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Sample records for high-energy emission mechanisms

  1. Studies on High Energy Radiation Mechanisms and Gamma-Ray Burst Prompt Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.

    2014-07-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the most violent high-energy explosion in the universe. They are randomly happened, pulse-like phenomena with short durations. Since its discovery in 1960's by Vela satellite, GRBs have become a hot topic for astrophysical research. In 1997 the BeppoSAX satellite discovered afterglows of GRBs, and then helped to measure GRB redshifts. Thus it was found that GRBs are the events occurred at cosmological distances. Now it is widely accepted that the long bursts with durations longer than 2 s are from the collapsing massive stars, while the short bursts with durations less than 2 s are results of the merging compact binaries. By studying GRBs, the physical processes in ultrarelativistic and very high energy conditions can be investigated, and the researches on other fields, including constraining the cosmological models, can also get helped. The goal of this thesis is to present some discussions on possible radiation mechanisms and prompt light curves of GRBs. Since radiation mechanisms and prompt emissions are related to GRB central engines directly, studying these topics can help us to get a better understanding of some properties of the central engine. In Chapter 1, we review the discovery and observations of GRBs, presenting major achievements from major GRB-monitoring satellites including Compton Gamma-ray Observatory, BeppoSAX satellite, Swift satellite, as well as the latest Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The multi-wavelength properties of prompt emission as well as afterglows of GRBs are also summarized in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 the current GRB standard model is presented. According to standard model, a fireball is ejected by the central engine. The internal shock is produced by collisions between various shells with different velocities inside the fireball. The directional kinetic energy of the fireball is then converted to internal energy, and finally the non-thermal radiation (the prompt emission) is produced by internal shocks

  2. High-energy thermal synchrotron emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imamura, J. N.; Epstein, R. I.; Petrosian, V.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown how the thermal synchrotron emission spectrum is modified when the photon energy is greater than the mean energy of the radiating particles. The effect if applying this energy conservation constraint is to produce spectra which have less high-energy photon emission than had been previously estimated. The thermal synchrotron spectra provide satisfactory fits to recently observed very high energy gamma ray spectra of certain burst sources.

  3. High-energy emission from transients.

    PubMed

    Hinton, J A; Starling, R L C

    2013-06-13

    Cosmic explosions dissipate energy into their surroundings on a very wide range of time scales: producing shock waves and associated particle acceleration. The historical culprits for the acceleration of the bulk of Galactic cosmic rays are supernova remnants: explosions on approximately 10(4) year time scales. Increasingly, however, time-variable emission points to rapid and efficient particle acceleration in a range of different astrophysical systems. Gamma-ray bursts have the shortest time scales, with inferred bulk Lorentz factors of approximately 1000 and photons emitted beyond 100 GeV, but active galaxies, pulsar wind nebulae and colliding stellar winds are all now associated with time-variable emission at approximately teraelectron volt energies. Cosmic photons and neutrinos at these energies offer a powerful probe of the underlying physical mechanisms of cosmic explosions, and a tool for exploring fundamental physics with these systems. Here, we discuss the motivations for high-energy observations of transients, the current experimental situation, and the prospects for the next decade, with particular reference to the major next-generation high-energy observatory, the Cherenkov Telescope Array.

  4. Role of oxygen vacancies on light emission mechanisms in SrTiO3 induced by high-energy particles

    DOE PAGES

    Crespillo, M. L.; Graham, J. T.; Agulló-López, F.; ...

    2017-02-23

    Light emission under MeV hydrogen and oxygen ions in stoichiometric SrTiO3 are identified at temperatures of 100 K, 170 K and room-temperature. MeV ions predominately deposit their energies to electrons in SrTiO3 with energy densities orders of magnitude higher than from UV or x-ray sources but comparable to femtosecond lasers. The ionoluminescence (IL) spectra can be resolved into three main Gaussian bands at 2.0 eV, 2.5 eV and 2.8 eV, whose relative contributions strongly depend on irradiation temperature, electronic energy loss and irradiation fluence. Two main bands, observed at 2.5 eV and 2.8 eV, are intrinsic and associated with electron–holemore » recombination in the perfect SrTiO3 lattice. The 2.8 eV band is attributed to recombination of free (conduction) electrons with an in-gap level, possibly related to self-trapped holes. Self-trapped excitons (STEs) are considered suitable candidates for the 2.5 eV emission band, which implies a large energy relaxation in comparison to the intrinsic edge transition. The dynamics of electronic excitation, governs a rapid initial rise of the intensity; whereas, accumulated irradiation damage (competing non-radiative recombination channels) accounts for a subsequent intensity decrease. The previously invoked role of isolated oxygen vacancies for the blue luminescence (2.8 eV) does not appear consistent with the data. An increasing well-resolved band at 2.0 eV dominates at 170 K and below. It has been only previously observed in heavily strained and amorphous SrTiO3, and is, here, attributed to transitions from d(t 2g) conduction band levels to d(e g) levels below the gap. In accordance with ab initio theoretical calculations they are associated to trapped electron states in relaxed Ti3+ centers at an oxygen vacancy within distorted TiO6 octahedra. The mechanism of defect evolution monitored during real-time IL experiments is presented. In conclusion, the light emission data confirm that IL is a useful tool to

  5. Role of oxygen vacancies on light emission mechanisms in SrTiO3 induced by high-energy particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespillo, M. L.; Graham, J. T.; Agulló-López, F.; Zhang, Y.; Weber, W. J.

    2017-04-01

    Light emission under MeV hydrogen and oxygen ions in stoichiometric SrTiO3 are identified at temperatures of 100 K, 170 K and room-temperature. MeV ions predominately deposit their energies to electrons in SrTiO3 with energy densities orders of magnitude higher than from UV or x-ray sources but comparable to femtosecond lasers. The ionoluminescence (IL) spectra can be resolved into three main Gaussian bands at 2.0 eV, 2.5 eV and 2.8 eV, whose relative contributions strongly depend on irradiation temperature, electronic energy loss and irradiation fluence. Two main bands, observed at 2.5 eV and 2.8 eV, are intrinsic and associated with electron–hole recombination in the perfect SrTiO3 lattice. The 2.8 eV band is attributed to recombination of free (conduction) electrons with an in-gap level, possibly related to self-trapped holes. Self-trapped excitons (STEs) are considered suitable candidates for the 2.5 eV emission band, which implies a large energy relaxation in comparison to the intrinsic edge transition. The dynamics of electronic excitation, governs a rapid initial rise of the intensity; whereas, accumulated irradiation damage (competing non-radiative recombination channels) accounts for a subsequent intensity decrease. The previously invoked role of isolated oxygen vacancies for the blue luminescence (2.8 eV) does not appear consistent with the data. An increasing well-resolved band at 2.0 eV dominates at 170 K and below. It has been only previously observed in heavily strained and amorphous SrTiO3, and is, here, attributed to transitions from d(t 2g) conduction band levels to d(e g) levels below the gap. In accordance with ab initio theoretical calculations they are associated to trapped electron states in relaxed Ti3+ centers at an oxygen vacancy within distorted TiO6 octahedra. The mechanism of defect evolution monitored during real-time IL experiments is presented. In conclusion, the light emission data confirm that IL is a

  6. High-Energy Emission From Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Usov, Vladimir V.; Muslimov, Alex G.

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray and gamma-ray spectrum of rotation-powered millisecond pulsars is investigated in a model for acceleration and pair cascades on open field lines above the polar caps. Although these pulsars have low surface magnetic fields, their short periods allow them to have large magnetospheric potential drops, but the majority do not produce sufficient pairs to completely screen the accelerating electric field. In these sources, the primary and secondary electrons continue to accelerate to high altitude and their Lorentz factors are limited by curvature and synchrotron radiation reaction. The accelerating particles maintain high Lorentz factors and undergo cyclotron resonant absorption of radio emission, that produces and maintains a large pitch angle, resulting in a strong synchrotron component. The resulting spectra consist of several distinct components: curvature radiation from primary electrons dominating from 1 - 100 GeV, synchrotron radiation from primary and secondary electrons dominating up to about 100 MeV, and much weaker inverse-Compton radiation from primary electrons a t 0.1 - 1 TeV. We find that the relative size of these components depends on pulsar period, period derivative, and neutron star mass and radius with the level of the synchrotron component also depending sensitively on the radio emission properties. This model is successful in describing the observed X-ray and gamma-ray spectrum of PSR J0218+4232 as synchrotron radiation, peaking around 100 MeV and extending up to a turnover around several GeV. The predicted curvature radiation components from a number of millisecond pulsars, as well as the collective emission from the millisecond pulsars in globular clusters, should be detectable with AGILE and GLAST. We also discuss a hidden population of X-ray-quiet and radio-quiet millisecond pulsars which have evolved below the pair death line, some of which may be detectable by telescopes sensitive above 1 GeV. Subject headings: pulsars: general

  7. High energy polarimetry of prompt GRB emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Mark L.

    2017-02-01

    [Evidence] of polarized γ-ray emission (> 50 keV) from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) has been accumulated in recent years. Measurements have been reported with levels in the range of 30-80%, typically with limited statistical significance. No clear picture has yet emerged with regards to the polarization properties of GRBs. Taken at face value, the data suggest that most GRBs have a relatively large level of polarization (typically, > 50%), which may suggest synchrotron emission associated with an ordered magnetic field structure within the GRB jet. But these results are far from conclusive. Here, we review the observations that have been made, concentrating especially on the instrumental issues and the lessons that might be learned from these data.

  8. Theory of High Energy Emission in GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Meszaros, Peter

    2007-05-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are thought to be capable of accelerating cosmic rays up to GZK energies Ep {approx} 1020 eV, leading to a flux at Earth comparable to that observed by large EAS arrays such as AUGER. Both leptonic, e.g. synchrotron and inverse Compton, as well as photomeson processes can lead to GeV-TeV gamma-rays measurable by GLAST, AGILE, or ACTs, providing useful probes of the burst physics and model parameters. Photomeson interactions also produce neutrinos at energies ranging from sub-TeV to EeV, which will be probed with forthcoming experiments such as IceCube, ANITA and KM3NeT. This would provide information about the fundamental interaction physics, the acceleration mechanism, the nature of the sources and their environment.

  9. High-energy emission in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matz, S. M.; Forrest, D. J.; Vestrand, W. T.; Chupp, E. L.; Share, G. H.; Rieger, E.

    1985-01-01

    Between February 1980 and August 1983 the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission Satellite (SMM) detected 72 events identified as being of cosmic origin. These events are an essentially unbiased subset of all gamma-ray bursts. The measured spectra of these events show that high energy (greater than 1 MeV) emission is a common and energetically important feature. There is no evidence for a general high-energy cut-off or a distribution of cut-offs below about 6 MeV. These observations imply a limit on the preferential beaming of high energy emission. This constraint, combined with the assumption of isotropic low energy emission, implies that the typical magnetic field strength at burst radiation sites is less than 1 x 10 to the 12th gauss.

  10. CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM GRB 130427A

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Errando, M.; Aune, T.; Barnacka, A.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M.; Berger, K.; Biteau, J.; Byrum, K.; Cardenzana, J. V; Dickinson, H. J.; Eisch, J. D.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connaughton, V.; Cui, W.; Falcone, A. E-mail: sjzhu@umd.edu; and others

    2014-11-01

    Prompt emission from the very fluent and nearby (z = 0.34) gamma-ray burst GRB 130427A was detected by several orbiting telescopes and by ground-based, wide-field-of-view optical transient monitors. Apart from the intensity and proximity of this GRB, it is exceptional due to the extremely long-lived high-energy (100 MeV to 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission, which was detected by the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope for ∼70 ks after the initial burst. The persistent, hard-spectrum, high-energy emission suggests that the highest-energy gamma rays may have been produced via synchrotron self-Compton processes though there is also evidence that the high-energy emission may instead be an extension of the synchrotron spectrum. VERITAS, a ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope array, began follow-up observations of GRB 130427A ∼71 ks (∼20 hr) after the onset of the burst. The GRB was not detected with VERITAS; however, the high elevation of the observations, coupled with the low redshift of the GRB, make VERITAS a very sensitive probe of the emission from GRB 130427A for E > 100 GeV. The non-detection and consequent upper limit derived place constraints on the synchrotron self-Compton model of high-energy gamma-ray emission from this burst.

  11. Neutron emission and fragment yield in high-energy fission

    SciTech Connect

    Grudzevich, O. T. Klinov, D. A.

    2013-07-15

    The KRIS special library of spectra and emission probabilities in the decays of 1500 nuclei excited up to energies between 150 and 250 MeV was developed for correctly taking into account the decay of highly excited nuclei appearing as fission fragments. The emission of neutrons, protons, and photons was taken into account. Neutron emission fromprimary fragments was found to have a substantial effect on the formation of yields of postneutron nuclei. The library was tested by comparing the calculated and measured yields of products originating from the fission of nuclei that was induced by high-energy protons. The method for calculating these yields was tested on the basis of experimental data on the thermal-neutroninduced fission of {sup 235}U nuclei.

  12. Theoretical overview on high-energy emission in microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch-Ramon, Valentí

    2007-06-01

    Microquasar (MQ) jets are sites of particle acceleration and synchrotron emission. Such synchrotron radiation has been detected coming from jet regions of different spatial scales, which for the instruments at work nowadays appear as compact radio cores, slightly resolvedradio jets, or (very) extended structures (e.g. Mirabel and Rodríguez, 1999; Fender, 2001; Corbel et al., 2002). Because of the presence of relativistic particles and dense photon, magnetic and matter fields, these outflows are also the best candidates to generate the very high-energy (VHE) gamma-rays detected coming from two of these objects, LS 5039 and LS I +61 303 (Aharonian, 2005; Aharonian et al., 2006a; and Albert, 2006, respectively), and may be contributing significantly to the X-rays emitted from the MQ core (e.g. Markoff et al., 2001; Bosch-Ramon et al., 2005a). In addition, beside electromagnetic radiation, jets at different scales are producing some amount of leptonic and hadronic cosmic rays (CR), and evidences of neutrino production in these objects may be eventually found. In this work, we review on the different physical processes that may be at work in or related to MQ jets. The jet regions capable to produce significant amounts of emission at different wavelengths have been reduced to the jet base, the jet at scales of the order of the size of the system orbital semi-major axis, the jet middle scales (the resolved radio jets), and the jet termination point. The surroundings of the jet could be sites of multiwavelength emission as well, deserving also an insight. We focus on those scenarios, either hadronic or leptonic, in which it seems more plausible to generate both photons from radio to VHE and high-energy neutrinos. We briefly comment as well on the relevance of MQ as possible contributors to the galactic CR in the GeV-PeV range.

  13. Resolving high energy emission of jets using strong gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnacka, Anna

    2014-11-01

    Chandra observations of M87 in 2004 uncovered an outburst originating in distant knot along the jet hundreds of parsecs from the core. This discovery challenges our understanding of the origin of high energy flares. Current technology is inadequate to resolve jets at distances greater than M87, or observed at higher energies. We propose to use gravitationally lensed jets to investigate the structure of more distant sources. Photons emitted at different sites cross the lens plane at different distances, thus magnification ratios and time delays differ between the mirage images. Monitoring of flares from lensed jets reveals the origin of the emission. With detectors like Chandra, lensed systems are a tool for resolving the structure of the jets and for investigating their cosmic evolution.

  14. Spectral diagnostics of high energy emission in lambda Eri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Myron

    1995-01-01

    Multi-line observations of the optical spectrum of lambda Eri demonstrates that rapidly varying, low-velocity emissions occur in several He I lines even when H alpha shows no emission. A peculiar aspect of the He I emissions is that the ratio 5876/6678 is = 1. A theory of helium line formation generally admits two common emission mechanisms. The first is recombination/cascades, which is well known to give a ratio of greater than or equal to 3. The second is a non-LTE effect that occurs in hot (O-type) photospheres when resonance He I 584 radiation becomes transparent and drives single lines along into the emission. To accommodate a ratio of 5876/6678 = 1 may require that both processes sometimes operate at the same time, presumably in separate localities near the surface of this star.

  15. The Prompt and High Energy Emission of Gamma Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Meszaros, P.

    2009-05-25

    I discuss some recent developments concerning the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts, in particular the jet properties and radiation mechanisms, as exemplified by the naked-eye burst GRB 080319b, and the prompt X-ray emission of XRB080109/SN2008d, where the progenitor has, for the first time, been shown to contribute to the prompt emission. I discuss then some recent theoretical calculations of the GeV/TeV spectrum of GRB in the context of both leptonic SSC models and hadronic models. The recent observations by the Fermi satellite of GRB 080916C are then reviewed, and their implications for such models are discussed, together with its interesting determination of a bulk Lorentz factor, and the highest lower limit on the quantum gravity energy scale so far.

  16. High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts - Before GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi

    2011-11-29

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft {gamma}-rays, which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s. The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs, support the fireball model, and imply a long-activity of the central engine. The high-energy {gamma}-ray emission (> 20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work, we review observational and theoretical studies of the high-energy emission from GRBs. Special attention is given to the expected high-energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

  17. Diffuse emission of high-energy neutrinos from gamma-ray burst fireballs

    SciTech Connect

    Tamborra, Irene; Ando, Shin'ichiro E-mail: s.ando@uva.nl

    2015-09-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been suggested as possible sources of the high-energy neutrino flux recently detected by the IceCube telescope. We revisit the fireball emission model and elaborate an analytical prescription to estimate the high-energy neutrino prompt emission from pion and kaon decays, assuming that the leading mechanism for the neutrino production is lepto-hadronic. To this purpose, we include hadronic, radiative and adiabatic cooling effects and discuss their relevance for long- (including high- and low-luminosity) and short-duration GRBs. The expected diffuse neutrino background is derived, by requiring that the GRB high-energy neutrino counterparts follow up-to-date gamma-ray luminosity functions and redshift evolutions of the long and short GRBs. Although dedicated stacking searches have been unsuccessful up to now, we find that GRBs could contribute up to a few % to the observed IceCube high-energy neutrino flux for sub-PeV energies, assuming that the latter has a diffuse origin. Gamma-ray bursts, especially low-luminosity ones, could however be the main sources of the IceCube high-energy neutrino flux in the PeV range. While high-luminosity and low-luminosity GRBs have comparable intensities, the contribution from the short-duration component is significantly smaller. Our findings confirm the most-recent IceCube results on the GRB searches and suggest that larger exposure is mandatory to detect high-energy neutrinos from high-luminosity GRBs in the near future.

  18. High-energy gamma-ray emission from pion decay in a solar flare magnetic loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandzhavidze, Natalie; Ramaty, Reuven

    1992-01-01

    The production of high-energy gamma rays resulting from pion decay in a solar flare magnetic loop is investigated. Magnetic mirroring, MHD pitch-angle scattering, and all of the relevant loss processes and photon production mechanisms are taken into account. The transport of both the primary ions and the secondary positrons resulting from the decay of the positive pions, as well as the transport of the produced gamma-ray emission are considered. The distributions of the gamma rays as a function of atmospheric depth, time, emission angle, and photon energy are calculated and the dependence of these distributions on the model parameters are studied. The obtained angular distributions are not sufficiently anisotropic to account for the observed limb brightening of the greater than 10 MeV flare emission, indicating that the bulk of this emission is bremsstrahlung from primary electrons.

  19. High-energy Neutrino Emission from White Dwarf Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Di; Mészáros, Peter; Murase, Kohta; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2016-11-01

    The merger of two white dwarfs is expected to result in a central fast-rotating core surrounded by a debris disk, in which magnetorotational instabilities give rise to a hot magnetized corona and a magnetized outflow. The dissipation of magnetic energy via reconnection could lead to the acceleration of cosmic-rays (CRs) in the expanding material, which would result in high energy neutrinos. We discuss the possibility of using these neutrino signals as probes of the outflow dynamics, magnetic energy dissipation rate, and CR acceleration efficiency. Importantly, the accompanying high-energy gamma-rays are absorbed within these sources because of the large optical depth, so these neutrino sources can be regarded as hidden cosmic-ray accelerators that are consistent with the non-detection of gamma-rays with Fermi-LAT. While the CR generation rate is highly uncertain, if it reaches ∼ {10}45 {erg} {{Mpc}}-3 {{yr}}-1, the diffuse neutrino flux could contribute a substantial fraction of the IceCube observations. We also evaluate the prospect of observing individual merger events, which provides a means for testing such sources in the future.

  20. Accretion, jets and winds: High-energy emission from young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, H. M.

    2011-06-01

    This article summarizes the processes of high-energy emission in young stellar objects. Stars of spectral type A and B are called Herbig Ae/Be (HAeBe) stars in this stage, all later spectral types are termed classical T Tauri stars (CTTS). Both types are studied by high-resolution X-ray and UV spectroscopy and modeling. Three mechanisms contribute to the high-energy emission from CTTS: 1) CTTS have active coronae similar to main-sequence stars, 2) the accreted material passes through an accretion shock at the stellar surface, which heats it to a few MK, and 3) some CTTS drive powerful outflows. Shocks within these jets can heat the plasma to X-ray emitting temperatures. Coronae are already well characterized in the literature; for the latter two scenarios models are shown. The magnetic field suppresses motion perpendicular to the field lines in the accretion shock, thus justifying a 1D geometry. The radiative loss is calculated as optically thin emission. A mixture of shocked and coronal gas is fitted to X-ray observations of accreting CTTS. Specifically, the model explains the peculiar line-ratios in the He-like triplets of Ne IX and O VII. All stars require only small mass accretion rates to power the X-ray emission. In contrast, the HAeBe HD 163296 has line ratios similar to coronal sources, indicating that neither a high density nor a strong UV-field is present in the region of the X-ray emission. This could be caused by a shock in its jet. Similar emission is found in the deeply absorbed CTTS DG Tau. Shock velocities between 400 and 500 km s-1 are required to explain the observed spectrum. Doctoral Thesis Award Lecture 2010

  1. Fermi γ-ray Pulsars: Towards the Understanding of the Pulsed High-Energy Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Kust Harding, Alice; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Brambilla, Gabriele

    2016-04-01

    Based on the Fermi observational data we reveal meaningful constraints for the dependence of the macroscopic parameters of dissipative pulsar magnetosphere models on the corresponding spin-down rate. Our models are specifications of the FIDO (Force-Free Inside, Dissipative Outside) model where the dissipative regions are outside the light-cylinder near the equatorial current sheet. These models provide not only the field geometry but also the necessary particle accelerating electric fields. Assuming emission due to curvature radiation, the FIDO models reproduce the observed light-curve phenomenology as depicted in the radio-lag vs peak-separation diagram obtained by Fermi. A direct and detailed comparison of the model spectral properties (cutoff energies and total γ-ray luminosities) with those observed by Fermi reveals the dependence of the macroscopic conductivity parameter on the spin-down rate providing a unique insight for the understanding of the physical mechanisms behind the high-energy emission in pulsar magnetospheres.

  2. High-energy emission of the first millisecond pulsar

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C.-Y.; Takata, J.; Leung, G. C. K.; Cheng, K. S.; Philippopoulos, P.

    2014-06-01

    We report on X-ray and gamma-ray observations of the millisecond pulsar (MSP) B1937+21 taken with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, XMM-Newton, and the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The pulsar X-ray emission shows a purely non-thermal spectrum with a hard photon index of 0.9 ± 0.1, and is nearly 100% pulsed. We found no evidence of varying pulse profile with energy as previously claimed. We also analyzed 5.5 yr of Fermi survey data and obtained much improved constraints on the pulsar's timing and spectral properties in gamma-rays. The pulsed spectrum is adequately fitted by a simple power-law with a photon index of 2.38 ± 0.07. Both the gamma-ray and X-ray pulse profiles show similar two-peak structure and generally align with the radio peaks. We found that the aligned profiles and the hard spectrum in X-rays seem to be common properties among MSPs with high magnetic fields at the light cylinder. We discuss a possible physical scenario that could give rise to these features.

  3. DISCOVERY OF HIGH-ENERGY AND VERY HIGH ENERGY {gamma}-RAY EMISSION FROM THE BLAZAR RBS 0413

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Bouvier, A.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Benbow, W.; Boettcher, M.; Bradbury, S. M.; Byrum, K.; Decerprit, G.; Cannon, A.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P.; Ciupik, L.; Coppi, P.; Cui, W. E-mail: fortin@llr.in2p3.fr; and others

    2012-05-10

    We report on the discovery of high-energy (HE; E > 0.1 GeV) and very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) {gamma}-ray emission from the high-frequency-peaked BL Lac object RBS 0413. VERITAS, a ground-based {gamma}-ray observatory, detected VHE {gamma} rays from RBS 0413 with a statistical significance of 5.5 standard deviations ({sigma}) and a {gamma}-ray flux of (1.5 {+-} 0.6{sub stat} {+-} 0.7{sub syst}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} photons m{sup -2} s{sup -1} ({approx}1% of the Crab Nebula flux) above 250 GeV. The observed spectrum can be described by a power law with a photon index of 3.18 {+-} 0.68{sub stat} {+-} 0.30{sub syst}. Contemporaneous observations with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope detected HE {gamma} rays from RBS 0413 with a statistical significance of more than 9{sigma}, a power-law photon index of 1.57 {+-} 0.12{sub stat}+{sup 0.11}{sub -0.12sys}, and a {gamma}-ray flux between 300 MeV and 300 GeV of (1.64 {+-} 0.43{sub stat}{sup +0.31}{sub -0.22sys}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} photons m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. We present the results from Fermi-LAT and VERITAS, including a spectral energy distribution modeling of the {gamma}-ray, quasi-simultaneous X-ray (Swift-XRT), ultraviolet (Swift-UVOT), and R-band optical (MDM) data. We find that, if conditions close to equipartition are required, both the combined synchrotron self-Compton/external-Compton and the lepto-hadronic models are preferred over a pure synchrotron self-Compton model.

  4. The Search for High Energy Extended Emission by Fermi-LAT from Swift-Localized Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, J.; Racusin, J.L.; /NASA, Goddard

    2012-05-01

    The brighter Fermi-LAT bursts have exhibited emission at energies >0.1 GeV that persists as late as {approx}2 ks after the prompt phase has nominally ended. This so-called 'extended emission' could arise from continued activity of the prompt burst mechanism or it could be the start of a high energy afterglow component. The high energy extended emission seen by the LAT has typically followed a t{sup -}{gamma} power-law temporal decay where {gamma} {approx} 1.2-1.7 and has shown no strong indication of spectral evolution. In contrast, the prompt burst emission generally displays strong spectral variability and more complex temporal changes in the LAT band. This differing behavior suggests that the extended emission likely corresponds to an early afterglow phase produced by an external shock. In this study, we look for evidence of high energy extended emission from 145 Swift-localized GRBs that have occurred since the launch of Fermi. A majority of these bursts were either outside of the LAT field-of-view or were otherwise not detected by the LAT during the prompt phase. However, because of the scanning operation of the Fermi satellite, the long-lived extended emission of these bursts may be detectable in the LAT data on the {approx}few ks time scale. We will look for emission from individual bursts and will perform a stacking analysis in order to set bounds on this emission for the sample as a whole. The detection of such emission would have implications for afterglow models and for the overall energy budget of GRBs.

  5. Search for emission of ultra high energy radiation from active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    The CYGNUS Collaboration

    1993-05-01

    A search for emission of ultra-high energy gamma radiation from 13 active galactic nuclei that were detected by EGRET, using the CYGNUS extensive air-shower array, is described. The data set has been searched for continuous emission, emission on the time scale of one week, and for on the time scale of out day. No evidence for emission from any of the AGN on any of the time scales examined was found. The 90% C.L. upper limit to the continuous flux from Mrk 421 above 50 TeV is 7.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}14} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}.

  6. Search for emission of ultra high energy radiation from active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    A search for emission of ultra-high energy gamma radiation from 13 active galactic nuclei that were detected by EGRET, using the CYGNUS extensive air-shower array, is described. The data set has been searched for continuous emission, emission on the time scale of one week, and for on the time scale of out day. No evidence for emission from any of the AGN on any of the time scales examined was found. The 90% C.L. upper limit to the continuous flux from Mrk 421 above 50 TeV is 7.5 [times] 10[sup [minus]14] cm[sup [minus]2]s[sup [minus]1].

  7. Spatially resolving the very high energy emission from MGRO J2019+37 with VERITAS

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Errando, M.; Aune, T.; Behera, B.; Chen, X.; Federici, S.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M.; Berger, K.; Bird, R.; Bouvier, A.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dumm, J.; Dwarkadas, V. V.; Falcone, A. E-mail: nahee@uchicago.edu; and others

    2014-06-10

    We present very high energy (VHE) imaging of MGRO J2019+37 obtained with the VERITAS observatory. The bright extended (∼2°) unidentified Milagro source is located toward the rich star formation region Cygnus-X. MGRO J2019+37 is resolved into two VERITAS sources. The faint, point-like source VER J2016+371 overlaps CTB 87, a filled-center remnant (SNR) with no evidence of a supernova remnant shell at the present time. Its spectrum is well fit in the 0.65-10 TeV energy range by a power-law model with photon index 2.3 ± 0.4. VER J2019+378 is a bright extended (∼1°) source that likely accounts for the bulk of the Milagro emission and is notably coincident with PSR J2021+3651 and the star formation region Sh 2–104. Its spectrum in the range 1-30 TeV is well fit with a power-law model of photon index 1.75 ± 0.3, among the hardest values measured in the VHE band, comparable to that observed near Vela-X. We explore the unusual spectrum and morphology in the radio and X-ray bands to constrain possible emission mechanisms for this source.

  8. Spatially Resolving the Very High Energy Emission from MGRO J2019+37 with VERITAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliu, E.; Aune, T.; Behera, B.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Berger, K.; Bird, R.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dumm, J.; Dwarkadas, V. V.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gillanders, G. H.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Griffin, S.; Griffiths, S. T.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Hughes, G.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kargaltsev, O.; Kertzman, M.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Madhavan, A. S.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Millis, J.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nieto, D.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Park, N.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Prokoph, H.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Rajotte, J.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Roberts, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tucci, J. V.; Tyler, J.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weinstein, A.; Welsing, R.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.

    2014-06-01

    We present very high energy (VHE) imaging of MGRO J2019+37 obtained with the VERITAS observatory. The bright extended (~2°) unidentified Milagro source is located toward the rich star formation region Cygnus-X. MGRO J2019+37 is resolved into two VERITAS sources. The faint, point-like source VER J2016+371 overlaps CTB 87, a filled-center remnant (SNR) with no evidence of a supernova remnant shell at the present time. Its spectrum is well fit in the 0.65-10 TeV energy range by a power-law model with photon index 2.3 ± 0.4. VER J2019+378 is a bright extended (~1°) source that likely accounts for the bulk of the Milagro emission and is notably coincident with PSR J2021+3651 and the star formation region Sh 2-104. Its spectrum in the range 1-30 TeV is well fit with a power-law model of photon index 1.75 ± 0.3, among the hardest values measured in the VHE band, comparable to that observed near Vela-X. We explore the unusual spectrum and morphology in the radio and X-ray bands to constrain possible emission mechanisms for this source.

  9. High-energy two-electron capture with emission of a single photon

    SciTech Connect

    Drukarev, E. G.; Mikhailov, A. I.; Mikhailov, I. A.; Scheid, W.

    2007-12-15

    We investigate the two-electron capture with emission of a single photon to the ground state in the Coulomb field of a heavy nucleus in its collision with a light atom. Describing electron-electron interactions in the bound state perturbatively, we obtained an analytical formula for the high-energy limit of the cross section. In combination with previous results obtained in the same approach we calculated the cross section in a broad interval of energies of the collision. We show that the amplitude of the process at high energy depends on the behavior of the bound state wave function near the triple coalescence point. We analyze the properties of the approximate wave functions which are necessary for the description of the high-energy limit.

  10. Very high energy gamma-ray emission from Tycho's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxon, Dana Boltuch

    Supernova remnant (SNR) G120.1+1.4 (also known as Tycho's SNR) is the remnant of one of only five confirmed historical supernovae. As such, it has been well studied across the electromagnetic spectrum. This thesis describes the first statistically significant detection of very high energy (VHE) (˜ 100 GeV to 100 TeV) gamma rays from Tycho's SNR, reported in 2011 by the VERITAS collaboration. The analysis that led to that detection was performed by this author, and this dissertation will discuss the process in detail. Subsequently, a statistically significant detection in high energy (HE) (˜ 30 MeV to 100 GeV) gamma rays was reported by other authors using data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Comparison of models to the spectral energy distribution of the photon flux from this remnant in HE and VHE gamma rays favors a hadronic origin for the emission, particularly when combined with current X-ray data, although a leptonic origin cannot be ruled out at this time. This is significant because a confirmed hadronic origin for the gamma-ray emission would identify this SNR as a site of cosmic ray acceleration, providing observational evidence for the idea that SNRs are the source of the Galactic cosmic ray population. Chapter 1 of this dissertation will provide historical background on Tycho's SNR, along with a summary of modern observations of the remnant across the electromagnetic spectrum. Chapter 2 is a discussion of the role played by SNRs in the process of cosmic ray acceleration, including both theoretical underpinnings and observational evidence. Chapter 3 provides an overview of the field of VHE gamma-ray astronomy, with discussions of gamma-ray production mechanisms and gamma-ray source classes. Chapter 4 describes the instruments used to observe HE and VHE gamma rays. Chapter 5 is a discussion of general analysis methods and techniques for data from Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs). Chapter 6 provides details about the specific

  11. Modulated High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from the Microquasar Cygnus X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celik, O.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Johnson, T. J.; Pottschmidt, K.; Thompson, D. J.

    2009-01-01

    Microquasars are accreting black holes or neutron stars in binary systems with associated relativistic jets. Despite their frequent outburst activity, they have never been unambiguously detected emitting high-energy gamma rays. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has detected a variable high-energy source coinciding with the position of the x-ray binary and microquasar Cygnus X-3. Its identification with Cygnus X-3 is secured by the detection of its orbital period in gamma rays, as well as the correlation of the LAT flux with radio emission from the relativistic jets of Cygnus X-3. The gamma-ray emission probably originates from within the binary system, opening new areas in which to study the formation of relativistic jets.

  12. Modulated high-energy gamma-ray emission from the microquasar Cygnus X-3.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Chaty, S; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Corbel, S; Corbet, R; Dermer, C D; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dubus, G; Dumora, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Frailis, M; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hill, A B; Hjalmarsdotter, L; Horan, D; Hughes, R E; Jackson, M S; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Koerding, E; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marchand, L; Marelli, M; Max-Moerbeck, W; Mazziotta, M N; McColl, N; McEnery, J E; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Migliari, S; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Ong, R A; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pooley, G; Porter, T A; Pottschmidt, K; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Rea, N; Readhead, A; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Richards, J L; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, J; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Stevenson, M; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tomsick, J A; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vasileiou, V; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wang, P; Wilms, J; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-12-11

    Microquasars are accreting black holes or neutron stars in binary systems with associated relativistic jets. Despite their frequent outburst activity, they have never been unambiguously detected emitting high-energy gamma rays. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has detected a variable high-energy source coinciding with the position of the x-ray binary and microquasar Cygnus X-3. Its identification with Cygnus X-3 is secured by the detection of its orbital period in gamma rays, as well as the correlation of the LAT flux with radio emission from the relativistic jets of Cygnus X-3. The gamma-ray emission probably originates from within the binary system, opening new areas in which to study the formation of relativistic jets.

  13. Search for continuous and single day emission from ultra-high-energy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mei-Li.

    1993-01-01

    Data from the CYGNUS experiment has been used to search the northern sky for point sources of continuous ultra-high-energy gamma radiation and to examine 51 candidate sources on a daily basis to search for episodic emission. In this paper, we make use of our most recent data to update our previously published results from these searches. The data sample is approximately twice as large as the published data set for continuous emission, and contains an additional year for the daily search. The latest results, up to the time of the conference, will be presented at the meeting.

  14. An upper limit on the high-energy gamma-ray emission of Vela X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattox, J. R.; Oegelman, H.; Kanbach, G.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of high-energy gamma-ray emission from the X-ray binary Vela X-1 was investigated by analyzing the COS-B satellite observations, using the COS-B X-ray detector for a phase coherent analysis in the search of rotational periodicity. The rotational upper limit is compared to the X-ray, TeV, and PeV fluxes reported by Chodil et al. (1967), North et al. (1984), and Protheroe et al. (1984), respectively. It was found that, under certain conditions, the upper limit determined here is not inconsistent with the reports of TeV and PeV emission.

  15. Search for ultra-high energy emission from Geminga and five unidentified EGRET sources

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Data from the CYGNUS extensive air shower array were searched for continuous ultra-high energy (UHE) gamma radiation from five unidentified EGRET sources and from the Geminga pulsar. No evidence for continuous emission from any of these objects was found. Data in the Geminga source bin were also searched for pulsed emission using the recent EGRET ephemeris (237 ms period). No evidence of a periodic signal was found. The 90% confidence level upper limit on the continuous gamma-ray flux above 80 TeV for Geminga is 7.9 [times] 10[sup [minus]14] cm[sup [minus]2] s[sup [minus]1].

  16. Search for ultra-high energy emission from Geminga and five unidentified EGRET sources

    SciTech Connect

    The CYGNUS Collaboration

    1993-05-01

    Data from the CYGNUS extensive air shower array were searched for continuous ultra-high energy (UHE) gamma radiation from five unidentified EGRET sources and from the Geminga pulsar. No evidence for continuous emission from any of these objects was found. Data in the Geminga source bin were also searched for pulsed emission using the recent EGRET ephemeris (237 ms period). No evidence of a periodic signal was found. The 90% confidence level upper limit on the continuous gamma-ray flux above 80 TeV for Geminga is 7.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}14} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}.

  17. Elementary Quantum Mechanics in a High-Energy Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denville, A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Compares two approaches to strong absorption in elementary quantum mechanics; the black sphere and a model based on the continuum theory of nuclear reactions. Examines the application to proton-antiproton interactions at low momenta and concludes that the second model is the appropriate and simplest to use. (Author/GA)

  18. High-Energy Emission From the Polar Cap and Slot Gap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2006-01-01

    Thirty-five years after the discovery of rotation-powered pulsars, we still do not understand the fundamentals of their pulsed emission at any wavelength. I will review the latest developments in understanding the high-energy emission of rotation-powered pulsars, with particular emphasis on the polar cap and slot gap models. Special and general relativistic effects play important roles in pulsar emission, from inertial frame-dragging near the stellar surface to aberration, time-of-flight and retardation of the magnetic field near the light cylinder. Understanding how these effects determine what we observe at different wavelengths is critical to unraveling the emission physics. I will discuss how the next generation of gamma-ray detectors, AGILE and GLAST, will test prediction of these models.

  19. FAINT HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY PHOTON EMISSION OF GRB 081006A FROM FERMI OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Weikang; Akerlof, Carl W.; Pandey, Shashi B.; McKay, Timothy A.; Zhang Binbin; Zhang Bing

    2012-01-20

    Since the launch of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope on 2008 June 11, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument has firmly detected more than 20 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with high-energy photon emission above 100 MeV. Using the matched filter technique, three more GRBs have also shown evidence of correlation with high-energy photon emission as demonstrated by Akerlof et al. In this paper, we present another GRB, GRB 081006A, unambiguously detected by the matched filter technique. This event is associated with more than 13 high-energy photons above 100 MeV. The likelihood analysis code provided by the Fermi Science Support Center generated an independent verification of this detection using a comparison of the test statistics value with similar calculations for random LAT data fields. We have performed detailed temporal and spectral analysis of photons from 8 keV up to 0.8 GeV from the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and the LAT. The properties of GRB 081006A can be compared to those of the other two long-duration GRBs detected at similar significance, GRB 080825C and GRB 090217A. We find that GRB 081006A is more similar to GRB 080825C with comparable appearances of late high-energy photon emission. As demonstrated previously, there appears to be a surprising dearth of faint LAT GRBs, with only one additional GRB identified in a sample of 74. In this unique period when both Swift and Fermi are operational, there is some urgency to explore this aspect of GRBs as fully as possible.

  20. VERITAS UPPER LIMIT ON THE VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM THE RADIO GALAXY NGC 1275

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W.; Aliu, E.; Boltuch, D.; Arlen, T.; Celik, O.; Aune, T.; Bautista, M.; Cogan, P.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Bradbury, S. M.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Duke, C.

    2009-12-01

    The recent detection by the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope of high-energy gamma-rays from the radio galaxy NGC 1275 makes the observation of the very high energy (VHE: E>100 GeV) part of its broadband spectrum particularly interesting, especially for the understanding of active galactic nuclei with misaligned multi-structured jets. The radio galaxy NGC 1275 was recently observed by VERITAS at energies above 100 GeV for about 8 hr. No VHE gamma-ray emission was detected by VERITAS from NGC 1275. A 99% confidence level upper limit of 2.1% of the Crab Nebula flux level is obtained at the decorrelation energy of approximately 340 GeV, corresponding to 19% of the power-law extrapolation of the Fermi Large Area Telescope result.

  1. VERY HIGH ENERGY gamma-RAY AFTERGLOW EMISSION OF NEARBY GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, R. R.; Fan, Y. Z.; Wei, D. M.; Tam, P. H.; Wagner, S. J.; Behera, B. E-mail: phtam@lsw.uni-heidelberg.d

    2009-09-20

    The synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission from gamma-ray burst (GRB) forward shock can extend to the very high energy (VHE; E{sub {gamma}} > 100 GeV) range. Such high energy photons are rare and are attenuated by the cosmic infrared background before reaching us. In this work, we discuss the prospect to detect these VHE photons using the current ground-based Cherenkov detectors. Our calculated results are consistent with the upper limits obtained with several Cherenkov detectors for GRB 030329, GRB 050509B, and GRB 060505 during the afterglow phase. For five bursts in our nearby GRB sample (except for GRB 030329), current ground-based Cherenkov detectors would not be expected to detect the modeled VHE signal. Only for those very bright and nearby bursts like GRB 030329, detection of VHE photons is possible under favorable observing conditions and a delayed observation time of {approx}<10 hr.

  2. Search for Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts using Milagro

    SciTech Connect

    Saz Parkinson, P. M.

    2007-07-12

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been detected at GeV energies by EGRET and models predict emission at > 100 GeV. Milagro is a wide field (2 sr) high duty cycle (> 90%) ground based water Cherenkov detector that records extensive air showers in the energy range 100 GeV to 100 TeV. We have searched for very high energy emission from a sample of 106 gamma-ray bursts (GRB) detected since the beginning of 2000 by BATSE, BeppoSax, HETE-2, INTEGRAL, Swift or the IPN. No evidence for emission from any of the bursts has been found and we present upper limits from these bursts.

  3. From Radio with Love: An Overview of the Role of Radio Observations in Understanding High-Energy Emission from Active Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ojha, Roopesh

    2012-01-01

    The gamma-ray satellite Fermi and the ground based TeV facilities MAGIC, VERITAS and HESS have ushered in a new era in the observation of high-energy emission from active galaxies. The energy budgets of these objects have a major contribution from gamma-rays and it is simply not possible to understand their physics without high-energy observations. Though the exact mechanisms for high-energy production in galaxies remains an open question, gamma-rays typically result from interactions between high-energy particles. Via different interactions these same particles can produce radio emission. Thus the non-thermal nature of gamma-ray emission practically guarantees that high-energy emitters are also radio loud. Aside from their obvious role as a component of multiwavelength analysis, radio observations provide two crucial elements essential to understanding the source structure and physical processes of high-energy emitters: very high timing resolution and very high spatial resolution. A brief overview of the unique role played by radio observations in unraveling the mysteries of the high energy Universe as presented here.

  4. Experimental results from CERN on reaction mechanisms in high energy heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, S.P. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-01-01

    Three main experimental results from CERN concerning reaction mechanisms in high energy heavy ion collisions are discussed: (1) the striking validity of the single particle picture, (2) the nuclear stopping power and (3) the attained energy densities.

  5. Sources of High-Energy Emission in the Green Pea Galaxies: New Constraints from Magellan Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Derek Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The recently discovered Green Pea galaxies display extreme starburst activity and may be some of the only possible Lyman continuum emitting galaxies at low redshift. Green Peas are characterized by their unusually high [O III]/[O II] ratios, similar to the ratios observed in high-redshift galaxies. In addition, the presence of the high-energy He II 4686 line shows that the Green Peas are highly ionized. However, the origin of the He II emission in the Green Peas, and many other starburst galaxies, is still an open question. We analyze IMACS and MagE spectra from the Magellan telescopes in order to evaluate the most probable cause of this He II emission. We also analyze other properties like dust content, temperature and density, and kinematic components. Our IMACS spectra show no Wolf-Rayet (WR) features. We set upper limits on the WR populations in our sample and conclude that Wolf-Rayet stars are not a likely candidate for the He II emission. With deeper MagE spectra we investigate energetic shocks as a possible source of the He II, and move one step closer to uncovering the origin of high-energy photons in these unique starbursts.

  6. An outer gap model of high-energy emission from rotation-powered pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, James; Romani, Roger W.

    1994-01-01

    We describe a refined calculation of high-energy emission from rotation-powered pulsars based on the outer gap model of Cheng, Ho, & Ruderman (1986 a, b). In this calculation, vacuum gaps form in regions near the speed-of-light cylinder of the pulsar magnetosphere along the boundary between the closed and open field line zones. We have improved upon previous efforts to model the spectra from these pulsars (e.g., Cheng et al. 1986b; Ho 1989) by following the variation in particle production and radiation properties with position in the outer gap. Curvature, synchotron, and inverse-Compton scattering fluxes vary significantly over the gap, and their interactions via photon-photon pair production build up the radiating charge populations at varying rates. We have also incorporated an approximate treatment of the transport particle and photon fluxes between gap emission zones. These effects, along with improved computations of the particle and photon distribution, provide very important modifications of the model gamma-ray flux. In paticular, we attempt to make specific predictions of pulse profile shapes and spectral variations as a function of pulse phase and suggest further extensions to the model which may provide accurate computations of the observed high-energy emissions.

  7. High energy (gamma)-ray emission from the starburst nucleus of NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo-Santamaria, E; Torres, D F

    2005-06-15

    The high density medium that characterizes the central regions of starburst galaxies and its power to accelerate particles up to relativistic energies make these objects good candidates as {gamma}-rays sources. In this paper, a self-consistent model of the multifrequency emission of the starburst galaxy NGC 253, from radio to gamma-rays, is presented. The model is in agreement with all current measurements and provides predictions for the high energy behavior of the NGC 253 central region. Prospects for observations with the HESS array and GLAST satellite are especially discussed.

