Science.gov

Sample records for high-efficiency fusion power

  1. Blanket options for high-efficiency fusion power

    SciTech Connect

    Usher, J L; Lazareth, O W; Fillo, J A; Horn, F L; Powell, J R

    1980-01-01

    The efficiencies of blankets for fusion reactors are usually in the range of 30 to 40%, limited by the operating temperatures (500/sup 0/C) of conventional structural materials such as stainless steels. In this project two-zone blankets are proposed; these blankets consist of a low-temperature shell surrounding a high-temperature interior zone. A survey of nucleonics and thermal hydraulic parameters has led to a reference blanket design consisting of a water-cooled stainless steel shell around a BeO, ZrO/sub 2/ interior (cooled by argon) utilizing Li/sub 2/O for tritium breeding. In this design, approximately 60% of the fusion energy is deposited in the high-temperature interior. The maximum argon temperature is 2230/sup 0/C leading to an overall efficiency estimate of 55 to 60% for this reference case.

  2. Fusion blanket for high-efficiency power cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Usher, J.L.; Powell, J.R.; Fillo, J.A.; Horn, F.L.; Lazareth, O.W.; Taussig, R.

    1980-01-01

    The efficiencies of blankets for fusion reactors are usually in the range of 30 to 40%, limited by the operating temperature (500/sup 0/C) of conventional structural materials such as stainless steels. In this project two-zone blankets are proposed; these blankets consist of a low-temperature shell surrounding a high-temperature interior zone. A survey of nucleonics and thermal hydraulic parameters has led to a reference blanket design consisting of a water-cooled stainless steel shell around a BeO, ZrO/sub 2/ interior (cooled by Ar) utilizing Li/sub 2/O for tritium breeding. In this design, approx. 60% of the fusion energy is deposited in the high-temperature interior. The maximum Ar temperature is 2230/sup 0/C leading to an overall efficiency estimate of 55 to 60% for this reference case.

  3. High-Efficiency Power Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N. (Inventor); Wintucky, Edwin G. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    One or more embodiments of the present invention pertain to an all solid-state microwave power module. The module includes a plurality of solid-state amplifiers configured to amplify a signal using a low power stage, a medium power stage, and a high power stage. The module also includes a power conditioner configured to activate a voltage sequencer (e.g., bias controller) when power is received from a power source. The voltage sequencer is configured to sequentially apply voltage to a gate of each amplifier and sequentially apply voltage to a drain of each amplifier.

  4. High-Efficiency Power Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N (Inventor); Wintucky, Edwin G (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    One or more embodiments of the present invention pertain to an all solid-state microwave power module. The module includes a plurality of solid-state amplifiers configured to amplify a signal using a low power stage, a medium power stage, and a high power stage. The module also includes a power conditioner configured to activate a voltage sequencer (e.g., bias controller) when power is received from a power source. The voltage sequencer is configured to sequentially apply voltage to a gate of each amplifier and sequentially apply voltage to a drain of each amplifier.

  5. High efficiency solar photovoltaic power module concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, I.

    1978-01-01

    The investigation of a preliminary concept for high efficiency solar power generation in space is presented. The concept was a synergistic combination of spectral splitting, tailored bandgap cells, high concentration ratios, and cool cell areas.

  6. High-efficiency solid state power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, Robert E. (Inventor); Cheng, Sheng (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A high-efficiency solid state power amplifier (SSPA) for specific use in a spacecraft is provided. The SSPA has a mass of less than 850 g and includes two different X-band power amplifier sections, i.e., a lumped power amplifier with a single 11-W output and a distributed power amplifier with eight 2.75-W outputs. These two amplifier sections provide output power that is scalable from 11 to 15 watts without major design changes. Five different hybrid microcircuits, including high-efficiency Heterostructure Field Effect Transistor (HFET) amplifiers and Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) phase shifters have been developed for use within the SSPA. A highly efficient packaging approach enables the integration of a large number of hybrid circuits into the SSPA.

  7. High Efficiency Targets for High Gain Inertial Confinement Fusion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-19

    Inertial Confinement Fusion JOHN H. GARDNER AND STEPHEN E. BODNER Laboratory for Computational Physics DTIC CD ELECTEf OCT 241986 j NU Aproedfr...81425 " 11 TITLE (include Security Classification) High Efficiency Targets for High Gain Inertial Confinement Fusion 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Gardner, John ...ArearCod) 22c OFFICE SYMBOL % John H. Gardner (202) 767-3055 Code 4040 DO FORM 1473. 84 MAR 83 APR edtion may be used until exhausted SECURITY

  8. Fusion Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dingee, David A.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the extraordinary potential, the technical difficulties, and the financial problems that are associated with research and development of fusion power plants as a major source of energy. (GA)

  9. Fusion Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dingee, David A.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the extraordinary potential, the technical difficulties, and the financial problems that are associated with research and development of fusion power plants as a major source of energy. (GA)

  10. High-power, high-efficiency FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1989-04-01

    High power, high efficiency FELs require tapering, as the particles loose energy, so as to maintain resonance between the electromagnetic wave and the particles. They also require focusing of the particles (usually done with curved pole faces) and focusing of the electromagnetic wave (i.e. optical guiding). In addition, one must avoid transverse beam instabilities (primarily resistive wall) and longitudinal instabilities (i.e sidebands). 18 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier (HEMPA) Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, W. Herbert

    2004-01-01

    This paper will focus on developing an exotic switching technique that enhances the DC-to-RF conversion efficiency of microwave power amplifiers. For years, switching techniques implemented in the 10 kHz to 30 MHz region have resulted in DC-to-RF conversion efficiencies of 90-95-percent. Currently amplifier conversion efficiency, in the 2-3 GHz region approaches, 10-20-percent. Using a combination of analytical modeling and hardware testing, a High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier was built that demonstrated conversion efficiencies four to five times higher than current state of the art.

  12. High-Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, Williams H.

    2005-01-01

    A high-efficiency power amplifier that operates in the S band (frequencies of the order of a few gigahertz) utilizes transistors operating under class-D bias and excitation conditions. Class-D operation has been utilized at lower frequencies, but, until now, has not been exploited in the S band. Nominally, in class D operation, a transistor is switched rapidly between "on" and "off" states so that at any given instant, it sustains either high current or high voltage, but not both at the same time. In the ideal case of zero "on" resistance, infinite "off" resistance, zero inductance and capacitance, and perfect switching, the output signal would be a perfect square wave. Relative to the traditional classes A, B, and C of amplifier operation, class D offers the potential to achieve greater power efficiency. In addition, relative to class-A amplifiers, class-D amplifiers are less likely to go into oscillation. In order to design this amplifier, it was necessary to derive mathematical models of microwave power transistors for incorporation into a larger mathematical model for computational simulation of the operation of a class-D microwave amplifier. The design incorporates state-of-the-art switching techniques applicable only in the microwave frequency range. Another major novel feature is a transmission-line power splitter/combiner designed with the help of phasing techniques to enable an approximation of a square-wave signal (which is inherently a wideband signal) to propagate through what would, if designed in a more traditional manner, behave as a more severely band-limited device (see figure). The amplifier includes an input, a driver, and a final stage. Each stage contains a pair of GaAs-based field-effect transistors biased in class D. The input signal can range from -10 to +10 dBm into a 50-ohm load. The table summarizes the performances of the three stages

  13. High Efficiency Thermoelectric Radioisotope Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed; Saber, Hamed; Caillat, Thierry

    2004-01-01

    The work performed and whose results presented in this report is a joint effort between the University of New Mexico s Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies (ISNPS) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology. In addition to the development, design, and fabrication of skutterudites and skutterudites-based segmented unicouples this effort included conducting performance tests of these unicouples for hundreds of hours to verify theoretical predictions of the conversion efficiency. The performance predictions of these unicouples are obtained using 1-D and 3-D models developed for that purpose and for estimating the actual performance and side heat losses in the tests conducted at ISNPS. In addition to the performance tests, the development of the 1-D and 3-D models and the development of Advanced Radioisotope Power systems for Beginning-Of-Life (BOM) power of 108 We are carried out at ISNPS. The materials synthesis and fabrication of the unicouples are carried out at JPL. The research conducted at ISNPS is documented in chapters 2-5 and that conducted at JP, in documented in chapter 5. An important consideration in the design and optimization of segmented thermoelectric unicouples (STUs) is determining the relative lengths, cross-section areas, and the interfacial temperatures of the segments of the different materials in the n- and p-legs. These variables are determined using a genetic algorithm (GA) in conjunction with one-dimensional analytical model of STUs that is developed in chapter 2. Results indicated that when optimized for maximum conversion efficiency, the interfacial temperatures between various segments in a STU are close to those at the intersections of the Figure-Of-Merit (FOM), ZT, curves of the thermoelectric materials of the adjacent segments. When optimizing the STUs for maximum electrical power density, however, the interfacial temperatures are different from those at the intersections of the ZT curves, but

  14. Design and analysis of a high efficiency linear power amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sucheng; Zhou, Luowei; Liu, Xiaodong; Lu, Weiguo

    2011-10-01

    A high efficiency linear power amplifier is introduced based on the idea of Switch-Linear Hybrid (SLH) power conversion. The SLH power amplifier developed from the conventional class B power amplifier, while the class B configuration power unit in the SLH power amplifier is fed by a dynamic switching power supply, not the usual constant DC power supply. Thus, the efficiency of the class B configuration power unit in SLH power amplifier can be greatly improved. By combining linear power amplifier with switching power supply, the SLH power amplifier has synthetic performance of high fidelity, high efficiency and excellent dynamic characteristics. In this article, analysis of SLH power amplifier is performed, especially focusing on its linear power unit which is the core of SLH power amplifier. Design considerations are also presented parallel with the analysis. Both the theoretical analysis and experimental results verify the validity of SLH power amplifier.

  15. Highly-efficient high-power pumps for fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gapontsev, V.; Moshegov, N.; Berezin, I.; Komissarov, A.; Trubenko, P.; Miftakhutdinov, D.; Berishev, I.; Chuyanov, V.; Raisky, O.; Ovtchinnikov, A.

    2017-02-01

    We report on high efficiency multimode pumps that enable ultra-high efficiency high power ECO Fiber Lasers. We discuss chip and packaged pump design and performance. Peak out-of-fiber power efficiency of ECO Fiber Laser pumps was reported to be as high as 68% and was achieved with passive cooling. For applications that do not require Fiber Lasers with ultimate power efficiency, we have developed passively cooled pumps with out-of-fiber power efficiency greater than 50%, maintained at operating current up to 22A. We report on approaches to diode chip and packaged pump design that possess such performance.

  16. Plasmonic energy nanofocusing for high-efficiency laser fusion ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Katsuaki

    2016-08-01

    We propose an efficient laser fusion ignition system consisting of metal nanoparticles or nanoshells embedded in conventional deuterated polystyrene fuel targets. The incident optical energy of the heating laser is highly concentrated around the metallic particulates randomly dispersed inside imploded targets due to the electromagnetic-field-enhancement effect by surface plasmon resonance, and thus effectively triggers nuclear-fusion chain reactions. Our preliminary calculations exhibit field enhancement factors of around 50 and 1100 for spherical Ag nanoparticles and Ag/SiO2 nanoshells, respectively, in the 1-µm band.

  17. High efficiency fuel cell/advanced turbine power cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Morehead, H.

    1995-10-19

    An outline of the Westinghouse high-efficiency fuel cell/advanced turbine power cycle is presented. The following topics are discussed: The Westinghouse SOFC pilot manufacturing facility, cell scale-up plan, pressure effects on SOFC power and efficiency, sureCell versus conventional gas turbine plants, sureCell product line for distributed power applications, 20 MW pressurized-SOFC/gas turbine power plant, 10 MW SOFC/CT power plant, sureCell plant concept design requirements, and Westinghouse SOFC market entry.

  18. High efficiency solar cells for laser power beaming applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    Understanding solar cell response to pulsed laser outputs is important for the evaluation of power beaming applications. The time response of high efficiency GaAs and silicon solar cells to a 25 nS monochromatic pulse input is described. The PC-1D computer code is used to analyze the cell current during and after the pulse for various conditions.

  19. Fuel Cell/Turbine Ultra High Efficiency Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein, Ghezel-Ayagh

    2001-11-06

    FuelCell Energy, INC. (FCE) is currently involved in the design of ultra high efficiency power plants under a cooperative agreement (DE-FC26-00NT40) managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) as part of the DOE's Vision 21 program. Under this project, FCE is developing a fuel cell/turbine hybrid system that integrates the atmospheric pressure Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) with an unfired Brayton cycle utilizing indirect heat recovery from the power plant. Features of the DFC/T{trademark} system include: high efficiency, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, no pressurization of the fuel cell, independent operating pressure of the fuel cell and turbine, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants at much smaller sizes. Objectives of the Vision 21 Program include developing power plants that will generate electricity with net efficiencies approaching 75 percent (with natural gas), while producing sulfur and nitrogen oxide emissions of less than 0.01 lb/million BTU. These goals are significant improvements over conventional power plants, which are 35-60 percent efficient and produce emissions of 0.07 to 0.3 lb/million BTU of sulfur and nitrogen oxides. The nitrogen oxide and sulfur emissions from the DFC/T system are anticipated to be better than the Vision 21 goals due to the non-combustion features of the DFC/T power plant. The expected high efficiency of the DFC/T will also result in a 40-50 percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions compared to conventional power plants. To date, the R&D efforts have resulted in significant progress including proof-of-concept tests of a sub-scale power plant built around a state-of-the-art DFC stack integrated with a modified Capstone Model 330 Microturbine. The objectives of this effort are to investigate the integration aspects of the fuel cell and turbine and to obtain design information and operational data that will

  20. HIGH EFFICIENCY FOSSIL POWER PLANT (HEFPP) CONCEPTUALIZATION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Justice

    1999-03-25

    This study confirms the feasibility of a natural gas fueled, 20 MW M-C Power integrated pressurized molten carbonate fuel cell combined in a topping cycle with a gas turbine generator plant. The high efficiency fossil power plant (HEFPP) concept has a 70% efficiency on a LHV basis. The study confirms the HEFPP has a cost advantage on a cost of electricity basis over the gas turbine based combined cycle plants in the 20 MW size range. The study also identifies the areas of further development required for the fuel cell, gas turbine generator, cathode blower, inverter, and power module vessel. The HEFPP concept offers an environmentally friendly power plant with minuscule emission levels when compared with the combined cycle power plant.

  1. 2250-MHz High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier (HEMPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, W. Herbert; Bell, Joseph L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Tnis paper will focus on developing an exotic switching technique that enhances the DC-to-RF conversion efficiency of microwave power amplifiers. For years, switching techniques implemented in the 10 kHz to 30 MHz region have resulted in DC-to-RF conversion efficiencies of 90-95-percent. Currently amplifier conversion efficiency, in the 2-3 GHz region approaches, 10-20-percent. Using a combination of analytical modeling and hardware testing, a High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier was built that demonstrated conversion efficiencies four to five times higher than current state of the art.

  2. Fusion Power Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Schmidt; J.M. Ogden

    2002-02-06

    Fusion power plants could be part of a future portfolio of non-carbon dioxide producing energy supplies such as wind, solar, biomass, advanced fission power, and fossil energy with carbon dioxide sequestration. In this paper, we discuss key issues that could impact fusion energy deployment during the last half of this century. These include geographic issues such as resource availability, scale issues, energy storage requirements, and waste issues. The resource needs and waste production associated with fusion deployment in the U.S. should not pose serious problems. One important feature of fusion power is the fact that a fusion power plant should be locatable within most local or regional electrical distribution systems. For this reason, fusion power plants should not increase the burden of long distance power transmission to our distribution system. In contrast to fusion power, regional factors could play an important role in the deployment of renewable resources such as wind, solar and biomass or fossil energy with CO2 sequestration. We examine the role of these regional factors and their implications for fusion power deployment.

  3. Ra: A high efficiency, D-/sup 3/He, tandem mirror fusion reactor: Appendix C

    SciTech Connect

    Santarius, J.F.; Attaya, H.; Corradini, M.L.; El-Guebaly, L.A.; Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Larsen, E.M.; Maynard, C.W.; Musicki, Z.; Sawan, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    The Ra tandem mirror fusion reactor concept features inherent safety, high net plant efficiency, low cost of electricity, low radioactive waste generation, low activation, highly efficient direct conversion, thin radiation shields, and axisymmetric magnets. The safety and environmental features are achieved through the use of D/He-3 fuel, while the high efficiency derives from a new operating mode. ICRF stabilization allows an axisymmetric magnet set. 11 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Lunar Helium-3 and Fusion Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Office of Exploration sponsored the NASA Lunar Helium-3 and Fusion Power Workshop. The meeting was held to understand the potential of using He-3 from the moon for terrestrial fusion power production. It provided an overview, two parallel working sessions, a review of sessions, and discussions. The lunar mining session concluded that mining, beneficiation, separation, and return of He-3 from the moon would be possible but that a large scale operation and improved technology is required. The fusion power session concluded that: (1) that He-3 offers significant, possibly compelling, advantages over fusion of tritium, principally increased reactor life, reduced radioactive wastes, and high efficiency conversion, (2) that detailed assessment of the potential of the D/He-3 fuel cycle requires more information, and (3) D/He-3 fusion may be best for commercial purposes, although D/T fusion is more near term.

  5. a High-Efficiency Fusion Method of Multi-Spectral Image and Panchromatic Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, X.; Wang, J. P.; Wang, H.; Xiang, F.

    2013-07-01

    With the development of modern remote sensing technology, a variety of earth observation satellites could continue to tremendously provide image data of different spatial resolution, time resolution, spectral resolution remote sensing, and the remote sensing data obtained is increasing with great capacity, which forms multi-source image pyramid in the same area. To play the advantages of a variety of remote sensing data, the application of remote sensing image fusion is a very important choice. When remote sensing data is large, fusion is large in computing capacity and time-consuming, so it is difficult to carry out rapid, real-time fusion. However, in some remote sensing applications, such as disaster prevention and relief quick, etc., timely fusion is required. Based on image fusion method of principal component analysis (PCA) and the advantage of parallel computing, a high-efficiency fusion method of multi-spectral image and panchromatic image is proposed. Beijing-1 Micro-satellite is a high-performance small satellite for earth observation,With Beijing-1 Micro-satellite remote sensing images as the experimental data, it is proved that good fusion results of multi-spectral image and panchromatic image can be obtained with the proposed method, and the fusion speed is also fast. At the same time, some measures of improving the efficiency of parallel image fusion are also discussed.

  6. AMTEC: High efficiency static conversion for space power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankston, C. P.; Shirbacheh, M.

    1986-01-01

    Future manned and unmanned space missions will require reliable, high efficiency energy conversion systems. For a manned Mars mission, power levels in the range of 10 to 100 kWe will be needed. The Alkali Metal Thermoelectric Converter (AMTEC) is a direct energy conversion technology with the potential to meet these needs. The AMTEC is a thermally regenerative electrochemical device that derives its operation from the sodium ion conducting properties of beta-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE). To date, an efficiency of 19%, area power density of 1 W/sq cm, and a lifetime of 10,000 hours at high temperature were demonstrated in laboratory devices. Systems studies show that projected AMTEC systems equal or surpass the performance of other static or dynamic systems in applications of 1 kWe-1 MWe. Thus, the laboratory experiments and applications studies conducted to date have shown that the AMTEC posseses great potential. In order to bring this technology to the stage where prototype units can be built and operated, several technical issues must be addressed. These include the need for long life, high power electrodes, minimization of radiative parasitic losses, and high temperature seals. In summary, the evidence shows that if AMTEC is developed, it can play a significant role in future space power applications.

  7. A High Efficiency PSOFC/ATS-Gas Turbine Power System

    SciTech Connect

    W.L. Lundberg; G.A. Israelson; M.D. Moeckel; S.E. Veyo; R.A. Holmes; P.R. Zafred; J.E. King; R.E. Kothmann

    2001-02-01

    A study is described in which the conceptual design of a hybrid power system integrating a pressurized Siemens Westinghouse solid oxide fuel cell generator and the Mercury{trademark} 50 gas turbine was developed. The Mercury{trademark} 50 was designed by Solar Turbines as part of the US. Department of Energy Advanced Turbine Systems program. The focus of the study was to develop the hybrid power system concept that principally would exhibit an attractively-low cost of electricity (COE). The inherently-high efficiency of the hybrid cycle contributes directly to achieving this objective, and by employing the efficient, power-intensive Mercury{trademark} 50, with its relatively-low installed cost, the higher-cost SOFC generator can be optimally sized such that the minimum-COE objective is achieved. The system cycle is described, major system components are specified, the system installed cost and COE are estimated, and the physical arrangement of the major system components is discussed. Estimates of system power output, efficiency, and emissions at the system design point are also presented. In addition, two bottoming cycle options are described, and estimates of their effects on overall-system performance, cost, and COE are provided.

  8. High-efficiency heteroepitaxial solar cells for space power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernon, S. M.; Tobin, S. P.; Keavney, C. J.; Wojtczuk, S. J.

    1989-01-01

    The experimental results for several technical approaches aimed at achieving highly efficient solar cells for space-power applications are reported. Efficiencies of up to 24.5 percent (170X, AM0) and 21.7 percent (1X, AM0) have been achieved with homoepitaxial GaAs p/n cells. This one-sun AM0 efficiency value is believed to be the highest reported to date. Tandem solar cells utilizing GaAs-on-Ge structures have been fabricated and shown to have efficiencies up to 21.3 percent (1X, AM0), and a GaAs-on-Si cell at 15.2 percent (1X, AM0) is reported. Homoepitaxial n/p InP cells with an efficiency of 18.8 percent (1X, AM0) are also reported. The fabrication of heteroepitaxial InP solar cells with one-sun AM0 efficiency values of 9.4 percent (on GaAs) and 7.2 percent (on Si) is described.

  9. HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

    2003-06-01

    OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil

  10. High Efficiency Solar Power via Separated Photo and Voltaic Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Naughton

    2009-02-17

    This project demonstrates a novel nanostructured solar cell architecture capable of achieving high efficiency levels that is relatively simple and inexpensive to manufacture. The high efficiency will be achieved by the novel structure that separates the path of the photons from the path of the generated charge carriers. In this way, the photon path can be long for maximum light absorption, while the path for carriers can be short for maximum electronic energy harvesting. The combination of maximum light absorption coupled with maximum carrier harvesting is the basis for the expected high efficiency. The project will develop high efficiency solar cell prototypes utilizing this unique nanostructured architecture. The project addresses the fundamental limitation inherent in all current solar cell designs, and which opens a pathway to development for high efficiency solar cells at low cost. Realizing this goal will result in a levelized cost of electricity in the range of 10¢/kWh, which would achieve the long-sought goal of making photovoltaic electricity cost competitive with fossil-fuel generated electricity without any governmental subsidies. This breakthrough would spur the already rapid growth in the photovoltaic industry to an explosive pace, with significant, widespread benefit to the national economy and the nation’s energy security. The initial target of the program is to develop single-junction solar cells using ultrathin amorphous silicon with the performance approaching that of single crystal silicon cells.

  11. High efficiency and brightness fluorescent organic light emitting diode by triplet-triplet fusion

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen; Zhang, Yifan

    2015-02-10

    A first device is provided. The first device further comprises an organic light emitting device. The organic light emitting device further comprises an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer may include an organic host compound and at least one organic emitting compound capable of fluorescent emission at room temperature. Various configurations are described for providing a range of current densities in which T-T fusion dominates over S-T annihilation, leading to very high efficiency fluorescent OLEDs.

  12. Design and identification of a high efficient formic acid cleavage site for separation of fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaguang; Li, Mei; Shi, Shuangfeng; Yin, Chao; Jia, Shirong; Wang, Zhixing; Liu, Yuhui

    2015-02-01

    The release of target protein with high efficiency and low cost from expressed fusion protein is a key requirement for commercial production of target proteins. To establish such a cleavage system, we have designed four formic acid (FA) cleavage sites C1 (DPDPDP), C2 (DPPDPP), C3 (DDDDPI) and C4 (IVDPNP), which was placed in between the E and G fusion protein. Four expression vectors were individually constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. Purified proteins were reacted with a series of FA concentrations or under different temperatures followed by SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis to verify the degree of cleavage efficiency. Results showed that the C2 was the most efficient site compared with the other three. After optimization of cleavage conditions for E-C2-G, the cleavage efficiently could reach as high as 87.3% within 2.5 h in 37% FA at 45 °C. Comparing with previous reports, a significant reduction (26%) of FA concentration at a lower temperature in a short duration of reaction (18 times less) was achieved. We believe the cleavage site of DPPDPP identified in this study can be used in the large-scale production of valuable fusion proteins to save the cost, time and energy.

  13. High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier: From the Lab to Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert, III; Bell, Joseph L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the beginnings of space travel, various microwave power amplifier designs have been employed. These included Class-A, -B, and -C bias arrangements. However, shared limitation of these topologies is the inherent high total consumption of input power associated with the generation of radio frequency (RF)/microwave power. The power amplifier has always been the largest drain for the limited available power on the spacecraft. Typically, the conversion efficiency of a microwave power amplifier is 10 to 20%. For a typical microwave power amplifier of 20 watts, input DC power of at least 100 watts is required. Such a large demand for input power suggests that a better method of RF/microwave power generation is required. The price paid for using a linear amplifier where high linearity is unnecessary includes higher initial and operating costs, lower DC-to-RF conversion efficiency, high power consumption, higher power dissipation and the accompanying need for higher capacity heat removal means, and an amplifier that is more prone to parasitic oscillation. The first use of a higher efficiency mode of power generation was described by Baxandall in 1959. This higher efficiency mode, Class-D, is achieved through distinct switching techniques to reduce the power losses associated with switching, conduction, and gate drive losses of a given transistor.

  14. The path to fusion power.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn Smith, Chris; Ward, David

    2007-04-15

    Fusion is potentially an environmentally responsible and intrinsically safe source of essentially limitless power. It should be possible to build viable fusion power stations, and it looks as if the cost of fusion power will be reasonable. But time is needed to further develop the technology and to test in power station conditions the materials that would be used in their construction. Assuming no major adverse surprises, an orderly fusion development programme could lead to a prototype fusion power station putting electricity into the grid within 30 years, with commercial fusion power following some 10 or more years later. In the second half of the century, fusion could therefore be an important part of the portfolio of measures that are needed to cope with rising demand for energy in an environmentally responsible manner. In this paper, we describe the basics of fusion, its potential attractions, the status of fusion R&D, the remaining challenges and how they will be tackled at the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor and the proposed International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility, and the timetable for the subsequent commercialization of fusion power.

  15. Cascade: a high-efficiency ICF power reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, J.H.

    1985-10-31

    Cascade attains a net power-plant efficiency of 49% and its cost is competitive with high-temperature gas-cooled reactor, pressurized-water reactor, and coal-fired power plants. The Cascade reactor and blanket are made of ceramic materials and activation is 6 times less than that of the MARS Tandem Mirror Reactor operating at comparable power. Hands-on maintenance of the heat exchangers is possible one day after shutdown. Essentially all tritium is recovered in the vacuum system, with the remainder recovered from the helium power conversion loop. Tritium leakage external to the vacuum system and power conversion loop is only 0.03 Ci/d.

  16. High efficiency fuel cell/advanced turbine power cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Morehead, H.

    1996-12-31

    The following figures are included: Westinghouse (W.) SOFC pilot manufacturing facility; cell scale-up plan; W. 25 kW SOFC unit at the utility`s facility on Rokko Island; pressure effect on SOFC power and efficiency; SureCELL{trademark} vs conventional gas turbine plants; SureCELL{trademark} product line for distributed power applications; 20 MW pressurized SOFC/gas turbine power plant; 10 MW SOFT/CT power plant; SureCELL{trademark} plant concept design requirements; and W. SOFC market entry.

  17. High efficiency GaP power conversion for Betavoltaic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, Paul E.; Dinetta, Louis C.; Barnett, Allen M.

    1994-01-01

    AstroPower is developing a gallium phosphide (GaP) based energy converter optimized for radio luminescent light-based power supplies. A 'two-step' or 'indirect' process is used where a phosphor is excited by radioactive decay products to produce light that is then converted to electricity by a photovoltaic energy converter. This indirect conversion of beta-radiation to electrical energy can be realized by applying recent developments in tritium based radio luminescent (RL) light sources in combination with the high conversion efficiencies that can be achieved under low illumination with low leakage, gallium phosphide based devices. This tritium to light approach is inherently safer than battery designs that incorporate high activity radionuclides because the beta particles emitted by tritium are of low average energy and are easily stopped by a thin layer of glass. GaP layers were grown by liquid phase epitaxy and p/n junction devices were fabricated and characterized for low light intensity power conversion. AstroPower has demonstrated the feasibility of the GaP based energy converter with the following key results: 23.54 percent conversion efficiency under 968 muW/sq cm 440 nm blue light, 14.59 percent conversion efficiency for 2.85 muW/sq cm 440 nm blue light, and fabrication of working 5 V array. We have also determined that at least 20 muW/sq cm optical power is available for betavoltaic power systems. Successful developments of this device is an enabling technology for low volume, safe, high voltage, milliwatt power supplies with service lifetimes in excess of 12 years.

  18. High efficiency GaP power conversion for Betavoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Paul E.; Dinetta, Louis C.; Barnett, Allen M.

    1994-09-01

    AstroPower is developing a gallium phosphide (GaP) based energy converter optimized for radio luminescent light-based power supplies. A 'two-step' or 'indirect' process is used where a phosphor is excited by radioactive decay products to produce light that is then converted to electricity by a photovoltaic energy converter. This indirect conversion of beta-radiation to electrical energy can be realized by applying recent developments in tritium based radio luminescent (RL) light sources in combination with the high conversion efficiencies that can be achieved under low illumination with low leakage, gallium phosphide based devices. This tritium to light approach is inherently safer than battery designs that incorporate high activity radionuclides because the beta particles emitted by tritium are of low average energy and are easily stopped by a thin layer of glass. GaP layers were grown by liquid phase epitaxy and p/n junction devices were fabricated and characterized for low light intensity power conversion. AstroPower has demonstrated the feasibility of the GaP based energy converter with the following key results: 23.54 percent conversion efficiency under 968 muW/sq cm 440 nm blue light, 14.59 percent conversion efficiency for 2.85 muW/sq cm 440 nm blue light, and fabrication of working 5 V array. We have also determined that at least 20 muW/sq cm optical power is available for betavoltaic power systems. Successful developments of this device is an enabling technology for low volume, safe, high voltage, milliwatt power supplies with service lifetimes in excess of 12 years.

  19. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  20. High-Efficiency Hall Thruster Discharge Power Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaquish, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Busek Company, Inc., is designing, building, and testing a new printed circuit board converter. The new converter consists of two series or parallel boards (slices) intended to power a high-voltage Hall accelerator (HiVHAC) thruster or other similarly sized electric propulsion devices. The converter accepts 80- to 160-V input and generates 200- to 700-V isolated output while delivering continually adjustable 300-W to 3.5-kW power. Busek built and demonstrated one board that achieved nearly 94 percent efficiency the first time it was turned on, with projected efficiency exceeding 97 percent following timing software optimization. The board has a projected specific mass of 1.2 kg/kW, achieved through high-frequency switching. In Phase II, Busek optimized to exceed 97 percent efficiency and built a second prototype in a form factor more appropriate for flight. This converter then was integrated with a set of upgraded existing boards for powering magnets and the cathode. The program culminated with integrating the entire power processing unit and testing it on a Busek thruster and on NASA's HiVHAC thruster.

  1. High efficiency carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, G.

    1995-10-19

    Carbonate fuel cells developed by Energy Research Corporation, in commercial 2.85 MW size, have an efficiency of 57.9 percent. Studies of higher efficiency hybrid power cycles were conducted in cooperation with METC to identify an economically competitive system with an efficiency in excess of 65 percent. A hybrid power cycle was identified that includes a direct carbonate fuel cell, a gas turbine and a steam cycle, which generates power at a LHV efficiency in excess of 70 percent. This new system is called a Tandem Technology Cycle (TTC). In a TTC operating on natural gas fuel, 95 percent of the fuel is mixed with recycled fuel cell anode exhaust, providing water for the reforming of the fuel, and flows to a direct carbonate fuel cell system which generates 72 percent of the power. The portion of the fuel cell anode exhaust which is not recycled, is burned and heat is transferred to the compressed air from a gas turbine, raising its temperature to 1800{degrees}F. The stream is then heated to 2000{degrees}F in the gas turbine burner and expands through the turbine generating 13 percent of the power. Half the exhaust from the gas turbine flows to the anode exhaust burner, and the remainder flows to the fuel cell cathodes providing the O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} needed in the electrochemical reaction. Exhaust from the fuel cells flows to a steam system which includes a heat recovery steam generator and stages steam turbine which generates 15 percent of the TTC system power. Studies of the TTC for 200-MW and 20-MW size plants quantified performance, emissions and cost-of-electricity, and compared the characteristics of the TTC to gas turbine combined cycles. A 200-MW TTC plant has an efficiency of 72.6 percent, and is relatively insensitive to ambient temperature, but requires a heat exchanger capable of 2000{degrees}F. The estimated cost of electricity is 45.8 mills/kWhr which is not competitive with a combined cycle in installations where fuel cost is under $5.8/MMBtu.

  2. The quest for fusion power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, Steven C.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion power is one of a very few sustainable options to replace fossil fuels as the world's primary energy source. Although the conditions for fusion have been reached, much remains to be done to turn scientific success into commercial electrical power.

  3. High-Efficiency, Low-Weight Power Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welsh, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    Technology for design and fabrication of radically new type of conductioncooled high-power (25 kVA) lightweight transformer having outstanding thermal and electrical characteristics. Fulfills longstanding need for conduction-cooled transformers and magnetics with low internal thermal resistances. Development techniques limited to conductive heat transfer, since other techniques such as liquid cooling, forced liquid cooling, and evaporative cooling of transformers impractical in zero-gravity space environment. Transformer uniquely designed: mechanical structure also serves as thermal paths for conduction cooling of magnetic core and windings.

  4. Development of high efficiency thermophotovoltaics for space power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Uppal, P.; Svensson, S.P.; Gill, D.; Loughin, S.

    1996-03-01

    This paper reports recent progress on thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices for space power applications. Previous investigations (Schock 1994 and Ewell 1993) indicate that the TPV approach may offer greater efficiency than conventional thermoelectric conversion. We discuss an approach based on photovoltaic (PV) devices made from ternary and quaternary III-V alloys, using dielectric and plasma filters. The objective is to develop a TPV cell and filter which is {open_quote}{open_quote}tunable{close_quote}{close_quote} to the emission spectrum of radioisotope or reactor heat sources, at temperatures in the range of 1273{endash}1473 K. An advantage of quaternary III-V semiconductors is that devices can be fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on a suitable binary substrate, such as GaSb or InAs, and the band gap and lattice constant can be adjusted independently to match requirements. Energy gaps from 0.5 to 0.72 eV can be obtained. The use of Al as one component of a III-V quaternary provides exceptional adjustability of the gap, while the use of Sb as one component reduces surface recombination velocity{emdash}enhancing collection efficiency. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. The path to fusion power.

    PubMed

    Smith, Chris Llewellyn; Cowley, Steve

    2010-03-13

    The promise, status and challenges of developing fusion power are outlined. The key physics and engineering principles are described and recent progress quantified. As the successful demonstration of 16 MW of fusion in 1997 in the Joint European Torus showed, fusion works. The central issue is therefore to make it work reliably and economically on the scale of a power station. We argue that to meet this challenge in 30 years we must follow the aggressive programme known as the 'Fast Track to Fusion'. This programme is described in some detail.

  6. High Efficiency Ka-Band Solid State Power Amplifier Waveguide Power Combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chevalier, Christine T.; Freeman, Jon C.

    2010-01-01

    A novel Ka-band high efficiency asymmetric waveguide four-port combiner for coherent combining of two Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Solid State Power Amplifiers (SSPAs) having unequal outputs has been successfully designed, fabricated and characterized over the NASA deep space frequency band from 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The measured combiner efficiency is greater than 90 percent, the return loss greater than 18 dB and input port isolation greater than 22 dB. The manufactured combiner was designed for an input power ratio of 2:1 but can be custom designed for any arbitrary power ratio. Applications considered are NASA s space communications systems needing 6 to 10 W of radio frequency (RF) power. This Technical Memorandum (TM) is an expanded version of the article recently published in Institute of Engineering and Technology (IET) Electronics Letters.

  7. Pulsed Power Driven Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    SLUTZ,STEPHEN A.

    1999-11-22

    Pulsed power is a robust and inexpensive technology for obtaining high powers. Considerable progress has been made on developing light ion beams as a means of transporting this power to inertial fusion capsules. However, further progress is hampered by the lack of an adequate ion source. Alternatively, z-pinches can efficiently convert pulsed power into thermal radiation, which can be used to drive an inertial fusion capsule. However, a z-pinch driven fusion explosion will destroy a portion of the transmission line that delivers the electrical power to the z-pinch. They investigate several options for providing standoff for z-pinch driven fusion. Recyclable Transmission Lines (RTLs) appear to be the most promising approach.

  8. Fusion Power measurement at ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Bertalot, L.; Barnsley, R.; Krasilnikov, V.; Stott, P.; Suarez, A.; Vayakis, G.; Walsh, M.

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear fusion research aims to provide energy for the future in a sustainable way and the ITER project scope is to demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear fusion energy. ITER is a nuclear experimental reactor based on a large scale fusion plasma (tokamak type) device generating Deuterium - Tritium (DT) fusion reactions with emission of 14 MeV neutrons producing up to 700 MW fusion power. The measurement of fusion power, i.e. total neutron emissivity, will play an important role for achieving ITER goals, in particular the fusion gain factor Q related to the reactor performance. Particular attention is given also to the development of the neutron calibration strategy whose main scope is to achieve the required accuracy of 10% for the measurement of fusion power. Neutron Flux Monitors located in diagnostic ports and inside the vacuum vessel will measure ITER total neutron emissivity, expected to range from 1014 n/s in Deuterium - Deuterium (DD) plasmas up to almost 10{sup 21} n/s in DT plasmas. The neutron detection systems as well all other ITER diagnostics have to withstand high nuclear radiation and electromagnetic fields as well ultrahigh vacuum and thermal loads. (authors)

  9. Conversion Tower for Dispatchable Solar Power: High-Efficiency Solar-Electric Conversion Power Tower

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-11

    HEATS Project: Abengoa Solar is developing a high-efficiency solar-electric conversion tower to enable low-cost, fully dispatchable solar energy generation. Abengoa’s conversion tower utilizes new system architecture and a two-phase thermal energy storage media with an efficient supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) power cycle. The company is using a high-temperature heat-transfer fluid with a phase change in between its hot and cold operating temperature. The fluid serves as a heat storage material and is cheaper and more efficient than conventional heat-storage materials, like molten salt. It also allows the use of a high heat flux solar receiver, advanced high thermal energy density storage, and more efficient power cycles.

  10. Cascade inertial-confinement-fusion power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, J.H.; Maya, I.

    1985-11-13

    The Cascade reactor is double-cone shaped with a maximum radius of 5 m. It rotates at 50 rpm. The average temperature of a three-material flowing granular blanket leaving the reactor is 1440 K. Heat from the blanket is transferred to helium gas in a shell- and ceramic-tube-type heat exchanger that has a separate region for each blanket material. Diffusion of tritium from the blanket granules through the heat exchanger is only 25 Ci/d, so no intermediate loop is needed for isolation. We selected a simple once-through, regenerative, 5-MPa helium gas-turbine (Brayton) cycle for power conversion because of its simplicity and high efficiency. Fusion power is 1500 MW; this is multiplied to 1670 MW/sub t/ in the blanket. Power conversion efficiency is 55%. Net electric power is 815 MW/sub e/, produced with a net plant efficiency of 49%.

  11. High efficiency WCDMA power amplifier with Pulsed Load Modulation (PLM) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Shu-Hsien

    In wireless communication, high data rate complex modulation is used for spectral efficiency. However, power efficiency of power amplifier degrades when complex modulation is applied. Therefore, efficiency enhancement is necessary to maintain the performance. However, conventional efficiency enhancement schemes are nonlinear and performance improvement can only be optimized over a small range of power level. In order to preserve linearity and power efficiency, we propose a new digital power amplification technique "Pulsed Load Modulation (PLM)" for high efficiency and linear amplification. The PLM technique realizes load impedance modulation in digital fashion which is insensitive to device nonlinearity. Furthermore, the optimum power efficiency can be maintained over a wide range of output power. In this work, a PLM power amplifier module has been fabricated and to demonstrate the ability of PLM to provide high efficiency and linear amplification.

  12. Progress in pulsed power fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Quintenz, J.P.; Adams, R.G.; Bailey, J.E.

    1996-07-01

    Pulsed power offers and efficient, high energy, economical source of x-rays for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. We are pursuing two main approaches to ICF driven with pulsed power accelerators: intense light ion beams and z-pinches. This paper describes recent progress in each approach and plans for future development.

  13. Power scaling of high-efficiency 1.5 μm cascaded Raman fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Supradeepa, V R; Nicholson, Jeffrey W

    2013-07-15

    High-power fiber lasers operating at the 1.5 μm wavelength region have attractive features, such as eye safety and atmospheric transparency, and cascaded Raman fiber lasers offer a convenient method to obtain high-power sources at these wavelengths. A limitation to power scaling, however, has been the lower conversion efficiency of these lasers. We recently introduced a high-efficiency architecture for high-power cascaded Raman fiber lasers applicable for 1.5 μm fiber lasers. Here we demonstrate further power scaling using this new architecture. Using numerical simulations, we identify the ideal operating conditions for the new architecture. We demonstrate a high-efficiency 1480 nm cascaded Raman fiber laser with an output power of 301 W, comparable to record power levels achieved with rare-earth-doped fiber lasers in the 1.5 μm wavelength region.

  14. A high efficiency C-band internally-matched harmonic tuning GaN power amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.; Zhao, B. C.; Zheng, J. X.; Zhang, H. S.; Zheng, X. F.; Ma, X. H.; Hao, Y.; Ma, P. J.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a high efficiency C-band gallium nitride (GaN) internally-matched power amplifier (PA) is presented. This amplifier consists of 2-chips of self-developed GaN high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) with 16 mm total gate width on SiC substrate. New harmonic manipulation circuits are induced both in the input and output matching networks for high efficiency matching at fundamental and 2nd-harmonic frequency, respectively. The developed amplifier has achieved 72.1% power added efficiency (PAE) with 107.4 W output power at 5 GHz. To the best of our knowledge, this amplifier exhibits the highest PAE in C-band GaN HEMT amplifiers with over 100 W output power. Additionally, 1000 hours' aging test reveals high reliability for practical applications.

  15. Time-reversal duality of high-efficiency RF power amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Reveyrand, T; Ramos, I; Popovic, Z

    2012-12-06

    The similarity between RF power amplifiers and rectifiers is discussed. It is shown that the same high-efficiency harmonically-terminated power amplifier can be operated in a dual rectifier mode. Nonlinear simulations with a GaN HEMT transistor model show the time-reversal intrinsic voltage and current waveform relationship between a class-F amplifier and rectifier. Measurements on a class-F-1 amplifier and rectifier at 2.14 GHz demonstrate over 80% efficiency in both cases.

  16. Highly efficient and high-power diode-pumped femtosecond Yb:LYSO laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Wenlong; Wang, Zhaohua; Zhu, Jiangfeng; Zheng, Lihe; Xu, Jun; Wei, Zhiyi

    2017-04-01

    A diode-pumped high-power femtosecond Yb:LYSO laser with high efficiency is demonstrated. With a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror for passive mode-locking and a Gires–Tournois interferometer mirror for intracavity dispersion compensation, stable mode-locking pulses of 297 fs duration at 1042 nm were obtained. The maximum average power of 3.07 W was realized under 5.17 W absorbed pump power, corresponding to as high as 59.4% opt–opt efficiency. The single pulse energy and peak power are about 35.5 nJ and 119.5 kW, respectively.

  17. Magnetic fusion commercial power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, John

    1994-09-01

    Toroidal magnetic systems offer the best opportunity to make a commercial fusion power plant. They have, between them, all the features needed; however, no one system yet meets the ideal requirements. The tokamak is the most advanced system, and the proposed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) will build upon the existing program to prepare for an advanced tokamak demonstration plant. Complementary toroidal systems such as the spherical torus, stellarator, reversed-field pinch, field-reversed configuration, and spheromak offer, between them, potential advantages in each area and should be studied in a balanced fusion development program.

  18. Advanced Concepts: Aneutronic Fusion Power and Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Aneutronic Fusion for In-Space thrust, power. Clean energy & potential nuclear gains. Fusion plant concepts, potential to use advanced fuels. Methods to harness ionic momentum for high Isp thrust plus direct power conversion into electricity will be presented.

  19. Fusion power for space propulsion.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, R.; Rayle, W.; Reinmann, J.

    1972-01-01

    Principles of operation, interplanetary orbit-to-orbit mission capabilities, technical problems, and environmental safeguards are examined for thermonuclear fusion propulsion systems. Two systems examined include (1) a fusion-electric concept in which kinetic energy of charged particles from the plasma is converted into electric power (for accelerating the propellant in an electrostatic thrustor) by the van de Graaf generator principle and (2) the direct fusion rocket in which energetic plasma lost from the reactor has a suitable amount of added propellant to obtain the optimum exhaust velocity. The deuterium-tritium and the deuterium/helium-3 reactions are considered as suitable candidates, and attention is given to problems of cryogenic refrigeration systems, magnet shielding, and high-energy particle extraction and guidance.

  20. Fusion power for space propulsion.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, R.; Rayle, W.; Reinmann, J.

    1972-01-01

    Principles of operation, interplanetary orbit-to-orbit mission capabilities, technical problems, and environmental safeguards are examined for thermonuclear fusion propulsion systems. Two systems examined include (1) a fusion-electric concept in which kinetic energy of charged particles from the plasma is converted into electric power (for accelerating the propellant in an electrostatic thrustor) by the van de Graaf generator principle and (2) the direct fusion rocket in which energetic plasma lost from the reactor has a suitable amount of added propellant to obtain the optimum exhaust velocity. The deuterium-tritium and the deuterium/helium-3 reactions are considered as suitable candidates, and attention is given to problems of cryogenic refrigeration systems, magnet shielding, and high-energy particle extraction and guidance.

  1. Design and fabrication of high efficiency power coupler between different photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Wei; Deng, Jun; Sahadevan, Ajeesh M.; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Liyong; Li, Xiangyin; Bhatia, Charanjit S.; Yang, Hyunsoo; Danner, Aaron J.

    2011-06-01

    Based on inspiration from an inverse optimization strategy and theoretical finite-difference time-domain method simulations, an ultralow loss power coupler between two different photonic crystal waveguides was designed, fabricated and characterized. The experimental results showed that the loss was less than 1 dB for transverse electric polarized light at a wavelength of 1550 nm, which is consistent with expectations from numerical modeling. High efficiency optical couplers are critical for development of integrated optical circuit functionality.

  2. Ku-band high efficiency GaAs MMIC power amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tserng, H. Q.; Witkowski, L. C.; Wurtele, M.; Saunier, Paul

    1988-01-01

    The development of Ku-band high efficiency GaAs MMIC power amplifiers is examined. Three amplifier modules operating over the 13 to 15 GHz frequency range are to be developed. The first MMIC is a 1 W variable power amplifier (VPA) with 35 percent efficiency. On-chip digital gain control is to be provided. The second MMIC is a medium power amplifier (MPA) with an output power goal of 1 W and 40 percent power-added efficiency. The third MMIC is a high power amplifier (HPA) with 4 W output power goal and 40 percent power-added efficiency. An output power of 0.36 W/mm with 49 percent efficiency was obtained on an ion implanted single gate MESFET at 15 GHz. On a dual gate MESFET, an output power of 0.42 W/mm with 27 percent efficiency was obtained. A mask set was designed that includes single stage, two stage, and three stage single gate amplifiers. A single stage 600 micron amplifier produced 0.4 W/mm output power with 40 percent efficiency at 14 GHz. A four stage dual gate amplifier generated 500 mW of output power with 20 dB gain at 17 GHz. A four-bit digital-to-analog converter was designed and fabricated which has an output swing of -3 V to +/- 1 V.

  3. Electrical heating of soils using high efficiency electrode patterns and power phases

    DOEpatents

    Buettner, Harley M.

    1999-01-01

    Powerline-frequency electrical (joule) heating of soils using a high efficiency electrode configuration and power phase arrangement. The electrode configuration consists of several heating or current injection electrodes around the periphery of a volume of soil to be heated, all electrodes being connected to one phase of a multi-phase or a single-phase power system, and a return or extraction electrode or electrodes located inside the volume to be heated being connected to the remaining phases of the multi-phase power system or to the neutral side of the single-phase power source. This electrode configuration and power phase arrangement can be utilized anywhere where powerline frequency soil heating is applicable and thus has many potential uses including removal of volatile organic compounds such as gasoline and tricholorethylene (TCE) from contaminated areas.

  4. Strained-graphene-based highly efficient quantum heat engine operating at maximum power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Arjun; Benjamin, Colin

    2017-09-01

    A strained graphene monolayer is shown to operate as a highly efficient quantum heat engine delivering maximum power. The efficiency and power of the proposed device exceeds that of recent proposals. The reason for these excellent characteristics is that strain enables complete valley separation in transmittance through the device, implying that increasing strain leads to very high Seebeck coefficient as well as lower conductance. In addition, since time-reversal symmetry is unbroken in our system, the proposed strained graphene quantum heat engine can also act as a high-performance refrigerator.

  5. Pulsed Power Fusion Program update

    SciTech Connect

    Quintenz, J.P.; Adams, R.G.; Allshouse, G.O.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy has supported a substantial research program in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) since the early 1970s. Over the course of the ensuing 25 years, pulsed power energy, efficiency, and relatively low cost of the technology when compared to the mainline ICF approach involving large glass lasers. These compelling advantages of pulsed power, however, have been tempered with the difficulty that has been encountered in concentrating the energy in space and time to create the high energy and power density required to achieve temperatures useful in indirect drive ICF. Since the Beams `96 meeting two years ago, the situation has changed dramatically and extremely high x-ray power ({approximately}290 TW) and energy ({approximately}1.8 MJ) have been produced in fast x-pinch implosions on the Z accelerator. These sources have been utilized to heat hohlraums to >150 eV and have opened the door to important ICF capsule experiments.

  6. High brilliance and high efficiency: optimized high power diode laser bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hülsewede, R.; Schulze, H.; Sebastian, J.; Schröder, D.; Meusel, J.; Hennig, P.

    2008-02-01

    The strong increasing laser market has ongoing demands to reduce the costs of diode laser pumped systems. For that reason JENOPTIK Diode Lab GmbH (JDL) optimized the bar brilliance (small vertical far field divergence) and bar efficiency (higher optical power operation) with respect to the pump applications. High efficiency reduces the costs for mounting and cooling and high brilliance increases the coupling efficiency. Both are carefully adjusted in the 9xx nm - high power diode laser bars for pump applications in disc- and fiber lasers. Based on low loss waveguide structures high brilliance bars with 19° fast axis beam divergence (FWHM) with 58 % maximum efficiency and 27° fast axis beam divergence (FWHM) with 62 % maximum efficiency are developed. Mounted on conductive cooled heat sinks high power operation with lifetime > 20.000 hours at 120 W output power level (50 % filling factor bars) and 80W (20 % filling factor bars) is demonstrated. 808nm bars used as pump sources for Nd:YAG solid state lasers are still dominating in the market. With respect to the demands on high reliability at high power operation current results of a 100 W high power life time test are showing more than 9000 hour operation time for passively cooled packaged high efficiency 50 % filling factor bars. Measurement of the COMD-level after this hard pulse life time test demonstrates very high power levels with no significant droop in COMD-power level. This confirms the high facet stability of JDL's facet technology. New high power diode laser bars with wavelength of 825 nm and 885 nm are still under development and first results are presented.

  7. Volume Bragg grating narrowed high-power and highly efficient cladding-pumped Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Yao, Weichao; Zhao, Chujun; Shen, Deyuan; Fan, Dianyuan

    2014-12-10

    High-power and highly efficient operation of a single-mode cladding-pumped Raman fiber laser with narrow lasing bandwidth is demonstrated. The spectral narrowing was realized by an external cavity containing a volume Bragg grating with a center wavelength of 1658 nm. A maximum output power of 10.4 W at 1658.3 nm with a spectral linewidth (FWHM) of ∼0.1  nm was obtained for the launched pump power of 18.4 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 109% with respect to the launched pump power. Lasing characteristics of free-running operation are also evaluated and discussed.

  8. Evolution of Automotive Chopper Circuits Towards Ultra High Efficiency and Power Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovsky, Martin; Tsuruta, Yukinori; Kawamura, Atsuo

    Automotive industry is considered to be one of the main contributors to environmental pollution and global warming. Therefore, many car manufacturers are in near future planning to introduce hybrid electric vehicles (HEV), fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV) and pure electric vehicles (EV) to make our cars more environmentally friendly. These new vehicles require highly efficient and small power converters. In recent years, considerable improvements were made in designing such converters. In this paper, an approach based on so called Snubber Assisted Zero Voltage and Zero Current Switching topology otherwise also known as SAZZ is presented. This topology has evolved to be one of the leaders in the field of highly efficient converters with high power densities. Evolution and main features of this topology are briefly discussed. Capabilities of the topology are demonstrated on two case study prototypes based on different design approaches. The prototypes are designed to be fully bi-directional for peak power output of 30kW. Both designs reached efficiencies close to 99% in wide load range. Power densities over 40kW/litre are attainable in the same time. Combination of MOSFET technology and SAZZ topology is shown to be very beneficial to converters designed for EV applications.

  9. High efficiency fuel cell based uninterruptible power supply for digital equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, James; Tamizhmani, Govindasamy

    Eliminating the ac-dc converter (such as a computer's power supply), in a dc system when using a fuel cell based uninterruptible power supply (UPS), serves several primary functions. Firstly, it eliminates the need for a dc-ac inverter, and secondly, it eliminates a usually highly inefficient component-the power supply. Multiple conversions result in multiple inefficiencies. By replacing the computer's ac power supply with a high efficiency dc power supply capable of operating directly from a fuel cell - and thereby eliminating the inverter - the overall efficiency of the UPS can be increased by 50% or more. This is essential considering that the primary function of a fuel cell based UPS is long-term operation of the system, and poor efficiency equates to higher fuel consumption. Furthermore, inefficient systems have greater power demands, and therefore a larger fuel cell stack is needed to power them. At the present cost of fuel cell systems, this is a considerable problem. The easiest way to accomplish a direct dc UPS is to replace the computer's ac-dc power supply with a dc-dc power supply.

  10. A low-power, high-efficiency Ka-band TWTA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curren, Arthur N.; Dayton, James A., Jr.; Palmer, Raymond W.; Force, Dale A.; Tamashiro, Rodney N.; Wilson, John F.; Dombro, Louis; Harvey, Wayne L.

    1992-01-01

    NASA has developed a new class of Ka-band TWT amplifiers (TWTAs) which achieve their high efficiency/low power performance goals by means of an advanced dynamic velocity taper (DVT). The DVT is characterized by a continuous, nonlinear reduction in helix pitch from its initial synchronous value in the output section of the TWT to near the end of the helix. Another efficiency-maximizing feature is the inclusion of a multistage depressed collector employing oxygen-free, high-conductivity Cu electrodes treated for secondary electron emission suppression by means of ion bombardment. An efficiency of 43 percent is expected to be reached.

  11. High power, high efficiency millimeter wavelength traveling wave tubes for high rate communications from deep space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, James A., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The high-power transmitters needed for high data rate communications from deep space will require a new class of compact, high efficiency traveling wave tubes (TWT's). Many of the recent TWT developments in the microwave frequency range are generically applicable to mm wave devices, in particular much of the technology of computer aided design, cathodes, and multistage depressed collectors. However, because TWT dimensions scale approximately with wavelength, mm wave devices will be physically much smaller with inherently more stringent fabrication tolerances and sensitivity to thermal dissipation.

  12. A low-power, high-efficiency Ka-band TWTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curren, Arthur N.; Dayton, James A., Jr.; Palmer, Raymond W.; Force, Dale A.; Tamashiro, Rodney N.; Wilson, John F.; Dombro, Louis; Harvey, Wayne L.

    1992-03-01

    NASA has developed a new class of Ka-band TWT amplifiers (TWTAs) which achieve their high efficiency/low power performance goals by means of an advanced dynamic velocity taper (DVT). The DVT is characterized by a continuous, nonlinear reduction in helix pitch from its initial synchronous value in the output section of the TWT to near the end of the helix. Another efficiency-maximizing feature is the inclusion of a multistage depressed collector employing oxygen-free, high-conductivity Cu electrodes treated for secondary electron emission suppression by means of ion bombardment. An efficiency of 43 percent is expected to be reached.

  13. High power, high efficiency millimeter wavelength traveling wave tubes for high rate communications from deep space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, James A., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The high-power transmitters needed for high data rate communications from deep space will require a new class of compact, high efficiency traveling wave tubes (TWT's). Many of the recent TWT developments in the microwave frequency range are generically applicable to mm wave devices, in particular much of the technology of computer aided design, cathodes, and multistage depressed collectors. However, because TWT dimensions scale approximately with wavelength, mm wave devices will be physically much smaller with inherently more stringent fabrication tolerances and sensitivity to thermal dissipation.

  14. High-Efficiency Ka-Band Waveguide Two-Way Asymmetric Power Combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.; Simons, R. N.; Freeman, J. C.; Chevalier, C. T.

    2011-01-01

    NASA is planning a number of Space Exploration, Earth Observation and Space Science missions where Ka-band solid-state power amplifiers (SSPAs) could have a role. Monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) based SSPAs with output powers on the order of 10 W at Ka-band frequencies would be adequate to satisfy the data transmission rate requirements at the distances involved. MMICs are a type of integrated circuit fabricated on a GaAs wafer, which operates at micro wave frequencies and performs the function of signal amplification. The highest power Ka-band (31.8 to 32.3 GHz) SSPA to have flown in space had an output power of 2.6 W with an overall efficiency of 14.3 percent. This SSPA was built around discrete GaAs pHEMT (high electron mobility transistor) devices and flew aboard the Deep Space One spacecraft. State-of-the-art GaAs pHEMT-based MMIC power amplifiers (PAs) can deliver RF power at Ka-band frequencies anywhere from 3 W with a power added efficiency (PAE) of 32 percent to 6 W with a PAE of 26 percent. However, to achieve power levels higher than 6 W, the output of several MMIC PAs would need to be combined using a high-efficiency power combiner. Conventional binary waveguide power combiners, based on short-slot and magic-T circuits, require MMIC PAs with identical amplitude and phase characteristics for high combining efficiency. However, due to manufacturing process variations, the output powers of the MMIC PAs tend to be unequal, and hence the need to develop unequal power combiners. A two-way asymmetric magic-T based power combiner for MMIC power amplifiers, which can take in unequal inputs, has been successfully designed, fabricated, and characterized over NASA s Deep Space Network (DSN) frequency range of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The figure is a transparent view of the a sym - metric combiner that shows the 4-port configuration and the internal structure. The rod, post, and iris are positioned by design to achieve the desired asymmetric power ratio

  15. Ka-Band TWT High-Efficiency Power Combiner for High-Rate Data Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee; Vaden, Karl R.; Lesny, Gary G.; Glass, Jeffrey L.

    2007-01-01

    A four-port magic-T hybrid waveguide junction serves as the central component of a high-efficiency two-way power combiner circuit for transmitting a high-rate phase-modulated digital signal at a carrier frequency in the Ka-band (between 27 and 40 GHz). This power combiner was developed to satisfy a specific requirement to efficiently combine the coherent outputs of two traveling-wavetube (TWT) amplifiers that are typically characterized by power levels on the order of 100 W or more. In this application, the use of a waveguide-based power combiner (instead of a coaxial-cable- or microstrip-based power combiner, for example) is dictated by requirements for low loss, high power-handling capability, and broadband response. Combiner efficiencies were typically 90 percent or more over both the linear and saturated output power regions of operation of the TWTs . Figure 1 depicts the basic configuration of the magic-T hybrid junction. The coherent outputs of the two TWTs enter through ports 1 and 4. As a result of the orientations of the electromagnetic fields, which also provides a needed high port-to-port isolation, of these two input signals and the interior design of the magic-T junction, the input powers are divided so as to add in phase at one output port (port 2), and to be opposite in phase and hence cancel each other at the opposite coplanar output port (port 3). The net result is that the output power at port 2 is essentially double that of the output of one TWT, minus the power lost in the magic-T hybrid junction. Optimum performance as a high-efficiency power combiner thus requires a balance of both power and phase at the input ports of the magic-T. Replicas of this two-way combiner can be arranged in a binary configuration to obtain a 2n-way (where n is an integer) combiner. For example, Figure 2 illustrates the use of three two-way combiners to combine the outputs of four TWTs.

