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Sample records for high-density eeg study

  1. Scalp and Source Power Topography in Sleepwalking and Sleep Terrors: A High-Density EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Castelnovo, Anna; Riedner, Brady A.; Smith, Richard F.; Tononi, Giulio; Boly, Melanie; Benca, Ruth M.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To examine scalp and source power topography in sleep arousals disorders (SADs) using high-density EEG (hdEEG). Methods: Fifteen adult subjects with sleep arousal disorders (SADs) and 15 age- and gender-matched good sleeping healthy controls were recorded in a sleep laboratory setting using a 256 channel EEG system. Results: Scalp EEG analysis of all night NREM sleep revealed a localized decrease in slow wave activity (SWA) power (1–4 Hz) over centro-parietal regions relative to the rest of the brain in SADs compared to good sleeping healthy controls. Source modelling analysis of 5-minute segments taken from N3 during the first half of the night revealed that the local decrease in SWA power was prominent at the level of the cingulate, motor, and sensori-motor associative cortices. Similar patterns were also evident during REM sleep and wake. These differences in local sleep were present in the absence of any detectable clinical or electrophysiological sign of arousal. Conclusions: Overall, results suggest the presence of local sleep differences in the brain of SADs patients during nights without clinical episodes. The persistence of similar topographical changes in local EEG power during REM sleep and wakefulness points to trait-like functional changes that cross the boundaries of NREM sleep. The regions identified by source imaging are consistent with the current neurophysiological understanding of SADs as a disorder caused by local arousals in motor and cingulate cortices. Persistent localized changes in neuronal excitability may predispose affected subjects to clinical episodes. Citation: Castelnovo A, Riedner BA, Smith RF, Tononi G, Boly M, Benca RM. Scalp and source power topography in sleepwalking and sleep terrors: a high-density EEG study. SLEEP 2016;39(10):1815–1825. PMID:27568805

  2. Early Left Parietal Activity Elicited by Direct Gaze: A High-Density EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Burra, Nicolas; Kerzel, Dirk; George, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Gaze is one of the most important cues for human communication and social interaction. In particular, gaze contact is the most primary form of social contact and it is thought to capture attention. A very early-differentiated brain response to direct versus averted gaze has been hypothesized. Here, we used high-density electroencephalography to test this hypothesis. Topographical analysis allowed us to uncover a very early topographic modulation (40–80 ms) of event-related responses to faces with direct as compared to averted gaze. This modulation was obtained only in the condition where intact broadband faces–as opposed to high-pass or low-pas filtered faces–were presented. Source estimation indicated that this early modulation involved the posterior parietal region, encompassing the left precuneus and inferior parietal lobule. This supports the idea that it reflected an early orienting response to direct versus averted gaze. Accordingly, in a follow-up behavioural experiment, we found faster response times to the direct gaze than to the averted gaze broadband faces. In addition, classical evoked potential analysis showed that the N170 peak amplitude was larger for averted gaze than for direct gaze. Taken together, these results suggest that direct gaze may be detected at a very early processing stage, involving a parallel route to the ventral occipito-temporal route of face perceptual analysis. PMID:27880776

  3. "Cuts in Action": A High-Density EEG Study Investigating the Neural Correlates of Different Editing Techniques in Film.

    PubMed

    Heimann, Katrin S; Uithol, Sebo; Calbi, Marta; Umiltà, Maria A; Guerra, Michele; Gallese, Vittorio

    2016-11-24

    In spite of their striking differences with real-life perception, films are perceived and understood without effort. Cognitive film theory attributes this to the system of continuity editing, a system of editing guidelines outlining the effect of different cuts and edits on spectators. A major principle in this framework is the 180° rule, a rule recommendation that, to avoid spectators' attention to the editing, two edited shots of the same event or action should not be filmed from angles differing in a way that expectations of spatial continuity are strongly violated. In the present study, we used high-density EEG to explore the neural underpinnings of this rule. In particular, our analysis shows that cuts and edits in general elicit early ERP component indicating the registration of syntactic violations as known from language, music, and action processing. However, continuity edits and cuts-across the line differ from each other regarding later components likely to be indicating the differences in spatial remapping as well as in the degree of conscious awareness of one's own perception. Interestingly, a time-frequency analysis of the occipital alpha rhythm did not support the hypothesis that such differences in processing routes are mainly linked to visual attention. On the contrary, our study found specific modulations of the central mu rhythm ERD as an indicator of sensorimotor activity, suggesting that sensorimotor networks might play an important role. We think that these findings shed new light on current discussions about the role of attention and embodied perception in film perception and should be considered when explaining spectators' different experience of different kinds of cuts.

  4. Adaptation in human somatosensory cortex as a model of sensory memory construction: a study using high-density EEG.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Claire; Joyce, Niamh; Garcia-Larrea, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation in sensory cortices has been seen as a mechanism allowing the creation of transient memory representations. Here we tested the adapting properties of early responses in human somatosensory areas SI and SII by analysing somatosensory-evoked potentials over the very first repetitions of a stimulus. SI and SII generators were identified by well-defined scalp potentials and source localisation from high-density 128-channel EEG. Earliest responses (~20 ms) from area 3b in the depth of the post-central gyrus did not show significant adaptation to stimuli repeated at 300 ms intervals. In contrast, responses around 45 ms from the crown of the gyrus (areas 1 and 2) rapidly lessened to a plateau and abated at the 20th stimulation, and activities from SII in the parietal operculum at ~100 ms displayed strong adaptation with a steady amplitude decrease from the first repetition. Although responses in both SI (1-2) and SII areas showed adapting properties and hence sensory memory capacities, evidence of sensory mismatch detection has been demonstrated only for responses reflecting SII activation. This may index the passage from an early form of sensory storage in SI to more operational memory codes in SII, allowing the prediction of forthcoming input and the triggering of a specific signal when such input differs from the previous sequence. This is consistent with a model whereby the length of temporal receptive windows increases with progression in the cortical hierarchy, in parallel with the complexity and abstraction of neural representations.

  5. Attention modulation regulates both motor and non-motor performance: a high-density EEG study in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, B; Moisello, C; Lanzafame, S; Varanese, S; Landsness, E C; Onofrj, M; Di Rocco, A; Tononi, G; Ghilardi, M F

    2010-09-01

    We have previously shown that, in early stages of Parkinson's disease (PD), patients with higher reaction times are also more impaired in visual sequence learning, suggesting that movement preparation shares resources with the learning of visuospatial sequences. Here, we ascertained whether, in patients with PD, the pattern of the neural correlates of attentional processes of movement planning predict sequence learning and working memory abilities. High density Electroencephalography (EEG, 256 electrodes) was recorded in 19 patients with PD performing reaching movements in a choice reaction time paradigm. Patients were also tested with Digit Span and performed a visuomotor sequence learning task that has an important declarative learning component. We found that attenuation of alpha/beta oscillatory activity before the stimulus presentation in frontoparietal regions significantly correlated with reaction time in the choice reaction time task, similarly to what we had previously found in normal subjects. In addition, such activity significantly predicted the declarative indices of sequence learning and the scores in the Digit Span task. These findings suggest that some motor and non motor PD signs might have common neural bases, and thus, might have a similar response to the same behavioral therapy. In addition, these results might help in designing and testing the efficacy of novel rehabilitative approaches to improve specific aspects of motor performance in PD and other neurological disorders.

  6. Understanding Actions of Others: The Electrodynamics of the Left and Right Hemispheres. A High-Density EEG Neuroimaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Ortigue, Stephanie; Sinigaglia, Corrado; Rizzolatti, Giacomo; Grafton, Scott T.

    2010-01-01

    Background When we observe an individual performing a motor act (e.g. grasping a cup) we get two types of information on the basis of how the motor act is done and the context: what the agent is doing (i.e. grasping) and the intention underlying it (i.e. grasping for drinking). Here we examined the temporal dynamics of the brain activations that follow the observation of a motor act and underlie the observer's capacity to understand what the agent is doing and why. Methodology/Principal Findings Volunteers were presented with two-frame video-clips. The first frame (T0) showed an object with or without context; the second frame (T1) showed a hand interacting with the object. The volunteers were instructed to understand the intention of the observed actions while their brain activity was recorded with a high-density 128-channel EEG system. Visual event-related potentials (VEPs) were recorded time-locked with the frame showing the hand-object interaction (T1). The data were analyzed by using electrical neuroimaging, which combines a cluster analysis performed on the group-averaged VEPs with the localization of the cortical sources that give rise to different spatio-temporal states of the global electrical field. Electrical neuroimaging results revealed four major steps: 1) bilateral posterior cortical activations; 2) a strong activation of the left posterior temporal and inferior parietal cortices with almost a complete disappearance of activations in the right hemisphere; 3) a significant increase of the activations of the right temporo-parietal region with simultaneously co-active left hemispheric sources, and 4) a significant global decrease of cortical activity accompanied by the appearance of activation of the orbito-frontal cortex. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that the early striking left hemisphere involvement is due to the activation of a lateralized action-observation/action execution network. The activation of this lateralized network mediates the

  7. A high-density EEG study of differences between three high speeds of simulated forward motion from optic flow in adult participants

    PubMed Central

    Vilhelmsen, Kenneth; van der Weel, F. R. (Ruud); van der Meer, Audrey L. H.

    2015-01-01

    A high-density EEG study was conducted to investigate evoked and oscillatory brain activity in response to high speeds of simulated forward motion. Participants were shown an optic flow pattern consisting of a virtual road with moving poles at either side of it, simulating structured forward motion at different driving speeds (25, 50, and 75 km/h) with a static control condition between each motion condition. Significant differences in N2 latencies and peak amplitudes between the three speeds of visual motion were found in parietal channels of interest P3 and P4. As motion speed increased, peak latency increased while peak amplitude decreased which might indicate that higher driving speeds are perceived as more demanding resulting in longer latencies, and as fewer neurons in the motion sensitive areas of the adult brain appear to be attuned to such high visual speeds this could explain the observed inverse relationship between speed and amplitude. In addition, significant differences between alpha de-synchronizations for forward motion and alpha synchronizations in the static condition were found in the parietal midline (PM) source. It was suggested that the alpha de-synchronizations reflect an activated state related to the visual processing of simulated forward motion, whereas the alpha synchronizations in response to the static condition reflect a deactivated resting period. PMID:26578903

  8. Moving mirrors: a high-density EEG study investigating the effect of camera movements on motor cortex activation during action observation.

    PubMed

    Heimann, Katrin; Umiltà, Maria Alessandra; Guerra, Michele; Gallese, Vittorio

    2014-09-01

    Action execution-perception links (mirror mechanism) have been repeatedly suggested to play crucial roles in social cognition. Remarkably, the designs of most studies exploring this topic so far excluded even the simplest traces of social interaction, such as a movement of the observer toward another individual. This study introduces a new design by investigating the effects of camera movements, possibly simulating the observer's own approaching movement toward the scene. We conducted a combined high-density EEG and behavioral study investigating motor cortex activation during action observation measured by event-related desynchronization and resynchronization (ERD/ERS) of the mu rhythm. Stimuli were videos showing a goal-related hand action filmed while using the camera in four different ways: filming from a fixed position, zooming in on the scene, approaching the scene by means of a dolly, and approaching the scene by means of a steadycam. Results demonstrated a consistently stronger ERD of the mu rhythm for videos that were filmed while approaching the scene with a steadycam. Furthermore, videos in which the zoom was applied reliably demonstrated a stronger rebound. A rating task showed that videos in which the camera approached the scene were felt as more involving and the steadycam was most able to produce a visual experience close to the one of a human approaching the scene. These results suggest that filming technique predicts time course specifics of ERD/ERS during action observation with only videos simulating the natural vision of a walking human observer eliciting a stronger ERD than videos filmed from a fixed position. This demonstrates the utility of ecologically designed studies for exploring social cognition.

  9. Automated detection and labeling of high-density EEG electrodes from structural MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Marco; Liu, Quanying; Brem, Silvia; Wenderoth, Nicole; Mantini, Dante

    2016-10-01

    Objective. Accurate knowledge about the positions of electrodes in electroencephalography (EEG) is very important for precise source localizations. Direct detection of electrodes from magnetic resonance (MR) images is particularly interesting, as it is possible to avoid errors of co-registration between electrode and head coordinate systems. In this study, we propose an automated MR-based method for electrode detection and labeling, particularly tailored to high-density montages. Approach. Anatomical MR images were processed to create an electrode-enhanced image in individual space. Image processing included intensity non-uniformity correction, background noise and goggles artifact removal. Next, we defined a search volume around the head where electrode positions were detected. Electrodes were identified as local maxima in the search volume and registered to the Montreal Neurological Institute standard space using an affine transformation. This allowed the matching of the detected points with the specific EEG montage template, as well as their labeling. Matching and labeling were performed by the coherent point drift method. Our method was assessed on 8 MR images collected in subjects wearing a 256-channel EEG net, using the displacement with respect to manually selected electrodes as performance metric. Main results. Average displacement achieved by our method was significantly lower compared to alternative techniques, such as the photogrammetry technique. The maximum displacement was for more than 99% of the electrodes lower than 1 cm, which is typically considered an acceptable upper limit for errors in electrode positioning. Our method showed robustness and reliability, even in suboptimal conditions, such as in the case of net rotation, imprecisely gathered wires, electrode detachment from the head, and MR image ghosting. Significance. We showed that our method provides objective, repeatable and precise estimates of EEG electrode coordinates. We hope our work

  10. Pain catastrophizing and cortical responses in amputees with varying levels of phantom limb pain: a high-density EEG brain-mapping study.

    PubMed

    Vase, Lene; Egsgaard, Line Lindhardt; Nikolajsen, Lone; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2012-05-01

    Pain catastrophizing has been associated with phantom limb pain, but so far the cortical processes and the brain regions involved in this relationship have not been investigated. It was therefore tested whether catastrophizing was related to (1) spontaneous pain, (2) somatosensory activity and (3) cortical responses in phantom limb pain patients. The cortical responses were investigated via electroencephalography (EEG) as it has a high temporal resolution which may be ideal for investigating especially the attentional and hypervigilance aspect of catastrophizing to standardized acute stimuli. Eighteen upper limb amputees completed the pain catastrophizing scale. Patients' spontaneous pain levels (worst and average pain, numerical rating scales) and thresholds to electrical stimulation (sensory detection and VRS2: intense but not painful) were determined. Non-painful electrical stimuli were applied to both the affected and non-affected arm, while high-resolution (128 channels) EEG signals were recorded. Catastrophizing accounted for significant amounts of the variance in relation to spontaneous pain, especially worst pain (64.1%), and it was significantly associated with thresholds. At the affected side, catastrophizing was significantly related to the power RMS of the N/P135 dipole located in the area around the secondary somatosensory cortex which has been shown to be associated with arousal and expectations. These findings corroborate the attentional model of pain catastrophizing by indicating that even non-painful stimuli are related to enhanced attention to and negative expectations of stimuli, and they suggest that memory processes may be central to understanding the link between catastrophizing and pain.

  11. Cortical Source Analysis of High-Density EEG Recordings in Children

    PubMed Central

    Bathelt, Joe; O'Reilly, Helen; de Haan, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    EEG is traditionally described as a neuroimaging technique with high temporal and low spatial resolution. Recent advances in biophysical modelling and signal processing make it possible to exploit information from other imaging modalities like structural MRI that provide high spatial resolution to overcome this constraint1. This is especially useful for investigations that require high resolution in the temporal as well as spatial domain. In addition, due to the easy application and low cost of EEG recordings, EEG is often the method of choice when working with populations, such as young children, that do not tolerate functional MRI scans well. However, in order to investigate which neural substrates are involved, anatomical information from structural MRI is still needed. Most EEG analysis packages work with standard head models that are based on adult anatomy. The accuracy of these models when used for children is limited2, because the composition and spatial configuration of head tissues changes dramatically over development3.  In the present paper, we provide an overview of our recent work in utilizing head models based on individual structural MRI scans or age specific head models to reconstruct the cortical generators of high density EEG. This article describes how EEG recordings are acquired, processed, and analyzed with pediatric populations at the London Baby Lab, including laboratory setup, task design, EEG preprocessing, MRI processing, and EEG channel level and source analysis.  PMID:25045930

  12. Longitudinal study of preterm and full-term infants: High-density EEG analyses of cortical activity in response to visual motion.

    PubMed

    Agyei, Seth B; van der Weel, F R Ruud; van der Meer, Audrey L H

    2016-04-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) was used to investigate brain electrical activity of full-term and preterm infants at 4 and 12 months of age as a functional response mechanism to structured optic flow and random visual motion. EEG data were recorded with an array of 128-channel sensors. Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and temporal spectral evolution (TSE, time-dependent amplitude changes) were analysed. VEP results showed a significant improvement in full-term infants' latencies with age for forwards and reversed optic flow but not random visual motion. Full-term infants at 12 months significantly differentiated between the motion conditions, with the shortest latency observed for forwards optic flow and the longest latency for random visual motion, while preterm infants did not improve their latencies with age, nor were they able to differentiate between the motion conditions at 12 months. Differences in induced activities were also observed where comparisons between TSEs of the motion conditions and a static non-flow pattern showed desynchronised theta-band activity in both full-term and preterm infants, with synchronised alpha-beta band activity observed only in the full-term infants at 12 months. Full-term infants at 12 months with a substantial amount of self-produced locomotor experience and neural maturation coupled with faster oscillating cell assemblies, rely on the perception of structured optic flow to move around efficiently in the environment. The poorer responses in the preterm infants could be related to impairment of the dorsal visual stream specialized in the processing of visual motion.

  13. MRI with and without a high-density EEG cap--what makes the difference?

    PubMed

    Klein, Carina; Hänggi, Jürgen; Luechinger, Roger; Jäncke, Lutz

    2015-02-01

    Besides the benefit of combining electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), much effort has been spent to develop algorithms aimed at successfully cleaning the EEG data from MRI-related gradient and ballistocardiological artifacts. However, there are also studies showing a negative influence of the EEG on MRI data quality. Therefore, in the present study, we focused for the first time on the influence of the EEG on morphometric measurements of T1-weighted MRI data (voxel- and surfaced-based morphometry). Here, we demonstrate a strong influence of the EEG on cortical thickness, surface area, and volume as well as subcortical volumes due to local EEG-related inhomogeneities of the static magnetic (B0) and the gradient field (B1). In a second step, we analyzed the signal-to-noise ratios for both the anatomical and the functional data when recorded simultaneously with EEG and MRI and compared them to the ratios of the MRI data without simultaneous EEG measurements. These analyses revealed consistently lower signal-to-noise ratios for anatomical as well as functional MRI data during simultaneous EEG registration. In contrast, further analyses of T2*-weighted images provided reliable results independent of whether including the individuals' T1-weighted image with or without the EEG cap in the fMRI preprocessing stream. Based on our findings, we strongly recommend against using the structural images obtained during simultaneous EEG-MRI recordings for further anatomical data analysis.

  14. High density wireless EEG prototype: Design and evaluation against reference equipment.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Stefano; Patki, Shrishail; Passoni, Marco; Perko, Hannes; Gritsch, Gerhard; Ossenblok, Pauly; Yazicioglu, Refet Firat

    2014-01-01

    A high density wireless electroencephalographic (EEG) platform has been designed. It is able to record up to 64 EEG channels with electrode to tissue impedance (ETI) monitoring. The analog front-end is based on two kinds of low power ASICs implementing the active electrodes and the amplifier. A power efficient compression algorithm enables the use of continuous wireless transmission of data through Bluetooth for real-time monitoring with an overall power consumption of about 350 mW. EEG acquisitions on five subjects (one healthy subject and four patients suffering from epilepsy) have been recorded in parallel with a reference system commonly used in clinical practice and data of the wireless prototype and reference system have been processed with an automatic tool for seizure detection and localization. The false alarm rates (0.1-0.5 events per hour) are comparable between the two system and wireless prototype also detected the seizure correctly and allowed its localization.

  15. A high-density EEG investigation into steady state binaural beat stimulation.

    PubMed

    Goodin, Peter; Ciorciari, Joseph; Baker, Kate; Carey, Anne-Marie; Carrey, Anne-Marie; Harper, Michelle; Kaufman, Jordy

    2012-01-01

    Binaural beats are an auditory phenomenon that has been suggested to alter physiological and cognitive processes including vigilance and brainwave entrainment. Some personality traits measured by the NEO Five Factor Model have been found to alter entrainment using pulsing light stimuli, but as yet no studies have examined if this occurs using steady state presentation of binaural beats for a relatively short presentation of two minutes. This study aimed to examine if binaural beat stimulation altered vigilance or cortical frequencies and if personality traits were involved. Thirty-one participants were played binaural beat stimuli designed to elicit a response at either the Theta (7 Hz) or Beta (16 Hz) frequency bands while undertaking a zero-back vigilance task. EEG was recorded from a high-density electrode cap. No significant differences were found in vigilance or cortical frequency power during binaural beat stimulation compared to a white noise control period. Furthermore, no significant relationships were detected between the above and the Big Five personality traits. This suggests a short presentation of steady state binaural beats are not sufficient to alter vigilance or entrain cortical frequencies at the two bands examined and that certain personality traits were not more susceptible than others.

  16. A High-Density EEG Investigation into Steady State Binaural Beat Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Goodin, Peter; Ciorciari, Joseph; Baker, Kate; Carrey, Anne-Marie; Harper, Michelle; Kaufman, Jordy

    2012-01-01

    Binaural beats are an auditory phenomenon that has been suggested to alter physiological and cognitive processes including vigilance and brainwave entrainment. Some personality traits measured by the NEO Five Factor Model have been found to alter entrainment using pulsing light stimuli, but as yet no studies have examined if this occurs using steady state presentation of binaural beats for a relatively short presentation of two minutes. This study aimed to examine if binaural beat stimulation altered vigilance or cortical frequencies and if personality traits were involved. Thirty-one participants were played binaural beat stimuli designed to elicit a response at either the Theta (7 Hz) or Beta (16 Hz) frequency bands while undertaking a zero-back vigilance task. EEG was recorded from a high-density electrode cap. No significant differences were found in vigilance or cortical frequency power during binaural beat stimulation compared to a white noise control period. Furthermore, no significant relationships were detected between the above and the Big Five personality traits. This suggests a short presentation of steady state binaural beats are not sufficient to alter vigilance or entrain cortical frequencies at the two bands examined and that certain personality traits were not more susceptible than others. PMID:22496862

  17. Identifying auditory attention with ear-EEG: cEEGrid versus high-density cap-EEG comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleichner, Martin G.; Mirkovic, Bojana; Debener, Stefan

    2016-12-01

    Objective. This study presents a direct comparison of a classical EEG cap setup with a new around-the-ear electrode array (cEEGrid) to gain a better understanding of the potential of ear-centered EEG. Approach. Concurrent EEG was recorded from a classical scalp EEG cap and two cEEGrids that were placed around the left and the right ear. Twenty participants performed a spatial auditory attention task in which three sound streams were presented simultaneously. The sound streams were three seconds long and differed in the direction of origin (front, left, right) and the number of beats (3, 4, 5 respectively), as well as the timbre and pitch. The participants had to attend to either the left or the right sound stream. Main results. We found clear attention modulated ERP effects reflecting the attended sound stream for both electrode setups, which agreed in morphology and effect size. A single-trial template matching classification showed that the direction of attention could be decoded significantly above chance (50%) for at least 16 out of 20 participants for both systems. The comparably high classification results of the single trial analysis underline the quality of the signal recorded with the cEEGrids. Significance. These findings are further evidence for the feasibility of around the-ear EEG recordings and demonstrate that well described ERPs can be measured. We conclude that concealed behind-the-ear EEG recordings can be an alternative to classical cap EEG acquisition for auditory attention monitoring.

  18. Seizure Onset Zone Localization from Ictal High-Density EEG in Refractory Focal Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Staljanssens, Willeke; Strobbe, Gregor; Holen, Roel Van; Birot, Gwénaël; Gschwind, Markus; Seeck, Margitta; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Vulliémoz, Serge; van Mierlo, Pieter

    2017-03-01

    Epilepsy surgery is the most efficient treatment option for patients with refractory epilepsy. Before surgery, it is of utmost importance to accurately delineate the seizure onset zone (SOZ). Non-invasive EEG is the most used neuroimaging technique to diagnose epilepsy, but it is hard to localize the SOZ from EEG due to its low spatial resolution and because epilepsy is a network disease, with several brain regions becoming active during a seizure. In this work, we propose and validate an approach based on EEG source imaging (ESI) combined with functional connectivity analysis to overcome these problems. We considered both simulations and real data of patients. Ictal epochs of 204-channel EEG and subsets down to 32 channels were analyzed. ESI was done using realistic head models and LORETA was used as inverse technique. The connectivity pattern between the reconstructed sources was calculated, and the source with the highest number of outgoing connections was selected as SOZ. We compared this algorithm with a more straightforward approach, i.e. selecting the source with the highest power after ESI as the SOZ. We found that functional connectivity analysis estimated the SOZ consistently closer to the simulated EZ/RZ than localization based on maximal power. Performance, however, decreased when 128 electrodes or less were used, especially in the realistic data. The results show the added value of functional connectivity analysis for SOZ localization, when the EEG is obtained with a high-density setup. Next to this, the method can potentially be used as objective tool in clinical settings.

  19. Differences between MEG and high-density EEG source localizations using a distributed source model in comparison to fMRI.

    PubMed

    Klamer, Silke; Elshahabi, Adham; Lerche, Holger; Braun, Christoph; Erb, Michael; Scheffler, Klaus; Focke, Niels K

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) are widely used to localize brain activity and their spatial resolutions have been compared in several publications. While most clinical studies demonstrated higher accuracy of MEG source localization, simulation studies suggested a more accurate EEG than MEG localization for the same number of channels. However, studies comparing real MEG and EEG data with equivalent number of channels are scarce. We investigated 14 right-handed healthy subjects performing a motor task in MEG, high-density-(hd-) EEG and fMRI as well as a somatosensory task in MEG and hd-EEG and compared source analysis results of the evoked brain activity between modalities with different head models. Using individual head models, hd-EEG localized significantly closer to the anatomical reference point obtained by fMRI than MEG. Source analysis results were least accurate for hd-EEG based on a standard head model. Further, hd-EEG and MEG localized more medially than fMRI. Localization accuracy of electric source imaging is dependent on the head model used with more accurate results obtained with individual head models. If this is taken into account, EEG localization can be more accurate than MEG localization for the same number of channels.

  20. Pattern recognition with adaptive-thresholds for sleep spindle in high density EEG signals.

    PubMed

    Gemignani, Jessica; Agrimi, Jacopo; Cheli, Enrico; Gemignani, Angelo; Laurino, Marco; Allegrini, Paolo; Landi, Alberto; Menicucci, Danilo

    2015-01-01

    Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, via Savi 10, 56126, Pisa, Italy Sleep spindles are electroencephalographic oscillations peculiar of non-REM sleep, related to neuronal mechanisms underlying sleep restoration and learning consolidation. Based on their very singular morphology, sleep spindles can be visually recognized and detected, even though this approach can lead to significant mis-detections. For this reason, many efforts have been put in developing a reliable algorithm for spindle automatic detection, and a number of methods, based on different techniques, have been tested via visual validation. This work aims at improving current pattern recognition procedures for sleep spindles detection by taking into account their physiological sources of variability. We provide a method as a synthesis of the current state of art that, improving dynamic threshold adaptation, is able to follow modification of spindle characteristics as a function of sleep depth and inter-subjects variability. The algorithm has been applied to physiological data recorded by a high density EEG in order to perform a validation based on visual inspection and on evaluation of expected results from normal night sleep in healthy subjects.

  1. Combining Computer Game-Based Behavioural Experiments With High-Density EEG and Infrared Gaze Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Keith J.; Belmonte, Matthew K.

    2010-01-01

    Experimental paradigms are valuable insofar as the timing and other parameters of their stimuli are well specified and controlled, and insofar as they yield data relevant to the cognitive processing that occurs under ecologically valid conditions. These two goals often are at odds, since well controlled stimuli often are too repetitive to sustain subjects' motivation. Studies employing electroencephalography (EEG) are often especially sensitive to this dilemma between ecological validity and experimental control: attaining sufficient signal-to-noise in physiological averages demands large numbers of repeated trials within lengthy recording sessions, limiting the subject pool to individuals with the ability and patience to perform a set task over and over again. This constraint severely limits researchers' ability to investigate younger populations as well as clinical populations associated with heightened anxiety or attentional abnormalities. Even adult, non-clinical subjects may not be able to achieve their typical levels of performance or cognitive engagement: an unmotivated subject for whom an experimental task is little more than a chore is not the same, behaviourally, cognitively, or neurally, as a subject who is intrinsically motivated and engaged with the task. A growing body of literature demonstrates that embedding experiments within video games may provide a way between the horns of this dilemma between experimental control and ecological validity. The narrative of a game provides a more realistic context in which tasks occur, enhancing their ecological validity (Chaytor & Schmitter-Edgecombe, 2003). Moreover, this context provides motivation to complete tasks. In our game, subjects perform various missions to collect resources, fend off pirates, intercept communications or facilitate diplomatic relations. In so doing, they also perform an array of cognitive tasks, including a Posner attention-shifting paradigm (Posner, 1980), a go/no-go test of motor

  2. Combining computer game-based behavioural experiments with high-density EEG and infrared gaze tracking.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Keith J; Belmonte, Matthew K

    2010-12-16

    Experimental paradigms are valuable insofar as the timing and other parameters of their stimuli are well specified and controlled, and insofar as they yield data relevant to the cognitive processing that occurs under ecologically valid conditions. These two goals often are at odds, since well controlled stimuli often are too repetitive to sustain subjects' motivation. Studies employing electroencephalography (EEG) are often especially sensitive to this dilemma between ecological validity and experimental control: attaining sufficient signal-to-noise in physiological averages demands large numbers of repeated trials within lengthy recording sessions, limiting the subject pool to individuals with the ability and patience to perform a set task over and over again. This constraint severely limits researchers' ability to investigate younger populations as well as clinical populations associated with heightened anxiety or attentional abnormalities. Even adult, non-clinical subjects may not be able to achieve their typical levels of performance or cognitive engagement: an unmotivated subject for whom an experimental task is little more than a chore is not the same, behaviourally, cognitively, or neurally, as a subject who is intrinsically motivated and engaged with the task. A growing body of literature demonstrates that embedding experiments within video games may provide a way between the horns of this dilemma between experimental control and ecological validity. The narrative of a game provides a more realistic context in which tasks occur, enhancing their ecological validity (Chaytor & Schmitter-Edgecombe, 2003). Moreover, this context provides motivation to complete tasks. In our game, subjects perform various missions to collect resources, fend off pirates, intercept communications or facilitate diplomatic relations. In so doing, they also perform an array of cognitive tasks, including a Posner attention-shifting paradigm (Posner, 1980), a go/no-go test of motor

  3. Functional brain network organisation of children between 2 and 5 years derived from reconstructed activity of cortical sources of high-density EEG recordings.

    PubMed

    Bathelt, Joe; O'Reilly, Helen; Clayden, Jonathan D; Cross, J Helen; de Haan, Michelle

    2013-11-15

    There is increasing interest in applying connectivity analysis to brain measures (Rubinov and Sporns, 2010), but most studies have relied on fMRI, which substantially limits the participant groups and numbers that can be studied. High-density EEG recordings offer a comparatively inexpensive easy-to-use alternative, but require channel-level connectivity analysis which currently lacks a common analytic framework and is very limited in spatial resolution. To address this problem, we have developed a new technique for studies of network development that overcomes the spatial constraint and obtains functional networks of cortical areas by using EEG source reconstruction with age-matched average MRI templates (He et al., 1999). In contrast to previously reported channel-level analysis, this approach provides information about the cortical areas most likely to be involved in the network as well as their functional relationship (Babiloni et al., 2005; De Vico Fallani et al., 2007). In this study, we applied source reconstruction with age-matched templates to task-free high-density EEG recordings in typically-developing children between 2 and 6 years of age (O'Reilly, 2012). Graph theory was then applied to the association strengths of 68 cortical regions of interest based on the Desikan-Killiany atlas. We found linear increases of mean node degree, mean clustering coefficient and maximum betweenness centrality between 2 years and 6 years of age. Characteristic path length was negatively correlated with age. The correlation of the network measures with age indicates network development towards more closely integrated networks similar to reports from other imaging modalities (Fair et al., 2008; Power et al., 2010). We also applied eigenvalue decomposition to obtain functional modules (Clayden et al., 2013). Connection strength within these modules did not change with age, and the modules resembled hub networks previously described for MRI (Hagmann et al., 2010; Power et al

  4. Different colors of light lead to different adaptation and activation as determined by high-density EEG.

    PubMed

    Münch, M; Plomp, G; Thunell, E; Kawasaki, A; Scartezzini, J L; Herzog, M H

    2014-11-01

    Light adaptation is crucial for coping with the varying levels of ambient light. Using high-density electroencephalography (EEG), we investigated how adaptation to light of different colors affects brain responsiveness. In a within-subject design, sixteen young participants were adapted first to dim white light and then to blue, green, red, or white bright light (one color per session in a randomized order). Immediately after both dim and bright light adaptation, we presented brief light pulses and recorded event-related potentials (ERPs). We analyzed ERP response strengths and brain topographies and determined the underlying sources using electrical source imaging. Between 150 and 261 ms after stimulus onset, the global field power (GFP) was higher after dim than bright light adaptation. This effect was most pronounced with red light and localized in the frontal lobe, the fusiform gyrus, the occipital lobe and the cerebellum. After bright light adaptation, within the first 100 ms after light onset, stronger responses were found than after dim light adaptation for all colors except for red light. Differences between conditions were localized in the frontal lobe, the cingulate gyrus, and the cerebellum. These results indicate that very short-term EEG brain responses are influenced by prior light adaptation and the spectral quality of the light stimulus. We show that the early EEG responses are differently affected by adaptation to different colors of light which may contribute to known differences in performance and reaction times in cognitive tests.

  5. Effects of partial sleep deprivation on slow waves during non-rapid eye movement sleep: a high density EEG investigation

    PubMed Central

    Plante, David T.; Goldstein, Michael R.; Cook, Jesse D.; Smith, Richard; Riedner, Brady A.; Rumble, Meredith E.; Jelenchick, Lauren; Roth, Andrea; Tononi, Giulio; Benca, Ruth M.; Peterson, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Changes in slow waves during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in response to acute total sleep deprivation are well-established measures of sleep homeostasis. This investigation utilized high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG) to examine topographic changes in slow waves during repeated partial sleep deprivation. Methods Twenty-four participants underwent a 6-day sleep restriction protocol. Spectral and period-amplitude analyses of sleep hdEEG data were used to examine changes in slow wave energy, count, amplitude, and slope relative to baseline. Results Changes in slow wave energy were dependent on the quantity of NREM sleep utilized for analysis, with widespread increases during sleep restriction and recovery when comparing data from the first portion of the sleep period, but restricted to recovery sleep if the entire sleep episode was considered. Period-amplitude analysis was less dependent on the quantity of NREM sleep utilized, and demonstrated topographic changes in the count, amplitude, and distribution of slow waves, with frontal increases in slow wave amplitude, numbers of high-amplitude waves, and amplitude/slopes of low amplitude waves resulting from partial sleep deprivation. Conclusions Topographic changes in slow waves occur across the course of partial sleep restriction and recovery. Significance These results demonstrate a homeostatic response to partial sleep loss in humans. PMID:26596212

  6. Concordance of Epileptic Networks Associated with Epileptic Spikes Measured by High-Density EEG and Fast fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Vera; Dümpelmann, Matthias; LeVan, Pierre; Ramantani, Georgia; Mader, Irina; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Jacobs, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study aims to investigate whether a newly developed fast fMRI called MREG (magnetic resonance encephalography) measures metabolic changes related to interictal epileptic discharges (IED). For this purpose BOLD changes are correlated with the IED distribution and variability. Methods Patients with focal epilepsy underwent EEG-MREG using a 64 channel cap. IED voltage maps were generated using 32 and 64 channels and compared regarding their correspondence to the BOLD response. The extents of IEDs (defined as number of channels with >50% of maximum IED negativity) were correlated with the extents of positive and negative BOLD responses. Differences in inter-spike variability were investigated between interictal epileptic discharges (IED) sets with and without concordant positive or negative BOLD responses. Results 17 patients showed 32 separate IED types. In 50% of IED types the BOLD changes could be confirmed by another independent imaging method. The IED extent significantly correlated with the positive BOLD extent (p = 0.04). In 6 patients the 64-channel EEG voltage maps better reflected the positive or negative BOLD response than the 32-channel EEG; in all others no difference was seen. Inter-spike variability was significantly lower in IED sets with than without concordant positive or negative BOLD responses (with p = 0.04). Significance Higher density EEG and fast fMRI seem to improve the value of EEG-fMRI in epilepsy. The correlation of positive BOLD and IED extent could suggest that widespread BOLD responses reflect the IED network. Inter-spike variability influences the likelihood to find IED concordant positive or negative BOLD responses, which is why single IED analysis may be promising. PMID:26496480

  7. Power spectral density changes and language lateralization during covert object naming tasks measured with high-density EEG recordings.

    PubMed

    Ramon, C; Holmes, M; Freeman, Walter J; Gratkowski, Maciej; Eriksen, K J; Haueisen, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Our objective was to study changes in EEG time-domain power spectral density (PSDt) and localization of language areas during covert object naming tasks in human subjects with epilepsy. EEG data for subjects with epilepsy were acquired during the covert object naming tasks using a net of 256 electrodes. The trials required each subject to provide the names of common objects presented every 4 seconds on slides. Each trial comprised the 1.0 second before and 3.0 seconds after initial object presentation. PSDt values at baseline and during tasks were calculated in the theta, alpha, beta, low gamma, and high gamma bands. The spatial contour plots reveal that PSDt values during object naming were 10-20% higher than the baseline values for different bands. Language was lateralized to left frontal or temporal areas. In all cases, the Wada test disclosed language lateralization to the left hemisphere as well.

  8. EEG Studies with Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flohr, John W.; Miller, Daniel C.; deBeus, Roger

    2000-01-01

    Describes how electroencephalogram (EEG) data are collected and how brain function is measured. Discusses studies on the effects of music experiences with adult subjects and studies focusing on the effects of music training on EEG activity of children and adolescents. Considers the implications of the studies and the future directions of this…

  9. Effects of oral temazepam on slow waves during non-rapid eye movement sleep in healthy young adults: a high-density EEG investigation

    PubMed Central

    Plante, DT; Goldstein, MR; Cook, JD; Smith, R; Riedner, BA; Rumble, ME; Jelenchick, L; Roth, A; Tononi, G; Benca, RM; Peterson, MJ

    2016-01-01

    Slow waves are characteristic waveforms that occur during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep that play an integral role in sleep quality and brain plasticity. Benzodiazepines are commonly used medications that alter slow waves, however, their effects may depend on the time of night and measure used to characterize slow waves. Prior investigations have utilized minimal scalp derivations to evaluate the effects of benzodiazepines on slow waves, and thus the topography of changes to slow waves induced by benzodiazepines has yet to be fully elucidated. This study used high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG) to evaluate the effects of oral temazepam on slow wave activity, incidence, and morphology during NREM sleep in 18 healthy adults relative to placebo. Temazepam was associated with significant decreases in slow wave activity and incidence, which were most prominent in the latter portions of the sleep period. However, temazepam was also associated with a decrease in the magnitude of high-amplitude slow waves and their slopes in the first NREM sleep episode, which was most prominent in frontal derivations. These findings suggest that benzodiazepines produce changes in slow waves throughout the night that vary depending on cortical topography and measures used to characterize slow waves. Further research that explores the relationships between benzodiazepine-induced changes to slow waves and the functional effects of these waveforms is indicated. PMID:26779596

  10. Effects of oral temazepam on slow waves during non-rapid eye movement sleep in healthy young adults: A high-density EEG investigation.

    PubMed

    Plante, D T; Goldstein, M R; Cook, J D; Smith, R; Riedner, B A; Rumble, M E; Jelenchick, L; Roth, A; Tononi, G; Benca, R M; Peterson, M J

    2016-03-01

    Slow waves are characteristic waveforms that occur during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep that play an integral role in sleep quality and brain plasticity. Benzodiazepines are commonly used medications that alter slow waves, however, their effects may depend on the time of night and measure used to characterize slow waves. Prior investigations have utilized minimal scalp derivations to evaluate the effects of benzodiazepines on slow waves, and thus the topography of changes to slow waves induced by benzodiazepines has yet to be fully elucidated. This study used high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG) to evaluate the effects of oral temazepam on slow wave activity, incidence, and morphology during NREM sleep in 18 healthy adults relative to placebo. Temazepam was associated with significant decreases in slow wave activity and incidence, which were most prominent in the latter portions of the sleep period. However, temazepam was also associated with a decrease in the magnitude of high-amplitude slow waves and their slopes in the first NREM sleep episode, which was most prominent in frontal derivations. These findings suggest that benzodiazepines produce changes in slow waves throughout the night that vary depending on cortical topography and measures used to characterize slow waves. Further research that explores the relationships between benzodiazepine-induced changes to slow waves and the functional effects of these waveforms is indicated.

  11. Experimental study of high density foods for the Space Operations Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    The experimental study of high density foods for the Space Operations Center is described. A sensory evaluation of the high density foods was conducted first to test the acceptability of the products. A shelf-life study of the high density foods was also conducted for three different time lengths at three different temperatures. The nutritional analysis of the high density foods is at present incomplete.

  12. Mapping of cortical activity in the first two decades of life: a high-density sleep electroencephalogram study.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Salomé; Ringli, Maya; Geiger, Anja; LeBourgeois, Monique; Jenni, Oskar G; Huber, Reto

    2010-10-06

    Evidence that electroencephalography (EEG) slow-wave activity (SWA) (EEG spectral power in the 1-4.5 Hz band) during non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) reflects plastic changes is increasing (Tononi and Cirelli, 2006). Regional assessment of gray matter development from neuroimaging studies reveals a posteroanterior trajectory of cortical maturation in the first three decades of life (Shaw et al., 2008). Our aim was to test whether this regional cortical maturation is reflected in regional changes of sleep SWA. We evaluated all-night high-density EEG (128 channels) in 55 healthy human subjects (2.4-19.4 years) and assessed age-related changes in NREM sleep topography. As in adults, we observed frequency-specific topographical distributions of sleep EEG power in all subjects. However, from early childhood to late adolescence, the location on the scalp showing maximal SWA underwent a shift from posterior to anterior regions. This shift along the posteroanterior axis was only present in the SWA frequency range and remained stable across the night. Changes in the topography of SWA during sleep parallel neuroimaging study findings indicating cortical maturation starts early in posterior areas and spreads rostrally over the frontal cortex. Thus, SWA might reflect the underlying processes of cortical maturation. In the future, sleep SWA assessments may be used as a clinical tool to detect aberrations in cortical maturation.

  13. Scoping study. High density polyethylene (HDPE) in salstone service

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, Mark A.

    2005-02-18

    An evaluation of the use of high density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembranes in Saltstone service has been conducted due to the potential benefits that could be derived from such usage. HDPE is one of the simplest hydrocarbon polymers and one of the most common polymers utilized in the production of geomembranes, which means that its costs are relatively low. Additionally, HDPE geomembranes have an extremely low permeability and an extremely low water vapor diffusional flux, which means that it is a good barrier to contaminant transport. The primary consideration in association with HDPE geomembranes in Saltstone service is the potential impact of Saltstone on the degradation of the HDPE geomembranes. Therefore, the evaluation documented herein has primarily focused upon the potential HDPE degradation in Saltstone service.

  14. EEG

    MedlinePlus

    Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Electroencephalography (EEG) - diagnostic. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013: ...

  15. The Mozart Effect: A quantitative EEG study.

    PubMed

    Verrusio, Walter; Ettorre, Evaristo; Vicenzini, Edoardo; Vanacore, Nicola; Cacciafesta, Mauro; Mecarelli, Oriano

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of Mozart's music on brain activity through spectral analysis of the EEG in young healthy adults (Adults), in healthy elderly (Elderly) and in elderly with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). EEG recording was performed at basal rest conditions and after listening to Mozart's K448 or "Fur Elise" Beethoven's sonatas. After listening to Mozart, an increase of alpha band and median frequency index of background alpha rhythm activity (a pattern of brain wave activity linked to memory, cognition and open mind to problem solving) was observed both in Adults and in Elderly. No changes were observed in MCI. After listening to Beethoven, no changes in EEG activity were detected. This results may be representative of the fact that said Mozart's music is able to "activate" neuronal cortical circuits related to attentive and cognitive functions.

  16. Illumination influences working memory: an EEG study.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Young; Min, Byoung-Kyong; Jung, Young-Chul; Pak, Hyensou; Jeong, Yeon-Hong; Kim, Eosu

    2013-09-05

    Illumination conditions appear to influence working efficacy in everyday life. In the present study, we obtained electroencephalogram (EEG) correlates of working-memory load, and investigated how these waveforms are modulated by illumination conditions. We hypothesized that illumination conditions may affect cognitive performance. We designed an EEG study to monitor and record participants' EEG during the Sternberg working memory task under four different illumination conditions. Illumination conditions were generated with a factorial design of two color-temperatures (3000 and 7100 K) by two illuminance levels (150 and 700 lx). During a working memory task, we observed that high illuminance led to significantly lower frontal EEG theta activity than did low illuminance. These differences persisted despite no significant difference in task performance between illumination conditions. We found that the latency of an early event-related potential component, such as N1, was significantly modulated by the illumination condition. The fact that the illumination condition affects brain activity but not behavioral performance suggests that the lighting conditions used in the present study did not influence the performance stage of behavioral processing. Nevertheless, our findings provide objective evidence that illumination conditions modulate brain activity. Further studies are necessary to refine the optimal lighting parameters for facilitating working memory.

  17. Study of the photo-detection efficiency of FBK High-Density silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappalà, G.; Acerbi, F.; Ferri, A.; Gola, A.; Paternoster, G.; Regazzoni, V.; Zorzi, N.; Piemonte, C.

    2016-11-01

    This work presents a study of the factors contributing to the Photo-Detection Efficiency of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs): Quantum Efficiency, Triggering Probability and Fill Factor. Two different SiPM High-Density technologies are tested, NUV-HD, based on n-on-p junction, and RGB-HD, based on p-on-n junction, developed at FBK, Trento. The quantum efficiency was measured on photodiodes produced along with the SiPMs. The triggering probability, as a function of wavelength and bias voltage, was measured on circular Single Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) with 100% fill factor. Square SPADs, having the same layout of single SiPM cells, were studied to measure the effective fill factor and compare it to the nominal value. The comparison of the circular and square SPADs allows to get the transition region size between the effective active area of the cell and the one defined by the layout.

  18. Crystallization Studies of Blends of Low Density Polyethylene and High Density Polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puig, C.; Gomez, S.; Castañeda, R.

    1997-03-01

    The incorporation of low density polyethylene (LDPE) segments within the high density polyethylene (HDPE) lamellae on cooling from the molten state is investigated using differential scanning calorimetry. Rich LDPE blends (>80%) on quenching from the melt exhibited partial cocrystallization. Two endotherms on heating are observed, the LDPE is the main component of the low melting endotherm whereas the HDPE is the main component of the high melting endotherm. A depression in the high melting temperature peak is observed. In addition, on subsequent treatment the crystallization behaviour under controlled conditions of the low melting component in quenched blends is studied and it shows a shift in the crystallization temperature when compared with pure LDPE. After reheating a depression in the low melting temperature with increasing HDPE content in the blend is observed. The effect of cooling conditions used from the melt on the cocrystallization between the two polymers is studied.

  19. Density functional study of the electric double layer formed by a high density electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Douglas; Lamperski, Stanisław; Jin, Zhehui; Wu, Jianzhong

    2011-11-10

    We use a classical density functional theory (DFT) to study the electric double layer formed by charged hard spheres near a planar charged surface. The DFT predictions are found to be in good agreement with recent computer simulation results. We study the capacitance of the charged hard-sphere system at a range of densities and surface charges and find that the capacitance exhibits a local minimum at low ionic densities and small electrode charge. Although this charging behavior is typical for an aqueous electrolyte solution, the local minimum gradually turns into a maximum as the density of the hard spheres increases. Charged hard spheres at high density provide a reasonable first approximation for ionic liquids. In agreement with experiment, the capacitance of this model ionic liquid double layer has a maximum at small electrode charge density.

  20. Study of short haul high-density V/STOL transportation systems, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, H. L.

    1972-01-01

    The relative advantages of STOL aircraft concepts were examined by simulating the operations of a short haul high-density intercity STOL system set in two arenas, the California corridor and the Chicago-Detroit-Cleveland triangle, during the 1980 time period. The study was constrained to the use of three aircraft concepts designated as the deflected slipstream turboprop, externally blown flap, and augmentor wing turbofan configurations. The projected demographic, economic, travel demand, and travel characteristics of the representative arenas were identified. The STOL airline operating scenarios were then formulated and through the use of the aerospace modal split simulation program, the traveler modal choices involving alternative STOL concepts were estimated in the context of the total transportation environment for 1980. System combinations that presented the best potential for economic return and traveler acceptance were then identified for each STOL concept.

  1. Spatiotemporal neural dynamics of moral judgment: A high-density ERP study

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Keith J.

    2014-01-01

    Morality is a pervasive aspect of human nature across all cultures, and neuroscience investigations are necessary for identifying what computational mechanisms underpin moral cognition. The current study used high-density ERPs to examine how moral evaluations are mediated by automatic and controlled processes as well as how quickly information and causal-intentional representations can be extracted when viewing morally laden behavior. The study also explored the extent to which individual dispositions in affective and cognitive empathy as well as justice sensitivity influence the encoding of moral valence when healthy participants make moral judgments about prosocial (interpersonal assistance) and antisocial (interpersonal harm) actions. Moral judgment differences were reflected in differential amplitudes for components associated with cognitive appraisal (LPP) as well as early components associated with emotional salience (N1 and N2). Moreover, source estimation was performed to indicate potential neural generators. A posterior-to-anterior shift was observed, with current density peaks first in right inferior parietal cortex (at the temporoparietal junction), then later in medial prefrontal cortex. Cognitive empathy scores predicted behavioral ratings of blame as well as differential amplitudes in LPP and component activity at posterior sites. Overall, this study offers important insights into the temporal unfolding of moral evaluations, including when in time individual differences in empathy influence neural encoding of moral valence. PMID:24905282

  2. Spatiotemporal neural dynamics of moral judgment: a high-density ERP study.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Keith J; Decety, Jean

    2014-07-01

    Morality is a pervasive aspect of human nature across all cultures, and neuroscience investigations are necessary for identifying what computational mechanisms underpin moral cognition. The current study used high-density ERPs to examine how moral evaluations are mediated by automatic and controlled processes as well as how quickly information and causal-intentional representations can be extracted when viewing morally laden behavior. The study also explored the extent to which individual dispositions in affective and cognitive empathy as well as justice sensitivity influence the encoding of moral valence when healthy participants make moral judgments about prosocial (interpersonal assistance) and antisocial (interpersonal harm) actions. Moral judgment differences were reflected in differential amplitudes for components associated with cognitive appraisal (LPP) as well as early components associated with emotional salience (N1 and N2). Moreover, source estimation was performed to indicate potential neural generators. A posterior-to-anterior shift was observed, with current density peaks first in right inferior parietal cortex (at the temporoparietal junction), then later in medial prefrontal cortex. Cognitive empathy scores predicted behavioral ratings of blame as well as differential amplitudes in LPP and component activity at posterior sites. Overall, this study offers important insights into the temporal unfolding of moral evaluations, including when in time individual differences in empathy influence neural encoding of moral valence.

  3. Using EEG to Study Cognitive Development: Issues and Practices.

    PubMed

    Bell, Martha Ann; Cuevas, Kimberly

    2012-07-10

    Developmental research is enhanced by use of multiple methodologies for examining psychological processes. The electroencephalogram (EEG) is an efficient and relatively inexpensive method for the study of developmental changes in brain-behavior relations. In this review, we highlight some of the challenges for using EEG in cognitive development research. We also list best practices for incorporating this methodology into the study of early cognitive processes. Consideration of these issues is critical for making an informed decision regarding implementation of EEG methodology.

  4. Spatially revolved high density electroencephalography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jerry; Szu, Harold; Chen, Yuechen; Guo, Ran; Gu, Xixi

    2015-05-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) measures voltage fluctuations resulting from ionic current flows within the neurons of the brain. In practice, EEG refers to the recording of the brain's spontaneous electrical activity over a short period of time, several tens of minutes, as recorded from multiple electrodes placed on the scalp. In order to improve the resolution and the distortion cause by the hair and scalp, large array magnetoencephalography (MEG) systems are introduced. The major challenge is to systematically compare the accuracy of epileptic source localization with high electrode density to that obtained with sparser electrode setups. In this report, we demonstrate a two dimension (2D) image Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis along with utilization of Peano (space-filling) curve to further reduce the hardware requirement for high density EEG and improve the accuracy and performance of the high density EEG analysis. The brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) in this work is enhanced by A field-programmable gate array (FPGA) board with optimized two dimension (2D) image Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis.

  5. Methods for Estimating Environmental Effects and Constraints on NexGen: High Density Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustine, S.; Ermatinger, C.; Graham, M.; Thompson, T.

    2010-01-01

    This document provides a summary of the current methods developed by Metron Aviation for the estimate of environmental effects and constraints on the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). This body of work incorporates many of the key elements necessary to achieve such an estimate. Each section contains the background and motivation for the technical elements of the work, a description of the methods used, and possible next steps. The current methods described in this document were selected in an attempt to provide a good balance between accuracy and fairly rapid turn around times to best advance Joint Planning and Development Office (JPDO) System Modeling and Analysis Division (SMAD) objectives while also supporting the needs of the JPDO Environmental Working Group (EWG). In particular this document describes methods applied to support the High Density (HD) Case Study performed during the spring of 2008. A reference day (in 2006) is modeled to describe current system capabilities while the future demand is applied to multiple alternatives to analyze system performance. The major variables in the alternatives are operational/procedural capabilities for airport, terminal, and en route airspace along with projected improvements to airframe, engine and navigational equipment.

  6. Irish study of high-density Schizophrenia families: Field methods and power to detect linkage

    SciTech Connect

    Kendler, K.S.; Straub, R.E.; MacLean, C.J.

    1996-04-09

    Large samples of multiplex pedigrees will probably be needed to detect susceptibility loci for schizophrenia by linkage analysis. Standardized ascertainment of such pedigrees from culturally and ethnically homogeneous populations may improve the probability of detection and replication of linkage. The Irish Study of High-Density Schizophrenia Families (ISHDSF) was formed from standardized ascertainment of multiplex schizophrenia families in 39 psychiatric facilities covering over 90% of the population in Ireland and Northern Ireland. We here describe a phenotypic sample and a subset thereof, the linkage sample. Individuals were included in the phenotypic sample if adequate diagnostic information, based on personal interview and/or hospital record, was available. Only individuals with available DNA were included in the linkage sample. Inclusion of a pedigree into the phenotypic sample required at least two first, second, or third degree relatives with non-affective psychosis (NAP), one of whom had schizophrenia (S) or poor-outcome schizoaffective disorder (PO-SAD). Entry into the linkage sample required DNA samples on at least two individuals with NAP, of whom at least one had S or PO-SAD. Affection was defined by narrow, intermediate, and broad criteria. 75 refs., 6 tabs.

  7. Application of spectral line shapes to the study of high density ICF plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, C.J.; Hammel, B.A.; Langer, S.H.; Lee, R.W.; Calisti, A.; Godbert, L.; Stamm, R.; Talin, B.

    1994-09-01

    Spectral line broadening manifests itself in the study of high density inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plasmas in two important ways. First, comparison between measured and calculated lineshapes of individual spectral lines or groups of lines is used to diagnose plasma conditions in dense ICF plasmas, particularly in implosions. Secondly, through the emission and absorption coefficients spectral lineshapes serve as important inputs to plasma spectroscopy simulation codes which calculate simulated spectra from ICF targets. We discuss recent results from each of these areas. With regard to lineshape diagnostics, the advent of generalized line broadening codes has allowed the line profiles of complex multielectron emitters to be considered for diagnostic purposes. Particular example of this is the use of Ar He-{beta} and its associated dielectronic satellites as a diagnostic of T{sub e} and N{sub e}, as well as the development of Ne-like Xe line broadening as a density diagnostic. With respect to simulation codes, the implementation of detailed lineshapes in calculations of this type is in many ways in its infancy. We present here examples of cases where effects related to spectral lineshapes such as continuum lowering and line transfer of Stark broadened lines are important so as to provide a stimulus for future work in this field. 34 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Unisensory processing and multisensory integration in schizophrenia: a high-density electrical mapping study.

    PubMed

    Stone, David B; Urrea, Laura J; Aine, Cheryl J; Bustillo, Juan R; Clark, Vincent P; Stephen, Julia M

    2011-10-01

    In real-world settings, information from multiple sensory modalities is combined to form a complete, behaviorally salient percept - a process known as multisensory integration. While deficits in auditory and visual processing are often observed in schizophrenia, little is known about how multisensory integration is affected by the disorder. The present study examined auditory, visual, and combined audio-visual processing in schizophrenia patients using high-density electrical mapping. An ecologically relevant task was used to compare unisensory and multisensory evoked potentials from schizophrenia patients to potentials from healthy normal volunteers. Analysis of unisensory responses revealed a large decrease in the N100 component of the auditory-evoked potential, as well as early differences in the visual-evoked components in the schizophrenia group. Differences in early evoked responses to multisensory stimuli were also detected. Multisensory facilitation was assessed by comparing the sum of auditory and visual evoked responses to the audio-visual evoked response. Schizophrenia patients showed a significantly greater absolute magnitude response to audio-visual stimuli than to summed unisensory stimuli when compared to healthy volunteers, indicating significantly greater multisensory facilitation in the patient group. Behavioral responses also indicated increased facilitation from multisensory stimuli. The results represent the first report of increased multisensory facilitation in schizophrenia and suggest that, although unisensory deficits are present, compensatory mechanisms may exist under certain conditions that permit improved multisensory integration in individuals afflicted with the disorder.

  9. Inhibitory control and visuo-spatial reversibility in Piaget's seminal number conservation task: a high-density ERP study

    PubMed Central

    Borst, Grégoire; Simon, Grégory; Vidal, Julie; Houdé, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The present high-density event-related potential (ERP) study on 13 adults aimed to determine whether number conservation relies on the ability to inhibit the overlearned length-equals-number strategy and then imagine the shortening of the row that was lengthened. Participants performed the number-conservation task and, after the EEG session, the mental imagery task. In the number-conservation task, first two rows with the same number of tokens and the same length were presented on a computer screen (COV condition) and then, the tokens in one of the two rows were spread apart (INT condition). Participants were instructed to determine whether the two rows had an identical number of tokens. In the mental imagery task, two rows with different lengths but the same number of tokens were presented and participants were instructed to imagine the tokens in the longer row aligning with the tokens in the shorter row. In the number-conservation task, we found that the amplitudes of the centro-parietal N2 and fronto-central P3 were higher in the INT than in the COV conditions. In addition, the differences in response times between the two conditions were correlated with the differences in the amplitudes of the fronto-central P3. In light of previous results reported on the number-conservation task in adults, the present results suggest that inhibition might be necessary to succeed the number-conservation task in adults even when the transformation of the length of one of the row is displayed. Finally, we also reported correlations between the speed at which participants could imagine the shortening of one of the row in the mental imagery task, the speed at which participants could determine that the two rows had the same number of tokens after the tokens in one of the row were spread apart and the latency of the late positive parietal component in the number-conservation task. Therefore, performing the number-conservation task might involve mental transformation processes in

  10. Modification of EEG power spectra and EEG connectivity in autobiographical memory: a sLORETA study.

    PubMed

    Imperatori, Claudio; Brunetti, Riccardo; Farina, Benedetto; Speranza, Anna Maria; Losurdo, Anna; Testani, Elisa; Contardi, Anna; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the modifications of scalp EEG power spectra and EEG connectivity during the autobiographical memory test (AM-T) and during the retrieval of an autobiographical event (the high school final examination, Task 2). Seventeen healthy volunteers were enrolled (9 women and 8 men, mean age 23.4 ± 2.8 years, range 19-30). EEG was recorded at baseline and while performing the autobiographical memory (AM) tasks, by means of 19 surface electrodes and a nasopharyngeal electrode. EEG analysis was conducted by means of the standardized LOw Resolution Electric Tomography (sLORETA) software. Power spectra and lagged EEG coherence were compared between EEG acquired during the memory tasks and baseline recording. The frequency bands considered were as follows: delta (0.5-4 Hz); theta (4.5-7.5 Hz); alpha (8-12.5 Hz); beta1 (13-17.5 Hz); beta2 (18-30 Hz); gamma (30.5-60 Hz). During AM-T, we observed a significant delta power increase in left frontal and midline cortices (T = 3.554; p < 0.05) and increased EEG connectivity in delta band in prefrontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital areas, and for gamma bands in the left temporo-parietal regions (T = 4.154; p < 0.05). In Task 2, we measured an increased power in the gamma band located in the left posterior midline areas (T = 3.960; p < 0.05) and a significant increase in delta band connectivity in the prefrontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital areas, and in the gamma band involving right temporo-parietal areas (T = 4.579; p < 0.05). These results indicate that AM retrieval engages in a complex network which is mediated by both low- (delta) and high-frequency (gamma) EEG bands.

  11. Electroencephalograph (EEG) study of brain bistable illusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qinglei; Hong, Elliot; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2015-05-01

    Bistable illusion reflects two different kinds of interpretations for a single image, which is currently known as a competition between two groups of antagonism of neurons. Recent research indicates that these two groups of antagonism of neurons express different comprehension, while one group is emitting a pulse, the other group will be restrained. On the other hand, when this inhibition mechanism becomes weaker, the other antagonism neurons group will take over the interpretation. Since attention plays key roles controlling cognition, is highly interesting to find the location and frequency band used by brain (with either top-down or bottom-up control) to reach deterministic visual perceptions. In our study, we used a 16-channel EEG system to record brain signals from subjects while conducting bistable illusion testing. An extra channel of the EEG system was used for temporal marking. The moment when subjects reach a perception switch, they click the channel and mark the time. The recorded data were presented in form of brain electrical activity map (BEAM) with different frequency bands for analysis. It was found that the visual cortex in the on the right side between parietal and occipital areas was controlling the switching of perception. In the periods with stable perception, we can constantly observe all the delta, theta, alpha and beta waves. While the period perception is switching, almost all theta, alpha, and beta waves were suppressed by delta waves. This result suggests that delta wave may control the processing of perception switching.

  12. Elevated High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Age-Related Macular Degeneration: The Alienor Study

    PubMed Central

    Cougnard-Grégoire, Audrey; Delyfer, Marie-Noëlle; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Rougier, Marie-Bénédicte; Le Goff, Mélanie; Dartigues, Jean-François; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; Delcourt, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Background Lipid metabolism and particularly high-density lipoprotein (HDL) may be involved in the pathogenic mechanism of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, conflicting results have been reported in the associations of AMD with plasma HDL and other lipids, which may be confounded by the recently reported associations of AMD with HDL-related genes. We explored the association of AMD with plasma lipid levels and lipid-lowering medication use, taking into account most of HDL-related genes associated with AMD. Methods The Alienor study is a population-based study on age-related eye diseases performed in 963 elderly residents of Bordeaux (France). AMD was graded from non mydriatic color retinal photographs in three exclusive stages: no AMD (n = 430 subjects, 938 eyes); large soft distinct drusen and/or large soft indistinct drusen and/or reticular drusen and/or pigmentary abnormalities (early AMD, n = 176, 247); late AMD (n = 40, 61). Associations of AMD with plasma lipids (HDL, total cholesterol (TC), Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and triglycerides (TG)) were estimated using Generalized Estimating Equation logistic regressions. Statistical analyses included 646 subjects with complete data. Results After multivariate adjustment for age, sex, educational level, smoking, BMI, lipid-lowering medication use, cardiovascular disease and diabetes, and for all relevant genetic polymorphisms (ApoE2, ApoE4, CFH Y402H, ARMS2 A69S, LIPC rs10468017, LIPC rs493258, LPL rs12678919, ABCA1 rs1883025 and CETP rs3764261), higher HDL was significantly associated with an increased risk of early (OR = 2.45, 95%CI: 1.54–3.90; P = 0.0002) and any AMD (OR = 2.29, 95%CI: 1.46–3.59; P = 0.0003). Association with late AMD was far from statistical significance (OR = 1.58, 95%CI: 0.48–5.17; p = 0.45). No associations were found for any stage of AMD with TC, LDL and TG levels, statin or fibrate drug use. Conclusions This study suggests that

  13. Neonatal hemodynamic response to visual cortex activity: high-density near-infrared spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Steve M.; Gregg, Nick M.; White, Brian R.; Zeff, Benjamin W.; Bjerkaas, Katelin A.; Inder, Terrie E.; Culver, Joseph P.

    2010-03-01

    The neurodevelopmental outcome of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) infants is a major clinical concern with many infants displaying neurobehavioral deficits in childhood. Functional neuroimaging may provide early recognition of neural deficits in high-risk infants. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has the advantage of providing functional neuroimaging in infants at the bedside. However, limitations in traditional NIRS have included contamination from superficial vascular dynamics in the scalp. Furthermore, controversy exists over the nature of normal vascular, responses in infants. To address these issues, we extend the use of novel high-density NIRS arrays with multiple source-detector distances and a superficial signal regression technique to infants. Evaluations of healthy term-born infants within the first three days of life are performed without sedation using a visual stimulus. We find that the regression technique significantly improves brain activation signal quality. Furthermore, in six out of eight infants, both oxy- and total hemoglobin increases while deoxyhemoglobin decreases, suggesting that, at term, the neurovascular coupling in the visual cortex is similar to that found in healthy adults. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using high-density NIRS arrays in infants to improve signal quality through superficial signal regression, and provide a foundation for further development of high-density NIRS as a clinical tool.

  14. Using EEG to Study Cognitive Development: Issues and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Martha Ann; Cuevas, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Developmental research is enhanced by use of multiple methodologies for examining psychological processes. The electroencephalogram (EEG) is an efficient and relatively inexpensive method for the study of developmental changes in brain-behavior relations. In this review, we highlight some of the challenges for using EEG in cognitive development…

  15. Disabling conditional inferences: an EEG study.

    PubMed

    Bonnefond, Mathilde; Kaliuzhna, Mariia; Van der Henst, Jean-Baptiste; De Neys, Wim

    2014-04-01

    Although the Modus Ponens inference is one of the most basic logical rules, decades of conditional reasoning research show that it is often rejected when people consider stored background knowledge about potential disabling conditions. In the present study we used EEG to identify neural markers of this process. We presented participants with many and few disabler conditionals for which retrieval of disabling conditions was likely or unlikely. As in classic behavioral studies we observed that participants accepted the standard MP conclusion less for conditionals with many disablers. The key finding was that the presentation of the standard MP conclusion also resulted in a more pronounced N2 and less pronounced P3b for the many disabler conditionals. This specific N2/P3b pattern has been linked to the violation and satisfaction of expectations, respectively. Thereby, the present ERP findings support the idea that disabler retrieval lowers reasoners' expectations that the standard MP conclusion can be drawn.

  16. Genome-wide association studies identified novel loci for non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and its postprandial lipemic response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (NHDL) is an independent and superior predictor of CVD risk as compared to low-density lipoprotein alone. It represents a spectrum of atherogenic lipid fractions with possibly a distinct genomic signature. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) t...

  17. Novel Changes in Discoidal High Density Lipoprotein Morphology: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Catte, Andrea; Patterson, James C.; Jones, Martin K.; Jerome, W. Gray; Bashtovyy, Denys; Su, Zhengchang; Gu, Feifei; Chen, Jianguo; Aliste, Marcela P.; Harvey, Stephen C.; Li, Ling; Weinstein, Gilbert; Segrest, Jere P.

    2006-01-01

    ApoA-I is a uniquely flexible lipid-scavenging protein capable of incorporating phospholipids into stable particles. Here we report molecular dynamics simulations on a series of progressively smaller discoidal high density lipoprotein particles produced by incremental removal of palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine via four different pathways. The starting model contained 160 palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholines and a belt of two antiparallel amphipathic helical lipid-associating domains of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I. The results are particularly compelling. After a few nanoseconds of molecular dynamics simulation, independent of the starting particle and method of size reduction, all simulated double belts of the four lipidated apoA-I particles have helical domains that impressively approximate the x-ray crystal structure of lipid-free apoA-I, particularly between residues 88 and 186. These results provide atomic resolution models for two of the particles produced by in vitro reconstitution of nascent high density lipoprotein particles. These particles, measuring 95 Å and 78 Å by nondenaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, correspond in composition and in size/shape (by negative stain electron microscopy) to the simulated particles with molar ratios of 100:2 and 50:2, respectively. The lipids of the 100:2 particle family form minimal surfaces at their monolayer-monolayer interface, whereas the 50:2 particle family displays a lipid pocket capable of binding a dynamic range of phospholipid molecules. PMID:16581834

  18. Comparative EEG mapping studies in Huntington's disease patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Painold, Annamaria; Anderer, Peter; Holl, Anna K; Letmaier, Martin; Saletu-Zyhlarz, Gerda M; Saletu, Bernd; Bonelli, Raphael M

    2010-11-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder with prominent motor and cognitive decline. Previous studies with small sample sizes and methodological limitations have described abnormal electroencephalograms (EEG) in this cohort. The aim of the present study was to investigate objectively and quantitatively the neurophysiological basis of the disease in HD patients as compared to normal controls, utilizing EEG mapping. In 55 HD patients and 55 healthy controls, a 3-min vigilance-controlled EEG (V-EEG) was recorded during midmorning hours. Evaluation of 36 EEG variables was carried out by spectral analysis and visualized by EEG mapping techniques. To elucidate drug interference, the analysis was performed for the total group, unmedicated patients only and between treated and untreated patients. Statistical overall analysis by the omnibus significance test demonstrated significant (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05) EEG differences between HD patients and controls. Subsequent univariate analysis revealed a general decrease in total power and absolute alpha and beta power, an increase in delta/theta power, and a slowing of the centroids of delta/theta, beta and total power. The slowing of the EEG in HD reflects a disturbed brain function in the sense of a vigilance decrement, electrophysiologically characterized by inhibited cortical areas (increased delta/theta power) and a lack of normal routine and excitatory activity (decreased alpha and beta power). The results are similar to those found in other dementing disorders. Medication did not affect the overall interpretation of the quantitative EEG analysis, but certain differences might be due to drug interaction, predominantly with antipsychotics. Spearman rank correlations revealed significant correlations between EEG mapping and cognitive and motor impairment in HD patients.