  8. Modelling the high-energy emission from gamma-ray binaries using numerical relativistic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubus, G.; Lamberts, A.; Fromang, S.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Detailed modelling of the high-energy emission from gamma-ray binaries has been propounded as a path to pulsar wind physics. Aims: Fulfilling this ambition requires a coherent model of the flow and its emission in the region where the pulsar wind interacts with the stellar wind of its companion. Methods: We have developed a code that follows the evolution and emission of electrons in the shocked pulsar wind based on inputs from a relativistic hydrodynamical simulation. The code is used to model the well-documented spectral energy distribution and orbital modulations from LS 5039. Results: The pulsar wind is fully confined by a bow shock and a back shock. The particles are distributed into a narrow Maxwellian, emitting mostly GeV photons, and a power law radiating very efficiently over a broad energy range from X-rays to TeV gamma rays. Most of the emission arises from the apex of the bow shock. Doppler boosting shapes the X-ray and very high energy (VHE) lightcurves, constraining the system inclination to i ≈ 35°. There is tension between the hard VHE spectrum and the level of X-ray to MeV emission, which requires differing magnetic field intensities that are hard to achieve with constant magnetisation σ and Lorentz factor Γp of the pulsar wind. Our best compromise implies σ ≈ 1 and Γp ≈ 5 × 103, so respectively higher and lower than the typical values in pulsar wind nebulae. Conclusions: The high value of σ derived here, where the wind is confined close to the pulsar, supports the classical picture that has pulsar winds highly magnetised at launch. However, such magnetisations will require that further investigations are based on relativistic MHD simulations. Movies associated to Figs. A.1-A.4 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. THE {gamma}-RAY SPECTRUM OF GEMINGA AND THE INVERSE COMPTON MODEL OF PULSAR HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2012-09-20

    We reanalyze the Fermi spectra of the Geminga and Vela pulsars. We find that the spectrum of Geminga above the break is well approximated by a simple power law without the exponential cutoff, making Geminga's spectrum similar to that of Crab. Vela's broadband {gamma}-ray spectrum is equally well fit with both the exponential cutoff and the double power-law shapes. In the broadband double power-law fits, for a typical Fermi spectrum of a bright {gamma}-ray pulsar, most of the errors accumulate due to the arbitrary parameterization of the spectral roll-off. In addition, a power law with an exponential cutoff gives an acceptable fit for the underlying double power-law spectrum for a very broad range of parameters, making such fitting procedures insensitive to the underlying Fermi photon spectrum. Our results have important implications for the mechanism of pulsar high-energy emission. A number of observed properties of {gamma}-ray pulsars-i.e., the broken power-law spectra without exponential cutoffs and stretching in the case of Crab beyond the maximal curvature limit, spectral breaks close to or exceeding the maximal breaks due to curvature emission, patterns of the relative intensities of the leading and trailing pulses in the Crab repeated in the X-ray and {gamma}-ray regions, presence of profile peaks at lower energies aligned with {gamma}-ray peaks-all point to the inverse Compton origin of the high-energy emission from majority of pulsars.

  10. Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of high-energy gamma-ray emission from Solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesce Rollins, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations of the active Sun provide the largest sample of detected solar flares with emission greater than 30 MeV to date. These include detections of impulsive and sustained emission, extending up to 20 hours in the case of the 2012 March 7 X-class flares. These high-energy flares are coincident with GOES X-ray flares of X, M and C classes as well as very fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CME). We will present results from the First Fermi-LAT solar flare catalog covering the majority of Solar Cycle 24 including correlation studies with the associated Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) and CMEs.

  11. Evolution of and High-Energy Emission from GHz-Peaked Spectrum Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stawarz, Ł.; Ostorero, L.; Begelman, M. C.; Moderski, R.; Kataoka, J.; Wagner, S.

    2008-06-01

    Here we discuss evolution and broadband emission of compact (emission of young radio sources. In particular, we argue that the observed spectral turnover in the radio synchrotron spectra of these objects cannot originate from the synchrotron self-absorption process but is most likely due to free-free absorption effects connected with neutral clouds of interstellar medium engulfed by the expanding lobes and photoionized by active centers. We also find a relatively strong and complex high-energy emission component produced by inverse Compton upscattering of various surrounding photon fields by the lobes' electrons. We argue that such high-energy radiation is strong enough to account for several observed properties of GHz-peaked spectrum (GPS) radio galaxies at UV and X-ray frequencies. In addition, this emission is expected to extend up to GeV (or possibly even TeV) photon energies and can thus be probed by several modern γ-ray instruments. In particular, we suggest that GPS radio galaxies should constitute a relatively numerous class of extragalactic sources detected by GLAST.

  12. High-energy gamma-ray emission from solar flares: Constraining the accelerated proton spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, David; Dunphy, Philip P.; Mackinnon, Alexander L.

    1994-01-01

    Using a multi-component model to describe the gamma-ray emission, we investigate the flares of December 16, 1988 and March 6, 1989 which exhibited unambiguous evidence of neutral pion decay. The observations are then combined with theoretical calculations of pion production to constrain the accelerated proton spectra. The detection of pi(sup 0) emission alone can indicate much about the energy distribution and spectral variation of the protons accelerated to pion producing energies. Here both the intensity and detailed spectral shape of the Doppler-broadened pi(sup 0) decay feature are used to determine the spectral form of the accelerated proton energy distribution. The Doppler width of this gamma-ray emission provides a unique diagnostic of the spectral shape at high energies, independent of any normalisation. To our knowledge, this is the first time that this diagnostic has been used to constrain the proton spectra. The form of the energetic proton distribution is found to be severely limited by the observed intensity and Doppler width of the pi(sup 0) decay emission, demonstrating effectively the diagnostic capabilities of the pi(sup 0) decay gamma-rays. The spectral index derived from the gamma-ray intensity is found to be much harder than that derived from the Doppler width. To reconcile this apparent discrepancy we investigate the effects of introducing a high-energy cut-off in the accelerated proton distribution. With cut-off energies of around 0.5-0.8 GeV and relatively hard spectra, the observed intensities and broadening can be reproduced with a single energetic proton distribution above the pion production threshold.

  13. On the Evolution of and High-Energy Emission from GHz-Peaked-Spectrum Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stawarz, L.; Ostorero, L.; Begelman, M.C.; Moderski, R.; Kataoka, J.; Wagner, S.

    2007-12-18

    Here we discuss evolution and broad-band emission of compact (< kpc) lobes in young radio sources. We propose a simple dynamical description for these objects, consisting of a relativistic jet propagating into a uniform gaseous medium in the central parts of an elliptical host. In the framework of the proposed model, we follow the evolution of ultrarelativistic electrons injected from a terminal hotspot of a jet to expanding lobes, taking into account their adiabatic energy losses as well as radiative cooling. This allows us to discuss the broad-band lobe emission of young radio sources. In particular, we argue that the observed spectral turnover in the radio synchrotron spectra of these objects cannot originate from the synchrotron self-absorption process but is most likely due to free-free absorption effects connected with neutral clouds of interstellar medium engulfed by the expanding lobes and photoionized by active centers. We also find a relatively strong and complex high-energy emission component produced by inverse-Compton up-scattering of various surrounding photon fields by the lobes electrons. We argue that such high energy radiation is strong enough to account for several observed properties of GHz-peaked-spectrum (GPS) radio galaxies at UV and X-ray frequencies. In addition, this emission is expected to extend up to GeV (or possibly even TeV) photon energies and can thus be probed by several modern {gamma}-ray instruments. In particular, we suggest that GPS radio galaxies should constitute a relatively numerous class of extragalactic sources detected by GLAST.

  14. High-energy proton emission and Fermi motion in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, W.; Liu, X.; Wada, R.; Huang, M.; Ren, P.; Tian, G.; Luo, F.; Sun, Q.; Chen, Z.; Xiao, G. Q.; Han, R.; Shi, F.; Liu, J.; Gou, B.

    2016-12-01

    An antisymmetrized molecular dynamics model (AMD-FM), modified to take into account the Fermi motion explicitly in its nucleon-nucleon collision process, is presented. Calculated high-energy proton spectra are compared with those of 40Ar+51V at 44 MeV/nucleon from Coniglione et al. [Phys. Lett. B 471, 339 (2000), 10.1016/S0370-2693(99)01383-0] and those of 36Ar+181Ta at 94 MeV/nucleon from Germain et al. [Nucl. Phys. A 620, 81 (1997), 10.1016/S0375-9474(97)00146-2]. Both of the experimental data are reasonably well reproduced by the newly added Fermi boost in the nucleon-nucleon collision process without additional processes, such as a three-body collision or a short-range correlation. The production mechanism of high-energy protons in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions is discussed.

  15. Measurements of particle emission from discharge sites in Teflon irradiated by high energy electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazelton, R. C.; Churchill, R. J.; Yadlowsky, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    Anomalous behavior of synchronous orbit satellites manifested by overall degradation of system performance and reduced operating life is associated with electrical discharges resulting from differential charging of the spacecraft surface by fluxes of high energy electrons. During a laboratory simulation silver-backed Teflon samples have been irradiated by electron beams having energies in the range 16-26 keV. Charged particles emitted from the resultant electrical discharges have been measured with a biased Faraday cup and retarding potential analyser. Measurements indicate the presence of two distinct fluxes of particles, the first being an early pulse (0-600ns) of high energy (about 7keV) electrons, while the second is a late pulse (1-5 microseconds) of low energy electrons (less than 1eV) and ions (70eV) leaving the discharge site as a quasi plasma. Calculations indicate an electrostatic field as the dominant accelerating mechanism for charged particles.

  16. FERMI-LAT OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-ENERGY γ-RAY EMISSION TOWARD THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Atwood, W. B.; Caputo, R.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonino, R.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; and others

    2016-03-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has provided the most detailed view to date of the emission toward the Galactic center (GC) in high-energy γ-rays. This paper describes the analysis of data taken during the first 62 months of the mission in the energy range 1–100 GeV from a 15° × 15° region about the direction of the GC. Specialized interstellar emission models (IEMs) are constructed to enable the separation of the γ-ray emissions produced by cosmic ray particles interacting with the interstellar gas and radiation fields in the Milky Way into that from the inner ∼1 kpc surrounding the GC, and that from the rest of the Galaxy. A catalog of point sources for the 15° × 15° region is self-consistently constructed using these IEMs: the First Fermi-LAT Inner Galaxy Point Source Catalog (1FIG). The spatial locations, fluxes, and spectral properties of the 1FIG sources are presented, and compared with γ-ray point sources over the same region taken from existing catalogs. After subtracting the interstellar emission and point-source contributions a residual is found. If templates that peak toward the GC are used to model the positive residual the agreement with the data improves, but none of the additional templates tried account for all of its spatial structure. The spectrum of the positive residual modeled with these templates has a strong dependence on the choice of IEM.

  17. 90° Neutron emission from high energy protons and lead ions on a thin lead target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Birattari, C.; Foglio Para, A.; Mitaroff, A.; Silari, M.; Ulrici, L.

    2002-01-01

    The neutron emission from a relatively thin lead target bombarded by beams of high energy protons/pions and lead ions was measured at CERN in one of the secondary beam lines of the Super Proton Synchrotron for radiation protection and shielding calculations. Measurements were performed with three different beams: 208Pb 82+ lead ions at 40 GeV/ c per nucleon and 158 GeV/ c per nucleon, and 40 GeV/ c mixed protons/pions. The neutron yield and spectral fluence per incident ion on target were measured at 90° with respect to beam direction. Monte-Carlo simulations with the FLUKA code were performed for the case of protons and pions and the results found in good agreement with the experimental data. A comparison between simulations and experiment for protons, pions and lead ions have shown that—for such high energy heavy ion beams—a reasonable estimate can be carried out by scaling the result of a Monte-Carlo calculation for protons by the projectile mass number to the power of 0.80-0.84.

  18. Search for High-Energy Emission from GRBs with the ARGO-YBJ Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Girolamo, T.

    2009-05-01

    ARGO-YBJ is a ``full coverage'' air shower detector consisting of a 6700 m2 carpet of Resistive Plate Counters, located at Yangbajing (Tibet, P.R. China, 4300 m a.s.l). Its large field of view (~2 sr, limited only by the atmospheric absorption) and high duty-cycle make ARGO-YBJ particularly suitable to detect unpredictable and short duration events such as GRBs. ARGO-YBJ works using two techniques: the ``Scaler Mode,'' which reaches the lower energy limit (~1 GeV) of the detector, and the ``Shower Mode,'' with an energy threshold of a few hundreds of GeV. Here we present the results of the search for high-energy emission from GRBs in coincidence with satellite detections.

  19. The high-energy γ-ray emission of AP Librae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E.; Anton, G.; Backes, M.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; O'C. Drury, L.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Naumann, C. L.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Raue, M.; Reichardt, I.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Rob, L.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.; Finke, J.; Fortin, P.; Horan, D.

    2015-01-01

    The γ-ray spectrum of the low-frequency-peaked BL Lac (LBL) object AP Librae is studied, following the discovery of very-high-energy (VHE; E> 100 GeV) γ-ray emission up to the TeV range by the H.E.S.S. experiment. This makes AP Librae one of the few VHE emitters of the LBL type. The measured spectrum yields a flux of (8.8 ± 1.5stat ± 1.8sys) × 10-12 cm-2 s-1 above 130 GeV and a spectral index of Γ = 2.65 ± 0.19stat ± 0.20sys. This study also makes use of Fermi-LAT observations in the high energy (HE, E> 100 MeV) range, providing the longest continuous light curve (5 years) ever published on this source. The source underwent a flaring event between MJD 56 306-56 376 in the HE range, with a flux increase of a factor of 3.5 in the 14 day bin light curve and no significant variation in spectral shape with respect to the low-flux state. While the H.E.S.S. and (low state) Fermi-LAT fluxes are in good agreement where they overlap, a spectral curvature between the steep VHE spectrum and the Fermi-LAT spectrum is observed. The maximum of the γ-ray emission in the spectral energy distribution is located below the GeV energy range.

  20. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of High-Energy Gamma-ray Emission From Behind-the-limb Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omodei, Nicola; Pesce-Rollins, Melissa; Petrosian, Vahe; Liu, Wei; Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Golenetskii, Sergei; Kashapova, Larisa; Krucker, Sam; Palshin, Valentin; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Fermi LAT >30 MeV observations of the active Sun have increased the number of detected solar flares by almost a factor of 10 with respect to previous space observations. Of particular interest are the recent detections of three solar flares whose position behind the limb was confirmed by the STEREO-B spacecraft. These observations sample flares from active regions originating from behind both the eastern and western limbs and include an event associated with the second ground level enhancement event (GLE) of the 24th Solar Cycle. While gamma-ray emission up to tens of MeV resulting from proton interactions has been detected before from occulted solar flares, the significance of these particular events lies in the fact that these are the first detections of >100 MeV gamma-ray emission from footpoint-occulted flares. These detections present an unique opportunity to diagnose the mechanisms of high-energy emission and particle acceleration and transport in solar flares. We will present the Fermi-LAT, RHESSI and STEREO observations of these flares and discuss the various emission scenarios for these sources.

  1. Clustering of LAT light curves: a clue to the origin of high-energy emission in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, L.; Vianello, G.; Omodei, N.; Ghisellini, G.; Ghirlanda, G.; Celotti, A.; Longo, F.; Desiante, R.; Barniol Duran, R.

    2014-10-01

    The physical origin of the >0.1 GeV emission detected from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by the Fermi satellite has not yet been completely understood. In this work, we consider the GeV light curves of 10 GRBs with measured redshift detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). These light curves are characterized by a long-lived (≳102 seconds) emission, whose luminosity decays in time as a power law. While the decay rate is similar for all GRBs (i.e. LLAT ∝ t-1.2), the normalization spans about two orders of magnitude in luminosity. However, after re-normalizing the luminosities to the prompt energetics Eprompt the light curves overlap. We consider the scenario in which the temporally extended LAT emission is dominated by synchrotron radiation from electrons accelerated at the forward external shock. According to this model, at high energies (i.e. above the typical synchrotron frequencies) a small dispersion of the Eprompt-normalized light curves is expected. The fact that the LAT temporally extended emission follows this behaviour reinforces its interpretation in terms of afterglow radiation from external shocks. Assuming this scenario, we argue that the parameters ɛe and ηγ (i.e. the fraction of shock-dissipated energy gained by the electrons, and the efficiency of the mechanism producing the prompt radiation, respectively) must be narrowly distributed.

  2. Milagro Search for Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Swift Era

    SciTech Connect

    Saz Parkinson, P. M.

    2006-05-19

    The recently launched Swift satellite is providing an unprecedented number of rapid and accurate Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) localizations, facilitating a flurry of follow-up observations by a large number of telescopes at many different wavelengths. The Very High Energy (VHE, >100 GeV) regime has so far been relatively unexplored. Milagro is a wide field of view (2 sr) and high duty cycle (> 90%) ground-based gamma-ray telescope which employs a water Cherenkov detector to monitor the northern sky almost continuously in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. We have searched the Milagro data for emission from the most recent GRBs identified within our field of view. These include three Swift bursts which also display late-time X-ray flares. We have searched for emission coincident with these flares. No significant detection was made. A 99% confidence upper limit is provided for each of the GRBs, as well as the flares.

  3. Extended Acceleration in Slot Gaps and Pulsar High-Energy Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor); Muslimov, Alex G.; Harding, Alice K.

    2003-01-01

    We revise the physics of primary electron acceleration in the "slot gap" (SG) above the pulsar polar caps (PCs), a regime originally proposed by Arons and Scharlemann (1979) in their electrodynamic model of pulsar PCs. We employ the standard definition of the SG as a pair-free space between the last open field lines and the boundary of the pair plasma column which is expected to develop above the bulk of the PC. The rationale for our revision is that the proper treatment of primary acceleration within the pulsar SGs should take into account the effect of the narrow geometry of the gap on the electrodynamics within the gap and also to include the effect of inertial frame dragging on the particle acceleration. We show that the accelerating electric field within the gap, being significantly boosted by the effect of frame dragging, becomes reduced because of the gap geometry by a factor proportional to the square of the SG width. The combination of the effects of frame dragging and geometrical screening in the gap region naturally gives rise to a regime of extended acceleration, that is not limited to favorably curved field lines as in earlier models, and the possibility of multiple-pair production by curvature photons at very high altitudes, up to several stellar radii. We present our estimates of the characteristic SG thickness across the PC, energetics of primaries accelerated within the gap, high-energy bolometric luminosities emitted from the high altitudes in the gaps, and maximum heating luminosities produced by positrons returning from the elevated pair fronts. The estimated theoretical high-energy luminosities are in good agreement with the corresponding empirical relationships for gamma-ray pulsars. We illustrate the results of our modeling of the pair cascades and gamma-ray emission from the high altitudes in the SG for the Crab pulsar. The combination of the frame-dragging field and high-altitude SG emission enables both acceleration at the smaller

  4. Effects of high energy photon emissions in laser generated ultra-relativistic plasmas: Real-time synchrotron simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallin, Erik; Gonoskov, Arkady; Marklund, Mattias

    2015-03-01

    We model the emission of high energy photons due to relativistic charged particle motion in intense laser-plasma interactions. This is done within a particle-in-cell code, for which high frequency radiation normally cannot be resolved due to finite time steps and grid size. A simple expression for the synchrotron radiation spectra is used together with a Monte-Carlo method for the emittance. We extend previous work by allowing for arbitrary fields, considering the particles to be in instantaneous circular motion due to an effective magnetic field. Furthermore, we implement noise reduction techniques and present validity estimates of the method. Finally, we perform a rigorous comparison to the mechanism of radiation reaction, and find the emitted energy to be in excellent agreement with the losses calculated using radiation reaction.

  5. Constraining the High-Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with Fermi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Racusin, J. L.; Sonbas, E.; Stamatikos, M.; Guirec, S.

    2012-01-01

    We examine 288 GRBs detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) that fell within the field-of-view of Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT) during the first 2.5 years of observations, which showed no evidence for emission above 100 MeV. We report the photon flux upper limits in the 0.1-10 GeV range during the prompt emission phase as well as for fixed 30 s and 100 s integrations starting from the trigger time for each burst. We compare these limits with the fluxes that would be expected from extrapolations of spectral fits presented in the first GBM spectral catalog and infer that roughly half of the GBM-detected bursts either require spectral breaks between the GBM and LAT energy bands or have intrinsically steeper spectra above the peak of the nuF(sub v) spectra (E(sub pk)). In order to distinguish between these two scenarios, we perform joint GBM and LAT spectral fits to the 30 brightest GBM-detected bursts and find that a majority of these bursts are indeed softer above E(sub pk) than would be inferred from fitting the GBM data alone. Approximately 20% of this spectroscopic subsample show statistically significant evidence for a cut-off in their high-energy spectra, which if assumed to be due to gamma gamma attenuation, places limits on the maximum Lorentz factor associated with the relativistic outflow producing this emission. All of these latter bursts have maximum Lorentz factor estimates that are well below the minimum Lorentz factors calculated for LAT-detected GRBs, revealing a wide distribution in the bulk Lorentz factor of GRB outflows and indicating that LAT-detected bursts may represent the high end of this distribution.

  6. High-energy emission from the pulsar striped wind: a synchrotron model for gamma-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétri, Jérôme

    2012-08-01

    Gamma-ray pulsars constitute a class of high and very high energy emitters for which the known population is steadily increasing thanks to the Fermi/Large Area Telescope. More than a hundred such pulsars have been detected, offering a reasonable sample on to which to apply statistical techniques in order to outline relevant trends in the averaged properties of this (maybe not so) special class of pulsars. In this paper, their gamma-ray luminosity and spectral features are explained in the framework of synchrotron radiation from particles located in the stripe of the pulsar wind. Apart from radiative losses, particles are also subject to a constant re-acceleration and reheating for instance by a magnetic-reconnection-induced electric field. The high-energy luminosity scales as Lγ ≈ 2 × 1026 W (Lsd/1028 W)1/2 (P/1 s)-1/2, where Lsd is the pulsar spin-down luminosity and P its period. From this relation, we derive important parameters of pulsar magnetosphere and wind theories. Indeed, we find the bulk Lorentz factor of the wind scaling as Γv≈10 τrec1/5(Lsd/1028 W)1/2, pair multiplicity κ related to the magnetization parameter σ by κ σ τrec1/5≈108 and efficiency η of spin-down luminosity conversion into particle kinetic energy according to the relation η σ ≈ 1. A good guess for the associated reconnection rate is then τrec ≈ 0.5 (Lsd/1028 W)-5/12. Finally, pulses in gamma-rays are visible only if Lsd/P ≳ 1027 W s-1. This model differs from other high-energy emission mechanisms because it makes allowance not only for rotational kinetic energy release but also for an additional reservoir of energy anchored to the magnetic field of the stripe and released for instance by some magnetic reconnection processes.

  7. The LAGO Collaboration: Searching for high energy GRB emissions in Latin America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, H.; Lago Collaboration

    2012-02-01

    During more than a decade Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB a cosmological phenomena of tremendous power) have been extensively studied in the keV - MeV energy range. However, the higher energy emission still remains a mystery. The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (L.A.G.O.) is an international collaboration started in 2005 aiming at a better understanding of the GRB by studying their emission at high energies (> 1 GeV), where the fluxes are low and measurements by satellites are difficult. This is done using the Single Particle Technique, by means of ground-based Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) at sites of high altitude. At those altitudes it is possible to detect air showers produced by high energy photons from the GRB, i. e. a higher rate of events on a short time scale, of the order of the second. The Pierre Auger Observatory could detect such GRB given its large number of detectors, but at 1400 m.a.s.l. the expected signal is quite small. At higher altitudes, similar performance is expected with only a very small number of WCD. As of 2011, high altitude WCD are in operation at Sierra Negra (Mexico, 4650 m.a.s.l.), Chacaltaya (Bolivia, 5200 m.a.s.l.), Maracapomacocha (Peru, 4200 m.a.s.l.), and new WCDs are being installed in Venezuela (Pico Espejo, 4750 m.a.s.l.), Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Guatemala. Most of the new WCDs will not be at high enough altitude to detect GRB, never the less it will allow obtaining valuable measurements of secondaries at ground level, which are relevant for solar physics. The LAGO sensitivity to GRB is determined from simulations (under a sudden increase of 1 GeV - 1 TeV photons from a GRB) of the gamma initiated particle shower in the atmosphere and the WCD response to secondaries. We report on WDC calibration and operation at high altitude, GRB detectability, background rates, search for bursts in several months of preliminary data, as well as search for signals at ground level when satellite burst is reported, all these show the

  8. High-energy emissions from the gamma-ray binary LS 5039

    SciTech Connect

    Takata, J.; Leung, Gene C. K.; Cheng, K. S.; Tam, P. H. T.; Kong, A. K. H.; Hui, C. Y. E-mail: gene930@connect.hku.hk

    2014-07-20

    We study mechanisms of multi-wavelength emissions (X-ray, GeV, and TeV gamma-rays) from the gamma-ray binary LS 5039. This paper is composed of two parts. In the first part, we report on results of observational analysis using 4 yr data of the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Due to the improvement of instrumental response function and increase of the statistics, the observational uncertainties of the spectrum in the ∼100-300 MeV bands and >10 GeV bands are significantly improved. The present data analysis suggests that the 0.1-100 GeV emissions from LS 5039 contain three different components: (1) the first component contributes to <1 GeV emissions around superior conjunction, (2) the second component dominates in the 1-10 GeV energy bands, and (3) the third component is compatible with the lower-energy tail of the TeV emissions. In the second part, we develop an emission model to explain the properties of the phase-resolved emissions in multi-wavelength observations. Assuming that LS 5039 includes a pulsar, we argue that emissions from both the magnetospheric outer gap and the inverse-Compton scattering process of cold-relativistic pulsar wind contribute to the observed GeV emissions. We assume that the pulsar is wrapped by two kinds of termination shock: Shock-I due to the interaction between the pulsar wind and the stellar wind and Shock-II due to the effect of the orbital motion. We propose that the X-rays are produced by the synchrotron radiation at the Shock-I region and the TeV gamma-rays are produced by the inverse-Compton scattering process at the Shock-II region.

  9. Effects of high energy radiation on the mechanical properties of epoxy graphite fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, R. D.; Fornes, R. E.; Memory, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of high energy radiation on mechanical properties and on the molecular and structural properties of graphite fiber reinforced composites are assessed so that durability in space applications can be predicted. A listing of composite systems irradiated along with the maximum radiation dose applied and type of mechanical tests performed is shown. These samples were exposed to 1/2 MeV electrons.

  10. THE VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM PULSARS: A CASE FOR INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Otte, Nepomuk; McCann, Andrew

    2012-07-20

    The observations of gamma-ray emission from pulsars with the Fermi-LAT detector and the detection of the Crab pulsar with the VERITAS array of Cherenkov telescopes at energies above 100 GeV make it unlikely that curvature radiation is the main source of photons above GeV energies in the Crab and many other pulsars. We outline a model in which the broad UV-X-ray component and the very high energy {gamma}-ray emission of pulsars are explained within the synchrotron self-Compton framework. We argue that the bulk of the observed radiation is generated by the secondary plasma, which is produced in cascades in the outer gaps of the magnetosphere. We find that the inverse Compton (IC) scattering occurs in the Klein-Nishina regime, which favors synchrotron photons in the UV band as target field for the scattering process. The primary beam is accelerated in a modest electric field, with a field strength that is of the order of a few percent of the magnetic field near the light cylinder. Overall, for IC scattering occurring in the Klein-Nishina regime, the particle distribution in the gap does not evolve toward a stationary distribution and thus is intrinsically time-dependent. We point out that in a radiation reaction-limited regime of particle acceleration the gamma-ray luminosity L{sub {gamma}} scales linearly with the pulsar spin-down power E-dot , L{sub {gamma}}{proportional_to} E-dot , and not proportional to {radical}( E-dot ) as expected from potential-limited acceleration.

  11. Characterization of High-Energy Emissions of GKM Stars using Wide Binaries with White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalán, S.; Garcés, A.; Ribas, I.

    2011-12-01

    The definition of an age calibration for main-sequence late-type stars has multiple applications, e.g., in the fields of galactic evolution, stellar dynamos, theories of angular momentum loss and planetary atmospheres. In the latter, the characterization of the time-evolution of stellar high-energy emissions can help us understand the influence on planetary atmospheres and their potential habitability. A key element for this characterization is a reliable age determination. For this purpose we have studied a sample of late G, K, and M stars. To cover the age window up to 0.7 Gyr we have used stars belonging to open clusters, while for ages above this limit we use wide binaries containing white dwarfs. Since the evolution of white dwarfs can be understood as a cooling process, which is relatively well known at the moment, we can use them as age calibrators. Wide binary members are supposed to have been born simultaneously and with the same chemical composition. Since they are well separated (100-1000 AU aprox.) we can assume that no interaction has occurred between them in the past and they have evolved as single stars. So, from the white dwarf age we can infer the age of the system. We present our current results based in a sample of 30 binaries from the NLTT catalogue comprised by a DA white dwarf (showing only H absorption lines) and a G, K or M star.

  12. The High-energy Continuum Emission of the Gamma-Ray Blazar PKS 0528+134

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambruna, Rita M.; Urry, C. Megan; Maraschi, L.; Ghisellini, G.; Mukherjee, R.; Pesce, Joseph E.; Wagner, S. J.; Wehrle, A. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Lin, Y. C.; VonMintigny, C.

    1997-01-01

    We present Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) observations of the gamma-ray blazar PKS 0528 + 134, obtained at two separate epochs in 1994 August and 1995 March. These data represent the first measurement of the X-ray continuum emission of this source in the medium-hard X-ray band. Both ASCA spectra are consistent with a single power law with photon index GAMMA approx. = 1.7-1.8 and column density N(sub H) approx. = 5 x 10(exp 21)/ sq cm, higher than Galactic. The X-ray flux increased by a factor of 4 in approx. 7 months without appreciable change of the spectral shape. During the lower state of 1994 August, PKS 0528 + 134 was observed simultaneously in the optical, X-rays, and at gamma-ray energies with Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). The gamma-ray intensity is the faintest detected thus far in the source, with a steep spectrum (GAMMA approx. = 2.7). The extrapolation of the X-ray continuum to the gamma-ray range requires a sharp spectral break at approx. 10(exp 22) Hz. We discuss the radio through gamma-ray spectral energy distribution of PKS 0528 + 134, comparing the low state of 1994 August with the flare state of 1993 March. We show that in PKS 0528 + 134, a non-negligible contribution from the external radiation field is present and that, although synchrotron self-Compton scenarios cannot be ruled out, inverse Compton upscattering of thermal seed photons may be the dominant cooling process for the production of the high-energy continuum in this blazar.

  13. The High-Energy Continuum Emission of the Gamma-Ray Blazar PKS 0528+134

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambruna, Rita M.; Urry, C. Megan; Maraschi, L.; Ghisellini, G.; Mukherjee, R.; Pesce, Joseph E.; Wagner, S. J.; Wehrle, A. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Lin, Y. C.

    1997-01-01

    We present Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) observations of the gamma-ray blazar PKS 0528 + 134, obtained at two separate epochs in 1994 August and 1995 March. These data represent the first measurement of the X-ray continuum emission of this source in the medium-hard X-ray band. Both ASCA spectra are consistent with a single power law with photon index GAMMA approximate 1.7-1.8 and column density N(sub H) approximately 5 x 10(exp 21) /sq cm, higher than Galactic. The X-ray flux increased by a factor of 4 in approximately 7 months without appreciable change of the spectral shape. During the lower state of 1994 August, PKS 0528 + 134 was observed simultaneously in the optical, X-rays, and at gamma-ray energies with EGRET. The gamma-ray intensity is the faintest detected thus far in the source, with a steep spectrum (GAMMA approximately 2.7). The extrapolation of the X-ray continuum to the gamma-ray range requires a sharp spectral break at approximately 10(exp 22) Hz. We discuss the radio through gamma-ray spectral energy distribution of PKS 0528 + 134, comparing the low state of 1994 August with the flare state of 1993 March. We show that in PKS 0528 + 134, a non-negligible contribution from the external radiation field is present and that, although synchrotron self-Compton scenarios cannot be ruled out, inverse Compton upscattering of thermal seed photons may be the dominant cooling process for the production of the high-energy continuum in this blazar.

  14. LEONA: Transient Luminous Event and Thunderstorm High Energy Emission Collaborative Network in Latin America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sao Sabbas, F. T.

    2012-12-01

    This project has the goal of establishing the Collaborative Network LEONA, to study the electrodynamical coupling of the atmospheric layers signaled by Transient Luminous Events - TLEs and high energy emissions from thunderstorms. We will develop and install a remotely controlled network of cameras to perform TLE observations in different locations in South America and one neutron detector in southern Brazil. The camera network will allow building a continuous data set of the phenomena studied in this continent. The first two trial units of the camera network are already installed, in Brazil and Peru, and two more will be installed until December 2012, in Argentina and Brazil. We expect to determine the TLE geographic distribution, occurrence rate, morphology, and possible coupling with other geophysical phenomena in South America, such as the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly - SAMA. We also expect to study thunderstorm neutron emissions in a region of intense electrical activity, measuring neutron fluxes with high time resolution simultaneously with TLEs and lightning for the first time in South America. Using an intensified high-speed camera for TLE observation during 2 campaigns we expect to be able to determine the duration and spatial- temporal development of the TLEs observed, to study the structure and initiation of sprites and to measure the velocity of development of sprite structures and the sprite delay. The camera was acquired via the FAPESP project DEELUMINOS (2005-2010), which also nucleated our research group Atmospheric Electrodynamical Coupling - ACATMOS. LEONA will nucleate this research in other institutions in Brazil and other countries in South America, providing continuity for this important research in our region. The camera network will be an unique tool to perform consistent long term TLE observation, and in fact is the only way to accumulate a data set for a climatological study of South America, since satellite instrumentation turns off in

  15. Mechanism of light-particle emission

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamiya, S.

    1982-02-01

    A general overview of the field of high-energy nuclear collisions studied from light particle spectra, pions, kaons, lambdas, protons, deuterons, and light composite fragments is given. Specifically, the basic reaction mechanism that determines the main features of particle emission such as the energy and angular distributions, the multiplicity, the production rate, the projectile and target mass dependences, the beam-energy dependences, etc. are discussed. Very general features of high-energy nuclear collisions are described. The major question is what characterizes these collisions. Proton emission is discussed since the proton is the dominant particle emitted at a large angle. The mechanism of composite-fragment formation is discussed. Also pion production and strange particle production are considered.

  16. HEAO 1 observations of high-energy X-rays from 3C273. [quasar emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primini, F. A.; Cooke, B. A.; Dobson, C. A.; Howe, S. K.; Scheepmaker, A.; Wheaton, W. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Baity, W. A.; Gruber, D. E.; Matteson, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    The first detection of high energy (13 to 120 keV) X rays from the quasar 3C273, made by the HEAO 1 satellite, is reported. Observations were made with the 13 to 180 keV slat collimated detectors of the high energy X-ray and low energy gamma-ray (A4) experiment during December 1977-January 1978 and June-July 1978. Results are consistent with the previously observed X-ray flux variability on a scale of months. Photon count rates are presented for each of five energy bands and count rate and photon spectra for the June through July 1978 observations are derived. A comparison of the data obtained with that at lower X-ray energies and higher gamma-ray energies indicates that there is an overall spectral steepening from low to high energies and a possible break near 20 keV, which may be due to the gamma rays originating from a different region than that of the X rays.

  17. High-Energy Ion Acceleration Mechanisms in a Dense Plasma Focus Z-Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginson, D. P.; Link, A.; Schmidt, A.; Welch, D.

    2016-10-01

    The compression of a Z-pinch plasma, specifically in a dense plasma focus (DPF), is known to accelerate high-energy electrons, ions and, if using fusion-reactant ions (e.g. D, T), neutrons. The acceleration of particles is known to coincide with the peak constriction of the pinch, however, the exact physical mechanism responsible for the acceleration remains an area of debate and uncertainty. Recent work has suggested that this acceleration is linked to the growth of an m =0 (sausage) instability that evacuates a region of low-density, highly-magnetized plasma and creates a strong (>MV/cm) electric field. Using the fully kinetic particle-in-cell code LSP in 2D-3V, we simulate the compression of a 2 MA, 35 kV DPF plasma and investigate in detail the formation of the electric field. The electric field is found to be predominantly in the axial direction and driven via charge-separation effects related to the resistivity of the kinetic plasma. The strong electric and magnetic fields are shown to induce non-Maxwellian distributions in both the ions and electrons and lead to the acceleration of high-energy tails. We compare the results in the kinetic simulations to assumptions of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Variable very-high-energy gamma-ray emission from the microquasar LS I +61 303.

    PubMed

    Albert, J; Aliu, E; Anderhub, H; Antoranz, P; Armada, A; Asensio, M; Baixeras, C; Barrio, J A; Bartelt, M; Bartko, H; Bastieri, D; Bavikadi, S R; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bigongiari, C; Biland, A; Bisesi, E; Bock, R K; Bordas, P; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bretz, T; Britvitch, I; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Chilingarian, A; Ciprini, S; Coarasa, J A; Commichau, S; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Curtef, V; Danielyan, V; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; de Los Reyes, R; De Lotto, B; Domingo-Santamaría, E; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Errando, M; Fagiolini, M; Ferenc, D; Fernández, E; Firpo, R; Flix, J; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Fuchs, M; Galante, N; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Giller, M; Goebel, F; Hakobyan, D; Hayashida, M; Hengstebeck, T; Höhne, D; Hose, J; Hsu, C C; Isar, P G; Jacon, P; Kalekin, O; Kosyra, R; Kranich, D; Laatiaoui, M; Laille, A; Lenisa, T; Liebing, P; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, J; López, M; Lorenz, E; Lucarelli, F; Majumdar, P; Maneva, G; Mannheim, K; Mansutti, O; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mase, K; Mazin, D; Merck, C; Meucci, M; Meyer, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Mizobuchi, S; Moralejo, A; Nilsson, K; Oña-Wilhelmi, E; Orduña, R; Otte, N; Oya, I; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Pasanen, M; Pascoli, D; Pauss, F; Pavel, N; Pegna, R; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Piccioli, A; Poller, M; Pooley, G; Prandini, E; Raymers, A; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Riegel, B; Rissi, M; Robert, A; Romero, G E; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Sánchez, A; Sartori, P; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schmitt, R; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shinozaki, K; Shore, S N; Sidro, N; Sillanpää, A; Sobczynska, D; Stamerra, A; Stark, L S; Takalo, L; Temnikov, P; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Tonello, N; Torres, A; Torres, D F; Turini, N; Vankov, H; Vitale, V; Wagner, R M; Wibig, T; Wittek, W; Zanin, R; Zapatero, J

    2006-06-23

    Microquasars are binary star systems with relativistic radio-emitting jets. They are potential sources of cosmic rays and can be used to elucidate the physics of relativistic jets. We report the detection of variable gamma-ray emission above 100 gigaelectron volts from the microquasar LS I 61 + 303. Six orbital cycles were recorded. Several detections occur at a similar orbital phase, which suggests that the emission is periodic. The strongest gamma-ray emission is not observed when the two stars are closest to one another, implying a strong orbital modulation of the emission or absorption processes.

  19. TRACING HIGH-ENERGY RADIATION FROM T TAURI STARS USING MID-INFRARED NEON EMISSION FROM DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Espaillat, C.; Ingleby, L.; McClure, M.; Nieusma, J.; Calvet, N.; Bergin, E.; Hartmann, L.; Miller, J. M. E-mail: lingleby@umich.edu E-mail: jdnieusma@gmail.com E-mail: ebergin@umich.edu; and others

    2013-01-01

    High-energy radiation from T Tauri stars (TTS) influences the amount and longevity of gas in disks, thereby playing a crucial role in the creation of gas giant planets. Here we probe the high-energy ionizing radiation from TTS using high-resolution mid-infrared (MIR) Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph neon forbidden line detections in a sample of disks from IC 348, NGC 2068, and Chamaeleon. We report three new detections of [Ne III] from CS Cha, SZ Cha, and T 54, doubling the known number of [Ne III] detections from TTS. Using [Ne III]-to-[Ne II] ratios in conjunction with X-ray emission measurements, we probe high-energy radiation from TTS. The majority of previously inferred [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratios based on [Ne III] line upper limits are significantly less than 1, pointing to the dominance of either X-ray radiation or soft extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) radiation in producing these lines. Here we report the first observational evidence for hard EUV-dominated Ne forbidden line production in a T Tauri disk: [Ne III]/[Ne II] {approx} 1 in SZ Cha. Our results provide a unique insight into the EUV emission from TTS, by suggesting that EUV radiation may dominate the creation of Ne forbidden lines, albeit in a minority of cases.

  20. Temporalization of peak electric generation particulate matter emissions during high energy demand days.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Caroline M; Moeller, Michael D; Felder, Frank A; Baker, Kirk R; Rodgers, Mark; Carlton, Annmarie G

    2015-04-07

    Underprediction of peak ambient pollution by air quality models hinders development of effective strategies to protect health and welfare. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's community multiscale air quality (CMAQ) model routinely underpredicts peak ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations. Temporal misallocation of electricity sector emissions contributes to this modeling deficiency. Hourly emissions are created for CMAQ by use of temporal profiles applied to annual emission totals unless a source is matched to a continuous emissions monitor (CEM) in the National Emissions Inventory (NEI). More than 53% of CEMs in the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland (PJM) electricity market and 45% nationally are unmatched in the 2008 NEI. For July 2006, a United States heat wave with high electricity demand, peak electric sector emissions, and elevated ambient PM2.5 mass, we match hourly emissions for 267 CEM/NEI pairs in PJM (approximately 49% and 12% of unmatched CEMs in PJM and nationwide) using state permits, electricity dispatch modeling and CEMs. Hourly emissions for individual facilities can differ up to 154% during the simulation when measurement data is used rather than default temporalization values. Maximum CMAQ PM2.5 mass, sulfate, and elemental carbon predictions increase up to 83%, 103%, and 310%, at the surface and 51%, 75%, and 38% aloft (800 mb), respectively.

  1. EGRET upper limits to the high-energy gamma-ray emission from the millisecond pulsars in nearby globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelson, P. F.; Bertsch, D. L.; Brazier, K.; Chiang, J.; Dingus, B. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Fierro, J.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.

    1994-01-01

    We report upper limits to the high-energy gamma-ray emission from the millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a number of globular clusters. The observations were done as part of an all-sky survey by the energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) during Phase I of the CGRO mission (1991 June to 1992 November). Several theoretical models suggest that MSPs may be sources of high-energy gamma radiation emitted either as primary radiation from the pulsar magnetosphere or as secondary radiation generated by conversion into photons of a substantial part of the relativistic e(+/-) pair wind expected to flow from the pulsar. To date, no high-energy emission has been detected from an individual MSP. However, a large number of MSPs are expected in globular cluster cores where the formation rate of accreting binary systems is high. Model predictions of the total number of pulsars range in the hundreds for some clusters. These expectations have been reinforced by recent discoveries of a substantial number of radio MSPs in several clusters; for example, 11 have been found in 47 Tucanae (Manchester et al.). The EGRET observations have been used to obtain upper limits for the efficiency eta of conversion of MSP spin-down power into hard gamma rays. The upper limits are also compared with the gamma-ray fluxes predicted from theoretical models of pulsar wind emission (Tavani). The EGRET limits put significant constraints on either the emission models or the number of pulsars in the globular clusters.

  2. The slingshot effect: A possible new laser-driven high energy acceleration mechanism for electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Fiore, Gaetano; Fedele, Renato; Angelis, Umberto de

    2014-11-15

    We show that under appropriate conditions the impact of a very short and intense laser pulse onto a plasma causes the expulsion of surface electrons with high energy in the direction opposite to the one of the propagations of the pulse. This is due to the combined effects of the ponderomotive force and the huge longitudinal field arising from charge separation (“slingshot effect”). The effect should also be present with other states of matter, provided the pulse is sufficiently intense to locally cause complete ionization. An experimental test seems to be feasible and, if confirmed, would provide a new extraction and acceleration mechanism for electrons, alternative to traditional radio-frequency-based or laser-wake-field ones.

  3. Effects of high energy radiation on the mechanical properties of epoxy/graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fornes, R. E.; Memory, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    Studies on the effects of high energy radiation on graphite fiber reinforced composites are summarized. Studies of T300/5208 and C6000/PMR15 composites, T300 fibers and the resin system MY720/DDS (tetraglycidyl-4,4'-diaminodiphenyl methane cured with diaminodiphenyl sulfone) are included. Radiation dose levels up to 8000 Mrads were obtained with no deleterious effects on the breaking stress or modulus. The effects on the structure and morphology were investigated using mechanical tests, electron spin resonance, X-ray diffraction, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA or X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy). Details of the experiments and results are given. Studies of the fracture surfaces of irradiated samples were studied with scanning electron microscopy; current results indicate no differences in the morphology of irradiated and control samples.

  4. Energetic particle imaging: The evolution of techniques in imaging high-energy neutral atom emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, D. G.; Brandt, P. C.; Westlake, J. H.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Andrews, G. B.; Nelson, K. S.

    2016-09-01

    Energetic neutral atom imaging instruments have been flown on a variety of space missions to satisfy a variety of science requirements. In this paper we discuss the most recent developments that lead to improvements in energy range, angular resolution, and background rejection for the high-energy range, as represented in the past by the Cassini magnetosphere imaging instrument Ion and Neutral Camera, the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) mission High-Energy Neutral Atom instrument, and to some degree the IMAGE mission Medium-Energy Neutral Atom instrument. The new approaches discussed here rely on the use of ultrathin foils without UV filters and on very high speed coincidence logic to reduce accidentals from intense background sources. We present laboratory results demonstrating an electrostatic design that meets the coincidence timing requirements, position, and scattering performance consistent with angular resolution (full width at half maximum) of 2° for hydrogen above 10 keV and a hydrogen energy threshold ≤1 keV.

  5. High-energy electron emission from metallic nano-tips driven by intense single-cycle terahertz pulses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sha; Jones, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    Electrons ejected from atoms and subsequently driven to high energies in strong laser fields enable techniques from attosecond pulse generation to imaging with rescattered electrons. Analogous processes govern strong-field electron emission from nanostructures, where long wavelength radiation and large local field enhancements hold the promise for producing electrons with substantially higher energies, allowing for higher resolution time-resolved imaging. Here we report on the use of single-cycle terahertz pulses to drive electron emission from unbiased nano-tips. Energies exceeding 5 keV are observed, substantially greater than previously attained at higher drive frequencies. Despite large differences in the magnitude of the respective local fields, we find that the maximum electron energies are only weakly dependent on the tip radius, for 10 nmhigh-energy electron emission is predicted to be confined to a single burst, potentially enabling a variety of applications. PMID:27830701

  6. High-energy Emissions from the Pulsar/Be Binary System PSR J2032+4127/MT91 213

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, J.; Tam, P. H. T.; Ng, C. W.; Li, K. L.; Kong, A. K. H.; Hui, C. Y.; Cheng, K. S.

    2017-02-01

    PSR J2032+4127 is a radio-loud gamma-ray-emitting pulsar; it is orbiting around a high-mass Be type star with a very long orbital period of 25–50 years, and is approaching periastron, which will occur in late 2017/early 2018. This system comprises a young pulsar and a Be type star, which is similar to the so-called gamma-ray binary PSR B1259–63/LS2883. It is expected therefore that PSR J2032+4127 shows an enhancement of high-energy emission caused by the interaction between the pulsar wind and Be wind/disk around periastron. Ho et al. recently reported a rapid increase in the X-ray flux from this system. In this paper, we also confirm a rapid increase in the X-ray flux along the orbit, while the GeV flux shows no significant change. We discuss the high-energy emissions from the shock caused by the pulsar wind and stellar wind interaction and examine the properties of the pulsar wind in this binary system. We argue that the rate of increase of the X-ray flux observed by Swift indicates (1) a variation of the momentum ratio of the two-wind interaction region along the orbit, or (2) an evolution of the magnetization parameter of the pulsar wind with the radial distance from the pulsar. We also discuss the pulsar wind/Be disk interaction at the periastron passage, and propose the possibility of formation of an accretion disk around the pulsar. We model high-energy emissions through the inverse-Compton scattering process of the cold-relativistic pulsar wind off soft photons from the accretion disk.