  16. A novel power source for high-precision, highly efficient micro w-EDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shun-Tong; Chen, Chi-Hung

    2015-07-01

    The study presents the development of a novel power source for high-precision, highly efficient machining of micropart microstructures using micro wire electrical discharge machining (w-EDM). A novel power source based on a pluri resistance-capacitance (pRC) circuit that can generate a high-frequency, high-peak current with a short pulse train is proposed and designed to enhance the performance of micro w-EDM processes. Switching between transistors is precisely controlled in the designed power source to create a high-frequency short-pulse train current. Various microslot cutting tests in both aluminum and copper alloys are conducted. Experimental results demonstrate that the pRC power source creates instant spark erosion resulting in markedly less material for removal, diminishing discharge crater size, and consequently an improved surface finish. A new evaluation approach for spark erosion ability (SEA) to assess the merits of micro EDM power sources is also proposed. In addition to increasing the speed of micro w-EDM by increasing wire feed rates by 1.6 times the original feed rate, the power source is more appropriate for machining micropart microstructures since there is less thermal breaking. Satisfactory cutting of an elaborate miniature hook-shaped structure and a high-aspect ratio microstructure with a squared-pillar array also reveal that the developed pRC power source is effective, and should be very useful in the manufacture of intricate microparts.

  17. High-efficiency, high-average-power, CW Yb:YAG zigzag slab master oscillator power amplifier at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoming; Xu, Liu; Hu, Hao; Zhou, Tangjian; Sun, Yinhong; Jiang, Hao; Lei, Jun; Lv, Wenqiang; Su, Hua; Shi, Yong; Li, Mi; Wu, Yingchen; Yao, Zhenyu; Zhao, Na; Xu, Xiaoxiao; Gao, Qingsong; Wang, Xiaojun; Tang, Chun

    2016-10-17

    We demonstrate a high-efficiency, high-average-power, CW master oscillator power amplifier based on a conduction-cooled, end-pumped Yb:YAG slab architecture at room temperature (RT). Firstly, the CW amplification property is theoretically analyzed based on the kinetics model for Yb:YAG. To realize high-efficiency laser amplification extraction for RT Yb:YAG, not only intense pump but also a high-power seed laser is of great importance. Experimentally, a composite Yb:YAG crystal slab with three doped and two un-doped segments symmetrically is employed as the gain medium, which is end-pumped by two high-power, 940-nm diode lasers. A high-power, narrow-spectral-width, 1030-nm fiber seed laser then double passes the composite slab to realize efficient power amplification. For 0.8-kW seed input, maximum output power of 3.54 kW is obtained at 6.7 kW of pump power, with the optical conversion efficiency of 41% and the highest slope efficiency of 59%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest power and efficiency reported for Yb:YAG lasing at RT except thin-disk lasers.

  18. Silicon-Carbide Power MOSFET Performance in High Efficiency Boost Power Processing Unit for Extreme Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikpe, Stanley A.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Carr, Gregory A.; Hunter, Don; Ludwig, Lawrence L.; Wood, William; Del Castillo, Linda Y.; Fitzpatrick, Fred; Chen, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Silicon-Carbide device technology has generated much interest in recent years. With superior thermal performance, power ratings and potential switching frequencies over its Silicon counterpart, Silicon-Carbide offers a greater possibility for high powered switching applications in extreme environment. In particular, Silicon-Carbide Metal-Oxide- Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors' (MOSFETs) maturing process technology has produced a plethora of commercially available power dense, low on-state resistance devices capable of switching at high frequencies. A novel hard-switched power processing unit (PPU) is implemented utilizing Silicon-Carbide power devices. Accelerated life data is captured and assessed in conjunction with a damage accumulation model of gate oxide and drain-source junction lifetime to evaluate potential system performance at high temperature environments.

  19. High Efficiency Power Combining of Ka-Band TWTs for High Data Rate Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.; Simons, R. N.; Vaden, K. R.; Lesny, G. G.; Glass, J. L.

    2006-01-01

    Future NASA deep space exploration missions are expected in some cases to require telecommunication systems capable of operating at very high data rates (potentially 1 Gbps or more) for the transmission back to Earth of large volumes of scientific data, which means high frequency transmitters with large bandwidth. Among the Ka band frequencies of interest are the present 500 MHz Deep Space Network (DSN) band of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz and a broader band at 37-38 GHz allocated for space science [1]. The large distances and use of practical antenna sizes dictate the need for high transmitter power of up to 1 kW or more. High electrical efficiency is also a requirement. The approach investigated by NASA GRC is a novel wave guide power combiner architecture based on a hybrid magic-T junction for combining the power output from multiple TWTs [1,2]. This architecture was successfully demonstrated and is capable of both high efficiency (90-95%, depending on frequency) and high data rate transmission (up to 622 Mbps) in a two-way power combiner circuit for two different pairs of Ka band TWTs at two different frequency bands. One pair of TWTs, tested over a frequency range of 29.1 to 29.6 GHz, consisted of two 110-115W TWTs previously used in uplink data transmission evaluation terminals in the NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) program [1,2]. The second pair was two 100W TWTs (Boeing 999H) designed for high efficiency operation (greater than 55%) over the DSN frequency band of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz [3]. The presentation will provide a qualitative description of the wave guide circuit, results for power combining and data transmission measurements, and results of computer modeling of the magic-T and alternative hybrid junctions for improvements in efficiency and power handling capability. The power combiner results presented here are relevant not only to NASA deep space exploration missions, but also to other U.S. Government agency programs.

  20. High-efficiency variable-power class-B dual-gate power FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahl, Inder; Geissberger, Art; Griffin, Edward

    1989-05-01

    The paper reports state-of-the-art measured performance of class-B dual-gate GaAs power FETs fabricated using a highly manufacturable SAG technology. The class-B devices use selective co-implantation for FET channel formation and demonstrate 640 mW/mm (for 2.5 mm FETs) of power at C-band with 45 percent PAE and 11.4-dB gain.

  1. A high-efficiency power cycle in which hydrogen is compressed by absorption in metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Powell, J R; Salzano, F J; Yu, W S; Milau, J S

    1976-07-23

    A high-efficiency power cycle is proposed in which molecular hydrogen gas is used as a working fluid in a regenerative closed Brayton cycle. The hydrogen gas is compressed by an absorption-desorption cycle on metal hydride (FeTiH(x)) beds. Low-temperature solar or geothermal heat (temperature about 100 degrees C) is used for the compression process, and high-temperature fossil fuel or nuclear heat (temperature about 700 degrees C) supplies the expansion work in the turbine. Typically, about 90 percent of the high-temperature heat input is converted to electricity, while about 3 kilowatts of low-temperature heat is required per kilowatt of electrical output.

  2. High Power High Efficiency Ka-Band Power Combiners for Solid-State Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Jon C.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Chevalier, Christine T.

    2006-01-01

    Wide-band power combining units for Ka-band are simulated for use as MMIC amplifier applications. Short-slot couplers as well as magic-tees are the basic elements for the combiners. Wide bandwidth (5 GHz) and low insertion (approx.0.2 dB) and high combining efficiencies (approx.90 percent) are obtained.

  3. Indirect drive targets for fusion power

    DOEpatents

    Amendt, Peter A.; Miles, Robin R.

    2016-10-11

    A hohlraum for an inertial confinement fusion power plant is disclosed. The hohlraum includes a generally cylindrical exterior surface, and an interior rugby ball-shaped surface. Windows over laser entrance holes at each end of the hohlraum enclose inert gas. Infrared reflectors on opposite sides of the central point reflect fusion chamber heat away from the capsule. P2 shields disposed on the infrared reflectors help assure an enhanced and more uniform x-ray bath for the fusion fuel capsule.

  4. Improvement of force factor of magnetostrictive vibration power generator for high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Shota Ueno, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Sotoshi

    2015-05-07

    We develop high power magnetostrictive vibration power generator for battery-free wireless electronics. The generator is based on a cantilever of parallel beam structure consisting of coil-wound Galfenol and stainless plates with permanent magnet for bias. Oscillating force exerted on the tip bends the cantilever in vibration yields stress variation of Galfenol plate, which causes flux variation and generates voltage on coil due to the law of induction. This generator has advantages over conventional, such as piezoelectric or moving magnet types, in the point of high efficiency, highly robust, and low electrical impedance. Our concern is the improvement of energy conversion efficiency dependent on the dimension. Especially, force factor, the conversion ratio of the electromotive force (voltage) on the tip velocity in vibration, has an important role in energy conversion process. First, the theoretical value of the force factor is formulated and then the validity was verified by experiments, where we compare four types of prototype with parameters of the dimension using 7.0 × 1.5 × 50 mm beams of Galfenol with 1606-turn wound coil. In addition, the energy conversion efficiency of the prototypes depending on load resistance was measured. The most efficient prototype exhibits the maximum instantaneous power of 0.73 W and energy of 4.7 mJ at a free vibration of frequency of 202 Hz in the case of applied force is 25 N. Further, it was found that energy conversion efficiency depends not only on the force factor but also on the damping (mechanical loss) of the vibration.

  5. Improvement of force factor of magnetostrictive vibration power generator for high efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Shota; Ueno, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Sotoshi

    2015-05-01

    We develop high power magnetostrictive vibration power generator for battery-free wireless electronics. The generator is based on a cantilever of parallel beam structure consisting of coil-wound Galfenol and stainless plates with permanent magnet for bias. Oscillating force exerted on the tip bends the cantilever in vibration yields stress variation of Galfenol plate, which causes flux variation and generates voltage on coil due to the law of induction. This generator has advantages over conventional, such as piezoelectric or moving magnet types, in the point of high efficiency, highly robust, and low electrical impedance. Our concern is the improvement of energy conversion efficiency dependent on the dimension. Especially, force factor, the conversion ratio of the electromotive force (voltage) on the tip velocity in vibration, has an important role in energy conversion process. First, the theoretical value of the force factor is formulated and then the validity was verified by experiments, where we compare four types of prototype with parameters of the dimension using 7.0 × 1.5 × 50 mm beams of Galfenol with 1606-turn wound coil. In addition, the energy conversion efficiency of the prototypes depending on load resistance was measured. The most efficient prototype exhibits the maximum instantaneous power of 0.73 W and energy of 4.7 mJ at a free vibration of frequency of 202 Hz in the case of applied force is 25 N. Further, it was found that energy conversion efficiency depends not only on the force factor but also on the damping (mechanical loss) of the vibration.

  6. Proceedings of the workshop on very high efficiency fuel cell/gas turbine power cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.C.; Zeh, C.M.

    1995-10-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) held a workshop on October 19, 1995, to explore the subject of Very High Efficiency Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine Power Plants. The combination of these two technologies has the potential for enormous synergies in that it offers a solution to two important problems: the low efficiency and relatively high nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions of small gas turbines, and the high cost of small fuel-cell power plants. Small gas turbines, with capacities of less than 10 megawatts (MW), typically have efficiencies in the 25 to 30 percent range. Small fuel cells are predicted to cost $1,000 to 1,500 per kilowatt (kW) when commercially available in the years after 2000. If the early efforts are successful in commercializing these products, the foundation will be laid for scaling up the technology to large-scale power plants. This is important since the combination, at the scale of 200 MW or more, can achieve efficiencies of 75 percent or more. This is significantly higher than other technologies for generating electricity from natural gas. As a result, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions could also be significantly reduced. In comparison, the best currently available, large scale, combined-cycle power plants have an efficiency of about 58 percent. That level will likely increase to 60 to 62 percent over the next decade, as a result of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) program sponsored by DOE. The highest efficiencies currently projected for several fuel cell technologies, which are now under development, are in the range of 55 to 65 percent for stand-alone, fuel-cell power plants. The presentations focused on the cycle analysis studies that have been done as well as suggestions from gas turbine and fuel cell vendors on how to arrange these components in practical and reliable configurations. Individual projects have been processed separately for the United States Department of Energy databases.

  7. Development of Technologies on Innovative-Simplified Nuclear Power Plant using High-Efficiency Steam Injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Shuichi; Narabayashi, Tadashi; Mori, Michitsugu; Iwaki, Chikako; Asanuma, Yutaka; Goto, Shoji

    A Steam Injector (SI) is a simple, compact and passive pump and also acts as a high-performance direct-contact heater. This provides SI with capability to serve also as a direct-contact feed-water heater that heats up feed-water by using extracted steam from turbine. Our technology development aims to significantly simplify equipment and reduce physical quantities by applying "High-Efficiency SI", which are applicable to a wide range of operation regimes beyond the performance and applicable range of existing SIs and enables unprecedented multistage and parallel operation, to the low-pressure feed-water heaters and Emergency Core Cooling System of nuclear power plants, as well as achieve high inherent safety to prevent severe accidents by keeping the core covered with water (a Severe Accident-Free Concept). This paper describes the results of the endurance and performance tests of low-pressure SIs for feed-water heaters with Jet-deaerator and core injection system.

  8. Perspectives on Magnetized Target Fusion Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. L.

    2007-06-01

    One approach to Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) builds upon the ongoing experimental effort (FRX-L) to generate a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) target plasma suitable for translation and cylindrical-liner (i.e., converging flux conserver) implosion. Numerical modeling is underway to elucidate key performance drivers for possible future power-plant extrapolations. The fusion gain, Q (ratio of DT fusion yield to the sum of initial liner kinetic energy plus plasma formation energy), sets the power-plant duty cycle for a nominal design electric power [ e.g. 1,000 MWe(net)]. A pulsed MTF power plant of this type derives from the historic Fast Liner Reactor (FLR) concept and shares attributes with the recent Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) Z-pinch and laser-driven pellet HYLIFE-II conceptual designs.

  9. Progress toward achieving high power and high efficiency semipolar LEDs and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hong

    Performance of current commercially available wurtzite nitride based light-emitting diodes (LEDs), grown along the polar (0001) c-plane orientation, is limited by the presence of polarization-related electric fields inside multi-quantum wells (MQWs). The discontinuities in both spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization at the heterointerfaces result in internal electric fields in the quantum wells. These electric fields cause carrier separation [quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE)] and reduce the radiative recombination rate within the quantum wells. One approach to reduce and possibly eliminate the polarization-related effects is to grow III-nitride devices on crystal planes that are inclined with respect to the c-axis, i.e., on semipolar planes. In this dissertation, metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) has been employed for the homoepitaxial growth of GaN based LEDs on semipolar orientations. As a consequence of growing on high-quality bulk GaN substrates, the LEDs have significantly reduced threading dislocation and stacking fault densities, resulting in remarkable improvements in EQE and output power. High efficiency semipolar (1011) violet-blue and blue LEDs have been demonstrated without any intentional effort to enhance the light extraction from those devices. Optimizations of epitaxial structures have led to increased output power and external quantum efficiency. A silicone encapsulated single quantum well blue LED with peak wavelength of 444 nm with output power of 24.3 mW, external quantum efficiency of 43% and luminous efficacy of 75 lm/W (with phosphorescent coating) at 20 mA has been demonstrated. Polarization fields in strained (1011) and (112¯2) InGaN quantum wells have been experimentally determined through bias-dependent optical studies. Our results show that the polarization field flips its direction in semipolar InGaN quantum wells with large inclination angles (i.e. around 60°). This suggests that there exists a polarization

  10. Performance Assessment of Baseline Cells for the High Efficiency Space Power Systems Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneidegger, Brianne T.

    2012-01-01

    The Enabling Technology Development and Demonstration (ETDD) Program High Efficiency Space Power Systems (HESPS) Project, formerly the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) Energy Storage Project is tasked with developing advanced lithium-ion cells for future NASA Exploration missions. Under this project, components under development via various in-house and contracted efforts are delivered to Saft America for scale-up and integration into cells. Progress toward meeting project goals will be measured by comparing the performance to these cells with cells of a similar format with Saft s state-of-the-art aerospace chemistry. This report discusses the results of testing performed on the first set of baseline cells delivered by Saft to the NASA Glenn Research Center. This build is a cylindrical "DD" geometry with a 10 Ah nameplate capacity. Testing is being performed to establish baseline cell performance at conditions relevant to ETDD HESPS Battery Key Performance Parameter (KPP) goals including various temperatures, rates, and cycle life conditions. Data obtained from these cells will serve as a performance baseline for future cell builds containing optimized ETDD HESPSdeveloped materials. A test plan for these cells was developed to measure cell performance against the high energy cell KPP goals. The goal for cell-level specific energy of the high energy technology is 180 Wh/kg at a C/10 discharge rate and 0 C. The cells should operate for at least 2000 cycles at 100 percent DOD with 80 percent capacity retention. Baseline DD cells delivered 152 Wh/kg at 20 C. This number decreased to 143.9 Wh/kg with a 0 C discharge. This report provides performance data and summarizes results of the testing performed on the DD cells.

  11. High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August, 2000 - July 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.C.

    2002-11-01

    OAK B188 High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August 2000 - July 2001. Currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process is available for commercialization nor has such a process been identified. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. The benefits of this work will include the generation of a low-polluting transportable energy feedstock in an efficient method that has little or no implication for greenhouse gas emissions from a primary energy source whose availability and sources are domestically controlled. This will help to ensure energy for a future transportation/energy infrastructure that is not influenced/controlled by foreign governments. This report describes work accomplished during the second year (Phase 2) of a three year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first year (Phase 1) was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water, in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most, three) for further detailed consideration. Phase 1 met its goals and did select one process, the sulfur-iodine process, for investigation in Phases 2 and 3. The combined goals of Phases 2 and 3 were to select the advanced nuclear reactor best suited to driving the

  12. EDITORIAL: Safety aspects of fusion power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbasov, B. N.

    2007-07-01

    This special issue of Nuclear Fusion contains 13 informative papers that were initially presented at the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Power Plant Safety held in Vienna, Austria, 10-13 July 2006. Following recommendation from the International Fusion Research Council, the IAEA organizes Technical Meetings on Fusion Safety with the aim to bring together experts to discuss the ongoing work, share new ideas and outline general guidance and recommendations on different issues related to safety and environmental (S&E) aspects of fusion research and power facilities. Previous meetings in this series were held in Vienna, Austria (1980), Ispra, Italy (1983), Culham, UK (1986), Jackson Hole, USA (1989), Toronto, Canada (1993), Naka, Japan (1996) and Cannes, France (2000). The recognized progress in fusion research and technology over the last quarter of a century has boosted the awareness of the potential of fusion to be a practically inexhaustible and clean source of energy. The decision to construct the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) represents a landmark in the path to fusion power engineering. Ongoing activities to license ITER in France look for an adequate balance between technological and scientific deliverables and complying with safety requirements. Actually, this is the first instance of licensing a representative fusion machine, and it will very likely shape the way in which a more common basis for establishing safety standards and policies for licensing future fusion power plants will be developed. Now that ITER licensing activities are underway, it is becoming clear that the international fusion community should strengthen its efforts in the area of designing the next generations of fusion power plants—demonstrational and commercial. Therefore, the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Safety focused on the safety aspects of power facilities. Some ITER-related safety issues were reported and discussed owing to their potential

  13. A 1.8-3 GHz-band high efficiency GaAs pHEMT power amplifier MMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Ge; Hongqi, Tao; Xuming, Yu

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes an S-band wideband high efficiency power amplifier based on the Nanjing Electron Device Institute's GaAs pHEMT monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) technology. To realize high efficiency, the two stage power amplifier is designed with a driver ratio of 1 : 8. The low-pass filter/high-pass filter combined matching circuit is applied to the amplifier to reduce the chip size, as well as to realize the optimum impedances over a wide bandwidth for high efficiency at each stage. Biased at class AB under a drain supply voltage of 5 V, the amplifier delivers 33-34 dBm saturated output power across the frequency range of 1.8 to 3 GHz with associated power-added efficiency of 35%-45% and very flat power gain of 25-26 dB in CW mode. The size of this MMIC is very compact with 2.7 × 2.75 mm2.

  14. Artist's concept of fusion-powered vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Travel to distant stars is a long-range goal of Marshall Space Flight Center's Advanced Concept Group. One of the many propulsion systems currently being studied is fusion power. The objective of this and many other alternative propulsion systems is to reduce the costs of space access and to reduce the travel time for planetary missions. One of the major factors is providing an alternate engery source for these missions. Pictured is an artist's concept of future interplanetary space flight using fusion power.

  15. Fusion power: a challenge for materials science.

    PubMed

    Duffy, D M

    2010-07-28

    The selection and design of materials that will withstand the extreme conditions of a fusion power plant has been described as one of the greatest materials science challenges in history. The high particle flux, high thermal load, thermal mechanical stress and the production of transmutation elements combine to produce a uniquely hostile environment. In this paper, the materials favoured for the diverse roles in a fusion power plant are discussed, along with the experimental and modelling techniques that are used to advance the understanding of radiation damage in materials. Areas where further research is necessary are highlighted.

  16. Third-Harmonic Envelope Feedback Method for High-Efficiency Linear Power Amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Shoichi; Ugajin, Mamoru; Harada, Mitsuru

    A new low-power feedback structure for a power amplifier (PA) reduces signal distortion while keeping the power efficiency of the PA high. The feedback structure injects the envelope of the third-order harmonics into the input signal. In adopting this method for a class-A amplifier, we obtain over 10% higher efficiency while maintaining the same adjacent channel power ratio (ACPR). The power consumption of additional circuit is 200µW.

  17. An X-band high-efficiency MMIC power amplifier with 20-dB return losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Huy Minh; Shih, Yi-Chi; Hwang, Vincent D.; Chi, Tom Y.; Kasel, Karl J.; Wang, David C.

    1991-10-01

    The authors describe the design principles and measured performance of an X-band high-efficiency monolithic-microwave-integrated-circuit (MMIC) power amplifier and discuss pertinent factors of the ion-implantation process. Also presented is a worst-case power prediction of the chip performance and a large-signal design using small-signal simulation. This balanced amplifier is fully monolithic with input and output return losses of better than 20 dB provided by Lange couplers. These return losses make it very convenient to cascade with other components. For high-efficiency operation, the drain voltage is 6 V. Across the 40 percent bandwidth from 8 to 12 GHz, the amplifier produces 1.6 to 2.1 W of output power at 33 to 40 percent power-added efficiency. For high-power operation, the drain voltage is 8.5 V. The amplifier can produce 2.4 to 2.8 W of output power at 26 to 29 percent power-added efficiency across the same 40 percent bandwidth.

  18. Triboelectric-pyroelectric-piezoelectric hybrid cell for high-efficiency energy-harvesting and self-powered sensing.

    PubMed

    Zi, Yunlong; Lin, Long; Wang, Jie; Wang, Sihong; Chen, Jun; Fan, Xing; Yang, Po-Kang; Yi, Fang; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-04-08

    A triboelectric-pyroelectric-piezoelectric hybrid cell, consisting of a triboelectric nanogenerator and a pyroelectric-piezoelectric nanogenerator, is developed for highly efficient mechanical energy harvesting through multiple mechanisms. The excellent performance of the hybrid cell enhances the energy-harvesting efficiency significantly (by 26.2% at 1 kΩ load resistance), and enables self-powered sensing, which will lead to a variety of advanced applications.

  19. Ultra-high efficiency photovoltaic cells for large scale solar power generation.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yoshiaki

    2012-01-01

    The primary targets of our project are to drastically improve the photovoltaic conversion efficiency and to develop new energy storage and delivery technologies. Our approach to obtain an efficiency over 40% starts from the improvement of III-V multi-junction solar cells by introducing a novel material for each cell realizing an ideal combination of bandgaps and lattice-matching. Further improvement incorporates quantum structures such as stacked quantum wells and quantum dots, which allow higher degree of freedom in the design of the bandgap and the lattice strain. Highly controlled arrangement of either quantum dots or quantum wells permits the coupling of the wavefunctions, and thus forms intermediate bands in the bandgap of a host material, which allows multiple photon absorption theoretically leading to a conversion efficiency exceeding 50%. In addition to such improvements, microfabrication technology for the integrated high-efficiency cells and the development of novel material systems that realizes high efficiency and low cost at the same time are investigated.

  20. Plasma instrumentation for fusion power reactor control

    SciTech Connect

    Sager, G.T.; Bauer, J.F.; Maya, I.; Miley, G.H.

    1985-07-01

    Feedback control will be implemented in fusion power reactors to guard against unpredicted behavior of the plant and to assure desirable operation. In this study, plasma state feedback requirements for plasma control by systems strongly coupled to the plasma (magnet sets, RF, and neutral beam heating systems, and refueling systems) are estimated. Generic considerations regarding the impact of the power reactor environment on plasma instrumentation are outlined. Solutions are proposed to minimize the impact of the power reactor environment on plasma instrumentation. Key plasma diagnostics are evaluated with respect to their potential for upgrade and implementation as power reactor instruments.

  1. Demonstration of a Highly Efficient Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power System Using Adiabatic Steam Reforming and Anode Gas Recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Michael R.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Mcvay, Gary L.

    2012-05-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are currently being developed for a wide variety of applications because of their high efficiency at multiple power levels. Applications for SOFCs encompass a large range of power levels including 1-2 kW residential combined heat and power applications, 100-250 kW sized systems for distributed generation and grid extension, and MW-scale power plants utilizing coal. This paper reports on the development of a highly efficient, small-scale SOFC power system operating on methane. The system uses adiabatic steam reforming of methane and anode gas recirculation to achieve high net electrical efficiency. The anode exit gas is recirculated and all of the heat and water required for the endothermic reforming reaction are provided by the anode gas emerging from the SOFC stack. Although the single-pass fuel utilization is only about 55%, because of the anode gas recirculation the overall fuel utilization is up to 93%. The demonstrated system achieved gross power output of 1650 to 2150 watts with a maximum net LHV efficiency of 56.7% at 1720 watts. Overall system efficiency could be further improved to over 60% with use of properly sized blowers.

  2. Fusion Propulsion and Power for Future Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froning, H. D., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    There are innovative magnetic and electric confinement fusion power and propulsion system designs with potential for: vacuum specific impulses of 1500-2000 seconds with rocket engine thrust/mass ratios of 5-10 g's; environmentally favorable exhaust emissions if aneutronic fusion propellants can be used; a 2 to 3-fold reduction in the mass of hypersonic airliners and SSTO aerospace planes; a 10 to 20 fold reduction in Mars expedition mass and cost (if propellant from planetary atmospheres is used); and feasibility or in-feasibility of these systems could be confirmed with a modest applied research and exploratory development cost.

  3. Highly efficient welding power supply. Final report, May 1, 1978-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Thommes, J M

    1980-09-01

    The results and findings of an energy efficient welding power development project are presented. The power source developed is to be used for electric arc welding processes in which 3.5 trillion Btu of energy (1978 example year) can be saved annually. The power source development incorporates the use of switch mode power supply techniques in order to convert industrial supply mains (230/460 VAC 3 phi 60 Hz) to appropriate welding voltages and currents (up to 32 volts/up to 300 amps). A series capacitor switch mode power circuit was the circuit technique chosen in order to optimize energy efficiency, costs, reliability, size/weight, and welding performance. Test results demonstrated an effective efficiency (taking into account idle power consumption) of 80 to 91% for the energy efficient power source while the conventional types of power sources tested ranged from 41 to 74% efficiency. Line power factor was also improved for the energy efficient power source. Field tests indicated additional refinements of weld process performance and power source audible noise emission reduction could be beneficial.

  4. Laser space power system for Moon: Ecological safety and high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Smakhtin, A.P.; Mosesov, S.K.

    1997-12-31

    The power supply of a space base placed on the Moon is a central problem in the development of the Moon as the nearest celestial body to the Earth. At the present time some different versions of the Moon`s base power supply with using chemical, solar, and nuclear power converters on the Moon`s surface are considered. The comparative analysis of the use of Space Power Systems which are placed in a low and a high lunar orbits and transmit electromagnetic power from the lunar orbit to the Moon`s base by the trapping of a focused electromagnetic beam is performed in this paper. From the results of this analysis it follows that such Space Power Systems may be an alternative power supply system to traditional systems and they offer few advantages over last mentioned systems in the near future. Space Power System with using solar pumped laser as means for power conversion and power transportation is particularly promising for solution to the problem of power supply of the Moon`s base.

  5. High-efficiency high-power cw solid state lasers for material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Heinz P.; Graf, Thomas; Weber, Rudolf

    2000-02-01

    The maximum power range over which a laser resonator supports stable oscillation is mainly determined by the material constants of the active medium and by the cooling schemes. The power range for stable fundamental-mode operation can be shifted to higher powers with special cavity design and intra-cavity optics but the width of the stability range will be unaffected and can be enlarged only with adaptive optics. We present investigations on a multi- rod laser cavity and a high-power side-pumped laser system. In order to obtain constant beam parameters with varying power we prose a novel self-adaptive method to compensate for the power-dependent thermal lenses in high-power lasers.

  6. Laser-Powered Thrusters for High Efficiency Variable Specific Impulse Missions (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-10

    OF LASER ABLATION PROPULSION LOW TOXICITY FUELS AND COMBUSTION PRODUCTS In our Laser Plasma Microthruster, Glycidyl Azide Polymer (GAP) is the...If the surface is a passive (i.e., non -exothermic) material, inertial confinemt fusion theory allows us to derive expressions for Cm and Isp:4 (16...17) allows us to estimate Isp, where Ψ = (A/2)[Z2(Z+1)]1/3, A is the mean atomic mass number and Z the mean ionic charge in the laser-plasma plume

  7. Alternative lattice options for energy recovery in high-average-power high-efficiency free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, P.; /Northern Illinois U. /NICADD, DeKalb /Fermilab

    2009-03-01

    High-average-power free-electron lasers often rely on energy-recovering linacs. In a high-efficiency free electron laser, the main limitation to high average power stems from the fractional energy spread induced by the free-electron laser process. Managing beams with large fractional energy spread while simultaneously avoiding beam losses is extremely challenging and relies on intricate longitudinal phase space manipulations. In this paper we discuss a possible alternative technique that makes use of an emittance exchange between one of the transverse and the longitudinal phase spaces.

  8. Pulsed power accelerators for particle beam fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T.H.; Barr, G.W.; VanDevender, J.P.; White, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is completing the construction phase of the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I (PBFA-I). Testing of the 36 module, 30 TW, 1 MJ output accelerator is in the initial stages. The 4 MJ, PBFA Marx generator has provided 3.6 MA into water-copper sulfate load resistors with a spread from first to last Marx firing between 15 to 25 ns and an output power of 5.7 TW. This accelerator is a modular, lower voltage, pulsed power device that is capable of scaling to power levels exceeding 100 TW. The elements of the PBFA technology and their integration into an accelerator system for particle beam fusion will be discussed.

  9. Switching coordination of distributed dc-dc converters for highly efficient photovoltaic power plants

    DOEpatents

    Agamy, Mohammed; Elasser, Ahmed; Sabate, Juan Antonio; Galbraith, Anthony William; Harfman Todorovic, Maja

    2014-09-09

    A distributed photovoltaic (PV) power plant includes a plurality of distributed dc-dc converters. The dc-dc converters are configured to switch in coordination with one another such that at least one dc-dc converter transfers power to a common dc-bus based upon the total system power available from one or more corresponding strings of PV modules. Due to the coordinated switching of the dc-dc converters, each dc-dc converter transferring power to the common dc-bus continues to operate within its optimal efficiency range as well as to optimize the maximum power point tracking in order to increase the energy yield of the PV power plant.

  10. Methodology for Scaling Fusion Power Plant Availability

    SciTech Connect

    Lester M. Waganer

    2011-01-04

    Normally in the U.S. fusion power plant conceptual design studies, the development of the plant availability and the plant capital and operating costs makes the implicit assumption that the plant is a 10th of a kind fusion power plant. This is in keeping with the DOE guidelines published in the 1970s, the PNL report1, "Fusion Reactor Design Studies - Standard Accounts for Cost Estimates. This assumption specifically defines the level of the industry and technology maturity and eliminates the need to define the necessary research and development efforts and costs to construct a one of a kind or the first of a kind power plant. It also assumes all the "teething" problems have been solved and the plant can operate in the manner intended. The plant availability analysis assumes all maintenance actions have been refined and optimized by the operation of the prior nine or so plants. The actions are defined to be as quick and efficient as possible. This study will present a methodology to enable estimation of the availability of the one of a kind (one OAK) plant or first of a kind (1st OAK) plant. To clarify, one of the OAK facilities might be the pilot plant or the demo plant that is prototypical of the next generation power plant, but it is not a full-scale fusion power plant with all fully validated "mature" subsystems. The first OAK facility is truly the first commercial plant of a common design that represents the next generation plant design. However, its subsystems, maintenance equipment and procedures will continue to be refined to achieve the goals for the 10th OAK power plant.

  11. High-efficiency wireless power delivery for medical implants using hybrid coils.

    PubMed

    Artan, N Sertac; Patel, Ramesh C; Ning, Chengzhi; Chao, H Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    With the exciting developments in the implant technology allowing sophisticated signal processing, stimulation, and drug delivery capabilities, there is new hope for many patients of epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, and stroke to improve their quality of life. Such implants require high power to deliver the promised rich functionality. Yet, delivering high power to implants without damaging the tissue due to heating while keeping the implant footprint small is a challenge. In this paper, we propose a hybrid multi-layer coil as the secondary coil to provide a power and space-efficient solution. The proposed coils can deliver power to an implant for long durations without increasing the skin temperature over 1C.

  12. Self-Powered Wireless Smart Sensor Node Enabled by an Ultrastable, Highly Efficient, and Superhydrophobic-Surface-Based Triboelectric Nanogenerator.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kun; Wang, Zhong Lin; Yang, Ya

    2016-09-27

    Wireless sensor networks will be responsible for a majority of the fast growth in intelligent systems in the next decade. However, most of the wireless smart sensor nodes require an external power source such as a Li-ion battery, where the labor cost and environmental waste issues of replacing batteries have largely limited the practical applications. Instead of using a Li-ion battery, we report an ultrastable, highly efficient, and superhydrophobic-surface-based triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) to scavenge wind energy for sustainably powering a wireless smart temperature sensor node. There is no decrease in the output voltage and current of the TENG after continuous working for about 14 h at a wind speed of 12 m/s. Through a power management circuit, the TENG can deliver a constant output voltage of 3.3 V and a pulsed output current of about 100 mA to achieve highly efficient energy storage in a capacitor. A wireless smart temperature sensor node can be sustainably powered by the TENG for sending the real-time temperature data to an iPhone under a working distance of 26 m, demonstrating the feasibility of the self-powered wireless smart sensor networks.

  13. Highly Efficient Wireless Powering for Autonomous Structural Health Monitoring and Test/Evaluation Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-27

    2016 Received Paper . Miniaturized Strongly Coupled Magnetic Resonant Systems for Wireless Power Transfer, 2016 IEEE Antennas Propagat. Society...Internat. Symp. 27-JUN-16, Fajardo, Puerto Rico. : , . Misalignment Study of Cylindrical SCMR Wireless Power Transfer System, IEEE Antennas Propagat...Coupled Magnetic Resonant devices, 2016 IEEE 17th Annual Wireless and Microwave Technology Conference (WAMICON). 11-APR-16, Clearwater, FL, USA

  14. High Efficiency Nuclear Power Plants using Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Rarick, Richard A.; Rangarajan, Rajmohan

    2009-01-01

    An overall system analysis approach is used to propose potential conceptual designs of advanced terrestrial nuclear power plants based on Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) experience and utilizing Closed Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) thermal-to-electric energy conversion technology. In particular conceptual designs for an advanced 1 GWe power plant with turbine reheat and compressor intercooling at a 950 K turbine inlet temperature (TIT), as well as near term 100 MWe demonstration plants with TITS of 950 K and 1200 K are presented. Power plant performance data were obtained for TITS ranging from 650 to 1300 K by use of a Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems code which considered the interaction between major sub-systems, including the Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor (LFTR), heat source and heat sink heat exchangers, turbo -generator machinery, and an electric power generation and transmission system. Optional off-shore submarine installation of the power plant is a major consideration.

  15. High Efficiency Nuclear Power Plants Using Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Rarick, Richard A.; Rangarajan, Rajmohan

    2009-01-01

    An overall system analysis approach is used to propose potential conceptual designs of advanced terrestrial nuclear power plants based on Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) experience and utilizing Closed Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) thermal-to-electric energy conversion technology. In particular conceptual designs for an advanced 1 GWe power plant with turbine reheat and compressor intercooling at a 950 K turbine inlet temperature (TIT), as well as near term 100 MWe demonstration plants with TITs of 950 and 1200 K are presented. Power plant performance data were obtained for TITs ranging from 650 to 1300 K by use of a Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems code which considered the interaction between major sub-systems, including the Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor (LFTR), heat source and heat sink heat exchangers, turbo-generator machinery, and an electric power generation and transmission system. Optional off-shore submarine installation of the power plant is a major consideration.

  16. 888 nm pumping of Nd:YVO 4 for high-power high-efficiency TEM 00 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonagh, Louis; Knappe, Ralf; Nebel, Achim; Wallenstein, Richard

    2007-02-01

    Nd:YVO 4 is a widely used gain medium in commercial lasers providing up to several tens of watts in a diffraction limited beam. Its high gain favors high repetition rates and short pulses in nanosecond Q-switched and picosecond mode-locked regimes. However, output power is limited by strong thermo-optical effects leading to an aberrated thermal lens and ultimately the crystal's fracture. In this contribution, we present the optimized pumping of vanadate at 888 nm, benefiting from polarization-independent absorption, reduced quantum defect and very low absorption coefficients compared to the common pump wavelengths of 808 and 880 nm. After a presentation of the principle and the key characteristics of a high-power fiber-coupled end-pumped multimode oscillator, a series of systems based on this pumping technique are presented. A compact 60W high-efficiency TEM 00 CW oscillator first proves the potential for high-power high-beam-quality systems. A CW intracavity-doubled system provided 62 W of power at 532 nm. A cavity-dumped Q-switched oscillator providing up to 47 W of average power with 6 ns long pulses at all repetition rates was investigated. Passive mode-locking of an oscillator providing 56 W of output power was achieved with a saturable absorber mirror. Finally, a high-power oscillator was amplified with high efficiency in a power amplifier based on the same pump/crystal configuration. The wide range of systems demonstrated illustrates the simplicity and flexibility of 888 nm pumping for extending the benefits of vanadate in the higher power range.

  17. Highly efficient high power CW and Q-switched Ho:YLF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, J.

    2015-06-01

    An efficient operation of a Ho:YLF laser pumped by a Tm-doped fibre laser is reported. The research in a continuous-wave (CW) operation was done for two crystals of the same 0.5 at.%Ho dopant concentration and with different lengths (3×3×30 mm3 and 3×3×50 mm3). For an output coupling transmission of 20% and a crystal length of 50 mm, the maximum CWoutput power of 38.9 W for 81.4 W of incident pump power, corresponding to the slope efficiency of 52.3% and optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 47.8% (determined with respect to the incident pump power) was achieved. The highest opti- cal-to-optical conversion efficiency of 70.2% with respect to the absorbed pump power was obtained. The influence of a heat-sink cooling water temperature on theCWlaser performance was studied. For a Q-switched operation the pulse repe- tition frequency (PRF) was changed from 2 to 10 kHz. The maximum average output power of 34.1 W at the PRF of 10 kHz was obtained for a 50 mm holmium crystal length. For 2 kHz PRF and 71.9 W of incident pump power, pulse energies of 13.7 mJ with a 21 ns FWHM pulse width corresponding to 652 kW peak power were recorded.

  18. A high-efficiency self-powered wireless sensor node for monitoring concerning vibratory events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dacheng; Li, Suiqiong; Li, Mengyang; Xie, Danpeng; Dong, Chuan; Li, Xinxin

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a self-powered wireless alarming sensor node (SWASN), which was designed to monitor the occurrence of concerning vibratory events. The major components of the sensor node include a vibration-threshold-triggered energy harvester (VTTEH) that powers the sensor node, a dual threshold voltage control circuit (DTVCC) for power management and a radio frequency (RF) signal transmitting module. The VTTEH generates significant electric energy only when the input vibration reaches certain amplitude. Thus, the VTTEH serves as both the power source and the vibration-event-sensing element for the sensor node. The DTVCC was specifically designed to utilize the limited power supply from the VTTEH to operate the sensor node. Constructed with only voltage detectors and MOSFETs, the DTVCC achieved low power consumption, which was 65% lower compared with the power management circuit designed in our previous work. Meanwhile, a RF transmit circuit was constructed based on the commercially available CC1110-F32 wireless transceiver chip and a compact planar antenna was designed to improve the signal transmission distance. The sensor node was fabricated and was characterized both in the laboratory and in the field. Experimental results showed that the SWASN could automatically send out alarming signals when the simulated concerning event occurred. The waiting time between two consecutive transmission periods is less than 125 s and the transmission distance can reach 1.31 km. The SWASN will have broad applications in field surveillances.

  19. Compact high efficiency, light weight 200-800 MHZ high power RF source

    SciTech Connect

    Shrader, M.B.; Preist, D.H.

    1985-10-01

    There has long been a need for a new more efficient less bulky high power RF power source to drive accelerators in the 200 to 800 MHz region. Results on a recent 5-year EIMAC sponsored R and D program which have lead to the introduction of the Klystrode for UHF television and troposcatter applications indicate that at power levels of 1MW or more efficiencies in excess of 75% can be obtained at 450 MHz. Efficiencies of this order coupled with potential size and weight parameters which coupled with potential size and weight parameters which are a fraction of those of existing high power UHF generators open up new applications which heretofore would have been impractical if not impossible. Measurements at 470 MHz on existing Klystrodes are given. Projected operating conditions for a 1MW 450 MHz Klystrode having an overall length of 60 inches and a total tube, circuit, and magnet weight of 250 pounds is presented.

  20. All-metal metamaterial slow-wave structure for high-power sources with high efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanshuai; Duan, Zhaoyun; Tang, Xianfeng; Wang, Zhanliang; Zhang, Yabin; Feng, Jinjun; Gong, Yubin

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a metamaterial (MTM) which is suitable for the compact high-power vacuum electron devices. For example, an S-band slow-wave structure (SWS) based on the all-metal MTMs has been studied by both simulation and experiment. The results show that this MTM SWS is very helpful to miniaturize the high-power vacuum electron devices and largely improve the output power and the electronic efficiency. The simulation model of an S-band MTM backward wave oscillator (BWO) is built, and the particle-in-cell simulated results are presented here: a 2.454 GHz signal is generated and its peak output power is 4.0 MW with a higher electronic efficiency of 31.5% relative to the conventional BWOs.

  1. All-metal metamaterial slow-wave structure for high-power sources with high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanshuai; Duan, Zhaoyun Tang, Xianfeng; Wang, Zhanliang; Zhang, Yabin; Gong, Yubin; Feng, Jinjun

    2015-10-12

    In this paper, we have proposed a metamaterial (MTM) which is suitable for the compact high-power vacuum electron devices. For example, an S-band slow-wave structure (SWS) based on the all-metal MTMs has been studied by both simulation and experiment. The results show that this MTM SWS is very helpful to miniaturize the high-power vacuum electron devices and largely improve the output power and the electronic efficiency. The simulation model of an S-band MTM backward wave oscillator (BWO) is built, and the particle-in-cell simulated results are presented here: a 2.454 GHz signal is generated and its peak output power is 4.0 MW with a higher electronic efficiency of 31.5% relative to the conventional BWOs.

  2. A high efficiency and high power factor electronic ballast using ZVS-PLR inverter

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, J.P.; Farook, O.; Sekhar, C.R.; Schurman, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the analysis, design and implementation of a high frequency (maximum 75 KHz) resonant inverter with power factor correction for driving the fluorescent lamps. The inverter is based on parallel resonant half-bridge topology. The inverter employs a boost derived power factor correction scheme. The switches turn on at zero voltage. Experimental results from a laboratory prototype are presented and compared with the performance of conventional 60 Hz, and high frequency commercial units.

  3. High-power and highly efficient diode-cladding-pumped Ho3+-doped silica fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Stuart D; Bugge, Frank; Erbert, Götz

    2007-11-15

    We demonstrate high-power operation from a singly Ho3+-doped silica fiber laser that is cladding pumped directly with diode lasers operating at 1150 nm. Internal slope efficiencies approaching the Stokes limit were produced, and the maximum output power was 2.2W. This result was achieved using a low Ho3+-ion concentration and La3+-ion codoping, which together limit the transfer of energy between excited Ho3+ ions.

  4. Modeling of high efficiency solar cells under laser pulse for power beaming applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    Solar cells have been used to convert sunlight to electrical energy for many years and also offer great potential for non-solar energy conversion applications. Their greatly improved performance under monochromatic light compared to sunlight, makes them suitable as photovoltaic (PV) receivers in laser power beaming applications. Laser beamed power to a PV array receiver could provide power to satellites, an orbital transfer vehicle, or a lunar base. Gallium arsenide (GaAs) and indium phosphide (InP) solar cells have calculated efficiencies of more than 50 percent under continuous illumination at the optimum wavelength. Currently high power free-electron lasers are being developed which operate in pulsed conditions. Understanding cell behavior under a laser pulse is important in the selection of the solar cell material and the laser. An experiment by NAsA lewis and JPL at the AVLIS laser facility in Livermore, CA presented experimental data on cell performance under pulsed laser illumination. Reference 5 contains an overview of technical issues concerning the use of solar cells for laser power conversion, written before the experiments were performed. As the experimental results showed, the actual effects of pulsed operation are more complicated. Reference 6 discusses simulations of the output of GaAs concentrator solar cells under pulsed laser illumination. The present paper continues this work, and compares the output of Si and GaAs solar cells.

  5. High Efficiency, Low Power-Consumption DFB Quantum Cascade Lasers Without Lateral Regrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Li-Jun; Zhang, Jin-Chuan; Liu, Feng-Qi; Zhou, Yu-Hong; Wang, Dong-Bo; Jia, Xue-Feng; Zhuo, Ning; Liu, Jun-Qi; Zhai, Shen-Qiang; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2017-04-01

    Very low power-consumption distributed feedback (DFB) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) at the wavelength around 4.9 μm were fabricated by conventional process without lateral regrowth of InP:Fe or using sidewall grating. Benefitted from the optimized materials and low waveguide loss, very low threshold current density of 0.5 kA/cm2 was obtained for a device with cavity length of 2 mm. Combined with the partial-high-reflection coating, the 1-mm-long DFB QCL achieved low power-consumption continuous wave (CW) operation up to 105 °C. The CW threshold power-consumptions were 0.72 and 0.78 W at 15 and 25 °C, respectively. The maximum CW output power was over 110 mW at 15 °C and still more than 35 mW at 105 °C. At 15 °C, wall-plug efficiency of 5.5% and slope efficiency of 1.8 W/A were deduced, which were very high for low power-consumption DFB QCLs.

  6. Modeling of high efficiency solar cells under laser pulse for power beaming applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-09-01

    Solar cells have been used to convert sunlight to electrical energy for many years and also offer great potential for non-solar energy conversion applications. Their greatly improved performance under monochromatic light compared to sunlight, makes them suitable as photovoltaic (PV) receivers in laser power beaming applications. Laser beamed power to a PV array receiver could provide power to satellites, an orbital transfer vehicle, or a lunar base. Gallium arsenide (GaAs) and indium phosphide (InP) solar cells have calculated efficiencies of more than 50 percent under continuous illumination at the optimum wavelength. Currently high power free-electron lasers are being developed which operate in pulsed conditions. Understanding cell behavior under a laser pulse is important in the selection of the solar cell material and the laser. An experiment by NAsA lewis and JPL at the AVLIS laser facility in Livermore, CA presented experimental data on cell performance under pulsed laser illumination. Reference 5 contains an overview of technical issues concerning the use of solar cells for laser power conversion, written before the experiments were performed. As the experimental results showed, the actual effects of pulsed operation are more complicated. Reference 6 discusses simulations of the output of GaAs concentrator solar cells under pulsed laser illumination. The present paper continues this work, and compares the output of Si and GaAs solar cells.

  7. Simple highly efficient pumping configuration in high-power thin-disk laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyedzamani, Sasan; Eslami, Esmaeil

    2017-08-01

    A simple high-power thin-disk pumping configuration using a radiation combination of four commercially available laser-diode stacks is introduced. Two setup modifications are presented to compensate the nonsuitable shape of the pumping spot arising from low beam quality in our combination method. The effects of setup modifications on pumping spot shapes are confirmed by ray tracing simulations using Trace-pro™ software. All setups are arranged in the laboratory, and the experimental measurements show pumping spots improvements on the disk due to modifications in agreement with simulation results. Output power measurements show that by adapting the pumping spot size to the disk cooling capacity the modified setups can deliver higher output powers and efficiencies. Furthermore, the modifications reduce the laser threshold and improve output laser beam quality. Hence, the modifications make the simple four laser-diodes beam combination applicable for thin-disk laser pumping.

  8. High-efficiency tunable Y-branch power splitters at terahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jinhua; You, Yun; Deng, Xiaohua; Shen, Linfang; Wu, Jin-Jei; Yang, Tzong-Jer

    2017-03-01

    Terahertz Y-branch power splitters formed by one-way waveguide are investigated theoretically. For such splitters, there exists no backward reflection from the Y-junction region for incident waves because the input channel supports no backward-propagating mode, therefore the transmission efficiency is perfect in the lossless case. Moreover, by varying the applied external magnetic field, the power splitting ratio of the splitters can be tunable for a given frequency, and required (equal or unequal) splitting ratio can also be achieved over a wide frequency band.

  9. High Efficiency GPS Block III L1 band Envelope Tracking Power Amplifier

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-31

    envelope sign igh efficiency lope tracking a -III L1-ba katani1, Jo entric Techno position resol block-III sa an current GP provide the specially in th...RF s abstract, the of an L-band power amplif e envelope tr used by radio . In Fig. 3 the and Bock-III 5 ar function, wh expansion. A ately 5 times... power amp pe tracking ar s with digi educes the iso iplexer greatly cking (ET) a f non-constan cking, the supp d by the lope of the RF throughout th s

  10. High-efficiency, high-output-power antiguide laser diode arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehuys, D.; Major, J. S., Jr.; Welch, D.; Scifres, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    Antiguide laser arrays have been fabricated and operated up to peak pulsed powers of 7.7 W in a beam with a full-width at half-maximum in the main lobe of 0.7 deg. Up to 0.7 W of continuous wave power is emitted into a radiation pattern 2.5 times the diffraction limit. By varying the temperature of the array to vary the operating wavelength of the device, the threshold gain condition of the array modes is altered, allowing thermal tuning of the far field of the device.

  11. Ultra Clean 1.1MW High Efficiency Natural Gas Engine Powered System

    SciTech Connect

    Zurlo, James; Lueck, Steve

    2011-08-31

    Dresser, Inc. (GE Energy, Waukesha gas engines) will develop, test, demonstrate, and commercialize a 1.1 Megawatt (MW) natural gas fueled combined heat and power reciprocating engine powered package. This package will feature a total efficiency > 75% and ultra low CARB permitting emissions. Our modular design will cover the 1 – 6 MW size range, and this scalable technology can be used in both smaller and larger engine powered CHP packages. To further advance one of the key advantages of reciprocating engines, the engine, generator and CHP package will be optimized for low initial and operating costs. Dresser, Inc. will leverage the knowledge gained in the DOE - ARES program. Dresser, Inc. will work with commercial, regulatory, and government entities to help break down barriers to wider deployment of CHP. The outcome of this project will be a commercially successful 1.1 MW CHP package with high electrical and total efficiency that will significantly reduce emissions compared to the current central power plant paradigm. Principal objectives by phases for Budget Period 1 include: • Phase 1 – market study to determine optimum system performance, target first cost, lifecycle cost, and creation of a detailed product specification. • Phase 2 – Refinement of the Waukesha CHP system design concepts, identification of critical characteristics, initial evaluation of technical solutions, and risk mitigation plans. Background

  12. Studies of basic mechanisms in high pressure gases: Applications to high efficiency high power lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdeyen, J. T.; Cherrington, B. E.; Leslie, S. G.; Millar, W. S.; Edwards, B. E.

    1976-01-01

    A high power pulsed dye laser was used to optically excite high pressure cesium-xenon mixtures and the resulting measurements are presented. A microwave discharge in rubidium at relatively high xenon pressure was achieved. Preliminary studies of cadium-rare gas mixtures are discussed and a detailed description of the entire experimental apparatus is given.

  13. Modeling of High Efficiency Solar Cells Under Laser Pulse for Power Beaming Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    Solar cells may be used as receivers for laser power beaming. To understand the behavior of solar cells when illuminated by a pulsed laser, the time response of gallium arsenide and silicon solar cells to pulsed monochromatic input has been modeled using a finite element solar cell model.

  14. High power, high efficiency, 2D laser diode arrays for pumping solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, A.; McShea, J.C.; Bogdan, A.R.; Petheram, J.C.; Rosen, A.

    1987-11-01

    This document reports the current performance of 2D laser diode arrays operating at 770 nm and 808 nm for pumping promethium and neodymium solid state lasers, respectively. Typical power densities are in excess of 2kw/cm/sup 2/ with overall efficiencies greater than 30%.

  15. A High-Density, High-Efficiency, Isolated On-Board Vehicle Battery Charger Utilizing Silicon Carbide Power Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, B; Barkley, A; Cole, Z; Passmore, B; Martin, D; McNutt, TR; Lostetter, AB; Lee, JS; Shiozaki, K

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents an isolated on-board vehicular battery charger that utilizes silicon carbide (SiC) power devices to achieve high density and high efficiency for application in electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid EVs (PHEVs). The proposed level 2 charger has a two-stage architecture where the first stage is a bridgeless boost ac-dc converter and the second stage is a phase-shifted full-bridge isolated dc-dc converter. The operation of both topologies is presented and the specific advantages gained through the use of SiC power devices are discussed. The design of power stage components, the packaging of the multichip power module, and the system-level packaging is presented with a primary focus on system density and a secondary focus on system efficiency. In this work, a hardware prototype is developed and a peak system efficiency of 95% is measured while operating both power stages with a switching frequency of 200 kHz. A maximum output power of 6.1 kW results in a volumetric power density of 5.0 kW/L and a gravimetric power density of 3.8 kW/kg when considering the volume and mass of the system including a case.

  16. 160 W high-power, high-efficiency, near-diffraction-limited beam quality all-fiber picosecond pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chang; Ge, Tingwu; An, Na; Cao, Kang; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a high-power, high-efficiency, near-diffraction-limited beam quality all-fiber picosecond pulse laser, which consists of a passively mode-locked seed laser and three-stage master power amplifiers. A repetition frequency multiplier and a high Yb-doped gain fiber with shorter length are utilized in the laser system to suppress the nonlinear effects and reduce the pulse broadening caused by dispersion. Moreover, the homemade light mode controllers based on a coiling and tapering fiber technique and the active fiber of the amplifier with a relatively small mode area are adopted to improve the beam quality. In addition, by experimentally adjusting the active fiber length, the optical conversion efficiency of the overall laser system can be optimized. Eventually, a 160 W high-power, high-efficiency, near-diffraction-limited picosecond pulse fiber laser is obtained, with the beam quality factor M2 at 1.12 and an optical conversion efficiency of the system of 75%.

  17. Opportunistic replacement of fusion power system parts

    SciTech Connect

    Day, J.A.; George, L.L.

    1981-10-26

    This paper describes a maintenance problem in a fusion power plant. The problem is to specify which life limited parts should be replaced when there is an opportunity. The objective is to minimize the cost rate of replacement parts and of maintenance actions while satisfying a power plant availability constraint. The maintenance policy is to look ahead and replace all parts that will reach their life limits within a time called a screen. Longer screens yield greater system availabilities because more parts are replaced prior to their life limits.

  18. High-Power, High-Efficiency Ka-Band Space Traveling-Wave Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krawczyk, Richard; Wilson, Jeffrey; Simons, Rainee; Williams, Wallace; Bhasin, Kul; Robbins, Neal; Dibb, Daniel; Menninger, William; Zhai, Xiaoling; Benton, Robert; Burdette, James

    2007-01-01

    The L-3 Communications Model 999H traveling-wave tube (TWT) has been demonstrated to generate an output power of 144 W at 60-percent overall efficiency in continuous-wave operation over the frequency band from 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The best TWT heretofore commercially available for operation in the affected frequency band is characterized by an output power of only 35 W and an efficiency of 50 percent. Moreover, whereas prior TWTs are limited to single output power levels, it has been shown that the output power of the Model 999H can be varied from 54 to 144 W. A TWT is a vacuum electronic device used to amplify microwave signals. TWTs are typically used in free-space communication systems because they are capable of operating at power and efficiency levels significantly higher than those of solid-state devices. In a TWT, an electron beam is generated by an electron gun consisting of a cathode, focusing electrodes, and an anode. The electrons pass through a hole in the anode and are focused into a cylindrical beam by a stack of periodic permanent magnets and travel along the axis of an electrically conductive helix, along which propagates an electromagnetic wave that has been launched by an input signal that is to be amplified. The beam travels within the helix at a velocity close to the phase velocity of the electromagnetic wave. The electromagnetic field decelerates some of the electrons and accelerates others, causing the beam to become formed into electron bunches, which further interact with the electromagnetic wave in such a manner as to surrender kinetic energy to the wave, thereby amplifying the wave. The net result is to amplify the input signal by a factor of about 100,000. After the electrons have passed along the helix, they impinge on electrodes in a collector. The collector decelerates the electrons in such a manner as to recover most of the remaining kinetic energy and thereby significantly increase the power efficiency of the TWT.

  19. Safeguard Requirements for Fusion Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Goldston and Alexander Glaser

    2012-08-10

    Nuclear proliferation risks from magnetic fusion energy associated with access to fissile materials can be divided into three main categories: 1) clandestine production of fissile material in an undeclared facility, 2) covert production and diversion of such material in a declared and safeguarded facility, and 3) use of a declared facility in a breakout scenario, in which a state openly produces fissile material in violation of international agreements. The degree of risk in each of these categories is assessed, taking into account both state and non-state actors, and it is found that safeguards are required for fusion energy to be highly attractive from a non-proliferation standpoint. Specific safeguard requirements and R&D needs are outlined for each category of risk, and the technical capability of the ITER experiment, under construction, to contribute to this R&D is noted. A preliminary analysis indicates a potential legal pathway for fusion power systems to be brought under the Treaty for the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. "Vertical" proliferation risks associated with tritium and with the knowledge that can be gained from inertial fusion energy R&D are outlined.

  20. An accelerated fusion power development plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Stephen O.; Baker, Charles C.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Kinkead, Susan D.

    1991-06-01

    Energy for electricity and transportation is a national issue with worldwide environmental and political implications. The world must have energy options for the next century that are not vulnerable to possible disruption for technical, environmental, public confidence, or other reasons. Growing concerns about the greenhouse effect and the safety of transporting oil may lead to reduced burning of coal and other fossil fuels, and the incidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, as well as nuclear waste storage problems, have eroded public acceptance of nuclear fission. Meeting future world energy needs will require improvements in energy efficiency and conservation. However, the world will soon need new central station power plants and increasing amounts of fuel for the transportation sector. The use of fossil fuels, and possibly even fission power, will very likely be restricted because of environmental, safety, and, eventually, supply considerations. Time is running out for policymakers. New energy technologies cannot be brought to the marketplace overnight. Decades are required to bring a new energy production technology from conception to full market penetration. With the added urgency to mitigate deleterious environmental effects of energy use, policymakers must act decisively now to establish and support vigorous energy technology development programs. The U.S. has invested 8 billion over the past 40 years in fusion research and development. If the U.S. fusion program proceeds according to its present strategy, an additional 40 years, and more money, will be expended before fusion will provide commercial electricity. Such an extended schedule is neither cost-effective nor technically necessary. It is time to launch a national venture to construct and operate a fusion power pilot plant. Such a plant could be operational within 15 years of a national commitment to proceed.