  19. Isotopic studies of high-density interstellar graphite from the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amari, S.; Zinner, E.; Lewis, R. S.

    1994-07-01

    We continue with multielement isotopic analyses of single graphite grains from various density fractions extracted from Murchison. Previous measurements have shown that different density fractions have different isotopic ratios and trace-element contents, suggesting multiple stellar sources for interstellar graphite. One goal is to identify these stellar sources. In this work we report isotopic ratios of graphite grains from the high-density fraction KFC1 (2.15-2.20 g/cu cm, greater than 1 micron) and compare them with results on the low-density fraction KE3 (1.68-1.71 g/cu cm, greater than 3 microns). To be able to obtain multielement isotopic data, we chose larger grains. Forty-five grains were analyzed for their C and N isotopic ratios and the C and N isotopic compositions of KFC1 and KE3 are plotted. As previously observed, most grains in this fraction have isotopically light C. Only three grains have heavy N with N-14/N-15 ratios less than 250 (2 sigma) (solar ratio; 272). The others have normal N. Of 40 grains measured for their O-18/O-16 ratios, all have normal ratios within errors. This is in contrast to graphite grains from KE3, of which two-thirds have O-18 excesses that range up to 100 times solar. Since large O-18 excesses can be generated in massive stars such as Wolf Rayet stars or supernovae, the O-18 excesses in KE3 suggest that a large fraction of low-density graphite grains originate from massive stars, while the contribution from massive stars is small to negligible in the high-density fraction KFC1. This agrees with the conclusions derived from Kr isotopic ratios for these fractions. A striking difference between the density fractions can also be seen for Al-26/Al-27 ratios. The Kr isotopic ratios measured in KFC1 suggest that AGB stars of low metallicity contributed high-density graphite grains.

  20. Studies of challenge in lower hybrid current drive capability at high density regime in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, B. J.; Li, M. H.; Li, Y. C.; Wang, M.; Liu, F. K.; Shan, J. F.; Li, J. G.; Wan, B. N.; Wan

    2017-02-01

    Aiming at a fusion reactor, two issues must be solved for the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD), namely good lower hybrid wave (LHW)-plasma coupling and effective current drive at high density. For this goal, efforts have been made to improve LHW-plasma coupling and current drive capability at high density in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). LHW-plasma coupling is improved by means of local gas puffing and gas puffing from the electron side is taken as a routine way for EAST to operate with LHCD. Studies of high density experiments suggest that low recycling and high lower hybrid (LH) frequency are preferred for LHCD experiments at high density, consistent with previous results in other machines. With the combination of 2.45 GHz and 4.6 GHz LH waves, a repeatable high confinement mode plasma with maximum density up to 19~\\text{m}-3$ was obtained by LHCD in EAST. In addition, in the first stage of LHCD cyclic operation, an alternative candidate for more economical fusion reactors has been demonstrated in EAST and further work will be continued.

  1. Study on Electrodeless Electric Propulsion in High-Density Helicon Plasma with Permanent Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Takamichi; Ishii, Hiroki; Otsuka, Shuhei; Teshigahara, Naoto; Fujitsuka, Hiroaki; Waseda, Shimpei; Kuwahara, Daisuke; Shinohara, Shunjiro

    To establish electrodeless electric propulsion, we have been developing a new electrodeless plasma acceleration thruster using high-density helicon plasmas and permanent magnets, and characterizing them by, e.g., electrostatic and magnetic probes, a high-resolution spectrometer (measuring argon line intensity and line intensity ratio to derive plasma parameters), and a high-speed camera measurements (deriving radial distribution of electron density), in addition to a laser induced fluorescence (LIF) method to measure plasma flow velocity, where they are under development. Here, we will present preliminary acceleration methods using such as Rotating Magnetic Field coil and m = 0 coil along with results of various measurements mentioned above to estimate the plasma performance.

  2. Ear-EEG from generic earpieces: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Kidmose, P; Looney, D; Jochumsen, L; Mandic, D P

    2013-01-01

    The use of brain monitoring based on EEG, in natural environments and over long time periods, is hindered by the limited portability of current wearable systems, and the invasiveness of implanted systems. To that end, we introduce an ear-EEG recording device based on generic earpieces which meets key patient needs (discreet, unobstrusive, user-friendly, robust) and that is low-cost and suitable for off-the-shelf use; thus promising great advantages for healthcare applications. Its feasibility is validated in a comprehensive comparative study with our established prototype, based on a personalized earpiece, for a key EEG paradigm.

  3. Executive Dysfunction and Reward Dysregulation: A High-Density Electrical Mapping Study in Cocaine Abusers

    PubMed Central

    Morie, Kristen P.; De Sanctis, Pierfilippo; Garavan, Hugh; Foxe, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Executive function deficits and reward dysregulation, which mainly manifests as anhedonia, are well documented in drug abusers. We investigated specific aspects of executive function (inhibitory control and cognitive control), as well as anhedonia, in a cohort of current cocaine abusers in order to ascertain to what extent these factors are associated with more severe drug dependence. Participants filled out questionnaires relating to anhedonia and their addiction history. Participants also performed a response inhibition task while high-density event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. Electrophysiological responses to successful inhibitions (N2/P3 components) and to commission errors (ERN/Pe components) were compared between 23 current users of cocaine and 27 non-using controls. A regression model was performed to determine the association of our measures of reward dysregulation and executive function with addiction severity. As expected, cocaine users performed more poorly than controls on the inhibitory control task and showed significant electrophysiological differences. They were also generally more anhedonic than controls. Higher levels of anhedonia were associated with more severe substance use, whereas the level of executive dysfunction was not associated with more severe substance use. However, N2 amplitude was associated with duration of drug use. Further, inhibitory control and anhedonia were correlated, but only in controls. These data suggest that while executive dysfunction characterizes drug abuse, it is anhedonia, independent of executive dysfunction, that is most strongly associated with more severe use. PMID:24911989

  4. Altered response-preparation in patients with adult ADHD: A high-density ERP study.

    PubMed

    Kakuszi, Brigitta; Tombor, László; Papp, Szilvia; Bitter, István; Czobor, Pál

    2016-03-30

    Aberrations in early-developing bottom-up processes, such as stimulus-driven response preparation, are thought to play a critical role in the onset of ADHD, and in its persistence over time. Electrophysiology offers a unique tool to gain insight into response preparation, since response preparation has been associated with distinctive ERP changes, including negative potential-shifts which occur predominantly over frontal brain areas. We examined response-preceding negative potential shifts (RPNS) as a probe of response-preparation in adult ADHD patients by obtaining high-density event-related potentials from 33 ADHD and 29 matched healthy subjects during a Go/Nogo task using a 128-channel BioSemi recording-system. Compared to controls, ADHD patients showed enhancement of the RPNS in fronto-central brain regions in the Go condition during correct responses. This change was associated with poor performance in the Stroop incongruency-task: the greater the enhancement, the higher the proportion of errors. Moreover, the ERP-enhancement showed association with the severity of ADHD-symptoms; and with heightened response-variability. Thus, ADHD patients demonstrate neurophysiological alterations in response-preparation and response-preceding brain activity, suggestive of excessive activation of prefrontal neural circuits. Given the correlation with neuropsychological and psychopathological measures, these changes may constitute a pathway for core symptoms of ADHD, including premature and impaired response-preparation and motor-hyperactivity.

  5. Plasma detachment study of high density helium plasmas in the Pilot-PSI device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Y.; Ješko, K.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Vernimmen, J. W. M.; Morgan, T. W.; Ohno, N.; Kajita, S.; Yoshikawa, M.; Masuzaki, S.

    2016-12-01

    We have investigated plasma detachment phenomena of high-density helium plasmas in the linear plasma device Pilot-PSI, which can realize a relevant ITER SOL/Divertor plasma condition. The experiment clearly indicated plasma detachment features such as drops in the plasma pressure and particle flux along the magnetic field lines that were observed under the condition of high neutral pressure; a feature of flux drop was parameterized using the degree of detachment (DOD) index. Fundamental plasma parameters such as electron temperature (T e) and electron density in the detached recombining plasmas were measured by different methods: reciprocating electrostatic probes, Thomson scattering (TS), and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The T e measured using single and double probes corresponded to the TS measurement. No anomalies in the single probe I-V characteristics, observed in other linear plasma devices [16, 17, 36], appeared under the present condition in the Pilot-PSI device. A possible reason for this difference is discussed by comparing the different linear devices. The OES results are also compared with the simulation results of a collisional radiative (CR) model. Further, we demonstrated more than 90% of parallel particle and heat fluxes were dissipated in a short length of 0.5 m under the high neutral pressure condition in Pilot-PSI.

  6. The neurophysiology of human biological motion processing: a high-density electrical mapping study.

    PubMed

    Krakowski, Aaron I; Ross, Lars A; Snyder, Adam C; Sehatpour, Pejman; Kelly, Simon P; Foxe, John J

    2011-05-01

    The neural processing of biological motion (BM) is of profound experimental interest since it is often through the movement of another that we interpret their immediate intentions. Neuroimaging points to a specialized cortical network for processing biological motion. Here, high-density electrical mapping and source-analysis techniques were employed to interrogate the timing of information processing across this network. Participants viewed point-light-displays depicting standard body movements (e.g. jumping), while event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded and compared to ERPs to scrambled motion control stimuli. In a pair of experiments, three major phases of BM-specific processing were identified: 1) The earliest phase of BM-sensitive modulation was characterized by a positive shift of the ERP between 100 and 200 ms after stimulus onset. This modulation was observed exclusively over the right hemisphere and source-analysis suggested a likely generator in close proximity to regions associated with general motion processing (KO/hMT). 2) The second phase of BM-sensitivity occurred from 200 to 350 ms, characterized by a robust negative-going ERP modulation over posterior middle temporal regions bilaterally. Source-analysis pointed to bilateral generators at or near the posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS). 3) A third phase of processing was evident only in our second experiment, where participants actively attended the BM aspect of the stimuli, and was manifest as a centro-parietal positive ERP deflection, likely related to later cognitive processes. These results point to very early sensory registration of biological motion, and highlight the interactive role of the posterior STS in analyzing the movements of other living organisms.

  7. The default mode network and EEG regional spectral power: a simultaneous fMRI-EEG study.

    PubMed

    Neuner, Irene; Arrubla, Jorge; Werner, Cornelius J; Hitz, Konrad; Boers, Frank; Kawohl, Wolfram; Shah, N Jon

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) frequencies have been linked to specific functions as an "electrophysiological signature" of a function. A combination of oscillatory rhythms has also been described for specific functions, with or without predominance of one specific frequency-band. In a simultaneous fMRI-EEG study at 3 T we studied the relationship between the default mode network (DMN) and the power of EEG frequency bands. As a methodological approach, we applied Multivariate Exploratory Linear Optimized Decomposition into Independent Components (MELODIC) and dual regression analysis for fMRI resting state data. EEG power for the alpha, beta, delta and theta-bands were extracted from the structures forming the DMN in a region-of-interest approach by applying Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA). A strong link between the spontaneous BOLD response of the left parahippocampal gyrus and the delta-band extracted from the anterior cingulate cortex was found. A positive correlation between the beta-1 frequency power extracted from the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and the spontaneous BOLD response of the right supplementary motor cortex was also established. The beta-2 frequency power extracted from the PCC and the precuneus showed a positive correlation with the BOLD response of the right frontal cortex. Our results support the notion of beta-band activity governing the "status quo" in cognitive and motor setup. The highly significant correlation found between the delta power within the DMN and the parahippocampal gyrus is in line with the association of delta frequencies with memory processes. We assumed "ongoing activity" during "resting state" in bringing events from the past to the mind, in which the parahippocampal gyrus is a relevant structure. Our data demonstrate that spontaneous BOLD fluctuations within the DMN are associated with different EEG-bands and strengthen the conclusion that this network is characterized by a specific

  8. The Default Mode Network and EEG Regional Spectral Power: A Simultaneous fMRI-EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Cornelius J.; Hitz, Konrad; Boers, Frank; Kawohl, Wolfram; Shah, N. Jon

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) frequencies have been linked to specific functions as an “electrophysiological signature” of a function. A combination of oscillatory rhythms has also been described for specific functions, with or without predominance of one specific frequency-band. In a simultaneous fMRI-EEG study at 3 T we studied the relationship between the default mode network (DMN) and the power of EEG frequency bands. As a methodological approach, we applied Multivariate Exploratory Linear Optimized Decomposition into Independent Components (MELODIC) and dual regression analysis for fMRI resting state data. EEG power for the alpha, beta, delta and theta-bands were extracted from the structures forming the DMN in a region-of-interest approach by applying Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA). A strong link between the spontaneous BOLD response of the left parahippocampal gyrus and the delta-band extracted from the anterior cingulate cortex was found. A positive correlation between the beta-1 frequency power extracted from the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and the spontaneous BOLD response of the right supplementary motor cortex was also established. The beta-2 frequency power extracted from the PCC and the precuneus showed a positive correlation with the BOLD response of the right frontal cortex. Our results support the notion of beta-band activity governing the “status quo” in cognitive and motor setup. The highly significant correlation found between the delta power within the DMN and the parahippocampal gyrus is in line with the association of delta frequencies with memory processes. We assumed “ongoing activity” during “resting state” in bringing events from the past to the mind, in which the parahippocampal gyrus is a relevant structure. Our data demonstrate that spontaneous BOLD fluctuations within the DMN are associated with different EEG-bands and strengthen the conclusion that this network is characterized by a specific

  9. Riboflavin crosslinked high-density collagen gel for the repair of annular defects in intervertebral discs: An in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Grunert, Peter; Borde, Brandon H; Towne, Sara B; Moriguchi, Yu; Hudson, Katherine D; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Härtl, Roger

    2015-10-01

    Open annular defects compromise the ability of the annulus fibrosus to contain nuclear tissue in the disc space, and therefore lead to disc herniation with subsequent degenerative changes to the entire intervertebral disc. This study reports the use of riboflavin crosslinked high-density collagen gel for the repair of annular defects in a needle-punctured rat-tail model. High-density collagen has increased stiffness and greater hydraulic permeability than conventional low-density gels; riboflavin crosslinking further increases these properties. This study found that treating annular defects with crosslinked high-density collagen inhibited the progression of disc degeneration over 18 weeks compared to untreated control discs. Histological sections of FITC-labeled collagen gel revealed an early tight attachment to host annular tissue. The gel was subsequently infiltrated by host fibroblasts which remodeled it into a fibrous cap that bridged the outer disrupted annular fibers and partially repaired the defect. This repair tissue enhanced retention of nucleus pulposus tissue, maintained physiological disc hydration, and preserved hydraulic permeability, according to MRI, histological, and mechanical assessments. Degenerative changes were partially reversed in treated discs, as indicated by an increase in nucleus pulposus size and hydration between weeks 5 and 18. The collagen gel appeared to work as an instant sealant and by enhancing the intrinsic healing capabilities of the host tissue.

  10. Individualising EEG frequency bands for sleep deprivation studies.

    PubMed

    Henelius, Andreas; Korpela, Jussi; Huotilainen, Minna

    2011-01-01

    A method for determining individualised frequency bands from electroencephalographic (EEG) power spectral density (PSD) plots is presented. EEG was collected during the performance of a computerised multitask test from 21 healthy male subjects, of which an experimental group of 14 subjects underwent sleep deprivation and 7 subjects formed the control group. EEG PSD plots were compared between the groups and were used to determine individual theta, alpha and beta bands for the subjects by studying the points of intersection between the individual subjects' normalised spectra and the normalised average spectrum of the control group. The results show that the frontal and occipital locations are best suited for the determination of individualised frequency bands. The proposed method can be used to enhance EEG spectral analysis of task-induced cognitive effort during sleep deprivation.

  11. The chronoarchitecture of human sexual desire: a high-density electrical mapping study.

    PubMed

    Ortigue, Stephanie; Bianchi-Demicheli, Francesco

    2008-11-01

    Recent neuroimaging research suggests that human sexual desire (SD) recruits both the limbic system and higher-order cognitive brain areas. Because of the temporal limitation of this technique, the chronoarchitecture of SD remains however unresolved. Here, we investigated the spatio-temporal dynamics of SD by combining a behavioral desire decision task with high-density visual event-related potential (VEP) recordings and brain source estimations. VEPs were recorded from thirteen healthy participants when presented with pictures from two different stimulus categories (i.e., high and low desirability). In agreement with the literature, behavioral results showed that participants were faster to rate non-desired stimuli than desired stimuli (p=0.028). Electrophysiological results extended these behavioral data. Group-averaged VEPs peaked at 90 to 140 ms (P100), at 142 to 220 ms (N200), and at 222 to 360 ms (P300). Desired stimuli (DS) were distinguished from non-desired stimuli (NDS) over the N200 period, notably from 142 to 187 ms. Over this time period, DS processing was characterized by a significant scalp potential field. Although both conditions (DS and NDS) showed the recruitment of the occipito-temporal region (including the extrastriate body area, EBA), LAURA source estimation of the DS scalp potential field revealed a more right-lateralized current source density maximum in the posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS) extending to the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ). The recruitment of STS and TPJ for desired stimuli indicates that these brain areas, known to be respectively involved in social cognition, attention, integration of body-related information and self-processing, play a crucial role for the coding of desirability of visual sexual human stimuli within the first 200 ms after stimulus onset. These findings support the hypothesis that complex cognitive processing for desire occurs much faster than previously thought and open new perspectives with

  12. On the "dependence" of "independent" group EEG sources; an EEG study on two large databases.

    PubMed

    Congedo, Marco; John, Roy E; De Ridder, Dirk; Prichep, Leslie; Isenhart, Robert

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this work is to study the coherence profile (dependence) of robust eyes-closed resting EEG sources isolated by group blind source separation (gBSS). We employ a test-retest strategy using two large sample normative databases (N = 57 and 84). Using a BSS method in the complex Fourier domain, we show that we can rigourously study the out-of-phase dependence of the extracted components, albeit they are extracted so as to be in-phase independent (by BSS definition). Our focus on lagged communication between components effectively yields dependence measures unbiased by volume conduction effects, which is a major concern about the validity of any dependence measures issued by EEG measurements. We are able to show the organization of the extracted components in two networks. Within each network components oscillate coherently with multiple-frequency dynamics, whereas between networks they exchange information at non-random multiple time-lag rates.

  13. Thermal and optical excitation of trapped electrons in high-density polyethylene (HDPE) studied through positron annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahid, F.; Zhang, J. D.; Yu, T. F.; Ling, C. C.; Fung, S.; Beling, C. D.

    2011-04-01

    Positronium (Ps) formation in high-density polyethylene (HDPE) has been studied below the glass transition temperature. The formation probability increases with positron irradiation time due to an increasing number of inter-track trapped electrons becoming available for positron capture. The temperature variation of the saturated Ps level is discussed in different models. The quenching of trapped electrons by light has been studied and the optical de-trapping cross-section for different photon energies has been estimated over the visible region.

  14. The use of standardized infinity reference in EEG coherency studies.

    PubMed

    Marzetti, L; Nolte, G; Perrucci, M G; Romani, G L; Del Gratta, C

    2007-05-15

    The study of large scale interactions in the brain from EEG signals is a promising method for the identification of functional networks. However, the validity of a large scale parameter is limited by two factors: the use of a non-neutral reference and the artifactual self-interactions between the measured EEG signals introduced by volume conduction. In this paper, we propose an approach to study large scale EEG coherency in which these factors are eliminated. Artifactual self-interaction by volume conduction is eliminated by using the imaginary part of the complex coherency as a measure of interaction and the Reference Electrode Standardization Technique (REST) is used for the approximate standardization of the reference of scalp EEG recordings to a point at infinity that, being far from all possible neural sources, acts like a neutral virtual reference. The application of our approach to simulated and real EEG data shows that the detection of interaction, as opposed to artifacts due to reference and volume conduction, is a goal that can be achieved from the study of a large scale parameter.

  15. Study of short haul high-density V/STOL transportation systems. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, H. L.

    1972-01-01

    Essential supporting data to the short haul transportation study are presented. The specific appendices are arena characteristics, aerospace transportation analysis computer program, economics, model calibration, STOLport siting and services path selection, STOL schedule definition, tabulated California corridor results, and tabulated Midwest arena results.

  16. The Horsehead Nebula: a template for extragalactic high density tracers studies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratier, P.; Pety, J.; Gerin, M.; Montillaud, J.; Guzman, V.; Goicoechea, J. R.

    2011-05-01

    The Horsehead Nebula, thanks to its proximity (1'' = 0.002 pc) and simple geometry is a perfect benchmark case to study the interplay between structure and chemistry in PDRs (Photon Dominated Regions). Our past studies of many tracers enabled us to obtain a clear picture of the density and temperature structure of the region. The presence of a steep density gradient (from less than 10^3 cm-3 to 10^5 cm-3 in less than 10'' = 0.02 pc) allows to probe different environments, from far-UV photon-dominated regions to shielded cold gas, in less than 50''. With the increased sensitivity available, extragalactic observations of gas tracers other than CO such as HCN, HNC, HCO^+ become more common. These observations are used in the extragalactic context to probe the density of the interstellar medium, to identify the heating mechanisms : FUV photons --- related to starburst phenomena, whose interaction with the ISM can be understood using PDR models ) or X rays --- related to AGN, using XDR models ---, and to probe star formation using specific molecular lines as tracers of embedded star forming regions. Nevertheless these observations are of low linear resolution and the details of the physics and chemistry of the interstellar medium are smeared by averaging over different environments. We will study how the understanding of these tracers in well known Galactic environments, such as the Horsehead PDR, can help the interpretation of extragalactic observations. We present high resolution multiline observations of HCN, HNC, CN and HCO^+ by the IRAM PdBI and 30m telescope instruments. We study the emission line ratios of these different molecules with the objective of comparing these high resolution observations of a well characterized Galactic region to extragalactic observations of the same tracers. Among the questions raised are : What is the importance of hyperfine anomalies in understanding the HCN and HNC observations? Can HCN be used as a tracer of star formation at

  17. Monoclonal antibodies to human apolipoproteins: application to the study of high density lipoprotein subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Bustos, P; Ulloa, N; Calvo, C; Muller, D; Durán, D; Martínez, J; Salazar, L; Quiroga, A

    2000-09-01

    We produced, selected and cloned hybridomas that secrete monoclonal antibodies against human apolipoprotein (apo) A-I. All of the antibodies corresponded to the IgG(1) subclass and were named 1C11, 2B4, 2C10, 7C5, 8A4 and 8A5. The antibodies were characterized by their reactivity with whole lipoproteins, apolipoproteins, synthetic peptides and fragments generated by cleavage of the apo A-I. Three of the monoclonal antibodies studied (2B4, 2C10 and 7C5) were similarly inhibited by an amino-terminal peptide (amino acid sequence 1-20) of apo A-I, whereas antibodies 1C11, 8A4 and 8A5 had no reaction. Other results show that monoclonal antibody 1C11 recognizes an epitope located between amino acids 135-148. We evaluated the monoclonal antibody 8A4 against different HDL subpopulations by competitive displacement analysis and it showed a similar reactivity with the HDL particles: LpA-I and LpA-I:A-II. This antibody was used to standardize a sandwich ELISA to quantitate LpA-I in plasma. We conclude that these monoclonal antibodies are relevant for the study of apo A-I epitope expression and for quantitating apo A-I containing lipoparticles.

  18. Photo- and biophysical studies of lectin-conjugated fluorescent nanoparticles: reduced sensitivity in high density assays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaqi; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C; Basu, Amit; Zimmt, Matthew B

    2010-11-18

    Lectin-conjugated, fluorescent silica nanoparticles (fNP) have been developed for carbohydrate-based histopathology evaluations of epithelial tissue biopsies. The fNP platform was selected for its enhanced emissive brightness compared to direct dye labeling. Carbohydrate microarray studies were performed to compare the carbohydrate selectivity of the mannose-recognizing lectin Concanavalin A (ConA) before and after conjugation to fluorescent silica nanoparticles (ConA-fNP). These studies revealed surprisingly low emission intensities upon staining with ConA-fNP compared to those with biotin-ConA/Cy3-streptavidin staining. A series of photophysical and biophysical characterizations of the fNP and ConA-fNP conjugates were performed to probe the low sensitivity from fNP in the microarray assays. Up to 1200 fluorescein (FL) and 80 tetramethylrhodamine (TR) dye molecules were incorporated into 46 nm diameter fNP, yielding emissive brightness values 400 and 35 times larger than the individual dye molecules, respectively. ConA lectin conjugated to carboxylic acid surface-modified nanoparticles covers 15-30% of the fNP surface. The CD spectra and mannose substrate selectivity of ConA conjugated to the fNP differed slightly compared to that of soluble ConA. Although, the high emissive brightness of fNP enhances detection sensitivity for samples with low analyte densities, large fNP diameters limit fNP recruitment and binding to samples with high analyte densities. The high analyte density and nearly two-dimensional target format of carbohydrate microarrays make probe size a critical parameter. In this application, fNP labels afford minimal sensitivity advantage compared to direct dye labeling.

  19. Study of high density Escherichia coli fermentation for production of porcine somatotropin protein.

    PubMed

    Chang, L L; Hwang, L Y; Hwang, C F; Mou, D G

    1991-12-27

    Recombinant E. coli strains and culture conditions were studied for the fermentation expression of porcine somatotropin (PST) inclusion bodies under the control of a pL promoter. Our objective was to achieve high cell density together with a high level of recombinant protein expression. Improved fermentation conditions included oxygen enrichment, yeast extract (YE) effect, optimal specific growth to switch on gene expression, and feeding strategies. To maintain a low residual glucose concentration, a medium feed rate was controlled on a real-time basis by using cell density information estimated from on-line carbon dioxide monitoring of a fermentor's exhaust gas. The optimal specific growth rate required to initiate a temperature shift in our system was found to be around 0.2 hr-1. The cell density and PST expression level could reach 55 OD600 and 35%, respectively, after 16 hours of cultivation under optimal conditions by applying computer-controlled nutrient feed. In our recombinant host/vector system, the location of cl gene appears to affect gene expression under YE-supplemented and/or a high cell density culture condition. With cl gene placed on plasmid, our E. coli host no longer showed sensitivity toward YE in PST gene expression.

  20. Flow Regime Study in a High Density Circulating Fluidized Bed Riser with an Abrupt Exit

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, J.S.; Shadle, L.J.; Yue, P.C.; Monazam, E.R.

    2007-01-01

    Flow regime study was conducted in a 0.3 m diameter, 15.5 m height circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser with an abrupt exit at the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy. Local particle velocities were measured at various radial positions and riser heights using an optical fiber probe. On-line measurement of solid circulating rate was continuously recorded by the Spiral. Glass beads of mean diameter 61 μm and particle density of 2,500 kg/m3 were used as bed material. The CFB riser was operated at various superficial gas velocities ranging from 3 to 7.6 m/s and solid mass flux from 20 to 550 kg/m2-s. At a constant riser gas velocity, transition from fast fluidization to dense suspension upflow (DSU) regime started at the bottom of the riser with increasing solid flux. Except at comparatively low riser gas velocity and solid flux, the apparent solid holdup at the top exit region was higher than the middle section of the riser. The solid fraction at this top region could be much higher than 7% under high riser gas velocity and solid mass flux. The local particle velocity showed downward flow near the wall at the top of the riser due to its abrupt exit. This abrupt geometry reflected the solids and, therefore, caused solid particles traveling downward along the wall. However, at location below, but near, the top of the riser the local particle velocities were observed flowing upward at the wall. Therefore, DSU was identified in the upper region of the riser with an abrupt exit while the fully developed region, lower in the riser, was still exhibiting core-annular flow structure. Our data were compared with the flow regime boundaries proposed by Kim et al. [1] for distinguishing the dilute pneumatic transport, fast fluidization, and DSU.

  1. 'Time-shrinking perception' in the visual system: a psychophysical and high-density ERP study.

    PubMed

    Nagaike, Atsushi; Mitsudo, Takako; Nakajima, Yoshitaka; Ogata, Katsuya; Yamasaki, Takao; Goto, Yoshinobu; Tobimatsu, Shozo

    2016-11-01

    'Time-shrinking perception (TSP)' is a unique perceptual phenomenon in which the duration of two successive intervals (T1 and T2) marked by three auditory stimuli is perceived as equal even when they are physically different. This phenomenon provides a link between time and working memory; however, previous studies have mainly been performed on the auditory modality but not the visual modality. To clarify the neural mechanism of visual TSP, we performed a psychophysical experiment and recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) under different T1/T2 combinations. Three successive black/white sinusoidal gratings (30 ms duration) were presented to the participants. In the psychophysical experiment, either T1 or T2 was varied from 240 to 560 ms in 40-ms steps, while T2 or T1 was fixed at 400 ms. Participants judged whether T1 and T2 were equal or not by pressing a button. ERPs were recorded from 128 scalp electrodes, while T1 was varied from 240, 320, and 400 ms with the 400 ms T2 duration, and vice versa. Behavioral data showed asymmetrical assimilation: When -80 ms ≤ (T1 - T2) ≤ +120 ms, TSP was observed in the T1-varied condition. When -120 ms ≤ (T1 - T2) ≤ +80 ms, it was also observed in the T2-varied condition. These asymmetric time ranges in vision were different from those in the auditory modality. ERP data showed that contingent negative variation (CNV) appeared in the fronto-central region at around 300-500 ms during T2 presentation in the T1 < T2 condition. In the /240/400/ pattern, the CNV amplitude was decreased at around 350 ms. In contrast, P3 appeared at the parietal region about 450-650 ms after T2 in the T1 > T2 condition. In the /400/240/ pattern, P3 amplitude was greater than those of other temporal patterns. These neural responses corresponded to participants' perception that T1 and T2 were not equal. The neural responses in the fronto-central region were involved with endogenous temporal attention for

  2. Study of composite thin films for applications in high density data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hua

    Granular Co-alloy + oxide thin films are currently used as the magnetic recording layer of perpendicular media in hard disk drives. The microstructure of these films is composed mainly of fine (7--10 nm) magnetic grains physically surrounded by oxide phases, which produce magnetic isolation of the grains. As a result, the magnetic switching volume is maintained as small as the physical grain size. Consequently, ample number of magnetic switching units can be obtained in one recording bit, in other words, higher signal to noise ratios (SNR) can be achieved. Therefore, a good understanding and control of the microstructure of the films is very important for high areal density magnetic recording media. Interlayers and seedlayers play important roles in controlling the microstructure in terms of grain size, grain size distribution, oxide segregation and orientation dispersion of the crystallographic texture. Developing novel interlayers or seedlayers with smaller grain size is a key approach to produce smaller grain size in the recording layer. This study focuses on how to achieve smaller grain sizes in the recording layer through novel interlayer/seedlayer materials and processes. It also discusses the resulting microstructure in smaller-grain-size thin films. Metal + oxide (e.g. Ru + SiO2) composite thin films were chosen as interlayer and seedlayer materials due to their unique segregated microstructure. Such layers can be grown epitaxially on top of fcc metal seedlayers with good orientation. It can also provide an epitaxial growth template for the subsequent magnetic layer (recording layer). The metal and oxide phases in the composite thin films are immiscible. The final microstructure of the interlayer depends on factors, such as, sputtering pressure, oxide species, oxide volume fraction, thickness, alloy composition, temperature etc. Moreover, it has been found that the microstructure of the composite thin films is affected mostly by two important factors

  3. Epileptic EEG: a comprehensive study of nonlinear behavior.

    PubMed

    Daneshyari, Moayed; Kamkar, L Lily; Daneshyari, Matin

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the nonlinear properties of the electroencephalograph (EEG) signals are investigated by comparing two sets of EEG, one set for epileptic and another set for healthy brain activities. Adopting measures of nonlinear theory such as Lyapunov exponent, correlation dimension, Hurst exponent, fractal dimension, and Kolmogorov entropy, the chaotic behavior of these two sets is quantitatively computed. The statistics for the two groups of all measures demonstrate the differences between the normal healthy group and epileptic one. The statistical results along with phase-space diagram verify that brain under epileptic seizures possess limited trajectory in the state space than in healthy normal state, consequently behaves less chaotically compared to normal condition.

  4. High-density polyethylene facial implants show surface oxidation in SEM and EDX examination: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Draenert, G F; Doeblinger, M; Draenert, M; Gosau, M

    2009-05-01

    Previous histopathological studies on explanted Medpor high-density polyethylene (HDPE) facial implants indicated signs of material destruction and claimed to observe phagocytized HDPE particles within the tissue samples beside the usual type IV reaction with severe fibrosis. We examined new and explanted Medpor material with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The implant surface of three patient-derived specimens showed significantly higher oxygenation in EDX analysis and morphological changes in SEM compared to the new unused material directly after opening of the package and after 1 year of exposure to air. Our preliminary findings indicate a possible oxidative biocorrosion in HDPE surgical implants. Further studies should confirm these pilot project results.

  5. Relationship between Job Stress and Hypo-high-density Lipoproteinemia of Chinese Workers in Shanghai: The Rosai Karoshi Study

    PubMed Central

    Muratsubaki, Tomohiko; Hattori, Tomomi; Li, Jue; Fukudo, Shin; Munakata, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Background: Karoshi, or death due to overwork, has now become a serious social problem in China. Worsening of cardiovascular risks by stress might initiate karoshi. Many studies have examined the relationship between job stress and obesity, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes mellitus, but less evidence exists for dyslipidemia like hypo-high-density lipoproteinemia (hypo-HDL). The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between job stress and hypo-HDL of Chinese workers in Shanghai. Methods: We studied 2219 Chinese workers in Shanghai, who participated in the Japan-China cooperative study for the prevention of karoshi. A questionnaire was administered to examine the lifestyle characteristics, job category, weekly working hours, and job stress. Job demand and job control were quantified using the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health questionnaire. Modified job strain measure was defined by the combination of low job control and high demand. Hypo-HDL was defined as plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration of <1.04 mmol/L (40 mg/dl). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed for hypo-HDL as a dependent variable. Results: Modified job strain was not related to hypo-HDL either in men or women. In men, multivariate adjusted odds ratio (OR) for having hypo-HDL was significantly higher in the lowest job control tertile compared with the highest job control tertile (OR = 1.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03–1.87, P = 0.034). In the same model, a similar trend was observed for women, but it did not reach a statistically significant level (OR = 1.51, 95% CI, 0.88–2.56, P = 0.132). Conclusion: A low level of job control but not modified job strain was significantly related to higher prevalence of hypo-HDL of Chinese workers in Shanghai. PMID:27748331

  6. Influence of total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides on risk of cerebrovascular disease: the Copenhagen City Heart Study.

    PubMed Central

    Lindenstrøm, E.; Boysen, G.; Nyboe, J.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To estimate the influence of plasma total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides on risk of cerebrovascular disease. DESIGN--The Copenhagen City Heart Study is a prospective observational survey with two cardiovascular examinations at five year intervals. Non-fasting plasma lipids were measured in participants once at each examination, along with other variables. The Cox regression model was used to establish the effect of the factors recorded on cerebrovascular events of mostly, but not exclusively, ischaemic origin. SUBJECTS--19,698 women and men at least 20 years old, randomly selected after age stratification from an area of central Copenhagen. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Initial cases of stroke and transient ischaemic attack recorded from hospital records and death certificates from 1976 through 1988. RESULTS--660 non-haemorrhagic and 33 haemorrhagic events were recorded. Total cholesterol was positively associated with risk of non-haemorrhagic events, but only for levels > 8 mmol/l, corresponding to the upper 5% of the distribution in the study population. For lower plasma cholesterol values the relative risk remained nearly constant. Plasma triglyceride concentration was significantly, positively associated with risk of non-haemorrhagic events. The relative risk corresponding to an increase of 1 mmol/l was 1.12 (95% confidence interval 1.07 to 1.16). There was a negative, log linear association between high density lipoprotein cholesterol and risk of non-haemorrhagic events (0.53 (0.34 to 0.83)). There was no indication that the effects of plasma lipids were different in women and men. CONCLUSIONS--The pattern of the association between plasma cholesterol and risk of ischaemic cerebrovascular disease was not log linear, and the increased risk was confined to the upper 5% of the cholesterol distribution. Further studies should concentrate on the association between plasma cholesterol and verified haemorrhagic stroke. PMID

  7. [Correlation between EEG and neuroimaging].

    PubMed

    Tobimatsu, Shozo

    2012-01-01

    The present state of knowledge of physiological mechanisms underlying nonepileptiform EEG abnormalities is reviewed to clarify the correlation between EEG and neuroimaging. Focal and widespread slow waves, background abnormalities, and bursts of rhythmic slow activity are discussed. EEG phenomena were correlated with lesion size, location, type (white matter vs. gray matter, high density vs. low density), and mass effect. Clinical and experimental accumulated over the past five decades suggest that polymorphic slow activity is generated in cerebral cortex by layers of pyramidal cells and is probably due to partial deafferentation from subcortical areas. Unilateral background activity changes are probably thalamic dysfunction, and bilateral paroxysmal slow activity is due to abnormal thalamocortical circuits combined with cortical pathology. Paroxysmal discharges indicate the presence of epilepsy with possible brain lesion(s). The EEG is a functional test and provides us complementary information to neuroimaging studies.

  8. Epileptic networks studied with EEG-fMRI.

    PubMed

    Gotman, Jean

    2008-01-01

    It is not easy to determine the location of the cerebral generators and the other brain regions that may be involved at the time of an epileptic spike seen in the scalp EEG. The possibility to combine EEG recording with functional MRI scanning (fMRI) opens the opportunity to uncover the regions of the brain showing changes in metabolism and blood flow in response to epileptic spikes seen in the EEG. These regions are presumably involved in the abnormal neuronal activity at the origin of epileptic discharges. This paper reviews the methodology involved in performing such studies, including the special techniques required for recording the EEG inside the scanner and the statistical issues in analyzing the fMRI signal. We then discuss the results obtained in patients with different types of focal epileptic disorders and in patients with primary generalized epilepsy. The results in general indicate that interictal epileptic discharges may affect brain areas well beyond the presumed region in which they are generated. The noninvasive nature of this method opens new horizons in the investigation of brain regions involved and affected by epileptic discharges.

  9. Building an EEG-fMRI Multi-Modal Brain Graph: A Concurrent EEG-fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qingbao; Wu, Lei; Bridwell, David A.; Erhardt, Erik B.; Du, Yuhui; He, Hao; Chen, Jiayu; Liu, Peng; Sui, Jing; Pearlson, Godfrey; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2016-01-01

    The topological architecture of brain connectivity has been well-characterized by graph theory based analysis. However, previous studies have primarily built brain graphs based on a single modality of brain imaging data. Here we develop a framework to construct multi-modal brain graphs using concurrent EEG-fMRI data which are simultaneously collected during eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) resting states. FMRI data are decomposed into independent components with associated time courses by group independent component analysis (ICA). EEG time series are segmented, and then spectral power time courses are computed and averaged within 5 frequency bands (delta; theta; alpha; beta; low gamma). EEG-fMRI brain graphs, with EEG electrodes and fMRI brain components serving as nodes, are built by computing correlations within and between fMRI ICA time courses and EEG spectral power time courses. Dynamic EEG-fMRI graphs are built using a sliding window method, versus static ones treating the entire time course as stationary. In global level, static graph measures and properties of dynamic graph measures are different across frequency bands and are mainly showing higher values in eyes closed than eyes open. Nodal level graph measures of a few brain components are also showing higher values during eyes closed in specific frequency bands. Overall, these findings incorporate fMRI spatial localization and EEG frequency information which could not be obtained by examining only one modality. This work provides a new approach to examine EEG-fMRI associations within a graph theoretic framework with potential application to many topics. PMID:27733821

  10. Building an EEG-fMRI Multi-Modal Brain Graph: A Concurrent EEG-fMRI Study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qingbao; Wu, Lei; Bridwell, David A; Erhardt, Erik B; Du, Yuhui; He, Hao; Chen, Jiayu; Liu, Peng; Sui, Jing; Pearlson, Godfrey; Calhoun, Vince D

    2016-01-01

    The topological architecture of brain connectivity has been well-characterized by graph theory based analysis. However, previous studies have primarily built brain graphs based on a single modality of brain imaging data. Here we develop a framework to construct multi-modal brain graphs using concurrent EEG-fMRI data which are simultaneously collected during eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) resting states. FMRI data are decomposed into independent components with associated time courses by group independent component analysis (ICA). EEG time series are segmented, and then spectral power time courses are computed and averaged within 5 frequency bands (delta; theta; alpha; beta; low gamma). EEG-fMRI brain graphs, with EEG electrodes and fMRI brain components serving as nodes, are built by computing correlations within and between fMRI ICA time courses and EEG spectral power time courses. Dynamic EEG-fMRI graphs are built using a sliding window method, versus static ones treating the entire time course as stationary. In global level, static graph measures and properties of dynamic graph measures are different across frequency bands and are mainly showing higher values in eyes closed than eyes open. Nodal level graph measures of a few brain components are also showing higher values during eyes closed in specific frequency bands. Overall, these findings incorporate fMRI spatial localization and EEG frequency information which could not be obtained by examining only one modality. This work provides a new approach to examine EEG-fMRI associations within a graph theoretic framework with potential application to many topics.

  11. Pharmaco-EEG Studies in Animals: A History-Based Introduction to Contemporary Translational Applications.

    PubMed

    Drinkenburg, Wilhelmus H I M; Ahnaou, Abdallah; Ruigt, Gé S F

    2015-01-01

    Current research on the effects of pharmacological agents on human neurophysiology finds its roots in animal research, which is also reflected in contemporary animal pharmaco-electroencephalography (p-EEG) applications. The contributions, present value and translational appreciation of animal p-EEG-based applications are strongly interlinked with progress in recording and neuroscience analysis methodology. After the pioneering years in the late 19th and early 20th century, animal p-EEG research flourished in the pharmaceutical industry in the early 1980s. However, around the turn of the millennium the emergence of structurally and functionally revealing imaging techniques and the increasing application of molecular biology caused a temporary reduction in the use of EEG as a window into the brain for the prediction of drug efficacy. Today, animal p-EEG is applied again for its biomarker potential - extensive databases of p-EEG and polysomnography studies in rats and mice hold EEG signatures of a broad collection of psychoactive reference and test compounds. A multitude of functional EEG measures has been investigated, ranging from simple spectral power and sleep-wake parameters to advanced neuronal connectivity and plasticity parameters. Compared to clinical p-EEG studies, where the level of vigilance can be well controlled, changes in sleep-waking behaviour are generally a prominent confounding variable in animal p-EEG studies and need to be dealt with. Contributions of rodent pharmaco-sleep EEG research are outlined to illustrate the value and limitations of such preclinical p-EEG data for pharmacodynamic and chronopharmacological drug profiling. Contemporary applications of p-EEG and pharmaco-sleep EEG recordings in animals provide a common and relatively inexpensive window into the functional brain early in the preclinical and clinical development of psychoactive drugs in comparison to other brain imaging techniques. They provide information on the impact of

  12. Genome-wide association studies identified novel loci for non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and its postprandial lipemic response.

    PubMed

    An, Ping; Straka, Robert J; Pollin, Toni I; Feitosa, Mary F; Wojczynski, Mary K; Daw, E Warwick; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Gibson, Quince; Ryan, Kathleen A; Hopkins, Paul N; Tsai, Michael Y; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Province, Michael A; Ordovas, Jose M; Shuldiner, Alan R; Arnett, Donna K; Borecki, Ingrid B

    2014-07-01

    Non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol(NHDL) is an independent and superior predictor of CVD risk as compared to low-density lipoprotein alone. It represents a spectrum of atherogenic lipid fractions with possibly a distinct genomic signature. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify loci influencing baseline NHDL and its postprandial lipemic (PPL) response. We carried out GWAS in 4,241 participants of European descent. Our discovery cohort included 928 subjects from the Genetics of Lipid-Lowering Drugs and Diet Network Study. Our replication cohorts included 3,313 subjects from the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention Heart Study and Family Heart Study. A linear mixed model using the kinship matrix was used for association tests. The best association signal was found in a tri-genic region at RHOQ-PIGF-CRIPT for baseline NHDL (lead SNP rs6544903, discovery p = 7e-7, MAF = 2 %; validation p = 6e-4 at 0.1 kb upstream neighboring SNP rs3768725, and 5e-4 at 0.7 kb downstream neighboring SNP rs6733143, MAF = 10 %). The lead and neighboring SNPs were not perfect surrogate proxies to each other (D' = 1, r (2) = 0.003) but they seemed to be partially dependent (likelihood ration test p = 0.04). Other suggestive loci (discovery p < 1e-6) included LOC100419812 and LOC100288337 for baseline NHDL, and LOC100420502 and CDH13 for NHDL PPL response that were not replicated (p > 0.01). The current and first GWAS of NHDL yielded an interesting common variant in RHOQ-PIGF-CRIPT influencing baseline NHDL levels. Another common variant in CDH13 for NHDL response to dietary high-fat intake challenge was also suggested. Further validations for both loci from large independent studies, especially interventional studies, are warranted.

  13. Genome-wide association studies identified novel loci for non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and its postprandial lipemic response

    PubMed Central

    An, Ping; Straka, Robert J.; Pollin, Toni I.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Daw, E. Warwick; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Gibson, Quince; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Hopkins, Paul N.; Tsai, Michael Y.; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Province, Michael A.; Ordovas, Jose M.; Shuldiner, Alan R; Arnett, Donna K.; Borecki, Ingrid B.

    2014-01-01

    Non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (NHDL) is an independent and superior predictor of CVD risk as compared to LDL alone. It represents a spectrum of atherogenic lipid fractions with possibly a distinct genomic signature. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify loci influencing baseline NHDL and its postprandial lipemic (PPL) response. We carried out GWAS in 4,241 participants of European descent. Our discovery cohort included 928 subjects from the Genetics of Lipid-Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (GOLDN) Study. Our replication cohorts included 3,313 subjects from the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention (HAPI) Heart Study and Family Heart Study (FamHS). A linear mixed model using the kinship matrix was used for association tests. The best association signal was found in a tri-genic region at RHOQ-PIGF-CRIPT for baseline NHDL (lead SNP rs6544903, discovery p = 7e-7, MAF = 2%; validation p = 6e-4 at 0.1 kb upstream neighboring SNP rs3768725, and 5e-4 at 0.7 kb downstream neighboring SNP rs6733143, MAF = 10%). The lead and neighboring SNPs were not perfect surrogate proxies to each other (D′ = 1, r2 = 0.003) but they seemed to be partially dependent (likelihood ration test p = 0.04). Other suggestive loci (discovery p < 1e-6) included LOC100419812 and LOC100288337 for baseline NHDL, and LOC100420502 and CDH13 for NHDL PPL response that were not replicated (p > 0.01). The current and first GWAS of NHDL yielded an interesting common variant in RHOQ-PIGF-CRIPT influencing baseline NHDL levels. Another common variant in CDH13 for NHDL response to dietary high fat intake challenge was also suggested. Further validations for both loci from large independent studies, especially interventional studies, are warranted. PMID:24604477

  14. Physical inactivity interacts with an endothelial lipase polymorphism to modulate high density lipoprotein cholesterol in the GOLDN study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Plasma high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration is highly heritable but is also modifiable by environmental factors including physical activity. HDL-C response to exercise varies among individuals, and this variability may be associated with genetic polymorphism...

  15. Pharmaco-EEG: A Study of Individualized Medicine in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Swatzyna, Ronald J; Kozlowski, Gerald P; Tarnow, Jay D

    2015-07-01

    Pharmaco-electroencephalography (Pharmaco-EEG) studies using clinical EEG and quantitative EEG (qEEG) technologies have existed for more than 4 decades. This is a promising area that could improve psychotropic intervention using neurological data. One of the objectives in our clinical practice has been to collect EEG and quantitative EEG (qEEG) data. In the past 5 years, we have identified a subset of refractory cases (n = 386) found to contain commonalities of a small number of electrophysiological features in the following diagnostic categories: mood, anxiety, autistic spectrum, and attention deficit disorders, Four abnormalities were noted in the majority of medication failure cases and these abnormalities did not appear to significantly align with their diagnoses. Those were the following: encephalopathy, focal slowing, beta spindles, and transient discharges. To analyze the relationship noted, they were tested for association with the assigned diagnoses. Fisher's exact test and binary logistics regression found very little (6%) association between particular EEG/qEEG abnormalities and diagnoses. Findings from studies of this type suggest that EEG/qEEG provides individualized understanding of pharmacotherapy failures and has the potential to improve medication selection.

  16. Neurobiological Correlates of EMDR Monitoring – An EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Marco; Di Lorenzo, Giorgio; Verardo, Anna Rita; Nicolais, Giampaolo; Monaco, Leonardo; Lauretti, Giada; Russo, Rita; Niolu, Cinzia; Ammaniti, Massimo; Fernandez, Isabel; Siracusano, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a recognized first-line treatment for psychological trauma. However its neurobiological bases have yet to be fully disclosed. Methods Electroencephalography (EEG) was used to fully monitor neuronal activation throughout EMDR sessions including the autobiographical script. Ten patients with major psychological trauma were investigated during their first EMDR session (T0) and during the last one performed after processing the index trauma (T1). Neuropsychological tests were administered at the same time. Comparisons were performed between EEGs of patients at T0 and T1 and between EEGs of patients and 10 controls who underwent the same EMDR procedure at T0. Connectivity analyses were carried out by lagged phase synchronization. Results During bilateral ocular stimulation (BS) of EMDR sessions EEG showed a significantly higher activity on the orbito-frontal, prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex in patients at T0 shifting towards left temporo-occipital regions at T1. A similar trend was found for autobiographical script with a higher firing in fronto-temporal limbic regions at T0 moving to right temporo-occipital cortex at T1. The comparisons between patients and controls confirmed the maximal activation in the limbic cortex of patients occurring before trauma processing. Connectivity analysis showed decreased pair-wise interactions between prefrontal and cingulate cortex during BS in patients as compared to controls and between fusiform gyrus and visual cortex during script listening in patients at T1 as compared to T0. These changes correlated significantly with those occurring in neuropsychological tests. Conclusions The ground-breaking methodology enabled our study to image for the first time the specific activations associated with the therapeutic actions typical of EMDR protocol. The findings suggest that traumatic events are processed at cognitive level following successful EMDR therapy, thus

  17. The neural dynamics of somatosensory processing and adaptation across childhood: a high-density electrical mapping study

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Neha; Foxe, John J.; Butler, John S.; Acluche, Frantzy

    2016-01-01

    Young children are often hyperreactive to somatosensory inputs hardly noticed by adults, as exemplified by irritation to seams or labels in clothing. The neurodevelopmental mechanisms underlying changes in sensory reactivity are not well understood. Based on the idea that neurodevelopmental changes in somatosensory processing and/or changes in sensory adaptation might underlie developmental differences in somatosensory reactivity, high-density electroencephalography was used to examine how the nervous system responds and adapts to repeated vibrotactile stimulation over childhood. Participants aged 6–18 yr old were presented with 50-ms vibrotactile stimuli to the right wrist over the median nerve at 5 blocked interstimulus intervals (ranging from ∼7 to ∼1 stimulus per second). Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) revealed three major phases of activation within the first 200 ms, with scalp topographies suggestive of neural generators in contralateral somatosensory cortex. Although overall SEPs were highly similar for younger, middle, and older age groups (6.1–9.8, 10.0–12.9, and 13.0–17.8 yr old), there were significant age-related amplitude differences in initial and later phases of the SEP. In contrast, robust adaptation effects for fast vs. slow presentation rates were observed that did not differ as a function of age. A greater amplitude response in the later portion of the SEP was observed for the youngest group and may be related to developmental changes in responsivity to somatosensory stimuli. These data suggest the protracted development of the somatosensory system over childhood, whereas adaptation, as assayed in this study, is largely in place by ∼7 yr of age. PMID:26763781

  18. Structure development during isothermal crystallisation of high-density polyethylene: Synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ślusarczyk, Czesław

    2013-12-01

    Isothermal melt crystallisation in high-density polyethylene (HDPE) was studied using the time-resolved SAXS method with synchrotron radiation over a wide range of crystallisation temperatures. The SAXS profile was analysed by an interface distribution function, g1(r), which is a superposition of three contributions associated with the size distributions of crystalline (LC) and amorphous (LA) layers and a distribution of long period (LP). The morphological parameters extracted from the g1(r) functions show that the lamellar thickness increases with time, obeying a logarithmic time dependence. The time evolution of LC observed for the sample crystallised at 122 °C leads to the conclusion that crystallisation proceeds according to the mechanism of thickening growth. For samples crystallised at lower temperatures (116 °C and 118 °C), the lamellar thickening mechanism has been observed. The rate of lamellar thickening in these cases is much lower than that at 122 °C. At 40 °C, thickening of the crystalline layer does not occur. The interface distribution functions were deconvoluted, and the relative standard deviation σC/LC obtained in this way is an additional parameter that is varied during crystallisation and can be used for analysis of this process. Time-dependent changes in the σC/LC at large supercooling (TC=40 °C) indicates that LC presents a broad distribution in which the relative standard deviation increases with time. At lower supercooling (TC=122 °C), LC shows a much sharper distribution. In this case, the relative standard deviation decreases with time.

  19. Ictal EEG/fMRI study of vertiginous seizures.

    PubMed

    Morano, Alessandra; Carnì, Marco; Casciato, Sara; Vaudano, Anna Elisabetta; Fattouch, Jinane; Fanella, Martina; Albini, Mariarita; Basili, Luca Manfredi; Lucignani, Giulia; Scapeccia, Marco; Tomassi, Regina; Di Castro, Elisabetta; Colonnese, Claudio; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2017-03-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are extremely common complaints, related to either peripheral or central nervous system disorders. Among the latter, epilepsy has to be taken into consideration: indeed, vertigo may be part of the initial aura of a focal epileptic seizure in association with other signs/symptoms, or represent the only ictal manifestation, a rare phenomenon known as "vertiginous" or "vestibular" seizure. These ictal symptoms are usually related to a discharge arising from/involving temporal or parietal areas, which are supposed to be a crucial component of the so-called "vestibular cortex". In this paper, we describe three patients suffering from drug-resistant focal epilepsy, symptomatic of malformations of cortical development or perinatal hypoxic/ischemic lesions located in the posterior regions, who presented clusters of vertiginous seizures. The high recurrence rate of such events, recorded during video-EEG monitoring sessions, offered the opportunity to perform an ictal EEG/fMRI study to identify seizure-related hemodynamic changes. The ictal EEG/fMRI revealed the main activation clusters in the temporo-parieto-occipital regions, which are widely recognized to be involved in the processing of vestibular information. Interestingly, ictal deactivation was also detected in the ipsilateral cerebellar hemisphere, suggesting the ictal involvement of cortical-subcortical structures known to be part of the vestibular integration network.

  20. PAGAT gel dosimeters for dose distribution measurements in the vicinity of high-density implants: A preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asena, A.; Kairn, T.; Crowe, S. B.; Smith, S. T.; Trapp, J. V.

    2015-01-01

    This work examined the suitability of the PAGAT gel dosimeter for use in dose distribution measurements around high-density implants. An assessment of the gels reactivity with various metals was performed and no corrosive effects were observed. An artefact reduction technique was also investigated in order to minimise scattering of the laser light in the optical CT scans. The potential for attenuation and backscatter measurements using this gel dosimeter were examined for a temporary tissue expander's internal magnetic port.

  1. Target Speaker Detection with Concealed EEG Around the Ear

    PubMed Central

    Mirkovic, Bojana; Bleichner, Martin G.; De Vos, Maarten; Debener, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Target speaker identification is essential for speech enhancement algorithms in assistive devices aimed toward helping the hearing impaired. Several recent studies have reported that target speaker identification is possible through electroencephalography (EEG) recordings. If the EEG system could be reduced to acceptable size while retaining the signal quality, hearing aids could benefit from the integration with concealed EEG. To compare the performance of a multichannel around-the-ear EEG system with high-density cap EEG recordings an envelope tracking algorithm was applied in a competitive speaker paradigm. The data from 20 normal hearing listeners were concurrently collected from the traditional state-of-the-art laboratory wired EEG system and a wireless mobile EEG system with two bilaterally-placed around-the-ear electrode arrays (cEEGrids). The results show that the cEEGrid ear-EEG technology captured neural signals that allowed the identification of the attended speaker above chance-level, with 69.3% accuracy, while cap-EEG signals resulted in the accuracy of 84.8%. Further analyses investigated the influence of ear-EEG signal quality and revealed that the envelope tracking procedure was unaffected by variability in channel impedances. We conclude that the quality of concealed ear-EEG recordings as acquired with the cEEGrid array has potential to be used in the brain-computer interface steering of hearing aids. PMID:27512364

  2. High density polyethylene (HDPE)/poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) polymer blend studies related to recycling co-mingled plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Pang-Yen

    Polymer blends of virgin high density polyethylene (HDPE) and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) were studied as an attempt to relate the microstructure to the mechanical properties of the blends. The virgin blends were prepared by extrusion and then injection molded into specimens for characterization. Two of the virgin blends were tested for possible compatibilization using a styrene-ethylene-butylene-styrene (SEBS) block copolymer. In addition, six blends of post-consumer resins (PCRs) of HDPE and PET were included in this work for comparison. The moduli of the virgin blends showed positive deviation from those expected from the rule of mixtures. The synergism of the composite moduli can be explained partly by a Poisson's effect. Yield strengths of the blends molded at low injection chamber temperatures (200sp°, 230sp°, and 250sp°C) followed the rule of mixtures well, because PET filaments found in the composites had very high length to diameter ratios. When the injection chamber temperature was above the PET melting point (˜254sp°C), PET filaments were found to break down into particles, and the yield strengths of the blends coincided with the values expected from the inverse rule of mixtures. Impact strengths of the virgin blends were much less than that of a HDPE homopolymer due to poor interfacial bonding between HDPE and PET. Compatibilization appeared to be advantageous since it dramatically improved the impact strength of the virgin blends. SEM micrographs of impact fractured surfaces revealed that the improved adhesion from compatibilization and the presence of numerous uniaxially aligned PET filaments in the HDPE substrate can account for the significant increases in fracture resistance of the compatibilized blends. Mechanical performance of the PCRs was inferior to that of the virgin blends. Aside from polymer degradation and contamination due to repeated processing and handling, absence of PET filaments and interfacial bonding could be

  3. Longitudinal study of EEG frequency maturation and power changes in children on the Russian North.

    PubMed

    Soroko, S I; Shemyakina, N V; Nagornova, Zh V; Bekshaev, S S

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the study was to reveal longitudinal changes in electroencephalogram spectral power and frequency (percentage frequency composition of EEG and alpha peak frequency) patterns in normal children from northern Russia. Fifteen children (9 girls and 6 boys) participated in the study. The resting state (eyes closed) EEGs were recorded yearly (2005-2013) from age 8 to age 16-17 for each child. EEG frequency patterns were estimated as the percentages of waves with a 1 Hz step revealed by measuring the interval durations between points crossing zero (isoline) by a curve. EEG spectral power changes were analyzed for delta (1.5-4 Hz), theta (4-7.5 Hz), alpha-1 (7.5-9.5 Hz), alpha-2 (9.5-12.5 Hz), beta-1 (12.5-18 Hz) and beta-2 (18-30 Hz) bands. According to the frequency composition of the EEG signals fast synchronous, polymorphous synchronous, polymorphous desynchronous and slow synchronous types of children EEG were revealed. These EEG types were relatively stable during adolescence. In these EEG types, the frequency patterns and spectral power dynamics with age had several common and specific features. Slow wave percentage and spectral power in the delta band remarkably decreased with age in all groups. Starting from the theta band the EEG types were characterized by different EEG spectral power changes with age. In fast synchronous EEG type, the theta and alpha-1 EEG power decreased, and the alpha-2 power increased in the occipital and parietal areas. The polymorphous synchronous type was characterized by increased both the alpha-1 and alpha-2 power with regional peculiarities. In the polymorphous desynchronous type spectral power in all bands decreased with age, and in the slow synchronous type, the alpha-1 power massively increased with age. Obtained results suggest predictive strength of the spatial-frequency patterns in EEG for its following maturation through the years.

  4. High density fluoride glass calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Q.; Scheltzbaum, J.; Akgun, U.

    2014-04-01

    The unprecedented radiation levels in current Large Hadron Collider runs, and plans to even increase the luminosity creates a need for new detector technologies to be investigated. Quartz plates to replace the plastic scintillators in current LHC calorimeters have been proposed in recent reports. Quartz based Cherenkov calorimeters can solve the radiation damage problem, however light production and transfer have proven to be challenging. This report summarizes the results from a computational study on the performance of a high-density glass calorimeter. High-density, scintillating, fluoride glass, CHG3, was used as the active material. This glass has been developed specifically for hadron collider experiments, and is known for fast response time, in addition to high light yield. Here, the details of a Geant4 model for a sampling calorimeter prototype with 20 layers, and its hadronic as well as electromagnetic performances are reported.

  5. Study of EEG during Sternberg Tasks with Different Direction of Arrangement for Letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamihoriuchi, Kenji; Nuruki, Atsuo; Matae, Tadashi; Kurono, Asutsugu; Yunokuchi, Kazutomo

    In previous study, we recorded electroencephalogram (EEG) of patients with dementia and healthy subjects during Sternberg task. But, only one presentation method of Sternberg task was considered in previous study. Therefore, we examined whether the EEG was different in two different presentation methods wrote letters horizontally and wrote letters vertically in this study. We recorded EEG of six healthy subjects during Sternberg task using two different presentation methods. The result was not different in EEG topography of all subjects. In all subjects, correct rate increased in case of vertically arranged letters.

  6. Neural correlates of emotional responses to music: an EEG study.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ian; Malik, Asad; Hwang, Faustina; Roesch, Etienne; Weaver, James; Kirke, Alexis; Williams, Duncan; Miranda, Eduardo; Nasuto, Slawomir J

    2014-06-24

    This paper presents an EEG study into the neural correlates of music-induced emotions. We presented participants with a large dataset containing musical pieces in different styles, and asked them to report on their induced emotional responses. We found neural correlates of music-induced emotion in a number of frequencies over the pre-frontal cortex. Additionally, we found a set of patterns of functional connectivity, defined by inter-channel coherence measures, to be significantly different between groups of music-induced emotional responses.

  7. Electroencephalograph (EEG) study on self-contemplating image formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qinglei; Hong, Elliot; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2016-05-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is one of the most widely used electrophysiological monitoring methods and plays a significant role in studies of human brain electrical activities. Default mode network (DMN), is a functional connection of brain regions that are activated while subjects are not in task positive state or not focused on the outside world. In this study, EEG was used for human brain signals recording while all subjects were asked to sit down quietly on a chair with eyes closed and thinking about some parts of their own body, such as left and right hands, left and right ears, lips, nose, and the images of faces that they were familiar with as well as doing some simple mathematical calculation. The time is marker when the image is formed in the subject's mind. By analyzing brain activity maps 300ms right before the time marked instant for each of the 4 wave bands, Delta, Theta, Alpha and Beta waves. We found that for most EEG datasets during this 300ms, Delta wave activity would mostly locate at the frontal lobe or the visual cortex, and the change and movement of activities are slow. Theta wave activity tended to rotate along the edge of cortex either clockwise or counterclockwise. Beta wave behaved like inquiry types of oscillations between any two regions spread over the cortex. Alpha wave activity looks like a mix of the Theta and Beta activities but more close to Theta activity. From the observation we feel that Beta and high Alpha are playing utility role for information inquiry. Theta and low Alpha are likely playing the role of binding and imagination formation in DMN operations.

  8. Kinesthetic and vestibular information modulate alpha activity during spatial navigation: a mobile EEG study

    PubMed Central

    Ehinger, Benedikt V.; Fischer, Petra; Gert, Anna L.; Kaufhold, Lilli; Weber, Felix; Pipa, Gordon; König, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In everyday life, spatial navigation involving locomotion provides congruent visual, vestibular, and kinesthetic information that need to be integrated. Yet, previous studies on human brain activity during navigation focus on stationary setups, neglecting vestibular and kinesthetic feedback. The aim of our work is to uncover the influence of those sensory modalities on cortical processing. We developed a fully immersive virtual reality setup combined with high-density mobile electroencephalography (EEG). Participants traversed one leg of a triangle, turned on the spot, continued along the second leg, and finally indicated the location of their starting position. Vestibular and kinesthetic information was provided either in combination, as isolated sources of information, or not at all within a 2 × 2 full factorial intra-subjects design. EEG data were processed by clustering independent components, and time-frequency spectrograms were calculated. In parietal, occipital, and temporal clusters, we detected alpha suppression during the turning movement, which is associated with a heightened demand of visuo-attentional processing and closely resembles results reported in previous stationary studies. This decrease is present in all conditions and therefore seems to generalize to more natural settings. Yet, in incongruent conditions, when different sensory modalities did not match, the decrease is significantly stronger. Additionally, in more anterior areas we found that providing only vestibular but no kinesthetic information results in alpha increase. These observations demonstrate that stationary experiments omit important aspects of sensory feedback. Therefore, it is important to develop more natural experimental settings in order to capture a more complete picture of neural correlates of spatial navigation. PMID:24616681

  9. A Preliminary Study of Muscular Artifact Cancellation in Single-Channel EEG

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xun; Liu, Aiping; Peng, Hu; Ward, Rabab K.

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings are often contaminated with muscular artifacts that strongly obscure the EEG signals and complicates their analysis. For the conventional case, where the EEG recordings are obtained simultaneously over many EEG channels, there exists a considerable range of methods for removing muscular artifacts. In recent years, there has been an increasing trend to use EEG information in ambulatory healthcare and related physiological signal monitoring systems. For practical reasons, a single EEG channel system must be used in these situations. Unfortunately, there exist few studies for muscular artifact cancellation in single-channel EEG recordings. To address this issue, in this preliminary study, we propose a simple, yet effective, method to achieve the muscular artifact cancellation for the single-channel EEG case. This method is a combination of the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) and the joint blind source separation (JBSS) techniques. We also conduct a study that compares and investigates all possible single-channel solutions and demonstrate the performance of these methods using numerical simulations and real-life applications. The proposed method is shown to significantly outperform all other methods. It can successfully remove muscular artifacts without altering the underlying EEG activity. It is thus a promising tool for use in ambulatory healthcare systems. PMID:25275348

  10. Pharmaco-EEG Studies in Animals: An Overview of Contemporary Translational Applications.

    PubMed

    Drinkenburg, Wilhelmus H I M; Ruigt, Gé S F; Ahnaou, Abdallah

    2015-01-01

    The contemporary value of animal pharmaco-electroencephalography (p-EEG)-based applications are strongly interlinked with progress in recording and neuroscience analysis methodology. While p-EEG in humans and animals has been shown to be closely related in terms of underlying neuronal substrates, both translational and back-translational approaches are being used to address extrapolation issues and optimize the translational validity of preclinical animal p-EEG paradigms and data. Present applications build further on animal p-EEG and pharmaco-sleep EEG findings, but also on stimulation protocols, more specifically pharmaco-event-related potentials. Pharmaceutical research into novel treatments for neurological and psychiatric diseases has employed an increasing number of pharmacological as well as transgenic models to assess the potential therapeutic involvement of different neurochemical systems and novel drug targets as well as underlying neuronal connectivity and synaptic function. Consequently, p-EEG studies, now also readily applied in modeled animals, continue to have an important role in drug discovery and development, with progressively more emphasis on its potential as a central readout for target engagement and as a (translational) functional marker of neuronal circuit processes underlying normal and pathological brain functioning. In a similar vein as was done for human p-EEG studies, the contribution of animal p-EEG studies can further benefit by adherence to guidelines for methodological standardization, which are presently under construction by the International Pharmaco-EEG Society (IPEG).

  11. Brain Areas Responsible for Vigilance: An EEG Source Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Do-Won; Im, Chang-Hwan

    2017-01-04

    Vigilance, sometimes referred to as sustained attention, is an important type of human attention as it is closely associated with cognitive activities required in various daily-life situations. Although many researchers have investigated which brain areas control the maintenance of vigilance, findings have been inconsistent. We hypothesized that this inconsistency might be due to the use of different experimental paradigms in the various studies. We found that most of the previous studies used paradigms that included specific cognitive tasks requiring a high cognitive load, which could complicate identification of brain areas associated only with vigilance. To minimize the influence of cognitive processes other than vigilance on the analysis results, we adopted the d2-test of attention, which is a well-known neuropsychological test of attention that does not require high cognitive load, and searched for brain areas at which EEG source activities were temporally correlated with fluctuation of vigilance over a prolonged period of time. EEG experiments conducted with 31 young adults showed that left prefrontal cortex activity was significantly correlated with vigilance variation in the delta, beta1, beta2, and gamma frequency bands, but not the theta and alpha frequency bands. Our study results suggest that the left prefrontal cortex plays a key role in vigilance modulation, and can therefore be used to monitor individual vigilance changes over time or serve as a potential target of noninvasive brain stimulation.

  12. Atomic force microscopic study of the structure of high-density polyethylene deformed in liquid medium by crazing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bagrov, D V; Yarysheva, A Y; Rukhlya, E G; Yarysheva, L M; Volynskii, A L; Bakeev, N F

    2014-02-01

    A procedure has been developed for the direct atomic force microscopic (AFM) examination of the native structure of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) deformed in an adsorption-active liquid medium (AALM) by the crazing mechanism. The AFM investigation has been carried out in the presence of a liquid medium under conditions preventing deformed films from shrinkage. Deformation of HDPE in AALM has been shown to proceed through the delocalized crazing mechanism and result in the development of a fibrillar-porous structure. The structural parameters of the crazed polymer have been determined. The obtained AFM images demonstrate a nanosized nonuniformity of the deformation and enable one to observe the structural rearrangements that take place in the deformed polymer after removal of the liquid medium and stress relaxation. A structural similarity has been revealed between HDPE deformed in the AALM and hard elastic polymers.

