores and associated co-morbidities in humans, it will be necessary to image adiposity throughout the body and ultimately also assess its functionality. Large clinical studies are demonstrating the prognostic importance of adipose tissue imaging. Newer techniques capable of imaging fat metabolism and other functions of adipose tissue may provide additional prognostic utility and may be useful in guiding therapeutic interventions. PMID:25147343

  7. Biometric Identification Using Holographic Radar Imaging Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, Douglas L.; Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.; Kennedy, Mike O.; Foote, Harlan P.

    2007-04-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers have been at the forefront of developing innovative screening systems to enhance security and a novel imaging system to provide custom-fit clothing using holographic radar imaging techniques. First-of-a-kind cylindrical holographic imaging systems have been developed to screen people at security checkpoints for the detection of concealed, body worn, non-metallic threats such as plastic and liquid explosives, knifes and contraband. Another embodiment of this technology is capable of obtaining full sized body measurements in near real time without the person under surveillance removing their outer garments. Radar signals readily penetrate clothing and reflect off the water in skin. This full body measurement system is commercially available for best fitting ready to wear clothing, which was the first “biometric” application for this technology. One compelling feature of this technology for security biometric applications is that it can see effectively through disguises, appliances and body hair.

  8. Biometric identification using holographic radar imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMakin, Douglas L.; Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.; Kennedy, Mike O.; Foote, Harlen P.

    2007-04-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers have been at the forefront of developing innovative screening systems to enhance security and a novel imaging system to provide custom-fit clothing using holographic radar imaging techniques. First-of-a-kind cylindrical holographic imaging systems have been developed to screen people at security checkpoints for the detection of concealed, body worn, non-metallic threats such as plastic and liquid explosives, knifes and contraband. Another embodiment of this technology is capable of obtaining full sized body measurements in near real time without the person under surveillance removing their outer garments. Radar signals readily penetrate clothing and reflect off the water in skin. This full body measurement system is commercially available for best fitting ready to wear clothing, which was the first "biometric" application for this technology. One compelling feature of this technology for security biometric applications is that it can see effectively through disguises, appliances and body hair.

  9. Diagnostic imaging techniques in thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Toriumi, D.M.; Mafee, M.F.

    1988-02-01

    With the refinement of fine-needle aspiration, the specific applications of thyroid imaging techniques need to be reevaluated for efficiency and cost containment. No thyroid imaging test should be routinely obtained. Radionuclide scanning is most beneficial in evaluating the functional status of thyroid nodules when fine-needle aspiration is inadequate, the findings are benign, or when there is no discrete nodule that is palpated in an enlarged gland. When fine-needle aspiration is unavailable or unreliable, radionuclide scanning becomes a first-line diagnostic tool. Ultrasonography should be used primarily for identifying a solid component of a cystic nodule, determining the size of nodules on thyroxine suppression that are not easily palpable, or for performing guided fine-needle aspiration. Computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging both have a definite role in the evaluation of thyroid tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging is superior to computerized tomography for the evaluation of metastatic, retrotracheal, or mediastinal involvement of large thyroid tumors or goiters. Careful selection of the diagnostic techniques will ensure more accurate diagnosis and reduce unnecessary patient costs in the treatment of thyroid cancer.

  10. Resolution enhancement techniques for halftoned images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Byong Tae; Lee, Jong Ok; Kim, Choon-Woo; Lee, Ho Keun; Kim, Sang Ho

    2007-01-01

    Recently, speed and resolution of electrophotographic printer engine have been significantly improved. In today's market, it is not difficult to find low to mid-end electrophotographic printers with the spatial resolution greater than 600 dpi and/or bit-depth resolution more than 1 bit. Printing speed is determined by the processing time at computer, data transmission time between computer and printer, and processing and printing time at printer. When halftoning is performed at computer side, halftoned data would be compressed and sent to printer. In this case, increase in the spatial and bit-depth resolution would increase data size to be transmitted and memory size at printer. For a high-speed printer, increased transmission time may limit the throughput in imaging chain. One of possible solutions to this problem is to develop resolution enhancement techniques. In this paper, a fast and efficient spatial resolution enhancement technique is proposed. Objectives of the proposed technique are to reduce the data size for transmission and minimize image quality deterioration. In the proposed technique, number of black pixels in the halftoned data is binary coded for data reduction. At printer, black pixel placement algorithm is applied to binary coded data. For non-edge area, screen order is utilized for the black pixel placement. When identified as edge area, locations of black pixels are selected by the edge order designed by genetic algorithm.

  11. High contrast single molecule tracking in the pericellular coat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrimgeour, Jan; McLane, Louis T.; Curtis, Jennifer E.

    2014-03-01

    The pericellular coat is a robust, hydrated, polymer brush-like structure that can extend several micrometers into the extracellular space around living cells. By controlling access to the cell surface, acting as a filter and storage reservoir for proteins, and actively controlling tissue-immune system interactions, the cell coat performs many important functions at scales ranging from the single cell to whole tissues. The cell coat consists of a malleable backbone - the large polysaccharide hyaluronic acid (HA) - with its structure, material properties, and ultimately its bio-functionality tuned by a diverse set of HA binding proteins. These proteins add charge, cross-links and growth factor-like ligands to the coat To probe the dynamic behavior of this soft biomaterial we have used high contrast single molecule imaging, based on highly inclined laser illumination, to observe individual fluorescently labeled HA binding proteins within the cell coat. Our work focuses on the cell coat of living chondrocyte (cartilage) cells, and in particular the effect of the large, highly charged, protein aggrecan on the properties of the coat. Through single molecule imaging we observe that aggrecan is tightly tethered to HA, and plays an important role in cell coat extension and stiffening.

  12. Robustness of speckle imaging techniques applied to horizontal imaging scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Jeremy P.

    Atmospheric turbulence near the ground severely limits the quality of imagery acquired over long horizontal paths. In defense, surveillance, and border security applications, there is interest in deploying man-portable, embedded systems incorporating image reconstruction to improve the quality of imagery available to operators. To be effective, these systems must operate over significant variations in turbulence conditions while also subject to other variations due to operation by novice users. Systems that meet these requirements and are otherwise designed to be immune to the factors that cause variation in performance are considered robust. In addition to robustness in design, the portable nature of these systems implies a preference for systems with a minimum level of computational complexity. Speckle imaging methods are one of a variety of methods recently been proposed for use in man-portable horizontal imagers. In this work, the robustness of speckle imaging methods is established by identifying a subset of design parameters that provide immunity to the expected variations in operating conditions while minimizing the computation time necessary for image recovery. This performance evaluation is made possible using a novel technique for simulating anisoplanatic image formation. I find that incorporate as few as 15 image frames and 4 estimates of the object phase per reconstructed frame provide an average reduction of 45% reduction in Mean Squared Error (MSE) and 68% reduction in deviation in MSE. In addition, the Knox-Thompson phase recovery method is demonstrated to produce images in half the time required by the bispectrum. Finally, it is shown that certain blind image quality metrics can be used in place of the MSE to evaluate reconstruction quality in field scenarios. Using blind metrics rather depending on user estimates allows for reconstruction quality that differs from the minimum MSE by as little as 1%, significantly reducing the deviation in

  13. Special feature on imaging systems and techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wuqiang; Giakos, George

    2013-07-01

    The IEEE International Conference on Imaging Systems and Techniques (IST'2012) was held in Manchester, UK, on 16-17 July 2012. The participants came from 26 countries or regions: Austria, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, India, Iran, Iraq, Italy, Japan, Korea, Latvia, Malaysia, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tunisia, UAE, UK and USA. The technical program of the conference consisted of a series of scientific and technical sessions, exploring physical principles, engineering and applications of new imaging systems and techniques, as reflected by the diversity of the submitted papers. Following a rigorous review process, a total of 123 papers were accepted, and they were organized into 30 oral presentation sessions and a poster session. In addition, six invited keynotes were arranged. The conference not only provided the participants with a unique opportunity to exchange ideas and disseminate research outcomes but also paved a way to establish global collaboration. Following the IST'2012, a total of 55 papers, which were technically extended substantially from their versions in the conference proceeding, were submitted as regular papers to this special feature of Measurement Science and Technology . Following a rigorous reviewing process, 25 papers have been finally accepted for publication in this special feature and they are organized into three categories: (1) industrial tomography, (2) imaging systems and techniques and (3) image processing. These papers not only present the latest developments in the field of imaging systems and techniques but also offer potential solutions to existing problems. We hope that this special feature provides a good reference for researchers who are active in the field and will serve as a catalyst to trigger further research. It has been our great pleasure to be the guest editors of this special feature. We would like to thank the authors for their contributions, without which it would

  14. Advanced Imaging Techniques for Multiphase Flows Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoresano, A.; Langella, G.; Di Santo, M.; Iodice, P.

    2017-08-01

    Advanced numerical techniques, such as fuzzy logic and neural networks have been applied in this work to digital images acquired on two applications, a centrifugal pump and a stationary spray in order to define, in a stochastic way, the gas-liquid interface evolution. Starting from the numeric matrix representing the image it is possible to characterize geometrical parameters and the time evolution of the jet. The algorithm used works with the fuzzy logic concept to binarize the chromatist of the pixels, depending them, by using the difference of the light scattering for the gas and the liquid phase.. Starting from a primary fixed threshold, the applied technique, can select the ‘gas’ pixel from the ‘liquid’ pixel and so it is possible define the first most probably boundary lines of the spray. Acquiring continuously the images, fixing a frame rate, a most fine threshold can be select and, at the limit, the most probably geometrical parameters of the jet can be detected.

  15. Imaging Techniques in Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Pérez del Villar, Candelas; Yotti, Raquel; Bermejo, Javier

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, imaging techniques have revolutionized the diagnosis of heart failure. In patients with a clinical picture of acute decompensation, prognosis is largely determined by early implementation of general measures and treatment of the underlying cause. Given its diagnostic yield and portability, ultrasound has become an essential tool in the setting of acute heart failure, and is currently found in all medical departments involved in the care of the critically ill patient. Cardiac magnetic resonance and computed tomography allow detailed characterization of multiple aspects of cardiac structure and function that were previously unavailable. This helps guide and monitor many of the treatment decisions in the acute heart failure population in an entirely noninvasive way. This article aims to review the usefulness of the imaging techniques that are clinically relevant in the context of an episode of acute heart failure. We discuss the indications and limitations of these techniques in detail and describe the general principles for the appropriate interpretation of results. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. A new image calibration technique for colposcopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Soto-Thompson, Marcelo; Xiong, Yizhi; Lange, Holger

    2006-03-01

    Colposcopy is a primary diagnostic method used to detect cancer and precancerous lesions of the uterine cervix. During the examination, the metaplastic and abnormal tissues exhibit different degrees of whiteness (acetowhitening effect) after applying a 3%-5% acetic acid solution. Colposcopists evaluate the color and density of the acetowhite tissue to assess the severity of lesions for the purpose of diagnosis, telemedicine, and annotation. However, the color and illumination of the colposcopic images vary with the light sources, the instruments and camera settings, as well as the clinical environments. This makes assessment of the color information very challenging even for an expert. In terms of developing a Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system for colposcopy, these variations affect the performance of the feature extraction algorithm for the acetowhite color. Non-uniform illumination from the light source is also an obstacle for detecting acetowhite regions, lesion margins and anatomic features. Therefore, in digital colposcopy, it is critical to map the color appearance of the images taken with different colposcopes into one standard color space with normalized illumination. This paper presents a novel image calibration technique for colposcopic images. First, a specially designed calibration unit is mounted on the colposcope to acquire daily calibration data prior to performing patient examinations. The calibration routine is fast, automated, accurate and reliable. We then use our illumination correction algorithm and a color calibration algorithm to calibrate the patient data. In this paper we describe these techniques and demonstrate their applications in clinical studies.

  17. Imaging techniques with refractive beam shaping optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim

    2012-10-01

    Applying of the refractive beam shapers in real research optical setups as well as in industrial installations requires very often manipulation of a final laser spot size. In many cases this task can be easily solved by using various imaging optical layouts presuming creating an image of a beam shaper output aperture. Due to the unique features of the refractive beam shapers of field mapping type, like flat wave front and low divergence of the collimated resulting beam with flattop or another intensity profile, there is a freedom in building of various imaging systems with using ordinary optical components, including off-the-shelf ones. There will be considered optical layouts providing high, up to 1/200×, de-magnifying factors, combining of refractive beam shapers like πShaper with scanning systems, building of relay imaging systems with extended depth of field. These optical layouts are widely used in such laser technologies like drilling holes in PCB, welding, various micromachining techniques with galvo-mirror scanning, interferometry and holography, various SLM-based applications. Examples of real implementations and experimental results will be presented as well.

  18. Atherosclerosis staging: imaging using FLIM technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicchieri, Leticia B.; Barioni, Marina Berardi; Silva, Mônica Nascimento; Monteiro, Andrea Moreira; Figueiredo Neto, Antonio Martins; Ito, Amando S.; Courrol, Lilia C.

    2014-03-01

    In this work it was used fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) to analyze biochemical composition of atherosclerotic plaque. For this purpose an animal experimentation was done with New Zealand rabbits divided into two groups: a control group of 4 rabbits that received a regular diet for 0, 20, 40 and 60 days; and an experimental group of 9 rabbits, divided in 3 subgroups, that were fed with 1% cholesterol diet for 20, 40 and 60 days respectively. The aortas slices stained with europium chlortetracycline were analyzed by FLIM exciting samples at 440 nm. The results shown an increase in the lifetime imaging of rabbits fed with cholesterol. It was observed that is possible to detect the metabolic changes associated with atherosclerosis at an early stage using FLIM technique exciting the tissue around 440 nm and observing autofluorescence lifetime. Lifetimes longer than 1.75 ns suggest the presence of porphyrins in the tissue and consequently, inflammation and the presence of macrophages.

  19. Image Enhancement Techniques for Cockpit Displays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-01

    waveforms on the other hand have magnitudes of only 1, -1 and 0. This results in only addition and substraction for their computation. The following...PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER P74-530R/D0802 7. AUTHOR(&) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) David J. Ketcham N00014-74-C-0313 Roger W. Lowe J. William Weber 9...Entered) Report No. P74-530R IMAGE ENHANCEMENT TECHNIQUES FOR COCKPIT DISPLAYS TECHNICAL REPORT David J. Ketcham Roger W. Lowe 3. William Weber Contract

  20. Exploiting Measurement Uncertainty Estimation in Evaluation of GOES-R ABI Image Navigation Accuracy Using Image Registration Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Evan; DeLuccia, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In evaluating GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) image navigation quality, upsampled sub-images of ABI images are translated against downsampled Landsat 8 images of localized, high contrast earth scenes to determine the translations in the East-West and North-South directions that provide maximum correlation. The native Landsat resolution is much finer than that of ABI, and Landsat navigation accuracy is much better than ABI required navigation accuracy and expected performance. Therefore, Landsat images are considered to provide ground truth for comparison with ABI images, and the translations of ABI sub-images that produce maximum correlation with Landsat localized images are interpreted as ABI navigation errors. The measured local navigation errors from registration of numerous sub-images with the Landsat images are averaged to provide a statistically reliable measurement of the overall navigation error of the ABI image. The dispersion of the local navigation errors is also of great interest, since ABI navigation requirements are specified as bounds on the 99.73rd percentile of the magnitudes of per pixel navigation errors. However, the measurement uncertainty inherent in the use of image registration techniques tends to broaden the dispersion in measured local navigation errors, masking the true navigation performance of the ABI system. We have devised a novel and simple method for estimating the magnitude of the measurement uncertainty in registration error for any pair of images of the same earth scene. We use these measurement uncertainty estimates to filter out the higher quality measurements of local navigation error for inclusion in statistics. In so doing, we substantially reduce the dispersion in measured local navigation errors, thereby better approximating the true navigation performance of the ABI system.

  1. MISR empirical stray light corrections in high-contrast scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limbacher, J. A.; Kahn, R. A.

    2015-07-01

    We diagnose the potential causes for the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer's (MISR) persistent high aerosol optical depth (AOD) bias at low AOD with the aid of coincident MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery from NASA's Terra satellite. Stray light in the MISR instrument is responsible for a large portion of the high AOD bias in high-contrast scenes, such as broken-cloud scenes that are quite common over ocean. Discrepancies among MODIS and MISR nadir-viewing blue, green, red, and near-infrared images are used to optimize seven parameters individually for each wavelength, along with a background reflectance modulation term that is modeled separately, to represent the observed features. Independent surface-based AOD measurements from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and the Marine Aerosol Network (MAN) are compared with MISR research aerosol retrieval algorithm (RA) AOD retrievals for 1118 coincidences to validate the corrections when applied to the nadir and off-nadir cameras. With these corrections, plus the baseline RA corrections and enhanced cloud screening applied, the median AOD bias for all data in the mid-visible (green, 558 nm) band decreases from 0.006 (0.020 for the MISR standard algorithm (SA)) to 0.000, and the RMSE decreases by 5 % (27 % compared to the SA). For AOD558 nm < 0.10, which includes about half the validation data, 68th percentile absolute AOD558 nm errors for the RA have dropped from 0.022 (0.034 for the SA) to < 0.02 (~ 0.018).

  2. Update on cardiac imaging techniques 2014.

    PubMed

    Mahía-Casado, Patricia; García-Orta, Rocío; Gómez de Diego, José J; Barba-Cosials, Joaquín; Rodríguez-Palomares, José F; Aguadé-Bruix, Santiago

    2015-02-01

    In this article, we review the contributions of the most important imaging techniques used in cardiology, reported in 2014. Echocardiography remains the cornerstone for diagnosing and monitoring valvular heart disease, and there has been a continuing effort to improve quantification of this condition and obtain prognostic parameters for follow-up. The study of regional myocardial function is anchored in the diagnosis of subclinical ventricular dysfunction, and 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography has become the perfect ally in interventional procedures for structural heart disease. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and cardiac computed tomography are the focus of most publications on cardiac imaging in ischemic heart disease, reflecting their consolidated use in clinical practice. Nuclear medicine excels in the study of myocardial viability after interventional treatment of acute coronary syndromes and its performance is validated in the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Fast Imaging Technique for fMRI: Consecutive Multishot Echo Planar Imaging Accelerated with GRAPPA Technique.

    PubMed

    Kang, Daehun; Sung, Yul-Wan; Kang, Chang-Ki

    2015-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the proposed consecutive multishot echo planar imaging (cmsEPI) combined with a parallel imaging technique in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and acceleration for a functional imaging study. We developed cmsEPI sequence using both consecutively acquired multishot EPI segments and variable flip angles to minimize the delay between segments and to maximize the SNR, respectively. We also combined cmsEPI with the generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions (GRAPPA) method. Temporal SNRs were measured at different acceleration factors and number of segments for functional sensitivity evaluation. We also examined the geometric distortions, which inherently occurred in EPI sequence. The practical acceleration factors, R = 2 or R = 3, of the proposed technique improved the temporal SNR by maximally 18% in phantom test and by averagely 8.2% in in vivo experiment, compared to cmsEPI without parallel imaging. The data collection time was decreased in inverse proportion to the acceleration factor as well. The improved temporal SNR resulted in better statistical power when evaluated on the functional response of the brain. In this study, we demonstrated that the combination of cmsEPI with the parallel imaging technique could provide the improved functional sensitivity for functional imaging study, compensating for the lower SNR by cmsEPI.