  7. High-energy Emission of GRB 130427A: Evidence for Inverse Compton Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Tam, P. H. T.; Zhang, Fu-Wen; Liang, Yun-Feng; He, Hao-Ning; Zhou, Bei; Yang, Rui-Zhi; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Wei, Da-Ming

    2013-10-01

    A nearby superluminous burst GRB 130427A was simultaneously detected by six γ-ray space telescopes (Swift, the Fermi GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM)/Large Area Telescope, Konus-Wind, SPI-ACS/INTEGRAL, AGILE, and RHESSI) and by three RAPTOR full-sky persistent monitors. The isotropic γ-ray energy release is ~1054 erg, rendering it the most powerful explosion among gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a redshift z <= 0.5. The emission above 100 MeV lasted about one day, and four photons are at energies greater than 40 GeV. We show that the count rate of 100 MeV-100 GeV emission may be mainly accounted for by the forward shock synchrotron radiation and the inverse Compton radiation likely dominates at GeV-TeV energies. In particular, an inverse Compton radiation origin is favored for the ~(95.3, 47.3, 41.4, 38.5, 32) GeV photons arriving at t ~ (243, 256.3, 610.6, 3409.8, 34366.2) s after the trigger of Fermi-GBM. Interestingly, the external inverse Compton scattering of the prompt emission (the second episode, i.e., t ~ 120-260 s) by the forward-shock-accelerated electrons is expected to produce a few γ-rays at energies above 10 GeV, while five were detected in the same time interval. A possible unified model for the prompt soft γ-ray, optical, and GeV emission of GRB 130427A, GRB 080319B, and GRB 090902B is outlined. Implications of the null detection of >1 TeV neutrinos from GRB 130427A by IceCube are discussed.

  8. HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION FROM THE COMPOSITE SUPERNOVA REMNANT MSH 15-56

    SciTech Connect

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Castro, Daniel; Gelfand, Joseph; Dickel, John R.

    2013-05-01

    MSH 15-56 (G326.3-1.8) is a composite supernova remnant (SNR) that consists of an SNR shell and a displaced pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the radio. We present XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of the remnant that reveal a compact source at the tip of the radio PWN and complex structures that provide evidence for mixing of the supernova (SN) ejecta with PWN material following a reverse shock interaction. The X-ray spectra are well fitted by a non-thermal power-law model whose photon index steepens with distance from the presumed pulsar, and a thermal component with an average temperature of 0.55 keV. The enhanced abundances of silicon and sulfur in some regions, and the similar temperature and ionization timescale, suggest that much of the X-ray emission can be attributed to SN ejecta that have either been heated by the reverse shock or swept up by the PWN. We find one region with a lower temperature of 0.3 keV that appears to be in ionization equilibrium. Assuming the Sedov model, we derive a number of SNR properties, including an age of 16,500 yr. Modeling of the {gamma}-ray emission detected by Fermi shows that the emission may originate from the reverse shock-crushed PWN.

  9. High-energy Emission from the Composite Supernova Remnant MSH 15-56

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Castro, Daniel; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Gelfand, Joseph; Dickel, John R.

    2013-05-01

    MSH 15-56 (G326.3-1.8) is a composite supernova remnant (SNR) that consists of an SNR shell and a displaced pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the radio. We present XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of the remnant that reveal a compact source at the tip of the radio PWN and complex structures that provide evidence for mixing of the supernova (SN) ejecta with PWN material following a reverse shock interaction. The X-ray spectra are well fitted by a non-thermal power-law model whose photon index steepens with distance from the presumed pulsar, and a thermal component with an average temperature of 0.55 keV. The enhanced abundances of silicon and sulfur in some regions, and the similar temperature and ionization timescale, suggest that much of the X-ray emission can be attributed to SN ejecta that have either been heated by the reverse shock or swept up by the PWN. We find one region with a lower temperature of 0.3 keV that appears to be in ionization equilibrium. Assuming the Sedov model, we derive a number of SNR properties, including an age of 16,500 yr. Modeling of the γ-ray emission detected by Fermi shows that the emission may originate from the reverse shock-crushed PWN.

  10. High-energy Emission from the Composite Supernova Remnant MSH 15-56

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Castro, Daniel; Plucinsky, Paul; Gelfand, Joseph; Dickel, John R.

    2013-01-01

    MSH 1556 (G326.3-1.8) is a composite supernova remnant (SNR) that consists of an SNR shell and a displaced pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the radio. We present XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of the remnant that reveal a compact source at the tip of the radio PWN and complex structures that provide evidence for mixing of the supernova (SN) ejecta with PWN material following a reverse shock interaction. The X-ray spectra are well fitted by a non-thermal power-law model whose photon index steepens with distance from the presumed pulsar, and a thermal component with an average temperature of 0.55 keV. The enhanced abundances of silicon and sulfur in some regions, and the similar temperature and ionization timescale, suggest that much of the X-ray emission can be attributed to SN ejecta that have either been heated by the reverse shock or swept up by the PWN. We find one region with a lower temperature of 0.3 keV that appears to be in ionization equilibrium.Assuming the Sedov model, we derive a number of SNR properties, including an age of 16,500 yr. Modeling of the gamma-ray emission detected by Fermi shows that the emission may originate from the reverse shock-crushed PWN.

  11. A LEPTONIC MODEL OF STEADY HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM Sgr A*

    SciTech Connect

    Kusunose, Masaaki; Takahara, Fumio E-mail: takahara@vega.ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2012-03-20

    Recent observations of Sgr A* by Fermi and HESS have detected steady {gamma}-ray emission in the GeV and TeV bands. We present a new model to explain the GeV {gamma}-ray emission by inverse Compton scattering by nonthermal electrons supplied by the NIR/X-ray flares of Sgr A*. The escaping electrons from the flare regions accumulate in a region with a size of {approx}10{sup 18} cm and magnetic fields of {approx}< 10{sup -4} G. Those electrons produce {gamma}-rays by inverse Compton scattering off soft photons emitted by stars and dust around the central black hole. By fitting the GeV spectrum, we find constraints on the magnetic field and the energy density of optical-UV radiation in the central 1 pc region around the supermassive black hole. While the GeV spectrum is well fitted by our model, the TeV {gamma}-rays, whose spectral index is different from that of the GeV emission, may be from different sources such as pulsar wind nebulae.

  12. Bremsstrahlung emission of high energy accompanying spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Maydanyuk, S. P.; Olkhovsky, V. S.; Mandaglio, G.; Manganaro, M.; Fazio, G.; Giardina, G.

    2010-07-15

    The study of the bremsstrahlung photon emission accompanying fragments produced in the spontaneous fission of heavy nuclei by a fully quantum approach is presented for the first time. This kind of problem requires the knowledge of wave functions of the fissioning system leading to a wide distribution of couples of fragments that are the products of fission. With the aim of obtaining these wave functions, the interaction potential between the emitted fragment and residual nucleus is calculated by a standard approach. A new procedure was performed that allows an increase in the accuracy of calculations of radial integrals in the far asymptotic region and the achievement of the convenient convergence in calculations of the spectra. The total probability of the emitted photons in the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf was calculated in such a way. We obtained good agreement between theory and experimental data up to 38 MeV for the bremsstrahlung spectrum of photons while the calculation of the total probability of photon emission accompanying fragments was performed up to an energy of 60 MeV. The analysis of contributions in the bremsstrahlung spectrum accompanying the emission of light, medium, and heavy fragments in the fission of {sup 252}Cf is presented.

  13. High energy neutron and pion-decay gamma-ray emissions from solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupp, Edward L.; Ryan, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Solar flare gamma-ray emissions from energetic ions and electrons have been detected and measured to GeV energies since 1980. In addition, neutrons produced in solar flares with 100 MeV to GeV energies have been observed at the Earth. These emissions are produced by the highest energy ions and electrons accelerated at the Sun and they provide our only direct (albeit secondary) knowledge about the properties of the accelerator(s) acting in a solar flare. The solar flares, which have direct evidence for pion-decay gamma-rays, are unique and are the focus of this paper. We review our current knowledge of the highest energy solar emissions, and how the characteristics of the acceleration process are deduced from the observations. Results from the RHESSI, INTEGRAL and CORONAS missions will also be covered. The review will also cover the solar flare capabilities of the new mission, FERMI GAMMA RAY SPACE TELESCOPE, launched on 2008 June 11. Finally, we discuss the requirements for future missions to advance this vital area of solar flare physics.

  14. The effect of expansion on high-energy emission from AGN jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Martin

    2006-04-01

    We study the radiation yield of relativistic particles in AGN jet that undergo expansion. For that purpose we use a specific model of particle acceleration (Pohl & Schlickeiser 2000) that is based on aborted relativistic shock acceleration and the direct conversion of bulk flow energy into particle energy. While jet expansion must be expected on account of the high pressure in the jet emission zones, the structure of radio galaxies suggests that the expansion is moderate. For various expansion profiles we solve the jet propagation equation and the continuity equations of energetic particles in parallel to derive observable signatures of expansion. A comparison with data suggests that expansion is very inefficient indeed, and we speculate on possible reasons why that is so. Though our study is based on a particular jet model, its results can -- within limits -- be extrapolated to other scenarios, provided they are based on jets being matter-dominated.

  15. High Energy Emission from Quasar Jets: HST polarimetry, X-ray and Gamma-ray Emission and the IC/CMB hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlman, Eric S.; Georganopoulos, Markos; Meyer, Eileen T.; Cara, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    One of the unique legacies of the Chandra X-ray Observatory is the discovery of X-ray emission from a large number of extragalactic jets (over 100 are now known). In less powerful, FR I radio jets this emission is generally understood to be synchrotron emission from the highest energy electrons, requiring in situ particle acceleration, but the nature of the high-energy emission from the more powerful quasar jets is less well constrained. In quasar jets, the emission extends for tens to hundreds of kiloparsecs, and the observed X-rays are harder and at a higher flux than expected from an extrapolation of the radio to optical spectrum. Over the last 15 years, a persistent debate has arisen as to the nature of this emission, with the leading model being inverse-Comptonization of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation. This explanation requires the jet to be relativistic out to hundreds of kiloparsecs from the nucleus, and requires an electron spectrum that extends to very low Lorentz factors. The combination of these two results in a very high kinetic power, very close to or over the Eddington limit if the electron spectrum continues to gamma ~ 1. We discuss recent work with HST polarimetry and the X-ray to gamma-ray spectrum that we believe makes it necessary to re-examine the IC/CMB hypothesis. In many quasar jets, the optical and X-ray emission is joined by a single spectral component, and HST polarimetry in that high-energy component is detecting high polarizations, making it difficult to explain the high-energy emission via the IC/CMB hypothesis. So far, this has been found in 2 jets (PKS 1136-135, Cara et al. 2013, and 1150+497), with observations of a third (3C 273) scheduled for January. In addition, IC/CMB of the highest energy synchrotron photons predicts that we should be detecting GeV gamma-ray emission from the extended jets (Georganopoulos et al. 2006, Meyer & Georganopoulos 2014). These lines of evidence have made the IC/CMB hypothesis very unlikely

  16. High-energy side-peak emission of exciton-polariton condensates in high density regime

    PubMed Central

    Horikiri, Tomoyuki; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Kamide, Kenji; Matsuo, Yasuhiro; Byrnes, Tim; Ishida, Natsuko; Löffler, Andreas; Höfling, Sven; Shikano, Yutaka; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Forchel, Alfred; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    In a standard semiconductor laser, electrons and holes recombine via stimulated emission to emit coherent light, in a process that is far from thermal equilibrium. Exciton-polariton condensates–sharing the same basic device structure as a semiconductor laser, consisting of quantum wells coupled to a microcavity–have been investigated primarily at densities far below the Mott density for signatures of Bose-Einstein condensation. At high densities approaching the Mott density, exciton-polariton condensates are generally thought to revert to a standard semiconductor laser, with the loss of strong coupling. Here, we report the observation of a photoluminescence sideband at high densities that cannot be accounted for by conventional semiconductor lasing. This also differs from an upper-polariton peak by the observation of the excitation power dependence in the peak-energy separation. Our interpretation as a persistent coherent electron-hole-photon coupling captures several features of this sideband, although a complete understanding of the experimental data is lacking. A full understanding of the observations should lead to a development in non-equilibrium many-body physics. PMID:27193700

  17. The extended jet of AP Librae: Origin of the very high-energy γ-ray emission?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, Michael; Wagner, Stefan J.

    2016-04-01

    The low-frequency peaked BL Lac object (LBL) AP Librae exhibits very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) γ-ray emission and hosts an extended jet, which has been detected in radio and X-rays. The jet X-ray spectral index implies an inverse Compton origin. These observations are unusual for LBLs calling for a consistent explanation of this extraordinary source. The observationally constrained parameters necessary to describe the core emission within the standard one-zone model are unable to explain the broad-band spectrum, even if observationally unconstrained external photon fields are taken into account. We demonstrate that the addition of the extended jet emission successfully reproduces the total spectral energy distribution. In particular, the VHE radiation is produced in the >100 kpc long extended jet via inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons by highly relativistic electrons. We present several ways to test this theory. The extended jet is weakly magnetized (B0 = 2.5 μG), while its minimum and maximum electron Lorentz factors are γmin = 60 and γmax = 5 × 106, respectively. The electron spectral index is s = 2.6. These parameters are comparable to parameters of other blazars with extended X-ray jets dominated by inverse Compton scattering.

  18. A Program To Search For Transient Microwave Emission From GRBs And Other High-Energy Sources Using Archival WMAP Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacy, J. Gregory; Case, Gary L.; Hart, Daniel R.; Jackson, Peter D.; Winkler, Christoph

    2007-07-01

    We report on a new program to search the public time-ordered datasets acquired with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) for transient signals associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and other high-energy sources. This program is an extension of earlier work in which we established the first limits on prompt microwave emission from GRBs using archival datasets from the Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) aboard the COBE satellite. The increased sensitivity and angular resolution of the WMAP radiometers compared to the COBE/DMR lead to a factor of ~10,000 improvement in overall point-source sensitivity. Such limits approach the signal levels predicted in the microwave band for the peak prompt emission arising from reverse shocks in GRBs. In the first phase of our program we are verifying our analysis software and assessing sensitivity limits by searching for microwave transients or flaring signals from known blazars and similar sources that are detected in the cumulative WMAP data as ``foreground'' point sources of microwave emission.

  19. Prospects for detection of very high-energy emission from GRB in the context of the external shock model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, A.; Piro, L.

    2008-10-01

    Context: The detection of the 100 GeV-TeV emission by a gamma-ray burst (GRB) will provide an unprecedented opportunity to study the nature of the central engine and the interaction between the relativistic flow and the environment of the burst's progenitor. Aims: In this paper we show that there are exciting prospects of detecting from the burst by MAGIC high-energy (HE) emission during the early X-ray flaring activity and, later, during the normal afterglow phase. We also identify the best observational strategy: trigger conditions and time period of observation. Methods: We determine the expected HE emission from the flaring and afterglow phases of GRBs in the context of the external shock scenario and compare them with the MAGIC threshold. Results: We find that an X-ray flare with the average properties of the class can be detected in the 100 GeV range by MAGIC, provided that z ≲ 0.7. The requested observational window with MAGIC should then start from 10-20 s after the burst and cover about 1000-2000 s. Furthermore, we demonstrate that there are solid prospects of detecting the late afterglow emission in the same energy range for most of the bursts with z ≲ 0.5 if the density of the external medium is n ≳ a few cm-3. In this case, the MAGIC observation shall extend to about 10-20 ks. We provide recipes for tailoring this prediction to the observational properties of each burst, in particular the fluence in the prompt emission and the redshift, thus allowing an almost real time decision procedure to decide whether to continue the follow-up observation of a burst at late times.

  20. Modeling the Delayed Emission in the 2005 Mkn 501 Very-High-Energy Gamma-Ray Flare

    SciTech Connect

    Bednarek, Wlodek; Wagner, Robert

    2008-12-24

    Recently, the MAGIC collaboration reported evidence for a delay in the arrival times of photons of different energies during a {gamma}-ray flare from the blazar Markarian 501 on 2005 July 9. We describe the observed delayed high-energy emission by applying a homogeneous synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model under the assumption that the blob, containing relativistic electrons, was observed in its acceleration phase. This modified SSC model predicts the appearance of a {gamma}-ray flare first at lower energies and subsequently at higher energies. Based on the reported time delay, we predict a delay on the order of 1 h if observed between 10 GeV and 100 GeV, which can be tested in the future by simultaneous flare observations using, e.g., the Fermi Gamma-Ray Telescope and Cerenkov telescopes.

  1. Gamma-ray emission from globular clusters. Shock high energy emission from the Be-Star/Pulsar System PSR 1259-63. Echoes in x-ray novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    1995-01-01

    This grant covers work on the Compton phase 3 investigation, 'Shock High Energy Emission from the Be- Star/Pulsar System PSR 1259-63' and cycle 4 investigations 'Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission at High Latitudes' and 'Echoes in X-Ray Novae'. Work under the investigation 'Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission at High Latitudes' has lead to the publication of a paper (attached), describing gamma-ray emissivity variations in the northern galactic hemisphere. Using archival EGRET data, we have found a large irregular region of enhanced gamma-ray emissivity at energies greater 100 MeV. This is the first observation of local structure in the gamma-ray emissivity. Work under the investigation 'Echoes in X-Ray Novae' is proceeding with analysis of data from OSSE from the transient source GRO J1655-40. The outburst of this source last fall triggered this Target of Opportunity investigation. Preliminary spectral analysis shows emission out to 600 keV and a pure power low spectrum with no evidence of an exponential cutoff. Work is complete on the analysis of BATSE data from the Be-Star/Pulsar Sustem PSR 1259-63.

  2. Probing the micro-mechanical behavior of bone via high-energy x-rays.

    SciTech Connect

    Almer, J.; Stock, S. R.; X-Ray Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2006-01-01

    the sample. While under load, high-energy x-rays (80.7 keV) of transverse size 0.05(x) x 0.05(y) mm{sup 2} were used to sample through the entire thickness (z) of the sample. Wide-angle scattering patterns at multiple x-positions (y=0) were collected using a large area detector, with each 2D pattern containing data in a plane approximately parallel to the sample x-y plane. Internal strains along the longitudinal/loading direction ({var_epsilon}{sub yy}) are shown for the apatite (002) reflection in Fig. 1. Values for five different lateral positions are shown, with x = -1 mm near the convex side of the sample and x = +1 near the concave side. Also shown are value from the strain gage located on the concave side of the specimen. All internal strains are non-zero before unloading and {var_epsilon}{sub yy} {approx} -700 {mu}{var_epsilon}. When stress is applied, strain response varies substantially across the sample, with {var_epsilon}{sub yy} (x = 1) showing the highest compression while {var_epsilon}{sub yy} (x = -1) slightly more tensile values. The macroscopic strain increases similar to, but at a higher degree than, {var_epsilon}{sub yy} (x = -1). At the maximum applied stress of {approx}33 MPa the sample experienced multiple cracks, as verified via post-mortem analysis. Upon unloading the macroscopic strain was primarily elastic, as values (nearly) returned to those seen upon loading.

  3. Mechanical effects induced by shock waves generated by high energy laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, J.; Ballard, P.; Merrien, P.; Barralis, J.; Castex, L.; Fabbro, R.

    1991-09-01

    Specimens made of low alloy and non alloyed medium carbon steels were subjected to high energy laser pulses. Direct ablation and confined plasma procedures were both investigated. An optimum impulse momentum transfer to the material is attained with a pulse duration of 30 ns and a power density of 10 GW .cm^2. Fatigue testing shows that the fatigue strengths of the selected materials are significantly increased. This can be related to the fact that laser shock processing generates an appropriate residual compressive stress field in a sufficiently thick layer and does not alter the initial surface roughness. In addition, the use of cumulative laser impacts and of dual treatment combining thermal and mechanical effects of the laser beam have been investigated and shown to result in an enhanced fatigue strength. Des échantillons d'acier éventuellement faiblement allié sont irradiés par un ou plusieurs pulses laser ayant une intensité comprise entre 1 et 100 GW/cm^2 et une durée d'émission laser de 3 ou 30 ns, les deux configurations d'ablation directe ou de plasma confiné étant utilisées. Les contraintes résiduelles résultant du passage de l'onde de choc sont analysées à l'aide de la technique de diffraction de rayons X. D'après cette étude, il apparaît clairement que les valeurs d'intensité et de durée d'émission laser les plus appropriées sont respectivement 10 GW/cm^2 et 30 ns. Ces valeurs correspondent à l'optimum de transfert d'impulsion. De plus, l'influence du nombre d'impacts laser utilisés est discuté et un essai de fatigue montre que ce traitement mécanique de surface augmente de manière significative la limite d'endurance du matériau étudié.

  4. Sub-second variations of high energy ( 300 keV) hard X-ray emission from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Taeil

    1986-01-01

    Subsecond variations of hard X-ray emission from solar flares were first observed with a balloon-borne detector. With the launch of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), it is now well known that subsecond variations of hard X-ray emission occur quite frequently. Such rapid variations give constraints on the modeling of electron energization. Such rapid variations reported until now, however, were observed at relatively low energies. Fast mode data obtained by the Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) has time resolution of approximately 1 ms but has no energy resolution. Therefore, rapid fluctuations observed in the fast-mode HXRBS data are dominated by the low energy hard X-rays. It is of interest to know whether rapid fluctuations are observed in high-energy X-rays. The highest energy band at which subsecond variations were observed is 223 to 1057 keV. Subsecond variations observed with HXRBS at energies greater than 300 keV are reported, and the implications discussed.

  5. DISCOVERY OF VERY HIGH ENERGY {gamma}-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SNR G54.1+0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W.; Aliu, E.; Boltuch, D.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Bautista, M.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Bradbury, S. M.; Butt, Y.; Byrum, K.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Finley, J. P.; Duke, C.; Finnegan, G. E-mail: wakely@uchicago.ed

    2010-08-10

    We report the discovery of very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission from the direction of the SNR G54.1+0.3 using the VERITAS ground-based gamma-ray observatory. The TeV signal has an overall significance of 6.8{sigma} and appears pointlike given the resolution of the instrument. The integral flux above 1 TeV is 2.5% of the Crab Nebula flux and significant emission is measured between 250 GeV and 4 TeV, well described by a power-law energy spectrum dN/dE {approx} E {sup -{Gamma}} with a photon index {Gamma} = 2.39 {+-} 0.23{sub stat} {+-} 0.30{sub sys}. We find no evidence of time variability among observations spanning almost two years. Based on the location, the morphology, the measured spectrum, the lack of variability, and a comparison with similar systems previously detected in the TeV band, the most likely counterpart of this new VHE gamma-ray source is the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the SNR G54.1+0.3. The measured X-ray to VHE gamma-ray luminosity ratio is the lowest among all the nebulae supposedly driven by young rotation-powered pulsars, which could indicate a particle-dominated PWN.

  6. DISCOVERY OF VARIABILITY IN THE VERY HIGH ENERGY {gamma}-RAY EMISSION OF 1ES 1218+304 WITH VERITAS

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W.; Aliu, E.; Beilicke, M.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Boltuch, D.; Boettcher, M.; Bradbury, S. M.; Byrum, K.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Fortson, L.; Cogan, P.; Cui, W.; Finley, J. P.; Duke, C.; Falcone, A.; Finnegan, G.; Furniss, A.

    2010-02-01

    We present results from an intensive VERITAS monitoring campaign of the high-frequency peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1218+304 in 2008/2009. Although 1ES 1218+304 was detected previously by MAGIC and VERITAS at a persistent level of {approx}6% of the Crab Nebula flux, the new VERITAS data reveal a prominent flare reaching {approx}20% of the Crab. While very high energy (VHE) flares are quite common in many nearby blazars, the case of 1ES 1218+304 (redshift z = 0.182) is particularly interesting since it belongs to a group of blazars that exhibit unusually hard VHE spectra considering their redshifts. When correcting the measured spectra for absorption by the extragalactic background light, 1ES 1218+304 and a number of other blazars are found to have differential photon indices {gamma}{<=} 1.5. The difficulty in modeling these hard spectral energy distributions in blazar jets has led to a range of theoretical {gamma}-ray emission scenarios, one of which is strongly constrained by these new VERITAS observations. We consider the implications of the observed light curve of 1ES 1218+304, which shows day scale flux variations, for shock acceleration scenarios in relativistic jets, and in particular for the viability of kiloparsec-scale jet emission scenarios.

  7. Lepton Acceleration in the Vicinity of the Event Horizon: High-energy and Very-high-energy Emissions from Rotating Black Holes with Various Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirotani, Kouichi; Pu, Hung-Yi; Chun-Che Lin, Lupin; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Inoue, Makoto; Kong, Albert K. H.; Matsushita, Satoki; Tam, Pak-Hin T.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the electrostatic acceleration of electrons and positrons in the vicinity of the event horizon, applying the pulsar outer-gap model to black hole (BH) magnetospheres. During a low accretion phase, the radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF) cannot emit enough MeV photons that are needed to sustain the force-free magnetosphere via two-photon collisions. In such a charge-starved region (or a gap), an electric field arises along the magnetic field lines to accelerate electrons and positrons into ultra-relativistic energies. These relativistic leptons emit copious gamma rays via curvature and inverse-Compton (IC) processes. Some of such gamma rays collide with the submillimeter-IR photons emitted from the RIAF to materialize as pairs, which polarize to partially screen the original acceleration electric field. It is found that the gap gamma-ray luminosity increases with decreasing accretion rate. However, if the accretion rate decreases too much, the diminished RIAF soft photon field can no longer sustain a stationary pair production within the gap. As long as a stationary gap is formed, the magnetosphere becomes force-free outside the gap by the cascaded pairs, irrespective of the BH mass. If a nearby stellar-mass BH is in quiescence, or if a galactic intermediate-mass BH is in a very low accretion state, its curvature and IC emissions are found to be detectable with Fermi/LAT and imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACT). If a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus is located within about 30 Mpc, the IC emission from its supermassive BH is marginally detectable with IACT.

  8. High-energy X-Ray Detection of G359.89-0.08 (Sgr A-E): Magnetic Flux Tube Emission Powered by Cosmic Rays?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuo; Hailey, Charles J.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Bauer, Franz E.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Christensen, Finn E.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Mori, Kaya; Nynka, Melania; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A.; Zhang, William W.

    2014-03-01

    We report the first detection of high-energy X-ray (E > 10 keV) emission from the Galactic center non-thermal filament G359.89-0.08 (Sgr A-E) using data acquired with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). The bright filament was detected up to ~50 keV during a NuSTAR Galactic center monitoring campaign. The featureless power-law spectrum with a photon index Γ ≈ 2.3 confirms a non-thermal emission mechanism. The observed flux in the 3-79 keV band is FX = (2.0 ± 0.1) × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1, corresponding to an unabsorbed X-ray luminosity LX = (2.6 ± 0.8) × 1034 erg s-1 assuming a distance of 8.0 kpc. Based on theoretical predictions and observations, we conclude that Sgr A-E is unlikely to be a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) or supernova remnant-molecular cloud (SNR-MC) interaction, as previously hypothesized. Instead, the emission could be due to a magnetic flux tube which traps TeV electrons. We propose two possible TeV electron sources: old PWNe (up to ~100 kyr) with low surface brightness and radii up to ~30 pc or MCs illuminated by cosmic rays (CRs) from CR accelerators such as SNRs or Sgr A*.

  9. High-Energy X-Ray Detection of G359.89-0.08 (SGR A-E): Magnetic Flux Tube Emission Powered by Cosmic Rays?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Shuo; Hailey, Charles J.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Bauer, Franz E.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Christensen, Finn E.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Mori, Kaya; Nynka, Melania; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A; Zhang, Will

    2014-01-01

    We report the first detection of high-energy X-ray (E (is) greater than 10 keV) emission from the Galactic center non-thermal filament G359.89-0.08 (Sgr A-E) using data acquired with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). The bright filament was detected up to approximately 50 keV during a NuSTAR Galactic center monitoring campaign. The featureless power-law spectrum with a photon index gamma approximately equals 2.3 confirms a non-thermal emission mechanism. The observed flux in the 3-79 keV band is F(sub X) = (2.0 +/- 0.1) × 10(exp -12)erg cm(-2) s(-1) , corresponding to an unabsorbed X-ray luminosity L(sub X) = (2.6+/-0.8)×10(exp 34) erg s(-1) assuming a distance of 8.0 kpc. Based on theoretical predictions and observations, we conclude that Sgr A-E is unlikely to be a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) or supernova remnant-molecular cloud (SNR-MC) interaction, as previously hypothesized. Instead, the emission could be due to a magnetic flux tube which traps TeV electrons. We propose two possible TeV electron sources: old PWNe (up to (is) approximately 100 kyr) with low surface brightness and radii up to (is) approximately 30 pc or MCs illuminated by cosmic rays (CRs) from CR accelerators such as SNRs or Sgr A*.

  10. Experimental study on the fabrication of advanced materials for energy applications using high energy mechanical milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana Swamy, Ashvin Kumar

    The reaction of aluminum (Al) powder with water has the potential for on demand hydrogen generation. Conventional Al powders, however, react with water slowly due to a highly protective oxide layer on the particle surface. Current methods for Al activation involve harmful and expensive materials. The nano-scale Al powders also remain very expensive and have problems such as a large amount of oxide on the surface. The use of aluminum in an energy generation cycle is also hindered by the fact that, although Al is the most abundant metal in the Earth's crust, its recovery from ore consumes a lot of energy. Recycling aluminum hydroxide, formed as a result of Al reaction with water, would also require large amounts of energy. The energy consumption for production of Al powder and hence its cost could be significantly reduced by using recycled aluminum scrap and waste where aluminum is contained in metallic, non-oxidized form. The research work presented here investigates the preparation of an activated aluminum powder from aluminum foil that is widely available as scrap and waste. The obtained results demonstrate that a highly reactive, fine powder can be obtained from Al foil by high-energy ball milling with sodium chloride (NaCl). The obtained powder readily reacts with hot water, releasing hydrogen. Note that NaCl is an environment-friendly additive that can easily be removed after milling and recycled. After washing NaCl out, the powders retain a high reactivity with respect to hot water. As compared to previously studied activation of commercial Al powders, a major advantage of the investigated process is the feasibility of using secondary aluminum. Another area of research presented here is the synthesis of gallium oxide (Ga2O3) nanostructures for their use as high-temperature sensors. Quasi one-dimensional nanomaterials are of great interest due to increased focus on their importance in physics research and also their applications in the nanodevices industry

  11. Impulsive and long duration high-energy gamma-ray emission from the very bright 2012 March 7 solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Charles, E.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Cecchi, C.; Brandt, T. J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Caraveo, P. A. E-mail: vahep@stanford.edu; and others

    2014-07-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) detected gamma-rays up to 4 GeV from two bright X-class solar flares on 2012 March 7, showing both an impulsive and temporally extended emission phases. The gamma-rays appear to originate from the same active region as the X-rays associated with these flares. The >100 MeV gamma-ray flux decreases monotonically during the first hour (impulsive phase) followed by a slower decrease for the next 20 hr. A power law with a high-energy exponential cutoff can adequately describe the photon spectrum. Assuming that the gamma rays result from the decay of pions produced by accelerated protons and ions with a power-law spectrum, we find that the index of that spectrum is ∼3, with minor variations during the impulsive phase. During the extended phase the photon spectrum softens monotonically, requiring the proton index varying from ∼4 to >5. The >30 MeV proton flux observed by the GOES satellites also shows a flux decrease and spectral softening, but with a harder spectrum (index ∼2-3). Based on these observations, we explore the relative merits of prompt or continuous acceleration scenarios, hadronic or leptonic emission processes, and acceleration at the solar corona or by the fast coronal mass ejections. We conclude that the most likely scenario is continuous acceleration of protons in the solar corona that penetrate the lower solar atmosphere and produce pions that decay into gamma rays. However, acceleration in the downstream of the shock cannot be definitely ruled out.

  12. Spectral and Atomic Physics Analysis of Xenon L-Shell Emission From High Energy Laser Produced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorn, Daniel; Kemp, G. E.; Widmann, K.; Benjamin, R. D.; May, M. J.; Colvin, J. D.; Barrios, M. A.; Fournier, K. B.; Liedahl, D.; Moore, A. S.; Blue, B. E.

    2016-10-01

    The spectrum of the L-shell (n =2) radiation in mid to high-Z ions is useful for probing plasma conditions in the multi-keV temperature range. Xenon in particular with its L-shell radiation centered around 4.5 keV is copiously produced from plasmas with electron temperatures in the 5-10 keV range. We report on a series of time-resolved L-shell Xe spectra measured with the NIF X-ray Spectrometer (NXS) in high-energy long-pulse (>10 ns) laser produced plasmas at the National Ignition Facility. The resolving power of the NXS is sufficiently high (E/ ∂E >100) in the 4-5 keV spectral band that the emission from different charge states is observed. An analysis of the time resolved L-shell spectrum of Xe is presented along with spectral modeling by detailed radiation transport and atomic physics from the SCRAM code and comparison with predictions from HYDRA a radiation-hydrodynamics code with inline atomic-physics from CRETIN. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Discovery of Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from 1FGL J2001.1 4351 by MAGIC

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Karsten; Paneque, David; Giavitto, Gianluca; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2012-05-07

    We report the discovery of Very High Energy (VHE; >100 GeV) gamma-ray emission from the source 1FGL J2001.1+4351, (RA 20 01 13.5, dec 43 53 02.8, J2000), which is positionally consistent with the location of the flat spectrum radio source MG4 J200112+4352 (RA 20 01 12.9, dec 43 52 52.8, J2000). The VHE detection is based on a 1.5 hour-long observation performed on July 16th in stereoscopic mode with the two 17m diameter imaging Cherenkov telescopes on La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain. The preliminary analysis of the MAGIC data using the standard cuts optimized for soft energy spectra sources yields a detection of 125 gamma-rays above 90 GeV, corresponding to a pre-trail statistical significance of 7.6 standard deviations. The observed flux is estimated to be {approx}20% of the Crab nebula flux above 100 GeV. Earlier MAGIC observations indicated a substantially lower flux; hence indicating that the source is variable on a few days timescale.

  14. Mechanism of multiple grating formation in high-energy recording of holographic sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Yetisen, Ali K. Yun, Seok Hyun; Montelongo, Yunuen; Farandos, Nicholas M.; Naydenova, Izabela; Lowe, Christopher R.

    2014-12-29

    We report numerical analyses of Bragg diffraction by Denisyuk reflection holograms recorded by a high-energy pulsed laser. An intensity threshold must be passed to pattern a multilayer reflection and transmission hologram, which exhibits a nonlinear fringe structure. Numerical evaluations are provided for the laser light intensity, readout diffraction offset angle, transmission of the layer, and thickness of the polymer matrix during hologram recording. A non-sinusoidal surface pattern is formed at the top of the multilayer structure, and its effect on the diffraction properties of the structure becomes significant when the recording tilt angle is increased. Experimental results show that the angle of the diffracted light increases nonlinearly according to the tilt geometry in grating formation.

  15. High-energy chemistry of formamide: A unified mechanism of nucleobase formation

    PubMed Central

    Ferus, Martin; Nesvorný, David; Šponer, Jiří; Kubelík, Petr; Michalčíková, Regina; Shestivská, Violetta; Šponer, Judit E.; Civiš, Svatopluk

    2015-01-01

    The coincidence of the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) period and the emergence of terrestrial life about 4 billion years ago suggest that extraterrestrial impacts could contribute to the synthesis of the building blocks of the first life-giving molecules. We simulated the high-energy synthesis of nucleobases from formamide during the impact of an extraterrestrial body. A high-power laser has been used to induce the dielectric breakdown of the plasma produced by the impact. The results demonstrate that the initial dissociation of the formamide molecule could produce a large amount of highly reactive CN and NH radicals, which could further react with formamide to produce adenine, guanine, cytosine, and uracil. Based on GC-MS, high-resolution FTIR spectroscopic results, as well as theoretical calculations, we present a comprehensive mechanistic model, which accounts for all steps taking place in the studied impact chemistry. Our findings thus demonstrate that extraterrestrial impacts, which were one order of magnitude more abundant during the LHB period than before and after, could not only destroy the existing ancient life forms, but could also contribute to the creation of biogenic molecules. PMID:25489115

  16. High-energy chemistry of formamide: a unified mechanism of nucleobase formation.

    PubMed

    Ferus, Martin; Nesvorný, David; Šponer, Jiří; Kubelík, Petr; Michalčíková, Regina; Shestivská, Violetta; Šponer, Judit E; Civiš, Svatopluk

    2015-01-20

    The coincidence of the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) period and the emergence of terrestrial life about 4 billion years ago suggest that extraterrestrial impacts could contribute to the synthesis of the building blocks of the first life-giving molecules. We simulated the high-energy synthesis of nucleobases from formamide during the impact of an extraterrestrial body. A high-power laser has been used to induce the dielectric breakdown of the plasma produced by the impact. The results demonstrate that the initial dissociation of the formamide molecule could produce a large amount of highly reactive CN and NH radicals, which could further react with formamide to produce adenine, guanine, cytosine, and uracil. Based on GC-MS, high-resolution FTIR spectroscopic results, as well as theoretical calculations, we present a comprehensive mechanistic model, which accounts for all steps taking place in the studied impact chemistry. Our findings thus demonstrate that extraterrestrial impacts, which were one order of magnitude more abundant during the LHB period than before and after, could not only destroy the existing ancient life forms, but could also contribute to the creation of biogenic molecules.

  17. High-energy X-ray detection of G359.89–0.08 (SGR A–E): Magnetic flux tube emission powered by cosmic rays?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuo; Hailey, Charles J.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Mori, Kaya; Nynka, Melania; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Bauer, Franz E.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Tomsick, John A.; Christensen, Finn E.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2014-03-20

    We report the first detection of high-energy X-ray (E > 10 keV) emission from the Galactic center non-thermal filament G359.89–0.08 (Sgr A–E) using data acquired with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). The bright filament was detected up to ∼50 keV during a NuSTAR Galactic center monitoring campaign. The featureless power-law spectrum with a photon index Γ ≈ 2.3 confirms a non-thermal emission mechanism. The observed flux in the 3-79 keV band is F{sub X} = (2.0 ± 0.1) × 10{sup –12} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}, corresponding to an unabsorbed X-ray luminosity L{sub X} = (2.6 ± 0.8) × 10{sup 34} erg s{sup –1} assuming a distance of 8.0 kpc. Based on theoretical predictions and observations, we conclude that Sgr A–E is unlikely to be a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) or supernova remnant-molecular cloud (SNR-MC) interaction, as previously hypothesized. Instead, the emission could be due to a magnetic flux tube which traps TeV electrons. We propose two possible TeV electron sources: old PWNe (up to ∼100 kyr) with low surface brightness and radii up to ∼30 pc or MCs illuminated by cosmic rays (CRs) from CR accelerators such as SNRs or Sgr A*.

  18. NuSTAR detection of high-energy X-ray emission and rapid variability from Sagittarius A{sup *} flares

    SciTech Connect

    Barrière, Nicolas M.; Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Zoglauer, Andreas; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Christensen, Finn E.; Dexter, Jason; Grefenstette, Brian; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya; Zhang, Shuo; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2014-05-01

    Sagittarius A{sup *} harbors the supermassive black hole that lies at the dynamical center of our Galaxy. Sagittarius A{sup *} spends most of its time in a low luminosity emission state but flares frequently in the infrared and X-ray, increasing up to a few hundred fold in brightness for up to a few hours at a time. The physical processes giving rise to the X-ray flares are uncertain. Here we report the detection with the NuSTAR observatory in Summer and Fall 2012 of four low to medium amplitude X-ray flares to energies up to 79 keV. For the first time, we clearly see that the power-law spectrum of Sagittarius A{sup *} X-ray flares extends to high energy, with no evidence for a cutoff. Although the photon index of the absorbed power-law fits are in agreement with past observations, we find a difference between the photon index of two of the flares (significant at the 95% confidence level). The spectra of the two brightest flares (∼55 times quiescence in the 2-10 keV band) are compared to simple physical models in an attempt to identify the main X-ray emission mechanism, but the data do not allow us to significantly discriminate between them. However, we confirm the previous finding that the parameters obtained with synchrotron models are, for the X-ray emission, physically more reasonable than those obtained with inverse Compton models. One flare exhibits large and rapid (<100 s) variability, which, considering the total energy radiated, constrains the location of the flaring region to be within ∼10 Schwarzschild radii of the black hole.

  19. NuSTAR Detection of High-Energy X-Ray Emission and Rapid Variability from Sagittarius A(star) Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barriere, Nicolas M.; Tomsick, John A.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Dexter, Jason; Grefenstette, Brian; Hailey, Charles J.; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Sagittarius A(star) harbors the supermassive black hole that lies at the dynamical center of our Galaxy. Sagittarius A(star) spends most of its time in a low luminosity emission state but flares frequently in the infrared and X-ray, increasing up to a few hundred fold in brightness for up to a few hours at a time. The physical processes giving rise to the X-ray flares are uncertain. Here we report the detection with the NuSTAR observatory in Summer and Fall 2012 of four low to medium amplitude X-ray flares to energies up to 79 keV. For the first time, we clearly see that the power-law spectrum of Sagittarius A(star) X-ray flares extends to high energy, with no evidence for a cut off. Although the photon index of the absorbed power-law fits are in agreement with past observations, we find a difference between the photon index of two of the flares (significant at the 95% confidence level). The spectra of the two brightest flares (approx. 55 times quiescence in the 2- 10 keV band) are compared to simple physical models in an attempt to identify the main X-ray emission mechanism, but the data do not allow us to significantly discriminate between them. However, we confirm the previous finding that the parameters obtained with synchrotron models are, for the X-ray emission, physically more reasonable than those obtained with inverse-Compton models. One flare exhibits large and rapid (less than 100 s) variability, which, considering the total energy radiated, constrains the location of the flaring region to be within approx. 10 Schwarzschild radii of the black hole.

  20. First limits on the very-high energy gamma-ray afterglow emission of a fast radio burst. H.E.S.S. observations of FRB 150418

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H. E. S. S. Collaboration; Abdalla, H.; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Andersson, T.; Angüner, E. O.; Arakawa, M.; Arrieta, M.; Aubert, P.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Büchele, M.; Bulik, T.; Capasso, M.; Carr, J.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chevalier, J.; Chrétien, M.; Coffaro, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Decock, J.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; Dewilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O.'c.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Eschbach, S.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Iwasaki, H.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jingo, M.; Jogler, T.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katsuragawa, M.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Kraus, M.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; Lorentz, M.; Liu, R.; López-Coto, R.; Lypova, I.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Nakashima, S.; de Naurois, M.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Öttl, S.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Padovani, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokhorov, D.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de Los Reyes, R.; Richter, S.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Saito, S.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Settimo, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Takahashi, T.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tibaldo, L.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tsuji, N.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zanin, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Żywucka, N.; Superb Collaboration; Jankowski, F.; Keane, E. F.; Petroff, E.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Following the detection of the fast radio burst FRB150418 by the SUPERB project at the Parkes radio telescope, we aim to search for very-high energy gamma-ray afterglow emission. Methods: Follow-up observations in the very-high energy gamma-ray domain were obtained with the H.E.S.S. imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope system within 14.5 h of the radio burst. Results: The obtained 1.4 h of gamma-ray observations are presented and discussed. At the 99% C.L. we obtained an integral upper limit on the gamma-ray flux of Φγ(E > 350 GeV) < 1.33 × 10-8 m-2 s-1. Differential flux upper limits as function of the photon energy were derived and used to constrain the intrinsic high-energy afterglow emission of FRB 150418. Conclusions: No hints for high-energy afterglow emission of FRB 150418 were found. Taking absorption on the extragalactic background light into account and assuming a distance of z = 0.492 based on radio and optical counterpart studies and consistent with the FRB dispersion, we constrain the gamma-ray luminosity at 1 TeV to L < 5.1 × 1047 erg/s at 99% C.L.

  1. GRB 110709A, 111117A, AND 120107A: FAINT HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY PHOTON EMISSION FROM FERMI-LAT OBSERVATIONS AND DEMOGRAPHIC IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Weikang; Akerlof, Carl W.; McKay, Timothy A.; Pandey, Shashi B.; Zhang Binbin; Zhang Bing; Sakamoto, Takanori

    2012-09-01

    Launched on 2008 June 11, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has provided a rare opportunity to study high-energy photon emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Although the majority of such events (27) have been identified by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration, four were uncovered by using more sensitive statistical techniques. In this paper, we continue our earlier work by finding three more GRBs associated with high-energy photon emission, GRB 110709A, 111117A, and 120107A. To systematize our matched filter approach, a pipeline has been developed to identify these objects in nearly real time. GRB 120107A is the first product of this analysis procedure. Despite the reduced threshold for identification, the number of GRB events has not increased significantly. This relative dearth of events with low photon number prompted a study of the apparent photon number distribution. We find an extremely good fit to a simple power law with an exponent of -1.8 {+-} 0.3 for the differential distribution. As might be expected, there is a substantial correlation between the number of lower energy photons detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and the number observed by LAT. Thus, high-energy photon emission is associated with some but not all of the brighter GBM events. Deeper studies of the properties of the small population of high-energy emitting bursts may eventually yield a better understanding of these entire phenomena.

  2. Overview of reaction mechanisms for calculating the high energy component of fast-nucleon induced gamma spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, F.S.

    1995-02-21

    This presentation reviews the current status of quantum mechanical models for understanding the high-energy component of gamma spectra resulting from radiative capture of fast nucleons; i.e., the part of the spectrum that is not amenable to standard statistical model (Hauser-Feshbach) treatments. These models are based on the direct-semidirect (DSD) model and its variants. Included are recent results on the extension of the DSD model to unbound final states, a discussion of problems and improvements in understanding the form factors in this model, and a brief discussion of a model closely related to the DSD, the pure-resonance model.

  3. Synthesis of Nanostructured GAMMA-TiAl Based Powders and Bulk Alloys Using High Energy Mechanical Milling and Hip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hongbao; Zhang, Deliang; Chen, Yuyong; Liu, Zhiguang

    The microstructural evolution and powder particle morphology change in the process used to synthesize bulk nanostructured γ-TiAl intermetallic based binary Ti-47Al (in at%) alloy (TA-1) and complex Ti-45Al-2Cr-2Nb-1B-0.5Ta (in at%) alloy (TA-2) have been studied. This process combines high energy mechanical milling of elemental powder mixtures, thermal treatment and HIP. The bulk alloys consist of predominantly TiAl phase and a small fraction of Ti3Al phase, with the average grain sizes of the TiAl and Ti3Al phases being approximately 45nm and 40nm respectively in the bulk TA-1 alloy and being 37nm and 35nm respectively in the bulk TA-2 alloy. The study also shows that addition of a small fraction of hard powder particles such as Nb, Cr, B and Ta powder particles to the starting powder mixture has a significant effect in maintaining a small average particle size during high energy mechanical milling without using PCA and thus significantly enhances the mechanical alloying effect of the milling process.

  4. Effects of high energy radiation on the mechanical properties of epoxy/graphite fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fornes, R. E.; Gilbert, R. D.; Memory, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The epoxy resin system formed by tetraglycidyl 4,4'-diamino diphenyl methane (TGDDM) and 4,4'-diamino diphenyl sulfone (DDS) was characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Dynamic mechanical properties of graphite fiber epoxy composite specimens formulated with two different adhesive systems (NARMCO 5208, NARMCO 5209) were determined. The specimens were exposed to varying dose levels of ionizing radiation (0.5 MeV electrons) with a maximum absorbed dose of 10,000 Mrads. Following irradiation, property measurements were made to assess the influence of radiation on the epoxy and composite specimens. The results established that ionizing radiation has a limited effect on the properties of epoxy and composite specimens.

  5. Very high energy gamma-ray emission from SHBL J001355.9-185406 detected by HESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, W.

    2010-11-01

    The AGN SHBL J001355.9-185406 (z=0.095), selected from a list of extremely high X-ray to radio flux ratio targets in the Sedentary High energy peaked BL Lac catalog (Giommi et al. 2005, A&A, 434, 385), has been detected by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.). Using published advanced analysis methods a statistical significance of more than 5 standard deviations above 300 GeV is found in 38 hours of live time taken between July 2008 and August 2010.