  1. High-Efficiency Food Production in a Renewable Energy Based Micro-Grid Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, David; Meiners, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Controlled Environment Agriculture (CEA) systems can be used to produce high-quality, desirable food year round, and the fresh produce can positively contribute to the health and well being of residents in communities with difficult supply logistics. While CEA has many positive outcomes for a remote community, the associated high electric demands have prohibited widespread implementation in what is typically already a fully subscribed power generation and distribution system. Recent advances in CEA technologies as well as renewable power generation, storage, and micro-grid management are increasing system efficiency and expanding the possibilities for enhancing community supporting infrastructure without increasing demands for outside supplied fuels. We will present examples of how new lighting, nutrient delivery, and energy management and control systems can enable significant increases in food production efficiency while maintaining high yields in CEA. Examples from Alaskan communities where initial incorporation of renewable power generation, energy storage and grid management techniques have already reduced diesel fuel consumption for electric generation by more than 40% and expanded grid capacity will be presented. We will discuss how renewable power generation, efficient grid management to extract maximum community service per kW, and novel energy storage approaches can expand the food production, water supply, waste treatment, sanitation and other community support services without traditional increases of consumable fuels supplied from outside the community. These capabilities offer communities with a range of choices to enhance their communities. The examples represent a synergy of technology advancement efforts to develop sustainable community support systems for future space-based human habitats and practical implementation of infrastructure components to increase efficiency and enhance health and well being in remote communities today and tomorrow.

  2. Ultra-broad band, low power, highly efficient coherent wavelength conversion in quantum dot SOA.

    PubMed

    Contestabile, G; Yoshida, Y; Maruta, A; Kitayama, K

    2012-12-03

    We report broadband, all-optical wavelength conversion over 100 nm span, in full S- and C-band, with positive conversion efficiency with low optical input power exploiting dual pump Four-Wave-Mixing in a Quantum Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifier (QD-SOA). We also demonstrate by Error Vector Magnitude analysis the full transparency of the conversion scheme for coherent modulation formats (QPSK, 8-PSK, 16-QAM, OFDM-16QAM) in the whole C-band.

  3. High efficiency direct fuel cell hybrid power cycle for near term application

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, G.; Maru, H.C.; Sanderson, R.A.

    1996-12-31

    Direct carbonate fuel cells being developed by Energy Research Corporation can generate power at an efficiency approaching 60% LHV. This unique fuel cell technology can consume natural gas and other hydrocarbon based fuels directly without requiring an external reformer, thus providing a simpler and inherently efficient power generation system. A 2 MW power plant demonstration of this technology has been initiated at an installation in the city of Santa Clara in California. A 2.85 MW commercial configuration shown in Figure 1 is presently being developed. The complete plant includes the carbonate fuel cell modules, an inverter, transformer and switchgear, a heat recovery unit and supporting instrument air and water treatment systems. The emission levels for this 2.85 MW plant are projected to be orders of magnitude below existing or proposed standards. The 30 year levelized cost of electricity, without inflation, is projected to be approximately 5{cents}/kW-h assuming capital cost for the carbonate fuel cell system of $1000/kW.

  4. Combined Heat and Power Systems Technology Development and Demonstration 370 kW High Efficiency Microturbine

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2015-10-14

    The C370 Program was awarded in October 2010 with the ambitious goal of designing and testing the most electrically efficient recuperated microturbine engine at a rated power of less than 500 kW. The aggressive targets for electrical efficiency, emission regulatory compliance, and the estimated price point make the system state-of-the-art for microturbine engine systems. These goals will be met by designing a two stage microturbine engine identified as the low pressure spool and high pressure spool that are based on derivative hardware of Capstone’s current commercially available engines. The development and testing of the engine occurred in two phases. Phase I focused on developing a higher power and more efficient engine, that would become the low pressure spool which is based on Capstone’s C200 (200kW) engine architecture. Phase II integrated the low pressure spool created in Phase I with the high pressure spool, which is based on Capstone’s C65 (65 kW) commercially available engine. Integration of the engines, based on preliminary research, would allow the dual spool engine to provide electrical power in excess of 370 kW, with electrical efficiency approaching 42%. If both of these targets were met coupled with the overall CHP target of 85% total combined heating and electrical efficiency California Air Resources Board (CARB) level emissions, and a price target of $600 per kW, the system would represent a step change in the currently available commercial generation technology. Phase I of the C370 program required the development of the C370 low pressure spool. The goal was to increase the C200 engine power by a minimum of 25% — 250 kW — and efficiency from 32% to 37%. These increases in the C200 engine output were imperative to meet the power requirements of the engine when both spools were integrated. An additional benefit of designing and testing the C370 low pressure spool was the possibility of developing a stand-alone product for possible

  5. High efficiency 4H-SiC betavoltaic power sources using tritium radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Christopher; Portnoff, Samuel; Spencer, M. G.

    2016-01-04

    Realization of an 18.6% efficient 4H-silicon carbide (4H-SiC) large area betavoltaic power source using the radioisotope tritium is reported. A 200 nm 4H-SiC P{sup +}N junction is used to collect high-energy electrons. The electron source is a titanium tritide (TiH{sup 3}{sub x}) foil, or an integrated titanium tritide region formed by the diffusion of tritium into titanium. The specific activity of the source is directly measured. Dark current measured under short circuit conditions was less than 6.1 pA/cm{sup 2}. Samples measured with an external tritium foil produced an open circuit voltage of 2.09 V, short circuit current of 75.47 nA/cm{sup 2}, fill factor of 0.86, and power efficiency of 18.6%. Samples measured with an integrated source produced power efficiencies of 12%. Simulations were done to determine the beta spectrum (modified by self absorption) exiting the source and the electron hole pair generation function in the 4H-SiC. The electron-hole pair generation function in 4H-SiC was modeled as a Gaussian distribution, and a closed form solution of the continuity equation was used to analyze the cell performance. The effective surface recombination velocity in our samples was found to be 10{sup 5}–10{sup 6 }cm/s. Our analysis demonstrated that the surface recombination dominates the performance of a tritium betavoltaic device but that using a thin P{sup +}N junction structure can mitigate some of the negative effects.

  6. High efficiency 4H-SiC betavoltaic power sources using tritium radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christopher; Portnoff, Samuel; Spencer, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    Realization of an 18.6% efficient 4H-silicon carbide (4H-SiC) large area betavoltaic power source using the radioisotope tritium is reported. A 200 nm 4H-SiC P+N junction is used to collect high-energy electrons. The electron source is a titanium tritide (TiH3x) foil, or an integrated titanium tritide region formed by the diffusion of tritium into titanium. The specific activity of the source is directly measured. Dark current measured under short circuit conditions was less than 6.1 pA/cm2. Samples measured with an external tritium foil produced an open circuit voltage of 2.09 V, short circuit current of 75.47 nA/cm2, fill factor of 0.86, and power efficiency of 18.6%. Samples measured with an integrated source produced power efficiencies of 12%. Simulations were done to determine the beta spectrum (modified by self absorption) exiting the source and the electron hole pair generation function in the 4H-SiC. The electron-hole pair generation function in 4H-SiC was modeled as a Gaussian distribution, and a closed form solution of the continuity equation was used to analyze the cell performance. The effective surface recombination velocity in our samples was found to be 105-106 cm/s. Our analysis demonstrated that the surface recombination dominates the performance of a tritium betavoltaic device but that using a thin P+N junction structure can mitigate some of the negative effects.

  7. High-power, high-efficiency, high-brightness long-wavelength laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Steve; Crump, Paul; Wang, Jun; Dong, Weimin; Grimshaw, Mike; Zhang, Shiguo; Elim, Sandrio; Das, Suhit; Bougher, Mike; Patterson, Jason; Kuang, Guokui; Bell, Jake; Farmer, Jason; DeVito, Mark

    2006-05-01

    Interest is rapidly growing in solid-state lasers emitting from 1500-nm to 2100-nm with applications in eye-safe range finding, LIDAR, infrared countermeasures, medicine, dentistry, and others. Traditionally, these solid-state lasers have been pumped by flash lamps or more recently, by semiconductor diode lasers. In the case of the latter, the diodes of choice have been those emitting below 1-μm. The sub-micron class of semiconductor diode lasers is highly mature and has enjoyed recent rapid advances in power and efficiency. Unfortunately, the quantum defect generated when converting to the desired wavelengths results in large amounts of excess heat generation leading to costly and heavy, expensive cooling systems and performance problems related to thermal lensing. System complexity adds further cost and weight when intermediaries, such as optical parametric oscillators, are required to reach the desired longer wavelengths. Recent advances in laser diodes emitting from 1400-nm to over 1900-nm now enable the near resonant pumping of such solid state media as Er:YAG, Ho:YAG and Cr:ZnSe. Record results in the peak output power and electrical-to-optical conversion efficiency of diode lasers emitting around 1470-nm, 1700-nm and 1900-nm are presented here.

  8. High-efficiency 1-, 2-, and 4-W class-B FET power amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, John R.; Freitag, Ronald G.; Hahn, Hyo-Kun; Degenford, James E.; Cohn, Marvin

    1986-12-01

    X-band GaAs FET amplifiers utilizing the higher efficiency of class-B operation have been designed and fabricated. This paper describes the design of these amplifiers and includes the results of a computer time-domain simulation of one of the topologies, which gives insight into the harmonic content of the output currents in different branches of the FET and amplifier circuit. The performance is presented of 1-W single-ended, 2-W push-pull, and 4-W dual push-pull amplifiers having state-of-the-art power-added efficiencies of 45 percent, 40 percent, and 35 percent, respectively, in a 1-GHz bandwidth, with associated gains of 5.8 dB, 5.4 dB, and 5.0 dB. Data are given for 15-unit lots of the 1-W and 2-W units to show the consistency of their performance. In addition to output power and efficiency data, this paper includes information on AM-to-PM conversion, second-harmonic generation, and intermodulation products.

  9. Structure of 100 W high-efficiency piezoelectric transformer for applications in power electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kohei; Adachi, Kazunari; Shibamata, Yuki; Suzuki, Tsunehisa

    2016-08-01

    We propose a piezoelectric transformer comprising two identical bolt-clamped Langevin-type transducers (BLTs) and a stepped horn for its applications to high-power electronics. The transformer can realize a specified step-up voltage transformation ratio determined by the cross-sectional area ratio of the horn, both ends of which are connected to the BLTs, at a driving frequency in the vicinity of its mechanical resonance frequency. In experiments, we obtained the results predicted by finite-element analysis. The deviations of the measured resonance and driving frequencies from the numerically estimated values were 0.86 and 0.80%, respectively. At the driving frequency, the maximum efficiency was 99.2%, and a maximum output power of 100 W was obtained with an input voltage of 100 Vrms. Nevertheless, we observed unstable actions of the transformer, which can be attributed to the “jumping and dropping” phenomena, in high voltage operation. Numerical analysis suggests that the instability may be caused by the local electric field concentration in the piezoelectric elements, which occurs only when the transformer is driven by a low-output-impedance voltage source at its mechanical resonance frequency.

  10. Terahertz radiation with high power and high efficiency in a magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhtiari, Farhad; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi; Ghafary, Bijan

    2017-07-01

    We propose a scheme for the generation of terahertz (THz) radiation in a plasma by beating of two flat-topped laser beams when a static magnetic field is applied to the plasma with a parallel or perpendicular direction. We show that the presence of a static magnetic field can enhance drastically the power and efficiency of THz radiation. The power and efficiency enhancement of the perpendicular magnetic field is greater than that of parallel one. Furthermore, the perpendicular magnetic field produces THz radiation with a square shaped field profile which has many applications in industries especially in optical communication. Optimizing the laser beams and magnetized plasma parameters and considering the interaction (mutual effect) between laser beams, THz radiation, and plasma, the THz radiation efficiency up to 8.3% can be obtained. A comparison between the THz radiation generated by flat-topped and super Gaussian laser beams shows that, at the same conditions, the THz radiation generated by flat-topped beam lasers has some advantages such as about two times wider flat-topped region and more than two times higher efficiency.

  11. High-efficiency power production from natural gas with carbon capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Thomas A.; Barton, Paul I.

    A unique electricity generation process uses natural gas and solid oxide fuel cells at high electrical efficiency (74%HHV) and zero atmospheric emissions. The process contains a steam reformer heat-integrated with the fuel cells to provide the heat necessary for reforming. The fuel cells are powered with H 2 and avoid carbon deposition issues. 100% CO 2 capture is achieved downstream of the fuel cells with very little energy penalty using a multi-stage flash cascade process, where high-purity water is produced as a side product. Alternative reforming techniques such as CO 2 reforming, autothermal reforming, and partial oxidation are considered. The capital and energy costs of the proposed process are considered to determine the levelized cost of electricity, which is low when compared to other similar carbon capture-enabled processes.

  12. Device and Design Optimization for AlGaN/GaN X-Band-Power-Amplifiers with High Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, Jutta; van Raay, Friedbert; Quay, Rüdiger; Kiefer, Rudolf; Mikulla, Michael; Seelmann-Eggebert, Matthias; Bronner, Wolfgang; Schlechtweg, Michael; Ambacher, Oliver; Thumm, Manfred

    2010-03-01

    The design, realization and characterization of dual-stage X-band high-power and highly-efficient monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifiers (PAs) with AlGaN/GaN high electronic mobility transistors (HEMTs) is presented. These high power amplifiers (HPAs) are based on a precise investigation of circuit-relevant HEMT behavior using two different field-plate variants and its effects on PA performance as well as optimization of HPA driver stage size which also has a deep impact on the entire HPA. Two broadband (3 GHz) MMICs with different field-plate variants and two narrowband (1 GHz) PAs with different driver- to final-stage gate-width ratio are realized with a maximum output power of 19-23 W, a maximum power-added efficiency (PAE) of ≥40%, and an associated power gain of 17 dB at X-band. Furthermore, two 1 mm test transistors of the same technology with the mentioned field-plate variants and a 1 mm test MMIC support VSWR-ratio tests of 6:1 and 4:1, respectively.

  13. High-power and highly efficient operation of wavelength-tunable Raman fiber lasers based on volume Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Shen, Deyuan; Huang, Haitao; Zhao, Chujun; Zhang, Xiaoqi; Fan, Dianyuan

    2014-03-24

    Highly efficient and high-power operation of Raman fiber lasers in fixed-wavelength and wavelength-tunable cavity configurations based on a graded-index multimode fiber is reported. Fixed-wavelength and wavelength tunable operating regimes are achieved using volume Bragg gratings (VBGs) with center wavelengths of 1658 nm and 1750 nm, respectively. The fixed-wavelength laser yielded a maximum output power of 10.5 W at 1658.3 nm with a FWHM linewidth of ~0.1 nm for the launched pump power of 23.4 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 82.7% with respect to the launched pump power. The measured beam quality in the form of M² factor is ~1.35, corresponding to the fundamental mode of the fiber. For the wavelength-tunable Raman fiber laser, a wavelength tuning range of 37 nm from 1638.5 to 1675.1 nm is obtained with a maximum output power of 3.6 W at 1658.5 nm for the launched pump power of 13.0 W.

  14. Editorially Speaking - Fusion Power: Reasons for Higher Priority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippincott, William T.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses current research trends in the use of laser-fusion technology in combustion chambers to eradicate energy shortages. Indicates that fusion power could be made available at a relatively low expense. (CC)

  15. Editorially Speaking - Fusion Power: Reasons for Higher Priority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippincott, William T.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses current research trends in the use of laser-fusion technology in combustion chambers to eradicate energy shortages. Indicates that fusion power could be made available at a relatively low expense. (CC)

  16. Spectral splitting optimization for high-efficiency solar photovoltaic and thermal power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierman, David M.; Lenert, Andrej; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2016-12-01

    Utilizing the full solar spectrum is desirable to enhance the conversion efficiency of a solar power generator. In practice, this can be achieved through spectral splitting between multiple converters in parallel. However, it is unclear which wavelength bands should be directed to each converter in order to maximize the efficiency. We developed a model of an ideal hybrid solar converter which utilizes both a single-junction photovoltaic cell and a thermal engine. We determined the limiting efficiencies of this hybrid strategy and the corresponding optimum spectral bandwidth directed to the photovoltaic cell. This optimum width is inversely proportional to the thermal engine efficiency and scales with the bandgap of the photovoltaic cell. This bandwidth was also obtained analytically through an entropy minimization scheme and matches well with our model. We show that the maximum efficiency of the system occurs when it minimizes the spectral entropy generation. This concept can be extended to capture generalized non-idealities to increase the usefulness of this technique for a range of full solar spectrum utilization technologies.

  17. High-efficiency concentration/multi-solar-cell system for orbital power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onffroy, J. R.; Stoltzmann, D. E.; Lin, R. J. H.; Knowles, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis was performed to determine the economic feasibility of a concentrating spectrophotovoltaic orbital electrical power generation system. In this system dichroic beam-splitting mirrors are used to divide the solar spectrum into several wavebands. Absorption of these wavebands by solar cells with matched energy bandgaps increases the cell efficiency while decreasing the amount of heat which must be rejected. The optical concentration is performed in two stages. The first concentration stage employs a Cassegrain-type telescope, resulting in a short system length. The output from this stage is directed to compound parabolic concentrators which comprise the second stage of concentration. Ideal efficiencies for one-, two-, three-, and four-cell systems were calculated under 1000 sun, AMO conditions, and optimum energy bands were determined. Realistic efficiencies were calculated for various combinations of Si, GaAs, Ge and GaP. Efficiencies of 32 to 33 percent were obtained with the multicell systems. The optimum system consists of an f/3.5 optical system, a beam splitter to divide the spectrum at 0.9 microns, and two solar cell arrays, GaAs and Si.

  18. SOAR: Space Orbiting Advanced Fusion Power Reactor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    AP-AIS 234 SOAR SPAC ITZGAYCEFUONPlRRETA() 11 NISCONSIN UNIY-MADISON F L KULCINSKI ET AL. SEP I? WINK.-TR-B?-204S F33615-S6-C-2705 UCLRSSIFIED FIG 22... Kulcinski J. F. Santarius UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN 1500 JOHNSON DRIVE MADISON, WISCONSIN 53706-1687 DTIC sELECTE~ l SEPTEMBER 1987 FINAL REPORT FOR...Include Security Classification) SOAR: Space Orbiting Advanced Fusion Power Reactor 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) C. L . Kulcinski 13a TYPE OF REPORT 13b

  19. High-efficiency ordered silicon nano-conical-frustum array solar cells by self-powered parallel electron lithography.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuerui; Lal, Amit

    2010-11-10

    Nanostructured silicon thin film solar cells are promising, due to the strongly enhanced light trapping, high carrier collection efficiency, and potential low cost. Ordered nanostructure arrays, with large-area controllable spacing, orientation, and size, are critical for reliable light-trapping and high-efficiency solar cells. Available top-down lithography approaches to fabricate large-area ordered nanostructure arrays are challenging due to the requirement of both high lithography resolution and high throughput. Here, a novel ordered silicon nano-conical-frustum array structure, exhibiting an impressive absorbance of 99% (upper bound) over wavelengths 400-1100 nm by a thickness of only 5 μm, is realized by our recently reported technique self-powered parallel electron lithography that has high-throughput and sub-35-nm high resolution. Moreover, high-efficiency (up to 10.8%) solar cells are demonstrated, using these ordered ultrathin silicon nano-conical-frustum arrays. These related fabrication techniques can also be transferred to low-cost substrate solar energy harvesting device applications.

  20. The high-efficiency jets magnetically accelerated from a thin disk in powerful lobe-dominated FRII radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shuang-Liang

    2014-06-10

    A maximum jet efficiency line R ∼ 25 (R = L {sub jet}/L {sub bol}), found in FRII radio galaxies by Fernandes et al., was extended to cover the full range of jet power by Punsly. Recent general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of jet formation have mainly focused on the enhancement of jet power. In this work, we suggest that the jet efficiency could be very high even for conventional jet power if the radiative efficiency of disks was much smaller. We adopt the model of a thin disk with magnetically driven winds to investigate the observational high-efficiency jets in FRII radio galaxies. It is found that the structure of a thin disk can be significantly altered by the feedback of winds. The temperature of a disk gradually decreases with increasing magnetic field; the disk density, surface density, and pressure also change enormously. The lower temperature and higher surface density in the inner disk result in the rapid decrease of radiative efficiency. Thus, the jet efficiency is greatly improved even if the jet power is conventional. Our results can explain the observations quite well. The theoretical maximum jet efficiency of R ∼ 1000 suggested by our calculations is large enough to explain all of the high jet efficiency in observations, even considering the episodic activity of jets.

  1. A commercial lunar helium 3 fusion power infrasructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sved, J.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Miley, G. H.

    1995-01-01

    The potential scenario of a commercial aneutronic fusion power economy based on Helium 3 is reviewed with recent developments in fusion grade plasma containment considered. The Spherical Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device is a type of fusion reactor with immediate commercial applications as a small non-power reactor. Further development and growth to power reactor fusion reaction rates using Deuterium and Helium 3 offers the potential practical solution to fusion power. Recovery of the lunar Helium 3 inventory for export to power utility customers will require the build-up of a cis-lunar industrial infrastructure. Space transport capacity will be obliged to grow rapidly to support several thousand tons of cargo delivery to the lunar surface per year. A highly reusable, low operations cost cis-lunar transport infrastructure and lunar surface industrial activity will be made more practical by the availability of IEC fusion power units that are intrinsically low mass and compatible with space transport.

  2. Alternate applications of fusion power: development of a high-temperature blanket for synthetic-fuel production

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, P.A.; Mattas, R.F.; Krajcinovic, D.; DePaz, J.; Gohar, Y.

    1981-11-01

    This study has shown that utilization of the unique features of a fusion reactor can result in a novel and potentially economical method of decomposing steam into hydrogen and oxygen. Most of the power of fusion reactors is in the form of energetic neutrons. If this power could be used to produce high temperature uncontaminated steam, a large fraction of the energy needed to decomposee the steam could be supplied as thermal energy by the fusion reaction. Proposed high temperature electrolysis processes require steam temperature in excess of 1000/sup 0/C for high efficiency. The design put forth in this study details a system that can accomplish that end.

  3. Explosive pulse power for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinovsky, R. E.; Lindemuth, I. R.; Marsh, S. P.; Lopez, E. A.

    Explosive pulse power systems, powered by flux compression generators and including a variety of high current power conditioning components, such as high current opening switches, are attractive for powering fusion physics experiments which require 10's MJ of electrical energy. Such systems are economical when compared to other high energy sources and require little capital investment to enable initial experiments. They are flexible and readily reconfigurable to accommodate changing experimental requirements and can be designed, assembled, and fielded in relatively short periods of time. Several configurations of very high energy flux compressors have been explored at Los Alamos and recently Russian researchers at the All Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) have reported notable results from modular systems based on disk concepts. A phenomenological model of disk flux compressors is described. The performance predicted by these models is in sufficiently good agreement with the results reported by VNIIEF researchers to allow the model to be applied, in the future, to the design of power conditions systems for use in conjunction with these high performance generators.

  4. Inertial fusion power for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W.R.; Hogan, W.J.; Hoffman, N.J.; Murray, K.A.; Olson, R.E.

    1986-05-19

    More than thirty-seven design concepts have been proposed for terrestrial ICF power plants. The design space is large because of the many allowable driver and reaction chamber combinations. These design studies have illustrated advantages of ICF power plants over other sources in lower impact on the environment, high safety, and almost no dependence on consumables like fuel. The fact that, once built, a 1000 MW/sub e/ ICF power plant would require only 240 kg of deuterium and from 770 to 9260 kg of lithium to run for five years (at 70% capacity factor) makes it potentially attractive for space power also. However, the designs proposed to date have emphasized features that would make the plant attractive for terrestrial applications, where economics, efficiency, and environmental considerations dominate. The resulting plants are large and contain many very heavy components that would not be at attractive for space applications. In this paper, we evaluate alternative ICF driver and reactor technologies using space application criteria and also discuss how some of those technologies can be altered to produce smaller, lighter fusion power sources for space.

  5. Introduction to Nuclear Fusion Power and the Design of Fusion Reactors. An Issue-Oriented Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fillo, J. A.

    This three-part module focuses on the principles of nuclear fusion and on the likely nature and components of a controlled-fusion power reactor. The physical conditions for a net energy release from fusion and two approaches (magnetic and inertial confinement) which are being developed to achieve this goal are described. Safety issues associated…

  6. Introduction to Nuclear Fusion Power and the Design of Fusion Reactors. An Issue-Oriented Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fillo, J. A.

    This three-part module focuses on the principles of nuclear fusion and on the likely nature and components of a controlled-fusion power reactor. The physical conditions for a net energy release from fusion and two approaches (magnetic and inertial confinement) which are being developed to achieve this goal are described. Safety issues associated…

  7. High efficient photovoltaic power converter suitable for 920nm to 970nm InGaAs laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, James; Wu, Ta-Chung; Cohen, Mort; Werthen, Jan G.

    2005-09-01

    In this work, we report a highly efficient Photovoltaic Power Converter (PPC) suitable for 920 nm to 970 nm InGaAs MQW lasers for the first time. The epitaxial layers were grown by low pressure MOCVD on the semi-insulting GaAs substrate. The epi layers consist of a p-n junction of In0.12Ga0.88As and the window layer of p+ AlInGaAs. The device is made of seven or eight pie-segments of equal area series-connected by means of air-bridges. Under 500mW of 940nm laser illumination, the open-circuit voltage of the eight-segment InGaAs chip is 6.7V. The short-circuit current is 29.7mA. Its maximum delivered electrical power is 171.2mW, equal to a 34.2% overall power conversion efficiency. We also demonstrate the high temperature characteristic and stability of the device.

  8. World power energetics. Fusion reactors. ITER project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikhov, E. P.

    1996-10-01

    The prospects of various energy sources have to be evaluated on the basis of economical, energy and political factors, and ecological consequences. The gradual replacement of energy technologies based on burning of fossil fuels by the new 'clean' ones not yielding greenhouse gases is called for so as to conserve the atmosphere at least in the present state. From this point, one of the most promising energy technologies is controlled fusion. Today, we are in the stage of transition from proof-of-principle plasma physics experiments to practical realization of this concept. The place of future fusion power reactors in the global system is being discussed widely. In 1985, the Government Agreement on the design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) was signed by Russia, Japan, The European Community, and the United States of America. That was the starting point of this enormous project; and now we are in the second phase, i.e. the Engineering Design Activities, to be completed by 1998. The focal point for design is the Joint Central Team, with about 200 scientists and engineers from Russia, Japan, the European Community, and the USA working jointly. The national Home Teams provide strong support for the design and research and development programs on the basis of equal contributions to the Project. One of the key problems to be solved concerns fusion reactor materials, including the creation of a complete database on appropriate materials irradiated up to a neutron fluence of 10 23 n · cm -3, the development of new alloys and relevant engineering technologies.

  9. Fusion Power Program biannual progress report, April-September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    This biannual report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed for the Office of Fusion Energy during the April-September 1979 quarter in the following research and development areas: materials; energy storage and transfer; tritium containment, recovery and control; advanced reactor design; atomic data; reactor safety; fusion-fission hybrid systems; alternate applications of fusion energy; and other work related to fusion power. Separate abstracts were prepared for three sections. (MOW)

  10. High efficient ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks by PW-ps laser pulses for producing fusion flames in DT and HB11 of solid state density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustaizis, S.; Lalousis, P.; Hora, H.; Miley, G. H.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks in the range of 1020 cm/s2 has been confirmed experimentally after this was long predicted as a non-thermal direct conversion of optical energy into plasma motion due to dominating nonlinear (ponderomotive) forces [1]. The use of laser pulses of more than PW power and ps or shorter duration can ignite a nuclear fusion flame in solid density deuterium tritium because the necessary energy flux of >108J/cm2 according to the theory of Chu [2] is available [3]. For the studies of the necessary velocities of the generated fusion flames above 1000 km/s the detailed processes can be analyzed by using the advanced genuine two-fluid hydrodynamic model [4] where it was surprising that the ignition of the fusion flame by the picosecond interaction needs a comparably long development in the nanosecond range before the thermal processes result in shock fronts similar to the Rakine-Hugoniot theory. For the evaluation of power generation the problem of lateral energy losses was studied by using very high pulsed magnetic fields. The recently produced 10 Kilotesla magnetic fields [5] are very promising for solutions.

  11. A high-efficiency tunable TEM-TE11 mode converter for high-power microwave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yu; Fan, Yu-Wei; Shu, Ting; Yuan, Cheng-wei; Zhang, Qiang

    2017-03-01

    The tunable high power microwave source (HPM's) is considered to be an important research direction. However, the corresponding mode converter has been researched little. In this paper, a high-efficiency tunable mode converter (HETMC) is investigated for high-power microwave applications. The HETMC that is consisted of coaxial inner and outer conductors, with four metal plates arranged radially, at 90° in the coaxial gap, and matching rods can transform coaxial transverse electromagnetic (TEM) mode to TE11 coaxial waveguide mode. The results show that adjusting the length of the downstream plate, and the distance between the rods installed upstream and the closest edges of the plates, can improve the conversion efficiency and bandwidth remarkably. Moreover, when the frequency ranges from 1.63 GHz to 2.12 GHz, the conversion efficiency is above 95% between 1.63 GHz and 2.12 GHz with a bandwidth of 26.1%. Besides, the unwished reflection and transmission can be eliminated effectively in the HETMC.

  12. Fusion-power demonstration. [Next step beyond MFTF-B

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.; Carlson, G.A.; Neef, W.S.; Moir, R.W.; Campbell, R.B.; Botwin, R.; Clarkson, I.R.; Carpenter, T.J.

    1983-03-29

    As a satellite to the MARS (Mirror Advanced Reactor Study) a smaller, near-term device has been scoped, called the FPD (Fusion Power Demonstration). Envisioned as the next logical step toward a power reactor, it would advance the mirror fusion program beyond MFTF-B and provide an intermediate step toward commercial fusion power. Breakeven net electric power capability would be the goal such that no net utility power would be required to sustain the operation. A phased implementation is envisioned, with a deuterium checkout first to verify the plasma systems before significant neutron activation has occurred. Major tritium-related facilities would be installed with the second phase to produce sufficient fusion power to supply the recirculating power to maintain the neutral beams, ECRH, magnets and other auxiliary equipment.

  13. High Efficiency Automatic-Power-Controlled and Gain-Clamped EDFA for Broadband Passive Optical Networking Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jyi-Lai; Wei, Shui-Ken; Lin, Chin-Yuan; Iong Li, Ssu; Huang, Chih-Chuan

    2010-04-01

    The configuration of a simple improved high efficiency automatic-power-controlled and gain-clamped EDFA (APC-GC-EDFA) for broadband passive optical networking systems (BPON) is presented here. In order to compensate the phase and amplitude variation due to the different distance between the optical line terminal (OLT) and optical network units (ONU), the APC-GC-EDFA need to be employed. A single 980 nm laser module is employed as the primary pump. To extend the bandwidth, all C-band ASE is recycled as the secondary pump to enhance the gain efficiency. An electrical feedback circuit is used as a multi-wavelength channel transmitter monitor for the automatic power control to improve the gain-flattened flatness for stable amplification. The experimental results prove that the EDFA system can provide flatter clamped gain in both C-band and L-band configurations. The gain flatness wavelength ranging from 1530 to 1610 nm is within 32.83 ± 0.64 dB, i.e. below 1.95 %. The gains are clamped at 33.85 ± 0.65 dB for the input signal power of -40 dBm to -10 dBm. The range of noise figure is between 6.37 and 6.56, which is slightly lower compared to that of unclamped amplifiers. This will be very useful for measuring the gain flatness of APC-GC-EDFA. Finally, we have also demonstrated the records of the overall simultaneous dynamics measurements for the new system stabilization. The carrier to noise ratio (CNR) is 49.5 to 50.8 dBc which is above the National Television System Committee (NTSC) standard of 43 dBc, and both composite second order (CSO) 69.2 to 71.5 dBc and composite triple beat (CTB) of 69.8 to 72.2 dBc are above 53 dBc. The recorded corresponding rise-time of 1.087 ms indicates that the system does not exhibit any overshoot of gain or ASE variation due to the signal at the beginning of the pulse.

  14. Modular control of fusion power heating applications

    SciTech Connect

    Demers, D. R.

    2012-08-24

    This work is motivated by the growing demand for auxiliary heating on small and large machines worldwide. Numerous present and planned RF experiments (EBW, Lower Hybrid, ICRF, and ECH) are increasingly complex systems. The operational challenges are indicative of a need for components of real-time control that can be implemented with a moderate amount of effort in a time- and cost-effective fashion. Such a system will improve experimental efficiency, enhance experimental quality, and expedite technological advancements. The modular architecture of this control-suite serves multiple purposes. It facilitates construction on various scales from single to multiple controller systems. It enables expandability of control from basic to complex via the addition of modules with varying functionalities. It simplifies the control implementation process by reducing layers of software and electronic development. While conceived with fusion applications in mind, this suite has the potential to serve a broad range of scientific and industrial applications. During the Phase-I research effort we established the overall feasibility of this modular control-suite concept. We developed the fundamental modules needed to implement open-loop active-control and demonstrated their use on a microwave power deposition experiment.

  15. Fusion Power Demonstrations I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Doggett, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    In this report we present a summary of the first phase of the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. During this first phase, we investigated two configurations, performed detailed studies of major components, and identified and examined critical issues. In addition to these design specific studies, we also assembled a mirror-systems computer code to help optimize future device designs. The two configurations that we have studied are based on the MARS magnet configuration and are labeled FPD-I and FPD-II. The FPD-I configuration employs the same magnet set used in the FY83 FPD study, whereas the FPD-II magnets are a new, much smaller set chosen to help reduce the capital cost of the system. As part of the FPD study, we also identified and explored issues critical to the construction of an Engineering Test Reactor (ETR). These issues involve subsystems or components, which because of their cost or state of technology can have a significant impact on our ability to meet FPD's mission requirements on the assumed schedule. General Dynamics and Grumman Aerospace studied two of these systems, the high-field choke coil and the halo pump/direct converter, in great detail and their findings are presented in this report.

  16. Advances in Tandem Mirror fusion power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L.J.; Logan, B.G.

    1986-05-20

    The Tandem Mirror exhibits several distinctive features which make the reactor embodiment of the principle very attractive: Simple low-technology linear central cell; steady-state operation; high-..beta.. operation; no driven current or disruptions; divertorless operation; direction conversion of end-loss power; low-surface heat loads; and advanced fusion fuel capability. In this paper, we examine these features in connection with two tandem mirror reactor designs, MARS and MINIMARS, and several advanced reactor concepts including the wall-stabilized reactor and the field-reversed mirror. With a novel compact end plug scheme employing octopole stabilization, MINIMARS is expressly designed for short construction times, factory-built modules, and a small (600 MWe) but economic reactor size. We have also configured the design for low radioactive afterheat and inherent/passive safety under LOCA/LOFA conditions, thereby obviating the need for expensive engineered safety systems. In contrast to the complex and expensive double-quadrupole end-cell of the MARS reactor, the compact octopole end-cell of MINIMARS enables ignition to be achieved with much shorter central cell lengths and considerably improves the economy of scale for small (approx.250 to 600 MWe) tandem mirror reactors. Finally, we examine the prospects for realizing the ultimate potential of the tandem mirror with regard to both innovative configurations and novel neutron energy conversion schemes, and stress that advanced fuel applications could exploit its unique reactor features.

  17. Inertial fusion research based on pulsed power

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    PBFA II, with design parameters of 3.5 MJ and 100 TW, is being designed to allow inertial fusion ignition experiments using imploding foils or light ion beams. Flexibility is being retained to implode a cylindrical foil through magnetically insulated power concentration at 30 MA or to drive one or more ion diodes operating in the 10-MV range. In both cases our goal is to deliver 100 TW/cm/sup 2/ and 1 MJ to a target in order to investigate ignition and possibly breakeven. Imploding foil data on Proto II has demonstrated that electromagnetic energy can be efficiently converted into foil kinetic energy with the output increasing as the square of the foil current. Our experiments have reached 60 kJ at 5 MA with the foil imploding in 80 ns and stagnating in 10 ns. This implosion demonstrates adequate stability, and modeling has shown that this behavior should extrapolate to higher currents if the implosion time is less than 100 ns. In order to extend the scaling data to 8 MA, we have modified Proto II by extending magnetic insulation to inhibit insulator flashover.

  18. Inertial Fusion Power Plant Concept of Operations and Maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Anklam, T.; Knutson, B.; Dunne, A. M.; Kasper, J.; Sheehan, T.; Lang, D.; Roberts, V.; Mau, D.

    2015-01-15

    Parsons and LLNL scientists and engineers performed design and engineering work for power plant pre-conceptual designs based on the anticipated laser fusion demonstrations at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Work included identifying concepts of operations and maintenance (O&M) and associated requirements relevant to fusion power plant systems analysis. A laser fusion power plant would incorporate a large process and power conversion facility with a laser system and fusion engine serving as the heat source, based in part on some of the systems and technologies advanced at NIF. Process operations would be similar in scope to those used in chemical, oil refinery, and nuclear waste processing facilities, while power conversion operations would be similar to those used in commercial thermal power plants. While some aspects of the tritium fuel cycle can be based on existing technologies, many aspects of a laser fusion power plant presents several important and unique O&M requirements that demand new solutions. For example, onsite recovery of tritium; unique remote material handling systems for use in areas with high radiation, radioactive materials, or high temperatures; a five-year fusion engine target chamber replacement cycle with other annual and multi-year cycles anticipated for major maintenance of other systems, structures, and components (SSC); and unique SSC for fusion target waste recycling streams. This paper describes fusion power plant O&M concepts and requirements, how O&M requirements could be met in design, and how basic organizational and planning issues can be addressed for a safe, reliable, economic, and feasible fusion power plant.

  19. Inertial fusion power plant concept of operations and maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutson, Brad; Dunne, Mike; Kasper, Jack; Sheehan, Timothy; Lang, Dwight; Anklam, Tom; Roberts, Valerie; Mau, Derek

    2015-02-01

    Parsons and LLNL scientists and engineers performed design and engineering work for power plant pre-conceptual designs based on the anticipated laser fusion demonstrations at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Work included identifying concepts of operations and maintenance (O&M) and associated requirements relevant to fusion power plant systems analysis. A laser fusion power plant would incorporate a large process and power conversion facility with a laser system and fusion engine serving as the heat source, based in part on some of the systems and technologies advanced at NIF. Process operations would be similar in scope to those used in chemical, oil refinery, and nuclear waste processing facilities, while power conversion operations would be similar to those used in commercial thermal power plants. While some aspects of the tritium fuel cycle can be based on existing technologies, many aspects of a laser fusion power plant presents several important and unique O&M requirements that demand new solutions. For example, onsite recovery of tritium; unique remote material handling systems for use in areas with high radiation, radioactive materials, or high temperatures; a five-year fusion engine target chamber replacement cycle with other annual and multi-year cycles anticipated for major maintenance of other systems, structures, and components (SSC); and unique SSC for fusion target waste recycling streams. This paper describes fusion power plant O&M concepts and requirements, how O&M requirements could be met in design, and how basic organizational and planning issues can be addressed for a safe, reliable, economic, and feasible fusion power plant.

  20. Fusion Breeding for Sustainable, Mid Century, Carbon Free Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manheimer, Wallace

    2015-11-01

    If ITER achieves Q ~10, it is still very far from useful fusion. The fusion power, and the driver power will allow only a small amount of power to be delivered, <~50MW for an ITER scale tokamak. It is unlikely, considering ``conservative design rules'' that tokamaks can ever be economical pure fusion power producers. Considering the status of other magnetic fusion concepts, it is also very unlikely that any alternate concept will either. Laser fusion does not seem to be constrained by any conservative design rules, but considering the failure of NIF to achhieve ignition, at this point it has many more obstacles to overcome than magnetic fusion. One way out of this dilemma is to use an ITER size tokamak, or a NIF size laser, as a fuel breeder for searate nuclear reactors. Hence ITER and NIF become ends in themselves, instead of steps to who knows what DEMO decades later. Such a tokamak can easily live within the consrtaints of conservative design rules. This has led the author to propose ``The Energy Park'' a sustainable, carbon free, economical, and environmently viable power source without prolifertion risk. It is one fusion breeder fuels 5 conventional nuclear reactors, and one fast neutron reactor burns the actinide wastes.

  1. Programmable AC power supply for simulating power transient expected in fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Halimi, B.; Suh, K. Y.

    2012-07-01

    This paper focus on control engineering of the programmable AC power source which has capability to simulate power transient expected in fusion reactor. To generate the programmable power source, AC-AC power electronics converter is adopted to control the power of a set of heaters to represent the transient phenomena of heat exchangers or heat sources of a fusion reactor. The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) plasma operation scenario is used as the basic reference for producing this transient power source. (authors)

  2. The neutronics studies of fusion fission hybrid power reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Youqi; Wu Hongchun; Zu Tiejun; Yang Chao; Cao Liangzhi

    2012-06-19

    In this paper, a series of neutronics analysis of hybrid power reactor is proposed. The ideas of loading different fuels in a modular-type fission blanket is analyzed, fitting different level of fusion developments, i.e., the current experimental power output, the level can be obtained in the coming future and the high-power fusion reactor like ITER. The energy multiplication of fission blankets and tritium breeding ratio are evaluated as the criterion of design. The analysis is implemented based on the D-type simplified model, aiming to find a feasible 1000MWe hybrid power reactor for 5 years' lifetime. Three patterns are analyzed: 1) for the low fusion power, the reprocessed fuel is chosen. The fuel with high plutonium content is loaded to achieve large energy multiplication. 2) For the middle fusion power, the spent fuel from PWRs can be used to realize about 30 times energy multiplication. 3) For the high fusion power, the natural uranium can be directly used and about 10 times energy multiplication can be achieved.

  3. High-efficiency grid-connected photovoltaic module integrated converter system with high-speed communication interfaces for small-scale distribution power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Woo-Young; Lai, Jih-Sheng

    2010-04-15

    This paper presents a high-efficiency grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) module integrated converter (MIC) system with reduced PV current variation. The proposed PV MIC system consists of a high-efficiency step-up DC-DC converter and a single-phase full-bridge DC-AC inverter. An active-clamping flyback converter with a voltage-doubler rectifier is proposed for the step-up DC-DC converter. The proposed step-up DC-DC converter reduces the switching losses by eliminating the reverse-recovery current of the output rectifying diodes. To reduce the PV current variation introduced by the grid-connected inverter, a PV current variation reduction method is also suggested. The suggested PV current variation reduction method reduces the PV current variation without any additional components. Moreover, for centralized power control of distributed PV MIC systems, a PV power control scheme with both a central control level and a local control level is presented. The central PV power control level controls the whole power production by sending out reference power signals to each individual PV MIC system. The proposed step-up DC-DC converter achieves a high-efficiency of 97.5% at 260 W output power to generate the DC-link voltage of 350 V from the PV voltage of 36.1 V. The PV MIC system including the DC-DC converter and the DC-AC inverter achieves a high-efficiency of 95% with the PV current ripple less than 3% variation of the rated PV current. (author)

  4. Inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber and power conversion system study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maya, I.; Schultz, K.R.; Bourque, R.F.; Cheng, E.T.; Creedon, R.L.; Norman, J.H.; Price, R.J.; Porter, J.; Schuster, H.L.; Simnad, M.J.

    1985-10-01

    This report summarizes the results of the second year of a two-year study on the design and evaluation of the Cascade concept as a commercial inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. We developed a reactor design based on the Cascade reaction chamber concept that would be competitive in terms of both capital and operating costs, safe and environmentally acceptable in terms of hazard to the public, occupational exposure and radioactive waste production, and highly efficient. The Cascade reaction chamber is a double-cone-shaped rotating drum. The granulated solid blanket materials inside the rotating chamber are held against the walls by centrifugal force. The fusion energy is captured in a blanket of solid carbon, BeO, and LiAlO/sub 2/ granules. These granules are circulated to the primary side of a ceramic heat exchanger. Primary-side granule temperatures range from 1285 K at the LiAlO/sub 2/ granule heat exchanger outlet to 1600 K at the carbon granule heat exchanger inlet. The secondary side consists of a closed-cycle gas turbine power conversion system with helium working fluid, operating at 1300 K peak outlet temperature and achieving a thermal power conversion efficiency of 55%. The net plant efficiency is 49%. The reference design is a plant producing 1500 MW of D-T fusion power and delivering 815 MW of electrical power for sale to the utility grid. 88 refs., 44 figs., 47 tabs.

  5. Integrated systems for pulsed-power driven inertial fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuneo, M. E.; Slutz, S. A.; Stygar, W. A.; Herrmann, M. C.; Sinars, D. B.; McBride, R. D.; Vesey, R. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Vandevender, J. P.; Waisman, E. M.; Hansen, D. L.; Owen, A. C.; Jones, J. F.; Romero, J. A.; McKenney, J.

    2011-10-01

    Pulsed power fusion concepts integrate: (i) directly-magnetically-driven fusion targets that absorb large energies (10 MJ), (ii) efficient, rep-rated driver modules, (iii) compact, scalable, integrated driver architectures, (iv) driver-to-target coupling techniques with standoff and driver protection, and (v) long lifetime fusion chambers shielded by vaporizing blankets and thick liquid walls. Large fusion yields (3-30 GJ) and low rep-rates (0.1-1 Hz) may be an attractive path for IFE. Experiments on the ZR facility are validating physics issues for magnetically driven targets. Scientific breakeven (fusion energy = fuel energy) may be possible in the next few years. Plans for system development and integration will be discussed. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. High power millimeter wave ECRH source needs for fusion program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    This document stems from the four-day Gyrotron Symposium held at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters on June 13-16, 1983, and serves as a position paper for the Office of Fusion Energy, DOE, on high-power millimeter wave source development for Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) of plasmas. It describes the fusion program needs for gyrotron as ECH sources, their current status, and desirable development strategies.

  7. Highly efficient optically pumped vertical-emitting semiconductor laser with more than 20 W average output power in a fundamental transverse mode.

    PubMed

    Rudin, B; Rutz, A; Hoffmann, M; Maas, D J H C; Bellancourt, A-R; Gini, E; Südmeyer, T; Keller, U

    2008-11-15

    We have demonstrated an optically pumped vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (OP-VECSEL) generating more than 20 W of cw output power in a fundamental transverse mode (M2 approximately 1.1) at 960 nm. The laser is highly efficient with a slope efficiency of 49%, a pump threshold of 4.4 W, and an overall optical-to-optical efficiency of 43%.

  8. Progress in GaAs Metamorphic HEMT Technology for Microwave Applications. High Efficiency Ka-Band MHEMT Power MMICs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. M.; Dugas, D.; Chu, K.; Nichols, K.; Duh, K. H.; Fisher, J.; MtPleasant, L.; Xu, D.; Gunter, L.; Vera, A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews recent progress in the development of GaAs metamorphic HEMT (MHEMT) technology for microwave applications. Commercialization has begun, while efforts to further improve performance, manufacturability and reliability continue. We also report the first multi-watt MHEMT MMIC power amplifiers, demonstrating up to 3.2W output power and record power-added efficiency (PAE) at Ka-band.

  9. 975 nm high power diode lasers with high efficiency and narrow vertical far field enabled by low index quantum barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crump, P.; Pietrzak, A.; Bugge, F.; Wenzel, H.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2010-03-01

    For optimal coupled power into fiber, high power diode lasers should operate efficiently with smallest possible vertical far field emission angle. Although waveguide and cladding layers can be designed to achieve small angles, the refractive index profile of the active region itself restricts the minimum achievable value. We show that the use of low index quantum barrier layers leads to substantially reduced far field angles, while sustaining high power conversion efficiency. 90 μm stripe lasers that use such designs have narrow vertical far field angles of 30° (95% power content), power conversion efficiency of 58% and operate reliably at 10 W output.

  10. Inertial fusion with ultra-powerful lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Tabak, M.; Hammer, J.; Glinsky, M.; Kruer, W.; Wilks, S.; Woodworth, J.; Campbell, E.M.; Perry, M.D.; Mason, R.

    1993-10-01

    Ultra-high intensity lasers can be used to ignite ICF capsules with a few tens of kilojoules of light and can lead to high gain with as little as 100 kilojoules of incident laser light. We propose a scheme with three phases. First, a capsule is imploded as in the conventional approach to inertial fusion to assemble a high density fuel configuration. Second, a hole is bored through capsule corona composed of ablated material, pushing critical density close to the high density core of the capsule, by employing the ponderomotive force associated with high intensity laser light. Finally, the fuel is ignited by suprathermal electrons, produced in the high intensity laser plasma interactions, which propagate from critical density to this high density core. This paper reviews two models of energy gain in ICF capsules and explains why ultra-high intensity lasers allow access to the model producing the higher gains. This new scheme also drastically reduces the difficulty of the implosion and thereby allows lower quality fabrication and less stringent beam quality and symmetry requirements from the implosion driver. The difficulty of the fusion scheme is transferred to the technological difficulty of producing the ultra-high-intensity laser and of transporting this energy to the fuel.

  11. The use of water in a fusion power core

    SciTech Connect

    Tillack, M. S.; Humrickhouse, P. W.; Malang, S.; Rowcliffe, A. F.

    2015-02-01

    Water has both advantages and disadvantages as a coolant in conceptual designs of future fusion power plants. In the United States, water has not been chosen as a fusion power core coolant for decades. Researchers in other countries continue to adopt water in their designs, in some cases as the leading or sole candidate. In this article, we summarize the technical challenges resulting from the choice of water coolant and the differences in approach and assumptions that lead to different design decisions amongst researchers in this field.

  12. Progress in the pulsed power Inertial Confinement Fusion program

    SciTech Connect

    Quintenz, J.P.; Matzen, M.K.; Mehlhorn, T.A.

    1996-12-01

    Pulsed power accelerators are being used in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research. In order to achieve our goal of a fusion yield in the range of 200 - 1000 MJ from radiation-driven fusion capsules, it is generally believed that {approx}10 MJ of driver energy must be deposited within the ICF target in order to deposit {approx}1 MJ of radiation energy in the fusion capsule. Pulsed power represents an efficient technology for producing both these energies and these radiation environments in the required short pulses (few tens of ns). Two possible approaches are being developed to utilize pulsed power accelerators in this effort: intense beams of light ions and z- pinches. This paper describes recent progress in both approaches. Over the past several years, experiments have successfully answered many questions critical to ion target design. Increasing the ion beam power and intensity are our next objectives. Last year, the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator H (PBFA II) was modified to generate ion beams in a geometry that will be required for high yield applications. This 2048 modification has resulted in the production of the highest power ion beam to be accelerated from an extraction ion diode. We are also evaluating fast magnetically-driven implosions (z-pinches) as platforms for ICF ablator physics and EOS experiments. Z-pinch implosions driven by the 20 TW Saturn accelerator have efficiently produced high x- ray power (> 75 TW) and energy (> 400 kJ). Containing these x-ray sources within a hohlraum produces a unique large volume (> 6000 mm{sup 3}), long lived (>20 ns) radiation environment. In addition to studying fundamental ICF capsule physics, there are several concepts for driving ICF capsules with these x-ray sources. Progress in increasing the x-ray power on the Saturn accelerator and promise of further increases on the higher power PBFA II accelerator will be described.

  13. High-efficiency gigahertz frequency doubling without power threshold in thin-film Ni81Fe19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C.; Bailey, W. E.

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate efficient second-harmonic generation at moderate input power for thin film Ni81Fe19 undergoing ferromagnetic resonance. Powers of the generated second-harmonic are shown to be quadratic in input power, with an upconversion ratio three orders of magnitude higher than that demonstrated in ferrites [W. P. Ayres et al., J. Appl. Phys. 27, 188 (1956)], defined as ΔP2ω/ΔPω˜4×10-5/W .Pω, where ΔP is the change in the transmitted rf power and P is the input rf power. The second harmonic signal generated exhibits a significantly lower linewidth than that predicted by low-power Gilbert damping and is excited without threshold. Results are in good agreement with an analytic, approximate expansion of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation.

  14. Design of an Ultra-High Efficiency GaN High-Power Amplifier for SAR Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thrivikraman, Tushar; Hoffman, James

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the development of a high-power amplifier for use with a remote sensing SAR system. The amplifier is intended to meet the requirements for the Sweep-SAR technique for use in the proposed DESDynI SAR instrument. In order to optimize the amplifier design, active load-pull technique is employed to provide harmonic tuning to provide efficiency improvements. In addition, some of the techniques to overcome the challenges of load-pulling high power devices are presented. The design amplifier was measured to have 49 dBm of output power with 75% PAE, which is suitable to meet the proposed system requirements.

  15. High-power and highly efficient Tm3+-doped silica fiber lasers pumped with diode lasers operating at 1150 nm.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Stuart D; Bugge, Frank; Erbert, Götz

    2007-10-01

    An output power of 1.74 W at 2.03 microm was generated at a slope efficiency of 51% when a double-clad Tm(3+)-doped silica fiber laser was pumped with high-power 1150 nm diode lasers. Pump excited state absorption from the upper laser level populates higher energy levels allowing cross relaxation to repopulate the upper laser level at a quantum efficiency greater than unity and to limit losses relating to additional pump excited state absorption. The output power was scaled to 4.77 W when both ends of the fiber were pumped.

  16. Design of an Ultra-High Efficiency GaN High-Power Amplifier for SAR Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thrivikraman, Tushar; Hoffman, James

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the development of a high-power amplifier for use with a remote sensing SAR system. The amplifier is intended to meet the requirements for the Sweep-SAR technique for use in the proposed DESDynI SAR instrument. In order to optimize the amplifier design, active load-pull technique is employed to provide harmonic tuning to provide efficiency improvements. In addition, some of the techniques to overcome the challenges of load-pulling high power devices are presented. The design amplifier was measured to have 49 dBm of output power with 75% PAE, which is suitable to meet the proposed system requirements.

  17. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): High-Efficiency High-Power Nd: YAG Laser under 885 nm Laser Diode Pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fang-Qin; Zhang, Xiao-Fu; Zong, Nan; Yang, Jing; Peng, Qin-Jun; Cui, Da-Fu; Xu, Zu-Yan

    2009-11-01

    A high-efficiency high-power Nd:YAG laser under 885nm laser diode (LD) pumping is demonstrated. The laser crystal is carefully designed, and the overlapping between the pump modes and the laser modes is optimized. The maximum output power at 1064 nm is 87W under the absorbed pump power 127.7W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 72.4% and an optical-optical efficiency of 68.1%. The optical-optical efficiency is 58.4% for the pump power emitted directly from the LD. To our best knowledge, this is the maximal optical-optical conversion efficiency obtained for the LD end-pumped Nd:YAG lasers so far.

  18. Super-X divertors and high power density fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Valanju, P. M.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Mahajan, S. M.; Canik, J.

    2009-05-15

    The Super-X Divertor (SXD), a robust axisymmetric redesign of the divertor magnetic geometry that can allow a fivefold increase in the core power density of toroidal fusion devices, is presented. With small changes in poloidal coils and currents for standard divertors, the SXD allows the largest divertor plate radius inside toroidal field coils. This increases the plasma-wetted area by 2-3 times over all flux-expansion-only methods (e.g., plate near main X point, plate tilting, X divertor, and snowflake), decreases parallel heat flux and hence plasma temperature at plate, and increases connection length by 2-5 times. Examples of high-power-density fusion devices enabled by SXD are discussed; the most promising near-term device is a 100 MW modular compact fusion neutron source 'battery' small enough to fit inside a conventional fission blanket.

  19. Simplified coupling power model for fibers fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saktioto, J.; Ali, J.; Fadhali, M.

    2009-09-01

    Fiber coupler fabrication used for an optical waveguide requires lossless power for an optimal application. The previous research coupled fibers were successfully fabricated by injecting hydrogen flow at 1 bar and fused slightly by unstable torch flame in the range of 800-1350°C. Optical parameters may vary significantly over wide range physical properties. Coupling coefficient and refractive index are estimated from the experimental result of the coupling ratio distribution from 1% to 75%. The change of geometrical fiber affects the normalized frequency V even for single mode fibers. V is derived and some parametric variations are performed on the left and right hand side of the coupling region. A partial power is modelled and derived using V, normalized lateral phase constant u, and normalized lateral attenuation constant, w through the second kind of modified Bessel function of the l order, which obeys the normal mode and normalized propagation constant b. Total power is maintained constant in order to comply with the energy conservation law. The power is integrated through V, u, and w over the pulling length of 7500 µm for 1-D. The core radius of a fiber significantly affects V and power partially at coupling region rather than wavelength and refractive index of core and cladding. This model has power phenomena in transmission and reflection for an optical switch and tunable filter.

  20. Evaluation of Characteristics of High Efficiency Power Generation Systems Utilizing Fermentation Gas of Simply Sorted Municipal Refuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Pyong Sik

    This paper evaluates characteristics of two kinds of power generation systems utilizing fermentation gas of municipal refuse which is generated with use of a fermentation equipment of sorted refuse from ordinary collected garbage. In evaluation, a garbage incineration plant treating refuse of 100 t/d was adopted. The two systems investigated are the following systems: (a) gas engine power generation system (Sys-GE) and (b) steam turbine power generation system with super heater of steam (Sys-SH). The characteristics of two systems have been estimated together with the conventional steam turbine power generation system (Sys-C). It has been estimated that Sys-GE and Sys-SH has 2.11 and 2.55 times greater energy saving and CO2 reduction effect compared with Sys-C, respectively.

  1. High-Efficiency, Low-Voltage, Compound Semiconductor Devices for Microwave and MM-Wave Power Amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, P.C.; Hietala, V.M.; Kong, W.; Sloan, Lynn R.

    1999-07-14

    Improvements in the last decade in InP materials growth, device processing techniques, characterization, and circuit design have enabled solid-state power performance through 122 GHz. Although originally targeted for low-noise and power performance at mm-wave frequencies (>30 GHz), InP HEMTs could become the preferred device for frequencies as low as 800 MHz. This investment has benefited the microwave frequency regime with higher efficiency and power densities at lower operating voltages. State-of-the-art microwave performance at lower operating voltage provides a path to smaller, lighter-weight systems in the battery operated arena of commercial and defense electronics. This paper describes an InP HEMT technology being investigated for many power and low-noise amplifier applications from UHF to W-band frequencies. Specifically the technology demonstrated 640mW/mm power density, 27 dB gain, and 84% power-added efficiency at L-band with a bias of 3.0 volts. Based on the author's literature search, this is a record efficiency at L-band with an operating voltage of less than 5 volts.

  2. High-efficiency multiple-light-source red-green-blue power combiner with optical waveguide mode coupling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, J.; Katayose, S.; Watanabe, K.; Itoh, M.; Hashimoto, T.

    2017-02-01

    We propose a very low loss multiple-light-source red-green-blue (RGB) power combiner by optical waveguide mode coupling technique. The combiner consists of a two-step circuit that performs both power coupling and wavelength multiplexing for an RBG multiple-light source. The first step of the circuit combines first R, G, and B as the 0th-order mode. The second step combines second R and G by mode conversion from the 0th-order mode to second-order modes using waveguide mode couplers. We used an even mode configuration to avoid asymmetric deformation of the beam due to interference between the modes. By using all of these coupler functions in the two steps, the circuit provides multiplelight-source (RRGGB) power combining. The combiner was fabricated by silica planar lightwave circuit (PLC) technology. The coupler length is about 4.5 mm, including 2.3 mm for the 0th-order coupler and 2 mm for the secondorder coupler. We estimated the coupling loss of both the 0th-order RGB coupler and second-order RG power coupler to be about 1 dB by evaluating the combined power for the 0th-order RGB couplers and the complementary output powers for mode couplers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a multiple-light-source RRGGB power combiner using multimode coupling. This method enables us to combine a much larger number of light sources using multi-stage coupling for different modes as well. Moreover, the beam shape can be controlled by mode selection.