  4. Fast Imaging Technique for fMRI: Consecutive Multishot Echo Planar Imaging Accelerated with GRAPPA Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Daehun; Sung, Yul-Wan; Kang, Chang-Ki

    2015-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the proposed consecutive multishot echo planar imaging (cmsEPI) combined with a parallel imaging technique in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and acceleration for a functional imaging study. We developed cmsEPI sequence using both consecutively acquired multishot EPI segments and variable flip angles to minimize the delay between segments and to maximize the SNR, respectively. We also combined cmsEPI with the generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions (GRAPPA) method. Temporal SNRs were measured at different acceleration factors and number of segments for functional sensitivity evaluation. We also examined the geometric distortions, which inherently occurred in EPI sequence. The practical acceleration factors, R = 2 or R = 3, of the proposed technique improved the temporal SNR by maximally 18% in phantom test and by averagely 8.2% in in vivo experiment, compared to cmsEPI without parallel imaging. The data collection time was decreased in inverse proportion to the acceleration factor as well. The improved temporal SNR resulted in better statistical power when evaluated on the functional response of the brain. In this study, we demonstrated that the combination of cmsEPI with the parallel imaging technique could provide the improved functional sensitivity for functional imaging study, compensating for the lower SNR by cmsEPI. PMID:26413518

  5. Assessment of regularization techniques for electrocardiographic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Milanič, Matija; Jazbinšek, Vojko; MacLeod, Robert S.; Brooks, Dana H.; Hren, Rok

    2014-01-01

    A widely used approach to solving the inverse problem in electrocardiography involves computing potentials on the epicardium from measured electrocardiograms (ECGs) on the torso surface. The main challenge of solving this electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) problem lies in its intrinsic ill-posedness. While many regularization techniques have been developed to control wild oscillations of the solution, the choice of proper regularization methods for obtaining clinically acceptable solutions is still a subject of ongoing research. However there has been little rigorous comparison across methods proposed by different groups. This study systematically compared various regularization techniques for solving the ECGI problem under a unified simulation framework, consisting of both 1) progressively more complex idealized source models (from single dipole to triplet of dipoles), and 2) an electrolytic human torso tank containing a live canine heart, with the cardiac source being modeled by potentials measured on a cylindrical cage placed around the heart. We tested 13 different regularization techniques to solve the inverse problem of recovering epicardial potentials, and found that non-quadratic methods (total variation algorithms) and first-order and second-order Tikhonov regularizations outperformed other methodologies and resulted in similar average reconstruction errors. PMID:24369741

  6. FT-IR microspectroscopic imaging of human carcinoma thin sections based on pattern recognition techniques.

    PubMed

    Lasch, P; Naumann, D

    1998-02-01

    FT-IR microspectroscopic maps of unstained thin sections from human melanoma and colon carcinoma tissues were obtained on a conventional infrared microscope equipped with an automatic x, y stage. Mapped infrared data were analyzed by different image re-assembling techniques, namely functional group mapping ("chemical mapping") and, for the first time by cluster analysis, principal component analysis and artificial neural networks. The output values of the different classifiers were recombined with the original spatial information to construct IR-images whose color or gray tones were based on the spatial distribution of individual spectral patterns. While the functional group mapping technique could not reliably differentiate between the different tissue regions, the approach based on pattern recognition yielded images with a high contrast that confirmed standard histopathological techniques. The new technique turned out to be particularly helpful to improve discrimination between different types of tissue structures in general, and to increase image contrast between normal and cancerous regions of a given tissue sample.

  7. The HST/STIS BAR5 Occulter: High Contrast in Space at Visible Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debes, John H.; Gaspar, Andras; Schneider, Glenn; Proffitt, Charles

    2015-11-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope currently has only one operational high contrast imaging coronagraphic mode, the 50CORON imaging mode of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). 50CORON includes two intersecting wedges and two bar occulting masks in an image plane ahead of the detector that block light from bright stars to reveal the faint emission from circumstellar disks or faint companions. Recently, the smallest supported inner working angle for these occulters was 0.3". We present in this poster the commissioning of new occulting locations on the detector that allow for inner working angles as close as 0.15" at the new BAR5 position. We show preliminary results for BAR5 using two nearby debris disks, AU Mic and Beta Pictoris, and provide interested users with a prescription for how to design their own high contrast imaging observations.

  8. New imaging techniques in retinal vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Mesquida, Marina; Llorens, Víctor; Adán, Alfredo

    2017-09-20

    The term retinal vasculitis (RV) encompasses a heterogeneous group of sight-threatening conditions that are included in the intraocular inflammatory diseases that affect the posterior segment of the eye. Based on the nature of the inflammatory process, RV are classified into predominantly inflammatory or ischaemic (occlusive RV). The diagnosis is clinical and the aetiology can be infectious or non-infectious (immune-mediated). RV can be an isolated ocular syndrome or be associated with a systemic disease, of which they can represent the first manifestation. New retinal imaging techniques such as ultra-wide field fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography angiography will help us classify the RV and aid the diagnostic process, which can be challenging and require a multidisciplinary approach. Therefore, clinical knowledge of RV is essential for prompt diagnosis and to establish the appropriate treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Techniques calm fear of imaging machine

    SciTech Connect

    Van Pelt, D.

    1990-04-02

    Magnetic resonance imaging has become a valuable tool in diagnosing diseases, and the imaging devices are now used as often as 2 million times a year in the United States. But as many as 10 percent of patients advised to undergo the procedure cannot because they become overwhelmed with claustrophobialike fear triggered by having to lie motionless in the machine's tunnel-like cylinder for about 45 minutes. To counteract this fear, several hospitals now practice various techniques to help reduce the feelings of confinement. One popular method is to give a patient special eyeglasses that allow him to look beyond his feet and see the tunnel opening. Other glasses use mirrors to direct the patient's vision out the back of the unit to large wilderness photographs or murals that simulate a sense of spaciousness. Even a basic item like a set of headphones that plays music can often distract a patient, and technicians frequently hold a patient's hand or foot during the procedure. Another trick is to invite family members and friends to remain with the patient during the scan to provide company and reassurance.

  10. Update on cardiac imaging techniques 2013.

    PubMed

    García-Orta, Rocío; Mahía-Casado, Patricia; Gómez de Diego, José J; Barba-Cosials, Joaquín; Rodriguez-Palomares, José F; Aguadé-Bruix, Santiago; Candell-Riera, Jaume

    2014-02-01

    Cardiac imaging is a cornerstone of diagnosis in heart conditions, and an essential tool for assessing prognosis and establishing treatment decisions. This year, echocardiography stands out as a guide in interventional procedures and in choosing the size of the prosthesis. It is also proving to be a valuable technique in low-flow, low-gradient aortic stenosis. Three-dimensional echocardiography is advancing our knowledge of cardiac anatomy and valvular measurements. The parameters indicating tissue deformation have predictive power in valve disease and in the follow-up of drug-induced cardiotoxicity. Single-photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography are proving useful in ischemic heart disease and in the diagnosis of cardiac inflammation and infections. The role of computed tomography has been strengthened in noninvasive coronary angiography, the emergency room management of chest pain, assessment of chronic occlusions, and morphologic study of coronary plaque. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging remains the gold standard for tissue characterization in ischemic heart disease and cardiomyopathies, and is assuming a greater role in stress studies and in the assessment of myocardial viability. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Low energy neutral atom imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H.O. McComas, D.J.; Scime, E.E.

    1993-01-01

    The potential scientific return from low energy neutral atom (LENA) imaging of the magnetosphere is extraordinary. The technical challenges of LENA detection include (1) removal of LENAs from the tremendous ambient UV without losing information of their incident trajectories, (2) quantification of their trajectories, and (3) obtaining high sensitivity measurements. Two techniques that have been proposed for this purpose are based on fundamentally different atomic interaction mechanisms between LENAs and a solid: LENA transmission through an ultrathin foil and LENA reflection from a solid surface. Both of these methods provide LENA ionization (for subsequent removal from the UV by electrostatic deflection) and secondary electron emission (for start pulse generation for time-of-flight and/or coincidence). We present a comparative study of the transmission and reflection techniques based on differences in atomic interactions with solids and surfaces. We show that transmission methods yield an order of magnitude greater secondary electron emission than reflection methods. Transmission methods are shown to be sufficient for LENA energies of approximately 1 keV to greater than 30 keV. Reflection methods using low work function surfaces could be employed for LENA ionization for energies less than several keV.

  12. Mathematical Morphology Techniques For Image Processing Applications In Biomedical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoo, Grace T.; Kim, Yongmin; Haralick, Robert M.; Nochlin, David; Sumi, Shuzo M.

    1988-06-01

    Mathematical morphology operations allow object identification based on shape and are useful for grouping a cluster of small objects into one object. Because of these capabilities, we have implemented and evaluated this technique for our study of Alzheimer's disease. The microscopic hallmark of Alzheimer's disease is the presence of brain lesions known as neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques. These lesions have distinct shapes compared to normal brain tissue. Neurofibrillary tangles appear as flame-shaped structures, whereas senile plaques appear as circular clusters of small objects. In order to quantitatively analyze the distribution of these lesions, we have developed and applied the tools of mathematical morphology on the Pixar Image Computer. As a preliminary test of the accuracy of the automatic detection algorithm, a study comparing computer and human detection of senile plaques was performed by evaluating 50 images from 5 different patients. The results of this comparison demonstrates that the computer counts correlate very well with the human counts (correlation coefficient = .81). Now that the basic algorithm has been shown to work, optimization of the software will be performed to improve its speed. Also future improvements such as local adaptive thresholding will be made to the image analysis routine to further improve the systems accuracy.

  13. High-Contrast Coronagraph Performance in the Presence of DM Actuator Defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Shaklan, Stuart; Cady, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Deformable Mirrors (DMs) are critical elements in high contrast coronagraphs, requiring precision and stability measured in picometers to enable detection of Earth-like exoplanets. Occasionally DM actuators or their associated cables or electronics fail, requiring a wavefront control algorithm to compensate for actuators that may be displaced from their neighbors by hundreds of nanometers. We have carried out experiments on our High-Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) to study the impact of failed actuators in partial fulfillment of the Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph optical model validation milestone. We show that the wavefront control algorithm adapts to several broken actuators and maintains dark-hole contrast in broadband light.

  14. Measuring techniques in induced polarisation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlin, Torleif; Leroux, Virginie; Nissen, Johan

    2002-06-01

    Multi-electrode geoelectrical imaging has become very popular and is used for many different purposes. For some of these, the inclusion of IP data would be desirable as it would allow the interpreter to distinguish between, e.g. sand formations with saltwater infiltration and clay formations or help delineate landfills. However, present-day IP measuring techniques require the use of nonpolarisable potential electrodes and special wire layout and are thus cumbersome and expensive. In this paper, we suggest making IP measurements with multi-electrode cables and just one set of steel electrodes. The polarisation potentials on the potential electrodes are corrected for by subtracting the polarisation potential measured when no primary current and no IP signal are present. Test measurements indicate that the polarisation potentials vary slowly and that the correction procedure is feasible. At two sites in southern Sweden, we have compared measurements with only stainless steel electrodes and measurements with both stainless steel and Pb-PbCl nonpolarisable electrodes using one or two sets of multicore cables, respectively. Almost no difference between the two data sets was observed. At one site, the charge-up effect on the potential electrodes was not important, while at the other site, the correction procedure was crucial. Though only two sites have been studied so far, it seems that time-domain IP imaging measurements can be taken with only steel electrodes and ordinary multicore cables. Coupling in the multicore cables has not presented any problems at the investigated sites where grounding resistances were moderate, making the coupling effect small. High grounding resistance sites have not yet been investigated.

  15. A Literature Review on Image Encryption Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Majid; Shah, Tariq

    2014-12-01

    Image encryption plays a paramount part to guarantee classified transmission and capacity of image over web. Then again, a real-time image encryption confronts a more noteworthy test because of vast measure of information included. This paper exhibits an audit on image encryption in spatial, frequency and hybrid domains with both full encryption and selective encryption strategy.

  16. Thermal Infrared Imaging of Exoplanets

    SciTech Connect

    Apai, Daniel

    2009-08-05

    High-contrast imaging remains the only way to search for and study weakly-irradiated giant exoplanets. We review here in brief a new high-contrast imaging technique that operates in the 3-5 mum window and show the exquisite sensitivity that can be reached using this technique. The two key advantages of the L-band high-contrast imaging are the superior image quality and the 2-to 4-magnitude gain in sensitivity provided by the red color of giant planets. Most excitingly, this method can be applied to constrain the yet-unexplored giant planet population at radii between 3 and 30 AU.

  17. A Review of Imaging Techniques for Plant Phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Qin; Huang, Danfeng

    2014-01-01

    Given the rapid development of plant genomic technologies, a lack of access to plant phenotyping capabilities limits our ability to dissect the genetics of quantitative traits. Effective, high-throughput phenotyping platforms have recently been developed to solve this problem. In high-throughput phenotyping platforms, a variety of imaging methodologies are being used to collect data for quantitative studies of complex traits related to the growth, yield and adaptation to biotic or abiotic stress (disease, insects, drought and salinity). These imaging techniques include visible imaging (machine vision), imaging spectroscopy (multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing), thermal infrared imaging, fluorescence imaging, 3D imaging and tomographic imaging (MRT, PET and CT). This paper presents a brief review on these imaging techniques and their applications in plant phenotyping. The features used to apply these imaging techniques to plant phenotyping are described and discussed in this review. PMID:25347588

  18. A review of imaging techniques for plant phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Qin; Huang, Danfeng

    2014-10-24

    Given the rapid development of plant genomic technologies, a lack of access to plant phenotyping capabilities limits our ability to dissect the genetics of quantitative traits. Effective, high-throughput phenotyping platforms have recently been developed to solve this problem. In high-throughput phenotyping platforms, a variety of imaging methodologies are being used to collect data for quantitative studies of complex traits related to the growth, yield and adaptation to biotic or abiotic stress (disease, insects, drought and salinity). These imaging techniques include visible imaging (machine vision), imaging spectroscopy (multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing), thermal infrared imaging, fluorescence imaging, 3D imaging and tomographic imaging (MRT, PET and CT). This paper presents a brief review on these imaging techniques and their applications in plant phenotyping. The features used to apply these imaging techniques to plant phenotyping are described and discussed in this review.

  19. Parameter-tolerant design of high contrast gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevallier, Christyves; Fressengeas, Nicolas; Jacquet, Joel; Almuneau, Guilhem; Laaroussi, Youness; Gauthier-Lafaye, Olivier; Cerutti, Laurent; Genty, Frédéric

    2015-02-01

    This work is devoted to the design of high contrast grating mirrors taking into account the technological constraints and tolerance of fabrication. First, a global optimization algorithm has been combined to a numerical analysis of grating structures (RCWA) to automatically design HCG mirrors. Then, the tolerances of the grating dimensions have been precisely studied to develop a robust optimization algorithm with which high contrast gratings, exhibiting not only a high efficiency but also large tolerance values, could be designed. Finally, several structures integrating previously designed HCGs has been simulated to validate and illustrate the interest of such gratings.

  20. Physics of near-wavelength high contrast gratings.

    PubMed

    Karagodsky, Vadim; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J

    2012-05-07

    We present a simple theory explaining the extraordinary features of high-contrast optical gratings in the near-wavelength regime, particularly the very broadband high reflectivity (>99%) and the ultra-high quality factor resonances (Q>10(7)). We present, for the first time, an intuitive explanation for both features using a simple phase selection rule, and reveal the anti-crossing and crossing effects between the grating modes. Our analytical results agree well with simulations and the experimental data obtained from vertical cavity surface emitting lasers incorporating a high contrast grating as top reflector.

  1. Imaging techniques: MRI illuminated by γ-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowtell, Richard

    2016-09-01

    A technique that combines magnetic resonance with nuclear medicine has been used to image the distribution of a radioactive tracer, potentially opening up a powerful and innovative approach to medical imaging. See Letter p.652

  2. [Tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI)--technique and methodological study].

    PubMed

    Markov, D

    2008-01-01

    We present a new form of data image processing obtained through three-dimensional scanning named tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI) and discuss its technique and clinical implications in obstetrics and gynecology.

  3. Functional Imaging and Related Techniques: An Introduction for Rehabilitation Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Crosson, Bruce; Ford, Anastasia; McGregor, Keith M.; Meinzer, Marcus; Cheshkov, Sergey; Li, Xiufeng; Walker-Batson, Delaina; Briggs, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging and related neuroimaging techniques are becoming important tools for rehabilitation research. Functional neuroimaging techniques can be used to determine the effects of brain injury or disease on brain systems related to cognition and behavior and to determine how rehabilitation changes brain systems. These techniques include: functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET), electroencephalography (EEG), magnetoencephalography (MEG), near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Related diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging techniques (DWI), including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI), can quantify white matter integrity. With the proliferation of these imaging techniques in rehabilitation research, it is critical that rehabilitation researchers, as well as consumers of rehabilitation research, become familiar with neuroimaging techniques, what they can offer, and their strengths and weaknesses The purpose to this review is to provide such an introduction to these neuroimaging techniques. PMID:20593321

  4. Imaging fault zones using 3D seismic image processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacopini, David; Butler, Rob; Purves, Steve

    2013-04-01

    Significant advances in structural analysis of deep water structure, salt tectonic and extensional rift basin come from the descriptions of fault system geometries imaged in 3D seismic data. However, even where seismic data are excellent, in most cases the trajectory of thrust faults is highly conjectural and still significant uncertainty exists as to the patterns of deformation that develop between the main faults segments, and even of the fault architectures themselves. Moreover structural interpretations that conventionally define faults by breaks and apparent offsets of seismic reflectors are commonly conditioned by a narrow range of theoretical models of fault behavior. For example, almost all interpretations of thrust geometries on seismic data rely on theoretical "end-member" behaviors where concepts as strain localization or multilayer mechanics are simply avoided. Yet analogue outcrop studies confirm that such descriptions are commonly unsatisfactory and incomplete. In order to fill these gaps and improve the 3D visualization of deformation in the subsurface, seismic attribute methods are developed here in conjunction with conventional mapping of reflector amplitudes (Marfurt & Chopra, 2007)). These signal processing techniques recently developed and applied especially by the oil industry use variations in the amplitude and phase of the seismic wavelet. These seismic attributes improve the signal interpretation and are calculated and applied to the entire 3D seismic dataset. In this contribution we will show 3D seismic examples of fault structures from gravity-driven deep-water thrust structures and extensional basin systems to indicate how 3D seismic image processing methods can not only build better the geometrical interpretations of the faults but also begin to map both strain and damage through amplitude/phase properties of the seismic signal. This is done by quantifying and delineating the short-range anomalies on the intensity of reflector amplitudes

  5. In Vivo Imaging Techniques: A New Era for Histochemical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Busato, A.; Feruglio, P. Fumene; Parnigotto, P.P.; Marzola, P.; Sbarbati, A.