  6. Effects of high energy radiation on the mechanical properties of epoxy-graphite fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fornes, R. E.; Gilbert, R. D.; Memory, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    In an effort to elucidate the changes in molecular structural and mechanical properties of epoxy/graphite fiber composites upon exposure to ionizing radiation in a simulated space environment, spectroscopic and surface properties of tetraglycidyl-4,4'-diamino diphenyl methane (TGDDM) red with diamino diphenyl sulfone (DDS) and T-300 graphite fiber were investigated following exposure to ionizing radiation. Cobalt-60 gamma radiation and 1/2 MeV electrons were used as radiation sources. The system was studied using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, infrared absorption spectroscopy, contact angle measurements, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis.

  7. High energy emission of GRB 130821A: Constraining the density profile of the circum-burst medium as well as the initial Lorentz factor of the outflow

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Yun-Feng; Zhou, Bei; He, Hao-Ning; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Wei, Da-Ming; Tam, Pak-Hin Thomas

    2014-02-01

    GRB 130821A was detected by Fermi-GBM/LAT, Konus-WIND, SPI-ACS/INTEGRAL, RHESSI and Mars Odyssey-HEND. Although the data of GRB 130821A are very limited, we show in this work that the high energy γ-ray emission (i.e., above 100 MeV) alone imposes tight constraint on the density profile of the circum-burst medium as well as the initial Lorentz factor of the outflow. The temporal behavior of the high energy γ-ray emission is consistent with the forward shock synchrotron radiation model, and the circum-burst medium likely has a constant-density profile. The Lorentz factor is about a few hundred, similar to other bright GRBs.

  8. Characterization of Al and Fe nanosized powders synthesized by high energy mechanical milling

    SciTech Connect

    Mhadhbi, Mohsen; Khitouni, Mohamed Azabou, Myriam; Kolsi, Abdelwaheb

    2008-07-15

    The process of nanocrystalline structure formation during mechanical milling was studied in Al and Fe powders. A detailed microstructural study of powder samples was carried out by X-ray diffraction experiments as a function of milling time. As a result, nanosized powders have been synthesized with microstructures showing a significant decrease of the coherent diffraction domains and the creation of a large number of linear defects, which induce microstrains. SEM results show that welding of very small particles to the surfaces of larger particles occurred and that the powder particles tended to form a matrix of randomly welded thin layers of highly deformed particles. Calorimetric measurements, as a function of milling time, indicated the decrease of the melting point of Al powder and at early stages it can be seen that initially endothermic peak was divided to two endothermic melting peaks. This is probably due to the oxide layer around the Al grains. In the case of Fe powder, the DSC measurements show a broad exothermal peak occurring over quite a large temperature interval, corresponding to the strain release and grain growth.

  9. Investigation of the 2p_{32}-3d_{52} line emission of Au;{53+}-Au;{69+} for diagnosing high energy density plasmas.

    PubMed

    Brown, G V; Hansen, S B; Träbert, E; Beiersdorfer, P; Widmann, K; Chen, H; Chung, H K; Clementson, J H T; Gu, M F; Thorn, D B

    2008-06-01

    Measurements of the L -shell emission of highly charged gold ions were made under controlled laboratory conditions using the SuperEBIT electron beam ion trap, allowing detailed spectral observations of lines from Fe-like Au53+ through Ne-like Au69+ . Using atomic data from the Flexible Atomic Code, we have identified strong 3d_{52}-->2p_{32} emission features that can be used to diagnose the charge state distribution in high energy density plasmas, such as those found in the laser entrance hole of hot hohlraum radiation sources. We provide collisional-radiative calculations of the average ion charge Z as a function of temperature and density, which can be used to relate charge state distributions inferred from 3d_{52}-->2p_{32} emission features to plasma conditions, and investigate the effects of plasma density on calculated L -shell Au emission spectra.

  10. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Mechanism of high-energy electron production in a laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, V. S.

    2004-01-01

    A mechanism of high-energy electron production in the interaction of high-intensity short laser pulses with a solid target is proposed and analysed. The theoretical dependences of fast-electron kinetic energy on the parameters of laser radiation and target material are given. The effect of ionisation of the target material is considered. The generation of ultrastrong magnetic fields in the laser plasma is shown to play the key part in the formation, transfer, and acceleration of electron beams. This results in the production of vortex electric fields accelerating electrons. The theoretical dependences yield well-proved limits for the electron energy and are in good agreement with the results of experiments performed on high-intensity laser setups, including the results obtained with participation of the author.

  11. Mechanical Design of a High Energy Beam Absorber for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Baffes, C.; Church, M.; Leibfritz, J.; Oplt, S.; Rakhno, I.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-10

    A high energy beam absorber has been built for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab. In the facility's initial configuration, an electron beam will be accelerated through 3 TTF-type or ILC-type SRF cryomodules to an energy of 750MeV. The electron beam will be directed to one of multiple downstream experimental and diagnostic beam lines and then deposited in one of two beam absorbers. The facility is designed to accommodate up to 6 cryomodules, which would produce a 75kW beam at 1.5GeV; this is the driving design condition for the beam absorbers. The beam absorbers consist of water-cooled graphite, aluminum and copper layers contained in a helium-filled enclosure. This paper describes the mechanical implementation of the beam absorbers, with a focus on thermal design and analysis. The potential for radiation-induced degradation of the graphite is discussed.

  12. A System for Conducting Sophisticated Mechanical Tests in Situ with High Energy Synchrotron X-Rays Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jeremy Weiss

    2012-08-02

    This is the final technical report for the SBIR Phase I project titled 'A System for Conducting Sophisticated Mechanical Tests in Situ with High Energy Synchrotron X-Rays.' Experiments using diffraction of synchrotron radiation that help scientists understand engineering material failure modes, such as fracture and fatigue, require specialized machinery. This machinery must be able to induce these failure modes in a material specimen while adhering to strict size, weight, and geometric limitations prescribed by diffraction measurement techniques. During this Phase I project, Mechanical Solutions, Inc. (MSI) developed one such machine capable of applying uniaxial mechanical loading to a material specimen in both tension and compression, with zero backlash while transitioning between the two. Engineers currently compensate for a lack of understanding of fracture and fatigue by employing factors of safety in crucial system components. Thus, mechanical and structural parts are several times bigger, thicker, and heavier than they need to be. The scientific discoveries that result from diffraction experiments which utilize sophisticated mechanical loading devices will allow for broad material, weight, fuel, and cost savings in engineering design across all industries, while reducing the number of catastrophic failures in transportation, power generation, infrastructure, and all other engineering systems. With an existing load frame as the starting point, the research focused on two main areas: (1) the design of a specimen alignment and gripping system that enables pure uniaxial tension and compression loading (and no bending, shear, or torsion), and (2) development of a feedback control system that is adaptive and thus can maintain a load set point despite changing specimen material properties (e.g. a decreasing stiffness during yield).

  13. Enhanced high-energy gamma-ray emission from the microquasar Cygnus X-3 detected by Fermi/LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Alan; Corbel, Stephane

    2017-02-01

    Following the recent decrease of the hard X-ray emission from the high-mass X-ray binary Cygnus X-3 as seen by the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (https://swift.gsfc.nasa.gov/results/transients/CygX-3/), the Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed significant gamma-ray emission originating from the microquasar.

  14. Imaging of high-energy x-ray emission from cryogenic thermonuclear fuel implosions on the NIF.

    PubMed

    Ma, T; Izumi, N; Tommasini, R; Bradley, D K; Bell, P; Cerjan, C J; Dixit, S; Döppner, T; Jones, O; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G; Landen, O L; LePape, S; Mackinnon, A J; Park, H-S; Patel, P K; Prasad, R R; Ralph, J; Regan, S P; Smalyuk, V A; Springer, P T; Suter, L; Town, R P J; Weber, S V; Glenzer, S H

    2012-10-01

    Accurately assessing and optimizing the implosion performance of inertial confinement fusion capsules is a crucial step to achieving ignition on the NIF. We have applied differential filtering (matched Ross filter pairs) to provide broadband time-integrated absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered implosions. This diagnostic measures the temperature- and density-sensitive bremsstrahlung emission and provides estimates of hot spot mass, mix mass, and pressure.

  15. Detection of very high energy gamma-ray emission from the gravitationally lensed blazar QSO B0218+357 with the MAGIC telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Arcaro, C.; Babic, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Berti, A.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Buson, S.; Carosi, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Clavero, R.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Lotto, B.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Di Pierro, F.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Engelkemeier, M.; Fallah Ramazani, V.; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Godinović, N.; Gora, D.; Guberman, D.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, A.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hughes, G.; Idec, W.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Moretti, E.; Nakajima, D.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nievas Rosillo, M.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nogués, L.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Pedaletti, G.; Peresano, M.; Perri, L.; Persic, M.; Poutanen, J.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Garcia, J. R.; Reichardt, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Schroeder, S.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Strzys, M.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Vanzo, G.; Verguilov, V.; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Wu, M. H.; Zanin, R.; Desiante, R.

    2016-11-01

    Context. QSO B0218+357 is a gravitationally lensed blazar located at a redshift of 0.944. The gravitational lensing splits the emitted radiation into two components that are spatially indistinguishable by gamma-ray instruments, but separated by a 10-12 day delay. In July 2014, QSO B0218+357 experienced a violent flare observed by the Fermi-LAT and followed by the MAGIC telescopes. Aims: The spectral energy distribution of QSO B0218+357 can give information on the energetics of z 1 very high energy gamma-ray sources. Moreover the gamma-ray emission can also be used as a probe of the extragalactic background light at z 1. Methods: MAGIC performed observations of QSO B0218+357 during the expected arrival time of the delayed component of the emission. The MAGIC and Fermi-LAT observations were accompanied by quasi-simultaneous optical data from the KVA telescope and X-ray observations by Swift-XRT. We construct a multiwavelength spectral energy distribution of QSO B0218+357 and use it to model the source. The GeV and sub-TeV data obtained by Fermi-LAT and MAGIC are used to set constraints on the extragalactic background light. Results: Very high energy gamma-ray emission was detected from the direction of QSO B0218+357 by the MAGIC telescopes during the expected time of arrival of the trailing component of the flare, making it the farthest very high energy gamma-ray source detected to date. The observed emission spans the energy range from 65 to 175 GeV. The combined MAGIC and Fermi-LAT spectral energy distribution of QSO B0218+357 is consistent with current extragalactic background light models. The broadband emission can be modeled in the framework of a two-zone external Compton scenario, where the GeV emission comes from an emission region in the jet, located outside the broad line region.

  16. Mössbauer analysis of high-energy mechanical-milled sand fraction of a magnetic soil developing on basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, José Flávio Marcelino; Hneda, Marlon Luiz; Brinatti, André Maurício; Cunha, João Batista Marimon da; Rosa, Jadir Aparecido; Fabris, José Domingos

    2011-11-01

    A sample of the coarse sand fraction from the soil material of the A-horizon (0-0.2 m from the soil surface) of a dusky red magnetic Oxisol was submitted to high-energy mechanical milling for different times. This assay aimed mainly at (a) monitoring the individualization of strongly aggregated mineral particles, and (b) measuring the effect of the milling pressure on the mineralogy changes of the material. These data are also intended to experimentally subside any physical model describing the mechanical behavior of the superficial soil layer that is subjected to intensive machine management, in agriculture fields. Powder X-ray data reveal that some mineralogical phases, notably gibbsite, disappear soon after the first few hours milling. The 298 K-transmission Mössbauer spectrum for the non-milled sand sample shows a qualitatively typical pattern for the sand fraction of basalt derived soils, with magnetically ordered sextets, assignable mainly to hematite and maghemite, and an intense central (super)paramagnetic Fe3 + doublet. For the milled samples, spectra revealed progressive spectral reduction of the magnetic hyperfine structure, with concomitant increase of relative subspectral areas due to (super)paramagnetic phases, as the milling time increased. This result is consistent with the reduction of measured saturation magnetization, from 4.96(8) J T - 1 kg - 1, for the non-milled sample, to 3.26(7) J T - 1 kg - 1, for the sample milled for 8 hours.

  17. Effect of high energy X-ray irradiation on the nano-mechanical properties of human enamel and dentine.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xue; Zhang, Jing Yang; Cheng, Iek Ka; Li, Ji Yao

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy for malignancies in the head and neck can cause common complications that can result in tooth damage that are also known as radiation caries. The aim of this study was to examine damage to the surface topography and calculate changes in friction behavior and the nano-mechanical properties (elastic modulus, nanohardness and friction coefficient) of enamel and dentine from extracted human third molars caused by exposure to radiation. Enamel and dentine samples from 50 human third molars were randomly assigned to four test groups or a control group. The test groups were exposed to high energy X-rays at 2 Gy/day, 5 days/week for 5 days (10 Gy group), 15 days (30 Gy group), 25 days (50 Gy group), 35 days (70 Gy group); the control group was not exposed. The nanohardness, elastic modulus, and friction coefficient were analyzed using a Hysitron Triboindenter. The nano-mechanical properties of both enamel and dentine showed significant dose-response relationships. The nanohardness and elastic modulus were most variable between 30-50 Gy, while the friction coefficient was most variable between 0-10 Gy for dentine and 30-50 Gy for enamel. After exposure to X-rays, the fracture resistance of the teeth clearly decreased (rapidly increasing friction coefficient with increasing doses under the same load), and they were more fragile. These nano-mechanical changes in dental hard tissue may increase the susceptibility to caries. Radiotherapy caused nano-mechanical changes in dentine and enamel that were dose related. The key doses were 30-50 Gy and the key time points occurred during the 15th-25th days of treatment, which is when application of measures to prevent radiation caries should be considered.

  18. Observational Signatures of High-Energy Emission during the Shallow Decay Phase of Gamma-Ray Burst X-Ray Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y. W.; Liu, X. W.; Dai, Z. G.

    2007-12-01

    The widely existing shallow decay phase of the X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is generally accepted to be due to long-lasting energy injection. The outflows carrying the injecting energy, based on the component that is dominant in energy, fall into two possible types: baryon-dominated and lepton-dominated ones. The former type of outflow could be ejecta that is ejected during the prompt phase of a GRB and consists of a series of baryonic shells with a distribution of Lorentz factors, and the latter type could be an electron-positron pair wind that is driven by the postburst central engine. We here provide a unified description for the dynamics of fireballs based on these two types of energy injection and calculate the corresponding high-energy photon emission by considering synchrotron radiation and inverse Compton scattering (including synchrotron self-Compton and combined inverse Compton) of electrons. We find that, in the two energy-injection models, there is a plateau (even a hump) in high-energy light curves during the X-ray shallow decay phase. In particular, a considerable fraction of the injecting energy in the lepton-dominated model can be shared by the long-lasting reverse shock since it is relativistic. Furthermore, almost all of the energy of the reverse shock is carried by leptons, and thus, the inverse Compton emission is enhanced dramatically. Therefore, this model predicts more significant high-energy afterglow emission than the baryon-dominated model. We argue that these observational signatures would be used to discriminate between different energy-injection models in the upcoming Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) era.

  19. A SEARCH FOR ENHANCED VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM THE 2013 MARCH CRAB NEBULA FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Errando, M.; Archambault, S.; Aune, T.; Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M.; Berger, K.; Bird, R.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Feng, Q.; Dumm, J.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S. E-mail: gtrichards@gatech.edu; and others

    2014-01-20

    In 2013 March, a flaring episode from the Crab Nebula lasting ∼2 weeks was detected by Fermi-LAT (Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope). The Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) provides simultaneous observations throughout this period. During the flare, Fermi-LAT detected a 20 fold increase in flux above the average synchrotron flux >100 MeV seen from the Crab Nebula. Simultaneous measurements with VERITAS are consistent with the non-variable long-term average Crab Nebula flux at TeV energies. Assuming a linear correlation between the very high energy flux change >1 TeV and the flux change seen in the Fermi-LAT band >100 MeV during the period of simultaneous observations, the linear correlation factor can be constrained to be at most 8.6 × 10{sup –3} with 95% confidence.

  20. Detection of high-energy gamma-ray emission from the globular cluster 47 Tucanae with Fermi.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Charles, E; Chaty, S; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Dermer, C D; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dormody, M; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Focke, W B; Frailis, M; Fukazawa, Y; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Horan, D; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kuehn, F; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Makeev, A; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Rea, N; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Sgrò, C; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vasileiou, V; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Wang, P; Webb, N; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-08-14

    We report the detection of gamma-ray emissions above 200 megaelectron volts at a significance level of 17sigma from the globular cluster 47 Tucanae, using data obtained with the Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Globular clusters are expected to emit gamma rays because of the large populations of millisecond pulsars that they contain. The spectral shape of 47 Tucanae is consistent with gamma-ray emission from a population of millisecond pulsars. The observed gamma-ray luminosity implies an upper limit of 60 millisecond pulsars present in 47 Tucanae.

  1. Study of the nanocrystalline bulk Al alloys synthesized by high energy mechanical milling followed by room temperature high pressing consolidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhlouf, T.; Azabou, M.; Ghrib, M.; Ghrib, T.; Yacoubi, N.; Khitouni, M.

    2009-11-01

    In the present study high energy mechanical milling followed by high-pressing consolidation has been used to obtain bulk nanocrystalline Al-Fe-Si alloy. Quantitative XRD analysis and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the material evolution during thermal treatments in the temperature range 25- 500∘ C. The cold-worked structure have been synthesized with microstructure showing a mixture of a significant low size of crystallite (70 nm) and a high level of lattice strains (0.85%). Starting from the nanocrystalline specimens, isochronal experiments were carried out to monitor the reserve microstructure and transformations. The high temperature annealing is required for ameliorating the quality of room temperature consolidated materials by removing all porosity and obtaining good interparticle bonding. The thermal conductivity and the thermal diffusivity are investigated with the Photothermal deflection technique. These thermal parameters increase with the annealing temperatures. This behavior is attributed to the increase in the rate of diffusion coefficient of added elements inside the aluminum matrix.

  2. Discovery of Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission in the W 28 (G6.4-0.1) Region and Multiwavelength Comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Rowell, G.; Brion, E.; Reimer, O.; Moriguchi, Y.; Fukui, Yasuo; Djannati-Atai, A.; Funk, S.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-10-29

    H.E.S.S. observations of the old-age (>10{sup 4} yr; {approx} 0.5 degree diameter) composite supernova remnant (SNR)W28 reveal very high energy (VHE) {gamma}-ray emission situated at its northeastern and southern boundaries. The northeastern VHE source (HESS J1801-233) is in an area where W 28 is interacting with a dense molecular cloud, containing OH masers, local radio and X-ray peaks. The southern VHE sources (HESS J1800-240 with components labeled A, B and C) are found in a region occupied by several HII regions, including the ultracompact HII region W 28A2. Our analysis of NANTEN CO data reveals a dense molecular cloud enveloping this southern region, and our reanalysis of EGRET data reveals MeV/GeV emission centered on HESS J1801-233 and the northeastern interaction region.

  3. Regimes of high-energy shock emission from the Be star/pulsar system PSR 1259-63

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco; Arons, Jonathan; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    1994-01-01

    PSR B1259-63 is a 47 ms radio pulsar in a wide, eccentric orbit with a Be star. We study the shock interaction between the pulsar and the companion's mass outflow and investigate the time evolution of radiative shock regimes. We find that for small values of the Be star's mass-loss rate, inverse-Compton scattering is likely to dominate the shock emission. Alternately, for a large mass-loss rate, synchrotron emission will dominate. Multifrequency X-ray and gamma-ray observations near periastron can distinguish between these cases and yield unique constraints on the pulsar and Be star winds. The PSR B1259-63 system provides a unique laboratory to study the time-dependent interaction of a pulsar wind with the circumbinary material from its companion star.

  4. A flat-spectrum candidate for a track-type high-energy neutrino emission event, the case of blazar PKS 0723-008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, E.; Biermann, P. L.; Gergely, L. Á.

    2017-03-01

    By cross-correlating both the Parkes Catalogue and the Second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources with the arrival direction of the track-type neutrinos detected by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, we find the flat-spectrum blazar PKS 0723-008 as a good candidate for the high-energy neutrino event 5 (ID5). Apart from its coordinates matching those of ID5, PKS 0723-008 exhibits further interesting radio properties. Its spectrum is flat up to high Planck frequencies, and it produced a fivefold-increased radio flux density through the last decade. Based upon these radio properties we propose a scenario of binary black hole evolution leading to the observed high-energy neutrino emission. The main contributing events are the spin-flip of the dominant black hole, the formation of a new jet with significant particle acceleration and interaction with the surrounding material, with the corresponding increased radio flux. Doppler boosting from the underlying jet pointing to the Earth makes it possible to identify the origin of the neutrinos, so the merger itself is the form of an extended flat-spectrum radio emission, a key selection criterion to find traces of this complex process.

  5. Observation of atomic oxygen O(1S) green-line emission in the summer polar upper mesosphere associated with high-energy (≥30 keV) electron precipitation during high-speed solar wind streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-Sook; Kwak, Young-Sil; Kim, Kyung-Chan; Solheim, Brian; Lee, Regina; Lee, Jaejin

    2017-01-01

    The auroral green-line emission at 557.7 nm wavelength as arising from the atomic oxygen O(1S → 1D) transition typically peaks at an altitude of 100 km specifically in the nightside oval, induced by auroral electrons within an energy range of 100 eV-30 keV. Intense aurora is known as being suppressed by sunlight in summer daytime but usually occurs in low electrical background conductivity. However, in the present study in summer (July) sunlit condition, enhancements of O(1S) emission rates observed by using the Wind Imaging Interferometer/UARS were frequently observed at low altitudes below 90 km, where ice particles are created initially as subvisible and detected as polar mesosphere summer echoes, emerging to be an optical phenomenon of polar mesospheric clouds. The intense O(1S) emission occurring in summer exceeds those occurring in the daytime in other seasons both in occurrence and in intensity, frequently accompanied by occurrences of supersonic neutral velocity (300-1500 m s-1). In the mesosphere, ion motion is controlled by electric field and the momentum is transferred to neutrals. The intense O(1S) emission is well associated with high-energy electron precipitation as observed during an event of high-speed solar wind streams. Meanwhile, since the minimum occurrences of O(1S) emission and supersonic velocity are maintained even in the low precipitation flux, the mechanism responsible is not only related to high-energy electron precipitation but also presumably to the local conditions, including the composition of meteoric-charged ice particles and charge separation expected in extremely low temperatures (<150 K).

  6. Imaging of High-Energy X-Ray Emission from Cryogenic Thermonuclear Fuel Implosions on the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, T

    2012-05-01

    Accurately assessing and optimizing the implosion performance of inertial confinement fusion capsules is a crucial step to achieving ignition on the NIF. We have applied differential filtering (matched Ross filter pairs) to provide spectrally resolved time-integrated absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered targets. Using bremsstrahlung assumptions, the measured absolute x-ray brightness allows for the inference of electron temperature, electron density, hot spot mass, mix mass, and pressure. Current inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) seek to indirectly drive a spherical implosion, compressing and igniting a deuterium-tritium fuel. This DT fuel capsule is cryogenically prepared as a solid ice layer surrounded by a low-Z ablator material. Ignition will occur when the hot spot approaches sufficient temperature ({approx}3-4 keV) and {rho}R ({approx}0.3 g/cm{sup 2}) such that alpha deposition can further heat the hot spot and generate a self-sustaining burn wave. During the implosion, the fuel mass becomes hot enough to emit large amounts of x-ray radiation, the spectra and spatial variation of which contains key information that can be used to evaluate the implosion performance. The Ross filter diagnostic employs differential filtering to provide spectrally resolved, time-integrated, absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered targets.

  7. Investigation of the 2p3/2-3d5/2 line emission of Au53+ -- Au69+ for diagnosing high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G V; Hansen, S B; Trabert, E; Beiersdorfer, P; Widmann, K; Chen, H; Chung, H K; Clementson, J T; Gu, M F; Thorn, D B

    2008-01-29

    Measurements of the L-shell emission of highly charged gold ions were made under controlled laboratory conditions using the SuperEBIT electron beam ion trap, allowing detailed spectral observations of lines from ironlike Au{sup 53+} through neonlike Au{sup 69+}. Using atomic data from the Flexible Atomic Code, we have identified strong 3d{sub 5/2} {yields} 2p{sub 3/2} emission features that can be used to diagnose the charge state distribution in high energy density plasmas, such as those found in the laser entrance hole of hot hohlraum radiation sources. We provide collisional-radiative calculations of the average ion charge as a function of temperature and density, which can be used to relate charge state distributions inferred from 3d{sub 5/2} {yields} 2p{sub 3/2} emission features to plasma conditions, and investigate the effects of plasma density on calculated L-shell Au emission spectra.

  8. High-energy gamma-ray emission from solar flares: Summary of Fermi large area telescope detections and analysis of two M-class flares

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; and others

    2014-05-20

    We present the detections of 18 solar flares detected in high-energy γ-rays (above 100 MeV) with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during its first 4 yr of operation. This work suggests that particle acceleration up to very high energies in solar flares is more common than previously thought, occurring even in modest flares, and for longer durations. Interestingly, all these flares are associated with fairly fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We then describe the detailed temporal, spatial, and spectral characteristics of the first two long-lasting events: the 2011 March 7 flare, a moderate (M3.7) impulsive flare followed by slowly varying γ-ray emission over 13 hr, and the 2011 June 7 M2.5 flare, which was followed by γ-ray emission lasting for 2 hr. We compare the Fermi LAT data with X-ray and proton data measurements from GOES and RHESSI. We argue that the γ-rays are more likely produced through pion decay than electron bremsstrahlung, and we find that the energy spectrum of the proton distribution softens during the extended emission of the 2011 March 7 flare. This would disfavor a trapping scenario for particles accelerated during the impulsive phase of the flare and point to a continuous acceleration process at play for the duration of the flares. CME shocks are known for accelerating the solar energetic particles (SEPs) observed in situ on similar timescales, but it might be challenging to explain the production of γ-rays at the surface of the Sun while the CME is halfway to the Earth. A stochastic turbulence acceleration process occurring in the solar corona is another likely scenario. Detailed comparison of characteristics of SEPs and γ-ray-emitting particles for several flares will be helpful to distinguish between these two possibilities.

  9. Poster — Thur Eve — 18: Cherenkov Emission By High-Energy Radiation Therapy Beams: A Characterization Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zlateva, Y.; El Naqa, I.; Quitoriano, N.

    2014-08-15

    We investigate Cherenkov emission (CE) by radiotherapy beams via radiation dose-versus-CE correlation analyses, CE detection optimization by means of a spectral shift towards the near-infrared (NIR) window of biological tissue, and comparison of CE to on-board MV imaging. Dose-CE correlation was investigated via simulation and experiment. A Monte Carlo (MC) CE simulator was designed using Geant4. Experimental phantoms include: water; tissue-simulating phantom composed of water, Intralipid®, and beef blood; plastic phantom with solid water insert. The detector system comprises an optical fiber and diffraction-grating spectrometer incorporating a front/back-illuminated CCD. The NIR shift was carried out with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs), emitting at (650±10) nm. CE and MV images were acquired with a CMOS camera and electronic portal imaging device. MC and experimental studies indicate a strong linear dose-CE correlation (Pearson coefficient > 0.99). CE by an 18-MeV beam was effectively NIR-shifted in water and a tissue-simulating phantom, exhibiting a significant increase at 650 nm for QD depths up to 10 mm. CE images exhibited relative contrast superior to MV images by a factor of 30. Our work supports the potential for application of CE in radiotherapy online imaging for patient setup and treatment verification, since CE is intrinsic to the beam and non-ionizing and QDs can be used to improve CE detectability, potentially yielding image quality superior to MV imaging for the case of low-density-variability, low-optical-attenuation materials (ex: breast/oropharynx). Ongoing work involves microenvironment functionalization of QDs and application of multi-channel spectrometry for simultaneous acquisition of dosimetric and tumor oxygenation signals.

  10. Deducing dust emission mechanisms from field measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field observations are needed to both develop and test theories on dust emission for use in global modeling systems. The mechanism of dust emission (aerodynamic entrainment, saltation bombardment, aggregate disintegration) and the amount and particle-size distribution of emitted dust may vary under ...

  11. High-energy particle production in solar flares (SEP, gamma-ray and neutron emissions). [solar energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, E. L.

    1987-01-01

    Electrons and ions, over a wide range of energies, are produced in association with solar flares. Solar energetic particles (SEPs), observed in space and near earth, consist of electrons and ions that range in energy from 10 keV to about 100 MeV and from 1 MeV to 20 GeV, respectively. SEPs are directly recorded by charged particle detectors, while X-ray, gamma-ray, and neutron detectors indicate the properties of the accelerated particles (electrons and ions) which have interacted in the solar atmosphere. A major problem of solar physics is to understand the relationship between these two groups of charged particles; in particular whether they are accelerated by the same mechanism. The paper reviews the physics of gamma-rays and neutron production in the solar atmosphere and the method by which properties of the primary charged particles produced in the solar flare can be deduced. Recent observations of energetic photons and neutrons in space and at the earth are used to present a current picture of the properties of impulsively flare accelerated electrons and ions. Some important properties discussed are time scale of production, composition, energy spectra, accelerator geometry. Particular attention is given to energetic particle production in the large flare on June 3, 1982.

  12. High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission From Solar Flares: Summary of Fermi LAT Detections and Analysis of Two M-Class Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Guiriec, S.; Hays, E.; McEnery, J. E.; Nemmen, R.; Perkins, J. S.; Thompson, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the detections of 19 solar flares detected in high-energy gamma rays (above 100 MeV) with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during its rst four years of operation. Interestingly, all ares are associated with fairly fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and are not all powerful X-ray ares. We then describe the detailed temporal, spatial and spectral characteristics of the rst two long-lasting events: the 2011 March 7 are, a moderate (M3.7) impulsive are followed by slowly varying gamma-ray emission over 13 hours, and the 2011 June 7 M2.5 are, which was followed by gamma-ray emission lasting for 2 hours. We compare the Fermi-LAT data with X-ray and proton data measurements from GOES and RHESSI. We argue that a hadronic origin of the gamma rays is more likely than a leptonic origin and nd that the energy spectrum of the proton distribution softens after the 2011 March 7 are, favoring a scenario with continuous acceleration at the are site. This work suggests that proton acceleration in solar ares is more common than previously thought, occurring for even modest X-ray ares, and for longer durations.

  13. The chemical sensitivity of X-ray spectroscopy: high energy resolution XANES versus X-ray emission spectroscopy of substituted ferrocenes.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Andrew J; Bauer, Matthias; Jacob, Christoph R

    2013-06-07

    X-ray spectroscopy at the metal K-edge is an important tool for understanding catalytic processes and provides insight into the geometric and electronic structures of transition metal complexes. In particular, X-ray emission-based methods such as high-energy resolution fluorescence detection (HERFD), X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy (V2C-XES) hold the promise of providing increased chemical sensitivity compared to conventional X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Here, we explore the ability of HERFD-XANES and V2C-XES spectroscopy to distinguish substitutions beyond the directly coordinated atoms for the example of ferrocene and selected ferrocene derivatives. The experimental spectra are assigned and interpreted through the use of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that while the pre-edge peaks in the HERFD-XANES spectra are affected by substituents at the cyclopentadienyl ring containing π-bonds [A. J. Atkins, Ch. R. Jacob and M. Bauer, Chem.-Eur. J., 2012, 18, 7021], the V2C-XES spectra are virtually unchanged. The pre-edge in HERFD-XANES probes the weak transition to unoccupied metal d-orbitals, while the V2C-XES spectra are determined by dipole-allowed transitions from occupied ligand orbitals to the 1s core hole. The latter turn out to be less sensitive to changes beyond the first coordination shell.

  14. Search for Hard X-Ray Emission from Aquila X-1: High Energy Emission from Gamma-ray Radio Star 2CG 135+1/LSI 61 305

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco

    1998-01-01

    Several investigations supported by these CCRO grant were completed or are close to completion. The study of EGRET data for the unidentified source 2CG 135+01 was very fruitful. We discovered transient gamma-ray emission by combining several data obtained since 1994 through 1997. It is the first time that time variable emission is established for this enigmatic source, and clearly an interpretation in terms of an isolated radio pulsar (Geminga-like) is disfavored now. Our preferred model is a Galactic source, probably an energetic pulsar (such as PSR129-63) in a binary system producing gamma-rays because of pulsar wind/mass outflow interaction. We also accumulated may data concerning the radio source LSI 61 303, the possible counterpart of 2CG 135+01. We show that a possible anti-correlation between radio and gamma-ray emission exists. This anticorrelation is evident only in the energy range above 100 MeV, as demonstrated by the lack of it obtained from OSSE data. If confirmed, this anti-correlation would prove to be very important for the interpretation of the hundreds of unidentified gamma-ray sources currently discovered by EGRET near the Galactic plane, and would point to a new class of sources in addition to AGNs and isolated pulsars. We also completed the analysis of several time variable gamma-ray sources near the Galactic plane, with the discussion of evidence for transient emission from 2EG J1813-12 and 2EG J1828+01. We completed several investigations regarding gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), including the study of the brightness distribution for different spectral/duration GRB sub-classes, an investigation of acceleration processes and their consequences for GRB afterglow emission [61, the application of the synchrotron shock model of GRBs to X-ray energies.

  15. Control of Y₂O₃ phase and its nanostructure formation through a very high energy mechanical milling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.K.; Park, E.K.; Park, J.J.; Rhee, C.K.

    2013-05-01

    The formation behavior of Y₂O₃ ceramic particles was studied by employing a very high energy ball milling (milling energy: ~165 kJ/g·hit, milling speed: 1000 rpm). Both the XRD and HRTEM studies revealed that the high impact strain energy generated during the milling caused a drastic phase transition from the original C-type cubic (space group Ia3, a=10.58 Å) to the metastable B-type monoclinic (space group C2/m, a=13.89 Å), finally followed by a partial solid-state amorphization. The cubic phase was difficult to be reduced down to smaller than 10 nm, while the monoclinic phase was stabilized at sizes smaller than 10 nm with a mean crystallite size of 7.57 nm. Consequently, the existence of Y₂O₃ at a nanoscale smaller than 10 nm is possible by forming metastable monoclinic crystals, which are strain-induced. - Graphical abstract: The fig shows the solid-state phase formation of Y₂O₃ by very high energy input into the particles during milling: ordered body-centered cubic phase (space group Ia3, a=10.58 Å) nanocrystalline monoclinic phase (space group C2/m, a=13.89 Å) disordered monoclinic phase partial amorphous phase. The formation of Y₂O₃ smaller than 10 nm was strongly dependent on whether the phase transition from cubic to monoclinic occurred. Highlights: • This paper analyses very high energy milling behavior of coarse Y₂O₃ particles. • A drastic phase transition from cubic to monoclinic occurred with a partial amorphization. • An existence of Y₂O₃ smaller than 10 nm is possible by forming strain-induced monoclinic crystals.

  16. New Prospects in High Energy Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Blandford, Roger; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-11-15

    Recent discoveries using TeV, X-ray and radio telescopes as well as Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray arrays are leading to new insights into longstanding puzzles in high energy astrophysics. Many of these insights come from combining observations throughout the electromagnetic and other spectra as well as evidence assembled from different types of source to propose general principles. Issues discussed in this general overview include methods of accelerating relativistic particles, and amplifying magnetic field, the dynamics of relativistic outflows and the nature of the prime movers that power them. Observational approaches to distinguishing hadronic, leptonic and electromagnetic outflows and emission mechanisms are discussed along with probes of the velocity field and the confinement mechanisms. Observations with GLAST promise to be very prescriptive for addressing these problems.

  17. Optical performance related to mechanical deformations of a Davies-Cotton mount for the high energy section of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovero, Adrian C.; Supanitsky, A. Daniel; Ringegni, Pablo; Antico, Federico; Botani, A.; Vallejo, G.; Ochoa, I.; Hughes, G.; Marconi, D.

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array is the next generation ground-based instrument for the observation of very high-energy gamma-rays. It will provide an order of magnitude more sensitivity and better angular and energy resolution than present systems as well as an increased energy range. For the high energy portion of this range, the construction of ~6m diameter Cherenkov telescopes is an option under study. We have proposed an innovative design of a Davies-Cotton mount for such a telescope, within Cherenkov Telescope Array specifications, and evaluated its mechanical and optical performance. The mount is a reticulated-type structure with steel tubes and tensioned wires. It consists of three main parts to be assembled on site. In this work we focus on the study of the point-pread-function of collected light for different mirror facet sizes and telescope positions, related to mount deformations.

  18. Equal-Channel Angular Extrusion of a Low-Density High-Entropy Alloy Produced by High-Energy Cryogenic Mechanical Alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Vincent H.; Atwater, Mark A.; Darling, Kristopher A.; Nguyen, Hoang Q.; Kecskes, Laszlo J.

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of forming a bulk consolidated, low-density high-entropy alloy, namely AlFeMgTiZn, which shows reasonable mechanical properties and high hardness. The fabrication of the high-entropy alloy from powdered precursors via high-energy mechanical alloying as a function of milling time is presented. In turn, the evolution of the alloy microstructure with postmilling anneal treatment is elucidated. Last, the severe plastic deformation processing methodology, i.e., equal-channel angular extrusion, chosen for consolidation, is described and shown to result in a bulk product with good results.

  19. High energy density sodium-ion capacitors through co-intercalation mechanism in diglyme-based electrolyte system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Pengxian; Han, Xiaoqi; Yao, Jianhua; Zhang, Lixue; Cao, Xiaoyan; Huang, Changshui; Cui, Gunglei

    2015-11-01

    A novel sodium-ion capacitor (NIC) was assembled using graphitic mesocarbon microbead anode and activated carbon cathode in diglyme-based electrolyte. Charge/discharge tests indicate that sodium ions can reversibly co-intercalated with diglyme solvent into graphite anode and show good rate performance. The energy densities of the NICs are as high as 93.5 and 86.5 Wh kg-1 at 573 and 2832 W kg-1 (equal to 4 C and 50 C) in the voltage window at 1-4 V, respectively. By optimizing the voltage ranges, the capacity retention of the NIC at 20 C is 98.3% even after 3000 cycles. Such superior electrochemical performance should be attributed to the reversible intercalated/deintercalated reaction of sodium ions and the formation of ternary graphite intercalation compounds in diglyme-based electrolyte. The present work pioneers new realms of hybrid energy storage system with high energy density, high power density and long cycle life.

  20. Effect of High Energy Radiation on Mechanical Properties of Graphite Fiber Reinforced Composites. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naranong, N.

    1980-01-01

    The flexural strength and average modulus of graphite fiber reinforced composites were tested before and after exposure to 0.5 Mev electron radiation and 1.33 Mev gamma radiation by using a three point bending test (ASTM D-790). The irradiation was conducted on vacuum treated samples. Graphite fiber/epoxy (T300/5208), graphite fiber/polyimide (C6000/PMR 15) and graphite fiber/polysulfone (C6000/P1700) composites after being irradiated with 0.5 Mev electron radiation in vacuum up to 5000 Mrad, show increases in stress and modulus of approximately 12% compared with the controls. Graphite fiber/epoxy (T300/5208 and AS/3501-6), after being irradiated with 1.33 Mev gamma radiation up to 360 Mrads, show increases in stress and modulus of approximately 6% at 167 Mrad compared with the controls. Results suggest that the graphite fiber composites studied should withstand the high energy radiation in a space environment for a considerable time, e.g., over 30 years.

  1. High-energy electron irradiation of annual plants (bagasse) for an efficient production of chemi-mechanical pulp fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Shailesh; Ray, A. K.; Großmann, Harald; Kleinert, Rene

    2015-12-01

    The paper industry is one of the largest consumers of energy and energy consumption has been increased several times in last few decades. Bagasse chemical pulping has very low yield about 45-55% and also generates high pollution load in the effluent as compared to mechanical pulping, g. Thermo-mechanical pulp (TMP). On the other hand,-->e.g. thermo-mechanical pulp (TMP). On the other hand, the specific energy consumption is very high for TMP pulps. ETMP (Energy efficient Thermo-Mechanical Pulping) or ECTMP (Energy efficient Chemi-Thermo Mechanical Pulping) is an innovative idea for reducing the energy demand in TMP refining. In the present investigation, energy efficient mechanical pulping potential of bagasse was studied using TMP, CTMP and ECTMP pulping methodology with electron irradiation pretreatment. It is evident from the results that more than 50% energy saving potential of irradiation pre-treatment was achieved.

  2. High-energy resolution X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy reveals insight into unique selectivity of La-based nanoparticles for CO2

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Ofer; Kvashnina, Kristina O.; Luo, Li; Süess, Martin J.; Glatzel, Pieter; Koziej, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    The lanthanum-based materials, due to their layered structure and f-electron configuration, are relevant for electrochemical application. Particularly, La2O2CO3 shows a prominent chemoresistive response to CO2. However, surprisingly less is known about its atomic and electronic structure and electrochemically significant sites and therefore, its structure–functions relationships have yet to be established. Here we determine the position of the different constituents within the unit cell of monoclinic La2O2CO3 and use this information to interpret in situ high-energy resolution fluorescence-detected (HERFD) X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy (vtc XES). Compared with La(OH)3 or previously known hexagonal La2O2CO3 structures, La in the monoclinic unit cell has a much lower number of neighboring oxygen atoms, which is manifested in the whiteline broadening in XANES spectra. Such a superior sensitivity to subtle changes is given by HERFD method, which is essential for in situ studying of the interaction with CO2. Here, we study La2O2CO3-based sensors in real operando conditions at 250 °C in the presence of oxygen and water vapors. We identify that the distribution of unoccupied La d-states and occupied O p- and La d-states changes during CO2 chemoresistive sensing of La2O2CO3. The correlation between these spectroscopic findings with electrical resistance measurements leads to a more comprehensive understanding of the selective adsorption at La site and may enable the design of new materials for CO2 electrochemical applications. PMID:26668362

  3. Study of Mechanical Properties of Bone by Measuring Load Transfer via High-energy X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, Anjali

    Synchrotron high-energy X-ray scattering is used to investigate the in situ strains in hydroxyapatite (HAP) platelets and mineralized collagen fibrils in bovine cortical bone. Compressive load-unload tests at room temperature (27°C) and body temperature (37°C) show that the load transfer to the stiff nano-sized platelets from the surrounding compliant protein matrix does not vary significantly with temperature. This emphasizes that the stiffness of bone is controlled by the stiffness of the HAP phase, which remains unaffected by this change in temperature. Monotonic loading tests in compression and tension, conducted at 37°C, illustrate the spatial variation of properties within a single femur, which is correlated to the mineral content, porosity and microstructure of the samples. The average apparent modulus of HAP and fibrils (EappHAP and Eappfib, respectively), defined as the ratio of applied stress and phase strain, is obtained as 27.5 ± 6.6 and 18.5 ± 8.9 GPa, respectively, in compression. These values are significantly higher than the values of 20.0 ± 5.4 and 4.1 ± 2.6 GPa obtained for HAP and fibrils, respectively, in tension. The difference between the two types of loading is attributed to greater plastic deformation of collagen in tension, which results in greater strains in the collagen fibril, and concomitant greater load transfer to the HAP. Increasing synchrotron X-ray doses (5-3880 kGy) affect neither apparent HAP nor fibrillar modulus, up to stresses of -60 MPa (measured during in situ loading and unloading). However, the residual elastic strains in the HAP phase decrease markedly with increased irradiation, indicating damage at the HAP-collagen interface. Analysis of the X-ray diffraction peak widths shows that unit cells of HAP which are under the highest initial residual strains are most able to relax due to irradiation, resulting in a net decrease in the strain

  4. Structural, mechanical and magnetic properties studies on high-energy Kr-ion irradiated Fe3O4 material (main corrosion layer of Fe-based alloys)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianrong; Wang, Zhiguang; Zhang, Hongpeng; Song, Peng; Chang, Hailong; Cui, Minghuan; Pang, Lilong; Zhu, Yabin; Li, Fashen

    2014-12-01

    The Fe-based (T91 and RAFM) alloys are considered as the promising candidate structural materials for DEMO and the first fusion power plant, and these two kinds of steels suffered more serious corrosion attack at 450 °C in liquid PbBi metal. So in order to further clarify the applicability of Fe-based structural materials in nuclear facilities, we should study not only the alloys itself but also its corrosion layers; and in order to simplify the discussion and clarify the irradiation effects of the different corrosion layer, we abstract the Fe3O4 (main corrosion layer of Fe-based alloys) to study the structural, micro-mechanical and magnetic properties under 2.03 GeV Kr-ion irradiation. The initial crystallographic structure of the Fe3O4 remains unaffected after irradiation at low damage levels, but as the Kr-ion fluence increases and the defects accumulate, the macroscopic magnetic properties (Ms, Hc, etc.) and micro-mechanical properties (nano-hardness and Young's modulus) are sensitive to high-energy Kr-ion irradiation and exhibit excruciating uniform changing regularities with varying fluences (firstly increases, then decreases). And these magnetism, hardening and softening phenomena can be interpreted very well by the effects related to the stress and defects (the production, accumulation and free) induced by high-energy ions irradiation.

  5. High energy neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-06-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos.

  6. Improvement of mechanical and thermal properties of high energy electron beam irradiated HDPE/hydroxyapatite nano-composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, M.; Ziaie, F.; Majdabadi, A.; Akhavan, A.; Shafaei, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this research work, the nano-composites of high density polyethylene/hydroxyapatite samples were manufactured via two methods: In the first method, the granules of high density polyethylene and nano-structure hydroxyapatite were processed in an internal mixer to prepare the nano-composite samples with a different weight percentage of the reinforcement phase. As for the second one, high density polyethylene was prepared in nano-powder form in boiling xylene. During this procedure, the hydroxyapatite nano-powder was added with different weight percentages to the solvent to obtain the nano-composite. In both of the procedures, the used hydroxyapatite nano-powder was synthesized via hydrolysis methods. The samples were irradiated under 10 MeV electron beam in 70-200 kGy of doses. Mechanical, thermal and morphological properties of the samples were investigated and compared. The results demonstrate that the nano-composites which we have prepared using nano-polyethylene, show better mechanical and thermal properties than the composites prepared from normal polyethylene granules, due to the better dispersion of nano-particles in the polymer matrix.

  7. DISENTANGLING HADRONIC AND LEPTONIC CASCADE SCENARIOS FROM THE VERY-HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION OF DISTANT HARD-SPECTRUM BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Takami, Hajime; Murase, Kohta; Dermer, Charles D. E-mail: murase@ias.edu

    2013-07-10

    Recent data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope have revealed about a dozen distant hard-spectrum blazars that have very-high-energy (VHE; {approx}> 100 GeV) photons associated with them, but most of them have not yet been detected by imaging atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes. Most of these high-energy gamma-ray spectra, like those of other extreme high-frequency peaked BL Lac objects, can be well explained either by gamma rays emitted at the source or by cascades induced by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, as we show specifically for KUV 00311-1938. We consider the prospects for detection of the VHE sources by the planned Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) and show how it can distinguish the two scenarios by measuring the integrated flux above {approx}500 GeV (depending on source redshift) for several luminous sources with z {approx}< 1 in the sample. Strong evidence for the origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays could be obtained from VHE observations with CTA. Depending on redshift, if the often quoted redshift of KUV 00311-1938 (z = 0.61) is believed, then preliminary H.E.S.S. data favor cascades induced by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. Accurate redshift measurements of hard-spectrum blazars are essential for this study.

  8. High Energy Polarization of Blazars: Detection Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, N.; Pavlidou, V.; Fields, B. D.