  13. Land use regression modelling of air pollution in high density high rise cities: A case study in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lee, Martha; Brauer, Michael; Wong, Paulina; Tang, Robert; Tsui, Tsz Him; Choi, Crystal; Cheng, Wei; Lai, Poh-Chin; Tian, Linwei; Thach, Thuan-Quoc; Allen, Ryan; Barratt, Benjamin

    2017-03-16

    Land use regression (LUR) is a common method of predicting spatial variability of air pollution to estimate exposure. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitric oxide (NO), fine particulate matter (PM2.5), and black carbon (BC) concentrations were measured during two sampling campaigns (April-May and November-January) in Hong Kong (a prototypical high-density high-rise city). Along with 365 potential geospatial predictor variables, these concentrations were used to build two-dimensional land use regression (LUR) models for the territory. Summary statistics for combined measurements over both campaigns were: a) NO2 (Mean=106μg/m(3), SD=38.5, N=95), b) NO (M=147μg/m(3), SD=88.9, N=40), c) PM2.5 (M=35μg/m(3), SD=6.3, N=64), and BC (M=10.6μg/m(3), SD=5.3, N=76). Final LUR models had the following statistics: a) NO2 (R(2)=0.46, RMSE=28μg/m(3)) b) NO (R(2)=0.50, RMSE=62μg/m(3)), c) PM2.5 (R(2)=0.59; RMSE=4μg/m(3)), and d) BC (R(2)=0.50, RMSE=4μg/m(3)). Traditional LUR predictors such as road length, car park density, and land use types were included in most models. The NO2 prediction surface values were highest in Kowloon and the northern region of Hong Kong Island (downtown Hong Kong). NO showed a similar pattern in the built-up region. Both PM2.5 and BC predictions exhibited a northwest-southeast gradient, with higher concentrations in the north (close to mainland China). For BC, the port was also an area of elevated predicted concentrations. The results matched with existing literature on spatial variation in concentrations of air pollutants and in relation to important emission sources in Hong Kong. The success of these models suggests LUR is appropriate in high-density, high-rise cities.

  14. EEG interpretation reliability and interpreter confidence: a large single-center study.

    PubMed

    Grant, Arthur C; Abdel-Baki, Samah G; Weedon, Jeremy; Arnedo, Vanessa; Chari, Geetha; Koziorynska, Ewa; Lushbough, Catherine; Maus, Douglas; McSween, Tresa; Mortati, Katherine A; Reznikov, Alexandra; Omurtag, Ahmet

    2014-03-01

    The intrarater and interrater reliability (I&IR) of EEG interpretation has significant implications for the value of EEG as a diagnostic tool. We measured both the intrarater reliability and the interrater reliability of EEG interpretation based on the interpretation of complete EEGs into standard diagnostic categories and rater confidence in their interpretations and investigated sources of variance in EEG interpretations. During two distinct time intervals, six board-certified clinical neurophysiologists classified 300 EEGs into one or more of seven diagnostic categories and assigned a subjective confidence to their interpretations. Each EEG was read by three readers. Each reader interpreted 150 unique studies, and 50 studies were re-interpreted to generate intrarater data. A generalizability study assessed the contribution of subjects, readers, and the interaction between subjects and readers to interpretation variance. Five of the six readers had a median confidence of ≥99%, and the upper quartile of confidence values was 100% for all six readers. Intrarater Cohen's kappa (κc) ranged from 0.33 to 0.73 with an aggregated value of 0.59. Cohen's kappa ranged from 0.29 to 0.62 for the 15 reader pairs, with an aggregated Fleiss kappa of 0.44 for interrater agreement. Cohen's kappa was not significantly different across rater pairs (chi-square=17.3, df=14, p=0.24). Variance due to subjects (i.e., EEGs) was 65.3%, due to readers was 3.9%, and due to the interaction between readers and subjects was 30.8%. Experienced epileptologists have very high confidence in their EEG interpretations and low to moderate I&IR, a common paradox in clinical medicine. A necessary, but insufficient, condition to improve EEG interpretation accuracy is to increase intrarater and interrater reliability. This goal could be accomplished, for instance, with an automated online application integrated into a continuing medical education module that measures and reports EEG I&IR to individual

  15. Going local: insights from EEG and stereo-EEG studies of the human sleep-wake cycle.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Michele; De Gennaro, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    In the present paper, we reviewed a large body of evidence, mainly from quantitative EEG studies of our laboratory, supporting the notion that sleep is a local and use-dependent process. Quantitative analyses of sleep EEG recorded from multiple cortical derivations clearly indicate that every sleep phenomenon, from sleep onset to the awakening, is strictly local in nature. Sleep onset first occurs in frontal areas, and a frontal predominance of low-frequency power persists in the first part of the night, when the homeostatic processes mainly occur, and then it vanishes. Upon awakening, we showed an asynchronous EEG activation of different cortical areas, the more anterior ones being the first to wake up. During extended periods of wakefulness, the increase of sleepiness-related low-EEG frequencies is again evident over the frontal derivations. Similarly, experimental manipulations of sleep length by total sleep deprivation, partial sleep curtailment or even selective slow-wave sleep deprivation lead to a slow-wave activity rebound localized especially on the anterior derivations. Thus, frontal areas are crucially involved in sleep homeostasis. According to the local use-dependent theory, this would derive from a higher sleep need of the frontal cortex, which in turn is due to its higher levels of activity during wakefulness. The fact that different brain regions can simultaneously exhibit different sleep intensities indicates that sleep is not a spatially global and uniform state, as hypothesized in the theory. We have also reviewed recent evidence of localized effects of learning and plasticity on EEG sleep measures. These studies provide crucial support to a key concept in the theory, the one claiming that local sleep characteristics should be use-dependent. Finally, we have reported data corroborating the notion that sleep is not necessarily present simultaneously in the entire brain. Our stereo-EEG recordings clearly indicate that sleep and wakefulness can co

  16. Maturation of EEG Power Spectra in Early Adolescence: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cragg, Lucy; Kovacevic, Natasa; McIntosh, Anthony Randal; Poulsen, Catherine; Martinu, Kristina; Leonard, Gabriel; Paus, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the fine-grained development of the EEG power spectra in early adolescence, and the extent to which it is reflected in changes in peak frequency. It also sought to determine whether sex differences in the EEG power spectra reflect differential patterns of maturation. A group of 56 adolescents were tested at age 10 years and…

  17. Effects of Drawing on Alpha Activity: A Quantitative EEG Study with Implications for Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belkofer, Christopher M.; Van Hecke, Amy Vaughan; Konopka, Lukasz M.

    2014-01-01

    Little empirical evidence exists as to how materials used in art therapy affect the brain and its neurobiological functioning. This pre/post within-groups study utilized the quantitative electroencephalogram (qEEG) to measure residual effects in the brain after 20 minutes of drawing. EEG recordings were conducted before and after participants (N =…

  18. Validation of a low-cost EEG device for mood induction studies.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Alejandro; Rey, Beatriz; Alcañiz, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    New electroencephalography (EEG) devices, more portable and cheaper, are appearing on the market. Studying the reliability of these EEG devices for emotional studies would be interesting, as these devices could be more economical and compatible with Virtual Reality (VR) settings. Therefore, the aim in this work was to validate a low-cost EEG device (Emotiv Epoc) to monitor brain activity during a positive emotional induction procedure. Emotional pictures (IAPS) were used to induce a positive mood in sixteen participants. Changes in the brain activity of subjects were compared between positive induction and neutral conditions. Obtained results were in accordance with previous scientific literature regarding frontal EEG asymmetry, which supports the possibility of using this low-cost EEG device in future mood induction studies combined with VR.

  19. Development of a high-density gas-jet target for nuclear astrophysics and reaction studies with rare isotope beams. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Uwe, Greife

    2014-08-12

    The purpose of this project was to develop a high-density gas jet target that will enable a new program of transfer reaction studies with rare isotope beams and targets of hydrogen and helium that is not currently possible and will have an important impact on our understanding of stellar explosions and of the evolution of nuclear shell structure away from stability. This is the final closeout report for the project.

  20. Spatio-temporal dynamics of adaptation in the human visual system: A high-density electrical mapping study

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Gizely N.; Butler, John S.; Mercier, Manuel R.; Molholm, Sophie; Foxe, John J.

    2015-01-01

    When sensory inputs are presented serially, response amplitudes to stimulus repetitions generally decrease as a function of presentation rate, diminishing rapidly as inter-stimulus-intervals (ISIs) fall below a second. This “adaptation” is believed to represent mechanisms by which sensory systems reduce responsivity to consistent environmental inputs, freeing resources to respond to potentially more relevant inputs. While auditory adaptation functions have been relatively well-characterized, considerably less is known about visual adaptation in humans. Here, high-density visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded while two paradigms were used to interrogate visual adaptation. The first presented stimulus pairs with varying ISIs, comparing VEP amplitude to the second stimulus to that of the first (paired-presentation). The second involved blocks of stimulation (N=100) at various ISIs and comparison of VEP amplitude between blocks of differing ISIs (block-presentation). Robust VEP modulations were evident as a function of presentation rate in the block-paradigm with strongest modulations in the 130–150ms and 160–180ms visual processing phases. In paired-presentations, with ISIs of just 200–300 ms, an enhancement of VEP was evident when comparing S2 to S1, with no significant effect of presentation rate. Importantly, in block-presentations, adaptation effects were statistically robust at the individual participant level. These data suggest that a more taxing block-presentation paradigm is better suited to engage visual adaptation mechanisms than a paired-presentation design. The increased sensitivity of the visual processing metric obtained in the block-paradigm has implications for the examination of visual processing deficits in clinical populations. PMID:25688539

  1. Spatio-temporal dynamics of adaptation in the human visual system: a high-density electrical mapping study.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Gizely N; Butler, John S; Mercier, Manuel R; Molholm, Sophie; Foxe, John J

    2015-04-01

    When sensory inputs are presented serially, response amplitudes to stimulus repetitions generally decrease as a function of presentation rate, diminishing rapidly as inter-stimulus intervals (ISIs) fall below 1 s. This 'adaptation' is believed to represent mechanisms by which sensory systems reduce responsivity to consistent environmental inputs, freeing resources to respond to potentially more relevant inputs. While auditory adaptation functions have been relatively well characterized, considerably less is known about visual adaptation in humans. Here, high-density visual-evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded while two paradigms were used to interrogate visual adaptation. The first presented stimulus pairs with varying ISIs, comparing VEP amplitude to the second stimulus with that of the first (paired-presentation). The second involved blocks of stimulation (N = 100) at various ISIs and comparison of VEP amplitude between blocks of differing ISIs (block-presentation). Robust VEP modulations were evident as a function of presentation rate in the block-paradigm, with strongest modulations in the 130-150 ms and 160-180 ms visual processing phases. In paired-presentations, with ISIs of just 200-300 ms, an enhancement of VEP was evident when comparing S2 with S1, with no significant effect of presentation rate. Importantly, in block-presentations, adaptation effects were statistically robust at the individual participant level. These data suggest that a more taxing block-presentation paradigm is better suited to engage visual adaptation mechanisms than a paired-presentation design. The increased sensitivity of the visual processing metric obtained in the block-paradigm has implications for the examination of visual processing deficits in clinical populations.

  2. Prospective Cohort Study Evaluating the Prognostic Value of Simple EEG Parameters in Postanoxic Coma.

    PubMed

    Azabou, Eric; Fischer, Catherine; Mauguiere, François; Vaugier, Isabelle; Annane, Djillali; Sharshar, Tarek; Lofaso, Fréderic

    2016-01-01

    We prospectively studied early bedside standard EEG characteristics in 61 acute postanoxic coma patients. Five simple EEG features, namely, isoelectric, discontinuous, nonreactive to intense auditory and nociceptive stimuli, dominant delta frequency, and occurrence of paroxysms were classified yes or no. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of each of these variables for predicting an unfavorable outcome, defined as death, persistent vegetative state, minimally conscious state, or severe neurological disability, as assessed 1 year after coma onset were computed as well as Synek's score. The outcome was unfavorable in 56 (91.8%) patients. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and AUC of nonreactive EEG for predicting an unfavorable outcome were 84%, 80%, 98%, 31%, and 0.82, respectively; and were all very close to the ones of Synek score>3, which were 82%, 80%, 98%, 29%, and 0.81, respectively. Specificities for predicting an unfavorable outcome were 100% for isoelectric, discontinuous, or dominant delta activity EEG. These 3 last features were constantly associated to unfavorable outcome. Absent EEG reactivity strongly predicted an unfavorable outcome in postanoxic coma, and performed as accurate as a Synek score>3. Analyzing characteristics of some simple EEG features may easily help nonneurophysiologist physicians to investigate prognostic issue of postanoxic coma patient. In this study (a) discontinuous, isoelectric, or delta-dominant EEG were constantly associated with unfavorable outcome and (b) nonreactive EEG performed prognostic as accurate as a Synek score>3.

  3. Depressive symptoms and baseline prefrontal EEG alpha activity: a study utilizing Ecological Momentary Assessment.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Katherine M; McSweeney, Lauren B

    2008-02-01

    Prefrontal cortex (PFC) electroencephalography (EEG) alpha asymmetry has been found in individuals with major depression. However, EEG activity has never been examined in regard to specific depressive symptoms. We examine the relationship between resting baseline PFC alpha activity and both rumination and self-esteem in a depressed outpatient group (N=6) and a healthy control group (N=7) using high-density EEG sampling and multiple longitudinal self report measures, i.e. Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA). Symptom measures were collected five times daily for 7 days, i.e. 35 assessments. Using a mixed-level analysis, significant Group x Hemisphere interactions for PFC sites and both rumination and self-esteem were found. Within the depressed group, lower bilateral PFC activity predicted higher levels of rumination, and lower right PFC activity predicted higher levels of self-esteem. There were no significant effects for the control group. Results indicate that specific symptoms of depression are uniquely associated with patterns of PFC EEG alpha activity.

  4. Development of cortical motor circuits between childhood and adulthood: A navigated TMS-HdEEG study.

    PubMed

    Määttä, Sara; Könönen, Mervi; Kallioniemi, Elisa; Lakka, Timo; Lintu, Niina; Lindi, Virpi; Ferreri, Florinda; Ponzo, David; Säisänen, Laura

    2017-02-20

    Motor functions improve during childhood and adolescence, but little is still known about the development of cortical motor circuits during early life. To elucidate the neurophysiological hallmarks of motor cortex development, we investigated the differences in motor cortical excitability and connectivity between healthy children, adolescents, and adults by means of navigated suprathreshold motor cortex transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) combined with high-density electroencephalography (EEG). We demonstrated that with development, the excitability of the motor system increases, the TMS-evoked EEG waveform increases in complexity, the magnitude of induced activation decreases, and signal spreading increases. Furthermore, the phase of the oscillatory response to TMS becomes less consistent with age. These changes parallel an improvement in manual dexterity and may reflect developmental changes in functional connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. EEG-fMRI integration for the study of human brain function.

    PubMed

    Jorge, João; van der Zwaag, Wietske; Figueiredo, Patrícia

    2014-11-15

    Electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have proved to be extremely valuable tools for the non-invasive study of human brain function. Moreover, due to a notable degree of complementarity between the two modalities, the combination of EEG and fMRI data has been actively sought in the last two decades. Although initially focused on epilepsy, EEG-fMRI applications were rapidly extended to the study of healthy brain function, yielding new insights into its underlying mechanisms and pathways. Nevertheless, EEG and fMRI have markedly different spatial and temporal resolutions, and probe neuronal activity through distinct biophysical processes, many aspects of which are still poorly understood. The remarkable conceptual and methodological challenges associated with EEG-fMRI integration have motivated the development of a wide range of analysis approaches over the years, each relying on more or less restrictive assumptions, and aiming to shed further light on the mechanisms of brain function along with those of the EEG-fMRI coupling itself. Here, we present a review of the most relevant EEG-fMRI integration approaches yet proposed for the study of brain function, supported by a general overview of our current understanding of the biophysical mechanisms coupling the signals obtained from the two modalities.

  6. Studying the default mode and its mindfulness-induced changes using EEG functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Berkovich-Ohana, Aviva; Glicksohn, Joseph; Goldstein, Abraham

    2014-10-01

    The default mode network (DMN) has been largely studied by imaging, but not yet by neurodynamics, using electroencephalography (EEG) functional connectivity (FC). mindfulness meditation (MM), a receptive, non-elaborative training is theorized to lower DMN activity. We explored: (i) the usefulness of EEG-FC for investigating the DMN and (ii) the MM-induced EEG-FC effects. To this end, three MM groups were compared with controls, employing EEG-FC (-MPC, mean phase coherence). Our results show that: (i) DMN activity was identified as reduced overall inter-hemispheric gamma MPC during the transition from resting state to a time production task and (ii) MM-induced a state increase in alpha MPC as well as a trait decrease in EEG-FC. The MM-induced EEG-FC decrease was irrespective of expertise or band. Specifically, there was a relative reduction in right theta MPC, and left alpha and gamma MPC. The left gamma MPC was negatively correlated with MM expertise, possibly related to lower internal verbalization. The trait lower gamma MPC supports the notion of MM-induced reduction in DMN activity, related with self-reference and mind-wandering. This report emphasizes the possibility of studying the DMN using EEG-FC as well as the importance of studying meditation in relation to it.

  7. Wake High-Density Electroencephalographic Spatiospectral Signatures of Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Michele A.; Ramautar, Jennifer R.; Wei, Yishul; Gomez-Herrero, Germán; Stoffers, Diederick; Wassing, Rick; Benjamins, Jeroen S.; Tagliazucchi, Enzo; van der Werf, Ysbrand D.; Cajochen, Christian; Van Someren, Eus J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Although daytime complaints are a defining characteristic of insomnia, most EEG studies evaluated sleep only. We used high-density electroencephalography to investigate wake resting state oscillations characteristic of insomnia disorder (ID) at a fine-grained spatiospectral resolution. Methods: A case-control assessment during eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) was performed in a laboratory for human physiology. Participants (n = 94, 74 female, 21–70 y) were recruited through www.sleepregistry.nl: 51 with ID, according to DSM-5 and 43 matched controls. Exclusion criteria were any somatic, neurological or psychiatric condition. Group differences in the spectral power topographies across multiple frequencies (1.5 to 40 Hz) were evaluated using permutation-based inference with Threshold-Free Cluster-Enhancement, to correct for multiple comparisons. Results: As compared to controls, participants with ID showed less power in a narrow upper alpha band (11–12.7 Hz, peak: 11.7 Hz) over bilateral frontal and left temporal regions during EO, and more power in a broad beta frequency range (16.3–40 Hz, peak: 19 Hz) globally during EC. Source estimates suggested global rather than cortically localized group differences. Conclusions: The widespread high power in a broad beta band reported previously during sleep in insomnia is present as well during eyes closed wakefulness, suggestive of a round-the-clock hyperarousal. Low power in the upper alpha band during eyes open is consistent with low cortical inhibition and attentional filtering. The fine-grained HD-EEG findings suggest that, while more feasible than PSG, wake EEG of short duration with a few well-chosen electrodes and frequency bands, can provide valuable features of insomnia. Citation: Colombo MA, Ramautar JR, Wei Y, Gomez-Herrero G, Stoffers D, Wassing R, Benjamins JS, Tagliazucchi E, van der Werf YD, Cajochen C, Van Someren EJW. Wake high-density electroencephalographic spatiospectral

  8. High density circuit technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, T. E.

    1980-01-01

    Acquisition of polyimide materials for inter-metal dielectrics was obtained from three vendors, with considerable evaluation conducted on the Dupont PI2550 material. Experimental results indicate this material can be patterned using contact printing to line width far below 0.1 mils. Optimum line width is acquired using plasma etch equipment. Metal lift-off experiments on thermal evaporated films were optimized for application to sputtered deposited films. Alternate metal-lift-off experiments are proposed for future investigation. Dry processing equipment studies and future trends in VLSI fabrication techniques are on-going.

  9. Study of the influence of a strong magnetic field on the composition of nuclear matter at high densities and zero temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, Eduardo L.; Chiapparini, Marcelo; Bracco, Mirian E.

    2013-03-25

    Magnetars are neutron stars with a strong surface magnetic field. Observations of soft gamma-ray and anomalous X-ray pulsars pointed out that the surface magnetic field of magnetars is equal or even greater than 10{sup 15} G. In this work we study the influence of a strong magnetic field on the composition of nuclear matter at high densities and zero temperature. We describe the matter through a relativistic mean-field model with eight light baryons (baryon octet), electrons, muons and with magnetic field. As output of the numerical calculations, we obtain the relative population of each species of particles as function of baryon density.

  10. Textile Electrodes for EEG Recording — A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Löfhede, Johan; Seoane, Fernando; Thordstein, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    The overall aim of our research is to develop a monitoring system for neonatal intensive care units. Long-term EEG monitoring in newborns require that the electrodes don’t harm the sensitive skin of the baby, an especially relevant feature for premature babies. Our approach to EEG monitoring is based on several electrodes distributed over the head of the baby, and since the weight of the head always will be on some of them, any type of hard electrode will inevitably cause a pressure-point that can irritate the skin. Therefore, we propose the use of soft conductive textiles as EEG electrodes, primarily for neonates, but also for other kinds of unobtrusive long-term monitoring. In this paper we have tested two types of textile electrodes on five healthy adults and compared them to standard high quality electrodes. The acquired signals were compared with respect to morphology, frequency distribution, spectral coherence, correlation and power line interference sensitivity, and the signals were found to be similar in most respects. The good measurement performance exhibited by the textile electrodes indicates that they are feasible candidates for EEG recording, opening the door for long-term EEG monitoring applications. PMID:23223149

  11. Serum high-density lipoprotein is associated with better cognitive function in a cross-sectional study of aging women.

    PubMed

    Bates, Kristyn A; Sohrabi, Hamid R; Rainey-Smith, Stephanie R; Weinborn, Michael; Bucks, Romola S; Rodrigues, Mark; Beilby, John; Howard, Matthew; Taddei, Kevin; Martins, Georgia; Paton, Athena; Shah, Tejal; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S; Foster, Jonathan K; Martins, Ian J; Lautenschlager, Nicola T; Mastaglia, Frank L; Gandy, Samuel E; Martins, Ralph N

    2017-03-01

    Purpose/Aim of the study: Poor cardiovascular health, including obesity and altered lipid profiles at mid-life, are linked to increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The biological mechanisms linking cardiovascular health and cognitive function are unclear though are likely to be multifactorial. This study examined the association between various lipoproteins and cognitive functioning in ageing women.

  12. Real-Time Adaptive EEG Source Separation Using Online Recursive Independent Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sheng-Hsiou; Mullen, Tim R; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2016-03-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) has been widely applied to electroencephalographic (EEG) biosignal processing and brain-computer interfaces. The practical use of ICA, however, is limited by its computational complexity, data requirements for convergence, and assumption of data stationarity, especially for high-density data. Here we study and validate an optimized online recursive ICA algorithm (ORICA) with online recursive least squares (RLS) whitening for blind source separation of high-density EEG data, which offers instantaneous incremental convergence upon presentation of new data. Empirical results of this study demonstrate the algorithm's: 1) suitability for accurate and efficient source identification in high-density (64-channel) realistically-simulated EEG data; 2) capability to detect and adapt to nonstationarity in 64-ch simulated EEG data; and 3) utility for rapidly extracting principal brain and artifact sources in real 61-channel EEG data recorded by a dry and wearable EEG system in a cognitive experiment. ORICA was implemented as functions in BCILAB and EEGLAB and was integrated in an open-source Real-time EEG Source-mapping Toolbox (REST), supporting applications in ICA-based online artifact rejection, feature extraction for real-time biosignal monitoring in clinical environments, and adaptable classifications in brain-computer interfaces.

  13. Real-time Adaptive EEG Source Separation using Online Recursive Independent Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Sheng-Hsiou; Mullen, Tim; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2016-01-01

    Independent Component Analysis (ICA) has been widely applied to electroencephalographic (EEG) biosignal processing and brain-computer interfaces. The practical use of ICA, however, is limited by its computational complexity, data requirements for convergence, and assumption of data stationarity, especially for high-density data. Here we study and validate an optimized online recursive ICA algorithm (ORICA) with online recursive least squares (RLS) whitening for blind source separation of high-density EEG data, which offers instantaneous incremental convergence upon presentation of new data. Empirical results of this study demonstrate the algorithm's: (a) suitability for accurate and efficient source identification in high-density (64-channel) realistically-simulated EEG data; (b) capability to detect and adapt to non-stationarity in 64-ch simulated EEG data; and (c) utility for rapidly extracting principal brain and artifact sources in real 61-channel EEG data recorded by a dry and wearable EEG system in a cognitive experiment. ORICA was implemented as functions in BCILAB and EEGLAB and was integrated in an open-source Real-time EEG Source-mapping Toolbox (REST), supporting applications in ICA-based online artifact rejection, feature extraction for real-time biosignal monitoring in clinical environments, and adaptable classifications in brain-computer interfaces. PMID:26685257

  14. What can be found in scalp EEG spectrum beyond common frequency bands. EEG-fMRI study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marecek, R.; Lamos, M.; Mikl, M.; Barton, M.; Fajkus, J.; I, Rektor; Brazdil, M.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. The scalp EEG spectrum is a frequently used marker of neural activity. Commonly, the preprocessing of EEG utilizes constraints, e.g. dealing with a predefined subset of electrodes or a predefined frequency band of interest. Such treatment of the EEG spectrum neglects the fact that particular neural processes may be reflected in several frequency bands and/or several electrodes concurrently, and can overlook the complexity of the structure of the EEG spectrum. Approach. We showed that the EEG spectrum structure can be described by parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), a method which blindly uncovers the spatial-temporal-spectral patterns of EEG. We used an algorithm based on variational Bayesian statistics to reveal nine patterns from the EEG of 38 healthy subjects, acquired during a semantic decision task. The patterns reflected neural activity synchronized across theta, alpha, beta and gamma bands and spread over many electrodes, as well as various EEG artifacts. Main results. Specifically, one of the patterns showed significant correlation with the stimuli timing. The correlation was higher when compared to commonly used models of neural activity (power fluctuations in distinct frequency band averaged across a subset of electrodes) and we found significantly correlated hemodynamic fluctuations in simultaneously acquired fMRI data in regions known to be involved in speech processing. Further, we show that the pattern also occurs in EEG data which were acquired outside the MR machine. Two other patterns reflected brain rhythms linked to the attentional and basal ganglia large scale networks. The other patterns were related to various EEG artifacts. Significance. These results show that PARAFAC blindly identifies neural activity in the EEG spectrum and that it naturally handles the correlations among frequency bands and electrodes. We conclude that PARAFAC seems to be a powerful tool for analysis of the EEG spectrum and might bring novel insight to the

  15. [Comparative EEG study in normal and autistic children].

    PubMed

    Lushchekina, E A; Podreznaia, E D; Lushchekin, V S; Strelets, V B

    2010-01-01

    The work represents the results of a comparative study of spectral power as well as averaged coherence in alpha, beta and gamma EEG bands in 5-to-7-year-old autistic and healthy boys in the state of rest and under cognitive load (mental calculation). The mean age of the examined children was 6 years 4 months. In both healthy and autistic children, there was a clear-cut baseline frontal-occipital gradient of the alpha activity. Performance of the cognitive task led to enhancement of spectral power in the alpha1 band and shifting its maximum to the left hemisphere, did not change the activity in the alpha2 band, and considerably increased the spectral power in the alpha3 band. In healthy children, the spectral power and average coherence of the fast rhythms increased in the central and frontal areas of the left hemisphere. The right-side dominance of the spectral power of the alpha band was revealed in autistic children both in the baseline and during cognitive task. The spectral power of the gamma band was higher in autistic children than in healthy children in the baseline. The cognitive task did not change this fast activity in autistic children.

  16. Aberrant EEG functional connectivity and EEG power spectra in resting state post-traumatic stress disorder: a sLORETA study.

    PubMed

    Imperatori, Claudio; Farina, Benedetto; Quintiliani, Maria Isabella; Onofri, Antonio; Castelli Gattinara, Paola; Lepore, Marta; Gnoni, Valentina; Mazzucchi, Edoardo; Contardi, Anna; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the modifications of EEG power spectra and EEG connectivity of resting state (RS) condition in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Seventeen patients and seventeen healthy subjects matched for age and gender were enrolled. EEG was recorded during 5min of RS. EEG analysis was conducted by means of the standardized Low Resolution Electric Tomography software (sLORETA). In power spectra analysis PTSD patients showed a widespread increase of theta activity (4.5-7.5Hz) in parietal lobes (Brodmann Area, BA 7, 4, 5, 40) and in frontal lobes (BA 6). In the connectivity analysis PTSD patients also showed increase of alpha connectivity (8-12.5Hz) between the cortical areas explored by Pz-P4 electrode. Our results could reflect the alteration of memory systems and emotional processing consistently altered in PTSD patients.

  17. Studies of high density baryon matter with high intensity heavy-ion beams at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sako, H.; Harada, H.; Sakaguchi, T.; Chujo, T.; Esumi, S.; Gunji, T.; Hasegawa, S.; Hwang, S. H.; Ichikawa, Y.; Imai, K.; Itakura, K.; Kaneta, M.; Kim, B. C.; Kinsho, M.; Kitazawa, M.; Liu, Y.; Masui, H.; Nagamiya, S.; Nishio, K.; Okamura, M.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Saha, P. K.; Sakaguchi, A.; Sato, S.; Shigaki, K.; Sugimura, H.; Tanida, K.; Tamura, J.; Tamura, H.; Nara, Y.; Saito, T. R.

    2016-12-01

    In J-PARC heavy-ion project, we aim at studies of QCD phase structures and hadron properties in high baryon density close to the neutron star core. We have developed a heavy-ion acceleration scheme with a new linac and a new booster with existing two synchrotrons with the goal beam rate of about 1011 Hz. We have also designed a large acceptance spectrometer based on a toroidal magnet. We have evaluated the spectrometer performance, and demonstrated reconstructing dielectron and dimuon spectra with full detector simulations. Finally, we designed a hypernuclear spectrometer which can utilize the full intensity ion beams.

  18. Study of diffusion bond development in 6061 aluminum and its relationship to future high density fuels fabrication.

    SciTech Connect

    Prokofiev, I.; Wiencek, T.; McGann, D.

    1997-10-07

    Powder metallurgy dispersions of uranium alloys and silicides in an aluminum matrix have been developed by the RERTR program as a new generation of proliferation-resistant fuels. Testing is done with miniplate-type fuel plates to simulate standard fuel with cladding and matrix in plate-type configurations. In order to seal the dispersion fuel plates, a diffusion bond must exist between the aluminum coverplates surrounding the fuel meat. Four different variations in the standard method for roll-bonding 6061 aluminum were studied. They included mechanical cleaning, addition of a getter material, modifications to the standard chemical etching, and welding methods. Aluminum test pieces were subjected to a bend test after each rolling pass. Results, based on 400 samples, indicate that at least a 70% reduction in thickness is required to produce a diffusion bond using the standard rollbonding method versus a 60% reduction using the Type II method in which the assembly was welded 100% and contained open 9mm holes at frame corners.

  19. Characterization of infant mu rhythm immediately before crawling: A high-resolution EEG study.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ran; Qi, Xiao; Patino, Alejandro; Fagg, Andrew H; Kolobe, Thubi H A; Miller, David P; Ding, Lei

    2017-02-01

    Crawling is an important milestone in infant motor development. However, infants with developmental motor disorders can exhibit delays, or even miss, in the acquisition of crawling skill. And little information is available from the neurodevelopmental domain about the changes in brain function with intervention. The mu rhythm can potentially play a substantial role in understanding human motor development at early ages in infants, as it has in adults. Studies about the mu rhythm in infants were in coarse temporal resolution with longitudinal samples taken months or years apart. Details about the infant mu rhythm at a fine age resolution has not been fully revealed, which leads to contradictory evidence about its formulation and developmental changes of its spectral origins and, therefore, impedes the full understanding of motor brain development before crawling skill acquisition. The present study aims to expand knowledge about the infant mu rhythm and its spatio-spectral pattern shifts along maturation immediately before crawling. With high-density EEG data recorded on a weekly basis and simultaneous characterization of spatio-spectral patterns of the mu rhythm, subtle developmental changes in its spectral peak, frequency range, and scalp topography are revealed. This mu rhythm further indicates a significant correlation to the crawling onset while powers from other frequency bands do not show such correlations. These details of developmental changes about the mu rhythm provide an insight of rapid changes in the human motor cortex in the first year of life. Our results are consistent with previous findings about the peak frequency shifting of the mu rhythm and further depict detailed developmental curves of its frequency ranges and spatial topographies. The infant mu rhythm could potentially be used to assess motor brain deficiencies at early ages and to evaluate intervention effectiveness in children with neuromotor disorders.

  20. Brain Networks Responsible for Sense of Agency: An EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Miseon; Nahab, Fatta B.; Park, Jihye; Kim, Do-Won; Kakareka, John; Miletta, Nathanial; Hallett, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background Self-agency (SA) is a person’s feeling that his action was generated by himself. The neural substrates of SA have been investigated in many neuroimaging studies, but the functional connectivity of identified regions has rarely been investigated. The goal of this study is to investigate the neural network related to SA. Methods SA of hand movements was modulated with virtual reality. We examined the cortical network relating to SA modulation with electroencephalography (EEG) power spectrum and phase coherence of alpha, beta, and gamma frequency bands in 16 right-handed, healthy volunteers. Results In the alpha band, significant relative power changes and phase coherence of alpha band were associated with SA modulation. The relative power decrease over the central, bilateral parietal, and right temporal regions (C4, Pz, P3, P4, T6) became larger as participants more effectively controlled the virtual hand movements. The phase coherence of the alpha band within frontal areas (F7-FP2, F7-Fz) was directly related to changes in SA. The functional connectivity was lower as the participants felt that they could control their virtual hand. In the other frequency bands, significant phase coherences were observed in the frontal (or central) to parietal, temporal, and occipital regions during SA modulation (Fz-O1, F3-O1, Cz-O1, C3-T4L in beta band; FP1-T6, FP1-O2, F7-T4L, F8-Cz in gamma band). Conclusions Our study suggests that alpha band activity may be the main neural oscillation of SA, which suggests that the neural network within the anterior frontal area may be important in the generation of SA. PMID:26270552

  1. EEG-fMRI Bayesian framework for neural activity estimation: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croce, Pierpaolo; Basti, Alessio; Marzetti, Laura; Zappasodi, Filippo; Del Gratta, Cosimo

    2016-12-01

    Objective. Due to the complementary nature of electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and given the possibility of simultaneous acquisition, the joint data analysis can afford a better understanding of the underlying neural activity estimation. In this simulation study we want to show the benefit of the joint EEG-fMRI neural activity estimation in a Bayesian framework. Approach. We built a dynamic Bayesian framework in order to perform joint EEG-fMRI neural activity time course estimation. The neural activity is originated by a given brain area and detected by means of both measurement techniques. We have chosen a resting state neural activity situation to address the worst case in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio. To infer information by EEG and fMRI concurrently we used a tool belonging to the sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) methods: the particle filter (PF). Main results. First, despite a high computational cost, we showed the feasibility of such an approach. Second, we obtained an improvement in neural activity reconstruction when using both EEG and fMRI measurements. Significance. The proposed simulation shows the improvements in neural activity reconstruction with EEG-fMRI simultaneous data. The application of such an approach to real data allows a better comprehension of the neural dynamics.

  2. Photoionization and High Density Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallman, T.; Bautista, M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present results of calculations using the XSTAR version 2 computer code. This code is loosely based on the XSTAR v.1 code which has been available for public use for some time. However it represents an improvement and update in several major respects, including atomic data, code structure, user interface, and improved physical description of ionization/excitation. In particular, it now is applicable to high density situations in which significant excited atomic level populations are likely to occur. We describe the computational techniques and assumptions, and present sample runs with particular emphasis on high density situations.

  3. The Effect of Residing Altitude on Levels of High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol: A Pilot Study From the Omani Arab Population.

    PubMed

    Al Riyami, Nafila B; Banerjee, Yajnavalka; Al-Waili, Khalid; Rizvi, Syed G; Al-Yahyaee, Said; Hassan, Mohammed O; Albarwani, Sulayma; Al-Rasadi, Khalid; Bayoumi, Riad A

    2015-07-01

    Lower mortality rates from coronary heart disease and higher levels of serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) have been observed in populations residing at high altitude. However, this effect has not been investigated in Arab populations, which exhibit considerable genetic homogeneity. We assessed the relationship between residing altitude and HDL-C in 2 genetically similar Omani Arab populations residing at different altitudes. The association between the levels of HDL-C and other metabolic parameters was also investigated. The levels of HDL-C were significantly higher in the high-altitude group compared with the low-altitude group. Stepwise regression analysis showed that altitude was the most significant factor affecting HDL-C, followed by gender, serum triglycerides, and finally the 2-hour postprandial plasma glucose. This finding is consistent with previously published studies from other populations and should be taken into consideration when comparing cardiovascular risk factors in populations residing at different altitudes.

  4. Study on EEG power and coherence in patients with mild cognitive impairment during working memory task.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zheng-yan

    2005-12-01

    To investigate the features of electroencephalography (EEG) power and coherence at rest and during a working memory task of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Thirty-five patients (17 males, 18 females; 52-71 years old) and 34 sex- and age-matched controls (17 males, 17 females; 51-63 years old) were recruited in the present study. Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) of 35 patients with MCI and 34 normal controls revealed that the scores of MCI patients did not differ significantly from those of normal controls (P>0.05). Then, EEGs at rest and during working memory task with three levels of working memory load were recorded. The EEG power was computed over 10 channels: right and left frontal (F3, F4), central (C3, C4), parietal (P3, P4), temporal (T5, T6) and occipital (O1, O2); inter-hemispheric coherences were computed from five electrode pairs of F3-F4, C3-C4, P3-P4, T5-T6 and O1-O2 for delta (1.0-3.5 Hz), theta (4.0-7.5 Hz), alpha-1 (8.0-10.0 Hz), alpha-2 (10.5 -13.0 Hz), beta-1 (13.5-18.0 Hz) and beta-2 (18.5-30.0 Hz) frequency bands. All values of the EEG power of MCI patients were found to be higher than those of normal controls at rest and during working memory tasks. Furthermore, the values of EEG power in the theta, alpha-1, alpha-2 and beta-1 bands of patients with MCI were significantly high (P<0.05) in comparison with those of normal controls. Correlation analysis indicated a significant negative correlation between the EEG powers and MMSE scores. In addition, during working memory tasks, the EEG coherences in all bands were significantly higher in the MCI group in comparison with those in the control group (P<0.05). However, there was no significant difference in EEG coherences between two groups at rest. These findings comprise evidence that MCI patients have higher EEG power at rest, and higher EEG power and coherence during working conditions. It suggests that MCI may be associated with compensatory processes at rest and during working

  5. Aerodynamic Focusing Of High-Density Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, D. E.; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2014-02-24

    High-density micron-sized particle aerosols might form the basis for a number of applications in which a material target with a particular shape might be quickly ionized to form a cylindrical or sheet shaped plasma. A simple experimental device was built in order to study the properties of high-density aerosol focusing for 1 m silica spheres. Preliminary results recover previous findings on aerodynamic focusing at low densities. At higher densities, it is demonstrated that the focusing properties change in a way which is consistent with a density dependent Stokes number.

  6. Canonical Decomposition of Ictal Scalp EEG and Accurate Source Localisation: Principles and Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    De Vos, Maarten; De Lathauwer, Lieven; Vanrumste, Bart; Van Huffel, Sabine; Van Paesschen, W.

    2007-01-01

    Long-term electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings are important in the presurgical evaluation of refractory partial epilepsy for the delineation of the ictal onset zones. In this paper, we introduce a new concept for an automatic, fast, and objective localisation of the ictal onset zone in ictal EEG recordings. Canonical decomposition of ictal EEG decomposes the EEG in atoms. One or more atoms are related to the seizure activity. A single dipole was then fitted to model the potential distribution of each epileptic atom. In this study, we performed a simulation study in order to estimate the dipole localisation error. Ictal dipole localisation was very accurate, even at low signal-to-noise ratios, was not affected by seizure activity frequency or frequency changes, and was minimally affected by the waveform and depth of the ictal onset zone location. Ictal dipole localisation error using 21 electrodes was around 10.0 mm and improved more than tenfold in the range of 0.5–1.0 mm using 148 channels. In conclusion, our simulation study of canonical decomposition of ictal scalp EEG allowed a robust and accurate localisation of the ictal onset zone. PMID:18301715

  7. Electroencephalography (EEG) in the Study of Equivalence Class Formation. An Explorative Study

    PubMed Central

    Arntzen, Erik; Steingrimsdottir, Hanna S.

    2017-01-01

    Teaching arbitrary conditional discriminations and testing for derived relations may be essential for understanding changes in cognitive skills. Such conditional discrimination procedures are often used within stimulus equivalence research. For example, the participant is taught AB and BC relations and tested if emergent relations as BA, CB, AC and CA occur. The purpose of the current explorative experiment was to study stimulus equivalence class formation in older adults with electroencephalography (EEG) recordings as an additional measure. The EEG was used to learn about whether there was an indication of cognitive changes such as those observed in neurocognitive disorders (NCD). The present study included four participants who did conditional discrimination training and testing. The experimental design employed pre-class formation sorting and post-class formation sorting of the stimuli used in the experiment. EEG recordings were conducted before training, after training and after testing. The results showed that two participants formed equivalence classes, one participant failed in one of the three test relations, and one participant failed in two of the three test relations. This fourth participant also failed to sort the stimuli in accordance with the experimenter-defined stimulus equivalence classes during post-class formation sorting. The EEG indicated no cognitive decline in the first three participants but possible mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in the fourth participant. The results suggest that equivalence class formation may provide information about cognitive impairments such as those that are likely to occur in the early stages of NCD. The study recommends replications with broader samples. PMID:28377704

  8. Externally and internally controlled attention in infants: an EEG study.

    PubMed

    Stroganova, T A; Orekhova, E V; Posikera, I N

    1998-11-01

    This work was designed to investigate EEG indices of Internally and Externally Controlled Attention in infancy. EEG was recorded in 15 infants aged 7-8 months under three experimental conditions: (1) visual attention to a new stimulation (Externally Controlled Attention or baseline condition); (2) attention guided by internal cognitive schemata during 'anticipatory' phase of the peek-a-boo game (Internally Controlled Attention); and (3) 'reappearance' phase of the peek-a-boo game when the experimenter talked and smiled to an infant (reappearance). The relative power (RP) in 4-5 single-Hz theta sub-band increased under both phases of the peek-a-boo game. The reactive changes of 4-5 single-Hz RP at prefrontal and frontal leads under the Internally Controlled Attention condition positively correlated with the total time during which an infant was able to maintain ICA. The RP in 5-6 single-Hz theta sub-band significantly increased only under the Internally Controlled Attention condition and did not correlate with the total time of this type of attention. The results support the concept of 'Diffuse Theta-Response System' that is active during expectancy and effortfully focused attention. In contrast to theta, the RP in 6-7, 7-8, and 8-9 single-Hz bands decreased during both phases of the game. The decrease was maximal at precentral leads and most probably reflected blockage of the sensorimotor (mu) rhythm due to higher motility and muscular tension in the game situation. It is concluded that EEG is an adequate vehicle for investigation of brain mechanisms of attention and voluntary control in infants.

  9. High-density electroencephalography developmental neurophysiological trajectories.

    PubMed

    Dan, Bernard; Pelc, Karine; Cebolla, Ana M; Cheron, Guy

    2015-04-01

    Efforts to document early changes in the developing brain have resulted in the construction of increasingly accurate structural images based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in newborn infants. Tractography diagrams obtained through diffusion tensor imaging have focused on white matter microstructure, with particular emphasis on neuronal connectivity at the level of fibre tract systems. Electroencephalography (EEG) provides a complementary approach with more direct access to brain electrical activity. Its temporal resolution is excellent, and its spatial resolution can be enhanced to physiologically relevant levels, through the combination of high-density recordings (e.g. by using 64 channels in newborn infants) and mathematical models (e.g. inverse modelling computation), to identify generators of different oscillation bands and synchrony patterns. The integration of functional and structural topography of the neonatal brain provides insights into typical brain organization, and the deviations seen in particular contexts, for example the effect of hypoxic-ischaemic insult in terms of damage, eventual reorganization, and functional changes. Endophenotypes can then be used for pathophysiological reasoning, management planning, and outcome measurements, and allow a longitudinal approach to individual developmental trajectories.

  10. Default Mode Network alterations in alexithymia: an EEG power spectra and connectivity study

    PubMed Central

    Imperatori, Claudio; Della Marca, Giacomo; Brunetti, Riccardo; Carbone, Giuseppe Alessio; Massullo, Chiara; Valenti, Enrico Maria; Amoroso, Noemi; Maestoso, Giulia; Contardi, Anna; Farina, Benedetto

    2016-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies have shown that alexithymia is characterized by functional alterations in different brain areas [e.g., posterior cingulate cortex (PCC)], during emotional/social tasks. However, only few data are available about alexithymic cortical networking features during resting state (RS). We have investigated the modifications of electroencephalographic (EEG) power spectra and EEG functional connectivity in the default mode network (DMN) in subjects with alexithymia. Eighteen subjects with alexithymia and eighteen subjects without alexithymia matched for age and gender were enrolled. EEG was recorded during 5 min of RS. EEG analyses were conducted by means of the exact Low Resolution Electric Tomography software (eLORETA). Compared to controls, alexithymic subjects showed a decrease of alpha power in the right PCC. In the connectivity analysis, compared to controls, alexithymic subjects showed a decrease of alpha connectivity between: (i) right anterior cingulate cortex and right PCC, (ii) right frontal lobe and right PCC, and (iii) right parietal lobe and right temporal lobe. Finally, mediation models showed that the association between alexithymia and EEG connectivity values was directed and was not mediated by psychopathology severity. Taken together, our results could reflect the neurophysiological substrate of some core features of alexithymia, such as the impairment in emotional awareness. PMID:27845326

  11. Antiepileptic drug intervention decouples electroencephalogram (EEG) signals: a case study in Unverricht-Lundborg Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang-Chia; Xanthopoulos, Petros; Chaovalitwongse, W; Pardalos, Panos M; Uthman, Basim M

    2008-01-01

    Change in severity of myoclonus as an outcome measure of antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment in patients with Unverricht-Lundborg Disease (ULD) has been estimated by utilizing the Unified Myoclonus Rating Scale (UMRS). In this study, we measure treatment effects through EEG analysis using mutual information approach to quantify interdependence/coupling strength among different electrode sites. Mutual information is known to have the ability to capture linear and non-linear dependencies between EEG time series with superior performance over the traditional linear measures. One subject with ULD participated in this study and 1-hour EEG recordings were acquired before and after treatment of AED. Our results indicate that the mutual information is significantly lower after taking the add-on AED for four weeks at least. This finding could lead to a new insight for developing a new outcome measure for patient with ULD, when UMRS could potentially fail to detect a significant difference.

  12. Neural Differences between Covert and Overt Attention Studied using EEG with Simultaneous Remote Eye Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Kulke, Louisa V.; Atkinson, Janette; Braddick, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Research on neural mechanisms of attention has generally instructed subjects to direct attention covertly while maintaining a fixed gaze. This study combined simultaneous eye tracking and electroencephalogram (EEG) to measure neural attention responses during exogenous cueing in overt attention shifts (with saccadic eye movements to a target) and compared these with covert attention shifts (responding manually while maintaining central fixation). EEG analysis of the period preceding the saccade latency showed similar occipital response amplitudes for overt and covert shifts, although response latencies differed. However, a frontal positivity was greater during covert attention shifts, possibly reflecting saccade inhibition to maintain fixation. The results show that combined EEG and eye tracking can be successfully used to study natural overt shifts of attention (applicable to non-verbal infants) and that requiring inhibition of saccades can lead to additional frontal responses. Such data can be used to refine current neural models of attention that have been mainly based on covert shifts. PMID:27932962

  13. Human memory retention and recall processes. A review of EEG and fMRI studies.

    PubMed

    Amin, Hafeezullah; Malik, Aamir S

    2013-10-01

    Human memory is an important concept in cognitive psychology and neuroscience. Our brain is actively engaged in functions of learning and memorization. Generally, human memory has been classified into 2 groups: short-term/working memory, and long-term memory. Using different memory paradigms and brain mapping techniques, psychologists and neuroscientists have identified 3 memory processes: encoding, retention, and recall. These processes have been studied using EEG and functional MRI (fMRI) in cognitive and neuroscience research. This study reviews previous research reported for human memory processes, particularly brain behavior in memory retention and recall processes with the use of EEG and fMRI. We discuss issues and challenges related to memory research with EEG and fMRI techniques.

  14. Fine mapping and association studies of a high-density lipoprotein cholesterol linkage region on chromosome 16 in French-Canadian subjects.

    PubMed

    Dastani, Zari; Pajukanta, Päivi; Marcil, Michel; Rudzicz, Nicholas; Ruel, Isabelle; Bailey, Swneke D; Lee, Jenny C; Lemire, Mathieu; Faith, Janet; Platko, Jill; Rioux, John; Hudson, Thomas J; Gaudet, Daniel; Engert, James C; Genest, Jacques

    2010-03-01

    Low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. To identify novel genetic variants that contribute to HDL-C, we performed genome-wide scans and quantitative association studies in two study samples: a Quebec-wide study consisting of 11 multigenerational families and a study of 61 families from the Saguenay-Lac St-Jean (SLSJ) region of Quebec. The heritability of HDL-C in these study samples was 0.73 and 0.49, respectively. Variance components linkage methods identified a LOD score of 2.61 at 98 cM near the marker D16S515 in Quebec-wide families and an LOD score of 2.96 at 86 cM near the marker D16S2624 in SLSJ families. In the Quebec-wide sample, four families showed segregation over a 25.5-cM (18 Mb) region, which was further reduced to 6.6 Mb with additional markers. The coding regions of all genes within this region were sequenced. A missense variant in CHST6 segregated in four families and, with additional families, we observed a P value of 0.015 for this variant. However, an association study of this single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in unrelated Quebec-wide samples was not significant. We also identified an SNP (rs11646677) in the same region, which was significantly associated with a low HDL-C (P=0.016) in the SLSJ study sample. In addition, RT-PCR results from cultured cells showed a significant difference in the expression of CHST6 and KIAA1576, another gene in the region. Our data constitute additional evidence for a locus on chromosome 16q23-24 that affects HDL-C levels in two independent French-Canadian studies.

  15. Anti-TNFα therapy transiently improves high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and microvascular endothelial function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD). This can be only partially attributed to traditional CVD risk factors such as dyslipidaemia and their downstream effects on endothelial function. The most common lipid abnormality in RA is reduced levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, probably due to active inflammation. In this longitudinal study we hypothesised that anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (anti-TNFα) therapy in patients with active RA improves HDL cholesterol, microvascular and macrovascular endothelial function. Methods Twenty-three RA patients starting on anti-TNFα treatment were assessed for HDL cholesterol level, and endothelial-dependent and -independent function of microvessels and macrovessels at baseline, 2-weeks and 3 months of treatment. Results Disease activity (CRP, fibrinogen, DAS28) significantly decreased during the follow-up period. There was an increase in HDL cholesterol levels at 2 weeks (p < 0.05) which was paralleled by a significant increase in microvascular endothelial-dependent function (p < 0.05). However, both parameters returned towards baseline at 12 weeks. Conclusion Anti-TNFα therapy in RA patients appears to be accompanied by transient but significant improvements in HDL cholesterol levels, which coexists with an improvement in microvascular endothelial-dependent function. PMID:22824166

  16. Effect of serial infusions of reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (CER-001) on coronary atherosclerosis: rationale and design of the CARAT study

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Jordan; Janssan, Alex; Nguyen, Tracy; Pisaniello, Anthony D.; Scherer, Daniel J.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Merkely, Bela; Nissen, Steven E.; Ray, Kausik; Schwartz, Gregory G.; Worthley, Stephen G.; Keyserling, Connie; Dasseux, Jean-Louis; Butters, Julie; Girardi, Jacinta; Miller, Rosemary

    2017-01-01

    Background High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is believed to have atheroprotective properties, but an effective HDL-based therapy remains elusive. Early studies have suggested that infusion of reconstituted HDL promotes reverse cholesterol transport and vascular reactivity. The CER-001 Atherosclerosis Regression Acute Coronary Syndrome Trial (CARAT) is investigating the impact of infusing an engineered pre-beta HDL mimetic containing sphingomyelin (SM) and dipalmitoyl phosphatidlyglycerol (CER-001) on coronary atheroma volume in patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Methods The CARAT is a phase 2, multicenter trial in which 292 patients with an ACS undergoing intracoronary ultrasonography and showing percent atheroma volume (PAV) greater than 30% are randomly assigned to treatment with ten infusions of CER-001 3 mg/kg or matching placebo, administered at weekly intervals. Intracoronary ultrasonography is repeated at the end of the treatment period. Results The primary endpoint is the nominal change in PAV. Safety and tolerability will also be evaluated. Conclusions CARAT will establish whether serial 3 mg/kg infusions of an engineered pre-beta HDL mimetic containing SM and dipalmitoyl phosphatidlyglycerol (CER-001) will regress atherosclerotic plaque in patients with a recent ACS. PMID:28164012

  17. Serum non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and the incidence of ischemic stroke in a Japanese population: the Jichi Medical School cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kakehi, Eiichi; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Shizukiyo; Gotoh, Tadao; Kayaba, Kazunori; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Kajii, Eiji

    2015-03-01

    The predictive value of serum non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) levels for the incidence of ischemic stroke and its subtypes has not yet been established. The present cohort study investigated their relationships in a Japanese population. The first incidence of ischemic stroke and its subtypes was documented as the primary outcome. A total of 249 ischemic stroke patients (men/women = 145/104) were identified during a follow-up period of 10.7 years among 10 760 community-dwelling subjects (men/women = 4212/6548). Cox proportional hazard model analyses revealed that when compared with the lowest tertile of non-HDL-C, multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios for the highest tertile were 0.55 (95% confidence interval = 0.32-0.95, P = .03) on ischemic stroke and 0.29 (95% confidence interval = 0.08-1.05, P = .06) on cardioembolic infarction in women. Men did not show such significant relationships. Low serum non-HDL-C levels may be a predictive marker associated with an increase in the incidence of ischemic stroke and possibly of cardioembolic infarction in Japanese women.

  18. Sensitivity of the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) to Topographic Effects: A Case Study in High-Density Cypress Forest

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Bunkei; Yang, Wei; Chen, Jin; Onda, Yuyichi; Qiu, Guoyu

    2007-01-01

    Vegetation indices play an important role in monitoring variations in vegetation. The Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) proposed by the MODIS Land Discipline Group and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) are both global-based vegetation indices aimed at providing consistent spatial and temporal information regarding global vegetation. However, many environmental factors such as atmospheric conditions and soil background may produce errors in these indices. The topographic effect is another very important factor, especially when the indices are used in areas of rough terrain. In this paper, we theoretically analyzed differences in the topographic effect on the EVI and the NDVI based on a non-Lambertian model and two airborne-based images acquired from a mountainous area covered by high-density Japanese cypress plantation were used as a case study. The results indicate that the soil adjustment factor “L” in the EVI makes it more sensitive to topographic conditions than is the NDVI. Based on these results, we strongly recommend that the topographic effect should be removed in the reflectance data before the EVI was calculated—as well as from other vegetation indices that similarly include a term without a band ratio format (e.g., the PVI and SAVI)—when these indices are used in the area of rough terrain, where the topographic effect on the vegetation indices having only a band ratio format (e.g., the NDVI) can usually be ignored.

  19. Lateralization of Auditory Language: An EEG Study of Bilingual Crow Indian Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vocate, Donna R.

    A study was undertaken to learn whether involvement of the brain's right hemisphere in auditory language processing, a phenomenon found in a previous study of Crow-English bilinguals, was language-specific. Alpha blocking response as measured by electroencephalography (EEG) was used as an indicator of brain activity. It was predicted that (1)…

  20. High-density digital recording

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalil, F. (Editor); Buschman, A. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The problems associated with high-density digital recording (HDDR) are discussed. Five independent users of HDDR systems and their problems, solutions, and insights are provided as guidance for other users of HDDR systems. Various pulse code modulation coding techniques are reviewed. An introduction to error detection and correction head optimization theory and perpendicular recording are provided. Competitive tape recorder manufacturers apply all of the above theories and techniques and present their offerings. The methodology used by the HDDR Users Subcommittee of THIC to evaluate parallel HDDR systems is presented.

  1. Comparison of Brain Activity during Drawing and Clay Sculpting: A Preliminary qEEG Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruk, Kerry A.; Aravich, Paul F.; Deaver, Sarah P.; deBeus, Roger

    2014-01-01

    A preliminary experimental study examined brain wave frequency patterns of female participants (N = 14) engaged in two different art making conditions: clay sculpting and drawing. After controlling for nonspecific effects of movement, quantitative electroencephalographic (qEEG) recordings were made of the bilateral medial frontal cortex and…

  2. The Reconstruction of Nasal Septal Perforation with High Density Porous Polyethylene Covered with Fascia Lata: An Experimental Study on Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Onar, Vedat; Sayin, Ibrahim; Onol, Suzan Deniz; Aydin, Tamer

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Evaluation of a new material, high-density porous polyethylene (HDPP), which is covered with fascia lata, for experimental nasal septal perforation closure. Methods Twenty New Zealand albino rabbits were included and divided into study and control groups. A lateral incision was made from the lateral aspect of the left nares to the incisura nasomaxillaris. After exposure of the cavum nasi, the nasal mucoperichondrium was elevated bilaterally. A full-thickness 0.5×0.5-cm perforation was created over the septum nasi with a No. 11 surgical blade. A fascia lata graft was used for the study group. The HDPP was covered with fascia lata and placed under the elevated mucosa. HDPP without a fascial covering was used in the control group. Four months after the procedure, magnetic resonance imaging was performed to evaluate resorption of the material. The animals were sacrificed, and the nasal septum was completely removed. Macroscopic and histopathological examinations were performed on the nasal septum. Results All rabbits had survived after the 4-month period. Macroscopically, nine of 10 (90%) perforations were closed in the fascia lata-covered HDPP group. Histopathological examination of these nine rabbits revealed that the continuity of cartilage was disturbed in the perforation areas. Granulation tissue was inverted in areas in which the cartilage continuity was disturbed. The HDPP had remained intact at the edge of the perforation. In the HDPP group, six of 10 implants were still perforated (60%) and four (40%) were closed. The fascia lata-covered HDPP implant had a significantly higher perforation closure rate than that of the HDPP implant alone (P<0.05). Conclusion In cases of septal perforation, it is better to cover the HDPP implant with fascia lata. This covered implant can be used for the repair of nasal septal perforations. HDPP implants are easy to work with and avoid the increased operative time and morbidity associated with harvesting autografts

  3. Hemodynamic and EEG Time-Courses During Unilateral Hand Movement in Patients with Cortical Myoclonus. An EEG-fMRI and EEG-TD-fNIRS Study.

    PubMed

    Visani, E; Canafoglia, L; Gilioli, I; Sebastiano, D Rossi; Contarino, V E; Duran, D; Panzica, F; Cubeddu, R; Contini, D; Zucchelli, L; Spinelli, L; Caffini, M; Molteni, E; Bianchi, A M; Cerutti, S; Franceschetti, S; Torricelli, A

    2015-11-01

    Multimodal human brain mapping has been proposed as an integrated approach capable of improving the recognition of the cortical correlates of specific neurological functions. We used simultaneous EEG-fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging) and EEG-TD-fNIRS (time domain functional near-infrared spectroscopy) recordings to compare different hemodynamic methods with changes in EEG in ten patients with progressive myoclonic epilepsy and 12 healthy controls. We evaluated O2Hb, HHb and Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) changes and event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) in the α and β bands of all of the subjects while they performed a simple motor task. The general linear model was used to obtain comparable fMRI and TD-fNIRS activation maps. We also analyzed cortical thickness in order to evaluate any structural changes. In the patients, the TD-NIRS and fMRI data significantly correlated and showed a significant lessening of the increase in O2Hb and the decrease in BOLD. The post-movement β rebound was minimal or absent in patients. Cortical thickness was moderately reduced in the motor area of the patients and correlated with the reduction in the hemodynamic signals. The fMRI and TD-NIRS results were consistent, significantly correlated and showed smaller hemodynamic changes in the patients. This finding may be partially attributable to mild cortical thickening. However, cortical hyperexcitability, which is known to generate myoclonic jerks and probably accounts for the lack of EEG β-ERS, did not reflect any increased energy requirement. We hypothesize that this is due to a loss of inhibitory neuronal components that typically fire at high frequencies.

  4. Population structure and genetic basis of the agronomic traits of upland cotton in China revealed by a genome-wide association study using high-density SNPs.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cong; Nie, Xinhui; Shen, Chao; You, Chunyuan; Li, Wu; Zhao, Wenxia; Zhang, Xianlong; Lin, Zhongxu

    2017-03-16

    Gossypium hirsutum L. represents the largest source of textile fibre, and China is one of the largest cotton producing and consuming countries in the world. To investigate the genetic architecture of the agronomic traits of upland cotton in China, a diverse and nation-wide population containing 503 G. hirsutum accessions was collected for a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on 16 agronomic traits. The accessions were planted in four places from 2012 to 2013 for phenotyping. The CottonSNP63K array and a published high-density map based on this array were used for genotyping. The 503 G. hirsutum accessions were divided into 3 subpopulations based on 11,975 quantified polymorphic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). By comparing the genetic structure and phenotypic variation among 3 genetic subpopulations, 7 geographic distributions and 4 breeding periods, we found that geographic distribution and breeding period were not the determinants of genetic structure. In addition, no obvious phenotypic differentiations were found among the 3 subpopulations, even though they had different genetic backgrounds. A total of 324 SNPs and 160 candidate quantitative trait loci (QTL) regions were identified as significantly associated with the 16 agronomic traits. A network was established for multi-effects in QTLs and inter-associations among traits. Thirty-eight associated regions had pleiotropic effects controlling more than one trait. One candidate gene, Gh_D08G2376, was speculated to control the lint percentage (LP). This GWAS is the first report using high-resolution SNPs in upland cotton in China to comprehensively investigate agronomic traits, and it provides a fundamental resource for cotton genetic research and breeding. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Possible association of ABCB1:c.3435T>C polymorphism with high-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol response to statin treatment--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sałacka, Anna; Bińczak-Kuleta, Agnieszka; Kaczmarczyk, Mariusz; Hornowska, Iwona; Safranow, Krzysztof; Clark, Jeremy S C

    2014-08-14

    The gene product ABCB1 (formerly MDR1 or P-glycoprotein) is hypothesized to be involved in cholesterol cellular trafficking, redistribution and intestinal re-absorption. Carriers of the ABCB1:3435T allele have previously been associated with decreases in ABCB1 mRNA and protein concentrations and have been correlated with changes in serum lipid concentrations. The aim of this study was to investigate possible association between the ABCB1:3435T>C polymorphism and changes in lipids in patients following statin treatment. Outpatients (n=130) were examined: 43 men (33%), 87 women (67%): treated with atorvastatin or simvastatin (all patients with equivalent dose of 20 or 40 mg/d simvastatin). Blood was taken for ABCB1:3435T>C genotyping, and before and after statin treatment for lipid concentration determination (total cholesterol, high-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides). Change (Δ) in lipid parameters, calculated as differences between measurements before and after treatment, were analyzed with multiple regression adjustments: gender, diabetes, age, body mass index, equivalent statin dose, length of treatment. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed significant differences in ΔHDL-C (univariate p=0.029; multivariate p=0.036) and %ΔHDL-C (univariate p=0.021; multivariate p=0.023) between patients with TT (-0.05 ± 0.13 g/l; -6.8% ± 20%; respectively) and CC+CT genotypes (0.004 ± 0.15 g/l; 4.1 ± 26%; respectively). Reduction of HDL-C in homozygous ABCB1:3435TT patients suggests this genotype could be associated with a reduction in the benefits of statin treatment.

  6. Estimating a neutral reference for electroencephalographic recordings: The importance of using a high-density montage and a realistic head model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Quanying; Balsters, Joshua H.; Baechinger, Marc; van der Groen, Onno; Wenderoth, Nicole; Mantini, Dante

    2016-01-01

    Objective In electroencephalography (EEG) measurements, the signal of each recording electrode is contrasted with a reference electrode or a combination of electrodes. The estimation of a neutral reference is a long-standing issue in EEG data analysis, which has motivated the proposal of different re-referencing methods, among which linked-mastoid re-referencing (LMR), average re-referencing (AR) and reference electrode standardization technique (REST). In this study we quantitatively assessed the extent to which the use of a high-density montage and a realistic head model can impact on the optimal estimation of a neutral reference for EEG recordings. Approach Using simulated recordings generated by projecting specific source activity over the sensors, we assessed to what extent AR, REST and LMR may distort the scalp topography. We examined the impact electrode coverage has on AR and REST, and how accurate the REST reconstruction is for realistic and less realistic (three-layer and single-layer spherical) head models, and with possible uncertainty in the electrode positions. We assessed LMR, AR and REST also in the presence of typical EEG artifacts that are mixed in the recordings. Finally, we applied them to real EEG data collected in a target detection experiment to corroborate our findings on simulated data. Main results Both AR and REST have relatively low reconstruction errors compared to LMR, and that REST is less sensitive than AR and LMR to artifacts mixed in the EEG data. For both AR and REST, high electrode density yields low re-referencing reconstruction errors. A realistic head model is critical for REST, leading to a more accurate estimate of a neutral reference compared to spherical head models. With a low-density montage, REST shows a more reliable reconstruction than AR either with a realistic or a three-layer spherical head model. Conversely, with a high-density montage AR yields better results unless precise information on electrode positions is

  7. Estimating a neutral reference for electroencephalographic recordings: the importance of using a high-density montage and a realistic head model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Quanying; Balsters, Joshua H.; Baechinger, Marc; van der Groen, Onno; Wenderoth, Nicole; Mantini, Dante

    2015-10-01

    Objective. In electroencephalography (EEG) measurements, the signal of each recording electrode is contrasted with a reference electrode or a combination of electrodes. The estimation of a neutral reference is a long-standing issue in EEG data analysis, which has motivated the proposal of different re-referencing methods, among which linked-mastoid re-referencing (LMR), average re-referencing (AR) and reference electrode standardization technique (REST). In this study we quantitatively assessed the extent to which the use of a high-density montage and a realistic head model can impact on the optimal estimation of a neutral reference for EEG recordings. Approach. Using simulated recordings generated by projecting specific source activity over the sensors, we assessed to what extent AR, REST and LMR may distort the scalp topography. We examined the impact electrode coverage has on AR and REST, and how accurate the REST reconstruction is for realistic and less realistic (three-layer and single-layer spherical) head models, and with possible uncertainty in the electrode positions. We assessed LMR, AR and REST also in the presence of typical EEG artifacts that are mixed in the recordings. Finally, we applied them to real EEG data collected in a target detection experiment to corroborate our findings on simulated data. Main results. Both AR and REST have relatively low reconstruction errors compared to LMR, and that REST is less sensitive than AR and LMR to artifacts mixed in the EEG data. For both AR and REST, high electrode density yields low re-referencing reconstruction errors. A realistic head model is critical for REST, leading to a more accurate estimate of a neutral reference compared to spherical head models. With a low-density montage, REST shows a more reliable reconstruction than AR either with a realistic or a three-layer spherical head model. Conversely, with a high-density montage AR yields better results unless precise information on electrode positions

  8. Spacelab high density digital recorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blais, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The design and performance of the high-density digital recorder (HDDR) developed for use at the NASA centers (KSC, JSC, and GSFC) and at the JPL to store and retrieve 50-Mb/s PCM data streams from the Spacelab experiments are reported. The recording reproduction, and transport requirements are reviewed; and the design solutions adopted in the final version of the HDDR are described, incuding three-position-modulation and Y-phase encoding, microprocessor-controlled automatic bit synchronization and equalization, cyclic-redundancy-check error detection and correction, clock regeneration, data and clock variations, tape-speed control, and EEE-488 remote control. Reliable performance, with bit error rates 1 in 10 to the 10th forward and 1 in 10 to the 9th reverse or better and packing density up to 50 percent greater than that obtainable using conventional codes, is reported after 1.5 years of service.

  9. Preliminary results of residual deficits observed in athletes with concussion history: combined EEG and cognitive study.

    PubMed

    Munia, Tamanna T K; Gendreau, Jeffrey L; Verma, Ajay K; Johnson, Benjamin D; Romanick, Mark; Tavakolian, Kouhyar; Fazel-Rezai, Reza

    2016-08-01

    Assessment, treatment, and management of sport-related concussions are a widely recognized public health issue. Although several neuropsychological and motor assessment tools have been developed and implemented for sports teams at various levels and ages, the sensitivity of these tests has yet to be validated with more objective measures to make return-to-play (RTP) decisions more confidently. The present study sought to analyze the residual effect of concussions on a sample of adolescent athletes who sustained one or more previous concussions compared to those who had no concussion history. For this purpose, a wide variety of assessment tools containing both neurocognitive and electroencephalogram (EEG) elements were used. All clinical testing and EEG were repeated at 8 months, 10 months, and 12 months post-injury for both healthy and concussed athletes. The concussed athletes performed poorer than healthy athletes on processing speed and impulse control subtest of neurocognitive test on month 8, but no alterations were marked in terms of visual and postural stability. EEG analysis revealed significant differences in brain activities of concussed athletes through all three intervals. These long-term neurocognitive and EEG deficits found from this ongoing sport-related concussion study suggest that the post-concussion physiological deficits may last longer than the observed clinical recovery.

  10. Assessing the memorization of TV commercials with the use of high resolution EEG: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Astolfi, L; Soranzo, R; Cincotti, F; Mattia, D; Scarano, G; Gaudiano, I; Marciani, M G; Salinari, S; De Vico Fallani, F; Babiloni, F

    2008-01-01

    The present work intends to evaluate the functional characteristics of the cerebral network during the successful memory encoding of TV commercials. We estimated the functional networks in the frequency domain from a set of high-resolution EEG data. High resolution EEG recordings were performed in a group of healthy subjects and the cortical activity during the observation of TV commercials was evaluated in several regions of interest coincident with the Brodmann areas (BAs). Summarizing the main results of the present study, a sign of the memorization of a particular set of TV commercials have been found in a group of investigated subjects with the aid of advanced modern tools for the acquisition and the processing of EEG data. The cerebral processes involved during the observation of TV commercials that were remembered successively by the population examined (RMB dataset) are generated by the posterior parietal cortices and the prefrontal areas, rather bilaterally and are irrespective of the frequency bands analyzed. Such results are compatible with previously results obtained from EEG recordings with superficial electrodes as well as with the brain activations observed with the use of MEG and fMRI devices.