    2016-01-01

    In vivo imaging techniques can be integrated with classical histochemistry to create an actual histochemistry of water. In particular, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), an imaging technique primarily used as diagnostic tool in clinical/preclinical research, has excellent anatomical resolution, unlimited penetration depth and intrinsic soft tissue contrast. Thanks to the technological development, MRI is not only capable to provide morphological information but also and more interestingly functional, biophysical and molecular. In this paper we describe the main features of several advanced imaging techniques, such as MRI microscopy, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, functional MRI, Diffusion Tensor Imaging and MRI with contrast agent as a useful support to classical histochemistry. PMID:28076937

  6. Imaging techniques in signal transduction IHC.

    PubMed

    Sedgewick, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Augmentation of digital images is almost always a necessity in order to obtain a reproduction that matches the appearance of the original. However, that augmentation can mislead if it is done incorrectly and not within reasonable limits. When procedures are in place for ensuring that originals are archived, and image manipulation steps are reported, scientists not only follow good laboratory practices, but also avoid ethical issues associated with postprocessing and protect their labs from any future allegations of scientific misconduct. Also, when procedures are in place for correct acquisition of images, the extent of postprocessing is minimized or eliminated. These procedures include color balancing (for brighfield images), keeping tonal values within the dynamic range of the detector, frame averaging to eliminate noise (typically in fluorescence imaging), use of the highest bit depth when a choice is available, flatfield correction, and archiving of the image in a nonlossy format (not JPEG).When postprocessing is necessary, the commonly used applications for correction include Photoshop, and ImageJ, but a free program (GIMP) can also be used. Corrections to images include scaling the bit depth to higher and lower ranges, removing color casts from brightfield images, setting brightness and contrast, reducing color noise, reducing "grainy" noise, conversion of pure colors to grayscale, conversion of grayscale to colors typically used in fluorescence imaging, correction of uneven illumination and flatfield correction, blending color images (fluorescence), and extending the depth of focus. These corrections are explained in step-by-step procedures in the chapter that follows.

  7. A hybrid technique for medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Nyma, Alamgir; Kang, Myeongsu; Kwon, Yung-Keun; Kim, Cheol-Hong; Kim, Jong-Myon

    2012-01-01

    Medical image segmentation is an essential and challenging aspect in computer-aided diagnosis and also in pattern recognition research. This paper proposes a hybrid method for magnetic resonance (MR) image segmentation. We first remove impulsive noise inherent in MR images by utilizing a vector median filter. Subsequently, Otsu thresholding is used as an initial coarse segmentation method that finds the homogeneous regions of the input image. Finally, an enhanced suppressed fuzzy c-means is used to partition brain MR images into multiple segments, which employs an optimal suppression factor for the perfect clustering in the given data set. To evaluate the robustness of the proposed approach in noisy environment, we add different types of noise and different amount of noise to T1-weighted brain MR images. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms other FCM based algorithms in terms of segmentation accuracy for both noise-free and noise-inserted MR images.

  8. High contrast broadband seeder for multi-PW laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalus, O.; Pellegrina, A.; Ricaud, S.; Casagrande, O.; Derycke, C.; Radier, C.; Soujaeff, A.; Matras, G.; Rey, G.; Boudjemaa, L.; Simon-Boisson, C.; Laux, S.; Lureau, F.

    2016-03-01

    A hybrid Ti:Sa CPA/BBO OPCPA system with a XPW filter in between the two has been developed to produce a broadband high contrast seeder of 10 mJ for the two 10 PetaWatt beamlines of ELI NP infrastructure.

  9. An image compression technique for use on token ring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorjala, B.; Sayood, Khalid; Meempat, G.

    1992-12-01

    A low complexity technique for compression of images for transmission over local area networks is presented. The technique uses the synchronous traffic as a side channel for improving the performance of an adaptive differential pulse code modulation (ADPCM) based coder.

  10. An image compression technique for use on token ring networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorjala, B.; Sayood, Khalid; Meempat, G.

    1992-01-01

    A low complexity technique for compression of images for transmission over local area networks is presented. The technique uses the synchronous traffic as a side channel for improving the performance of an adaptive differential pulse code modulation (ADPCM) based coder.

  11. Application of digital image processing techniques to astronomical imagery 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorre, J. J.; Lynn, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Nine specific techniques of combination of techniques developed for applying digital image processing technology to existing astronomical imagery are described. Photoproducts are included to illustrate the results of each of these investigations.

  12. A content-based image retrieval method for optical colonoscopy images based on image recognition techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosato, Hirokazu; Sakanashi, Hidenori; Takahashi, Eiichi; Murakawa, Masahiro

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes a content-based image retrieval method for optical colonoscopy images that can find images similar to ones being diagnosed. Optical colonoscopy is a method of direct observation for colons and rectums to diagnose bowel diseases. It is the most common procedure for screening, surveillance and treatment. However, diagnostic accuracy for intractable inflammatory bowel diseases, such as ulcerative colitis (UC), is highly dependent on the experience and knowledge of the medical doctor, because there is considerable variety in the appearances of colonic mucosa within inflammations with UC. In order to solve this issue, this paper proposes a content-based image retrieval method based on image recognition techniques. The proposed retrieval method can find similar images from a database of images diagnosed as UC, and can potentially furnish the medical records associated with the retrieved images to assist the UC diagnosis. Within the proposed method, color histogram features and higher order local auto-correlation (HLAC) features are adopted to represent the color information and geometrical information of optical colonoscopy images, respectively. Moreover, considering various characteristics of UC colonoscopy images, such as vascular patterns and the roughness of the colonic mucosa, we also propose an image enhancement method to highlight the appearances of colonic mucosa in UC. In an experiment using 161 UC images from 32 patients, we demonstrate that our method improves the accuracy of retrieving similar UC images.

  13. High-contrast in vivo visualization of microvessels using novel FeCo/GC magnetic nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Hyung; Sherlock, Sarah P; Terashima, Masahiro; Kosuge, Hisanori; Suzuki, Yoriyasu; Goodwin, Andrew; Robinson, Joshua; Seo, Won Seok; Liu, Zhuang; Luong, Richard; McConnell, Michael V; Nishimura, Dwight G; Dai, Hongjie

    2009-12-01

    FeCo-graphitic carbon shell nanocrystals are a novel MRI contrast agent with unprecedented high per-metal-atom-basis relaxivity (r(1) = 97 mM(-1) sec(-1), r(2) = 400 mM(-1) sec(-1)) and multifunctional capabilities. While the conventional gadolinium-based contrast-enhanced angiographic magnetic MRI has proven useful for diagnosis of vascular diseases, its short circulation time and relatively low sensitivity render high-resolution MRI of morphologically small vascular structures such as those involved in collateral, arteriogenic, and angiogenic vessel formation challenging. Here, by combining FeCo-graphitic carbon shell nanocrystals with high-resolution MRI technique, we demonstrate that such microvessels down to approximately 100 mum can be monitored in high contrast and noninvasively using a conventional 1.5-T clinical MRI system, achieving a diagnostic imaging standard approximating that of the more invasive X-ray angiography. Preliminary in vitro and in vivo toxicity study results also show no sign of toxicity.

  14. High-Contrast In Vivo Visualization of Microvessels Using Novel FeCo/GC Magnetic Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Hyung; Sherlock, Sarah P.; Terashima, Masahiro; Kosuge, Hisanori; Suzuki, Yoriyasu; Goodwin, Andrew; Robinson, Joshua; Seo, Won Seok; Liu, Zhuang; Luong, Richard; McConnell, Michael V.; Nishimura, Dwight G.; Dai, Hongjie

    2010-01-01

    FeCo-graphitic carbon shell nanocrystals are a novel MRI contrast agent with unprecedented high per-metal-atom-basis relaxivity (r1 = 97 mM−1 sec−1, r2 = 400 mM−1 sec−1) and multifunctional capabilities. While the conventional gadolinium-based contrast-enhanced angiographic magnetic MRI has proven useful for diagnosis of vascular diseases, its short circulation time and relatively low sensitivity render high-resolution MRI of morphologically small vascular structures such as those involved in collateral, arteriogenic, and angiogenic vessel formation challenging. Here, by combining FeCo-graphitic carbon shell nanocrystals with high-resolution MRI technique, we demonstrate that such microvessels down to ~100 μm can be monitored in high contrast and noninvasively using a conventional 1.5-T clinical MRI system, achieving a diagnostic imaging standard approximating that of the more invasive X-ray angiography. Preliminary in vitro and in vivo toxicity study results also show no sign of toxicity. PMID:19859938

  15. Selective document image data compression technique

    DOEpatents

    Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

    1998-05-19

    A method of storing information from filled-in form-documents comprises extracting the unique user information in the foreground from the document form information in the background. The contrast of the pixels is enhanced by a gamma correction on an image array, and then the color value of each of pixel is enhanced. The color pixels lying on edges of an image are converted to black and an adjacent pixel is converted to white. The distance between black pixels and other pixels in the array is determined, and a filled-edge array of pixels is created. User information is then converted to a two-color format by creating a first two-color image of the scanned image by converting all pixels darker than a threshold color value to black. All the pixels that are lighter than the threshold color value to white. Then a second two-color image of the filled-edge file is generated by converting all pixels darker than a second threshold value to black and all pixels lighter than the second threshold color value to white. The first two-color image and the second two-color image are then combined and filtered to smooth the edges of the image. The image may be compressed with a unique Huffman coding table for that image. The image file is also decimated to create a decimated-image file which can later be interpolated back to produce a reconstructed image file using a bilinear interpolation kernel. 10 figs.

  16. Selective document image data compression technique

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Chi-Yung; Petrich, Loren I.

    1998-01-01

    A method of storing information from filled-in form-documents comprises extracting the unique user information in the foreground from the document form information in the background. The contrast of the pixels is enhanced by a gamma correction on an image array, and then the color value of each of pixel is enhanced. The color pixels lying on edges of an image are converted to black and an adjacent pixel is converted to white. The distance between black pixels and other pixels in the array is determined, and a filled-edge array of pixels is created. User information is then converted to a two-color format by creating a first two-color image of the scanned image by converting all pixels darker than a threshold color value to black. All the pixels that are lighter than the threshold color value to white. Then a second two-color image of the filled-edge file is generated by converting all pixels darker than a second threshold value to black and all pixels lighter than the second threshold color value to white. The first two-color image and the second two-color image are then combined and filtered to smooth the edges of the image. The image may be compressed with a unique Huffman coding table for that image. The image file is also decimated to create a decimated-image file which can later be interpolated back to produce a reconstructed image file using a bilinear interpolation kernel.--(235 words)

  17. Bayesian technique for image classifying registration.

    PubMed

    Hachama, Mohamed; Desolneux, Agnès; Richard, Frédéric J P

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we address a complex image registration issue arising while the dependencies between intensities of images to be registered are not spatially homogeneous. Such a situation is frequently encountered in medical imaging when a pathology present in one of the images modifies locally intensity dependencies observed on normal tissues. Usual image registration models, which are based on a single global intensity similarity criterion, fail to register such images, as they are blind to local deviations of intensity dependencies. Such a limitation is also encountered in contrast-enhanced images where there exist multiple pixel classes having different properties of contrast agent absorption. In this paper, we propose a new model in which the similarity criterion is adapted locally to images by classification of image intensity dependencies. Defined in a Bayesian framework, the similarity criterion is a mixture of probability distributions describing dependencies on two classes. The model also includes a class map which locates pixels of the two classes and weighs the two mixture components. The registration problem is formulated both as an energy minimization problem and as a maximum a posteriori estimation problem. It is solved using a gradient descent algorithm. In the problem formulation and resolution, the image deformation and the class map are estimated simultaneously, leading to an original combination of registration and classification that we call image classifying registration. Whenever sufficient information about class location is available in applications, the registration can also be performed on its own by fixing a given class map. Finally, we illustrate the interest of our model on two real applications from medical imaging: template-based segmentation of contrast-enhanced images and lesion detection in mammograms. We also conduct an evaluation of our model on simulated medical data and show its ability to take into account spatial variations

  18. Overview of image security techniques with applications in multimedia systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfgang, Raymond B.; Delp, Edward J., III

    1998-02-01

    The growth of networked multimedia system has created a need for the copyright protection of digital images and video. Copyright protection involves the authentication of image content and/or ownership. This can be used to identify illegal copies of an image. One approach is to mark an image by adding an invisible structure known as a digital watermark to the image. Techniques of incorporating such a watermark into digital images include spatial-domain techniques, transform-domain algorithms and sub-band filtering approaches.

  19. Various diffusion magnetic resonance imaging techniques for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Meng-Yue; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Tian-Wu; Huang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors and remains a treatment-refractory cancer with a poor prognosis. Currently, the diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasm depends mainly on imaging and which methods are conducive to detecting small lesions. Compared to the other techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has irreplaceable advantages and can provide valuable information unattainable with other noninvasive or minimally invasive imaging techniques. Advances in MR hardware and pulse sequence design have particularly improved the quality and robustness of MRI of the pancreas. Diffusion MR imaging serves as one of the common functional MRI techniques and is the only technique that can be used to reflect the diffusion movement of water molecules in vivo. It is generally known that diffusion properties depend on the characterization of intrinsic features of tissue microdynamics and microstructure. With the improvement of the diffusion models, diffusion MR imaging techniques are increasingly varied, from the simplest and most commonly used technique to the more complex. In this review, the various diffusion MRI techniques for pancreatic cancer are discussed, including conventional diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), multi-b DWI based on intra-voxel incoherent motion theory, diffusion tensor imaging and diffusion kurtosis imaging. The principles, main parameters, advantages and limitations of these techniques, as well as future directions for pancreatic diffusion imaging are also discussed. PMID:26753059

  20. Damage characterization using guided-wave linear arrays and image compounding techniques.

    PubMed

    Higuti, Ricardo T; Martínez-Graullera, Oscar; Martín, Carlos J; Octavio, Alberto; Elvira, Luis; Montero de Espinosa, Francisco

    2010-09-01

    In this work, a high-resolution imaging method for the inspection of isotropic plate-like structures using linear arrays and Lamb waves is proposed. The evaluation of these components is limited by the low dynamic range resulting from main lobe and side lobe field patterns, and from the narrowband nature of the Lamb waves. Based on a full matrix array, synthetic aperture technique using all emitter-receiver combinations, different images from the same object are obtained by using different apodization coefficients, which are related to a trade-off between main lobe width and relative side lobe level. Several image compounding strategies have been tested and a new algorithm, based on apodization and polarity diversities between signals, is proposed. However, some effects, such as the dead zone close to the array and reverberations caused by interactions of the wavefront and defects, still limit the quality of the images. The use of spatial diversity, obtained by an additional array, introduces complementary information about the defects and improves the results of the proposed algorithm, producing high-resolution, high-contrast images. Experimental results are shown for a 1-mm-thick isotropic aluminum plate with artificial defects using linear arrays formed by 30 piezoelectric elements, with the low dispersion symmetric mode S0 at the frequency of 330 kHz.

  1. Forensic Techniques for Image Source Classification: A Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delp, Edward J.

    Digital images can be captured or generated by a variety of sources including digital cameras, scanners and computer graphics softwares. In many cases it is important to be able to determine the source of a digital image such as for criminal and forensic investigation. Based on their originating mechanism digital images can be classified into three classes: digital camera images, scanner generated images and computer-graphics generated images. Image source classification is helpful as a first step for identifying the unique device or system which produced the image. This paper presents a survey of different methods for solving image source classification problem, some improvements over them and compares their performance in a common framework. As expected with the advances in computer graphics techniques, artificial images are becoming closer and closer to the natural ones and harder to distinguish by human visual system. Hence, the methods based on characteristics of image generating process are more successful than those based on image content.

  2. Particle Imaging Velocimetry Technique Development for Laboratory Measurement of Fracture Flow Inside a Pressure Vessel Using Neutron Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Polsky, Yarom; Bingham, Philip R; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Carmichael, Justin R

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe recent progress made in developing neutron imaging based particle imaging velocimetry techniques for visualizing and quantifying flow structure through a high pressure flow cell with high temperature capability (up to 350 degrees C). This experimental capability has great potential for improving the understanding of flow through fractured systems in applications such as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). For example, flow structure measurement can be used to develop and validate single phase flow models used for simulation, experimentally identify critical transition regions and their dependence on fracture features such as surface roughness, and study multiphase fluid behavior within fractured systems. The developed method involves the controlled injection of a high contrast fluid into a water flow stream to produce droplets that can be tracked using neutron radiography. A description of the experimental setup will be provided along with an overview of the algorithms used to automatically track droplets and relate them to the velocity gradient in the flow stream. Experimental results will be reported along with volume of fluids based simulation techniques used to model observed flow.

  3. Unconventional techniques of fundus imaging: A review.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Mahesh P; Mishra, Divyansh Kailash Chandra; Rajesh, R; Madhukumar, R

    2015-07-01

    The methods of fundus examination include direct and indirect ophthalmoscopy and imaging with a fundus camera are an essential part of ophthalmic practice. The usage of unconventional equipment such as a hand-held video camera, smartphone, and a nasal endoscope allows one to image the fundus with advantages and some disadvantages. The advantages of these instruments are the cost-effectiveness, ultra portability and ability to obtain images in a remote setting and share the same electronically. These instruments, however, are unlikely to replace the fundus camera but then would always be an additional arsenal in an ophthalmologist's armamentarium.

  4. Distortion of DNA Origami on Graphene Imaged with Advanced TEM Techniques.

    PubMed

    Kabiri, Yoones; Ananth, Adithya N; van der Torre, Jaco; Katan, Allard; Hong, Jin-Yong; Malladi, Sairam; Kong, Jing; Zandbergen, Henny; Dekker, Cees

    2017-08-01

    While graphene may appear to be the ultimate support membrane for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging of DNA nanostructures, very little is known if it poses an advantage over conventional carbon supports in terms of resolution and contrast. Microscopic investigations are carried out on DNA origami nanoplates that are supported onto freestanding graphene, using advanced TEM techniques, including a new dark-field technique that is recently developed in our lab. TEM images of stained and unstained DNA origami are presented with high contrast on both graphene and amorphous carbon membranes. On graphene, the images of the origami plates show severe unwanted distortions, where the rectangular shape of the nanoplates is significantly distorted. From a number of comparative control experiments, it is demonstrated that neither staining agents, nor screening ions, nor the level of electron-beam irradiation cause this distortion. Instead, it is suggested that origami nanoplates are distorted due to hydrophobic interaction of the DNA bases with graphene upon adsorption of the DNA origami nanoplates. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Holographic Radar Imaging Privacy Techniques Utilizing Dual-Frequency Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.; Sheen, David M.

    2008-04-18

    Over the last 15 years, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has performed significant research and development activities to enhance the state of the art of holographic radar imaging systems to be used at security checkpoints for screening people for concealed threats hidden under their garments. These enhancement activities included improvements to privacy techniques to remove human features and providing automatic detection of body-worn concealed threats. The enhanced privacy and detection methods used both physical and software imaging techniques. The physical imaging techniques included polarization-diversity illumination and reception, dual-frequency implementation, and high-frequency imaging at 60 GHz. Software imaging techniques to enhance the privacy of the person under surveillance included extracting concealed threat artifacts from the imagery to automatically detect the threat. This paper will focus on physical privacy techniques using dual-frequency implementation.

  6. Combined neutron imaging techniques for cultural heritage purpose

    SciTech Connect

    Materna, T.

    2009-01-28

    This article presents the different new neutron techniques developed by the Ancient Charm collaboration to image objects of cultural heritage importance: Prompt-gamma-ray activation imaging (PGAI) coupled to cold/thermal neutron transmission tomography, Neutron Resonance Capture Imaging (NRCI) and Neutron Resonance Tomography.