  3. Inertial-electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion for space power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George H.; Nadler, Jonathon H.; Hochberg, Timothy K.; Barnouin, Olivier; Gu, Yibin

    1991-01-01

    Fusion offers the potential for a very high specific power, providing a large specific impulse that can be traded-off with thrust for mission optimization. Thus fusion is a leading candidate for missions beyond the moon. Here we discuss a new approach for space fusion power, namely Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement (IEC). This method offers a high power density in a relatively small, simple device. It appears capable of burning aneutronic fuels which are most desirable for space applications and is well suited for direct energy conversion. In view of its potential, IEC is currently undergoing experimental and theoretical study as a fusion power source at the University of Illinois. The goal of the research is to create a confined plasma inside multiple nested spherical potential wells. These wells are formed by injecting ions into a highly transparent, high voltage (5-50 kV) sphericl cathode. Multiple passes of ions through the center create a high density non-Maxwellian core. Preliminary experimental results are presented here.

  4. Carbon-14 Source Terms and Generation in Fusion Power Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khripunov, V. I.; Kurbatov, D. K.; Subbotin, M. L.

    2008-12-01

    A consecutive study of the source terms of 14C as the major contributor to the external costs of fusion and its production rate was performed by system and neutron activation analysis. It shows that the specific 14C activity induced in the low activation structural materials, coolants and breeders suggested for future fusion power reactor cores is significantly dependent upon the assumption for nitrogen content. The determined range of the specific 14C activity ˜2-20 TBq/GW(e)a induced by the near-term water-cooled, gas-cooled and advanced liquid lithium and lithium-lead self-cooled fusion power reactors is given in the paper regarding the values for natural 14C background and artificial 14C sources as fission power reactors and nuclear tests. It is definitely recommended to minimize the nitrogen content below 0.01 wt.% in the beryllium multipliers and in the structural materials, SiC/SiC composite including. Then due to environmental and waste disposal reasons the 14C generation in fusion power blankets will have negligible impact on the cost.

  5. Advanced Fusion Reactors for Space Propulsion and Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, John J.

    2011-06-15

    In recent years the methodology proposed for conversion of light elements into energy via fusion has made steady progress. Scientific studies and engineering efforts in advanced fusion systems designs have introduced some new concepts with unique aspects including consideration of Aneutronic fuels. The plant parameters for harnessing aneutronic fusion appear more exigent than those required for the conventional fusion fuel cycle. However aneutronic fusion propulsion plants for Space deployment will ultimately offer the possibility of enhanced performance from nuclear gain as compared to existing ionic engines as well as providing a clean solution to Planetary Protection considerations and requirements. Proton triggered 11Boron fuel (p- 11B) will produce abundant ion kinetic energy for In-Space vectored thrust. Thus energetic alpha particles' exhaust momentum can be used directly to produce high Isp thrust and also offer possibility of power conversion into electricity. p-11B is an advanced fusion plant fuel with well understood reaction kinematics but will require some new conceptual thinking as to the most effective implementation.

  6. Advanced Fusion Reactors for Space Propulsion and Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years the methodology proposed for conversion of light elements into energy via fusion has made steady progress. Scientific studies and engineering efforts in advanced fusion systems designs have introduced some new concepts with unique aspects including consideration of Aneutronic fuels. The plant parameters for harnessing aneutronic fusion appear more exigent than those required for the conventional fusion fuel cycle. However aneutronic fusion propulsion plants for Space deployment will ultimately offer the possibility of enhanced performance from nuclear gain as compared to existing ionic engines as well as providing a clean solution to Planetary Protection considerations and requirements. Proton triggered 11Boron fuel (p- 11B) will produce abundant ion kinetic energy for In-Space vectored thrust. Thus energetic alpha particles "exhaust" momentum can be used directly to produce high ISP thrust and also offer possibility of power conversion into electricity. p- 11B is an advanced fusion plant fuel with well understood reaction kinematics but will require some new conceptual thinking as to the most effective implementation.

  7. Investigation of materials for fusion power reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhaddane, A.; Slugeň, V.; Sojak, S.; Veterníková, J.; Petriska, M.; Bartošová, I.

    2014-06-01

    The possibility of application of nuclear-physical methods to observe radiation damage to structural materials of nuclear facilities is nowadays a very actual topic. The radiation damage to materials of advanced nuclear facilities, caused by extreme radiation stress, is a process, which significantly limits their operational life as well as their safety. In the centre of our interest is the study of the radiation degradation and activation of the metals and alloys for the new nuclear facilities (Generation IV fission reactors, fusion reactors ITER and DEMO). The observation of the microstructure changes in the reactor steels is based on experimental investigation using the method of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). The experimental part of the work contains measurements focused on model reactor alloys and ODS steels. There were 12 model reactor steels and 3 ODS steels. We were investigating the influence of chemical composition on the production of defects in crystal lattice. With application of the LT 9 program, the spectra of specimen have been evaluated and the most convenient samples have been determined.

  8. 16 W output power by high-efficient spectral beam combining of DBR-tapered diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Müller, André; Vijayakumar, Deepak; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Hasler, Karl-Heinz; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Andersen, Peter E; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2011-01-17

    Up to 16 W output power has been obtained using spectral beam combining of two 1063 nm DBR-tapered diode lasers. Using a reflecting volume Bragg grating, a combining efficiency as high as 93.7% is achieved, resulting in a single beam with high spatial coherence. The result represents the highest output power achieved by spectral beam combining of two single element tapered diode lasers. Since spectral beam combining does not affect beam propagation parameters, M2-values of 1.8 (fast axis) and 3.3 (slow axis) match the M2-values of the laser with lowest spatial coherence. The principle of spectral beam combining used in our experiments can be expanded to combine more than two tapered diode lasers and hence it is expected that the output power may be increased even further in the future.

  9. High efficiency, diode pumped Nd:YAG ceramics slab laser with 230 W continuous-wave output power.

    PubMed

    Lapucci, Antonio; Ciofini, Marco; Vannoni, Maurizo; Sordini, Andrea

    2012-06-20

    Diode pumped zig-zag slab lasers are widely adopted for continuous-wave high power or pulsed high energy applications. Recently [J. Eur. Opt. Soc.-Rapid 6, 11041 (2011)] we started to investigate a new thin slab format in which pumping radiation input is obtained through the thin lateral faces (edge pumping) and the beam propagation takes place bouncing on these same lateral faces ("edge zig-zag"). We report on the optimized operation of a ceramic Nd:YAG laser, based on this geometry, extracting 230 W at a 43% output power to diode power conversion efficiency. Thorough investigation of the thermal lens effect allows us to analyze the optical cavity and thus to define the main aspects limiting the present laser configuration.

  10. Very high efficiency small nuclear gas turbine power plant concept (HTGR-GT/BC) for special applications

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, C.F.; Cavallaro, L.; Kapich, D.; Medwid, W.A.

    1984-06-01

    To meet the energy needs of special terrestrial defense installations, where a premium is placed on high plant efficiency, conceptual studies have been performed on an advanced closed-cycle gas turbine system with a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as the heat source. Emphasis has been placed on system compactness and plant simplicity. A goal of plant operation for extended periods with no environmental contact had a strong influence on the design features. To realize a high plant efficiency (over 50%) for this mode of operation, a combined cycle was investigated. A primary helium Brayton power conversion system coupled with a Freon bottoming cycle was selected. Details are presented of the reactor arrangement, power conversion system, major components, installation, and performance for a compact nuclear power plant currently in a very early stage of concept definition.

  11. High-Efficiency Expression of TAT-bFGF Fusion Protein in Escherichia coli and the Effect on Hypertrophic Scar Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xuechao; Tian, Haishan; Tang, Lu; Zheng, Long; Zheng, Lulu; Yang, Ting; Yu, Bingjie; Wang, Zhitao; Lin, Peng; Li, Xiaokun; Wang, Xiaojie

    2015-01-01

    Background Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is a member of the fibroblast growth factor family that has effects on wounding healing and neuro-protection. However, it is difficult to use bFGF to treat diseases that are separated by physiological barriers, such as the dermal barrier and blood brain barrier. Methodology/Principal Findings To improve bFGF’s penetration ability, we fused the recombinant human fibroblast growth factor (rhbFGF) gene with TAT. We constructed a pET3c vector that contained the recombinant bFGF gene and successfully expressed this gene in the E. coli strain BL21 (DE3) pLsS. The fusion protein was purified using CM Sepharose FF and heparin affinity chromatography. The purity of the TAT-rhbFGF was greater than 95%, as detected by SDS-PAGE. An in vitro MTT trial revealed that the modified bFGF significantly promoted the proliferation of NIH3T3 cells. The cell penetration trial and the mouse skin penetration trial demonstrated that the fusion protein had certain penetration abilities. The animal experiments confirmed that TAT-rhbFGF was effective in the treatment of the hypertrophic scars. Conclusions/Significance We have successfully expressed and purified a TAT-rhbFGF fusion protein in this study. Our results have shown that the fusion protein had a greater ability to penetrate the dermal skin layer. TAT-rhbFGF improved the physical appearance of hypertrophic scars. TAT-rhbFGF may be a potential fusion protein in the treatment of dermal disorders, including hypertrophic scar. PMID:25706539

  12. Manufacturing Methods and Technology Engineering High-Efficiency, High-Power Gallium Arsenide Read-Type IMPATT Diodes. Volume I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    A design review of Read profile IMPATT diodes is presented. Work performed on this program to achieve the target specifications for high power X-band...applied to the manufacturing processes to improve the production rates of Read IMPATT diodes. This included spray dicing of the wafers, and new thermal

  13. Techno-Economic Feasibility of Highly Efficient Cost-Effective Thermoelectric-SOFC Hybrid Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jifeng Zhang; Jean Yamanis

    2007-09-30

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems have the potential to generate exhaust gas streams of high temperature, ranging from 400 to 800 C. These high temperature gas streams can be used for additional power generation with bottoming cycle technologies to achieve higher system power efficiency. One of the potential candidate bottoming cycles is power generation by means of thermoelectric (TE) devices, which have the inherent advantages of low noise, low maintenance and long life. This study was to analyze the feasibility of combining coal gas based SOFC and TE through system performance and cost techno-economic modeling in the context of multi-MW power plants, with 200 kW SOFC-TE module as building blocks. System and component concepts were generated for combining SOFC and TE covering electro-thermo-chemical system integration, power conditioning system (PCS) and component designs. SOFC cost and performance models previously developed at United Technologies Research Center were modified and used in overall system analysis. The TE model was validated and provided by BSST. The optimum system in terms of energy conversion efficiency was found to be a pressurized SOFC-TE, with system efficiency of 65.3% and cost of $390/kW of manufacturing cost. The pressurization ratio was approximately 4 and the assumed ZT of the TE was 2.5. System and component specifications were generated based on the modeling study. The major technology and cost barriers for maturing the system include pressurized SOFC stack using coal gas, the high temperature recycle blowers, and system control design. Finally, a 4-step development roadmap is proposed for future technology development, the first step being a 1 kW proof-of-concept demonstration unit.

  14. High-power and high-efficiency distributed feedback (DFB) lasers operating in the 1.4-1.6 μm range for eye-safe applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrod, Toby; Brunet, François; Galstad, Christian; Klaus, Michael; Olson, Don; Zenner, Chris; Xiao, Yan; Mawst, Luke; Botez, Dan

    2013-02-01

    Incorporating monolithic distributed feedback (DFB) gratings into broad-area (BA) diode lasers results in ten times narrower spectral width and four-to-five times lower thermal shift in emission wavelength. We report on our progress to obtaining a high-power, high-efficiency DFB diode pump in the 1.4-1.6 μm wavelength range for use in industrial and military, eye-safe applications. Results for Fabry-Perot diode lasers emitting at 1530 nm are also discussed. We report on an index-guided, single-emitter design (0.15 x 0.01 cm2) capable of producing 2.5 W of continuous-wave output power at room-temperature with a peak power conversion efficiency of 50%.

  15. Modular stellarator reactor: a fusion power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.; Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Heck, F.M.; Green, L.; Karbowski, J.S.; Murphy, J.H.; Tupper, R.B.; DeLuca, R.A.; Moazed, A.

    1983-07-01

    A comparative analysis of the modular stellarator and the torsatron concepts is made based upon a steady-state ignited, DT-fueled, reactor embodiment of each concept for use as a central electric-power station. Parametric tradeoff calculations lead to the selection of four design points for an approx. 4-GWt plant based upon Alcator transport scaling in l = 2 systems of moderate aspect ratio. The four design points represent high-aspect ratio. The four design points represent high-(0.08) and low-(0.04) beta versions of the modular stellarator and torsatron concepts. The physics basis of each design point is described together with supporting engineering and economic analyses. The primary intent of this study is the elucidation of key physics and engineering tradeoffs, constraints, and uncertainties with respect to the ultimate power reactor embodiment.

  16. Inertial-electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion for space power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George H.; Nadler, Jonathon H.; Hochberg, Timothy K.; Barnouin, Olivier; Gu, Yibin

    Fusion reactor power is a major candidate for missions beyond the moon. Attention is presently given to the IEC system concept for fusion, which offers high energy density in a comparatively small and simple device which may be capable of burning aneutronic fuels that are highly desirable for space applications. The IEC is also well suited for direct energy conversion. The goal of the current IEC research program discussed is the creation of a confined plasma within multiple nested sphericl potential walls that are formed by the injection of ions into a highly transparent, high voltage spherical cathode. Attention is given to preliminary experimental results.

  17. Assessment of tritium breeding requirements for fusion power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, J.

    1983-12-01

    This report presents an assessment of tritium-breeding requirements for fusion power reactors. The analysis is based on an evaluation of time-dependent tritium inventories in the reactor system. The method presented can be applied to any fusion systems in operation on a steady-state mode as well as on a pulsed mode. As an example, the UWMAK-I design was analyzed and it has been found that the startup inventory requirement calculated by the present method significantly differs from those previously calculated. The effect of reactor-parameter changes on the required tritium breeding ratio is also analyzed for a variety of reactor operation scenarios.

  18. A fusion power plant without plasma-material interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.A.

    1997-04-01

    A steady-state fusion power plant is described which avoids the deleterious plasma-material interactions found in D-T fueled tokamaks. It is based on driven p-{sup 11}B fusion in a high-beta closed-field device, the field-reversed configuration (FRC), anchored in a gas-dynamic trap (GDT). The plasma outflow on the open magnetic-field lines is cooled by radiation in the GDT, then channeled through a magnetic nozzle, promoting 3-body recombination in the expansion region. The resulting supersonic neutral exhaust stream flows through a turbine, generating electricity.

  19. Fusion powered human transport to Mars (UWFR94)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cappellari, John; Grota, Susan; Hagedorn, David; Hirai, Yoshi; Remmel, Mark; Schmidt, Deanna; Sveum, Matt; Wandow, Helena

    1994-01-01

    In the future, two important technological dreams will have become reality: fusion will be a viable power source, and human settlement on Mars will be feasible, desirable, and even necessary. Merging these two concepts is especially attractive for the aerospace engineer because of the high specific power that will be possible with fusion (on the order 10 kW/kg). The UWFR94, a large, fusion-powered, human-transport ship, is designed to transport 100 passengers between earth and Mars in approximately thirty days. This relatively short transit time, which mitigates the need for artificial gravity, is made possible by a Polywell inertial electrostatic fusion reactor capable of 20 kW/kg. The mass of each reactor is 37 metric tons and the fuel used is (3)He-(3)He. The electricity generated drives the propulsion system, composed of nine ion thrusters and 780 tons of xenon propellant. The payload consists of three independent, identical cylinders housing the crew, and has a mass of approximately 400 tons. The aluminum cylinders' radius and length are 3 and 12 meters, respectively, with a thickness of 6 cm (15 cm in the solar flare safe rooms). Atmospheric reentry is avoided by constructing and repairing the UWFR94 in space, and by transferring crew and cargo to shuttle-like vehicles for transportation to the planet upon arrival.

  20. Fusion powered human transport to Mars (UWFR94)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellari, John; Grota, Susan; Hagedorn, David; Hirai, Yoshi; Remmel, Mark; Schmidt, Deanna; Sveum, Matt; Wandow, Helena

    In the future, two important technological dreams will have become reality: fusion will be a viable power source, and human settlement on Mars will be feasible, desirable, and even necessary. Merging these two concepts is especially attractive for the aerospace engineer because of the high specific power that will be possible with fusion (on the order 10 kW/kg). The UWFR94, a large, fusion-powered, human-transport ship, is designed to transport 100 passengers between earth and Mars in approximately thirty days. This relatively short transit time, which mitigates the need for artificial gravity, is made possible by a Polywell inertial electrostatic fusion reactor capable of 20 kW/kg. The mass of each reactor is 37 metric tons and the fuel used is (3)He-(3)He. The electricity generated drives the propulsion system, composed of nine ion thrusters and 780 tons of xenon propellant. The payload consists of three independent, identical cylinders housing the crew, and has a mass of approximately 400 tons. The aluminum cylinders' radius and length are 3 and 12 meters, respectively, with a thickness of 6 cm (15 cm in the solar flare safe rooms). Atmospheric reentry is avoided by constructing and repairing the UWFR94 in space, and by transferring crew and cargo to shuttle-like vehicles for transportation to the planet upon arrival.

  1. High-efficiency space-based software radio architectures & algorithms (a minimum size, weight, and power TeraOps processor)

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Mark Edward; Baker, Zachary K; Stettler, Matthew W; Pigue, Michael J; Schmierer, Eric N; Power, John F; Graham, Paul S

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos has recently completed the latest in a series of Reconfigurable Software Radios, which incorporates several key innovations in both hardware design and algorithms. Due to our focus on satellite applications, each design must extract the best size, weight, and power performance possible from the ensemble of Commodity Off-the-Shelf (COTS) parts available at the time of design. In this case we have achieved 1 TeraOps/second signal processing on a 1920 Megabit/second datastream, while using only 53 Watts mains power, 5.5 kg, and 3 liters. This processing capability enables very advanced algorithms such as our wideband RF compression scheme to operate remotely, allowing network bandwidth constrained applications to deliver previously unattainable performance.

  2. Improved power capacity in a high efficiency klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator by distributed energy extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Renzhen; Chen, Changhua; Cao, Yibing; Sun, Jun

    2013-12-07

    With the efficiency increase of a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator, the maximum axial electric field and harmonic current simultaneously appear at the end of the beam-wave interaction region, leading to a highly centralized energy exchange in the dual-cavity extractor and a very high electric field on the cavity surface. Thus, we present a method of distributed energy extraction in this kind of devices. Particle-in-cell simulations show that with the microwave power of 5.1 GW and efficiency of 70%, the maximum axial electric field is decreased from 2.26 MV/cm to 1.28 MV/cm, indicating a threefold increase in the power capacity.

  3. Vertical Stand Transparent Light-Emitting Diode Architecture for High-Efficiency and High-Power Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chih-Chien; Koslow, Ingrid; Sonoda, Junichi; Ohta, Hiroaki; Ha, Jun-Seok; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P.

    2010-08-01

    Using a transparent ZnO vertical stand as a submount, a novel Light-emitting diode architecture, which is similar to conventional lighting bulbs, was proposed. The emission power of a blue LED based on c-plane (0001) bulk GaN was increased by 14.2 and 5.1% compared with those of conventional and suspended die packages, respectively. The output power and external quantum efficiency of LEDs respectively reached 31.7 mW and 57.1% at a forward current of 20 mA under direct current conditions. The high thermal conductivity and refractive index of the transparent submount simultaneously resulted in high current operation and high external efficiency.

  4. Improved power capacity in a high efficiency klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator by distributed energy extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Renzhen; Chen, Changhua; Cao, Yibing; Sun, Jun

    2013-12-01

    With the efficiency increase of a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator, the maximum axial electric field and harmonic current simultaneously appear at the end of the beam-wave interaction region, leading to a highly centralized energy exchange in the dual-cavity extractor and a very high electric field on the cavity surface. Thus, we present a method of distributed energy extraction in this kind of devices. Particle-in-cell simulations show that with the microwave power of 5.1 GW and efficiency of 70%, the maximum axial electric field is decreased from 2.26 MV/cm to 1.28 MV/cm, indicating a threefold increase in the power capacity.

  5. Superstructure high efficiency photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, M.; So, L. C.; Leburton, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    A novel class of photovoltaic cascade structures is introduced which features multijunction upper subcells. These superstructure high efficiency photovoltaics (SHEP's) exhibit enhanced upper subcell spectral response because of the additional junctions which serve to reduce bulk recombination losses by decreasing the mean collection distance for photogenerated minority carriers. Two possible electrical configurations were studied and compared: a three-terminal scheme that allows both subcells to be operated at their individual maximum power points and a two-terminal configuration with an intercell ohmic contact for series interconnection. The three-terminal devices were found to be superior both in terms of beginning-of-life expectancy and radiation tolerance. Realistic simulations of three-terminal AlGaAs/GaAs SHEP's show that one sun AMO efficiencies in excess of 26 percent are possible.

  6. IEC fusion: The future power and propulsion system for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Walter E.; Coventry, Matt; Hanson, John; Hrbud, Ivana; Miley, George H.; Nadler, Jon

    2000-01-01

    Rapid access to any point in the solar system requires advanced propulsion concepts that will provide extremely high specific impulse, low specific power, and a high thrust-to-power ratio. Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion is one of many exciting concepts emerging through propulsion and power research in laboratories across the nation which will determine the future direction of space exploration. This is part of a series of papers that discuss different applications of the Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion concept for both in-space and terrestrial use. IEC will enable tremendous advances in faster travel times within the solar system. The technology is currently under investigation for proof of concept and transitioning into the first prototype units for commercial applications. In addition to use in propulsion for space applications, terrestrial applications include desalinization plants, high energy neutron sources for radioisotope generation, high flux sources for medical applications, proton sources for specialized medical applications, and tritium production. .

  7. An Inertial-Fusion Z-Pinch Power Plant Concept

    SciTech Connect

    DERZON,MARK S.; ROCHAU,GARY E.; DEGROOT,J.; OLSON,CRAIG L.; PETERSON,P.; PETERSON,R.R.; SLUTZ,STEPHEN A.; ZAMORA,ANTONIO J.

    2000-12-15

    With the promising new results of fast z-pinch technology developed at Sandia National Laboratories, we are investigating using z-pinch driven high-yield Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) as a fusion power plant energy source. These investigations have led to a novel fusion system concept based on an attempt to separate many of the difficult fusion engineering issues and a strict reliance on existing technology, or a reasonable extrapolation of existing technology, wherever possible. In this paper, we describe the main components of such a system with a focus on the fusion chamber dynamics. The concept works with all of the electrically-coupled ICF proposed fusion designs. It is proposed that a z-pinch driven ICF power system can be feasibly operated at high yields (1 to 30 GJ) with a relatively low pulse rate (0.01-0.1 Hz). To deliver the required current from the rep-rated pulse power driver to the z-pinch diode, a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) and the integrated target hardware are fabricated, vacuum pumped, and aligned prior to loading for each power pulse. In this z-pinch driven system, no laser or ion beams propagate in the chamber such that the portion of the chamber outside the RTL does not need to be under vacuum. Additionally, by utilizing a graded-density solid lithium or fluorine/lithium/beryllium eutectic (FLiBe) blanket between the source and the first-wall the system can breed its own fuel absorb a large majority of the fusion energy released from each capsule and shield the first-wall from a damaging neutron flux. This neutron shielding significantly reduces the neutron energy fluence at the first-wall such that radiation damage should be minimal and will not limit the first-wall lifetime. Assuming a 4 m radius, 8 m tall cylindrical chamber design with an 80 cm thick spherical FLiBe blanket, our calculations suggest that a 20 cm thick 6061-T6 Al chamber wall will reach the equivalent uranium ore radioactivity level within 100 years after a 30

  8. Nanofluidic crystal: a facile, high-efficiency and high-power-density scaling up scheme for energy harvesting based on nanofluidic reverse electrodialysis.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Wei; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Haixia; Wu, Wengang; Li, Zhihong

    2013-08-30

    The great advances in nanotechnology call for advances in miniaturized power sources for micro/nano-scale systems. Nanofluidic channels have received great attention as promising high-power-density substitutes for ion exchange membranes for use in energy harvesting from ambient ionic concentration gradient, namely reverse electrodialysis. This paper proposes the nanofluidic crystal (NFC), of packed nanoparticles in micro-meter-sized confined space, as a facile, high-efficiency and high-power-density scaling-up scheme for energy harvesting by nanofluidic reverse electrodialysis (NRED). Obtained from the self-assembly of nanoparticles in a micropore, the NFC forms an ion-selective network with enormous nanochannels due to electrical double-layer overlap in the nanoparticle interstices. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, a maximum efficiency of 42.3 ± 1.84%, a maximum power density of 2.82 ± 0.22 W m(-2), and a maximum output power of 1.17 ± 0.09 nW/unit (nearly three orders of magnitude of amplification compared to other NREDs) were achieved in our prototype cell, which was prepared within 30 min. The current NFC-based prototype cell can be parallelized and cascaded to achieve the desired output power and open circuit voltage. This NFC-based scaling-up scheme for energy harvesting based on NRED is promising for the building of self-powered micro/nano-scale systems.

  9. Nanofluidic crystal: a facile, high-efficiency and high-power-density scaling up scheme for energy harvesting based on nanofluidic reverse electrodialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Wei; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Haixia; Wu, Wengang; Li, Zhihong

    2013-08-01

    The great advances in nanotechnology call for advances in miniaturized power sources for micro/nano-scale systems. Nanofluidic channels have received great attention as promising high-power-density substitutes for ion exchange membranes for use in energy harvesting from ambient ionic concentration gradient, namely reverse electrodialysis. This paper proposes the nanofluidic crystal (NFC), of packed nanoparticles in micro-meter-sized confined space, as a facile, high-efficiency and high-power-density scaling-up scheme for energy harvesting by nanofluidic reverse electrodialysis (NRED). Obtained from the self-assembly of nanoparticles in a micropore, the NFC forms an ion-selective network with enormous nanochannels due to electrical double-layer overlap in the nanoparticle interstices. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, a maximum efficiency of 42.3 ± 1.84%, a maximum power density of 2.82 ± 0.22 W m-2, and a maximum output power of 1.17 ± 0.09 nW/unit (nearly three orders of magnitude of amplification compared to other NREDs) were achieved in our prototype cell, which was prepared within 30 min. The current NFC-based prototype cell can be parallelized and cascaded to achieve the desired output power and open circuit voltage. This NFC-based scaling-up scheme for energy harvesting based on NRED is promising for the building of self-powered micro/nano-scale systems.

  10. Propagation of nuclear data uncertainties for fusion power measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöstrand, Henrik; Conroy, Sean; Helgesson, Petter; Hernandez, Solis Augusto; Koning, Arjan; Pomp, Stephan; Rochman, Dimitri

    2017-09-01

    Neutron measurements using neutron activation systems are an essential part of the diagnostic system at large fusion machines such as JET and ITER. Nuclear data is used to infer the neutron yield. Consequently, high-quality nuclear data is essential for the proper determination of the neutron yield and fusion power. However, uncertainties due to nuclear data are not fully taken into account in uncertainty analysis for neutron yield calibrations using activation foils. This paper investigates the neutron yield uncertainty due to nuclear data using the so-called Total Monte Carlo Method. The work is performed using a detailed MCNP model of the JET fusion machine; the uncertainties due to the cross-sections and angular distributions in JET structural materials, as well as the activation cross-sections in the activation foils, are analysed. It is found that a significant contribution to the neutron yield uncertainty can come from uncertainties in the nuclear data.

  11. Materials integration issues for high performance fusion power systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. L.

    1998-01-14

    One of the primary requirements for the development of fusion as an energy source is the qualification of materials for the frost wall/blanket system that will provide high performance and exhibit favorable safety and environmental features. Both economic competitiveness and the environmental attractiveness of fusion will be strongly influenced by the materials constraints. A key aspect is the development of a compatible combination of materials for the various functions of structure, tritium breeding, coolant, neutron multiplication and other special requirements for a specific system. This paper presents an overview of key materials integration issues for high performance fusion power systems. Issues such as: chemical compatibility of structure and coolant, hydrogen/tritium interactions with the plasma facing/structure/breeder materials, thermomechanical constraints associated with coolant/structure, thermal-hydraulic requirements, and safety/environmental considerations from a systems viewpoint are presented. The major materials interactions for leading blanket concepts are discussed.

  12. ARC: A compact, high-field, disassemblable fusion nuclear science facility and demonstration power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorbom, Brandon; Ball, Justin; Palmer, Timothy; Mangiarotti, Franco; Sierchio, Jennifer; Bonoli, Paul; Kasten, Cale; Sutherland, Derek; Barnard, Harold; Haakonsen, Christian; Goh, Jon; Sung, Choongki; Whyte, Dennis

    2014-10-01

    The Affordable, Robust, Compact (ARC) reactor conceptual design aims to reduce the size, cost, and complexity of a combined Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) and demonstration fusion pilot power plant. ARC is a 270 MWe tokamak reactor with a major radius of 3.3 m, a minor radius of 1.1 m, and an on-axis magnetic field of 9.2 T. ARC has Rare Earth Barium Copper Oxide (REBCO) superconducting toroidal field coils with joints to allow disassembly, allowing for removal and replacement of the vacuum vessel as a single component. Inboard-launched current drive of 25 MW LHRF power and 13.6 MW ICRF power is used to provide a robust, steady state core plasma far from disruptive limits. ARC uses an all-liquid blanket, consisting of low pressure, slowly flowing Fluorine Lithium Beryllium (FLiBe) molten salt. The liquid blanket acts as a working fluid, coolant, and tritium breeder, and minimizes the solid material that can become activated. The large temperature range over which FLiBe is liquid permits blanket operation at 800-900 K with single phase fluid cooling and allows use of a high-efficiency Brayton cycle for electricity production in the secondary coolant loop.

  13. Inertial fusion energy power plant design using the Compact Torus Accelerator: HYLIFE-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.; Hammer, J.H.; Hartman, C.W.; Leber, R.L.; Logan, B.G.; Petzoldt, R.W.; Tabak, M.; Tobin, M.T. ); Bieri, R.L. Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA ); Hoffman, M.A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-03-05

    The Compact Torus Accelerator (CTA), under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, offers the promise of a low-cost, high-efficiency, high energy, high-power-density driver for ICF and MICF (Magnetically Insulated ICF) type fusion systems. A CTA with 100 MJ driver capacitor bank energy is predicted to deliver {approximately}30 MJ CT kinetic energy to a 1 cm{sup 2} target in several nanoseconds for a power density of {approximately}10{sup 16} watts/cm{sup 2}. The estimated cost of delivered energy is {approximately}3$/Joule, or $100M for 30 MJ. This driver appears to be cost-effective and, in this regard, is virtually alone among IFE drivers. We discuss indirect-drive ICF with a DT fusion energy gain Q = 70 for a total yield of 2 GJ. The CT can be guided to the target inside a several-meter-long disposable cone made of frozen Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}, the same material as the coolant. We have designed a power plant including CT injection, target emplacement, containment, energy recovery, and tritium breeding. The cost of electricity is predicted to be 4.8 {cents}/kWh, which is competitive with future coal and nuclear costs.

  14. Laser driven nuclear science and applications: The need of high efficiency, high power and high repetition rate Laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gales, S.

    2015-10-01

    Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) is a pan European research initiative selected on the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures Roadmap that aims to close the gap between the existing laboratory-based laser driven research and international facility-grade research centre. The ELI-NP facility, one of the three ELI pillars under construction, placed in Romania and to be operational in 2018, has as core elements a couple of new generation 10 PW laser systems and a narrow bandwidth Compton backscattering gamma source with photon energies up to 19 MeV. ELI-NP will address nuclear photonics, nuclear astrophysics and quantum electrodynamics involving extreme photon fields. Prospective applications of high power laser in nuclear astrophysics, accelerator physics, in particular towards future Accelerator Driven System, as well as in nuclear photonics, for detection and characterization of nuclear material, and for nuclear medicine, will be discussed. Key issues in these research areas will be at reach with significant increase of the repetition rates and of the efficiency at the plug of the high power laser systems as proposed by the ICAN collaboration.

  15. Very High Efficiency, Miniaturized, Long-Lived Alpha Particle Power Source Using Diamond Devices for Extreme Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolawa, Elizabeth A. (Inventor); Patel, Jagdishbhai U. (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A power source that converts a-particle energy into electricity by coulomb collision in doped diamond films is described. Alpha particle decay from curium-244 creates electron-hole pairs by free- ing electrons and holes inside the crystal lattice in N- and P-doped diamond films. Ohmic contacts provide electrical connection to an electronic device. Due to the built-in electric field at the rectifying junction across the hT- and P-doped diamond films, the free electrons are constrained to traveling in generally one direction. This one direction then supplies electrons in a manner similar to that of a battery. The radioactive curium layer may be disposed on diamond films for even distribution of a-particle radiation. The resulting power source may be mounted on a diamond substrate that serves to insulate structures below the diamond substrate from a-particle emission. Additional insulation or isolation may be provided in order to prevent damage from a-particle collision. N-doped silicon may be used instead of N-doped diamond.

  16. Very High Efficiency, Miniaturized, Long-Lived Alpha Particle Power Source Using Diamond Devices for Extreme Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolawa, Elizabeth A. (Inventor); Patel, Jagdishbhai U. (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A power source that converts a-particle energy into electricity by coulomb collision in doped diamond films is described. Alpha particle decay from curium-244 creates electron-hole pairs by free- ing electrons and holes inside the crystal lattice in N- and P-doped diamond films. Ohmic contacts provide electrical connection to an electronic device. Due to the built-in electric field at the rectifying junction across the hT- and P-doped diamond films, the free electrons are constrained to traveling in generally one direction. This one direction then supplies electrons in a manner similar to that of a battery. The radioactive curium layer may be disposed on diamond films for even distribution of a-particle radiation. The resulting power source may be mounted on a diamond substrate that serves to insulate structures below the diamond substrate from a-particle emission. Additional insulation or isolation may be provided in order to prevent damage from a-particle collision. N-doped silicon may be used instead of N-doped diamond.

  17. Personnel Safety for Future Magnetic Fusion Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lee Cadwallader

    2009-07-01

    The safety of personnel at existing fusion experiments is an important concern that requires diligence. Looking to the future, fusion experiments will continue to increase in power and operating time until steady state power plants are achieved; this causes increased concern for personnel safety. This paper addresses four important aspects of personnel safety in the present and extrapolates these aspects to future power plants. The four aspects are personnel exposure to ionizing radiation, chemicals, magnetic fields, and radiofrequency (RF) energy. Ionizing radiation safety is treated well for present and near-term experiments by the use of proven techniques from other nuclear endeavors. There is documentation that suggests decreasing the annual ionizing radiation exposure limits that have remained constant for several decades. Many chemicals are used in fusion research, for parts cleaning, as use as coolants, cooling water cleanliness control, lubrication, and other needs. In present fusion experiments, a typical chemical laboratory safety program, such as those instituted in most industrialized countries, is effective in protecting personnel from chemical exposures. As fusion facilities grow in complexity, the chemical safety program must transition from a laboratory scale to an industrial scale program that addresses chemical use in larger quantity. It is also noted that allowable chemical exposure concentrations for workers have decreased over time and, in some cases, now pose more stringent exposure limits than those for ionizing radiation. Allowable chemical exposure concentrations have been the fastest changing occupational exposure values in the last thirty years. The trend of more restrictive chemical exposure regulations is expected to continue into the future. Other issues of safety importance are magnetic field exposure and RF energy exposure. Magnetic field exposure limits are consensus values adopted as best practices for worker safety; a typical

  18. A High-Efficiency CMOS Class-B Push-Pull Power Amplifier for Code-Division-Multiple-Access Cellular System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Michio; Saito, Tetsuya; Tachibana, Ryoichi; Morimoto, Akihiro; Masu, Kazuya; Tsubouchi, Kazuo

    2000-04-01

    A silicon Class-B complementary push-pull power amplifier for a code-division-multiple-access IS-95 cellular system has been proposed for the first time. 0.8-μm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices are fabricated and evaluated using RF measurement and simulation. The RF-CMOS balanced design between n- and p-MOS devices has been investigated. From RF simulation, a power-added efficiency (PAE) of over 60% at an input power of 5 dBm and an adjacent-channel-power-ratio of {-}42 dBc are obtained. It is found that both high efficiency and high linearity are obtained using the RF-CMOS balanced design with optimized channel length and width. Furthermore, drain voltage control for IS-95 criteria has been proposed in addition to the balanced design. The overall PAE, which is defined as the PAE multiplied by the probability distribution function of the used power-level and integrated over the entire used power range, has been improved up to 49%.

  19. Fusion primer and nested integrated PCR (FPNI-PCR): a new high-efficiency strategy for rapid chromosome walking or flanking sequence cloning

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The advent of genomics-based technologies has revolutionized many fields of biological enquiry. However, chromosome walking or flanking sequence cloning is still a necessary and important procedure to determining gene structure. Such methods are used to identify T-DNA insertion sites and so are especially relevant for organisms where large T-DNA insertion libraries have been created, such as rice and Arabidopsis. The currently available methods for flanking sequence cloning, including the popular TAIL-PCR technique, are relatively laborious and slow. Results Here, we report a simple and effective fusion primer and nested integrated PCR method (FPNI-PCR) for the identification and cloning of unknown genomic regions flanked known sequences. In brief, a set of universal primers was designed that consisted of various 15-16 base arbitrary degenerate oligonucleotides. These arbitrary degenerate primers were fused to the 3' end of an adaptor oligonucleotide which provided a known sequence without degenerate nucleotides, thereby forming the fusion primers (FPs). These fusion primers are employed in the first step of an integrated nested PCR strategy which defines the overall FPNI-PCR protocol. In order to demonstrate the efficacy of this novel strategy, we have successfully used it to isolate multiple genomic sequences namely, 21 orthologs of genes in various species of Rosaceace, 4 MYB genes of Rosa rugosa, 3 promoters of transcription factors of Petunia hybrida, and 4 flanking sequences of T-DNA insertion sites in transgenic tobacco lines and 6 specific genes from sequenced genome of rice and Arabidopsis. Conclusions The successful amplification of target products through FPNI-PCR verified that this novel strategy is an effective, low cost and simple procedure. Furthermore, FPNI-PCR represents a more sensitive, rapid and accurate technique than the established TAIL-PCR and hiTAIL-PCR procedures. PMID:22093809

  20. LIFE: a sustainable solution for developing safe, clean fusion power.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Susana; Dunne, Mike; Kramer, Kevin; Anklam, Tom; Havstad, Mark; Mazuecos, Antonio Lafuente; Miles, Robin; Martinez-Frias, Joel; Deri, Bob

    2013-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in California is currently in operation with the goal to demonstrate fusion energy gain for the first time in the laboratory-also referred to as "ignition." Based on these demonstration experiments, the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) power plant is being designed at LLNL in partnership with other institutions with the goal to deliver baseload electricity from safe, secure, sustainable fusion power in a time scale that is consistent with the energy market needs. For this purpose, the LIFE design takes advantage of recent advances in diode-pumped, solid-state laser technology and adopts the paradigm of Line Replaceable Units used on the NIF to provide high levels of availability and maintainability and mitigate the need for advanced materials development. The LIFE market entry plant will demonstrate the feasibility of a closed fusion fuel cycle, including tritium breeding, extraction, processing, refueling, accountability, and safety, in a steady-state power-producing device. While many fusion plant designs require large quantities of tritium for startup and operations, a range of design choices made for the LIFE fuel cycle act to reduce the in-process tritium inventory. This paper presents an overview of the delivery plan and the preconceptual design of the LIFE facility with emphasis on the key safety design principles being adopted. In order to illustrate the favorable safety characteristics of the LIFE design, some initial accident analysis results are presented that indicate potential for a more attractive licensing regime than that of current fission reactors.

  1. High efficiency and high peak power picosecond mid-infrared optical parametric amplifier based on BaGa4Se7 crystal.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Yao, Ji-yong; Xu, Hong-yan; Feng, Kai; Yin, Wen-long; Li, Fang-qin; Yang, Jing; Du, Shi-feng; Peng, Qin-jun; Zhang, Jing-yuan; Cui, Da-fu; Wu, Yi-cheng; Chen, Chuang-tian; Xu, Zu-yan

    2013-10-01

    A high efficiency and high peak power picosecond (ps) mid-infrared optical parametric amplifier with a new nonlinear crystal BaGa(4)Se(7) pumped by a 30 ps 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser is demonstrated for the first time. The maximum photon conversion efficiency of 56% from 1064 nm to 3.9 μm idler has been achieved at the pump energy of ~1.8 mJ. A maximum idler output of 830 μJ at 3.9 μm with peak power of ~27 MW was obtained at pump energy of ~9.1 mJ. Moreover, a 3-5 μm idler tuning range was demonstrated, with output energies of ~300 μJ at 5 μm and up to 1 mJ at 3 μm at ~8.2 mJ pump energy.

  2. Design of power control system using SMES and SVC for fusion power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niiyama, K.; Yagai, T.; Tsuda, M.; Hamajima, T.

    2008-02-01

    A SMES (Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage System) system with converter composed of self-commutated valve devices such as GTO and IGBT is available to control active and reactive power simultaneously. A SVC (Static Var Compensators) or STATCOM (Static Synchronous Compensator) is widely employed to reduce reactive power in power plants and substations. Owing to progress of power electronics technology using GTO and IGBT devices, power converters in the SMES system and the SVC can easily control power flow in few milliseconds. Moreover, since the valve devices for the SMES are equivalent to those for the SVC, the device cost must be reduced. In this paper the basic control system combined with the SMES and SVC is designed for large pulsed loads of a nuclear fusion power plant. This combined system largely expands the reactive power control region as well as the active one. The simulation results show that the combined system is effective and prospective for the nuclear fusion power plant.

  3. High-efficiency and high-power rechargeable lithium–sulfur dioxide batteries exploiting conventional carbonate-based electrolytes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeokjun; Lim, Hee-Dae; Lim, Hyung-Kyu; Seong, Won Mo; Moon, Sehwan; Ko, Youngmin; Lee, Byungju; Bae, Youngjoon; Kim, Hyungjun; Kang, Kisuk

    2017-01-01

    Shedding new light on conventional batteries sometimes inspires a chemistry adoptable for rechargeable batteries. Recently, the primary lithium-sulfur dioxide battery, which offers a high energy density and long shelf-life, is successfully renewed as a promising rechargeable system exhibiting small polarization and good reversibility. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that reversible operation of the lithium-sulfur dioxide battery is also possible by exploiting conventional carbonate-based electrolytes. Theoretical and experimental studies reveal that the sulfur dioxide electrochemistry is highly stable in carbonate-based electrolytes, enabling the reversible formation of lithium dithionite. The use of the carbonate-based electrolyte leads to a remarkable enhancement of power and reversibility; furthermore, the optimized lithium-sulfur dioxide battery with catalysts achieves outstanding cycle stability for over 450 cycles with 0.2 V polarization. This study highlights the potential promise of lithium-sulfur dioxide chemistry along with the viability of conventional carbonate-based electrolytes in metal-gas rechargeable systems. PMID:28492225

  4. High-efficiency and high-power rechargeable lithium-sulfur dioxide batteries exploiting conventional carbonate-based electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyeokjun; Lim, Hee-Dae; Lim, Hyung-Kyu; Seong, Won Mo; Moon, Sehwan; Ko, Youngmin; Lee, Byungju; Bae, Youngjoon; Kim, Hyungjun; Kang, Kisuk

    2017-05-01

    Shedding new light on conventional batteries sometimes inspires a chemistry adoptable for rechargeable batteries. Recently, the primary lithium-sulfur dioxide battery, which offers a high energy density and long shelf-life, is successfully renewed as a promising rechargeable system exhibiting small polarization and good reversibility. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that reversible operation of the lithium-sulfur dioxide battery is also possible by exploiting conventional carbonate-based electrolytes. Theoretical and experimental studies reveal that the sulfur dioxide electrochemistry is highly stable in carbonate-based electrolytes, enabling the reversible formation of lithium dithionite. The use of the carbonate-based electrolyte leads to a remarkable enhancement of power and reversibility; furthermore, the optimized lithium-sulfur dioxide battery with catalysts achieves outstanding cycle stability for over 450 cycles with 0.2 V polarization. This study highlights the potential promise of lithium-sulfur dioxide chemistry along with the viability of conventional carbonate-based electrolytes in metal-gas rechargeable systems.

  5. Thick liquid protection in inertial fusion power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pemberton, Steven James

    Liquid jets are designed and developed for the construction of a thick-liquid first wall in fusion power plants, with attention to preventing line-of-sight interaction between target debris and solid structural materials in inertial fusion power plants. First, an introduction is given to basic fusion concepts in order to set the background for inertial fusion plant design. After this introduction, scaling relationships for experimental studies are presented and different jet types for thick-liquid inertial fusion chambers are described, including stationary cylindrical jet grids, large oscillating liquid slabs, and vortex tubes created from centrifugal flow inside pipes. The design of vortex tubes is given in some detail with an illustration of some simple concepts from fluid mechanics for the evolution of flow in the tubes, and the results of this basic analysis are compared to empirical results from a prototype device. The actual thickness of the vortex layer is found to depart from the ideal, laminar consideration of the flow development. However, the basic considerations also predict that flow in the vortex layer will remain stable in the region of interest, and will be independent of the volumetric flow rate. These estimates are supported by experimental observations. The construction of a prototype slab jet is also described, and one chapter of this dissertation is dedicated to the analysis of impulse delivery to and dispersion within a slab jet with finely dispersed voids. The reaction of a slab jet to impulse loading is predicted using a simple compressible flow model for incompressible fluid with dispersed voids. The model is compared with experimental impulse-load data, and it is found that this simple model does a fair job of predicting the empirical results. The dissertation concludes with a discussion of some important factors in vortex flow and slab jet disruption, and possible sources of departure from the basic analyses.

  6. Pinch me - I'm fusing! Fusion Power - what is it? What is a z pinch? And why are z-pinches a promising fusion power technology?

    SciTech Connect

    DERZON,MARK S.

    2000-03-01

    The process of combining nuclei (the protons and neutrons inside an atomic nucleus) together with a release of kinetic energy is called fusion. This process powers the Sun, it contributes to the world stockpile of weapons of mass destruction and may one day generate safe, clean electrical power. Understanding the intricacies of fusion power, promised for 50 years, is sometimes difficult because there are a number of ways of doing it. There is hot fusion, cold fusion and con-fusion. Hot fusion is what powers suns through the conversion of mass energy to kinetic energy. Cold fusion generates con-fusion and nobody really knows what it is. Even so, no one is generating electrical power for you and me with either method. In this article the author points out some basic features of the mainstream approaches taken to hot fusion power, as well as describe why z pinches are worth pursuing as a driver for a power reactor and how it may one day generate electrical power for mankind.

  7. High efficiency preparation of bioactive human alpha-defensin 6 in Escherichia coli Origami(DE3)pLysS by soluble fusion expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aiping; Su, Yongping; Wang, Song; Shen, Mingqiang; Chen, Fang; Chen, Mo; Ran, Xinze; Cheng, Tianmin; Wang, Junping

    2010-08-01

    Human alpha-defensin 6 (HD(6)), a small cysteine-rich cationic peptide specially expressed in epithelial cells of digestive tract, may play a crucial role in mucosal immunity. This is the first report on efficient production of bioactive HD(6) through a gene-engineering approach in Escherichia coli. The recombinant plasmid pET32a-omHD(6) was primarily constructed by inserting a PCR fragment encoding mature HD(6) peptide (mHD(6)) preceded by an enterokinase recognition sequence into the expression vector pET32a(+), in frame with the upstream thioredoxin (TrxA) gene. Under optimized expression conditions, a high percentage (>60%) of soluble TrxA-omHD(6) fusion protein was obtained with a yield of about 1.69 g/l, and the theoretical productivity of recombinant mHD(6) (rmHD(6)) reached 0.38 g/l. A feasible three-step purification strategy involving nickel-sepharose chromatography, enterokinase-cleavage and cation exchange chromatography was developed to purify rmHD(6), followed by characteristic identifications by Western blot, mass spectrometry and sequencing. About 102 mg/l of rmHD(6) with its intact N-terminal amino acid sequence was finally achieved. The in vitro experiments showed that rmHD(6) possesses high potency to inhibit herpes simplex virus-2 infection. This work settles substantial foundation for further functional study of HD(6).

  8. A Robust Modular IGBT Power Supply for Fusion Science Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, Timothy; Miller, Ken; Prager, James

    2010-11-01

    A present challenge facing the fusion energy community and particularly the ICC community in its support of the main line tokamak program is the ability to generate increased power levels for pulsed magnets, arc plasma sources, radio frequency heating, and current drive schemes, at reasonable cost. Continuous wave (CW) tube based power supplies are typically large and expensive, making them prohibitive for smaller experimental facilities or not cost effective when only pulsed input power is required. Continued research and development of next generation solid state power supplies could allow for multiple applications with a single well developed, low cost module that could be configured in many ways. Eagle Harbor Technologies has developed, built, and tested a modular solid state power supply based on Insulate Gate Bi-polar Transistor (IGBT) technologies. The power supply utilized a modular, low cost, high power IGBT based system that can be assembled in multiple ways to address a wide range of applications. Testing results demonstrating the prototype abilities in both parallel and series configurations and for both high current and/or high voltage operation will be presented. The prototype cost was shown to be significantly lower than older generation power supplies for similar applications. Future work includes upgrading the prototype for increased power levels (> 10 MW).

  9. The challenge of developing structural materials for fusion power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, Everett E.

    1998-10-01

    Nuclear fusion can be one of the most attractive sources of energy from the viewpoint of safety and minimal environmental impact. Central in the goal of designing a safe, environmentally benign, and economically competitive fusion power system is the requirement for high performance, low activation materials. The general performance requirements for such materials have been defined and it is clear that materials developed for other applications (e.g. aerospace, nuclear fission, fossil energy systems) will not fully meet the needs of fusion. Advanced materials, with composition and microstructure tailored to yield properties that will satisfy the specific requirements of fusion must be developed. The international fusion programs have made significant progress towards this goal. Compositional requirements for low activation lead to a focus of development efforts on silicon carbide composites, vanadium alloys, and advanced martensitic steels as candidate structural material systems. Control of impurities will be critically important in actually achieving low activation but this appears possible. Neutron irradiation produces significant changes in the mechanical and physical properties of each of these material systems raising feasibility questions and design limitations. A focus of the research and development effort is to understand these effects, and through the development of specific compositions and microstructures, produce materials with improved and adequate performance. Other areas of research that are synergistic with the development of radiation resistant materials include fabrication, joining technology, chemical compatibility with coolants and tritium breeders and specific questions relating to the unique characteristics of a given material (e.g. coatings to reduce gas permeation in SiC composites) or design concept (e.g. electrical insulator coatings for liquid metal concepts).

  10. High-Efficiency Robust Free-Standing Composited Phosphor Films with 2D and 3D Nanostructures for High-Power Remote White LEDs.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chun-Feng; Li, Jia-Sian; Shen, Chung-Wen

    2017-02-08

    This study demonstrated that combined free-standing quasi-amorphous/micropattern (QA/MP) composited resin film-assisted phosphor films enhanced the mechanical robustness, luminous efficacy, color rendering index (CRI), and special R9 of high-power remote warm white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs). Introducing QA/MP nanostructures into phosphor film resulted in high efficiency of remote warm WLEDs with low phosphor thickness (approximately 25 μm) and reduced the correlated color temperature (CCT) from cold white light (approximately 5565 K) to warm white light (approximately 3178 K). The QA/MP composited phosphor films (CPFs) used for high-power remote WLEDs enhanced the CRI and special R9 and reduced the CCT. These results were attributed to that QA resin film reflected the blue light and re-emitted the added red emission. CIR (84), a natural warm white CCT (3178 K), and an acceptable luminous efficacy (102.5 lm/W) were achieved from the QA/MP CPFs of high-power remote WLEDs during operation at an input power of 10 W (current of 700 mA). The bending strength of QA/MP CPFs at approximately 112 N was significantly enhanced by 40% compared with that of flat CPFs. The QA/MP CPFs applied to high-power remote WLEDs exhibited good thermal and optical stability. QA/MP CPFs were also conducted to a reliability analysis (RA), in which temperature of 85 °C and relative humidity of 85% were applied for 3288 h. Lumen maintenance was degraded by 8% during RA test because the transmittance of trimethylolopropane ethoxylate triacrylate resins was degraded under high temperature. Overall, we implemented a reliable and inexpensive technology that can potentially reduce phosphor thickness, address the out-bin problems of defective WLEDs, and fabricate flat-panel lighting source with good lighting quality.

  11. Task toward a Realization of Commercial Tokamak Fusion Plants in 2050 -The Role of ITER and the Succeeding Developments- 3.Fusion Plasma Research toward Fusion Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Yutaka; Shimada, Michiya; Miura, Yukitoshi; Ogawa, Yuichi

    This section discusses fusion plasma research that needs to be carried out to develop fusion power plants. Burning plasma, in which self-heating by energetic alph aparticles plays an essential role, should be recognized as autonomous system. This is quite different from present plasma experiments, suggesting a possibility to yield some qualitative changes in fusion plasma research. Research with ITER is strongly expected to contribute to this burning plasma physics. In addition, plasma performance in steady-state and at high beta is very important in fusion power plants from the engineering and economical viewpoints. Plasma parameters expected for fusion power plants are discussed, and present status of experimental research is reviewed. Research in devices other than ITER with unique features would be instrumental for exploring high performance plasmas. A necessity of research complementary to ITER plasma is discussed.

  12. Inertial-fusion research based on pulsed power

    SciTech Connect

    Yonas, G.

    1982-01-01

    PBFA-II, with design parameters of 3.5 MJ and 100 TW, is being configured to allow us to investigate either imploding foils or ion beams as inertial fusion drivers. The same accelerator can drive a foil with a magnetically insulated electromagnetic flow > 10/sup 12/ W/cm/sup 2/ at 10 MV/cm and also power an ion diode at a source intensity of 10/sup 10/ W/cm/sup 2/ and an accelerating potential approx. 10 MV. Our goal is to obtain 100 TW/cm/sup 2/ and 1 MJ on target for ignition studies.

  13. High Efficiency, Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Donald Stanton

    2010-03-31

    Energy use in trucks has been increasing at a faster rate than that of automobiles within the U.S. transportation sector. According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), a 23% increase in fuel consumption for the U.S. heavy duty truck segment is expected between 2009 to 2020. The heavy duty vehicle oil consumption is projected to grow between 2009 and 2050 while light duty vehicle (LDV) fuel consumption will eventually experience a decrease. By 2050, the oil consumption rate by LDVs is anticipated to decrease below 2009 levels due to CAFE standards and biofuel use. In contrast, the heavy duty oil consumption rate is anticipated to double. The increasing trend in oil consumption for heavy trucks is linked to the vitality, security, and growth of the U.S. economy. An essential part of a stable and vibrant U.S. economy is a productive U.S. trucking industry. Studies have shown that the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) is strongly correlated to freight transport. Over 90% of all U.S. freight tonnage is transported by diesel power and over 75% is transported by trucks. Given the vital role that the trucking industry plays in the economy, improving the efficiency of the transportation of goods was a central focus of the Cummins High Efficient Clean Combustion (HECC) program. In a commercial vehicle, the diesel engine remains the largest source of fuel efficiency loss, but remains the greatest opportunity for fuel efficiency improvements. In addition to reducing oil consumption and the dependency on foreign oil, this project will mitigate the impact on the environment by meeting US EPA 2010 emissions regulations. Innovation is a key element in sustaining a U.S. trucking industry that is competitive in global markets. Unlike passenger vehicles, the trucking industry cannot simply downsize the vehicle and still transport the freight with improved efficiency. The truck manufacturing and supporting industries are faced with numerous

  14. Design considerations for an inertial confinement fusion reactor power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, J.V.; Simpson, J.E.

    1981-08-10

    To further define the engineering and economic concerns for inertial confinement fusion reactors (ICR's), a conceptual design study was performed by Bechtel Group Incorporated under the direction of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The study examined alternatives to the LLNL HYLIFE concept and expanded the previous balance of plant design to incorporate information from recent liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) power plant studies. The majority of the effort was to incorporate present laser and target physics models into a reactor design with a low coolant flowrate and a high driver repetition rate. An example of such a design is the LLNL JADE concept. In addition to producing a power plant design for LLNL using the JADE example, Bechtel has also examined the applicability of the EAGLE (Energy Absorbing Gas Lithium Ejector) concept.

  15. Physics assessment of stellarators as fusion power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, J.F.; Rome, J.A.; Garabedian, P.R.; Anderson, D.T.; Painter, S.L.

    1995-02-01

    Four different stellarator configurations (a Compact Torsatron, a new modular torsatron, Helias, and a new Modular Helias-like Heliac) were analyzed as fusion power plants and compared with the second-stability ARIES-IV tokamak. The device and plasma parameters were determined by minimizing the projected cost of electricity subject to various constraints. The stellarators were competitive with ARIES-IV for a range of assumptions on confinement models, alpha-particle losses, and beta. 1-D power balance equations were solved for both Lackner-Gottardi confinement scaling with an assumed n{sub e}(r) and for helical-ripple-induced transport with both assumed and calculated forms for n{sub e}(r) and E{sub r}(r).

  16. Fabrication of Very High Efficiency 5.8 GHz Power Amplifiers using AlGaN HFETs on SiC Substrates for Wireless Power Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Gerry

    2001-01-01

    For wireless power transmission using microwave energy, very efficient conversion of the DC power into microwave power is extremely important. Class E amplifiers have the attractive feature that they can, in theory, be 100% efficient at converting, DC power to RF power. Aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) semiconductor material has many advantageous properties, relative to silicon (Si), gallium arsenide (GaAs), and silicon carbide (SiC), such as a much larger bandgap, and the ability to form AlGaN/GaN heterojunctions. The large bandgap of AlGaN also allows for device operation at higher temperatures than could be tolerated by a smaller bandgap transistor. This could reduce the cooling requirements. While it is unlikely that the AlGaN transistors in a 5.8 GHz class E amplifier can operate efficiently at temperatures in excess of 300 or 400 C, AlGaN based amplifiers could operate at temperatures that are higher than a GaAs or Si based amplifier could tolerate. Under this program, AlGaN microwave power HFETs have been fabricated and characterized. Hybrid class E amplifiers were designed and modeled. Unfortunately, within the time frame of this program, good quality HFETs were not available from either the RSC laboratories or commercially, and so the class E amplifiers were not constructed.

  17. HIGH EFFICIENCY SYNGAS GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Copeland; Yevgenia Gershanovich; Brian Windecker

    2005-02-01

    This project investigated an efficient and low cost method of auto-thermally reforming natural gas to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Reforming is the highest cost step in producing products such as methanol and Fisher Tropsch liquids (i.e., gas to liquids); and reducing the cost of reforming is the key to reducing the cost of these products. Steam reforming is expensive because of the high cost of the high nickel alloy reforming tubes (i.e., indirectly fired reforming tubes). Conventional auto-thermal or Partial Oxidation (POX) reforming minimizes the size and cost of the reformers and provides a near optimum mixture of CO and hydrogen. However POX requires pure oxygen, which consumes power and significantly increases the cost to reforming. Our high efficiency process extracts oxygen from low-pressure air with novel oxygen sorbent and transfers the oxygen to a nickel-catalyzed reformer. The syngas is generated at process pressure (typically 20 to 40 bar) without nitrogen dilution and has a 1CO to 2H{sub 2} ratio that is near optimum for the subsequent production of Fisher-Tropsch liquid to liquids and other chemicals (i.e., Gas to Liquids, GTL). Our high process efficiency comes from the way we transfer the oxygen into the reformer. All of the components of the process, except for the oxygen sorbent, are commonly used in commercial practice. A process based on a longlived, regenerable, oxygen transfer sorbent could substantially reduce the cost of natural gas reforming to syngas. Lower cost syngas (CO + 2H{sub 2}) that is the feedstock for GTL would reduce the cost of GTL and for other commercial applications (e.g., methanol, other organic chemicals). The vast gas resources of Alaska's North Slope (ANS) offer more than 22 Tcf of gas and GTL production in this application alone, and could account for as much as 300,000 to 700,000 bpd for 20 to 30+ years. We developed a new sorbent, which is an essential part of the High Efficiency Oxygen Process (HOP). We tested the

  18. A dual-mode highly efficient class-E stimulator controlled by a low-Q class-E power amplifier through duty cycle.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hung-Wei; Lu, Chien-Chi; Chuang, Jia-min; Lin, Wei-Tso; Lin, Chii-Wann; Kao, Ming-Chien; Lin, Mu-Lien

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the design flow of two high-efficiency class-E amplifiers for the implantable electrical stimulation system. The implantable stimulator is a high-Q class-E driver that delivers a sine-wave pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) stimulation, which was verified to have a superior efficacy in pain relief to a square wave. The proposed duty-cycle-controlled class-E PRF driver designed with a high-Q factor has two operational modes that are able to achieve 100% DC-AC conversion, and involves only one switched series inductor and an unchanged parallel capacitor. The measured output amplitude under low-voltage (LV) mode using a 22% duty cycle was 0.98 V with 91% efficiency, and under high-voltage (HV) mode using a 47% duty cycle was 2.95 V with 92% efficiency. These modes were inductively controlled by a duty-cycle detector, which can detect the duty-cycle modulated signal generated from the external complementary low-Q class-E power amplifier (PA). The design methodology of the low-Q inductive interface for a non-50% duty cycle is presented. The experimental results exhibits that the 1.5-V PA that consumes DC power of 14.21 mW was able to deliver a 2.9-V sine wave to a 500 Ω load. The optimal 60% drain efficiency of the system from the PA to the load was obtained at a 10-mm coupling distance.