  11. Contradictory reasoning network: an EEG and FMRI study.

    PubMed

    Porcaro, Camillo; Medaglia, Maria Teresa; Thai, Ngoc Jade; Seri, Stefano; Rotshtein, Pia; Tecchio, Franca

    2014-01-01

    Contradiction is a cornerstone of human rationality, essential for everyday life and communication. We investigated electroencephalographic (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in separate recording sessions during contradictory judgments, using a logical structure based on categorical propositions of the Aristotelian Square of Opposition (ASoO). The use of ASoO propositions, while controlling for potential linguistic or semantic confounds, enabled us to observe the spatial temporal unfolding of this contradictory reasoning. The processing started with the inversion of the logical operators corresponding to right middle frontal gyrus (rMFG-BA11) activation, followed by identification of contradictory statement associated with in the right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG-BA47) activation. Right medial frontal gyrus (rMeFG, BA10) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, BA32) contributed to the later stages of process. We observed a correlation between the delayed latency of rBA11 response and the reaction time delay during inductive vs. deductive reasoning. This supports the notion that rBA11 is crucial for manipulating the logical operators. Slower processing time and stronger brain responses for inductive logic suggested that examples are easier to process than general principles and are more likely to simplify communication.

  12. Investigating Cooperative Behavior in Ecological Settings: An EEG Hyperscanning Study.

    PubMed

    Toppi, Jlenia; Borghini, Gianluca; Petti, Manuela; He, Eric J; De Giusti, Vittorio; He, Bin; Astolfi, Laura; Babiloni, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The coordinated interactions between individuals are fundamental for the success of the activities in some professional categories. We reported on brain-to-brain cooperative interactions between civil pilots during a simulated flight. We demonstrated for the first time how the combination of neuroelectrical hyperscanning and intersubject connectivity could provide indicators sensitive to the humans' degree of synchronization under a highly demanding task performed in an ecological environment. Our results showed how intersubject connectivity was able to i) characterize the degree of cooperation between pilots in different phases of the flight, and ii) to highlight the role of specific brain macro areas in cooperative behavior. During the most cooperative flight phases pilots showed, in fact, dense patterns of interbrain connectivity, mainly linking frontal and parietal brain areas. On the contrary, the amount of interbrain connections went close to zero in the non-cooperative phase. The reliability of the interbrain connectivity patterns was verified by means of a baseline condition represented by formal couples, i.e. pilots paired offline for the connectivity analysis but not simultaneously recorded during the flight. Interbrain density was, in fact, significantly higher in real couples with respect to formal couples in the cooperative flight phases. All the achieved results demonstrated how the description of brain networks at the basis of cooperation could effectively benefit from a hyperscanning approach. Interbrain connectivity was, in fact, more informative in the investigation of cooperative behavior with respect to established EEG signal processing methodologies applied at a single subject level.

  13. The brain, obesity and addiction: an EEG neuroimaging study

    PubMed Central

    De Ridder, Dirk; Manning, Patrick; Leong, Sook Ling; Ross, Samantha; Sutherland, Wayne; Horwath, Caroline; Vanneste, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is among the greatest challenges facing healthcare systems with 20% of the world’s population afflicted. Great controversy exists whether obesity can be regarded as an addictive disorder or not. Recently the Yale Food Addiction Scale questionnaire has been developed as a tool to identify individuals with traits of addiction towards food. Using clinical and source localized EEG data we dichotomize obesity. Brain activity in food-addicted and non-food-addicted obese people is compared to alcohol-addicted and non-addicted lean controls. We show that food addiction shares common neural brain activity with alcohol addiction. This ‘addiction neural brain activity’ consists of the dorsal and pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, parahippocampal area and precuneus. Furthermore, common neural obesity neural brain activity exists as well. The ‘obesity neural brain activity’ consists of dorsal and pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate extending into the precuneus/cuneus as well as the parahippocampal and inferior parietal area. However food-addicted differ from non-food-addicted obese people by opposite activity in the anterior cingulate gyrus. This food addiction and non-food-addiction obesity dichotomy demonstrates there is at least 2 different kinds of obesity with overlapping network activity, but different in anterior cingulate cortex activity. PMID:27658351

  14. Investigating Cooperative Behavior in Ecological Settings: An EEG Hyperscanning Study

    PubMed Central

    Petti, Manuela; He, Eric J.; De Giusti, Vittorio; He, Bin; Astolfi, Laura; Babiloni, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The coordinated interactions between individuals are fundamental for the success of the activities in some professional categories. We reported on brain-to-brain cooperative interactions between civil pilots during a simulated flight. We demonstrated for the first time how the combination of neuroelectrical hyperscanning and intersubject connectivity could provide indicators sensitive to the humans’ degree of synchronization under a highly demanding task performed in an ecological environment. Our results showed how intersubject connectivity was able to i) characterize the degree of cooperation between pilots in different phases of the flight, and ii) to highlight the role of specific brain macro areas in cooperative behavior. During the most cooperative flight phases pilots showed, in fact, dense patterns of interbrain connectivity, mainly linking frontal and parietal brain areas. On the contrary, the amount of interbrain connections went close to zero in the non-cooperative phase. The reliability of the interbrain connectivity patterns was verified by means of a baseline condition represented by formal couples, i.e. pilots paired offline for the connectivity analysis but not simultaneously recorded during the flight. Interbrain density was, in fact, significantly higher in real couples with respect to formal couples in the cooperative flight phases. All the achieved results demonstrated how the description of brain networks at the basis of cooperation could effectively benefit from a hyperscanning approach. Interbrain connectivity was, in fact, more informative in the investigation of cooperative behavior with respect to established EEG signal processing methodologies applied at a single subject level. PMID:27124558

  15. A method to study global spatial patterns related to sensory perception in scalp EEG.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Yusely; Pockett, Susan; Freeman, Walter J; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Li, Guang

    2010-08-15

    Prior studies of multichannel ECoG from animals showed that beta and gamma oscillations carried perceptual information in both local and global spatial patterns of amplitude modulation, when the subjects were trained to discriminate conditioned stimuli (CS). Here the hypothesis was tested that similar patterns could be found in the scalp EEG human subjects trained to discriminate simultaneous visual-auditory CS. Signals were continuously recorded from 64 equispaced scalp electrodes and band-pass filtered. The Hilbert transform gave the analytic phase, which segmented the EEG into temporal frames, and the analytic amplitude, which expressed the pattern in each frame as a feature vector. Methods applied to the ECoG were adapted to the EEG for systematic search of the beta-gamma spectrum, the time period after CS onset, and the scalp surface to locate patterns that could be classified with respect to type of CS. Spatial patterns of EEG amplitude modulation were found from all subjects that could be classified with respect to stimulus combination type significantly above chance levels. The patterns were found in the beta range (15-22 Hz) but not in the gamma range. They occurred in three short bursts following CS onset. They were non-local, occupying the entire array. Our results suggest that the scalp EEG can yield information about the timing of episodically synchronized brain activity in higher cognitive function, so that future studies in brain-computer interfacing can be better focused. Our methods may be most valuable for analyzing data from dense arrays with very high spatial and temporal sampling rates.

  16. Reliability of information-based integration of EEG and fMRI data: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Assecondi, Sara; Ostwald, Dirk; Bagshaw, Andrew P

    2015-02-01

    Most studies involving simultaneous electroencephalographic (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data rely on the first-order, affine-linear correlation of EEG and fMRI features within the framework of the general linear model. An alternative is the use of information-based measures such as mutual information and entropy, which can also detect higher-order correlations present in the data. The estimate of information-theoretic quantities might be influenced by several parameters, such as the numerosity of the sample, the amount of correlation between variables, and the discretization (or binning) strategy of choice. While these issues have been investigated for invasive neurophysiological data and a number of bias-correction estimates have been developed, there has been no attempt to systematically examine the accuracy of information estimates for the multivariate distributions arising in the context of EEG-fMRI recordings. This is especially important given the differences between electrophysiological and EEG-fMRI recordings. In this study, we drew random samples from simulated bivariate and trivariate distributions, mimicking the statistical properties of EEG-fMRI data. We compared the estimated information shared by simulated random variables with its numerical value and found that the interaction between the binning strategy and the estimation method influences the accuracy of the estimate. Conditional on the simulation assumptions, we found that the equipopulated binning strategy yields the best and most consistent results across distributions and bias correction methods. We also found that within bias correction techniques, the asymptotically debiased (TPMC), the jackknife debiased (JD), and the best upper bound (BUB) approach give similar results, and those are consistent across distributions.

  17. Hepatitis E Virus: A Cross-Sectional Serological and Virological Study in Pigs and Humans at Zoonotic Risk within a High-Density Pig Farming Area.

    PubMed

    Caruso, C; Peletto, S; Rosamilia, A; Modesto, P; Chiavacci, L; Sona, B; Balsamelli, F; Ghisetti, V; Acutis, P L; Pezzoni, G; Brocchi, E; Vitale, N; Masoero, L

    2016-07-05

    An increase in autochthonous hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections has been recorded in Italy suspected to be zoonotically transmitted from pigs; this study was carried out to determinate the seroprevalence and risk factors associated with hepatitis HEV exposition, both in swine and humans working in pig farms, located within a high-density pig farming area in Piedmont region, north-western Italy. The presence of viral RNA in human and swine samples was also evaluated, and phylogenetic analysis was performed on HEV-positive samples. Forty-two swine farms were sampled; 142 workers were enrolled in the study and classified into two groups: (i) 69 workers with occupational contact with swine (including veterinarians and farmers) recruited in the 42 sampled farms; (ii) 73 without occupational contact with swine. Forty-one of 42 (97%) swine farms resulted positive to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test for HEV antibodies (Abs). Overall seroprevalence in swine was 50% (441/879), with seropositivity rate higher in sows (333/469, 71%). HEV RNA in stool samples was detected in animals from 13 of 42 tested farms (31%), and a higher positivity resulted in weaners (40/246, 16.3%). Phylogenetic analysis classified all HEV isolates within genotype 3 (subtypes 3f, 3e, 3c). All humans were negative for HEV viral genome in blood. Five of 142 sera were positive for IgG anti-HEV with an overall prevalence of 3.52% with no statistically significant differences in prevalence rates between workers at zoonotic risk and the control group (5.7% versus 1.3%). In contrast, a significant difference (OR 10.1) was observed within the subgroup including subjects exposed for short periods (veterinarians) compared with those who worked for long periods (farmers) suggesting a correlation between the time of exposure and the likelihood of HEV infection. Reporting HEV infection is not mandatory in Italy, but a constant epidemiological surveillance should be ensured to clarify the epidemiology of this

  18. Plasma Cystatin C and High-Density Lipoprotein Are Important Biomarkers of Alzheimer’s Disease and Vascular Dementia: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Chen, Zhaoyu; Fu, Yongmei; Wei, Xiaobo; Liao, Jinchi; Liu, Xu; He, Bingjun; Xu, Yunqi; Zou, Jing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Weng, Ruihui; Tan, Sheng; McElroy, Christopher; Jin, Kunlin; Wang, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Cystatin C (Cys C) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) play critical roles in neurodegenerative diseases, such as dementia, Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). However, whether they can be used as reliable biomarkers to distinguish patients with dementia from healthy subjects and to determine disease severity remain largely unknown. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine plasma Cys C and HDL levels of 88 patients with dementia (43 AD patients, 45 VaD patients) and 45 healthy age-matched controls. The severity of dementia was determined based on the Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living (ADL) Scale, the Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE), the Global Deterioration Scale (GDS), the Lawton Instrumental ADL (IADL) Scale, and the Hachinski Ischemia Scale (Hachinski). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated to determine the diagnostic accuracy of Cys C and HDL levels in distinguishing patients with dementia from healthy subjects. Results: We found that plasma Cys C levels were higher, but HDL levels were lower in AD and VaD patients respectively, compared to healthy control subjects. Yet, Cys C levels were highest among patients with VaD. Interestingly, plasma Cys C levels were significantly correlated with IADL Scale scores. In addition, the ROC curves for Cys C (area under the curve, AUC 0.816 for AD, AUC 0.841 for VaD) and HDL (AUC 0.800 for AD, AUC 0.731 for VaD) exhibited potential diagnostic value in distinguishing AD/VaD patients from healthy subjects. While the ROC curve for the combination of Cys C and HDL (AUC 0.873 for AD, AUC 0.897 for VaD) showed higher diagnostic accuracy in distinguishing AD/VaD patients from healthy subjects than the separate curves for each parameter. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the inflammatory mediators Cys C and HDL may play important roles in the pathogenesis of dementia, and plasma Cys C and HDL levels may be useful screening tools for

  19. Plasma Cystatin C and High-Density Lipoprotein Are Important Biomarkers of Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Dementia: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Chen, Zhaoyu; Fu, Yongmei; Wei, Xiaobo; Liao, Jinchi; Liu, Xu; He, Bingjun; Xu, Yunqi; Zou, Jing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Weng, Ruihui; Tan, Sheng; McElroy, Christopher; Jin, Kunlin; Wang, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Cystatin C (Cys C) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) play critical roles in neurodegenerative diseases, such as dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). However, whether they can be used as reliable biomarkers to distinguish patients with dementia from healthy subjects and to determine disease severity remain largely unknown. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine plasma Cys C and HDL levels of 88 patients with dementia (43 AD patients, 45 VaD patients) and 45 healthy age-matched controls. The severity of dementia was determined based on the Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living (ADL) Scale, the Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE), the Global Deterioration Scale (GDS), the Lawton Instrumental ADL (IADL) Scale, and the Hachinski Ischemia Scale (Hachinski). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated to determine the diagnostic accuracy of Cys C and HDL levels in distinguishing patients with dementia from healthy subjects. Results: We found that plasma Cys C levels were higher, but HDL levels were lower in AD and VaD patients respectively, compared to healthy control subjects. Yet, Cys C levels were highest among patients with VaD. Interestingly, plasma Cys C levels were significantly correlated with IADL Scale scores. In addition, the ROC curves for Cys C (area under the curve, AUC 0.816 for AD, AUC 0.841 for VaD) and HDL (AUC 0.800 for AD, AUC 0.731 for VaD) exhibited potential diagnostic value in distinguishing AD/VaD patients from healthy subjects. While the ROC curve for the combination of Cys C and HDL (AUC 0.873 for AD, AUC 0.897 for VaD) showed higher diagnostic accuracy in distinguishing AD/VaD patients from healthy subjects than the separate curves for each parameter. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the inflammatory mediators Cys C and HDL may play important roles in the pathogenesis of dementia, and plasma Cys C and HDL levels may be useful screening tools for

  20. Sleep misperception, EEG characteristics and autonomic nervous system activity in primary insomnia: a retrospective study on polysomnographic data.

    PubMed

    Maes, J; Verbraecken, J; Willemen, M; De Volder, I; van Gastel, A; Michiels, N; Verbeek, I; Vandekerckhove, M; Wuyts, J; Haex, B; Willemen, T; Exadaktylos, V; Bulckaert, A; Cluydts, R

    2014-03-01

    Misperception of Sleep Onset Latency, often found in Primary Insomnia, has been cited to be influenced by hyperarousal, reflected in EEG- and ECG-related indices. The aim of this retrospective study was to examine the association between Central Nervous System (i.e. EEG) and Autonomic Nervous System activity in the Sleep Onset Period and the first NREM sleep cycle in Primary Insomnia (n=17) and healthy controls (n=11). Furthermore, the study examined the influence of elevated EEG and Autonomic Nervous System activity on Stage2 sleep-protective mechanisms (K-complexes and sleep spindles). Confirming previous findings, the Primary Insomnia-group overestimated Sleep Onset Latency and this overestimation was correlated with elevated EEG activity. A higher amount of beta EEG activity during the Sleep Onset Period was correlated with the appearance of K-complexes immediately followed by a sleep spindle in the Primary Insomnia-group. This can be interpreted as an extra attempt to protect sleep continuity or as a failure of the sleep-protective role of the K-complex by fast EEG frequencies following within one second. The strong association found between K-alpha (K-complex within one second followed by 8-12 Hz EEG activity) in Stage2 sleep and a lower parasympathetic Autonomic Nervous System dominance (less high frequency HR) in Slow-wave sleep, further assumes a state of hyperarousal continuing through sleep in Primary Insomnia.

  1. Brain scale-free properties in awake rest and NREM sleep: a simultaneous EEG/fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xu; Wang, Yulin; Yuan, Hong; Chen, Antao

    2015-03-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies revealed that spontaneous activity in the brain has scale-invariant properties, as indicated by a frequency spectrum that follows a power-law distribution. However, current knowledge about the exact relationship between scaling properties in EEG and fMRI signals is very limited. To address this question, we collected simultaneous EEG-fMRI data in healthy individuals during resting wakefulness and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. For either of these conditions, we found that both EEG and fMRI power spectra followed a power-law distribution. Furthermore, the EEG and fMRI scaling exponents were highly variable across subjects, and sensitive to the choice of reference and nuisance variables in EEG and fMRI data, respectively. Interestingly, the EEG exponent of the whole brain selectively corresponded to the fMRI exponent of the thalamus during NREM sleep. Together, our findings suggest that scale-free brain activity is characterized by robust temporal structures and behavioral significance. This motivates future studies to unravel its physiological mechanisms, as well as its relevance to behavior.

  2. Hemispheric Specialization Varies with EEG Brain Resting States and Phase of Menstrual Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Cacioppo, Stephanie; Bianchi-Demicheli, Francesco; Bischof, Paul; DeZiegler, Dominique; Michel, Christoph M.; Landis, Theodor

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of behavioral studies has demonstrated that women’s hemispheric specialization varies as a function of their menstrual cycle, with hemispheric specialization enhanced during their menstruation period. Our recent high-density electroencephalogram (EEG) study with lateralized emotional versus neutral words extended these behavioral results by showing that hemispheric specialization in men, but not in women under birth-control, depends upon specific EEG resting brain states at stimulus arrival, suggesting that hemispheric specialization may be pre-determined at the moment of the stimulus onset. To investigate whether EEG brain resting state for hemispheric specialization could vary as a function of the menstrual phase, we tested 12 right-handed healthy women over different phases of their menstrual cycle combining high-density EEG recordings and the same lateralized lexical decision paradigm with emotional versus neutral words. Results showed the presence of specific EEG resting brain states, associated with hemispheric specialization for emotional words, at the moment of the stimulus onset during the menstruation period only. These results suggest that the pre-stimulus EEG pattern influencing hemispheric specialization is modulated by the hormonal state. PMID:23638185

  3. Refractory Epilepsy-MRI, EEG and CT scan, a Correlative Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Nikodijevic, Dijana; Baneva–Dolnenec, Natalija; Petrovska-Cvetkovska, Dragana; Caparoska, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Refractory epilepsies (RE), as well as, the surgically correctable syndromes, are of great interest, since they affect the very young population of children and adolescents. The early diagnosis and treatment are very important in preventing the psychosocial disability. Therefore MRI and EEG are highly sensitive methods in the diagnosis and localization of epileptogenic focus, but also in pre-surgical evaluation of these patients. The aim of our study is to correlate the imaging findings of EEG, MRI and CT scan in refractory symptomatic epilepsies, and to determine their specificity in detecting the epileptogenic focus. METHODS: The study was prospective with duration of over two years, open-labelled, and involved a group of 37 patients that had been evaluated and diagnosed as refractory epilepsy patients. In the evaluation the type and frequency of seizures were considered, together with the etiologic factors and their association, and finally the risk for developing refractory epilepsy was weighted. EEG and MRI findings and CT scan results were evaluated for their specificity and sensitivity in detecting the epileptogenic focus, and the correlation between them was analyzed. RESULTS: Regarding the type of seizures considered in our study, the patients with PCS (partial complex seizures) dominated, as opposed to those with generalized seizures (GS) (D=1.178, p < 0.05). Positive MRI findings were registered in 28 patients (75.7%). Most of them were patients with hippocampal sclerosis, 12 (42.8%), and also they were found to have the highest risk of developing refractory epilepsy (RE) (Odds ratio = 5.7), and the highest association between the etiologic factor and refractory epilepsy (p < 0.01). In detecting the epileptogenic focus, a significant difference was found (p < 0.01) between MRI and CT scan findings, especially in patients with hippocampal sclerosis and cerebral malformations. There was a strong correlation between the MRI findings and the

  4. Combining TMS and EEG to study cognitive function and cortico-cortico interactions

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Paul CJ; Walsh, Vincent; Eimer, Martin

    2009-01-01

    There has long been an interest in exploring the functional dynamics of the brain’s connectivity during cognitive processing, and some recent methodological developments now allow us to test important long-standing hypotheses. This review focuses on the recent development of combined online transcranial magnetic stimulation and electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) and on new studies that have employed this combination to study causal interactions between neural areas involved in perception and cognition. PMID:18485496

  5. Correlation of invasive EEG and scalp EEG.

    PubMed

    Ramantani, Georgia; Maillard, Louis; Koessler, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    Ever since the implementation of invasive EEG recordings in the clinical setting, it has been perceived that a considerable proportion of epileptic discharges present at a cortical level are missed by routine scalp EEG recordings. Several in vitro, in vivo, and simulation studies have been performed in the past decades aiming to clarify the interrelations of cortical sources with their scalp and invasive EEG correlates. The amplitude ratio of cortical potentials to their scalp EEG correlates, the extent of the cortical area involved in the discharge, as well as the localization of the cortical source and its geometry have been each independently linked to the recording of the cortical discharge with scalp electrodes. The need to elucidate these interrelations has been particularly imperative in the field of epilepsy surgery with its rapidly growing EEG-based localization technologies. Simultaneous multiscale EEG recordings with scalp, subdural and/or depth electrodes, applied in presurgical epilepsy workup, offer an excellent opportunity to shed some light to this fundamental issue. Whereas past studies have considered predominantly neocortical sources in the context of temporal lobe epilepsy, current investigations have included deep sources, as in mesial temporal epilepsy, as well as extratemporal sources. Novel computational tools may serve to provide surrogates for the shortcomings of EEG recording methodology and facilitate further developments in modern electrophysiology.

  6. Structure-property relationships: Model studies on melt-extruded uniaxially-oriented high density polyethylene films having well defined morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongyi

    High density polyethylene (HDPE) films having simple and well-defined stacked lamellar morphology, either with or without a distinct presence of row-nucleated fibril structures, have been utilized as model materials to carry out investigations on solid state structure-property relationships. Mechanical tests, including tensile (INSTRON), creep (TMA), and dynamic mechanical (DMTA) tests, were performed at different angles with respect to the original machine direction (MD) of the melt extruded films; morphological changes as a result of these mechanical tests were detected by WAXS, SAXS, and TEM. Crystalline lamellar thickness and its distribution were determined by DSC, SAXS, TEM and AFM experiments. In the large strain deformation study (chapter 4.0), samples were stretched at 00sp°, 45sp° and 90sp° angles with respect to the original MD. A distinct orientation dependence of the tensile behavior was observed and correlated to the corresponding deformation modes and morphological changes, namely (1) lamellar separation and fragmentation by chain slip for the 00sp° stretch, (2) lamellar break-up via chain pull-out for the 90sp° stretch, and (3) lamellar shear, rotation and break-up through chain slip and/or tilt for the 45sp° stretch. A strong strengthening effect was observed for samples with row-nucleated fibril structures at the 00sp° stretch; whereas for the 90sp° stretch, the presence of such structures significantly limited deformability of the samples. In the dynamic strain mechanical alpha relaxation study (chapter 5.0), samples were tested at nine different angles with respect to the original MD, and the morphologies of samples before and after the dynamic tests were also investigated. The mechanical dispersions for the 00sp° and 90sp° tests were believed to arise essentially from the crystalline phase, and they contain contributions from two earlier recognized sub-relaxations of alphasbI and alphasbII. While for the 45sp° test, in addition to a

  7. Two-color QCD at high density

    SciTech Connect

    Boz, Tamer; Skullerud, Jon-Ivar; Giudice, Pietro; Hands, Simon; Williams, Anthony G.

    2016-01-22

    QCD at high chemical potential has interesting properties such as deconfinement of quarks. Two-color QCD, which enables numerical simulations on the lattice, constitutes a laboratory to study QCD at high chemical potential. Among the interesting properties of two-color QCD at high density is the diquark condensation, for which we present recent results obtained on a finer lattice compared to previous studies. The quark propagator in two-color QCD at non-zero chemical potential is referred to as the Gor’kov propagator. We express the Gor’kov propagator in terms of form factors and present recent lattice simulation results.

  8. ADOLECSENT MANIA, EEG ABNORMALITY AND RESPONSE TO ANTICONVULSANTS: A THREE - YEAR FOLLOW-UP STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Tapas K.; Sinha, Vinod Kumar; Nizami, Hauque S.

    2001-01-01

    We had reported earlier (1998) a high percentage of moderate to severe EEG abnormalities (43.75% of cases) amongst adolescent manic population. Sixteen adolescent manics, with a mean age of 14 9 years, diagnosed according to ICD-10 were taken up for the initial study. Present study is the three-year follow-up report of 67.75% (11 out of 16) of the original patient population. All these patients were subjected fc 21-channel EEG and anticonvulsant drugs were started to all. Follow-up data showed that 3 out of 6 patients, who discontinued medications, were relapsed during this 3 years period. But none of the 5 patients, who regularly took prescribed medicines, relapsed during the same period. Significance of these findings in relapse prevention and the role of anticonvulsants, particularly in relation to adolescent mania, have been emphasized. PMID:21407863

  9. The interrelated effect of sleep and learning in dogs (Canis familiaris); an EEG and behavioural study.

    PubMed

    Kis, Anna; Szakadát, Sára; Gácsi, Márta; Kovács, Enikő; Simor, Péter; Török, Csenge; Gombos, Ferenc; Bódizs, Róbert; Topál, József

    2017-02-06

    The active role of sleep in memory consolidation is still debated, and due to a large between-species variation, the investigation of a wide range of different animal species (besides humans and laboratory rodents) is necessary. The present study applied a fully non-invasive methodology to study sleep and memory in domestic dogs, a species proven to be a good model of human awake behaviours. Polysomnography recordings performed following a command learning task provide evidence that learning has an effect on dogs' sleep EEG spectrum. Furthermore, spectral features of the EEG were related to post-sleep performance improvement. Testing an additional group of dogs in the command learning task revealed that sleep or awake activity during the retention interval has both short- and long-term effects. This is the first evidence to show that dogs' human-analogue social learning skills might be related to sleep-dependent memory consolidation.

  10. The interrelated effect of sleep and learning in dogs (Canis familiaris); an EEG and behavioural study

    PubMed Central

    Kis, Anna; Szakadát, Sára; Gácsi, Márta; Kovács, Enikő; Simor, Péter; Török, Csenge; Gombos, Ferenc; Bódizs, Róbert; Topál, József

    2017-01-01

    The active role of sleep in memory consolidation is still debated, and due to a large between-species variation, the investigation of a wide range of different animal species (besides humans and laboratory rodents) is necessary. The present study applied a fully non-invasive methodology to study sleep and memory in domestic dogs, a species proven to be a good model of human awake behaviours. Polysomnography recordings performed following a command learning task provide evidence that learning has an effect on dogs’ sleep EEG spectrum. Furthermore, spectral features of the EEG were related to post-sleep performance improvement. Testing an additional group of dogs in the command learning task revealed that sleep or awake activity during the retention interval has both short- and long-term effects. This is the first evidence to show that dogs’ human-analogue social learning skills might be related to sleep-dependent memory consolidation. PMID:28165489

  11. Manual lymph drainage attenuates frontal EEG asymmetry in subjects with psychological stress: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jung-Myo; Kim, Sung-Joong

    2014-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this preliminary study was to investigate the effect of manual lymph drainage (MLD) of the neck on frontal electroencephalogram (EEG) asymmetry in subjects with psychological stress. [Subjects] Thirteen subjects with psychological stress participated in the study. [Methods] Subjects received MLD of the neck for 15 min. [Results] Analysis of the frontal asymmetry index showed that the energy shift in the alpha frequency band from the left hemisphere to the right hemisphere after MLD resulted in greater left-side activation (positive asymmetry values), which could be related to the positive emotional state observed particularly in the F7-F8 area. [Conclusion] These preliminary findings suggest that frontal EEG asymmetry was significantly attenuated after MLD.

  12. Face, eye, and body selective responses in fusiform gyrus and adjacent cortex: an intracranial EEG study.

    PubMed

    Engell, Andrew D; McCarthy, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) studies have investigated the degree to which processing of whole faces, face-parts, and bodies are differentially localized within the fusiform gyrus and adjacent ventral occipitotemporal cortex. While some studies have emphasized the spatial differentiation of processing into discrete areas, others have emphasized the overlap of processing and the importance of distributed patterns of activity. Intracranial EEG (iEEG) recorded from subdural electrodes provides excellent temporal and spatial resolution of local neural activity, and thus provides an alternative method to fMRI for studying differences and commonalities in face and body processing. In this study we recorded iEEG from 12 patients while they viewed images of novel faces, isolated eyes, headless bodies, and flowers. Event-related potential analysis identified 69 occipitotemporal sites at which there was a face-, eye-, or body-selective response when contrasted to flowers. However, when comparing faces, eyes, and bodies to each other at these sites, we identified only 3 face-specific, 13 eye-specific, and 1 body-specific electrodes. Thus, at the majority of sites, faces, eyes, and bodies evoked similar responses. However, we identified ten locations at which the amplitude of the responses spatially varied across adjacent electrodes, indicating that the configuration of current sources and sinks were different for faces, eyes, and bodies. Our results also demonstrate that eye-sensitive regions are more abundant and more purely selective than face- or body-sensitive regions, particularly in lateral occipitotemporal cortex.

  13. Face, eye, and body selective responses in fusiform gyrus and adjacent cortex: an intracranial EEG study

    PubMed Central

    Engell, Andrew D.; McCarthy, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) studies have investigated the degree to which processing of whole faces, face-parts, and bodies are differentially localized within the fusiform gyrus and adjacent ventral occipitotemporal cortex. While some studies have emphasized the spatial differentiation of processing into discrete areas, others have emphasized the overlap of processing and the importance of distributed patterns of activity. Intracranial EEG (iEEG) recorded from subdural electrodes provides excellent temporal and spatial resolution of local neural activity, and thus provides an alternative method to fMRI for studying differences and commonalities in face and body processing. In this study we recorded iEEG from 12 patients while they viewed images of novel faces, isolated eyes, headless bodies, and flowers. Event-related potential analysis identified 69 occipitotemporal sites at which there was a face-, eye-, or body-selective response when contrasted to flowers. However, when comparing faces, eyes, and bodies to each other at these sites, we identified only 3 face-specific, 13 eye-specific, and 1 body-specific electrodes. Thus, at the majority of sites, faces, eyes, and bodies evoked similar responses. However, we identified ten locations at which the amplitude of the responses spatially varied across adjacent electrodes, indicating that the configuration of current sources and sinks were different for faces, eyes, and bodies. Our results also demonstrate that eye-sensitive regions are more abundant and more purely selective than face- or body-sensitive regions, particularly in lateral occipitotemporal cortex. PMID:25191255

  14. Study of impedance spectra for dry and wet EarEEG electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kappel, Simon L; Kidmose, Preben

    2015-01-01

    EarEEG is a novel recordings concept where electrodes are embedded on the surface of an earpiece customized to the individual anatomical shape of the users ear. A key parameter for recording EEG signals of good quality is a stable and low impedance electrode-body interface. This study characterizes the impedance for dry and wet EarEEG electrodes in a study of 10 subjects. A custom made and automated setup was used to characterize the impedance spectrum from 0.1 Hz-2 kHz. The study of dry electrodes showed a mean (standard deviation) low frequency impedance of the canal electrodes of 1.2 MΩ (1.4 MΩ) and the high frequency impedance was 230 kΩ (220 kΩ). For wet electrodes the low frequency impedance was 34 kΩ (37 kΩ) and the high frequency impedance was 5.1 kΩ (4.4 kΩ). The high standard deviation of the impedance for dry electrodes imposes very high requirements for the input impedance of the amplifier in order to achieve an acceptable common-mode rejection. The wet electrode impedance was in line with what is typical for a wet electrode interface.

  15. Modification of EEG functional connectivity and EEG power spectra in overweight and obese patients with food addiction: An eLORETA study.

    PubMed

    Imperatori, Claudio; Fabbricatore, Mariantonietta; Innamorati, Marco; Farina, Benedetto; Quintiliani, Maria Isabella; Lamis, Dorian A; Mazzucchi, Edoardo; Contardi, Anna; Vollono, Catello; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the modifications of electroencephalographic (EEG) power spectra and EEG connectivity in overweight and obese patients with elevated food addiction (FA) symptoms. Fourteen overweight and obese patients (3 men and 11 women) with three or more FA symptoms and fourteen overweight and obese patients (3 men and 11 women) with two or less FA symptoms were included in the study. EEG was recorded during three different conditions: 1) five minutes resting state (RS), 2) five minutes resting state after a single taste of a chocolate milkshake (ML-RS), and 3) five minutes resting state after a single taste of control neutral solution (N-RS). EEG analyses were conducted by means of the exact Low Resolution Electric Tomography software (eLORETA). Significant modification was observed only in the ML-RS condition. Compared to controls, patients with three or more FA symptoms showed an increase of delta power in the right middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann Area [BA] 8) and in the right precentral gyrus (BA 9), and theta power in the right insula (BA 13) and in the right inferior frontal gyrus (BA 47). Furthermore, compared to controls, patients with three or more FA symptoms showed an increase of functional connectivity in fronto-parietal areas in both the theta and alpha band. The increase of functional connectivity was also positively associated with the number of FA symptoms. Taken together, our results show that FA has similar neurophysiological correlates of other forms of substance-related and addictive disorders suggesting similar psychopathological mechanisms.

  16. No evidence for mirror system dysfunction in schizophrenia from a multimodal TMS/EEG study.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Sophie C; Enticott, Peter G; Hoy, Kate E; Thomson, Richard H; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2015-08-30

    Dysfunctional mirror neuron systems have been proposed to contribute to the social cognitive deficits observed in schizophrenia. A few studies have explored mirror systems in schizophrenia using various techniques such as TMS (levels of motor resonance) or EEG (levels of mu suppression), with mixed results. This study aimed to use a novel multimodal approach (i.e. concurrent TMS and EEG) to further investigate mirror systems and social cognition in schizophrenia. Nineteen individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 19 healthy controls participated. Single-pulse TMS was applied to M1 during the observation of hand movements designed to elicit mirror system activity. Single EEG electrodes (C3, CZ, C4) recorded brain activity. Participants also completed facial affect recognition and theory of mind tasks. The schizophrenia group showed significant deficits in facial affect recognition and higher level theory of mind compared to healthy controls. A significant positive relationship was revealed between mu suppression and motor resonance for the overall sample, indicating concurrent validity of these measures. Levels of mu suppression and motor resonance were not significantly different between groups. These findings indicate that in stable outpatients with schizophrenia, mirror system functioning is intact, and therefore their social cognitive difficulties may be caused by alternative pathophysiology.

  17. From lab to field conditions: a pilot study on EEG methodology in applied sports sciences.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, Kirsten; Cordes, Marjolijn; Lerch, Christiane; Koutsandréou, Flora; Schubert, Michael; Weiss, Michael; Baumeister, Jochen

    2011-12-01

    Although neurophysiological aspects have become more important in sports and exercise sciences in the last years, it was not possible to measure cortical activity during performance outside a laboratory due to equipment limits or movement artifacts in particular. With this pilot study we want to investigate whether Electroencephalography (EEG) data obtained in a laboratory golf putting performance differ from a suitable putting task under field conditions. Therefore, parameters of the working memory (frontal Theta and parietal Alpha 2 power) were recorded during these two conditions. Statistical calculations demonstrated a significant difference only for Theta power at F4 regarding the two putting conditions "field" and "laboratory". These findings support the idea that brain activity patterns obtained under laboratory conditions are comparable but not equivalent to those obtained under field conditions. Additionally, we were able to show that the EEG methodology seems to be a reliable tool to observe brain activity under field conditions in a golf putting task. However, considering the still existing problems of movement artifacts during EEG measurements, eligible sports and exercises are limited to those being relatively motionless during execution. Further studies are needed to confirm these pilot results.

  18. A Study on Analysis of EEG Caused by Grating Stimulation Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urakawa, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Toshihiro; Tsubai, Masayoshi; Itoh, Kenji

    Recently, many researchers have studied a visual perception. Focus is attended to studies of the visual perception phenomenon by using the grating stimulation images. The previous researches have suggested that a subset of retinal ganglion cells responds to motion in the receptive field center, but only if the wider surround moves with a different trajectory. We discuss the function of human retina, and measure and analysis EEG(electroencephalography) of a normal subject who looks on grating stimulation images. We confirmed the visual perception of human by EEG signal analysis. We also have obtained that a sinusoidal grating stimulation was given, asymmetry was observed the α wave element in EEG of the symmetric part in a left hemisphere and a right hemisphere of the brain. Therefore, it is presumed that projected image is even when the still picture is seen and the image projected onto retinas of right and left eyes is not even for the dynamic scene. It evaluated it by taking the envelope curve for the detected α wave, and using the average and standard deviation.

  19. Impact of red blood cells count on the relationship between high density lipoproteins and the prevalence and extent of coronary artery disease: a single centre study [corrected].

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Alon; Verdoia, Monica; Cassetti, Ettore; Barbieri, Lucia; Perrone-Filardi, Pasquale; Marino, Paolo; De Luca, Giuseppe

    2015-07-01

    We have hypothesized that high red blood cells (RBC) count can potentially play an atheroprotective role in patients with coronary atherosclerosis. We, therefore, have investigated the relationship between high density lipoproteins cholesterol (HDL-C) and RBC levels in patients undergoing coronary angiography. Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a major cause of mortality. Impaired lipid profile represents a major risk factor for atherosclerosis. High density lipoprotein (HDL) is a key factor in atherosclerosis disease development. RBC can mimic HDL's reverse cholesterol transportation with a potential atheroprotective role. Coronary angiography has been evaluated in 3,534 patients. Fasting samples were collected for haematology and lipids levels assessment. Coronary disease was defined for at least 1 vessel stenosis >50 %. Patients were divided according to HDL-C and RBC tertiles. Lower HDL-C was significantly associated to the prevalence of CAD (84.8 vs 78.5 vs 67.3 %, p ≤ 0.001; adjusted OR [95 % CI] = 1.55 [1.3-1.8], p < 0.001) and severe CAD (30 % vs 30 % vs 24.4 %, p = 0.002; adjusted OR [95 % CI] = 1.08 [1.01-1.16], p = 0.02), this relationship was maintained even dividing our population according to RBC tertiles (p < 0.001).In conclusion, HDL-C levels are directly related to RBC count and inversely to the prevalence and extent of coronary disease. Higher RBC levels can reduce the risk of CAD in patients with lower HDL-C levels, suggesting an important atheroprotective role.

  20. Green tea with high-density catechins improves liver function and fat infiltration in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients: a double-blind placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Ryuichiro; Nakamura, Toru; Torimura, Takuji; Ueno, Takato; Sata, Michio

    2013-11-01

    Catechins, a major component of green tea extract, have anti-hyperlipidemic effects. The present study investigated the effects of consumption of green tea with high-density catechins in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients. Seventeen patients with NAFLD consumed green tea with high-density catechins, low-density catechins or a placebo for 12 weeks in a randomized double-blind study. Ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) were performed at baseline and after 12 weeks. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels and urine 8-isoprostane were monitored and compared to baseline at 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Body fat was significantly decreased in the high-density catechin group compared with the placebo and low-density catechin groups after 12 weeks of consumption. All the patients in the high-density catechin group showed a significantly improved liver-to-spleen CT attenuation ratio compared with the placebo and low-density catechin groups after 12 weeks of consumption. The high-density catechin group significantly decreased serum ALT levels and reduced urinary 8-isoprostane excretion compared with the placebo and low-density catechin group after 12 weeks of consumption. Based on a reduced proportion of body fat as estimated by bioimpedance measurement, increased liver-to-spleen CT attenuation ratio, decreased serum ALT levels and reduced urinary 8-isoprostane excretion, we concluded that 12 weeks of 700 ml per day of green tea containing >1 g catechin improved liver fat content and inflammation by reducing oxidative stress in patients with NAFLD.

  1. Category-Selectivity in Human Visual Cortex Follows Cortical Topology: A Grouped icEEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Conner, Christopher Richard; Whaley, Meagan Lee; Baboyan, Vatche George; Tandon, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies suggest that category-selective regions in higher-order visual cortex are topologically organized around specific anatomical landmarks: the mid-fusiform sulcus (MFS) in the ventral temporal cortex (VTC) and lateral occipital sulcus (LOS) in the lateral occipital cortex (LOC). To derive precise structure-function maps from direct neural signals, we collected intracranial EEG (icEEG) recordings in a large human cohort (n = 26) undergoing implantation of subdural electrodes. A surface-based approach to grouped icEEG analysis was used to overcome challenges from sparse electrode coverage within subjects and variable cortical anatomy across subjects. The topology of category-selectivity in bilateral VTC and LOC was assessed for five classes of visual stimuli—faces, animate non-face (animals/body-parts), places, tools, and words—using correlational and linear mixed effects analyses. In the LOC, selectivity for living (faces and animate non-face) and non-living (places and tools) classes was arranged in a ventral-to-dorsal axis along the LOS. In the VTC, selectivity for living and non-living stimuli was arranged in a latero-medial axis along the MFS. Written word-selectivity was reliably localized to the intersection of the left MFS and the occipito-temporal sulcus. These findings provide direct electrophysiological evidence for topological information structuring of functional representations within higher-order visual cortex. PMID:27272936

  2. Different modalities of painful somatosensory stimulations affect anticipatory cortical processes: a high-resolution EEG study.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Brancucci, Alfredo; Capotosto, Paolo; Del Percio, Claudio; Romani, Gian Luca; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2007-03-15

    Pain sensation is characterized by multiple features that allow to differentiate pricking, burning, aching, stinging, and electrical shock. These features are sub-served by neural pathways that might give flexibility and selectivity to the cerebral anticipatory processes. In this line, the present high-resolution electroencephalography (EEG) study tested the hypothesis that the anticipatory cortical processes are stronger for painful thermal (biologically relevant) than electrical ("artificial") stimuli with similar intensity. EEG data (128 electrodes) were recorded in normal subjects during the expectancy of painful electrical or laser stimuli (visual omitted stimulus paradigm; interval between two painful stimuli: 16s), delivered over the median nerve region of the right arm (nonpainful stimuli as controls). After each stimulus, the subject reported the perceived stimulus intensity. Surface Laplacian estimation of the EEG data spatially enhanced the anticipatory stimulus-preceding negativity (SPN), which reflects motivational relevance of the stimulus. Subjects perceived no difference in the intensity of the electrical versus laser stimuli in both painful and nonpainful conditions. However, the anticipatory SPN appeared over large scalp regions before painful laser but not electrical stimulation. The same was true for the nonpainful stimulations. The present results suggest that the motivational anticipatory cortical processes are induced by nonpainful and painful biologically/ecologically relevant laser stimuli rather than by "artificial" electrical stimuli with similar intensity.

  3. Neural processing of emotions in traumatized children treated with Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing therapy: a hdEEG study

    PubMed Central

    Trentini, Cristina; Pagani, Marco; Fania, Piercarlo; Speranza, Anna Maria; Nicolais, Giampaolo; Sibilia, Alessandra; Inguscio, Lucio; Verardo, Anna Rita; Fernandez, Isabel; Ammaniti, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy has been proven efficacious in restoring affective regulation in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients. However, its effectiveness on emotion processing in children with complex trauma has yet to be explored. High density electroencephalography (hdEEG) was used to investigate the effects of EMDR on brain responses to adults’ emotions on children with histories of early maltreatment. Ten school-aged children were examined before (T0) and within one month after the conclusion of EMDR (T1). hdEEGs were recorded while children passively viewed angry, afraid, happy, and neutral faces. Clinical scales were administered at the same time. Correlation analyses were performed to detect brain regions whose activity was linked to children’s traumatic symptom-related and emotional-adaptive problem scores. In all four conditions, hdEEG showed similar significantly higher activity on the right medial prefrontal and fronto-temporal limbic regions at T0, shifting toward the left medial and superior temporal regions at T1. Moreover, significant correlations were found between clinical scales and the same regions whose activity significantly differed between pre- and post-treatment. These preliminary results demonstrate that, after EMDR, children suffering from complex trauma show increased activity in areas implicated in high-order cognitive processing when passively viewing pictures of emotional expressions. These changes are associated with the decrease of depressive and traumatic symptoms, and with the improvement of emotional-adaptive functioning over time. PMID:26594183

  4. Neural processing of emotions in traumatized children treated with Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing therapy: a hdEEG study.

    PubMed

    Trentini, Cristina; Pagani, Marco; Fania, Piercarlo; Speranza, Anna Maria; Nicolais, Giampaolo; Sibilia, Alessandra; Inguscio, Lucio; Verardo, Anna Rita; Fernandez, Isabel; Ammaniti, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy has been proven efficacious in restoring affective regulation in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients. However, its effectiveness on emotion processing in children with complex trauma has yet to be explored. High density electroencephalography (hdEEG) was used to investigate the effects of EMDR on brain responses to adults' emotions on children with histories of early maltreatment. Ten school-aged children were examined before (T0) and within one month after the conclusion of EMDR (T1). hdEEGs were recorded while children passively viewed angry, afraid, happy, and neutral faces. Clinical scales were administered at the same time. Correlation analyses were performed to detect brain regions whose activity was linked to children's traumatic symptom-related and emotional-adaptive problem scores. In all four conditions, hdEEG showed similar significantly higher activity on the right medial prefrontal and fronto-temporal limbic regions at T0, shifting toward the left medial and superior temporal regions at T1. Moreover, significant correlations were found between clinical scales and the same regions whose activity significantly differed between pre- and post-treatment. These preliminary results demonstrate that, after EMDR, children suffering from complex trauma show increased activity in areas implicated in high-order cognitive processing when passively viewing pictures of emotional expressions. These changes are associated with the decrease of depressive and traumatic symptoms, and with the improvement of emotional-adaptive functioning over time.

  5. Relationship of EEG sources of neonatal seizures to acute perinatal brain lesions seen on MRI: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Despotovic, Ivana; Cherian, Perumpillichira J; De Vos, Maarten; Hallez, Hans; Deburchgraeve, Wouter; Govaert, Paul; Lequin, Maarten; Visser, Gerhard H; Swarte, Renate M; Vansteenkiste, Ewout; Van Huffel, Sabine; Philips, Wilfried

    2013-10-01

    Even though it is known that neonatal seizures are associated with acute brain lesions, the relationship of electroencephalographic (EEG) seizures to acute perinatal brain lesions visible on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has not been objectively studied. EEG source localization is successfully used for this purpose in adults, but it has not been sufficiently explored in neonates. Therefore, we developed an integrated method for ictal EEG dipole source localization based on a realistic head model to investigate the utility of EEG source imaging in neonates with postasphyxial seizures. We describe here our method and compare the dipole seizure localization results with acute perinatal lesions seen on brain MRI in 10 full-term infants with neonatal encephalopathy. Through experimental studies, we also explore the sensitivity of our method to the electrode positioning errors and the variations in neonatal skull geometry and conductivity. The localization results of 45 focal seizures from 10 neonates are compared with the visual analysis of EEG and MRI data, scored by expert physicians. In 9 of 10 neonates, dipole locations showed good relationship with MRI lesions and clinical data. Our experimental results also suggest that the variations in the used values for skull conductivity or thickness have little effect on the dipole localization, whereas inaccurate electrode positioning can reduce the accuracy of source estimates. The performance of our fused method indicates that ictal EEG source imaging is feasible in neonates and with further validation studies, this technique can become a useful diagnostic tool.

  6. Decoding the attended speech stream with multi-channel EEG: implications for online, daily-life applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkovic, Bojana; Debener, Stefan; Jaeger, Manuela; De Vos, Maarten

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Recent studies have provided evidence that temporal envelope driven speech decoding from high-density electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography recordings can identify the attended speech stream in a multi-speaker scenario. The present work replicated the previous high density EEG study and investigated the necessary technical requirements for practical attended speech decoding with EEG. Approach. Twelve normal hearing participants attended to one out of two simultaneously presented audiobook stories, while high density EEG was recorded. An offline iterative procedure eliminating those channels contributing the least to decoding provided insight into the necessary channel number and optimal cross-subject channel configuration. Aiming towards the future goal of near real-time classification with an individually trained decoder, the minimum duration of training data necessary for successful classification was determined by using a chronological cross-validation approach. Main results. Close replication of the previously reported results confirmed the method robustness. Decoder performance remained stable from 96 channels down to 25. Furthermore, for less than 15 min of training data, the subject-independent (pre-trained) decoder performed better than an individually trained decoder did. Significance. Our study complements previous research and provides information suggesting that efficient low-density EEG online decoding is within reach.

  7. Quantitative EEG and its Correlation with Cardiovascular, Cognition and mood State: an Integrated Study in Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianyuan; Hu, Bin; Chen, Wenjuan; Moore, Philip; Xu, Tingting; Dong, Qunxi; Liu, Zhenyu; Luo, Yuejia; Chen, Shanguang

    2014-12-01

    The focus of the study is the estimation of the effects of microgravity on the central nervous activity and its underlying influencing mechanisms. To validate the microgravity-induced physiological and psychological effects on EEG, quantitative EEG features, cardiovascular indicators, mood state, and cognitive performances data collection was achieved during a 45 day period using a -6°head-down bed rest (HDBR) integrated approach. The results demonstrated significant differences in EEG data, as an increased Theta wave, a decreased Beta wave and a reduced complexity of brain, accompanied with an increased heart rate and pulse rate, decreased positive emotion, and degraded emotion conflict monitoring performance. The canonical correlation analysis (CCA) based cardiovascular and cognitive related EEG model showed the cardiovascular effect on EEG mainly affected bilateral temporal region and the cognitive effect impacted parietal-occipital and frontal regions. The results obtained in the study support the use of an approach which combines a multi-factor influential mechanism hypothesis. The changes in the EEG data may be influenced by both cardiovascular and cognitive effects.

  8. Anticipatory attentional suppression of visual features indexed by oscillatory alpha-band power increases: a high-density electrical mapping study.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Adam C; Foxe, John J

    2010-03-17

    Retinotopically specific increases in alpha-band ( approximately 10 Hz) oscillatory power have been strongly implicated in the suppression of processing for irrelevant parts of the visual field during the deployment of visuospatial attention. Here, we asked whether this alpha suppression mechanism also plays a role in the nonspatial anticipatory biasing of feature-based attention. Visual word cues informed subjects what the task-relevant feature of an upcoming visual stimulus (S2) was, while high-density electroencephalographic recordings were acquired. We examined anticipatory oscillatory activity in the Cue-to-S2 interval ( approximately 2 s). Subjects were cued on a trial-by-trial basis to attend to either the color or direction of motion of an upcoming dot field array, and to respond when they detected that a subset of the dots differed from the majority along the target feature dimension. We used the features of color and motion, expressly because they have well known, spatially separated cortical processing areas, to distinguish shifts in alpha power over areas processing each feature. Alpha power from dorsal regions increased when motion was the irrelevant feature (i.e., color was cued), and alpha power from ventral regions increased when color was irrelevant. Thus, alpha-suppression mechanisms appear to operate during feature-based selection in much the same manner as has been shown for space-based attention.

  9. What's behind an Inference? An EEG Study with Conditional Arguments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnefond, Mathilde; Van der Henst, Jean-Baptiste

    2009-01-01

    Conditional reasoning studies typically involve presenting a major conditional premise ("If P then Q"), a minor premise (P) and a conclusion (Q). We describe how most fMRI studies investigate reasoning and point out that these studies neglect to take into consideration the temporal sequence of cognitive steps generated by the interaction of the…

  10. Tinnitus: A Large VBM-EEG Correlational Study

    PubMed Central

    Vanneste, Sven; Van De Heyning, Paul; De Ridder, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    A surprising fact in voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies performed in tinnitus is that not one single region is replicated in studies of different centers. The question then rises whether this is related to the low sample size of these studies, the selection of non-representative patient subgroups, or the absence of stratification according to clinical characteristics. Another possibility is that VBM is not a good tool to study functional pathologies such as tinnitus, in contrast to pathologies like Alzheimer’s disease where it is known the pathology is related to cell loss. In a large sample of 154 tinnitus patients VBM and QEEG (Quantitative Electroencephalography) was performed and evaluated by a regression analysis. Correlation analyses are performed between VBM and QEEG data. Uncorrected data demonstrated structural differences in grey matter in hippocampal and cerebellar areas related to tinnitus related distress and tinnitus duration. After control for multiple comparisons, only cerebellar VBM changes remain significantly altered. Electrophysiological differences are related to distress, tinnitus intensity, and tinnitus duration in the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, hippocampus, and parahippocampus, which confirms previous results. The absence of QEEG-VBM correlations suggest functional changes are not reflected by co-occurring structural changes in tinnitus, and the absence of VBM changes (except for the cerebellum) that survive correct statistical analysis in a large study population suggests that VBM might not be very sensitive for studying tinnitus. PMID:25781934

  11. Meditation States and Traits: EEG, ERP, and Neuroimaging Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahn, B. Rael; Polich, John

    2006-01-01

    Neuroelectric and imaging studies of meditation are reviewed. Electroencephalographic measures indicate an overall slowing subsequent to meditation, with theta and alpha activation related to proficiency of practice. Sensory evoked potential assessment of concentrative meditation yields amplitude and latency changes for some components and…

  12. Usefulness of Simultaneous EEG-NIRS Recording in Language Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallois, F.; Mahmoudzadeh, M.; Patil, A.; Grebe, R.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most challenging tasks in neuroscience in language studies, is investigation of the brain's ability to integrate and process information. This task can only be successfully addressed by applying various assessment techniques integrated into a multimodal approach. Each of these techniques has its advantages and disadvantages, but help to…

  13. Brain Functional Connectivity in MS: An EEG-NIRS Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    will be available as we proceed and publish on the technological aspects of the work. Inventions, patent applications, and/or licenses Dr. Diamond ...is the inventor on one patent and one patent application for technology that is being used in this study: 1. Diamond , S.G. System, Optode and...Cap for Near-Infrared Diffuse-Optical Functional Neuroimaging. PCT/US09/41560 filed April 23, 2009, issued Sept. 23, 2013. 2. Diamond , S.G. and

  14. Abstract art and cortical motor activation: an EEG study

    PubMed Central

    Umilta', M. Alessandra; Berchio, Cristina; Sestito, Mariateresa; Freedberg, David; Gallese, Vittorio

    2012-01-01

    The role of the motor system in the perception of visual art remains to be better understood. Earlier studies on the visual perception of abstract art (from Gestalt theory, as in Arnheim, 1954 and 1988, to balance preference studies as in Locher and Stappers, 2002, and more recent work by Locher et al., 2007; Redies, 2007, and Taylor et al., 2011), neglected the question, while the field of neuroesthetics (Ramachandran and Hirstein, 1999; Zeki, 1999) mostly concentrated on figurative works. Much recent work has demonstrated the multimodality of vision, encompassing the activation of motor, somatosensory, and viscero-motor brain regions. The present study investigated whether the observation of high-resolution digitized static images of abstract paintings by Lucio Fontana is associated with specific cortical motor activation in the beholder's brain. Mu rhythm suppression was evoked by the observation of original art works but not by control stimuli (as in the case of graphically modified versions of these works). Most interestingly, previous visual exposure to the stimuli did not affect the mu rhythm suppression induced by their observation. The present results clearly show the involvement of the cortical motor system in the viewing of static abstract art works. PMID:23162456

  15. Exploratory study of EEG burst characteristics in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Simayijiang, Zhayida; Backman, Sofia; Ulén, Johannes; Wikström, Sverre; Åstrom, Kalle

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we study machine learning techniques and features of electroencephalography activity bursts for predicting outcome in extremely preterm infants. It was previously shown that the distribution of interburst interval durations predicts clinical outcome, but in previous work the information within the bursts has been neglected. In this paper, we perform exploratory analysis of feature extraction of burst characteristics and use machine learning techniques to show that such features could be used for outcome prediction. The results are promising, but further verification in larger datasets is needed to obtain conclusive results.

  16. Fluid hydrogen at high density - Pressure dissociation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saumon, Didier; Chabrier, Gilles

    1991-01-01

    A model for the Helmholtz free energy of fluid hydrogen at high density and high temperature is developed. This model aims at describing both pressure and temperature dissociation and ionization and bears directly on equations of state of partially ionized plasmas, as encountered in astrophysical situations and high-pressure experiments. This paper focuses on a mixture of hydrogen atoms and molecules and is devoted to the study of the phenomenon of pressure dissociation at finite temperatures. In the present model, the strong interactions are described with realistic potentials and are computed with a modified Weeks-Chandler-Andersen fluid perturbation theory that reproduces Monte Carlo simulations to better than 3 percent. Theoretical Hugoniot curves derived from the model are in excellent agreement with experimental data.

  17. Structures of High Density Molecular Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, B; Cynn, H; Iota, V; Yoo, C-S

    2002-02-01

    The goal of this proposal is to develop an in-situ probe for high density molecular fluids. We will, therefore, use Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) applied to laser heated samples in a diamond-anvil cell (DAC) to investigate molecular fluids at simultaneous conditions of high temperatures (T > 2000K) and high pressures (P > 10 GPa.) Temperatures sufficient to populate vibrational levels above the ground state will allow the vibrational potential to be mapped by CARS. A system capable of heating and probing these samples will be constructed. Furthermore, the techniques that enable a sample to be sufficiently heated and probed while held at static high pressure in a diamond-anvil-cell will be developed. This will be an in-situ investigation of simple molecules under conditions relevant to the study of detonation chemistry and the Jovain planet interiors using state of the art non-linear spectroscopy, diamond-anvil-cells, and laser heating technology.

  18. Treatment Effects on Neonatal EEG.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Rawad; Tsuchida, Tammy N

    2016-10-01

    Conventional EEG and amplitude-integrated electroencephalography are used in neonates to assess prognosis and significant changes in brain activity. Neuroactive medications and hypothermia can influence brain activity and therefore alter EEG interpretation. There are limited studies on the effect of these therapies on neonatal EEG background activity. Medication effects on the EEG or amplitude-integrated electroencephalography include increased interburst interval duration, voltage suppression, and sleep disruption. The effect is transient in term newborns but can be persistent in premature newborns. Although therapeutic hypothermia does not produce significant changes in EEG activity, it does change the time point at which EEG can accurately predict neurodevelopmental outcome. It is important to account for these effects on the EEG to avoid inaccurate interpretation that may affect prognostication.

  19. Precaution for volume conduction in rodent cortical electroencephalography using high-density polyimide-based microelectrode arrays on the skull.

    PubMed

    Stienen, P J; Venzi, M; Poppendieck, W; Hoffmann, K P; Åberg, E

    2016-04-01

    In humans, significant progress has been made to link spatial changes in electroencephalographic (EEG) spectral density, connectivity strength, and phase-amplitude modulation to neurological, physiological, and psychological correlates. In contrast, standard rodent EEG techniques employ only few electrodes, which results in poor spatial resolution. Recently, a technique was developed to overcome this limitation in mice. This technique was based on a polyimide-based microelectrode (PBM) array applied on the mouse skull, maintaining a significant number of electrodes with consistent contact, electrode impedance, and mechanical stability. The present study built on this technique by extending it to rats. Therefore, a similar PBM array, but adapted to rats, was designed and fabricated. In addition, this array was connected to a wireless EEG headstage, allowing recording in untethered, freely moving rats. The advantage of a high-density array relies on the assumption that the signal recorded from the different electrodes is generated from distinct sources, i.e., not volume-conducted. Therefore, the utility and validity of the array were evaluated by determining the level of synchrony between channels due to true synchrony or volume conduction during basal vigilance states and following a subanesthetic dose of ketamine. Although the PBM array allowed recording with high signal quality, under both drug and drug-free conditions, high synchronization existed due to volume conduction between the electrodes even in the higher spectral frequency range. Discrimination existed only between frontally and centrally/distally grouped electrode pairs. Therefore, caution should be used in interpreting spatial data obtained from high-density PBM arrays in rodents.

  20. Removing ballistocardiogram (BCG) artifact from full-scalp EEG acquired inside the MR scanner with Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP)

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hongjing; Ruan, Dan; Cohen, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Ballistocardiogram (BCG) artifact remains a major challenge that renders electroencephalographic (EEG) signals hard to interpret in simultaneous EEG and functional MRI (fMRI) data acquisition. Here, we propose an integrated learning and inference approach that takes advantage of a commercial high-density EEG cap, to estimate the BCG contribution in noisy EEG recordings from inside the MR scanner. To estimate reliably the full-scalp BCG artifacts, a near-optimal subset (20 out of 256) of channels first was identified using a modified recording setup. In subsequent recordings inside the MR scanner, BCG-only signal from this subset of channels was used to generate continuous estimates of the full-scalp BCG artifacts via inference, from which the intended EEG signal was recovered. The reconstruction of the EEG was performed with both a direct subtraction and an optimization scheme. We evaluated the performance on both synthetic and real contaminated recordings, and compared it to the benchmark Optimal Basis Set (OBS) method. In the challenging non-event-related-potential (non-ERP) EEG studies, our reconstruction can yield more than fourteen-fold improvement in reducing the normalized RMS error of EEG signals, compared to OBS. PMID:25120421

  1. Incidence and localizing value of vertigo and dizziness in patients with epilepsy: Video-EEG monitoring study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Wook; Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-10-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are common neurological complaints that have long been associated with epilepsy. However, studies of patients with epileptic vertigo or dizziness with concurrent EEG monitoring are scarce. We performed the present study to investigate the incidence and localizing value of vertigo and dizziness in patients with epilepsy who had confirmation of EEG changes via video-EEG monitoring. Data of aura and clinical seizure episodes of 831 consecutive patients who underwent video-EEG monitoring were analyzed retrospectively. Out of 831 patients, 40 patients (4.8%) experienced vertigo or dizziness as aura (mean age, 32.8±11.8years), all of whom had partial seizures. Eight had mesial temporal, 20 had lateral temporal, four had frontal, one had parietal, and seven had occipital lobe onset seizures. An intracranial EEG with cortical stimulation study was performed in seven patients, and the area of stimulation-induced vertigo or dizziness coincided with the ictal onset area in only one patient. Our study showed that vertigo or dizziness is a common aura in patients with epilepsy, and that the temporal lobe is the most frequent ictal onset area in these patients. However, it can be suggested that the symptomatogenic area in patients with epileptic vertigo and dizziness may not coincide with the ictal onset area.

  2. Wake and Sleep EEG in Patients With Huntington Disease: An eLORETA Study and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Piano, Carla; Mazzucchi, Edoardo; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Losurdo, Anna; Calandra Buonaura, Giovanna; Imperatori, Claudio; Cortelli, Pietro; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the EEG modifications in patients with Huntington disease (HD) compared with controls, by means of the exact LOw REsolution Tomography (eLORETA) software. We evaluated EEG changes during wake, non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Moreover, we reviewed the literature concerning EEG modifications in HD. Twenty-three consecutive adult patients affected by HD were enrolled, 14 women and 9 men, mean age was 57.0 ± 12.4 years. Control subjects were healthy volunteers (mean age 58.2 ± 14.6 years). EEG and polygraphic recordings were performed during wake (before sleep) and during sleep. Sources of EEG activities were determined using the eLORETA software. In wake EEG, significant differences between patients and controls were detected in the delta frequency band (threshold T = ±4.606; P < .01) in the Brodmann areas (BAs) 3, 4, and 6 bilaterally. In NREM sleep, HD patients showed increased alpha power (T = ±4.516; P < .01) in BAs 4 and 6 bilaterally; decreased theta power (T = ±4.516; P < .01) in the BAs 23, 29, and 30; and decreased beta power (T = ±4.516; P < .01) in the left BA 30. During REM, HD patients presented decreased theta and alpha power (threshold T = ±4.640; P < .01) in the BAs 23, 29, 30, and 31 bilaterally. In conclusion, EEG data suggest a motor cortex dysfunction during wake and sleep in HD patients, which correlates with the clinical and polysomnographic evidence of increased motor activity during wake and NREM, and nearly absent motor abnormalities in REM.

  3. Multivariate genetic determinants of EEG oscillations in schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder from the BSNIP study

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, B; Soh, P; Calhoun, V D; Ruaño, G; Kocherla, M; Windemuth, A; Clementz, B A; Tamminga, C A; Sweeney, J A; Keshavan, M S; Pearlson, G D

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and psychotic bipolar disorder (PBP) are disabling psychiatric illnesses with complex and unclear etiologies. Electroencephalogram (EEG) oscillatory abnormalities in SZ and PBP probands are heritable and expressed in their relatives, but the neurobiology and genetic factors mediating these abnormalities in the psychosis dimension of either disorder are less explored. We examined the polygenic architecture of eyes-open resting state EEG frequency activity (intrinsic frequency) from 64 channels in 105 SZ, 145 PBP probands and 56 healthy controls (HCs) from the multisite BSNIP (Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes) study. One million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were derived from DNA. We assessed eight data-driven EEG frequency activity derived from group-independent component analysis (ICA) in conjunction with a reduced subset of 10 422 SNPs through novel multivariate association using parallel ICA (para-ICA). Genes contributing to the association were examined collectively using pathway analysis tools. Para-ICA extracted five frequency and nine SNP components, of which theta and delta activities were significantly correlated with two different gene components, comprising genes participating extensively in brain development, neurogenesis and synaptogenesis. Delta and theta abnormality was present in both SZ and PBP, while theta differed between the two disorders. Theta abnormalities were also mediated by gene clusters involved in glutamic acid pathways, cadherin and synaptic contact-based cell adhesion processes. Our data suggest plausible multifactorial genetic networks, including novel and several previously identified (DISC1) candidate risk genes, mediating low frequency delta and theta abnormalities in psychoses. The gene clusters were enriched for biological properties affecting neural circuitry and involved in brain function and/or development. PMID:26101851

  4. Numerical magnitude processing in abacus-trained children with superior mathematical ability: an EEG study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Du, Feng-lei; Yao, Yuan; Wan, Qun; Wang, Xiao-Song; Chen, Fei-Yan

    2015-08-01

    Distance effect has been regarded as the best established marker of basic numerical magnitude processes and is related to individual mathematical abilities. A larger behavioral distance effect is suggested to be concomitant with lower mathematical achievement in children. However, the relationship between distance effect and superior mathematical abilities is unclear. One could get superior mathematical abilities by acquiring the skill of abacus-based mental calculation (AMC), which can be used to solve calculation problems with exceptional speed and high accuracy. In the current study, we explore the relationship between distance effect and superior mathematical abilities by examining whether and how the AMC training modifies numerical magnitude processing. Thus, mathematical competencies were tested in 18 abacus-trained children (who accepted the AMC training) and 18 non-trained children. Electroencephalography (EEG) waveforms were recorded when these children executed numerical comparison tasks in both Arabic digit and dot array forms. We found that: (a) the abacus-trained group had superior mathematical abilities than their peers; (b) distance effects were found both in behavioral results and on EEG waveforms; (c) the distance effect size of the average amplitude on the late negative-going component was different between groups in the digit task, with a larger effect size for abacus-trained children; (d) both the behavioral and EEG distance effects were modulated by the notation. These results revealed that the neural substrates of magnitude processing were modified by AMC training, and suggested that the mechanism of the representation of numerical magnitude for children with superior mathematical abilities was different from their peers. In addition, the results provide evidence for a view of non-abstract numerical representation.

  5. Multivariate genetic determinants of EEG oscillations in schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder from the BSNIP study.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, B; Soh, P; Calhoun, V D; Ruaño, G; Kocherla, M; Windemuth, A; Clementz, B A; Tamminga, C A; Sweeney, J A; Keshavan, M S; Pearlson, G D

    2015-06-23

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and psychotic bipolar disorder (PBP) are disabling psychiatric illnesses with complex and unclear etiologies. Electroencephalogram (EEG) oscillatory abnormalities in SZ and PBP probands are heritable and expressed in their relatives, but the neurobiology and genetic factors mediating these abnormalities in the psychosis dimension of either disorder are less explored. We examined the polygenic architecture of eyes-open resting state EEG frequency activity (intrinsic frequency) from 64 channels in 105 SZ, 145 PBP probands and 56 healthy controls (HCs) from the multisite BSNIP (Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes) study. One million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were derived from DNA. We assessed eight data-driven EEG frequency activity derived from group-independent component analysis (ICA) in conjunction with a reduced subset of 10,422 SNPs through novel multivariate association using parallel ICA (para-ICA). Genes contributing to the association were examined collectively using pathway analysis tools. Para-ICA extracted five frequency and nine SNP components, of which theta and delta activities were significantly correlated with two different gene components, comprising genes participating extensively in brain development, neurogenesis and synaptogenesis. Delta and theta abnormality was present in both SZ and PBP, while theta differed between the two disorders. Theta abnormalities were also mediated by gene clusters involved in glutamic acid pathways, cadherin and synaptic contact-based cell adhesion processes. Our data suggest plausible multifactorial genetic networks, including novel and several previously identified (DISC1) candidate risk genes, mediating low frequency delta and theta abnormalities in psychoses. The gene clusters were enriched for biological properties affecting neural circuitry and involved in brain function and/or development.

  6. Study of the frequency parameters of EEG influenced by zone-dependent local ELF-MF exposure on the human head.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, S A; Firoozabadi, S M; Rasoulzadeh Tabatabaie, K; Ghabaee, M

    2012-06-01

    It has been reported that human subjects exposed to electromagnetic fields exhibit changes in human EEG signals at the frequency of stimulation. The aim of the present study was to expose different parts of the brain to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields locally and investigate EEG power spectrum alters at the frequency of stimulation. EEG relative power spectrum were evaluated at 3, 5, 10, 17, and 45 Hz frequencies at T4, T3, F3, Cz, and F4 points, respectively, when these points were exposed to magnetic fields with similar frequencies and 100 μT intensity. The paired t-test results showed that power value of EEG did not alter significantly at the frequency of stimulation (P<0.05). Further, significant changes in different EEG bands caused by locally exposing to ELF-MF in different points of brain were observed. The changes in the EEG bands were not limited necessarily to the exposure point.