  7. Laser image denoising technique based on multi-fractal theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Lin; Sun, Huayan; Tian, Weiqing; Wang, Shuai

    2014-02-01

    The noise of laser images is complex, which includes additive noise and multiplicative noise. Considering the features of laser images, the basic processing capacity and defects of the common algorithm, this paper introduces the fractal theory into the research of laser image denoising. The research of laser image denoising is implemented mainly through the analysis of the singularity exponent of each pixel in fractal space and the feature of multi-fractal spectrum. According to the quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the processed image, the laser image processing technique based on fractal theory not only effectively removes the complicated noise of the laser images obtained by range-gated laser active imaging system, but can also maintains the detail information when implementing the image denoising processing. For different laser images, multi-fractal denoising technique can increase SNR of the laser image at least 1~2dB compared with other denoising techniques, which basically meet the needs of the laser image denoising technique.

  8. Investigation of Antiangiogenic Mechanisms Using Novel Imaging Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    Biomed. Opt. 95, 982–994 2004. 6. M. Khurana, E. H. Moriyama, A. Mariampillai, and B. C. Wilson, “ Intravital high-resolution optical imaging of...Mechanisms Using Novel Imaging Techniques PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Andrew Fontanella CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Duke University Durham...Using Novel Imaging Techniques 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-1-0113 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Andrew Fontanella

  9. Technique for identifying, tracing, or tracking objects in image data

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert J [Albuquerque, NM; Rothganger, Fredrick [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-08-28

    A technique for computer vision uses a polygon contour to trace an object. The technique includes rendering a polygon contour superimposed over a first frame of image data. The polygon contour is iteratively refined to more accurately trace the object within the first frame after each iteration. The refinement includes computing image energies along lengths of contour lines of the polygon contour and adjusting positions of the contour lines based at least in part on the image energies.

  10. Phase Diversity and Polarization Augmented Techniques for Active Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Phase Diversity and Polarization Augmented Techniques for Active Imaging DISSERTATION Peter M. Johnson, Captain, USAF AFIT/DS/ENG/07-05 DEPARTMENT OF...Force, Department of Defense, or the United States Government. AFIT/DS/ENG/07-05 Phase Diversity and Polarization Augmented Techniques for Active Imaging...must be used. To facilitate this, a multi-frame active phase diversity imaging (APDI) algorithm is derived and demonstrated for the statistics of

  11. Real-time optical image processing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1988-01-01

    Nonlinear real-time optical processing on spatial pulse frequency modulation has been pursued through the analysis, design, and fabrication of pulse frequency modulated halftone screens and the modification of micro-channel spatial light modulators (MSLMs). Micro-channel spatial light modulators are modified via the Fabry-Perot method to achieve the high gamma operation required for non-linear operation. Real-time nonlinear processing was performed using the halftone screen and MSLM. The experiments showed the effectiveness of the thresholding and also showed the needs of higher SBP for image processing. The Hughes LCLV has been characterized and found to yield high gamma (about 1.7) when operated in low frequency and low bias mode. Cascading of two LCLVs should also provide enough gamma for nonlinear processing. In this case, the SBP of the LCLV is sufficient but the uniformity of the LCLV needs improvement. These include image correlation, computer generation of holograms, pseudo-color image encoding for image enhancement, and associative-retrieval in neural processing. The discovery of the only known optical method for dynamic range compression of an input image in real-time by using GaAs photorefractive crystals is reported. Finally, a new architecture for non-linear multiple sensory, neural processing has been suggested.

  12. Real-time optical image processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1988-10-01

    Nonlinear real-time optical processing on spatial pulse frequency modulation has been pursued through the analysis, design, and fabrication of pulse frequency modulated halftone screens and the modification of micro-channel spatial light modulators (MSLMs). Micro-channel spatial light modulators are modified via the Fabry-Perot method to achieve the high gamma operation required for non-linear operation. Real-time nonlinear processing was performed using the halftone screen and MSLM. The experiments showed the effectiveness of the thresholding and also showed the needs of higher SBP for image processing. The Hughes LCLV has been characterized and found to yield high gamma (about 1.7) when operated in low frequency and low bias mode. Cascading of two LCLVs should also provide enough gamma for nonlinear processing. In this case, the SBP of the LCLV is sufficient but the uniformity of the LCLV needs improvement. These include image correlation, computer generation of holograms, pseudo-color image encoding for image enhancement, and associative-retrieval in neural processing. The discovery of the only known optical method for dynamic range compression of an input image in real-time by using GaAs photorefractive crystals is reported. Finally, a new architecture for non-linear multiple sensory, neural processing has been suggested.

  13. Comparison and improvement of color-based image retrieval techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yujin; Liu, Zhong W.; He, Yun

    1997-12-01

    With the increasing popularity of image manipulation with contents, many color-based image retrieval techniques have been proposed in the literature. A systematic and comparative study of 8 representative techniques is first presented in this paper, which uses a database of 200 images of flags and trademarks. These techniques are determined to cover the variations of the color models used, of the characteristic color features employed and of the distance measures calculated for judging the similarity of color images. The results of this comparative study are presented both by the list of retrieved images for subjective visual inspection and by the retrieving ratios computed for objective judgement. All of them show that the cumulative histogram based techniques using Euclidean distance measures in two perception related color spaces give best results among the 8 techniques under consideration. Started from the best performed techniques, works toward further improving their retrieving capability are then carried on and this has resulted 2 new techniques which use local cumulative histograms. The new techniques have been tested by using a database of 400 images of real flowers which are quite complicated in color contents. Some satisfactory results, compared to that obtained by using existing cumulative histogram based techniques are obtained and presented.

  14. Techniques to derive geometries for image-based Eulerian computations

    PubMed Central

    Dillard, Seth; Buchholz, James; Vigmostad, Sarah; Kim, Hyunggun; Udaykumar, H.S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The performance of three frequently used level set-based segmentation methods is examined for the purpose of defining features and boundary conditions for image-based Eulerian fluid and solid mechanics models. The focus of the evaluation is to identify an approach that produces the best geometric representation from a computational fluid/solid modeling point of view. In particular, extraction of geometries from a wide variety of imaging modalities and noise intensities, to supply to an immersed boundary approach, is targeted. Design/methodology/approach Two- and three-dimensional images, acquired from optical, X-ray CT, and ultrasound imaging modalities, are segmented with active contours, k-means, and adaptive clustering methods. Segmentation contours are converted to level sets and smoothed as necessary for use in fluid/solid simulations. Results produced by the three approaches are compared visually and with contrast ratio, signal-to-noise ratio, and contrast-to-noise ratio measures. Findings While the active contours method possesses built-in smoothing and regularization and produces continuous contours, the clustering methods (k-means and adaptive clustering) produce discrete (pixelated) contours that require smoothing using speckle-reducing anisotropic diffusion (SRAD). Thus, for images with high contrast and low to moderate noise, active contours are generally preferable. However, adaptive clustering is found to be far superior to the other two methods for images possessing high levels of noise and global intensity variations, due to its more sophisticated use of local pixel/voxel intensity statistics. Originality/value It is often difficult to know a priori which segmentation will perform best for a given image type, particularly when geometric modeling is the ultimate goal. This work offers insight to the algorithm selection process, as well as outlining a practical framework for generating useful geometric surfaces in an Eulerian setting. PMID

  15. Steganalysis Techniques for Documents and Images

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    generalized our previous steganalysis technique of sample pair analysis to a theoretical framework for the detection of the LSB steganography . The new...steganalysis technique of sample pair analysis to a theoretical framework for the detection of the LSB steganography . The new framework exploits high-order... steganography as an additive noise process and measuring the mean and variance of the stego-signal. We derived a formula that governs all additive

  16. Externally triggered imaging technique for microbolometer-type terahertz imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Naoki; Sudou, Takayuki; Ishi, Tsutomu; Okubo, Syuichi; Isoyama, Goro; Irizawa, Akinori; Kawase, Keigo; Kato, Ryukou

    2016-04-01

    The authors developed terahertz (THz) imager which incorporates 320x240 focal plane array (FPA) with enhanced sensitivity in sub-THz region (ca. 0.5 THz). The imager includes functions such as external-trigger imaging, lock-in imaging, beam profiling and so on. The function of the external-trigger imaging is mainly described in this paper, which was verified in combination of the THz imager with the pulsed THz free electron laser (THz-FEL) developed by Osaka University. The THz-FEL emits THz radiation in a wavelength range of 25 - 150 μm at repetition rates of 2.5, 3.3, 5.0 and 10 pulses per second. The external trigger pulse for the THz imager was generated with a pulse generator, using brightening pulse for THz-FEL. A series of pulses emitted by the THz-FEL at 86 μm were introduced to the THz imager and Joule meter via beam splitter, so that the output signal of THz imager was normalized with the output of the Joule meter and the stability of the THz radiation from FEL was also monitored. The normalized output signals of THz imager (digits/μJ) obtained at the repetition rates mentioned above were found consistent with one another. The timing-relation of the external trigger pulse to the brightening pulse was varied and the influence of the timing-relation on beam pattern is presented. These experimental results verify that the external trigger imaging function operates correctly.

  17. Infrared Imaging Data Reduction Software and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbey, C. N.; McMahon, R. G.; Lewis, J. R.; Irwin, M. J.

    Developed to satisfy certain design requirements not met in existing packages (e.g., full weight map handling) and to optimize the software for large data sets (non-interactive tasks that are CPU and disk efficient), the InfraRed Data Reduction software package is a small ANSI C library of fast image processing routines for automated pipeline reduction of infrared (dithered) observations. The software includes stand-alone C programs for tasks such as running sky frame subtraction with object masking, image registration and co-addition with weight maps, dither offset measurement using cross-correlation, and object mask dilation. Although currently used for near-IR mosaic images, the modular software is concise and readily adaptable for reuse in other work. IRDR, available via anonymous ftp at ftp.ast.cam.ac.uk in pub/sabbey

  18. Cartilage imaging in children: current indications, magnetic resonance imaging techniques, and imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Ho-Fung, Victor M; Jaramillo, Diego

    2013-07-01

    Evaluation of hyaline cartilage in pediatric patients requires in-depth understanding of normal physiologic changes in the developing skeleton. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a powerful tool for morphologic and functional imaging of the cartilage. In this review article, current imaging indications for cartilage evaluation pertinent to the pediatric population are described. In particular, novel surgical techniques for cartilage repair and MR classification of cartilage injuries are summarized. The authors also provide a review of the normal anatomy and a concise description of the advances in quantitative cartilage imaging (ie, T2 mapping, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of cartilage, and T1rho). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of neutron tomography and phase contrast imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kashyap, Y. S.; Agrawal, Ashish; Sarkar, P. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sinha, Amar

    2013-02-05

    This paper presents design and development of a state of art neutron imaging technique at CIRUS reactor with special reference for techniques adopted for tomography and phase contrast imaging applications. Different components of the beamline such as collimator, shielding, sample manipulator, digital imaging system were designed keeping in mind the requirements of data acquisition time and resolution. The collimator was designed in such a way that conventional and phase contrast imaging can be done using same collimator housing. We have done characterization of fuel pins, study of hydride blisters in pressure tubes hydrogen based cells, two phase flow visualization, and online study of locomotive parts etc. using neutron tomography and radiography technique. We have also done some studies using neutron phase contrast imaging technique on this beamline.

  20. Development of neutron tomography and phase contrast imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, Y. S.; Agrawal, Ashish; Sarkar, P. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sinha, Amar

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents design and development of a state of art neutron imaging technique at CIRUS reactor with special reference for techniques adopted for tomography and phase contrast imaging applications. Different components of the beamline such as collimator, shielding, sample manipulator, digital imaging system were designed keeping in mind the requirements of data acquisition time and resolution. The collimator was designed in such a way that conventional and phase contrast imaging can be done using same collimator housing. We have done characterization of fuel pins, study of hydride blisters in pressure tubes hydrogen based cells, two phase flow visualization, and online study of locomotive parts etc. using neutron tomography and radiography technique. We have also done some studies using neutron phase contrast imaging technique on this beamline.

  1. Neurovascular coupling: in vivo optical techniques for functional brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Liao, Lun-De; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Delgado-Martínez, Ignacio; Li, Meng-Lin; Erzurumlu, Reha; Vipin, Ashwati; Orellana, Josue; Lin, Yan-Ren; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, You-Yin; Thakor, Nitish V

    2013-04-30

    Optical imaging techniques reflect different biochemical processes in the brain, which is closely related with neural activity. Scientists and clinicians employ a variety of optical imaging technologies to visualize and study the relationship between neurons, glial cells and blood vessels. In this paper, we present an overview of the current optical approaches used for the in vivo imaging of neurovascular coupling events in small animal models. These techniques include 2-photon microscopy, laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDi), functional photoacoustic microscopy (fPAM), functional near-infrared spectroscopy imaging (fNIRS) and multimodal imaging techniques. The basic principles of each technique are described in detail, followed by examples of current applications from cutting-edge studies of cerebral neurovascular coupling functions and metabolic. Moreover, we provide a glimpse of the possible ways in which these techniques might be translated to human studies for clinical investigations of pathophysiology and disease. In vivo optical imaging techniques continue to expand and evolve, allowing us to discover fundamental basis of neurovascular coupling roles in cerebral physiology and pathophysiology.

  2. Neurovascular coupling: in vivo optical techniques for functional brain imaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optical imaging techniques reflect different biochemical processes in the brain, which is closely related with neural activity. Scientists and clinicians employ a variety of optical imaging technologies to visualize and study the relationship between neurons, glial cells and blood vessels. In this paper, we present an overview of the current optical approaches used for the in vivo imaging of neurovascular coupling events in small animal models. These techniques include 2-photon microscopy, laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDi), functional photoacoustic microscopy (fPAM), functional near-infrared spectroscopy imaging (fNIRS) and multimodal imaging techniques. The basic principles of each technique are described in detail, followed by examples of current applications from cutting-edge studies of cerebral neurovascular coupling functions and metabolic. Moreover, we provide a glimpse of the possible ways in which these techniques might be translated to human studies for clinical investigations of pathophysiology and disease. In vivo optical imaging techniques continue to expand and evolve, allowing us to discover fundamental basis of neurovascular coupling roles in cerebral physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:23631798

  3. Compression technique for plume hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feather, B. K.; Fulkerson, S. A.; Jones, J. H.; Reed, R. A.; Simmons, M. A.; Swann, D. G.; Taylor, W. E.; Bernstein, L. S.

    2005-06-01

    The authors recently developed a hyperspectral image output option for a standardized government code designed to predict missile exhaust plume infrared signatures. Typical predictions cover the 2- to 5-m wavelength range (2000 to 5000 cm-1) at 5 cm-1 spectral resolution, and as a result the hyperspectral images have several hundred frequency channels. Several hundred hyperspectral plume images are needed to span the full operational envelope of missile altitude, Mach number, and aspect angle. Since the net disk storage space can be as large as 100 GB, a Principal Components Analysis is used to compress the spectral dimension, reducing the volume of data to just a few gigabytes. The principal challenge was to specify a robust default setting for the data compression routine suitable for general users, who are not necessarily specialists in data compression. Specifically, the objective was to provide reasonable data compression efficiency of the hyperspectral imagery while at the same time retaining sufficient accuracy for infrared scene generation and hardware-in-the-loop test applications over a range of sensor bandpasses and scenarios. In addition, although the end users of the code do not usually access the detailed spectral information contained in these hyperspectral images, this information must nevertheless be of sufficient fidelity so that atmospheric transmission losses between the missile plume and the sensor could be reliably computed as a function of range. Several metrics were used to determine how far the plume signature hyperspectral data could be safely compressed while still meeting these end-user requirements.

  4. Diffusion weighted imaging: Technique and applications

    PubMed Central

    Baliyan, Vinit; Das, Chandan J; Sharma, Raju; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is a method of signal contrast generation based on the differences in Brownian motion. DWI is a method to evaluate the molecular function and micro-architecture of the human body. DWI signal contrast can be quantified by apparent diffusion coefficient maps and it acts as a tool for treatment response evaluation and assessment of disease progression. Ability to detect and quantify the anisotropy of diffusion leads to a new paradigm called diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). DTI is a tool for assessment of the organs with highly organised fibre structure. DWI forms an integral part of modern state-of-art magnetic resonance imaging and is indispensable in neuroimaging and oncology. DWI is a field that has been undergoing rapid technical evolution and its applications are increasing every day. This review article provides insights in to the evolution of DWI as a new imaging paradigm and provides a summary of current role of DWI in various disease processes. PMID:27721941

  5. Recovering depth from focus using iterative image estimation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Vitria, J.; Llacer, J.

    1993-09-01

    In this report we examine the possibility of using linear and nonlinear image estimation techniques to build a depth map of a three dimensional scene from a sequence of partially focused images. In particular, the techniques proposed to solve the problem of construction of a depth map are: (1) linear methods based on regularization procedures and (2) nonlinear methods based on statistical modeling. In the first case, we have implemented a matrix-oriented method to recover the point spread function (PSF) of a sequence of partially defocused images. In the second case, the chosen method has been a procedure based on image estimation by means of the EM algorithm, a well known technique in image reconstruction in medical applications. This method has been generalized to deal with optically defocused image sequences.

  6. Towards Automatic Image Segmentation Using Optimised Region Growing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alazab, Mamoun; Islam, Mofakharul; Venkatraman, Sitalakshmi

    Image analysis is being adopted extensively in many applications such as digital forensics, medical treatment, industrial inspection, etc. primarily for diagnostic purposes. Hence, there is a growing interest among researches in developing new segmentation techniques to aid the diagnosis process. Manual segmentation of images is labour intensive, extremely time consuming and prone to human errors and hence an automated real-time technique is warranted in such applications. There is no universally applicable automated segmentation technique that will work for all images as the image segmentation is quite complex and unique depending upon the domain application. Hence, to fill the gap, this paper presents an efficient segmentation algorithm that can segment a digital image of interest into a more meaningful arrangement of regions and objects. Our algorithm combines region growing approach with optimised elimination of false boundaries to arrive at more meaningful segments automatically. We demonstrate this using X-ray teeth images that were taken for real-life dental diagnosis.

  7. Verification of Ultrasonic Image Fusion Technique for Laparoscopic Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenbutsu, Satoki; Igarashi, Tatsuo; Mamou, Jonathan; Yamaguchi, Tadashi

    2012-07-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is one of the most challenging surgical operations, because inside information about the target organ cannot be fully understood from the laparoscopic image. Therefore, a fusion technique of laparoscopic and ultrasonic images is proposed for guidance during laparoscopic surgery. The proposed technique can display the internal organ structure by overlaying a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasonic image over a 3D laparoscopic image, which is acquired using a stereo laparoscope. The registration of the 3D images is performed by registering the surface of the target organ, which is found in the two 3D images without requiring the use of an external position detecting device. The proposed technique was evaluated experimentally using a tissue-mimicking phantom. Results obtained led to registration accuracy better than 2 cm. The total computation time was 3.1 min on a personal computer (Xeon processor, 3 GHz CPU). The structural information permits the visualization of target organs during laparoscopic surgery.

  8. Color-gamut mapping techniques for color hardcopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Toru; Berns, Roy S.