  19. Homogeneous deposition-assisted synthesis of iron-nitrogen composites on graphene as highly efficient non-precious metal electrocatalysts for microbial fuel cell power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Jin, Xiao-Jun; Dionysiou, Dionysios D.; Liu, Hong; Huang, Yu-Ming

    2015-03-01

    This work proposed a novel strategy for synthesizing highly efficient non-precious metal oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysts. Fe complexes were homogeneously deposited (HD) on graphene oxide through in situ hydrolysis of urea, followed by two-step pyrolysis under Ar and NH3 atmospheres, resulting in formation of Fe- and N-functionalized graphene (HD-FeN/G). The morphology, crystalline structure and elemental composition of HD-FeN/G were characterized. ORR activity was evaluated by using a rotary disk electrode (RDE) electrochemical system. HD improved the loading and distribution of the Fe-Nx composites on graphene. The ORR activity of the as-prepared HD-FeN/G in neutral medium was comparable to that of the state-of-the-art commercial Pt/C and significantly superior to a FeN/G counterpart produced via traditional approach. The ORR electron transfer number of HD-FeN/G was as high as 3.83 ± 0.08, which suggested that ORR catalysis proceeds through a four-electron pathway. HD-FeN/G was used as a cathodic electrocatalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), and the resultant HD-FeN/G-MFC showed comparable voltage output and maximum power density to those of Pt/C-MFC. The HD-FeN/G-MFC achieved a maximum power density of 885 mW m-2, which was much higher than that of FeN/G-MFC (708 mW m-2). These findings demonstrate that HD-FeN/G produced through the novel synthesis strategy proposed in this work would be a good candidate as cathodic electrocatalyst in MFCs.

  20. Connections between physics and economics for Tokamak fusion power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krakowski, R. A.; Delene, J. G.

    1988-03-01

    A simplified physics, engineering, and costing model of a tokamak fusion reactor is used to examine quantitatively the connection between physics performance and power-plant economics. The material contained herein was generated as part of a broader study of the economic, safety, and environmental impact of fusion based on a range of confinement schemes, fusion fuels, blanket/shield configurations, power-conversion schemes, and commercial end products. Only a DT-fuelled tokamak reactor that produces electricity through an intermediate heat exchange and a conventional thermal-electric conversion cycle is considered; a self-cooled lithium-metal blanket with vanadium-alloy structure, steel shield, and superconducting magnets is used for all cases studied. An optimistic extension of Troyon scaling is applied to a high-elongation ( κ = 2.5) and low-safety-factor ( q ψ =2.3) plasma with β=0.1 and efficient ( I φ P CD =0.2 A/W) current drive. This 1200-MWe (net) power plant provides an economically competitive base case with which to compare other approaches to tokamak fusion power. The base case chosen for comparisons represents an optimistic extrapolation of present tokamak physics and technology. Troyon scaling with a coefficient β B φ a/ I φ equal to 0.04 is applied; the impact of an ad hoc but pessimistic scaling that diminished the Troyon coefficient with plasma elongation was also examined. Additionally, a constant current-drive efficiency, ϒ= nI φ R T / P CD =0.2 A/W, at T=10 keV plasma temperature is assumed; although representing an aggressive R&D target relative to present experience, the realization of bootstrap currents for the basecase, and especially for the second-stability-region tokamak, can significantly reduce this problem. The impact and reoptimization for a constant normalized current-drive efficiency, ϒ= nI φ R T/ P CD, was also examined. Although the focus of this study has been the optimistic basecase tokamak, comparisons are made with

  1. HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER FINAL RECHNICAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 1, 1999 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2002 REV. 1

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH, RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

    2003-12-01

    monoxide) that are detrimental to precious metal catalyzed fuel cells, as is now recognized by many of the world's largest automobile companies. Thermochemical hydrogen will not contain carbon monoxide as an impurity at any level. Electrolysis, the alternative process for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy, suffers from thermodynamic inefficiencies in both the production of electricity and in electrolytic parts of the process. The efficiency of electrolysis (electricity to hydrogen) is currently about 80%. Electric power generation efficiency would have to exceed 65% (thermal to electrical) for the combined efficiency to exceed the 52% (thermal to hydrogen) calculated for one thermochemical cycle. Thermochemical water-splitting cycles have been studied, at various levels of effort, for the past 35 years. They were extensively studied in the late 70s and early 80s but have received little attention in the past 10 years, particularly in the U.S. While there is no question about the technical feasibility and the potential for high efficiency, cycles with proven low cost and high efficiency have yet to be developed commercially. Over 100 cycles have been proposed, but substantial research has been executed on only a few. This report describes work accomplished during a three-year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.''

  2. High efficiency, long life terrestrial solar panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, T.; Khemthong, S.; Ling, R.; Olah, S.

    1977-01-01

    The design of a high efficiency, long life terrestrial module was completed. It utilized 256 rectangular, high efficiency solar cells to achieve high packing density and electrical output. Tooling for the fabrication of solar cells was in house and evaluation of the cell performance was begun. Based on the power output analysis, the goal of a 13% efficiency module was achievable.

  3. STARFIRE: a commercial tokamak fusion power plant study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    STARFIRE is a 1200 MWe central station fusion electric power plant that utilizes a deuterium-tritium fueled tokamak reactor as a heat source. Emphasis has been placed on developing design features which will provide for simpler assembly and maintenance, and improved safety and environmental characteristics. The major features of STARFIRE include a steady-state operating mode based on continuous rf lower-hybrid current drive and auxiliary heating, solid tritium breeder material, pressurized water cooling, limiter/vacuum system for impurity control and exhaust, high tritium burnup and low vulnerable tritium inventories, superconducting EF coils outside the superconducting TF coils, fully remote maintenance, and a low-activation shield. A comprehensive conceptual design has been developed including reactor features, support facilities and a complete balance of plant. A construction schedule and cost estimate are presented, as well as study conclusions and recommendations.

  4. RF behavior of triple-frequency high power fusion gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nitin; Singh, Udaybir; Kumar, Anil; Sinha, A. K.

    2014-05-01

    The RF behavior of high power, triple frequency (170-, 127.5-, and 85 GHz) gyrotron for fusion application is presented in this paper. The operating mode selection is discussed in detail for each corresponding frequencies and TE34,10, TE25,8 and TE17,5 modes are selected as the operating mode for 170 GHz, 127.5 GHz and 85 GHz operation of the device, respectively. The interaction cavity geometry and beam parameters are finalized by the cold cavity analysis and beam-wave interaction simulations. Considering the beam parameters and the beam launching positions in cavity (beam radius), the design of Magnetically Tunable MIG (MT-MIG) is also presented. Results of MT-MIG confirm the beam launching with desired beam parameters at the beam radius corresponding to the selected operating modes for all three frequencies. The CVD diamond window is also designed for RF power transmission. The beam-wave interaction simulations confirm more than 1 MW power at all three frequencies (170-, 127.5-, and 85 GHz).

  5. Dealing with uncertainties in fusion power plant conceptual development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, R.; Lux, H.; Kovari, M.; Morris, J.; Wenninger, R.; Zohm, H.; Biel, W.; Federici, G.

    2017-04-01

    Although the ultimate goal of most current fusion research is to build an economically attractive power plant, the present status of physics and technology does not provide the performance necessary to achieve this goal. Therefore, in order to model how such plants may operate and what their output might be, extrapolations must be made from existing experimental data and technology. However, the expected performance of a plant built to the operating point specifications can only ever be a ‘best guess’. Extrapolations far beyond the current operating regimes are necessarily uncertain, and some important interactions, for example the coupling of conducted power from the scape-off layer to the divertor surface, lack reliable predictive models. This means both that the demands on plant systems at the target operating point can vary significantly from the nominal value, and that the overall plant performance may potentially fall short of design targets. In this contribution we discuss tools and techniques that have been developed to assess the robustness of the operating points for the EU-DEMO tokamak-based demonstration power plant, and the consequences for its design. The aim is to make explicit the design choices and areas where improved modelling and DEMO-relevant experiments will have the greatest impact on confidence in a successful DEMO design.

  6. High efficiency magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, Philip A.; Jayaraman, Chaitanya P.; Anand, Davinder K.; Kirk, James A.

    1993-01-01

    Research activities concerning high efficiency permanent magnet plus electromagnet (PM/EM) pancake magnetic bearings at the University of Maryland are reported. A description of the construction and working of the magnetic bearing is provided. Next, parameters needed to describe the bearing are explained. Then, methods developed for the design and testing of magnetic bearings are summarized. Finally, a new magnetic bearing which allows active torque control in the off axes directions is discussed.

  7. High efficiency incandescent lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Bermel, Peter; Ilic, Ognjen; Chan, Walker R.; Musabeyoglu, Ahmet; Cukierman, Aviv Ruben; Harradon, Michael Robert; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-09-02

    Incandescent lighting structure. The structure includes a thermal emitter that can, but does not have to, include a first photonic crystal on its surface to tailor thermal emission coupled to, in a high-view-factor geometry, a second photonic filter selected to reflect infrared radiation back to the emitter while passing visible light. This structure is highly efficient as compared to standard incandescent light bulbs.

  8. Findings of the US research needs workshop on the topic of fusion power

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W. R.; Raffray, A. R.; Kurtz, R. J.; Morley, N. B.; Reiersen, W. T.; Sharpe, P.; Willms, S.

    2010-12-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) conducted a Research Needs Workshop, referred to as ReNeW, in June 2009. The information developed at this workshop will help OFES develop a plan for US fusion research during the ITER era, roughly the next two decades. The workshop was organized in five Themes, one of which was Harnessing Fusion Power (or Fusion Power for short). The top level goal of the Fusion Power Theme was to identify the research needed to develop the knowledge to design and build, with high confidence, robust and reliable systems that can convert fusion products to useful forms of energy in a reactor environment, including a self-sufficient supply of tritium fuel. Each Theme was subsequently subdivided into Panels to address specific topics. The Fusion Power Panel topics were: Fusion Fuel Cycle; Power Extraction; Materials Science; Safety and Environment; and Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Inspectability (RAMI). Finally, here we present the key findings of the Fusion Power Theme.

  9. Findings of the US research needs workshop on the topic of fusion power

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. Meier; A. R. Raffray; R. J. Kurtz; N. B. Morley; W. T. Reiersen; Phil Sharpe; S. Willms

    2010-12-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) conducted a Research Needs Workshop, referred to as ReNeW, in June 2009. The information developed at this workshop will help OFES develop a plan for US fusion research during the ITER era, roughly the next two decades. The workshop was organized in five Themes, one of which was Harnessing Fusion Power (or Fusion Power for short). The top level goal of the Fusion Power Theme was to identify the research needed to develop the knowledge to design and build, with high confidence, robust and reliable systems that can convert fusion products to useful forms of energy in a reactor environment, including a self-sufficient supply of tritium fuel. Each Theme was subsequently subdivided into Panels to address specific topics. The Fusion Power Panel topics were: Fusion Fuel Cycle; Power Extraction; Materials Science; Safety and Environment; and Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Inspectability (RAMI). Here we present the key findings of the Fusion Power Theme.

  10. Findings of the US Research Needs Workshop on the Topic of Fusion Power

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R; Raffray, A R; Kurtz, R J; Morley, N B; Reiersen, W T; Sharpe, P; Willms, S

    2009-09-16

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) conducted a Research Needs Workshop, referred to as ReNeW, in June 2009. The information developed at this workshop will help OFES develop a plan for US fusion research during the ITER era, roughly the next two decades. The workshop was organized in five Themes, one of which was Harnessing Fusion Power (or Fusion Power for short). The top level goal of the Fusion Power Theme was to identify the research needed to develop the knowledge to design and build, with high confidence, robust and reliable systems that can convert fusion products to useful forms of energy in a reactor environment, including a self-sufficient supply of tritium fuel. Each Theme was subsequently subdivided into Panels to address specific topics. The Fusion Power Panel topics were: fusion fuel cycle; power extraction; materials science; safety and environment; and reliability, availability, maintainability and inspectability (RAMI). Here we present the key findings of the Fusion Power Theme.

  11. Control of a laser inertial confinement fusion-fission power plant

    DOEpatents

    Moses, Edward I.; Latkowski, Jeffery F.; Kramer, Kevin J.

    2015-10-27

    A laser inertial-confinement fusion-fission energy power plant is described. The fusion-fission hybrid system uses inertial confinement fusion to produce neutrons from a fusion reaction of deuterium and tritium. The fusion neutrons drive a sub-critical blanket of fissile or fertile fuel. A coolant circulated through the fuel extracts heat from the fuel that is used to generate electricity. The inertial confinement fusion reaction can be implemented using central hot spot or fast ignition fusion, and direct or indirect drive. The fusion neutrons result in ultra-deep burn-up of the fuel in the fission blanket, thus enabling the burning of nuclear waste. Fuels include depleted uranium, natural uranium, enriched uranium, spent nuclear fuel, thorium, and weapons grade plutonium. LIFE engines can meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the highly undesirable stockpiles of depleted uranium, spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials.

  12. Advanced high efficiency concentrator cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, R. . Varian Research Center)

    1992-06-01

    This report describes research to develop the technology needed to demonstrate a monolithic, multijunction, two-terminal, concentrator solar cell with a terrestrial power conversion efficiency greater than 35%. Under three previous subcontracts, Varian developed many of the aspects of a technology needed to fabricate very high efficiency concentrator cells. The current project was aimed at exploiting the new understanding of high efficiency solar cells. Key results covered in this report are as follows. (1) A 1.93-eV AlGaAs/1.42-eV GaAs metal-interconnected cascade cell was manufactured with a one-sun efficiency at 27.6% at air mass 1.5 (AM1.5) global. (2) A 1.0eV InGaAs cell was fabricated on the reverse'' side of a low-doped GaAs substrate with a one-sun efficiency of 2.5% AM1.5 diffuse and a short-circuit current of 14.4 mA/cm{sup 2}. (3) Small-scale manufacturing of GaAs p/n concentrator cells was attempted and obtained an excellent yield of high-efficiency cells. (4) Grown-in tunnel junction cell interconnects that are transparent and thermally stable using C and Si dopants were developed. 10 refs.

  13. High efficiency solar panel /HESP/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, P. M.; Gay, C.; Uno, F.; Scott-Monck, J.

    1978-01-01

    A family of high efficiency, weldable silicon solar cells, incorporating nearly every feature of advanced cell technology developed in the past four years, was produced and subjected to space qualification testing. This matrix contained both field and non-field cells ranging in thickness from 0.10 mm to 0.30 mm, and in base resistivity from nominal two to one hundred ohm-cm. Initial power outputs as high as 20 mW/sq cm (14.8% AM0 efficiency) were produced by certain cell types within the matrix.

  14. High efficiency multifrequency feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajioka, J. S.; Tsuda, G. I.; Leeper, W. A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Antenna systems and particularly compact and simple antenna feeds which can transmit and receive simultaneously in at least three frequency bands, each with high efficiency and polarization diversity are described. The feed system is applicable for frequency bands having nominal frequency bands with the ratio 1:4:6. By way of example, satellite communications telemetry bands operate in frequency bands 0.8 - 1.0 GHz, 3.7 - 4.2 GHz and 5.9 - 6.4 GHz. In addition, the antenna system of the invention has monopulse capability for reception with circular or diverse polarization at frequency band 1.

  15. High efficiency photoionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1984-01-31

    A high efficiency photoionization detector is described using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36 [+-] 0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20 C. 6 figs.

  16. High efficiency photoionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1984-01-01

    A high efficiency photoionization detector using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36.+-.0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20.degree. C.

  17. YLIFE-2 inertial fusion energy power plant design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, R. W.

    1992-03-01

    The HYLIFE-2 inertial fusion power plant design study uses a liquid fall, in the form of jets, to protect the first structural wall from neutron damage, x rays, and blast to provide a 30-y lifetime. HYLIFE-1 used liquid lithium. HYLIFE-2 avoids the fire hazard of lithium by using a molten salt composed of fluorine, lithium, and beryllium (Li2BeF4) called Flibe. Access for heavy-ion beams is provided. Calculations for assumed heavy-ion beam performance show a nominal gain of 70 at 5 MJ producing 350 MJ, about 5.2 times less yield than the 1.8 GJ from a driver energy of 4.5 MJ with gain of 400 for HYLIFE-1. The nominal 1 GWe of power can be maintained by increasing the repetition rate by a factor of about 5.2, from 1.5 to 8 Hz. A higher repetition rate requires faster re-establishment of the jets after a shot, which can be accomplished in part by decreasing the jet fall height and increasing the jet flow velocity. In addition, although not adequately considered for HYLIFE-1, there is liquid splash that must be forcibly cleared because gravity is too slow, at higher repetition rates than 1 Hz. Splash removal is accomplished in the central region by oscillating jet flows. The cost of electricity is estimated to be 0.09 $/kWh in constant 1988 dollars, about twice that of future coal and light water reactor nuclear power. The driver beam cost is about one-half the total cost, that is, a zero cost driver would give a calculated cost of electricity of 0.045 $/kWh.

  18. HYLIFE-2 inertial confinement: Fusion power plant design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, R. W.

    1990-12-01

    The HYLIFE-2 inertial fusion power plant design study uses a liquid fall, in the form of jets to protect the first structural wall from neutron damage, x rays, and blast to provide a 30-y lifetime. HYLIFE-1 used liquid lithium. HYLIFE 2 avoids the fire hazard of lithium by using a molten salt composed of fluorine, lithium, and beryllium (Li2BeF4) called Flibe. Access for heavy-ion beams is provided. Calculations for assumed heavy-ion beam performance show a nominal gain of 70 at 5 MJ producing 350 MJ, about 5.2 times less yield than the 1.8 GJ from a driver energy of 4.5 MJ with gain of 400 for HYLIFE-1. The nominal 1 GWe of power can be maintained by increasing the repetition rate by a factor of about 5.2, from 1.5 to 8 Hz. A higher repetition rate requires faster re-establishment of the jets after a shot, which can be accomplished in part by decreasing the jet fall height and increasing the jet flow velocity. Multiple chambers may be required. In addition, although not considered for HYLIFE-1, there is undoubtedly liquid splash that must be forcibly cleared because gravity is too slow, especially at high repetition rates. Splash removal can be accomplished by either pulsed or oscillating jet flows. The cost of electricity is estimated to be 0.09 $/kW x h in constant 1988 dollars, about twice that of future coal and light water reactor nuclear power. The driver beam cost is about one-half the total cost.

  19. High efficiency RCCI combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splitter, Derek A.

    An experimental investigation of the pragmatic limits of Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) engine efficiency was performed. The study utilized engine experiments combined with zero-dimensional modeling. Initially, simulations were used to suggest conditions of high engine efficiency with RCCI. Preliminary simulations suggested that high efficiency could be obtained by using a very dilute charge with a high compression ratio. Moreover, the preliminary simulations further suggested that with simultaneous 50% reductions in heat transfer and incomplete combustion, 60% gross thermal efficiency may be achievable with RCCI. Following the initial simulations, experiments to investigate the combustion process, fuel effects, and methods to reduce heat transfer and incomplete combustion reduction were conducted. The results demonstrated that the engine cycle and combustion process are linked, and if high efficiency is to be had, then the combustion event must be tailored to the initial cycle conditions. It was found that reductions to engine heat transfer are a key enabler to increasing engine efficiency. In addition, it was found that the piston oil jet gallery cooling in RCCI may be unnecessary, as it had a negative impact on efficiency. Without piston oil gallery cooling, it was found that RCCI was nearly adiabatic, achieving 95% of the theoretical maximum cycle efficiency (air standard Otto cycle efficiency).

  20. Power Plant and Fusion Chamber Considerations for Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R; Hogan, W J

    2005-03-10

    A large number of inertial fusion energy (IFE) chamber concepts have been proposed and analyzed to various levels of detail [1, 2]. A smaller number of detailed power plant design studies (i.e., studies considering self-consistent integration of targets, drivers and chambers) have also been completed for both direct-drive and indirect-drive, central ignition (CI) targets [3-5]. There have not been any comparable studies of fusion chambers or integrated power plants for fast-ignition (FI) based IFE. Some specific aspects (advantages and issues) have been previously describe [6, 7], but not to the level of detail of the large integrated design studies. In this paper, we review current understanding of chamber design and power plant features for fast-ignition. We approach this topic by asking what chamber and power plant issues and features will be different for fast ignition compared to central ignition. In this article, we consider first wall and final optics design issues for various chamber concepts with direct and indirect drive FI targets, while target manufacture and injection issues are considered in another paper in this special issue [8]. If it is found that the ignitor beams can efficiently penetrate the plasma that is blown off the fuel capsule surface during the compression phase, the FI targets may look much like CI targets. In this case the fusion chamber and final optics issues are likely to be very similar to those for CI targets, except for the final optics of the ignitor beams. It is more likely that the efficiency of transferring ignitor beam energy through the blow-off plasma to the ignition spot fuel will be so low that whatever advantage fast ignition has in reducing required compression driver energy will be more than offset by the size and, therefore, cost of the ignitor lasers themselves. Therefore, it has been proposed to use a cone of high-Z material [9] to shield the ignitor beam line-of-sight from the blow-off plasma and possibly help

  1. Advanced smart tungsten alloys for a future fusion power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litnovsky, A.; Wegener, T.; Klein, F.; Linsmeier, Ch; Rasinski, M.; Kreter, A.; Tan, X.; Schmitz, J.; Mao, Y.; Coenen, J. W.; Bram, M.; Gonzalez-Julian, J.

    2017-06-01

    The severe particle, radiation and neutron environment in a future fusion power plant requires the development of advanced plasma-facing materials. At the same time, the highest level of safety needs to be ensured. The so-called loss-of-coolant accident combined with air ingress in the vacuum vessel represents a severe safety challenge. In the absence of a coolant the temperature of the tungsten first wall may reach 1200 °C. At such a temperature, the neutron-activated radioactive tungsten forms volatile oxide which can be mobilized into atmosphere. Smart tungsten alloys are being developed to address this safety issue. Smart alloys should combine an acceptable plasma performance with the suppressed oxidation during an accident. New thin film tungsten-chromium-yttrium smart alloys feature an impressive 105 fold suppression of oxidation compared to that of pure tungsten at temperatures of up to 1000 °C. Oxidation behavior at temperatures up to 1200 °C, and reactivity of alloys in humid atmosphere along with a manufacturing of reactor-relevant bulk samples, impose an additional challenge in smart alloy development. First exposures of smart alloys in steady-state deuterium plasma were made. Smart tungsten-chroimium-titanium alloys demonstrated a sputtering resistance which is similar to that of pure tungsten. Expected preferential sputtering of alloying elements by plasma ions was confirmed experimentally. The subsequent isothermal oxidation of exposed samples did not reveal any influence of plasma exposure on the passivation of alloys.

  2. High Efficiency Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbajal, B. G.

    1979-01-01

    The specific activity was to improve the tandem junction Cell (TJC) as a high efficiency solar cell. The TJC development was to be consistent with module assembly and should contribute to the overall goals of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. During 1978, TJC efficiency improved from approximately 11 percent to approximately 16 percent (AMI). Photogenerated current densities in excess of 42 mA/sq cm were observed at AMO. Open circuit voltages as high as 0.615 V were measured at AMO. Fill factor was only 0.68 - 0.75 due to a nonoptimum metal contact design. A device model was conceived in which the solar cell is modelled as a transitor. There are virtually no interconnect or packaging factor systems and the TJC is compatible with all conventional module fabrication systems. A modification of the TJC, the Front Surface Field (FSF) cell, was also explored.

  3. Challenges of Fusion Power Plant Licensing: Differences and Commonalities with Existing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    L. El-Guebaly; L. Cadwallader; W. Sowder

    2011-08-01

    At present, there are no regulatory guidelines to follow for US fusion power plant construction and operation. Thus far, the Department of Energy (DOE) has been regulating existing fusion experiments, following the 1996-1999 DOE Fusion Standards and using the spirit of the ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) code. Considering this reality, a few options emerged for licensing ARIES-type power plants and the like. Developing new fusion-specific regulations stands out as the most logical option, but requires well-coordinated effort between DOE, regulatory agencies, and the fusion community with considerable funding and long lead-time. Nevertheless, a few recent developments seem promising: (1) The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) plans to assert regulatory jurisdiction over commercial fusion devices, and (2) the ongoing effort within ASME will develop rules for the construction of fusion-energy-related components. The most recent NRC, ASME and fusion licensing developments are reviewed in this paper. In addition, an interesting comparison with ITER was made to foresee how US fusion power plants could leverage from ITER.

  4. Commercial objectives, technology transfer, and systems analysis for fusion power development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Stephen O.

    1988-03-01

    Fusion is an essentially inexhaustible source of energy that has the potential for economically attractive commercial applications with excellent safety and environmental characteristics. The primary focus for the fusion-energy development program is the generation of centralstation electricity. Fusion has the potential, however, for many other applications. The fact that a large fraction of the energy released in a DT fusion reaction is carried by high-energy neutrons suggests potentially unique applications. These include breeding of fissile fuels, production of hydrogen and other chemical products, transmutation or “burning” of various nuclear or chemical wastes, radiation processing of materials, production of radioisotopes, food preservation, medical diagnosis and medical treatment, and space power and space propulsion. In addition, fusion R&D will lead to new products and new markets. Each fusion application must meet certain standards of economic and safety and environmental attractiveness. For this reason, economics on the one hand, and safety and environment and licensing on the other hand, are the two primary criteria for setting long-range commercial fusion objectives. A major function of systems analysis is to evaluate the potential of fusion against these objectives and to help guide the fusion R&D program toward practical applications. The transfer of fusion technology and skills from the national laboratories and universities to industry is the key to achieving the long-range objective of commercial fusion applications.

  5. On the wanderings of a quantum chemist in the world of fusion power and politics

    SciTech Connect

    Monkhorst, H.J.

    2000-03-05

    Ruminations by a quantum chemist are offered on his forays into the treacherous territory of the global fusion power research community. His and a colleague's proposal for a colliding beam fusion reactor is explained. His experiences hold general lessons about the treatment an innocent scientist can expect when he challenges the entrenched modus operandi of a large scientific/engineering establishment.

  6. Comment on ‘On the fusion triple product and fusion power gain of tokamak pilot plants and reactors’, by A. Costley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biel, W.; Lackner, K.; Sauter, O.; Wenninger, R.; Zohm, H.

    2017-03-01

    In this comment, we discuss the arguments raised in two recent papers (Costley 2016 Nucl. Fusion 56 066003, Costley et al 2015 Nucl. Fusion 55 033001) on the claimed size independence of fusion power, triple product and fusion gain in tokamak reactors, and we show that all these three quantities actually do depend on the size of the tokamak, when distinguishing between independent input parameters (design parameters) and output quantities, and when taking into account technological limitations.

  7. High Efficiency Lithium-Thionyl Chloride Cell.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    AD-Al14 672 HONEYWELL POWER SOURCES CENTER HORSHAM PA F/S 10/3 HIGH EFFICIENCY LITHIUM - THIONYL CHLORIDE CELLo(U) APR 82 N DODDAPANEN! OAAK20-81-C...CHART NATIONAl BUREAU OF STANDARDS 1963 A Research and Development Technical Report DELET-TR-81-0381-3 HIGH EFFICIENCY LITHIUM - THIONYL CHLORIDE CELL...reverse aide it necessary and Identify by block number) Thionyl chloride , lithium , high discharge rates, low temperatures, catalysis, cyclic

  8. High-efficiency CARM

    SciTech Connect

    Bratman, V.L.; Kol`chugin, B.D.; Samsonov, S.V.; Volkov, A.B.

    1995-12-31

    The Cyclotron Autoresonance Maser (CARM) is a well-known variety of FEMs. Unlike the ubitron in which electrons move in a periodical undulator field, in the CARM the particles move along helical trajectories in a uniform magnetic field. Since it is much simpler to generate strong homogeneous magnetic fields than periodical ones for a relatively low electron energy ({Brit_pounds}{le}1-3 MeV) the period of particles` trajectories in the CARM can be sufficiently smaller than in the undulator in which, moreover, the field decreases rapidly in the transverse direction. In spite of this evident advantage, the number of papers on CARM is an order less than on ubitron, which is apparently caused by the low (not more than 10 %) CARM efficiency in experiments. At the same time, ubitrons operating in two rather complicated regimes-trapping and adiabatic deceleration of particles and combined undulator and reversed guiding fields - yielded efficiencies of 34 % and 27 %, respectively. The aim of this work is to demonstrate that high efficiency can be reached even for a simplest version of the CARM. In order to reduce sensitivity to an axial velocity spread of particles, a short interaction length where electrons underwent only 4-5 cyclotron oscillations was used in this work. Like experiments, a narrow anode outlet of a field-emission electron gun cut out the {open_quotes}most rectilinear{close_quotes} near-axis part of the electron beam. Additionally, magnetic field of a small correcting coil compensated spurious electron oscillations pumped by the anode aperture. A kicker in the form of a sloping to the axis frame with current provided a control value of rotary velocity at a small additional velocity spread. A simple cavity consisting of a cylindrical waveguide section restricted by a cut-off waveguide on the cathode side and by a Bragg reflector on the collector side was used as the CARM-oscillator microwave system.

  9. Enhanced Ceria Solid Electrolyte Fuel Cell Development. Reduction of Electronic Conductivity Permits use of a Solid Ceria Electrolyte in High Efficiency High Power Density Fuel Cells at Temperatures Compatible with Metallic Cell Hardware

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    DTC FILE COPY DARPA ORDER 9526 lit I 0ENHANCED CERIA SOLID ELECTROLYTE FUEL CELL DEVELOPMENT Reduction of Electronic Conductivity Permits use of a...Solid Ceria Electrolyte * I’- in High Efficiency High Power Density Fuel Cells at Temperatures Compatible with Metallic Cell Hardware Prepared by D T IC...D. L. MairicleI < T International Fuel Cells D. .. Box 739 FEB 0 8 1990 195 Governors Highway D South Windsor, CT 06074 January 1990 IFCR-10824

  10. Tritium Breeding Blanket for a Commercial Fusion Power Plant - A System Engineering Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Wayne R.

    2014-04-14

    The goal of developing a new source of electric power based on fusion has been pursued for decades. If successful, future fusion power plants will help meet growing world-wide demand for electric power. A key feature and selling point for fusion is that its fuel supply is widely distributed globally and virtually inexhaustible. Current world-wide research on fusion energy is focused on the deuterium-tritium (DT for short) fusion reaction since it will be the easiest to achieve in terms of the conditions (e.g., temperature, density and confinement time of the DT fuel) required to produce net energy. Over the past decades countless studies have examined various concepts for TBBs for both magnetic fusion energy (MFE) and inertial fusion energy (IFE). At this time, the key organizations involved are government sponsored research organizations world-wide. The near-term focus of the MFE community is on the development of TBB mock-ups to be tested on the ITER tokamak currently under construction in Caderache France. TBB concepts for IFE tend to be different from MFE primarily due to significantly different operating conditions and constraints. This report focuses on longer-term commercial power plants where the key stakeholders include: electric utilities, plant owner and operator, manufacturer, regulators, utility customers, and in-plant subsystems including the heat transfer and conversion systems, fuel processing system, plant safety systems, and the monitoring control systems.

  11. High Efficiency Engine Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect

    Rich Kruiswyk

    2010-07-13

    Caterpillar's Product Development and Global Technology Division carried out a research program on waste heat recovery with support from DOE (Department of Energy) and the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. The objective of the program was to develop a new air management and exhaust energy recovery system that would demonstrate a minimum 10% improvement in thermal efficiency over a base heavy-duty on-highway diesel truck engine. The base engine for this program was a 2007 C15 15.2L series-turbocharged on-highway truck engine with a LPL (low-pressure loop) exhaust recirculation system. The focus of the program was on the development of high efficiency turbomachinery and a high efficiency turbocompound waste heat recovery system. The focus of each area of development was as follows: (1) For turbine stages, the focus was on investigation and development of technologies that would improve on-engine exhaust energy utilization compared to the conventional radial turbines in widespread use today. (2) For compressor stages, the focus was on investigating compressor wheel design parameters beyond the range typically utilized in production, to determine the potential efficiency benefits thereof. (3) For turbocompound, the focus was on the development of a robust bearing system that would provide higher bearing efficiencies compared to systems used in turbocompound power turbines in production. None of the turbocharger technologies investigated involved addition of moving parts, actuators, or exotic materials, thereby increasing the likelihood of a favorable cost-value tradeoff for each technology. And the turbocompound system requires less hardware addition than competing bottoming cycle technologies, making it a more attractive solution from a cost and packaging standpoint. Main outcomes of the program are as follows: (1) Two turbine technologies that demonstrated up to 6% improvement in turbine efficiency on gas stand and 1-3% improvement in thermal efficiency in

  12. CONFERENCE REPORT: Summary of the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Power Plant Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, J. Ph.; Gulden, W.; Kolbasov, B.; Louzeiro-Malaquias, A.-J.; Petti, D.; Rodriguez-Rodrigo, L.

    2008-01-01

    Reports were presented covering a selection of topics on the safety of fusion power plants. These included a review on licensing studies developed for ITER site preparation surveying common and non-common issues (i.e. site dependent) as lessons to a broader approach for fusion power plant safety. Several fusion power plant models, spanning from accessible technology to more advanced-materials based concepts, were discussed. On the topic related to fusion-specific technology, safety studies were reported on different concepts of breeding blanket modules, tritium handling and auxiliary systems under normal and accident scenarios' operation. The testing of power plant relevant technology in ITER was also assessed in terms of normal operation and accident scenarios, and occupational doses and radioactive releases under these testings have been determined. Other specific safety issues for fusion have also been discussed such as availability and reliability of fusion power plants, dust and tritium inventories and component failure databases. This study reveals that the environmental impact of fusion power plants can be minimized through a proper selection of low activation materials and using recycling technology helping to reduce waste volume and potentially open the route for its reutilization for the nuclear sector or even its clearance into the commercial circuit. Computational codes for fusion safety have been presented in support of the many studies reported. The on-going work on establishing validation approaches aiming at improving the prediction capability of fusion codes has been supported by experimental results and new directions for development have been identified. Fusion standards are not available and fission experience is mostly used as the framework basis for licensing and target design for safe operation and occupational and environmental constraints. It has been argued that fusion can benefit if a specific fusion approach is implemented, in particular

  13. Path to Market for Compact Modular Fusion Power Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, Simon; Baerny, Jennifer K.; Mattor, Nathan; Stoulil, Don; Miller, Ronald; Marston, Theodore

    2012-08-01

    The benefits of an energy source whose reactants are plentiful and whose products are benign is hard to measure, but at no time in history has this energy source been more needed. Nuclear fusion continues to promise to be this energy source. However, the path to market for fusion systems is still regularly a matter for long-term (20 + year) plans. This white paper is intended to stimulate discussion of faster commercialization paths, distilling guidance from investors, utilities, and the wider energy research community (including from ARPA-E). There is great interest in a small modular fusion system that can be developed quickly and inexpensively. A simple model shows how compact modular fusion can produce a low cost development path by optimizing traditional systems that burn deuterium and tritium, operating not only at high magnetic field strength, but also by omitting some components that allow for the core to become more compact and easier to maintain. The dominant hurdles to the development of low cost, practical fusion systems are discussed, primarily in terms of the constraints placed on the cost of development stages in the private sector. The main finding presented here is that the bridge from DOE Office of Science to the energy market can come at the Proof of Principle development stage, providing the concept is sufficiently compact and inexpensive that its development allows for a normal technology commercialization path.

  14. High efficiency gas burner

    DOEpatents

    Schuetz, Mark A.

    1983-01-01

    A burner assembly provides for 100% premixing of fuel and air by drawing the air into at least one high velocity stream of fuel without power assist. Specifically, the nozzle assembly for injecting the fuel into a throat comprises a plurality of nozzles in a generally circular array. Preferably, swirl is imparted to the air/fuel mixture by angling the nozzles. The diffuser comprises a conical primary diffuser followed by a cusp diffuser.

  15. Modelling the power deposition into a spherical tokamak fusion power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windsor, C. G.; Morgan, J. G.; Buxton, P. F.; Costley, A. E.; Smith, G. D. W.; Sykes, A.

    2017-03-01

    Numerical studies have been made to improve the performance of the central column of a superconducting spherical tokamak fusion pilot plant. The assumed neutron shield includes concentric layers of tungsten carbide and water. The relative thickness of the water layers was varied and a minimum power deposition was found at about 17% of water. It was found advantageous to have an approximately 1.7 times thicker water layer next to the core and a similarly thinner layer next to the plasma. The use of tungsten boride instead of tungsten carbide was shown to make an improvement especially if placed close to the central superconducting core, the inner layer alone reducing the power deposition by 29%. Engineering features such as a central steel tie-bar, an insulating thermal vacuum gap, a wall gap next to the plasma and knowledge of the vertical energy distribution are essential to a successful design and their effects on the power deposition are shown in an appendix. The results have been fitted to model distributions and incorporated into the Tokamak Energy System Code, which can then give predictions of the power deposition as a function of other parameters such as the plasma major radius and the maximum magnetic field permitted on the superconductors.

  16. Optimization of the SHX Fusion Powered Transatmospheric Propulsion Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Robert B.; Landrum, D. Brian

    2001-01-01

    Existing propulsion technology has not achieved cost effective payload delivery rates to low earth orbit. A fusion based propulsion system, denoted as the Simultaneous Heating and eXpansion (SHX) engine, has been proposed in earlier papers. The SHX couples energy generated by a fusion reactor to the engine flowpath by use of coherent beam emitters. A quasi-one-dimensional flow model was used to quantify the effects of area expansion and energy input on propulsive efficiency for several beam models. Entropy calculations were included to evaluate the lost work in the system.

  17. Safety and Environment aspects of Tokamak- type Fusion Power Reactor- An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doshi, Bharat; Reddy, D. Chenna

    2017-04-01

    Naturally occurring thermonuclear fusion reaction (of light atoms to form a heavier nucleus) in the sun and every star in the universe, releases incredible amounts of energy. Demonstrating the controlled and sustained reaction of deuterium-tritium plasma should enable the development of fusion as an energy source here on Earth. The promising fusion power reactors could be operated on the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle with fuel self-sufficiency. The potential impact of fusion power on the environment and the possible risks associated with operating large-scale fusion power plants is being studied by different countries. The results show that fusion can be a very safe and sustainable energy source. A fusion power plant possesses not only intrinsic advantages with respect to safety compared to other sources of energy, but also a negligible long term impact on the environment provided certain precautions are taken in its design. One of the important considerations is in the selection of low activation structural materials for reactor vessel. Selection of the materials for first wall and breeding blanket components is also important from safety issues. It is possible to fully benefit from the advantages of fusion energy if safety and environmental concerns are taken into account when considering the conceptual studies of a reactor design. The significant safety hazards are due to the tritium inventory and energetic neutron fluence induced activity in the reactor vessel, first wall components, blanket system etc. The potential of release of radioactivity under operational and accident conditions needs attention while designing the fusion reactor. Appropriate safety analysis for the quantification of the risk shall be done following different methods such as FFMEA (Functional Failure Modes and Effects Analysis) and HAZOP (Hazards and operability). Level of safety and safety classification such as nuclear safety and non-nuclear safety is very important for the FPR (Fusion

  18. Radio-frequency energy in fusion power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, J.Q.; Becraft, W.R.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    The history of radio-frequency (rf) energy in fusion experiments is reviewed, and the status of current efforts is described. Potential applications to tasks other than plasma heating are described, as are the research and development needs of rf energy technology.

  19. The NASA-Lewis program on fusion energy for space power and propulsion, 1958-1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman R.; Roth, J. Reece

    1990-01-01

    An historical synopsis is provided of the NASA-Lewis research program on fusion energy for space power and propulsion systems. It was initiated to explore the potential applications of fusion energy to space power and propulsion systems. Some fusion related accomplishments and program areas covered include: basic research on the Electric Field Bumpy Torus (EFBT) magnetoelectric fusion containment concept, including identification of its radial transport mechanism and confinement time scaling; operation of the Pilot Rig mirror machine, the first superconducting magnet facility to be used in plasma physics or fusion research; operation of the Superconducting Bumpy Torus magnet facility, first used to generate a toroidal magnetic field; steady state production of neutrons from DD reactions; studies of the direct conversion of plasma enthalpy to thrust by a direct fusion rocket via propellant addition and magnetic nozzles; power and propulsion system studies, including D(3)He power balance, neutron shielding, and refrigeration requirements; and development of large volume, high field superconducting and cryogenic magnet technology.

  20. High efficiency motor rewind study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, A. K.; Spee, R.

    1991-02-01

    The objective of performing this work was to evaluate a new technology used for rewinding electric motors. Motor performance evaluation was conducted at the motor test facility at Oregon State University. The test program consisted of comparing new high efficiency motor technology and standard rewind technology with the Unity-Plus system. The Unity-Plus configuration exhibited reduced efficiency over the complete load range compared to the other motors. Appropriately sized capacitors connected to the terminals of the conventional induction motor produced the same power factor improvement as the Unity-Plus system. Torque production and torque pulsation were very similar for all systems. The Unity-Plus configuration drew lower starting currents but the duration of the starting transient was increased. Motor temperature rise was about the same for all systems. Noise levels were about the same in all systems. Although determination of time to failure was not undertaken, the expected lifetime of the Unit-Plus system is probably less due to higher capacitor stress and higher insulation stress. The investigation concludes that a conventional induction motor with terminal capacitors is the most acceptable way of obtaining good efficiency and power factor and the Unity-Plus system cannot be recommended on the basis of any of the evaluation criteria used in this study.

  1. High-power and highly efficient diode-cladding-pumped holmium-doped fluoride fiber laser operating at 2.94 microm.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Stuart D

    2009-08-01

    A high-power diode-cladding-pumped Ho(3+), Pr(3+)-doped fluoride glass fiber laser is demonstrated. The laser produced a maximum output power of 2.5 W at a slope efficiency of 32% using diode lasers emitting at 1,150 nm. The long-emission wavelength of 2.94 microm measured at maximum pump power, which is particularly suited to medical applications, indicates that tailoring of the proportion of Pr(3+) ions can provide specific emission wavelengths while providing sufficient de-excitation of the lower laser level.

  2. Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  3. OSIRIS and SOMBRERO Inertial Fusion Power Plant Designs, Volume 2: Designs, Assessments, and Comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W. R.; Bieri, R. L.; Monsler, M. J.; Hendricks, C. D.; Laybourne, P.; Shillito, K. R.

    1992-03-01

    This is a comprehensive design study of two Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) electric power plants. Conceptual designs are presented for a fusion reactor (called Osiris) using an induction-linac heavy-ion beam driver, and another (called SOMBRERO) using a KrF laser driver. The designs covered all aspects of IFE power plants, including the chambers, heat transport and power conversion systems, balance-of-plant facilities, target fabrication, target injection and tracking, as well as the heavy-ion and KrF drivers. The point designs were assessed and compared in terms of their environmental & safety aspects, reliability and availability, economics, and technology development needs.

  4. Flywheel induction motor-generator for magnet power supply in small fusion device

    SciTech Connect

    Hatakeyma, S. Yoshino, F.; Tsutsui, H.; Tsuji-Iio, S.

    2016-04-15

    A flywheel motor-generator (MG) for the toroidal field (TF) coils of a small fusion device was developed which utilizes a commercially available squirrel-cage induction motor. Advantages of the MG are comparably-long duration, quick power response, and easy implementation of power control compared with conventional capacitor-type power supply. A 55-kW MG was fabricated, and TF coils of a small fusion device were energized. The duration of the current flat-top was extended to 1 s which is much longer than those of conventional small devices (around 10–100 ms).

  5. OSIRIS and SOMBRERO Inertial Fusion Power Plant Designs, Volume 1: Executive Summary & Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W. R.; Bieri, R. L.; Monsler, M. J.; Hendricks, C.D.; Laybourne, P.; Shillito, K. R.

    1992-03-01

    This is a comprehensive design study of two Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) electric power plants. Conceptual designs are presented for a fusion reactor (called Osiris) using an induction-linac heavy-ion beam driver, and another (called SOMBRERO) using a KrF laser driver. The designs covered all aspects of IFE power plants, including the chambers, heat transport and power conversion systems, balance-of-plant facilities, target fabrication, target injection and tracking, as well as the heavy-ion and KrF drivers. The point designs were assessed and compared in terms of their environmental & safety aspects, reliability and availability economics, and technology development needs.

  6. Flywheel induction motor-generator for magnet power supply in small fusion device.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyma, S; Yoshino, F; Tsutsui, H; Tsuji-Iio, S

    2016-04-01

    A flywheel motor-generator (MG) for the toroidal field (TF) coils of a small fusion device was developed which utilizes a commercially available squirrel-cage induction motor. Advantages of the MG are comparably-long duration, quick power response, and easy implementation of power control compared with conventional capacitor-type power supply. A 55-kW MG was fabricated, and TF coils of a small fusion device were energized. The duration of the current flat-top was extended to 1 s which is much longer than those of conventional small devices (around 10-100 ms).

  7. Flywheel induction motor-generator for magnet power supply in small fusion device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyma, S.; Yoshino, F.; Tsutsui, H.; Tsuji-Iio, S.

    2016-04-01

    A flywheel motor-generator (MG) for the toroidal field (TF) coils of a small fusion device was developed which utilizes a commercially available squirrel-cage induction motor. Advantages of the MG are comparably-long duration, quick power response, and easy implementation of power control compared with conventional capacitor-type power supply. A 55-kW MG was fabricated, and TF coils of a small fusion device were energized. The duration of the current flat-top was extended to 1 s which is much longer than those of conventional small devices (around 10-100 ms).

  8. ECOFUSION: AN ELECTRON-COOLED, CELLULAR APPROACH TO HARNESSING FUSION POWER

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D. J.

    2009-07-26

    A cellular electron-cooled storage ring system for achieving particle-beam fusion-based-energy is described. The system uses multiple electron-cooled, overlapping storage rings to enable colliding-beam fusion. Particles are continuously fed into the storage rings, and the electron cooling systems continuously correct the ion beam trajectories, compensating for various scattering events that occur in the system. This allows for large currents to be built up in the ion storage rings. The rate of fusion reactions that occur in the overlap regions between the storage rings can be increased by focusing to enable power outputs of interest for fusion-based power reactors. The system can be built with technology readily available today.

  9. Apparatus and method for extracting power from energetic ions produced in nuclear fusion

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, N.J.; Rax, J.M.

    1994-12-20

    An apparatus and method of extracting power from energetic ions produced by nuclear fusion in a toroidal plasma to enhance respectively the toroidal plasma current and fusion reactivity. By injecting waves of predetermined frequency and phase traveling substantially in a selected poloidal direction within the plasma, the energetic ions become diffused in energy and space such that the energetic ions lose energy and amplify the waves. The amplified waves are further adapted to travel substantially in a selected toroidal direction to increase preferentially the energy of electrons traveling in one toroidal direction which, in turn, enhances or generates a toroidal plasma current. In an further adaptation, the amplified waves can be made to preferentially increase the energy of fuel ions within the plasma to enhance the fusion reactivity of the fuel ions. The described direct, or in situ, conversion of the energetic ion energy provides an efficient and economical means of delivering power to a fusion reactor. 4 figures.

  10. Apparatus and method for extracting power from energetic ions produced in nuclear fusion

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Rax, Jean M.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method of extracting power from energetic ions produced by nuclear fusion in a toroidal plasma to enhance respectively the toroidal plasma current and fusion reactivity. By injecting waves of predetermined frequency and phase traveling substantially in a selected poloidal direction within the plasma, the energetic ions become diffused in energy and space such that the energetic ions lose energy and amplify the waves. The amplified waves are further adapted to travel substantially in a selected toroidal direction to increase preferentially the energy of electrons traveling in one toroidal direction which, in turn, enhances or generates a toroidal plasma current. In an further adaptation, the amplified waves can be made to preferentially increase the energy of fuel ions within the plasma to enhance the fusion reactivity of the fuel ions. The described direct, or in situ, conversion of the energetic ion energy provides an efficient and economical means of delivering power to a fusion reactor.

  11. Reply to ‘Comment “On the fusion triple product and fusion power gain of tokamak pilot plants and reactors”’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costley, A. E.; Buxton, P. F.; Hugill, J.

    2017-03-01

    In reply to the Comment by Biel et al (2016 Nucl. Fusion 57 038001) on our recent papers Costley et al (2015 Nucl Fusion 55 033001) and Costley (2016 Nucl. Fusion 56 066003), we point out that the fusion triple product, nTτ E, and fusion power gain, Q fus, cannot be expressed solely in terms of independent engineering design variables such as major radius, R, and toroidal field, B; output performance variables such as normalised beta, β N, safety factor, q, and fusion power P fus, have to be invoked. Further, we show that the density limit has the effect of largely cancelling the size dependence in nTτ E and Q fus, which would otherwise be present, when these parameters are expressed in terms of P fus. Considerations of engineering aspects are also briefly discussed.

  12. Channel Temperature Model for Microwave AlGaN/GaN HEMTs on SiC and Sapphire MMICs in High Power, High Efficiency SSPAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Jon C.

    2004-01-01

    A key parameter in the design trade-offs made during AlGaN/GaN HEMTs development for microwave power amplifiers is the channel temperature. An accurate determination can, in general, only be found using detailed software; however, a quick estimate is always helpful, as it speeds up the design cycle. This paper gives a simple technique to estimate the channel temperature of a generic microwave AlGaN/GaN HEMT on SiC or Sapphire, while incorporating the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity. The procedure is validated by comparing its predictions with the experimentally measured temperatures in microwave devices presented in three recently published articles. The model predicts the temperature to within 5 to 10 percent of the true average channel temperature. The calculation strategy is extended to determine device temperature in power combining MMICs for solid-state power amplifiers (SSPAs).

  13. Fusion power demonstration - a baseline for the mirror engineering test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.; Neef, W.S.; Dorn, D.; Clarkson, I.R.; Carpenter, T.; Gordon, J.D.; Campbell, R.B.; Hsu, P.; Nelson, D.

    1983-12-02

    Developing a definition of an engineering test reactor (ETR) is a current goal of the Office of Fusion Energy (OFE). As a baseline for the mirror ETR, the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) concept has been pursued at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in cooperation with Grumman Aerospace, TRW, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Envisioned as an intermediate step to fusion power applications, the FPD would achieve DT ignition in the central cell, after which blankets and power conversion would be added to produce net power. To achieve ignition, a minimum central cell length of 67.5 m is needed to supply the ion and alpha particles radial drift pumping losses in the transition region. The resulting fusion power is 360 MW. Low electron-cyclotron heating power of 12 MW, ion-cyclotron heating of 2.5 MW, and a sloshing ion beam power of 1.0 MW result in a net plasma Q of 22. A primary technological challenge is the 24-T, 45-cm bore choke coil, comprising a copper hybrid insert within a 15 to 18 T superconducting coil.

  14. High-power and high-efficiency diode-pumped Nd:LuYAG mixed crystal lasers operating at 939 and 946  nm.

    PubMed

    Cui, Qin; Lan, Jinglong; Lin, Zhi; Xu, Bin; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Xu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Jun

    2016-09-10

    We report on high-performance infrared lasers at 0.94 μm based on quasi-three-level transition of F3/24→I9/24 in Nd:LuYAG mixed crystal, for the first time to our knowledge. The maximum output power was achieved to 5.64 W with slope efficiency of approximately 52.5% at 946 nm. The simultaneous dual-wavelength laser at 939 and 946 nm is also obtained with maximum output power of 3.61 W and slope efficiency of 34.8% by introducing a glass etalon into the cavity. Moreover, a 2.0-W single-wavelength laser at 939 nm can be further attained by suitably tilting the etalon. Using a Cr:YAG saturable absorber, Q-switched laser operation is realized with maximum average output power of 0.68 W and the narrowest pulse width of 8.4 ns, which results in the maximum single pulse energy of approximately 55.3 μJ and the maximum pulse peak power of approximately 6.15 kW. Finally, thermal focal length of the laser crystal is estimated by using a flat-flat laser cavity.

  15. Highly-efficient continuous-wave intra-cavity frequency-doubled Yb:LuAG thin-disk laser with 1 kW of output power.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Tom; Piehler, Stefan; Rumpel, Martin; Villeval, Philippe; Lupinski, Dominique; Abdou-Ahmed, Marwan; Graf, Thomas

    2017-03-06

    We report on the generation of continuous-wave, intra-cavity frequency-doubled, multi-mode laser radiation in an Yb:LuAG thin-disk laser. Output powers of up to 1 kW at a wavelength of 515 nm were achieved at an unprecedented optical efficiency of 51.6% with respect to the pumping power of the thin-disk laser. The wavelength stabilization and spectral narrowing as well as the polarization selection, which is necessary for a stable and efficient second-harmonic generation, was achieved by the integration of a diffraction grating into the dielectric end mirror of the cavity, which exhibits a diffraction efficiency of 99.8%. At a frequency-doubled output power of 820 W the peak-to-valley power fluctuations measured during 100 minutes of laser operation amounted to only 8.2 W (1.0%). The beam parameter product of the frequency-doubled output was 3.4 mm·mrad (M2 ≈ 20), which is suitable for standard beam delivery using fibers with a core diameter of 100 µm and a NA of 0.2.

  16. High gain (43 dB), high power (40 W), highly efficient multipass amplifier at 995 nm inYb:LiYF4

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-15

    optic modulator specified to provide better than 50 dB extinction in the time between pulses. The modulators were separately measured to provide...29 dB extinction . The pulses are nominally flat-top in time. The signal passes first through the acousto-optic modulator to reduce the average power

  17. Taming the heat flux problem: Advanced divertors towards fusion power

    SciTech Connect

    Kotschenreuther, M.; Mahajan, S.; Valanju, P. M.; Covele, B.; Waelbroeck, F. L.; Canik, John M.; LaBombard, Brian

    2015-09-11

    The next generation fusion machines are likely to face enormous heat exhaust problems. In addition to summarizing major issues and physical processes connected with these problems, we discuss how advanced divertors, obtained by modifying the local geometry, may yield workable solutions. We also point out that: (1) the initial interpretation of recent experiments show that the advantages, predicted, for instance, for the X-divertor (in particular, being able to run a detached operation at high pedestal pressure) correlate very well with observations, and (2) the X-D geometry could be implemented on ITER (and DEMOS) respecting all the relevant constraints. As a result, a roadmap for future research efforts is proposed.

  18. A Battery Powered Highly Efficient Exterior Lighting System Using Low Pressure Sodium Vapour Lamp for Use in Non-electrified Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Kalyankumar; Golder, Sujit; Mazumdar, Saswati

    Innumerous attempts to solve the problems of exterior lighting in non-electrified areas of India e.g. highways, hilly areas, rural areas of delta regions have been made in the last two decades. A solar powered lighting system with 11 watt or 18 watt Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFL) have been mounted in street light fixtures at some places but insufficient amount of light do not always serve the required need of the users specially in foggy weather. This paper reports the development of a battery powered lighting system fitted with a 35 Watt Low Pressure Sodium Vapour (SOX) lamp. It is extremely beneficial in remote non-electrified areas for its far higher light output when fitted in street light or flood light fixtures. The battery may be charged from any non-conventional energy source and is connected to the electronic circuit, which operates at high frequency. The light output of this system fitted with a solar photovoltaic array (SPVA) and the corresponding battery power have been measured and the results have been reported in this paper. This high intensity lighting system has a wide application potential in developing countries throughout the world.

  19. Fusion power production from TFTR plasmas fueled with deuterium and tritium*

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J. D.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Synakowski, E.

    1994-03-01

    Peak fusion power production of 6.2 ± 0.4 MW has been achieved in TFTR plasmas heated by deuterium and tritium neutral beams at a total power of 29.5 MW. These plasmas have an inferred central fusion alpha particle density of 1.2 x 1017 m₋3 without the appearance of either disruptive MHD events or detectable changes in Alfvén wave activity. The measured loss rate of energetic alpha particles agreed with the approximately 5% losses expected from alpha particles which are born on unconfined orbits.

  20. Fusion power production from TFTR plasmas fueled with deuterium and tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J. D.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J. L.; Ashcroft, D.; Barnes, Cris W.; Barnes, G.; Batha, S.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bretz, N. L.; Budny, R.; Bush, C. E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, Z.; Cheng, C. Z.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Darrow, D. S.; DeLooper, J.; Duong, H.; Dudek, L.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ernst, D.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R. J.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G. Y.; Furth, H. P.; Gentile, C.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L. R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G. R.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hill, K. W.; Hosea, J.; Hsuan, H.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D. L.; Jobes, F. C.; Johnson, D. W.; Johnson, L. C.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kugel, H.; Lam, N. T.; LaMarche, P. H.; Loughlin, M. J.; LeBlanc, B.; Leonard, M.; Levinton, F. M.; Machuzak, J.; Mansfield, D. K.; Martin, A.; Mazzucato, E.; Majeski, R.; Marmar, E.; McChesney, J.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D. C.; McGuire, K. M.; McKee, G.; Meade, D. M.; Medley, S. S.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Nagy, A.; Nazikian, R.; Newman, R.; Nishitani, T.; Norris, M.; O’Connor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D. K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Paul, S. F.; Pearson, G.; Perry, E.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Pitcher, S.; Ramsey, A. T.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Redi, M. H.; Roberts, D.; Rogers, J.; Rossmassler, R.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ruskov, E.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Sasao, M.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G. L.; Scott, S. D.; Sissingh, R.; Skinner, C. H.; Snipes, J. A.; Stevens, J.; Stevenson, T.; Stratton, B. C.; Synakowski, E.; Tang, W.; Taylor, G.; Terry, J. L.; Thompson, M. E.; Tuszewski, M.; Vannoy, C.; von Halle, A.; von Goeler, S.; Voorhees, D.; Walters, R. T.; Wieland, R.; Wilgen, J. B.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Wong, K. L.; Wurden, G. A.; Yamada, M.; Young, K. M.; Zarnstorff, M. C.; Zweben, S. J.

    1994-05-01

    Peak fusion power production of 6.2 ± 0.4 MW has been achieved in TFTR plasmas heated by deuterium and tritium neutral beams at a total power of 29.5 MW. These plasmas have an inferred central fusion alpha particle density of 1.2 x 1017 m ₋3 without the appearance of either disruptive magnetohydrodynamics events or detectable changes in Alfvén wave activity. The measured loss rate of energetic alpha particles agreed with the approximately 5% losses expected from alpha particles which are born on unconfined orbits.

  1. Technology Development for High Efficiency Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Deep space optical communications is a significantly more challenging operational domain than near Earth space optical communications, primarily due to effects resulting from the vastly increased range between transmitter and receiver. The NASA Game Changing Development Program Deep Space Optical Communications Project is developing four key technologies for the implementation of a high efficiency telecommunications system that will enable greater than 10X the data rate of a state-of-the-art deep space RF system (Ka-band) for similar transceiver mass and power burden on the spacecraft. These technologies are a low mass spacecraft disturbance isolation assembly, a flight qualified photon counting detector array, a high efficiency flight laser amplifier and a high efficiency photon counting detector array for the ground-based receiver.