  7. High density harp for SSCL linac

    SciTech Connect

    Fritsche, C.T.; Krogh, M.L.; Crist, C.E.

    1993-05-01

    AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division, and the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) are collaboratively developing a high density harp for the SSCL linac. This harp is designed using hybrid microcircuit (HMC) technology to obtain a higher wire density than previously available. The developed harp contains one hundred twenty-eight 33-micron-diameter carbon wires on 0.38-mm centers. The harp features an onboard broken wire detection circuit. Carbon wire preparation and attachment processes were developed. High density surface mount connectors were located. The status of high density harp development will be presented along with planned future activities.

  8. 'Is Going through Clinical Test a Headache?' An HRV Study and Descriptive Report of Subjective Experience of Undergoing EEG Testing.

    PubMed

    Kathrotia, Rajesh; Singh, Yogesh; Goel, Arun; Patil, Prashant

    2016-03-01

    To explore the heart rate variability (HRV) changes and subjective perception of undergoing electroencephalography (EEG). We conducted a study on 35 healthy male volunteers. The intervention consisted of placing 23 disc-type EEG electrodes of 5-7 mm diameter with long flexible lead according to international 10-20 system for the duration of 30 min, in a sitting position, on the scalp. The outcome measures were time and frequency domain parameters of HRV analysis and descriptive report of subjective experiences on a 3-point Likert scale. The perception of undergoing EEG ranged from pleasant to uneasy. For 13 (37%) participants it was soothing and relaxing, for 11 (31.5%) it was neutral and for the rest 11 (31.5%) it was uneasy and restrictive in nature. However, HRV analysis of the pre and post EEG, showed no statistically significant difference. In our study, the mixed subjective experience of undergoing EEG may be due to individual variation in the perception of the intervention. No difference in HRV parameters may be because of 2 possibilities. The first possibility is varied experiences of procedure with temporal progression. Same participants may have experienced 2 opposite extremes of experiences over and over again, which may have cancelled out sympathetic and parasympathetic responses. The second possibility may be that no stress is generated during clinical test.

  9. On the effect of resistive EEG electrodes and leads during 7 T MRI: simulation and temperature measurement studies.

    PubMed

    Angelone, Leonardo M; Vasios, Christos E; Wiggins, Graham; Purdon, Patrick L; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the effects of electrodes and leads on electromagnetic field and specific absorption rate (SAR) distributions during simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and 7-T MRI. Two different approaches were evaluated and compared to the case without electrodes: (a) the use of different EEG lead resistivity and (b) the use of a radiofrequency (RF) resistor on the lead near the EEG electrode. These configurations are commonly used in research and clinical settings. Electromagnetic field and SAR distributions generated by the transmit RF coil were evaluated using finite difference time domain simulations on an anatomically accurate head model. The spatiotemporal changes of temperature were estimated with the heat equation. Temperature changes during turbo spin echo sequences were also measured using a custom-made phantom: the conductive head mannequin anthropomorphic (CHEMA). The results of this study showed that the SAR and temperature distributions in CHEMA (a) increased when using low resistive leads, with respect to the no-electrode case; (b) were affected by the resistivity of the EEG leads, with carbon fiber leads performing better than standard copper leads; and (c) were not affected by the use of an RF resistor between the EEG electrode and the lead.

  10. Evidence of CNS impairment in HIV infection: clinical, neuropsychological, EEG, and MRI/MRS study

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, M; Newman, S; Hall-Craggs, M; Fowler, C; Miller, R; Kendall, B; Paley, M; Wilkinson, I; Sweeney, B; Lunn, S; Carter, S; Williams, I

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To identify by clinical examination, EEG, MRI, and proton spectroscopy, and neuropsychological assessment the prevalence of signs of CNS involvement in patients infected with HIV, and to relate such findings to the evidence of immunosuppression.
METHODS—The design was a cross sectional analysis of a cohort of male patients with infected HIV with an AIDS defining diagnosis or low CD4 count (<350), and seropositive asymptomatic subjects, both groups being followed up in a longitudinal study. Control groups consisted of seronegative subjects from the same genitourinary medicine clinics.
RESULTS—This report sets out the cross sectional findings at the seventh visit in the longitudinal study. Patients with AIDS had more signs of neurological dysfunction, poorer performance on a neuropsychological test battery, were more likely to have an abnormal EEG, and to have abnormalities on MRI. They more often had cerebral atrophy, abnormal appearing white matter, , and abnormal relaxometry and spectroscopy. There was little evidence of abnormality in seropositive people who had a CD4 count >350 compared with seronegative people from a similar background.
CONCLUSIONS—Detailed testing failed to disclose significant CNS impairment without immunosuppression in men infected with HIV. Findings from MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) correlated with those of the neurological examination and neuropsychogical assessment. A combination of such assessments offers a simple surrogate for studies of CNS involvement in HIV disease.

 PMID:9728940

  11. High density load bearing insulation peg

    DOEpatents

    Nowobilski, J.J.; Owens, W.J.

    1985-01-29

    A high density peg is disclosed which can support a large load and exhibits excellent thermal resistance produced by a method wherein the peg is made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure. 4 figs.

  12. High density load bearing insulation peg

    DOEpatents

    Nowobilski, Jeffert J.; Owens, William J.

    1985-01-01

    A high density peg which can support a large load and exhibits excellent thermal resistance produced by a method wherein the peg is made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure.

  13. High Density Fuel Development for Research Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Wachs; Dennis Keiser; Mitchell Meyer; Douglas Burkes; Curtis Clark; Glenn Moore; Jan-Fong Jue; Totju Totev; Gerard Hofman; Tom Wiencek; Yeon So Kim; Jim Snelgrove

    2007-09-01

    An international effort to develop, qualify, and license high and very high density fuels has been underway for several years within the framework of multi-national RERTR programs. The current development status is the result of significant contributions from many laboratories, specifically CNEA in Argentina, AECL in Canada, CEA in France, TUM in Germany, KAERI in Korea, VNIIM, RDIPE, IPPE, NCCP and RIARR in Russia, INL, ANL and Y-12 in USA. These programs are mainly engaged with UMo dispersion fuels with densities from 6 to 8 gU/cm3 (high density fuel) and UMo monolithic fuel with density as high as 16 gU/cm3 (very high density fuel). This paper, mainly focused on the French & US programs, gives the status of high density UMo fuel development and perspectives on their qualification.

  14. Combining Different Tools for EEG Analysis to Study the Distributed Character of Language Processing

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Armando Freitas; Foz, Flávia Benevides; Pereira, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies on language processing indicate that language cognition is better understood if assumed to be supported by a distributed intelligent processing system enrolling neurons located all over the cortex, in contrast to reductionism that proposes to localize cognitive functions to specific cortical structures. Here, brain activity was recorded using electroencephalogram while volunteers were listening or reading small texts and had to select pictures that translate meaning of these texts. Several techniques for EEG analysis were used to show this distributed character of neuronal enrollment associated with the comprehension of oral and written descriptive texts. Low Resolution Tomography identified the many different sets (si) of neurons activated in several distinct cortical areas by text understanding. Linear correlation was used to calculate the information H(ei) provided by each electrode of the 10/20 system about the identified si. H(ei) Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to study the temporal and spatial activation of these sources si. This analysis evidenced 4 different patterns of H(ei) covariation that are generated by neurons located at different cortical locations. These results clearly show that the distributed character of language processing is clearly evidenced by combining available EEG technologies. PMID:26713089

  15. The Dynamics of Visual Experience, an EEG Study of Subjective Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Mark A.; Twomey, Deirdre; Glennon, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Background Since the origin of psychological science a number of studies have reported visual pattern formation in the absence of either physiological stimulation or direct visual-spatial references. Subjective patterns range from simple phosphenes to complex patterns but are highly specific and reported reliably across studies. Methodology/Principal Findings Using independent-component analysis (ICA) we report a reduction in amplitude variance consistent with subjective-pattern formation in ventral posterior areas of the electroencephalogram (EEG). The EEG exhibits significantly increased power at delta/theta and gamma-frequencies (point and circle patterns) or a series of high-frequency harmonics of a delta oscillation (spiral patterns). Conclusions/Significance Subjective-pattern formation may be described in a way entirely consistent with identical pattern formation in fluids or granular flows. In this manner, we propose subjective-pattern structure to be represented within a spatio-temporal lattice of harmonic oscillations which bind topographically organized visual-neuronal assemblies by virtue of low frequency modulation. PMID:22292053

  16. Study on Brain Dynamics by Non Linear Analysis of Music Induced EEG Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Archi; Sanyal, Shankha; Patranabis, Anirban; Banerjee, Kaushik; Guhathakurta, Tarit; Sengupta, Ranjan; Ghosh, Dipak; Ghose, Partha

    2016-02-01

    Music has been proven to be a valuable tool for the understanding of human cognition, human emotion, and their underlying brain mechanisms. The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of Hindustani music on brain activity during normal relaxing conditions using electroencephalography (EEG). Ten male healthy subjects without special musical education participated in the study. EEG signals were acquired at the frontal (F3/F4) lobes of the brain while listening to music at three experimental conditions (rest, with music and without music). Frequency analysis was done for the alpha, theta and gamma brain rhythms. The finding shows that arousal based activities were enhanced while listening to Hindustani music of contrasting emotions (romantic/sorrow) for all the subjects in case of alpha frequency bands while no significant changes were observed in gamma and theta frequency ranges. It has been observed that when the music stimulus is removed, arousal activities as evident from alpha brain rhythms remain for some time, showing residual arousal. This is analogous to the conventional 'Hysteresis' loop where the system retains some 'memory' of the former state. This is corroborated in the non linear analysis (Detrended Fluctuation Analysis) of the alpha rhythms as manifested in values of fractal dimension. After an input of music conveying contrast emotions, withdrawal of music shows more retention as evidenced by the values of fractal dimension.

  17. Mapping brain injury with symmetrical-channels' EEG signal analysis--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Liu, Xiao-ping; Ling, Xian-hong; Li, Jing-qi; Yang, Wen-wei; Zhang, Dan-ke; Li, Li-hua; Yang, Yong

    2014-05-21

    A technique for detecting brain injury at the bedside has great clinical value, but conventional imaging techniques (such as computed tomography [CT] and magnetic resonance imaging) are impractical. In this study, a novel method-the symmetrical channel electroencephalogram (EEG) signal analysis-was developed for this purpose. The study population consisted of 45 traumatic brain injury patients and 10 healthy controls. EEG signals in resting and stimulus states were acquired, and approximate entropy (ApEn) and slow-wave coefficient were extracted to calculate the ratio values of ApEn and SWC for injured and uninjured areas. Statistical analyses showed that the ratio values for both ApEn and SWC between injured and uninjured brain areas differed significantly (P<0.05) for both resting and name call stimulus states. A set of criteria (range of ratio values) to determine whether a brain area is injured or uninjured was proposed and its reliability was verified by statistical analyses and CT images.

  18. Bright light as a sleepiness prophylactic: a laboratory study of subjective ratings and EEG.

    PubMed

    Akerstedt, Torbjörn; Landström, Ulf; Byström, Marianne; Nordström, Bertil; Wibom, Roger

    2003-12-01

    Sleepiness is a major problem when driving a vehicle and contributes to 15 to 30% of all road accidents. One possible countermeasure may be exposure to light. This study was designed to test whether 30 min. of exposure to a bright light would reduce subjective sleepiness and EEG indicators of sleepiness, such as alpha and theta power density. 10 female and 10 male university students (recruited through advertisements) participated in a laboratory study, consisting of 30 min. of dim light followed by 30 min. of bright light (or red light in the control condition) exposures and then by 30 min. of dim light exposure. In the dim light exposure, the luminance was 20 cd/m2, and the illuminance was about 5 Lux. In the bright exposure, the luminance was 500 cd/m2 and the illuminance about 2000 Lux. In the red light exposure, the luminance was 10 cd/m2 and the illuminance about 30 Lux. The subject sat in a chair with a seating comfort corresponding to that of a driver's seat. Analysis showed that the subjects became subjectively sleepier during the pre-exposure condition, and alpha and theta power density increased in their EEGs. The intervention significantly reduced subjective sleepiness but did not have significant effects on alpha or theta power density. The results suggest that a short (30 min.) exposure to bright light may not be a useful prophylactic against sleepiness for the period following the exposure.

  19. Dynamic Causal Modelling of epileptic seizure propagation pathways: a combined EEG-fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Murta, Teresa; Leal, Alberto; Garrido, Marta I; Figueiredo, Patrícia

    2012-09-01

    Simultaneous EEG-fMRI offers the possibility of non-invasively studying the spatiotemporal dynamics of epileptic activity propagation from the focus towards an extended brain network, through the identification of the haemodynamic correlates of ictal electrical discharges. In epilepsy associated with hypothalamic hamartomas (HH), seizures are known to originate in the HH but different propagation pathways have been proposed. Here, Dynamic Causal Modelling (DCM) was employed to estimate the seizure propagation pathway from fMRI data recorded in a HH patient, by testing a set of clinically plausible network connectivity models of discharge propagation. The model consistent with early propagation from the HH to the temporal-occipital lobe followed by the frontal lobe was selected as the most likely model to explain the data. Our results demonstrate the applicability of DCM to investigate patient-specific effective connectivity in epileptic networks identified with EEG-fMRI. In this way, it is possible to study the propagation pathway of seizure activity, which has potentially great impact in the decision of the surgical approach for epilepsy treatment.

  20. Difficulty in clinical identification of neonatal seizures: an EEG monitor study.

    PubMed Central

    Fenichel, G. M.

    1987-01-01

    Seventeen newborns were monitored for 24 hours using a three-channel ambulatory EEG (A/EEG). All newborns were thought to be having subtle seizures by the nursery staff. Fifteen of the 17 newborns were recorded as having 1-30 clinical seizures during the time of monitoring. Only one newborn had clinically identified seizures associated with A/EEG discharges. The seizures were characterized by eye rolling. Fifty-two episodes (thought to be seizures) of lip smacking, bicycling, jerking, fisting, staring, stiffening, or any combination of the above occurred in eight newborns without an associated discharge on A/EEG. However, two of the eight had seizure discharges at other times, not associated with any clinical manifestation. Seventy-four apnea spells, thought to be possible seizures, occurred in seven newborns. None was associated with discharges on A/EEG, but one of these newborns had 50 A/EEG discharges unrelated to apnea or other clinical manifestations. PMID:3577211

  1. Respiratory-cycle related analysis of the EEG-spectrum during sleep: a healthy population study.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Molina, Gary; Bialas, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has shown the EEG's spectral changes that occur in synchrony with the respiratory-cycle. During wakefulness, and for healthy subjects it is reported that the EEG power in several frequency bands changes between the expiratory and inspiratory phases. For sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) patients, it is reported that the amplitude of changes in normalized EEG power (referred to as respiratory-cycle related EEG changes RCREC) within a respiratory-cycle decreases after a successful intervention to alleviate the SDB condition. In this paper, we focus on analyzing the changes in the sleep’s EEG spectrum related to the respiratory-cycle for a healthy population comprising 39 subjects. For 3 sleep stages (N2, N3, REM), 6 EEG channels, and 7 frequency bands, two types of EEG spectral analyzes were considered: 1) the ratio between the EEG power during expiration and that during inspiration, and 2) the RCREC. For the first type of analysis and at the population level, no statistically significant difference was found between the EEG power during expiration and that during inspiration. For the second type of analysis, the RCREC for all conditions is at a level that is statistically significantly larger than 0.1. The latter being the value at which the RCREC decreased after successful SDB intervention.

  2. Preliminary study of Alzheimer's Disease diagnosis based on brain electrical signals using wireless EEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handayani, N.; Akbar, Y.; Khotimah, S. N.; Haryanto, F.; Arif, I.; Taruno, W. P.

    2016-03-01

    This research aims to study brain's electrical signals recorded using EEG as a basis for the diagnosis of patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD). The subjects consisted of patients with AD, and normal subjects are used as the control. Brain signals are recorded for 3 minutes in a relaxed condition and with eyes closed. The data is processed using power spectral analysis, brain mapping and chaos test to observe the level of complexity of EEG's data. The results show a shift in the power spectral in the low frequency band (delta and theta) in AD patients. The increase of delta and theta occurs in lobus frontal area and lobus parietal respectively. However, there is a decrease of alpha activity in AD patients where in the case of normal subjects with relaxed condition, brain alpha wave dominates the posterior area. This is confirmed by the results of brain mapping. While the results of chaos analysis show that the average value of MMLE is lower in AD patients than in normal subjects. The level of chaos associated with neural complexity in AD patients with lower neural complexity is due to neuronal damage caused by the beta amyloid plaques and tau protein in neurons.

  3. The dynamics of contour integration: A simultaneous EEG-fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Mijović, Bogdan; De Vos, Maarten; Vanderperren, Katrien; Machilsen, Bart; Sunaert, Stefan; Van Huffel, Sabine; Wagemans, Johan

    2014-03-01

    To study the dynamics of contour integration in the human brain, we simultaneously acquired EEG and fMRI data while participants were engaged in a passive viewing task. The stimuli were Gabor arrays with some Gabor elements positioned on the contour of an embedded shape, in three conditions: with local and global structure (perfect contour alignment), with global structure only (orthogonal orientations interrupting the alignment), or without contour. By applying JointICA to the EEG and fMRI responses of the subjects, new insights could be obtained that cannot be derived from unimodal recordings. In particular, only in the global structure condition, an ERP peak around 300ms was identified that involved a loop from LOC to the early visual areas. This component can be interpreted as being related to the verification of the consistency of the different local elements with the globally defined shape, which is necessary when perfect local-to-global alignment is absent. By modifying JointICA, a quantitative comparison of brain regions and the time-course of their interplay were obtained between different conditions. More generally, we provide additional support for the presence of feedback loops from higher areas to lower level sensory regions.

  4. Does EEG-Neurofeedback Improve Neurocognitive Functioning in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder? A Systematic Review and a Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollebregt, Madelon A.; van Dongen-Boomsma, Martine; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Slaats-Willemse, Dorine

    2014-01-01

    Background: The number of placebo-controlled randomized studies relating to EEG-neurofeedback and its effect on neurocognition in attention-deficient/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is limited. For this reason, a double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study was designed to assess the effects of EEG-neurofeedback on neurocognitive functioning…

  5. Spatial patterning of the neonatal EEG suggests a need for a high number of electrodes.

    PubMed

    Odabaee, Maryam; Freeman, Walter J; Colditz, Paul B; Ramon, Ceon; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2013-03-01

    There is an increasing demand for source analysis of neonatal EEG, but currently there is inadequate knowledge about i) the spatial patterning of neonatal scalp EEG and hence ii) the number of electrodes needed to capture neonatal EEG in full spatial detail. This study addresses these issues by using a very high density (2.5mm interelectrode spacing) linear electrode array to assess the spatial power spectrum, by using a high density (64 electrodes) EEG cap to assess the spatial extent of the common oscillatory bouts in the neonatal EEG and by using a neonatal size spherical head model to assess the effects of source depth and skull conductivities on the spatial frequency spectrum. The linear array recordings show that the spatial power spectrum decays rapidly until about 0.5-0.8 cycles per centimeter. The dense array EEG recordings show that the amplitude of oscillatory events decays within 4-6 cm to the level of global background activity, and that the higher frequencies (12-20 Hz) show the most rapid spatial decline in amplitude. Simulation with spherical head model showed that realistic variation in skull conductivity and source depths can both introduce orders of magnitude difference in the spatial frequency of the scalp EEG. Calculation of spatial Nyquist frequencies from the spatial power spectra suggests that an interelectrode distance of about 6-10mm would suffice to capture the full spatial texture of the raw EEG signal at the neonatal scalp without spatial aliasing or under-sampling. The spatial decay of oscillatory events suggests that a full representation of their spatial characteristics requires an interelectrode distance of 10-20mm. The findings show that the conventional way of recording neonatal EEG with about 10 electrodes ignores most spatial EEG content, that increasing the electrode density is necessary to improve neonatal EEG source localization and information extraction, and that prospective source models will need to carefully consider the

  6. EEG Abnormalities Are Associated With Poorer Depressive Symptom Outcomes With Escitalopram and Venlafaxine-XR, but Not Sertraline: Results From the Multicenter Randomized iSPOT-D Study.

    PubMed

    Arns, Martijn; Gordon, Evian; Boutros, Nash N

    2017-01-01

    Rationale Limited research is available on electrophysiological abnormalities such as epileptiform EEG or EEG slowing in depression and its association with antidepressant treatment response. Objectives We investigated the association between EEG abnormalities and antidepressant treatment response in the international Study to Predict Optimized Treatment in Depression (iSPOT-D). Methods Of 1008 participants with major depressive disorder randomized to escitalopram, sertraline, or venlafaxine-XR, 622 completed 8 weeks of treatment per protocol. The study also recruited 336 healthy controls. Treatment response was established after 8 weeks using the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17). The resting-state EEG was assessed at baseline with eyes closed. EEG abnormalities including epileptiform activity, EEG slowing, and alpha peak frequency (APF) were scored for all subjects, blind to treatment outcome. Results Patients and controls did not differ in the occurrence of EEG abnormalities. Furthermore, in the per protocol sample the occurrence of epileptiform EEG and EEG slowing (as a combined marker) were associated with a reduced likelihood of responding to escitalopram (P = .019; odds ratio [OR] = 3.56) and venlafaxine-XR (P = .043; OR = 2.76), but not sertraline (OR = 0.73). The response rates for this "any EEG abnormality" groups versus the "no-abnormality" group were 33% and 64% for escitalopram and 41% and 66% for venlafaxine-XR, respectively. A slow APF was associated with treatment response only in the sertraline group (P = .21; d = .027). Conclusions EEG abnormalities are associated with nonresponse to escitalopram and venlafaxine-XR, but not sertraline, whereas a slow APF is associated to response for sertraline only.

  7. EEG (Electroencephalogram)

    MedlinePlus

    ... simple calculations, read a paragraph, look at a picture, breathe deeply (hyperventilate) for a few minutes, or look at a flashing light. Video is frequently recorded during the EEG. Your body motions are captured by a video camera while the ...

  8. Cognitive workload modulation through degraded visual stimuli: a single-trial EEG study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, K.; Prasad, I.; Mir, H.; Thakor, N.; Al-Nashash, H.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Our experiments explored the effect of visual stimuli degradation on cognitive workload. Approach. We investigated the subjective assessment, event-related potentials (ERPs) as well as electroencephalogram (EEG) as measures of cognitive workload. Main results. These experiments confirm that degradation of visual stimuli increases cognitive workload as assessed by subjective NASA task load index and confirmed by the observed P300 amplitude attenuation. Furthermore, the single-trial multi-level classification using features extracted from ERPs and EEG is found to be promising. Specifically, the adopted single-trial oscillatory EEG/ERP detection method achieved an average accuracy of 85% for discriminating 4 workload levels. Additionally, we found from the spatial patterns obtained from EEG signals that the frontal parts carry information that can be used for differentiating workload levels. Significance. Our results show that visual stimuli can modulate cognitive workload, and the modulation can be measured by the single trial EEG/ERP detection method.

  9. Signal distortion from microelectrodes in clinical EEG acquisition systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacey, William C.; Kellis, Spencer; Patel, Paras R.; Greger, Bradley; Butson, Christopher R.

    2012-10-01

    Many centers are now using high-density microelectrodes during traditional intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) both for research and clinical purposes. These microelectrodes are FDA-approved and integrate into clinical EEG acquisition systems. However, the electrical characteristics of these electrodes are poorly described and clinical systems were not designed to use them; thus, it is possible that this shift into clinical practice could have unintended consequences. In this study, we characterized the impedance of over 100 commercial macro- and microelectrodes using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to determine how electrode properties could affect signal acquisition and interpretation. The EIS data were combined with the published specifications of several commercial EEG systems to design digital filters that mimic the behavior of the electrodes and amplifiers. These filters were used to analyze simulated brain signals that contain a mixture of characteristic features commonly observed in iEEG. Each output was then processed with several common quantitative EEG measurements. Our results show that traditional macroelectrodes had low impedances and produced negligible distortion of the original signal. Brain tissue and electrical wiring also had negligible filtering effects. However, microelectrode impedances were much higher and more variable than the macroelectrodes. When connected to clinical amplifiers, higher impedance electrodes produced considerable distortion of the signal at low frequencies (<60 Hz), which caused significant changes in amplitude, phase, variance and spectral band power. In contrast, there were only minimal changes to the signal content for frequencies above 100 Hz. In order to minimize distortion with microelectrodes, we determined that an acquisition system should have an input impedance of at least 1 GΩ, which is much higher than most clinical systems. These results show that it is critical to account for variations

  10. Delayed Early Primary Visual Pathway Development in Premature Infants: High Density Electrophysiological Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Emmanuel; Vannasing, Phetsamone; Roy, Marie-Sylvie; Lefebvre, Francine; Kombate, Damelan; Lassonde, Maryse; Lepore, Franco; McKerral, Michelle; Gallagher, Anne

    2014-01-01

    In the past decades, multiple studies have been interested in developmental patterns of the visual system in healthy infants. During the first year of life, differential maturational changes have been observed between the Magnocellular (P) and the Parvocellular (P) visual pathways. However, few studies investigated P and M system development in infants born prematurely. The aim of the present study was to characterize P and M system maturational differences between healthy preterm and fullterm infants through a critical period of visual maturation: the first year of life. Using a cross-sectional design, high-density electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded in 31 healthy preterms and 41 fullterm infants of 3, 6, or 12 months (corrected age for premature babies). Three visual stimulations varying in contrast and spatial frequency were presented to stimulate preferentially the M pathway, the P pathway, or both systems simultaneously during EEG recordings. Results from early visual evoked potentials in response to the stimulation that activates simultaneously both systems revealed longer N1 latencies and smaller P1 amplitudes in preterm infants compared to fullterms. Moreover, preterms showed longer N1 and P1 latencies in response to stimuli assessing the M pathway at 3 months. No differences between preterms and fullterms were found when using the preferential P system stimulation. In order to identify the cerebral generator of each visual response, distributed source analyses were computed in 12-month-old infants using LORETA. Source analysis demonstrated an activation of the parietal dorsal region in fullterm infants, in response to the preferential M pathway, which was not seen in the preterms. Overall, these findings suggest that the Magnocellular pathway development is affected in premature infants. Although our VEP results suggest that premature children overcome, at least partially, the visual developmental delay with time, source analyses reveal abnormal brain

  11. Anchors as Semantic Primes in Value Construction: An EEG Study of the Anchoring Effect

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Qiang; Qiu, Wenwei

    2015-01-01

    Previous research regarding anchoring effects has demonstrated that human judgments are often assimilated to irrelevant information. Studies have demonstrated that anchors influence the economic valuation of various products and experiences; however, the cognitive explanations of this effect remain controversial, and its neural mechanisms have rarely been explored. In the current study, we conducted an electroencephalography (EEG) experiment to investigate the anchoring effect on willingness to accept (WTA) for an aversive hedonic experience and the role of anchors in this judgment heuristic. The behavioral results demonstrated that random numbers affect participants’ WTA for listening to pieces of noise. The participants asked for higher pay after comparing their WTA with higher numbers. The EEG results indicated that anchors also influenced the neural underpinnings of the valuation process. Specifically, when a higher anchor number was drawn, larger P2 and late positive potential amplitudes were elicited, reflecting the anticipation of more intensive pain from the subsequent noise. Moreover, higher anchors induced a stronger theta band power increase compared with lower anchors when subjects listened to the noises, indicating that the participants felt more unpleasant during the actual experience of the noise. The levels of unpleasantness during both anticipation and experience were consistent with the semantic information implied by the anchors. Therefore, these data suggest that a semantic priming process underlies the anchoring effect in WTA. This study provides proof for the robustness of the anchoring effect and neural evidence of the semantic priming model. Our findings indicate that activated contextual information, even seemingly irrelevant, can be embedded in the construction of economic value in the brain. PMID:26439926

  12. Modeling EEG fractal dimension changes in wake and drowsy states in humans--a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Bojić, Tijana; Vuckovic, Aleksandra; Kalauzi, Aleksandar

    2010-01-21

    Aim of this preliminary study was to examine and compare topographic distribution of Higuchi's fractal dimension (FD, measure of signal complexity) of EEG signals between states of relaxed wakefulness and drowsiness, as well as their FD differences. The experiments were performed on 10 healthy individuals using a fourteen-channel montage. An explanation is offered on the causes of the detected FD changes. FD values of 60s records belonging to wake (Hori's stage 1) and drowsy (Hori's stages 2-4) states were calculated for each channel and each subject. In 136 out of 140 epochs an increase in FD was obtained. Relationship between signal FD and its relative alpha amplitude was mathematically modeled and we quantitatively demonstrated that the increase in FD was predominantly due to a reduction in alpha activity. The model was generalized to include other EEG oscillations. By averaging FD values for each channel across 10 subjects, four clusters (O2O1; T6P4T5P3; C3F3F4C4F8F7; T4T3) for the wake and two clusters (O2O1P3T6P4T5; C3C4F4F3F8T4T3F7) for the drowsy state were statistically verified. Topographic distribution of FD values in wakefulness showed a lateral symmetry and a partial fronto-occipital gradient. In drowsiness, a reduction in the number of clusters was detected, due to regrouping of channels T3, T4, O1 and O2. Topographic distribution of absolute FD differences revealed largest values at F7, O1 and F3. Reorganization of channel clusters showed that regionalized brain activity, specific for wakefulness, became more global by entering into drowsiness. Since the global increase in FD during wake-to-drowsy transition correlated with the decrease of alpha power, we inferred that increase of EEG complexity may not necessarily be an index of brain activation.

  13. Safety and Biocompatibility of a New High-Density Polyethylene-Based Spherical Integrated Porous Orbital Implant: An Experimental Study in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Bueno, Ivan; Di Lauro, Salvatore; Alvarez, Ivan; Lopez, Jose Carlos; Garcia-Gutierrez, Maria Teresa; Fernandez, Itziar; Larra, Eva; Pastor, Jose Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate clinically and histologically the safety and biocompatibility of a new HDPE-based spherical porous orbital implants in rabbits. Methods. MEDPOR (Porex Surgical, Inc., Fairburn, GA, USA), OCULFIT I, and OCULFIT II (AJL Ophthalmic S.A., Vitoria, Spain) implants were implanted in eviscerated rabbis. Animals were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 4 each) according to the 3 implant materials tested and 2 follow-up times of 90 or 180 days. Signs of regional pain and presence of eyelid swelling, conjunctival hyperemia, and amount of exudate were semiquantitatively evaluated. After animals sacrifice, the implants and surrounding ocular tissues were processed for histological staining and polarized light evaluation. Statistical study was performed by ANOVA and Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results. No statistically significant differences in regional pain, eyelid swelling, or conjunctival hyperemia were shown between implants and/or time points evaluated. However, amount of exudate differed, with OCULFIT I causing the smallest amount. No remarkable clinical complications were observed. Histological findings were similar in all three types of implants and agree with minor inflammatory response. Conclusions. OCULFIT ophthalmic tolerance and biocompatibility in rabbits were comparable to the clinically used MEDPOR. Clinical studies are needed to determine if OCULFIT is superior to the orbital implants commercially available. PMID:26689343

  14. Human decision making based on variations in internal noise: an EEG study.

    PubMed

    Amitay, Sygal; Guiraud, Jeanne; Sohoglu, Ediz; Zobay, Oliver; Edmonds, Barrie A; Zhang, Yu-Xuan; Moore, David R

    2013-01-01

    Perceptual decision making is prone to errors, especially near threshold. Physiological, behavioural and modeling studies suggest this is due to the intrinsic or 'internal' noise in neural systems, which derives from a mixture of bottom-up and top-down sources. We show here that internal noise can form the basis of perceptual decision making when the external signal lacks the required information for the decision. We recorded electroencephalographic (EEG) activity in listeners attempting to discriminate between identical tones. Since the acoustic signal was constant, bottom-up and top-down influences were under experimental control. We found that early cortical responses to the identical stimuli varied in global field power and topography according to the perceptual decision made, and activity preceding stimulus presentation could predict both later activity and behavioural decision. Our results suggest that activity variations induced by internal noise of both sensory and cognitive origin are sufficient to drive discrimination judgments.

  15. Aspartame exacerbates EEG spike-wave discharge in children with generalized absence epilepsy: a double-blind controlled study.

    PubMed

    Camfield, P R; Camfield, C S; Dooley, J M; Gordon, K; Jollymore, S; Weaver, D F

    1992-05-01

    There are anecdotal reports of increased seizures in humans after ingestion of aspartame. We studied 10 children with newly diagnosed but untreated generalized absence seizures. Ambulatory cassette recording of EEG allowed quantification of numbers and length of spike-wave discharges in a double-blind study on two consecutive days. On one day the children received 40 mg/kg aspartame and on the other day, a sucrose-sweetened drink. Baseline EEG was the same before aspartame and sucrose. Following aspartame compared with sucrose, the number of spike-wave discharges per hour and mean length of spike-wave discharges increased but not to a statistically significant degree. However, the total duration of spike-wave discharge per hour was significantly increased after aspartame (p = 0.028), with a 40% +/- 17% (SEM) increase in the number of seconds per hour of EEG recording that the children spent in spike-wave discharge. Aspartame appears to exacerbate the amount of EEG spike wave in children with absence seizures. Further studies are needed to establish if this effect occurs at lower doses and in other seizure types.

  16. Distraction affects frontal alpha rhythms related to expectancy of pain: an EEG study.

    PubMed

    Del Percio, Claudio; Le Pera, Domenica; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Babiloni, Claudio; Brancucci, Alfredo; Chen, Andrew C N; De Armas, Liala; Miliucci, Roberto; Restuccia, Domenico; Valeriani, Massimiliano; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2006-07-01

    Previous electroencephalographic (EEG) evidence has shown event-related desynchronization (ERD) of alpha rhythms before predictable painful stimuli, as a possible neural concomitant of attentional preparatory processes (Babiloni, C., Brancucci, A., Babiloni, F., Capotosto, P., Carducci, F., Cincotti, F., Arendt-Nielsen, L., Chen, A.C., Rossini, P.M., 2003. Anticipatory cortical responses during the expectancy of a predictable painful stimulation. A high-resolution electroencephalography study. Eur. J. Neurosci. 18 (6) 1692-700). This study tested the hypothesis that alpha ERD before predictable painful stimuli is reduced as an effect of distraction. A visual warning stimulus preceded a laser painful stimulation, which was strictly followed by visual imperative stimuli. In the Pain (control) condition, no task was required after the imperative stimuli. In the Pain + Movement condition, subjects had to perform a movement of the right index finger. In the Pain + Cognition condition, they had to mentally perform an arithmetical task. EEG data were recorded in 10 subjects from 30 electrodes. Artifact-free recordings were spatially enhanced by surface Laplacian transformation. Alpha ERD was computed at three alpha sub-bands according to subjects' individual alpha frequency peak (i.e., about 6-8 Hz, 8-10 Hz, 10-12 Hz). Compared to the control condition, the subjects reported a significantly lower stimulus intensity perception and unpleasantness in the Pain + Movement and Pain + Cognition conditions. In addition, there was a cancellation of the alpha 3 ERD (i.e., about 10-12 Hz) in Pain + Cognition condition and even a generation of a statistically significant alpha 3 ERS in Pain + Movement condition. These effects were maximum over fronto-central midline. These results suggest that distraction during the expectancy of pain is related to a reduced neural desynchronization of fronto-central midline alpha rhythms (i.e., reduced cortical activation) towards an overt hyper

  17. The interplay between feedback-related negativity and individual differences in altruistic punishment: An EEG study.

    PubMed

    Mothes, Hendrik; Enge, Sören; Strobel, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    To date, the interplay betwexen neurophysiological and individual difference factors in altruistic punishment has been little understood. To examine this issue, 45 individuals participated in a Dictator Game with punishment option while the feedback-related negativity (FRN) was derived from the electroencephalogram (EEG). Unlike previous EEG studies on the Dictator Game, we introduced a third party condition to study the effect of fairness norm violations in addition to employing a first person perspective. For the first time, we also examined the role of individual differences, specifically fairness concerns, positive/negative affectivity, and altruism/empathy as well as recipients' financial situation during altruistic punishment. The main results show that FRN amplitudes were more pronounced for unfair than for fair assignments in both the first person and third party perspectives. These findings suggest that FRN amplitudes are sensitive to fairness norm violations and play a crucial role in the recipients' evaluation of dictator assignments. With respect to individual difference factors, recipients' current financial situation affected the FRN fairness effect in the first person perspective, indicating that when being directly affected by the assignments, more affluent participants experienced stronger violations of expectations in altruistic punishment decisions. Regarding individual differences in trait empathy, in the third party condition FRN amplitudes were more pronounced for those who scored lower in empathy. This may suggest empathy as another motive in third party punishment. Independent of the perspective taken, higher positive affect was associated with more punishment behavior, suggesting that positive emotions may play an important role in restoring violated fairness norms.

  18. High-density lipoprotein subclasses are a potential intermediary between alcohol intake and reduced risk of cardiovascular disease: the Rancho Bernardo Study.

    PubMed

    Muth, Natalie D; Laughlin, Gail A; von Mühlen, Denise; Smith, Sidney C; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2010-10-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional study of NMR-derived HDL subclasses and alcohol intake among 2171 community-dwelling older adults with a large proportion of daily or near-daily alcohol consumers (44 %). We aimed to assess whether, in addition to increasing total HDL, alcohol may induce a beneficial shift in HDL particle size distribution. Participants were categorised based on reported alcohol intake (g per week) and on frequency (none, < 3 times/week, 3-4 times/week, ≥ 5 times/week). The association between alcohol intake and lipoprotein fractions was examined using sex-specific linear regression models adjusted for age, BMI, diabetes, current smoking, exercise and hormone therapy in women. There was a stepwise gradient with the highest weekly alcohol consumption associated with the highest total HDL size and greatest number of medium and large HDL particles, as well as higher total HDL concentrations (all P < 0.001); total small HDL did not differ. Alcohol-HDL size associations were similar in both sexes and did not differ by use of hormone replacement therapy in women. In conclusion, regular alcohol consumers had a higher number and percentage of large HDL particles than non-drinkers. These results suggest that one way that alcohol may decrease CVD is through potentially favourable changes in lipoprotein subclass composition.

  19. A Whole Genome Association Study on Meat Quality Traits Using High Density SNP Chips in a Cross between Korean Native Pig and Landrace.

    PubMed

    Lee, K-T; Lee, Y-M; Alam, M; Choi, B H; Park, M R; Kim, K-S; Kim, T-H; Kim, J-J

    2012-11-01

    A whole genome association (WGA) study was performed to detect significant polymorphisms for meat quality traits in an F2 cross population (N = 478) that were generated with Korean native pig sires and Landrace dams in National Livestock Research Institute, Songwhan, Korea. The animals were genotyped using Illumina porcine 60k SNP beadchips, in which a set of 46,865 SNPs were available for the WGA analyses on ten carcass quality traits; live weight, crude protein, crude lipids, crude ash, water holding capacity, drip loss, shear force, CIE L, CIE a and CIE b. Phenotypes were regressed on additive and dominance effects for each SNP using a simple linear regression model, after adjusting for sex, sire and slaughter stage as fixed effects. With the significant SNPs for each trait (p<0.001), a stepwise regression procedure was applied to determine the best set of SNPs with the additive and/or dominance effects. A total of 106 SNPs, or quantitative trait loci (QTL) were detected, and about 32 to 66% of the total phenotypic variation was explained by the significant SNPs for each trait. The QTL were identified in most porcine chromosomes (SSCs), in which majority of the QTL were detected in SSCs 1, 2, 12, 13, 14 and 16. Several QTL clusters were identified on SSCs 12, 16 and 17, and a cluster of QTL influencing crude protein, crude lipid, drip loss, shear force, CIE a and CIE b were located between 20 and 29 Mb of SSC12. A pleiotropic QTL for drip loss, CIE L and CIE b was also detected on SSC16. These QTL need to be validated in commercial pig populations for genetic improvement in meat quality via marker-assisted selection.

  20. Feature analysis for correlation studies of simultaneous EEG-fMRI data: A proof of concept for neurofeedback approaches.

    PubMed

    Simoes, Simões; Lima, João; Direito, Bruno; Castelhano, João; Ferreira, Carlos; Carvalho, Paulo; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The identification and interpretation of facial expressions is an important feature of social cognition. This characteristic is often impaired in various neurodevelopmental disorders. Recent therapeutic approaches to intervene in social communication impairments include neurofeedback (NF). In this study, we present a NF real-time functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (rt-fMRI), combined with electroencephalography (EEG) to train social communication skills. In this sense, we defined the right Superior Temporal Sulcus as our target region-of-interest. To analyze the correlation between the fMRI regions of interest and the EEG data, we transposed the sources located at the nearest cortical location to the target region. We extracted a set of 75 features from EEG segments and performed a correlation analysis with the brain activations extracted from rt-fMRI in the right pSTS region. The finding of significant correlations of simultaneously measured signals in distinct modalities (EEG and fMRI) is promising. Future studies should address whether the observed correlation levels between local brain activity and scalp measures are sufficient to implement NF approaches.

  1. Cognitive, Affective, and Motivational Changes during Ostracism: An ERP, EMG, and EEG Study Using a Computerized Cyberball Task.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Taishi; Nittono, Hiroshi; Ura, Mitsuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Individuals are known to be highly sensitive to signs of ostracism, such as being ignored or excluded; however, the cognitive, affective, and motivational processes underlying ostracism have remained unclear. We investigated temporal changes in these psychological states resulting from being ostracized by a computer. Using event-related brain potentials (ERPs), the facial electromyogram (EMG), and electroencephalogram (EEG), we focused on the P3b amplitude, corrugator supercilii activity, and frontal EEG asymmetry, which reflect attention directed at stimuli, negative affect, and approach/withdrawal motivation, respectively. Results of the P3b and corrugator supercilii activity replicated findings of previous studies on being ostracized by humans. The mean amplitude of the P3b wave decreased, and facial EMG activity increased over time. In addition, frontal EEG asymmetry changed from relative left frontal activation, suggestive of approach motivation, to relative right frontal activation, indicative of withdrawal motivation. These findings suggest that ostracism by a computer-generated opponent is an aversive experience that in time changes the psychological status of ostracized people, similar to ostracism by human. Our findings also imply that frontal EEG asymmetry is a useful index for investigating ostracism. Results of this study suggest that ostracism has well developed neurobiological foundations.

  2. High density laser-driven target

    DOEpatents

    Lindl, John D.

    1981-01-01

    A high density target for implosion by laser energy composed of a central quantity of fuel surrounded by a high-Z pusher shell with a low-Z ablator-pusher shell spaced therefrom forming a region filled with low-density material.

  3. Approach of high density coal preparation method

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.; Chen, Q.

    1996-12-31

    Density difference of aged anthracite coal of high density and discard is less than that of general coal and discard; conventional separation methods are difficult to be used. For the special coal, coal dry beneficiation technology with air-dense medium fluidized bed has obvious superiority over other separation methods.

  4. Multimodal integration of EEG and MEG data: a simulation study with variable signal-to-noise ratio and number of sensors.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Fabio; Babiloni, Claudio; Carducci, Filippo; Romani, Gian Luca; Rossini, Paolo M; Angelone, Leonardo M; Cincotti, Febo

    2004-05-01

    Previous simulation studies have stressed the importance of the multimodal integration of electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) data in the estimation of cortical current density. In such studies, no systematic variations of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and of the number of sensors were explicitly taken into account in the estimation process. We investigated effects of variable SNR and number of sensors on the accuracy of current density estimate by using multimodal EEG and MEG data. This was done by using as the dependent variable both the correlation coefficient (CC) and the relative error (RE) between imposed and estimated waveforms at the level of cortical region of interests (ROI). A realistic head and cortical surface model was used. Factors used in the simulations were: (1). the SNR of the simulated scalp data (with seven levels: infinite, 30, 20, 10, 5, 3, 1); (2). the particular inverse operator used to estimate the cortical source activity from the simulated scalp data (INVERSE, with two levels, including minimum norm and weighted minimum norm); and (3). the number of EEG or MEG sensors employed in the analysis (SENSORS, with three levels: 128, 61, 29 for EEG and 153, 61, or 38 in MEG). Analysis of variance demonstrated that all the considered factors significantly affect the CC and the RE indexes. Combined EEG-MEG data produced statistically significant lower RE and higher CC in source current density reconstructions compared to that estimated by the EEG and MEG data considered separately. These observations hold for the range of SNR values presented by the analyzed data. The superiority of current density estimation by multimodal integration of EEG and MEG was not due to differences in number of sensors between unimodal (EEG, MEG) and combined (EEG-MEG) inverse estimates. In fact, the current density estimate relative to the EEG-MEG multimodal integration involved 61 EEG plus 63 MEG sensors, whereas estimations carried out

  5. Judgment of actions in experts: a high-resolution EEG study in elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Del Percio, Claudio; Rossini, Paolo M; Marzano, Nicola; Iacoboni, Marco; Infarinato, Francesco; Lizio, Roberta; Piazza, Marina; Pirritano, Mirella; Berlutti, Giovanna; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2009-04-01

    The present study tested the two following hypotheses: (i) compared to non-athletes, elite athletes are characterized by a reduced cortical activation during the judgment of sporting observed actions; (ii) in elite athletes, a good judgment of observed sporting actions is related to a low cortical activation. To address these issues, electroencephalographic (EEG) data were recorded in 15 elite rhythmic gymnasts and 13 non-gymnasts. They observed a series of 120 rhythmic gymnastic videos. At the end of each video, the subjects had to judge the artistic/athletic level of the exercise by a scale from 0 to 10. The mismatch between their judgment and that of the coach indexed the degree of action judgment. The EEG cortical sources were estimated by sLORETA. With reference to a pre-stimulus period, the power decrease of alpha (8-12 Hz) rhythms during the videos indexed the cortical activation (event related desynchronization, ERD). Regarding the hypothesis (i), low- and high-frequency alpha ERD was lower in amplitude in the elite rhythmic gymnasts compared to the non-gymnasts in occipital and temporal areas (ventral pathway) and in dorsal pathway. Regarding the hypothesis (ii), in the elite rhythmic gymnasts high-frequency alpha ERD was higher in amplitude with the videos characterized by a high judgment error than those characterized by a low judgment error; this was true in inferior posterior parietal and ventral premotor areas ("mirror" pathway). These results globally suggest that the judgment of observed sporting actions is related to low amplitude of alpha ERD, as a possible index of spatially selective cortical activation ("neural efficiency").

  6. High density tape/head interface study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csengery, L. C.

    1983-01-01

    The high energy (H sub c approximately or = to 650 oersteds) tapes and high track density (84 tracks per inch) heads investigated had, as its goal, the definition of optimum combinations of head and tape, including the control required of their interfacial dynamics that would enable the manufacture of high rate (150 Mbps) digital tape recorders for unattended space flight.

  7. Functional brain networks in healthy subjects under acupuncture stimulation: An EEG study based on nonlinear synchronization likelihood analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haitao; Liu, Jing; Cai, Lihui; Wang, Jiang; Cao, Yibin; Hao, Chongqing

    2017-02-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal evoked by acupuncture stimulation at "Zusanli" acupoint is analyzed to investigate the modulatory effect of manual acupuncture on the functional brain activity. Power spectral density of EEG signal is first calculated based on the autoregressive Burg method. It is shown that the EEG power is significantly increased during and after acupuncture in delta and theta bands, but decreased in alpha band. Furthermore, synchronization likelihood is used to estimate the nonlinear correlation between each pairwise EEG signals. By applying a threshold to resulting synchronization matrices, functional networks for each band are reconstructed and further quantitatively analyzed to study the impact of acupuncture on network structure. Graph theoretical analysis demonstrates that the functional connectivity of the brain undergoes obvious change under different conditions: pre-acupuncture, acupuncture, and post-acupuncture. The minimum path length is largely decreased and the clustering coefficient keeps increasing during and after acupuncture in delta and theta bands. It is indicated that acupuncture can significantly modulate the functional activity of the brain, and facilitate the information transmission within different brain areas. The obtained results may facilitate our understanding of the long-lasting effect of acupuncture on the brain function.

  8. Effective Connectivity of Cortical Sensorimotor Networks During Finger Movement Tasks: A Simultaneous fNIRS, fMRI, EEG Study.

    PubMed

    Anwar, A R; Muthalib, M; Perrey, S; Galka, A; Granert, O; Wolff, S; Heute, U; Deuschl, G; Raethjen, J; Muthuraman, Muthuraman

    2016-09-01

    Recently, interest has been growing to understand the underlying dynamic directional relationship between simultaneously activated regions of the brain during motor task performance. Such directionality analysis (or effective connectivity analysis), based on non-invasive electrophysiological (electroencephalography-EEG) and hemodynamic (functional near infrared spectroscopy-fNIRS; and functional magnetic resonance imaging-fMRI) neuroimaging modalities can provide an estimate of the motor task-related information flow from one brain region to another. Since EEG, fNIRS and fMRI modalities achieve different spatial and temporal resolutions of motor-task related activation in the brain, the aim of this study was to determine the effective connectivity of cortico-cortical sensorimotor networks during finger movement tasks measured by each neuroimaging modality. Nine healthy subjects performed right hand finger movement tasks of different complexity (simple finger tapping-FT, simple finger sequence-SFS, and complex finger sequence-CFS). We focused our observations on three cortical regions of interest (ROIs), namely the contralateral sensorimotor cortex (SMC), the contralateral premotor cortex (PMC) and the contralateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). We estimated the effective connectivity between these ROIs using conditional Granger causality (GC) analysis determined from the time series signals measured by fMRI (blood oxygenation level-dependent-BOLD), fNIRS (oxygenated-O2Hb and deoxygenated-HHb hemoglobin), and EEG (scalp and source level analysis) neuroimaging modalities. The effective connectivity analysis showed significant bi-directional information flow between the SMC, PMC, and DLPFC as determined by the EEG (scalp and source), fMRI (BOLD) and fNIRS (O2Hb and HHb) modalities for all three motor tasks. However the source level EEG GC values were significantly greater than the other modalities. In addition, only the source level EEG showed a

  9. Impact of the reference choice on scalp EEG connectivity estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chella, Federico; Pizzella, Vittorio; Zappasodi, Filippo; Marzetti, Laura

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Several scalp EEG functional connectivity studies, mostly clinical, seem to overlook the reference electrode impact. The subsequent interpretation of brain connectivity is thus often biased by the choice of a non-neutral reference. This study aims at systematically investigating these effects. Approach. As EEG reference, we examined the vertex electrode (Cz), the digitally linked mastoids (DLM), the average reference (AVE), and the reference electrode standardization technique (REST). As a connectivity metric, we used the imaginary part of the coherency. We tested simulated and real data (eyes-open resting state) by evaluating the influence of electrode density, the effect of head model accuracy in the REST transformation, and the impact on the characterization of the topology of functional networks from graph analysis. Main results. Simulations demonstrated that REST significantly reduced the distortion of connectivity patterns when compared to AVE, Cz, and DLM references. Moreover, the availability of high-density EEG systems and an accurate knowledge of the head model are crucial elements to improve REST performance, with the individual realistic head model being preferable to the standard realistic head model. For real data, a systematic change of the spatial pattern of functional connectivity depending on the chosen reference was also observed. The distortion of connectivity patterns was larger for the Cz reference, and progressively decreased when using the DLM, the AVE, and the REST. Strikingly, we also showed that network attributes derived from graph analysis, i.e. node degree and local efficiency, are significantly influenced by the EEG reference choice. Significance. Overall, this study highlights that significant differences arise in scalp EEG functional connectivity and graph network properties, in dependence on the chosen reference. We hope that our study will convey the message that caution should be used when interpreting and comparing

  10. Heat map visualization of high-density clinical chemistry data.

    PubMed

    Auman, J Todd; Boorman, Gary A; Wilson, Ralph E; Travlos, Gregory S; Paules, Richard S

    2007-10-22

    Clinical chemistry data are routinely generated as part of preclinical animal toxicity studies and human clinical studies. With large-scale studies involving hundreds or even thousands of samples in multiple treatment groups, it is currently difficult to interpret the resulting complex, high-density clinical chemistry data. Accordingly, we conducted this study to investigate methods for easy visualization of complex, high-density data. Clinical chemistry data were obtained from male rats each treated with one of eight different acute hepatotoxicants from a large-scale toxicogenomics study. The raw data underwent a Z-score transformation comparing each individual animal's clinical chemistry values to that of reference controls from all eight studies and then were visualized in a single graphic using a heat map. The utility of using a heat map to visualize high-density clinical chemistry data was explored by clustering changes in clinical chemistry values for >400 animals. A clear distinction was observed in animals displaying hepatotoxicity from those that did not. Additionally, while animals experiencing hepatotoxicity showed many similarities in the observed clinical chemistry alterations, distinct differences were noted in the heat map profile for the different compounds. Using a heat map to visualize complex, high-density clinical chemistry data in a single graphic facilitates the identification of previously unrecognized trends. This method is simple to implement and maintains the biological integrity of the data. The value of this clinical chemistry data transformation and visualization will manifest itself through integration with other high-density data, such as genomics data, to study physiology at the systems level.

  11. The high density Z-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, G.H.

    1988-01-01

    During the past few years techniques have been developed for producing pinches in solid deuterium. The conditions which exist in these plasmas are quiet different from those produced earlier. The pinch is formed from a fiber of solid deuterium rather than from a low density gas, and the current is driven by a low impedance, high voltage pulse generator. Because of the high initial density, it is not necessary to compress the pinch to reach thermonuclear conditions, and the confinement time required for energy production is much shorter than for a gas. The experimental results, which have been verified by experiments performed at higher current were quite surprising and encouraging. The pinch appeared to be stable for a time much longer than the Alfven radial transit time. In this paper, however, I argue that the pinch is not strictly stable, but it does not appear to disassemble in a catastrophic fashion. It appears that there may be a distinction between stability and confinement in the high density pinch. In the discussion below I will present the status of the high density Z-pinch experiments at laboratories around the world, and I will describe some of the calculational and experimental results. I will confine my remarks to recent work on the high density pinch. 17 refs. 10 figs.

  12. Functional Equivalence of Imagined vs. Real Performance of an Inhibitory Task: An EEG/ERP Study

    PubMed Central

    Galdo-Alvarez, Santiago; Bonilla, Fidel M.; González-Villar, Alberto J.; Carrillo-de-la-Peña, María T.

    2016-01-01

    Early neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies suggested that motor imagery recruited a different network than motor execution. However, several studies have provided evidence for the involvement of the same circuits in motor imagery tasks, in the absence of overt responses. The present study aimed to test whether imagined performance of a stop-signal task produces a similar pattern of motor-related EEG activity than that observed during real performance. To this end, mu and beta event-related desynchronization (ERD) and the Lateralized Readiness Potential (LRP) were analyzed. The study also aimed to clarify the functional significance of the Stop-N2 and Stop-P3 event-related potential (ERPs) components, which were also obtained during both real and imagined performance. The results showed a common pattern of brain electrical activity, and with a similar time course, during covert performance and overt execution of the stop-signal task: presence of LRP and Stop-P3 in the imagined condition and identical LRP onset, and similar mu and beta ERD temporal windows for both conditions. These findings suggest that a similar inhibitory network may be activated during both overt and covert execution of the task. Therefore, motor imagery may be useful to improve inhibitory skills and to develop new communicating systems for Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) devices based on inhibitory signals. PMID:27695410

  13. Laser Direct Routing for High Density Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Wilfrido Alejandro

    Diffused Link. A high density Laser Vertical Link with resistance values below 10 ohms was developed, studied and tested using design of experiment methodologies. The vertical link offers excellent advantages in the area of quick prototyping of electronic circuits, but even more important, due to having similar characteristics to a foundry produced via, it gives quick transfer from the prototype system verification stage to the mass production stage.

  14. Validation of a smartphone-based EEG among people with epilepsy: A prospective study.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Erica D; Lim, Andrew S P; Leung, Edward C W; Cole, Andrew J; Lam, Alice D; Eloyan, Ani; Nirola, Damber K; Tshering, Lhab; Thibert, Ronald; Garcia, Rodrigo Zepeda; Bui, Esther; Deki, Sonam; Lee, Liesly; Clark, Sarah J; Cohen, Joseph M; Mantia, Jo; Brizzi, Kate T; Sorets, Tali R; Wahlster, Sarah; Borzello, Mia; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Cash, Sydney S; Mateen, Farrah J

    2017-04-03

    Our objective was to assess the ability of a smartphone-based electroencephalography (EEG) application, the Smartphone Brain Scanner-2 (SBS2), to detect epileptiform abnormalities compared to standard clinical EEG. The SBS2 system consists of an Android tablet wirelessly connected to a 14-electrode EasyCap headset (cost ~ 300 USD). SBS2 and standard EEG were performed in people with suspected epilepsy in Bhutan (2014-2015), and recordings were interpreted by neurologists. Among 205 participants (54% female, median age 24 years), epileptiform discharges were detected on 14% of SBS2 and 25% of standard EEGs. The SBS2 had 39.2% sensitivity (95% confidence interval (CI) 25.8%, 53.9%) and 94.8% specificity (95% CI 90.0%, 97.7%) for epileptiform discharges with positive and negative predictive values of 0.71 (95% CI 0.51, 0.87) and 0.82 (95% CI 0.76, 0.89) respectively. 31% of focal and 82% of generalized abnormalities were identified on SBS2 recordings. Cohen's kappa (κ) for the SBS2 EEG and standard EEG for the epileptiform versus non-epileptiform outcome was κ = 0.40 (95% CI 0.25, 0.55). No safety or tolerability concerns were reported. Despite limitations in sensitivity, the SBS2 may become a viable supportive test for the capture of epileptiform abnormalities, and extend EEG access to new, especially resource-limited, populations at a reduced cost.

  15. Validation of a smartphone-based EEG among people with epilepsy: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Erica D.; Lim, Andrew S. P.; Leung, Edward C. W.; Cole, Andrew J.; Lam, Alice D.; Eloyan, Ani; Nirola, Damber K.; Tshering, Lhab; Thibert, Ronald; Garcia, Rodrigo Zepeda; Bui, Esther; Deki, Sonam; Lee, Liesly; Clark, Sarah J.; Cohen, Joseph M.; Mantia, Jo; Brizzi, Kate T.; Sorets, Tali R.; Wahlster, Sarah; Borzello, Mia; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Cash, Sydney S.; Mateen, Farrah J.

    2017-01-01

    Our objective was to assess the ability of a smartphone-based electroencephalography (EEG) application, the Smartphone Brain Scanner-2 (SBS2), to detect epileptiform abnormalities compared to standard clinical EEG. The SBS2 system consists of an Android tablet wirelessly connected to a 14-electrode EasyCap headset (cost ~ 300 USD). SBS2 and standard EEG were performed in people with suspected epilepsy in Bhutan (2014–2015), and recordings were interpreted by neurologists. Among 205 participants (54% female, median age 24 years), epileptiform discharges were detected on 14% of SBS2 and 25% of standard EEGs. The SBS2 had 39.2% sensitivity (95% confidence interval (CI) 25.8%, 53.9%) and 94.8% specificity (95% CI 90.0%, 97.7%) for epileptiform discharges with positive and negative predictive values of 0.71 (95% CI 0.51, 0.87) and 0.82 (95% CI 0.76, 0.89) respectively. 31% of focal and 82% of generalized abnormalities were identified on SBS2 recordings. Cohen’s kappa (κ) for the SBS2 EEG and standard EEG for the epileptiform versus non-epileptiform outcome was κ = 0.40 (95% CI 0.25, 0.55). No safety or tolerability concerns were reported. Despite limitations in sensitivity, the SBS2 may become a viable supportive test for the capture of epileptiform abnormalities, and extend EEG access to new, especially resource-limited, populations at a reduced cost. PMID:28367974

  16. The relationship of Asperger’s syndrome to autism: a preliminary EEG coherence study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It has long been debated whether Asperger’s Syndrome (ASP) should be considered part of the Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) or whether it constitutes a unique entity. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, fourth edition (DSM-IV) differentiated ASP from high functioning autism. However, the new DSM-5 umbrellas ASP within ASD, thus eliminating the ASP diagnosis. To date, no clear biomarkers have reliably distinguished ASP and ASD populations. This study uses EEG coherence, a measure of brain connectivity, to explore possible neurophysiological differences between ASP and ASD. Methods Voluminous coherence data derived from all possible electrode pairs and frequencies were previously reduced by principal components analysis (PCA) to produce a smaller number of unbiased, data-driven coherence factors. In a previous study, these factors significantly and reliably differentiated neurotypical controls from ASD subjects by discriminant function analysis (DFA). These previous DFA rules are now applied to an ASP population to determine if ASP subjects classify as control or ASD subjects. Additionally, a new set of coherence based DFA rules are used to determine whether ASP and ASD subjects can be differentiated from each other. Results Using prior EEG coherence based DFA rules that successfully classified subjects as either controls or ASD, 96.2% of ASP subjects are classified as ASD. However, when ASP subjects are directly compared to ASD subjects using new DFA rules, 92.3% ASP subjects are identified as separate from the ASD population. By contrast, five randomly selected subsamples of ASD subjects fail to reach significance when compared to the remaining ASD populations. When represented by the discriminant variable, both the ASD and ASD populations are normally distributed. Conclusions Within a control-ASD dichotomy, an ASP population falls closer to ASD than controls. However, when compared directly with ASD, an ASP population is distinctly separate. The

  17. Detectability of Fast Ripples (>250 Hz) on the Scalp EEG: A Proof-of-Principle Study with Subdermal Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, Francesca; Frauscher, Birgit; Ferrari-Marinho, Taissa; Amiri, Mina; Dubeau, Francois; Gotman, Jean

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the possibility of detecting fast ripples (FRs) on the surface EEG of patients with focal pharmacoresistant epilepsy, and to investigate the relationship between scalp FRs and localization of the seizure onset zone (SOZ). We included 10 patients undergoing combined surface-intracranial EEG with ≥10 spikes in the surface EEG during the first 30 consecutive minutes of N3 sleep. FRs (≥4 consecutive oscillations above 250 Hz with an amplitude clearly exceeding that of the background) on the surface EEG (F3-C3, C3-P3, Fz-Cz, Cz-Pz, F4-C4, C4-P4) were visually marked, and verified by two EEG experts. FRs were categorized as related to the SOZ, if localized in the brain lobe of the SOZ. Low-amplitude FRs with a rate of 0.09/min were found in 6/10 patients: two exhibited events related to the SOZ, three showed no relationship with the SOZ, and in one patient the SOZ was not identified. It may be possible to detect FRs with surface EEG using subdermal electrodes in patients with focal epilepsy. The relationship between surface FRs and the SOZ remains unclear. Future studies aiming at a higher spatial EEG coverage are needed to elucidate their significance.

  18. Platform for the study of virtual task-oriented motion and its evaluation by EEG and EMG biopotentials.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Garcia, Ivan; Aguilar-Leal, Omar; Hernandez-Reynoso, Ana G; Madrigal, Jimena; Fuentes, Rita Q; Huegel, Joel C; Garcia-Gonzalez, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a platform to study the relationship between upper limb kinematic and biopotential measurements. The platform comprises of a haptic joystick, biopotential acquisition systems and 3D rendered virtual tasks that require user interaction. The haptic joystick, named TeeR, reproduces the pronation-supination and flexion-extension movements of the human arm, which are directly mapped to a 2D graphic display. The biopotential acquisition system is able to record electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) signals and synchronize them with kinematic data obtained from the Tee-R. The 3D virtual tasks are designed to obtain performance measurements from the user interaction. We include an example that depicts the possibilities of application for the study of event-related (de)synchronization (ERD/ERS) based on EEG during motor tasks.

  19. [EEG-fMRI studies on the neural networks of the generalized spike and wave discharges: an overview].

    PubMed

    Li, Qifu; Zhou, Dong

    2012-02-01

    This paper generalizes the seizures characterized with paroxysmal generalized spike and wave discharges (GSWDs) in the EEG. Recent studies showed that GSWDs disrupt specific neural networks only rather than the entire brain homogenously. Simultaneous EEG and functional MRI (EEG-fMRDI) provides a high spatiotemporal resolution method for uncovering the regions of the brain showing changes in metabolism and blood flow during epileptic activity. Human EEG-fMRI studies to date have revealed the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal changes in response to GSWDs in some specific brain regions. Most studies have noted similar BOLD signals decrease in the bilateral cortical regions including frontal, frontal-parietal, posterior cingulated and precuneus cortex, as well as in the basal ganglia, and BOLD signals increase in the bilateral thalamic. Further studies demonstrated that BOLD signals in different regions were dynamic changes in the time course of GSWDs and BOLD changes in the cortical areas occurred before in the thalamus. These cortical-subcortical structures may form the neural networks associated with GSWDs generation and maintenance. More sophisticated analytic techniques will be developed to explore the BOLD time-course of GSWDs and identify the brain structures involved in seizure onset and discharges propagation respectively. The sub-network associated with different behavioral deficits between interical and ictal GSWDs, and the different subtypes of generalized seizures will be further studied. The functional connectivity of the nodes of the neural network of GSWDs can also be further investigated. A better understanding of the neural network responsible for GSWDs generation may help to develop new therapeutic interventions.

  20. Cortical characterization of the perception of intelligible and unintelligible speech measured via high-density electroencephalography.

    PubMed

    Utianski, Rene L; Caviness, John N; Liss, Julie M

    2015-01-01

    High-density electroencephalography was used to evaluate cortical activity during speech comprehension via a sentence verification task. Twenty-four participants assigned true or false to sentences produced with 3 noise-vocoded channel levels (1--unintelligible, 6--decipherable, 16--intelligible), during simultaneous EEG recording. Participant data were sorted into higher- (HP) and lower-performing (LP) groups. The identification of a late-event related potential for LP listeners in the intelligible condition and in all listeners when challenged with a 6-Ch signal supports the notion that this induced potential may be related to either processing degraded speech, or degraded processing of intelligible speech. Different cortical locations are identified as neural generators responsible for this activity; HP listeners are engaging motor aspects of their language system, utilizing an acoustic-phonetic based strategy to help resolve the sentence, while LP listeners do not. This study presents evidence for neurophysiological indices associated with more or less successful speech comprehension performance across listening conditions.

  1. EEG during masturbation and ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Graber, B; Rohrbaugh, J W; Newlin, D B; Varner, J L; Ellingson, R J

    1985-12-01

    The occurrence of a distinctive EEG pattern specifically related to sexual arousal and orgasm would provide a reliable and convenient means of identifying such events in the laboratory and would also provide clues to cerebral structures involved in the processes. EEG-polygraph recordings were obtained under rigorously controlled conditions in four normal male subjects during masturbation and ejaculation. The EEG data were subjected to both impressionistic and quantitative analyses. They showed no remarkable changes during the sequence of relevant physiological responses. The sole effect was a slight depression of alpha activity, a well-known nonspecific effect associated with changes in attention and arousal. Examination of the literature shows little agreement among reported results of studies of EEG changes during orgasm. It is likely that at least some reported changes were artifactual. It is concluded that the case for the existence of EEG changes specifically related to sexual arousal and orgasm remains unproven.

  2. Gender and Age Related Effects While Watching TV Advertisements: An EEG Study.

    PubMed

    Cartocci, Giulia; Cherubino, Patrizia; Rossi, Dario; Modica, Enrica; Maglione, Anton Giulio; di Flumeri, Gianluca; Babiloni, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to show how the variation of the EEG frontal cortical asymmetry is related to the general appreciation perceived during the observation of TV advertisements, in particular considering the influence of the gender and age on it. In particular, we investigated the influence of the gender on the perception of a car advertisement (Experiment 1) and the influence of the factor age on a chewing gum commercial (Experiment 2). Experiment 1 results showed statistically significant higher approach values for the men group throughout the commercial. Results from Experiment 2 showed significant lower values by older adults for the spot, containing scenes not very enjoyed by them. In both studies, there was no statistical significant difference in the scene relative to the product offering between the experimental populations, suggesting the absence in our study of a bias towards the specific product in the evaluated populations. These evidences state the importance of the creativity in advertising, in order to attract the target population.

  3. Gender and Age Related Effects While Watching TV Advertisements: An EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Cartocci, Giulia; Cherubino, Patrizia; Rossi, Dario; Modica, Enrica; Maglione, Anton Giulio; di Flumeri, Gianluca; Babiloni, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to show how the variation of the EEG frontal cortical asymmetry is related to the general appreciation perceived during the observation of TV advertisements, in particular considering the influence of the gender and age on it. In particular, we investigated the influence of the gender on the perception of a car advertisement (Experiment 1) and the influence of the factor age on a chewing gum commercial (Experiment 2). Experiment 1 results showed statistically significant higher approach values for the men group throughout the commercial. Results from Experiment 2 showed significant lower values by older adults for the spot, containing scenes not very enjoyed by them. In both studies, there was no statistical significant difference in the scene relative to the product offering between the experimental populations, suggesting the absence in our study of a bias towards the specific product in the evaluated populations. These evidences state the importance of the creativity in advertising, in order to attract the target population. PMID:27313602

  4. Evolution of EEG Motor Rhythms after Spinal Cord Injury: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    López-Larraz, Eduardo; Montesano, Luis; Gil-Agudo, Ángel; Minguez, Javier; Oliviero, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) does not only produce a lack of sensory and motor function caudal to the level of injury, but it also leads to a progressive brain reorganization. Chronic SCI patients attempting to move their affected limbs present a significant reduction of brain activation in the motor cortex, which has been linked to the deafferentation. The aim of this work is to study the evolution of the motor-related brain activity during the first months after SCI. Eighteen subacute SCI patients were recruited to participate in bi-weekly experimental sessions during at least two months. Their EEG was recorded to analyze the temporal evolution of the event-related desynchronization (ERD) over the motor cortex, both during motor attempt and motor imagery of their paralyzed hands. The results show that the α and β ERD evolution after SCI is negatively correlated with the clinical progression of the patients during the first months after the injury. This work provides the first longitudinal study of the event-related desynchronization during the subacute phase of spinal cord injury. Furthermore, our findings reveal a strong association between the ERD changes and the clinical evolution of the patients. These results help to better understand the brain transformation after SCI, which is important to characterize the neuroplasticity mechanisms involved after this lesion and may lead to new strategies for rehabilitation and motor restoration of these patients. PMID:26177457

  5. High density circuit technology, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, T. E.

    1982-01-01

    The metal (or dielectric) lift-off processes used in the semiconductor industry to fabricate high density very large scale integration (VLSI) systems were reviewed. The lift-off process consists of depositing the light-sensitive material onto the wafer and patterning first in such a manner as to form a stencil for the interconnection material. Then the interconnection layer is deposited and unwanted areas are lifted off by removing the underlying stencil. Several of these lift-off techniques were examined experimentally. The use of an auxiliary layer of polyimide to form a lift-off stencil offers considerable promise.