    1993-08-01

    Color gamut mapping is required whenever two imaging devices do not have coincident color gamuts or viewing conditions. Two major gamut mapping techniques include lightness and chroma manipulations. Lightness mapping accounts for differences in white level, black level, and viewing conditions while chroma mapping accounts for differences in gamut volume. As a three dimensional space in which color gamut mapping is implemented, the 1991 Hunt model of color appearance was used utilizing dimensions of lightness, chroma, and hue. This model accounts for viewing conditions in addition to the usual device independent specification. The mapping techniques were applied to back-lit photographic transparencies in order to reproduce images using a dye diffusion thermal transfer printer. As the first experiment, a lightness mapping experiment was performed. Three different lightness mapping techniques, a linear technique and two non-linear techniques, were tested for four images. The psychophysical method of paired comparison was used to generate interval scales of preferred color reproduction. In general, the preferred technique depended on the amount of lightness mapping required and on the original image's lightness histograms. For small amounts of compression, the preferred technique was a clipping type. For large amounts of compression, the preferred technique was image dependent; low preference was caused by loss of detail or apparent fluorescence of high chroma image areas.

  9. Cylindrical millimeter-wave imaging technique and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2006-05-01

    The wideband microwave or millimeter-wave cylindrical imaging technique has been developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for several applications including concealed weapon detection and automated body measurement for apparel fitting. This technique forms a fully-focused, diffraction-limited, three-dimensional image of the person or imaging target by scanning an inward-directed vertical array around the person or imaging target. The array is switched electronically to sequence across the array at high-speed, so that a full 360 degree mechanical scan over the cylindrical aperture can occur in 2-10 seconds. Wideband, coherent reflection data from each antenna position are recorded in a computer and subsequently reconstructed using an FFT-based image reconstruction algorithm developed at PNNL. The cylindrical scanning configuration is designed to optimize the illumination of the target and minimize non-returns due to specular reflection of the illumination away from the array. In this paper, simulated modeling data are used to explore imaging issues that affect the cylindrical imaging technique. Physical optics scattering simulations are used to model realistic returns from curved surfaces to determine the extent to which specular reflection affects the signal return and subsequent image reconstruction from these surfaces. This is a particularly important issue for the body measurement application. Also, an artifact in the imaging technique, referred to as "circular convolution aliasing" is discussed including methods to reduce or eliminate it. Numerous simulated and laboratory measured imaging results are presented.

  10. Cylindrical Millemeter-Wave Imaging Technique and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2006-08-01

    The wideband microwave or millimeter-wave cylindrical imaging technique has been developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for several applications including concealed weapon detection and automated body measurements for apparel fitting. This technique forms a fully-focused, diffraction-limited, three-dimensional image of the person or imaging target by scanning an inward-directed vertical array around the person or imaging target. The array is switched electronically to sequence across the array at high-speed, so that a full 360 degree mechanical scan over the cylindrical aperture can occur in 2-10 seconds. Wideband, coherent reflection data from each antenna position are recorded in a computer and subsequently reconstructed using an FFT-based image reconstruction algorithm developed at PNNL. The cylindrical scanning configuration is designed to optimize the illumination of the target and minimize non-returns due to specular reflection of the illumination away from the array. In this paper, simulated modeling data is used to explore imaging issues that affect the cylindrical imaging technique. Physical optics scattering simulations are used to model realistic returns from curved surfaces to determine the extent to which specular reflection affects the signal return and subsequent image reconstruction from these surfaces. This is a particularly important issue for the body measurement application. Also, an artifact in the imaging technique, referred to as "circular convolution aliasing" is discussed including methods to reduce or eliminate it. Numerous simulated and laboratory measured imaging results are presented.

  11. Hierarchical clustering techniques for image database organization and summarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vellaikal, Asha; Kuo, C.-C. Jay

    1998-10-01

    This paper investigates clustering techniques as a method of organizing image databases to support popular visual management functions such as searching, browsing and navigation. Different types of hierarchical agglomerative clustering techniques are studied as a method of organizing features space as well as summarizing image groups by the selection of a few appropriate representatives. Retrieval performance using both single and multiple level hierarchies are experimented with and the algorithms show an interesting relationship between the top k correct retrievals and the number of comparisons required. Some arguments are given to support the use of such cluster-based techniques for managing distributed image databases.

  12. Optical image segmentation using wavelet filtering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veronin, Christopher P.

    1990-12-01

    This research effort successfully implemented an automatic, optically based image segmentation scheme for locating potential targets in a cluttered FLIR image. Such a design is critical to achieve real-time segmentation and classification for machine vision applications. The segmentation scheme used in this research was based on texture discrimination and employs orientation specific, bandpass spatial filters as its main component. The orientation specific, bandpass spatial filters designed during this research include symmetrically located circular apertures implemented on heavy, black aluminum foil; cosine and sine Gabor filters implemented with detour-phase computer generated holography photoreduced onto glass slides; and symmetrically located circular apertures implemented on a liquid crystal television (LCTV) for real-time filter selection. The most successful design was the circular aperture pairs implemented on the aluminum foil. Segmentation was illustrated for simple and complex texture slides, glass template slides, and static and real-time FLIR imagery displayed on an LCTV.

  13. Multiwavelet-transform-based image compression techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Sathyanarayana S.; Yoon, Sung H.; Shenoy, Deepak

    1996-10-01

    Multiwavelet transforms are a new class of wavelet transforms that use more than one prototype scaling function and wavelet in the multiresolution analysis/synthesis. The popular Geronimo-Hardin-Massopust multiwavelet basis functions have properties of compact support, orthogonality, and symmetry which cannot be obtained simultaneously in scalar wavelets. The performance of multiwavelets in still image compression is studied using vector quantization of multiwavelet subbands with a multiresolution codebook. The coding gain of multiwavelets is compared with that of other well-known wavelet families using performance measures such as unified coding gain. Implementation aspects of multiwavelet transforms such as pre-filtering/post-filtering and symmetric extension are also considered in the context of image compression.

  14. Reconstruction Techniques for Sparse Multistatic Linear Array Microwave Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2014-06-09

    Sequentially-switched linear arrays are an enabling technology for a number of near-field microwave imaging applications. Electronically sequencing along the array axis followed by mechanical scanning along an orthogonal axis allows dense sampling of a two-dimensional aperture in near real-time. In this paper, a sparse multi-static array technique will be described along with associated Fourier-Transform-based and back-projection-based image reconstruction algorithms. Simulated and measured imaging results are presented that show the effectiveness of the sparse array technique along with the merits and weaknesses of each image reconstruction approach.

  15. Automated thermal mapping techniques using chromatic image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal imaging techniques are introduced using a chromatic image analysis system and temperature sensitive coatings. These techniques are used for thermal mapping and surface heat transfer measurements on aerothermodynamic test models in hypersonic wind tunnels. Measurements are made on complex vehicle configurations in a timely manner and at minimal expense. The image analysis system uses separate wavelength filtered images to analyze surface spectral intensity data. The system was initially developed for quantitative surface temperature mapping using two-color thermographic phosphors but was found useful in interpreting phase change paint and liquid crystal data as well.

  16. High-Resolution and Animal Imaging Instrumentation and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belcari, Nicola; Guerra, AlbertoDel

    During the last decade we have observed a growing interest in "in vivo" imaging techniques for small animals. This is due to the necessity of studying biochemical processes at a molecular level for pharmacology, genetic, and pathology investigations. This field of research is usually called "molecular imaging."Advances in biological understanding have been accompanied by technological advances in instrumentation and techniques and image-reconstruction software, resulting in improved image quality, visibility, and interpretation. The main technological challenge is then the design of systems with high spatial resolution and high sensitivity.

  17. The application of image enhancement techniques to remote manipulator operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    Methods of image enhancement which can be used by an operator who is not experienced with the mechanisms of enhancement to obtain satisfactory results were designed and implemented. Investigation of transformations which operate directly on the image domain resulted in a new technique of contrast enhancement. Transformations on the Fourier transform of the original image, including such techniques as homomorphic filtering, were also investigated. The methods of communication between the enhancement system and the computer operator were analyzed, and a language was developed for use in image enhancement. A working enhancement system was then created, and is included.

  18. Efficient imaging techniques using an ultrasonic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, L.; Hunter, A. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2010-03-01

    Over the past few years, ultrasonic phased arrays have shown good potential for non-destructive testing (NDT), thanks to high resolution imaging algorithms that allow the characterization of defects in a structure. Many algorithms are based on the full matrix capture, obtained by firing each element of an ultrasonic array independently, while collecting the data with all elements. Because of the finite sound velocity in the specimen, two consecutive firings must be separated by a minimum time interval. Therefore, more elements in the array require longer data acquisition times. Moreover, if the array has N elements, then the full matrix contains N2 temporal signals to be processed. Because of the limited calculation speed of current computers, a large matrix of data can result in rather long post-processing times. In an industrial context where real-time imaging is desirable, it is crucial to reduce acquisition and/or post-processing times. This paper investigates methods designed to reduce acquisition and post-processing times for the TFM and wavenumber algorithms. To reduce data capture and post-processing, limited transmission cycles are used. Post-processing times is also further reduced by demodulating the data to baseband, which allows reducing the sampling rate of signals. Results are presented so that a compromise can be made between acquisition time, post-processing time and image quality. Possible improvement of images quality, using the effective aperture theory, is discussed. This has been implemented for the TFM but it still has to be developed for the wavenumber algorithm.

  19. Robust image modeling technique with a bioluminescence image segmentation application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jianghong; Wang, Ruiping; Tian, Jie

    2009-02-01

    A robust pattern classifier algorithm for the variable symmetric plane model, where the driving noise is a mixture of a Gaussian and an outlier process, is developed. The veracity and high-speed performance of the pattern recognition algorithm is proved. Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has recently gained wide acceptance in the field of in vivo small animal molecular imaging. So that it is very important for BLT to how to acquire the highprecision region of interest in a bioluminescence image (BLI) in order to decrease loss of the customers because of inaccuracy in quantitative analysis. An algorithm in the mode is developed to improve operation speed, which estimates parameters and original image intensity simultaneously from the noise corrupted image derived from the BLT optical hardware system. The focus pixel value is obtained from the symmetric plane according to a more realistic assumption for the noise sequence in the restored image. The size of neighborhood is adaptive and small. What's more, the classifier function is base on the statistic features. If the qualifications for the classifier are satisfied, the focus pixel intensity is setup as the largest value in the neighborhood.Otherwise, it will be zeros.Finally,pseudo-color is added up to the result of the bioluminescence segmented image. The whole process has been implemented in our 2D BLT optical system platform and the model is proved.

  20. Employing image processing techniques for cancer detection using microarray images.

    PubMed

    Dehghan Khalilabad, Nastaran; Hassanpour, Hamid

    2017-02-01

    Microarray technology is a powerful genomic tool for simultaneously studying and analyzing the behavior of thousands of genes. The analysis of images obtained from this technology plays a critical role in the detection and treatment of diseases. The aim of the current study is to develop an automated system for analyzing data from microarray images in order to detect cancerous cases. The proposed system consists of three main phases, namely image processing, data mining, and the detection of the disease. The image processing phase performs operations such as refining image rotation, gridding (locating genes) and extracting raw data from images the data mining includes normalizing the extracted data and selecting the more effective genes. Finally, via the extracted data, cancerous cell is recognized. To evaluate the performance of the proposed system, microarray database is employed which includes Breast cancer, Myeloid Leukemia and Lymphomas from the Stanford Microarray Database. The results indicate that the proposed system is able to identify the type of cancer from the data set with an accuracy of 95.45%, 94.11%, and 100%, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Automated synthesis of image processing procedures using AI planning techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Mortensen, Helen

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the Multimission VICAR (Video Image Communication and Retrieval) Planner (MVP) (Chien 1994) system, which uses artificial intelligence planning techniques (Iwasaki & Friedland, 1985, Pemberthy & Weld, 1992, Stefik, 1981) to automatically construct executable complex image processing procedures (using models of the smaller constituent image processing subprograms) in response to image processing requests made to the JPL Multimission Image Processing Laboratory (MIPL). The MVP system allows the user to specify the image processing requirements in terms of the various types of correction required. Given this information, MVP derives unspecified required processing steps and determines appropriate image processing programs and parameters to achieve the specified image processing goals. This information is output as an executable image processing program which can then be executed to fill the processing request.

  2. Biophotonics techniques for structural and functional imaging, in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Gandjbakhche, Amir H; Najafizadeh, Laleh

    2013-01-01

    In vivo optical imaging is being conducted in a variety of medical applications, including optical breast cancer imaging, functional brain imaging, endoscopy, exercise medicine, and monitoring the photodynamic therapy and progress of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In the past three decades, in vivo diffuse optical breast cancer imaging has shown promising results in cancer detection, and monitoring the progress of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The use of near infrared spectroscopy for functional brain imaging has been growing rapidly. In fluorescence imaging, the difference between autofluorescence of cancer lesions compared to normal tissues were used in endoscopy to distinguish malignant lesions from normal tissue or inflammation and in determining the boarders of cancer lesions in surgery. Recent advances in drugs targeting specific tumor receptors, such as monoclonal antibodies (mAb), has created a new demand for developing non-invasive in vivo imaging techniques for detection of cancer biomarkers, and for monitoring their down regulations during therapy. Targeted treatments, combined with new imaging techniques, are expected to potentially result in new imaging and treatment paradigms in cancer therapy. Similar approaches can potentially be applied for the characterization of other disease-related biomarkers. In this chapter, we provide a review of diffuse optical and fluorescence imaging techniques with their application in functional brain imaging and cancer diagnosis.

  3. Biophotonics techniques for structural and functional imaging, in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Gandjbakhche, Amir H; Najafizadeh, Laleh

    2012-01-01

    In vivo optical imaging is being conducted in a variety of medical applications, including optical breast cancer imaging, functional brain imaging, endoscopy, exercise medicine, and monitoring the photodynamic therapy and progress of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In the past three decades, in vivo diffuse optical breast cancer imaging has shown promising results in cancer detection, and monitoring the progress of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The use of near infrared spectroscopy for functional brain imaging has been growing rapidly. In fluorescence imaging, the difference between autofluorescence of cancer lesions compared to normal tissues were used in endoscopy to distinguish malignant lesions from normal tissue or inflammation and in determining the boarders of cancer lesions in surgery. Recent advances in drugs targeting specific tumor receptors, such as AntiBodies (MAB), has created a new demand for developing non-invasive in vivo imaging techniques for detection of cancer biomarkers, and for monitoring their down regulations during therapy. Targeted treatments, combined with new imaging techniques, are expected to potentially result in new imaging and treatment paradigms in cancer therapy. Similar approaches can potentially be applied for the characterization of other disease-related biomarkers. In this chapter, we provide a review of diffuse optical and fluorescence imaging techniques with their application in functional brain imaging and cancer diagnosis.

  4. Visible light metasurfaces based on gallium nitride high contrast gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenhai; He, Shumin; Liu, Qifa; Wang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    We propose visible-light metasurfaces (VLMs) capable of serving as lens and beam deflecting element based on gallium nitride (GaN) high contrast gratings (HCGs). By precisely manipulating the wavefront of the transmitted light, we theoretically demonstrate an HCG focusing lens with transmissivity of 86.3%, and a VLM with beam deflection angle of 6.09° and transmissivity as high as 91.4%. The proposed all-dielectric metasurfaces are promising for GaN-based visible light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which would be robust and versatile for controlling the output light propagation and polarization, as well as enhancing the extraction efficiency of the LEDs.

  5. Highly efficient polarization control using subwavelength high contrast transmitarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbabi, Amir; Horie, Yu; Bagheri, Mahmood; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-02-01

    We report efficient wave plates with different retardations and orientations of fast axes realized using transmitarrays composed of a periodic arrangement of amorphous silicon elliptical cylinders on glass. We show that novel polarization devices which locally rotate the polarization by different angles while preserving the wavefront can be demonstrated using such a high contrast transmitarray. We present design, fabrication and experimental characterization results for near infrared transmissive wave retarders with efficiencies in excess of 90%, and discuss the potential applications of atwill local polarization control enabled by this technology.

  6. Optical double image encryption employing a pseudo image technique in the Fourier domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Changliang; Liu, Shi; Sheridan, John T.

    2014-06-01

    A novel optical encryption method is proposed involving double image encryption in which one image is introduced as the pseudo image while the other is the original object image. The Double Random Phase Encoding technique is used to encrypt both the pseudo and object images into complex images. A unique binary image is then employed to first generate the random phase key for the object image encryption and then to embed the encrypted object image into the encrypted pseudo image, which acts as host image. Both the second random phase mask used for encoding the pseudo image and the binary image act as encryption keys. If an attacker attempts to crack the random phase key and decrypt the original object image, the pseudo image will be obtained instead. Simulation results and robustness tests are performed which demonstrate the feasibility of the algorithm.

  7. "Relative CIR": an image enhancement and visualization technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, Michael D.

    1993-01-01

    Many techniques exist to spectrally and spatially enhance digital multispectral scanner data. One technique enhances an image while keeping the colors as they would appear in a color-infrared (CIR) image. This "relative CIR" technique generates an image that is both spectrally and spatially enhanced, while displaying a maximum range of colors. The technique enables an interpreter to visualize either spectral or land cover classes by their relative CIR characteristics. A relative CIR image is generated by developed spectral statistics for each class in the classifications and then, using a nonparametric approach for spectral enhancement, the means of the classes for each band are ranked. A 3 by 3 pixel smoothing filter is applied to the classification for spatial enhancement and the classes are mapped to the representative rank for each band. Practical applications of the technique include displaying an image classification product as a CIR image that was not derived directly from a spectral image, visualizing how a land cover classification would look as a CIR image, and displaying a spectral classification or intermediate product that will be used to label spectral classes.

  8. Comparison of interferometric spectral imaging techniques near the pupil plane and image plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Kazuyoshi; Inoue, Takashi; Ichioka, Yoshiki

    1990-07-01

    We present an analysis of signal to noise ratios of two interferometric techniques for spectral imaging and its experimental verification. One technique makes use of interference signals detected near the pupil plane and the other uses the signals near the image plane. The experiments showed that the latter technique is superior to the former under the normal conditions. 1.

  9. Visualization of sound generation: special imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahlweg, Cornelius F.; Skaloud, Daniel C.; Gutzmann, Holger L.; Kutz, Sascha; Rothe, Hendrik

    2013-09-01

    The present paper is dedicated to the Optics and Music session of the Novel Systems Design and Optimization XVI Conference. It is intended as an informative paper for the music enthusiasts. Included are some examples of visualization of sound generation and vibration modes of musically relevant objects and processes - record playback, an electric guitar and a wine glass - using high speed video, borescopic view and cross polarization techniques.

  10. New spectral imaging techniques for blood oximetry in the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alabboud, Ied; Muyo, Gonzalo; Gorman, Alistair; Mordant, David; McNaught, Andrew; Petres, Clement; Petillot, Yvan R.; Harvey, Andrew R.