  2. Z-inertial fusion energy: power plant final report FY 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Mark; Kulcinski, Gerald; Zhao, Haihua; Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Olson, Craig Lee; Sierra, Dannelle P.; Meier, Wayne; McConnell, Paul E.; Ghiaasiaan, M. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Kern, Brian (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Tajima, Yu (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Campen, Chistopher (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Sketchley, Tomas (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Moir, R (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories); Bardet, Philippe M. (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Durbin, Samuel; Morrow, Charles W.; Vigil, Virginia L (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Modesto-Beato, Marcos A.; Franklin, James Kenneth; Smith, James Dean; Ying, Alice; Cook, Jason T.; Schmitz, Lothar (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Abdel-Khalik, S. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Abdou, Mohamed A.; Bonazza, Riccardo; Rodriguez, Salvador B.; Sridharan, Kumar (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Rochau, Gary Eugene; Gudmundson, Jesse; Peterson, Per F.; Marriott, Ed; Oakley, Jason

    2006-10-01

    This report summarizes the work conducted for the Z-inertial fusion energy (Z-IFE) late start Laboratory Directed Research Project. A major area of focus was on creating a roadmap to a z-pinch driven fusion power plant. The roadmap ties ZIFE into the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative through the use of high energy fusion neutrons to burn the actinides of spent fuel waste. Transmutation presents a near term use for Z-IFE technology and will aid in paving the path to fusion energy. The work this year continued to develop the science and engineering needed to support the Z-IFE roadmap. This included plant system and driver cost estimates, recyclable transmission line studies, flibe characterization, reaction chamber design, and shock mitigation techniques.

  3. The theory of an auto-resonant field emission cathode relativistic electron accelerator for high efficiency microwave to direct current power conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    A novel method of microwave power conversion to direct current is discussed that relies on a modification of well known resonant linear relativistic electron accelerator techniques. An analysis is presented that shows how, by establishing a 'slow' electromagnetic field in a waveguide, electrons liberated from an array of field emission cathodes, are resonantly accelerated to several times their rest energy, thus establishing an electric current over a large potential difference. Such an approach is not limited to the relatively low frequencies that characterize the operation of rectennas, and can, with appropriate waveguide and slow wave structure design, be employed in the 300 to 600 GHz range where much smaller transmitting and receiving antennas are needed.

  4. Surface charge tunability as a powerful strategy to control electrostatic interaction for high efficiency silencing, using tailored oligopeptide-modified poly(beta-amino ester)s (PBAEs).

    PubMed

    Dosta, Pere; Segovia, Nathaly; Cascante, Anna; Ramos, Victor; Borrós, Salvador

    2015-07-01

    Here we present an extended family of pBAEs that incorporate terminal oligopeptide moieties synthesized from both positive and negative amino acids. Polymer formulations of mixtures of negative and positive oligopeptide-modified pBAEs are capable of condensing siRNA into discrete nanoparticles. We have demonstrated that efficient delivery of nucleic acids in a cell-type dependent manner can be achieved by careful control of the pBAE formulation. In addition, our approach of adding differently charged oligopeptides to the termini of poly(β-amino ester)s is of great interest for the design of tailored complexes having specific features, such as tuneable zeta potential. We anticipate that this surface charge tunability may be a powerful strategy to control unwanted electrostatic interactions, while preserving high silencing efficiency and reduced toxicity.

  5. Development of heat sink concept for near-term fusion power plant divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimza, Sandeep; Khirwadkar, Samir; Velusamy, Karupanna

    2017-04-01

    Development of an efficient divertor concept is an important task to meet in the scenario of the future fusion power plant. The divertor, which is a vital part of the reactor has to discharge the considerable fraction of the total fusion thermal power (∼15%). Therefore, it has to survive very high thermal fluxes (∼10 MW/m2). In the present paper, an efficient divertor heat exchanger cooled by helium is proposed for the fusion tokamak. The Plasma facing surface of divertor made-up of several modules to overcome the stresses caused by high heat flux. The thermal hydraulic performance of one such module is numerically investigated in the present work. The result shows that the proposed design is capable of handling target heat flux values of 10 MW/m2. The computational model has been validated against high-heat flux experiments and a satisfactory agreement is noticed between the present simulation and the reported results.

  6. Summary of the 1st International Workshop on Environmental, Safety and Economic Aspects of Fusion Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Stevens, E.; Kim, K.; Maisonnier, D.; Kalashnikov, A.; Tobita, K.; Jackson, D.; Alejaldre, C.; Perrault, D.; Panayotov, D.; Merrill, B.; Grisolia, C.; Zucchetti, M.; Pinna, T.; van Houtte, D.; Konishi, S.; Kolbasov, B.

    2016-12-01

    The 1st International workshop on Environmental, Safety and Economic Aspects of Fusion Power (ESEFP) was held on 13 September 2015 at Jeju Island, South Korea. The workshop was initiated by the International Energy Agency Implementing Agreement on a Co-operative Program on ESEFP. The workshop was well attended with about forty participants representing twelve institutions in ten countries. The presentations covered safety issues and environmental impacts, availability improvement and risk control and socio-economic aspects of fusion power. Safety and licensing gaps between DEMO and ITER were discussed in depth with the consensus output presented as a plenary presentation at the 12th International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology (ISFNT-12). The next workshop is planned to be held in conjunction with the ISFNT-13 in 2017.

  7. Commercial power from inertial confinement fusion: issues and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, W.

    1985-05-01

    Future criteria for desirable power plants are difficult to determine, but they include economic competitiveness, availability of consumables, reliability, maintainability, safety, disposal of wastes, and environment impact. In the near future, the desirability of ICF power plants will probably be evaluated on terms similar to those used for fission reactors, which currently emphasize small, inherently safe reactors constructed from factory-built, standardized modules that can lower the direct capital costs and the construction time. Several of these issues are discussed.

  8. Discourse, Power, and Knowledge in the Management of "Big Science": The Production of Consensus in a Nuclear Fusion Research Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsella, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Extends a Foucauldian view of power/knowledge to the archetypical knowledge-intensive organization, the scientific research laboratory. Describes the discursive production of power/knowledge at the "big science" laboratory conducting nuclear fusion research and illuminates a critical incident in which the fusion research…

  9. Discourse, Power, and Knowledge in the Management of "Big Science": The Production of Consensus in a Nuclear Fusion Research Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsella, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Extends a Foucauldian view of power/knowledge to the archetypical knowledge-intensive organization, the scientific research laboratory. Describes the discursive production of power/knowledge at the "big science" laboratory conducting nuclear fusion research and illuminates a critical incident in which the fusion research…

  10. Development of D+3He Fusion Electric Thrusters and Power Supplies for Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Thomas M.

    1994-07-01

    Development of D+3He Fusion Electric Thrusters (FET) and Power Supplies (FPS) should occur at a lunar base because of the following: availability of helium-3, a vacuum better than on Earth, low K in shade reachable by radiant cooling, supply of ``high temp'' superconducting ceramic-metals, and a low G environment. The early FET will be much smaller than an Apollo engine, with specific impulse of 10,000-100,000-s. Solar power and low G will aid early development. To counter the effect of low G on humans, centrifuges will be employed for sleeping and resting. Work will be done by telerobotic view control. The FPS will be of comparable size, and will generate power mainly by having replaceable rectennas, resonant to the fusion synchrotron radiation. FPSs are used for house keeping power and initiating superconduction. Spaceships will carry up to ten FETs and two FPSs. In addition to fusion fuel, the FET will inject H or Li low mass propellant into the fusion chamber. Developing an FET would be difficult on Earth. FET spaceships will park between missions in L1, and an FET Bus will fetch humans/supplies from Moon and Earth. Someday FETs, with rocket assist, will lift spaceships from Earth, and make space travel to planets far cheaper, faster, and safer, than at present. Too long a delay due to the space station, or the huge cost of getting into space by current means, will damage the morale of the space program.

  11. Progress in modular-stellarator fusion-power-reactor conceptual designs

    SciTech Connect

    Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Van Sciver, S.W.; Kulcinski, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    Recent encouraging experimental results on stellarators/torsatrons/heliotrons (S/T/H) have revived interest in these concepts as possible fusion power reactors. The use of modular coils to generate the stellarator topology has added impetus to this renewed interest. Studies of the modular coil approach to stellarators by UW-Madison and Los Alamos National Laboratory are summarized in this paper.

  12. A flexible data fusion architecture for persistent surveillance using ultra-low-power wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Jeffrey A.; McLaughlin, Keith L.; Sereno, Thomas J.

    2011-06-01

    We have developed a flexible, target-driven, multi-modal, physics-based fusion architecture that efficiently searches sensor detections for targets and rejects clutter while controlling the combinatoric problems that commonly arise in datadriven fusion systems. The informational constraints imposed by long lifetime requirements make systems vulnerable to false alarms. We demonstrate that our data fusion system significantly reduces false alarms while maintaining high sensitivity to threats. In addition, mission goals can vary substantially in terms of targets-of-interest, required characterization, acceptable latency, and false alarm rates. Our fusion architecture provides the flexibility to match these trade-offs with mission requirements unlike many conventional systems that require significant modifications for each new mission. We illustrate our data fusion performance with case studies that span many of the potential mission scenarios including border surveillance, base security, and infrastructure protection. In these studies, we deployed multi-modal sensor nodes - including geophones, magnetometers, accelerometers and PIR sensors - with low-power processing algorithms and low-bandwidth wireless mesh networking to create networks capable of multi-year operation. The results show our data fusion architecture maintains high sensitivities while suppressing most false alarms for a variety of environments and targets.

  13. Advances in low-power visible/thermal IR video image fusion hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Lawrence B.; Socolinsky, Diego A.; Eveland, Christopher K.; Reese, C. E.; Bender, E. J.; Wood, M. V.

    2005-03-01

    Equinox Corporation has developed two new video board products for real-time image fusion of visible (or intensified visible/near-infrared) and thermal (emissive) infrared video. These products can provide unique capabilities to the dismounted soldier, maritime/naval operations and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) with low-power, lightweight, compact and inexpensive FPGA video fusion hardware. For several years Equinox Corporation has been studying and developing image fusion methodologies using the complementary modalities of the visible and thermal infrared wavebands including applications to face recognition, tracking, sensor development and fused image visualization. The video board products incorporate Equinox's proprietary image fusion algorithms into an FPGA architecture with embedded programmable capability. Currently included are (1) user interactive image fusion algorithms that go significantly beyond standard "A+B" fusion providing an intuitive color visualization invariant to distracting illumination changes, (2) generalized image co-registration to compensate for parallax, scale and rotation differences between visible/intensified and thermal IR, as well as non-linear optical and display distortion, and (3) automatic gain control (AGC) for dynamic range adaptation.

  14. High efficiency stationary hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hynek, S.; Fuller, W.; Truslow, S.

    1995-09-01

    Stationary storage of hydrogen permits one to make hydrogen now and use it later. With stationary hydrogen storage, one can use excess electrical generation capacity to power an electrolyzer, and store the resultant hydrogen for later use or transshipment. One can also use stationary hydrogen as a buffer at fueling stations to accommodate non-steady fueling demand, thus permitting the hydrogen supply system (e.g., methane reformer or electrolyzer) to be sized to meet the average, rather than the peak, demand. We at ADL designed, built, and tested a stationary hydrogen storage device that thermally couples a high-temperature metal hydride to a phase change material (PCM). The PCM captures and stores the heat of the hydriding reaction as its own heat of fusion (that is, it melts), and subsequently returns that heat of fusion (by freezing) to facilitate the dehydriding reaction. A key component of this stationary hydrogen storage device is the metal hydride itself. We used nickel-coated magnesium powder (NCMP) - magnesium particles coated with a thin layer of nickel by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Magnesium hydride can store a higher weight fraction of hydrogen than any other practical metal hydride, and it is less expensive than any other metal hydride. We designed and constructed an experimental NCM/PCM reactor out of 310 stainless steel in the form of a shell-and-tube heat exchanger, with the tube side packed with NCMP and the shell side filled with a eutectic mixture of NaCL, KCl, and MgCl{sub 2}. Our experimental results indicate that with proper attention to limiting thermal losses, our overall efficiency will exceed 90% (DOE goal: >75%) and our overall system cost will be only 33% (DOE goal: <50%) of the value of the delivered hydrogen. It appears that NCMP can be used to purify hydrogen streams and store hydrogen at the same time. These prospects make the NCMP/PCM reactor an attractive component in a reformer-based hydrogen fueling station.

  15. Sustaining neutral beam power supply system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Eckard, R.D.; Wilson, J.H.; Van Ness, H.W.

    1980-01-01

    In late August 1978, a fixed price procurement contract for $25,000,000 was awarded to Aydin Energy Division, Palo Alto, California, for the design, manufacture, installation and acceptance testing of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) Sustaining Neutral Beam Power Supply System (SNBPSS). This system of 24 power supply sets will provide the conditioned power for the 24 neutral beam source modules. Each set will provide the accel potential the arc power, the filament power, and the suppressor power for its associated neutral beam source module. The design and development of the SNBPSS has progressed through the final design phase and is now in production. Testing of the major sub-assembly power supply is proceeding at Aydin and the final acceptance testing of the first two power supplies at LLNL is expected to be completed this year.

  16. STARFIRE: a commercial tokamak fusion power plant study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    This volume contains chapters on each of the following topics: (1) radioactivity, (2) heat transport and energy conversion, (3) tritium systems, (4) electrical storage and power supplies, (5) support structure, (6) cryogenics, (7) instrumentation and control, (8) maintenance and operation, (9) balance of plant design, (10) safety and environmental analysis, (11) economic analysis, and (12) plant construction.

  17. A partial coupling power of single mode fiber fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saktioto, Toto; Ali, Jalil; Rahman, Rosly Abdul; Fadhali, Mohammed; Zainal, Jasman

    2008-01-01

    Coupled fibers are successfully fabricated by injecting hydrogen flow at 1bar and fused slightly by unstable torch flame in the range of 800-1350°C. Optical parameters may vary significantly over wide range physical properties. Coupling coefficient and refractive index are estimated from the experimental result of the coupling ratio distribution from 1% to 75%. The change of structural and geometrical fiber affects the normalized frequency (V) even for single mode fibers. Coupling ratio as a function of coupling coefficient and separation of fiber axis changes with respect to V at coupling region. V is derived from radius, wavelength and refractive index parameters. Parametric variations are performed on the left and right hand side of the coupling region. At the center of the coupling region V is assumed constant. A partial power is modeled and derived using V, normalized lateral phase constant (u), and normalized lateral attenuation constant, (w) through the second kind of modified Bessel function of the l order, which obeys the normal mode, LP 01 and normalized propagation constant (b). Total power is maintained constant in order to comply with the energy conservation law. The power is integrated through V, u and w over the pulling length range of 7500-9500 μm for 1-D where radial and angle directions are ignored. The core radius of fiber significantly affects V and power partially at coupling region rather than wavelength and refractive index of core and cladding. This model has power phenomena in transmission and reflection for industrial application of coupled fibers.

  18. Requirements for high-efficiency solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sah, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    Minimum recombination and low injection level are essential for high efficiency. Twenty percent AM1 efficiency requires a dark recombination current density of 2 x 10 to the minus 13th power A/sq cm and a recombination center density of less than 10 to the 10th power /cu cm. Recombination mechanisms at thirteen locations in a conventional single crystalline silicon cell design are reviewed. Three additional recombination locations are described at grain boundaries in polycrystalline cells. Material perfection and fabrication process optimization requirements for high efficiency are outlined. Innovative device designs to reduce recombination in the bulk and interfaces of single crystalline cells and in the grain boundary of polycrystalline cells are reviewed.

  19. Development of intermetallic coatings for fusion power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Domenico, T.; Dragel, G.; Clark, R.

    1994-03-01

    In the design of liquid-metal cooling systems, corrosion resistance of structural materials and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) force and its subsequent influence on thermal hydraulics and corrosion are major concerns. The objective of this study is to develop stable corrosion-resistant electrical insulator coatings at the liquid-metal/structural-material interface, with emphasis on electrically insulating coatings that prevent adverse MHD-generated currents from passing through the structural walls. Vanadium and V-base alloys are potential materials for structural applications in a fusion reactor. Insulator coatings inside the tubing are required when the system is cooled by liquid metals. Various intermetallic films were produced on V, V-t, and V-20 Ti, V-5Cr-t and V-15Cr-t, and Ti, and Types 304 and 316 stainless steel. The intermetallic layers were developed by exposure of the materials to liquid lithium of 3--5 at.% and containing dissolved metallic solutes at temperatures of 416--880{degrees}C. Subsequently, electrical insulator coatings were produced by reaction of the reactive layers with dissolved nitrogen in liquid lithium or by air oxidation under controlled conditions at 600--1000{degrees}C. These reactions converted the intermetallic layers to electrically insulating oxide/nitride or oxy-nitride layers. This coating method could be applied to a commercial product. The liquid metal can be used over and over because only the solutes are consumed within the liquid metal. The technique can be applied to various shapes because the coating is formed by liquid-phase reaction. This paper will discuss initial results on the nature of the coatings and their in-situ electrical resistivity characteristics in liquid lithium at high temperatures.

  20. Tate Medal for International Leadership in Physics Talk: Nuclear Fusion Power: Are we really serious about our future?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Gustav-Adolf

    2010-02-01

    There's a frantic search under way for new energy sources that do not damage global climate. In the public discussion of this subject, nuclear fusion is hardly ever mentioned. Yet nuclear fusion is the answer to the problem. It's the best way to generate large amounts of baseload power, needed in the intermediate and far future. The long-standing joke about fusion always being ``just 50 years away'' illustrates the unfavourable attitude most people have towards fusion technology, and while this is understandable in the light of fusion's history, it is unwarranted. We need a strong international effort to develop this energy source to help avoid climate change turning into global disaster. )

  1. Cosmic Evolution of Accretion Power and Fusion Power: AGN and Starbursts at High Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold Malkan, Matthew

    2009-05-01

    Extragalactic astronomers have been working for decades on obtaining robust measures of the luminosities galaxies produce from stars, and from active galactic nuclei. Our ultimate goal is deriving the cosmic evolution of all radiation produced by fusion and by black hole accretion. The combined effects of dust reddening and redshift make it impossible to achieve this with optical observations alone. Fortunately, infrared thermal continuum and forbidden line emission--from warm dust grains and ionized gas, respectively--can now be measured with excellent sensitivity. However, when measuring entire galaxies, these dust and gas emissions are powered by both active galactic nuclei and starbursts, which may be hard to separate spatially. We must use the fact that the patterns of IR energy output from AGN and SBs differ, with AGN making more ionized gas and hotter dust grains. Low-resolution spectroscopy, or even narrow-band filters can sort out the line emission from both processes when they are mixed in the same galaxy. The hope is that these spectroscopic determinations of star formation rate, and mass accretion rate in relatively small samples of bright galaxies will allow a calibration of broadband continuum measures. The dust continuum emission will then be measured in enormous samples of galaxies spanning their full range of masses, metallicities, environments and redshifts. Along the way, we should learn the astrophysical basis of black hole/galaxy "co-evolution." I will summarize some of the first specific infrared steps of this ambitious agenda, taken with IRAS and ISO to 2MASS, Akari and Spitzer and other telescopes. Time permitting, some of the exciting upcoming observational prospects will be advertised.

  2. Recent advances in inertial-electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion for space power and propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadler, J.; Miley, G. H.; Coventry, M.; Momota, H.

    2000-01-01

    Concept Studies have shown the IEC to be one of the most attractive approaches to fusion propulsion, provided the physics and technology involved can be scaled-up to high power levels. A key step involves development of a pulsed IEC that can obtain high ion currents along with good ion confinement. Results from initial pulsed IEC experiments are described here. The obtainment of a D-D fusion neutron yield of 8×108 n/s at a peak pulse current of 17 A demonstrates that the dynamic formation of the required accelerating fields with the IEC discharge is possible. A next step involves improvement in confinement. .

  3. Inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber and power conversion system study

    SciTech Connect

    Maya, I.; Schultz, K.R.; Battaglia, J.M.; Buksa, J.J.; Creedson, R.L.; Erlandson, O.D.; Levine, H.E.; Roelant, D.F.; Sanchez, H.W.; Schrader, S.A.

    1984-09-01

    GA Technologies has developed a conceptual ICF reactor system based on the Cascade rotating-bed reaction chamber concept. Unique features of the system design include the use of low activation SiC in a reaction chamber constructed of box-shaped tiles held together in compression by prestressing tendons to the vacuum chamber. Circulating Li/sub 2/O granules serve as the tritium breeding and energy transport material, cascading down the sides of the reaction chamber to the power conversion system. The total tritium inventory of the system is 6 kg; tritium recovery is accomplished directly from the granules via the vacuum system. A system for centrifugal throw transport of the hot Li/sub 2/O granules from the reaction chamber to the power conversion system has been developed. A number of issues were evaluated during the course of this study. These include the response of first-layer granules to the intense microexplosion surface heat flux, cost effective fabrication of Li/sub 2/O granules, tritium inventory and recovery issues, the thermodynamics of solids-flow options, vacuum versus helium-medium heat transfer, and the tradeoffs of capital cost versus efficiency for alternate heat exchange and power conversion system option. The resultant design options appear to be economically competitive, safe, and environmentally attractive.

  4. Computational modeling of pulsed-power-driven magnetized target fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehey, P.; Kirkpatrick, R.; Lindemuth, I.

    1995-08-01

    Direct magnetic drive using electrical pulsed power has been considered impractically slow for traditional inertial confinement implosion of fusion targets. However, if the target contains a preheated, magnetized plasma, magnetothermal insulation may allow the near-adiabatic compression of such a target to fusion conditions on a much slower time scale. 100-MJ-class explosive flux compression generators with implosion kinetic energies far beyond those available with conventional fusion drivers, are an inexpensive means to investigate such magnetized target fusion (MTF) systems. One means of obtaining the preheated and magnetized plasma required for an MTF system is the recently reported {open_quotes}MAGO{close_quotes} concept. MAGO is a unique, explosive-pulsed-power driven discharge in two cylindrical chambers joined by an annular nozzle. Joint Russian-American MAGO experiments have reported D-T neutron yields in excess of 10{sup 13} from this plasma preparation stage alone, without going on to the proposed separately driven NM implosion of the main plasma chamber. Two-dimensional MED computational modeling of MAGO discharges shows good agreement to experiment. The calculations suggest that after the observed neutron pulse, a diffuse Z-pinch plasma with temperature in excess of 100 eV is created, which may be suitable for subsequent MTF implosion, in a heavy liner magnetically driven by explosive pulsed power. Other MTF concepts, such as fiber-initiated Z-pinch target plasmas, are also being computationally and theoretically evaluated. The status of our modeling efforts will be reported.

  5. Transmutation behaviour of Eurofer under irradiation in the IFMIF test facility and fusion power reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, U.; Simakov, S. P.; Wilson, P. P. H.

    2004-08-01

    The transmutation behaviour of the low activation steel Eurofer was analysed for irradiation simulations in the high flux test module (HFTM) of the International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) neutron source and the first wall of a typical fusion power reactor (FPR) employing helium cooled lithium lead (HCLL) and pebble bed (HCPB) blankets. The transmutation calculations were conducted with the analytical and laplacian adaptive radioactivity analysis (ALARA) code and IEAF-2001 data for the IFMIF and the EASY-2003 system for the fusion power reactor (FPR) irradiations. The analyses showed that the transmutation of the main constituents of Eurofer, including iron and chromium, is not significant. Minor constituents such as Ti, V and Mn increase by 5-15% per irradiation year in the FPR and by 10-35% in the IFMIF HFTM. Other minor constituents such as B, Ta, and W show a different transmutation behaviour resulting in different elemental compositions of the Eurofer steel after high fluence irradiations in IFMIF and fusion power reactors.

  6. High efficiency solar cell processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, F.; Iles, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    At the time of writing, cells made by several groups are approaching 19% efficiency. General aspects of the processing required for such cells are discussed. Most processing used for high efficiency cells is derived from space-cell or concentrator cell technology, and recent advances have been obtained from improved techniques rather than from better understanding of the limiting mechanisms. Theory and modeling are fairly well developed, and adequate to guide further asymptotic increases in performance of near conventional cells. There are several competitive cell designs with promise of higher performance ( 20%) but for these designs further improvements are required. The available cell processing technology to fabricate high efficiency cells is examined.

  7. Liquid lithium loop system to solve challenging technology issues for fusion power plant

    DOE PAGES

    Ono, Masayuki; Majeski, Richard P.; Jaworski, Michael A.; ...

    2017-07-12

    Here, steady-state fusion power plant designs present major divertor technology challenges, including high divertor heat flux both in steady-state and during transients. In addition to these concerns, there are the unresolved technology issues of long term dust accumulation and associated tritium inventory and safety issues. It has been suggested that radiation-based liquid lithium (LL) divertor concepts with a modest lithium-loop could provide a possible solution for these outstanding fusion reactor technology issues, while potentially improving reactor plasma performance. The application of lithium (Li) in NSTX resulted in improved H-mode confinement, H-mode power threshold reduction, and reduction in the divertor peakmore » heat flux while maintaining essentially Li-free core plasma operation even during H-modes. These promising results in NSTX and related modeling calculations motivated the radiative liquid lithium divertor (RLLD) concept and its variant, the active liquid lithium divertor concept (ARLLD), taking advantage of the enhanced or non-coronal Li radiation in relatively poorly confined divertor plasmas. To maintain the LL purity in a 1 GW-electric class fusion power plant, a closed LL loop system with a modest circulating capacity of ~ 1 liter/second (l/sec) is envisioned. We examined two key technology issues: 1) dust or solid particle removal and 2) real time recovery of tritium from LL while keeping the tritium inventory level to an acceptable level. By running the LL-loop continuously, it can carry the dust particles and impurities generated in the vacuum vessel to the outside where the dust / impurities can be removed by relatively simple dust filter, cold trap and/or centrifugal separation systems. With ~ 1 l/sec LL flow, even a small 0.1% dust content by weight (or 0.5 g per sec) suggests that the LL-loop could carry away nearly 16 tons of dust per year. In a 1 GW-electric (or ~ 3 GW fusion power) fusion power plant, about 0.5 g / sec of

  8. Inertial fusion energy power reactor fuel recovery system

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, C. A.; Kozub, T.; Langish, S. W.; Ciebiera, L. P.; Nobile, A.; Wermer, J.; Sessions, K.

    2008-07-15

    A conceptual design is proposed to support the recovery of un-expended fuel, ash, and associated post-detonation products resident in plasma exhaust from a {approx}2 GWIFE direct drive power reactor. The design includes systems for the safe and efficient collection, processing, and purification of plasma exhaust fuel components. The system has been conceptually designed and sized such that tritium bred within blankets, lining the reactor target chamber, can also be collected, processed, and introduced into the fuel cycle. The system will nominally be sized to process {approx}2 kg of tritium per day and is designed to link directly to the target chamber vacuum pumping system. An effort to model the fuel recovery system (FRS) using the Aspen Plus engineering code has commenced. The system design supports processing effluent gases from the reactor directly from the exhaust of the vacuum pumping system or in batch mode, via a buffer vessel in the Receiving and Analysis System. Emphasis is on nuclear safety, reliability, and redundancy as to maximize availability. The primary goal of the fuel recovery system design is to economically recycle components of direct drive IFE fuel. The FRS design is presented as a facility sub-system in the context of supporting the larger goal of producing safe and economical IFE power. (authors)

  9. Highly efficient solid state magnetoelectric gyrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Chung Ming; Zhuang, Xin; Friedrichs, Daniel; Li, Jiefang; Erickson, Robert W.; Laletin, V.; Popov, M.; Srinivasan, G.; Viehland, D.

    2017-09-01

    An enhancement in the power-conversion-efficiency (η) of a magneto-electric (ME) gyrator has been found by the use of Mn-substituted nickel zinc ferrite. A trilayer gyrator of Mn-doped Ni0.8Zn0.2Fe2O3 and Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 has η = 85% at low power conditions (˜20 mW/in3) and η ≥ 80% at high power conditions (˜5 W/in3). It works close to fundamental electromechanical resonance in both direct and converse modes. The value of η is by far the highest reported so far, which is due to the high mechanical quality factor (Qm) of the magnetostrictive ferrite. Such highly efficient ME gyrators with a significant power density could become important elements in power electronics, potentially replacing electromagnetic and piezoelectric transformers.

  10. Transport vehicle for manned Mars missions powered by inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orth, Charles D.; Klein, Gail; Sercel, Joel; Hoffman, Nathan; Murray, Kathy; Chang-Diaz, Franklin

    1987-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is an ideal engine power source for manned spacecraft to Mars because of its inherently high power-to-mass ratios and high specific impulses. In this paper a concept is produced for a vehicle powered by ICF and utilizing a magnetic thrust chamber to avoid plasma thermalization with wall structures and the resultant degradation of specific impulse, that are unavoidable with the use of mechanical thrust chambers. This vehicle is capable of 100-day manned Mars missions with a 100-metric-ton payload and a total vehicle launch mass near 6000 metric tons, based on advanced technology assumed to be available by A.D. 2020.

  11. The future of high efficiency solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, J. C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Research approaches to obtain solar cell modules with 1 sun efficiencies of 20-30 percent at air mass 1 are now well understood. Such high efficiency modules should become available in the near future. It can be expected that these modules will be extensively used in terrestrial power generation, space power generation, and consumer electronics. To achieve practical module efficiencies significantly above 30 percent, it will be necessary to employ concepts other than spectral splitting, such as spectral compression and broad band detection. A major breakthrough in these areas is not anticipated at this time.

  12. The Pulsed Fission-Fusion (PUFF) Concept for Deep Space Exploration and Terrestrial Power Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Robert; Cassibry, Jason; Schillo, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    This team is exploring a modified Z-pinch geometry as a propulsion system, imploding a liner of liquid lithium onto a pellet containing both fission and fusion fuel. The plasma resulting from the fission and fusion burn expands against a magnetic nozzle, for propulsion, or a magnetic confinement system, for terrestrial power generation. There is considerable synergy in the concept; the lithium acts as a temporary virtual cathode, and adds reaction mass for propulsion. Further, the lithium acts as a radiation shield against generated neutrons and gamma rays. Finally, the density profile of the column can be tailored using the lithium sheath. Recent theoretical and experimental developments (e.g. tailored density profile in the fuel injection, shear stabilization, and magnetic shear stabilization) have had great success in mitigating instabilities that have plagued previous fusion efforts. This paper will review the work in evaluating the pellet sizes and z-pinch conditions for optimal PuFF propulsion. Trades of pellet size and composition with z-pinch power levels and conditions for the tamper and lithium implosion are evaluated. Current models, both theoretical and computational, show that a z-pinch can ignite a small (1 cm radius) fission-fusion target with significant yield. Comparison is made between pure fission and boosted fission targets. Performance is shown for crewed spacecraft for high speed Mars round trip missions and near interstellar robotic missions. The PuFF concept also offers a solution for terrestrial power production. PuFF can, with recycling of the effluent, achieve near 100% burnup of fission fuel, providing a very attractive power source with minimal waste. The small size of PuFF relative to today's plants enables a more distributed power network and less exposure to natural or man-made disruptions.

  13. TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) neutral beam injected power measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Grisham, L.R.; Dudek, L.E.; Gammel, G.M.; Johnson, G.A.; Kugel, H.W.; Lagin, L.; O'Connor, T.E.; Shah, P.A.; Sichta, P.

    1989-05-01

    Energy flow within TFTR neutral beamlines is measured with a waterfall calorimetry system capable of simultaneously measuring the energy deposited within four heating beamlines (three ion sources each), or of measuring the energy deposited in a separate neutral beam test stand. Of the energy extracted from the ion source in the well instrumented test stand, 99.5 +- 3.5% can be accounted for. When the ion deflection magnet is energized, however, 6.5% of the extracted energy is lost. This loss is attributed to a spray of devious particles onto unmonitored surfaces. A 30% discrepancy is also observed between energy measurements on the internal beamline calorimeter and energy measurements on a calorimeter located in the test stand target chamber. Particle reflection from the flat plate calorimeter in the target chamber, which the incident beam strikes at a near-grazing angle of 12/degree/, is the primary loss of this energy. A slight improvement in energy accountability is observed as the beam pulse length is increased. This improvement is attributed to systematic error in the sensitivity of the energy measurement to small fluctuations on the supply water temperature. An overall accuracy of 15% is estimated for the total power injected into TFTR. Contributions to this error are uncertainties in the beam neutralization efficiency, reionization and beam scrape-off in the drift duct, and fluctuations in the temperature of the supply water. 28 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Ion Deflection for Final Optics In Laser Inertial Fusion Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, R P; Latkowski, J F

    2006-11-17

    Left unprotected, both transmissive and reflective final optics in a laser inertial fusion power plant would quickly fail from melting, pulsed thermal stresses, or degradation of optical properties as a result of ion implantation. One potential option for mitigating this threat is to magnetically deflect the ions such that they are directed into a robust energy dump. In this paper we detail integrated studies that have been carried out to asses the viability of this approach for protecting final optics.

  15. Ion Deflection for Final Optics in Laser Inertial Fusion Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Ryan P.

    2005-12-01

    Left unprotected, both transmissive and reflective final optics in a laser-driven inertial fusion power plant would quickly fail from melting, pulsed thermal stress, or degradation of optical properties as a result of ion implantation. One potential option for mitigating this threat is to magnetically deflect the ions such that they are directed to a robust energy dump. In this paper we detail integrated studies that have been carried out to assess the viability of this approach for protecting final optics.

  16. Developmental validation of the PowerPlex(®) Fusion 6C System.

    PubMed

    Ensenberger, Martin G; Lenz, Kristy A; Matthies, Learden K; Hadinoto, Gregory M; Schienman, John E; Przech, Angela J; Morganti, Michael W; Renstrom, Daniel T; Baker, Victoria M; Gawrys, Kori M; Hoogendoorn, Marlijn; Steffen, Carolyn R; Martín, Pablo; Alonso, Antonio; Olson, Hope R; Sprecher, Cynthia J; Storts, Douglas R

    2016-03-01

    The PowerPlex(®) Fusion 6C System is a 27-locus, six-dye, multiplex that includes all markers in the expanded CODIS core loci and increases overlap with STR database standards throughout the world. Additionally, it contains two, rapidly mutating, Y-STRs and is capable of both casework and database workflows, including direct amplification. A multi-laboratory developmental validation study was performed on the PowerPlex(®) Fusion 6C System. Here, we report the results of that study which followed SWGDAM guidelines and includes data for: species specificity, sensitivity, stability, precision, reproducibility and repeatability, case-type samples, concordance, stutter, DNA mixtures, and PCR-based procedures. Where appropriate we report data from both extracted DNA samples and direct amplification samples from various substrates and collection devices. Samples from all studies were separated on both Applied Biosystems 3500 series and 6-dye capable 3130 series Genetic Analyzers and data is reported for each. Together, the data validate the design and demonstrate the performance of the PowerPlex(®) Fusion 6C System.

  17. DT fusion power production in ELM free H modes in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimini, F. G.; JET Team

    1999-11-01

    Experiments in the ELM free hot ion H mode regime have been carried out in DT plasmas in JET. Initial experiments undertaken at constant neutral beam (NB) power (~11 MW) demonstrated that core fuelling was dominated by wall/target recycling rather than NB fuelling and made it possible to arrange an optimum core DT mix by adjusting the DT mix in wall/target, gas and NB. High power experiments at 4.2 MA/3.6 T have successfully and reliably delivered fusion power (Pfus) up to 16.1 MW and plasma stored energy (Wdia) up to 17 MJ. The results are in good agreement with extrapolations, carried out with the TRANSP and JETTO codes, from similar deuterium discharges. Transiently, values of Qtot up to 0.95 +/-0.17 were achieved, consistent with values of nDT(0)τE, diaTi (0) approx 8.7 × 1020 m-3·s·keV+/-20%. The ratio of fusion power to input power, Qin, is in excess of 0.6. There are indications of an isotope effect on the edge pressure pedestal, but no net dependence of global confinement on isotopic plasma composition has been found.

  18. Axisymmetric Tandem Mirror Magnetic Fusion Energy Power Plant with Thick Liquid-Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R W; Rognlien, T D

    2006-04-26

    A fusion power plant is described that utilizes a new version of the tandem mirror device including spinning liquid walls. The magnetic configuration is evaluated with an axisymmetric equilibrium code predicting an average beta of 60%. The geometry allows a flowing molten salt, (flibe-Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}), which protects the walls and structures from damage arising from neutrons and plasma particles. The free surface between the liquid and the burning plasma is heated by bremsstrahlung radiation, line radiation, and by neutrons. The temperature of the free surface of the liquid is calculated, and then the evaporation rate is estimated from vapor-pressure data. The allowed impurity concentration in the burning plasma is taken as 1% fluorine, which gives a 17% reduction in the fusion power owing to D/T fuel dilution, with F line-radiation causing minor power degradation. The end leakage power density of 0.6 MW/m{sup 2} is readily handled by liquid jets. The tritium breeding is adequate with natural lithium. A number of problem areas are identified that need further study to make the design more self-consistent and workable; however, the simple geometry and the use of liquid walls promise the cost of power competitive with that from fission and coal.

  19. High-efficiency 20 W yellow VECSEL.

    PubMed

    Kantola, Emmi; Leinonen, Tomi; Ranta, Sanna; Tavast, Miki; Guina, Mircea

    2014-03-24

    A high-efficiency optically pumped vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser emitting 20 W at a wavelength around 588 nm is demonstrated. The semiconductor gain chip emitted at a fundamental wavelength around 1170-1180 nm and the laser employed a V-shaped cavity. The yellow spectral range was achieved by intra-cavity frequency doubling using a LBO crystal. The laser could be tuned over a bandwidth of ~26 nm while exhibiting watt-level output powers. The maximum conversion efficiency from absorbed pump power to yellow output was 28% for continuous wave operation. The VECSEL's output could be modulated to generate optical pulses with duration down to 570 ns by directly modulating the pump laser. The high-power pulse operation is a key feature for astrophysics and medical applications while at the same time enables higher slope efficiency than continuous wave operation owing to decreased heating.

  20. High Efficiency Room Air Conditioner

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    This project was undertaken as a CRADA project between UT-Battelle and Geberal Electric Company and was funded by Department of Energy to design and develop of a high efficiency room air conditioner. A number of novel elements were investigated to improve the energy efficiency of a state-of-the-art WAC with base capacity of 10,000 BTU/h. One of the major modifications was made by downgrading its capacity from 10,000 BTU/hr to 8,000 BTU/hr by replacing the original compressor with a lower capacity (8,000 BTU/hr) but high efficiency compressor having an EER of 9.7 as compared with 9.3 of the original compressor. However, all heat exchangers from the original unit were retained to provide higher EER. The other subsequent major modifications included- (i) the AC fan motor was replaced by a brushless high efficiency ECM motor along with its fan housing, (ii) the capillary tube was replaced with a needle valve to better control the refrigerant flow and refrigerant set points, and (iii) the unit was tested with a drop-in environmentally friendly binary mixture of R32 (90% molar concentration)/R125 (10% molar concentration). The WAC was tested in the environmental chambers at ORNL as per the design rating conditions of AHAM/ASHRAE (Outdoor- 95F and 40%RH, Indoor- 80F, 51.5%RH). All these modifications resulted in enhancing the EER of the WAC by up to 25%.

  1. Interface modification for highly efficient organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steim, Roland; Choulis, Stelios A.; Schilinsky, Pavel; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2008-03-01

    We present highly efficient inverted polymer:fullerene bulk-heterojunction solar cells by incorporation of a nanoscale organic interfacial layer between the indium tin oxide (ITO) and the metal oxide electron-conducting layer. We demonstrate that stacking of solution-processed organic and metal oxide interfacial layers gives highly charged selective low ohmic cathodes. The incorporation of a polyoxyethylene tridecyl ether interfacial layer between ITO and solution-processed titanium oxide (TiOx) raised the power conversion efficiency of inverted organic photovoltaics to 3.6%, an improvement of around 15% in their performance over comparable devices without the organic interfacial layer.

  2. High efficiency SPS klystron design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalos, E. J.

    1980-01-01

    The most likely compact configuration to realize both high efficiency and high gain (approx. 40 dB) is a 5-6 cavity design focused by an electromagnet. The basic klystron efficiency cannot be expected to exceed 70-75% without collector depression. It was estimated that the net benefit of a 5 stage collector over a 2 stage collector is between 1.5 and 3.5 kW per tube. A modulating anode is incorporated in the design to enable rapid shutoff of the beam current in case the r.f. drive should be removed.

  3. High-efficiency photoionization detector

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.F.

    1981-05-12

    A high efficiency photoionization detector using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36 +- 0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20/sup 0/C.

  4. Synergies Between Generation-IV and Advanced Fusion Power Plant Research Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Paul P.H.; Allen, Todd R.; El-Guebaly, Laila A.

    2005-04-15

    For the first time since the early 1990's, the U.S. Department of Energy has long term research and development programs in both nuclear fission and nuclear fusion, the Generation IV program and the ARIES program, respectively. The Generation IV program has introduced a safety goal for future fission reactor systems that has long been reflected in the ARIES mission: no off-site emergency response to any design basis accident. This change, in concert with the overall departure from light water reactor technology, will drive a change in the regulatory framework for both Generation IV reactors and fusion power plants of the future. Further, both fission and fusion power plants will have to compete in similar future energy markets with uncertainties in energy prices and the development of alternative energy products. Enabling the success of nuclear energy, advanced materials will be a cornerstone to both programs, driven both by higher temperatures and heat fluxes and by a desire for longer lifetimes in high radiation environments. The synergies created by these increasingly parallel programs open the door for renewed collaborations that will increase the total effectiveness of research needed in both.

  5. Transmutation and activation analysis for divertor materials in a HCLL-type fusion power reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, U.; Pereslavtsev, P.; Möslang, A.; Rieth, M.

    2009-04-01

    The activation and transmutation of tungsten and tantalum as plasma facing materials was assessed for a helium cooled divertor irradiated in a typical fusion power reactor based on the use of Helium-cooled Lithium Lead (HCLL) blankets. 3D activation calculations were performed by applying a programme system linking the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP and the fusion inventory code FISPACT through an appropriate interface. Special attention was given to the proper treatment of the resonance shielding of tungsten and tantalum by using reaction rates provided directly by MCNP on the basis of continuous energy activation cross-section data. It was shown that the long-term activation behaviour is dominated by activation products of the assumed tramp material while the short-term behaviour is due to the activation of the stable Ta and W isotopes. The recycling limit for remote handling of 100 mSv/h can be achieved after decay times of 10 and 50 years for Ta and W, respectively. The elemental transmutation rates of Ta and W were shown to be on a moderate level for the HCLL-type fusion power reactor.

  6. Accident consequences analysis of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Gomez del Rio, J; Sanz, J

    2000-02-23

    Previous studies of the safety and environmental (S and E) aspects of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant design have used simplistic assumptions in order to estimate radioactivity releases under accident conditions. Conservatisms associated with these traditional analyses can mask the actual behavior of the plant and have revealed the need for more accurate modeling and analysis of accident conditions and radioactivity mobilization mechanisms. In the present work a set of computer codes traditionally used for magnetic fusion safety analyses (CHEMCON, MELCOR) has been applied for simulating accident conditions in a simple model of the HYLIFE-II IFE design. Here the authors consider a severe lost of coolant accident (LOCA) producing simultaneous failures of the beam tubes (providing a pathway for radioactivity release from the vacuum vessel towards the containment) and of the two barriers surrounding the chamber (inner shielding and containment building it self). Even though containment failure would be a very unlikely event it would be needed in order to produce significant off-site doses. CHEMCON code allows calculation of long-term temperature transients in fusion reactor first wall, blanket, and shield structures resulting from decay heating. MELCOR is used to simulate a wide range of physical phenomena including thermal-hydraulics, heat transfer, aerosol physics and fusion product release and transport. The results of these calculations show that the estimated off-site dose is less than 6 mSv (0.6 rem), which is well below the value of 10 mSv (1 rem) given by the DOE Fusion Safety Standards for protection of the public from exposure to radiation during off-normal conditions.

  7. Progress in accident analysis of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Latkowski, J F; Gomez del Rio, J; Sanz, J

    2000-10-11

    The present work continues our effort to perform an integrated safety analysis for the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant design. Recently we developed a base case for a severe accident scenario in order to calculate accident doses for HYLIFE-II. It consisted of a total loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in which all the liquid flibe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) was lost at the beginning of the accident. Results showed that the off-site dose was below the limit given by the DOE Fusion Safety Standards for public protection in case of accident, and that his dose was dominated by the tritium released during the accident.

  8. Systems Modeling For The Laser Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R; Abbott, R; Beach, R; Blink, J; Caird, J; Erlandson, A; Farmer, J; Halsey, W; Ladran, T; Latkowski, J; MacIntyre, A; Miles, R; Storm, E

    2008-10-02

    A systems model has been developed for the Laser Inertial Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) power plant. It combines cost-performance scaling models for the major subsystems of the plant including the laser, inertial fusion target factory, engine (i.e., the chamber including the fission and tritium breeding blankets), energy conversion systems and balance of plant. The LIFE plant model is being used to evaluate design trade-offs and to identify high-leverage R&D. At this point, we are focused more on doing self consistent design trades and optimization as opposed to trying to predict a cost of electricity with a high degree of certainty. Key results show the advantage of large scale (>1000 MWe) plants and the importance of minimizing the cost of diodes and balance of plant cost.

  9. Highly efficient pulsed power supply system with a two-stage LC generator and a step-up transformer for fast capillary discharge soft x-ray laser at shorter wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Yusuke; Takahashi, Shnsuke; Komatsu, Takanori; Song, Inho; Watanabe, Masato; Hotta, Eiki

    2010-01-15

    Highly efficient and compact pulsed power supply system for a capillary discharge soft x-ray laser (SXRL) has been developed. The system consists of a 2.2 {mu}F two-stage LC inversion generator, a 2:54 step-up transformer, a 3 nF water capacitor, and a discharge section with a few tens of centimeter length capillary. Adoption of the pulsed transformer in combination with the LC inversion generator enables us to use only one gap switch in the circuit for charging the water capacitor up to about 0.5 MV. Furthermore, step-up ratio of a water capacitor voltage to a LC inversion generator initial charging voltage is about 40 with energy transfer efficiency of about 50%. It also leads to good reproducibility of a capillary discharge which is necessary for lasing a SXRL stably. For the study of the possibility of lasing a SXRL at shorter wavelength in a small laboratory scale, high-density and high-temperature plasma column suitable for the laser can be generated relatively easily with this system.

  10. Highly efficient pulsed power supply system with a two-stage LC generator and a step-up transformer for fast capillary discharge soft x-ray laser at shorter wavelength.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yusuke; Takahashi, Shnsuke; Komatsu, Takanori; Song, Inho; Watanabe, Masato; Hotta, Eiki

    2010-01-01

    Highly efficient and compact pulsed power supply system for a capillary discharge soft x-ray laser (SXRL) has been developed. The system consists of a 2.2 microF two-stage LC inversion generator, a 2:54 step-up transformer, a 3 nF water capacitor, and a discharge section with a few tens of centimeter length capillary. Adoption of the pulsed transformer in combination with the LC inversion generator enables us to use only one gap switch in the circuit for charging the water capacitor up to about 0.5 MV. Furthermore, step-up ratio of a water capacitor voltage to a LC inversion generator initial charging voltage is about 40 with energy transfer efficiency of about 50%. It also leads to good reproducibility of a capillary discharge which is necessary for lasing a SXRL stably. For the study of the possibility of lasing a SXRL at shorter wavelength in a small laboratory scale, high-density and high-temperature plasma column suitable for the laser can be generated relatively easily with this system.

  11. The High-Yield Lithium-Injection Fusion-Energy (HYLIFE)-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant concept and implications for IFE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, Ralph W.

    1995-06-01

    In the High-Yield Lithium-Injection Fusion-Energy (HYLIFE) power plant design, lithium is replaced by molten salt. HYLIFE-II [Fusion Technol. 25, 5 (1994)] is based on nonflammable, renewable-liquid-wall fusion target chambers formed with Li2BeF4 molten-salt jets, a heavy-ion driver, and single-sided illumination of indirect-drive targets. Building fusion chambers from existing materials with life-of-plant structural walls behind the liquid walls, while still meeting non-nuclear grade construction and low-level waste requirements, has profound implications for inertial fusion energy (IFE) development. Fluid-flow work and computational fluid dynamics predict chamber clearing adequate for 6 Hz pulse rates. Predicted electricity cost is reduced about 30% to 4.4¢/kWh at 1 GWe and 3.2¢/kWh at 2 GWe. Development can be foreshortened and cost reduced by obviating expensive neutron sources to develop first-wall materials. The driver and chamber can be upgraded in stages, avoiding separate and sequential facilities. Important features of a practical IFE power plant are ignition and sufficient gain in targets; low-cost, efficient, rep-ratable driver; and low-cost targets.

  12. High-power microwave transmission and launching systems for fusion plasma heating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, T.S.

    1989-01-01

    Microwave power in the 30- to 300-GHz frequency range is becoming widely used for heating of plasma in present-day fusion energy magnetic confinement experiments. Microwave power is effective in ionizing plasma and heating electrons through the electron cyclotron heating (ECH) process. Since the power is absorbed in regions of the magnetic field where resonance occurs and launching antennas with narrow beam widths are possible, power deposition location can be highly controlled. This is important for maximizing the power utilization efficiency and improving plasma parameters. Development of the gyrotron oscillator tube has advanced in recent years so that a 1-MW continuous-wave, 140-GHz power source will soon be available. Gyrotron output power is typically in a circular waveguide propagating a circular electric mode (such as TE/sub 0,2/) or a whispering-gallery mode (such as TE/sub 15,2/), depending on frequency and power level. An alternative high-power microwave source currently under development is the free-electron laser (FEL), which may be capable of generating 2-10 MW of average power at frequencies of up to 500 GHz. The FEL has a rectangular output waveguide carrying the TE/sub 0,1/ mode. Because of its higher complexity and cost, the high-average-power FEL is not yet as extensively developed as the gyrotron. In this paper, several types of operating ECH transmission systems are discussed, as well systems currently being developed. The trend in this area is toward higher power and frequency due to the improvements in plasma density and temperature possible. Every system requires a variety of components, such as mode converters, waveguide bends, launchers, and directional couplers. Some of these components are discussed here, along with ongoing work to improve their performance. 8 refs.

  13. High Efficiency IMM Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharps, P.; Cho, B.; Chumney, D.; Cornfeild, A.; Guzie, B.; Hazlett, D.; Lin, Y.; Mackos, C.; Patel, P.; Stan, M.; Steinfeldt, J.; Tourino, C.

    2014-08-01

    We review the status of currently available commercial multi-junction cells, review options for next generation high efficiency cell architectures, and present the latest developments on the inverted metamorphic multi- junction (IMM) solar cell. Over 20,000 IMM cells have been prototyped to date, and efficiencies of up to 37% have been measured. We present the most recent performance data, including the response to particle radiation. The IMM cell can be used in a number of rigid or flexible configurations, and considerable effort is currently focused on cell packaging and panel integration. We discuss several design options, including a "drop in" replacement for the current 29.5% ZTJ cell technology. We will also address the reliability and cost of the IMM cell.

  14. High efficiency laser spectrum conditioner

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Norman R.

    1980-01-01

    A high efficiency laser spectrum conditioner for generating a collinear parallel output beam containing a predetermined set of frequencies from a multifrequency laser. A diffraction grating and spherical mirror are used in combination, to disperse the various frequencies of the input laser beam and direct these frequencies along various parallel lines spatially separated from one another to an apertured mask. Selection of the desired frequencies is accomplished by placement of apertures at locations on the mask where the desired frequencies intersect the mask. A recollimated parallel output beam with the desired set of frequencies is subsequently generated utilizing a mirror and grating matched and geometrically aligned in the same manner as the input grating and mirror.

  15. Transport vehicle for manned Mars missions powered by inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, C.D.; Klein, G.; Sercel, J.; Hoffman, N.; Murray, K.; Chang-Diaz, F.

    1987-06-26

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is an ideal engine power source for manned spacecraft to Mars because of its inherently high power-to-mass ratios and high specific impulses. We have produced a concept for a vehicle powered by ICF and utilizing a magnetic thrust chamber to avoid plasma thermalization with wall structures and the resultant degradation of specific impulse that are unavoidable with the use of mechanical thrust chambers. This vehicle is capable of 100-day manned Mars missions with a 100-metric-ton payload and a total vehicle launch mass near 6000 metric tons, based on advanced technology assumed to be available by A.D. 2020. Such short-duration missions minimize radiation exposures and physiological deterioration of astronauts.

  16. Next generation laser optics for a hybrid fusion-fission power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Stolz, C J; Latkowski, J T; Schaffers, K I

    2009-09-10

    The successful completion of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), followed by a campaign to achieve ignition, creates the proper conditions to begin exploring what development work remains to construct a power plant based on Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) technology. Fundamentally, two distinct NIF laser properties must be overcome. The repetition rate must increase from a shot every four hours to several shots per second. Additionally, the efficiency of converting electricity to laser light must increase by 20x to roughly 10 percent. Solid state diode pumped lasers, commercially available for table top applications, have adequate repetition rates and power conversion efficiencies, however, they operate at a tiny fraction of the required energy for an ICF power plant so would need to be scaled in energy and aperture. This paper describes the optics and coatings that would be needed to support this type of laser architecture.

  17. High-efficiency silicon concentrator cell commercialization

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, R.A.; Swanson, R.M.

    1993-05-01

    This report summarizes the first phase of a forty-one month program to develop a commercial, high-efficiency concentrator solar cell and facility for manufacturing it. The period covered is November 1, 1990 to December 31, 1991. This is a joint program between the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Sandia National Laboratories. (This report is also published by EPRI as EPRI report number TR-102035.) During the first year of the program, SunPower accomplished the following major objectives: (1) a new solar cell fabrication facility, which is called the Cell Pilot Line (CPL), (2) a baseline concentrator cell process has been developed, and (3) a cell testing facility has been completed. Initial cell efficiencies are about 23% for the baseline process. The long-range goal is to improve this efficiency to 27%.

  18. The HYLIFE-2 inertial fusion energy power plant concept and implications for IFE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, Ralph W.

    1994-11-01

    HYLIFE-II is based on nonflammable, renewable-liquid-wall fusion target chambers formed with Li2BeF4 molten-salt jets, a heavy-ion driver, and single-sided illumination of indirect-drive targets. Building fusion chambers from existing materials with life-of-plant structural walls behind the liquid walls, while still meeting non-nuclear grade construction and low-level waste requirements, has profound implications for IFE development. Fluid-flow work and computational fluid dynamics predict chamber clearing adequate for 6-Hz pulse rates. Predicted electricity cost is reduced about 30% to 4.4 cents/kWh at 1 GWe. Development can be foreshortened and cost reduced by obviating expensive neutron sources to develop first-wall materials. The driver and chamber can be upgraded in stages, avoiding separate and sequential facilities. The most important features of a practical inertial fusion power plant are sufficient ignition and gain in targets; a low-cost, efficient, rep-ratable driver; and low-cost targets.

  19. A new simpler way to obtain high fusion power gain in tandem mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, T. K.; Moir, R. W.; Simonen, T. C.

    2017-05-01

    From the earliest days of fusion research, Richard F. Post and other advocates of magnetic mirror confinement recognized that mirrors favor high ion temperatures where nuclear reaction rates < σ v> begin to peak for all fusion fuels. In this paper we review why high ion temperatures are favored, using Post’s axisymmetric Kinetically Stabilized Tandem Mirror as the example; and we offer a new idea that appears to greatly improve reactor prospects at high ion temperatures. The idea is, first, to take advantage of recent advances in superconducting magnet technology to minimize the size and cost of End Plugs; and secondly, to utilize parallel advances in gyrotrons that would enable intense electron cyclotron heating (ECH) in these high field End Plugs. The yin-yang magnets and thermal barriers that complicated earlier tandem mirror designs are not required. We find that, concerning end losses, intense ECH in symmetric End Plugs could increase the fusion power gain Q, for both DT and Catalyzed DD fuel cycles, to levels competitive with steady-state tokamaks burning DT fuel. Radial losses remain an issue that will ultimately determine reactor viability.

  20. Electrochemically induced deuterium-tritium fusion power reactor; Preliminary design of a reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.; Kondo, S. . Faculty of Engineering )

    1989-09-01

    Conceptual design of an electrochemically induced deuterium-tritium fusion power reactor has been carried out. A double-tube-type fuel cell is proposed for efficient electrolysis and to provide a large cathode area. The fuel cell tubes are assembled like a pressurized water reactor (PWR) control rod cluster. The tritium fuel is continuously fed through the cluster rod to the cell. The voltage for the electrolysis is supplied through the rod. The tritium breeding Li/sub 2/O is contained in a hexagonal blanket through which coolant tubes penetrate. The fuel cell tube is inserted in the coolant tube and the water coolant flows through the annuli.

  1. Electricity production from laser-driven fusion reactors: technological aspects of power conversion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulcinski, Gerald L.

    2000-01-01

    One of the most important considerations for laser driven fusion power plants is the safe and efficient operation of the chamber that contains the thermonuclear energy released from the target. Several approaches to the design of such a chamber are described in this paper and the critical issues associated with protection of the first wall, the performance of the structural materials, and the cost are discussed. Presently, the need for direct drive illumination of the cryogenic targets makes the use of liquid first wall protection problematical at best. The use of dry first walls protected with a few torr of an inert gas seems to hold the most promise.

  2. Osiris and SOMBRERO inertial confinement fusion power plant designs. Volume 1, Executive summary and overview, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W.R.; Bieri, R.L.; Monsler, M.J.

    1992-03-01

    Conceptual designs and assessments have been completed for two inertial fusion energy (IFE) electric power plants. The detailed designs and results of the assessment studies are presented in this report. Osiris is a heavy-ion-beam (HIB) driven power plant and SOMBRERO is a Krypton-Fluoride (KrF) laser-driven power plant. Both plants are sized for a net electric power of 1000 MWe.

  3. Development of effective power supply using electric double layer capacitor for static magnetic field coils in fusion plasma experiments.

    PubMed

    Inomoto, M; Abe, K; Yamada, T; Kuwahata, A; Kamio, S; Cao, Q H; Sakumura, M; Suzuki, N; Watanabe, T; Ono, Y

    2011-02-01

    A cost-effective power supply for static magnetic field coils used in fusion plasma experiments has been developed by application of an electric double layer capacitor (EDLC). A prototype EDLC power supply system was constructed in the form of a series LCR circuit. Coil current of 100 A with flat-top longer than 1 s was successfully supplied to an equilibrium field coil of a fusion plasma experimental apparatus by a single EDLC module with capacitance of 30 F. The present EDLC power supply has revealed sufficient performance for plasma confinement experiments whose discharge duration times are an order of several seconds.

  4. High-efficiency photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Yang, H.T.; Zehr, S.W.

    1982-06-21

    High efficiency solar converters comprised of a two cell, non-lattice matched, monolithic stacked semiconductor configuration using optimum pairs of cells having bandgaps in the range 1.6 to 1.7 eV and 0.95 to 1.1 eV, and a method of fabrication thereof, are disclosed. The high band gap subcells are fabricated using metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) or molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) to produce the required AlGaAs layers of optimized composition, thickness and doping to produce high performance, heteroface homojunction devices. The low bandgap subcells are similarly fabricated from AlGa(As)Sb compositions by LPE, MBE or MOCVD. These subcells are then coupled to form a monolithic structure by an appropriate bonding technique which also forms the required transparent intercell ohmic contact (IOC) between the two subcells. Improved ohmic contacts to the high bandgap semiconductor structure can be formed by vacuum evaporating to suitable metal or semiconductor materials which react during laser annealing to form a low bandgap semiconductor which provides a low contact resistance structure.

  5. High efficiency shale oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, C.D.

    1992-07-18

    The overall project objective is to demonstrate the high efficiency of the Adams Counter-Current shale oil recovery process. The efficiency will first be demonstrated at bench-scale, in the current phase, after which the demonstration will be extended to the operation of a small pilot plant. Thus the immediate project objective is to obtain data on oil shale retorting operations in a small batch rotary kiln that will be representative of operations in the proposed continuous process pilot plant. Although an oil shale batch sample is sealed in the batch kiln from the start until the end of the run, the process conditions for the batch are the same as the conditions that an element of oil shale would encounter in a larger continuous process kiln. For example, similar conditions of heatup rate, oxidation of the residue and cool-down prevail for the element in both systems. This batch kiln is a unit constructed in a 1987 Phase I SBIR tar sand retorting project. The kiln worked fairly well in that project; however, the need for certain modifications was observed. These modifications are now underway to simplify the operation and make the data and analysis more exact. The second quarter agenda consisted of (a) kiln modifications; (b) sample preparation; and (c) Heat Transfer calibration runs (part of proposal task number 3 -- to be completed by the end of month 7).