  6. Regulation of high density lipoprotein levels

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, R.M.

    1982-03-01

    An increasing awareness of the physiologic and pathologic importance of serum high density lipoproteins (HDL) has led to a large number of observations regarding factors which influence their concentrations. HDL consists of a heterogeneous collection of macromolecules with diverse physical properties and chemical constituents. While laboratory techniques have made it possible to measure HDL and their individual components, there are as yet large gaps in our knowledge of the biochemical mechanisms and clinical significance of changes in these laboratory parameters. In this review, current concepts of the structure and metabolism of HDL will be briefly summarized, and the factors influencing their levels in humans will be surveyed. 313 references.

  7. Method of high-density foil fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Blue, Craig A.; Sikka, Vinod K.; Ohriner, Evan K.

    2003-12-16

    A method for preparing flat foils having a high density includes the steps of mixing a powdered material with a binder to form a green sheet. The green sheet is exposed to a high intensity radiative source adapted to emit radiation of wavelengths corresponding to an absorption spectrum of the powdered material. The surface of the green sheet is heated while a lower sub-surface temperature is maintained. An apparatus for preparing a foil from a green sheet using a radiation source is also disclosed.

  8. Wavelet-based study of valence-arousal model of emotions on EEG signals with LabVIEW.

    PubMed

    Guzel Aydin, Seda; Kaya, Turgay; Guler, Hasan

    2016-06-01

    This paper illustrates the wavelet-based feature extraction for emotion assessment using electroencephalogram (EEG) signal through graphical coding design. Two-dimensional (valence-arousal) emotion model was studied. Different emotions (happy, joy, melancholy, and disgust) were studied for assessment. These emotions were stimulated by video clips. EEG signals obtained from four subjects were decomposed into five frequency bands (gamma, beta, alpha, theta, and delta) using "db5" wavelet function. Relative features were calculated to obtain further information. Impact of the emotions according to valence value was observed to be optimal on power spectral density of gamma band. The main objective of this work is not only to investigate the influence of the emotions on different frequency bands but also to overcome the difficulties in the text-based program. This work offers an alternative approach for emotion evaluation through EEG processing. There are a number of methods for emotion recognition such as wavelet transform-based, Fourier transform-based, and Hilbert-Huang transform-based methods. However, the majority of these methods have been applied with the text-based programming languages. In this study, we proposed and implemented an experimental feature extraction with graphics-based language, which provides great convenience in bioelectrical signal processing.

  9. Resting state brain dynamics and its transients: a combined TMS-EEG study

    PubMed Central

    Bonnard, Mireille; Chen, Sophie; Gaychet, Jérôme; Carrere, Marcel; Woodman, Marmaduke; Giusiano, Bernard; Jirsa, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    The brain at rest exhibits a spatio-temporally rich dynamics which adheres to systematic behaviours that persist in task paradigms but appear altered in disease. Despite this hypothesis, many rest state paradigms do not act directly upon the rest state and therefore cannot confirm hypotheses about its mechanisms. To address this challenge, we combined transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG) to study brain’s relaxation toward rest following a transient perturbation. Specifically, TMS targeted either the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), i.e. part of the Default Mode Network (DMN) or the superior parietal lobule (SPL), involved in the Dorsal Attention Network. TMS was triggered by a given brain state, namely an increase in occipital alpha rhythm power. Following the initial TMS-Evoked Potential, TMS at MPFC enhances the induced occipital alpha rhythm, called Event Related Synchronisation, with a longer transient lifetime than TMS at SPL, and a higher amplitude. Our findings show a strong coupling between MPFC and the occipital alpha power. Although the rest state is organized around a core of resting state networks, the DMN functionally takes a special role among these resting state networks. PMID:27488504

  10. Deployment of spatial attention towards locations in memory representations. An EEG study.

    PubMed

    Leszczyński, Marcin; Wykowska, Agnieszka; Perez-Osorio, Jairo; Müller, Hermann J

    2013-01-01

    Recalling information from visual short-term memory (VSTM) involves the same neural mechanisms as attending to an actually perceived scene. In particular, retrieval from VSTM has been associated with orienting of visual attention towards a location within a spatially-organized memory representation. However, an open question concerns whether spatial attention is also recruited during VSTM retrieval even when performing the task does not require access to spatial coordinates of items in the memorized scene. The present study combined a visual search task with a modified, delayed central probe protocol, together with EEG analysis, to answer this question. We found a temporal contralateral negativity (TCN) elicited by a centrally presented go-signal which was spatially uninformative and featurally unrelated to the search target and informed participants only about a response key that they had to press to indicate a prepared target-present vs. -absent decision. This lateralization during VSTM retrieval (TCN) provides strong evidence of a shift of attention towards the target location in the memory representation, which occurred despite the fact that the present task required no spatial (or featural) information from the search to be encoded, maintained, and retrieved to produce the correct response and that the go-signal did not itself specify any information relating to the location and defining feature of the target.

  11. Deployment of Spatial Attention towards Locations in Memory Representations. An EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Osorio, Jairo; Müller, Hermann J.

    2013-01-01

    Recalling information from visual short-term memory (VSTM) involves the same neural mechanisms as attending to an actually perceived scene. In particular, retrieval from VSTM has been associated with orienting of visual attention towards a location within a spatially-organized memory representation. However, an open question concerns whether spatial attention is also recruited during VSTM retrieval even when performing the task does not require access to spatial coordinates of items in the memorized scene. The present study combined a visual search task with a modified, delayed central probe protocol, together with EEG analysis, to answer this question. We found a temporal contralateral negativity (TCN) elicited by a centrally presented go-signal which was spatially uninformative and featurally unrelated to the search target and informed participants only about a response key that they had to press to indicate a prepared target-present vs. -absent decision. This lateralization during VSTM retrieval (TCN) provides strong evidence of a shift of attention towards the target location in the memory representation, which occurred despite the fact that the present task required no spatial (or featural) information from the search to be encoded, maintained, and retrieved to produce the correct response and that the go-signal did not itself specify any information relating to the location and defining feature of the target. PMID:24386295

  12. Aging and sequential modulations of poorer strategy effects: An EEG study in arithmetic problem solving.

    PubMed

    Hinault, Thomas; Lemaire, Patrick; Phillips, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated age-related differences in electrophysiological signatures of sequential modulations of poorer strategy effects. Sequential modulations of poorer strategy effects refer to decreased poorer strategy effects (i.e., poorer performance when the cued strategy is not the best) on current problem following poorer strategy problems compared to after better strategy problems. Analyses on electrophysiological (EEG) data revealed important age-related changes in time, frequency, and coherence of brain activities underlying sequential modulations of poorer strategy effects. More specifically, sequential modulations of poorer strategy effects were associated with earlier and later time windows (i.e., between 200- and 550 ms and between 850- and 1250 ms). Event-related potentials (ERPs) also revealed an earlier onset in older adults, together with more anterior and less lateralized activations. Furthermore, sequential modulations of poorer strategy effects were associated with theta and alpha frequencies in young adults while these modulations were found in delta frequency and theta inter-hemispheric coherence in older adults, consistent with qualitatively distinct patterns of brain activity. These findings have important implications to further our understanding of age-related differences and similarities in sequential modulations of cognitive control processes during arithmetic strategy execution.

  13. Activation of cortical areas in music execution and imagining: a high-resolution EEG study.

    PubMed

    Kristeva, Rumyana; Chakarov, Vihren; Schulte-Mönting, Jürgen; Spreer, Joachim

    2003-11-01

    Neuroimaging studies have shown that execution of a musical sequence on an instrument activates bilateral frontal opercular regions, in addition to bilateral sensorimotor and supplementary motor areas. During imagining activation of the same areas without primary sensorimotor areas was shown. We recorded EEG from 58 scalp positions to investigate the temporal sequence and the time course of activation of these areas while violin players prepared to execute, executed, prepared to imagine, or imagined a musical sequence on a violin. During the preparation for the sequence in three of seven musicians investigated the bilateral frontal opercular regions became active earlier than the motor areas and in one of them simultaneously with the motor areas. In two of the musicians a rather variable pattern of activation was observed. The frontal opercular regions were also strongly involved throughout the period of music execution or imagining. The supplementary motor area was involved in both preparation for the sequence and during execution and imagining of the sequence. The left primary sensorimotor area was involved in the preparation and termination of the musical sequence for both execution and imagining. The right sensorimotor area was strongly involved in the preparation for and during the execution of the sequence. We conclude that the bilateral frontal opercular regions are crucial in both preparation for and during music execution and imagining. They may have "mirror neurone" properties that underlie observation or imagining of one's own performance. The motor areas are differentially activated during the preparation and execution or imagining the sequence.

  14. Does retigabine affect the development of alcohol dependence?--A pharmaco-EEG study.

    PubMed

    Zwierzyńska, Ewa; Andrzejczak, Dariusz; Pietrzak, Bogusława

    2016-01-12

    New antiepileptic drugs have been investigated for their potential role in the treatment of alcohol dependence. One of these drugs is retigabine and this study examines the effect of retigabine co-administered with ethanol on the development of alcohol dependence and the course of acute withdrawal syndrome. A pharmaco-EEG method was used to examine this impact in selected brain structures of rabbits (midbrain reticular formation, hippocampus and frontal cortex). Retigabine was administered p.o. at a dose of 5mg/kg/day with ethanol ad libitum for 6 weeks and then alone for 2 weeks during an abstinence period. Changes in bioelectric activity, which demonstrated the inhibitory effect of alcohol on the brain structures, were already visible after 2 weeks of ethanol administration. In the abstinence period, changes were of a different nature and significant neuronal hyperactivity was observed, particularly in the midbrain reticular formation and the hippocampus. This findings reveal that retigabine decreased ethanol-induced changes during both alcohol administration and abstinence periods. In particular, the modulatory effect of retigabine on the hippocampus may be a significant element of its mechanism of action in alcohol dependence therapy.

  15. Response mode-dependent differences in neurofunctional networks during response inhibition: an EEG-beamforming study.

    PubMed

    Dippel, Gabriel; Chmielewski, Witold; Mückschel, Moritz; Beste, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Response inhibition processes are one of the most important executive control functions and have been subject to intense research in cognitive neuroscience. However, knowledge on the neurophysiology and functional neuroanatomy on response inhibition is biased because studies usually employ experimental paradigms (e.g., sustained attention to response task, SART) in which behavior is susceptible to impulsive errors. Here, we investigate whether there are differences in neurophysiological mechanisms and networks depending on the response mode that predominates behavior in a response inhibition task. We do so comparing a SART with a traditionally formatted task paradigm. We use EEG-beamforming in two tasks inducing opposite response modes during action selection. We focus on theta frequency modulations, since these are implicated in cognitive control processes. The results show that a response mode that is susceptible to impulsive errors (response mode used in the SART) is associated with stronger theta band activity in the left temporo-parietal junction. The results suggest that the response modes applied during response inhibition differ in the encoding of surprise signals, or related processes of attentional sampling. Response modes during response inhibition seem to differ in processes necessary to update task representations relevant to behavioral control.

  16. Attenuated asymmetry of functional connectivity in schizophrenia: a high-resolution EEG study.

    PubMed

    Jalili, Mahdi; Meuli, Reto; Do, Kim Q; Hasler, Martin; Crow, Timothy J; Knyazeva, Maria G

    2010-07-01

    The interhemispheric asymmetries that originate from connectivity-related structuring of the cortex are compromised in schizophrenia (SZ). Under the assumption that such abnormalities affect functional connectivity, we analyzed its correlate-EEG synchronization-in SZ patients and matched controls. We applied multivariate synchronization measures based on Laplacian EEG and tuned to various spatial scales. Compared to the controls who had rightward asymmetry at a local level (EEG power), rightward anterior and leftward posterior asymmetries at an intraregional level (1st and 2nd order S-estimator), and rightward global asymmetry (hemispheric S-estimator), SZ patients showed generally attenuated asymmetry, the effect being strongest for intraregional synchronization in the alpha and beta bands. The abnormalities of asymmetry increased with the duration of the disease and correlated with the negative symptoms. We discuss the tentative links between these findings and gross anatomical asymmetries, including the cerebral torque and gyrification pattern, in normal subjects and SZ patients.

  17. Expectancy of pain is influenced by motor preparation: a high-resolution EEG study of cortical alpha rhythms.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Brancucci, Alfredo; Capotosto, Paolo; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Chen, Andrew C N; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2005-04-01

    This high-resolution electroencephalographic (EEG) study on alpha event-related desynchronization (ERD) evaluated whether anticipatory activity precedes a sensorimotor interaction induced by concomitant painful stimuli and sensorimotor demand. An omitted-stimulus paradigm induced the expectancy of the painful stimulation at the left hand. In the experimental condition, the painful stimulation was associated with a visual go/no-go task triggering right-hand movements. Two control conditions manipulated the painful sensorimotor interaction variable. Compared with the control conditions, the expectancy of the painful sensorimotor interaction increased the high-band alpha EEG oscillations over the right primary sensorimotor cortex contralateral to the nociceptive stimuli and, to a lesser extent, over the centroparietal midline. These findings suggest that concomitant painful stimuli and simple sensorimotor go/no-go demands affect anticipatory activity as revealed by alpha ERD.

  18. Study of Sedative-Hypnotic Effects of Aloe vera L. Aqueous Extract through Behavioral Evaluations and EEG Recording in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahnejad, Fatemeh; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud; Nasoohi, Sanaz; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Faizi, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the sedative and hypnotic effects of the aqueous extract of Aloe vera on rats. In order to evaluate the overall hypnotic effects of the Aloe vera extract, open field and loss of righting reflex tests were primarily used. The sedative and hypnotic effects of the extract were then confirmed by detection of remarkable raise in the total sleeping time through analysis of electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings of animals. Analysis of the EEG recordings showed that there is concomitant change in Rapid Eye Movement (REM) and None Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep in parallel with the prolonged total sleeping time. Results of the current research show that the extract has sedative-hypnotic effects on both functional and electrical activities of the brain. PMID:27610170

  19. From Oscillatory Transcranial Current Stimulation to Scalp EEG Changes: A Biophysical and Physiological Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Merlet, Isabelle; Birot, Gwénaël; Salvador, Ricardo; Molaee-Ardekani, Behnam; Mekonnen, Abeye; Soria-Frish, Aureli; Ruffini, Giulio; Miranda, Pedro C.; Wendling, Fabrice

    2013-01-01

    Both biophysical and neurophysiological aspects need to be considered to assess the impact of electric fields induced by transcranial current stimulation (tCS) on the cerebral cortex and the subsequent effects occurring on scalp EEG. The objective of this work was to elaborate a global model allowing for the simulation of scalp EEG signals under tCS. In our integrated modeling approach, realistic meshes of the head tissues and of the stimulation electrodes were first built to map the generated electric field distribution on the cortical surface. Secondly, source activities at various cortical macro-regions were generated by means of a computational model of neuronal populations. The model parameters were adjusted so that populations generated an oscillating activity around 10 Hz resembling typical EEG alpha activity. In order to account for tCS effects and following current biophysical models, the calculated component of the electric field normal to the cortex was used to locally influence the activity of neuronal populations. Lastly, EEG under both spontaneous and tACS-stimulated (transcranial sinunoidal tCS from 4 to 16 Hz) brain activity was simulated at the level of scalp electrodes by solving the forward problem in the aforementioned realistic head model. Under the 10 Hz-tACS condition, a significant increase in alpha power occurred in simulated scalp EEG signals as compared to the no-stimulation condition. This increase involved most channels bilaterally, was more pronounced on posterior electrodes and was only significant for tACS frequencies from 8 to 12 Hz. The immediate effects of tACS in the model agreed with the post-tACS results previously reported in real subjects. Moreover, additional information was also brought by the model at other electrode positions or stimulation frequency. This suggests that our modeling approach can be used to compare, interpret and predict changes occurring on EEG with respect to parameters used in specific stimulation

  20. Correspondence of electroencephalography and near-infrared spectroscopy sensitivities to the cerebral cortex using a high-density layout

    PubMed Central

    Giacometti, Paolo; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. This study investigates the correspondence of the cortical sensitivity of electroencephalography (EEG) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). EEG forward model sensitivity to the cerebral cortex was calculated for 329 EEG electrodes following the 10-5 EEG positioning system using a segmented structural magnetic resonance imaging scan of a human subject. NIRS forward model sensitivity was calculated for the same subject using 156 NIRS source-detector pairs selected from 32 source and 32 detector optodes positioned on the scalp using a subset of the 10-5 EEG positioning system. Sensitivity correlations between colocalized NIRS source-detector pair groups and EEG channels yielded R=0.46±0.08. Groups of NIRS source-detector pairs with maximum correlations to EEG electrode sensitivities are tabulated. The mean correlation between the point spread functions for EEG and NIRS regions of interest (ROI) was R=0.43±0.07. Spherical ROIs with radii of 26 mm yielded the maximum correlation between EEG and NIRS averaged across all cortical mesh nodes. These sensitivity correlations between EEG and NIRS should be taken into account when designing multimodal studies of neurovascular coupling and when using NIRS as a statistical prior for EEG source localization. PMID:25558462

  1. [Study of cortico-cortical functional connectivity with vector autoregressive model of multichannel EEG].

    PubMed

    Kurganskiĭ, A V

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on some practical issues of using vector autoregressive model (VAR) for multichannel EEG analysis. Those issues include: EEG preprocessing, checking if the necessary conditions of VAR model applicability are met, optimal order selection, and assessment of the validity of fitted VAR model. Both non-directed (ordinary coherence and imaginary part of the complex-valued coherency) and directed (directed coherence, directed transfer function and partial directed coherence) measures of the strength of inter-channel coupling are discussed. These measures are analyzed with respect to their properties (scale invariance) and known problems in using them (spurious interactions, volume conduction).

  2. The effect of a single session of short duration heart rate variability biofeedback on EEG: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Prinsloo, Gabriell E; Rauch, H G Laurie; Karpul, David; Derman, Wayne E

    2013-03-01

    This pilot study examines the effect of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback on measures of electroencephalogram (EEG) during and immediately after biofeedback. Eighteen healthy males exposed to work-related stress, were randomised into an HRV biofeedback (BIO) or a comparative group (COM). EEG was recorded during the intervention and during rest periods before and after the intervention. Power spectral density in theta, alpha and beta frequency bands and theta/beta ratios were calculated. During the intervention, the BIO group had higher relative theta power [Fz and Pz (p < 0.01), Cz (p < 0.05)], lower fronto-central relative beta power (p < 0.05), and higher theta/beta [Fz and Cz (p < 0.01), Pz (p < 0.05)] than the COM group. The groups showed different responses after the intervention with increased posterior theta/beta (p < 0.05) in the BIO group and altered posterior relative theta (p < 0.05), central relative beta (p = 0.06) and central-posterior theta/beta (p < 0.01) in the post-intervention rest period. The findings of this study suggest that a single session of HRV biofeedback after a single training session was associated with changes in EEG suggestive of increased internal attention and relaxation both during and after the intervention. However, the comparative intervention was associated with changes suggestive of increased mental effort and possible anxiety during and after the intervention.

  3. Allotypy of High Density Lipoprotein of Rabbit Serum

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Kåre; Boman, Helge; Torsvik, Harald; Walker, Suzanne M.

    1971-01-01

    A common antigenic polymorphism of high density lipoprotein (HDL) in rabbit serum is described. The presence or absence of an antigen termed Hl 1 appears to be controlled by autosomal dominant inheritance. The polymorphism should be a useful tool in the study of serum lipoproteins, particularly since genetic polymorphisms within the low density lipoprotein are already known in several species. The Hl polymorphism may make the rabbit more useful for model studies of serum lipoproteins in health and disease. Images PMID:4995822

  4. Advanced short haul aircraft for high density markets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloway, T. L.

    1977-01-01

    The short haul (less than 500 miles) passenger enplanements represent about 50% of the total domestic enplanements. These can be distinguished by the annual passenger flow for a given city pair and classified into low, medium and high densiy markets. NASA studies have investigated various advanced short haul aircraft concepts that have potential application in these three market areas. Although advanced operational techniques impact all market densities, advanced vehicle design concepts such as RTOL, STOL and VTOL have the largest impact in the high density markets. This paper summarizes the results of NASA sponsored high density short haul air transportation systems studies and briefly reviews NASA sponsored advanced VTOL conceptual aircraft design studies. Trends in vehicle characteristics and operational requirements will be indicated in addition to economic suitability and impact on the community.

  5. Music and emotion: an EEG connectivity study in patients with disorders of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Varotto, G; Fazio, P; Rossi Sebastiano, D; Avanzini, G; Franceschetti, S; Panzica, F; CRC

    2012-01-01

    Human emotion perception is a topic of great interest for both cognitive and clinical neuroscience, but its electrophysiological correlates are still poorly understood. The present study is aimed at evaluating if measures of synchronization and indexes based on graph-theory are a tool suitable to study and quantify electrophysiological changes due to emotional stimuli perception. In particular, our study is aimed at evaluating if different EEG connectivity patterns can be induced by pleasant (consonant) or unpleasant (dissonant) music, in a population of healthy subjects, and in patients with severe disorders of consciousness (DOCs), namely vegetative state (VS) patients. In the control group, pleasant music induced an increase in network number of connections, compared with the resting condition, while no changes were caused by the unpleasant stimuli. However, clustering coefficient and path length, two indexes derived from graph theory, able to characterise segregation and integration properties of a network, were not affected by the stimuli, neither pleasant nor unpleasant. In the VS group, changes were found only in those patients with the less severe consciousness impairment, according to the clinical assessment. In these patients a stronger synchronization was found during the unpleasant condition; moreover we observed changes in the network topology, with decreased values of clustering coefficient and path length during both musical stimuli.Our results show that measures of synchronization can provide new insights into the study of the electro physiological correlates of emotion perception, indicating that these tools can be used to study patients with DOCs, in whom the issue of objective measures and quantification of the degree of impairment is still an open and unsolved question.

  6. Spontaneous Slow Fluctuation of EEG Alpha Rhythm Reflects Activity in Deep-Brain Structures: A Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Omata, Kei; Hanakawa, Takashi; Morimoto, Masako; Honda, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of the occipital alpha rhythm on brain electroencephalogram (EEG) is associated with brain activity in the cerebral neocortex and deep brain structures. To further understand the mechanisms of alpha rhythm power fluctuation, we performed simultaneous EEGs and functional magnetic resonance imaging recordings in human subjects during a resting state and explored the dynamic relationship between alpha power fluctuation and blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals of the brain. Based on the frequency characteristics of the alpha power time series (APTS) during 20-minute EEG recordings, we divided the APTS into two components: fast fluctuation (0.04–0.167 Hz) and slow fluctuation (0–0.04 Hz). Analysis of the correlation between the MRI signal and each component revealed that the slow fluctuation component of alpha power was positively correlated with BOLD signal changes in the brain stem and the medial part of the thalamus and anterior cingulate cortex, while the fast fluctuation component was correlated with the lateral part of the thalamus and the anterior cingulate cortex, but not the brain stem. In summary, these data suggest that different subcortical structures contribute to slow and fast modulations of alpha spectra on brain EEG. PMID:23824708

  7. Wavelet Jensen Shannon divergence as a tool for studying the dynamics of frequency band components in EEG epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereyra, M. E.; Lamberti, P. W.; Rosso, O. A.

    2007-06-01

    We develop a quantitative method of analysis of EEG records. The method is based on the wavelet analysis of the record and on the capability of the Jensen-Shannon divergence (JSD) to identify dynamical changes in a time series. The JSD is a measure of distance between probability distributions. Therefore for its evaluation it is necessary to define a (time dependent) probability distribution along the record. We define this probability distribution from the wavelet decomposition of the associated time series. The wavelet JSD provides information about dynamical changes in the scales and can be considered a complementary methodology reported earlier [O.A. Rosso, S. Blanco, A. Rabinowicz, Signal Processing 86 (2003) 1275; O.A. Rosso, S. Blanco, J. Yordanova, V. Kolev, A. Figliola, M. Schürmann, E. Başar, J. Neurosci. Methods 105 (2001) 65; O.A. Rosso, M.T. Martin, A. Figliola, K. Keller, A. Plastino, J. Neurosci. Methods 153 (2006) 163]. In the present study we have demonstrated it by analyzing EEG signal of tonic-clonic epileptic seizures applying the JSD method. The display of the JSD curves enables easy comparison of frequency band component dynamics. This would, in turn, promise easy and successful comparison of the EEG records from various scalp locations of the brain.

  8. Functional coupling of sensorimotor and associative areas during a catching ball task: a qEEG coherence study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Catching an object is a complex movement that involves not only programming but also effective motor coordination. Such behavior is related to the activation and recruitment of cortical regions that participates in the sensorimotor integration process. This study aimed to elucidate the cortical mechanisms involved in anticipatory actions when performing a task of catching an object in free fall. Methods Quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) was recorded using a 20-channel EEG system in 20 healthy right-handed participants performed the catching ball task. We used the EEG coherence analysis to investigate subdivisions of alpha (8-12 Hz) and beta (12-30 Hz) bands, which are related to cognitive processing and sensory-motor integration. Results Notwithstanding, we found the main effects for the factor block; for alpha-1, coherence decreased from the first to sixth block, and the opposite effect occurred for alpha-2 and beta-2, with coherence increasing along the blocks. Conclusion It was concluded that to perform successfully our task, which involved anticipatory processes (i.e. feedback mechanisms), subjects exhibited a great involvement of sensory-motor and associative areas, possibly due to organization of information to process visuospatial parameters and further catch the falling object. PMID:22364485

  9. Stage 2 Sleep EEG Sigma Activity and Motor Learning in Childhood ADHD: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Saletin, Jared M; Coon, William G; Carskadon, Mary A

    2017-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with deficits in motor learning and sleep. In healthy adults, overnight improvements in motor skills are associated with sleep spindle activity in the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG). This association is poorly characterized in children, particularly in pediatric ADHD. Polysomnographic sleep was monitored in 7 children with ADHD and 14 typically developing controls. All children were trained on a validated motor sequence task (MST) in the evening with retesting the following morning. Analyses focused on MST precision (speed-accuracy trade-off). NREM Stage 2 sleep EEG power spectral analyses focused on spindle-frequency EEG activity in the sigma (12-15 Hz) band. The ADHD group demonstrated a selective decrease in power within the sigma band. Evening MST precision was lower in ADHD, yet no difference in performance was observed following sleep. Moreover, ADHD status moderated the association between slow sleep spindle activity (12-13.5 Hz) and overnight improvement; spindle-frequency EEG activity was positively associated with performance improvements in children with ADHD but not in controls. These data highlight the importance of sleep in supporting next-day behavior in ADHD while indicating that differences in sleep neurophysiology may contribute to deficits in this population.

  10. Cortical High-Density Counterstream Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Markov, Nikola T.; Ercsey-Ravasz, Mária; Van Essen, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Small-world networks provide an appealing description of cortical architecture owing to their capacity for integration and segregation combined with an economy of connectivity. Previous reports of low-density interareal graphs and apparent small-world properties are challenged by data that reveal high-density cortical graphs in which economy of connections is achieved by weight heterogeneity and distance-weight correlations. These properties define a model that predicts many binary and weighted features of the cortical network including a core-periphery, a typical feature of self-organizing information processing systems. Feedback and feedforward pathways between areas exhibit a dual counterstream organization, and their integration into local circuits constrains cortical computation. Here, we propose a bow-tie representation of interareal architecture derived from the hierarchical laminar weights of pathways between the high-efficiency dense core and periphery. PMID:24179228

  11. High Density Mastering Using Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Yoshiaki; Kitahara, Hiroaki; Kasono, Osamu; Katsumura, Masahiro; Wada, Yasumitsu

    1998-04-01

    A mastering system for the next-generation digital versatile disk (DVD) is required to have a higher resolution compared with the conventional mastering systems. We have developed an electron beam mastering machine which features a thermal field emitter and a vacuum sealed air spindle motor. Beam displacement caused by magnetic fluctuation with spindle rotation was about 60 nm(p-p) in both the radial and tangential directions. Considering the servo gain of a read-out system, it has little influence on the read-out signal in terms of tracking errors and jitters. The disk performance was evaluated by recording either the 8/16 modulation signal or a groove on the disk. The electron beam recording showed better jitter values from the disk playback than those from a laser beam recorder. The deviation of track pitch was 44 nm(p-p). We also confirmed the high density recording with a capacity reaching 30 GB.

  12. Vacuum Outgassing of High Density Polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Sze, J; Schildbach, M A; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S; Raboin, P; McLean II, W

    2008-08-11

    A combination of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and temperature programmed decomposition (TPD) was employed to identify the outgassing species, the total amount of outgassing, and the outgassing kinetics of high density polyethylene (HDPE) in a vacuum environment. The isoconversional kinetic analysis was then used to analyze the outgassing kinetics and to predict the long-term outgassing of HDPE in vacuum applications at ambient temperature. H{sub 2}O and C{sub n}H{sub x} with n as high as 9 and x centering around 2n are the major outgassing species from solid HDPE, but the quantities evolved can be significantly reduced by vacuum baking at 368 K for a few hours prior to device assembly.

  13. High Density Methane Storage in Nanoporous Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rash, Tyler; Dohnke, Elmar; Soo, Yuchoong; Maland, Brett; Doynov, Plamen; Lin, Yuyi; Pfeifer, Peter; Mriglobal Collaboration; All-Craft Team

    2014-03-01

    Development of low-pressure, high-capacity adsorbent based storage technology for natural gas (NG) as fuel for advanced transportation (flat-panel tank for NG vehicles) is necessary in order to address the temperature, pressure, weight, and volume constraints present in conventional storage methods (CNG & LNG.) Subcritical nitrogen adsorption experiments show that our nanoporous carbon hosts extended narrow channels which generate a high surface area and strong Van der Waals forces capable of increasing the density of NG into a high-density fluid. This improvement in storage density over compressed natural gas without an adsorbent occurs at ambient temperature and pressures ranging from 0-260 bar (3600 psi.) The temperature, pressure, and storage capacity of a 40 L flat-panel adsorbed NG tank filled with 20 kg of nanoporous carbon will be featured.

  14. Ultra-high density diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Padmore, Howard A.; Voronov, Dmytro L.; Cambie, Rossana; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2012-12-11

    A diffraction grating structure having ultra-high density of grooves comprises an echellette substrate having periodically repeating recessed features, and a multi-layer stack of materials disposed on the echellette substrate. The surface of the diffraction grating is planarized, such that layers of the multi-layer stack form a plurality of lines disposed on the planarized surface of the structure in a periodical fashion, wherein lines having a first property alternate with lines having a dissimilar property on the surface of the substrate. For example, in one embodiment, lines comprising high-Z and low-Z materials alternate on the planarized surface providing a structure that is suitable as a diffraction grating for EUV and soft X-rays. In some embodiments, line density of between about 10,000 lines/mm to about 100,000 lines/mm is provided.

  15. Ground state of high-density matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, ED; Kolb, Edward W.; Lee, Kimyeong

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that if an upper bound to the false vacuum energy of the electroweak Higgs potential is satisfied, the true ground state of high-density matter is not nuclear matter, or even strange-quark matter, but rather a non-topological soliton where the electroweak symmetry is exact and the fermions are massless. This possibility is examined in the standard SU(3) sub C tensor product SU(2) sub L tensor product U(1) sub Y model. The bound to the false vacuum energy is satisfied only for a narrow range of the Higgs boson masses in the minimal electroweak model (within about 10 eV of its minimum allowed value of 6.6 GeV) and a somewhat wider range for electroweak models with a non-minimal Higgs sector.

  16. Manufacture of high-density ceramic sinters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibata, Y.

    1986-01-01

    High density ceramic sinters are manufactured by coating premolded or presintered porous ceramics with a sealing material of high SiO2 porous glass or nitride glass and then sintering by hot isostatic pressing. The ceramics have excellent abrasion and corrosion resistances. Thus LC-10 (Si3N2 powder) and Y2O3-Al2O3 type sintering were mixed and molded to give a premolded porous ceramic (porosity 37%, relative bulk density 63%). The ceramic was dipped in a slurry containing high SiO2 porous glass and an alcohol solution of cellulose acetate and dried. The coated ceramic was treated in a nitrogen atmosphere and then sintered by hot isostatic pressing to give a dense ceramic sinter.

  17. High-density fiber optic biosensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Jason R.; Walt, David R.

    2002-02-01

    Novel approaches are required to coordinate the immense amounts of information derived from diverse genomes. This concept has influenced the expanded role of high-throughput DNA detection and analysis in the biological sciences. A high-density fiber optic DNA biosensor was developed consisting of oligonucleotide-functionalized, 3.1 mm diameter microspheres deposited into the etched wells on the distal face of a 500 micrometers imaging fiber bundle. Imaging fiber bundles containing thousands of optical fibers, each associated with a unique oligonucleotide probe sequence, were the foundation for an optically connected, individually addressable DNA detection platform. Different oligonucleotide-functionalized microspheres were combined in a stock solution, and randomly dispersed into the etched wells. Microsphere positions were registered from optical dyes incorporated onto the microspheres. The distribution process provided an inherent redundancy that increases the signal-to-noise ratio as the square root of the number of sensors examined. The representative amount of each probe-type in the array was dependent on their initial stock solution concentration, and as other sequences of interest arise, new microsphere elements can be added to arrays without altering the existing detection capabilities. The oligonucleotide probe sequences hybridize to fluorescently-labeled, complementary DNA target solutions. Fiber optic DNA microarray research has included DNA-protein interaction profiles, microbial strain differentiation, non-labeled target interrogation with molecular beacons, and single cell-based assays. This biosensor array is proficient in DNA detection linked to specific disease states, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP's) discrimination, and gene expression analysis. This array platform permits multiple detection formats, provides smaller feature sizes, and enables sensor design flexibility. High-density fiber optic microarray biosensors provide a fast

  18. Peculiarities of brain functioning in children with adolescence idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) according to EEG studies.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, D; Dudin, M; Bekshayev, S; Pinchuk, O

    2012-01-01

    Brain structures with bioelectric activity (BA) different from BA of the same structures in healthy peers were revealed using an original 3DLocEEG analysis of EEGs that solves so-called "reverse EEG task". These were the following structures: thalamus, pineal gland, hypothalamic area, including suprahiasmatic nuclei, and infratemporal cortex. The shift of BA focus to structures of the left hemisphere including left thalamus was recorded in patients with AIS; the shift increased both with worsening of deformation and increasing progression activity. This was not observed in healthy children (aged 7-14 years), although it is natural for older adolescents (15-17 years) and healthy adults. In other words, the interhemispheric asymmetry of brain BA in children with AIS becomes typical for the definitive brain much earlier. This phenomenon may be used for future development of a method for prediction of deformation progression patterns. A number of differences obtained in comparative analysis of EEGs, processed by 3DLocEEG method, between right-side and left-side AIS allow us to hypothesize about aetiology and pathogenesis differences of these two AIS clinical forms. Data obtained suggest that brain structures play a much more important role in aetiology and pathogenesis of AIS right-side forms compared with left-side ones. Primary subclinical dysfunctions of brain regulatory systems leading to disturbances of spinal cord and brain associated growth and subsequently to scoliosis development are supposed to play the main role in pathogenesis of right-side AIS forms (or their substantial part). Evidently, the major reason for manifesting these latent dysfunctions is an overstrain of central nervous system (CNS) adaptation-compensation mechanisms during the pubertal period.

  19. Ambulatory EEG NeuroMonitor platform for engagement studies of children with development delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Ruhi; Consul-Pacareu, Sergi; Abusaud, Mohammed; Sahadat, Md N.; Morshed, Bashir I.

    2013-05-01

    Engagement monitoring is crucial in many clinical and therapy applications such as early learning preschool classes for children with developmental delays including autism spectrum disorder (ASD), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), or cerebral palsy; as it is challenging for the instructors to evaluate the individual responses of these children to determine the effectiveness of the teaching strategies due to the diverse and unique need of each child who might have difficulty in verbal or behavioral communication. This paper presents an ambulatory scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) NeuroMonitor platform to study brain engagement activities in natural settings. The developed platform is miniature (size: 2.2" x 0.8" x 0.36", weight: 41.8 gm with 800 mAh Li-ion battery and 3 snap leads) and low-power (active mode: 32 mA low power mode: under 5mA) with 2 channels (Fp1, Fp2) to record prefrontal cortex activities of the subject in natural settings while concealed within a headband. The signals from the electrodes are amplified with a low-power instrumentation amplifier; notch filtered (fc = 60Hz), then band-passed by a 2nd-order Chebyshev-I low-pass filter cascaded with a 2nd-order low-pass (fc = 125Hz). A PSoC ADC (16-bit, 256 sps) samples this filtered signal, and can either transmit it through a Class-2 Bluetooth transceiver to a remote station for real-time analysis or store it in a microSD card for offline processing. This platform is currently being evaluated to capture data in the classroom settings for engagement monitoring of children, aimed to study the effectiveness of various teaching strategies that will allow the development of personalized classroom curriculum for children with developmental delays.

  20. Compatibility and Decontamination of High-Density Polyethylene Exposed to Sulfur Mustard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    COMPATIBILITY AND DECONTAMINATION OF HIGH-DENSITY POLYETHYLENE EXPOSED TO SULFUR MUSTARD ECBC-TR-1235...Decontamination of High-Density Polyethylene Exposed to Sulfur Mustard 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...study to determine the compatability of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) with liquid mustard (HD) material and decontamination of HDPE when exposed

  1. Nonlinear dynamics and quantitative EEG analysis.

    PubMed

    Jansen, B H

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative, computerized electroencephalogram (EEG) analysis appears to be based on a phenomenological approach to EEG interpretation, and is primarily rooted in linear systems theory. A fundamentally different approach to computerized EEG analysis, however, is making its way into the laboratories. The basic idea, inspired by recent advances in the area of nonlinear dynamics and chaos theory, is to view an EEG as the output of a deterministic system of relatively simple complexity, but containing nonlinearities. This suggests that studying the geometrical dynamics of EEGs, and the development of neurophysiologically realistic models of EEG generation may produce more successful automated EEG analysis techniques than the classical, stochastic methods. A review of the fundamentals of chaos theory is provided. Evidence supporting the nonlinear dynamics paradigm to EEG interpretation is presented, and the kind of new information that can be extracted from the EEG is discussed. A case is made that a nonlinear dynamic systems viewpoint to EEG generation will profoundly affect the way EEG interpretation is currently done.

  2. [Computerized EEG and personality].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Pérez, A; Martínez López-Coterilla, M; Fajardo López, A; Lardelli Claret, A

    1989-01-01

    The ordinary EEG, on only showing qualitative malfunction of abnormal graphoelements in the tracings, proves itself insufficient to go into the analysis of psychological and psycho-pathological problems. Since computerised studies of EEG permit quantitative comparisons, we tried to apply them in correlation with the characteristics of the personality classified also with quantitative criteria, such as those offered in the personality inventory 16 PF; from which have been chosen the so-called factors of the second order, and the subjectivity-objectivity factors. The test was carried out on 100 voluntary subjects from Almeria (Spain), all with High School grades, between 18 and 40 years of age, of both sexes, all right-handed, without neuro-psychiatric history, and with normal ordinary EEGs. From the statistical analysis of the results one could deduce that there are significant specific relationships from the computerised EEG, with those secondary polar values of 16 PF: high and low anxiety, extroversion-introversion. Subjects with low anxiety presented a significant increase of the alpha band opposed to the subjects with high anxiety. There is a significant differences in power of the frontal areas between extrovert and introvert subjects. The extroverted subjects have a greater power of the right side and the introverted subjects a greater power of the left.

  3. Combined EEG-fNIRS decoding of motor attempt and imagery for brain switch control: an offline study in patients with tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Blokland, Yvonne; Spyrou, Loukianos; Thijssen, Dick; Eijsvogels, Thijs; Colier, Willy; Floor-Westerdijk, Marianne; Vlek, Rutger; Bruhn, Jorgen; Farquhar, Jason

    2014-03-01

    Combining electrophysiological and hemodynamic features is a novel approach for improving current performance of brain switches based on sensorimotor rhythms (SMR). This study was conducted with a dual purpose: to test the feasibility of using a combined electroencephalogram/functional near-infrared spectroscopy (EEG-fNIRS) SMR-based brain switch in patients with tetraplegia, and to examine the performance difference between motor imagery and motor attempt for this user group. A general improvement was found when using both EEG and fNIRS features for classification as compared to using the single-modality EEG classifier, with average classification rates of 79% for attempted movement and 70% for imagined movement. For the control group, rates of 87% and 79% were obtained, respectively, where the "attempted movement" condition was replaced with "actual movement." A combined EEG-fNIRS system might be especially beneficial for users who lack sufficient control of current EEG-based brain switches. The average classification performance in the patient group for attempted movement was significantly higher than for imagined movement using the EEG-only as well as the combined classifier, arguing for the case of a paradigm shift in current brain switch research.

  4. Neural Mechanisms of Inhibitory Response in a Battlefield Scenario: A Simultaneous fMRI-EEG Study.

    PubMed

    Ko, Li-Wei; Shih, Yi-Cheng; Chikara, Rupesh Kumar; Chuang, Ya-Ting; Chang, Erik C

    2016-01-01

    The stop-signal paradigm has been widely adopted as a way to parametrically quantify the response inhibition process. To evaluate inhibitory function in realistic environmental settings, the current study compared stop-signal responses in two different scenarios: one uses simple visual symbols as go and stop signals, and the other translates the typical design into a battlefield scenario (BFS) where a sniper-scope view was the background, a terrorist image was the go signal, a hostage image was the stop signal, and the task instructions were to shoot at terrorists only when hostages were not present but to refrain from shooting if hostages appeared. The BFS created a threatening environment and allowed the evaluation of how participants' inhibitory control manifest in this realistic stop-signal task. In order to investigate the participants' brain activities with both high spatial and temporal resolution, simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) recordings were acquired. The results demonstrated that both scenarios induced increased activity in the right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG) and presupplementary motor area (preSMA), which have been linked to response inhibition. Notably, in right temporoparietal junction (rTPJ) we found both higher blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activation and synchronization of theta-alpha activities (4-12 Hz) in the BFS than in the traditional scenario after the stop signal. The higher activation of rTPJ in the BFS may be related to morality judgments or attentional reorienting. These results provided new insights into the complex brain networks involved in inhibitory control within naturalistic environments.

  5. Neural Mechanisms of Inhibitory Response in a Battlefield Scenario: A Simultaneous fMRI-EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Li-Wei; Shih, Yi-Cheng; Chikara, Rupesh Kumar; Chuang, Ya-Ting; Chang, Erik C.

    2016-01-01

    The stop-signal paradigm has been widely adopted as a way to parametrically quantify the response inhibition process. To evaluate inhibitory function in realistic environmental settings, the current study compared stop-signal responses in two different scenarios: one uses simple visual symbols as go and stop signals, and the other translates the typical design into a battlefield scenario (BFS) where a sniper-scope view was the background, a terrorist image was the go signal, a hostage image was the stop signal, and the task instructions were to shoot at terrorists only when hostages were not present but to refrain from shooting if hostages appeared. The BFS created a threatening environment and allowed the evaluation of how participants’ inhibitory control manifest in this realistic stop-signal task. In order to investigate the participants’ brain activities with both high spatial and temporal resolution, simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) recordings were acquired. The results demonstrated that both scenarios induced increased activity in the right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG) and presupplementary motor area (preSMA), which have been linked to response inhibition. Notably, in right temporoparietal junction (rTPJ) we found both higher blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activation and synchronization of theta-alpha activities (4–12 Hz) in the BFS than in the traditional scenario after the stop signal. The higher activation of rTPJ in the BFS may be related to morality judgments or attentional reorienting. These results provided new insights into the complex brain networks involved in inhibitory control within naturalistic environments. PMID:27199708

  6. High-Density Amorphous Ice, the Frost on Interstellar Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, P.; Blake, D. F.; Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.

    1995-01-01

    Most water ice in the universe is in a form which does not occur naturally on Earth and of which only minimal amounts have been made in the laboratory. We have encountered this 'high-density amorphous ice' in electron diffraction experiments of low-temperature (T less than 30 K) vapor-deposited water and have subsequently modeled its structure using molecular dynamics simulations. The characteristic feature of high-density amorphous ice is the presence of 'interstitial' oxygen pair distances between 3 and 4 A. However, we find that the structure is best described as a collapsed lattice of the more familiar low-density amorphous form. These distortions are frozen in at temperatures below 38 K because, we propose, it requires the breaking of one hydrogen bond, on average, per molecule to relieve the strain and to restructure the lattice to that of low-density amorphous ice. Several features of astrophysical ice analogs studied in laboratory experiments are readily explained by the structural transition from high-density amorphous ice into low-density amorphous ice. Changes in the shape of the 3.07 gm water band, trapping efficiency of CO, CO loss, changes in the CO band structure, and the recombination of radicals induced by low-temperature UV photolysis all covary with structural changes that occur in the ice during this amorphous to amorphous transition. While the 3.07 micrometers ice band in various astronomical environments can be modeled with spectra of simple mixtures of amorphous and crystalline forms, the contribution of the high-density amorphous form nearly always dominates.

  7. Fasting cholesteryl ester transfer protein concentration is independently associated with the postprandial decrease in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration after fat-rich meals: the Hoorn prandial study.

    PubMed

    Alssema, Marjan; El-Harchaoui, Karim; Schindhelm, Roger K; Diamant, Michaela; Nijpels, Giel; Kostense, Piet J; Teerlink, Tom; Heine, Robert J; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M; Kuivenhoven, Jan A; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Scheffer, Peter G

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the study was to test whether fasting or postprandial cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) concentrations are associated with postprandial changes in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) concentrations after fat-rich or carbohydrate-rich meals. Postmenopausal women (76 with normal glucose metabolism [NGM], 41 with type 2 diabetes mellitus [T2DM], and 38 T2DM women with statin therapy [T2DM-ST]) received 2 consecutive fat-rich or carbohydrate-rich meals on separate occasions. Linear regression analysis was performed to assess the associations of fasting CETP and postprandial changes of CETP with postprandial changes in HDL-c. Mean plasma HDL-c concentrations decreased significantly after the fat-rich meals: 0.18 +/- 0.09 mmol/L in NGM, 0.16 +/- 0.09 mmol/L in T2DM, and 0.14 +/- 0.08 mmol/L in T2DM-ST women. This effect was smaller after using carbohydrate-rich meals: 0.12 +/- 0.09 mmol/L in the NGM, 0.12 +/- 0.08 mmol/L in the T2DM, and 0.10 +/- 0.05 mmol/L in the T2DM-ST study group. Higher fasting but not postprandial CETP concentrations were associated with a larger postprandial decrease in HDL-c (beta -0.034; 95% confidence interval, -0.067 to -0.001) after the fat-rich meals. This association was independent of the postprandial increase in triglycerides and similar among the 3 study groups. A high fasting CETP concentration may contribute to the postprandial atherogenic lipoprotein profile in postmenopausal women by decreasing HDL-c after fat-rich meals. This effect is independent from the postprandial increase in triglycerides.

  8. High density plasma etching of magnetic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Kee Bum

    Magnetic materials such as NiFe (permalloy) or NiFeCo are widely used in the data storage industry. Techniques for submicron patterning are required to develop next generation magnetic devices. The relative chemical inertness of most magnetic materials means they are hard to etch using conventional RIE (Reactive Ion Etching). Therefore ion milling has generally been used across the industry, but this has limitations for magnetic structures with submicron dimensions. In this dissertation, we suggest high density plasmas such as ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) and ICP (Inductively Coupled Plasma) for the etching of magnetic materials (NiFe, NiFeCo, CoFeB, CoSm, CoZr) and other related materials (TaN, CrSi, FeMn), which are employed for magnetic devices like magnetoresistive random access memories (MRAM), magnetic read/write heads, magnetic sensors and microactuators. This research examined the fundamental etch mechanisms occurring in high density plasma processing of magnetic materials by measuring etch rate, surface morphology and surface stoichiometry. However, one concern with using Cl2-based plasma chemistry is the effect of residual chlorine or chlorinated etch residues remaining on the sidewalls of etched features, leading to a degradation of the magnetic properties. To avoid this problem, we employed two different processing methods. The first one is applying several different cleaning procedures, including de-ionized water rinsing or in-situ exposure to H2, O2 or SF6 plasmas. Very stable magnetic properties were achieved over a period of ˜6 months except O2 plasma treated structures, with no evidence of corrosion, provided chlorinated etch residues were removed by post-etch cleaning. The second method is using non-corrosive gas chemistries such as CO/NH3 or CO2/NH3. There is a small chemical contribution to the etch mechanism (i.e. formation of metal carbonyls) as determined by a comparison with Ar and N2 physical sputtering. The discharge should be NH3

  9. Characterization of the high density plasma etching process of CCTO thin films for the fabrication of very high density capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altamore, C.; Tringali, C.; Sparta', N.; Di Marco, S.; Grasso, A.; Ravesi, S.

    2010-02-01

    In this work the feasibility of CCTO (Calcium Copper Titanate) patterning by etching process is demonstrated and fully characterized in a hard to etch materials etcher. CCTO sintered in powder shows a giant relative dielectric constant (105) measured at 1 MHz at room temperature. This feature is furthermore coupled with stability from 101 Hz to 106 Hz in a wide temperature range (100K - 600K). In principle, this property can allow to fabricate very high capacitance density condenser. Due to its perovskite multi-component structure, CCTO can be considered a hard to etch material. For high density capacitor fabrication, CCTO anisotropic etching is requested by using high density plasma. The behavior of etched CCTO was studied in a HRe- (High Density Reflected electron) plasma etcher using Cl2/Ar chemistry. The relationship between the etch rate and the Cl2/Ar ratio was also studied. The effects of RF MHz, KHz Power and pressure variation, the impact of HBr addiction to the Cl2/Ar chemistry on the CCTO etch rate and on its selectivity to Pt and photo resist was investigated.

  10. Infrared imaging of high density protein arrays.

    PubMed

    De Meutter, Joëlle; Vandenameele, Julie; Matagne, André; Goormaghtigh, Erik

    2017-04-10

    We propose in this paper that protein microarrays could be analysed by infrared imaging in place of enzymatic or fluorescence labelling. This label-free method reports simultaneously a large series of data on the spotted sample (protein secondary structure, phosphorylation, glycosylation, presence of impurities, etc.). In the present work, 100 μm protein spots each containing about 100 pg protein were deposited to form high density regular arrays. Using arrays of infrared detectors, high resolution images could be obtained where each pixel of the image is in fact a full infrared spectrum. With microarrays, hundreds of experimental conditions can be tested easily and quickly, with no further labelling or chemistry of any kind. We describe how the noise present in the infrared spectra can be split into image noise and detector noise. We also detail how both types of noise can be most conveniently dealt with to generate very high quality spectra of less than 100 pg protein. Finally, the results suggest that the protein secondary structure is preserved during microarray building.

  11. Recycling of irradiated high-density polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navratil, J.; Manas, M.; Mizera, A.; Bednarik, M.; Stanek, M.; Danek, M.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation crosslinking of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) is a well-recognized modification of improving basic material characteristics. This research paper deals with the utilization of electron beam irradiated HDPE (HDPEx) after the end of its lifetime. Powder of recycled HDPEx (irradiation dose 165 kGy) was used as a filler into powder of virgin low-density polyethylene (LDPE) in concentrations ranging from 10% to 60%. The effect of the filler on processability and mechanical behavior of the resulting mixtures was investigated. The results indicate that the processability, as well as mechanical behavior, highly depends on the amount of the filler. Melt flow index dropped from 13.7 to 0.8 g/10 min comparing the lowest and the highest concentration; however, the higher shear rate the lower difference between each concentration. Toughness and hardness, on the other hand, grew with increasing addition of the recycled HDPEx. Elastic modulus increased from 254 to 450 MPa and material hardness increased from 53 to 59 ShD. These results indicate resolving the problem of further recycling of irradiated polymer materials while taking advantage of the improved mechanical properties.

  12. Automated sleep EEG analysis applied to the evaluation of drugs: illustration by study of clorazepate dipotassium.

    PubMed

    Smith, J R; Karacan, I; Keane, B P; Yang, M

    1976-12-01

    An automated sleep EEG analysis system was used to evaluate the effects of clorazepate dipotassium in normal subjects. Ten young-adult men slept 18 consecutive nights in the laboratory. On days 8-15 clorazepate (7.5 mg) was administered three times daily; on days 5-7 and 16-18 a placebo was administered in a similar fashion. The drug reduced amounts of alpha and delta activity and increased the amount of beta activity and the number of spindles. These effects generally persisted through the 3 day placebo recovery period. Our results suggest that sleep EEG waveform descriptors are sensitive indicators of drug activity and that beta activity in particular may be useful in the detailed description of various drug effects.

  13. Tobacco Smoking and the Resting Maternal Brain: A Preliminary Study of Frontal EEG

    PubMed Central

    Wilbanks, Haley E.; Von Mohr, Mariana; Potenza, Marc N.; Mayes, Linda C.; Rutherford, Helena J.V.

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco smoking has been attributed to a wide range of detrimental health consequences for both women and their children. In addition to its known physical health effects, smoking may also impact maternal neural responses and subsequent caregiving behavior. To begin investigating this issue, we employed electroencephalography (EEG) to examine resting neural oscillations of tobacco-smoking mothers (n = 35) and non-smoking mothers (n = 35). We examined seven EEG frequency bands recorded from frontal electrode sites (delta, theta, alpha, alpha1, alpha2, beta, and gamma). While no between-group differences were present in high-frequency bands (alpha2, beta, gamma), smokers showed greater spectral power in low-frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, alpha1) compared to non-smokers. This increased power in low-frequency bands of tobacco-smoking mothers is consistent with a less aroused state and may be one mechanism through which smoking might affect the maternal brain and caregiving behavior. PMID:27354838

  14. Preliminary Study on Quantitative Sleep EEG Characteristics in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seong Min; Kim, Jong Won; Choi, Jae Won; Jeong, Do-Un

    2017-01-01

    We used quantitative electroencephalography (EEG) spectral analysis to compare activity in the bilateral frontal, central, and occipital areas in nine patients with schizophrenia and ten healthy control subjects during standard nocturnal polysomnography. Patients with schizophrenia had longer sleep latency than controls. In N2 sleep, the patients had significantly lower 0.5–1 Hz power and higher theta power in the left frontal region, and higher beta power in the left occipital region than did control subjects. In N3 sleep, the patients with schizophrenia had significantly higher alpha power in the left occipital region than did controls. These findings show distinctive EEG sleep patterns in patients with schizophrenia, which may reflect brain dysfunction or medication effects. PMID:28326122

  15. Analysis of brain activity and response to colour stimuli during learning tasks: an EEG study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folgieri, Raffaella; Lucchiari, Claudio; Marini, Daniele

    2013-02-01

    The research project intends to demonstrate how EEG detection through BCI device can improve the analysis and the interpretation of colours-driven cognitive processes through the combined approach of cognitive science and information technology methods. To this end, firstly it was decided to design an experiment based on comparing the results of the traditional (qualitative and quantitative) cognitive analysis approach with the EEG signal analysis of the evoked potentials. In our case, the sensorial stimulus is represented by the colours, while the cognitive task consists in remembering the words appearing on the screen, with different combination of foreground (words) and background colours. In this work we analysed data collected from a sample of students involved in a learning process during which they received visual stimuli based on colour variation. The stimuli concerned both the background of the text to learn and the colour of the characters. The experiment indicated some interesting results concerning the use of primary (RGB) and complementary (CMY) colours.

  16. Electroencephalogram (EEG) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old EEG (Electroencephalogram) KidsHealth > For Parents > EEG (Electroencephalogram) A A A What's in this article? ... Child If You Have Questions en español Electroencefalograma (EEG) What It Is An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a ...

  17. Electroencephalogram (EEG) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old EEG (Electroencephalogram) KidsHealth > For Parents > EEG (Electroencephalogram) Print A A A What's in this ... Child If You Have Questions en español Electroencefalograma (EEG) What It Is An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a ...

  18. Creativity as a distinct trainable mental state: An EEG study of musical improvisation.

    PubMed

    Lopata, Joel A; Nowicki, Elizabeth A; Joanisse, Marc F

    2017-03-18

    Alpha-band EEG was used to index how creative mental states relate to the creation of artistic works in skilled musicians. We contrasted differences in frontal upper alpha-band activity between tasks with high and low creativity demands by recording EEGs while skilled musicians listened to, played back, and improvised jazz melodies. Neural responses were compared for skilled musicians with training in musical improvisation versus those who had no formal improvisation training. Consistent with our hypotheses, individuals showed increased frontal upper alpha-band activity during more creative tasks (i.e., improvisation) compared to during less creative tasks (i.e., rote playback). Moreover, this effect was greatest for musicians with formal improvisation training. The strength of this effect also appeared to modulate the quality of these improvisations, as evidenced by significant correlations between upper alpha EEG power and objective post-hoc ratings of individuals' performances. These findings support a conceptualization of creativity as a distinct mental state and suggest spontaneous processing capacity is better nurtured through formal institutional training than informal.

  19. A Cross-Sectional Study Demonstrating Increased Serum Amyloid A Related Inflammation in High-Density Lipoproteins from Subjects with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and How This Association Was Augmented by Poor Glycaemic Control

    PubMed Central

    McEneny, Jane; Daniels, Jane-Ann; McGowan, Anne; Gunness, Anjuli; Moore, Kevin; Stevenson, Michael; Young, Ian S.; Gibney, James

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory atherosclerosis is increased in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Normally high-density lipoproteins (HDL) protect against atherosclerosis; however, in the presence of serum amyloid-A- (SAA-) related inflammation this property may be reduced. Fasting blood was obtained from fifty subjects with T1DM, together with fifty age, gender and BMI matched control subjects. HDL was subfractionated into HDL2 and HDL3 by rapid ultracentrifugation. Serum-hsCRP and serum-, HDL2-, and HDL3-SAA were measured by ELISAs. Compared to control subjects, SAA was increased in T1DM subjects, nonsignificantly in serum (P = 0.088), and significantly in HDL2(P = 0.003) and HDL3(P = 0.005). When the T1DM group were separated according to mean HbA1c (8.34%), serum-SAA and HDL3-SAA levels were higher in the T1DM subjects with HbA1c ≥ 8.34%, compared to when HbA1c was <8.34% (P < 0.05). Furthermore, regression analysis illustrated, that for every 1%-unit increase in HbA1c, SAA increased by 20% and 23% in HDL2 and HDL3, respectively, independent of BMI. HsCRP did not differ between groups (P > 0.05). This cross-sectional study demonstrated increased SAA-related inflammation in subjects with T1DM that was augmented by poor glycaemic control. We suggest that SAA is a useful inflammatory biomarker in T1DM, which may contribute to their increased atherosclerosis risk. PMID:26557720

  20. EEG reactions of the human brain in the gradient magnetic field zone of the active geological fault (pilot study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pobachenko, S. V.; Shitov, A. V.; Grigorjev, P. E.; Sokolov, M. V.; Zubrilkin, A. I.; Vypiraylo, D. N.; Solovjev, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental studies of the dynamics of the functional state of a person within the zone of an active geological fault characterized by abnormal spatial distribution of the magnetic- field vector values. It is shown that these geophysical modifications have a pronounced effect on the fluctuations of the electrical activity of the human brain. When the person gets into a zone with abnormal levels of gradient magnetic field in the absence of any subjective sensations, a nonspecific orientation activation reaction is observed, which is characterized by a significant increase in the levels of peak performance in key functional EEG frequency bands.

  1. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93.123 High density traffic airports. (a) Each of the following airports is designated as a...

  2. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93.123 High density traffic airports. (a) Each of the following airports is designated as a...

  3. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93.123 High density traffic airports. (a) Each of the following airports is designated as a...

  4. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93.123 High density traffic airports. (a) Each of the following airports is designated as a...

  5. Heavy alcohol use in adolescence is associated with altered cortical activity: a combined TMS-EEG study.

    PubMed

    Kaarre, Outi; Kallioniemi, Elisa; Könönen, Mervi; Tolmunen, Tommi; Kekkonen, Virve; Kivimäki, Petri; Heikkinen, Noora; Ferreri, Florinda; Laukkanen, Eila; Määttä, Sara

    2016-12-23

    Long-term alcohol use affects cognitive and neurophysiological functioning as well as structural brain development. Combining simultaneous electroencephalogram (EEG) recording with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) enables direct, in vivo exploration of cortical excitability and assessment of effective and functional connectivity. In the central nervous system, the effects of alcohol are particularly mediated by alterations in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurotransmission, and TMS-evoked potentials (TEPs) N45 and N100 in EEG are known to reflect GABAergic function. However, no previous studies have examined the effects of long-term alcohol use in adolescence on TEPs. In this study, a total of 27 young adults with heavy alcohol use in adolescence and 25 age-matched, gender-matched and education-matched controls with little or no alcohol use participated in TMS-EEG measurements. The motor cortex (M1) was stimulated with an intensity of 90 percent of the resting motor threshold of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle. No significant differences were found in the resting motor threshold, TEP latencies or neuropsychological functioning between the groups. We observed an increase in the global mean field power in the time window of 54- to 75-millisecond post-TMS, as well as significant topographical differences in the P60 and N100 in those with a history of heavy drinking. Furthermore, there was a marked increase in the GABAergic N45 amplitude in alcohol users. These findings suggest that long-term alcohol use in adolescence, even when not meeting the diagnostic criteria for a disorder, is associated with changes in connectivity and cortical excitability.

  6. A high density genetic linkage map for rainbow trout (Onchorynchus mykiss) containing 47,839 SNPS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-density SNP arrays have become the tool of choice for QTL mapping, genome-wide association studies and genomic selection. More recently, high-density linkage maps generated by SNP array data have proven to be crucial for the accurate assembly of scaffolds and contigs in whole-genome sequencing ...

  7. Emotion classification in Parkinson's disease by higher-order spectra and power spectrum features using EEG signals: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Yuvaraj, R; Murugappan, M; Ibrahim, Norlinah Mohamed; Omar, Mohd Iqbal; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Mohamad, Khairiyah; Palaniappan, R; Satiyan, M

    2014-03-01

    Deficits in the ability to process emotions characterize several neuropsychiatric disorders and are traits of Parkinson's disease (PD), and there is need for a method of quantifying emotion, which is currently performed by clinical diagnosis. Electroencephalogram (EEG) signals, being an activity of central nervous system (CNS), can reflect the underlying true emotional state of a person. This study applied machine-learning algorithms to categorize EEG emotional states in PD patients that would classify six basic emotions (happiness and sadness, fear, anger, surprise and disgust) in comparison with healthy controls (HC). Emotional EEG data were recorded from 20 PD patients and 20 healthy age-, education level- and sex-matched controls using multimodal (audio-visual) stimuli. The use of nonlinear features motivated by the higher-order spectra (HOS) has been reported to be a promising approach to classify the emotional states. In this work, we made the comparative study of the performance of k-nearest neighbor (kNN) and support vector machine (SVM) classifiers using the features derived from HOS and from the power spectrum. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that power spectrum and HOS based features were statistically significant among the six emotional states (p < 0.0001). Classification results shows that using the selected HOS based features instead of power spectrum based features provided comparatively better accuracy for all the six classes with an overall accuracy of 70.10% ± 2.83% and 77.29% ± 1.73% for PD patients and HC in beta (13-30 Hz) band using SVM classifier. Besides, PD patients achieved less accuracy in the processing of negative emotions (sadness, fear, anger and disgust) than in processing of positive emotions (happiness, surprise) compared with HC. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of applying machine learning techniques to the classification of emotional states in PD patients in a user independent manner using EEG signals. The

  8. Pharmacokinetic and -dynamic studies with a new anxiolytic, suriclone, utilizing EEG mapping and psychometry.

    PubMed Central

    Saletu, B; Grünberger, J; Linzmayer, L; Semlitsch, H V; Anderer, P; Chwatal, K

    1994-01-01

    1. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study, acute pharmacokinetic, neurophysiological and psychotropic effects of suriclone, a new cyclopyrrolone derivative, were investigated and compared with alprazolam. 2. Fifteen normal young volunteers received randomized oral single doses of placebo, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg suriclone as well as 1 mg alprazolam as reference compound. Investigations were carried out before and 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 h after drug administration. 3. Pharmacokinetic investigations by radioimmunoassay showed a dose-dependent fast rise of plasma concentrations with a peak at 1 h and a rapid decline thereafter. Both the Cmax and the AUC values exhibited a linear relationship to dose. 4. EEG brain mapping demonstrated significant CNS effects of both compounds, characteristic for tranquillizers (increase of beta, decrease of alpha and increase of delta activity; attenuation of total power and acceleration of the centroid, i.e. centre of gravity frequency). When compared with alprazolam, suriclone exerted less sedative effects. 5. Time-efficacy calculations showed the pharmacodynamic peak effect of suriclone from the 2nd to the 4th hour, and of alprazolam in the 1st hour. Dose-efficacy calculations showed that the most pronounced CNS changes occurred after 1 mg alprazolam, followed by 0.4, 0.2 and 0.1 mg suriclone. 6. Psychometric investigations demonstrated no significant effects after the two lower doses of suriclone, while 0.4 mg and 1 mg alprazolam induced a decrement both in noopsychic and thymopsychic variables seen after higher doses of anxiolytic sedatives. Psychophysiology (critical flicker fusion, pupillometry, and skin conductance measures) pulse rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure remained unchanged. 7. Psychophysiology (critical flicker fusion, pupillometry and skin conductance measures) showed differential dose-dependent effects. Pulse rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure remained unchanged. Anxiolytic

  9. Classification of Healthy Subjects and Alzheimer's Disease Patients with Dementia from Cortical Sources of Resting State EEG Rhythms: A Study Using Artificial Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Triggiani, Antonio I.; Bevilacqua, Vitoantonio; Brunetti, Antonio; Lizio, Roberta; Tattoli, Giacomo; Cassano, Fabio; Soricelli, Andrea; Ferri, Raffaele; Nobili, Flavio; Gesualdo, Loreto; Barulli, Maria R.; Tortelli, Rosanna; Cardinali, Valentina; Giannini, Antonio; Spagnolo, Pantaleo; Armenise, Silvia; Stocchi, Fabrizio; Buenza, Grazia; Scianatico, Gaetano; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Lacidogna, Giordano; Orzi, Francesco; Buttinelli, Carla; Giubilei, Franco; Del Percio, Claudio; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; Babiloni, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Previous evidence showed a 75.5% best accuracy in the classification of 120 Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients with dementia and 100 matched normal elderly (Nold) subjects based on cortical source current density and linear lagged connectivity estimated by eLORETA freeware from resting state eyes-closed electroencephalographic (rsEEG) rhythms (Babiloni et al., 2016a). Specifically, that accuracy was reached using the ratio between occipital delta and alpha1 current density for a linear univariate classifier (receiver operating characteristic curves). Here we tested an innovative approach based on an artificial neural network (ANN) classifier from the same database of rsEEG markers. Frequency bands of interest were delta (2–4 Hz), theta (4–8 Hz Hz), alpha1 (8–10.5 Hz), and alpha2 (10.5–13 Hz). ANN classification showed an accuracy of 77% using the most 4 discriminative rsEEG markers of source current density (parietal theta/alpha 1, temporal theta/alpha 1, occipital theta/alpha 1, and occipital delta/alpha 1). It also showed an accuracy of 72% using the most 4 discriminative rsEEG markers of source lagged linear connectivity (inter-hemispherical occipital delta/alpha 2, intra-hemispherical right parietal-limbic alpha 1, intra-hemispherical left occipital-temporal theta/alpha 1, intra-hemispherical right occipital-temporal theta/alpha 1). With these 8 markers combined, an accuracy of at least 76% was reached. Interestingly, this accuracy based on 8 (linear) rsEEG markers as inputs to ANN was similar to that obtained with a single rsEEG marker (Babiloni et al., 2016a), thus unveiling their information redundancy for classification purposes. In future AD studies, inputs to ANNs should include other classes of independent linear (i.e., directed transfer function) and non-linear (i.e., entropy) rsEEG markers to improve the classification. PMID:28184183

  10. Classification of Healthy Subjects and Alzheimer's Disease Patients with Dementia from Cortical Sources of Resting State EEG Rhythms: A Study Using Artificial Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Triggiani, Antonio I; Bevilacqua, Vitoantonio; Brunetti, Antonio; Lizio, Roberta; Tattoli, Giacomo; Cassano, Fabio; Soricelli, Andrea; Ferri, Raffaele; Nobili, Flavio; Gesualdo, Loreto; Barulli, Maria R; Tortelli, Rosanna; Cardinali, Valentina; Giannini, Antonio; Spagnolo, Pantaleo; Armenise, Silvia; Stocchi, Fabrizio; Buenza, Grazia; Scianatico, Gaetano; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Lacidogna, Giordano; Orzi, Francesco; Buttinelli, Carla; Giubilei, Franco; Del Percio, Claudio; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Babiloni, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Previous evidence showed a 75.5% best accuracy in the classification of 120 Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients with dementia and 100 matched normal elderly (Nold) subjects based on cortical source current density and linear lagged connectivity estimated by eLORETA freeware from resting state eyes-closed electroencephalographic (rsEEG) rhythms (Babiloni et al., 2016a). Specifically, that accuracy was reached using the ratio between occipital delta and alpha1 current density for a linear univariate classifier (receiver operating characteristic curves). Here we tested an innovative approach based on an artificial neural network (ANN) classifier from the same database of rsEEG markers. Frequency bands of interest were delta (2-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz Hz), alpha1 (8-10.5 Hz), and alpha2 (10.5-13 Hz). ANN classification showed an accuracy of 77% using the most 4 discriminative rsEEG markers of source current density (parietal theta/alpha 1, temporal theta/alpha 1, occipital theta/alpha 1, and occipital delta/alpha 1). It also showed an accuracy of 72% using the most 4 discriminative rsEEG markers of source lagged linear connectivity (inter-hemispherical occipital delta/alpha 2, intra-hemispherical right parietal-limbic alpha 1, intra-hemispherical left occipital-temporal theta/alpha 1, intra-hemispherical right occipital-temporal theta/alpha 1). With these 8 markers combined, an accuracy of at least 76% was reached. Interestingly, this accuracy based on 8 (linear) rsEEG markers as inputs to ANN was similar to that obtained with a single rsEEG marker (Babiloni et al., 2016a), thus unveiling their information redundancy for classification purposes. In future AD studies, inputs to ANNs should include other classes of independent linear (i.e., directed transfer function) and non-linear (i.e., entropy) rsEEG markers to improve the classification.