    2015-01-01

    Emission from blazar jets in the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared is polarized. If these low-energy photons were inverse-Compton scattered, the upscattered high-energy photons retain a fraction of the polarization. Current and future X-ray and gamma-ray polarimeters such as INTEGRAL-SPI, PoGOLITE, X-Calibur, Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter, GEMS-like missions, ASTRO-H, and POLARIX have the potential to discover polarized X-rays and gamma-rays from blazar jets for the first time. Detection of such polarization will open a qualitatively new window into high-energy blazar emission; actual measurements of polarization degree and angle will quantitatively test theories of jet emission mechanisms. We examine the detection prospects of blazars by these polarimetry missions using examples of 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 454.3, bright sources with relatively high degrees of low-energy polarization. We conclude that while balloon polarimeters will be challenged to detect blazars within reasonable observational times (with X-Calibur offering the most promising prospects), space-based missions should detect the brightest blazars for polarization fractions down to a few percent. Typical flaring activity of blazars could boost the overall number of polarimetric detections by nearly a factor of five to six purely accounting for flux increase of the brightest of the comprehensive, all-sky, Fermi-LAT blazar distribution. The instantaneous increase in the number of detections is approximately a factor of two, assuming a duty cycle of 20% for every source. The detectability of particular blazars may be reduced if variations in the flux and polarization fraction are anticorrelated. Simultaneous use of variability and polarization trends could guide the selection of blazars for high-energy polarimetric observations.

  9. HIGH ENERGY POLARIZATION OF BLAZARS: DETECTION PROSPECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, N.; Pavlidou, V.; Fields, B. D.

    2015-01-01

    Emission from blazar jets in the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared is polarized. If these low-energy photons were inverse-Compton scattered, the upscattered high-energy photons retain a fraction of the polarization. Current and future X-ray and gamma-ray polarimeters such as INTEGRAL-SPI, PoGOLITE, X-Calibur, Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter, GEMS-like missions, ASTRO-H, and POLARIX have the potential to discover polarized X-rays and gamma-rays from blazar jets for the first time. Detection of such polarization will open a qualitatively new window into high-energy blazar emission; actual measurements of polarization degree and angle will quantitatively test theories of jet emission mechanisms. We examine the detection prospects of blazars by these polarimetry missions using examples of 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 454.3, bright sources with relatively high degrees of low-energy polarization. We conclude that while balloon polarimeters will be challenged to detect blazars within reasonable observational times (with X-Calibur offering the most promising prospects), space-based missions should detect the brightest blazars for polarization fractions down to a few percent. Typical flaring activity of blazars could boost the overall number of polarimetric detections by nearly a factor of five to six purely accounting for flux increase of the brightest of the comprehensive, all-sky, Fermi-LAT blazar distribution. The instantaneous increase in the number of detections is approximately a factor of two, assuming a duty cycle of 20% for every source. The detectability of particular blazars may be reduced if variations in the flux and polarization fraction are anticorrelated. Simultaneous use of variability and polarization trends could guide the selection of blazars for high-energy polarimetric observations.

  10. Structural studies of calcium phosphate doped with titanium and zirconium obtained by high-energy mechanical alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C. C.; Sombra, A. S. B.

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we present a new variation of the solid-state procedure on the synthesis of bioceramics with titanium (CapTi) and zirconium (CapZr), considering that zirconium (ZrO2) and titanium oxide (TiO2) are strengthening agents, due to their superb force and fracture toughness. The high efficiency of the calcination process opens a new way of producing commercial amounts of nanocrystalline bioceramics. In this work, a new variation of the solid-state procedure method was used to produce nanocrystalline powders of titanium and zirconium, using two different experimental chemical routes: CapTi: Ca(H2PO4)2+TiO2 and CapZr: Ca(H2PO4)2+ZrO2. The powders were submitted to calcination processes (CapTic and CapZrc) at 800, 900 and 1000 °C. The calcium titanium phosphate phase, CaTi4P6O24, was obtained in the CapTic reaction and the calcium zirconium phosphate, CaZr4P6O24, was obtained in the CapZrc reaction. The obtained ceramics were characterized by x-ray powder diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, Raman scattering spectroscopy (RSS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. This method was compared with the milling process (CapTim and CapZrm), where in the last process the melting is not necessary and the powder obtained is nanocrystalline. The calcium titanium phosphate phase, CaTi4P6O24, was obtained in the reaction CapTim, but in CapZrm the formation of any calcium phosphate phase even after 15 h of dry mechanical alloying was not observed.

  11. From QCD-based hard-scattering to nonextensive statistical mechanical descriptions of transverse momentum spectra in high-energy pp and pp¯ collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Wilk, Grzegorz; Cirto, Leonardo J. L.; ...

    2015-06-22

    Transverse spectra of both jets and hadrons obtained in high-energymore » $pp$ and $$p\\bar p $$ collisions at central rapidity exhibit power-law behavior of $$1/p_T^n$$ at high $$p_T$$. The power index $n$ is 4-5 for jet production and is slightly greater for hadron production. Furthermore, the hadron spectra spanning over 14 orders of magnitude down to the lowest $$p_T$$ region in $pp$ collisions at LHC can be adequately described by a single nonextensive statistical mechanical distribution that is widely used in other branches of science. This suggests indirectly the dominance of the hard-scattering process over essentially the whole $$p_T$$ region at central rapidity in $pp$ collisions at LHC. We show here direct evidences of such a dominance of the hard-scattering process by investigating the power index of UA1 jet spectra over an extended $$p_T$$ region and the two-particle correlation data of the STAR and PHENIX Collaborations in high-energy $pp$ and $$p \\bar p$$ collisions at central rapidity. We then study how the showering of the hard-scattering product partons alters the power index of the hadron spectra and leads to a hadron distribution that can be cast into a single-particle non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution. Lastly, because of such a connection, the non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution can be considered as a lowest-order approximation of the hard-scattering of partons followed by the subsequent process of parton showering that turns the jets into hadrons, in high energy $pp$ and $$p\\bar p$$ collisions.« less

  12. i RadMat: A thermo-mechanical testing system for in situ high-energy X-ray characterization of radioactive specimens

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Xuan; Xu, Chi; Wang, Leyun; ...

    2017-01-27

    Here, we present an in situ Radiated Materials (iRadMat) experimental module designed to interface with a servo-hydraulic load frame for X-ray measurements at beamline 1-ID at the Advanced Photon Source. This new capability allows in situ studies of radioactive specimens subject to thermo-mechanical loading using a suite of high-energy X-ray scattering and imaging techniques. The iRadMat is a radiation-shielded vacuum heating system with the sample rotation-under-load capability. We describe the design features and performances of the iRadMat and present a dataset from a 300 °C uniaxial tensile test of a neutron-irradiated pure Fe specimen to demonstrate its capabilities.

  13. iRadMat: A thermo-mechanical testing system for in situ high-energy X-ray characterization of radioactive specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Xu, Chi; Wang, Leyun; Chen, Yiren; Li, Meimei; Almer, Jonathan D.; Benda, Erika; Kenesei, Peter; Mashayekhi, Ali; Park, Jun-Sang; Westferro, Frank J.

    2017-01-01

    We present an in situ Radiated Materials (iRadMat) experimental module designed to interface with a servo-hydraulic load frame for X-ray measurements at beamline 1-ID at the Advanced Photon Source. This new capability allows in situ studies of radioactive specimens subject to thermo-mechanical loading using a suite of high-energy X-ray scattering and imaging techniques. The iRadMat is a radiation-shielded vacuum heating system with the sample rotation-under-load capability. We describe the design features and performances of the iRadMat and present a dataset from a 300 °C uniaxial tensile test of a neutron-irradiated pure Fe specimen to demonstrate its capabilities.

  14. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics Program at the University of California, Riverside. In 1990, we will concentrate on analysis of LEP data from the OPAL detector. We expect to record 10{sup 5} Z`s by the end of 1989 and 10{sup 6} in 1990. This data will be used to measure the number of quark-lepton families in the universe. In the second half of 1990 we will also be occupied with the installation of the D-Zero detector in the Tevatron Collider and the preparation of software for the 1991 run. A new initiative made possible by generous university support is a laboratory for detector development at UCR. The focus will be on silicon strip tracking detectors both for the D-Zero upgrade and for SSC physics. The theory program will pursue further various mass-generating radiative mechanisms for understanding small quark and lepton masses as well as some novel phenomenological aspects of supersymmetry.

  15. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics program at the University of California at Riverside. In hadron collider physics the authors will complete their transition from experiment UA1 at CERN to the DZERO experiment at Fermilab. On experiment UA1 their effort will concentrate on data analysis at Riverside. At Fermilab they will coordinate the high voltage system for all detector elements. They will also carry out hardware/software development for the D0 muon detector. The TPC/Two-Gamma experiment has completed its present phase of data-taking after accumulating 160 pb{sup {minus}}1 of luminosity. The UC Riverside group will continue data and physics analysis and make minor hardware improvement for the high luminosity run. The UC Riverside group is participating in design and implementation of the data acquisition system for the OPAL experiment at LEP. Mechanical and electronics construction of the OPAL hadron calorimeter strip readout system is proceeding on schedule. Data analysis and Monte Carlo detector simulation efforts are proceeding in preparation for the first physics run when IEP operation comenses in fall 1989.

  16. Black holes and high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grib, A. A.; Pavlov, Yu. V.

    2016-01-01

    Three mechanisms of getting high energies in particle collisions in the ergosphere of the rotating black holes are considered. The consequences of these mechanisms for observation of ultra high energy cosmic rays particles on the Earth as result of conversion of superheavy dark matter particles into ordinary particles are discussed.

  17. Field emission, morphological and mechanical properties of variety of diamond-like carbon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Kumar, Sushil; Tripathi, R. K.; Malik, H. K.; Panwar, O. S.

    2011-11-01

    The effect of nitrogen incorporation and sandwich titanium and copper layers, on field emission, morphological and mechanical properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films is explored. The introduction of foreign element (N2) and sandwich Cu and Ti layers changed the amorphous morphology to nanostructured, reduced the stress, enhanced the hardness (except N2 incorporated DLC film) and improved the field emission (except Ti/DLC bilayer) of modified DLC films. The associated versatile electrical and mechanical properties of modified DLC film made it a material of great utility in the development of field emission display panels and also lead to its application as a hard and protective coating on cutting tools, automobile parts etc. It is important to mention that DLC-based electronic materials may replace currently used soft electronic materials (such as Si) due to their enhanced stability under high energy radiation.

  18. Ultraviolet and Visible Emission Mechanisms in Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stancil, Phillip C.; Schultz, David R.

    2003-01-01

    The project involved the study of ultraviolet (UV) and visible emission mechanisms in astrophysical and atmospheric environments. In many situations, the emission is a direct consequence of a charge transferring collision of an ion with a neutral with capture of an electron to an excited state of the product ion. The process is also important in establishing the ionization and thermal balance of an astrophysical plasma. As little of the necessary collision data are available, the main thrust of the project was the calculation of total and state-selective charge transfer cross sections and rate coefficients for a very large number of collision systems. The data was computed using modern explicit techniques including the molecular-orbital close-coupling (MOCC), classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC), and continuum distorted wave (CDW) methods. Estimates were also made in some instances using the multichannel Landau-Zener (MCLZ) and classical over-the-barrier (COB) models. Much of the data which has been computed has been formatted for inclusion in a charge transfer database on the World Wide Web (cfadc.phy.ornl.gov/astro/ps/data/). A considerable amount of data has been generated during the lifetime of the grant. Some of it has not been analyzed, but it will be as soon as possible, the data placed on our website, and papers ultimately written.

  19. High-energy detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E [South Setauket, NY; Camarda, Giuseppe [Farmingville, NY; Cui, Yonggang [Upton, NY; James, Ralph B [Ridge, NY

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  20. High Energy Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA (Universities Space Research Association) contract team during the six months during the reporting period (10/95 - 3/96) and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science, Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  1. High Energy Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed-by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, visiting the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA); X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE); X-ray Spectrometer (XRS); Astro-E; High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  2. High Energy Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    An overview of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory 2 contributions to X-ray astronomy is presented along with a brief description of the satellite and onboard telescope. Observations relating to galaxies and galactic clusters, black holes, supernova remnants, quasars, and cosmology are discussed.

  3. High energy particle astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffington, A.; Muller, R. A.; Smith, L. H.; Smoot, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of techniques currently used in high energy particle astronomy for measuring charged and neutral cosmic rays and their isotope and momentum distribution. Derived from methods developed for accelerator experiments in particle physics, these techniques help perform important particle astronomy experiments pertaining to nuclear cosmic ray and gamma ray research, electron and position probes, and antimatter searches.

  4. High energy colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-02-01

    The authors consider the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, p{anti p}), lepton (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}) and photon-photon colliders. Technical problems in obtaining increased energy in each type of machine are presented. The machines relative size are also discussed.

  5. High capacity retention Si/silicide nanocomposite anode materials fabricated by high-energy mechanical milling for lithium-ion rechargeable batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hyoung Kyu; Loka, Chadrasekhar; Yang, Yun Mo; Kim, Jae Hyuk; Moon, Sung Whan; Cho, Jong Soo; Lee, Kee-Sun

    2015-05-01

    The preparation of different kinds of nanocomposite materials is a promising approach to alleviate the severe volume changes of Silicon anode materials for lithium-ion secondary batteries. In the present study, a novel nanocomposite Si80Fe16Cr4 was synthesized by high-energy mechanical milling without noticeable contamination. The nano-indentation results revealed that the elastic recoverable energy range of the synthesized nanocomposite is 3.43 times higher than that of Si. The proposed nanocomposite milled for 8 and 10 h recorded a noteworthy reversible capacity of 841 and 812 mAh g-1 even at 100th cycle, with excellent capacity retention. Remarkably, the nanocomposite exhibited a very low initial cycle (1st cycle) capacity loss ∼14%. The crystal separation of the less active silicide phases was determined after the extended cycling, which is advantageous for accommodating the stress produced by the volume changes of the active Si. The primary factors attributed to the excellent electrochemical performance were the size reduction of Si particles to nanometer scale, the formation of the highly elastic matrix, and separation of silicide phases after extended cycling.

  6. High energy flux thermo-mechanical test of 1D-carbon-carbon fibre composite prototypes for the SPIDER diagnostic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    De Muri, M. Pasqualotto, R.; Dalla Palma, M.; Cervaro, V.; Fasolo, D.; Franchin, L.; Tollin, M.; Serianni, G.; Cavallin, T.; Greuner, H.; Böswirth, B.

    2014-02-15

    Operation of the thermonuclear fusion experiment ITER requires additional heating via injection of neutral beams from accelerated negative ions. In the SPIDER test facility, under construction in Padova, the production of negative ions will be studied and optimised. STRIKE (Short-Time Retractable Instrumented Kalorimeter Experiment) is a diagnostic used to characterise the SPIDER beam during short pulse operation (several seconds) to verify if the beam meets the ITER requirements about the maximum allowed beam non-uniformity (below ±10%). The major components of STRIKE are 16 1D-CFC (Carbon-Carbon Fibre Composite) tiles, observed at the rear side by a thermal camera. This contribution gives an overview of some tests under high energy particle flux, aimed at verifying the thermo-mechanical behaviour of several CFC prototype tiles. The tests were performed in the GLADIS facility at IPP (Max-Plank-Institut für Plasmaphysik), Garching. Dedicated linear and nonlinear simulations were carried out to interpret the experiments and a comparison of the experimental data with the simulation results is presented. The results of some morphological and structural studies on the material after exposure to the GLADIS beam are also given.

  7. High energy flux thermo-mechanical test of 1D-carbon-carbon fibre composite prototypes for the SPIDER diagnostic calorimeter.

    PubMed

    De Muri, M; Cavallin, T; Pasqualotto, R; Dalla Palma, M; Cervaro, V; Fasolo, D; Franchin, L; Tollin, M; Greuner, H; Böswirth, B; Serianni, G

    2014-02-01

    Operation of the thermonuclear fusion experiment ITER requires additional heating via injection of neutral beams from accelerated negative ions. In the SPIDER test facility, under construction in Padova, the production of negative ions will be studied and optimised. STRIKE (Short-Time Retractable Instrumented Kalorimeter Experiment) is a diagnostic used to characterise the SPIDER beam during short pulse operation (several seconds) to verify if the beam meets the ITER requirements about the maximum allowed beam non-uniformity (below ±10%). The major components of STRIKE are 16 1D-CFC (Carbon-Carbon Fibre Composite) tiles, observed at the rear side by a thermal camera. This contribution gives an overview of some tests under high energy particle flux, aimed at verifying the thermo-mechanical behaviour of several CFC prototype tiles. The tests were performed in the GLADIS facility at IPP (Max-Plank-Institut für Plasmaphysik), Garching. Dedicated linear and nonlinear simulations were carried out to interpret the experiments and a comparison of the experimental data with the simulation results is presented. The results of some morphological and structural studies on the material after exposure to the GLADIS beam are also given.

  8. High energy flux thermo-mechanical test of 1D-carbon-carbon fibre composite prototypes for the SPIDER diagnostic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Muri, M.; Cavallin, T.; Pasqualotto, R.; Dalla Palma, M.; Cervaro, V.; Fasolo, D.; Franchin, L.; Tollin, M.; Greuner, H.; Böswirth, B.; Serianni, G.

    2014-02-01

    Operation of the thermonuclear fusion experiment ITER requires additional heating via injection of neutral beams from accelerated negative ions. In the SPIDER test facility, under construction in Padova, the production of negative ions will be studied and optimised. STRIKE (Short-Time Retractable Instrumented Kalorimeter Experiment) is a diagnostic used to characterise the SPIDER beam during short pulse operation (several seconds) to verify if the beam meets the ITER requirements about the maximum allowed beam non-uniformity (below ±10%). The major components of STRIKE are 16 1D-CFC (Carbon-Carbon Fibre Composite) tiles, observed at the rear side by a thermal camera. This contribution gives an overview of some tests under high energy particle flux, aimed at verifying the thermo-mechanical behaviour of several CFC prototype tiles. The tests were performed in the GLADIS facility at IPP (Max-Plank-Institut für Plasmaphysik), Garching. Dedicated linear and nonlinear simulations were carried out to interpret the experiments and a comparison of the experimental data with the simulation results is presented. The results of some morphological and structural studies on the material after exposure to the GLADIS beam are also given.

  9. Investigation of the capacity retention mechanisms in novel composite sulfur copolymer-base cathodes for high-energy density Li-S batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleshko, Vladimir; Kim, Jenny; Masser, Kevin; Hudson, Steven; Soles, Christopher; Griebel, Jared; Chung, Woo Jin; Simmonds, Adam; Pyun, Jeffrey

    2013-03-01

    Utilization of the active cathode material in high-energy density Li-S batteries limited by the insulating nature of sulfur and losses in the form of insoluble polysulfides was improved by the use of 1,3-diisopropenylbenzene (DIB) copolymerized with molten sulfur. This approach termed, inverse vulcanization, transforms elemental sulfur into chemically stable processable copolymer forms with tunable thermomechanical properties. According to dielectric spectroscopy and dc conductivity measurements, composite sulfur-DIB copolymer cathodes exhibit a glassy-state beta relaxation related to short sulfur segments or to the DIB cross-linker. High-resolution AEM and FESEM studies down to the atomic scale reveal multiscale 3D-architectures created within the pristine and cycled composite cathodes with various contents of the electroactive copolymers. The morphology, structures, bonding and local compositional distributions of the constituents (sulfur, copolymers, aggregated conductive carbon nanoparticles) as well as extended pore structures and their transformations under cycling have been examined to provide insights into mechanisms of the enhanced capacity retention in the modified Li-S cells. NIST support under grant MML12-1053-N00

  10. Perspective of detecting very high energy gamma-ray emission from active galactic nuclei with Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yi; Yuan, Qiang; Bi, Xiao-Jun; Zhu, Feng-Rong; Jia, Huan-Yu

    2016-10-01

    The detectability of active galactic nuclei (AGN), a major class of γ-ray emitters in the sky, by the newly planned Chinese project, Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO), is investigated. The expectation is primarily based on the AGN catalog of Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT), with an extrapolation to the very high energy (VHE) range taking into account the absorption effect by the extragalactic background light (EBL). It is found that LHAASO may have the potential to detect more than several tens of the Fermi detected AGN, basically BL Lacertaes, with one-year sky survey. The capability of measuring the energy spectrum and light curve are also discussed.

  11. High-energy facility development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.; Roberts, W. T.; Dabbs, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    Approaches to the deployment of instruments for the study of high-energy solar emissions alone or in conjunction with other solar instruments are considered. The Space Station has been identified as the preferred mode for the deployment of the Advanced Solar Observatory, and it is suggested that a proposed High-Energy Facility could be on a coorbiting platform. The implementation plan for the High-Energy Facility involves the definition of the interface structures required to mount the facility instruments to the Space Station and the development of hard X-ray and gamma-ray imaging, spectroscopic, and polarimetric instruments.

  12. High energy from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, Bruce; Canizares, Claude; Catura, Richard C.; Clark, George W.; Fichtel, Carl E.; Friedman, Herbert; Giacconi, Riccardo; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Helfand, David J.; Holt, Stephen S.

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) important scientific problems for high energy astrophysics (stellar activity, the interstellar medium in galaxies, supernovae and endpoints of stellar evolution, nucleosynthesis, relativistic plasmas and matter under extreme conditions, nature of gamma-bursts, identification of black holes, active nuclei, accretion physics, large-scale structures, intracluster medium, nature of dark matter, and the X- and gamma-ray background); (2) the existing experimental programs (Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO), X-Ray Timing Explorer (XTE), High Energy Transient Experiment (HETE), U.S. participation in foreign missions, and attached Shuttle and Space Station Freedom payloads); (3) major missions for the 1990's; (4) a new program of moderate missions; (5) new opportunities for small missions; (6) technology development issues; and (7) policy issues.

  13. High energy transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woosley, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    A meeting was convened on the campus of the University of California at Santa Cruz during the two-week interval July 11 through July 22, 1983. Roughly 100 participants were chosen so as to give broad representation to all aspects of high energy transients. Ten morning review sessions were held in which invited speakers discussed the current status of observations and theory of the above subjects. Afternoon workshops were also held, usually more than one per day, to informally review various technical aspects of transients, confront shortcomings in theoretical models, and to propose productive courses for future research. Special attention was also given to the instrumentation used to study high energy transient and the characteristics and goals of a dedicated space mission to study transients in the next decade were determined. A listing of articles written by various members of the workshop is included.

  14. High energy beam lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetto, M.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    The ISAC post accelerator comprises an RFQ, DTL and SC-linac. The high energy beam lines connect the linear accelerators as well as deliver the accelerated beams to two different experimental areas. The medium energy beam transport (MEBT) line connects the RFQ to the DTL. The high energy beam transport (HEBT) line connects the DTL to the ISAC-I experimental stations (DRAGON, TUDA-I, GPS). The DTL to superconducting beam (DSB) transport line connects the ISAC-I and ISAC-II linacs. The superconducting energy beam transport (SEBT) line connects the SC linac to the ISAC-II experimental station (TUDA-II, HERACLES, TIGRESS, EMMA and GPS). All these lines have the function of transporting and matching the beams to the downstream sections by manipulating the transverse and longitudinal phase space. They also contain diagnostic devices to measure the beam properties.

  15. Near-IR laser generation of a high-energy conformer of L-alanine and the mechanism of its decay in a low-temperature nitrogen matrix.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Cláudio M; Lapinski, Leszek; Fausto, Rui; Reva, Igor

    2013-03-28

    Monomers of L-alanine (ALA) were isolated in cryogenic nitrogen matrices at 14 K. Two conformers were identified for the compound trapped from the gas-phase into the solid nitrogen environment. The potential energy surface (PES) of ALA was theoretically calculated at the MP2 and QCISD levels. Twelve minima were located on this PES. Seven low-energy conformers fall within the 0-10 kJ mol(-1) range and should be appreciably populated in the equilibrium gas phase prior to deposition. Observation of only two forms in the matrices is explained in terms of calculated barriers to conformational rearrangements. All conformers with the O=C-O-H moiety in the cis orientation are separated by low barriers and collapse to the most stable form I during deposition of the matrix onto the low-temperature substrate. The second observed form II has the O=C-O-H group in the trans orientation. The remaining trans forms have very high relative energies (between 24 and 30 kJ mol(-1)) and are not populated. The high-energy trans form VI, that differs from I only by rotation of the OH group, was found to be separated from other conformers by barriers that are high enough to open a perspective for its stabilization in a matrix. The form VI was photoproduced in situ by narrow-band near-infrared irradiation of the samples at 6935-6910 cm(-1), where the first overtone of the OH stretching vibration in form I appears. The photogenerated form VI decays in N2 matrices back to conformer I with a characteristic decay time of ∼15 min. The mechanism of the VI → I relaxation is rationalized in terms of the proton tunneling.

  16. Theoretical High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, Norman H.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    2014-07-14

    we provide reports from each of the six faculty supported by the Department of Energy High Energy Physics Theory grant at Columbia University. Each is followed by a bibliography of the references cited. A complete list of all of the publications in the 12/1/2010-04/30/2014 period resulting from research supported by this grant is provided in the following section. The final section lists the Ph.D. dissertations based on research supported by the grant that were submitted during this period.

  17. High energy electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    High energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. The questions of using electron cooling with and without a magnetic field are presented for discussion at this workshop. The electron cooling method was suggested by G. Budker in the middle sixties. The original idea of the electron cooling was published in 1966. The design activities for the NAP-M project was started in November 1971 and the first run using a proton beam occurred in September 1973. The first experiment with both electron and proton beams was started in May 1974. In this experiment good result was achieved very close to theoretical prediction for a usual two component plasma heat exchange.

  18. UNDERSTANDING THE UNUSUAL X-RAY EMISSION PROPERTIES OF THE MASSIVE, CLOSE BINARY WR 20a: A HIGH ENERGY WINDOW INTO THE STELLAR WIND INITIATION REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Montes, Gabriela; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Strickler, Rachel

    2013-11-10

    The problem of explaining the X-ray emission properties of the massive, close binary WR 20a is discussed. Located near the cluster core of Westerlund 2, WR 20a is composed of two nearly identical Wolf-Rayet stars of 82 and 83 solar masses orbiting with a period of only 3.7 days. Although Chandra observations were taken during the secondary optical eclipse, the X-ray light curve shows no signs of a flux decrement. In fact, WR 20a appears slightly more X-ray luminous and softer during the optical eclipse, opposite to what has been observed in other binary systems. To aid in our interpretation of the data, we compare with the results of hydrodynamical simulations using the adaptive mesh refinement code Mezcal which includes radiative cooling and a radiative acceleration force term. It is shown that the X-ray emission can be successfully explained in models where the wind-wind collision interface in this system occurs while the outflowing material is still being accelerated. Consequently, WR 20a serves as a critical test-case for how radiatively driven stellar winds are initiated and how they interact. Our models not only procure a robust description of current Chandra data, which cover the orbital phases between 0.3 and 0.6, but also provide detailed predictions over the entire orbit.

  19. Understanding the Unusual X-Ray Emission Properties of the Massive, Close Binary WR 20a: A High Energy Window into the Stellar Wind Initiation Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Gabriela; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Strickler, Rachel

    2013-11-01

    The problem of explaining the X-ray emission properties of the massive, close binary WR 20a is discussed. Located near the cluster core of Westerlund 2, WR 20a is composed of two nearly identical Wolf-Rayet stars of 82 and 83 solar masses orbiting with a period of only 3.7 days. Although Chandra observations were taken during the secondary optical eclipse, the X-ray light curve shows no signs of a flux decrement. In fact, WR 20a appears slightly more X-ray luminous and softer during the optical eclipse, opposite to what has been observed in other binary systems. To aid in our interpretation of the data, we compare with the results of hydrodynamical simulations using the adaptive mesh refinement code Mezcal which includes radiative cooling and a radiative acceleration force term. It is shown that the X-ray emission can be successfully explained in models where the wind-wind collision interface in this system occurs while the outflowing material is still being accelerated. Consequently, WR 20a serves as a critical test-case for how radiatively driven stellar winds are initiated and how they interact. Our models not only procure a robust description of current Chandra data, which cover the orbital phases between 0.3 and 0.6, but also provide detailed predictions over the entire orbit.

  20. Detection of high-energy gamma-ray emission from the BL Lacertae object Markarian 421 by the Egret telescope on the Compton Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Y. C.; Bertsch, D. L.; Chiang, J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Kwok, P. W.; Mattox, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Gamma radiation in the energy range from 50 MeV to well over 1 GeV has been observed from the direction of the BL Lac object Markarian 421 by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope on the Compton Observatory during the period 1991 June 27-July 11. The source flux is weak, but still statistically significant at the level of 10 exp -5; the integrated photon flux above 100 MeV is (1.4 +/- 0.3) x 10 exp -7/sq cm s. The differential photon energy spectrum can be represented by a power law with exponent 1.96 +/- 0.14. This is the first detection of gamma-ray emission from a BL Lac object.

  1. Long-Term Monitoring of the High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from LS I +61 deg 303 and LS 5039

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadasch, D.; Torres, D. F.; Tanaka, T.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Hill, A. B.; Dubois, R.; Dubus, G.; Glanzman, T.; Corbel, S.; Li, J.; Chen, Y. P.; Zhang, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Kerr, M.; Richards, J. L.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Readhead, A.; Pooley, G.

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) reported the first definitive gigaelectron volts detections of the binaries LS I +61 deg 303 and LS 5039 in the first year after its launch in 2008 June. These detections were unambiguous as a consequence of the reduced positional uncertainty and the detection of modulated gamma-ray emission on the corresponding orbital periods. An analysis of new data from the LAT, comprising 30 months of observations, identifies a change in the gamma-ray behavior of LS I +61 deg 303. An increase in flux is detected in 2009 March and a steady decline in the orbital flux modulation is observed. Significant emission up to 30 gigaelectron volts is detected by the LAT; prior data sets led to upper limits only. Contemporaneous terraelectron volt observations no longer detected the source, or found it-in one orbit-close to periastron, far from the phases at which the source previously appeared at terraelectron volt energies. The detailed numerical simulations and models that exist within the literature do not predict or explain many of these features now observed at gigaelectron volt and terraelectron volt energies. New ideas and models are needed to fully explain and understand this behavior. A detailed phase-resolved analysis of the spectral characterization of LS I +61 deg 303 in the gigaelectron volt regime ascribes a power law with an exponential cutoff spectrum along each analyzed portion of the system's orbit. The on-source exposure of LS 5039 is also substantially increased with respect to our prior publication. In this case, whereas the general gamma-ray properties remain consistent, the increased statistics of the current data set allows for a deeper investigation of its orbital and spectral evolution.

  2. LONG-TERM MONITORING OF THE HIGH-ENERGY {gamma}-RAY EMISSION FROM LS I +61 Degree-Sign 303 AND LS 5039

    SciTech Connect

    Hadasch, D.; Torres, D. F.; Caliandro, G. A.; Tanaka, T.; Hill, A. B.; Dubois, R.; Glanzman, T.; Kerr, M.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Dubus, G.; Li, J.; Chen, Y. P.; Zhang, S.; Richards, J. L.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Readhead, A.; Pooley, G.

    2012-04-10

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) reported the first definitive GeV detections of the binaries LS I +61 Degree-Sign 303 and LS 5039 in the first year after its launch in 2008 June. These detections were unambiguous as a consequence of the reduced positional uncertainty and the detection of modulated {gamma}-ray emission on the corresponding orbital periods. An analysis of new data from the LAT, comprising 30 months of observations, identifies a change in the {gamma}-ray behavior of LS I +61 Degree-Sign 303. An increase in flux is detected in 2009 March and a steady decline in the orbital flux modulation is observed. Significant emission up to 30 GeV is detected by the LAT; prior data sets led to upper limits only. Contemporaneous TeV observations no longer detected the source, or found it-in one orbit-close to periastron, far from the phases at which the source previously appeared at TeV energies. The detailed numerical simulations and models that exist within the literature do not predict or explain many of these features now observed at GeV and TeV energies. New ideas and models are needed to fully explain and understand this behavior. A detailed phase-resolved analysis of the spectral characterization of LS I +61 Degree-Sign 303 in the GeV regime ascribes a power law with an exponential cutoff spectrum along each analyzed portion of the system's orbit. The on-source exposure of LS 5039 is also substantially increased with respect to our prior publication. In this case, whereas the general {gamma}-ray properties remain consistent, the increased statistics of the current data set allows for a deeper investigation of its orbital and spectral evolution.

  3. Insights into the High-energy γ-ray Emission of Markarian 501 from Extensive Multifrequency Observations in the Fermi Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Cannon, A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Palma, F.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fuhrmann, L.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kadler, M.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S.-H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nishino, S.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pavlidou, V.; Pearson, T. J.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Readhead, A.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Richards, J. L.; Ripken, J.; Ritz, S.; Roth, M.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Scargle, J. D.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stawarz, Ł.; Stevenson, M.; Strickman, M. S.; Sokolovsky, K. V.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wehrle, A. E.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Zensus, J. A.; Ziegler, M.; Fermi LAT Collaboration; Aleksić, J.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Backes, M.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Bordas, P.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Bose, D.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Camara, M.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; de Angelis, A.; De Cea del Pozo, E.; De Lotto, B.; De Maria, M.; De Sabata, F.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Elsaesser, D.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Gaug, M.; Giavitto, G.; Godinovi, N.; Hadasch, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Jogler, T.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Kranich, D.; Krause, J.; La Barbera, A.; Leonardo, E.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; Lorenz, E.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, E.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Miyamoto, H.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Orito, R.; Oya, I.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Pasanen, M.; Pauss, F.; Pegna, R. G.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, J.; Pochon, J.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prada, F.; Prandini, E.; Puchades, N.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, T.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rissi, M.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shore, S. N.; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Struebig, J. C.; Suric, T.; Takalo, L. O.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Vankov, H.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; MAGIC Collaboration; Acciari, V. A.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Benbow, W.; Boltuch, D.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Gillanders, G. H.; Godambe, S.; Grube, J.; Guenette, R.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Huang, D.; Hui, C. M.; Humensky, T. B.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; McCutcheon, M.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Ong, R.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pichel, A.; Pohl, M.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Rose, H. J.; Rovero, A. C.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Senturk, G. D.; Steele, D.; Swordy, S. P.; Tešić, G.; Theiling, M.; Thibadeau, S.; Varlotta, A.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Williams, D. A.; Wood, M.; Zitzer, B.; VERITAS Collaboration; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Arkharov, A. A.; Blinov, D. A.; Calcidese, P.; Chen, W. P.; Efimova, N. V.; Kimeridze, G.; Konstantinova, T. S.; Kopatskaya, E. N.; Koptelova, E.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Kurtanidze, S. O.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Larionov, V. M.; Larionova, E. G.; Larionova, L. V.; Ligustri, R.; Morozova, D. A.; Nikolashvili, M. G.; Sigua, L. A.; Troitsky, I. S.; Angelakis, E.; Capalbi, M.; Carramiñana, A.; Carrasco, L.; Cassaro, P.; de la Fuente, E.; Gurwell, M. A.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Kovalev, Yu. A.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Krimm, H. A.; Leto, P.; Lister, M. L.; Maccaferri, G.; Moody, J. W.; Mori, Y.; Nestoras, I.; Orlati, A.; Pagani, C.; Pace, C.; Pearson, R., III; Perri, M.; Piner, B. G.; Pushkarev, A. B.; Ros, E.; Sadun, A. C.; Sakamoto, T.; Tornikoski, M.; Yatsu, Y.; Zook, A.

    2011-02-01

    We report on the γ-ray activity of the blazar Mrk 501 during the first 480 days of Fermi operation. We find that the average Large Area Telescope (LAT) γ-ray spectrum of Mrk 501 can be well described by a single power-law function with a photon index of 1.78 ± 0.03. While we observe relatively mild flux variations with the Fermi-LAT (within less than a factor of two), we detect remarkable spectral variability where the hardest observed spectral index within the LAT energy range is 1.52 ± 0.14, and the softest one is 2.51 ± 0.20. These unexpected spectral changes do not correlate with the measured flux variations above 0.3 GeV. In this paper, we also present the first results from the 4.5 month long multifrequency campaign (2009 March 15—August 1) on Mrk 501, which included the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), Swift, RXTE, MAGIC, and VERITAS, the F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, and other collaborations and instruments which provided excellent temporal and energy coverage of the source throughout the entire campaign. The extensive radio to TeV data set from this campaign provides us with the most detailed spectral energy distribution yet collected for this source during its relatively low activity. The average spectral energy distribution of Mrk 501 is well described by the standard one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model. In the framework of this model, we find that the dominant emission region is characterized by a size lsim0.1 pc (comparable within a factor of few to the size of the partially resolved VLBA core at 15-43 GHz), and that the total jet power (sime1044 erg s-1) constitutes only a small fraction (~10-3) of the Eddington luminosity. The energy distribution of the freshly accelerated radiating electrons required to fit the time-averaged data has a broken power-law form in the energy range 0.3 GeV-10 TeV, with spectral indices 2.2 and 2.7 below and above the break energy of 20 GeV. We argue that such a form is consistent with a scenario in which the bulk

  4. Magnetic Reconnection-Powered Relativistic Particle Acceleration, High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission, and Pair Production in Coronae of Accreting Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental plasma process believed to play an important role in energetics of magnetically-dominated coronae of various astrophysical objects including accreting black holes. Building up on recent advances in kinetic simulations of relativistic collisionless reconnection, we investigate nonthermal particle acceleration and its key observational consequences for these systems. We argue that reconnection can efficiently accelerate coronal electrons (as well as ions) up to hundreds of MeV or even GeV energies. In brightest systems, radiation back-reaction due to inverse-Compton (and/or synchrotron) emission becomes important at these energies and limits any further electron acceleration, thereby turning reconnection layers into powerful and efficient radiators of γ-rays. We then evaluate the rate of absorption of the resulting γ-ray photons by the ambient soft (X-ray) photon fields and show that it can be a significant source of pair production, with important implications for the composition of black-hole coronae and jets. Finally, we assess the prospects of laboratory studies of magnetic reconnection in the physical regimes relevant to black-hole accretion flows using modern and future laser-plasma facilities. This work is supported by DOE, NSF, and NASA.

  5. Prospects at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, C.

    1988-11-01

    I discuss some possibilities for neutrino experiments in the fixed-target environment of the SPS, Tevatron, and UNK, with their primary proton beams of 0.4, 0.9, and 3.0 TeV. The emphasis is on unfinished business: issues that have been recognized for some time, but not yet resolved. Then I turn to prospects for proton-proton colliders to explore the 1-TeV scale. I review the motivation for new physics in the neighborhood of 1 TeV and mention some discovery possibilities for high-energy, high-luminosity hadron colliders and the implications they would have for neutrino physics. I raise the possibility of the direct study of neutrino interactions in hadron colliders. I close with a report on the status of the SSC project. 38 refs., 17 figs.

  6. CONSTRAINTS ON THE SYNCHROTRON EMISSION MECHANISM IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Beniamini, Paz; Piran, Tsvi E-mail: tsvi.piran@mail.huji.ac.il

    2013-05-20

    We reexamine the general synchrotron model for gamma-ray bursts' (GRBs') prompt emission and determine the regime in the parameter phase space in which it is viable. We characterize a typical GRB pulse in terms of its peak energy, peak flux, and duration and use the latest Fermi observations to constrain the high-energy part of the spectrum. We solve for the intrinsic parameters at the emission region and find the possible parameter phase space for synchrotron emission. Our approach is general and it does not depend on a specific energy dissipation mechanism. Reasonable synchrotron solutions are found with energy ratios of 10{sup -4} < {epsilon}{sub B}/{epsilon}{sub e} < 10, bulk Lorentz factor values of 300 < {Gamma} < 3000, typical electrons' Lorentz factor values of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} < {gamma}{sub e} < 10{sup 5}, and emission radii of the order 10{sup 15} cm < R < 10{sup 17} cm. Most remarkable among those are the rather large values of the emission radius and the electron's Lorentz factor. We find that soft (with peak energy less than 100 keV) but luminous (isotropic luminosity of 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 53}) pulses are inefficient. This may explain the lack of strong soft bursts. In cases when most of the energy is carried out by the kinetic energy of the flow, such as in the internal shocks, the synchrotron solution requires that only a small fraction of the electrons are accelerated to relativistic velocities by the shocks. We show that future observations of very high energy photons from GRBs by CTA could possibly determine all parameters of the synchrotron model or rule it out altogether.

  7. Disentangling dust emission mechanisms – a field study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field observations are needed to both develop and test theories on dust emission for use in global modeling systems. The dust emission mechanism (aerodynamic entrainment, saltation bombardment, aggregate disintegration) as well as the amount and particle-size distribution of emitted dust may vary un...

  8. FSU High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Prosper, Harrison B.; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Berg, Bernd; Blessing, Susan K.; Okui, Takemichi; Owens, Joseph F.; Reina, Laura; Wahl, Horst D.

    2014-12-01

    The High Energy Physics group at Florida State University (FSU), which was established in 1958, is engaged in the study of the fundamental constituents of matter and the laws by which they interact. The group comprises theoretical and experimental physicists, who sometimes collaborate on projects of mutual interest. The report highlights the main recent achievements of the group. Significant, recent, achievements of the group’s theoretical physicists include progress in making precise predictions in the theory of the Higgs boson and its associated processes, and in the theoretical understanding of mathematical quantities called parton distribution functions that are related to the structure of composite particles such as the proton. These functions are needed to compare data from particle collisions, such as the proton-proton collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with theoretical predictions. The report also describes the progress in providing analogous functions for heavy nuclei, which find application in neutrino physics. The report highlights progress in understanding quantum field theory on a lattice of points in space and time (an area of study called lattice field theory), the progress in constructing several theories of potential new physics that can be tested at the LHC, and interesting new ideas in the theory of the inflationary expansion of the very early universe. The focus of the experimental physicists is the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN. The report, however, also includes results from the D0 experiment at Fermilab to which the group made numerous contributions over a period of many years. The experimental group is particularly interested in looking for new physics at the LHC that may provide the necessary insight to extend the standard model (SM) of particle physics. Indeed, the search for new physics is the primary task of contemporary particle physics, one motivated by the need to explain certain facts, such as the

  9. Mechanism of directional emission from a peanut-shaped microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Shu Fangjie; Zou Changling; Sun Fangwen; Xiao Yunfeng

    2011-05-15

    Collimated directional emission is essentially required for an asymmetric resonant cavity. In this paper, we theoretically investigate a type of peanut-shaped microcavity which can support highly directional emission with a beam divergence as small as 2.5 deg. The mechanism of the collimated emission of this type of peanut-shaped microcavity is explained with a short-term ray trajectory. Moreover, the explanations are also confirmed by a numerical wave simulation. This extremely narrow divergence of the emission holds great potential in highly collimated lasing from on-chip microcavities.

  10. AN EMISSION MECHANISM EXPLAINING OFF-PULSE EMISSION ORIGINATING IN THE OUTER MAGNETOSPHERE OF PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Rahul; Mitra, Dipanjan; Melikidze, George I. E-mail: dmitra@ncra.tifr.res.in

    2013-08-01

    We have examined the cyclotron resonance instability developing in the relativistic outflowing plasma in the pulsar magnetosphere. The instability condition leads to radio emission in the subgigahertz frequency regime which is likely to be seen as off-pulse emission. Recent studies have shown the presence of off-pulse emission in long period pulsars, and we demonstrate this plasma process to be an energetically viable mechanism.

  11. High Energy Astrophysics Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Ormes, Jonathan F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The nature of gravity and its relationship to the other three forces and to quantum theory is one of the major challenges facing us as we begin the new century. In order to make progress we must challenge the current theories by observing the effects of gravity under the most extreme conditions possible. Black holes represent one extreme, where the laws of physics as we understand them break down. The Universe as whole is another extreme, where its evolution and fate is dominated by the gravitational influence of dark matter and the nature of the Cosmological constant. The early universe represents a third extreme, where it is thought that gravity may somehow be unified with the other forces. NASA's "Cosmic Journeys" program is part of a NASA/NSF/DoE tri-agency initiative designed to observe the extremes of gravity throughout the universe. This program will probe the nature of black holes, ultimately obtaining a direct image of the event horizon. It will investigate the large scale structure of the Universe to constrain the location and nature of dark matter and the nature of the cosmological constant. Finally it will search for and study the highest energy processes, that approach those found in the early universe. I will outline the High Energy Astrophysics part of this program.

  12. Surface renewal as a significant mechanism for dust emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Teng, Zhenjiao; Huang, Ning; Guo, Lei; Shao, Yaping

    2016-12-01

    Wind tunnel experiments of dust emissions from different soil surfaces are carried out to better understand dust emission mechanisms. The effects of surface renewal on aerodynamic entrainment and saltation bombardment are analyzed in detail. It is found that flow conditions, surface particle motions (saltation and creep), soil dust content and ground obstacles all strongly affect dust emission, causing its rate to vary over orders of magnitude. Aerodynamic entrainment is highly effective, if dust supply is unlimited, as in the first 2-3 min of our wind tunnel runs. While aerodynamic entrainment is suppressed by dust supply limits, surface renewal through the motion of surface particles appears to be an effective pathway to remove the supply limit. Surface renewal is also found to be important to the efficiency of saltation bombardment. We demonstrate that surface renewal is a significant mechanism affecting dust emission and recommend that this mechanism be included in future dust models.

  13. Comparison of Spitzer/IRAC Galactic Center Mid-IR Survey Results with X-ray and Radio Emission Due to High-Energy Processes in the Central 100 Parsecs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, D. Y.; Arendt, R. A.; Smith, R.; Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Stolovy, S.; Law, C.; Smith, H. A.; Moseley, Harvey; Ramirez, S.; Karr, J.

    2006-01-01

    We compare the results of a small region from our 3.6 - 8.0 micron Spitzer/IRAC imaging survey of 2 x 1.5 deg around the Galactic Center with x-ray and radio emission due to high energy processes. The region we studied covers 100 x 100 parsecs, and was chosen to include a rich collection of sources, including Sgr A* and the bright Sgr AWest infrared/radio source complex, the non-thermal radio filaments and the thermal: radio arches. In a 40 x 40 parsec subset of that region we also make a preliminary analysis of the correlation between approx.2300 x-ray sources identified by Muno et al. (2003) and 20,000 infrared sources from our survey. We also investigate the correlation between infrared and radio emission in the large-scale structures including the thermal radio arches and non-thermal radio filaments. We set constrictions on the synchrotron spectrum observed at radio and millimeter wavelengths extrapolated to 8 micons, and set limits on the midinfrared variability of Sgr A* during and after the coordinated multi-wavelength observing campaign in September 2004.

  14. Multiwavelength Observations of AGN Jets: Untangling the Coupled Problems of Emission Mechanism and Jet Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlman, Eric S.; Avachat, Sayali S.; Clautice, Devon; Georganopoulos, Markos; Meyer, Eileen; Cara, Mihai

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of X-ray and optical emission from large numbers of AGN jets is one of the key legacies of the Chandra X-ray Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope. Several dozen optical and X-ray emitting jets are now known, most of which are seen in both bands as well as in the radio, where they were first discovered. Jets carry prodigious amounts of energy and mass out from the nuclear regions out to tens to hundreds of kiloparsecs distant from the central black hole, depositing it into the host galaxy and cluster. Interpreting their multiwavelength emissions has not been easy: while in most jets, the optical and radio emission in many objects is believed to emerge via the synchrotron process, due to its characteristic spectral shape and high radio polarization, the X-ray emission has been a tougher nut to crack. In less powerful, FR I jets, such as M87, the X-ray emission is believed to be synchrotron emission from the highest energy electrons, requiring in situ particle acceleration due to the short radiative lifetimes of the particles. However, in FR II and quasar jets, a variety of emission mechanisms are possible. Until the last few years, the leading interpretation had been inverse-Comptonization of Cosmic Microwave Background photons (the IC/CMB mechanism). This requires the jet to be relativistic out to hundreds of kiloparsecs from the nucleus, and requires an electron spectrum that extends to very low Lorentz factors. However, that now appears less likely, due to observed high optical polarizations in jets where the optical and X-ray emission appears to lie on the same spectral component, as well as limits derived from Fermi observations in the GeV gamma-rays. It now appears more likely that the X-rays must arise as synchrotron emission from a second, high energy electron population. With this revelation, we must tackle anew the coupling between jet structure and emission mechanisms. Multiwavelength imaging and polarimetry can give us clues to the

  15. Volatile Emission of Mechanically Damaged Almonds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mature almonds from the Monterey variety were evaluated for their volatile composition after mechanical damage and compared to the volatile composition of the corresponding undamaged almonds. Volatiles were collected on Tenax, desorbed with diethyl ether, and identified via GC-MS analyses. Volatile ...