    2007-07-01

    Hyperspectral imaging of the retina presents a unique opportunity for direct and quantitative mapping of retinal biochemistry - particularly of the vasculature where blood oximetry is enabled by the strong variation of absorption spectra with oxygenation. This is particularly pertinent both to research and to clinical investigation and diagnosis of retinal diseases such as diabetes, glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration. The optimal exploitation of hyperspectral imaging however, presents a set of challenging problems, including; the poorly characterised and controlled optical environment of structures within the retina to be imaged; the erratic motion of the eye ball; and the compounding effects of the optical sensitivity of the retina and the low numerical aperture of the eye. We have developed two spectral imaging techniques to address these issues. We describe first a system in which a liquid crystal tuneable filter is integrated into the illumination system of a conventional fundus camera to enable time-sequential, random access recording of narrow-band spectral images. Image processing techniques are described to eradicate the artefacts that may be introduced by time-sequential imaging. In addition we describe a unique snapshot spectral imaging technique dubbed IRIS that employs polarising interferometry and Wollaston prism beam splitters to simultaneously replicate and spectrally filter images of the retina into multiple spectral bands onto a single detector array. Results of early clinical trials acquired with these two techniques together with a physical model which enables oximetry map are reported.

  11. Technique development for photoacoustic imaging guided interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qian; Zhang, Haonan; Yuan, Jie; Feng, Ting; Xu, Guan; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    Laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), i.e. tissue destruction induced by a local increase of temperature by means of laser light energy transmission, has been frequently used for minimally invasive treatments of various diseases such as benign thyroid nodules and liver cancer. The emerging photoacoustic (PA) imaging, when integrated with ultrasound (US), could contribute to LITT procedure. PA can enable a good visualization of percutaneous apparatus deep inside tissue and, therefore, can offer accurate guidance of the optical fibers to the target tissue. Our initial experiment demonstrated that, by picking the strong photoacoustic signals generated at the tips of optical fibers as a needle, the trajectory and position of the fibers could be visualized clearly using a commercial available US unit. When working the conventional US Bscan mode, the fibers disappeared when the angle between the fibers and the probe surface was larger than 60 degree; while working on the new PA mode, the fibers could be visualized without any problem even when the angle between the fibers and the probe surface was larger than 75 degree. Moreover, with PA imaging function integrated, the optical fibers positioned into the target tissue, besides delivering optical energy for thermotherapy, can also be used to generate PA signals for on-line evaluation of LITT. Powered by our recently developed PA physio-chemical analysis, PA measurements from the tissue can provide a direct and accurate feedback of the tissue responses to laser ablation, including the changes in not only chemical compositions but also histological microstructures. The initial experiment on the rat liver model has demonstrated the excellent sensitivity of PA imaging to the changes in tissue temperature rise and tissue status (from native to coagulated) when the tissue is treated in vivo with LITT.

  12. Studies of EGRET sources with a novel image restoration technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, Hiroyasu; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Finazzi, Stefano; Chiang, James

    2007-07-12

    We have developed an image restoration technique based on the Richardson-Lucy algorithm optimized for GLAST-LAT image analysis. Our algorithm is original since it utilizes the PSF (point spread function) that is calculated for each event. This is critical for EGRET and GLAST-LAT image analysis since the PSF depends on the energy and angle of incident gamma-rays and varies by more than one order of magnitude. EGRET and GLAST-LAT image analysis also faces Poisson noise due to low photon statistics. Our technique incorporates wavelet filtering to minimize noise effects. We present studies of EGRET sources using this novel image restoration technique for possible identification of extended gamma-ray sources.

  13. Electrical capacitance volume tomography with high contrast dielectrics using a cuboid sensor geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurge, Mark A.

    2007-05-01

    An electrical capacitance volume tomography system has been created for use with a new image reconstruction algorithm capable of imaging high contrast dielectric distributions. The electrode geometry consists of two 4 × 4 parallel planes of copper conductors connected through custom built switch electronics to a commercially available capacitance to digital converter. Typical electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) systems rely solely on mutual capacitance readings to reconstruct images of dielectric distributions. This paper presents a method of reconstructing images of high contrast dielectric materials using only the self-capacitance measurements. By constraining the unknown dielectric material to one of two values, the inverse problem is no longer ill-determined. Resolution becomes limited only by the accuracy and resolution of the measurement circuitry. Images were reconstructed using this method with both synthetic and real data acquired using an aluminium structure inserted at different positions within the sensing region. Comparisons with standard two-dimensional ECT systems highlight the capabilities and limitations of the electronics and reconstruction algorithm.

  14. Electrical capacitance volume tomography of high contrast dielectrics using a cuboid geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurge, Mark A.

    An Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography system has been created for use with a new image reconstruction algorithm capable of imaging high contrast dielectric distributions. The electrode geometry consists of two 4 x 4 parallel planes of copper conductors connected through custom built switch electronics to a commercially available capacitance to digital converter. Typical electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) systems rely solely on mutual capacitance readings to reconstruct images of dielectric distributions. This dissertation presents a method of reconstructing images of high contrast dielectric materials using only the self capacitance measurements. By constraining the unknown dielectric material to one of two values, the inverse problem is no longer ill-determined. Resolution becomes limited only by the accuracy and resolution of the measurement circuitry. Images were reconstructed using this method with both synthetic and real data acquired using an aluminum structure inserted at different positions within the sensing region. Comparisons with standard two dimensional ECT systems highlight the capabilities and limitations of the electronics and reconstruction algorithm.

  15. High-contrast and fast electrochromic switching enabled by plasmonics

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ting; Walter, Erich C.; Agrawal, Amit; Bohn, Christopher; Velmurugan, Jeyavel; Zhu, Wenqi; Lezec, Henri J.; Talin, A. Alec

    2016-01-01

    With vibrant colours and simple, room-temperature processing methods, electrochromic polymers have attracted attention as active materials for flexible, low-power-consuming devices. However, slow switching speeds in devices realized to date, as well as the complexity of having to combine several distinct polymers to achieve a full-colour gamut, have limited electrochromic materials to niche applications. Here we achieve fast, high-contrast electrochromic switching by significantly enhancing the interaction of light—propagating as deep-subwavelength-confined surface plasmon polaritons through arrays of metallic nanoslits, with an electrochromic polymer—present as an ultra-thin coating on the slit sidewalls. The switchable configuration retains the short temporal charge-diffusion characteristics of thin electrochromic films, while maintaining the high optical contrast associated with thicker electrochromic coatings. We further demonstrate that by controlling the pitch of the nanoslit arrays, it is possible to achieve a full-colour response with high contrast and fast switching speeds, while relying on just one electrochromic polymer. PMID:26814453

  16. High-contrast and fast electrochromic switching enabled by plasmonics

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Ting; Walter, Erich C.; Agrawal, Amit; ...

    2016-01-27

    With vibrant colours and simple, room-temperature processing methods, electrochromic polymers have attracted attention as active materials for flexible, low-power-consuming devices. However, slow switching speeds in devices realized to date, as well as the complexity of having to combine several distinct polymers to achieve a full-colour gamut, have limited electrochromic materials to niche applications. Here we achieve fast, high-contrast electrochromic switching by significantly enhancing the interaction of light—propagating as deep-subwavelength-confined surface plasmon polaritons through arrays of metallic nanoslits, with an electrochromic polymer—present as an ultra-thin coating on the slit sidewalls. The switchable configuration retains the short temporal charge-diffusion characteristics of thinmore » electrochromic films, while maintaining the high optical contrast associated with thicker electrochromic coatings. In conclusion, we further demonstrate that by controlling the pitch of the nanoslit arrays, it is possible to achieve a full-colour response with high contrast and fast switching speeds, while relying on just one electrochromic polymer.« less

  17. High-contrast and fast electrochromic switching enabled by plasmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ting; Walter, Erich C.; Agrawal, Amit; Bohn, Christopher; Velmurugan, Jeyavel; Zhu, Wenqi; Lezec, Henri J.; Talin, A. Alec

    2016-01-27

    With vibrant colours and simple, room-temperature processing methods, electrochromic polymers have attracted attention as active materials for flexible, low-power-consuming devices. However, slow switching speeds in devices realized to date, as well as the complexity of having to combine several distinct polymers to achieve a full-colour gamut, have limited electrochromic materials to niche applications. Here we achieve fast, high-contrast electrochromic switching by significantly enhancing the interaction of light—propagating as deep-subwavelength-confined surface plasmon polaritons through arrays of metallic nanoslits, with an electrochromic polymer—present as an ultra-thin coating on the slit sidewalls. The switchable configuration retains the short temporal charge-diffusion characteristics of thin electrochromic films, while maintaining the high optical contrast associated with thicker electrochromic coatings. In conclusion, we further demonstrate that by controlling the pitch of the nanoslit arrays, it is possible to achieve a full-colour response with high contrast and fast switching speeds, while relying on just one electrochromic polymer.

  18. High Contrast Programmable Field Masks for JWST NIRSpec

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutyrev, Alexander S.

    2008-01-01

    Microshutter arrays are one of the novel technologies developed for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). It will allow Near Infrared Spectrometer (NIRSpec) to acquire spectra of hundreds of objects simultaneously therefore increasing its efficiency tremendously. We have developed these programmable arrays that are based on Micro-Electro Mechanical Structures (MEMS) technology. The arrays are 2D addressable masks that can operate in cryogenic environment of JWST. Since the primary JWST science requires acquisition of spectra of extremely faint objects, it is important to provide very high contrast of the open to closed shutters. This high contrast is necessary to eliminate any possible contamination and confusion in the acquired spectra by unwanted objects. We have developed and built a test system for the microshutter array functional and optical characterization. This system is capable of measuring the contrast of the microshutter array both in visible and infrared light of the NIRSpec wavelength range while the arrays are in their working cryogenic environment. We have measured contrast ratio of several microshutter arrays and demonstrated that they satisfy and in many cases far exceed the NIRSpec contrast requirement value of 2000.

  19. High-contrast and fast electrochromic switching enabled by plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talin, Albert; Xu, Ting; Walter, Erich; Agrawal, Amit; Bohn, Christopher; Velmurugan, Jeyavel; Zhu, Wenqi; Lezec, Henri

    With vibrant colors and simple, room-temperature processing methods, electrochromic polymers have long attracted attention as active materials for flexible, low-power consuming devices such as smart windows and displays. However, despite their many advantages, slow switching speed and complexity of combining several separate polymers to achieve full-color gamut has limited electrochromic materials to niche applications. Here we exploit the enhanced light-matter interaction associated with the deep-subwavelength mode confinement of surface plasmon polaritons propagating in metallic nanoslit arrays coated with ultra-thin electrochromic polymers to build a novel configuration for achieving high-contrast and fast electrochromic switching. The switchable configuration retains the short temporal charge-diffusion characteristics of thin electrochromic films while maintaining the high optical-contrast associated with thicker electrochromic coatings. We further demonstrate that by controlling the pitch of the nanoslit arrays, it is possible to achieve a full-color response with high-contrast and fast switching-speeds while relying on just one electrochromic polymer.

  20. Active tunable high contrast meta-structure Si waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lingjun; Anderson, Stephen; Taleb, Hussein; Huang, Zhaoran R.; Zhou, Weimin

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we have designed a novel Si based 1-dimensional high contrast meta-structure waveguide that has slow light effect as well as phase tunability using p-n junction. The goal is to use such waveguide to design active optical devices such as high frequency modulators and tunable filters for analog RF-photonics or data communication applications. The Si ridge waveguide has a pair of high contrast grating wings adhered to the waveguide core in the center. Grating bars at two sides of the waveguide are doped P and N-type respectively, while a p-n junction region is formed in the middle of the waveguide core. By applying a voltage to bias the p-n junction, one can sweep the free carriers to change the effective index of the waveguide as well as the dispersion property of the grating. This metastructure Si waveguide is ideal in the design of high frequency optical modulators since the slow light effect can reduce the modulator waveguide length, increase the modulation efficiency as well as compensate other nonlinearity factors of the modulator for analog applications.

  1. High-contrast and fast electrochromic switching enabled by plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ting; Walter, Erich C.; Agrawal, Amit; Bohn, Christopher; Velmurugan, Jeyavel; Zhu, Wenqi; Lezec, Henri J.; Talin, A. Alec

    2016-01-01

    With vibrant colours and simple, room-temperature processing methods, electrochromic polymers have attracted attention as active materials for flexible, low-power-consuming devices. However, slow switching speeds in devices realized to date, as well as the complexity of having to combine several distinct polymers to achieve a full-colour gamut, have limited electrochromic materials to niche applications. Here we achieve fast, high-contrast electrochromic switching by significantly enhancing the interaction of light--propagating as deep-subwavelength-confined surface plasmon polaritons through arrays of metallic nanoslits, with an electrochromic polymer--present as an ultra-thin coating on the slit sidewalls. The switchable configuration retains the short temporal charge-diffusion characteristics of thin electrochromic films, while maintaining the high optical contrast associated with thicker electrochromic coatings. We further demonstrate that by controlling the pitch of the nanoslit arrays, it is possible to achieve a full-colour response with high contrast and fast switching speeds, while relying on just one electrochromic polymer.

  2. High-contrast and fast electrochromic switching enabled by plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ting; Walter, Erich C; Agrawal, Amit; Bohn, Christopher; Velmurugan, Jeyavel; Zhu, Wenqi; Lezec, Henri J; Talin, A Alec

    2016-01-27

    With vibrant colours and simple, room-temperature processing methods, electrochromic polymers have attracted attention as active materials for flexible, low-power-consuming devices. However, slow switching speeds in devices realized to date, as well as the complexity of having to combine several distinct polymers to achieve a full-colour gamut, have limited electrochromic materials to niche applications. Here we achieve fast, high-contrast electrochromic switching by significantly enhancing the interaction of light--propagating as deep-subwavelength-confined surface plasmon polaritons through arrays of metallic nanoslits, with an electrochromic polymer--present as an ultra-thin coating on the slit sidewalls. The switchable configuration retains the short temporal charge-diffusion characteristics of thin electrochromic films, while maintaining the high optical contrast associated with thicker electrochromic coatings. We further demonstrate that by controlling the pitch of the nanoslit arrays, it is possible to achieve a full-colour response with high contrast and fast switching speeds, while relying on just one electrochromic polymer.

  3. A fuzzy optimal threshold technique for medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirupathi Kannan, Balaji; Krishnasamy, Krishnaveni; Pradeep Kumar Kenny, S.

    2011-12-01

    A new fuzzy based thresholding method for medical images especially cervical cytology images having blob and mosaic structures is proposed in this paper. Many existing thresholding algorithms may segment either blob or mosaic images but there aren't any single algorithm that can do both. In this paper, an input cervical cytology image is binarized, preprocessed and the pixel value with minimum Fuzzy Gaussian Index is identified as an optimal threshold value and used for segmentation. The proposed technique is tested on various cervical cytology images having blob or mosaic structures, compared with various existing algorithms and proved better than the existing algorithms.

  4. A fuzzy optimal threshold technique for medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirupathi Kannan, Balaji; Krishnasamy, Krishnaveni; Pradeep Kumar Kenny, S.

    2012-01-01

    A new fuzzy based thresholding method for medical images especially cervical cytology images having blob and mosaic structures is proposed in this paper. Many existing thresholding algorithms may segment either blob or mosaic images but there aren't any single algorithm that can do both. In this paper, an input cervical cytology image is binarized, preprocessed and the pixel value with minimum Fuzzy Gaussian Index is identified as an optimal threshold value and used for segmentation. The proposed technique is tested on various cervical cytology images having blob or mosaic structures, compared with various existing algorithms and proved better than the existing algorithms.

  5. Optical and digital microscopic imaging techniques and applications in pathology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    The conventional optical microscope has been the primary tool in assisting pathological examinations. The modern digital pathology combines the power of microscopy, electronic detection, and computerized analysis. It enables cellular-, molecular-, and genetic-imaging at high efficiency and accuracy to facilitate clinical screening and diagnosis. This paper first reviews the fundamental concepts of microscopic imaging and introduces the technical features and associated clinical applications of optical microscopes, electron microscopes, scanning tunnel microscopes, and fluorescence microscopes. The interface of microscopy with digital image acquisition methods is discussed. The recent developments and future perspectives of contemporary microscopic imaging techniques such as three-dimensional and in vivo imaging are analyzed for their clinical potentials.

  6. Magnetic resonance image segmentation using multifractal techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yue-e.; Wang, Fang; Liu, Li-lin

    2015-11-01

    In order to delineate target region for magnetic resonance image (MRI) with diseases, the classical multifractal spectrum (MFS)-segmentation method and latest multifractal detrended fluctuation spectrum (MF-DFS)-based segmentation method are employed in our study. One of our main conclusions from experiments is that both of the two multifractal-based methods are workable for handling MRIs. The best result is obtained by MF-DFS-based method using Lh10 as local characteristic. The anti-noises experiments also suppot the conclusion. This interest finding shows that the features can be better represented by the strong fluctuations instead of the weak fluctuations for the MRIs. By comparing the multifractal nature between lesion and non-lesion area on the basis of the segmentation results, an interest finding is that the gray value's fluctuation in lesion area is much severer than that in non-lesion area.

  7. Advanced millimeter-wave security portal imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2012-03-01

    Millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging is rapidly gaining acceptance as a security tool to augment conventional metal detectors and baggage x-ray systems for passenger screening at airports and other secured facilities. This acceptance indicates that the technology has matured; however, many potential improvements can yet be realized. The authors have developed a number of techniques over the last several years including novel image reconstruction and display techniques, polarimetric imaging techniques, array switching schemes, and high-frequency high-bandwidth techniques. All of these may improve the performance of new systems; however, some of these techniques will increase the cost and complexity of the mm-wave security portal imaging systems. Reducing this cost may require the development of novel array designs. In particular, RF photonic methods may provide new solutions to the design and development of the sequentially switched linear mm-wave arrays that are the key element in the mm-wave portal imaging systems. Highfrequency, high-bandwidth designs are difficult to achieve with conventional mm-wave electronic devices, and RF photonic devices may be a practical alternative. In this paper, the mm-wave imaging techniques developed at PNNL are reviewed and the potential for implementing RF photonic mm-wave array designs is explored.

  8. Investigations of Antiangiogenic Mechanisms Using Novel Imaging Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    Wilson, “ Intravital high-resolution optical imaging of individual vessel re- sponse to photodynamic treatment,” J. Biomed. Opt. 134, 040502 2008. 7...nanoparticles ∼80–100 nm diam. 1.2 Microscope A Zeiss MPS intravital microscope was used for all imaging , using a 2.5X objective. A DAPI excitation filter...Jan 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER BC083195 Investigation of Antiangiogenic Mechanisms Using Novel Imaging Techniques 5b

  9. Development of Digital Steroscopic Imaging Technique in Mammography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-01

    imaging technique in which the phantom was shifted instead of the focal spot for acquisition of the left-eye and right-eye images. In a preliminary observer... Phantoms (C) Phantom Evaluation of Full Field Steremammography (D) Evaluation of the Effect of Zooming on Depth Measurements in Digital...interpretation by radiologists and reduce unnecessary biopsies. To accomplish this goal, we first performed phantom studies to develop an optimal imaging

  10. Reconstruction techniques for sparse multistatic linear array microwave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2014-06-01

    Sequentially-switched linear arrays are an enabling technology for a number of near-field microwave imaging applications. Electronically sequencing along the array axis followed by mechanical scanning along an orthogonal axis allows dense sampling of a two-dimensional aperture in near real-time. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed this technology for several applications including concealed weapon detection, groundpenetrating radar, and non-destructive inspection and evaluation. These techniques form three-dimensional images by scanning a diverging beam swept frequency transceiver over a two-dimensional aperture and mathematically focusing or reconstructing the data into three-dimensional images. Recently, a sparse multi-static array technology has been developed that reduces the number of antennas required to densely sample the linear array axis of the spatial aperture. This allows a significant reduction in cost and complexity of the linear-array-based imaging system. The sparse array has been specifically designed to be compatible with Fourier-Transform-based image reconstruction techniques; however, there are limitations to the use of these techniques, especially for extreme near-field operation. In the extreme near-field of the array, back-projection techniques have been developed that account for the exact location of each transmitter and receiver in the linear array and the 3-D image location. In this paper, the sparse array technique will be described along with associated Fourier-Transform-based and back-projection-based image reconstruction algorithms. Simulated imaging results are presented that show the effectiveness of the sparse array technique along with the merits and weaknesses of each image reconstruction approach.