  11. Transient alcohol craving suppression by rTMS of dorsal anterior cingulate: an fMRI and LORETA EEG study.

    PubMed

    De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven; Kovacs, Silvia; Sunaert, Stefan; Dom, Geert

    2011-05-27

    It has recently become clear that alcohol addiction might be related to a brain dysfunction, in which a genetic background and environmental factors shape brain mechanisms involved with alcohol consumption. Craving, a major component determining relapses in alcohol abuse has been linked to abnormal activity in the orbitofrontal cortex, dorsal anterior cingulated cortex (dACC) and amygdala. We report the results of a patient who underwent rTMS targeting the dACC using a double cone coil in an attempt to suppress very severe intractable alcohol craving. Functional imaging studies consisting of fMRI and resting state EEG were performed before rTMS, after successful rTMS and after unsuccessful rTMS with relapse. Craving was associated with EEG beta activity and connectivity between the dACC and PCC in the patient in comparison to a healthy population, which disappeared after successful rTMS. Cue induced worsening of craving pre-rTMS activated the ACC-vmPFC and PCC on fMRI, as well as the nucleus accumbens area, and lateral frontoparietal areas. The nucleus accumbens, ACC-vmPFC and PCC activation disappeared on fMRI following successful rTMS. Relapse was associated with recurrence of ACC and PCC EEG activity, but in gamma band, in comparison to a healthy population. On fMRI nucleus accumbens, ACC and PCC activation returned to the initial activation pattern. A pathophysiological approach is described to suppress alcohol craving temporarily by rTMS directed at the anterior cingulate. Linking functional imaging changes to craving intensity suggests this approach warrants further exploration.

  12. EEG analyses with SOBI.

    SciTech Connect

    Glickman, Matthew R.; Tang, Akaysha

    2009-02-01

    The motivating vision behind Sandia's MENTOR/PAL LDRD project has been that of systems which use real-time psychophysiological data to support and enhance human performance, both individually and of groups. Relevant and significant psychophysiological data being a necessary prerequisite to such systems, this LDRD has focused on identifying and refining such signals. The project has focused in particular on EEG (electroencephalogram) data as a promising candidate signal because it (potentially) provides a broad window on brain activity with relatively low cost and logistical constraints. We report here on two analyses performed on EEG data collected in this project using the SOBI (Second Order Blind Identification) algorithm to identify two independent sources of brain activity: one in the frontal lobe and one in the occipital. The first study looks at directional influences between the two components, while the second study looks at inferring gender based upon the frontal component.

  13. EEG correlates of virtual reality hypnosis.

    PubMed

    White, David; Ciorciari, Joseph; Carbis, Colin; Liley, David

    2009-01-01

    The study investigated hypnosis-related electroencephalographic (EEG) coherence and power spectra changes in high and low hypnotizables (Stanford Hypnotic Clinical Scale) induced by a virtual reality hypnosis (VRH) induction system. In this study, the EEG from 17 participants (Mean age = 21.35, SD = 1.58) were compared based on their hypnotizability score. The EEG recording associated with a 2-minute, eyes-closed baseline state was compared to the EEG during a hypnosis-related state. This novel induction system was able to produce EEG findings consistent with previous hypnosis literature. Interactions of significance were found with EEG beta coherence. The high susceptibility group (n = 7) showed decreased coherence, while the low susceptibility group (n = 10) demonstrated an increase in coherence between medial frontal and lateral left prefrontal sites. Methodological and efficacy issues are discussed.

  14. ‘Is Going through Clinical Test a Headache?’ An HRV Study and Descriptive Report of Subjective Experience of Undergoing EEG Testing

    PubMed Central

    Kathrotia, Rajesh; Singh, Yogesh; Goel, Arun; Patil, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    To explore the heart rate variability (HRV) changes and subjective perception of undergoing electroencephalography (EEG). We conducted a study on 35 healthy male volunteers. The intervention consisted of placing 23 disc-type EEG electrodes of 5-7 mm diameter with long flexible lead according to international 10-20 system for the duration of 30 min, in a sitting position, on the scalp. The outcome measures were time and frequency domain parameters of HRV analysis and descriptive report of subjective experiences on a 3-point Likert scale. The perception of undergoing EEG ranged from pleasant to uneasy. For 13 (37%) participants it was soothing and relaxing, for 11 (31.5%) it was neutral and for the rest 11 (31.5%) it was uneasy and restrictive in nature. However, HRV analysis of the pre and post EEG, showed no statistically significant difference. In our study, the mixed subjective experience of undergoing EEG may be due to individual variation in the perception of the intervention. No difference in HRV parameters may be because of 2 possibilities. The first possibility is varied experiences of procedure with temporal progression. Same participants may have experienced 2 opposite extremes of experiences over and over again, which may have cancelled out sympathetic and parasympathetic responses. The second possibility may be that no stress is generated during clinical test. PMID:27536017

  15. Simultaneous real-time 3D photoacoustic tomography and EEG for neurovascular coupling study in an animal model of epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Xiao, Jiaying; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Neurovascular coupling in epilepsy is poorly understood; its study requires simultaneous monitoring of hemodynamic changes and neural activity in the brain. Approach. Here for the first time we present a combined real-time 3D photoacoustic tomography (PAT) and electrophysiology/electroencephalography (EEG) system for the study of neurovascular coupling in epilepsy, whose ability was demonstrated with a pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) induced generalized seizure model in rats. Two groups of experiments were carried out with different wavelengths to detect the changes of oxy-hemoglobin (HbO2) and deoxy-hemoglobin (HbR) signals in the rat brain. We extracted the average PAT signals of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), and compared them with the EEG signal. Main results. Results showed that the seizure process can be divided into three stages. A ‘dip’ lasting for 1-2 min in the first stage and the following hyperfusion in the second stage were observed. The HbO2 signal and the HbR signal were generally negatively correlated. The change of blood flow was also estimated. All the acquired results here were in accordance with other published results. Significance. Compared to other existing functional neuroimaging tools, the method proposed here enables reliable tracking of hemodynamic signal with both high spatial and high temporal resolution in 3D, so it is more suitable for neurovascular coupling study of epilepsy.

  16. Study of brain functional network based on sample entropy of EEG under magnetic stimulation at PC6 acupoint.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lei; Wang, Yao; Yu, Hongli; Yin, Ning; Li, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Acupuncture is based on the theory of traditional Chinese medicine. Its therapeutic effectiveness has been proved by clinical practice. However, its mechanism of action is still unclear. Magnetic stimulation at acupuncture point provides a new means for studying the theory of acupuncture. Based on the Graph Theory, the construction and analysis method of complex network can help to investigate the topology of brain functional network and understand the working mechanism of brain. In this study, magnetic stimulation was used to stimulate Neiguan (PC6) acupoint and the EEG (Electroencephalograph) signal was recorded. Using non-linear method (Sample Entropy) and complex network theory, brain functional network based on EEG signal under magnetic stimulation at PC6 acupoint was constructed and analyzed. In addition, the features of complex network were comparatively analyzed between the quiescent and stimulated states. Our experimental results show the topology of the network is changed, the connection of the network is enhanced, the efficiency of information transmission is improved and the small-world property is strengthened through stimulating the PC6 acupoint.

  17. "Small World" architecture in brain connectivity and hippocampal volume in Alzheimer's disease: a study via graph theory from EEG data.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Fabrizio; Miraglia, Francesca; Piludu, Francesca; Granata, Giuseppe; Romanello, Roberto; Caulo, Massimo; Onofrj, Valeria; Bramanti, Placido; Colosimo, Cesare; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2016-03-09

    Brain imaging plays an important role in the study of Alzheimer's disease (AD), where atrophy has been found to occur in the hippocampal formation during the very early disease stages and to progress in parallel with the disease's evolution. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a possible correlation between "Small World" characteristics of the brain connectivity architecture-as extracted from EEG recordings-and hippocampal volume in AD patients. A dataset of 144 subjects, including 110 AD (MMSE 21.3) and 34 healthy Nold (MMSE 29.8) individuals, was evaluated. Weighted and undirected networks were built by the eLORETA solutions of the cortical sources' activities moving from EEG recordings. The evaluation of the hippocampal volume was carried out on a subgroup of 60 AD patients who received a high-resolution T1-weighted sequence and underwent processing for surface-based cortex reconstruction and volumetric segmentation using the Freesurfer image analysis software. Results showed that, quantitatively, more correlation was observed in the right hemisphere, but the same trend was seen in both hemispheres. Alpha band connectivity was negatively correlated, while slow (delta) and fast-frequency (beta, gamma) bands positively correlated with hippocampal volume. Namely, the larger the hippocampal volume, the lower the alpha and the higher the delta, beta, and gamma Small World characteristics of connectivity. Accordingly, the Small World connectivity pattern could represent a functional counterpart of structural hippocampal atrophying and related-network disconnection.

  18. PSYCHOPHYSICS OF EEG ALPHA STATE DISCRIMINATION

    PubMed Central

    Frederick, Jon A.

    2012-01-01

    Nearly all research in neurofeedback since the 1960s has focused on training voluntary control over EEG constructs. By contrast, EEG state discrimination training focuses on awareness of subjective correlates of EEG states. This study presents the first successful replication of EEG alpha state discrimination first reported by Kamiya (1962). A 150-second baseline was recorded in 106 participants. During the task, low (<30th percentile of the baseline) and high alpha events (>70th percentile) triggered a prompt. Participants indicated “high” or “low” with a keypress response and received immediate feedback. Seventy-five percent of participants achieved significant discrimination within nine sessions, with a significant learning curve effect. Performance was significantly related to physical properties of the EEG signal, including magnitude, duration, and absolute vs. relative amplitude. These results are consistent with a conceptualization of EEG state discrimination as a sensory modality, although it is also intricately related to voluntary control of these states. PMID:22800733

  19. Brain activity in predictive sensorimotor control for landings: an EEG pilot study.

    PubMed

    Baumeister, J; von Detten, S; van Niekerk, S-M; Schubert, M; Ageberg, E; Louw, Q A

    2013-12-01

    Landing from a jump is related to predictive sensorimotor control. Frontal, central and parietal brain areas are known to play a role in this process based on online sensory feedback. This can be measured by EEG. However, there is only limited knowledge about brain activity during predictive preparation for drop landings (DL). The purpose is to demonstrate changes in brain activity in preparation for DL in different conditions. After resting, 10 athletes performed a series of DLs and were asked to concentrate on the landing preparation for 10 s before an auditory signal required them to drop land from a 30 cm platform. This task was executed before and after a standardized fatigue protocol. EEG spectral power was calculated during DL preparation. Frontal Theta power was increased during preparation compared to rest. Parietal Alpha-2 power demonstrated higher values in preparation after fatigue condition while lower limb kinematics remained unchanged. Cortical activity in frontal and parietal brain areas is sensitive for predictive sensorimotor control of drop landings. Frontal Theta power demonstrates an increase and is related to higher attentional control. In a fatigued condition the parietal Alpha-2 power increase might be related to a deactivation in the somatosensory brain areas.

  20. A skull-based multiple dipole phantom for EEG and MEG studies

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, M.E.; Leahy, R.M.; Mosher, J.C.

    1996-07-01

    A versatile phantom for use in evaluating forward and inverse methods for MEG and EEG has been designed and is currently being constructed. The phantom consists of three major components: (i) a 32-element cur- rent dipole array, (ii) a PC-controlled dipole driver with 32 isolated channels allowing independent control of each dipole, (iii) spherical and human-skull mounts in which the dipole array is placed. Materials were selected throughout the phantom to produce minimal field distortions and artifacts to enable acquisition of high quality EEG and MEG data. The dipoles are made from a rigid narrow (0.84 mm) stainless steel coax cable. The dipole drivers can be configured as either current or voltage sources, are independently programmable and fully isolated, and are capable of producing arbitrary bipolar waveforms up to a 200 Hz bandwidth. The spherical mount is a single shell sphere filled with conductive gelatin. The human skull mount has three shells: ``brain`` (conducting gelatin), ``skull`` (the skull is impregnated with a low conductivity conducting gelatin), and ``scalp`` (a thin layer of rubber latex mixed with NaCl to achieve a conductivity matched to the brain). The conductivities will be adjusted to achieve approximately an 80:1:80 ratio. Data collected to date from the spherical phantom shows excellent agreement between measured surface potentials and that predicted from theory (27 of the 32 dipoles give better than 99.9% rms fit) and negligible leakage between dipoles. We are currently completing construction of the skull mount.

  1. Neuronal Correlates of Maladaptive Coping: An EEG-Study in Tinnitus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vanneste, Sven; Joos, Kathleen; Langguth, Berthold; To, Wing Ting; De Ridder, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Here we aimed to investigate the neuronal correlates of different coping styles in patients suffering from chronic tinnitus. Adaptive and maladaptive coping styles were determined in 85 tinnitus patients. Based on resting state EEG recordings, coping related differences in brain activity and connectivity were found. Maladaptive coping behavior was related to increases in subjective tinnitus loudness and distress, higher tinnitus severity and higher depression scores. EEG recordings demonstrated increased alpha activity over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) as well as increased connectivity in the default (i.e. resting state) network in tinnitus patients with a maladaptive coping style. Correlation analysis revealed that the changes in the DLPFC correlate primarily with maladaptive coping behavior, whereas the changes in the sgACC correlate with tinnitus severity and depression. Our findings are in line with previous research in the field of depression that during resting state a alpha band hyperconnectivity exists within the default network for patients who use a maladaptive coping style, with the sgACC as the dysfunctional node and that the strength of the connectivity is related to focusing on negative mood and catastrophizing about the consequences of tinnitus. PMID:24558383

  2. Neuronal correlates of maladaptive coping: an EEG-study in tinnitus patients.

    PubMed

    Vanneste, Sven; Joos, Kathleen; Langguth, Berthold; To, Wing Ting; De Ridder, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Here we aimed to investigate the neuronal correlates of different coping styles in patients suffering from chronic tinnitus. Adaptive and maladaptive coping styles were determined in 85 tinnitus patients. Based on resting state EEG recordings, coping related differences in brain activity and connectivity were found. Maladaptive coping behavior was related to increases in subjective tinnitus loudness and distress, higher tinnitus severity and higher depression scores. EEG recordings demonstrated increased alpha activity over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) as well as increased connectivity in the default (i.e. resting state) network in tinnitus patients with a maladaptive coping style. Correlation analysis revealed that the changes in the DLPFC correlate primarily with maladaptive coping behavior, whereas the changes in the sgACC correlate with tinnitus severity and depression. Our findings are in line with previous research in the field of depression that during resting state a alpha band hyperconnectivity exists within the default network for patients who use a maladaptive coping style, with the sgACC as the dysfunctional node and that the strength of the connectivity is related to focusing on negative mood and catastrophizing about the consequences of tinnitus.

  3. Cortical connectivity and memory performance in cognitive decline: A study via graph theory from EEG data.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, F; Miraglia, F; Quaranta, D; Granata, G; Romanello, R; Marra, C; Bramanti, P; Rossini, P M

    2016-03-01

    Functional brain abnormalities including memory loss are found to be associated with pathological changes in connectivity and network neural structures. Alzheimer's disease (AD) interferes with memory formation from the molecular level, to synaptic functions and neural networks organization. Here, we determined whether brain connectivity of resting-state networks correlate with memory in patients affected by AD and in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). One hundred and forty-four subjects were recruited: 70 AD (MMSE Mini Mental State Evaluation 21.4), 50 MCI (MMSE 25.2) and 24 healthy subjects (MMSE 29.8). Undirected and weighted cortical brain network was built to evaluate graph core measures to obtain Small World parameters. eLORETA lagged linear connectivity as extracted by electroencephalogram (EEG) signals was used to weight the network. A high statistical correlation between Small World and memory performance was found. Namely, higher Small World characteristic in EEG gamma frequency band during the resting state, better performance in short-term memory as evaluated by the digit span tests. Such Small World pattern might represent a biomarker of working memory impairment in older people both in physiological and pathological conditions.

  4. Mathematical cognitive style and arithmetic sign comprehension: a study of EEG alpha and theta activity.

    PubMed

    Earle, J B; Garcia-Dergay, P; Manniello, A; Dowd, C

    1996-01-01

    The localization of arithmetic sign comprehension was investigated using EEG spectral parameters as indicators of cortical engagement. Right-handed male subjects were selected on the basis of scores on the Mathematics Cognitive Style Survey and assigned to 2 groups, a 'left hemisphere oriented (LHO)' (N = 9) and 'right hemisphere oriented (RHO)' (N = 9) group. Subjects were presented with 4 conditions, a motoric baseline condition, two arithmetic fact retrieval tasks employing either a sign operator or verbal operator and a sign comprehension task which required subjects to fill in a missing sign (e.g. 6 ? 4 = 24). Both across subject correlational analysis of EEG alpha 1 asymmetry and performance as well as within subject analysis of condition means indicated a somewhat unique contribution of the right hemisphere to sign comprehension. LHO subjects exhibited greater relative left mid-temporal lobe activation than RHO subjects but less relative left frontal activation (theta band) than RHO subjects during the verbal operator task. It was tentatively concluded that this frontal lobe asymmetry difference was due to a mismatch in strategy preference and coding requirements among RHO subjects.

  5. Shared genetic influences on ADHD symptoms and very low-frequency EEG activity: a twin study

    PubMed Central

    Tye, Charlotte; Rijsdijk, Frühling; Greven, Corina U.; Kuntsi, Jonna; Asherson, Philip; McLoughlin, Gráinne

    2013-01-01

    Background ADHD is a common and highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder with a complex aetiology. The identification of candidate intermediate phenotypes that are both heritable and genetically linked to ADHD may facilitate the detection of susceptibility genes and elucidate aetiological pathways. Very low-frequency (VLF; <0.5Hz) electroencephalographic (EEG) activity represents a promising indicator of risk for ADHD, but it is currently unclear whether it is heritable or genetically linked to the disorder. Methods Direct-current (DC)-EEG was recorded during a cognitive activation condition in 30 monozygotic and dizygotic adolescent twin pairs concordant or discordant for high ADHD symptom scores, and 37 monozygotic and dizygotic matched-control twin pairs with low ADHD symptom scores. Structural equation modelling was used to quantify the genetic and environmental contributions to the phenotypic covariance between ADHD and VLF activity. Results ADHD was significantly associated with reduced VLF power during cognitive activation, which suggests reduced synchronisation of widespread neuronal activity. VLF power demonstrated modest heritability (0.31) and the genetic correlation (−0.80) indicated a substantial degree of overlap in genetic influences on ADHD and VLF activity. Conclusions Altered VLF activity is a potential candidate intermediate phenotype of ADHD, which warrants further investigation of underlying neurobiological and genetic mechanisms. PMID:22118296

  6. Neural mechanisms of selective exposure: an EEG study on the processing of decision-consistent and inconsistent information.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Peter; Reinweber, Matthias; Vogrincic, Claudia; Schäfer, Axel; Schienle, Anne; Volberg, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    Decision makers tend to prefer decision-consistent information and/or neglect decision-inconsistent information (selective exposure). In the present EEG study the neural mechanisms of the classic selective exposure effect were examined by investigating oscillatory brain responses to consistent vs. inconsistent information. Twenty participants made an economic decision and subsequently were exposed to 45 consistent and 45 inconsistent images concerning their decision. EEG was recorded from 31 electrodes and differences between oscillatory brain responses towards consistent and inconsistent information were examined. The main result was an increase of induced theta power (5-8Hz, 0-0.7s) in the consistent compared to the inconsistent condition at right temporo-parietal electrodes, as well as a corresponding increase of evoked theta power at frontal electrodes. Since theta oscillations are often observed during memory formation, we conclude that decision-consistent information triggers memory formation, whereas decision-inconsistent information seems not to do so. This finding supports the classic motivational perspective of Leon Festinger on the selective exposure effect.

  7. Long-range neural activity evoked by premotor cortex stimulation: a TMS/EEG co-registration study

    PubMed Central

    Zanon, Marco; Battaglini, Piero P.; Jarmolowska, Joanna; Pizzolato, Gilberto; Busan, Pierpaolo

    2013-01-01

    The premotor cortex is one of the fundamental structures composing the neural networks of the human brain. It is implicated in many behaviors and cognitive tasks, ranging from movement to attention and eye-related activity. Therefore, neural circuits that are related to premotor cortex have been studied to clarify their connectivity and/or role in different tasks. In the present work, we aimed to investigate the propagation of the neural activity evoked in the dorsal premotor cortex using transcranial magnetic stimulation/electroencephalography (TMS/EEG). Toward this end, interest was focused on the neural dynamics elicited in long-ranging temporal and spatial networks. Twelve healthy volunteers underwent a single-pulse TMS protocol in a resting condition with eyes closed, and the evoked activity, measured by EEG, was compared to a sham condition in a time window ranging from 45 ms to about 200 ms after TMS. Spatial and temporal investigations were carried out with sLORETA. TMS was found to induce propagation of neural activity mainly in the contralateral sensorimotor and frontal cortices, at about 130 ms after delivery of the stimulus. Different types of analyses showed propagated activity also in posterior, mainly visual, regions, in a time window between 70 and 130 ms. Finally, a likely “rebounding” activation of the sensorimotor and frontal regions, was observed in various time ranges. Taken together, the present findings further characterize the neural circuits that are driven by dorsal premotor cortex activation in healthy humans. PMID:24324426

  8. Graph theory in brain-to-brain connectivity: A simulation study and an application to an EEG hyperscanning experiment.

    PubMed

    Toppi, J; Ciaramidaro, A; Vogel, P; Mattia, D; Babiloni, F; Siniatchkin, M; Astolfi, L

    2015-08-01

    Hyperscanning consists in the simultaneous recording of hemodynamic or neuroelectrical signals from two or more subjects acting in a social context. Well-established methodologies for connectivity estimation have already been adapted to hyperscanning purposes. The extension of graph theory approach to multi-subjects case is still a challenging issue. In the present work we aim to test the ability of the currently used graph theory global indices in describing the properties of a network given by two interacting subjects. The testing was conducted first on surrogate brain-to-brain networks reproducing typical social scenarios and then on real EEG hyperscanning data recorded during a Joint Action task. The results of the simulation study highlighted the ability of all the investigated indexes in modulating their values according to the level of interaction between subjects. However, only global efficiency and path length indexes demonstrated to be sensitive to an asymmetry in the communication between the two subjects. Such results were, then, confirmed by the application on real EEG data. Global efficiency modulated, in fact, their values according to the inter-brain density, assuming higher values in the social condition with respect to the non-social condition.

  9. Altered characteristic of brain networks in mild cognitive impairment during a selective attention task: An EEG study.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ling; Li, Yingjie; Yang, Xiaoli; Xue, Qing; Wang, Yuping

    2015-10-01

    The present study evaluated the topological properties of whole brain networks using graph theoretical concepts and investigated the time-evolution characteristic of brain network in mild cognitive impairment patients during a selective attention task. Electroencephalography (EEG) activities were recorded in 10 MCI patients and 17 healthy subjects when they performed a color match task. We calculated the phase synchrony index between each possible pairs of EEG channels in alpha and beta frequency bands and analyzed the local interconnectedness, overall connectedness and small-world characteristic of brain network in different degree for two groups. Relative to healthy normal controls, the properties of cortical networks in MCI patients tend to be a shift of randomization. Lower σ of MCI had suggested that patients had a further loss of small-world attribute both during active and resting states. Our results provide evidence for the functional disconnection of brain regions in MCI. Furthermore, we found the properties of cortical networks could reflect the processing of conflict information in the selective attention task. The human brain tends to be a more regular and efficient neural architecture in the late stage of information processing. In addition, the processing of conflict information needs stronger information integration and transfer between cortical areas.

  10. Stability of serum high-density lipoprotein-microRNAs for preanalytical conditions.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Yamada, Hiroya; Taromaru, Nao; Kondo, Kanako; Nagura, Ayuri; Yamazaki, Mirai; Ando, Yoshitaka; Munetsuna, Eiji; Suzuki, Koji; Ohashi, Koji; Teradaira, Ryoji

    2017-01-01

    Background Recently, several studies have shown that microRNAs are present in high-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein-microRNA may be a promising disease biomarker. We investigated the stability of high-density lipoprotein-microRNAs in different storage conditions as this is an important issue for its application to the field of clinical research. Methods microRNAs were extracted from the high-density lipoprotein fraction that was purified from the serum. miR-135 a and miR-223, which are known to be present in high-density lipoprotein, were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR. The influence of preanalytical parameters on the analysis of high-density lipoprotein-miRNAs was examined by the effect of RNase, storage conditions, and freezing and thawing. Results The concentrations of microRNA in high-density lipoprotein were not altered by RNase A treatment (0-100 U/mL). No significant change in these microRNAs was observed after storing serum at room temperature or 4℃ for 0-24 h, and there was a similar result in the cryopreservation for up to two weeks. Also, high-density lipoprotein-microRNAs were stable for, at least, up to five freeze-thaw cycles. Conclusions These results demonstrated that high-density lipoprotein-microRNAs are relatively resistant to various storage conditions. This study provides new and important information on the stability of high-density lipoprotein-microRNAs.

  11. Coupling of infraslow fluctuations in autonomic and central vigilance markers: skin temperature, EEG β power and ERP P300 latency.

    PubMed

    Ramautar, Jennifer R; Romeijn, Nico; Gómez-Herrero, Germán; Piantoni, Giovanni; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2013-08-01

    Even under thermoneutral conditions, skin temperature fluctuates spontaneously, most prominently at distal parts of the body. These fluctuations were shown to be associated with fluctuations in vigilance: mild manipulation of skin temperature during nocturnal sleep affects sleep depth and the power spectral density of the electroencephalogram (EEG), and fluctuations in skin temperature during daytime wakefulness are related to sleep propensity and task performance. The association of daytime skin temperature fluctuations with EEG markers of vigilance has not previously been investigated. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the association between daytime fluctuations in skin temperature with those in two quantitative EEG measures: the power spectral density of background EEG, and the event related potential (ERP) elicited by visual stimuli. High-density EEG and skin temperature were obtained in eight healthy adults five times a day while they performed a visual sustained-attention task. Assessments were made after a night of normal sleep and after the challenge of a night of total sleep deprivation. Fluctuations in the distal-to-proximal skin temperature gradient measured from the earlobe and mastoid were associated with fluctuations in parieto-occipital high beta band (20-40 Hz) power of the pre-stimulus background EEG, but only after sleep deprivation. The temperature fluctuations were moreover associated with fluctuations in the latency of the P300 elicited by the stimulus. The findings demonstrate close association between fluctuations in an autonomic correlate of the vigilance state (i.e. the distal-to-proximal skin temperature gradient), and fluctuations in central nervous system correlates of the vigilance state (i.e. background EEG and ERP). The findings are of theoretical and practical relevance for the assessment and manipulation of vigilance.

  12. Test-retest reliability of cognitive EEG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEvoy, L. K.; Smith, M. E.; Gevins, A.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Task-related EEG is sensitive to changes in cognitive state produced by increased task difficulty and by transient impairment. If task-related EEG has high test-retest reliability, it could be used as part of a clinical test to assess changes in cognitive function. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of the EEG recorded during the performance of a working memory (WM) task and a psychomotor vigilance task (PVT). METHODS: EEG was recorded while subjects rested quietly and while they performed the tasks. Within session (test-retest interval of approximately 1 h) and between session (test-retest interval of approximately 7 days) reliability was calculated for four EEG components: frontal midline theta at Fz, posterior theta at Pz, and slow and fast alpha at Pz. RESULTS: Task-related EEG was highly reliable within and between sessions (r0.9 for all components in WM task, and r0.8 for all components in the PVT). Resting EEG also showed high reliability, although the magnitude of the correlation was somewhat smaller than that of the task-related EEG (r0.7 for all 4 components). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that under appropriate conditions, task-related EEG has sufficient retest reliability for use in assessing clinical changes in cognitive status.

  13. Persistent topographic quantitative EEG sequelae of chronic marihuana use: a replication study and initial discriminant function analysis.

    PubMed

    Struve, F A; Straumanis, J J; Patrick, G

    1994-04-01

    In a previous pilot study using psychiatric patients we reported that daily marihuana users had significant elevations of (1) Absolute Alpha Power, (2) Relative Alpha Power, and (3) Interhemispheric Alpha Coherence over both frontal and frontal-central areas when contrasted with subjects who did not use marihuana. We referred to this phenomenon as Hyperfrontality of Alpha. The study presented here is a successful replication of our previous findings using new samples of subjects and identical methods. Post hoc analyses based on the combined sample from both studies suggest that variables of psychiatric diagnoses and medication did not bias our results. In addition, a discriminant function analysis using quantitative EEG variables as candidate predictors generated a 95% correct THC user versus nonuser classification accuracy which received a successful jackknife replication.

  14. An evaluation of serum high density lipoproteins-phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Ide, H; Tsuji, M; Shimada, M; Kondo, T; Fujiya, S; Asanuma, Y; Agishi, Y

    1988-07-01

    Phospholipids in high density lipoproteins (HDL) is being used as a negative risk indicator of atherosclerosis. Phospholipids in HDL may not demonstrate the actual level of HDL-phospholipids when determined by the precipitation or ultracentrifugal methods, because HDL fractions contain very high density lipoproteins (VHDL) and albumin. In the present study, the true level of phospholipids in HDL was estimated using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and it was compared with the level of phospholipids in HDL determined by the precipitation method. Sera from 18 healthy subjects were used as materials. In the HPLC method, the HDL fraction was extracted making sure that it contained no free albumin, which is albumin not bound to phospholipids. The HDL fraction was separated into subfractions. It was found that phospholipids in the VHDL fraction make a 20.2 +/- 7.3% (mean +/- S.D.) part of the total HDL-phospholipids. A large part of the VHDL fraction was constituted of albumin-bound phospholipids. A significant correlation was observed between HDL-phospholipids determined by the precipitation method, which contain albumin, and the actual HDL fraction phospholipids determined by HPLC, which do not contain VHDL (r = 0.903, p less than 0.01). These results suggest that HDL-phospholipids values determined by the precipitation method give useful clinical data.

  15. Preferred EEG brain states at stimulus onset in a fixed interstimulus interval equiprobable auditory Go/NoGo task: a definitive study.

    PubMed

    Barry, Robert J; De Blasio, Frances M; De Pascalis, Vilfredo; Karamacoska, Diana

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the occurrence of preferred EEG phase states at stimulus onset in an equiprobable auditory Go/NoGo task with a fixed interstimulus interval, and their effects on the resultant event-related potentials (ERPs). We used a sliding short-time FFT decomposition of the EEG at Cz for each trial to assess prestimulus EEG activity in the delta, theta, alpha and beta bands. We determined the phase of each 2 Hz narrow-band contributing to these four broad bands at 125 ms before each stimulus onset, and for the first time, avoided contamination from poststimulus EEG activity. This phase value was extrapolated 125 ms to obtain the phase at stimulus onset, combined into the broad-band phase, and used to sort trials into four phase groups for each of the four broad bands. For each band, ERPs were derived for each phase from the raw EEG activity at 19 sites. Data sets from each band were separately decomposed using temporal Principal Components Analyses with unrestricted VARIMAX rotation to extract N1-1, PN, P2, P3, SW and LP components. Each component was analysed as a function of EEG phase at stimulus onset in the context of a simple conceptualisation of orthogonal phase effects (cortical negativity vs. positivity, negative driving vs. positive driving, waxing vs. waning). The predicted non-random occurrence of phase-defined brain states was confirmed. The preferred states of negativity, negative driving, and waxing were each associated with more efficient stimulus processing, as reflected in amplitude differences of the components. The present results confirm the existence of preferred brain states and their impact on the efficiency of brain dynamics in perceptual and cognitive processing.

  16. [Mental activity hand orthosis control using the EEG: a case study].

    PubMed

    Pfurtscheller, G; Müller, G; Korisek, G

    2002-02-01

    A report is given on the realization of a steering mechanism of a hand orthosis for a patient with paraplegia. An EEG-based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) was used here for the first time, transferring purely mental activity to a control signal. This means that the patient has the capability to open or close the hand orthosis only by imagination of a movement. At this time, after a training period of about four months, the patient is able to move the hand orthosis with a certainty of almost hundred percent. The restored grasp function was verified by a grasp function test. Results are compared to those obtained using a conventional EMG-controlled orthosis.

  17. The neural basis of sublexical speech and corresponding nonspeech processing: a combined EEG-MEG study.

    PubMed

    Kuuluvainen, Soila; Nevalainen, Päivi; Sorokin, Alexander; Mittag, Maria; Partanen, Eino; Putkinen, Vesa; Seppänen, Miia; Kähkönen, Seppo; Kujala, Teija

    2014-03-01

    We addressed the neural organization of speech versus nonspeech sound processing by investigating preattentive cortical auditory processing of changes in five features of a consonant-vowel syllable (consonant, vowel, sound duration, frequency, and intensity) and their acoustically matched nonspeech counterparts in a simultaneous EEG-MEG recording of mismatch negativity (MMN/MMNm). Overall, speech-sound processing was enhanced compared to nonspeech sound processing. This effect was strongest for changes which affect word meaning (consonant, vowel, and vowel duration) in the left and for the vowel identity change in the right hemisphere also. Furthermore, in the right hemisphere, speech-sound frequency and intensity changes were processed faster than their nonspeech counterparts, and there was a trend for speech-enhancement in frequency processing. In summary, the results support the proposed existence of long-term memory traces for speech sounds in the auditory cortices, and indicate at least partly distinct neural substrates for speech and nonspeech sound processing.

  18. Childhood EEG frontal alpha power as a predictor of adolescent antisocial behavior: A twin heritability study

    PubMed Central

    Niv, Sharon; Ashrafulla, Syed; Tuvblad, Catherine; Joshi, Anand; Raine, Adrian; Leahy, Richard; Baker, Laura A.

    2015-01-01

    High EEG frontal alpha power (FAP) is thought to represent a state of low arousal in the brain, which has been related in past research to antisocial behavior (ASB). We investigated a longitudinal sample of 900 twins in two assessments in late childhood and mid-adolescence to verify whether relationships exist between FAP and both aggressive and nonaggressive ASB. ASB was measured by the Child Behavioral Checklist, and FAP was calculated using connectivity analysis methods that used principal components analysis to derive power of the most dominant frontal activation. Significant positive predictive relationships emerged in males between childhood FAP and adolescent aggressive ASB using multilevel mixed modeling. No concurrent relationships were found. Using bivariate biometric twin modeling analysis, the relationship between childhood FAP and adolescent aggressive ASB in males was found to be entirely due to genetic factors, which were correlated r = 0.22. PMID:25456277

  19. Comparative Study of Wavelet-Based Unsupervised Ocular Artifact Removal Techniques for Single-Channel EEG Data

    PubMed Central

    Khatun, Saleha; Mahajan, Ruhi

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) is a technique for recording the asynchronous activation of neuronal firing inside the brain with non-invasive scalp electrodes. Artifacts, such as eye blink activities, can corrupt these neuronal signals. While ocular artifact (OA) removal is well investigated for multiple channel EEG systems, in alignment with the recent momentum toward minimalistic EEG systems for use in natural environments, we investigate unsupervised and effective removal of OA from single-channel streaming raw EEG data. In this paper, the unsupervised wavelet transform (WT) decomposition technique was systematically evaluated for the effectiveness of OA removal for a single-channel EEG system. A set of seven raw EEG data set was analyzed. Two commonly used WT methods, Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) and Stationary Wavelet Transform (SWT), were applied. Four WT basis functions, namely, haar, coif3, sym3, and bior4.4, were considered for OA removal with universal threshold and statistical threshold (ST). To quantify OA removal efficacy from single-channel EEG, five performance metrics were utilized: correlation coefficients, mutual information, signal-to-artifact ratio, normalized mean square error, and time-frequency analysis. The temporal and spectral analysis shows that the optimal combination could be DWT with ST with coif3 or bior4.4 to remove OA among 16 combinations. This paper demonstrates that the WT can be an effective tool for unsupervised OA removal from single-channel EEG data for real-time applications. PMID:27551645

  20. Modeling of EEG electrode artifacts and thermal ripples in human radiofrequency exposure studies.

    PubMed

    Murbach, Manuel; Neufeld, Esra; Christopoulou, Maria; Achermann, Peter; Kuster, Niels

    2014-05-01

    The effects of radiofrequency (RF) exposure on wake and sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) have been in focus since mobile phone usage became pervasive. It has been hypothesized that effects may be explained by (1) enhanced induced fields due to RF coupling with the electrode assembly, (2) the subsequent temperature increase around the electrodes, or (3) RF induced thermal pulsing caused by localized exposure in the head. We evaluated these three hypotheses by means of both numerical and experimental assessments made with appropriate phantoms and anatomical human models. Typical and worst-case electrode placements were examined at 900 and 2140 MHz. Our results indicate that hypothesis 1 can be rejected, as the induced fields cause <20% increase in the 10 g-averaged specific absorption rate (SAR). Simulations with an anatomical model indicate that hypothesis 2 is also not supported, as the realistic worst-case electrode placement results in a maximum skin temperature increase of 0.31 °C while brain temperature elevations remained <0.1 °C. These local short-term temperature elevations are unlikely to change brain physiology during the time period from minutes to several hours after exposure. The maximum observed temperature ripple due to RF pulses is <0.001 °C for GSM-like signals and <0.004 °C for 20-fold higher pulse energy, and offers no support for hypothesis 3. Thus, the mechanism of interaction between RF and changes in the EEG power spectrum remains unknown.

  1. High-Density Lipoprotein and Prostate Cancer: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Kotani, Kazuhiko; Sekine, Yoshitaka; Ishikawa, Shizukiyo; Ikpot, Imoh Z.; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Remaley, Alan T.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common disease in modern, developed societies and has a high incidence and mortality. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) has recently received much attention as a possible risk marker of prostate cancer development and prognosis. In the present article, we summarized findings from epidemiologic studies of the association between HDL-C and prostate cancer. Low HDL-C level was found to be a risk and prognostic factor of prostate cancer in several epidemiologic studies, although the overall linkage between HDL and prostate cancer has not been definitively established. The mechanisms for this association remain uncertain; however, limited data from experimental studies imply a possible role of HDL in the pathophysiology of prostate cancer. More epidemiologic research, in combination with experimental studies, is needed in this field. PMID:23985823

  2. Brain functional networks in syndromic and non-syndromic autism: a graph theoretical study of EEG connectivity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Graph theory has been recently introduced to characterize complex brain networks, making it highly suitable to investigate altered connectivity in neurologic disorders. A current model proposes autism spectrum disorder (ASD) as a developmental disconnection syndrome, supported by converging evidence in both non-syndromic and syndromic ASD. However, the effects of abnormal connectivity on network properties have not been well studied, particularly in syndromic ASD. To close this gap, brain functional networks of electroencephalographic (EEG) connectivity were studied through graph measures in patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC), a disorder with a high prevalence of ASD, as well as in patients with non-syndromic ASD. Methods EEG data were collected from TSC patients with ASD (n = 14) and without ASD (n = 29), from patients with non-syndromic ASD (n = 16), and from controls (n = 46). First, EEG connectivity was characterized by the mean coherence, the ratio of inter- over intra-hemispheric coherence and the ratio of long- over short-range coherence. Next, graph measures of the functional networks were computed and a resilience analysis was conducted. To distinguish effects related to ASD from those related to TSC, a two-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was applied, using age as a covariate. Results Analysis of network properties revealed differences specific to TSC and ASD, and these differences were very consistent across subgroups. In TSC, both with and without a concurrent diagnosis of ASD, mean coherence, global efficiency, and clustering coefficient were decreased and the average path length was increased. These findings indicate an altered network topology. In ASD, both with and without a concurrent diagnosis of TSC, decreased long- over short-range coherence and markedly increased network resilience were found. Conclusions The altered network topology in TSC represents a functional correlate of structural abnormalities and may play a

  3. Mobile brain/body imaging (MoBI): High-density electrical mapping of inhibitory processes during walking.

    PubMed

    De Sanctis, Pierfilippo; Butler, John S; Green, Jason M; Snyder, Adam C; Foxe, John J

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the feasibility of acquiring high-density event-related brain potential (ERP) recordings during treadmill walking in human subjects. The work builds upon recent studies testing the applicability of real-world tasks while obtaining electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings. Participants performed a response inhibition GO/NOGO task - designed to evoke a P3 component for correct response inhibitions and an error-related negativity (ERN) for incorrect commission errors - while speed of walking was experimentally manipulated. Robust P3 and ERN components were obtained under all experimental conditions - while participants were sitting, walking at moderate speed (2.4 km/hour), or walking rapidly (5 km/hour). Signal-to-noise ratios were remarkably similar across conditions, pointing to the feasibility of high-fidelity ERP recordings under relatively vigorous activity regimens. There is considerable research and clinical motivation to obtain high quality neurophysiological measures under more naturalistic environmental settings such as these. Strong links between cognitive load and gait abnormalities are seen in a number of clinical populations and these MoBI technologies provide highly promising methods for gaining insights into the underlying pathophysiology.

  4. An extended Kalman filtering approach for the estimation of human head tissue conductivities by using EEG data: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Şengül, G; Baysal, U

    2012-04-01

    In this study, we propose an extended Kalman filter approach for the estimation of the human head tissue conductivities in vivo by using electroencephalogram (EEG) data. Since the relationship between the surface potentials and conductivity distribution is nonlinear, the proposed algorithm first linearizes the system and applies extended Kalman filtering. By using a three-compartment realistic head model obtained from the magnetic resonance images of a real subject, a known dipole assumption and 32 electrode positions, the performance of the proposed method is tested in simulation studies and it is shown that the proposed algorithm estimates the tissue conductivities with less than 1% error in noiseless measurements and less than 5% error when the signal-to-noise ratio is 40 dB or higher. We conclude that the proposed extended Kalman filter approach successfully estimates the tissue conductivities in vivo.

  5. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol on a roller coaster: where will the ride end?

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Bowe et al. report an association between low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations and various incident chronic kidney disease end points in a cohort of almost 2 million US veterans followed for 9 years. These impressive data should be a starting point for further investigations including genetic epidemiologic investigations as well as post hoc analyses of interventional trials that target high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and, finally, studies that focus on the functionality of high-density lipoprotein particles.

  6. Preterm EEG: a multimodal neurophysiological protocol.

    PubMed

    Stjerna, Susanna; Voipio, Juha; Metsäranta, Marjo; Kaila, Kai; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2012-02-18

    Since its introduction in early 1950s, electroencephalography (EEG) has been widely used in the neonatal intensive care units (NICU) for assessment and monitoring of brain function in preterm and term babies. Most common indications are the diagnosis of epileptic seizures, assessment of brain maturity, and recovery from hypoxic-ischemic events. EEG recording techniques and the understanding of neonatal EEG signals have dramatically improved, but these advances have been slow to penetrate through the clinical traditions. The aim of this presentation is to bring theory and practice of advanced EEG recording available for neonatal units. In the theoretical part, we will present animations to illustrate how a preterm brain gives rise to spontaneous and evoked EEG activities, both of which are unique to this developmental phase, as well as crucial for a proper brain maturation. Recent animal work has shown that the structural brain development is clearly reflected in early EEG activity. Most important structures in this regard are the growing long range connections and the transient cortical structure, subplate. Sensory stimuli in a preterm baby will generate responses that are seen at a single trial level, and they have underpinnings in the subplate-cortex interaction. This brings neonatal EEG readily into a multimodal study, where EEG is not only recording cortical function, but it also tests subplate function via different sensory modalities. Finally, introduction of clinically suitable dense array EEG caps, as well as amplifiers capable of recording low frequencies, have disclosed multitude of brain activities that have as yet been overlooked. In the practical part of this video, we show how a multimodal, dense array EEG study is performed in neonatal intensive care unit from a preterm baby in the incubator. The video demonstrates preparation of the baby and incubator, application of the EEG cap, and performance of the sensory stimulations.

  7. Relation between the High Density Phase and the Very-High Density Phase of Amorphous Solid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovambattista, Nicolas; Stanley, H. Eugene; Sciortino, Francesco

    2005-03-01

    It has been suggested that high-density amorphous (HDA) ice is a structurally arrested form of high-density liquid (HDL) water, while low-density amorphous ice is a structurally arrested form of low-density liquid (LDL) water. Recent experiments and simulations have been interpreted to support the possibility of a second distinct high-density structural state, named very high-density amorphous (VHDA) ice, questioning the LDL-HDL hypothesis. We test this interpretation using extensive computer simulations and find that VHDA is a more stable form of HDA and that, in fact, VHDA should be considered as the amorphous ice of the quenched HDL.

  8. Distributed Signal Processing for Wireless EEG Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Inspired by ongoing evolutions in the field of wireless body area networks (WBANs), this tutorial paper presents a conceptual and exploratory study of wireless electroencephalography (EEG) sensor networks (WESNs), with an emphasis on distributed signal processing aspects. A WESN is conceived as a modular neuromonitoring platform for high-density EEG recordings, in which each node is equipped with an electrode array, a signal processing unit, and facilities for wireless communication. We first address the advantages of such a modular approach, and we explain how distributed signal processing algorithms make WESNs more power-efficient, in particular by avoiding data centralization. We provide an overview of distributed signal processing algorithms that are potentially applicable in WESNs, and for illustration purposes, we also provide a more detailed case study of a distributed eye blink artifact removal algorithm. Finally, we study the power efficiency of these distributed algorithms in comparison to their centralized counterparts in which all the raw sensor signals are centralized in a near-end or far-end fusion center.

  9. Confirmatory and exploratory analysis applied to pharmaco-EEG and related study data: contradiction or useful enrichment?

    PubMed

    Ferner, U; Matejcek, M; Neff, G

    1983-01-01

    Besides hypothesis testing, which should be done as sparingly as possible, the measured or observed data should be described as extensively as possible. The traditional reliance on profiles of the mean responses may neglect useful information, and such profiles may also be misleading. With the aid of exploratory data analysis, different aspects of the structure of a data set can be considered. 'Data snooping' may discover coherences, non-trivial structures and peculiarities, which lead to a new hypothesis or to new mathematical-statistical models. It is, in our opinion, a necessity to consider exploratory and confirmatory data analyses in conjunction. This will be illustrated by examples taken from pharmaco-EEG studies.

  10. Computer-analyzed EEG (CEEG) and dynamic brain mapping in AIDS and HIV related syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Itil, T M; Ferracuti, S; Freedman, A M; Sherer, C; Mehta, P; Itil, K Z

    1990-07-01

    In a group of HIV positive young male patients without any significant neuropsychiatric signs, computer-analyzed EEG (CEEG) and Dynamic Brain Mapping evaluations were conducted. These patients, who only had micro-neuropsychiatric symptoms, demonstrated CEEG profiles that more closely resemble those of patients diagnosed as suffering from mild dementia than age-related normals from our CEEG data base. The CEEGs of patients diagnosed as having Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), compared to patients with HIV positive, showed greater similarity in CEEG patterns to severely demented patients than to normal control groups. The findings of this pilot study suggest that CEEG may be useful for early determination of the Central Nervous System's (CNS) involvement with the AIDS virus and monitoring the progress of the illness.

  11. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123 Section 93.123 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic...

  12. Neural signatures of economic parameters during decision-making: a functional MRI (FMRI), electroencephalography (EEG) and autonomic monitoring study.

    PubMed

    Minati, Ludovico; Grisoli, Marina; Franceschetti, Silvana; Epifani, Francesca; Granvillano, Alice; Medford, Nick; Harrison, Neil A; Piacentini, Sylvie; Critchley, Hugo D

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive behaviour requires an ability to obtain rewards by choosing between different risky options. Financial gambles can be used to study effective decision-making experimentally, and to distinguish processes involved in choice option evaluation from outcome feedback and other contextual factors. Here, we used a paradigm where participants evaluated 'mixed' gambles, each presenting a potential gain and a potential loss and an associated variable outcome probability. We recorded neural responses using autonomic monitoring, electroencephalography (EEG) and functional neuroimaging (fMRI), and used a univariate, parametric design to test for correlations with the eleven economic parameters that varied across gambles, including expected value (EV) and amount magnitude. Consistent with behavioural economic theory, participants were risk-averse. Gamble evaluation generated detectable autonomic responses, but only weak correlations with outcome uncertainty were found, suggesting that peripheral autonomic feedback does not play a major role in this task. Long-latency stimulus-evoked EEG potentials were sensitive to expected gain and expected value, while alpha-band power reflected expected loss and amount magnitude, suggesting parallel representations of distinct economic qualities in cortical activation and central arousal. Neural correlates of expected value representation were localized using fMRI to ventromedial prefrontal cortex, while the processing of other economic parameters was associated with distinct patterns across lateral prefrontal, cingulate, insula and occipital cortices including default-mode network and early visual areas. These multimodal data provide complementary evidence for distributed substrates of choice evaluation across multiple, predominantly cortical, brain systems wherein distinct regions are preferentially attuned to specific economic features. Our findings extend biologically-plausible models of risky decision-making while providing

  13. A comparative study on classification of sleep stage based on EEG signals using feature selection and classification algorithms.

    PubMed

    Şen, Baha; Peker, Musa; Çavuşoğlu, Abdullah; Çelebi, Fatih V

    2014-03-01

    Sleep scoring is one of the most important diagnostic methods in psychiatry and neurology. Sleep staging is a time consuming and difficult task undertaken by sleep experts. This study aims to identify a method which would classify sleep stages automatically and with a high degree of accuracy and, in this manner, will assist sleep experts. This study consists of three stages: feature extraction, feature selection from EEG signals, and classification of these signals. In the feature extraction stage, it is used 20 attribute algorithms in four categories. 41 feature parameters were obtained from these algorithms. Feature selection is important in the elimination of irrelevant and redundant features and in this manner prediction accuracy is improved and computational overhead in classification is reduced. Effective feature selection algorithms such as minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR); fast correlation based feature selection (FCBF); ReliefF; t-test; and Fisher score algorithms are preferred at the feature selection stage in selecting a set of features which best represent EEG signals. The features obtained are used as input parameters for the classification algorithms. At the classification stage, five different classification algorithms (random forest (RF); feed-forward neural network (FFNN); decision tree (DT); support vector machine (SVM); and radial basis function neural network (RBF)) classify the problem. The results, obtained from different classification algorithms, are provided so that a comparison can be made between computation times and accuracy rates. Finally, it is obtained 97.03 % classification accuracy using the proposed method. The results show that the proposed method indicate the ability to design a new intelligent assistance sleep scoring system.

  14. Multimodal antidepressant vortioxetine increases frontal cortical oscillations unlike escitalopram and duloxetine – a quantitative EEG study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Leiser, S C; Pehrson, A L; Robichaud, P J; Sanchez, C

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose EEG studies show that 5-HT is involved in regulation of sleep–wake state and modulates cortical oscillations. Vortioxetine is a 5-HT3, 5-HT7, and 5-HT1D receptor antagonist, 5-HT1B partial agonist, 5-HT1A agonist, and 5-HT transporter inhibitor. Preclinical (animal) and clinical studies with vortioxetine show positive impact on cognitive metrics involving cortical function. Here we assess vortioxetine's effect on cortical neuronal oscillations in actively awake rats. Experimental Approach Telemetric EEG recordings were obtained with the following treatments (mg·kg−1, s.c.): vehicle, vortioxetine (0.1, 1.0, 3.0, 10), 5-HT1A agonist flesinoxan (2.5), 5-HT3 antagonist ondansetron (0.30), 5-HT7 antagonist SB-269970-A (10), escitalopram (2.0), duloxetine (10) and vortioxetine plus flesinoxan. Target occupancies were determined by ex vivo autoradiography. Key Results Vortioxetine dose-dependently increased wakefulness. Flesinoxan, duloxetine, ondansetron, but not escitalopram or SB-269970-A increased wakefulness. Quantitative spectral analyses showed vortioxetine alone and with flesinoxan increased θ (4–8 Hz), α (8–12 Hz) and γ (30–50 Hz) power. Duloxetine had no effect on θ and γ, but decreased α power, while escitalopram produced no changes. Ondansetron and SB-269970 (≈31–35% occupancy) increased θ power. Flesinoxan (≈41% occupancy) increased θ and γ power. Conclusions and Implications Vortioxetine increased wakefulness and increased frontal cortical activity, most likely because of its 5-HT7 and 5-HT3 antagonism and 5-HT1A agonism. Vortioxetine differs from escitalopram and duloxetine by increasing cortical θ, α and γ oscillations. These preclinical findings suggest a role of vortioxetine in modulating cortical circuits known to be recruited during cognitive behaviours and warrant further investigation as to their clinical impact. PMID:24846338

  15. Complex dynamics of epileptic EEG.

    PubMed

    Kannathal, N; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan K; Choo Min, Lim

    2004-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) - the recorded representation of electrical activity of the brain contain useful information about the state of the brain. Recent studies indicate that nonlinear methods can extract valuable information from neuronal dynamics. We compare the dynamical properties of EEG signals of healthy subjects with epileptic subjects using nonlinear time series analysis techniques. Chaotic invariants like correlation dimension (D2) , largest Lyapunov exponent (lambda1), Hurst exponent (H) and Kolmogorov entropy (K) are used to characterize the signal. Our study showed clear differences in dynamical properties of brain electrical activity of the normal and epileptic subjects with a confidence level of more than 90%. Furthermore to support this claim fractal dimension (FD) analysis is performed. The results indicate reduction in value of FD for epileptic EEG indicating reduction in system complexity.

  16. Local Experience-Dependent Changes in the Wake EEG after Prolonged Wakefulness

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ching-Sui; Sarasso, Simone; Ferrarelli, Fabio; Riedner, Brady; Ghilardi, M. Felice; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Prolonged wakefulness leads to a progressive increase in sleep pressure, reflected in a global increase in slow wave activity (SWA, 0.5-4.5 Hz) in the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG). A global increase in wake theta activity (5-9 Hz) also occurs. Recently, it was shown that prolonged wakefulness in rodents leads to signs of “local sleep” in an otherwise awake brain, accompanied by a slow/theta wave (2-6 Hz) in the local EEG that occurs at different times in different cortical areas. Compelling evidence in animals and humans also indicates that sleep is locally regulated by the amount of experience-dependent plasticity. Here, we asked whether the extended practice of tasks that involve specific brain circuits results in increased occurrence of local intermittent theta waves in the human EEG, above and beyond the global EEG changes previously described. Design: Participants recorded with high-density EEG completed 2 experiments during which they stayed awake ≥ 24 h practicing a language task (audiobook listening [AB]) or a visuomotor task (driving simulator [DS]). Setting: Sleep laboratory. Patients or Participants: 16 healthy participants (7 females). Interventions: Two extended wake periods. Measurements and Results: Both conditions resulted in global increases in resting wake EEG theta power at the end of 24 h of wake, accompanied by increased sleepiness. Moreover, wake theta power as well as the occurrence and amplitude of theta waves showed regional, task-dependent changes, increasing more over left frontal derivations in AB, and over posterior parietal regions in DS. These local changes in wake theta power correlated with similar local changes in sleep low frequencies including SWA. Conclusions: Extended experience-dependent plasticity of specific circuits results in a local increase of the wake theta EEG power in those regions, followed by more intense sleep, as reflected by SWA, over the same areas. Citation: Hung CS; Sarasso S

  17. Ultracold molecular Rydberg physics in a high density environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiles, Matthew T.; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Robicheaux, F.; Greene, Chris H.

    2016-06-01

    Sufficiently high densities in Bose-Einstein condensates provide favorable conditions for the production of ultralong-range polyatomic molecules consisting of one Rydberg atom and a number of neutral ground state atoms. The chemical binding properties and electronic wave functions of these exotic molecules are investigated analytically via hybridized diatomic states. The effects of the molecular geometry on the system’s properties are studied through comparisons of the adiabatic potential curves and electronic structures for both symmetric and randomly configured molecular geometries. General properties of these molecules with increasing numbers of constituent atoms and in different geometries are presented. These polyatomic states have spectral signatures that lead to non-Lorentzian line-profiles.

  18. High density propellant for single stage to orbit vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, J. J.; Masters, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    Mixed mode propulsion concepts are studied for advanced, single stage earth orbital transportation systems (SSTO) for use in the post-1990 time period. These propulsion concepts are based on the sequential and/or parallel use of high density impulse and high specific impulse propellants in a single stage to increase vehicle performance and reduce dry weight. Specifically, the mixed mode concept utilizes two propulsion systems with two different fuels (mode 1 and mode 2) with liquid oxygen as a common oxidizer. Mode 1 engines would burn a high bulk density fuel for lift-off and early ascent to minimize performance penalties associated with carrying fuel tankage to orbit. Mode 2 engines will complete orbital injection utilizing liquid hydrogen as the fuel.

  19. WEAR BEHAVIOR OF CARBON NANOTUBE/HIGH DENSITY POLYETHYLENE COMPOSITES

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brian B.; Novotny, John E.; Advani, Suresh G.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon Nanotube/High Density Polyethylene (CNT/HDPE) composites were manufactured and tested to determine their wear behavior. The nanocomposites were made from untreated multi-walled carbon nanotubes and HDPE pellets. Thin films of the precursor materials were created with varying weight percentages of nanotubes (1%, 3%, and 5%), through a process of mixing and extruding. The precursor composites were then molded and machined to create test specimens for mechanical and wear tests. These included small punch testing to compare stiffness, maximum load and work-to-failure and block-on-ring testing to determine wear behavior. Each of the tests was conducted for the different weight percentages of composite as well as pure HDPE as the baseline. The measured mechanical properties and wear resistance of the composite materials increased with increasing nanotube content in the range studied. PMID:20161101

  20. Resting-state EEG study of comatose patients: a connectivity and frequency analysis to find differences between vegetative and minimally conscious states.

    PubMed

    Lehembre, Rémy; Marie-Aurélie, Bruno; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Chatelle, Camille; Cologan, Victor; Leclercq, Yves; Soddu, Andrea; Macq, Benoit; Laureys, Steven; Noirhomme, Quentin

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to look for differences in the power spectra and in EEG connectivity measures between patients in the vegetative state (VS/UWS) and patients in the minimally conscious state (MCS). The EEG of 31 patients was recorded and analyzed. Power spectra were obtained using modern multitaper methods. Three connectivity measures (coherence, the imaginary part of coherency and the phase lag index) were computed. Of the 31 patients, 21 were diagnosed as MCS and 10 as VS/UWS using the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R). EEG power spectra revealed differences between the two conditions. The VS/UWS patients showed increased delta power but decreased alpha power compared with the MCS patients. Connectivity measures were correlated with the CRS-R diagnosis; patients in the VS/UWS had significantly lower connectivity than MCS patients in the theta and alpha bands. Standard EEG recorded in clinical conditions could be used as a tool to help the clinician in the diagnosis of disorders of consciousness.

  1. Effect of synchronized or desynchronized music listening during osteopathic treatment: an EEG study.

    PubMed

    Mercadié, Lolita; Caballe, Julie; Aucouturier, Jean-Julien; Bigand, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    While background music is often used during osteopathic treatment, it remains unclear whether it facilitates treatment, and, if it does, whether it is listening to music or jointly listening to a common stimulus that is most important. We created three experimental situations for a standard osteopathic procedure in which patients and practitioner listened either to silence, to the same music in synchrony, or (unknowingly) to different desynchronized montages of the same material. Music had no effect on heart rate and arterial pressure pre- and posttreatment compared to silence, but EEG measures revealed a clear effect of synchronized versus desynchronized listening: listening to desynchronized music was associated with larger amounts of mu-rhythm event-related desynchronization (ERD), indicating decreased sensorimotor fluency compared to what was gained in the synchronized music listening condition. This result suggests that, if any effect can be attributed to music for osteopathy, it is related to its capacity to modulate empathy between patient and therapist and, further, that music does not systematically create better conditions for empathy than silence.

  2. Functional Connectivity in the Left Dorsal Stream Facilitates Simultaneous Language Translation: An EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Elmer, Stefan; Kühnis, Jürg

    2016-01-01

    Cortical speech processing is dependent on the mutual interdependence of two distinctive processing streams supporting sound-to-meaning (i.e., ventral stream) and sound-to-articulation (i.e., dorsal stream) mapping. Here, we compared the strengths of intracranial functional connectivity between two main hubs of the dorsal stream, namely the left auditory-related cortex (ARC) and Broca’s region, in a sample of simultaneous interpreters (SIs) and multilingual control subjects while the participants performed a mixed and unmixed auditory semantic decision task. Under normal listening conditions such kind of tasks are known to initiate a spread of activation along the ventral stream. However, due to extensive and specific training, here we predicted that SIs will more strongly recruit the dorsal pathway in order to pre-activate the speech codes of the corresponding translation. In line with this reasoning, EEG results demonstrate increased left-hemispheric theta phase synchronization in SLI compared to multilingual control participants during early task-related processing stages. In addition, within the SI group functional connectivity strength in the left dorsal pathway was positively related to the cumulative number of training hours across lifespan, and inversely correlated with the age of training commencement. Hence, we propose that the alignment of neuronal oscillations between brain regions involved in “hearing” and “speaking” results from an intertwining of training, sensitive period, and predisposition. PMID:26924976

  3. Effects of binge drinking on action cascading processes: an EEG study.

    PubMed

    Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Beste, Christian

    2014-02-01

    High-dosage alcohol intoxication (i.e., binge drinking in humans) is an increasingly prevalent problem. Despite the well-known long-term consequences, the acute effects of high-dosage alcohol intoxication on cognitive control processes have not been investigated with respect to neurophysiological changes in humans. We provide insights into the effects of high-dosage ethanol intoxication on action control functions in humans on the basis of neurophysiological (EEG) data. Action control processes were examined in a stop-change task. Based on a detailed analysis of behavioral and electrophysiological data, we demonstrate a specific modulation of action cascading processes. Opposed to commonly held views, high-dosage ethanol intoxication (0.9-1.13 ‰) exerts highly specific effects on cognitive subprocesses mediating action control. If action control processes are performed in succession, intoxicated and non-intoxicated participants perform equally well. However, action control processes become compromised during high-dosage ethanol intoxication, when different response options require processing resources in parallel. Under high-dose ethanol intoxication, subjects are not able to prioritize different response options. We could demonstrate that the effects were of high effect sizes (η (2) = 0.702) and rely more on response selection deficits than on deficits in attentional processing. The changes in response selection processes are mediated via the anterior cingulate cortex. The specificity of the observed effects may be due to a differential involvement of dopaminergic and GABAergic processes in action control and attentional selection processes.

  4. Subject position affects EEG magnitudes.

    PubMed

    Rice, Justin K; Rorden, Christopher; Little, Jessica S; Parra, Lucas C

    2013-01-01

    EEG (electroencephalography) has been used for decades in thousands of research studies and is today a routine clinical tool despite the small magnitude of measured scalp potentials. It is widely accepted that the currents originating in the brain are strongly influenced by the high resistivity of skull bone, but it is less well known that the thin layer of CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) has perhaps an even more important effect on EEG scalp magnitude by spatially blurring the signals. Here it is shown that brain shift and the resulting small changes in CSF layer thickness, induced by changing the subject's position, have a significant effect on EEG signal magnitudes in several standard visual paradigms. For spatially incoherent high-frequency activity the effect produced by switching from prone to supine can be dramatic, increasing occipital signal power by several times for some subjects (on average 80%). MRI measurements showed that the occipital CSF layer between the brain and skull decreases by approximately 30% in thickness when a subject moves from prone to supine position. A multiple dipole model demonstrated that this can indeed lead to occipital EEG signal power increases in the same direction and order of magnitude as those observed here. These results suggest that future EEG studies should control for subjects' posture, and that some studies may consider placing their subjects into the most favorable position for the experiment. These findings also imply that special consideration should be given to EEG measurements from subjects with brain atrophy due to normal aging or neurodegenerative diseases, since the resulting increase in CSF layer thickness could profoundly decrease scalp potential measurements.

  5. Total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and choline esterase in overseas and Japanese university students.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S

    1985-04-01

    Serum lipids were studied in 97 overseas and 282 Japanese university students. As compared with Japanese, serum total cholesterol levels were low and high density lipoprotein/total cholesterol ratio was high in the overseas students, especially in Chinese and Korean students. 30-39-year-old Chinese students, moreover, showed elevated high density lipoprotein levels. Choline esterase levels were significantly lower in 30-39-year-old Chinese and Korean students than in Japanese and Taiwanese.

  6. Analysis of EEG Related Saccadic Eye Movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funase, Arao; Kuno, Yoshiaki; Okuma, Shigeru; Yagi, Tohru

    Our final goal is to establish the model for saccadic eye movement that connects the saccade and the electroencephalogram(EEG). As the first step toward this goal, we recorded and analyzed the saccade-related EEG. In the study recorded in this paper, we tried detecting a certain EEG that is peculiar to the eye movement. In these experiments, each subject was instructed to point their eyes toward visual targets (LEDs) or the direction of the sound sources (buzzers). In the control cases, the EEG was recorded in the case of no eye movemens. As results, in the visual experiments, we found that the potential of EEG changed sharply on the occipital lobe just before eye movement. Furthermore, in the case of the auditory experiments, similar results were observed. In the case of the visual experiments and auditory experiments without eye movement, we could not observed the EEG changed sharply. Moreover, when the subject moved his/her eyes toward a right-side target, a change in EEG potential was found on the right occipital lobe. On the contrary, when the subject moved his/her eyes toward a left-side target, a sharp change in EEG potential was found on the left occipital lobe.

  7. Spectral features of EEG in depression.

    PubMed

    Hinrikus, Hiie; Suhhova, Anna; Bachmann, Maie; Aadamsoo, Kaire; Võhma, Ulle; Pehlak, Hannes; Lass, Jaanus

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to find distinctions of the EEG signal in female depression. Experiments were carried out on two groups of 18 female volunteers each: a group of patients with depressive disorder who were not on medication and a group of control subjects. Patients who had Hamilton depression rating scores higher than 14 were selected. Resting EEG was recorded for the duration of 30 min. Spectral asymmetry (SA) of the EEG spectrum was estimated as relative difference in the selected higher and lower EEG frequency band power. Calculated SA values were positive for depressive and negative for healthy subjects (except for 2-3 subjects). The values behaved similarly in all EEG channels and brain hemispheres. Differences in SA between depressive and control groups were significant in all EEG channels. Dependence of SA on EGG signal length appeared not to be identical for depressive and healthy subjects. Our results suggest that SA based on balance between the powers of the higher and the lower EEG frequency bands seems to enable characterization of the EEG in depression.

  8. EEG default mode network in the human brain: spectral regional field powers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Andrew C N; Feng, Weijia; Zhao, Huixuan; Yin, Yanling; Wang, Peipei

    2008-06-01

    Eyes-closed (EC) and eyes-open (EO) are essential behaviors in mammalians, including man. At resting EC-EO state, brain activity in the default mode devoid of task-demand has recently been established in fMRI. However, the corresponding comprehensive electrophysiological conditions are little known even though EEG has been recorded in humans for nearly 80 years. In this study, we examined the spatial characteristics of spectral distribution in EEG field powers, i.e., sitting quietly with an EC and EO resting state of 3 min each, measured with high-density 128-ch EEG recording and FFT signal analyses in 15 right-handed healthy college females. Region of interest was set at a threshold at 90% of the spectral effective value to delimit the dominant spatial field power of effective energy in brain activity. Low-frequency delta (0.5-3.5 Hz) EEG field power was distributed at the prefrontal area with great expansion of spatial field and enhancement of field power (t=-2.72, p<0.02) from the EC to the EO state. Theta (4-7 Hz) EEG field power was distributed over the fronto-central area and leaned forward from EC to the EO state but with drastic reduction in field power (t=4.04, p<0.01). The middle-frequency alpha-1 (7.5-9.5 Hz) and alpha-2 (10-12 Hz) EEG powers exhibited bilateral distribution over the posterior areas with an anterior field in lower alpha-1. Both showed significantly reduction of field powers (respectively, W=120, p<0.001 for alpha-1; t=4.12, p<0.001 for alpha-2) from EC to the EO state. Beta-1 (13-23 Hz) exhibited a similar spatial region over the posterior area as in alpha-2 and showed reduction of field power (t=4.42, p<0.001) from EC to the EO state. In contrast, high-frequency beta-2 and gamma band exhibited similar, mainly prefrontal distribution in field power, and exhibited no change from EC to the EO state. Corresponding correlation analyses indicated significant group association between EC and EO only in the field powers of delta (r=0.95, p<0

  9. Spatiotemporal dynamics of the brain at rest--exploring EEG microstates as electrophysiological signatures of BOLD resting state networks.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Han; Zotev, Vadim; Phillips, Raquel; Drevets, Wayne C; Bodurka, Jerzy

    2012-05-01

    Neuroimaging research suggests that the resting cerebral physiology is characterized by complex patterns of neuronal activity in widely distributed functional networks. As studied using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) signal, the resting brain activity is associated with slowly fluctuating hemodynamic signals (~10s). More recently, multimodal functional imaging studies involving simultaneous acquisition of BOLD-fMRI and electroencephalography (EEG) data have suggested that the relatively slow hemodynamic fluctuations of some resting state networks (RSNs) evinced in the BOLD data are related to much faster (~100 ms) transient brain states reflected in EEG signals, that are referred to as "microstates". To further elucidate the relationship between microstates and RSNs, we developed a fully data-driven approach that combines information from simultaneously recorded, high-density EEG and BOLD-fMRI data. Using independent component analysis (ICA) of the combined EEG and fMRI data, we identified thirteen microstates and ten RSNs that are organized independently in their temporal and spatial characteristics, respectively. We hypothesized that the intrinsic brain networks that are active at rest would be reflected in both the EEG data and the fMRI data. To test this hypothesis, the rapid fluctuations associated with each microstate were correlated with the BOLD-fMRI signal associated with each RSN. We found that each RSN was characterized further by a specific electrophysiological signature involving from one to a combination of several microstates. Moreover, by comparing the time course of EEG microstates to that of the whole-brain BOLD signal, on a multi-subject group level, we unraveled for the first time a set of microstate-associated networks that correspond to a range of previously described RSNs, including visual, sensorimotor, auditory, attention, frontal, visceromotor and default mode networks. These

  10. Mobile EEG in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Askamp, Jessica; van Putten, Michel J A M

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of routine EEG recordings for interictal epileptiform discharges in epilepsy is limited. In some patients, inpatient video-EEG may be performed to increase the likelihood of finding abnormalities. Although many agree that home EEG recordings may provide a cost-effective alternative to these recordings, their use is still not introduced everywhere. We surveyed Dutch neurologists and patients and evaluated a novel mobile EEG device (Mobita, TMSi). Key specifications were compared with three other current mobile EEG devices. We shortly discuss algorithms to assist in the review process. Thirty percent (33 out of 109) of Dutch neurologists reported that home EEG recordings are used in their hospital. The majority of neurologists think that mobile EEG can have additional value in investigation of unclear paroxysms, but not in the initial diagnosis after a first seizure. Poor electrode contacts and signal quality, limited recording time and absence of software for reliable and effective assistance in the interpretation of EEGs have been important constraints for usage, but in recent devices discussed here, many of these problems have been solved. The majority of our patients were satisfied with the home EEG procedure and did not think that our EEG device was uncomfortable to wear, but they did feel uneasy wearing it in public.