  16. Constraints on Black Hole Emission Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccarone, Thomas J.

    2001-12-01

    This thesis concentrates on the analysis of a unique Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer(RXTE)/Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment(OSSE) data set for Cygnus X-1. We find: (1) Autocorrelation and cross-correlation analyses of Cyg X-1 require an active rather than a static corona and the observed hard time lags must come from coronal variations rather than light travel times, (2) The lightcurves of Cyg X-1 and GX 339-4 show a different sense of asymmetry on long timescales than on short timescales. This requires a second process driving the long timescale variability, perhaps an energy reservoir. (3) The hard-state X/γ-ray spectrum of Cyg X-1 is well modelled with a single corona, and is shown to have a reflection fraction substantially less than unity. Hybrid thermal/non-thermal models are preferred over pure thermal models. (4) In the soft and transition states, the iron line of Cyg X-1 has a constant equivalent width, requiring that the line emission comes primarily from the disk/corona system, and a constant blackbody temperature, requiring that coronal changes drive the variability. (5) The spectra of GRS 1915+105 are well fit by hybrid Comptonization models, often with large non-thermal electron fractions. Reflection features are washed out at high optical depths. Disk radii can be correctly fit with these models. (6) The spectra of neutron star Aql X-1 can be well fit with thermal Comptonization models. Bursts are used to probe the corona in neutron stars. The state transitions occur at variable luminosities, casting doubt on propeller models.

  17. Acoustic emission spectral analysis of fiber composite failure mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, D. M.; Williams, J. H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The acoustic emission of graphite fiber polyimide composite failure mechanisms was investigated with emphasis on frequency spectrum analysis. Although visual examination of spectral densities could not distinguish among fracture sources, a paired-sample t statistical analysis of mean normalized spectral densities did provide quantitative discrimination among acoustic emissions from 10 deg, 90 deg, and plus or minus 45 deg, plus or minus 45 deg sub s specimens. Comparable discrimination was not obtained for 0 deg specimens.

  18. Green house gas emissions from composting and mechanical biological treatment.

    PubMed

    Amlinger, Florian; Peyr, Stefan; Cuhls, Carsten

    2008-02-01

    In order to carry out life-cycle assessments as a basis for far-reaching decisions about environmentally sustainable waste treatment, it is important that the input data be reliable and sound. A comparison of the potential greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with each solid waste treatment option is essential. This paper addresses GHG emissions from controlled composting processes. Some important methodological prerequisites for proper measurement and data interpretation are described, and a common scale and dimension of emission data are proposed so that data from different studies can be compared. A range of emission factors associated with home composting, open windrow composting, encapsulated composting systems with waste air treatment and mechanical biological waste treatment (MBT) are presented from our own investigations as well as from the literature. The composition of source materials along with process management issues such as aeration, mechanical agitation, moisture control and temperature regime are the most important factors controlling methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and ammoniac (NH3) emissions. If ammoniac is not stripped during the initial rotting phase or eliminated by acid scrubber systems, biofiltration of waste air provides only limited GHG mitigation, since additional N2O may be synthesized during the oxidation of NH3, and only a small amount of CH4 degradation occurs in the biofilter. It is estimated that composting contributes very little to national GHG inventories generating only 0.01-0.06% of global emissions. This analysis does not include emissions from preceding or post-treatment activities (such as collection, transport, energy consumption during processing and land spreading), so that for a full emissions account, emissions from these activities would need to be added to an analysis.

  19. Ammonia emissions from two mechanically ventilated UK livestock buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demmers, T. G. M.; Burgess, L. R.; Short, J. L.; Phillips, V. R.; Clark, J. A.; Wathes, C. M.

    Ammonia emission rates from livestock buildings are required to construct an accurate emission inventory for the UK. Ventilation and ammonia emission rates from a fattening pig unit and a broiler house, both mechanically ventilated, were estimated using fan wheel anemometers and thermal converters with a chemiluminescence NO x-analyser to measure the ventilation rate and the ammonia concentration, respectively. The estimated ammonia emission factors were 46.9 and 16.6 kg lu -1 a -1 for the fattening pig unit and the broiler house, respectively. Both emission factors were within the range reported in the literature. A tracer gas (CO) method, based on a constant tracer release rate, was validated for measuring ventilation rates from naturally ventilated livestock buildings. Air inlets and outlets were identified using the air temperature or tracer concentration in the opening. Tracer concentration was found to be a more suitable criterion than temperature. In both houses, a significant correlation between the estimated ventilation rate using the tracer method and the measured ventilation rate using fan wheel anemometers was found. The ventilation rate was underestimated by 12 and 6% for the piggery and broiler house, respectively. The instantaneous ammonia emission derived from the tracer gas method was lower than the ammonia emission derived from the fan wheel anemometer method by 14 and 16% for the piggery and broiler house, respectively. The ventilation and ammonia emission estimates using the tracer method were within acceptable range from the ventilation and emission rates measured using measuring fans, but because of its accuracy and simplicity the fan wheel anemometer method is preferred for long-term measurements of ventilation rate in mechanically ventilated buildings.

  20. Increased chemical weathering of olivine in high-energy shelf seas can counteract human CO2 emissions and ocean acidification against a price well below that of CCS and other methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Poppe L.; Schuiling, Roelof D.

    2014-05-01

    In the reaction: Mg(Fe)2SiO4 (olivine) + 4 H2O 2 Mg(Fe)2+ + 4 OH- + H4SiO4, followed by 4 OH- + 4 CO2 4 HCO3-, CO2 is consumed, and Mg2+, Fe2+, H4SiO4 and HCO3- are produced. Contrary to the paradigm that olivine weathering in nature is a slow process, flume experiments show a fast reaction, consuming CO2, and raising the pH at short notice. Only under static conditions a silica coating develops that retards the reaction. In high-energy shallow marine environments such silica coatings are abraded so that the chemical reaction can continue. When kept in motion even large olivine grains and gravels, rubbing and bumping against each other and against other sediment grains, weather quickly. Experiments show that fine micron- to silt-sized olivine particles are produced, and that the chemical reaction is fast. The chemical weathering of 7 km3 olivine is needed on a yearly basis in order to compensate the human CO2 emissions. This seems much, but is of the same order of magnitude as the volume of fossil fuels (in oil equivalents ~10 km3) that are burnt annually. Olivine is readily available at the Earth' surface on all continents, and such volume of 7 km3 is exceeded by existing mines; e.g. the Bingham Canyon open pit mine in Utah has an excavated volume of 25 km3. Hydrocarbons, on the other hand, are commonly retrieved with great efforts, from great depths, and often at remote locations. Spreading of large amounts of olivine (and/or serpentinite) in high-energy shelf seas where coarse sand and gravel can be transported, will counteract human CO2 production by fossil fuel burning and ocean acidification against a price well below that of other methods; order of US 10.- per ton CO2. For example part of the continental shelf between the Shetland Isles and France, that is the Southern Bight of the North Sea, the English Channel and the Irish Sea, is covered with sand waves, and in and around the English Channel an area of well over 100,000 km2 experiences bed shear stresses

  1. Current Perspectives in High Energy Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormes, Jonathan F. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    High energy astrophysics is a space-age discipline that has taken a quantum leap forward in the 1990s. The observables are photons and particles that are unable to penetrate the atmosphere and can only be observed from space or very high altitude balloons. The lectures presented as chapters of this book are based on the results from the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) and Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) missions to which the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center made significant hardware contributions. These missions study emissions from very hot plasmas, nuclear processes, and high energy particle interactions in space. Results to be discussed include gamma-ray beaming from active galactic nuclei (AGN), gamma-ray emission from pulsars, radioactive elements in the interstellar medium, X-ray emission from clusters of galaxies, and the progress being made to unravel the gamma-ray burst mystery. The recently launched X-ray Timing Explorer (XTE) and prospects for upcoming Astro-E and Advanced X-ray Astronomy Satellite (AXAF) missions are also discussed.

  2. Mechanisms of Increased Particle and VOC Emissions during DPF Active Regeneration and Practical Emissions Considering Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Inomata, Satoshi; Tanimoto, Hiroshi

    2017-03-07

    Mechanisms involved in increased particle and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions during active and parked active regenerations of a diesel particulate filter (DPF) were investigated using heavy-duty trucks equipped with both a urea selective catalytic reduction system and a DPF (SCR + DPF) and a DPF-only. Particle emissions increased in the later part of the regeneration period but the mechanisms were different above and below 23 nm. Particles above 23 nm were emitted due to the lower filtering efficiency of the DPF because of the decreasing amount of soot trapped during regeneration. Small particles below 23 nm were thought to be mainly sulfuric acid particles produced from SO2 trapped by the catalyst, being released and oxidized during regeneration. Contrary to the particle emissions, VOCs increased in the earlier part of the regeneration period. The mean molecular weights of the VOCs increased gradually as the regeneration proceeded. To evaluate "practical emissions" in which increased emissions during the regeneration were considered, a Regeneration Correction Factor (RCF), which is the average emission during one cycle of regeneration/emission in normal operation, was adopted. The RCFs of PM and VOCs were 1.1-1.5, and those of PNs were as high as 3-140, although they were estimated from a limited number of observations.

  3. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    Hadron collider studies will focus on: (i) the search for the top quark with the newly installed D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, (ii) the upgrade of the D0 detector to match the new main injector luminosity and (iii) R&D on silicon microstrip tracking devices for the SSC. High statistics studies of Z{sup 0} decay will continue with the OPAL detector at LEP. These studies will include a direct measurement of Z decay to neutrinos, the search for Higgs and heavy quark decays of Z. Preparations for the Large Scintillation Neutrino Detector (LSND) to measure neutrino oscillations at LAMPF will focus on data acquisition and testing of photomultiplier tubes. In the theoretical area E. Ma will concentrate on mass-generating radiative mechanisms for light quarks and leptons in renormalizable gauge field theories. J. Wudka`s program includes a detailed investigation of the magnetic-flip approach to the solar neutrino.

  4. Unraveling the Voltage-Fade Mechanism in High-Energy-Density Lithium-Ion Batteries: Origin of the Tetrahedral Cations for Spinel Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Debasish; Li, Jianlin; Abraham, Daniel P.; Huq, Ashfia; Payzant, E. Andrew; Wood, David L.; Daniel, Claus

    2014-09-30

    Discovery of high-voltage layered lithium-and manganese-rich (LMR) composite oxide electrode has dramatically enhanced the energy density of current Li-ion energy storage systems. However, practical usage of these materials is currently not viable because of their inability to maintain a consistent voltage profile (voltage fading) during subsequent charge-discharge cycles. This report rationalizes the cause of this voltage fade by providing the evidence of layer to spinel-like (LSL) structural evolution pathways in the host Li1.2Mn0.55Ni0.15Co0.1O2 LMR composite oxide. By employing neutron powder diffraction, and temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility, we show that LSL structural rearrangement in LMR oxide occurs through a tetrahedral cation intermediate via: i) diffusion of lithium atoms from octahedral to tetrahedral sites of the lithium layer [(LiLioct →LiLitet] which is followed by the dispersal of the lithium ions from the adjacent octahedral site of the metal layer to the tetrahedral sites of lithium layer [LiTM oct → LiLitet]; and ii) migration of Mn from the octahedral sites of the transition metal layer to the permanent octahedral site of lithium layer via tetrahedral site of lithium layer [MnTMoct MnLitet MnLioct)]. The findings opens the door to the potential routes to mitigate this atomic restructuring in the high-voltage LMR composite oxide cathodes by manipulating the composition/structure for practical use in high-energy-density lithium-ion batteries.

  5. Unraveling the Voltage-Fade Mechanism in High-Energy-Density Lithium-Ion Batteries: Origin of the Tetrahedral Cations for Spinel Conversion

    DOE PAGES

    Mohanty, Debasish; Li, Jianlin; Abraham, Daniel P.; ...

    2014-09-30

    Discovery of high-voltage layered lithium-and manganese-rich (LMR) composite oxide electrode has dramatically enhanced the energy density of current Li-ion energy storage systems. However, practical usage of these materials is currently not viable because of their inability to maintain a consistent voltage profile (voltage fading) during subsequent charge-discharge cycles. This report rationalizes the cause of this voltage fade by providing the evidence of layer to spinel-like (LSL) structural evolution pathways in the host Li1.2Mn0.55Ni0.15Co0.1O2 LMR composite oxide. By employing neutron powder diffraction, and temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility, we show that LSL structural rearrangement in LMR oxide occurs through a tetrahedral cationmore » intermediate via: i) diffusion of lithium atoms from octahedral to tetrahedral sites of the lithium layer [(LiLioct →LiLitet] which is followed by the dispersal of the lithium ions from the adjacent octahedral site of the metal layer to the tetrahedral sites of lithium layer [LiTM oct → LiLitet]; and ii) migration of Mn from the octahedral sites of the transition metal layer to the permanent octahedral site of lithium layer via tetrahedral site of lithium layer [MnTMoct MnLitet MnLioct)]. The findings opens the door to the potential routes to mitigate this atomic restructuring in the high-voltage LMR composite oxide cathodes by manipulating the composition/structure for practical use in high-energy-density lithium-ion batteries.« less

  6. High-energy spectroscopic astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güdel, Manuel; Walter, Roland

    After three decades of intense research in X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, the time was ripe to summarize basic knowledge on X-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy for interested students and researchers ready to become involved in new high-energy missions. This volume exposes both the scientific basics and modern methods of high-energy spectroscopic astrophysics. The emphasis is on physical principles and observing methods rather than a discussion of particular classes of high-energy objects, but many examples and new results are included in the three chapters as well.

  7. Experimental High Energy Neutrino Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Distefano, Carla

    2005-10-12

    Neutrinos are considered promising probes for high energy astrophysics. More than four decades after deep water Cerenkov technique was proposed to detect high energy neutrinos. Two detectors of this type are successfully taking data: BAIKAL and AMANDA. They have demonstrated the feasibility of the high energy neutrino detection and have set first constraints on TeV neutrino production astrophysical models. The quest for the construction of km3 size detectors have already started: in the South Pole, the IceCube neutrino telescope is under construction; the ANTARES, NEMO and NESTOR Collaborations are working towards the installation of a neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea.

  8. Nonthermal processes around collapsed objects: High energy gamma ray sources in the radio sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, David J.; Ruderman, Malvin; Applegate, James H.; Becker, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    In our proposal responding to the initial Guest Observer NRA for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, 'Nonthermal Processes Around Collapsed Objects: High Energy Gamma Ray Sources in the Radio Sky', we stated that 'At high energies - the identity of the principal Galactic source population remains unknown' although the 'one certain source of high energy emission is young radio pulsars'. These two statements remain true, although at this writing, eighteen months after the beginning of the Compton allsky survey, much of the gamma-ray data required to greatly extend our knowledge of the Galaxy's high energy emission has been collected. The thrust of the program supported by our grant was to collect and analyze a complementary set of data on the Milky Way at radio wavelengths in order to help identify the dominant Pop 1 component of the Galaxy's gamma ray sources, and to pursue theoretical investigations on the origins and emission mechanisms of young pulsars, the one component of this population identified to date. We summarize here our accomplishments under the grant. In Section 2, we describe our VLA surveys of the Galactic Plane along with the current status of the radio source catalogs derived therefrom; unfortunately, owing to the TDRSS antenna problem and subsequent extension of the Sky Survey, we were not able to carry out a comparison with the EGRET data directly, although everything is now in place to do so as soon as it becomes available. In Section 2, we summarize our progress on the theoretical side, including the substantial completion of a dissertation on pulsar origins and work on the high energy emission mechanisms of isolated pulsars. We list the personnel supported by the grant in section 4 and provide a complete bibliography of publications supported in whole or in part by the grant in the final section.

  9. Astrophysical High-Energy Neutrinos and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kohta

    2008-10-22

    High-energy neutrinos from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been expected in various scenarios. Many predictions for prompt and afterglow emission were done in the pre-Swift era. After the launch of Swift, several new discoveries such as flares have allowed us to expect additional new possibilities of high-energy neutrino emission from GRBs. In this paper, we overview various predictions of GRB neutrino emission, and discuss feature prospects. High-energy neutrino signals may be detected by future-coming large neutrino detectors such as IceCube and KM3Net. If detected, they should be very useful to know the nature of cosmic-ray acceleration sites. It would also help us to reveal the possible connection between ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) and GRBs. Finally, we also compare a prediction of GRB neutrinos with several predictions for other sources such as active galactic nuclei (AGN) and clusters of galaxies.

  10. Intrinsic mechanical behavior of femoral cortical bone in young, osteoporotic and bisphosphonate-treated individuals in low- and high energy fracture conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Gludovatz, Bernd; Schmidt, Felix N.; Riedel, Christoph; Krause, Matthias; Vettorazzi, Eik; Acevedo, Claire; Hahn, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; Tang, Simon; Amling, Michael; Ritchie, Robert O.; Busse, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are a common treatment to reduce osteoporotic fractures. This treatment induces osseous structural and compositional changes accompanied by positive effects on osteoblasts and osteocytes. Here, we test the hypothesis that restored osseous cell behavior, which resembles characteristics of younger, healthy cortical bone, leads to improved bone quality. Microarchitecture and mechanical properties of young, treatment-naïve osteoporosis, and bisphosphonate-treated cases were investigated in femoral cortices. Tissue strength was measured using three-point bending. Collagen fibril-level deformation was assessed in non-traumatic and traumatic fracture states using synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) at low and high strain rates. The lower modulus, strength and fibril deformation measured at low strain rates reflects susceptibility for osteoporotic low-energy fragility fractures. Independent of age, disease and treatment status, SAXS revealed reduced fibril plasticity at high strain rates, characteristic of traumatic fracture. The significantly reduced mechanical integrity in osteoporosis may originate from porosity and alterations to the intra/extrafibrillar structure, while the fibril deformation under treatment indicates improved nano-scale characteristics. In conclusion, losses in strength and fibril deformation at low strain rates correlate with the occurrence of fragility fractures in osteoporosis, while improvements in structural and mechanical properties following bisphosphonate treatment may foster resistance to fracture during physiological strain rates. PMID:26879146

  11. Intrinsic mechanical behavior of femoral cortical bone in young, osteoporotic and bisphosphonate-treated individuals in low- and high energy fracture conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Gludovatz, Bernd; Schmidt, Felix N.; Riedel, Christoph; Krause, Matthias; Vettorazzi, Eik; Acevedo, Claire; Hahn, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; Tang, Simon; Amling, Michael; Ritchie, Robert O.; Busse, Björn

    2016-02-16

    Bisphosphonates are a common treatment to reduce osteoporotic fractures. This treatment induces osseous structural and compositional changes accompanied by positive effects on osteoblasts and osteocytes. Here, we test the hypothesis that restored osseous cell behavior, which resembles characteristics of younger, healthy cortical bone, leads to improved bone quality. Microarchitecture and mechanical properties of young, treatment-naïve osteoporosis, and bisphosphonate-treated cases were investigated in femoral cortices. Tissue strength was measured using three-point bending. Collagen fibril-level deformation was assessed in non-traumatic and traumatic fracture states using synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) at low and high strain rates. The lower modulus, strength and fibril deformation measured at low strain rates reflects susceptibility for osteoporotic low-energy fragility fractures. Independent of age, disease and treatment status, SAXS revealed reduced fibril plasticity at high strain rates, characteristic of traumatic fracture. We find the significantly reduced mechanical integrity in osteoporosis may originate from porosity and alterations to the intra/extrafibrillar structure, while the fibril deformation under treatment indicates improved nano-scale characteristics. In conclusion, losses in strength and fibril deformation at low strain rates correlate with the occurrence of fragility fractures in osteoporosis, while improvements in structural and mechanical properties following bisphosphonate treatment may foster resistance to fracture during physiological strain rates.

  12. Intrinsic mechanical behavior of femoral cortical bone in young, osteoporotic and bisphosphonate-treated individuals in low- and high energy fracture conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Gludovatz, Bernd; ...

    2016-02-16

    Bisphosphonates are a common treatment to reduce osteoporotic fractures. This treatment induces osseous structural and compositional changes accompanied by positive effects on osteoblasts and osteocytes. Here, we test the hypothesis that restored osseous cell behavior, which resembles characteristics of younger, healthy cortical bone, leads to improved bone quality. Microarchitecture and mechanical properties of young, treatment-naïve osteoporosis, and bisphosphonate-treated cases were investigated in femoral cortices. Tissue strength was measured using three-point bending. Collagen fibril-level deformation was assessed in non-traumatic and traumatic fracture states using synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) at low and high strain rates. The lower modulus, strength and fibrilmore » deformation measured at low strain rates reflects susceptibility for osteoporotic low-energy fragility fractures. Independent of age, disease and treatment status, SAXS revealed reduced fibril plasticity at high strain rates, characteristic of traumatic fracture. We find the significantly reduced mechanical integrity in osteoporosis may originate from porosity and alterations to the intra/extrafibrillar structure, while the fibril deformation under treatment indicates improved nano-scale characteristics. In conclusion, losses in strength and fibril deformation at low strain rates correlate with the occurrence of fragility fractures in osteoporosis, while improvements in structural and mechanical properties following bisphosphonate treatment may foster resistance to fracture during physiological strain rates.« less

  13. Intrinsic mechanical behavior of femoral cortical bone in young, osteoporotic and bisphosphonate-treated individuals in low- and high energy fracture conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Gludovatz, Bernd; Schmidt, Felix N.; Riedel, Christoph; Krause, Matthias; Vettorazzi, Eik; Acevedo, Claire; Hahn, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; Tang, Simon; Amling, Michael; Ritchie, Robert O.; Busse, Björn

    2016-02-01

    Bisphosphonates are a common treatment to reduce osteoporotic fractures. This treatment induces osseous structural and compositional changes accompanied by positive effects on osteoblasts and osteocytes. Here, we test the hypothesis that restored osseous cell behavior, which resembles characteristics of younger, healthy cortical bone, leads to improved bone quality. Microarchitecture and mechanical properties of young, treatment-naïve osteoporosis, and bisphosphonate-treated cases were investigated in femoral cortices. Tissue strength was measured using three-point bending. Collagen fibril-level deformation was assessed in non-traumatic and traumatic fracture states using synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) at low and high strain rates. The lower modulus, strength and fibril deformation measured at low strain rates reflects susceptibility for osteoporotic low-energy fragility fractures. Independent of age, disease and treatment status, SAXS revealed reduced fibril plasticity at high strain rates, characteristic of traumatic fracture. The significantly reduced mechanical integrity in osteoporosis may originate from porosity and alterations to the intra/extrafibrillar structure, while the fibril deformation under treatment indicates improved nano-scale characteristics. In conclusion, losses in strength and fibril deformation at low strain rates correlate with the occurrence of fragility fractures in osteoporosis, while improvements in structural and mechanical properties following bisphosphonate treatment may foster resistance to fracture during physiological strain rates.

  14. Wavelength and Intensity Dependence of the Standing Wave Mechanism in the Near-IR Regime in Producing High Energy Backwards Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngirmang, Gregory; Orban, Chris; Feister, Scott; Morrison, John; Chowdhury, Enam; Roquemore, William

    2016-10-01

    Laser-plasma interactions involving ultra-short ultra-intense, near IR or IR wavelength lasers represent a novel regime, specifically inducing relativistic dynamics of charges at lower intensities than required for current ultra-intense lasers. We present 2D(3 v) Particle-in-Cell(PIC) simulations using the LSP code that produce super-ponderomotive MeV electron beams from ultra-short ultra-intense IR or Near-IR laser beams incident on targets with significant pre-plasma. We perform simulations across different wavelengths, including 800 nanometer, 3 microns, and 10 microns. We also simulate different pulse energies varying from tens of microjoules to tens of joules, and different scale lengths of pre-plasma. The accelerated electrons energies reach super-ponderomotive energies that scale roughly with the normalized vector potential, in line with the standing wave acceleration mechanism discussed in Orban et al. The angular spectrum of ejected electrons in all cases are similar, displaying preferred angles as suggested by the elaborations on the standing wave mechanism explained in Ngirmang, et al.

  15. Generation mechanism of whistler-mode chorus emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omura, Yoshiharu

    We describe the nonlinear dynamics of resonant electrons interacting with a coherent whistler-mode wave and the formation of electromagnetic electron holes or hills in the velocity phase space. In the presence of the inhomogeneity due to the frequency variation and the gradient of the magnetic field, the electron holes or hills result in resonant currents generating rising-tone emissions (1, 2) or falling-tone emissions (3), respectively. After formation of a coherent wave at the maximum linear growth rate, triggering of the nonlinear wave growth takes place when the wave amplitude is close to the optimum wave amplitude (4). The wave amplitude also has to be above the threshold amplitude (2) so that the nonlinear wave growth can occur as an absolute instability at the magnetic equator. The triggering process is repeated at progressively higher frequencies in the case of a rising-tone emission, generating subpackets of a chorus element. We also describe the mechanism of nonlinear wave damping due to quasi-oblique propagation from the equator (2), which results in the formation of a gap at half the electron cyclotron frequency, separating a long rising-tone chorus emission into the upper-band and lower-band chorus emissions (5). *References (1) Y. Omura,Y. Katoh, and D. Summers, Theory and simulation of the generation of whistler-mode chorus, J. Geophys. Res., 113, A04223, 2008. (2) Y. Omura, , M. Hikishima, Y. Katoh, D. Summers, and S. Yagitani, Nonlinear mechanisms of lower band and upper band VLF chorus emissions in the magnetosphere, J. Geophys. Res., 114, A07217, 2009. (3) Nunn, D., and Y. Omura, A computational and theoretical analysis of falling frequency VLF emissions, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A08228, 2012. (4) Omura, Y., and D. Nunn, Triggering process of whistler mode chorus emissions in the magnetosphere, J. Geophys. Res., 116, A05205, 2011. (5) S. Kurita, Y. Katoh, Y. Omura, V. Angelopoulos, C. M. Cully, O. Le Contel, and H. Misawa, THEMIS observation of

  16. Irradiation damage from low-dose high-energy protons on mechanical properties and positron annihilation lifetimes of Fe-9Cr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Q.; Fukumoto, K.; Ishi, Y.; Kuriyama, Y.; Uesugi, T.; Sato, K.; Mori, Y.; Yoshiie, T.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear reactions in accelerator-driven systems (ADS) result in the generation of helium within the ADS materials. The amount of helium produced in this way is approximately one order of magnitude higher than that generated by nuclear fusion. As helium is well-known to induce degradation in the mechanical properties of metals, its effect on ADS materials is an important factor to assess. The results obtained in this study show that low-dose proton irradiation (11 MeV at 573 K to 9.0 × 10-4 dpa and 150 MeV at room temperature to 2.6 × 10-6 dpa) leads to a decrease in yield stress and ultimate tensile strength in a Fe-9Cr alloy. Moreover, interstitial helium and hydrogen atoms, as well as the annihilation of dislocation jogs, were identified as key factors that determine the observed softening of the alloy.

  17. High energy neutrinos from primary cosmic rays accelerated in the cores of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Done, C.; Salamon, M. H.; Sommers, P.

    1991-01-01

    The spectra and high-energy neutrino fluxes are calculated from photomeson production in active galactic nuclei (AGN) such as quasars and Seyfert galaxies using recent UV and X-ray observations to define the photon fields and an accretion-disk shock-acceleration model for producing ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays in the AGN. Collectively AGN should produce the dominant isotropic neutrino background between 10 exp 4 and 10 exp 10 GeV. Measurement of this background could be critical in determining the energy-generation mechanism, evolution, and distribution of AGN. High-energy background spectra and spectra from bright AGN such as NGC4151 and 3C273 are predicted which should be observable with present detectors. High energy AGN nus should produce a sphere of stellar disruption around their cores which could explain their observed broad-line emission regions.

  18. Mechanisms of charge transfer and redistribution in LaAlO3/SrTiO3 revealed by high-energy optical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmara, T. C.; Annadi, A.; Santoso, I.; Gogoi, P. K.; Kotlov, A.; Omer, H. M.; Motapothula, M.; Breese, M. B. H.; Rübhausen, M.; Venkatesan, T.; Ariando; Rusydi, A.

    2014-04-01

    In condensed matter physics the quasi two-dimensional electron gas at the interface of two different insulators, polar LaAlO3 on nonpolar SrTiO3 (LaAlO3/SrTiO3) is a spectacular and surprising observation. This phenomenon is LaAlO3 film thickness dependent and may be explained by the polarization catastrophe model, in which a charge transfer of 0.5e- from the LaAlO3 film into the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface is expected. Here we show that in conducting samples (≥4 unit cells of LaAlO3) there is indeed a ~0.5e- transfer from LaAlO3 into the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface by studying the optical conductivity in a broad energy range (0.5-35 eV). Surprisingly, in insulating samples (≤3 unit cells of LaAlO3) a redistribution of charges within the polar LaAlO3 sublayers (from AlO2 to LaO) as large as ~0.5e- is observed, with no charge transfer into the interface. Hence, our results reveal the different mechanisms for the polarization catastrophe compensation in insulating and conducting LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces.

  19. Effects of high-energy electro-pulsing treatment on microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaoxin; Wang, Lingsheng; Tse, Zion T H; Tang, Guoyi; Song, Guolin

    2015-04-01

    The effect of electro-pulsing treatment (EPT) on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of cold-rolled Ti-6Al-4V alloy strips was investigated in this paper. It was found that the elongation to failure of materials obtains a noticeable enhancement with increased EPT processing time while slightly sacrificing strength. Fine recrystallized grains and the relative highest elongation to failure (32.5%) appear in the 11second-EPT samples. Grain coarsening and decreased ductility were brought in with longer EPT duration time. Fracture surface analysis shows that transition from intergranular brittle facture to transgranular dimple fracture takes place with an increase in processing time of EPT. Meanwhile, corrosion behavior of titanium alloys is greatly improved with increased EPT processing time, which is presented by polarization test and surface observation with the beneficial effect of forming a protective anatase-TiO2 film on the surface of alloys. The rapid recrystallization behavior and oxide formation of the titanium alloy strip under EPTs are attributed to the enhancement of nucleation rate, atomic diffusion and oxygen migration resulting from the coupling of the thermal and athermal effects.

  20. Synthesis of Nanostructured Carbides of Titanium and Vanadium from Metal Oxides and Ferroalloys Through High-energy Mechanical Milling and Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, P.; Jian, P. F.; Seong, K. Y.; Seng, G. S.; Masrom, A. K.; Hussain, Z.; Aziz, A.

    2010-03-01

    Carbides of Ti and V have been synthesized directly from their oxides and ferroalloys through mechanical milling and heat treatment. The powder mixtures are milled in a planetary ball mill from 15-80 hours and subsequently heat treated at 1000-1300° C for TiO2-C mixtures, at 500-550° C for V2O5-C mixtures and at 600-1000° C for (Fe-V)-C mixtures. The milled and heat treated powders are characterized by SEM, EDAX, XRD, and BET techniques. Nanostructured TiC has been successfully synthesized under suitable processing conditions. However, carbides of vanadium is unidentified even though possibilities of V2O5-C reaction are indicated with an extent of induced amorphism in the powder mixture. Density, specific surface area and particle size of the milled and heat treated mixtures are correlated with heat treatment temperatures. Similar attempts are also made to synthesize vanadium carbides from industrial grade Fe-V.

  1. High energy cosmic ray composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, E. S.

    Cosmic rays are understood to result from energetic processes in the galaxy, probably from supernova explosions. However, cosmic ray energies extend several orders of magnitude beyond the limit thought possible for supernova blast waves. Over the past decade several ground-based and space-based investigations were initiated to look for evidence of a limit to supernova acceleration in the cosmic-ray chemical composition at high energies. These high-energy measurements are difficult because of the very low particle fluxes in the most interesting regions. The space-based detectors must be large enough to collect adequate statistics, yet stay within the weight limit for space flight. Innovative approaches now promise high quality measurements over an energy range that was not previously possible. The current status of high energy cosmic-ray composition measurements and planned future missions are discussed in this paper.

  2. Future of high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Panofsky, W.K.H.

    1984-06-01

    A rough overview is given of the expectations for the extension of high energy colliders and accelerators into the xtremely high energy range. It appears likely that the SSC or something like it will be the last gasp of the conventional method of producing high energy proton-proton collisions using synchrotron rings with superconducting magnets. It is likely that LEP will be the highest energy e+e/sup -/ colliding beam storage ring built. The future beyond that depends on the successful demonstrations of new technologies. The linear collider offers hope in this respect for some extension in energy for electrons, and maybe even for protons, but is too early to judge whether, by how much, or when such an extension will indeed take place.

  3. Nuclear reactions induced by high-energy alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear reactions induced by high energy protons and heavier ions are included. Fundamental data needed in the shielding, dosimetry, and radiobiology of high energy particles produced by accelerators were generated, along with data on cosmic ray interaction with matter. The mechanism of high energy nucleon-nucleus reactions is also examined, especially for light target nuclei of mass number comparable to that of biological tissue.

  4. High Energy Astrophysics Program (HEAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, Lorella; Corcoran, Michael; Drake, Stephen; McGlynn, Thomas A.; Snowden, Stephen; Mukai, Koji; Cannizzo, John; Lochner, James; Rots, Arnold; Christian, Eric; Barthelmy, Scott; Palmer, David; Mitchell, John; Esposito, Joseph; Sreekumar, P.; Hua, Xin-Min; Mandzhavidze, Natalie; Chan, Kai-Wing; Soong, Yang; Barrett, Paul

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by the members of the USRA contract team during the 6 months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming 6 months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in astrophysics. Supported missions include advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-Ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) and others.

  5. High Energy Astrophysics Program (HEAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, L.

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  6. High-Energy Polarization from Jets in AGN and Microquasars (Solicited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Markus

    2016-07-01

    This talk will give an overview of recent advances in theoretical predictions of X-ray and gamma-ray polarization of the emission from relativistic jet sources. The high-energy emission from such sources is either synchrotron radiation from ultrarelativistic particles or Compton emission, either synchrotron self-Compton or Comptonization of external radiation. I will present model calculations of the resulting high-energy polarization in various model scenarios, with high-energy emission dominated both by leptonic and hadronic emission processes. The results demonstrate the prospect of diagnosing the topology of magnetic fields in relativistic astrophysical jets and distinguishing between leptonic and hadronic high-energy emission models, with important implications concerning the origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic-rays and high-energy neutrinos.

  7. On the generation mechanism of ULF seismogenic electromagnetic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanov, O. A.; Hayakawa, M.

    Microfracturing electrification is suggested as a possible mechanism for explaining ULF electromagnetic emissions observed before and after the earthquakes. This effect appears as fast fluctuation of microcracks and leads to the origination of wideband electromagnetic noise. This noise dissipates outside the source region and produces ULF emissions on the ground surface with an upper cutoff frequency ˜1 Hz due to the skin depth attenuation. Each microcurrent results from charge relaxation during microcrack opening and depends on the time of opening and conductivity of the rock medium. The normal size distribution of microcracks, their fast opening and healing (intermittence), and average size progression due to stress corrosion are assumed. Using this model, it is possible to compare these theoretical explanations with the observational results with reference to the intensity, frequency spectrum and temporal development of ULF magnetic field variations.

  8. Extraterrestrial high energy neutrino fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    Using the most recent cosmic ray spectra up to 2x10 to the 20th power eV, production spectra of high energy neutrinos from cosmic ray interactions with interstellar gas and extragalactic interactions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays with 3K universal background photons are presented and discussed. Estimates of the fluxes from cosmic diffuse sources and the nearby quasar 3C273 are made using the generic relationship between secondary neutrinos and gammas and using recent gamma ray satellite data. These gamma ray data provide important upper limits on cosmological neutrinos. Quantitative estimates of the observability of high energy neutrinos from the inner galaxy and 3C273 above atmospheric background for a DUMAND type detector are discussed in the context of the Weinberg-Salam model with sq sin theta omega = 0.2 and including the atmospheric background from the decay of charmed mesons. Constraints on cosmological high energy neutrino production models are also discussed. It appears that important high energy neutrino astronomy may be possible with DUMAND, but very long observing times are required.

  9. Mexican High Energy Physics Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Olivo, J. C.; Napsuciale, M.; Pérez-Angón, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    The Mexican High Energy Physics Network is one of CONACYT's thematic research networks, created with the aim of increasing the communication and cooperation of the scientific and technology communities of Mexico in strategic areas. In this report we review the evolution, challenges, achievements and opportunities faced by the network.

  10. Analysis of Jovian decametric data: Study of radio emission mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Catalogues of approx. 200 decametric arcs and approx. 200 gaps between arcs were studied, in an effort to reconcile the data with predictions for the model wherein reflections of Io-induced currents each emit in a conical pattern and yield a distinct radio arc. The most recent interpretations of this data suggest that these Io-produced Alfven waves persist for at least one or two passages of Io, and that the emission cone half angles are approx. 40 to 90 deg., varying from arc to arc. Below 1.2 MHz it was discovered that Jupiter emits radiation strongly modulated in frequency with periods of approx. 200 kHz; this quasi-sinusoidal emission (MSA) can shift more than 180 deg. in phase over periods of 6 seconds, although these shifts are usually much smaller. MSA is not strongly correlated with the longitudes of Io or Jupiter, and typically occurs in patches covering approx. 500 kHz or more for periods of a few minutes. Furthermore, this modulation sometimes resembles a train of impulses in frequency with exponential decays toward high frequencies. Comparison of these results with the previous studies of V-shaped S-bursts is suggestive of an emission mechanism.

  11. Identifying the nature of high energy Astroparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomé Caballero Mora, Karen

    2016-10-01

    High energy Astroparticles include Cosmic Ray (CR), gamma ray and neutrinos, all of them coming from the universe. The origin and production, acceleration and propagation mechanisms of ultrahigh-energy CR (UHECR ∼ 1020 eV) are still unknown. Knowledge on particle interactions taking place at those energies, useful for studying current theories on particle physics, can be obtained only from measurements of high energy astroparticles. In the present document some techniques on data analysis of mass composition of UHECR with the Pierre Auger Observatory are described. The relevance of the muon component of air showers produced by the primary CR, as well as some low energy simulations of that component, are explained.

  12. ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO HIGH ENERGY.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRAVAR, A.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRUNO, D.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

    2006-10-02

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide collisions of high energy polarized protons for the quest of understanding the proton spin structure. Polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV have been achieved in RHIC since 2001. Recently, polarized proton beam was accelerated to 250 GeV in RHIC for the first time. Unlike accelerating unpolarized protons, the challenge for achieving high energy polarized protons is to fight the various mechanisms in an accelerator that can lead to partial or total polarization loss due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. We report on the progress of the RHIC polarized proton program. We also present the strategies of how to preserve the polarization through the entire acceleration chain, i.e. a 200 MeV linear accelerator, the Booster, the AGS and RHIC.

  13. Generalized Mechanism of Field Emission from Nanostructured Semiconductor Film Cathodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ru-Zhi; Zhao, Wei; Yan, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Considering the effect of both the buffer layer and substrate, a series of ultrathin multilayered structure cathodes (UTMC) is constructed to simulate the field emission (FE) process of nanostructured semiconductor film cathodes (NSFCs). We find a generalized FE mechanism of the NSFCs, in which there are three distinct FE modes with the change of the applied field. Our results clearly show significant differences of FE between conventional emitters and nanofilm emitters, which the non-Fowler-Nordheim characteristics and the resonant FE will be inevitable for NSFCs. Moreover, the controllable FE can be realized by fine-tuning the quantum structure of NSFCs. The generalized mechanism of NSFCs presented here may be particularly useful for design high-speed and high-frequency vacuum nano-electronic devices.

  14. Generalized Mechanism of Field Emission from Nanostructured Semiconductor Film Cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ru-Zhi; Zhao, Wei; Yan, Hui

    2017-03-01

    Considering the effect of both the buffer layer and substrate, a series of ultrathin multilayered structure cathodes (UTMC) is constructed to simulate the field emission (FE) process of nanostructured semiconductor film cathodes (NSFCs). We find a generalized FE mechanism of the NSFCs, in which there are three distinct FE modes with the change of the applied field. Our results clearly show significant differences of FE between conventional emitters and nanofilm emitters, which the non-Fowler-Nordheim characteristics and the resonant FE will be inevitable for NSFCs. Moreover, the controllable FE can be realized by fine-tuning the quantum structure of NSFCs. The generalized mechanism of NSFCs presented here may be particularly useful for design high-speed and high-frequency vacuum nano-electronic devices.

  15. High energy density aluminum battery

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Gilbert M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Dudney, Nancy J.; Manthiram, Arumugan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Hansan

    2016-10-11

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for a high energy density aluminum battery. The battery comprises an anode comprising aluminum metal. The battery further comprises a cathode comprising a material capable of intercalating aluminum or lithium ions during a discharge cycle and deintercalating the aluminum or lithium ions during a charge cycle. The battery further comprises an electrolyte capable of supporting reversible deposition and stripping of aluminum at the anode, and reversible intercalation and deintercalation of aluminum or lithium at the cathode.

  16. A high energy physics perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1997-01-13

    The status of the Standard model and role of symmetry in its development are reviewed. Some outstanding problems are surveyed and possible solutions in the form of additional {open_quotes}Hidden Symmetries {close_quotes} are discussed. Experimental approaches to uncover {open_quotes}New Physics{close_quotes} associated with those symmetries are described with emphasis on high energy colliders. An outlook for the future is given.

  17. Cosmology for high energy physicists

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, A.

    1987-11-01

    The standard big bang model of cosmology is presented. Although not perfect, its many successes make it a good starting point for most discussions of cosmology. Places are indicated where well understood laboratory physics is incorporated into the big bang, leading to successful predictions. Much less established aspects of high energy physics and some of the new ideas they have introduced into the field of cosmology are discussed, such as string theory, inflation and monopoles. 49 refs., 5 figs.

  18. High energy gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    High energy gamma ray astronomy has evolved with the space age. Nonexistent twenty-five years ago, there is now a general sketch of the gamma ray sky which should develop into a detailed picture with the results expected to be forthcoming over the next decade. The galactic plane is the dominant feature of the gamma ray sky, the longitude and latitude distribution being generally correlated with galactic structural features including the spiral arms. Two molecular clouds were already seen. Two of the three strongest gamma ray sources are pulsars. The highly variable X-ray source Cygnus X-3 was seen at one time, but not another in the 100 MeV region, and it was also observed at very high energies. Beyond the Milky Way Galaxy, there is seen a diffuse radiation, whose origin remains uncertain, as well as at least one quasar, 3C 273. Looking to the future, the satellite opportunities for high energy gamma ray astronomy in the near term are the GAMMA-I planned to be launched in late 1987 and the Gamma Ray Observatory, scheduled for launch in 1990. The Gamma Ray Observatory will carry a total of four instruments covering the entire energy range from 30,000 eV to 3 x 10 to the 10th eV with over an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity relative to previous satellite instruments.

  19. On the Origin of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T; Colgate, S; Li, H

    2009-07-01

    Turbulence-driven plasma accelerators produced by magnetized accretion disks around black holes are proposed as the mechanism mainly responsible for observed cosmic ray protons with ultra high energies 10{sup 19}-10{sup 21} eV. The magnetized disk produces a voltage comparable to these cosmic ray energies. Here we present a Poynting model in which this voltage provides all of the energy to create the jet-like structures observed to be ejected from accretion disks, and this voltage also accelerates ions to high energies at the top of the expanding structure. Since the inductive electric field E = -v x B driving expansion has no component parallel to the magnetic field B, ion acceleration requires plasma wave generation - either a coherent wave accelerator as recently proposed, or instability-driven turbulence. We find that turbulence can tap the full inductive voltage as a quasi-steady accelerator, and even higher energies are produced by transient events on this structure. We find that both MHD modes due to the current and ion diffusion due to kinetic instability caused by the non-Maxwellian ion distribution contribute to acceleration. We apply our results to extragalactic giant radiolobes, whose synchrotron emissions serve to calibrate the model, and we discuss extrapolating to other astrophysical structures. Approximate calculations of the cosmic ray intensity and energy spectrum are in rough agreement with data and serve to motivate more extensive MHD and kinetic simulations of turbulence that could provide more accurate cosmic ray and synchrotron spectra to be compared with observations. A distinctive difference from previous models is that the cosmic ray and synchrotron emissions arise from different parts of the magnetic structure, thus providing a signature for the model.

  20. Cross sections for proton induced high energy γ -ray emission (PIGE) in reaction 19 F(p, αγ)16 O at incident proton energies between 1.5 and 4 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanelas, P.; Cruz, J.; Fonseca, M.; Henriques, A.; Lourenço, F.; Luís, H.; Machado, J.; Pires Ribeiro, J.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Teubig, P.; Velho, P.; Zarza-Moreno, M.; Galaviz, D.; Jesus, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the high energy gamma-rays produced in the reaction 19 F(p, αγ)16 O for incident proton energies from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV over NaF/Ag and CaF2/Ag thin targets in two different sets of data. Gamma-rays were detected with a High Purity Ge detector with an angle of 130° with respect to the beam axis. The cross-sections for the high energy gamma-rays of 6.129, 6.915 and 7.115 MeV have been measured for the whole group between 5 and 7.2 MeV with accuracy better than 10%. A new energy range was covered and more points are included in the cross-sections data base expanding the existing set of data. Results are in agreement with previous measurements in similar conditions.

  1. Computational studies on the crystal structure, thermodynamic properties, detonation performance, and pyrolysis mechanism of 2,4,6,8-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacubane as a novel high energy density material.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Du, Hongchen; Zhang, Jianying; Gong, Xuedong

    2011-10-27

    Studies have suggested that octanitrocubane (ONC) is one of the most powerful non-nuclear high energy density material (HEDM) currently known. 2,4,6,8-Tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacubane (TNTAC) studied in this work may also be a novel HEDM due to its high nitrogen content and crystal density. Density functional theory and molecular mechanics methods have been employed to study the crystal structure, IR spectrum, electronic structure, thermodynamic properties, gas-phase and condensed-phase heat of formation, detonation performance, and pyrolysis mechanism of TNTAC. The TNTAC has a predicted density of about 2.12 g/cm(3), and its detonation velocity (10.42 km/s) and detonation pressure (52.82 GPa) are higher than that of ONC. The crystalline packing is P2(1)2(1)2(1), and the corresponding cell parameters are Z = 4, a = 8.87 Å, b = 8.87 Å, and c = 11.47 Å. Both the density of states of the predicted crystal and the bond dissociation energy of the molecule in gas phase show that the cage C-N bond is the trigger bond during thermolysis. The activation energy of the pyrolysis initiation reaction obtained from the B3LYP/6-311++G(2df,2p) level is 125.98 kJ/mol, which indicates that TNTAC meets the thermal stability request as an exploitable HEDM.

  2. HIGH ENERGY GASEOUS DISCHARGE DEVICES

    DOEpatents

    Josephson, V.