  11. Cell imaging techniques based on digital image plane holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhaoji; Gong, Wendi; Liu, Feifei; Wang, Huaying

    2010-11-01

    This paper has further studied the implementation methods and recording conditions of digital microscopic image plane holography (DMIPH). Two optical systems of DMIPH were built: one is recording hologram by using plane waves as reference light, the other is recording hologram by spherical reference light. Breast cancer cells and USAF resolution test target is used as tested samples in the experiment. Then the intensity distribution and three-dimensional shape information of the cells are got accurately. The experiment results show that DMIPH avoids the process of finding recording distance by using auto-focusing approach. The recording and reconstruction process of DMIPH is simple. Therefore DMIPH can be applied to the microscopic imaging of cells more effectively.

  12. Application of digital image processing techniques to astronomical imagery 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorre, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Techniques for using image processing in astronomy are identified and developed for the following: (1) geometric and radiometric decalibration of vidicon-acquired spectra, (2) automatic identification and segregation of stars from galaxies; and (3) display of multiband radio maps in compact and meaningful formats. Examples are presented of these techniques applied to a variety of objects.

  13. Using image processing techniques on proximity probe signals in rotordynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, Dawie; Heyns, Stephan; Oberholster, Abrie

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a new approach to process proximity probe signals in rotordynamic applications. It is argued that the signal be interpreted as a one dimensional image. Existing image processing techniques can then be used to gain information about the object being measured. Some results from one application is presented. Rotor blade tip deflections can be calculated through localizing phase information in this one dimensional image. It is experimentally shown that the newly proposed method performs more accurately than standard techniques, especially where the sampling rate of the data acquisition system is inadequate by conventional standards.

  14. The Advanced Space Plant Culture Device with Live Imaging Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weibo; Zhang, Tao; Tong, Guanghui

    The live imaging techniques, including the color and fluorescent imags, are very important and useful for space life science. The advanced space plant culture Device (ASPCD) with live imaging Technique, developed for Chinese Spacecraft, would be introduced in this paper. The ASPCD had two plant experimental chambers. Three cameras (two color cameras and one fluorescent camera) were installed in the two chambers. The fluorescent camera could observe flowering genes, which were labeled by GFP. The lighting, nutrient, temperature controling and water recycling were all independent in each chamber. The ASPCD would beed applied to investigate for the growth and development of the high plant under microgravity conditions on board the Chinese Spacecraft.

  15. A fast iterative technique for restoring scanning electron microscope images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahira, Kenji; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Honda, Toshifumi

    2014-12-01

    This paper proposes a fast new technique for restoring scanning electron microscope images to improve their sharpness. The images with our approach are sharpened by deconvolution with the point spread function modeled as the intensity distribution of the electron beam at the specimen's surface. We propose an iterative technique that employs a modified cost function based on the Richardson-Lucy method to achieve faster processing. The empirical results indicate significant improvements in image quality. The proposed approach speeds up deconvolution by about 10-50 times faster than that with the conventional Richardson-Lucy method.

  16. High-Contrast Observation of Unstained Proteins and Viruses by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2012-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is an important tool for the nanometre-scale analysis of the various samples. Imaging of biological specimens can be difficult for two reasons: (1) Samples must often be left unstained to observe detail of the biological structures; however, lack of staining significantly decreases image contrast. (2) Samples are prone to serious radiation damage from electron beam. Herein we report a novel method for sample preparation involving placement on a new metal-coated insulator film. This method enables obtaining high-contrast images from unstained proteins and viruses by scanning electron microscopy with minimal electron radiation damage. These images are similar to those obtained by transmission electron microscopy. In addition, the method can be easily used to observe specimens of proteins, viruses and other organic samples by using SEM. PMID:23056522

  17. High-contrast plasma-electrode Pockels cell.

    PubMed

    Kruschwitz, B E; Kelly, J H; Shoup Iii, M J; Waxer, L J; Cost, E C; Green, E T; Hoyt, Z M; Taniguchi, J; Walker, T W

    2007-03-10

    A plasma-electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) has been developed for use on the OMEGA extended performance (EP) laser system that can be used in a high-contrast optical switch, as required for isolation of the system from retroreflected pulses. Contrast ratios reliably exceeded 500:1 locally everywhere in the clear aperture. The key to achieving this improvement was the use of circular windows simply supported on compliant O rings, which is shown to produce very low stress-induced birefringence despite vacuum loading. Reliable operation was achieved operating at a relatively high operating pressure, low operating pressures being found to be strongly correlated to occurrences of local loss of plasma density.

  18. High-Contrast Gratings based Spoof Surface Plasmons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhuo; Liu, Liangliang; Xu, Bingzheng; Ning, Pingping; Chen, Chen; Xu, Jia; Chen, Xinlei; Gu, Changqing; Qing, Quan

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we explore the existence of spoof surface plasmons (SSPs) supported by deep-subwavelength high-contrast gratings (HCGs) on a perfect electric conductor plane. The dispersion relation of the HCGs-based SSPs is derived analyt- ically by combining multimode network theory with rigorous mode matching method, which has nearly the same form with and can be degenerated into that of the SSPs arising from deep-subwavelength metallic gratings (MGs). Numerical simula- tions validate the analytical dispersion relation and an effective medium approximation is also presented to obtain the same analytical dispersion formula. This work sets up a unified theoretical framework for SSPs and opens up new vistas in surface plasmon optics. PMID:26879637

  19. High contrast reflective liquid crystal display using a thermochromic reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Kyong Chan; Yi, Jonghoon; Kwon, Jin Hyuk; Seog Gwag, Jin

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a reflective liquid crystal display (LCD) with a high contrast ratio (CR) combined with mono-type thermochromic materials to solve the low CR of reflective type LCDs. Here, reflective, wide-band, electrically controlled birefringence mode was used as the optical liquid crystal (LC) mode, and a thermochromic material was used as the reflector for the white state and an absorber for the dark state. The combination of LCD and thermochromic material can have a synergistic effect in achieving a better display. By controlling the reflectance of the thermochromic reflector using Joule heating, the proposed reflective LC cell exhibited a high CR of approximately 70:1. The figure was extremely high compared to the approximately 10:1 of a typical reflective LC cell with an optically wide band design. The proposed LC cell configuration is expected to find many outdoor applications which can admit slow response speed.

  20. Nondestructive evaluation technique using infrared thermography and terahertz imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakagami, Takahide; Shiozawa, Daiki; Tamaki, Yoshitaka; Iwama, Tatsuya

    2016-05-01

    Nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques using pulse heating infrared thermography and terahertz (THz) imaging were developed for detecting deterioration of oil tank floor, such as blister and delamination of corrosion protection coating, or corrosion of the bottom steel plate under coating. Experimental studies were conducted to demonstrate the practicability of developed techniques. It was found that the pulse heating infrared thermography was utilized for effective screening inspection and THz-TDS imaging technique performed well for the detailed inspection of coating deterioration and steel corrosion.

  1. Imaging techniques applied to characterize bitumen and bituminous emulsions.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Valverde, M A; Ramón-Torregrosa, P; Páez-Dueñas, A; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M A; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R

    2008-01-15

    The purpose of this article is to present some important advances in the imaging techniques currently used in the characterization of bitumen and bituminous emulsions. Bitumen exhibits some properties, such as a black colour and a reflecting surface at rest, which permit the use of optical techniques to study the macroscopic behaviour of asphalt mixes in the cold mix technology based on emulsion use. Imaging techniques allow monitoring in situ the bitumen thermal sensitivity as well as the complex phenomenon of emulsion breaking. Evaporation-driven breaking was evaluated from the shape of evaporating emulsion drops deposited onto non-porous and hydrophobic substrates. To describe the breaking kinetics, top-view images of a drying emulsion drop placed on an aggregate sheet were acquired and processed properly. We can conclude that computer-aided image analysis in road pavement engineering can elucidate the mechanism of breaking and curing of bituminous emulsion.

  2. Digital imaging techniques for dental alloy castability quantification.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S M; Vaidyanathan, T K; Tanabe, N

    1992-05-01

    In this study, mesh monitors cast from experimental compositions of a Ni-Cr-Be alloy are evaluated by the application of image analysis techniques. Castability values obtained by this method are then contrasted with those from three commonly employed manual counting procedures. While castability values obtained by all methods reflect the effect of compositional variations, a comparison of results with respect to evaluation method indicates that the image analysis technique consistently yields higher castability values, especially evident in the poorly casting groups. The apparent explanation for these observed differences is that with imaging, segments that are partially cast to varying degrees are not arbitrarily eliminated from the data, as is the usual practice in manual counting methods; therefore, castability values obtained by using the imaging technique will very closely reflect an actual alloy volume of each cast monitor.

  3. Vascular image registration techniques: A living review.

    PubMed

    Matl, Stefan; Brosig, Richard; Baust, Maximilian; Navab, Nassir; Demirci, Stefanie

    2017-01-01

    Registration of vascular structures is crucial for preoperative planning, intraoperative navigation, and follow-up assessment. Typical applications include, but are not limited to, Trans-catheter Aortic Valve Implantation and monitoring of tumor vasculature or aneurysm growth. In order to achieve the aforementioned goals, a large number of various registration algorithms has been developed. With this review paper we provide a comprehensive overview over the plethora of existing techniques with a particular focus on the suitable classification criteria such as the involved modalities of the employed optimization methods. However, we wish to go beyond a static literature review which is naturally doomed to be outdated after a certain period of time due to the research progress. We augment this review paper with an extendable and interactive database in order to obtain a living review whose currency goes beyond the one of a printed paper. All papers in this database are labeled with one or multiple tags according to 13 carefully defined categories. The classification of all entries can then be visualized as one or multiple trees which are presented via a web-based interactive app (http://livingreview.in.tum.de) allowing the user to choose a unique perspective for literature review. In addition, the user can search the underlying database for specific tags or publications related to vessel registration. Many applications of this framework are conceivable, including the use for getting a general overview on the topic or the utilization by physicians for deciding about the best-suited algorithm for a specific application.

  4. Minimax Techniques For Optimizing Non-Linear Image Algebra Transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Jennifer L.

    1989-08-01

    It has been well established that the Air Force Armament Technical Laboratory (AFATL) image algebra is capable of expressing all linear transformations [7]. The embedding of the linear algebra in the image algebra makes this possible. In this paper we show a relation of the image algebra to another algebraic system called the minimax algebra. This system is used extensively in economics and operations research, but until now has not been investigated for applications to image processing. The relationship is exploited to develop new optimization methods for a class of non-linear image processing transforms. In particular, a general decomposition technique for templates in this non-linear domain is presented. Template decomposition techniques are an important tool in mapping algorithms efficiently to both sequential and massively parallel architectures.

  5. Computational ghost imaging: advanced compressive sensing (CS) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katkovnik, Vladimir; Astola, Jaakko

    2012-10-01

    A novel efficient variational technique for speckle imaging is discussed. It is developed with the main motivation to filter noise, to wipe out the typical diffraction artifacts and to achieve crisp imaging. A sparse modeling is used for the wave field at the object plane in order to overcome the loss of information due to the ill-posedness of forward propagation image formation operators. This flexible and data adaptive modeling relies on the recent progress in sparse imaging and compressive sensing (CS). Being in line with the general formalism of CS, we develop an original approach to wave field reconstruction.7 In this paper we demonstrate this technique in its application for computational amplitude ghost imaging (GI), where a spatial light modulator (SLM) is used in order to generate a speckle wave field sensing a transmitted mask object.

  6. A COMPARISON OF SPECTROSCOPIC VERSUS IMAGING TECHNIQUES FOR DETECTING CLOSE COMPANIONS TO KEPLER OBJECTS OF INTEREST

    SciTech Connect

    Teske, Johanna K.; Everett, Mark E.; Hirsch, Lea; Furlan, Elise; Ciardi, David R.; Horch, Elliott P.; Howell, Steve B.; Gonzales, Erica; Crepp, Justin R.

    2015-11-15

    Kepler planet candidates require both spectroscopic and imaging follow-up observations to rule out false positives and detect blended stars. Traditionally, spectroscopy and high-resolution imaging have probed different host star companion parameter spaces, the former detecting tight binaries and the latter detecting wider bound companions as well as chance background stars. In this paper, we examine a sample of 11 Kepler host stars with companions detected by two techniques—near-infrared adaptive optics and/or optical speckle interferometry imaging, and a new spectroscopic deblending method. We compare the companion effective temperatures (T{sub eff}) and flux ratios (F{sub B}/F{sub A}, where A is the primary and B is the companion) derived from each technique and find no cases where both companion parameters agree within 1σ errors. In 3/11 cases the companion T{sub eff} values agree within 1σ errors, and in 2/11 cases the companion F{sub B}/F{sub A} values agree within 1σ errors. Examining each Kepler system individually considering multiple avenues (isochrone mapping, contrast curves, probability of being bound), we suggest two cases for which the techniques most likely agree in their companion detections (detect the same companion star). Overall, our results support the advantage that the spectroscopic deblending technique has for finding very close-in companions (θ ≲ 0.″02–0.″05) that are not easily detectable with imaging. However, we also specifically show how high-contrast AO and speckle imaging observations detect companions at larger separations (θ ≥ 0.″02–0.″05) that are missed by the spectroscopic technique, provide additional information for characterizing the companion and its potential contamination (e.g., position angle, separation, magnitude differences), and cover a wider range of primary star effective temperatures. The investigation presented here illustrates the utility of combining the two techniques to reveal higher

  7. An image morphing technique based on optimal mass preserving mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Yang, Yan; Haker, Steven; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-06-01

    Image morphing, or image interpolation in the time domain, deals with the metamorphosis of one image into another. In this paper, a new class of image morphing algorithms is proposed based on the theory of optimal mass transport. The L(2) mass moving energy functional is modified by adding an intensity penalizing term, in order to reduce the undesired double exposure effect. It is an intensity-based approach and, thus, is parameter free. The optimal warping function is computed using an iterative gradient descent approach. This proposed morphing method is also extended to doubly connected domains using a harmonic parameterization technique, along with finite-element methods.

  8. An Image Morphing Technique Based on Optimal Mass Preserving Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lei; Yang, Yan; Haker, Steven; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2013-01-01

    Image morphing, or image interpolation in the time domain, deals with the metamorphosis of one image into another. In this paper, a new class of image morphing algorithms is proposed based on the theory of optimal mass transport. The L2 mass moving energy functional is modified by adding an intensity penalizing term, in order to reduce the undesired double exposure effect. It is an intensity-based approach and, thus, is parameter free. The optimal warping function is computed using an iterative gradient descent approach. This proposed morphing method is also extended to doubly connected domains using a harmonic parameterization technique, along with finite-element methods. PMID:17547128

  9. Digital subtraction angiography: principles and pitfalls of image improvement techniques.

    PubMed

    Levin, D C; Schapiro, R M; Boxt, L M; Dunham, L; Harrington, D P; Ergun, D L

    1984-09-01

    The technology of imaging methods in digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is discussed in detail. Areas covered include function of the video camera in both interlaced and sequential scan modes, digitization by the analog-to-digital converter, logarithmic signal processing, dose rates, and acquisition of images using frame integration and pulsed-sequential techniques. Also discussed are various methods of improving image content and quality by both hardware and software modifications. These include the development of larger image intensifiers, larger matrices, video camera improvements, reregistration, hybrid subtraction, matched filtering, recursive filtering, DSA tomography, and edge enhancement.

  10. Demonstration of high contrast in 10% broadband light with the shaped pupil coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Ruslan; Give'on, Amir; Kern, Brian; Cady, Eric; Carr, Michael; Shaklan, Stuart; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; White, Victor; Echternach, Pierre; Dickie, Matt; Trauger, John; Kuhnert, Andreas; Kasdin, N. Jeremy

    2007-09-01

    The Shaped Pupil Coronagraph (SPC) is a high-contrast imaging system pioneered at Princeton for detection of extra-solar earthlike planets. It is designed to achieve 10 -10 contrast at an inner working angle of 4λ/D in broadband light. A critical requirement in attaining this contrast level in practice is the ability to control wavefront phase and amplitude aberrations to at least λ/10 4 in rms phase and 1/1000 rms amplitude, respectively. Furthermore, this has to be maintained over a large spectral band. The High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) is a state-of-the-art facility for studying such high contrast imaging systems and wavefront control methods. It consists of a vacuum chamber containing a configurable coronagraph setup with a Xinetics deformable mirror. Previously, we demonstrated 4x10 -8 contrast with the SPC at HCIT in 10% broadband light. The limiting factors were subsequently identified as (1) manufacturing defects due to minimal feature size constraints on our shaped pupil masks and (2) the inefficiency of the wavefront correction algorithm we used (classical speckle nulling) to correct for these defects. In this paper, we demonstrate the solutions to both of these problems. In particular, we present a method to design masks with practical minimal feature sizes and show new manufactured masks with few defects. These masks were installed at HCIT and tested using more sophisticated wavefront control algorithms based on energy minimization of light in the dark zone. We present the results of these experiments, notably a record 2.4×10 -9 contrast in 10% broadband light.

  11. A new x-ray imaging technique for radiography mode of flat-panel imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, K.; Ikeda, S.; Ueda, K.; Baba, R.

    2007-03-01

    A digital radiography system using a flat-panel imager, which has a novel imaging technique for a radiography mode, has been developed. A radiographic image captured by the new imaging technique has a wide dynamic range in comparison with conventional radiographic images. The purpose of this presentation is to show the basic performance of the image quality acquired by the new imaging technique and compare it with an image taken by a conventional technique. The flat-panel imager has a gain switching capability, normally used in a dynamic imaging mode for a cone-beam CT study. The gain switching method has two gain settings and switches between them automatically, depending on the incident dose to each pixel of flat-panel imager. As a result of the gain switching method, an image having wide dynamic range is achieved. In this study, we applied the gain switching method to the radiography mode, and achieved a radiographic image with wider dynamic range than a conventional radiograph. Furthermore, we have also developed an algorithm for calibration of the gain switching method in radiography mode.

  12. [Novel endoscopic techniques to image the upper gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Quénéhervé, Lucille; Neunlist, Michel; Bruley des Varannes, Stanislas; Tearney, Guillermo; Coron, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Novel endoscopic techniques for the analysis of the digestive wall have recently been developed to allow investigating digestive diseases beyond standard "white-light" macroscopic imaging of the mucosal surface. Among innovative techniques under clinical evaluation, confocal endomicroscopy and optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) are the most promising. Indeed, these techniques allow performing in vivo microscopy with different levels in terms of depths and magnification, as well as functional assessment of structures. Some of these techniques, such as capsule-based OFDI, are also less invasive than traditional endoscopy and might help screening large groups of patients for specific disorders, for instance oesophageal precancerous diseases. In this review, we will focus on the results obtained with these techniques in precancerous, inflammatory and neuromuscular disorders.