  6. Scaling magnetized liner inertial fusion on Z and future pulsed-power accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutz, S. A.; Stygar, W. A.; Gomez, M. R.; Peterson, K. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Vesey, R. A.; Campbell, E. M.; Betti, R.

    2016-02-01

    The MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] has demonstrated fusion-relevant plasma conditions [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] on the Z accelerator with a peak drive current of about 18 MA. We present 2D numerical simulations of the scaling of MagLIF on Z as a function of drive current, preheat energy, and applied magnetic field. The results indicate that deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion yields greater than 100 kJ could be possible on Z when all of these parameters are at the optimum values: i.e., peak current = 25 MA, deposited preheat energy = 5 kJ, and Bz = 30 T. Much higher yields have been predicted [S. A. Slutz and R. A. Vesey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 025003 (2012)] for MagLIF driven with larger peak currents. Two high performance pulsed-power accelerators (Z300 and Z800) based on linear-transformer-driver technology have been designed [W. A. Stygar et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 18, 110401 (2015)]. The Z300 design would provide 48 MA to a MagLIF load, while Z800 would provide 65 MA. Parameterized Thevenin-equivalent circuits were used to drive a series of 1D and 2D numerical MagLIF simulations with currents ranging from what Z can deliver now to what could be achieved by these conceptual future pulsed-power accelerators. 2D simulations of simple MagLIF targets containing just gaseous DT have yields of 18 MJ for Z300 and 440 MJ for Z800. The 2D simulated yield for Z800 is increased to 7 GJ by adding a layer of frozen DT ice to the inside of the liner.

  7. High-efficiency indoor air mover

    SciTech Connect

    Ariewitz, D.; Lackey, R.S.; Veyo, S.E.

    1983-01-06

    A high-efficiency indoor air mover has been developed for the advanced electric heat pump. Preprototype air mover overall efficiency is approximately 40 percent, twice that of the conventionally applied squirrel-cage blower. The air mover consists of a 411 mm (16.2 inch) diameter single entry blower wheel carried in a volute sheet steel scroll and driven by a 250 W (1/3 horsepower) high-efficiency motor. The blower wheel uses ten backward curved, uniformly spaced, cambered plate blades. As installed in the advanced heat pump the air mover consumes 390 W of electrical power and delivers 662 l/s (1405 scfm) at 1092 rpm into an external static flow resistance of 87 Pa (0.35 inches of water). Although this air mover will cost about twice as much as the conventional squirrel-cage blower and motor of comparable flow performance the incremental premium cost at the retail level can be recovered in less than one year through energy savings assuming 6000 hours of operation per year with electricity at $0.05/kWh.

  8. A high-efficiency indoor air mover

    SciTech Connect

    Ariewitz, D.; Lackey, R.S.; Veyo, S.E.

    1983-06-01

    A high-efficiency indoor air mover has been developed for the advanced electric heat pump. Preprototype air mover overall efficiency is approximately 46%, more than twice that of the conventionally applied squirrel-cage blower. The air mover consists of a 16.25 in (413 mm) diameter single-entry blower wheel carried in a volute sheet steel scroll and driven by a 1/3 hp (250 W) high-efficiency motor. The blower wheel uses ten backward curved, uniformly spaced, cambered plate blades. As installed in the advanced heat pump, the air mover consumes 390 W of electrical power and delivers 1405 scfm (663 L/s) at 1092 rpm into an estimated overall static-flow resistance of 1.09 in of water (271 Pa). Although this air mover will cost about twice as much as the conventional squirrel-cage blower and motor of comparable flow performance, the incremental premium cost at the retail level can be recovered in less than one year through energy savings with electricity at $0.05/kWh in Minneapolis, where the blower would run approximately 4900 hours per year.

  9. High efficiency IMPATT diodes for 60 GHz intersatellite link applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haugland, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    Intersatellite links are expected to play an increasingly important role in future satellite systems. Improved components are required to properly utilize the wide bandwidth allocated for intersatellite link applications around 60 GHz. IMPATT diodes offer the highest potential performance as solid state power sources for a 60 GHz transmitter. Presently available devices do not have the desired power and efficiency. High efficiency, high power IMPATT diodes for intersatellite link applications are being developed by NASA and other government agencies. This paper describes the development of high efficiency 60 GHz IMPATT diodes by NASA. These programs are cofunded by the U.S. Air Force, Space Division.

  10. High efficiency IMPATT diodes for 60 GHz intersatellite link applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haugland, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    Intersatellite links are expected to play an increasingly important role in future satellite systems. Improved components are required to properly utilize the wide bandwidth allocated for intersatellite link applications around 60 GHz. IMPATT diodes offer the highest potential performance as solid state power sources for a 60 GHz transmitter. Presently available devices do not have the desired power and efficiency. High efficiency, high power IMPATT diodes for intersatellite link applications are being developed by NASA and other government agencies. The development of high efficiency 60 GHz IMPATT diodes by NASA is described.

  11. Development of gyrotrons for fusion with power exceeding 1 MW over a wide frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariya, T.; Imai, T.; Minami, R.; Numakura, T.; Eguchi, T.; Kato, T.; Endo, Y.; Ichimura, M.; Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Takahashi, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Ito, S.; Mutoh, T.; Sakamoto, K.; Idei, H.; Zushi, H.; Nagasaki, K.; Sano, F.; Ono, M.; Mitsunaka, Y.

    2015-09-01

    Megawatt-class gyrotrons covering a wide frequency range (14 GHz-300 GHz) are in increasing demand for nuclear fusion. Recent electron cyclotron heating and electron cyclotron current drive experiments highlight a requirement of megawatt-scale gyrotrons at a relatively lower frequency (14-35 GHz) range of some plasma devices, like GAMMA 10/PDX of the University of Tsukuba, QUEST of Kyushu University, NSTX-U of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, and Heliotron J of Kyoto University. Collaborative studies for designing a new 28 GHz/35 GHz dual-frequency gyrotron and a 14 GHz gyrotron have commenced. Operation above 1 MW of 28 GHz/35 GHz dual oscillation was demonstrated experimentally. Further in the design of dual-frequency gyrotron, operations with 2 MW 3 s and 0.4 MW CW (continuous wave) at 28 GHz, and power exceeding 1 MW for 3 s at 34.8 GHz have been shown to be feasible. The 14 GHz gyrotron is expected to operate above 1 MW. We are also developing higher frequency gyrotrons (77-300 GHz). The joint program of National Institute for Fusion Science and the University of Tsukuba developed two new 154 GHz gyrotrons for the large helical device after the demonstration of three 77 GHz gyrotrons. The 154 GHz gyrotrons achieved a maximum output power of 1.25 MW and quasi-CW operation of 0.35 MW for 30 min.

  12. Simulations of alpha parameters in a TFTR DT supershot with high fusion power

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.V.; Bell, M.G.; Janos, A.C.

    1995-07-01

    A TFTR supershot with a plasma current of 2.5 MA, neutral beam heating power of 33.7 MW, and a peak DT fusion power of 7.5 MW is studied using the TRANSP plasma analysis code. Simulations of alpha parameters such as the alpha heating, pressure, and distributions in energy and v{sub parallel}/v are given. The effects of toroidal ripple and mixing of the fast alpha particles during the sawteeth observed after the neutral beam injection phase are modeled. The distributions of alpha particles on the outer midplane are peaked near forward and backward v{sub parallel}/v. Ripple losses deplete the distributions in the vicinity of v{sub parallel}/v {approximately}{minus}0.4. Sawtooth mixing of fast alpha particles is computed to reduce their central density and broaden their width in energy.

  13. Final focus shielding designs for modern heavy-ion fusion power plant designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latkowski, J. F.; Meier, W. R.

    2001-05-01

    Recent work in heavy-ion fusion accelerators and final focusing systems shows a trend towards less current per beam, and thus, a greater number of beams. Final focusing magnets are susceptible to nuclear heating, radiation damage, and neutron activation. The trend towards more beams, however, means that there can be less shielding for each magnet. Excessive levels of nuclear heating may lead to magnet quench or to an intolerable recirculating power for magnet cooling. High levels of radiation damage may result in short magnet lifetimes and low reliability. Finally, neutron activation of the magnet components may lead to difficulties in maintenance, recycling, and waste disposal. The present work expands upon previous, three-dimensional magnet shielding calculations for a modified version of the HYLIFE-II IFE power plant design. We present key magnet results as a function of the number of beams.

  14. Final Focus Shielding Designs for Modern Heavy-Ion Fusion Power Plant Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J F; Meier, W R

    2000-07-05

    Recent work in heavy-ion fusion accelerators and final focusing systems shows a trend towards less current per beam, and thus, a greater number of beams. Final focusing magnets are susceptible to nuclear heating, radiation damage, and neutron activation. The trend towards more beams, however, means that there can be less shielding for each magnet, Excessive levels of nuclear heating may lead to magnet quench or an intolerable recirculating power for magnet cooling. High levels of radiation damage may result in short magnet lifetimes and low reliability. Finally, neutron activation of the magnet components may lead to difficulties in maintenance, recycling, and waste disposal. The present work expands upon previous, three-dimensional magnet shielding calculations for a modified version of the HYLIFE-I1 IFE power plant design. We present key magnet results as a function of the number of beams.

  15. Improved Final Focus Shielding Designs for Modern Heavy-Ion Fusion Power Plant Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J.F.; Meier, W.R.

    2000-03-01

    Recent work in heavy-ion fusion accelerators and final focusing systems shows a trend towards less current per beam, and thus, a significantly greater number of beams. Final focusing magnets are susceptible to nuclear heating, radiation damage, and neutron activation. The trend towards more beams, however, means that there can be less shielding for each magnet. Excessive levels of nuclear heating may lead to magnet quench or an intolerable recirculating power for magnet cooling. High levels of radiation damage may result in short magnet lifetimes and low reliability. Finally, neutron activation of the magnet components may lead to difficulties in maintenance, recycling, and waste disposal. The present work expands upon previous, three-dimensional magnet shielding calculations for a modified version of the HYLIFE-II IFE power plant design. We present key magnet results as a function of the number of beams.

  16. Positioning Performance of Power and Manual Drivers in Posterior Spinal Fusion Procedures.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, J Micah; Perry, Alexander C; Patel, Vikas V; Lindley, Emily M; Rentschler, Mark E

    2017-01-01

    This work presents an analysis and comparison of the efficacy of two methods for pedicle screw placement during posterior spinal fusion surgery. A total of 100 screws (64 manual and 36 power driven), all placed utilizing a surgical navigation system, were analyzed and compared. Final screw placement was compared to initial surgical plans using the navigation system, and the final screw locations were analyzed on the basis of angular deviation from these planned trajectories as well as screw translation within a critical reference plane. The power driver was found to insignificantly decrease the resulting angular deviation of these pedicle screws with a mean deviation of 3.35 degrees compared to 3.44 degrees with the manual driver (p = 0.853). Conversely, the power driver was found to increase the translational distance in the critical region, with mean deviations of 2.45 mm for the power driver compared to 1.54 mm with the manual driver. The increase in translational deviation was significant (p = 0.002) indicating that there may be some loss in performance from the adoption of the power driver.

  17. High efficiency shale oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.C.

    1993-04-22

    The overall project objective is to demonstrate the high efficiency of the Adams Counter-Current shale oil recovery process. The efficiency will first be demonstrated on a small scale, in the current phase, after which the demonstration will be extended to the operation of a small pilot plant. Thus the immediate project objective is to obtain data on oil shale retorting operations in a small batch rotary kiln that will be representative of operations in the proposed continuous process pilot plant. Although an oil shale batch sample is sealed in the batch kiln from the start until the end of the run, the process conditions for the batch are the same as the conditions that an element of oil shale would encounter in a continuous process kiln. Similar chemical and physical conditions (heating, mixing, pyrolysis, oxidation) exist in both systems.The two most important data objectives in this phase of the project are to demonstrate (1) that the heat recovery projected for this project is reasonable and (2) that an oil shale kiln will run well and not plug up due to sticking and agglomeration. The following was completed this quarter. (1) Twelve pyrolysis runs were made on five different oil shales. All of the runs exhibited a complete absence of any plugging, tendency. Heat transfer for Green River oil shale in the rotary kiln was 84.6 Btu/hr/ft[sup 2]/[degrees]F, and this will provide for ample heat exchange in the Adams kiln. (2) One retorted residue sample was oxidized at 1000[degrees]F. Preliminary indications are that the ash of this run appears to have been completely oxidized. (3) Further minor equipment repairs and improvements were required during the course of the several runs.

  18. High efficiency shale oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    The overall project objective is to demonstrate the high efficiency of the Adams Counter-Current shale oil recovery process. The efficiency will first be demonstrated at bench-scale, in the current phase, after which the demonstration will be extended to the operation of a small pilot plant. Thus the immediate project objective is to obtain data on oil shale retorting operations in a small batch rotary kiln that will be representative of operations in the proposed continuous process pilot plant. Although a batch oil shale sample will be sealed in the batch kiln from the start until the end of the run, the process conditions for the batch will be the same as the conditions that an element of oil shale would encounter in a large continuous process kiln. For example, similar conditions of heat-up rate (20 deg F/min during the pyrolysis), oxidation of the residue and cool-down will prevail for the element in both systems. This batch kiln is a unit constructed in a 1987 Phase I SBIR tar sand retorting project. The kiln worked fairly well in that project; however, the need for certain modifications was observed. These modifications are now underway to simplify the operation and make the data and analysis more exact. The agenda for the first three months of the project consisted of the first of nine tasks and was specified as the following four items: 1. Sample acquisition and equipment alteration: Obtain seven oil shale samples, of varying grade each 10 lb or more, and samples of quartz sand. Order equipment for kiln modification. 3. Set up and modify kiln for operation, including electric heaters on the ends of the kiln. 4. Connect data logger and make other repairs and changes in rotary batch kiln.

  19. High efficiency shale oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    The overall project objective is to demonstrate the high efficiency of the Adams Counter-Current shale oil recovery process. The efficiency will first be demonstrated on a small scale, in the current phase, after which the demonstration will be extended to the operation of a small pilot plant. Thus the immediate project objective is to obtain data on oil shale retorting operations in a small batch rotary kiln that will be representative of operations in the proposed continuous process pilot plant. Although an oil shale batch sample is sealed in the batch kiln from the start until the end of the run, the process conditions for the batch are the same as the conditions that an element of oil shale would encounter in a continuous process kiln. Similar chemical and physical (heating, mixing) conditions exist in both systems. The two most important data objectives in this phase of the project are to demonstrate (1) that the heat recovery projected for this project is reasonable and (2) that an oil shale kiln will run well and not plug up due to sticking and agglomeration. The following was completed and is reported on this quarter: (1) A software routine was written to eliminate intermittently inaccurate temperature readings. (2) We completed the quartz sand calibration runs, resolving calibration questions from the 3rd quarter. (3) We also made low temperature retorting runs to identify the need for certain kiln modifications and kiln modifications were completed. (4) Heat Conductance data on two Pyrolysis runs were completed on two samples of Occidental oil shale.

  20. Polarization Issues with High Power Injection and Low Power Emission in Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, T. P.; Felici, F.; Udintsev, V. S.

    2009-11-26

    All tokamak experiments using ECCD require setting of the beam elliptical polarization for proper coupling to the plasma. This is done either in the matching optics unit (MOU) at the output of the gyrotron, or in a couple of miter bends of the transmission line. Similarly, oblique ECE receivers require selection of the correct elliptical polarization to provide localized measurements. For the TCV tokamak at the CRPP, gyrotron and oblique-ECE polarizers are characterized during either high- or low- power testing of equipment: for the gyrotrons the behaviour is determined at a single frequency, but for the oblique-ECE the broadband response is needed. These characteristics are included in the calibration database and used during subsequent analysis of the power coupling to, or from, the sources (gyrotron, plasma, or low power transmitting antenna). A more detailed characterization has been carried out (at low power) with the MOU for the EU, 170 GHz, 2 MW, gyrotron prototype for ITER. This paper discusses the methodology and results of these measurements, as well as a review of nearly a decade's worth of experimental data from the 6 gyrotron, 3 MW, 82.6 GHz TCV system. In particular, the consistency between the calibrations and the subsequent data from tokamak experiments is analysed.

  1. Highly Efficient Freestyle Magnetic Nanoswimmer.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianlong; Li, Jinxing; Morozov, Konstantin I; Wu, Zhiguang; Xu, Tailin; Rozen, Isaac; Leshansky, Alexander M; Li, Longqiu; Wang, Joseph

    2017-08-09

    The unique swimming strategies of natural microorganisms have inspired recent development of magnetic micro/nanorobots powered by artificial helical or flexible flagella. However, as artificial nanoswimmers with unique geometries are being developed, it is critical to explore new potential modes for kinetic optimization. For example, the freestyle stroke is the most efficient of the competitive swimming strokes for humans. Here we report a new type of magnetic nanorobot, a symmetric multilinked two-arm nanoswimmer, capable of efficient "freestyle" swimming at low Reynolds numbers. Excellent agreement between the experimental observations and theoretical predictions indicates that the powerful "freestyle" propulsion of the two-arm nanorobot is attributed to synchronized oscillatory deformations of the nanorobot under the combined action of magnetic field and viscous forces. It is demonstrated for the first time that the nonplanar propulsion gait due to the cooperative "freestyle" stroke of the two magnetic arms can be powered by a plane oscillatory magnetic field. These two-arm nanorobots are capable of a powerful propulsion up to 12 body lengths per second, along with on-demand speed regulation and remote navigation. Furthermore, the nonplanar propulsion gait powered by the consecutive swinging of the achiral magnetic arms is more efficient than that of common chiral nanohelical swimmers. This new swimming mechanism and its attractive performance opens new possibilities in designing remotely actuated nanorobots for biomedical operation at the nanoscale.

  2. Progress toward fusion with light ions

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    New results in target design, beam generation and transport, and pulse power technology have led to a program shift stressing light ion-driven inertial confinement fusion. According to present estimates, a gain ten fusion pellet will require at least one megajoule and approx. 100 TW power input. Progress in ion sources has resulted in beam power density of approx. 1 TW/cm/sup 2/, a factor of ten increase over the last year, and cylindrical implosion experiments have been performed. Other experiments have demonstrated the ability to transport ion and electron beams with high efficiency and have confirmed numerical predictions on the properties of beam transport channels converging at a target. These developments together with improvements in pulse power technology allow us to project that the 72 beam, 100 TW Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator, PBFA-II will attain target output energy equal to stored energy in the accelerator.

  3. Power-scalable 1.57 microm mode-locked semiconductor disk laser using wafer fusion.

    PubMed

    Saarinen, Esa J; Puustinen, Janne; Sirbu, Alexei; Mereuta, Alexandru; Caliman, Andrei; Kapon, Eli; Okhotnikov, Oleg G

    2009-10-15

    We report the first (to our knowledge) wafer-fused high-power passively mode-locked semiconductor disk laser operating at 1.57 microm wavelength. An InP-based active medium was fused with GaAs/AlGaAs distributed Bragg reflector on a 2 inch wafer level, resulting in an integrated monolithic gain mirror. An intracavity wedged diamond heat-spreader capillary bonded to the gain chip provides efficient heat removal from the gain structure without disturbing the spectrum of the mode-locked laser. The laser produces over 0.6 W of average output power at 15 degrees C with 16 ps pulse width. The total output power accounting for all output beams emerging from the cavity was 0.86 W. The results reveal an essential advantage of wafer fusion processing of disparate materials over monolithically grown InP-based gain structures and demonstrate the high potential of this technique for power scaling of long-wavelength semiconductor disk lasers.

  4. Evolution of light ion driven fusion power plants leading to the LIBRA-SP design

    SciTech Connect

    Kulcinski, G.L.; Peterson, R.R.; Moses, G.A.; Bruggink, D.; Cousseau, P.; Engelstad, R.L.; Lee, Y.M.; Khater, H.Y.; Lovell, E.G.; MacFarlane, J.J.

    1994-11-01

    The use of light ion or electron beams to compress matter to the densities required for fusion has been proposed for more than 20 years. In the past ten years, a series of light ion beam power plant conceptual designs have been published under the generic name LIBRA. Considerable advances in both physics and technology have allowed major improvements from the design performance of the earliest LIBRA 330 MW{sub e} power plant to the more recent 979 MW{sub e} LIBRA-LiTE, and the 1000 MW{sub e} LIBRA-SP reactors. The recent declassification of target designs allows more realistic target spectra, gains, and injection parameters to be analyzed. The pulsed power driver technology has matured to the point that Helia induction technology can be tested in the laboratory under single pulse conditions and confidently extrapolated to LIBRA repetition rates. New concepts for protecting the first structural wall of the reactor have been developed; the use of flexible INPORT (INhibited Flow in PORous Tube) and rigid PERIT (PErforated RIgid Tube) units allow the reflector and first wall to last the lifetime of the power plant. The use of PbLi eutectic alloy has greatly improved the safety features of these reactors and the economics of all three compare very favorably to the tokamak, laser, and heavy ion beam reactors.

  5. Direct drive target survival during injection in an inertial fusion energy power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzoldt, R. W.; Goodin, D. T.; Nikroo, A.; Stephens, E.; Siegel, N.; Alexander, N. B.; Raffray, A. R.; Mau, T. K.; Tillack, M.; Najmabadi, F.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Gallix, R.

    2002-12-01

    In inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant designs, the fuel is a spherical layer of frozen DT contained in a target that is injected at high velocity into the reaction chamber. For direct drive, typically laser beams converge at the centre of the chamber (CC) to compress and heat the target to fusion conditions. To obtain the maximum energy yield from the fusion reaction, the frozen DT layer must be at about 18.5 K and the target must maintain a high degree of spherical symmetry and surface smoothness when it reaches the CC. During its transit in the chamber the cryogenic target is heated by radiation from the hot chamber wall. The target is also heated by convection as it passes through the rarefied fill-gas used to control chamber wall damage by x-rays and debris from the target explosion. This article addresses the temperature limits at the target surface beyond which target uniformity may be damaged. It concentrates on direct drive targets because fuel warm up during injection is not currently thought to be an issue for present indirect drive designs and chamber concepts. Detailed results of parametric radiative and convective heating calculations are presented for direct-drive targets during injection into a dry-wall reaction chamber. The baseline approach to target survival utilizes highly reflective targets along with a substantially lower chamber wall temperature and fill-gas pressure than previously assumed. Recently developed high-Z material coatings with high heat reflectivity are discussed and characterized. The article also presents alternate target protection methods that could be developed if targets with inherent survival features cannot be obtained within a reasonable time span.

  6. Fusion Power: A Strategic Choice for the Future Energy Provision. Why is So Much Time Wasted for Decision Making?

    SciTech Connect

    D'haeseleer, William D

    2005-04-15

    From a general analysis of the world energy issue, it is argued that an affordable, clean and reliable energy supply will have to consist of a portfolio of primary energy sources, a large fraction of which will be converted to a secondary carrier in large baseload plants. Because of all future uncertainties, it would be irresponsible not to include thermonuclear fusion as one of the future possibilities for electricity generation.The author tries to understand why nuclear-fusion research is not considered of strategic importance by the major world powers. The fusion programs of the USA and Europe are taken as prime examples to illustrate the 'hesitation'. Europe is now advocating a socalled 'fast-track' approach, thereby seemingly abandoning the 'classic' time frame towards fusion that it has projected for many years. The US 'oscillatory' attitude towards ITER in relation to its domestic program is a second case study that is looked at.From the real history of the ITER design and the 'siting' issue, one can try to understand how important fusion is considered by these world powers. Not words are important, but deeds. Fast tracks are nice to talk about, but timely decisions need to be taken and sufficient money is to be provided. More fundamental understanding of fusion plasma physics is important, but in the end, real hardware devices must be constructed to move along the path of power plant implementation.The author tries to make a balance of where fusion power research is at this moment, and where, according to his views, it should be going.

  7. Highly efficient white OLEDs for lighting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murano, Sven; Burghart, Markus; Birnstock, Jan; Wellmann, Philipp; Vehse, Martin; Werner, Ansgar; Canzler, Tobias; Stübinger, Thomas; He, Gufeng; Pfeiffer, Martin; Boerner, Herbert

    2005-10-01

    The use of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) for large area general lighting purposes is gaining increasing interest during the recent years. Especially small molecule based OLEDs have already shown their potential for future applications. For white light emission OLEDs, power efficiencies exceeding that of incandescent bulbs could already be demonstrated, however additional improvements are needed to further mature the technology allowing for commercial applications as general purpose illuminating sources. Ultimately the efficiencies of fluorescent tubes should be reached or even excelled, a goal which could already be achieved in the past for green OLEDs.1 In this publication the authors will present highly efficient white OLEDs based on an intentional doping of the charge carrier transport layers and the usage of different state of the art emission principles. This presentation will compare white PIN-OLEDs based on phosphorescent emitters, fluorescent emitters and stacked OLEDs. It will be demonstrated that the reduction of the operating voltage by the use of intentionally doped transport layers leads to very high power efficiencies for white OLEDs, demonstrating power efficiencies of well above 20 lm/W @ 1000 cd/m2. The color rendering properties of the emitted light is very high and CRIs between 85 and 95 are achieved, therefore the requirements for standard applications in the field of lighting applications could be clearly fulfilled. The color coordinates of the light emission can be tuned within a wide range through the implementation of minor structural changes.

  8. Space fusion energy conversion using a field reversed configuration reactor: A new technical approach for space propulsion and power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman R.; Miley, George H.; Santarius, John F.

    1991-01-01

    The fusion energy conversion design approach, the Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) - when burning deuterium and helium-3, offers a new method and concept for space transportation with high energy demanding programs, like the Manned Mars Mission and planetary science outpost missions require. FRC's will increase safety, reduce costs, and enable new missions by providing a high specific power propulsion system from a high performance fusion engine system that can be optimally designed. By using spacecraft powered by FRC's the space program can fulfill High Energy Space Missions (HESM) in a manner not otherwise possible. FRC's can potentially enable the attainment of high payload mass fractions while doing so within shorter flight times.

  9. High Efficiency Cascade Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shuguang Deng, Seamus Curran, Igor Vasiliev

    2010-09-28

    This report summarizes the main work performed by New Mexico State University and University of Houston on a DOE sponsored project High Efficiency Cascade Solar Cells. The main tasks of this project include materials synthesis, characterization, theoretical calculations, organic solar cell device fabrication and test. The objective of this project is to develop organic nano-electronic-based photovoltaics. Carbon nanotubes and organic conjugated polymers were used to synthesize nanocomposites as the new active semiconductor materials that were used for fabricating two device architectures: thin film coating and cascade solar cell fiber. Chemical vapor deposition technique was employed to synthesized a variety of carbon nanotubes (single-walled CNT, doubled-walled CNT, multi-walled CNT, N-doped SWCNT, DWCNT and MWCNT, and B-doped SWCNT, DWCNT and MWCNT) and a few novel carbon structures (CNT-based nanolance, nanocross and supported graphene film) that have potential applications in organic solar cells. Purification procedures were developed for removing amorphous carbons from carbon nanotubes, and a controlled oxidation method was established for partial truncation of fullerene molecules. Carbon nanotubes (DWCNT and DWCNT) were functionalized with fullerenes and dyes covalently and used to form nanocomposites with conjugated polymers. Biologically synthesized Tellurium nanotubes were used to form composite with the conjugated polymers as well, which generated the highest reported optical limiting values from composites. Several materials characterization technique including SEM/TEM, Raman, AFM, UV-vis, adsorption and EDS were employed to characterize the physical and chemical properties of the carbon nanotubes, the functionalized carbon nanotubes and the nanocomposites synthesized in this project. These techniques allowed us to have a spectroscopic and morphological control of the composite formation and to understand the materials assembled. A parallel 136-CPU

  10. Gas Transport and Control in Thick-Liquid Inertial Fusion PowerPlants

    SciTech Connect

    Debonnel, Christophe Sylvain

    2006-01-01

    Among the numerous potential routes to a commercial fusion power plant, the inertial path with thick-liquid protection is explored in this doctoral dissertation. Gas dynamics phenomena in such fusion target chambers have been investigated since the early 1990s with the help of a series of simulation codes known as TSUNAMI. For this doctoral work, the code was redesigned and rewritten entirely to enable the use of modern programming techniques, languages and software; improve its user-friendliness; and refine its ability to model thick-liquid protected chambers. The new ablation and gas dynamics code is named “Visual Tsunami” to emphasize its graphics-based pre- and post-processors. It is aimed at providing a versatile and user-friendly design tool for complex systems for which transient gas dynamics phenomena play a key role. Simultaneously, some of these improvements were implemented in a previous version of the code; the resulting code constitutes the version 2.8 of the TSUNAMI series. Visual Tsunami was used to design and model the novel Condensation Debris Experiment (CDE), which presents many aspects of a typical Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) system and has therefore been used to exercise the code. Numerical and experimental results are in good agreement. In a heavy-ion IFE target chamber, proper beam and target propagation set stringent requirements for the control of ablation debris transport in the target chamber and beam tubes. When the neutralized ballistic transport mode is employed, the background gas density should be adequately low and the beam tube metallic surfaces upstream of the neutralizing region should be free of contaminants. TSUNAMI 2.8 was used for the first simulation of gas transport through the complex geometry of the liquid blanket of a hybrid target chamber and beam lines. Concurrently, the feasibility of controlling the gas density was addressed with a novel beam tube design, which introduces magnetic shutters and a long low

  11. The Mercury Laser System-A scaleable average-power laser for fusion and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbers, C A; Moses, E I

    2008-03-26

    Nestled in a valley between the whitecaps of the Pacific and the snowcapped crests of the Sierra Nevada, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is home to the nearly complete National Ignition Facility (NIF). The purpose of NIF is to create a miniature star-on demand. An enormous amount of laser light energy (1.8 MJ in a pulse that is 20 ns in duration) will be focused into a small gold cylinder approximately the size of a pencil eraser. Centered in the gold cylinder (or hohlraum) will be a nearly perfect sphere filled with a complex mixture of hydrogen gas isotopes that is similar to the atmosphere of our Sun. During experiments, the laser light will hit the inside of the gold cylinder, heating the metal until it emits X-rays (similar to how your electric stove coil emits visible red light when heated). The X-rays will be used to compress the hydrogen-like gas with such pressure that the gas atoms will combine or 'fuse' together, producing the next heavier element (helium) and releasing energy in the form of energetic particles. 2010 will mark the first credible attempt at this world-changing event: the achievement of fusion energy 'break-even' on Earth using NIF, the world's largest laser! NIF is anticipated to eventually perform this immense technological accomplishment once per week, with the capability of firing up to six shots per day - eliminating the need for continued underground testing of our nation's nuclear stockpile, in addition to opening up new realms of science. But what about the day after NIF achieves ignition? Although NIF will achieve fusion energy break-even and gain, the facility is not designed to harness the enormous potential of fusion for energy generation. A fusion power plant, as opposed to a world-class engineering research facility, would require that the laser deliver drive pulses nearly 100,000 times more frequently - a rate closer to 10 shots per second as opposed to several shots per day.

  12. VISTA -- A Vehicle for Interplanetary Space Transport Application Powered by Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, C D

    2005-03-31

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is an ideal technology to power self-contained single-stage piloted (manned) spacecraft within the solar system because of its inherently high power/mass ratios and high specific impulses (i.e., high exhaust velocities). These technological advantages are retained when ICF is utilized with a magnetic thrust chamber, which avoids the plasma thermalization and resultant degradation of specific impulse that are unavoidable with the use of mechanical thrust chambers. We started with Rod Hyde's 1983 description of an ICF-powered engine concept using a magnetic thrust chamber, and conducted a more detailed systems study to develop a viable, realistic, and defensible spacecraft concept based on ICF technology projected to be available in the first half of the 21st century. The results include an entirely new conical spacecraft conceptual design utilizing near-existing radiator technology. We describe the various vehicle systems for this new concept, estimate the missions performance capabilities for general missions to the planets within the solar system, and describe in detail the performance for the baseline mission of a piloted roundtrip to Mars with a 100-ton payload. For this mission, we show that roundtrips totaling {ge}145 days are possible with advanced DT fusion technology and a total (wet) spacecraft mass of about 6000 metric tons. Such short-duration missions are advantageous to minimize the known cosmic-radiation hazards to astronauts, and are even more important to minimize the physiological deteriorations arising from zero gravity. These ICF-powered missions are considerably faster than those available using chemical or nuclear-electric-propulsion technologies with minimum-mass vehicle configurations. VISTA also offers onboard artificial gravity and propellant-based shielding from cosmic rays, thus reducing the known hazards and physiological deteriorations to insignificant levels. We emphasize, however, that the degree to

  13. Development of high power radio frequency components for fusion plasma heating. Final report, Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-11

    The purpose of this CRADA was to develop advanced microwave heating systems for both ion cyclotron heating and electron cyclotron heating for magnetic fusion reactors. This involved low-frequency (UHF), high-power (millimeter-wave) microwave components, such as antennas, windows, and matching elements. This CRADA also involved developing conceptual designs for new microwave sources. General Atomics built and tested the distributed cooled window and provided LLNL with transmission and reflection test data in order to then benchmark the EM computer codes. The combline antenna built and analyzed by LLNL was based on a GA design. GA provided LLNL with a number of niobium plates for hot pressing and provided the necessary guidance to allow successful bonding. GA representatives were on site at LLNL on numerous occasions to consult and give guidance on the ferroelectric tuner, combline antenna and distributed window analysis.

  14. Transport and deposition of activation products in a helium cooled fusion power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bickford, W.E.

    1980-09-01

    The transport and deposition of neutron activation products in a helium cooled tokamak fusion power plant are investigated. Stainless steel is used as coolant channel material for a helium/steam system. The important gamma emitting nuclides /sup 56/Mn, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 57/Co, /sup 58/Co, /sup 60/Co, /sup 51/Cr, and /sup 99/Mo are considered. The dominant release mechanism identified is direct daughter recoil emission from (n,x) type reactions. Corrosion and evaporation are discussed. The radionuclide inventory released by these mechanisms is predicted to exceed 1 x 10/sup 4/ Ci for a reference reactor design after only several days of operation, and approach 3.5 x 10/sup 4/ Ci in equilibrium. A mass transport model is then used to predict the deposition pattern of this inventory in the reactor cooling system.

  15. A Snowflake Divertor: a Possible Way of Improving the Power Handling in Future Fusion Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D D; Bulmer, R H; Cohen, R H; Hill, D N; Lao, L; Menard, J E; Petrie, T W; Pearlstein, L D; Rognlien, T D; Snyder, P B; Soukhanovskii, V; Umansky, M V

    2008-09-17

    Handling high power loads on plasma facing components is one of the critical issues in developing an economically competitive fusion reactor based on tokamak. In this study, we provide a detailed analysis of a relatively unexplored approach to this problem based on the use of divertors with the poloidal magnetic field structure closely approaching a second-order null. We demonstrate that this geometry opens up new possibilities for radiative divertors, has favorable effect on the convective transport, and provides an additional control over ELM activity. In the ideal case where the null is exactly second order, the separatrix near the null acquires a characteristic hexagonal shape reminiscent of a snowflake, whence the name of this configuration. It can be created by a simple set of divertor coils situated outside the toroidal field coils.

  16. Scaling magnetized liner inertial fusion on Z and future pulsed-power accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Slutz, Stephen A.; Stygar, William A.; Gomez, Matthew R.; ...

    2016-02-04

    In this study, the MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] has demonstrated fusion–relevant plasma conditions [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] on the Z accelerator with a peak drive current of about 18 MA. We present 2D numerical simulations of the scaling of MagLIF on Z as a function of drive current, preheat energy, and applied magnetic field. The results indicate that deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion yields greater than 100 kJ could be possible on Z when all of these parameters are at the optimum values:more » i.e., peak current = 25 MA, deposited preheat energy = 5 kJ, and Bz = 30 T. Much higher yields have been predicted [S. A. Slutz and R. A. Vesey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 025003 (2012)] for MagLIF driven with larger peak currents. Two high performance pulsed-power accelerators (Z300 and Z800) based on linear-transformer-driver technology have been designed [W. A. Stygar et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 18, 110401 (2015)]. The Z300 design would provide 48 MA to a MagLIF load, while Z800 would provide 65 MA. Parameterized Thevenin-equivalent circuits were used to drive a series of 1D and 2D numerical MagLIF simulations with currents ranging from what Z can deliver now to what could be achieved by these conceptual future pulsed-power accelerators. 2D simulations of simple MagLIF targets containing just gaseous DT have yields of 18 MJ for Z300 and 440 MJ for Z800. The 2D simulated yield for Z800 is increased to 7 GJ by adding a layer of frozen DT ice to the inside of the liner.« less

  17. Liquid Scoping Study for Tritium-Lean, Fast Ignition Inertial Fusion Energy Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, R C; Latkowski, J F; Durbin, S G; Meier, W R; Reyes, S

    2001-08-14

    In a thick-liquid protected chamber design, such as HYLIFE-II, a molten-salt is used to attenuate neutrons and protect the chamber structures from radiation damage. The molten-salt absorbs some of the material and energy given off by the target explosion. In the case of a fast ignition inertial fusion system, advanced targets have been proposed that may be Self-sufficient in the tritium breeding (i.e., the amount of tritium bred in target exceeds the amount burned). These ''tritium-lean'' targets contain approximately 0.5% tritium and 99.5% deuterium, but require a large pr of 10-20 g/cm{sup 2}. Although most of the yield is provided by D-T reactions, the majority of fusion reactions are D-D, which produces a net surplus of tritium. This aspect allows for greater freedom when selecting a liquid for the protective blanket (lithium-bearing compounds are not required). This study assesses characteristics of many single, binary, and ternary molten-salts. Using the NIST Properties of Molten Salts Database, approximately 4300 molten-salts were included in the study [1]. As an initial screening, salts were evaluated for their safety and environmental (S&E) characteristics, which included an assessment of waste disposal rating, contact dose, and radioactive afterheat. Salts that passed the S&E criteria were then evaluated for neutron shielding ability and pumping power. The pumping power was calculated using three components: velocity head losses, frictional losses, and lift. This assessment left us with 57 molten-salts to recommend for further analysis. Many of these molten-salts contain elements such as sodium, lithium, beryllium, boron, fluorine, and oxygen. Recommendations for further analysis are also made.

  18. Novel High Efficient Organic Photovoltaic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Sam; Haliburton, James; Wang, Yi-Qing; Fan, Zhen; Taft, Charles; Maaref, Shahin; Bailey, Sheila (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Solar energy is a renewable, nonpolluting, and most abundant energy source for human exploration of a remote site or outer space. In order to generate appreciable electrical power in space or on the earth, it is necessary to collect sunlight from large areas and with high efficiency due to the low density of sunlight. Future organic or polymer (plastic) solar cells appear very attractive due to their unique features such as light weight, flexible shape, tunability of energy band-gaps via versatile molecular or supramolecular design, synthesis, processing and device fabrication schemes, and much lower cost on large scale industrial production. It has been predicted that supramolecular and nano-phase separated block copolymer systems containing electron rich donor blocks and electron deficient acceptor blocks may facilitate the charge carrier separation and migration due to improved electronic ultrastructure and morphology in comparison to polymer composite system. This presentation will describe our recent progress in the design, synthesis and characterization of a novel block copolymer system containing donor and acceptor blocks covalently attached. Specifically, the donor block contains an electron donating alkyloxy derivatized polyphenylenevinylene (RO-PPV), the acceptor block contains an electron withdrawing alkyl-sulfone derivatized polyphenylenevinylene (SF-PPV). The key synthetic strategy includes the synthesis of each individual block first, then couple the blocks together. While the donor block has a strong PL emission at around 560 nm, and acceptor block has a strong PL emission at around 520 nm, the PL emissions of final block copolymers are severely quenched. This verifies the expected electron transfer and charge separation due to interfaces of donor and acceptor nano phase separated blocks. The system therefore has potential for variety light harvesting applications, including high efficient photovoltaic applications.

  19. Novel High Efficient Organic Photovoltaic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Sam; Haliburton, James; Wang, Yi-Qing; Fan, Zhen; Taft, Charles; Maaref, Shahin; Bailey, Sheila (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Solar energy is a renewable, nonpolluting, and most abundant energy source for human exploration of a remote site or outer space. In order to generate appreciable electrical power in space or on the earth, it is necessary to collect sunlight from large areas and with high efficiency due to the low density of sunlight. Future organic or polymer (plastic) solar cells appear very attractive due to their unique features such as light weight, flexible shape, tunability of energy band-gaps via versatile molecular or supramolecular design, synthesis, processing and device fabrication schemes, and much lower cost on large scale industrial production. It has been predicted that supramolecular and nano-phase separated block copolymer systems containing electron rich donor blocks and electron deficient acceptor blocks may facilitate the charge carrier separation and migration due to improved electronic ultrastructure and morphology in comparison to polymer composite system. This presentation will describe our recent progress in the design, synthesis and characterization of a novel block copolymer system containing donor and acceptor blocks covalently attached. Specifically, the donor block contains an electron donating alkyloxy derivatized polyphenylenevinylene (RO-PPV), the acceptor block contains an electron withdrawing alkyl-sulfone derivatized polyphenylenevinylene (SF-PPV). The key synthetic strategy includes the synthesis of each individual block first, then couple the blocks together. While the donor block has a strong PL emission at around 560 nm, and acceptor block has a strong PL emission at around 520 nm, the PL emissions of final block copolymers are severely quenched. This verifies the expected electron transfer and charge separation due to interfaces of donor and acceptor nano phase separated blocks. The system therefore has potential for variety light harvesting applications, including high efficient photovoltaic applications.

  20. Multiscale integral analysis of a HT leakage in a fusion nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, M.; Fradera, J.; Perlado, J. M.; Zamora, I.; Martínez-Saban, E.; Colomer, C.; Briani, P.

    2016-05-01

    The present work presents an example of the application of an integral methodology based on a multiscale analysis that covers the whole tritium cycle within a nuclear fusion power plant, from a micro scale, analyzing key components where tritium is leaked through permeation, to a macro scale, considering its atmospheric transport. A leakage from the Nuclear Power Plants, (NPP) primary to the secondary side of a heat exchanger (HEX) is considered for the present example. Both primary and secondary loop coolants are assumed to be He. Leakage is placed inside the HEX, leaking tritium in elementary tritium (HT) form to the secondary loop where it permeates through the piping structural material to the exterior. The Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system removes the leaked tritium towards the NPP exhaust. The HEX is modelled with system codes and coupled to Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) to account for tritium dispersion inside the nuclear power plants buildings and in site environment. Finally, tritium dispersion is calculated with an atmospheric transport code and a dosimetry analysis is carried out. Results show how the implemented methodology is capable of assessing the impact of tritium from the microscale to the atmospheric scale including the dosimetric aspect.

  1. Highly efficient Raman distributed feedback fibre lasers.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jindan; Alam, Shaif-ul; Ibsen, Morten

    2012-02-27

    We demonstrate highly efficient Raman distributed feedback (DFB) fibre lasers for the first time with up to 1.6 W of continuous wave (CW) output power. The DFB Bragg gratings are written directly into two types of commercially available passive germano-silica fibres. Two lasers of 30 cm length are pumped with up to 15 W of CW power at 1068 nm. The threshold power is ~2 W for a Raman-DFB (R-DFB) laser written in standard low-NA fibre, and only ~1 W for a laser written in a high-NA fibre, both of which oscillate in a narrow linewidth of <0.01 nm at ~1117 nm and ~1109 nm, respectively. The slope efficiencies are ~74% and ~93% with respect to absorbed pump power in the low-NA fibre and high-NA fibre respectively. Such high conversion efficiency suggests that very little energy is lost in the form of heat through inefficient energy transfer. Our results are supported by numerical simulations, and furthermore open up for the possibility of having narrow linewidth all-fibre laser sources in wavelength bands not traditionally covered by rare-earth doped silica fibres. Simulations also imply that this technology has the potential to produce even shorter R-DFB laser devices at the centimetre-level and with mW-level thresholds, if Bragg gratings formed in fibre materials with higher intrinsic Raman gain coefficient than silica are used. These materials include for example tellurite or chalcogenide glasses. Using glasses like these would also open up the possibility of having narrow linewidth fibre sources with DFB laser oscillating much further into the IR than what currently is possible with rare-earth doped silica glasses.

  2. High efficiency turbine blade coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Gallis, Michail A.

    2014-06-01

    The development of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) that exhibit lower thermal conductivity through better control of electron beam - physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processing is of prime interest to both the aerospace and power industries. This report summarizes the work performed under a two-year Lab-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project (38664) to produce lower thermal conductivity, graded-layer thermal barrier coatings for turbine blades in an effort to increase the efficiency of high temperature gas turbines. This project was sponsored by the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Investment Area. Therefore, particular importance was given to the processing of the large blades required for industrial gas turbines proposed for use in the Brayton cycle of nuclear plants powered by high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). During this modest (~1 full-time equivalent (FTE)) project, the processing technology was developed to create graded TBCs by coupling ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) with substrate pivoting in the alumina-YSZ system. The Electron Beam - 1200 kW (EB-1200) PVD system was used to deposit a variety of TBC coatings with micron layered microstructures and reduced thermal conductivity below 1.5 W/m.K. The use of IBAD produced fully stoichiometric coatings at a reduced substrate temperature of 600°C and a reduced oxygen background pressure of 0.1 Pa. IBAD was also used to successfully demonstrate the transitioning of amorphous PVD-deposited alumina to the -phase alumina required as an oxygen diffusion barrier and for good adhesion to the substrate Ni2Al3 bondcoat. This process replaces the time consuming thermally grown oxide formation required before the YSZ deposition. In addition to the process technology, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo plume modeling and spectroscopic characterization of the PVD plumes were performed. The project consisted of five tasks. These included the

  3. Reactor for boron fusion with picosecond ultrahigh power laser pulses and ultrahigh magnetic field trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, G. H.; Hora, H.; Kirchhoff, G.

    2016-05-01

    Compared with the deuterium tritium (DT) fusion, the environmentally clean fusion of protons with 11B is extremely difficult. When instead of nanosecond laser pulses for thermal-ablating driven ignition, picosecond pulses are used, a drastic change by nonlinearity results in ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks. This radically changes to economic boron fusion by a measured new avalanche ignition.

  4. High efficiency thermionic converter studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, F. N.; Sommer, A. H.; Balestra, C. L.; Briere, D. P.; Oettinger, P. E.

    1976-01-01

    The objective is to improve thermionic converter performance by means of reduced interelectrode losses, greater emitter capabilities, and lower collector work functions until the converter performance level is suitable for out-of-core space reactors and radioisotope generators. Electrode screening experiments have identified several promising collector materials. Back emission work function measurements of a ZnO collector in a thermionic diode have given values less than 1.3 eV. Diode tests were conducted over the range of temperatures of interest for space power applications. Enhanced mode converter experiments have included triodes operated in both the surface ionization and plasmatron modes. Pulsed triodes were studied as a function of pulse length, pulse potential, inert gas fill pressure, cesium pressure, spacing, emitter temperature and collector temperature. Current amplifications (i.e., mean output current/mean grid current) of several hundred were observed up to output current densities of one amp/sq cm. These data correspond to an equivalent arc drop less than 0.1 eV.

  5. Towards high efficiency heliostat fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbes, Florian; Wöhrbach, Markus; Gebreiter, Daniel; Weinrebe, Gerhard

    2017-06-01

    CSP power plants have great potential to substantially contribute to world energy supply. To set this free, cost reductions are required for future projects. Heliostat field layout optimization offers a great opportunity to improve field efficiency. Field efficiency primarily depends on the positions of the heliostats around the tower, commonly known as the heliostat field layout. Heliostat shape also influences efficiency. Improvements to optical efficiency results in electricity cost reduction without adding any extra technical complexity. Due to computational challenges heliostat fields are often arranged in patterns. The mathematical models of the radial staggered or spiral patterns are based on two parameters and thus lead to uniform patterns. Optical efficiencies of a heliostat field do not change uniformly with the distance to the tower, they even differ in the northern and southern field. A fixed pattern is not optimal in many parts of the heliostat field, especially when used as large scaled heliostat field. In this paper, two methods are described which allow to modify field density suitable to inconsistent field efficiencies. A new software for large scale heliostat field evaluation is presented, it allows for fast optimizations of several parameters for pattern modification routines. It was used to design a heliostat field with 23,000 heliostats, which is currently planned for a site in South Africa.

  6. Commercial objectives, technology transfer, and systems analysis for fusion power development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Stephen O.

    1988-01-01

    Fusion is an inexhaustible source of energy that has the potential for economic commercial applications with excellent safety and environmental characteristics. The primary focus for the fusion energy development program is the generation of central station electricity. Fusion has the potential, however, for many other applications. The fact that a large fraction of the energy released in a DT fusion reaction is carried by high energy neutrons suggests potentially unique applications. In addition, fusion R and D will lead to new products and new markets. Each fusion application must meet certain standards of economic and safety and environmental attractiveness. For this reason, economics on the one hand, and safety and environment and licensing on the other, are the two primary criteria for setting long range commercial fusion objectives. A major function of systems analysis is to evaluate the potential of fusion against these objectives and to help guide the fusion R and D program toward practical applications. The transfer of fusion technology and skills from the national labs and universities to industry is the key to achieving the long range objective of commercial fusion applications.

  7. Creating a Star: The Science of Fusion--Fusion Power Would Not Contribute to Global Warming, Acid Rain, or Other Forms of Air Pollution, nor Would It Create Long-Lived Radioactive Waste

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Stephen L.

    2005-01-01

    Fusion is the process that powers the sun and the stars. Since the 1950s, scientists and engineers in the United States and around the world have been conducting fusion research in pursuit of the creation of a new energy source for our planet and to further our understanding and control of plasma, the fourth state of matter that dominates the…

  8. Creating a Star: The Science of Fusion--Fusion Power Would Not Contribute to Global Warming, Acid Rain, or Other Forms of Air Pollution, nor Would It Create Long-Lived Radioactive Waste

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Stephen L.

    2005-01-01

    Fusion is the process that powers the sun and the stars. Since the 1950s, scientists and engineers in the United States and around the world have been conducting fusion research in pursuit of the creation of a new energy source for our planet and to further our understanding and control of plasma, the fourth state of matter that dominates the…

  9. High efficiency thin-film GaAs solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zwerdling, S.; Wang, K.L.; Yeh, Y.C.M.

    1981-01-01

    This research is directed toward demonstrating the feasibility of producing high-efficiency GaAs solar cells with high power-to-weight ratio by organo-metallic chemical vapor deposition (OM-CVD) growth of thin epi-layers on suitable substrates. 4 refs.

  10. Applications of ion implantation for high efficiency silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnucci, J. A.; Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1977-01-01

    Ion implantation is utilized for the dopant introduction processes necessary to fabricate a silicon solar cell. Implantation provides a versatile powerful tool for development of high efficiency cells. Advantages and problems of implantation and the present status of developmental use of the technique for solar cells are discussed.

  11. Development of a high efficiency thin silicon solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindmayer, J.

    1975-01-01

    Specific power output and radiation resistance characteristics developed for thin film silicon solar cells are reported. The technological base for fabricating these high efficiency cells and limitations of cell photovoltage are included. In addition, optical and electronic measurement instrumentation and mathematical analyses aids are included. Antireflection coatings for these cells are discussed.

  12. The Gevaltig: An inertial fusion powered manned spacecraft design for outer solar system missions

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, K.A.

    1989-10-01

    The Gevaltig is an inertial fusion powered rocket engine capable of manned missions to other planets with round trip mission times as low as 100 days. The Gevaltig design was previously described for a mission to Mars. This effort defines the spacecraft components in terms of mass and presents a mission analysis for a manned trip to Titan, a moon of Saturn. The Gevaltig component masses are provided as a function of fuel pellet ignition frequency. These variable mass components include the fuel tanks, radiators, structure and EM pumps. Fixed mass components include the drivers, coil, coil shield, power processing system, payload, crew shield and laser mirrors. A 6 MW nuclear reactor is included in the design for startup purposes. Various combinations of thrust, mission duration and specific impulse were evaluated to determine a reasonable mission scenario for the Titan mission. The mission analysis yielded several viable mission scenarios, with round trip durations of 370 to 500 days and initial (launch) masses from lunar orbit of 2500 to 20,000 metric tons. 15 refs., 13 figs., 14 tabs.

  13. Wind power application research on the fusion of the determination and ensemble prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Shi; Lina, Xu; Yuzhu, Hao

    2017-07-01

    The fused product of wind speed for the wind farm is designed through the use of wind speed products of ensemble prediction from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) and professional numerical model products on wind power based on Mesoscale Model5 (MM5) and Beijing Rapid Update Cycle (BJ-RUC), which are suitable for short-term wind power forecasting and electric dispatch. The single-valued forecast is formed by calculating the different ensemble statistics of the Bayesian probabilistic forecasting representing the uncertainty of ECMWF ensemble prediction. Using autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model to improve the time resolution of the single-valued forecast, and based on the Bayesian model averaging (BMA) and the deterministic numerical model prediction, the optimal wind speed forecasting curve and the confidence interval are provided. The result shows that the fusion forecast has made obvious improvement to the accuracy relative to the existing numerical forecasting products. Compared with the 0-24 h existing deterministic forecast in the validation period, the mean absolute error (MAE) is decreased by 24.3 % and the correlation coefficient (R) is increased by 12.5 %. In comparison with the ECMWF ensemble forecast, the MAE is reduced by 11.7 %, and R is increased 14.5 %. Additionally, MAE did not increase with the prolongation of the forecast ahead.

  14. Overview of the VISTA Spacecraft Concept Powered by Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, C D

    2000-11-21

    VISTA was conceived through a detailed systems analysis as a viable, realistic, and defensible spacecraft concept based on advanced ICF technology but existing or near-term technology for other systems. It is a conical self-contained single-stage piloted spacecraft in which a magnetic thrust chamber directs the plasma emissions from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets into a rearward exhaust. VISTA's propulsion system is therefore unique because it is based on (1) a rather mature technology (ICF), which is known to work with sufficient driver input; (2) direct heating of all expellant by the fusion process, thus providing high mass flow rates without significant degradation of jet efficiency; and (3) a magnetic thrust chamber, which avoids the plasma thermalization and resultant degradation of specific impulse that are unavoidable with the use of mechanical thrust chambers. VISTA therefore has inherently high power/mass ratios and high specific impulses. With advanced ICF technology, ultra-fast roundtrips (RTs) to objects within the solar system are possible (e.g., {ge}145 days RT to Mars, {ge}7 years RT to Pluto). Such short-duration missions are imperative to minimize the human physiological deteriorations arising from zero gravity and the cosmic-radiation. In addition, VISTA offers on-board artificial gravity and propellant-based shielding from cosmic rays, thus reducing the physiological deteriorations to insignificant levels. In this paper, we give an overview of the various vehicle systems for this concept, estimate the general missions performance capabilities for interplanetary missions, and describe in detail the performance for the baseline mission of a piloted roundtrip to Mars with a 100-ton payload. Items requiring further research include a reduction of the wet mass from its baseline value of 6,000 metric tons, and the development of fast ignition or its equivalent to provide target gains in excess of several hundred. With target gains well

  15. The QED engine system: Direct-electric fusion-powered rocket propulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussard, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    Practical ground-to-orbit and inter-orbital space flights both require propulsion systems of large flight-path-averaged specific impulse (Isp) and engine system thrust-to-mass-ratio (F/me=[F]) for useful payload and structure fractions in single-stage vehicles (Hunter 1966). Current rocket and air-breathing engine technologies lead to enormous vehicles and small payloads; a natural result of the limited specific energy available from chemical reactions. While nuclear energy far exceeds these specific energy limits (Bussard and DeLauer 1958), the inherent high-Isp advantages of fission propulsion concepts for space and air-breathing flight (Bussard and DeLauer 1965) are negated for manned systems by the massive radiation shielding required by their high radiation output (Bussard 1971). However, there are well-known radiation-free nuclear fusion reactions (Gross 1984) between isotopes of selected light elements (such as H+11B, D+3He) that yield only energetic charged particles, whose energy can be converted directly into electricity by confining electric fields (Moir and Barr 1973,1983). New confinement concepts using magnetic-electric-potentials (Bussard 1989a) or inertial-collisional-compression (ICC) (Bussard 1990) have been found that offer the prospect of clean, compact fusion systems with very high output and low mass. Their radiation-free d.c. electrical output can power unique new electron-beam-driven thrust systems of extremely high performance. Parametric design studies show that such charged-particle electric-discharge engines (``QED'' engines) might yield rocket propulsion systems with performance in the ranges of 2<[F]<6 and 1500

  16. The Information Fusion Embrittlement Models for U.S. Power Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Rao, Nageswara S; Konduri, Savanthi

    2007-01-01

    The complex nonlinear dependencies observed in typical reactor pressure vessel (RPV) material embrittlement data, as well as the inherent large uncertainties and scatter in the radiation embrittlement data, make prediction of radiation embrittlement a difficult task. Conventional statistical and deterministic approaches have only resulted in rather large uncertainties, in part because they do not fully exploit domain-specific mechanisms. The domain models built by researchers in the field, on the other hand, do not fully exploit the statistical and information content of the data. As evidenced in previous studies, it is unlikely that a single method, whether statistical, nonlinear, or domain model, will outperform all others. More generally, considering the complexity of the embrittlement prediction problem, it is highly unlikely that a single best method exists and is tractable, even in theory. In this paper, we propose to combine a number of complementary methods including domain models, neural networks, and nearest neighbor regressions (NNRs). Such a combination of methods has become possible because of recent developments in measurement-based optimal fusers in the area of information fusion. The information fusion technique is used to develop radiation embrittlement prediction models for reactor RPV steels from U.S. power reactors, including boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors. The Charpy transition temperature-shift data is used as the primary index of RPV radiation embrittlement in this study. Six Cu, Ni, P, neutron fluence, irradiation time, and irradiation-parameters are used in the embrittlement prediction models. The results-temperature indicate that this new embrittlement predictor achieved reductions of about 49.5% and 52% in the uncertainties for plate and weld data, respectively, for pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor data, compared with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2. The

  17. Multi-petascale highly efficient parallel supercomputer

    DOEpatents

    Asaad, Sameh; Bellofatto, Ralph E.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Blumrich, Matthias A.; Boyle, Peter; Brunheroto, Jose R.; Chen, Dong; Cher, Chen -Yong; Chiu, George L.; Christ, Norman; Coteus, Paul W.; Davis, Kristan D.; Dozsa, Gabor J.; Eichenberger, Alexandre E.; Eisley, Noel A.; Ellavsky, Matthew R.; Evans, Kahn C.; Fleischer, Bruce M.; Fox, Thomas W.; Gara, Alan; Giampapa, Mark E.; Gooding, Thomas M.; Gschwind, Michael K.; Gunnels, John A.; Hall, Shawn A.; Haring, Rudolf A.; Heidelberger, Philip; Inglett, Todd A.; Knudson, Brant L.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Kumar, Sameer; Mamidala, Amith R.; Marcella, James A.; Megerian, Mark G.; Miller, Douglas R.; Miller, Samuel J.; Muff, Adam J.; Mundy, Michael B.; O'Brien, John K.; O'Brien, Kathryn M.; Ohmacht, Martin; Parker, Jeffrey J.; Poole, Ruth J.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Salapura, Valentina; Satterfield, David L.; Senger, Robert M.; Smith, Brian; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Stockdell, William M.; Stunkel, Craig B.; Sugavanam, Krishnan; Sugawara, Yutaka; Takken, Todd E.; Trager, Barry M.; Van Oosten, James L.; Wait, Charles D.; Walkup, Robert E.; Watson, Alfred T.; Wisniewski, Robert W.; Wu, Peng

    2015-07-14

    A Multi-Petascale Highly Efficient Parallel Supercomputer of 100 petaOPS-scale computing, at decreased cost, power and footprint, and that allows for a maximum packaging density of processing nodes from an interconnect point of view. The Supercomputer exploits technological advances in VLSI that enables a computing model where many processors can be integrated into a single Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC). Each ASIC computing node comprises a system-on-chip ASIC utilizing four or more processors integrated into one die, with each having full access to all system resources and enabling adaptive partitioning of the processors to functions such as compute or messaging I/O on an application by application basis, and preferably, enable adaptive partitioning of functions in accordance with various algorithmic phases within an application, or if I/O or other processors are underutilized, then can participate in computation or communication nodes are interconnected by a five dimensional torus network with DMA that optimally maximize the throughput of packet communications between nodes and minimize latency.