  11. Review of neonatal EEG.

    PubMed

    Husain, Aatif M

    2005-03-01

    Neonatal electroencephalography (EEG) presents some of the most difficult challenges in EEG interpretation. It differs significantly in many ways from EEG of older children and adults. Technologically, acquisition of a neonatal EEG is significantly more difficult and different than an adult EEG. There are numerous features that are age-specific and change almost week-to-week in the preterm infant. Some features may be normal at one age and abnormal if they persist for several weeks. Many of these features also have different implications in neonates as compared to older individuals. These issues mandate a different approach to neonatal EEG interpretation. In this article an overview of neonatal EEG is presented. After a brief discussion of relevant technical issues, various normal EEG features encountered in neonates are discussed. This is followed by a discussion of the ontogeny of EEG, starting from the age of viability to the first few months of life. A description of various abnormalities follows. Finally, an approach to analysis of a neonatal EEG is presented.

  12. Brain Oscillations in Sport: Toward EEG Biomarkers of Performance

    PubMed Central

    Cheron, Guy; Petit, Géraldine; Cheron, Julian; Leroy, Axelle; Cebolla, Anita; Cevallos, Carlos; Petieau, Mathieu; Hoellinger, Thomas; Zarka, David; Clarinval, Anne-Marie; Dan, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Brain dynamics is at the basis of top performance accomplishment in sports. The search for neural biomarkers of performance remains a challenge in movement science and sport psychology. The non-invasive nature of high-density electroencephalography (EEG) recording has made it a most promising avenue for providing quantitative feedback to practitioners and coaches. Here, we review the current relevance of the main types of EEG oscillations in order to trace a perspective for future practical applications of EEG and event-related potentials (ERP) in sport. In this context, the hypotheses of unified brain rhythms and continuity between wake and sleep states should provide a functional template for EEG biomarkers in sport. The oscillations in the thalamo-cortical and hippocampal circuitry including the physiology of the place cells and the grid cells provide a frame of reference for the analysis of delta, theta, beta, alpha (incl.mu), and gamma oscillations recorded in the space field of human performance. Based on recent neuronal models facilitating the distinction between the different dynamic regimes (selective gating and binding) in these different oscillations we suggest an integrated approach articulating together the classical biomechanical factors (3D movements and EMG) and the high-density EEG and ERP signals to allow finer mathematical analysis to optimize sport performance, such as microstates, coherency/directionality analysis and neural generators. PMID:26955362

  13. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol: current perspective for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Whayne, Thomas F

    2009-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins are regarded as ''good guys'' but not always. Situations involving high-density lipoproteins are discussed and medication results are considered. Clinicians usually consider high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Nicotinic acid is the best available medication to elevate high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and this appears beneficial for cardiovascular risk. The major problem with nicotinic acid is that many patients do not tolerate the associated flushing. Laropiprant decreases this flushing and has an approval in Europe but not in the United States. The most potent medications for increasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol are cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors. The initial drug in this class, torcetrapib, was eliminated by excess cardiovascular problems. Two newer cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors, R1658 and anacetrapib, initially appear promising. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol may play an important role in improving cardiovascular risk in the 60% of patients who do not receive cardiovascular mortality/morbidity benefit from low-density lipoproteins reduction by statins.

  14. EEG/functional MRI in epilepsy: The Queen Square Experience.

    PubMed

    Hamandi, Khalid; Salek-Haddadi, Afraim; Fish, David R; Lemieux, Louis

    2004-01-01

    The recording of EEG during functional MRI scanning (EEG/fMRI) has opened up new dimensions in brain research. The simultaneous recording of EEG activity and its temparospatial haemodynamic correlates is a powerful tool in the non-invasive mapping of normal and pathological brain function. The technological constraints imposed by having a conductor (the EEG) within the magnetic environment of the MRI scanner have been sufficiently overcome for high quality EEG recording during MRI. The initial applications of EEG/fMRI were in the study of epileptiform discharges in epilepsy. This has been rapidly followed by studies of normal EEG rhythms and evoked response in healthy subjects. The ability to map brain areas involved in the generation of epileptiform discharges recorded on the surface EEG has been shown using EEG/fMRI in patients with epilepsy. This has potential clinical applications in providing additional localizing information in the pre-surgical workup of epilepsy patients and in gaining a greater understanding of the neurobiology of interictal epileptiform discharges and epileptic seizures. In this review we address the issues in recording EEG during fMRI and review the application of EEG/fMRI in the study of patients with epilepsy at our centre.

  15. Neural basis for brain responses to TV commercials: a high-resolution EEG study.

    PubMed

    Astolfi, Laura; De Vico Fallani, F; Cincotti, F; Mattia, D; Bianchi, L; Marciani, M G; Salinari, S; Colosimo, A; Tocci, A; Soranzo, R; Babiloni, F

    2008-12-01

    We investigated brain activity during the observation of TV commercials by tracking the cortical activity and the functional connectivity changes in normal subjects. The aim was to elucidate if the TV commercials that were remembered by the subjects several days after their first observation elicited particular brain activity and connectivity compared with those generated during the observation of TV commercials that were quickly forgotten. High-resolution electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings were performed in a group of healthy subjects and the cortical activity during the observation of TV commercials was evaluated in several regions of interest coincident with the Brodmann areas (BAs). The patterns of cortical connectivity were obtained in the four principal frequency bands, Theta (3-7 Hz), Alpha (8-12 Hz), Beta (13-30 Hz), Gamma (30-40 Hz) and the directed influences between any given pair of the estimated cortical signals were evaluated by use of a multivariate spectral technique known as partial directed coherence. The topology of the cortical networks has been identified with tools derived from graph theory. Results suggest that the cortical activity and connectivity elicited by the viewing of the TV commercials that were remembered by the experimental subjects are markedly different from the brain activity elicited during the observation of the TV commercials that were forgotten. In particular, during the observation of the TV commercials that were remembered, the amount of cortical spectral activity from the frontal areas (BA 8 and 9) and from the parietal areas (BA 5, 7, and 40) is higher compared with the activity elicited by the observation of TV commercials that were forgotten. In addition, network analysis suggests a clear role of the parietal areas as a target of the incoming flow of information from all the other parts of the cortex during the observation of TV commercials that have been remembered. The techniques presented here shed new light on

  16. EEG and Coma.

    PubMed

    Ardeshna, Nikesh I

    2016-03-01

    Coma is defined as a state of extreme unresponsiveness, in which a person exhibits no voluntary movement or behavior even to painful stimuli. The utilization of EEG for patients in coma has increased dramatically over the last few years. In fact, many institutions have set protocols for continuous EEG (cEEG) monitoring for patients in coma due to potential causes such as subarachnoid hemorrhage or cardiac arrest. Consequently, EEG plays an important role in diagnosis, managenent, and in some cases even prognosis of coma patients.

  17. Large Scale Functional Brain Networks Underlying Temporal Integration of Audio-Visual Speech Perception: An EEG Study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G Vinodh; Halder, Tamesh; Jaiswal, Amit K; Mukherjee, Abhishek; Roy, Dipanjan; Banerjee, Arpan

    2016-01-01

    Observable lip movements of the speaker influence perception of auditory speech. A classical example of this influence is reported by listeners who perceive an illusory (cross-modal) speech sound (McGurk-effect) when presented with incongruent audio-visual (AV) speech stimuli. Recent neuroimaging studies of AV speech perception accentuate the role of frontal, parietal, and the integrative brain sites in the vicinity of the superior temporal sulcus (STS) for multisensory speech perception. However, if and how does the network across the whole brain participates during multisensory perception processing remains an open question. We posit that a large-scale functional connectivity among the neural population situated in distributed brain sites may provide valuable insights involved in processing and fusing of AV speech. Varying the psychophysical parameters in tandem with electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings, we exploited the trial-by-trial perceptual variability of incongruent audio-visual (AV) speech stimuli to identify the characteristics of the large-scale cortical network that facilitates multisensory perception during synchronous and asynchronous AV speech. We evaluated the spectral landscape of EEG signals during multisensory speech perception at varying AV lags. Functional connectivity dynamics for all sensor pairs was computed using the time-frequency global coherence, the vector sum of pairwise coherence changes over time. During synchronous AV speech, we observed enhanced global gamma-band coherence and decreased alpha and beta-band coherence underlying cross-modal (illusory) perception compared to unisensory perception around a temporal window of 300-600 ms following onset of stimuli. During asynchronous speech stimuli, a global broadband coherence was observed during cross-modal perception at earlier times along with pre-stimulus decreases of lower frequency power, e.g., alpha rhythms for positive AV lags and theta rhythms for negative AV lags. Thus, our

  18. Large Scale Functional Brain Networks Underlying Temporal Integration of Audio-Visual Speech Perception: An EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, G. Vinodh; Halder, Tamesh; Jaiswal, Amit K.; Mukherjee, Abhishek; Roy, Dipanjan; Banerjee, Arpan

    2016-01-01

    Observable lip movements of the speaker influence perception of auditory speech. A classical example of this influence is reported by listeners who perceive an illusory (cross-modal) speech sound (McGurk-effect) when presented with incongruent audio-visual (AV) speech stimuli. Recent neuroimaging studies of AV speech perception accentuate the role of frontal, parietal, and the integrative brain sites in the vicinity of the superior temporal sulcus (STS) for multisensory speech perception. However, if and how does the network across the whole brain participates during multisensory perception processing remains an open question. We posit that a large-scale functional connectivity among the neural population situated in distributed brain sites may provide valuable insights involved in processing and fusing of AV speech. Varying the psychophysical parameters in tandem with electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings, we exploited the trial-by-trial perceptual variability of incongruent audio-visual (AV) speech stimuli to identify the characteristics of the large-scale cortical network that facilitates multisensory perception during synchronous and asynchronous AV speech. We evaluated the spectral landscape of EEG signals during multisensory speech perception at varying AV lags. Functional connectivity dynamics for all sensor pairs was computed using the time-frequency global coherence, the vector sum of pairwise coherence changes over time. During synchronous AV speech, we observed enhanced global gamma-band coherence and decreased alpha and beta-band coherence underlying cross-modal (illusory) perception compared to unisensory perception around a temporal window of 300–600 ms following onset of stimuli. During asynchronous speech stimuli, a global broadband coherence was observed during cross-modal perception at earlier times along with pre-stimulus decreases of lower frequency power, e.g., alpha rhythms for positive AV lags and theta rhythms for negative AV lags. Thus

  19. [Residual risk: The roles of triglycerides and high density lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Grammer, Tanja; Kleber, Marcus; Silbernagel, Günther; Scharnagl, Hubert; März, Winfried

    2016-06-01

    In clinical trials, the reduction of LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) with statins reduces the incidence rate of cardiovascular events by approximately one third. This means, that a sizeable "residual risk" remains. Besides high lipoprotein (a), disorders in the metabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and high density liproteins have been implicated as effectors of the residual risk. Both lipoprotein parameters correlate inversely with each other. Therefore, the etiological contributions of triglycerides and / or of HDL for developing cardiovascular disease can hardly be estimated from either observational studies or from intervention studies. The largely disappointing results of intervention studies with inhibitors of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein and in particular the available set of genetically-epidemiological studies suggest that in the last decade, the importance of HDL cholesterol has been overvalued, while the importance of triglycerides has been underestimated. High triglycerides not always atherogenic, but only if they are associated with the accumulation relatively cholesterol-enriched, incompletely catabolized remnants of chylomicrons and very low density lipoproteins (familial type III hyperlipidemia, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus). The normalization of the concentration of triglycerides and remnants by inhibiting the expression of apolipoprotein C3 is hence a new, promising therapeutic target.

  20. Towards the utilization of EEG as a brain imaging tool.

    PubMed

    Michel, Christoph M; Murray, Micah M

    2012-06-01

    Recent advances in signal analysis have engendered EEG with the status of a true brain mapping and brain imaging method capable of providing spatio-temporal information regarding brain (dys)function. Because of the increasing interest in the temporal dynamics of brain networks, and because of the straightforward compatibility of the EEG with other brain imaging techniques, EEG is increasingly used in the neuroimaging community. However, the full capability of EEG is highly underestimated. Many combined EEG-fMRI studies use the EEG only as a spike-counter or an oscilloscope. Many cognitive and clinical EEG studies use the EEG still in its traditional way and analyze grapho-elements at certain electrodes and latencies. We here show that this way of using the EEG is not only dangerous because it leads to misinterpretations, but it is also largely ignoring the spatial aspects of the signals. In fact, EEG primarily measures the electric potential field at the scalp surface in the same way as MEG measures the magnetic field. By properly sampling and correctly analyzing this electric field, EEG can provide reliable information about the neuronal activity in the brain and the temporal dynamics of this activity in the millisecond range. This review explains some of these analysis methods and illustrates their potential in clinical and experimental applications.

  1. The Fixation Distance to the Stimulus Influences ERP Quality: An EEG and Eye Tracking N400 Study.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Martínez, Estefanía; Parise, Eugenio; Strandvall, Tommy; Reid, Vincent M

    2015-01-01

    In a typical visual Event Related Potential (ERP) study, the stimulus is presented centrally on the screen. Normally an ERP response will be measured provided that the participant directs their gaze towards the stimulus. The aim of this study was to assess how the N400 component of an ERP was affected when the stimulus was presented in the foveal, parafoveal or peripheral vision of the participant's visual field. Utilizing stimuli that have previously produced an N400 response to action incongruities, the same stimuli sequences were presented at 0°, 4°, 8° and 12° of visual angle from a fixation location. In addition to the EEG data, eye tracking data were recorded to act as a fixation control method and to allow for eye artifact detection. The results show a significant N400 effect in the right parieto-temporal electrodes within the 0° visual angle condition. For the other conditions, the N400 effect was reduced (4°) or not present (8° and 12°). Our results suggest that the disappearance of the N400 effect with eccentricity is due to the fixation distance to the stimulus. However, variables like attentional allocation could have also had an impact on the results. This study highlights the importance of presenting a stimulus within the foveal vision of the participant in order to maximize ERP effects related to higher order cognitive processes.

  2. The Fixation Distance to the Stimulus Influences ERP Quality: An EEG and Eye Tracking N400 Study

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Martínez, Estefanía; Parise, Eugenio; Strandvall, Tommy; Reid, Vincent M.

    2015-01-01

    In a typical visual Event Related Potential (ERP) study, the stimulus is presented centrally on the screen. Normally an ERP response will be measured provided that the participant directs their gaze towards the stimulus. The aim of this study was to assess how the N400 component of an ERP was affected when the stimulus was presented in the foveal, parafoveal or peripheral vision of the participant’s visual field. Utilizing stimuli that have previously produced an N400 response to action incongruities, the same stimuli sequences were presented at 0°, 4°, 8° and 12° of visual angle from a fixation location. In addition to the EEG data, eye tracking data were recorded to act as a fixation control method and to allow for eye artifact detection. The results show a significant N400 effect in the right parieto-temporal electrodes within the 0° visual angle condition. For the other conditions, the N400 effect was reduced (4°) or not present (8° and 12°). Our results suggest that the disappearance of the N400 effect with eccentricity is due to the fixation distance to the stimulus. However, variables like attentional allocation could have also had an impact on the results. This study highlights the importance of presenting a stimulus within the foveal vision of the participant in order to maximize ERP effects related to higher order cognitive processes. PMID:26222059

  3. Whole-scalp EEG mapping of somatosensory evoked potentials in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Gindrat, Anne-Dominique; Quairiaux, Charles; Britz, Juliane; Brunet, Denis; Lanz, Florian; Michel, Christoph M; Rouiller, Eric M

    2015-07-01

    High-density scalp EEG recordings are widely used to study whole-brain neuronal networks in humans non-invasively. Here, we validate EEG mapping of somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) in macaque monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) for the long-term investigation of large-scale neuronal networks and their reorganisation after lesions requiring a craniotomy. SSEPs were acquired from 33 scalp electrodes in five adult anaesthetized animals after electrical median or tibial nerve stimulation. SSEP scalp potential maps were identified by cluster analysis and identified in individual recordings. A distributed, linear inverse solution was used to estimate the intracortical sources of the scalp potentials. SSEPs were characterised by a sequence of components with unique scalp topographies. Source analysis confirmed that median nerve SSEP component maps were in accordance with the somatotopic organisation of the sensorimotor cortex. Most importantly, SSEP recordings were stable both intra- and interindividually. We aim to apply this method to the study of recovery and reorganisation of large-scale neuronal networks following a focal cortical lesion requiring a craniotomy. As a prerequisite, the present study demonstrated that a 300-mm(2) unilateral craniotomy over the sensorimotor cortex necessary to induce a cortical lesion, followed by bone flap repositioning, suture and gap plugging with calcium phosphate cement, did not induce major distortions of the SSEPs. In conclusion, SSEPs can be successfully and reproducibly recorded from high-density EEG caps in macaque monkeys before and after a craniotomy, opening new possibilities for the long-term follow-up of the cortical reorganisation of large-scale networks in macaque monkeys after a cortical lesion.

  4. Coupling between resting cerebral perfusion and EEG.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, R L; Poil, S-S; Brandeis, D; Klaver, P; Bollmann, S; Ghisleni, C; Lüchinger, R; Martin, E; Shankaranarayanan, A; Alsop, D C; Michels, L

    2013-07-01

    While several studies have investigated interactions between the electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging BOLD signal fluctuations, less is known about the associations between EEG oscillations and baseline brain haemodynamics, and few studies have examined the link between EEG power outside the alpha band and baseline perfusion. Here we compare whole-brain arterial spin labelling perfusion MRI and EEG in a group of healthy adults (n = 16, ten females, median age: 27 years, range 21-48) during an eyes closed rest condition. Correlations emerged between perfusion and global average EEG power in low (delta: 2-4 Hz and theta: 4-7 Hz), middle (alpha: 8-13 Hz), and high (beta: 13-30 Hz and gamma: 30-45 Hz) frequency bands in both cortical and sub-cortical regions. The correlations were predominately positive in middle and high-frequency bands, and negative in delta. In addition, central alpha frequency positively correlated with perfusion in a network of brain regions associated with the modulation of attention and preparedness for external input, and central theta frequency correlated negatively with a widespread network of cortical regions. These results indicate that the coupling between average EEG power/frequency and local cerebral blood flow varies in a frequency specific manner. Our results are consistent with longstanding concepts that decreasing EEG frequencies which in general map onto decreasing levels of activation.

  5. Effects of Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback on EEG Alpha Asymmetry and Anxiety Symptoms in Male Athletes: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Dziembowska, Inga; Izdebski, Paweł; Rasmus, Anna; Brudny, Janina; Grzelczak, Marta; Cysewski, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    Heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BFB) has been shown as useful tool to manage stress in various populations. The present study was designed to investigate whether the biofeedback-based stress management tool consisting of rhythmic breathing, actively self-generated positive emotions and a portable biofeedback device induce changes in athletes' HRV, EEG patterns, and self-reported anxiety and self-esteem. The study involved 41 healthy male athletes, aged 16-21 (mean 18.34 ± 1.36) years. Participants were randomly divided into two groups: biofeedback and control. Athletes in the biofeedback group received HRV biofeedback training, athletes in the control group didn't receive any intervention. During the randomized controlled trial (days 0-21), the mean anxiety score declined significantly for the intervention group (change-4 p < 0.001) but not for the control group (p = 0.817). In addition, as compared to the control, athletes in biofeedback group showed substantial and statistically significant improvement in heart rate variability indices and changes in power spectra of both theta and alpha brain waves, and alpha asymmetry. These changes suggest better self-control in the central nervous system and better flexibility of the autonomic nervous system in the group that received biofeedback training. A HRV biofeedback-based stress management tool may be beneficial for stress reduction for young male athletes.

  6. Sample size calculations in human electrophysiology (EEG and ERP) studies: A systematic review and recommendations for increased rigor.

    PubMed

    Larson, Michael J; Carbine, Kaylie A

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing focus across scientific fields on adequate sample sizes to ensure non-biased and reproducible effects. Very few studies, however, report sample size calculations or even the information needed to accurately calculate sample sizes for grants and future research. We systematically reviewed 100 randomly selected clinical human electrophysiology studies from six high impact journals that frequently publish electroencephalography (EEG) and event-related potential (ERP) research to determine the proportion of studies that reported sample size calculations, as well as the proportion of studies reporting the necessary components to complete such calculations. Studies were coded by the two authors blinded to the other's results. Inter-rater reliability was 100% for the sample size calculations and kappa above 0.82 for all other variables. Zero of the 100 studies (0%) reported sample size calculations. 77% utilized repeated-measures designs, yet zero studies (0%) reported the necessary variances and correlations among repeated measures to accurately calculate future sample sizes. Most studies (93%) reported study statistical values (e.g., F or t values). Only 40% reported effect sizes, 56% reported mean values, and 47% reported indices of variance (e.g., standard deviations/standard errors). Absence of such information hinders accurate determination of sample sizes for study design, grant applications, and meta-analyses of research and whether studies were adequately powered to detect effects of interest. Increased focus on sample size calculations, utilization of registered reports, and presenting information detailing sample size calculations and statistics for future researchers are needed and will increase sample size-related scientific rigor in human electrophysiology research.

  7. Short-Term EEG Spectral Pattern as a Single Event in EEG Phenomenology

    PubMed Central

    Fingelkurts, Al. A; Fingelkurts, An. A

    2010-01-01

    Spectral decomposition, to this day, still remains the main analytical paradigm for the analysis of EEG oscillations. However, conventional spectral analysis assesses the mean characteristics of the EEG power spectra averaged out over extended periods of time and/or broad frequency bands, thus resulting in a “static” picture which cannot reflect adequately the underlying neurodynamic. A relatively new promising area in the study of EEG is based on reducing the signal to elementary short-term spectra of various types in accordance with the number of types of EEG stationary segments instead of using averaged power spectrum for the whole EEG. It is suggested that the various perceptual and cognitive operations associated with a mental or behavioural condition constitute a single distinguishable neurophysiological state with a distinct and reliable spectral pattern. In this case, one type of short-term spectral pattern may be considered as a single event in EEG phenomenology. To support this assumption the following issues are considered in detail: (a) the relations between local EEG short-term spectral pattern of particular type and the actual state of the neurons in underlying network and a volume conduction; (b) relationship between morphology of EEG short-term spectral pattern and the state of the underlying neurodynamical system i.e. neuronal assembly; (c) relation of different spectral pattern components to a distinct physiological mechanism; (d) relation of different spectral pattern components to different functional significance; (e) developmental changes of spectral pattern components; (f) heredity of the variance in the individual spectral pattern and its components; (g) intra-individual stability of the sets of EEG short-term spectral patterns and their percent ratio; (h) discrete dynamics of EEG short-term spectral patterns. Functional relevance (consistency) of EEG short-term spectral patterns in accordance with the changes of brain functional state

  8. Short-term EEG spectral pattern as a single event in EEG phenomenology.

    PubMed

    Fingelkurts, Al A; Fingelkurts, An A

    2010-09-08

    Spectral decomposition, to this day, still remains the main analytical paradigm for the analysis of EEG oscillations. However, conventional spectral analysis assesses the mean characteristics of the EEG power spectra averaged out over extended periods of time and/or broad frequency bands, thus resulting in a "static" picture which cannot reflect adequately the underlying neurodynamic. A relatively new promising area in the study of EEG is based on reducing the signal to elementary short-term spectra of various types in accordance with the number of types of EEG stationary segments instead of using averaged power spectrum for the whole EEG. It is suggested that the various perceptual and cognitive operations associated with a mental or behavioural condition constitute a single distinguishable neurophysiological state with a distinct and reliable spectral pattern. In this case, one type of short-term spectral pattern may be considered as a single event in EEG phenomenology. To support this assumption the following issues are considered in detail: (a) the relations between local EEG short-term spectral pattern of particular type and the actual state of the neurons in underlying network and a volume conduction; (b) relationship between morphology of EEG short-term spectral pattern and the state of the underlying neurodynamical system i.e. neuronal assembly; (c) relation of different spectral pattern components to a distinct physiological mechanism; (d) relation of different spectral pattern components to different functional significance; (e) developmental changes of spectral pattern components; (f) heredity of the variance in the individual spectral pattern and its components; (g) intra-individual stability of the sets of EEG short-term spectral patterns and their percent ratio; (h) discrete dynamics of EEG short-term spectral patterns. Functional relevance (consistency) of EEG short-term spectral patterns in accordance with the changes of brain functional state

  9. Adaptive autoregressive identification with spectral power decomposition for studying movement-related activity in scalp EEG signals and basal ganglia local field potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foffani, Guglielmo; Bianchi, Anna M.; Priori, Alberto; Baselli, Giuseppe

    2004-09-01

    We propose a method that combines adaptive autoregressive (AAR) identification and spectral power decomposition for the study of movement-related spectral changes in scalp EEG signals and basal ganglia local field potentials (LFPs). This approach introduces the concept of movement-related poles, allowing one to study not only the classical event-related desynchronizations (ERD) and synchronizations (ERS), which correspond to modulations of power, but also event-related modulations of frequency. We applied the method to analyze movement-related EEG signals and LFPs contemporarily recorded from the sensorimotor cortex, the globus pallidus internus (GPi) and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in a patient with Parkinson's disease who underwent stereotactic neurosurgery for the implant of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. In the AAR identification we compared the whale and the exponential forgetting factors, showing that the whale forgetting provides a better disturbance rejection and it is therefore more suitable to investigate movement-related brain activity. Movement-related power modulations were consistent with previous studies. In addition, movement-related frequency modulations were observed from both scalp EEG signals and basal ganglia LFPs. The method therefore represents an effective approach to the study of movement-related brain activity.

  10. Structural Stability and Functional Remodeling of High-Density Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Gursky, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Lipoproteins are protein-lipid nanoparticles that transport lipids in circulation and are central in atherosclerosis and other disorders of lipid metabolism. Apolipoproteins form flexible structural scaffolds and important functional ligands on the particle surface and direct lipoprotein metabolism. Lipoproteins undergo multiple rounds of metabolic remodeling that is crucial to lipid transport. Important aspects of this remodeling, including apolipoprotein dissociation and particle fusion, are mimicked in thermal or chemical denaturation and are modulated by free energy barriers. Here we review our biophysical studies that revealed kinetic mechanism of lipoprotein stabilization and unraveled its structural basis. The main focus is on high-density lipoprotein (HDL). An inverse correlation between stability and functions of various HDLs in cholesterol transport suggests functional role of structural disorder. A mechanism for conformational adaptation of the major HDL proteins, apoA-I and apoA-II, to the increasing lipid load is proposed. Together, these studies help understand why HDL form discrete subclasses separated by kinetic barriers, which have distinct composition, conformation and functional properties. Understanding these properties may help improve HDL quality and develop novel therapies for cardiovascular disease. PMID:25749369

  11. Fracture behavior of kaolin-reinforced high density polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Wetherhold, R.C.; Mouzakis, D.E.

    1999-10-01

    The addition of the low-cost mineral filler kaolin to high-density polyethylene (HDPE) creates a composite with both improved stiffness and toughness properties. This study focuses on two aspects of the toughness of these composites: the fracture toughness increment produced by work at the fracture surface and the directionality induced by the injection molding fabrication process. The Essential Work of Fracture (EWF) method gives results which show that a higher volume fraction of kaolin produces more surface work, consistent with earlier work using Compact Tension (CT) tests. The EWF method also demonstrates that a lower volume fraction can produce a higher overall plastic work and apparent toughness. A heat treatment that removes the orientation of the matrix but not that of the particles was applied to study the effect of matrix crystallinity. The results indicate that the matrix supramolecular structure (crystallinity and skin-core effect) is responsible for the directionality of toughness, and that a heat treatment can be used to produce high toughness behavior in both major directions.

  12. Synthetic high-density lipoproteins for delivery of 10-hydroxycamptothecin

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yue; Wen, Jian; Tang, Jie; Kan, Qiming; Ackermann, Rose; Olsen, Karl; Schwendeman, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel synthetic high-density lipoprotein (sHDL) nanoparticle delivery system for 10-hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) for treatment of colon carcinoma. HDL is recognized by scavenger receptor B-I (SR-BI) over-expressed in colon carcinomas 5- to 35-fold relative to the human fibroblasts. The sHDL nanoparticles were composed of apolipoprotein A-I mimic peptide (5A) and contained 0.5%–1.5% (w/w) of HCPT. An optimized HCPT-sHDL formulation exhibited 0.7% HCPT loading with 70% efficiency with an average size of 10–12 nm. Partitioning of HCPT in the sHDL lipid membrane enhanced drug stability in its active lactone form, increased solubilization, and enabled slow release. Cytotoxicity studies in HT29 colon carcinoma cells revealed that the IC50 of HCPT-sHDL was approximately 3-fold lower than that of free HCPT. Pharmacokinetics in rats following intravenous administration showed that the area under the serum concentration-time curve (AUC0−t) and Cmax of HCPT-HDL were 2.7- and 6.5-fold higher relative to the values for the free HCPT, respectively. These results suggest that sHDL-based formulations of hydrophobic drugs are useful for future evaluation in treatment of SR-BI-positive tumors. PMID:27920529

  13. Acrolein impairs the cholesterol transport functions of high density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Alexandra C; Holme, Rebecca L; Chen, Yiliang; Thomas, Michael J; Sorci-Thomas, Mary G; Silverstein, Roy L; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Sahoo, Daisy

    2015-01-01

    High density lipoproteins (HDL) are considered athero-protective, primarily due to their role in reverse cholesterol transport, where they transport cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver for excretion. The current study was designed to determine the impact of HDL modification by acrolein, a highly reactive aldehyde found in high abundance in cigarette smoke, on the cholesterol transport functions of HDL. HDL was chemically-modified with acrolein and immunoblot and mass spectrometry analyses confirmed apolipoprotein crosslinking, as well as acrolein adducts on apolipoproteins A-I and A-II. The ability of acrolein-modified HDL (acro-HDL) to serve as an acceptor of free cholesterol (FC) from COS-7 cells transiently expressing SR-BI was significantly decreased. Further, in contrast to native HDL, acro-HDL promotes higher neutral lipid accumulation in murine macrophages as judged by Oil Red O staining. The ability of acro-HDL to mediate efficient selective uptake of HDL-cholesteryl esters (CE) into SR-BI-expressing cells was reduced compared to native HDL. Together, the findings from our studies suggest that acrolein modification of HDL produces a dysfunctional particle that may ultimately promote atherogenesis by impairing functions that are critical in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway.

  14. High-Density Lipoprotein, Lecithin: Cholesterol Acyltransferase, and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ossoli, Alice; Pavanello, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data clearly show the existence of a strong inverse correlation between plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and the incidence of coronary heart disease. This relation is explained by a number of atheroprotective properties of HDL, first of all the ability to promote macrophage cholesterol transport. HDL are highly heterogeneous and are continuously remodeled in plasma thanks to the action of a number of proteins and enzymes. Among them, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) plays a crucial role, being the only enzyme able to esterify cholesterol within lipoproteins. LCAT is synthetized by the liver and it has been thought to play a major role in reverse cholesterol transport and in atheroprotection. However, data from animal studies, as well as human studies, have shown contradictory results. Increased LCAT concentrations are associated with increased HDL-C levels but not necessarily with atheroprotection. On the other side, decreased LCAT concentration and activity are associated with decreased HDL-C levels but not with increased atherosclerosis. These contradictory results confirm that HDL-C levels per se do not represent the functionality of the HDL system. PMID:27302716

  15. Experienced mindfulness meditators exhibit higher parietal-occipital EEG gamma activity during NREM sleep.

    PubMed

    Ferrarelli, Fabio; Smith, Richard; Dentico, Daniela; Riedner, Brady A; Zennig, Corinna; Benca, Ruth M; Lutz, Antoine; Davidson, Richard J; Tononi, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Over the past several years meditation practice has gained increasing attention as a non-pharmacological intervention to provide health related benefits, from promoting general wellness to alleviating the symptoms of a variety of medical conditions. However, the effects of meditation training on brain activity still need to be fully characterized. Sleep provides a unique approach to explore the meditation-related plastic changes in brain function. In this study we performed sleep high-density electroencephalographic (hdEEG) recordings in long-term meditators (LTM) of Buddhist meditation practices (approximately 8700 mean hours of life practice) and meditation naive individuals. We found that LTM had increased parietal-occipital EEG gamma power during NREM sleep. This increase was specific for the gamma range (25-40 Hz), was not related to the level of spontaneous arousal during NREM and was positively correlated with the length of lifetime daily meditation practice. Altogether, these findings indicate that meditation practice produces measurable changes in spontaneous brain activity, and suggest that EEG gamma activity during sleep represents a sensitive measure of the long-lasting, plastic effects of meditative training on brain function.

  16. Experienced Mindfulness Meditators Exhibit Higher Parietal-Occipital EEG Gamma Activity during NREM Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Ferrarelli, Fabio; Smith, Richard; Dentico, Daniela; Riedner, Brady A.; Zennig, Corinna; Benca, Ruth M.; Lutz, Antoine; Davidson, Richard J.; Tononi, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Over the past several years meditation practice has gained increasing attention as a non-pharmacological intervention to provide health related benefits, from promoting general wellness to alleviating the symptoms of a variety of medical conditions. However, the effects of meditation training on brain activity still need to be fully characterized. Sleep provides a unique approach to explore the meditation-related plastic changes in brain function. In this study we performed sleep high-density electroencephalographic (hdEEG) recordings in long-term meditators (LTM) of Buddhist meditation practices (approximately 8700 mean hours of life practice) and meditation naive individuals. We found that LTM had increased parietal-occipital EEG gamma power during NREM sleep. This increase was specific for the gamma range (25–40 Hz), was not related to the level of spontaneous arousal during NREM and was positively correlated with the length of lifetime daily meditation practice. Altogether, these findings indicate that meditation practice produces measurable changes in spontaneous brain activity, and suggest that EEG gamma activity during sleep represents a sensitive measure of the long-lasting, plastic effects of meditative training on brain function. PMID:24015304

  17. Amplitude of Sensorimotor Mu Rhythm Is Correlated with BOLD from Multiple Brain Regions: A Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Siyang; Liu, Yuelu; Ding, Mingzhou

    2016-01-01

    The mu rhythm is a field oscillation in the ∼10Hz range over the sensorimotor cortex. For decades, the suppression of mu (event-related desynchronization) has been used to index movement planning, execution, and imagery. Recent work reports that non-motor processes, such as spatial attention and movement observation, also desynchronize mu, raising the possibility that the mu rhythm is associated with the activity of multiple brain regions and systems. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by recording simultaneous resting-state EEG-fMRI from healthy subjects. Independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to extract the mu components. The amplitude (power) fluctuations of mu were estimated as a time series using a moving-window approach, which, after convolving with a canonical hemodynamic response function (HRF), was correlated with blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signals from the entire brain. Two main results were found. First, mu power was negatively correlated with BOLD from areas of the sensorimotor network, the attention control network, the putative mirror neuron system, and the network thought to support theory of mind. Second, mu power was positively correlated with BOLD from areas of the salience network, including anterior cingulate cortex and anterior insula. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that sensorimotor mu rhythm is associated with multiple brain regions and systems. They also suggest that caution should be exercised when attempting to interpret mu modulation in terms of a single brain network. PMID:27499736

  18. An EEG study on the somatotopic organisation of sensorimotor cortex activation during action execution and observation in infancy

    PubMed Central

    de Klerk, Carina C.J.M.; Johnson, Mark H.; Southgate, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sensorimotor cortex activation is somatotopically-organised during action execution and observation in adulthood. Here we aimed to investigate the development of this phenomenon in infancy. We elicited arm and leg actions from 12-month-old infants and presented them, and a control group of adults, with videos of arm and leg actions while we measured their sensorimotor alpha suppression using EEG. Sensorimotor alpha suppression during action execution was somatotopically organised in 12-month-old infants: there was more suppression over the arm areas when infants performed reaching actions, and more suppression over the leg area when they performed kicking actions. Adults also showed somatotopically-organised activation during the observation of reaching and kicking actions. In contrast, infants did not show somatotopically-organised activation during action observation, but instead activated the arm areas when observing both reaching and kicking actions. We suggest that the somatotopic organisation of sensorimotor cortex activation during action observation may depend on infants’ understanding of the action goal and their expectations about how this goal will be achieved. PMID:26318840

  19. Amplitude of Sensorimotor Mu Rhythm Is Correlated with BOLD from Multiple Brain Regions: A Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Study.

    PubMed

    Yin, Siyang; Liu, Yuelu; Ding, Mingzhou

    2016-01-01

    The mu rhythm is a field oscillation in the ∼10Hz range over the sensorimotor cortex. For decades, the suppression of mu (event-related desynchronization) has been used to index movement planning, execution, and imagery. Recent work reports that non-motor processes, such as spatial attention and movement observation, also desynchronize mu, raising the possibility that the mu rhythm is associated with the activity of multiple brain regions and systems. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by recording simultaneous resting-state EEG-fMRI from healthy subjects. Independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to extract the mu components. The amplitude (power) fluctuations of mu were estimated as a time series using a moving-window approach, which, after convolving with a canonical hemodynamic response function (HRF), was correlated with blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signals from the entire brain. Two main results were found. First, mu power was negatively correlated with BOLD from areas of the sensorimotor network, the attention control network, the putative mirror neuron system, and the network thought to support theory of mind. Second, mu power was positively correlated with BOLD from areas of the salience network, including anterior cingulate cortex and anterior insula. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that sensorimotor mu rhythm is associated with multiple brain regions and systems. They also suggest that caution should be exercised when attempting to interpret mu modulation in terms of a single brain network.

  20. Changes in alpha band activity associated with application of the compression of fourth ventricular (CV-4) osteopathic procedure: a qEEG pilot study.

    PubMed

    Miana, Luiz; Bastos, Victor Hugo do Vale; Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Almeida, Laís; Ribeiro, Pedro; Machado, Dionis; King, Hollis; Silva, Julio Guilherme

    2013-07-01

    The compression of the fourth ventricle (CV-4) is one of the more well known procedures in the cranial manipulation curriculum and practice. Cranial manipulation has received criticism because of the subtle, difficult to learn techniques, controversy over whether or not cranial bone structures move, and what if any clinical effects have been shown. The aim of this study was to measure the effects of CV-4 in 10 healthy subjects through quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG), specifically in alpha band. Participants were randomly distributed in control, sham-CV4 and CV4 conditions using a cross-over design. qEEG activity was recorded for each of the 10 subjects in each of the 3 conditions. There was a significant increase in the alpha absolute power between pre and post in the CV-4 condition. There appears to be potential for understanding the effect of the CV-4 if these finding are replicated in further clinical trials.

  1. High-density lipoprotein-raising strategies: update 2010.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, Frank; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Tschöpe, Carsten; Van Linthout, Sophie

    2010-05-01

    Population studies have consistently shown that high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels are a strong, independent inverse predictor of cardiovascular disease. Every 1 mg/dl increase in HDL cholesterol is associated with a 2% to 3% decrease in coronary artery disease risk, independent of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglyceride levels. The primary mechanism for this protective effect is believed to be reverse cholesterol transport, but several other anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidative functions for HDL have also been identified. Low HDL cholesterol is predictive of cardiovascular events in statin-treated patients with low LDL cholesterol, indicating that intensive lipid lowering strategies with statins alone are not sufficient to prevent cardiovascular events, and merging for additional effective HDL-raising therapy. This review focuses at giving an overview of current established HDL-raising pharmaca, including statins, fibrates, thiazolidinediones, and nicotinic acids, and of novel therapies including cholesterol ester transfer protein-inhibitors, liver X receptor agonists, reconstituted HDL, and apolipoprotein A-I mimetics. Working mechanisms are described and results from clinical trials of monotherapy and combination therapy are discussed.

  2. New electrode-barrier structures for high density ferroelectric memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, R.; Desu, C. S.; Tirumala, S.; Bhatt, H. D.; Desu, S. B.; Lee, K. B.

    2001-03-01

    In this paper, two electrode-barrier structures based on Pt-Rh and Pt-Ir alloys and their oxides are proposed for high-density ferroelectric memory applications. These electrode-barriers are multi-layered, comprising a diffusion barrier (PtRhOx or PtIrOx), metal alloy (PtRh or PtIr) and another PtRhOx or PtIrOx layer for fatigue reduction in the case of PZT capacitors. Both lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and strontium bismuth tantalate (SBT) capacitors based on the electrode-barriers were used in the present study. The electrode-barrier structure acts as a conducting electrode as well as an excellent diffusion barrier for lead, bismuth, oxygen and silicon. The PZT test capacitors fabricated on these electrode-barriers showed excellent fatigue resistance with other ferroelectric properties being similar to those on Pt. Also, these electrode-barriers are stable, and remain conductive even up to the processing temperatures of SBT (750 °C). This makes direct integration of both PZT and SBT capacitors on to a poly-Si plug attainable. In addition, the conducting electrode-barrier structures can be deposited in situ, directly over n+polycrystalline Si, thereby significantly improving the density of the device.

  3. Enhanced configurational entropy in high-density nanoconfined bilayer ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsetti, Fabiano; Zubeltzu, Jon; Artacho, Emilio

    Understanding the structural tendencies of nanoconfined water is of great interest for nanoscience and biology, where nano/micro-sized objects may be separated by very few layers of water. We present a study of water confined to a 2D geometry by a featureless, chemically neutral potential, in order to characterize its intrinsic behaviour. We use molecular dynamics simulations with the TIP4P/2005 potential, combined with density-functional theory calculations with a non-local van der Waals density functional and an ab initio random structure search procedure. We propose a novel kind of crystal order in high-density nanoconfined bilayer ice. A first-order transition is observed between a low-temperature proton-ordered solid and a high-temperature proton-disordered solid. The latter is shown to possess crystalline order for the oxygen positions, arranged on a close-packed triangular lattice with AA stacking. Uniquely amongst the ice phases, the triangular bilayer is characterized by two levels of disorder (for the bonding network and for the protons) which results in a configurational entropy twice that of bulk ice.

  4. Gene expression profiling in peanut using high density oligonucleotide microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Payton, Paxton; Kottapalli, Kameswara Rao; Rowland, Diane; Faircloth, Wilson; Guo, Baozhu; Burow, Mark; Puppala, Naveen; Gallo, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Background Transcriptome expression analysis in peanut to date has been limited to a relatively small set of genes and only recently has a significant number of ESTs been released into the public domain. Utilization of these ESTs for oligonucleotide microarrays provides a means to investigate large-scale transcript responses to a variety of developmental and environmental signals, ultimately improving our understanding of plant biology. Results We have developed a high-density oligonucleotide microarray for peanut using 49,205 publicly available ESTs and tested the utility of this array for expression profiling in a variety of peanut tissues. To identify putatively tissue-specific genes and demonstrate the utility of this array for expression profiling in a variety of peanut tissues, we compared transcript levels in pod, peg, leaf, stem, and root tissues. Results from this experiment showed 108 putatively pod-specific/abundant genes, as well as transcripts whose expression was low or undetected in pod compared to peg, leaf, stem, or root. The transcripts significantly over-represented in pod include genes responsible for seed storage proteins and desiccation (e.g., late-embryogenesis abundant proteins, aquaporins, legumin B), oil production, and cellular defense. Additionally, almost half of the pod-abundant genes represent unknown genes allowing for the possibility of associating putative function to these previously uncharacterized genes. Conclusion The peanut oligonucleotide array represents the majority of publicly available peanut ESTs and can be used as a tool for expression profiling studies in diverse tissues. PMID:19523230

  5. Online detection of fetal acidemia during labour by testing synchronization of EEG and heart rate: a prospective study in fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaogang; Durosier, L Daniel; Ross, Michael G; Richardson, Bryan S; Frasch, Martin G

    2014-01-01

    Severe fetal acidemia during labour can result in life-lasting neurological deficits, but the timely detection of this condition is often not possible. This is because the positive predictive value (PPV) of fetal heart rate (FHR) monitoring, the mainstay of fetal health surveillance during labour, to detect concerning fetal acidemia is around 50%. In fetal sheep model of human labour, we reported that severe fetal acidemia (pH<7.00) during repetitive umbilical cord occlusions (UCOs) is preceded ∼60 minutes by the synchronization of electroencephalogram (EEG) and FHR. However, EEG and FHR are cyclic and noisy, and although the synchronization might be visually evident, it is challenging to detect automatically, a necessary condition for bedside utility. Here we present and validate a novel non-parametric statistical method to detect fetal acidemia during labour by using EEG and FHR. The underlying algorithm handles non-stationary and noisy data by recording number of abnormal episodes in both EEG and FHR. A logistic regression is then deployed to test whether these episodes are significantly related to each other. We then apply the method in a prospective study of human labour using fetal sheep model (n = 20). Our results render a PPV of 68% for detecting impending severe fetal acidemia ∼60 min prior to pH drop to less than 7.00 with 100% negative predictive value. We conclude that this method has a great potential to improve PPV for detection of fetal acidemia when it is implemented at the bedside. We outline directions for further refinement of the algorithm that will be achieved by analyzing larger data sets acquired in prospective human pilot studies.

  6. Neural Correlates of Dream Lucidity Obtained from Contrasting Lucid versus Non-Lucid REM Sleep: A Combined EEG/fMRI Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Dresler, Martin; Wehrle, Renate; Spoormaker, Victor I.; Koch, Stefan P.; Holsboer, Florian; Steiger, Axel; Obrig, Hellmuth; Sämann, Philipp G.; Czisch, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the neural correlates of lucid dreaming. Design: Parallel EEG/fMRI recordings of night sleep. Setting: Sleep laboratory and fMRI facilities. Participants: Four experienced lucid dreamers. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Out of 4 participants, one subject had 2 episodes of verified lucid REM sleep of sufficient length to be analyzed by fMRI. During lucid dreaming the bilateral precuneus, cuneus, parietal lobules, and prefrontal and occipito-temporal cortices activated strongly as compared with non-lucid REM sleep. Conclusions: In line with recent EEG data, lucid dreaming was associated with a reactivation of areas which are normally deactivated during REM sleep. This pattern of activity can explain the recovery of reflective cognitive capabilities that are the hallmark of lucid dreaming. Citation: Dresler M; Wehrle R; Spoormaker VI; Koch SP; Holsboer F; Steiger A; Obrig H; Sämann PG; Czisch M. Neural correlates of dream lucidity obtained from contrasting lucid versus non-lucid REM sleep: a combined EEG/fMRI case study. SLEEP 2012;35(7):1017–1020. PMID:22754049

  7. Emerging strategies for increasing high-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Forrester, James S; Shah, Prediman K

    2006-12-01

    High-density lipoprotein cholesterol is a potent and independent epidemiologic risk factor and is a proved antiatherosclerotic agent in animal models of atherosclerosis, acting through the principal mechanisms of accelerating cholesterol efflux and inhibiting oxidation and inflammation. Lifestyle modification increases serum levels by 5% to 15%, whereas niacin, the drug most widely used to increase high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, increases it by 25% to 35% at the highest doses. This review examines the potent methods of increasing high-density lipoprotein and/or enhancing reverse cholesterol transport, including cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors, apolipoprotein A-I Milano, D4F, the dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists, and rimonabant, that are now in clinical trials. In conclusion, these new agents, used alone or in combination with existing therapies, carry the potential to markedly reduce the incidence of new coronary disease and cardiac events in this decade.

  8. High-density monolayers of metal complexes: preparation and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kenji; Sawamura, Masaya; Fukuoka, Atsushi

    2014-10-01

    Catalysts are one of the key materials for realizing a sustainable society. However, we may encounter problematic cases where conventional catalyst systems cannot provide effective solutions. We thus believe that the establishment of novel methods of catalyst preparation is currently necessary. Utilization of high-density monolayers of molecular metal complexes is our strategy, and we expect that this methodology will enable facile and systematic screening of unique and efficient catalysts. This Personal Account describes our challenges to establish such an immature method in catalyst preparation as well as the related background and perspective. Preparation and catalysis by high-density monolayers of Rh complexes with N-heterocyclic carbene, structurally compact phosphine and diisocyanide ligands on gold surfaces are presented. The catalytic application of a high-density Pd-bisoxazoline complex prepared on a single-crystal silicon surface is also shown. Uniquely high catalyst turnover numbers and high chemoselectivities were observed with these catalyst systems.

  9. High density semiconductor nanodots by direct laser fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghizadeh, Anahita; Yang, Haeyeon

    2016-03-01

    We report a direct method of fabricating high density nanodots on the GaAs(001) surfaces using laser irradiations on the surface. Surface images indicate that the large clumps are not accompanied with the formation of nanodots even though its density is higher than the critical density above which detrimental large clumps begin to show up in the conventional Stranski-Krastanov growth technique. Atomic force microscopy is used to image the GaAs(001) surfaces that are irradiated by high power laser pulses interferentially. The analysis suggests that high density quantum dots be fabricated directly on semiconductor surfaces.

  10. Modifications of EEG power spectra in mesial temporal lobe during n-back tasks of increasing difficulty. A sLORETA study

    PubMed Central

    Imperatori, Claudio; Farina, Benedetto; Brunetti, Riccardo; Gnoni, Valentina; Testani, Elisa; Quintiliani, Maria I.; Del Gatto, Claudia; Indraccolo, Allegra; Contardi, Anna; Speranza, Anna M.; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    The n-back task is widely used to investigate the neural basis of Working Memory (WM) processes. The principal aim of this study was to explore and compare the EEG power spectra during two n-back tests with different levels of difficulty (1-back vs. 3-back). Fourteen healthy subjects were enrolled (seven men and seven women, mean age 31.21 ± 7.05 years, range: 23–48). EEG was recorded while performing the N-back test, by means of 19 surface electrodes referred to joint mastoids. EEG analysis were conducted by means of the standardized Low Resolution brain Electric Tomography (sLORETA) software. The statistical comparison between EEG power spectra in the two conditions was performed using paired t-statistics on the coherence values after Fisher's z transformation available in the LORETA program package. The frequency bands considered were: delta (0.5–4 Hz); theta (4.5–7.5 Hz); alpha (8–12.5 Hz); beta (13–30 Hz); gamma (30.5–100 Hz). Significant changes occurred in the delta band: in the 3-back condition an increased delta power was localized in a brain region corresponding to the Brodmann Area (BA) 28 in the left posterior entorhinal cortex (T = 3.112; p < 0.05) and in the BA 35 in the left perirhinal cortex in the parahippocampal gyrus (T = 2.876; p < 0.05). No significant differences were observed in the right hemisphere and in the alpha, theta, beta, and gamma frequency bands. Our results indicate that the most prominent modification induced by the increased complexity of the task occur in the mesial left temporal lobe structures. PMID:23565085

  11. EEG Theta Dynamics within Frontal and Parietal Cortices for Error Processing during Reaching Movements in a Prism Adaptation Study Altering Visuo-Motor Predictive Planning.

    PubMed

    Arrighi, Pieranna; Bonfiglio, Luca; Minichilli, Fabrizio; Cantore, Nicoletta; Carboncini, Maria Chiara; Piccotti, Emily; Rossi, Bruno; Andre, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Modulation of frontal midline theta (fmθ) is observed during error commission, but little is known about the role of theta oscillations in correcting motor behaviours. We investigate EEG activity of healthy partipants executing a reaching task under variable degrees of prism-induced visuo-motor distortion and visual occlusion of the initial arm trajectory. This task introduces directional errors of different magnitudes. The discrepancy between predicted and actual movement directions (i.e. the error), at the time when visual feedback (hand appearance) became available, elicits a signal that triggers on-line movement correction. Analysis were performed on 25 EEG channels. For each participant, the median value of the angular error of all reaching trials was used to partition the EEG epochs into high- and low-error conditions. We computed event-related spectral perturbations (ERSP) time-locked either to visual feedback or to the onset of movement correction. ERSP time-locked to the onset of visual feedback showed that fmθ increased in the high- but not in the low-error condition with an approximate time lag of 200 ms. Moreover, when single epochs were sorted by the degree of motor error, fmθ started to increase when a certain level of error was exceeded and, then, scaled with error magnitude. When ERSP were time-locked to the onset of movement correction, the fmθ increase anticipated this event with an approximate time lead of 50 ms. During successive trials, an error reduction was observed which was associated with indices of adaptations (i.e., aftereffects) suggesting the need to explore if theta oscillations may facilitate learning. To our knowledge this is the first study where the EEG signal recorded during reaching movements was time-locked to the onset of the error visual feedback. This allowed us to conclude that theta oscillations putatively generated by anterior cingulate cortex activation are implicated in error processing in semi-naturalistic motor

  12. Modifications of EEG power spectra in mesial temporal lobe during n-back tasks of increasing difficulty. A sLORETA study.

    PubMed

    Imperatori, Claudio; Farina, Benedetto; Brunetti, Riccardo; Gnoni, Valentina; Testani, Elisa; Quintiliani, Maria I; Del Gatto, Claudia; Indraccolo, Allegra; Contardi, Anna; Speranza, Anna M; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    The n-back task is widely used to investigate the neural basis of Working Memory (WM) processes. The principal aim of this study was to explore and compare the EEG power spectra during two n-back tests with different levels of difficulty (1-back vs. 3-back). Fourteen healthy subjects were enrolled (seven men and seven women, mean age 31.21 ± 7.05 years, range: 23-48). EEG was recorded while performing the N-back test, by means of 19 surface electrodes referred to joint mastoids. EEG analysis were conducted by means of the standardized Low Resolution brain Electric Tomography (sLORETA) software. The statistical comparison between EEG power spectra in the two conditions was performed using paired t-statistics on the coherence values after Fisher's z transformation available in the LORETA program package. The frequency bands considered were: delta (0.5-4 Hz); theta (4.5-7.5 Hz); alpha (8-12.5 Hz); beta (13-30 Hz); gamma (30.5-100 Hz). Significant changes occurred in the delta band: in the 3-back condition an increased delta power was localized in a brain region corresponding to the Brodmann Area (BA) 28 in the left posterior entorhinal cortex (T = 3.112; p < 0.05) and in the BA 35 in the left perirhinal cortex in the parahippocampal gyrus (T = 2.876; p < 0.05). No significant differences were observed in the right hemisphere and in the alpha, theta, beta, and gamma frequency bands. Our results indicate that the most prominent modification induced by the increased complexity of the task occur in the mesial left temporal lobe structures.

  13. A prospective study on the cost-effective utilization of long-term inpatient video-EEG monitoring in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Chemmanam, Thomas; Radhakrishnan, Ashalatha; Sarma, Sankara P; Radhakrishnan, Kurupath

    2009-04-01

    To investigate diagnostic value, therapeutic benefit and cost-effective utilization of video-EEG monitoring (VEM) in a comprehensive epilepsy program in a developing country. The authors prospectively recruited all patients who underwent long-term (> or =3 hours) inpatient VEM during a 10-month period. The cohort was followed to gather information about the proportion of patients in whom long-term management was altered by VEM and resultant impact on direct health care costs. Out of 143 study subjects (median age 22 years), 102 (71.3%) were referred for presurgical evaluation. The median duration of VEM was 61 hours, and median number of events recorded per patient was 3. Video-EEG monitoring helped to clarify the epilepsy syndromic diagnosis in 123 of 132 (93.2%) patients referred with the diagnosis of epileptic seizures. Video-EEG monitoring confirmed coexistent complex partial seizures in 4 of 11 (36.4%) patients with a referral diagnosis of psychogenic nonepileptic events. During mean follow-up period of 2.2 years, 48 patients (33.6%) underwent epilepsy surgery. A significant decrease in antiepileptic drug polytherapy, and minimization in recurring direct medical and nonmedical costs occurred. In addition to immediate diagnostic usefulness, VEM contributes significantly to long-term therapeutic and economic benefits for patients with difficult to diagnose and treat paroxysmal events.

  14. Biomimetic High-Density Lipoproteins from a Gold Nanoparticle Template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luthi, Andrea Jane

    For hundreds of years the field of chemistry has looked to nature for inspiration and insight to develop novel solutions for the treatment of human diseases. The ability of chemists to identify, mimic, and modifiy small molecules found in nature has led to the discovery and development of many important therapeutics. Chemistry on the nanoscale has made it possible to mimic natural, macromolecular structures that may also be useful for understanding and treating diseases. One example of such a structure is high-density lipoprotein (HDL). The goal of this work is to use a gold nanoparticle (Au NP) as a template to synthesize functional mimics of HDL and characterize their structure and function. Chapter 1 details the structure and function of natural HDL and how chemistry on the nanoscale provides new strategies for mimicking HDL. This Chapter also describes the first examples of using nanoparticles to mimic HDL. Chapter 2 reports the synthesis and characterization of biomimetic HDL using different sizes of Au NPs and different surface chemistries and how these variables can be used to tailor the properties of biomimetic HDL. From these studies the optimal strategy for synthesizing biomimetic HDL was determined. In Chapter 3, the optimization of the synthesis of biomimetic HDL is discussed as well as a full characterization of its structure. In addition, the work in this chapter shows that biomimetic HDL can be synthesized on a large scale without alterations to its structure or function. Chapter 4 focuses on understanding the pathways by which biomimetic HDL accepts cholesterol from macrophage cells. The results of these studies demonstrate that biomimetic HDL is able to accept cholesterol by both active and passive pathways of cholesterol efflux. In Chapter 5 the preliminary results of in vivo studies to characterize the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of biomimetic HDL are presented. These studies suggest that biomimetic HDL traffics through tissues prone to

  15. Characterizing the EEG correlates of exploratory behavior.

    PubMed

    Bourdaud, Nicolas; Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Galan, Ferran; Millan, José Del R

    2008-12-01

    This study aims to characterize the electroencephalography (EEG) correlates of exploratory behavior. Decision making in an uncertain environment raises a conflict between two opposing needs: gathering information about the environment and exploiting this knowledge in order to optimize the decision. Exploratory behavior has already been studied using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Based on a usual paradigm in reinforcement learning, this study has shown bilateral activation in the frontal and parietal cortex. To our knowledge, no previous study has been done on it using EEG. The study of the exploratory behavior using EEG signals raises two difficulties. First, the labels of trial as exploitation or exploration cannot be directly derived from the subject action. In order to access this information, a model of how the subject makes his decision must be built. The exploration related information can be then derived from it. Second, because of the complexity of the task, its EEG correlates are not necessarily time locked with the action. So the EEG processing methods used should be designed in order to handle signals that shift in time across trials. Using the same experimental protocol as the fMRI study, results show that the bilateral frontal and parietal areas are also the most discriminant. This strongly suggests that the EEG signal also conveys information about the exploratory behavior.

  16. SNP-based high density genetic map and mapping of btwd1 dwarfing gene in barley

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xifeng; Wang, Jibin; Liu, Lipan; Sun, Genlou; Li, Chengdao; Luo, Hong; Sun, Dongfa

    2016-01-01

    A high-density linkage map is a valuable tool for functional genomics and breeding. A newly developed sequence-based marker technology, restriction site associated DNA (RAD) sequencing, has been proven to be powerful for the rapid discovery and genotyping of genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and for the high-density genetic map construction. The objective of this research was to construct a high-density genetic map of barley using RAD sequencing. 1894 high-quality SNP markers were developed and mapped onto all seven chromosomes together with 68 SSR markers. These 1962 markers constituted a total genetic length of 1375.8 cM and an average of 0.7 cM between adjacent loci. The number of markers within each linkage group ranged from 209 to 396. The new recessive dwarfing gene btwd1 in Huaai 11 was mapped onto the high density linkage maps. The result showed that the btwd1 is positioned between SNP marks 7HL_6335336 and 7_249275418 with a genetic distance of 0.9 cM and 0.7 cM on chromosome 7H, respectively. The SNP-based high-density genetic map developed and the dwarfing gene btwd1 mapped in this study provide critical information for position cloning of the btwd1 gene and molecular breeding of barley. PMID:27530597

  17. Rhesus positivity and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol: a new link?

    PubMed

    Kanbay, Mehmet; Yildirir, Aylin; Ulus, Taner; Bilgi, Muhammet; Kucuk, Alparslan; Muderrisoglu, Haldun

    2006-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship of ABO and Rh blood groups with lipid profile in patients with established multivessel coronary artery disease in a population with low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The records of 978 patients with multivessel coronary artery disease, in whom coronary bypass surgery was performed, were investigated. Coronary risk factors including diabetes, hypertension, smoking, and obesity were noted for each patient. Serum lipid profiles: total cholesterol, low-density and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels, were also recorded. The mean age of the patients was 59.3 +/- 9.7 years (range, 25-84 years) and 80% were male. The risk factors and lipid profiles of ABO blood types were similar. Rh-negative patients had higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (46.9 +/- 9.9 vs. 41.6 +/- 10.4 mg.dL(-1), p = 0.001) and a lower total/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio (4.8 +/- 1.3 vs. 5.2 +/- 1.6, p = 0.029) compared to Rh-positive patients. The other lipid levels and risk factors had no association with Rh typing. These results indicate a significant association between rhesus positivity and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease.

  18. Computerized EEG: predictor of outcome in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Itil, T M; Marasa, J; Saletu, B; Davis, S; Mucciardi, A N

    1975-03-01

    Based on a double blind cross-over study, it was determined that schizophrenic patient who have more high frequency fast activity and a lesser degree of alpha and slow waves in computerized EEG before the treatment have a better therapeutic outcome to the major tranquilizer (neuroleptic) treatment. The correlation between pretreatment high frequency computer EEG measurements and better therapeutic outcome reached the level of statistical significance. "Therapy resistant" schizophrenic patients were characterized by a lesser degree of very fast beta activity, more alpha waves and slow waves, higher amplitudes in computer EEG, and a lesser degree of acute (florid) psychotic symptomatology but more "negative" symptoms such as motor retardation and blunted affect. One of the most striking results of the study is the finding that schizophrenic patients with certain psychopathological profiles also have similar computer EEG profiles.

  19. Neural Correlates of Action Observation and Execution in 14-Month-Old Infants: An Event-Related EEG Desynchronization Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Peter J.; Young, Thomas; Meltzoff, Andrew N.

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing interest in neurobiological methods for investigating the shared representation of action perception and production in early development. We explored the extent and regional specificity of EEG desynchronization in the infant alpha frequency range (6-9 Hz) during action observation and execution in 14-month-old infants.…

  20. A personalized history of EEG-fMRI integration.

    PubMed

    Laufs, Helmut

    2012-08-15

    In this personalized review, the history of EEG recorded simultaneously with functional MRI (EEG-fMRI) is summarized. A brief overview is given of the hardware development followed by a discussion of EEG-fMRI applications. The technique's development was clinically motivated in the context of epilepsy. Accordingly, the evolution of studies trying to identify with EEG-fMRI the origin of individual epileptiform discharges up to those revealing general mechanisms of epilepsy syndromes is sketched. In epilepsy centers experienced with the methodology, EEG-fMRI has found its place in the presurgical evaluation of patients. In cognitive neuroscience, the multimodal technique has significantly contributed to the understanding of phenomena of the resting state and neuronal oscillations. While most of the studies discussed relate EEG to fMRI by means of prediction, the development of forward models facilitating the symmetrical 'fusion' of EEG and fMRI data is the subject of current neuro-computational research. Recently, intracranial EEG has been safely recorded during (functional) MRI broadly extending the perspectives for epilepsy and research into neurovascular coupling. EEG-fMRI has evolved into a mature, generally accessible and in principle easily applicable technique, which is a great achievement. Because this at the same time bears the risk of unreflected use, EEG-fMRI safety issues are also highlighted.

  1. High density packaging and interconnect of massively parallel image processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, John C.; Indin, Ronald J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents conceptual designs for high density packaging of parallel processing systems. The systems fall into two categories: global memory systems where many processors are packaged into a stack, and distributed memory systems where a single processor and many memory chips are packaged into a stack. Thermal behavior and performance are discussed.

  2. High Density Polymer-Based Integrated Electgrode Array

    DOEpatents

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Davidson, James Courtney; Hamilton, Julie K.

    2006-04-25

    A high density polymer-based integrated electrode apparatus that comprises a central electrode body and a multiplicity of arms extending from the electrode body. The central electrode body and the multiplicity of arms are comprised of a silicone material with metal features in said silicone material that comprise electronic circuits.

  3. High density constraint on the entropy instability. [with nonisothermal effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, M. K.; Kennel, C. F.

    1974-01-01

    The entropy instability squared is a nonisothermal effect which is eliminated by parallel ion pressure at high densities (k sub z lambda sub e 1/2 sq root of m/M), reducing previous growth rate estimates and the range of unstable parameters.

  4. Comparison Study for Whitney (Raviart-Thomas)-Type Source Models in Finite-Element-Method-Based EEG Forward Modeling.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Martin; Pursiainen, Sampsa; Vorwerk, Johannes; Kostler, Harald; Wolters, Carsten H

    2015-11-01

    This study concentrates on finite-element-method (FEM)-based electroencephalography (EEG) forward simulation in which the electric potential evoked by neural activity in the brain is to be calculated at the surface of the head. The main advantage of the FEM is that it allows realistic modeling of tissue conductivity inhomogeneity. However, it is not straightforward to apply the classical model of a dipolar source with the FEM, due to its strong singularity and the resulting irregularity. The focus of this study is on comparing different methods to cope with this problem. In particular, we evaluate the accuracy of Whitney (Raviart-Thomas)-type dipole-like source currents compared to two reference dipole modeling methods: the St. Venant and partial integration approach. Common to all these methods is that they enable direct approximation of the potential field utilizing linear basis functions. In the present context, Whitney elements are particularly interesting, as they provide a simple means to model a divergence-conforming primary current vector field satisfying the square integrability condition. Our results show that a Whitney-type source model can provide simulation accuracy comparable to the present reference methods. It can lead to superior accuracy under optimized conditions with respect to both source location and orientation in a tetrahedral mesh. For random source orientations, the St. Venant approach turns out to be the method of choice over the interpolated version of the Whitney model. The overall moderate differences obtained suggest that practical aspects, such as the focality, should be prioritized when choosing a source model.

  5. Proprotein convertases in high-density lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seungbum; Korstanje, Ron

    2013-09-18

    The proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexins (PCSKs) are a serine endopeptidase family. PCSK members cleave amino acid residues and modulate the activity of precursor proteins. Evidence from patients and animal models carrying genetic alterations in PCSK members show that PCSK members are involved in various metabolic processes. These studies further revealed the molecular mechanism by which genetic alteration of some PCSK members impairs normal molecular and physiological functions, which in turn lead to cardiovascular disease. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is anti-atherogenic as it removes excessive amount of cholesterol from blood and peripheral tissues. Several PCSK members are involved in HDL metabolism. PCSK3, PCSK5, and PCSK6 process two triglyceride lipase family members, endothelial lipase and lipoprotein lipase, which are important for HDL remodeling. Recent studies in our lab found evidence that PCSK1 and PCSK9 are also involved in HDL metabolism. A mouse model carrying an amino acid substitution in PCSK1 showed an increase in serum apolipoprotein A1 (APOA1) level. Another mouse model lacking PCSK9 showed a decrease in APOE-containing HDL. In this review, we summarize the role of the five PCSK members in lipid, glucose, and bile acid (BA) metabolism, each of which can influence HDL metabolism. We propose an integrative model in which PCSK members regulate HDL metabolism through various molecular mechanisms and metabolic processes and genetic variation in some PCSK members may affect the efficiency of reverse cholesterol transport. PCSK members are considered as attractive therapeutic targets. A greater understanding of the molecular and physiological functions of PCSK members will improve therapeutic strategies and drug efficacy for cardiovascular disease where PCSK members play critical role, with fewer adverse effects.

  6. Isolation of high density lipoproteins from rat intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Magun, A M; Brasitus, T A; Glickman, R M

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies have defined forms of high density lipoproteins (HDL) in rat mesenteric lymph, suggesting that they have a secretory origin. This study describes the isolation and characterization of intestinal intracellular HDL. Two preparations were made as follows: (a) Rat enterocytes were isolated and a Golgi organelle fraction was prepared. (b) Cell homogenates were subjected to nitrogen cavitation and a cytoplasmic fraction was prepared. Lipoproteins were isolated from both preparations by sequential ultracentrifugation. When the HDL fraction (1.07-1.21 g/ml) was subjected to isopyknic density gradient ultracentrifugation, a peak of apoproteins A-I and B (apoA-I and apoB, respectively) was found at a density of 1.11-1.14 g/ml. Electron microscopy of the fraction showed spherical particles ranging in size from 6 to 13 nm. Immunoelectrophoresis revealed a precipitin arc in the alpha region against apoA-I which extended into the pre-beta region where a precipitin arc against apoB was also seen. ApoB antisera depleted the pre-beta particles whereas the alpha migrating particles remained. Lipid analysis of the whole HDL fraction revealed phospholipid, cholesteryl ester, and triglyceride as the major lipids. [3H]leucine was then administered into the duodenum and a radiolabeled intracellular HDL fraction was isolated. The newly synthesized apoproteins of the HDL fraction, as determined by gel electrophoresis, were apoB, apoA-I, and apolipoprotein A-IV (ApoA-IV). Immunoprecipitation of the apoB particles revealed apoA-I and apoA-IV in the supernatant. These data demonstrate that there are at least two intracellular intestinal forms of HDL particles, one of which contains apoB. The other particle contains apoA-I and apoA-IV, has alpha mobility, is spherical, and resembles a particle found in the lymph. Images PMID:3965504

  7. Surface interactions involved in flashover with high density electronegative gases.

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, Kei