  13. 3D thermography imaging standardization technique for inflammation diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Xiangyang; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Siebert, J. Paul

    2005-01-01

    We develop a 3D thermography imaging standardization technique to allow quantitative data analysis. Medical Digital Infrared Thermal Imaging is very sensitive and reliable mean of graphically mapping and display skin surface temperature. It allows doctors to visualise in colour and quantify temperature changes in skin surface. The spectrum of colours indicates both hot and cold responses which may co-exist if the pain associate with an inflammatory focus excites an increase in sympathetic activity. However, due to thermograph provides only qualitative diagnosis information, it has not gained acceptance in the medical and veterinary communities as a necessary or effective tool in inflammation and tumor detection. Here, our technique is based on the combination of visual 3D imaging technique and thermal imaging technique, which maps the 2D thermography images on to 3D anatomical model. Then we rectify the 3D thermogram into a view independent thermogram and conform it a standard shape template. The combination of these imaging facilities allows the generation of combined 3D and thermal data from which thermal signatures can be quantified.

  14. Comparison of lossless compression techniques for prepress color images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Assche, Steven; Denecker, Koen N.; Philips, Wilfried R.; Lemahieu, Ignace L.

    1998-12-01

    In the pre-press industry color images have both a high spatial and a high color resolution. Such images require a considerable amount of storage space and impose long transmission times. Data compression is desired to reduce these storage and transmission problems. Because of the high quality requirements in the pre-press industry only lossless compression is acceptable. Most existing lossless compression schemes operate on gray-scale images. In this case the color components of color images must be compressed independently. However, higher compression ratios can be achieved by exploiting inter-color redundancies. In this paper we present a comparison of three state-of-the-art lossless compression techniques which exploit such color redundancies: IEP (Inter- color Error Prediction) and a KLT-based technique, which are both linear color decorrelation techniques, and Interframe CALIC, which uses a non-linear approach to color decorrelation. It is shown that these techniques are able to exploit color redundancies and that color decorrelation can be done effectively and efficiently. The linear color decorrelators provide a considerable coding gain (about 2 bpp) on some typical prepress images. The non-linear interframe CALIC predictor does not yield better results, but the full interframe CALIC technique does.

  15. Bifunctional Luminomagnetic Rare-Earth Nanorods for High-Contrast Bioimaging Nanoprobes

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bipin Kumar; Singh, Satbir; Kumar, Pawan; Lee, Yean; Kedawat, Garima; Narayanan, Tharangattu N.; Vithayathil, Sajna Antony; Ge, Liehui; Zhan, Xiaobo; Gupta, Sarika; Martí, Angel A.; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Kaipparettu, Benny Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles exhibiting both magnetic and luminescent properties are need of the hour for many biological applications. A single compound exhibiting this combination of properties is uncommon. Herein, we report a strategy to synthesize a bifunctional luminomagnetic Gd2−xEuxO3 (x = 0.05 to 0.5) nanorod, with a diameter of ~20 nm and length in ~0.6 μm, using hydrothermal method. Gd2O3:Eu3+ nanorods have been characterized by studying its structural, optical and magnetic properties. The advantage offered by photoluminescent imaging with Gd2O3:Eu3+ nanorods is that this ultrafine nanorod material exhibits hypersensitive intense red emission (610 nm) with good brightness (quantum yield more than 90%), which is an essential parameter for high-contrast bioimaging, especially for overcoming auto fluorescent background. The utility of luminomagnetic nanorods for biological applications in high-contrast cell imaging capability and cell toxicity to image two human breast cancer cell lines T47D and MDA-MB-231 are also evaluated. Additionally, to understand the significance of shape of the nanostructure, the photoluminescence and paramagnetic characteristic of Gd2O3:Eu3+ nanorods were compared with the spherical nanoparticles of Gd2O3:Eu3+. PMID:27585638

  16. Bifunctional Luminomagnetic Rare-Earth Nanorods for High-Contrast Bioimaging Nanoprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Bipin Kumar; Singh, Satbir; Kumar, Pawan; Lee, Yean; Kedawat, Garima; Narayanan, Tharangattu N.; Vithayathil, Sajna Antony; Ge, Liehui; Zhan, Xiaobo; Gupta, Sarika; Martí, Angel A.; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Kaipparettu, Benny Abraham

    2016-09-01

    Nanoparticles exhibiting both magnetic and luminescent properties are need of the hour for many biological applications. A single compound exhibiting this combination of properties is uncommon. Herein, we report a strategy to synthesize a bifunctional luminomagnetic Gd2‑xEuxO3 (x = 0.05 to 0.5) nanorod, with a diameter of ~20 nm and length in ~0.6 μm, using hydrothermal method. Gd2O3:Eu3+ nanorods have been characterized by studying its structural, optical and magnetic properties. The advantage offered by photoluminescent imaging with Gd2O3:Eu3+ nanorods is that this ultrafine nanorod material exhibits hypersensitive intense red emission (610 nm) with good brightness (quantum yield more than 90%), which is an essential parameter for high-contrast bioimaging, especially for overcoming auto fluorescent background. The utility of luminomagnetic nanorods for biological applications in high-contrast cell imaging capability and cell toxicity to image two human breast cancer cell lines T47D and MDA-MB-231 are also evaluated. Additionally, to understand the significance of shape of the nanostructure, the photoluminescence and paramagnetic characteristic of Gd2O3:Eu3+ nanorods were compared with the spherical nanoparticles of Gd2O3:Eu3+.

  17. Bifunctional Luminomagnetic Rare-Earth Nanorods for High-Contrast Bioimaging Nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Bipin Kumar; Singh, Satbir; Kumar, Pawan; Lee, Yean; Kedawat, Garima; Narayanan, Tharangattu N; Vithayathil, Sajna Antony; Ge, Liehui; Zhan, Xiaobo; Gupta, Sarika; Martí, Angel A; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Kaipparettu, Benny Abraham

    2016-09-02

    Nanoparticles exhibiting both magnetic and luminescent properties are need of the hour for many biological applications. A single compound exhibiting this combination of properties is uncommon. Herein, we report a strategy to synthesize a bifunctional luminomagnetic Gd2-xEuxO3 (x = 0.05 to 0.5) nanorod, with a diameter of ~20 nm and length in ~0.6 μm, using hydrothermal method. Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanorods have been characterized by studying its structural, optical and magnetic properties. The advantage offered by photoluminescent imaging with Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanorods is that this ultrafine nanorod material exhibits hypersensitive intense red emission (610 nm) with good brightness (quantum yield more than 90%), which is an essential parameter for high-contrast bioimaging, especially for overcoming auto fluorescent background. The utility of luminomagnetic nanorods for biological applications in high-contrast cell imaging capability and cell toxicity to image two human breast cancer cell lines T47D and MDA-MB-231 are also evaluated. Additionally, to understand the significance of shape of the nanostructure, the photoluminescence and paramagnetic characteristic of Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanorods were compared with the spherical nanoparticles of Gd2O3:Eu(3+).

  18. Pattern recognition software and techniques for biological image analysis.

    PubMed

    Shamir, Lior; Delaney, John D; Orlov, Nikita; Eckley, D Mark; Goldberg, Ilya G

    2010-11-24

    The increasing prevalence of automated image acquisition systems is enabling new types of microscopy experiments that generate large image datasets. However, there is a perceived lack of robust image analysis systems required to process these diverse datasets. Most automated image analysis systems are tailored for specific types of microscopy, contrast methods, probes, and even cell types. This imposes significant constraints on experimental design, limiting their application to the narrow set of imaging methods for which they were designed. One of the approaches to address these limitations is pattern recognition, which was originally developed for remote sensing, and is increasingly being applied to the biology domain. This approach relies on training a computer to recognize patterns in images rather than developing algorithms or tuning parameters for specific image processing tasks. The generality of this approach promises to enable data mining in extensive image repositories, and provide objective and quantitative imaging assays for routine use. Here, we provide a brief overview of the technologies behind pattern recognition and its use in computer vision for biological and biomedical imaging. We list available software tools that can be used by biologists and suggest practical experimental considerations to make the best use of pattern recognition techniques for imaging assays.

  19. Pattern Recognition Software and Techniques for Biological Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shamir, Lior; Delaney, John D.; Orlov, Nikita; Eckley, D. Mark; Goldberg, Ilya G.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of automated image acquisition systems is enabling new types of microscopy experiments that generate large image datasets. However, there is a perceived lack of robust image analysis systems required to process these diverse datasets. Most automated image analysis systems are tailored for specific types of microscopy, contrast methods, probes, and even cell types. This imposes significant constraints on experimental design, limiting their application to the narrow set of imaging methods for which they were designed. One of the approaches to address these limitations is pattern recognition, which was originally developed for remote sensing, and is increasingly being applied to the biology domain. This approach relies on training a computer to recognize patterns in images rather than developing algorithms or tuning parameters for specific image processing tasks. The generality of this approach promises to enable data mining in extensive image repositories, and provide objective and quantitative imaging assays for routine use. Here, we provide a brief overview of the technologies behind pattern recognition and its use in computer vision for biological and biomedical imaging. We list available software tools that can be used by biologists and suggest practical experimental considerations to make the best use of pattern recognition techniques for imaging assays. PMID:21124870

  20. Rock type discrimination techniques using Landsat and Seasat image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blom, R.; Abrams, M.; Conrad, C.

    1981-01-01

    Results of a sedimentary rock type discrimination project using Seasat radar and Landsat multispectral image data of the San Rafael Swell, in eastern Utah, are presented, which has the goal of determining the potential contribution of radar image data to Landsat image data for rock type discrimination, particularly when the images are coregistered. The procedure employs several images processing techniques using the Landsat and Seasat data independently, and then both data sets are coregistered. The images are evaluated according to the ease with which contacts can be located and rock units (not just stratigraphically adjacent ones) separated. Results show that of the Landsat images evaluated, the image using a supervised classification scheme is the best for sedimentary rock type discrimination. Of less value, in decreasing order, are color ratio composites, principal components, and the standard color composite. In addition, for rock type discrimination, the black and white Seasat image is less useful than any of the Landsat color images by itself. However, it is found that the incorporation of the surface textural measures made from the Seasat image provides a considerable and worthwhile improvement in rock type discrimination.

  1. Rock type discrimination techniques using Landsat and Seasat image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blom, R.; Abrams, M.; Conrad, C.

    1981-01-01

    Results of a sedimentary rock type discrimination project using Seasat radar and Landsat multispectral image data of the San Rafael Swell, in eastern Utah, are presented, which has the goal of determining the potential contribution of radar image data to Landsat image data for rock type discrimination, particularly when the images are coregistered. The procedure employs several images processing techniques using the Landsat and Seasat data independently, and then both data sets are coregistered. The images are evaluated according to the ease with which contacts can be located and rock units (not just stratigraphically adjacent ones) separated. Results show that of the Landsat images evaluated, the image using a supervised classification scheme is the best for sedimentary rock type discrimination. Of less value, in decreasing order, are color ratio composites, principal components, and the standard color composite. In addition, for rock type discrimination, the black and white Seasat image is less useful than any of the Landsat color images by itself. However, it is found that the incorporation of the surface textural measures made from the Seasat image provides a considerable and worthwhile improvement in rock type discrimination.

  2. Imaging in pulmonary hypertension, part 1: clinical perspectives, classification, imaging techniques and imaging algorithm.

    PubMed

    McCann, Caroline; Gopalan, Deepa; Sheares, Karen; Screaton, Nicholas

    2012-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an uncommon condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It has diverse aetiology with differing clinical presentations, imaging features and treatments that range from surgical treatment of proximal chronic thromboembolic disease to targeted medical therapies in small vessel disease. Current classification of pulmonary hypertension (PH) is clinically based and groups diseases with similar pathophysiological mechanisms and therapeutic approaches. Groupings include conditions characterised by diffuse small vessel diseases such as idiopathic PAH, PH secondary to chronic hypoxic lung disease, left sided cardiac disease, chronic large vessel obstruction such as chronic thromboembolic disease and a miscellaneous group of diseases. The physiological manifestation of all of these diseases is increased pulmonary vascular resistance and PAH and while clinical features may provide a clue to diagnosis imaging plays a fundamental role in establishing a precise diagnosis and therefore guides therapy. A broad range of imaging modalities is available for the patient with suspected PH including chest radiograph, echocardiography, ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy, catheter pulmonary angiography as well as cross-sectional CT and MRI. Each modality has its strengths and limitations and different techniques may be used at different stages of diagnostic investigation and frequently complement each other. For example, while MRI and echocardiography permit cardiac structural and functional assessment, CT pulmonary angiography provides exquisite morphological information about the proximal pulmonary vasculature and lung parenchyma but little functional information. Modern cross-sectional imaging techniques (CT and MRI) hold the promise of a comprehensive evaluation of the heart, circulation and lung parenchyma in PH. The authors present a multimodality-imaging algorithm for the investigation of patients with suspected PH though

  3. Radiation-Based Medical Imaging Techniques: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prior, John O.; Lecoq, Paul

    This chapter will present an overview of two radiation-based medical imaging techniques using radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine/molecular imaging, namely, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). The relative merits in terms of radiation sensitivity and image resolution of SPECT and PET will be compared to the main conventional radiologic modalities that are computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Differences in terms of temporal resolution will also be outlined, as well as the other similarities and dissimilarities of these two techniques, including their latest and upcoming multimodality combination. The main clinical applications are briefly described and examples of specific SPECT and PET radiopharmaceuticals are listed. SPECT and PET imaging will be then further detailed in the two subsequent chapters describing in greater depth the basics and future trends of each technique (see Chaps. 37, "SPECT Imaging: Basics and New Trends" 10.1007/978-3-642-13271-1_37 and 38, "PET Imaging: Basics and New Trends" 10.1007/978-3-642-13271-1_38.

  4. Video Multiple Watermarking Technique Based on Image Interlacing Using DWT

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohamed M.; Abdel Kader, Neamat S.; Zorkany, M.

    2014-01-01

    Digital watermarking is one of the important techniques to secure digital media files in the domains of data authentication and copyright protection. In the nonblind watermarking systems, the need of the original host file in the watermark recovery operation makes an overhead over the system resources, doubles memory capacity, and doubles communications bandwidth. In this paper, a robust video multiple watermarking technique is proposed to solve this problem. This technique is based on image interlacing. In this technique, three-level discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is used as a watermark embedding/extracting domain, Arnold transform is used as a watermark encryption/decryption method, and different types of media (gray image, color image, and video) are used as watermarks. The robustness of this technique is tested by applying different types of attacks such as: geometric, noising, format-compression, and image-processing attacks. The simulation results show the effectiveness and good performance of the proposed technique in saving system resources, memory capacity, and communications bandwidth. PMID:25587570

  5. Video multiple watermarking technique based on image interlacing using DWT.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Abdel Kader, Neamat S; Zorkany, M

    2014-01-01

    Digital watermarking is one of the important techniques to secure digital media files in the domains of data authentication and copyright protection. In the nonblind watermarking systems, the need of the original host file in the watermark recovery operation makes an overhead over the system resources, doubles memory capacity, and doubles communications bandwidth. In this paper, a robust video multiple watermarking technique is proposed to solve this problem. This technique is based on image interlacing. In this technique, three-level discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is used as a watermark embedding/extracting domain, Arnold transform is used as a watermark encryption/decryption method, and different types of media (gray image, color image, and video) are used as watermarks. The robustness of this technique is tested by applying different types of attacks such as: geometric, noising, format-compression, and image-processing attacks. The simulation results show the effectiveness and good performance of the proposed technique in saving system resources, memory capacity, and communications bandwidth.

  6. Advances in image-guided intratumoral drug delivery techniques

    PubMed Central

    Solorio, Luis; Patel, Ravi B; Wu, Hanping; Krupka, Tianyi; Exner, Agata A

    2017-01-01

    Image-guided drug delivery provides a means for treating a variety of diseases with minimal systemic involvement while concurrently monitoring treatment efficacy. These therapies are particularly useful to the field of interventional oncology, where elevation of tumor drug levels, reduction of systemic side effects and post-therapy assessment are essential. This review highlights three such image-guided procedures: transarterial chemoembolization, drug-eluting implants and convection-enhanced delivery. Advancements in medical imaging technology have resulted in a growing number of new applications, including image-guided drug delivery. This minimally invasive approach provides a comprehensive answer to many challenges with local drug delivery. Future evolution of imaging devices, image-acquisition techniques and multifunctional delivery agents will lead to a paradigm shift in patient care. PMID:22816134

  7. Image measurement technique on vibration amplitude of ultrasonic horn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-bin; Wu, Zhi-qun; Zhu, Jian-ping; He, Jian-guo; Liu, Guang-min

    2013-10-01

    The paper proposes a method to measure vibration amplitude of ultrasonic horn which is a very important component in the spindle for micro-electrical-chemical discharging machining. The method of image measuring amplitude on high frequency vibration is introduced. Non-contact measurement system based on vision technology is constructed. High precision location algorithm on image centroid, quadratic location algorithm, is presented to find the center of little light spot. Measurement experiments have been done to show the effect of image measurement technique on vibration amplitude of ultrasonic horn. In the experiments, precise calibration of the vision system is implemented using a normal graticule to obtain the scale factor between image pixel and real distance. The vibration amplitude of ultrasonic horn is changed by modifying the voltage amplitude of pulse power supply. The image of feature on ultrasonic horn is captured and image processing is carried out. The vibration amplitudes are got at different voltages.

  8. Spaceborne synthetic-aperture imaging radars - Applications, techniques, and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.; Bicknell, T.; Jordan, R. L.; Wu, C.

    1982-01-01

    In June 1978, the Seasat satellite was placed into orbit around the earth with a synthetic-aperture imaging radar (SAR) as one of the payload sensors. The Seasat SAR provided, for the first time, synoptic radar images of the earth's surface with a resolution of 25 m. In November 1981, the second imaging radar was successfully operated from space on the Shuttle. The Shuttle Imaging Radar-A acquired images over a variety of regions around the world with an imaging geometry different from the one used by the Seasat SAR. The spaceborne SAR principle is discussed, taking into account ambiguities, orbital and environmental factors, range curvature and range walk, surface interaction mechanisms, thermal and speckle noise, key tradeoff parameters, and nonconventional SAR systems. Attention is also given to spaceborne SAR sensors, the digital processing of spaceborne SAR data, the optical processing of spaceborne SAR data, postimage formation processing, data interpretation techniques and applications, and the next decade.

  9. Magneto-exciton-polariton condensation in a sub-wavelength high contrast grating based vertical microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.; Brodbeck, S.; Worschech, L.; Kamp, M.; Schneider, C.; Höfling, S.; Zhang, B.; Wang, Z.; Deng, H.

    2014-03-03

    We comparably investigate the diamagnetic shift of an uncoupled quantum well exciton with a microcavity exciton-polariton condensate on the same device. The sample is composed of multiple GaAs quantum wells in an AlAs microcavity, surrounded by a Bragg reflector and a sub-wavelength high contrast grating reflector. Our study introduces an independent and easily applicable technique, namely, the measurement of the condensate diamagnetic shift, which directly probes matter contributions in polariton condensates and hence discriminates it from a conventional photon laser.

  10. Application of optical correlation techniques to particle