    1960-02-16

    The high-energy electrical discharge device described comprises an envelope, a pair of main discharge electrodes supported in opposition in the envelope, and a metallic shell symmetrically disposed around and spaced from the discharge path between the electrodes. The metallic shell comprises a first element of spaced helical turns of metallic material and a second element of spaced helical turns of methllic material insulatedly supported in superposition outside the first element and with the turns overlapping the gap between the turns of the first element.

  3. High-energy neutrino astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halzen, Francis

    2017-03-01

    The chargeless, weakly interacting neutrinos are ideal astronomical messengers as they travel through space without scattering, absorption or deflection. But this weak interaction also makes them notoriously di cult to detect, leading to neutrino observatories requiring large-scale detectors. A few years ago, the IceCube experiment discovered neutrinos originating beyond the Sun with energies bracketed by those of the highest energy gamma rays and cosmic rays. I discuss how these high-energy neutrinos can be detected and what they can tell us about the origins of cosmic rays and about dark matter.

  4. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This is an artist's concept describing the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO). The HEAO project involved the launching of three unmarned scientific observatories into low Earth orbit between 1977 and 1979 to study some of the most intriguing mysteries of the universe; pulsars, black holes, neutron stars, and super nova. This concept was painted by Jack Hood of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Hardware support for the imaging instruments was provided by American Science and Engineering. The HEAO spacecraft were built by TRW, Inc. under project management of the MSFC.

  5. Microwave subsecond pulses in solar flares - source localization, emission mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altyntsev, A. T.; Kardapolova, N. N.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lesovoi, S. V.; Meshalkina, N. S.; Yan, Y.

    The observations of bursts with fine temporal structures is one of few ways to study the primary energy release sites in solar flares. The localization of their sources in a flare region using the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope data (5.7 GHz) provide us with the unique possibility to determine plasma parameters, and to verify emission mechanisms. The simultaneous spectral observations (5.2 - 7.7 GHz) were provided by National Astronomical Observatories/Beijing spectropolarimeters. An analysis is made of the subsecond pulses of different types: short duration wide band pulses, U-type cm-bursts, the bursts with the "zebra" pattern. The suggestion is justified that in many cases the frequency drifts are response to the plasma density dynamics in the local sites in flare loops. It is argued that the conditions of emission escaping from the source strongly influent the apparent source sizes and the polarization degree of the subsecond sources. This research was supported by Grants 02-02-39030 and 03-02-16229 of RFBR, and E02-3.2-489 of Education department of Russia.

  6. Hybrid plasmonic nanodevices: Switching mechanism for the nonlinear emission

    SciTech Connect

    Bragas, Andrea V.; Singh, Mahi R.

    2014-03-31

    Control of the light emission at the nanoscale is of central interest in nanophotonics due to the many applications in very different fields, ranging from quantum information to biophysics. Resonant excitation of surface plasmon polaritons in metal nanoparticles create nanostructured and enhanced light fields around those structures, which produce their strong interaction in a hybrid nanodevice with other plasmonic or non-plasmonic objects. This interaction may in turn also modulate the far field with important consequences in the applications. We show in this paper that the nonlinear emission from semiconductor quantum dots is strongly affected by the close presence of metal nanoparticles, which are resonantly excited. Using a pulsed laser, optical second harmonic is generated in the quantum dot, and it is highly enhanced when the laser is tuned around the nanoparticle plasmon resonance. Even more interesting is the demonstration of a switching mechanism, controlled by an external continuous-wave field, which can enhance or extinguish the SH signal, even when the pulsed laser is always on. Experimental observations are in excellent agreement with the theoretical calculations, based on the dipole-dipole near-field coupling of the objects forming the hybrid system.

  7. Analysis of Jovian decametric data: Study of radio emission mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, D. H.; Arias, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    Data gathered by the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 Planetary Radio Astronomy Experiments (PRA) are unique in many ways including their frequency range, time resolution, polarization information and geometric characteristics. Studies of rapidly varying phenomena have thus far been hampered by paper display techniques which require large amounts of paper to exploit the full PRA time resolution. A software package capable of effectively displaying full 6s resolution PRA dynamic spectra on a high quality video monitor while compensating for the aforementioned variations was developed. The most striking phenomena revealed by the new display techniques is called Modulated Spectral Activity (MSA) because of its appearance in dynamic spectra as a series at least two parallel emission bands which drift back and forth in frequency on time scales of tens of seconds. In an attempt to locate and understand the MSA source mechanism, a catalogue has been compiled of the start and end of all known MSA events.

  8. Mechanically flexible organic electroluminescent device with directional light emission

    DOEpatents

    Duggal, Anil Raj; Shiang, Joseph John; Schaepkens, Marc

    2005-05-10

    A mechanically flexible and environmentally stable organic electroluminescent ("EL") device with directional light emission comprises an organic EL member disposed on a flexible substrate, a surface of which is coated with a multilayer barrier coating which includes at least one sublayer of a substantially transparent organic polymer and at least one sublayer of a substantially transparent inorganic material. The device includes a reflective metal layer disposed on the organic EL member opposite to the substrate. The reflective metal layer provides an increased external quantum efficiency of the device. The reflective metal layer and the multilayer barrier coating form a seal around the organic EL member to reduce the degradation of the device due to environmental elements.

  9. Extreme Transients in the High Energy Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2013-01-01

    The High Energy Universe is rich in diverse populations of objects spanning the entire cosmological (time)scale, from our own present-day Milky Way to the re-ionization epoch. Several of these are associated with extreme conditions irreproducible in laboratories on Earth. Their study thus sheds light on the behavior of matter under extreme conditions, such as super-strong magnetic fields (in excess of 10^14 G), high gravitational potentials (e.g., Super Massive Black Holes), very energetic collimated explosions resulting in relativistic jet flows (e.g., Gamma Ray Bursts, exceeding 10^53 ergs). In the last thirty years, my work has been mostly focused on two apparently different but potentially linked populations of such transients: magnetars (highly magnetized neutron stars) and Gamma Ray Bursts (strongly beamed emission from relativistic jets), two populations that constitute unique astrophysical laboratories, while also giving us the tools to probe matter conditions in the Universe to redshifts beyond z=10, when the first stars and galaxies were assembled. I did not make this journey alone I have either led or participated in several international collaborations studying these phenomena in multi-wavelength observations; solitary perfection is not sufficient anymore in the world of High Energy Astrophysics. I will describe this journey, present crucial observational breakthroughs, discuss key results and muse on the future of this field.

  10. High Energy Laser Diagnostic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, James R.; Goddard, Douglas N.; Lewis, Jay; Thomas, David

    2010-10-01

    Recent advancements in high energy laser (HEL) sources have outpaced diagnostic tools capable of accurately quantifying system performance. Diagnostic tools are needed that allow system developers to measure the parameters that define HEL effectiveness. The two critical parameters for quantifying HEL effectiveness are the irradiance on target and resultant rise in target temperature. Off-board sensing has its limitations, including unpredictable changes in the reflectivity of the target, smoke and outgassing, and atmospheric distortion. On-board sensors overcome the limitations of off-board techniques but must survive high irradiance levels and extreme temperatures. We have developed sensors for on-target diagnostics of high energy laser beams and for the measurement of the thermal response of the target. The conformal sensors consist of an array of quantum dot photodetectors and resistive temperature detectors. The sensor arrays are lithographically fabricated on flexible substrates and can be attached to a variety of laser targets. We have developed a nanoparticle adhesive process that provides good thermal contact with the target and that ensures the sensor remains attached to the target for as long as the target survives. We have calibrated the temperature and irradiance sensors and demonstrated them in a HEL environment.

  11. High-energy neutrino astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montaruli, Teresa

    2012-07-01

    Neutrino astronomy, conceptually conceived four decades ago, has entered an exciting phase for providing results on the quest for the sources of the observed highest energy particles. IceCube and ANTARES are now completed and are scanning in space and time possible signals of high energy neutrinos indicating the existence of such sources. DeepCore, inside IceCube, is a playground for vetoed neutrino measurement with better potential below 1 TeV. A larger and denser detector is now being discussed. ARA, now in test phase, will be composed by radio stations that could cover up to ~ 100 km2 and aims at the highest energy region of cosmogenic neutrinos. The non observation of cosmic events is on one side a source of disappointment, on the other it represents by itself an important result. If seen in the context of a multi-messenger science, the combination of photon and cosmic ray experiment results brings invaluable information. The experimental upper bounds of the cubic-kilometer telescope IceCube are now below the theoretical upper bounds for extragalactic fluxes of neutrinos from optically thin sources. These are responsible for accelerating the extragalactic cosmic rays. Such limits constrain the role of gamma-ray bursts, described by the fireball picture, as sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. Neutrino telescopes are exciting running multi-task experiments that produce astrophysics and particle physics results some of which have been illustrated at this conference and are summarized in this report.

  12. High Energy Neutrinos from the Fermi Bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Lunardini, Cecilia; Razzaque, Soebur

    2012-06-01

    Recently the Fermi-LAT data have revealed two gamma-ray emitting bubble-shaped structures at the Galactic center. If the observed gamma rays have hadronic origin (collisions of accelerated protons), the bubbles must emit high energy neutrinos as well. This new, Galactic, neutrino flux should trace the gamma-ray emission in spectrum and spatial extent. Its highest energy part, above 20–50 TeV, is observable at a kilometer-scale detector in the northern hemisphere, such as the planned KM3NeT, while interesting constraints on it could be obtained by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. The detection or exclusion of neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles will discriminate between hadronic and leptonic models, thus bringing unique information on the still mysterious origin of these objects and on the time scale of their formation.

  13. High energy neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles.

    PubMed

    Lunardini, Cecilia; Razzaque, Soebur

    2012-06-01

    Recently the Fermi-LAT data have revealed two gamma-ray emitting bubble-shaped structures at the Galactic center. If the observed gamma rays have hadronic origin (collisions of accelerated protons), the bubbles must emit high energy neutrinos as well. This new, Galactic, neutrino flux should trace the gamma-ray emission in spectrum and spatial extent. Its highest energy part, above 20-50 TeV, is observable at a kilometer-scale detector in the northern hemisphere, such as the planned KM3NeT, while interesting constraints on it could be obtained by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. The detection or exclusion of neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles will discriminate between hadronic and leptonic models, thus bringing unique information on the still mysterious origin of these objects and on the time scale of their formation.

  14. Observations of high-energy radiation during thunderstorms at Tien-Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, A. V.; Almenova, A. M.; Antonova, V. P.; Chubenko, A. P.; Karashtin, A. N.; Kryakunova, O. N.; Lutsenko, V. Yu.; Mitko, G. G.; Ptitsyn, M. O.; Piscal, V. V.; Ryabov, V. A.; Salikhov, N. M.; Sadykov, T. Kh.; Shepetov, A. L.; Shlyugaev, Yu. V.; Thu, W. M.; Vil'danova, L. I.; Zastrozhnova, N. N.; Zybin, K. P.

    2016-07-01

    Energetic radiation during thunderstorms is studied. The possibility to identify the high-energy lightning emission in the 10 s monitoring mode is demonstrated. Simultaneous measurements of gamma-ray emission, high-energy electrons, and neutron radiation in the triggering mode are fulfilled. Energy spectra of gamma emission and electrons are obtained. The intensity both of electrons and gamma rays in lightning discharge prevail the background emission by 1.5 to 2 orders of magnitude.

  15. Third emission mechanism in solid-state nanocavity quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Makoto; Asano, Takashi; Noda, Susumu

    2012-09-01

    Photonic crystal (PC) nanocavities have been receiving a great deal of attention recently because of their ability to strongly confine photons in a tiny space with a high quality factor. According to cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED), such confined photons can achieve efficient interactions with excitons in semiconductors, leading to the Purcell effect in the weak coupling regime and vacuum Rabi splitting (VRS) in the strong coupling regime. These features are promising for applications such as quantum information processing, highly efficient single photon sources and ultra-low threshold lasers. In this context, the coupled system of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) and a PC nanocavity has been intensively investigated in recent years.Although experimental reports have demonstrated such fundamental features, two anomalous phenomena have also been observed. First, photon emission from the cavity occurs even when it is significantly detuned from the QD. Second, spectral triplets are formed by additional bare-cavity lines between the VRS lines. These features cannot be explained by standard cavity QED theories and have prompted controversy regarding their physical mechanisms. In this review we describe the recent experimental and theoretical progress made in the investigation of these phenomena. Similar mechanisms will also occur in many other coupled quantum systems, and thus the findings are applicable to a wide range of fields.

  16. A mechanism for biologically induced iodine emissions from sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz-Lopez, A.; Blaszczak-Boxe, C. S.; Carpenter, L. J.

    2015-09-01

    Ground- and satellite-based measurements have reported high concentrations of iodine monoxide (IO) in coastal Antarctica. The sources of such a large iodine burden in the coastal Antarctic atmosphere remain unknown. We propose a mechanism for iodine release from sea ice based on the premise that micro-algae are the primary source of iodine emissions in this environment. The emissions are triggered by the biological production of iodide (I-) and hypoiodous acid (HOI) from micro-algae (contained within and underneath sea ice) and their diffusion through sea-ice brine channels, ultimately accumulating in a thin brine layer (BL) on the surface of sea ice. Prior to reaching the BL, the diffusion timescale of iodine within sea ice is depth-dependent. The BL is also a vital component of the proposed mechanism as it enhances the chemical kinetics of iodine-related reactions, which allows for the efficient release of iodine to the polar boundary layer. We suggest that iodine is released to the atmosphere via three possible pathways: (1) emitted from the BL and then transported throughout snow atop sea ice, from where it is released to the atmosphere; (2) released directly from the BL to the atmosphere in regions of sea ice that are not covered with snowpack; or (3) emitted to the atmosphere directly through fractures in the sea-ice pack. To investigate the proposed biology-ice-atmosphere coupling at coastal Antarctica we use a multiphase model that incorporates the transport of iodine species, via diffusion, at variable depths, within brine channels of sea ice. Model simulations were conducted to interpret observations of elevated springtime IO in the coastal Antarctic, around the Weddell Sea. While a lack of experimental and observational data adds uncertainty to the model predictions, the results nevertheless show that the levels of inorganic iodine (i.e. I2, IBr, ICl) released from sea ice through this mechanism could account for the observed IO concentrations during

  17. Multiplicities in high energy interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Derrick, M.

    1985-05-13

    This paper reviews the data on multiplicities in high energy interactions. Results from e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, from neutrino interactions, and from hadronic collisions, both diffractive and nondiffractive, are compared and contrasted. The energy dependence of the mean charged multiplicity, , as well as the rapidity density at Y = 0 are presented. For hadronic collisions, the data on neutral pion production shows a strong correlation with . The heavy particle fractions increase with ..sqrt..s up to the highest energies. The charged particle multiplicity distributions for each type of reaction show a scaling behavior when expressed in terms of the mean. Attempts to understand this behavior, which was first predicted by Koba, Nielsen, and Olesen, are discussed. The multiplicity correlations and the energy variation of the shape of the KNO scaling distribution provide important constraints on models. Some extrapolations to the energies of the Superconducting Super Collider are made. 51 refs., 27 figs.

  18. High energy beam lifetime analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Sterne, P.A.; Hartley, J.; Cowan, T.E.

    1997-05-01

    We have developed a positron lifetime defect analysis capability based on a 3 MeV electrostatic accelerator. The high energy beam lifetime spectrometer is operational with a 60 mCi {sup 22}Na source providing a current of 7 10{sup 5} positrons per second. Lifetime data are derived from a thin plastic transmission detector providing an implantation time and a BaF{sub 2} detector to determine the annihilation time. Positron lifetime analysis is performed with a 3 MeV positron beam on thick sample specimens at counting rates in excess of 2000 per second. The instrument is being used for bulk sample analysis and analysis of samples encapsulated in controlled environments for in situ measurements.

  19. Oxides having high energy densities

    DOEpatents

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Kang, Kisuk

    2013-09-10

    Certain disclosed embodiments generally relate to oxide materials having relatively high energy and/or power densities. Various aspects of the embodiments are directed to oxide materials having a structure B.sub.i(M.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2, for example, a structure Li.sub.j(Ni.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2 such as Li(Ni.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5)O.sub.2. In this structure, Y represents one or more atoms, each independently selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metals, transition metals, Group 14 elements, Group 15, or Group 16 elements. In some embodiments, such an oxide material may have an O3 crystal structure, and/or a layered structure such that the oxide comprises a plurality of first, repeating atomic planes comprising Li, and a plurality of second, repeating atomic planes comprising Ni and/or Y.

  20. High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A

    2004-11-11

    High-energy-density (HED) physics refers broadly to the study of macroscopic collections of matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density. The experimental facilities most widely used for these studies are high-power lasers and magnetic-pinch generators. The HED physics pursued on these facilities is still in its infancy, yet new regimes of experimental science are emerging. Examples from astrophysics include work relevant to planetary interiors, supernovae, astrophysical jets, and accreting compact objects (such as neutron stars and black holes). In this paper, we will review a selection of recent results in this new field of HED laboratory astrophysics and provide a brief look ahead to the coming decade.

  1. Pion exchange at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.M.

    1980-07-01

    The state of Regge pion exchange calculations for high-energy reactions is reviewed. Experimental evidence is summarized to show that (i) the pion trajectory has a slope similar to that of other trajectories; (ii) the pion exchange contribution can dominate contributions of higher trajectories up to quite a large energy; (iii) many two-body cross sections with large pion contributions can be fit only by models which allow for kinematical conspiracy at t=0. The theory of kinematic conspiracy is reviewed for two-body amplitudes, and calculations of the conspiring pion--Pomeron cut discussed. The author then summarizes recent work on pion exchange in Reggeized Deck models for multiparticle final states, with emphasis on the predictions of various models (with and without resonances) for phases of the partial wave amplitudes.

  2. Microwave detection of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privitera, P.

    2011-09-01

    A novel detection technique for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays based on microwave emission from the extensive air showers may provide large area coverage with 100% duty cycle at low cost. The status and prospects of several complementary R&D projects for GHz detectors is reviewed.

  3. Recent experimental developments concerning the mechanisms underlying dust emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna Neuman, C. L.; Sanderson, R. S.; O'Brien, P.

    2012-12-01

    Field based studies have been invaluable in elucidating the great variability and complexity in natural surfaces that emit dust. Spanning hours to days, and meters to kilometers, measurements of the regional and global characteristics of dust emission and transport are contributing to a clearer understanding of these phenomena. This work has been complimented by the development of increasingly more sophisticated atmospheric dispersion models. Only very recently, however, has much attention been paid to the physics of dust emission from the bed surface that necessarily require precise, high frequency measurements over fractions of millimeters under carefully manipulated conditions. This paper provides an overview of recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of dust emission, as derived from experiments carried out in the Trent boundary layer wind tunnel by a variety of workers. Energy transfer to the bed surface through the impacts of saltating particles has long been recognized as crucial for the ejection of silt and clay sized particles from surfaces where interparticle bonding is significant. Using Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) and laser Doppler anemometry (LDA), we are now able to measure the energy transfer to the surface and the consequent deformation/rupture for both loose and consolidated beds of silt. The coefficient of restitution is found to decrease with particle impact speed, although some compaction may also occur with plowing and displacement of loose bed material (Gordon and McKenna Neuman, 2009). Further consideration is given to wind pumping as an alternate mechanism for dust entrainment from surfaces that are armored; that is, where insufficient sand supply is available to the support the development of a saltation cloud. LDA and pressure tap measurements confirm that turbulent structures measured in the atmospheric boundary layer are able to penetrate into the pores of gravel sized material, and specifically, the smelter waste

  4. High energy chemical laser system

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, D.W.; Pearson, R.K.

    1975-12-23

    A high energy chemical laser system is described wherein explosive gaseous mixtures of a reducing agent providing hydrogen isotopes and interhalogen compounds are uniformly ignited by means of an electrical discharge, flash- photolysis or an electron beam. The resulting chemical explosion pumps a lasing chemical species, hydrogen fluoride or deuterium fluoride which is formed in the chemical reaction. The generated lasing pulse has light frequencies in the 3- micron range. Suitable interhalogen compounds include bromine trifluoride (BrF$sub 3$), bromine pentafluoride (BrF$sub 5$), chlorine monofluoride (ClF), chlorine trifluoride (ClF$sub 3$), chlorine pentafluoride (ClF$sub 5$), iodine pentafluoride (IF$sub 5$), and iodine heptafluoride (IF$sub 7$); and suitable reducing agents include hydrogen (H$sub 2$), hydrocarbons such as methane (CH$sub 4$), deuterium (D$sub 2$), and diborane (B$sub 2$H$sub 6$), as well as combinations of the gaseous compound and/or molecular mixtures of the reducing agent.

  5. High Energy Plasma Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    In order to meet NASA's challenge on advanced concept activity in the propulsion area, we initiated a new program entitled "High Energy Plasma Space Propulsion Studies" within the current cooperative agreement in 1998. The goals of this work are to gain further understanding of the engine of the AIMStar spacecraft, a concept which was developed at Penn State University, and to develop a prototype concept for the engine. The AIMStar engine concept was developed at Penn State University several years ago as a hybrid between antimatter and fusion technologies. Because of limited amounts of antimatter available, and concurrently the demonstrated ability for antiprotons to efficiently ignite nuclear fusion reactions, it was felt that this was a very good match. Investigations have been made concerning the performance of the reaction trap. This is a small Penning-like electromagnetic trap, which is used to simultaneously confine antiprotons and fusion fuels. Small DHe3 or DT droplets, containing a few percent molar of a fissile material, are injected into the trap, filled with antiprotons. We have found that it is important to separate the antiprotons into two adjacent wells, to inject he droplet between them and to simultaneously bring the antiprotons to the center of the trap, surrounding the droplet. Our previous concept had the droplet falling onto one cloud of antiprotons. This proved to be inefficient, as the droplet tended to evaporate away from the cloud as it interacted on its surface.

  6. HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRINO AND GAMMA-RAY TRANSIENTS FROM TRANS-RELATIVISTIC SUPERNOVA SHOCK BREAKOUTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiyama, Kazumi; Gao, Shan; Meszaros, Peter; Murase, Kohta; Horiuchi, Shunsaku

    2013-05-20

    Trans-relativistic shocks that accompany some supernovae (SNe) produce X-ray burst emissions as they break out in the dense circumstellar medium around the progenitors. This phenomenon is sometimes associated with peculiar low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts (LL GRBs). Here, we investigate the high-energy neutrino and gamma-ray counterparts of such a class of SNe. Just beyond the shock breakout radius, particle acceleration in the collisionless shock starts to operate in the presence of breakout photons. We show that protons may be accelerated to sufficiently high energies and produce high-energy neutrinos and gamma rays via the photomeson interaction. These neutrinos and gamma rays may be detectable from {approx}< 10 Mpc away by IceCube/KM3Net as multi-TeV transients almost simultaneously with the X-ray breakout, and even from {approx}< 100 Mpc away with follow-up observations by the Cherenkov Telescope Array using a wide-field sky monitor like Swift as a trigger. A statistical technique using a stacking approach could also be possible for the detection, with the aid of the SN optical/infrared counterparts. Such multi-messenger observations offer the possibility to probe the transition of trans-relativistic shocks from radiation-mediated to collisionless ones, and would also constrain the mechanisms of particle acceleration and emission in LL GRBs.

  7. Tibiofibula Transposition in High-Energy Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Gledhill, Rebecca A.; Evans, Nick

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of failed attempts at closed reduction of high-energy tibial fractures with an associated fibula fracture. The first case was a 39-year-old male involved in high-speed motorbike collision, while the second was a 14-year-old male who injured his leg following a fall of three metres. Emergency medical services at the scenes of the accidents reported a 90-degree valgus deformity of the injured limb and both limbs were realigned on scene and stabilized. Adequate alignment of the tibia could not be achieved by manipulation under sedation or anaesthesia. Open reduction and exposure of the fracture sites revealed that the distal fibula fragment was “transposed” and entrapped in the medulla of the proximal tibial fragment. Reduction required simulation of the mechanism of injury in order to disengage the fragments and allow reduction. Tibiofibula transposition is a rare complication of high-energy lower limb fractures which has not previously been reported and may prevent adequate closed reduction. Impaction of the distal fibula within the tibial medulla occurs as the limb is realigned by paramedic staff before transfer to hospital. We recommend that when this complication is identified the patient is transferred to the operating room for open reduction and stabilization of the fracture. PMID:27807487

  8. Tests and prospects of new physics at very high energy. Beyond the standard basic principles, and beyond conventional matter and space-time. On the possible origin of Quantum Mechanics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Mestres, Luis

    2015-05-01

    Recent results and announcements by Planck and BICEP2 have led to important controversies in the fields of Cosmology and Particle Physics. As new ideas and alternative approaches can since then more easily emerge, the link between the Mathematical Physics aspects of theories and the interpretation of experimental results becomes more direct. This evolution is also relevant for Particle Physics experiments at very high energy, where the interpretation of data on the highest-energy cosmic rays remains a major theoretical and phenomenological challenge. Alternative particle physics and cosmology can raise fundamental questions such as that of the structure of vacuum and space-time. In particular, the simplified description of the physical vacuum contained in standard quantum field theory does not necessarily correspond to reality at a deeper level, and similarly for the relativistic space-time based on four real variables. In a more general approach, the definition itself of vacuum can be a difficult task. The spinorial space-time (SST) we suggested in 1996-97 automatically incorporates a local privileged space direction (PSD) for each comoving observer, possibly leading to a locally anisotropic vacuum structure. As the existence of the PSD may have been confirmed by Planck, and a possible discovery of primordial B-modes in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) may turn out to contain new evidence for the SST, we explore other possible implications of this approach to space-time. The SST structure can naturally be at the origin of Quantum Mechanics at distance scales larger than the fundamental one if standard particles are dealt with as vacuum excitations. We also discuss possible implications of our lack of knowledge of the structure of vacuum, as well as related theoretical, phenomenological and cosmological uncertainties. Pre-Big Bang scenarios and new ultimate constituents of matter (including superbradyons) are crucial open subjects

  9. High energy survey of supernova remnants with BATSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCollough, M. L.; Wilson, C. A.; Zhang, S. N.; Harmon, B. A.

    1997-01-01

    The burst and transient source experiment (BATSE) survey of the high energy emission from supernova remnants is reported on. The ability of BATSE to continuously monitor the entire sky in the 20 keV to 2 MeV energy range enables a large group of remnants to by studied at high energies. Preliminary analysis indicates the likely detection of several supernova remnants other than the Crab nebula. Among these are MSH 15-52, Vela, Cas A and possibly HB 9. The techniques employed are discussed together with the status of the survey and its limitations.

  10. An alternative mechanism for production of emission features in some infrared objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apruzese, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    Two dust-envelope models of the M supergiant VX Sgr, which exhibits a prominent emission feature at 10 microns, are presented. The models indicate that, for certain envelope sizes, the presence of the observed emission feature does not necessarily indicate that the emitting grains possess a similar feature in their emissivity profile. The mechanism which may in some cases be producing the observed emission feature is discussed.

  11. High-energy proton radiation belt.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    The experiments and theories to explain the high-energy protons trapped in the earth's radiation belt are reviewed. The theory of cosmic ray albedo neutron decay injection of protons into the radiation belt is discussed. Radial diffusion and change in the earth's dipole moment are considered along with losses of protons by ionization and nuclear collision. It is found that the measured albedo neutron escape current is sufficient to supply trapped protons above 30 MeV. The theoretical calculations of the trapped protons are in agreement with the measurements for L less than or equal to 1.7 both on and off the equator. For L greater than or equal to 1.7, additional trapped proton differential energy measurements should be made before the theory can be adequately tested. It appears that an additional loss mechanism such as pitch angle scattering may be required.

  12. EDITORIAL: Focus on High Energy Cosmic Rays FOCUS ON HIGH ENERGY COSMIC RAYS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teshima, Masahiro; Watson, Alan A.

    2009-06-01

    The topic of high-energy cosmic rays has recently attracted significant attention. While the AGASA and HiRes Observatories have closed after many years of successful operation, the Pierre Auger Observatory began taking data in January 2004 and the first results have been reported. Plans for the next generation of instruments are in hand: funding is now being sought for the northern phase of the Auger Observatory and plans for a space detector, JEM-EUSO, to be launched in 2013-14 are well advanced with the long-term target of a dedicated satellite for the 2020s. It therefore seemed an appropriate time to make a collection of outstanding and original research articles from the leading experimental groups and from some of the theorists who seek to interpret the hard-won data and to speculate on the origin of the highest energy cosmic rays. This focus issue in New Journal of Physics on the topic of high energy cosmic rays, contains a comprehensive account of the work of the Yakutsk group (A A Ivanov, S P Knurenko and I Ye Sleptsov) who have used Cerenkov radiation produced by shower particles in the air to provide the basis for energy calibration. This technique contrasts with that of detecting fluorescence radiation from space that is proposed for the JEM-EUSO instrument to be placed on the International Space Station in 2013, described by Y Takahashi. Supplementing this is an article by A Santangelo and A Petrolini describing the scientific goals, requirements and main instrument features of the Super Extreme Universe Space Observatory mission (S-EUSO). The use of fluorescence light to measure energies was the key component of the HiRes instrument and is also used extensively by the Pierre Auger Collaboration so an article, by F Arqueros, F Blanco and J Rosado, summarizing the properties of fluorescence emission, still not fully understood, is timely. M Nagano, one of the architects of the AGASA Observatory, has provided an overview of the experimental situation with

  13. Experimental High Energy Physics Research

    SciTech Connect

    Hohlmann, Marcus

    2016-01-13

    This final report summarizes activities of the Florida Tech High Energy Physics group supported by DOE under grant #DE-SC0008024 during the period June 2012 – March 2015. We focused on one of the main HEP research thrusts at the Energy Frontier by participating in the CMS experiment. We were exploiting the tremendous physics opportunities at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and prepared for physics at its planned extension, the High-Luminosity LHC. The effort comprised a physics component with analysis of data from the first LHC run and contributions to the CMS Phase-2 upgrades in the muon endcap system (EMU) for the High-Luminosity LHC. The emphasis of our hardware work was the development of large-area Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) for the CMS forward muon upgrade. We built a production and testing site for such detectors at Florida Tech to complement future chamber production at CERN. The first full-scale CMS GE1/1 chamber prototype ever built outside of CERN was constructed at Florida Tech in summer 2013. We conducted two beam tests with GEM prototype chambers at CERN in 2012 and at FNAL in 2013 and reported the results at conferences and in publications. Principal Investigator Hohlmann served as chair of the collaboration board of the CMS GEM collaboration and as co-coordinator of the GEM detector working group. He edited and authored sections of the detector chapter of the Technical Design Report (TDR) for the GEM muon upgrade, which was approved by the LHCC and the CERN Research Board in 2015. During the course of the TDR approval process, the GEM project was also established as an official subsystem of the muon system by the CMS muon institution board. On the physics side, graduate student Kalakhety performed a Z' search in the dimuon channel with the 2011 and 2012 CMS datasets that utilized 20.6 fb⁻¹ of p-p collisions at √s = 8 TeV. For the dimuon channel alone, the 95% CL lower limits obtained on the mass of a Z' resonance are 2770 GeV for a Z

  14. On the Emission Mechanism of Barium Containing Thermionic Cathodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-27

    easily be transported to the emissions center. From the deposited activated material to the minimum work function, we estimate the size of 13 the emission...theories were not able to explain the electrospark phenomenon. Experiments show that electrosparkz are spurts carrying positively charged atoms" . A...cathode with good conductivity shouldn’t let out electrosparks , because there is no reason for them to be able to spurt out positively charged atom groups

  15. An experimental high energy physics program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidos, J. A.; Loeffler, F. J.; McIlwain, R. L.; Miller, D. H.; Palfrey, T. R.; Shibata, E. I.

    1989-05-01

    The CLEO detector accumulated, (approximately 480,000 B-mesons) the world's largest sample of B decays, before being shutdown in May 1988 for the installation of CLEO II. This data sample came from 335 pb(-1) accumulated at the upsilon (4S). The Cornell Electron Storage Ring set new luminosity records, reaching 3.5 pb(-1) in a single day. These data are being intensively analyzed and 21 papers were given at the Baltimore APS meeting. Among the highlights are: confirmation of B(sup 0)(bar B)(sup 0) mixing; discovery of the charm-strange baryon xi (sub c)(sup 0); limits on b yields u decay; and non-observation of B yields p(bar p)pi(pi), which was reported by the ARGUS collaboration. The construction of CLEO II is proceeding on schedule. The new 1.5 T superconducting magnet has passed all tests and all of the detector elements have been installed. This includes a 7800 CsI crystals electromagnetic shower calorimeter. The data from the Gamma Ray Astrophysics experiment show a significant signal for high energy gamma ray emission from Cygnus X-3 and also confirm the previously reported anomalous period from Her X-1. Meanwhile, the old 6 mirror telescope has been refitted with 26 high resolution mirrors and improved fast electronics. GRANDE, the next generation detector based on the water Cherenkov technique, has been formally proposed to HEPAP. The detector will search for neutrino emission in the Southern Hemisphere and gamma radiation in the Northern Hemisphere.

  16. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, Yuiko T.; Guesto-Barnak, Donna

    1992-01-01

    A low-or no-silica, low- or no-alkali phosphate glass useful as a laser amplifier in a multiple pass, high energy laser system having a high thermal conductivity, K.sub.90.degree. C. >0.85 W/mK, a low coefficient of thermal expansion, .alpha..sub.20.degree.-300.degree. C. <80.times.10.sup.-7 /.degree.C., low emission cross section, .sigma.<2.5.times.10.sup.-20 cm.sup.2, and a high fluorescence lifetime, .tau.>325 .mu.secs at 3 wt. % Nd doping, consisting essentially of (on an oxide composition basis): wherein Ln.sub.2 O.sub.3 is the sum of lanthanide oxides; .SIGMA.R.sub.2 O is <5, R being Li, Na, K, Cs, and Rb; the sum of Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and MgO is <24 unless .SIGMA.R.sub.2 O is 0, then the sum of Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and MgO is <42; and the ratio of MgO to B.sub.2 O.sub.3 is 0.48-4.20.

  17. Three Decades of High Energy Transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts are the most brilliant explosions in space. The first GRB was discovered on 1967, just over 40 years ago. It took several years and multiple generations of space and ground instruments to unravel some of the mysteries of this phenomenon. However, many questions remain open today. I will discuss the history, evolution and current status of the GRB field and its contributions in our understanding of the transient high energy sky. Finally, I will describe how GRBs can be utilized in future missions as tools, to probe the cosmic chemical evolution of the Universe Magnetars are magnetically powered rotating neutron stars with extreme magnetic fields (over 10(exp 14) Gauss). They were discovered in the X- and gamma-rays where they predominantly emit their radiation. Very few sources (roughly 24) have been found since their discovery in 1987. NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was launched June 11, 2009; since then the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) recorded emission from several magnetar sources. In total, six new sources were discovered between 2008 and 2011, with a synergy between Swift, RXTE, Fermi and the Interplanetary Network (IPN). I will give a short history of magnetars and describe how this, once relatively esoteric field, has emerged as a link between several astrophysical areas including Gamma-Ray Bursts.

  18. High energy hadron-hadron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.T.

    1990-11-01

    Results of a study on high energy collision with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (i) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (ii) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (iii) the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. For elastic collisions, a simple expression for the proton matter distribution is proposed which fits well the elastic {bar p}p scattering from ISR to S{bar p}pS energies within the geometrical model. The proton form factor is of the dipole form with an energy-dependent range parameter. The {bar p}p elastic differential cross section at Tevatron energies obtained by extrapolation is in good agreement with experiments. For multiparticle emission processes a unified physical picture for hadron-hadron and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions was proposed. A number of predictions were made, including the one that KNO-scaling does not obtain for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} two-jet events. An extension of the considerations within the geometrical model led to a theory of the momentum distributions of the outgoing particles which are found in good agreement with current experimental data. Extrapolations of results to higher energies have been made. The cluster size of hadrons produced in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation is found to increase slowly with energy.

  19. High Energy Astrophysics and Cosmology from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornschemeier, Ann

    2014-03-01

    While much can be learned from physics experiments on and astronomical observations from the ground, certain questions require space-based investigations. Sometimes the scale of the measurement, such as the baseline of approximately 106 km necessary for the observation of gravitational waves in the frequency range expected for high-redshift supermassive black hole mergers, causes us to leave behind the limitations of the earth. From space we measure the X-ray emission from the final stages of accretion onto black holes and critical energy ranges of cosmic rays and gamma ray photons resulting from particle acceleration in e.g., star forming environments, that otherwise we could not measure due to the atmosphere. Space-borne experiments may also measure all of the cosmological information available in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background to probe the physical conditions that caused the process of inflation in the early universe, moments after the big bang. This presentation will cover the NASA high energy astrophysics and cosmology science portfolio, embodied in its Physics of the Cosmos program, including updates on technology development and programmatic matters.

  20. Panchromatic Observations of the Textbook GRB 110205A: Constraining Physical Mechanisms of Prompt Emission and Afterglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, W.; Shen, R. F.; Sakamoto, T.; Beardmore, A. P.; De Pasquale, M.; Wu, X. F.; Gorosabel, J.; Urata, Y.; Sugita, S.; Zhang, B.; Pozanenko, A.; Nissinen, M.; Sahu, D. K.; Im, M.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Andreev, M.; Klunko, E.; Volnova, A.; Akerlof, C. W.; Anto, P.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Breeveld, A.; Carsenty, U.; Gehrels, N.; Sonbas, E.

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of a bright, long duration (T(sub 90) approx. 257 s) GRB 110205A at redshift z = 2.22. The optical prompt emission was detected by Swift/UVOT, ROTSE-IIIb and BOOTES telescopes when the GRB was still radiating in the gamma-ray band. Thanks to its long duration, nearly 200 s of observations were obtained simultaneously from optical, X-ray to gamma-ray (1 eV - 5 MeV), which makes it one of the exceptional cases to study the broadband spectral energy distribution across 6 orders of magnitude in energy during the prompt emission phase. In particular, by fitting the time resolved prompt spectra, we clearly identify, for the first time, an interesting two-break energy spectrum, roughly consistent with the standard GRB synchrotron emission model in the fast cooling regime. Although the prompt optical emission is brighter than the extrapolation of the best fit X/ -ray spectra, it traces the -ray light curve shape, suggesting a relation to the prompt high energy emission. The synchrotron + synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) scenario is disfavored by the data, but the models invoking a pair of internal shocks or having two emission regions can interpret the data well. Shortly after prompt emission (approx. 1100 s), a bright (R = 14.0) optical emission hump with very steep rise ( alpha approx. 5.5) was observed which we interpret as the emission from the reverse shock. It is the first time that the rising phase of a reverse shock component has been closely observed.

  1. Dust Obscured Blazars as sources of high-energy neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, G.; de Vries, K. D.; van Eijndhoven, N.

    2016-08-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are believed to be among the most promising sources of the ultra-high-energy cosmic ray flux. A hadronic component which is accelerated in the high energy environment of an AGN immediately implies the production of high-energy neutrinos. Nevertheless, no clear correlation between AGN and the high-energy cosmic-neutrino flux obtained by IceCube has been found so-far, putting strong limits on the neutrino production at AGN. We discuss a specific type of AGN for which an enhanced neutrino production is expected. This specific sub-set is given by AGN with their high-energy jet directed toward Earth, which is obscured by surrounding dust or gas, defining Dust Obscured Blazars. This type of AGN is predicted to have an enhanced neutrino emission due to the interaction of a possible hadronic component inside the AGN-jet with the surrounding matter. From two different galaxy catalogs, we have selected a sample of nearby sources with the characteristics of Dust Obscured Blazars. This selection is based on observations in the X-ray and radio bands. The data is consequently used to investigate the column density of the surrounding matter, providing an estimate for the neutrino production enhancement due to the nucleon-matter interactions in a beam dump scenario for various dust or gas compositions.

  2. The Structure and Emission Model of the Relativistic Jet in the Quasar 3C 279 Inferred From Radio To High-Energy Gamma-Ray Observations in 2008-2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    We present time-resolved broad-band observations of the quasar 3C 279 obtained from multiwavelength campaigns conducted during the first two years of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission. While investigating the previously reported gamma-ray/optical flare accompanied by a change in optical polarization, we found that the optical emission appears delayed with respect to the gamma-ray emission by about 10 days. X-ray observations reveal a pair of 'isolated' flares separated. by approx. 90 days, with only weak gamma-ray/optical counterparts. The spectral structure measured by Spitzer reveals a synchrotron component peaking in the mid-infrared band with a sharp break at the far-infrared band during the gamma-ray flare, while the peak appears in the mm/sub-mm band in the low state. Selected spectral energy distributions are fitted with leptonic models including Comptonization of external radiation produced in a dusty torus or the broad-line region. Adopting the interpretation of the polarization swing involving propagation of the emitting region along a curved trajectory, we can explain the evolution of the broad-band spectra during the gamma-ray flaring event by a shift of its location from approx. 1 pc to approx. 4 pc from the central black hole. On the other hand, if the gamma-ray flare is generated instead at sub-pc distance from the central black hole, the far-infrared break can be explained by synchrotron self-absorption. We also model the low spectral state, dominated by the mm/sub-mm peaking synchrotron component, and suggest that the corresponding inverse-Compton component explains the steady X-ray emission.

  3. THE STRUCTURE AND EMISSION MODEL OF THE RELATIVISTIC JET IN THE QUASAR 3C 279 INFERRED FROM RADIO TO HIGH-ENERGY {gamma}-RAY OBSERVATIONS IN 2008-2010

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashida, M.; Madejski, G. M.; Chiang, J.; Blandford, R. D.; Buehler, R.; Sikora, M.; Wehrle, A. E.; Ogle, P.; Collmar, W.; Larsson, S.; Fukazawa, Y.; Itoh, R.; Stawarz, L.; Richards, J. L.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Readhead, A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ciprini, S.; Gehrels, N. E-mail: madejski@slac.stanford.edu E-mail: sikora@camk.edu.pl; and others

    2012-08-01

    We present time-resolved broadband observations of the quasar 3C 279 obtained from multi-wavelength campaigns conducted during the first two years of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission. While investigating the previously reported {gamma}-ray/optical flare accompanied by a change in optical polarization, we found that the optical emission appears to be delayed with respect to the {gamma}-ray emission by about 10 days. X-ray observations reveal a pair of 'isolated' flares separated by {approx}90 days, with only weak {gamma}-ray/optical counterparts. The spectral structure measured by Spitzer reveals a synchrotron component peaking in the mid-infrared band with a sharp break at the far-infrared band during the {gamma}-ray flare, while the peak appears in the millimeter (mm)/submillimeter (sub-mm) band in the low state. Selected spectral energy distributions are fitted with leptonic models including Comptonization of external radiation produced in a dusty torus or the broad-line region. Adopting the interpretation of the polarization swing involving propagation of the emitting region along a curved trajectory, we can explain the evolution of the broadband spectra during the {gamma}-ray flaring event by a shift of its location from {approx}1 pc to {approx}4 pc from the central black hole. On the other hand, if the {gamma}-ray flare is generated instead at sub-pc distance from the central black hole, the far-infrared break can be explained by synchrotron self-absorption. We also model the low spectral state, dominated by the mm/sub-mm peaking synchrotron component, and suggest that the corresponding inverse-Compton component explains the steady X-ray emission.

  4. The ANSTO high energy heavy ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegele, Rainer; Cohen, David D.; Dytlewski, Nick

    1999-10-01

    Recently the construction of the ANSTO High Energy Heavy Ion Microprobe (HIMP) at the 10 MV ANTARES tandem accelerator has been completed. The high energy heavy ion microprobe focuses not only light ions at energies of 2-3 MeV, but is also capable of focusing heavy ions at high energies with ME/ q2 values up to 150 MeV amu and greater. First performance tests and results are reported here.

  5. Harvard University High Energy Physics progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The principal goals of this work are to carry out forefront programs in high energy physics research and to provide first rate educational opportunities for students. The experimental program supported through HEPL is carried out at the major accelerator centers in the world and addresses some of the most important questions in high energy physics. The program is based at Harvard`s High Energy Physics Laboratory, which has offices, computing facilities, and engineering support, and both electronics and machine shops.

  6. Harvard University High Energy Physics progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The principal goals of this work are to carry out forefront programs in high energy physics research and to provide first rate educational opportunities for students. The experimental program supported through HEPL is carried out at the major accelerator centers in the world and addresses some of the most important questions in high energy physics. The program is based at Harvard's High Energy Physics Laboratory, which has offices, computing facilities, and engineering support, and both electronics and machine shops.

  7. γ-ray Binaries : A Bridge Between Be Stars and High Energy Astrophysics Invited Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberts, A.

    2016-11-01

    Advances in X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy have opened a new window on our universe and revealed a wide variety of binaries composed of a compact object and a Be star. In Be X-ray binaries, a neutron star accretes the Be disk and truncates it through tidal interactions. Such systems have important X-ray outbursts, some related to the disk structure. In other systems, strong gamma-ray emission is observed. In γ-ray binaries, the neutron star is not accreting but driving a highly relativistic wind. The wind collision region presents similarities to colliding wind binaries composed of massive stars. The high energy emission is coming from particles being accelerated at the relativistic shock. I will review the physics of X-ray and gamma-ray binaries, focusing particularly on the recent developments on gamma-ray binaries. I will describe physical mechanisms such as relativistic hydrodynamics, tidal forces and non thermal emission. I will highlight how high energy astrophysics can shed a new light on Be star physics and vice-versa.

  8. Variability in the high energy gamma ray emission from Cyg X-3 over a two-year period (1983 - 1984) at E 4 x 10(11) eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cawley, M. F.; Fegan, D. J.; Gibbs, K.; Gorham, P. W.; Lamb, R. C.; Liebing, D. F.; Porter, N. A.; Stenger, V. J.; Weekes, T. C.; Williams, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Cygnus X-3 is observed to emit gamma rays with energies in excess of 4 x 10 to the 11th power eV during two out of 9 observational categories over an 18 month time span. The emissions are observed at the 0.6 phase of the characteristic 4.8 hr light curve for this binary system. We estimate a peak flux at phase 0.6 of 5 x 10 to the minus 10th power photons cm-2s-1 at a software threshold of 8 x 10 to the 11th power eV for Oct/Nov 1983. A flux for the June 84 effect cannot be reliably calculated at present due to lack of Monte Carlo simulations for the energy range and spectral region. For the other 7 observational categories the observations are consistent with zero source emission. The light curve would appear to be variable on a time scale of a couple of weeks at these categories. Selection of compact images in accordance with Monte Carlo simulations combined with empirical optimization techniques have led to an enriched gamma ray light curve for the Oct/Nov 1983 data. Selection on the basis of shower orientation, however, has not led to any notable enhancement of the gamma ray content. Individual Cherenko images can be reliably sorted on an event by event basis into either proton-induced or photon-induced showers.