  18. High-efficiency red electrophosphorescence devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Chihaya; Baldo, Marc A.; Forrest, Stephen R.; Lamansky, Sergey; Thompson, Mark E.; Kwong, Raymond C.

    2001-03-01

    We demonstrate high-efficiency red electrophosphorescent organic light-emitting devices employing bis(2-(2'-benzo[4,5-a]thienyl)pyridinato-N,C3') iridium(acetylacetonate) [Btp2Ir(acac)] as a red phosphor. A maximum external quantum efficiency of ηext=(7.0±0.5)% and power efficiency of ηp=(4.6±0.5) lm/W are achieved at a current density of J=0.01 mA/cm2. At a higher current density of J=100 mA/cm2, ηext=(2.5±0.3)% and ηp=(0.56±0.05) lm/W are obtained. The electroluminescent spectrum has a maximum at a wavelength of λmax=616 nm with additional intensity peaks at λsub=670 and 745 nm. The Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage coordinates of (x=0.68, y=0.32) are close to meeting video display standards. The short phosphorescence lifetime (˜4 μs) of Btp2Ir(acac) leads to a significant improvement in ηext at high currents as compared to the previously reported red phosphor, 2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octaethyl-12H, 23H-prophine platinum (II) PtOEP with a lifetime of ˜50 μs.

  19. Efficiency and reliability assessments of retrofitted high-efficiency motors

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, John S.; Otaduy, P.J.; Dueck, J.D.

    1994-12-31

    The majority of electric-motor applications are pumps, fans, blowers, and certain compressors that follow the load torque pattern described in this paper. It has been known for many years that simply replacing the old motor with a high-efficiency motor might not produce the expected efficiency gain. This paper suggests the calculations for the effective efficiency and temperature rise of the high-efficiency motor. The reliability in terms of temperature rise, downsizing, power factor, harmonics, mechanical structure, etc., are discussed.

  20. Scaling magnetized liner inertial fusion on Z and future pulsed-power accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Slutz, S. A.; Stygar, W. A.; Gomez, M. R.; Peterson, K. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Vesey, R. A.; Campbell, E. M.; Betti, R.

    2016-02-15

    The MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] has demonstrated fusion–relevant plasma conditions [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] on the Z accelerator with a peak drive current of about 18 MA. We present 2D numerical simulations of the scaling of MagLIF on Z as a function of drive current, preheat energy, and applied magnetic field. The results indicate that deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion yields greater than 100 kJ could be possible on Z when all of these parameters are at the optimum values: i.e., peak current = 25 MA, deposited preheat energy = 5 kJ, and B{sub z} = 30 T. Much higher yields have been predicted [S. A. Slutz and R. A. Vesey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 025003 (2012)] for MagLIF driven with larger peak currents. Two high performance pulsed-power accelerators (Z300 and Z800) based on linear-transformer-driver technology have been designed [W. A. Stygar et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 18, 110401 (2015)]. The Z300 design would provide 48 MA to a MagLIF load, while Z800 would provide 65 MA. Parameterized Thevenin-equivalent circuits were used to drive a series of 1D and 2D numerical MagLIF simulations with currents ranging from what Z can deliver now to what could be achieved by these conceptual future pulsed-power accelerators. 2D simulations of simple MagLIF targets containing just gaseous DT have yields of 18 MJ for Z300 and 440 MJ for Z800. The 2D simulated yield for Z800 is increased to 7 GJ by adding a layer of frozen DT ice to the inside of the liner.

  1. Flibe Coolant Cleanup and Processing in the HYLIFE-II Inertial Fusion Energy Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R W

    2001-03-23

    In the HYLIFE-II chamber design, a thick flowing blanket of molten-salt (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) called flibe is used to protect structures from radiation damage. Since it is directly exposed to the fusion target, the flibe will absorb the target debris. Removing the materials left over from target explosions at the rate of {approx}6/s and then recycling some of these materials poses a challenge for the inertial fusion energy power plant. The choice of target materials derives from multi-disciplinary criteria such as target performance, fabricability, safety and environment, corrosion, and cost of recycle. Indirect-drive targets require high-2 materials for the hohlraum. Gold and gadolinium are favorite target materials for laboratory experiments but cost considerations may preclude their use in power plants or at least requires cost effective recycle because a year's supply of gold and gadolinium is estimated at 520 M$ and 40 M$. Environmental and waste considerations alone require recycle of this material. Separation by volatility appears to be the most attractive (e.g., Hg and Xe); centrifugation (e.g., Pb) is acceptable with some problems (e.g., materials compatibility) and chemical separation is the least attractive (e.g. Gd and Hf). Mercury, hafnium and xenon might be substituted with equal target performance and have advantages in removal and recycle due to their high volatility, except for hafnium. Alternatively, lead, tungsten and xenon might be used due to the ability to use centrifugation and gaseous separation. Hafnium or tantalum form fluorides, which will complicate materials compatibility, corrosion and require sufficient volatility of the fluoride for separation. Further complicating the coolant cleanup and processing is the formation of free fluorine due to nuclear transformation of lithium and beryllium in the flibe, which requires chemical control of the fluoride level to minimize corrosion. The study of the choice of target materials and the

  2. The Development of SiC MOSFET-based Switching Power Amplifiers for Fusion Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prager, James; Ziemba, Timothy; Miller, Kenneth; Picard, Julian

    2015-11-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT), Inc. is developing a switching power amplifier (SPA) based on silicon carbide (SiC) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). SiC MOSFETs offer many advantages over IGBTs including lower drive energy requirements, lower conduction and switching losses, and higher switching frequency capabilities. When comparing SiC and traditional silicon-based MOSFETs, SiC MOSFETs provide higher current carrying capability allowing for smaller package weights and sizes and lower operating temperature. EHT has conducted single device testing that directly compares the capabilities of SiC MOSFETs and IGBTs to demonstrate the utility of SiC MOSFETs for fusion science applications. These devices have been built into a SPA that can drive resistive loads and resonant tank loads at 800 V, 4.25 kA at pulse repetition frequencies up to 1 MHz. During the Phase II program, EHT will finalize the design of the SPA. In Year 2, EHT will replace the SPAs used in the HIT-SI lab at the University of Washington to allow for operation over 100 kHz. SPA prototype results will be presented. This work is supported under DOE Grant # DE-SC0011907.

  3. Physics Basis for the Advanced Tokamak Fusion Power Plant ARIES-AT

    SciTech Connect

    S.C. Jardin; C.E. Kessel; T.K. Mau; R.L. Miller; F. Najmabadi; V.S. Chan; M.S. Chu; R. LaHaye; L.L. Lao; T.W. Petrie; P. Politzer; H.E. St. John; P. Snyder; G.M. Staebler; A.D. Turnbull; W.P. West

    2003-10-07

    The advanced tokamak is considered as the basis for a fusion power plant. The ARIES-AT design has an aspect ratio of A always equal to R/a = 4.0, an elongation and triangularity of kappa = 2.20, delta = 0.90 (evaluated at the separatrix surface), a toroidal beta of beta = 9.1% (normalized to the vacuum toroidal field at the plasma center), which corresponds to a normalized beta of bN * 100 x b/(I(sub)P(MA)/a(m)B(T)) = 5.4. These beta values are chosen to be 10% below the ideal-MHD stability limit. The bootstrap-current fraction is fBS * I(sub)BS/I(sub)P = 0.91. This leads to a design with total plasma current I(sub)P = 12.8 MA, and toroidal field of 11.1 T (at the coil edge) and 5.8 T (at the plasma center). The major and minor radii are 5.2 and 1.3 m, respectively. The effects of H-mode edge gradients and the stability of this configuration to non-ideal modes is analyzed. The current-drive system consists of ICRF/FW for on-axis current drive and a lower-hybrid system for off-axis. Tran sport projections are presented using the drift-wave based GLF23 model. The approach to power and particle exhaust using both plasma core and scrape-off-layer radiation is presented.

  4. High efficiency flat plate solar energy collector

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, R. F.

    1985-04-30

    A concentrating flat plate collector for the high efficiency collection of solar energy. Through an arrangement of reflector elements, incoming solar radiation, either directly or after reflection from the reflector elements, impinges upon both surfaces of a collector element.

  5. Multi Band Gap High Efficiency Converter (RAINBOW)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, I.; Lewis, C.; Phillips, W.; Shields, V.; Stella, P.

    1997-01-01

    The RAINBOW multi band gap system represents a unique combination of solar cells, concentrators and beam splitters. RAINBOW is a flexible system which can readily expand as new high efficiency components are developed.

  6. High-efficiency silicon solar cell research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.

    1984-01-01

    Progress reports on research in high-efficiency silicon solar cells were presented by eight contractors and JPL. The presentations covered the issues of Bulk and Surface Loss, Modeling, Measurements, and Proof of Concept.

  7. Novel High Efficient Organic Photovoltaic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Sam; Haliburton, James; Fan, Zben; Taft, Charles; Wang, Yi-Qing; Maaref, Shahin; Mackey, Willie R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In man's mission to the outer space or a remote site, the most abundant, renewable, nonpolluting, and unlimited external energy source is light. Photovoltaic (PV) materials can convert light into electrical power. In order to generate appreciable electrical power in space or on the Earth, it is necessary to collect sunlight from large areas due to the low density of sunlight, and this would be very costly using current commercially available inorganic solar cells. Future organic or polymer based solar cells seemed very attractive due to several reasons. These include lightweight, flexible shape, ultra-fast optoelectronic response time (this also makes organic PV materials attractive for developing ultra-fast photo detectors), tunability of energy band-gaps via molecular design, versatile materials synthesis and device fabrication schemes, and much lower cost on large-scale industrial production. It has been predicted that nano-phase separated block copolymer systems containing electron rich donor blocks and electron deficient acceptor blocks will facilitate the charge separation and migration due to improved electronic ultrastructure and morphology in comparison to current polymer composite photovoltaic system. This presentation will describe our recent progress in the design, synthesis and characterization of a novel donor-bridge-acceptor block copolymer system for potential high-efficient organic optoelectronic applications. Specifically, the donor block contains an electron donating alkyloxy derivatized polyphenylenevinylene, the acceptor block contains an electron withdrawing alkyl-sulfone derivatized polyphenylenevinylene, and the bridge block contains an electronically neutral non-conjugated aliphatic hydrocarbon chain. The key synthetic strategy includes the synthesis of each individual block first, then couple the blocks together. While the donor block stabilizes the holes, the acceptor block stabilizes the electrons. The bridge block is designed to hinder

  8. Novel High Efficient Organic Photovoltaic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Sam; Haliburton, James; Fan, Zben; Taft, Charles; Wang, Yi-Qing; Maaref, Shahin; Mackey, Willie R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In man's mission to the outer space or a remote site, the most abundant, renewable, nonpolluting, and unlimited external energy source is light. Photovoltaic (PV) materials can convert light into electrical power. In order to generate appreciable electrical power in space or on the Earth, it is necessary to collect sunlight from large areas due to the low density of sunlight, and this would be very costly using current commercially available inorganic solar cells. Future organic or polymer based solar cells seemed very attractive due to several reasons. These include lightweight, flexible shape, ultra-fast optoelectronic response time (this also makes organic PV materials attractive for developing ultra-fast photo detectors), tunability of energy band-gaps via molecular design, versatile materials synthesis and device fabrication schemes, and much lower cost on large-scale industrial production. It has been predicted that nano-phase separated block copolymer systems containing electron rich donor blocks and electron deficient acceptor blocks will facilitate the charge separation and migration due to improved electronic ultrastructure and morphology in comparison to current polymer composite photovoltaic system. This presentation will describe our recent progress in the design, synthesis and characterization of a novel donor-bridge-acceptor block copolymer system for potential high-efficient organic optoelectronic applications. Specifically, the donor block contains an electron donating alkyloxy derivatized polyphenylenevinylene, the acceptor block contains an electron withdrawing alkyl-sulfone derivatized polyphenylenevinylene, and the bridge block contains an electronically neutral non-conjugated aliphatic hydrocarbon chain. The key synthetic strategy includes the synthesis of each individual block first, then couple the blocks together. While the donor block stabilizes the holes, the acceptor block stabilizes the electrons. The bridge block is designed to hinder

  9. A high-efficiency superhydrophobic plasma separator.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changchun; Liao, Shih-Chuan; Song, Jinzhao; Mauk, Michael G; Li, Xuanwen; Wu, Gaoxiang; Ge, Dengteng; Greenberg, Robert M; Yang, Shu; Bau, Haim H

    2016-02-07

    To meet stringent limit-of-detection specifications for low abundance target molecules, a relatively large volume of plasma is needed for many blood-based clinical diagnostics. Conventional centrifugation methods for plasma separation are not suitable for on-site testing or bedside diagnostics. Here, we report a simple, yet high-efficiency, clamshell-style, superhydrophobic plasma separator that is capable of separating a relatively large volume of plasma from several hundred microliters of whole blood (finger-prick blood volume). The plasma separator consists of a superhydrophobic top cover with a separation membrane and a superhydrophobic bottom substrate. Unlike previously reported membrane-based plasma separators, the separation membrane in our device is positioned at the top of the sandwiched whole blood film to increase the membrane separation capacity and plasma yield. In addition, the device's superhydrophobic characteristics (i) facilitates the formation of well-defined, contracted, thin blood film with a high contact angle; (ii) minimizes biomolecular adhesion to surfaces; (iii) increases blood clotting time; and (iv) reduces blood cell hemolysis. The device demonstrated a "blood in-plasma out" capability, consistently extracting 65 ± 21.5 μL of plasma from 200 μL of whole blood in less than 10 min without electrical power. The device was used to separate plasma from Schistosoma mansoni genomic DNA-spiked whole blood with a recovery efficiency of >84.5 ± 25.8%. The S. mansoni genomic DNA in the separated plasma was successfully tested on our custom-made microfluidic chip by using loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method.

  10. A High-Efficiency Superhydrophobic Plasma Separator

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changchun; Liao, Shih-Chuan; Song, Jinzhao; Mauk, Michael G.; Li, Xuanwen; Wu, Gaoxiang; Ge, Dengteng; Greenberg, Robert M.; Yang, Shu; Bau, Haim H.

    2016-01-01

    To meet stringent limit-of-detection specifications for low abundance target molecules, a relatively large volume of plasma is needed for many blood-based clinical diagnostics. Conventional centrifugation methods for plasma separation are not suitable for on-site testing or bedside diagnostics. Here, we report a simple, yet high-efficiency, clamshell-style, superhydrophobic plasma separator that is capable of separating a relatively large volume of plasma from several hundred microliters of whole blood (finger-prick blood volume). The plasma separator consists of a superhydrophobic top cover with a separation membrane and a superhydrophobic bottom substrate. Unlike previously reported membrane-based plasma separators, the separation membrane in our device is positioned at the top of the sandwiched whole blood film to increase the membrane separation capacity and plasma yield. In addition, the device’s superhydrophobic characteristics (i) facilitates the formation of well-defined, contracted, thin blood film with a high contact angle; (ii) minimizes biomolecular adhesion to surfaces; (iii) increases blood clotting time; and (iv) reduces blood cell hemolysis. The device demonstrated a “blood in-plasma out” capability, consistently extracting 65±21.5 μL of plasma from 200 μL of whole blood in less than 10 min without electrical power. The device was used to separate plasma from Schistosoma mansoni genomic DNA-spiked whole blood with a recovery efficiency of > 84.5 ± 25.8 %. The S. mansoni genomic DNA in the separated plasma was successfully tested on our custom-made microfluidic chip by using loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method. PMID:26732765

  11. Fusion materials: Technical evaluation of the technology of vandium alloys for use as blanket structural materials in fusion power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-04

    The Committee`s evaluation of vanadium alloys as a structural material for fusion reactors was constrained by limited data and time. The design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor is still in the concept stage, so meaningful design requirements were not available. The data on the effect of environment and irradiation on vanadium alloys were sparse, and interpolation of these data were made to select the V-5Cr-5Ti alloy. With an aggressive, fully funded program it is possible to qualify a vanadium alloy as the principal structural material for the ITER blanket in the available 5 to 8-year window. However, the data base for V-5Cr-5Ti is United and will require an extensive development and test program. Because of the chemical reactivity of vanadium the alloy will be less tolerant of system failures, accidents, and off-normal events than most other candidate blanket structural materials and will require more careful handling during fabrication of hardware. Because of the cost of the material more stringent requirements on processes, and minimal historical worlding experience, it will cost an order of magnitude to qualify a vanadium alloy for ITER blanket structures than other candidate materials. The use of vanadium is difficult and uncertain; therefore, other options should be explored more thoroughly before a final selection of vanadium is confirmed. The Committee views the risk as being too high to rely solely on vanadium alloys. In viewing the state and nature of the design of the ITER blanket as presented to the Committee, h is obvious that there is a need to move toward integrating fabrication, welding, and materials engineers into the ITER design team. If the vanadium allay option is to be pursued, a large program needs to be started immediately. The commitment of funding and other resources needs to be firm and consistent with a realistic program plan.

  12. High Power LaB6 Plasma Source Performance for the Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Jonathon

    2016-10-01

    Lockheed Martin's Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) concept is a linear encapsulated ring cusp. Due to the complex field geometry, plasma injection into the device requires careful consideration. A high power thermionic plasma source (>0.25MW; >10A/cm2) has been developed with consideration to phase space for optimal coupling. We present the performance of the plasma source, comparison with alternative plasma sources, and plasma coupling with the CFR field configuration. ©2016 Lockheed Martin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Important loss mechanisms in high-efficiency solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sah, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify loss mechanisms in high efficiency silicon solar cells. The following were considered: (1) recombination loss mechanisms; (2) high efficiency cells; (3) very high efficiency cells; and (4) ultra high efficiency cells.

  14. The Fusion Energy Option

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Stephen O.

    2004-06-01

    Presentations from a Fusion Power Associates symposium, The Fusion Energy Option, are summarized. The topics include perspectives on fossil fuel reserves, fusion as a source for hydrogen production, status and plans for the development of inertial fusion, planning for the construction of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, status and promise of alternate approaches to fusion and the need for R&D now on fusion technologies.

  15. The Status of Research Regarding Magnetic Mirrors as a Fusion Neutron Source or Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, T

    2008-12-23

    experiments have confirmed the physics of effluent plasma stabilization predicted by theory. The plasma had a mean ion energy of 10 keV and a density of 5e19m-3. If successful, the axisymmetric tandem mirror extension of the GDT idea could lead to a Q {approx} 10 power plant of modest size and would yield important applications at lower Q. In addition to the GDT method, there are four other ways to augment stability that have been demonstrated; including: plasma rotation (MCX), diverter coils (Tara), pondermotive (Phaedrus & Tara), and end wall funnel shape (Nizhni Novgorod). There are also 5 stabilization techniques predicted, but not yet demonstrated: expander kinetic pressure (KSTM-Post), Pulsed ECH Dynamic Stabilization (Post), wall stabilization (Berk), non-paraxial end mirrors (Ryutov), and cusp ends (Kesner). While these options should be examined further together with conceptual engineering designs. Physics issues that need further analysis include: electron confinement, MHD and trapped particle modes, analysis of micro stability, radial transport, evaluation and optimization of Q, and the plasma density needed to bridge to the expansion-region. While promising all should be examined through increased theory effort, university-scale experiments, and through increased international collaboration with the substantial facilities in Russia and Japan The conventional wisdom of magnetic mirrors was that they would never work as a fusion concept for a number of reasons. This conventional wisdom is most probably all wrong or not applicable, especially for applications such as low Q (DT Neutron Source) aimed at materials testing or for a Q {approx} 3-5 fusion neutron source applied to destroying actinides in fission waste and breeding of fissile fuel.

  16. Modelling and simulation of new generation powerful gyrotrons for the fusion research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabchevski, S.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    2007-04-01

    One of the important issues related with the cyclotron resonance heating (CRH) and current drive of fusion plasmas in thermonuclear reactors (tokamaks and stellarators) is the development of multi-megawatt class gyrotrons. There are generally three stages of the implementation of that task, notably (i) elaborating a novel generation of software tools for the physical modelling and simulation of such kind of gyrotrons, (ii) their computer aided design (CAD) and construction on the basis of the simulation's results, and finally, (iii) gyrotrons' testing in real experimental conditions. This tutorial paper concerns the first item-the development of software tools. In co-operation with the Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany, and Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas at École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland, we work on the conceptual design of the software tools under development. The basic conclusions are that the numerical codes for gyrotrons' modelling should possess the following essential characteristics: (a) portability, (b) extensibility, (c) to be oriented toward the solution of practical problems (i.e., elaborating of computer programs that can be used in the design process), (d) to be based on self-consistent 3D physical models, which take into account the departure from axial symmetry, and (e) ability to simulate time dependent processes (electrostatic PIC simulation) alongside with a trajectory analysis (ray tracing simulation). Here, we discuss how various existing numerical codes have to be improved and implemented via the advanced programming technologies for state-of-the-art computer systems including clusters, grid, parallel platforms, and supercomputers.

  17. Results of the international large coil task: a milestone for superconducting magnets in fusion power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dresner, L.; Fietz, W. A.; Gauss, S.; Haubenreich, P. N.; Jakob, B.; Kato, T.; Komarek, P.; Lubell, M. S.; Lue, J. W.; Luton, J. N.; Maurer, W.; Okuno, K.; Schwenterly, S. W.; Shimamoto, S.; Takahashi, Y.; Ulbricht, A.; Vécsey, G.; Wüchner, F.; Zichy, J. A.

    The aim of the Large Coil Task (LCT) was to demonstrate the reliable operation of large superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and to prove the design principles and fabrication techniques to be applied for the magnets in a tokamak experimental power reactor. This has been achieved by an outstanding international development effort during more than ten years of cooperation within an IEA agreement. Parties were the US DOE, EURATOM, JAERI and the Swiss government. Six different D-shaped test coils were separately designed, developed and constructed by the LCT participants, then extensively tested together in a compact toroidal array. The ORNL acted for DOE as the LCT operating agent, building and operating the required test facility. The US also provided three test coils; the other three participants one coil each. Detailed information on coil design and manufacture and all test data were shared among the LCT participants. After facility shakedown operations and preliminary coil tests, the full six-coil array tests were carried out in a continuous period from the beginning of 1986 until September 1987. Beside the originally planned tests to reach an 8 T design point performance, the tests went well beyond this goal, reaching 9 T peak field in each coil. The experiments also delineated the limits of operability and demonstrated the coil safety under abnormal conditions. For fusion application the transient a.c. field behaviour in the coils was also of great interest. Three of the coils have been tested in this respect and showed excellent performance, with loss values in agreement with the theoretical predictions. At the time of International Experimental Reactor (ITER) activities, it might be worthwhile to mention that LCT demonstrated an effective multinational collaboration in an advanced technology project, involving large scale hardware produced in several countries then assembled and operated as a tightly integrated system.

  18. Enhanced ceria solid electrolyte fuel cell development. Reduction of electronic conductivity permits use of a solid ceria electrolyte in high efficiency high power density fuel cells at temperatures compatible with metallic cell hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maricle, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    The high operating temperature of zirconia based solid oxide fuel cells has been shown in many studies to have advantages for both space and terrestrial applications. The high heat rejection temperature minimizes radiator size and weight for high atmospheric and space applications. Mobile and stationary terrestrial applications take advantage of a cell temperature high enough to directly reform hydro-carbon fuels, achieving high efficiency and energy density. Government funded solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) efforts are concentrated on the monolithic and tubular cell designs employing zirconia as the oxide ion conduction membrane. Zirconia requires an operating temperature of 1000 C to achieve adequate electrolyte conductivity. All-ceramic cell structures are used in both cases, leading to fragile, failure prone cells, and manufacturing steps which are difficult to scale up and costly. IFC's molten carbonate fuel cell development demonstrates the reliability of ductile sheet metal parts used for gas flow fields, separator plates, and frames in the 650 C temperature range. Ceria doped with gadolinium has ionic conductivity at 700 C comparable to zirconia at 1000 C. At 700 C a variety of stainless steels offer acceptable strength and oxidation resistance for use as cell hardware.

  19. High-efficiency coaxial relativistic backward wave oscillator.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yan; Xiao, Renzhen; Song, Zhimin; Jun, Sun; Chen, Changhua; Shao, Hao; Liu, Guozhi; Tang, Chuanxiang

    2011-02-01

    This paper studies the coaxial relativistic backward wave oscillator (CRBWO) through analytical, numerical, and experimental methods. This new type of device is remarked by its high efficiency of more than 35%, which is predicted by the theoretical calculation and the numerical simulation and validated by experiment. The two primary hindrances preventing CRBWO from achieving the expected high efficiency, the poor coaxiality and the power capacity, are discussed in detail and some advanced methods are developed. The theoretical and numerical conclusions agree with the experiment results, which are obtained from the electric probe and the calorimeter simultaneously for each shot of CRBWO. Employing the electron beam pulse of the full width at half maximum 28 ns, a microwave pulse of the width about 20 ns is generated in the experiment; the power is 710 MW and the efficiency is higher than 33%.

  20. High Efficient Universal Buck Boost Solar Array Regulator SAR Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmelmann, Stefan; Knorr, Wolfgang

    2014-08-01

    The high efficient universal Buck Boost Solar Array Regulator (SAR) module concept is applicable for a wide range of input and output voltages. The single point failure tolerant SAR module contains 3 power converters for the transfer of the SAR power to the battery dominated power bus. The converters are operating parallel in a 2 out of 3 redundancy and are driven by two different controllers. The output power of one module can be adjusted up to 1KW depending on the requirements. The maximum power point tracker (MPPT) is placed on a separate small printed circuit board and can be used if no external tracker signal is delivered. Depending on the mode and load conditions an efficiency of more than 97% is achievable. The stable control performance is achieved by implementing the magnetic current sense detection. The sensed power coil current is used in Buck and Boost control mode.

  1. A high efficiency 3 kW switchmode battery charger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latos, T. S.; Bosack, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper discusses the design approach and status of a high-efficiency switchmode battery charger designed to charge a 108 V battery from the 115 Vac line. The charger contains a transformer isolated boost chopper operating at 20 kHz. The boost inductor current is programmed to follow the ac line voltage such that high power factor operation and low line distortion are obtained.

  2. High efficiency cw laser-pumped tunable alexandrite laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, S.T.; Shand, M.L.

    1983-10-01

    High efficiency cw alexandrite laser operation has been achieved. With longitudinal pumping by a krypton laser in a nearly concentric cavity, a 51% output power slope efficiency has been measured. Including the transmission at the input coupler mirror, a quantum yield of 85% has been attained above threshold. Tunability from 726 to 802 nm has also been demonstrated. The low loss and good thermal properties make alexandrite ideal for cw laser operation.

  3. Block Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) with Condensed Matter Cluster Type Targets for p-B11 Powered Space Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, George H.; Hora, H.; Badziak, J.; Wolowski, J.; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie; Osman, F.; Zhang Weiyan; Tuhe Xia

    2009-03-16

    The use of laser-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) for space propulsion has been the subject of several earlier conceptual design studies, (see: Orth, 1998; and other references therein). However, these studies were based on older ICF technology using either 'direct' or 'in-direct x-ray driven' type target irradiation. Important new directions have opened for laser ICF in recent years following the development of 'chirped' lasers capable of ultra short pulses with powers of TW up to few PW which leads to the concept of 'fast ignition (FI)' to achieve higher energy gains from target implosions. In a recent publication the authors showed that use of a modified type of FI, termed 'block ignition' (Miley et al., 2008), could meet many of the requirements anticipated (but not then available) by the designs of the Vehicle for Interplanetary Space Transport Applications (VISTA) ICF fusion propulsion ship (Orth, 2008) for deep space missions. Subsequently the first author devised and presented concepts for imbedding high density condensed matter 'clusters' of deuterium into the target to obtain ultra high local fusion reaction rates (Miley, 2008). Such rates are possible due to the high density of the clusters (over an order of magnitude above cryogenic deuterium). Once compressed by the implosion, the yet higher density gives an ultra high reaction rate over the cluster volume since the fusion rate is proportional to the square of the fuel density. Most recently, a new discovery discussed here indicates that the target matrix could be composed of B{sup 11} with proton clusters imbedded. This then makes p-B{sup 11} fusion practical, assuming all of the physics issues such as stability of the clusters during compression are resolved. Indeed, p-B{sup 11} power is ideal for fusion propulsion since it has a minimum of unwanted side products while giving most of the reaction energy to energetic alpha particles which can be directed into an exhaust (propulsion) nozzle

  4. Lightweight High Efficiency Electric Motors for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.; Tyler, Tony R.; Piper, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Lightweight high efficiency electric motors are needed across a wide range of space applications from - thrust vector actuator control for launch and flight applications to - general vehicle, base camp habitat and experiment control for various mechanisms to - robotics for various stationary and mobile space exploration missions. QM Power?s Parallel Path Magnetic Technology Motors have slowly proven themselves to be a leading motor technology in this area; winning a NASA Phase II for "Lightweight High Efficiency Electric Motors and Actuators for Low Temperature Mobility and Robotics Applications" a US Army Phase II SBIR for "Improved Robot Actuator Motors for Medical Applications", an NSF Phase II SBIR for "Novel Low-Cost Electric Motors for Variable Speed Applications" and a DOE SBIR Phase I for "High Efficiency Commercial Refrigeration Motors" Parallel Path Magnetic Technology obtains the benefits of using permanent magnets while minimizing the historical trade-offs/limitations found in conventional permanent magnet designs. The resulting devices are smaller, lower weight, lower cost and have higher efficiency than competitive permanent magnet and non-permanent magnet designs. QM Power?s motors have been extensively tested and successfully validated by multiple commercial and aerospace customers and partners as Boeing Research and Technology. Prototypes have been made between 0.1 and 10 HP. They are also in the process of scaling motors to over 100kW with their development partners. In this paper, Parallel Path Magnetic Technology Motors will be discussed; specifically addressing their higher efficiency, higher power density, lighter weight, smaller physical size, higher low end torque, wider power zone, cooler temperatures, and greater reliability with lower cost and significant environment benefit for the same peak output power compared to typically motors. A further discussion on the inherent redundancy of these motors for space applications will be provided.

  5. Task toward a Realization of Commercial Tokamak Fusion Plants in 2050 -The Role of ITER and the Succeeding Developments- 4.Technology and Material Research in Fusion Power Plant Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiba, Masato; Matsui, Hideki; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Konishi, Satoshi

    Technical issues regarding the fusion power plant that are required to be developed in the period of ITER construction and operation, both with ITER and with other facilities that complement ITER are described in this section. Three major fields are considered to be important in fusion technology. Section 4.1 summarizes blanket study, and ITER Test Blanket Module (TBM) development that focuses its effort on the first generation power blanket to be installed in DEMO. ITER will be equipped with 6 TBMs which are developed under each party's fusion program. In Japan, the solid breeder using water as a coolant is the primary candidate, and He-cooled pebble bed is the alternative. Other liquid options such as LiPb, Li or molten salt are developed by other parties' initiatives. The Test Blanket Working Group (TBWG) is coordinating these efforts. Japanese universities are investigating advanced concepts and fundamental crosscutting technologies. Section 4.2 introduces material development and particularly, the international irradiation facility, IFMIF. Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels are identified as promising candidates for the structural material of the first generation fusion blanket, while and vanadium alloy and SiC/SiC composite are pursued as advanced options. The IFMIF is currently planning the next phase of joint activity, EVEDA (Engineering Validation and Engineering Design Activity) that encompasses construction. Material studies together with the ITER TBM will provide essential technical information for development of the fusion power plant. Other technical issues to be addressed regarding the first generation fusion power plant are summarized in section 4.3. Development of components for ITER made remarkable progress for the major essential technology also necessary for future fusion plants, however many still need further improvements toward power plant. Such areas includes; the divertor, plasma heating/current drive, magnets, tritium, and

  6. Field testing of high-efficiency supermarket refrigeration

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D. )

    1992-12-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has undertaken a field test to quantify the performance of high-efficiency supermarket refrigeration. The initial work on this project was presented in EPRI report CU-6268 Supermarket Refrigeration Modeling and Field Demonstration.'' The information given here was generated through continued testing at the field test site. The field test was conducted at a supermarket owned by Safeway Stores, Inc., that was located in Menlo Park, CA. Testing was performed with the existing conventional refrigeration system and a high-efficiency multiplex refrigeration system that was installed for these tests. The results of the testing showed that the high-efficiency multiplex system reduced refrigeration energy consumption by 23.9% and peak electric demand for refrigeration by 30.0%. Analyses of these savings showed that the largest portion was due to the use of high-efficiency compressors (29.5% of total saving). Floating head pressure control, ambient and mechanical subcooling, compressor multiplexing and hot gas defrost accounted for 50% of total savings. The remainder of the savings (20.5%) were attributed to the use of an evaporative condenser. Tests were also conducted with several retrofit technologies. The most promising results were obtained with external liquid-suction heat exchangers installed at the outlets of the display cases. Favorable paybacks were calculated for these exchangers when they were used with very low and low temperature refrigeration.

  7. Field testing of high-efficiency supermarket refrigeration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.

    1992-12-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has undertaken a field test to quantify the performance of high-efficiency supermarket refrigeration. The initial work on this project was presented in EPRI report CU-6268 ``Supermarket Refrigeration Modeling and Field Demonstration.`` The information given here was generated through continued testing at the field test site. The field test was conducted at a supermarket owned by Safeway Stores, Inc., that was located in Menlo Park, CA. Testing was performed with the existing conventional refrigeration system and a high-efficiency multiplex refrigeration system that was installed for these tests. The results of the testing showed that the high-efficiency multiplex system reduced refrigeration energy consumption by 23.9% and peak electric demand for refrigeration by 30.0%. Analyses of these savings showed that the largest portion was due to the use of high-efficiency compressors (29.5% of total saving). Floating head pressure control, ambient and mechanical subcooling, compressor multiplexing and hot gas defrost accounted for 50% of total savings. The remainder of the savings (20.5%) were attributed to the use of an evaporative condenser. Tests were also conducted with several retrofit technologies. The most promising results were obtained with external liquid-suction heat exchangers installed at the outlets of the display cases. Favorable paybacks were calculated for these exchangers when they were used with very low and low temperature refrigeration.

  8. Measure Guideline. High Efficiency Natural Gas Furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, L.; Rose, W.

    2012-10-01

    This measure guideline covers installation of high-efficiency gas furnaces, including: when to install a high-efficiency gas furnace as a retrofit measure; how to identify and address risks; and the steps to be used in the selection and installation process. The guideline is written for Building America practitioners and HVAC contractors and installers. It includes a compilation of information provided by manufacturers, researchers, and the Department of Energy as well as recent research results from the Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit (PARR) Building America team.

  9. Measure Guideline: High Efficiency Natural Gas Furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, L.; Rose, W.

    2012-10-01

    This Measure Guideline covers installation of high-efficiency gas furnaces. Topics covered include when to install a high-efficiency gas furnace as a retrofit measure, how to identify and address risks, and the steps to be used in the selection and installation process. The guideline is written for Building America practitioners and HVAC contractors and installers. It includes a compilation of information provided by manufacturers, researchers, and the Department of Energy as well as recent research results from the Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit (PARR) Building America team.

  10. Advanced high efficiency wraparound contact solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J. A.; Uno, F. M.; Thornhill, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    A significant advancement in the development of thin high efficiency wraparound contact silicon solar cells has been made by coupling space and terrestrial processing procedures. Although this new method for fabricating cells has not been completely reduced to practice, some of the initial cells have delivered over 20 mW/sq cm when tested at 25 C under AMO intensity. This approach not only yields high efficiency devices, but shows promise of allowing complete freedom of choice in both the location and size of the wraparound contact pad area

  11. Advanced high efficiency wraparound contact solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J. A.; Uno, F. M.; Thornhill, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    A significant advancement in the development of thin high efficiency wraparound contact silicon solar cells has been made by coupling space and terrestrial processing procedures. Although this new method for fabricating cells has not been completely reduced to practice, some of the initial cells have delivered over 20 mW/sq cm when tested at 25 C under AMO intensity. This approach not only yields high efficiency devices, but shows promise of allowing complete freedom of choice in both the location and size of the wraparound contact pad area.

  12. Osiris and SOMBRERO inertial confinement fusion power plant designs. Volume 2, Designs, assessments, and comparisons, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W.R.; Bieri, R.L.; Monsler, M.J.

    1992-03-01

    The primary objective of the of the IFE Reactor Design Studies was to provide the Office of Fusion Energy with an evaluation of the potential of inertial fusion for electric power production. The term reactor studies is somewhat of a misnomer since these studies included the conceptual design and analysis of all aspects of the IFE power plants: the chambers, heat transport and power conversion systems, other balance of plant facilities, target systems (including the target production, injection, and tracking systems), and the two drivers. The scope of the IFE Reactor Design Studies was quite ambitious. The majority of our effort was spent on the conceptual design of two IFE electric power plants, one using an induction linac heavy ion beam (HIB) driver and the other using a Krypton Fluoride (KrF) laser driver. After the two point designs were developed, they were assessed in terms of their (1) environmental and safety aspects; (2) reliability, availability, and maintainability; (3) technical issues and technology development requirements; and (4) economics. Finally, we compared the design features and the results of the assessments for the two designs.

  13. A Self-Aligned Gate AlGaAs/GaAs Heterostructure Field-Effect Transistor with an Ion-Implanted Buried-Channel for use in High Efficiency Power Amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihori, Kazuya; Kitaura, Yoshiaki; Tanabe, Yoshikazu; Mihara, Masakatsu; Yoshimura, Misao; Nitta, Tomohiro; Kakiuchi, Yorito; Uchitomi, Naotaka

    1998-06-01

    In this paper we report on a self-aligned gate buried-channel Al0.22Ga0.78As/GaAs heterostructure field-effect transistor (BC-HFET). The BC-HFET comprises a selectively ion-implanted channel and an undoped i-AlGaAs surface layer. In order to realize the buried channel heterostructure, a combined process of ion-implantation and epitaxial growth is developed. The post-implantation annealing before the epitaxial growth successfully reduces the interdiffusion at the heterointerface between the ion-implanted GaAs channel and the AlGaAs surface layer. The BC-HFET overcomes the disadvantages of a low breakdown voltage which exists in conventional self-aligned gate MESFETs. The BC-HFET exhibits a high breakdown voltage of 8 V and a high Schottky barrier height of 0.75 eV. The 1-mm-wide power BC-HFET demonstrates an output power of 18.2 dBm and a drain efficiency of 50% at a low adjacent channel leakage power of -59 dBc for a 1.9-GHz π/4-shifted quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) modulated input, for use as Personal Handy-phone System handsets.

  14. Physics of laser fusion. Volume IV. The future development of high-power solid-state laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Emmett, J.L.; Krupke, W.F.; Trenholme, J.B.

    1982-11-01

    Solid state lasers, particularly neodymium glass systems, have undergone intensive development during the last decade. In this paper, we review solid state laser technology in the context of high-peak-power systems for inertial confinement fusion. Specifically addressed are five major factors: efficiency, wavelength flexibility, average power, system complexity, and cost; these factors today limit broader application of the technology. We conclude that each of these factors can be greatly improved within current fundamental physical limits. We further conclude that the systematic development of new solid state laser madia, both vitreous and crystalline, should ultimately permit the development of wavelength-flexible, very high average power systems with overall efficiencies in the range of 10 to 20%.

  15. High Efficient Synthesis of Iron-based Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ai-Hua; Huang, Fu-Qiang; Xie, Xiao-Ming; Jiang, Mian-Heng

    We have performed systematic investigations aimed at high efficient synthesis of the 1111 family iron-based superconductors. By using meta-stable reactive starting materials of LnAs and FeO, assisted by mechanical alloying and fast heating, high purity samples with Tconset greater than 50K can be made with sintering temperatures between 1433K-1073K, and sintering time from 20 min to 40 h. High purity phase with sintering temperature as low as 973K was demonstrated successfully although Tconset fall below 50K and weak grain boundary suppressed greatly the zero resistance temperature. Ultra fast microwave sintering brings the sintering time further down to 5 min. Samples prepared by the above high efficient methods typically posses submicron grain and very high upper critical field, indicating very high pinning power. Besides offering cost advantages, the developed methods may play important roles in the exploit of novel superconductors.

  16. Effects of alpha stopping power modelling on the ignition threshold in a directly-driven inertial confinement fusion capsule

    DOE PAGES

    Temporal, Mauro; Canaud, Benoit; Cayzac, Witold; ...

    2017-05-25

    The alpha-particle energy deposition mechanism modifies the ignition conditions of the thermonuclear Deuterium-Tritium fusion reactions, and constitutes a key issue in achieving high gain in Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions. One-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations have been performed with the code Multi-IFE to simulate the implosion of a capsule directly irradiated by a laser beam. The diffusion approximation for the alpha energy deposition has been used to optimize three laser profiles corresponding to different implosion velocities. A Monte-Carlo package has been included in Multi-IFE to calculate the alpha energy transport, and in this case the energy deposition uses both the LP and themore » BPS stopping power models. Homothetic transformations that maintain a constant implosion velocity have been used to map out the transition region between marginally-igniting and high-gain configurations. Furthermore, the results provided by the two models have been compared and it is found that – close to the ignition threshold – in order to produce the same fusion energy, the calculations performed with the BPS model require about 10% more invested energy with respect to the LP model.« less

  17. Use of Clearance Indexes to Assess Waste Disposal Issues for the HYLIFE-II Inertial Fusion Energy Power Plant Design

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Latkowski, J F; Sanz, J

    2002-01-17

    Traditionally, waste management studies for fusion energy have used the Waste Disposal Rating (WDR) to evaluate if radioactive material from irradiated structures could qualify for shallow land burial. However, given the space limitations and the negative public perception of large volumes of waste, there is a growing international motivation to develop a fusion waste management system that maximizes the amount of material that can be cleared or recycled. In this work, we present an updated assessment of the waste management options for the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant, using the concept of Clearance Index (CI) for radioactive waste disposal. With that purpose, we have performed a detailed neutronics analysis of the HYLIFE-II design, using the TART and ACAB computer codes for neutron transport and activation, respectively. Whereas the traditional version of ACAB only provided the user with the WDR as an index for waste considerations, here we have modified the code to calculate Clearance Indexes using the current International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) clearance limits for radiological waste disposal. The results from the analysis are used to perform an assessment of the waste management options for the HYLIFE-II IFE design.

  18. Effects of alpha stopping power modelling on the ignition threshold in a directly-driven inertial confinement fusion capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temporal, Mauro; Canaud, Benoit; Cayzac, Witold; Ramis, Rafael; Singleton, Robert L.

    2017-05-01

    The alpha-particle energy deposition mechanism modifies the ignition conditions of the thermonuclear Deuterium-Tritium fusion reactions, and constitutes a key issue in achieving high gain in Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions. One-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations have been performed with the code Multi-IFE [R. Ramis, J. Meyer-ter-Vehn, Comput. Phys. Commun. 203, 226 (2016)] to simulate the implosion of a capsule directly irradiated by a laser beam. The diffusion approximation for the alpha energy deposition has been used to optimize three laser profiles corresponding to different implosion velocities. A Monte-Carlo package has been included in Multi-IFE to calculate the alpha energy transport, and in this case the energy deposition uses both the LP [C.K. Li, R.D. Petrasso, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 3059 (1993)] and the BPS [L.S. Brown, D.L. Preston, R.L. Singleton Jr., Phys. Rep. 410, 237 (2005)] stopping power models. Homothetic transformations that maintain a constant implosion velocity have been used to map out the transition region between marginally-igniting and high-gain configurations. The results provided by the two models have been compared and it is found that - close to the ignition threshold - in order to produce the same fusion energy, the calculations performed with the BPS model require about 10% more invested energy with respect to the LP model.

  19. High efficiency novel window air conditioner

    DOE PAGES

    Bansal, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the technical development of a high efficiency window air conditioner. In order to achieve higher energy efficiency ratio (EER), the original capacity of the R410A unit was downgraded by replacing the original compressor with a lower capacity but higher EER compressor, while all heat exchangers and the chassis from the original unit were retained. The other subsequent major modifications included – the AC fan motor being replaced with a brushless high efficiency electronically commuted motor (ECM) motor, the capillary tube being replaced with a needle valve to better control the refrigerant flow and refrigerant set points, andmore » R410A being replaced with drop-in environmentally friendly binary mixture of R32 (85% molar concentration)/R125 (15% molar concentration). All these modifications resulted in significant EER enhancement of the modified unit.« less

  20. High efficiency novel window air conditioner

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the technical development of a high efficiency window air conditioner. In order to achieve higher energy efficiency ratio (EER), the original capacity of the R410A unit was downgraded by replacing the original compressor with a lower capacity but higher EER compressor, while all heat exchangers and the chassis from the original unit were retained. The other subsequent major modifications included – the AC fan motor being replaced with a brushless high efficiency electronically commuted motor (ECM) motor, the capillary tube being replaced with a needle valve to better control the refrigerant flow and refrigerant set points, and R410A being replaced with drop-in environmentally friendly binary mixture of R32 (85% molar concentration)/R125 (15% molar concentration). All these modifications resulted in significant EER enhancement of the modified unit.

  1. Creation of High Efficient Firefly Luciferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsu, Toru

    Firefly emits visible yellow-green light. The bioluminescence reaction is carried out by the enzyme luciferase. The bioluminescence of luciferase is widely used as an excellent tool for monitoring gene expression, the measurement of the amount of ATP and in vivo imaging. Recently a study of the cancer metastasis is carried out by in vivo luminescence imaging system, because luminescence imaging is less toxic and more useful for long-term assay than fluorescence imaging by GFP. However the luminescence is much dimmer than fluorescence. Then bioluminescence imaging in living organisms demands the high efficient luciferase which emits near infrared lights or enhances the emission intensity. Here I introduce an idea for creating the high efficient luciferase based on the crystal structure.

  2. High-efficiency silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.

    1985-01-01

    Fabrication and characterization of high-efficiency metal insulator, n-p (MINP) cells is described. Particular attention was paid to development of measurement methods for surface recombination and density of surface states. A modified Rosier test structure was used successfully for density of surface states. Silicon oxide and silicon nitride passivants were studied. Heat treatment after plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon nitride was shown to be beneficial. A more optimum emitter concentration profile was modeled.

  3. High efficiency wraparound contact solar cells /HEWACS/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillanders, M.; Opjorden, R.

    1980-01-01

    A cell technology, producing high efficiency wrap-around contact solar cells (HEWACS), with both electrical contacts on the back and AMO conversion efficiencies of almost 15%, is presented. A flow chart indicating the baseline process sequence along with the process changes is given. Tests checking for coating delamination and contact integrity, those measuring contact strength, and thermal cycle tests, successfully demonstrated that this cell technology is ready to be moved to the pilot production stage.

  4. High efficiency, long-life photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, Lawrence; Montgomery, Eric; Jensen, Kevin; Collins, George; Marsden, David; Karimov, Rasul; Falce, Lou

    2017-03-01

    Research and development on high efficiency, robust, long-life photocathodes is in progress for accelerator, light source, and other commercial applications. The research is investigating detailed physics of photoemission and developing a computational capability to predict performance. Reservoir technology will significantly increase lifetime and allow recovery from many poisoning events. Better understanding of the physics will impact fabrication techniques to optimize performance. A production facility is under construction to provide improved photocathodes to users.

  5. Inertial confinement fusion with direct electric generation by magnetic flux comparession

    SciTech Connect

    Lasche, G.P.

    1983-01-01

    A high-power-density laser-fusion-reactor concept in investigated in which directed kinetic enery imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium--in which the fusion target is centrally located--is maximized. In turn, this kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with, potentially, very high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the concept maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall can be many orders of magnitude less than is typical of D-T fusion reactor concepts.

  6. Method and system to directly produce electrical power within the lithium blanket region of a magnetically confined, deuterium-tritium (DT) fueled, thermonuclear fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Woolley, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    A method for integrating liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power generation with fusion blanket technology to produce electrical power from a thermonuclear fusion reactor located within a confining magnetic field and within a toroidal structure. A hot liquid metal flows from a liquid metal blanket region into a pump duct of an electromagnetic pump which moves the liquid metal to a mixer where a gas of predetermined pressure is mixed with the pressurized liquid metal to form a Froth mixture. Electrical power is generated by flowing the Froth mixture between electrodes in a generator duct. When the Froth mixture exits the generator the gas is separated from the liquid metal and both are recycled.

  7. Method and System to Directly Produce Electrical Power within the Lithium Blanket Region of a Magnetically Confined, Deuterium-Tritium (DT) Fueled, Thermonuclear Fusion Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, Robert D.

    1998-09-22

    A method for integrating liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power generation with fusion blanket technology to produce electrical power from a thermonuclear fusion reactor located within a confining magnetic field and within a toroidal structure. A hot liquid metal flows from a liquid metal blanket region into a pump duct of an electromagnetic pump which moves the liquid metal to a mixer where a gas of predetermined pressure is mixed with the pressurized liquid metal to form a Froth mixture. Electrical power is generated by flowing the Froth mixture between electrodes in a generator duct. When the Froth mixture exits the generator the gas is separated from the liquid metal and both are recycled.

  8. Target Designs for an Inertial Fusion Energy Power Plant Driven by Heavy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, D A; Tabak, M

    2001-08-23

    We present two indirect drive inertial fusion targets driven by heavy ions beams for fusion energy production. Because there are uncertainties in the ion beam focal spot size and uncertainties in the accelerator cost, we have tried to design targets that cover a large parameter space. One of the designs requires small ion beam focal spots but produces more than adequate gain at low driver energy (gain 130 from 3.3 MJ of beam energy). The other design allows a large beam spot, but requires more driver energy (gain 55 from 6.7 MJ of beam energy). Target physics issues as well as the implications for the accelerator from each design are discussed.

  9. Channeling of fusion alpha-particle power using minority ion catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhmoginov, A I; Fisch, N J

    2011-10-21

    Maintaining fuel ions hotter than electrons would greatly facilitate controlled nuclear fusion. The parameter range for achieving this temperature disparity is shown here to be enhanced by catalyzing the α-channeling effect (wave-induced simultaneous expulsion and cooling of α particles) through minority-ion heating. Specifically, a wave can extract energy from hot α particles and transfer it to colder minority ions, which act as a catalyst, eventually forwarding the energy to still colder fuel ions through collisions. In comparison with the traditional α-channeling mechanism, the requirements are thereby relaxed on the waves that accomplish the α channeling, which no longer have to interact simultaneously with α particles and fuel ions. Numerical simulations illustrate how the new scheme may increase, for example, the effective fusion reactivity of mirror-confined plasmas. © 2011 American Physical Society

  10. Channeling of Fusion Alpha-Particle Power Using Minority Ion Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhmoginov, A. I.; Fisch, N. J.

    2011-10-01

    Maintaining fuel ions hotter than electrons would greatly facilitate controlled nuclear fusion. The parameter range for achieving this temperature disparity is shown here to be enhanced by catalyzing the α-channeling effect (wave-induced simultaneous expulsion and cooling of α particles) through minority-ion heating. Specifically, a wave can extract energy from hot α particles and transfer it to colder minority ions, which act as a catalyst, eventually forwarding the energy to still colder fuel ions through collisions. In comparison with the traditional α-channeling mechanism, the requirements are thereby relaxed on the waves that accomplish the α channeling, which no longer have to interact simultaneously with α particles and fuel ions. Numerical simulations illustrate how the new scheme may increase, for example, the effective fusion reactivity of mirror-confined plasmas.

  11. Extreme laser pulses for possible development of boron fusion power reactors for clean and lasting energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, H.; Eliezer, S.; Kirchhoff, G. J.; Korn, G.; Lalousis, P.; Miley, G. H.; Moustaizis, S.

    2017-05-01

    The nuclear reaction of hydrogen (protons) with the boron isotope 11 (HB11) is aneutronic avoiding the production of dangerous neutrons in contrast to any other fusion but it is extremely difficult at thermal equilibrium plasma conditions. There are alternative schemes without thermal equilibrium, e.g. the Tri Alpha reversed magnetic field (RMF) confinement and others, however, the only historical first measurements of HB11 fusion were with lasers interacting with high density plasmas using non-thermal direct conversion of laser energy into ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks to avoid the thermal problems. Combining these long studied mechanisms with recently measured ultrahigh magnetic fields for trapping the reacting plasma arrives at a very compact design of an environmentally clean reactor for profitable low cost energy using present technologies.

  12. Boosting laser power - the FEL's research potential ranges from fusion energy to cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yarris, L.

    1986-11-01

    The status of FEL research at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories is reviewed, and some potential applications are examined. The history of laser development is traced; the operating principles of FELs are outlined; and the importance of tapered undulators in extending FEL output beyond 200 MW and increasing energy-extraction efficiency from 5 to 40 percent is stressed. The use of such FELs to heat plasma in nuclear fusion reactors or as the microwave source for a proposed two-beam accelerator is considered.

  13. Transmission final lenses in the HiPER laser fusion power plant: system design for temperature control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páramo, A. R.; Sordo, F.; Garoz, D.; Le Garrec, B.; Perlado, J. M.; Rivera, A.

    2014-12-01

    The European laser fusion project HiPER is developing technologically feasible components for a laser fusion power plant with an evacuated dry wall chamber which is likely to operate with a shock ignition scheme and direct targets. One of the key components is the final optics. In this work, we consider silica transmission final lenses and address the major issues regarding the unavoidable neutron irradiation they must withstand. For pre-commercial power plants (150 MJ target yield at 10 Hz) a distance of 16 m between the final lenses and target leads to maximum lens temperatures within tolerable limits. However, a non-uniform steady-state temperature profile is a major concern because it is the origin of unacceptable aberrations that severely affect the target spots. We have devised an active intervention system based on a heat-transfer fluid to keep the temperature profile as smooth as possible. The main characteristics of the temperature control system are defined throughout this work and enable the operation of the plant, both for the start-up procedure and for normal operation.

  14. Highly efficient one-dimensional ZnO nanowire-based dye-sensitized solar cell using a metal-free, D-π-A-type, carbazole derivative with more than 5% power conversion.

    PubMed

    Barpuzary, Dipankar; Patra, Anindya S; Vaghasiya, Jayraj V; Solanki, Bharat G; Soni, Saurabh S; Qureshi, Mohammad

    2014-08-13

    Hydrothermally grown one-dimensional ZnO nanowire (1D ZnO NW) and a newly synthesized metal-free, D-π-A type, carbazole dye (SK1) sensitizer-based photovoltaic device with a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of more than 5% have been demonstrated by employing the cobalt tris(2,2'-bipyridyl) redox shuttle. A short-circuit current density (Jsc) of ∼12.0 mA/cm(2), an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of ∼719 mV, and a fill factor (FF) of ∼65% have been afforded by the 1D ZnO NW-based dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) incorporating [Co(bpy)3](3+/2+) complex as the one-electron redox mediator. In contrast, the identical DSSC with traditional I3(-)/I(-) electrolyte has shown a Jsc ≈ 12.2 mA/cm(2), a Voc ≈ 629 mV, and a FF ≈ 62%, yielding a PCE of ∼4.7%. The persuasive role of the inherent superior electron transport property of 1D ZnO NWs in enhancing the device efficiency is evidenced from the impoverished performance of the DSSCs with photoanodes fabricated using ZnO nanoparticles (NPs). The DSSCs having ZnO NP-based photoanodes have achieved the PCEs of ∼3.6% and ∼3.2% using cobalt- and iodine-based redox electrolytes, respectively. The electronic interactions between the SK1 sensitizer and ZnO (NWs and NPs) to induce the photogenerated charge transfer from SK1 to the conduction band (CB) of ZnO are evidenced from the significant quenching of photoluminescence and exciton lifetime decay of SK1, when it is anchored onto the ZnO architectures. The energetics of the SK1 dye molecule are estimated by combining the spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques. The electronic distributions of SK1 dye molecule in its HOMO and LUMO energy levels are interpreted using density functional theory (DFT)-based calculations. The electron donor-π linker-acceptor (D-π-A) configuration of SK1 dye provides an intramolecular charge transfer within the molecule, prompting the electron migration from the carbazole donor to cyanoacrylic acceptor moiety via the oligo

  15. Resonantly pumped high efficiency Ho:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ying-Jie; Yao, Bao-Quan; Duan, Xiao-Ming; Dai, Tong-Yu; Ju, You-Lun; Wang, Yue-Zhu

    2012-11-20

    High-efficient CW and Q-switched Ho:YAG lasers resonantly dual-end-pumped by two diode-pumped Tm:YLF lasers at 1908 nm were investigated. A maximum slope efficiency of 74.8% in CW operation as well as a maximum output power of 58.7 W at 83.2 W incident pump power was achieved, which corresponded to an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 70.6%. The maximum pulse energy of 2.94 mJ was achieved, with a 31 ns FWHM pulse width and a peak power of approximately 94.7 kW.

  16. High-Efficiency Absorber for Damping the Transverse Wake Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; Weathersby, S.; /SLAC

    2007-02-28

    Transverse wake fields generated by intense beams may propagate long distances in the vacuum chamber and dissipate power in different shielded elements such as bellows, vacuum valves or vacuum pumps. Induced heating in these elements may be high enough to deteriorate vacuum conditions. We have developed a broadband water-cooled bellows-absorber to capture and damp these harmful transverse fields without impacting the longitudinal beam impedance. Experimental results at the PEP-II SLAC B-factory demonstrate high efficiency of this device. This absorber may be useful in other machines like synchrotron light sources or International Linear Collider.

  17. High-efficiency, 200 watt, 12-gigahertz traveling wave tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G.; Mcnary, B. D.; Sauseng, O.

    1974-01-01

    Design and performance of a highly efficient experimental 200-watt traveling wave tube for space communications are described. The tube uses a coupled cavity slow wave structure with periodic permanent magnet focusing. A two-step velocity taper is incorporated in the slow wave structure for velocity resynchronization with the modulated beam. The spent beam is reconditioned in a refocusing section before it is collected in a novel multistage depressed collector. The collector is radiation cooled and heat insulated from the tube body. At saturation the tube provides peak output power of 240 watts with a 35-db gain and an overall maximum efficiency of 56 percent.

  18. High efficiency low cost monolithic module for SARSAT distress beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Wendell C.; Siu, Daniel P.

    1992-01-01

    The program objectives were to develop a highly efficient, low cost RF module for SARSAT beacons; achieve significantly lower battery current drain, amount of heat generated, and size of battery required; utilize MMIC technology to improve efficiency, reliability, packaging, and cost; and provide a technology database for GaAs based UHF RF circuit architectures. Presented in viewgraph form are functional block diagrams of the SARSAT distress beacon and beacon RF module as well as performance goals, schematic diagrams, predicted performances, and measured performances for the phase modulator and power amplifier.

  19. Very High Efficiency Solar Cell Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, A.; Kirkpatrick, D.; Honsberg, C.; Moore, D.; Wanlass, M.; Emery, K.; Schwartz, R.; Carlson, D.; Bowden, S.; Aiken, D.; Gray, A.; Kurtz, S.; Kazmerski, L., et al

    2009-01-01

    The Very High Efficiency Solar Cell (VHESC) program is developing integrated optical system - PV modules for portable applications that operate at greater than 50% efficiency. We are integrating the optical design with the solar cell design, and have entered previously unoccupied design space. Our approach is driven by proven quantitative models for the solar cell design, the optical design, and the integration of these designs. Optical systems efficiency with an optical efficiency of 93% and solar cell device results under ideal dichroic splitting optics summing to 42.7 {+-} 2.5% are described.

  20. Proposal for superstructure based high efficiency photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, M.; Leburton, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    A novel class of cascade structures is proposed which features multijunction upper subcells, referred to as superstructure high-efficiency photovoltaics (SHEPs). The additional junctions enhance spectral response and improve radiation tolerance by reducing bulk recombination losses. This is important because ternary III-V alloys, which tend to have short minority-carrier diffusion lengths, are the only viable materials for the high-bandgap upper subcells required for cascade solar cells. Realistic simulations of AlGaAs SHEPs show that one-sun AM0 efficiencies in excess of 26 percent are possible.