  9. Organometallics in High Energy Chemistry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-31

    C Comments on the Mechanisms of Heterogeneous Catalysis of the Hydrodenitrogenat ion Reaction D Metallic Palladium, the Actual Catalyst in Lindlar...CO Pressure Studies These reactions were run following procedure A with the amine concentration for Et3N and Pr3N set at 0.74 N and with methanol as... reactions were run following procedure A. Experiments were conducted in methanol under 100 psig of CO at 1600C. The total amine concentration was 4.36 M

  10. Terrestrial effects of high energy cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atri, Dimitra

    On geological timescales, the Earth is likely to be exposed to higher than the usual flux of high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) from astrophysical sources such as nearby supernovae, gamma ray bursts or by galactic shocks. These high-energy particles strike the Earth's atmosphere, initiating an extensive air shower. As the air shower propagates deeper, it ionizes the atmosphere by producing charged secondary particles and photons. Increased ionization leads to changes in atmospheric chemistry, resulting in ozone depletion. This increases the flux of solar UVB radiation at the surface, which is potentially harmful to living organisms. Increased ionization affects the global electrical circuit, which could enhance the low-altitude cloud formation rate. Secondary particles such as muons and thermal neutrons produced as a result of hadronic interactions of the primary cosmic rays with the atmosphere are able to reach the ground, enhancing the biological radiation dose. The muon flux dominates the radiation dose from cosmic rays causing damage to DNA and an increase in mutation rates and cancer, which can have serious biological implications for surface and sub-surface life. Using CORSIKA, we perform massive computer simulations and construct lookup tables for 10 GeV - 1 PeV primaries, which can be used to quantify these effects from enhanced cosmic ray exposure to any astrophysical source. These tables are freely available to the community and can be used for other studies. We use these tables to study the terrestrial implications of galactic shock generated by the infall of our galaxy toward the Virgo cluster. Increased radiation dose from muons could be a possible mechanism explaining the observed periodicity in biodiversity in paleobiology databases.

  11. High-Energy Astrophysics: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy astrophysics is the study of objects and phenomena in space with energy densities much greater than that found in normal stars and galaxies. These include black holes, neutron stars, cosmic rays, hypernovae and gamma-ray bursts. A history and an overview of high-energy astrophysics will be presented, including a description of the objects that are observed. Observing techniques, space-borne missions in high-energy astrophysics and some recent discoveries will also be described. Several entirely new types of astronomy are being employed in high-energy astrophysics. These will be briefly described, along with some NASA missions currently under development.

  12. Aggregation-induced emission: phenomenon, mechanism and applications.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yuning; Lam, Jacky W Y; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2009-08-07

    It is textbook knowledge that chromophore aggregation generally quenches light emission. In this feature article, we give an account on how we observed an opposite phenomenon termed aggregation-induced emission (AIE) and identified the restriction of intramolecular rotation as a main cause for the AIE effect. Based on the mechanistic understanding, we developed a series of new fluorescent and phosphorescent AIE systems with emission colours covering the entire visible spectral region and luminescence quantum yields up to unity. We explored high-tech applications of the AIE luminogens as, for example, fluorescence sensors (for explosive, ion, pH, temperature, viscosity, pressure, etc.), biological probes (for protein, DNA, RNA, sugar, phospholipid, etc.), immunoassay markers, PAGE visualization agents, polarized light emitters, monitors for layer-by-layer assembly, reporters for micelle formation, multistimuli-responsive nanomaterials, and active layers in the fabrication of organic light-emitting diodes.

  13. A radio view of high-energy emitting AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Robert Frank

    2016-07-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are among the most energetic objects in the Universe. These galaxies that are dominated in part or even throughout the electromagnetic spectrum by emission from their central, compact region. AGNs are extensively studied by multi-wavelength observations. In the standard picture, the main driver of an AGN is a supermassive black hole (SMBH) in its centre that is surrounded by an accretion disk. Perpendicular to the disk, in the vicinity of highly magnetized SMBH relativistic outflows of plasma, so-called jets, can form on either side that can reach far beyond the host galaxy. Only about 10% of all AGNs are dominated by emission from these jets due to relativistic beaming effects and these so-called blazars dominate the extragalactic gamma-ray sky. It is commonly accepted that the low-energy emission (radio to UV/X-ray) is due to synchrotron emission from the jet. The high-energy emission is considered to stem from inverse-Compton scattering of photons on the jet particles, but different sources for these photons are discussed (internal or external to the AGN) and other models for the high-energy emission have also been proposed. The nature of the high-energy emission is strongly linked to the location of the emission region in the jet which requires a detailed understanding of the formation and evolution of jets. Radio observations especially using very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) provide the best way to gain direct information on the intrinsic properties of jets down to sub-pc scales, close to their formation region. In this thesis, I focus on the properties of three different AGNs, IC 310, PKS2004-447, and 3C 111 that belong to the small non-blazar population of gamma-ray-loud AGNs. I study them in detail with a variety of radio astronomical instruments with respect to their high-energy emission and in the context of the large monitoring programmes MOJAVE (Monitoring Of Jets in Active galactic nuclei with VLBA Experiments) and

  14. The anatomy of a long gamma-ray burst: a simple classification scheme for the emission mechanism(s).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bégué, Damien; Burgess, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Ultra-relativistic motion and efficient conversion of kinetic energy to radiation are required by gamma-ray burst (GRB) observations, yet they are difficult to simultaneously achieve. Three leading mechanisms have been proposed to explain the observed emission emanating from GRB outflows: radiation from either relativistic internal or external shocks, or thermal emission from a photosphere. Previous works were mechanisms and arguing for a sole, unique origin of the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts. In contrast, herein, we first explain why all three models are valid mechanisms and that a contribution from each of them is expected in the prompt phase. Additionally, we show that a single parameter, the dimensionless entropy of the GRB outflow, determines which mechanism contributes the most to the emission. More specifically, internal shocks dominate for low values of the dimensionless entropy, external shocks for intermediate values and finally, photospheric emission for large values. We present a unified framework for the emission mechanisms of GRBs with easily testable predictions for each process.

  15. The Anatomy of a Long Gamma-Ray Burst: A Simple Classification Scheme for the Emission Mechanism(s).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bégué, D.; Burgess, J. Michael

    2016-03-01

    Ultra-relativistic motion and efficient conversion of kinetic energy to radiation are required by gamma-ray burst (GRB) observations, yet they are difficult to simultaneously achieve. Three leading mechanisms have been proposed to explain the observed emission emanating from GRB outflows: radiation from either relativistic internal or external shocks, or thermal emission from a photosphere. Previous works were dedicated to independently treating these three mechanisms and arguing for a sole, unique origin of the prompt emission of GRBs. In contrast, herein, we first explain why all three models are valid mechanisms and that a contribution from each of them is expected in the prompt phase. Additionally, we show that a single parameter, the dimensionless entropy of the GRB outflow, determines which mechanism contributes the most to the emission. More specifically, internal shocks dominate for low values of the dimensionless entropy, external shocks for intermediate values, and finally, photospheric emission for large values. We present a unified framework for the emission mechanisms of GRBs with easily testable predictions for each process.

  16. THE ANATOMY OF A LONG GAMMA-RAY BURST: A SIMPLE CLASSIFICATION SCHEME FOR THE EMISSION MECHANISM(S)

    SciTech Connect

    Bégué, D.; Burgess, J. Michael E-mail: damienb@kth.se

    2016-03-20

    Ultra-relativistic motion and efficient conversion of kinetic energy to radiation are required by gamma-ray burst (GRB) observations, yet they are difficult to simultaneously achieve. Three leading mechanisms have been proposed to explain the observed emission emanating from GRB outflows: radiation from either relativistic internal or external shocks, or thermal emission from a photosphere. Previous works were dedicated to independently treating these three mechanisms and arguing for a sole, unique origin of the prompt emission of GRBs. In contrast, herein, we first explain why all three models are valid mechanisms and that a contribution from each of them is expected in the prompt phase. Additionally, we show that a single parameter, the dimensionless entropy of the GRB outflow, determines which mechanism contributes the most to the emission. More specifically, internal shocks dominate for low values of the dimensionless entropy, external shocks for intermediate values, and finally, photospheric emission for large values. We present a unified framework for the emission mechanisms of GRBs with easily testable predictions for each process.

  17. Angular correlations in gluon production at high energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael

    2011-02-01

    We present a general, model independent argument demonstrating that gluons produced in high energy hadronic collision are necessarily correlated in rapidity and also in the emission angle. The strength of the correlation depends on the process and on the structure/model of the colliding particles. In particular we argue that it is strongly affected (and underestimated) by factorized approximations frequently used to quantify the effect.

  18. Analysis of Jovian decamteric data: Study of radio emission mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, D. H.; Rosenkranz, P. W.; Arias, T. A.; Garnavich, P. N.; Hammerschlag, R.

    1986-01-01

    This research effort involved careful examination of Jovian radio emission data below 40 MHz, with emphasis on the informative observations of the Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment (PRA) on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft. The work is divided into three sections, decametric arcs, decametric V bursts, and hectometric modulated spectral activity (MSA).

  19. Fast Radio Bursts’ Emission Mechanism: Implication from Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2017-03-01

    We argue that the localization of the repeating fast radio bursts (FRBs) at ∼1 Gpc excludes a rotationally powered type of radio emission (e.g., analogs of Crab’s giant pulses coming from very young energetic pulsars) as the origin of FRBs.

  20. GEANT4: Applications in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Tariq; Zafar, Abrar Ahmed; Hussain, Talib; Rashid, Haris

    2007-02-14

    GEANT4 is a detector simulation toolkit aimed at studying, mainly experimental high energy physics. In this paper we will give an overview of this software with special reference to its applications in high energy physics experiments. A brief of process methods is given. Object-oriented nature of the simulation toolkit is highlighted.

  1. High energy interactions of cosmic ray particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    The highlights of seven sessions of the Conference dealing with high energy interactions of cosmic rays are discussed. High energy cross section measurements; particle production-models of experiments; nuclei and nuclear matter; nucleus-nucleus collision; searches for magnetic monopoles; and studies of nucleon decay are covered.

  2. High-Energy-Density Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slenes, Kirk

    2003-01-01

    Capacitors capable of storing energy at high densities are being developed for use in pulse-power circuits in such diverse systems as defibrillators, particle- beam accelerators, microwave sources, and weapons. Like typical previously developed energy-storage capacitors, these capacitors are made from pairs of metal/solid-dielectric laminated sheets that are wound and pressed into compact shapes to fit into cans, which are then filled with dielectric fluids. Indeed, these capacitors can be fabricated largely by conventional fabrication techniques. The main features that distinguish these capacitors from previously developed ones are improvements in (1) the selection of laminate materials, (2) the fabrication of the laminated sheets from these materials, and (3) the selection of dielectric fluids. In simplest terms, a high-performance laminated sheet of the type used in these capacitors is made by casting a dielectric polymer onto a sheet of aluminized kraft paper. The dielectric polymer is a siloxane polymer that has been modified with polar pendant groups to increase its permittivity and dielectric strength. Potentially, this polymer is capable of withstanding an energy density of 7.5 J/cm3, which is four times that of the previous state-of-the-art-capacitor dielectric film material. However, the full potential of this polymer cannot be realized at present because (1) at thicknesses needed for optimum performance (.8.0 m), the mechanical strength of a film of this polymer is insufficient for incorporation into a wound capacitor and (2) at greater thickness, the achievable energy density decreases because of a logarithmic decrease in dielectric strength with increasing thickness. The aluminized kraft paper provides the mechanical strength needed for processing of the laminate and fabrication of the capacitor, and the aluminum film serves as an electrode layer. Because part of the thickness of the dielectric is not occupied by the modified siloxane polymer, the

  3. Application of PIXE, RBS and high energy proton microbeams to the elemental analysis of coal and coal waste. [Proton and x-ray induced x-ray emission and Rutherford backscattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kraner, H.W.; Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Oakley, S.A.; Duedall, I.W.; Woodhead, P.M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Proton and x-ray induced x-ray emission have proved to be sensitive and convenient methods to measure major trace element concentrations in bulk quantities of coal and coal waste materials. These techniques are complementary in their sensitivities as a function of atomic number, and both require little sample preparation. The PIXE measurements were made with the proton beam in air in a microprobe configuration. Collimated proton beam scans were made on several thin sections of fly ash/sludge block materials and good trace sensitivities were observed for small specific volumes; SEM scans showed a high degree of material homogeneity which precluded significant elemental variations at the approx. 100 ..mu..m spatial resolution used. Rutherford backscattering was used to directly observe major and minor elemental concentrations in coal waste materials and in several representative ranks of coals. RBS is useful for only trace concentrations of heavy elements, but it does provide a method independent of fluoresced x rays for detection of possible middle Z interferences. Arsenic, present in trace amounts in coal, is an element of concern and is enriched in fly ash. The form of As in fly ash is unknown. However, because of its volatility most of the As probably becomes attached to the surfaces of the fly ash particles during and subsequent to combustion processes. This view is supported by the fact that As is rapidly mobilized in aqueous solutions whose pH > 9.

  4. Engine Tune-up Service. Unit 6: Emission Control Systems. Student Guide. Automotive Mechanics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, E. Miles

    This student guide is for Unit 6, Emission Control Systems, in the Engine Tune-Up Service portion of the Automotive Mechanics Curriculum. It deals with inspecting, testing, and servicing an emission control system. A companion review exercise book and posttests are available separately as CE 031 221-222. An introduction tells how this unit fits…

  5. Phoneme-Specific Nasal Emission in Children with and without Physical Anomalies of the Velopharyngeal Mechanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson-Falzone, Sally J.; Graham, Minnie S.

    1990-01-01

    Phoneme-specific nasal emission was identified in 36 children, age 3-16; 19 children had no orofacial mechanism anomalies, whereas 17 had findings ranging from minor to severe. The 2 groups were more alike than different in speech behaviors. Five patterns of phoneme-specific nasal emission were exhibited by 2 or more children. (Author/JDD)

  6. Acoustic Emission Determination of Deformation Mechanisms Leading to Failure of Naval Alloys. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    Emission Laser Beam Interferometer HY80 , 100, 130 Steels Mechanical Deformation Nondestructive Evaluation 2. ABSTRACT (Conetnue an rovere eli if necoo y...publication, J. Applied Phys.). 43. A. Peterlin, B.B. Djordjvic, J.C. Murphy, R.E. Green, "Acoustic Emission During Craze Forma- tion in Polymers

  7. Engine Performance (Section C: Emission Control Systems). Auto Mechanics Curriculum Guide. Module 3. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rains, Larry

    This engine performance (emission control systems) module is one of a series of competency-based modules in the Missouri Auto Mechanics Curriculum Guide. Topics of this module's five units are: positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) and evaporative emission control systems; exhaust gas recirculation (EGR); air injection and catalytic converters;…

  8. Pulsar Emission Geometry and Accelerating Field Strength

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    ar X iv :1 11 1. 03 25 v1 [ as tr o- ph .H E ] 1 N ov 2 01 1 2011 Fermi Symposium, Roma., May. 9-12 1 Pulsar Emission Geometry and Accelerating...observations of gamma-ray pulsars have opened a new window to understanding the generation mechanisms of high-energy emission from these systems. The high...the Vela and CTA 1 pulsars with simulated high-energy light curves generated from geometrical representations of the outer gap and slot gap emission

  9. MEASUREMENT OF AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM MECHANICALLY VENTILATED POULTRY HOUSES USING MULTIPATH TUNABLE DIODE LASER SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonia emissions from mechanically ventilated poultry operations are an important environmental concern. Open Path Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy has emerged as a robust real-time method for gas phase measurement of ammonia concentrations in agricultural settings. ...

  10. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, Y.T.; Payne, S.A.; Hayden, J.S.; Campbell, J.H.; Aston, M.K.; Elder, M.L.

    1996-06-11

    In a high energy laser system utilizing phosphate laser glass components to amplify the laser beam, the laser system requires a generated laser beam having an emission bandwidth of less than 26 nm and the laser glass components consist essentially of (on an oxide composition basis) in mole percent: P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, 50--75; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {gt}0--10; K{sub 2}O, {gt}0--30; MgO, 0--30; CaO, 0--30; Li{sub 2}O, 0--20; Na{sub 2}O, 0--20; Rb{sub 2}O, 0--20; Cs{sub 2}O, 0--20; BeO, 0--20; SrO, 0--20; BaO, 0--20; ZnO, 0--20; PbO, 0--20; B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--8; Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.01--8; wherein the sum of MgO and CaO is >0--30; the sum of Li{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, Rb{sub 2}O, and Cs{sub 2}O is 0--20; the sum of BeO, SrO, BaO, ZnO, and PbO is 0--20; the sum of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} is 0--10; and Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} represents the sum of the oxides of active lasing lanthanides of atomic number 58--71. 21 figs.

  11. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, Yuiko T.; Payne, Stephen A.; Hayden, Joseph S.; Campbell, John H.; Aston, Mary Kay; Elder, Melanie L.

    1996-01-01

    In a high energy laser system utilizing phosphate laser glass components to amplify the laser beam, the laser system requires a generated laser beam having an emission bandwidth of less than 26 nm and the laser glass components consist essentially of (on an oxide composition basis) in mole percent: P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, 50--75; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {gt}0--10; K{sub 2}O, {gt}0--30; MgO, 0--30; CaO, 0--30; Li{sub 2}O, 0--20; Na{sub 2}O, 0--20; Rb{sub 2}O, 0--20; Cs{sub 2}O, 0--20; BeO, 0--20; SrO, 0--20; BaO, 0--20; ZnO, 0--20; PbO, 0--20; B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--8; Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.01--8; wherein the sum of MgO and CaO is >0--30; the sum of Li{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, Rb{sub 2}O, and Cs{sub 2}O is 0--20; the sum of BeO, SrO, BaO, ZnO, and PbO is 0--20; the sum of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} is 0--10; and Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} represents the sum of the oxides of active lasing lanthanides of atomic number 58--71. 21 figs.

  12. Revisiting the mechanism of nitrogen fluorescence emission induced by femtosecond filament in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suyu; Jiang, Yuanfei; Chen, Anmin; He, Lanhai; Liu, Dunli; Jin, Mingxing

    2017-03-01

    The backward propagating and side emitted fluorescence during the femtosecond filamentation in air is experimentally investigated in this paper. By comparing the fluorescence emission in the circular and linear polarization states, we find that in the shorter focal length case, the direct ionization of N 2 greatly affects the fluorescence emission behaviors: the fluorescence from N2 + and N 2 is always stronger in the linear and circular polarization cases, respectively. Based on the observation, the emission mechanism of nitrogen fluorescence emission induced by a femtosecond filament is discussed.

  13. Spin structure in high energy processes: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    DePorcel, L.; Dunwoodie, C.

    1994-12-01

    This report contains papers as the following topics: Spin, Mass, and Symmetry; physics with polarized Z{sup 0}s; spin and precision electroweak physics; polarized electron sources; polarization phenomena in quantum chromodynamics; polarized lepton-nucleon scattering; polarized targets in high energy physics; spin dynamics in storage rings and linear accelerators; spin formalism and applications to new physics searches; precision electroweak physics at LEP; recent results on heavy flavor physics from LEP experiments using 1990--1992 data; precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry in Z boson production by electron-positron collisions; preliminary results on heavy flavor physics at SLD; QCD tests with SLD and polarized beams; recent results from TRISTAN at KEK; recent B physics results from CLEO; searching for the H dibaryon at Brookhaven; recent results from the compton observatory; the spin structure of the deuteron; spin structure of the neutron ({sup 3}HE) and the Bjoerken sum rule; a consumer`s guide to lattice QCD results; top ten models constrained by b {yields} sy; a review of the Fermilab fixed target program; results from the D0 experiment; results from CDF at FNAL; quantum-mechanical suppression of bremsstrahlung; report from the ZEUS collaboration at HERA; physics from the first year of H1 at HERA, and hard diffraction. These papers have been cataloged separately elsewhere.

  14. Thermonuclear model for high energy transients

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.

    1982-01-01

    The thermonuclear model for x- and ..gamma..-ray bursts is discussed. Different regimes of nuclear burning are reviewed, each appropriate to a given range of (steady state) accretion rate. Accretion rates in the range 10/sup -14/ to 10/sup -8/ Msub solar y/sup -1/ all appear capable of producing x-ray transients of various durations and intervals. Modifications introduced by radiatively driven mass loss, the thermal inertia of the envelope, different burning mechanisms, and two-dimensional considerations are discussed as are difficulties encountered when the thermonuclear model is confronted with observations of rapidly recurrent bursts (less than or equal to 10 min), and super-Eddington luminosities and temperatures. Results from a numerical simulation of a combined hydrogen-helium runaway initiated at pycnonuclear density are presented for the first time. The thermonuclear model for ..gamma..-ray bursts is also reviewed and updated, particularly with regard to the breakdown of the steady state hypothesis employed in previous work. Solely on the basis of nuclear instability, ..gamma..-ray bursts of various types appear possible for a very broad variety of accretion rates (approx. 10/sup -17/ to approx. 10/sup -11/ Msub solar y/sup -1/) although other considerations may restrict this range. The thermonuclear model appears capable of yielding a great diversity of high energy transient phenomena for various accretion rates, magnetic field configurations, and neutron star envelope histories.

  15. High Energy Electron Detection with ATIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Adams, James H., Jr.; Ahn, H.; Ampe, J.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The ATIC (Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter) balloon-borne ionization calorimeter is well suited to record and identify high energy cosmic ray electrons. The instrument was exposed to high-energy beams at CERN H2 bean-dine in September of 1999. We have simulated the performance of the instrument, and compare the simulations with actual high energy electron exposures at the CERN accelerator. Simulations and measurements do not compare exactly, in detail, but overall the simulations have predicted actual measured behavior quite well.

  16. Practical neutron dosimetry at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    McCaslin, J.B.; Thomas, R.H.

    1980-10-01

    Dosimetry at high energy particle accelerators is discussed with emphasis on physical measurements which define the radiation environment and provide an immutable basis for the derivation of any quantities subsequently required for risk evaluation. Results of inter-laboratory dosimetric comparisons are reviewed and it is concluded that a well-supported systematic program is needed which would make possible detailed evaluations and inter-comparisons of instruments and techniques in well characterized high energy radiation fields. High-energy dosimetry is so coupled with radiation transport that it is clear their study should proceed concurrently.

  17. Computing in high-energy physics

    DOE PAGES

    Mount, Richard P.

    2016-05-31

    I present a very personalized journey through more than three decades of computing for experimental high-energy physics, pointing out the enduring lessons that I learned. This is followed by a vision of how the computing environment will evolve in the coming ten years and the technical challenges that this will bring. I then address the scale and cost of high-energy physics software and examine the many current and future challenges, particularly those of management, funding and software-lifecycle management. Lastly, I describe recent developments aimed at improving the overall coherence of high-energy physics software.

  18. New accelerators in high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Blewett, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    First, I should like to mention a few new ideas that have appeared during the last few years in the accelerator field. A couple are of importance in the design of injectors, usually linear accelerators, for high-energy machines. Then I shall review some of the somewhat sensational accelerator projects, now in operation, under construction or just being proposed. Finally, I propose to mention a few applications of high-energy accelerators in fields other than high-energy physics. I realize that this is a digression from my title but I hope that you will find it interesting.

  19. High energy hadrons in extensive air showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tonwar, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental data on the high energy hadronic component in extensive air showers of energies approx. 10 to the 14 to 10 to the 16 eV when compared with expectations from Monte Carlo simulations have shown the observed showers to be deficient in high energy hadrons relative to simulated showers. An attempt is made to understand these anomalous features with more accurate comparison of observations with expectations, taking into account the details of the experimental system. Results obtained from this analysis and their implications for the high energy physics of particle interactions at energy approx. 10 to the 15 eV are presented.

  20. High energy physics in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Month, M.

    1985-10-16

    The US program in high energy physics from 1985 to 1995 is reviewed. The program depends primarily upon work at the national accelerator centers, but includes a modest but diversified nonaccelerator program. Involvement of universities is described. International cooperation in high energy physics is discussed, including the European, Japanese, USSR, and the People's Republic of China's programs. Finally, new facilities needed by the US high energy physics program are discussed, with particular emphasis given to a Superconducting Super Collider for achieving ever higher energies in the 20 TeV range. (LEW)

  1. High energy mode locked fiber oscillators for high contrast, high energy petawatt laser seed sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; An, J; Kim, D; Barty, C J

    2006-06-15

    In a high-energy petawatt laser beam line the ASE pulse contrast is directly related to the total laser gain. Thus a more energetic input pulse will result in increased pulse contrast at the target. We have developed a mode-locked fiber laser with high quality pulses and energies exceeding 25nJ. We believe this 25nJ result is scalable to higher energies. This oscillator has no intra-cavity dispersion compensation, which yields an extremely simple, and elegant laser configuration. We will discuss the design of this laser, our most recent results and characterization of all the key parameters relevant to it use as a seed laser. Our oscillator is a ring cavity mode-locked fiber laser [1]. These lasers operate in a self-similar pulse propagation regime characterized by a spectrum that is almost square. This mode was found theoretically [2] to occur only in the positive dispersion regime. Further increasing positive dispersion should lead to increasing pulse energy [2]. We established that the positive dispersion required for high-energy operation was approximately that of 2m of fiber. To this end, we constructed a laser cavity similar to [1], but with no gratings and only 2m of fiber, which we cladding pumped in order to ensure sufficient pump power was available to achieve mode-locked operation. A schematic of the laser is shown in figure 1 below. This laser produced low noise 25nJ pulses with a broad self similar spectrum (figure 2) and pulses that could be de-chirped to <100fs (figure 3). Pulse contrast is important in peta-watt laser systems. A major contributor to pulse contrast is amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), which is proportional to the gain in the laser chain. As the oscillator strength is increased, the required gain to reach 1PW pulses is decreased, reducing ASE and improving pulse contrast. We believe these lasers can be scaled in a stable fashion to pulse energies as high as 100nJ and have in fact seen 60nJ briefly in our lab, which is work still

  2. Sharpening of field emitter tips using high-energy ions

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.

    1999-11-30

    A process for sharpening arrays of field emitter tips of field emission cathodes, such as found in field-emission, flat-panel video displays. The process uses sputtering by high-energy (more than 30 keV) ions incident along or near the longitudinal axis of the field emitter to sharpen the emitter with a taper from the tip or top of the emitter down to the shank of the emitter. The process is particularly applicable to sharpening tips of emitters having cylindrical or similar (e.g., pyramidal) symmetry. The process will sharpen tips down to radii of less than 12 nm with an included angle of about 20 degrees. Because the ions are incident along or near the longitudinal axis of each emitter, the tips of gated arrays can be sharpened by high-energy ion beams rastered over the arrays using standard ion implantation equipment. While the process is particularly applicable for sharpening of arrays of field emitters in field-emission flat-panel displays, it can be effectively utilized in the fabrication of other vacuum microelectronic devices that rely on field emission of electrons.

  3. Perspectives on High-Energy-Density Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. Paul

    2008-11-01

    Much of 21st century plasma physics will involve work to produce, understand, control, and exploit very non-traditional plasmas. High-energy density (HED) plasmas are often examples, variously involving strong Coulomb interactions and few particles per Debeye sphere, dominant radiation effects, strongly relativistic effects, or strongly quantum-mechanical behavior. Indeed, these and other modern plasma systems often fall outside the early standard theoretical definitions of ``plasma''. This presentation will focus on two types of HED plasmas that exhibit non-traditional behavior. Our first example will be the plasmas produced by extremely strong shock waves. Shock waves are present across the entire realm of plasma densities, often in space or astrophysical contexts. HED shock waves (at pressures > 1 Mbar) enable studies in many areas, from equations of state to hydrodynamics to radiation hydrodynamics. We will specifically consider strongly radiative shocks, in which the radiative energy fluxes are comparable to the mechanical energy fluxes that drive the shocks. Modern HED facilities can produce such shocks, which are also present in dense, energetic, astrophysical systems such as supernovae. These shocks are also excellent targets for advanced simulations due to their range of spatial scales and complex radiation transport. Our second example will be relativistic plasmas. In general, these vary from plasmas containing relativistic particle beams, produced for some decades in the laboratory, to the relativistic thermal plasmas present for example in pulsar winds. Laboratory HED relativistic plasmas to date have been those produced by laser beams of irradiance ˜ 10^18 to 10^22 W/cm^2 or by accelerator-produced HED electron beams. These have applications ranging from generation of intense x-rays to production of proton beams for radiation therapy to acceleration of electrons. Here we will focus on electron acceleration, a spectacular recent success and a rare

  4. The evolution of high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.

    1989-10-01

    In this lecture I would like to trace how high energy particle accelerators have grown from tools used for esoteric small-scale experiments to gigantic projects being hotly debated in Congress as well as in the scientific community.

  5. Research in High Energy Physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, John S.

    2013-08-09

    This final report details the work done from January 2010 until April 2013 in the area of experimental and theoretical high energy particle physics and cosmology at the University of California, Davis.

  6. Physics at high energy photon photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    I review the physic prospects for high energy photon photon colliders, emphasizing results presented at the LBL Gamma Gamma Collider Workshop. Advantages and difficulties are reported for studies of QCD, the electroweak gauge sector, supersymmetry, and electroweak symmetry breaking.

  7. High Energy Astrophysics Research and Programmatic Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angellini, L.

    1994-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA contract team during the three months of the reporting period. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics.

  8. Solvatochromism Unravels the Emission Mechanism of Carbon Nanodots.

    PubMed

    Sciortino, Alice; Marino, Emanuele; Dam, Bart van; Schall, Peter; Cannas, Marco; Messina, Fabrizio

    2016-09-01

    High quantum yield, photoluminescence tunability, and sensitivity to the environment are hallmarks that make carbon nanodots interesting for fundamental research and applications. Yet, the underlying electronic transitions behind their bright photoluminescence are strongly debated. Despite carbon-dot interactions with their environment should provide valuable insight into the emitting transitions, they have hardly been studied. Here, we investigate these interactions in a wide range of solvents to elucidate the nature of the electronic transitions. We find remarkable and systematic dependence of the emission energy and kinetics on the characteristics of the solvent, with strong response of the photoexcited dots to hydrogen bonding. These findings suggest that the fluorescence originates from the radiative recombination of a photoexcited electron migrated to surface groups with holes left in the valence band of the crystalline core. Furthermore, the results demonstrate the fluorescence tunability to inherently derive from dot-to-dot polydispersity, independent of solvent interactions.

  9. Elementary particle physics and high energy phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, A.R.; Cumalat, J.P.; de Alwis, S.P.; DeGrand, T.A.; Ford, W.T.; Mahanthappa, K.T.; Nauenberg, U.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses the following research in high energy physics: the properties of the z neutral boson with the SLD detector; the research and development program for the SDC muon detector; the fixed-target k-decay experiments; the Rocky Mountain Consortium for HEP; high energy photoproduction of states containing heavy quarks; and electron-positron physics with the CLEO II and Mark II detectors. (LSP).

  10. Exploring the High Energy Universe: GLAST Mission and Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2007-01-01

    GLAST, the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope, is NASA's next-generation high-energy gamma-ray satellite scheduled for launch in Autumn 2007. GLAST will allow measurements of cosmic gamma-ray sources in t he 10 MeV to 100 GeV energy band to be made with unprecedented sensi tivity. Amongst its key scientific objectives are to understand part icle acceleration in Active Galactic Nuclei, Pulsars and Supernovae Remnants, to provide high resolution measurements of unidentified ga mma-ray sources, to study transient high energy emission from objects such as gamma-ray bursts, and to probe Dark Matter and the early Uni verse. Dr. McEnery will present an overview of the GLAST mission and its scientific goals.

  11. Exploring the High Energy Universe: GLAST Mission and Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2007-01-01

    GLAST, the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope, is NASA's next-generation high-energy gamma-ray satellite scheduled for launch in Autumn 2007. GLAST will allow measurements of cosmic gamma-ray sources in the 10 MeV to 100 GeV energy band to be made with unprecedented sensitivity. Amongst its key scientific objectives are to understand particle acceleration in Active Galactic Nuclei, Pulsars and Supernovae Remnants, to provide high resolution measurements of unidentified gamma-ray sources, to study transient high energy emission from objects such as gamma-ray bursts, and to probe Dark Matter and the early Universe. Dr. McEnery will present an overview of the GLAST mission and its scientific goals.

  12. Radio detection of ultra-high energy cosmic neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Vieregg, Abigail G.

    2015-07-15

    Ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrino astronomy constitutes a new window of observation onto the UHE universe. The detection and characterization of astrophysical neutrinos at the highest energies (E> 10{sup 18} eV) would reveal the sources of high-energy cosmic rays, the highest energy particles ever seen, and would constrain the evolution of such sources over time. UHE neutrino astrophysics also allows us to probe weak interaction couplings at energies much greater than those available at particle colliders. One promising way of detecting the highest energy neutrinos is through the radio emission created when they interact in a large volume of dielectric, such as ice. Here I discuss current results and future efforts to instrument large volumes of detector material with radio antennas to detect, point back, and characterize the energy of UHE astrophysical neutrinos.

  13. High Energy Gamma Ray Lines from Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, Carol Jo

    2000-01-01

    A number of nuclear states have been identified as possible candidates for producing high-energy gamma-ray line emission in solar flares. For one high-energy line, resulting from the decay of C-12 (15.11 MeV), the excitation cross sections and branching radios have been studied extensively. In a solar flare, the ratio of the flux of 15. 11 -MeV gamma rays to the flux of 4.44-MeV gamma rays depends critically on the spectral index of the flare-accelerated protons. Prospects for being able to determine that spectral index using results from HESSI observations together with the analytic results of Crannell, Crannell, and Ramaty (1979) will be presented.

  14. TESTING THE ORIGIN OF HIGH-ENERGY COSMIC RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimirov, A. E.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Porter, T. A.; Johannesson, G.

    2012-06-10

    Recent accurate measurements of cosmic-ray (CR) protons and nuclei by ATIC-2, CREAM, and PAMELA reveal (1) unexpected spectral hardening in the spectra of CR species above a few hundred GeV per nucleon, (2) a harder spectrum of He compared to protons, and (3) softening of the CR spectra just below the break energy. These newly discovered features may offer a clue to the origin of the observed high-energy Galactic CRs. We discuss possible interpretations of these spectral features and make predictions for the secondary CR fluxes and secondary-to-primary ratios, anisotropy of CRs, and diffuse Galactic {gamma}-ray emission in different phenomenological scenarios. Our predictions can be tested by currently running or near-future high-energy astrophysics experiments.

  15. Roles of the major, small, acid-soluble spore proteins and spore-specific and universal DNA repair mechanisms in resistance of Bacillus subtilis spores to ionizing radiation from X rays and high-energy charged-particle bombardment.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Ralf; Setlow, Peter; Horneck, Gerda; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Günther; Rettberg, Petra; Doherty, Aidan J; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2008-02-01

    The role of DNA repair by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination, spore photoproduct lyase, and DNA polymerase I and genome protection via alpha/beta-type small, acid-soluble spore proteins (SASP) in Bacillus subtilis spore resistance to accelerated heavy ions (high-energy charged [HZE] particles) and X rays has been studied. Spores deficient in NHEJ and alpha/beta-type SASP were significantly more sensitive to HZE particle bombardment and X-ray irradiation than were the recA, polA, and splB mutant and wild-type spores, indicating that NHEJ provides an efficient DNA double-strand break repair pathway during spore germination and that the loss of the alpha/beta-type SASP leads to a significant radiosensitivity to ionizing radiation, suggesting the essential function of these spore proteins as protectants of spore DNA against ionizing radiation.

  16. Emission Mechanism of "Green Fuzzies" in High-mass Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takami, Michihiro; Chen, How-Huan; Karr, Jennifer L.; Lee, Hsu-Tai; Lai, Shih-Ping; Minh, Young-Chol

    2012-03-01

    The Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope has revealed that a number of high-mass protostars are associated with extended mid-infrared emission, particularly prominent at 4.5 μm. These are called "Green Fuzzy" emission or "Extended Green Objects." We present color analysis of this emission toward six nearby (d = 2-3 kpc) well-studied high-mass protostars and three candidate high-mass protostars identified with the Spitzer GLIMPSE survey. In our color-color diagrams, most of the sources show a positive correlation between the [3.6]-[4.5] and [3.5]-[5.8] colors along the extinction vector in all or part of the region. We compare the colors with those of scattered continuum associated with the low-mass protostar L 1527, modeled scattered continuum in cavities, shocked emission associated with low-mass protostars, modeled H2 emission for thermal and fluorescent cases, and modeled polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission. Of the emission mechanisms discussed above, scattered continuum provides the simplest explanation for the observed linear correlation. In this case, the color variation within each object is attributed to different foreground extinctions at different positions. Alternative possible emission mechanisms to explain this correlation may be a combination of thermal and fluorescent H2 emission in shocks, and a combination of scattered continuum and thermal H2 emission, but detailed models or spectroscopic follow-up are required to investigate this possibility further. Our color-color diagrams also show possible contributions from PAHs in two objects. However, none of our samples show clear evidence for PAH emission directly associated with the high-mass protostars, several of which should be associated with ionizing radiation. This suggests that these protostars are heavily embedded even at mid-infrared wavelengths.

  17. On the Origin of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays II

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T K; Colgate, S; Li, H; Bulmer, R H; Pino, J

    2011-03-08

    We show that accretion disks around Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) could account for the enormous power in observed ultra high energy cosmic rays {approx}10{sup 20} eV (UHEs). In our model, cosmic rays are produced by quasi-steady acceleration of ions in magnetic structures previously proposed to explain jets around Active Galactic Nuclei with supermassive black holes. Steady acceleration requires that an AGN accretion disk act as a dynamo, which we show to follow from a modified Standard Model in which the magnetic torque of the dynamo replaces viscosity as the dominant mechanism accounting for angular momentum conservation during accretion. A black hole of mass M{sub BH} produces a steady dynamo voltage V {proportional_to} {radical}M{sub BH} giving V {approx} 10{sup 20} volts for M{sub BH} {approx} 10{sup 8} solar masses. The voltage V reappears as an inductive electric field at the advancing nose of a dynamo-driven jet, where plasma instability inherent in collisionless runaway acceleration allows ions to be steadily accelerated to energies {approx} V, finally ejected as cosmic rays. Transient events can produce much higher energies. The predicted disk radiation is similar to the Standard Model. Unique predictions concern the remarkable collimation of jets and emissions from the jet/radiolobe structure. Given MBH and the accretion rate, the model makes 7 predictions roughly consistent with data: (1) the jet length; (2) the jet radius; (3) the steady-state cosmic ray energy spectrum; (4) the maximum energy in this spectrum; (5) the UHE cosmic ray intensity on Earth; (6) electron synchrotron wavelengths; and (7) the power in synchrotron radiation. These qualitative successes motivate new computer simulations, experiments and data analysis to provide a quantitative verification of the model.

  18. A simplified reaction mechanism for calculation of emissions in hydrocarbon (Jet-A) combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, K. P.; Deur, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents a simplified reaction mechanism developed for use in calculations of NO(x) emissions in Jet-A combustion. The rate for the N2 + O2 reaction was selected to match available experimental results, and the reaction rates for other global reactions in the Jet-A are empirical reaction rates adjusted to match species concentrations using the detailed mechanism of Miller and Bowman (1989). The mechanism was validated by comparing the emission of NO(x) calculated using propane as fuel.

  19. Preliminary Breakdown: Physical Mechanisms and Potential for Energetic Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, D.; Beasley, W. H.

    2014-12-01

    Observations and analysis of the preliminary breakdown phase of virgin negative cloud-to-ground (-CG) lightning strokes will be presented. Of primary interest are the physical processes responsible for the fast electric field "characteristic" pulses that are often observed during this phase. The pulse widths of characteristic pulses are shown to occur as a superposed bimodal distribution, with the short and long modes having characteristic timescales on the order of 1 microsecond and 10 microseconds, respectively. Analysis of these pulses is based on comparison with laboratory observations of long spark discharge processes and with recently acquired high-speed video observations of a single -CG event. It will be argued that the fast electric field bimodal distribution is the result of conventional discharge processes operating in an extensive strong ambient electric field environment. An important related topic will also be discussed, where it will be argued that preliminary breakdown discharges are capable of generating energetic electrons and may therefore seed relativistic electron avalanches that go on to produce pulsed energetic photon emissions.

  20. A simplified reaction mechanism for prediction of NO(x) emissions in the combustion of hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, K. P.; Deur, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    A simplified reaction mechanism is developed for the prediction of NO(x) in hydrocarbon combustion. The mechanism uses fewer reacting species and reaction steps than the detailed mechanisms available in the literature and therefore takes less computer time when used in CFD calculations. The mechanism has been used to calculate NO(x) emissions in the combustion of propane. With slight modifications, the same mechanism can be used to calculate NO(x) in the combustion of other hydrocarbons. Results obtained with the simplified reaction are compared with experimental results and results obtained with a detailed kinetic mechanism.

  1. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, Y.T.; Guesto-Barnak, D.

    1992-12-22

    Disclosed is a low-or no-silica, low- or no-alkali phosphate glass useful as a laser amplifier in a multiple pass, high energy laser system having a high thermal conductivity, K[sub 90 C] >0.85 W/mK, a low coefficient of thermal expansion, [alpha][sub 20-300 C] <80[times]10[sup [minus]7]/C, low emission cross section, [sigma]<2.5[times]10[sup [minus]20] cm[sup 2], and a high fluorescence lifetime, [tau]>325 [mu]secs at 3 wt. % Nd doping, consisting essentially of (on an oxide composition basis): (Mole %) P[sub 2]O[sub 5], (52-72); Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], (0-<20); B[sub 2]O[sub 3], (>0-25); ZnO, (0-31); Li[sub 2]O, (0-5); K[sub 2]O, (0-5); Na[sub 2]O, (0-5); Cs[sub 2]O, (0-5); Rb[sub 2]O, (0-5); MgO, (>0-<30); CaO, (0-20); BaO, (0-20); SrO, (0-<20); Sb[sub 2]O[sub 3], (0-<1); As[sub 2]O[sub 3], (0-<1); Nb[sub 2]O[sub 5], (0-<1); Ln[sub 2]O[sub 3], (up to 6.5); PbO, (0-<5); and SiO[sub 2], (0-3); wherein Ln[sub 2]O[sub 3] is the sum of lanthanide oxides; [Sigma]R[sub 2]O is <5, R being Li, Na, K, Cs, and Rb; the sum of Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and MgO is <24 unless [Sigma]R[sub 2]O is 0, then the sum of Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and MgO is <42; and the ratio of MgO to B[sub 2]O[sub 3] is 0.48-4.20. 7 figs.

  2. Introduction to High-Energy Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosswog, Stephan; Bruggen, Marcus

    2003-04-01

    High-energy astrophysics covers cosmic phenomena that occur under the most extreme physical conditions. It explores the most violent events in the Universe: the explosion of stars, matter falling into black holes, and gamma-ray bursts - the most luminous explosions since the Big Bang. Driven by a wealth of new observations, the last decade has seen a large leap forward in our understanding of these phenomena. Exploring modern topics of high-energy astrophysics, such as supernovae, neutron stars, compact binary systems, gamma-ray bursts, and active galactic nuclei, this textbook is ideal for undergraduate students in high-energy astrophysics. It is a self-supporting, timely overview of this exciting field of research. Assuming a familiarity with basic physics, it introduces all other concepts, such as gas dynamics or radiation processes, in an instructive way. An extended appendix gives an overview of some of the most important high-energy astrophysics instruments, and each chapter ends with exercises.• New, up-to-date, introductory textbook providing a broad overview of high-energy phenomena and the many advances in our knowledge gained over the last decade • Written especially for undergraduate teaching use, it introduces the necessary physics and includes many exercises • This book fills a valuable niche at the advanced undergraduate level, providing professors with a new modern introduction to the subject

  3. Suppression of Kasha's rule as a mechanism for fluorescent molecular rotors and aggregation-induced emission.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hai; Cousins, Morgan E; Horak, Erik H; Wakefield, Audrey; Liptak, Matthew D; Aprahamian, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Although there are some proposed explanations for aggregation-induced emission, a phenomenon with applications that range from biosensors to organic light-emitting diodes, current understanding of the quantum-mechanical origin of this photophysical behaviour is limited. To address this issue, we assessed the emission properties of a series of BF2-hydrazone-based dyes as a function of solvent viscosity. These molecules turned out to be highly efficient fluorescent molecular rotors. This property, in addition to them being aggregation-induced emission luminogens, enabled us to probe deeper into their emission mechanism. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations and experimental results showed that the emission is not from the S1 state, as predicted from Kasha's rule, but from a higher energy (>S1) state. Furthermore, we found that suppression of internal conversion to the dark S1 state by restricting the rotor rotation enhances fluorescence, which leads to the proposal that suppression of Kasha's rule is the photophysical mechanism responsible for emission in both viscous solution and the solid state.

  4. Suppression of Kasha's rule as a mechanism for fluorescent molecular rotors and aggregation-induced emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Hai; Cousins, Morgan E.; Horak, Erik H.; Wakefield, Audrey; Liptak, Matthew D.; Aprahamian, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Although there are some proposed explanations for aggregation-induced emission, a phenomenon with applications that range from biosensors to organic light-emitting diodes, current understanding of the quantum-mechanical origin of this photophysical behaviour is limited. To address this issue, we assessed the emission properties of a series of BF2-hydrazone-based dyes as a function of solvent viscosity. These molecules turned out to be highly efficient fluorescent molecular rotors. This property, in addition to them being aggregation-induced emission luminogens, enabled us to probe deeper into their emission mechanism. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations and experimental results showed that the emission is not from the S1 state, as predicted from Kasha's rule, but from a higher energy (>S1) state. Furthermore, we found that suppression of internal conversion to the dark S1 state by restricting the rotor rotation enhances fluorescence, which leads to the proposal that suppression of Kasha's rule is the photophysical mechanism responsible for emission in both viscous solution and the solid state.

  5. SAS-2 high-energy gamma-ray observations of the Vela pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Ogelman, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    The Second Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-2) high-energy (in excess of 35 MeV) gamma-ray telescope has detected pulsed gamma-ray emission at the radio period from PSR 0833-45, the Vela pulsar, as well as an unpulsed flux from the Vela region. The pulsed emission consists of two peaks following the single radio peak by about 13 ms and 48 ms. The luminosity of the pulsed emission above 100 MeV from Vela is about 0.1 that of the pulsar NP 0532 in the Crab nebula, whereas the pulsed emission from Vela at optical wavelengths is less than 0.0002 that from the Crab. The relatively high intensity of the pulsed gamma-ray emission, and the double peak structure, compared with the single pulse in the radio emission, suggest that the high-energy gamma-ray pulsar emission may be produced under different conditions from those at lower energies.

  6. Future high energy colliders symposium. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z. |

    1996-12-31

    A `Future High Energy Colliders` Symposium was held October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was one of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor, the National Science Foundation, as part of a 5 month program on `New Ideas for Particle Accelerators`. The long term program and symposia were organized and coordinated by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of Brookhaven National Laboratory/ITP. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the future direction of high energy physics by bringing together leaders from the theoretical, experimental and accelerator physics communities. Their talks provided personal perspectives on the physics objectives and the technology demands of future high energy colliders. Collectively, they formed a vision for where the field should be heading and how it might best reach its objectives.

  7. Scientific applications for high-energy lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.W.

    1994-03-01

    The convergence of numerous factors makes the time ripe for the development of a community of researchers to use the high-energy laser for scientific investigations. This document attempts to outline the steps necessary to access high-energy laser systems and create a realistic plan to implement usage. Since an academic/scientific user community does not exist in the USA to any viable extent, we include information on present capabilities at the Nova laser. This will briefly cover laser performance and diagnostics and a sampling of some current experimental projects. Further, to make the future possibilities clearer, we will describe the proposed next- generation high-energy laser, named for its inertial fusion confinement (ICF) goal, the multi-megaJoule, 500-teraWatt National Facility, or NIF.

  8. ROSAT: An international mission exploring the high energy universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    ROSAT was designed specifically to detect high energy radiation, by using its telescopes to study x ray and ultraviolet emissions, regions of the electromagnetic spectrum that cannot be seen and that cannot penetrate the Earth's atmosphere. ROSAT is an international astronomical observatory project. ROSAT's science mission is divided into two phases. With its in-orbit checkout period complete, ROSAT has begun phase one of its mission, an all sky survey to map the heavens. When the 6 month mapping survey is complete, the satellite will begin phase two and be pointed at selected objects, studying individual targets, for the remainder of its mission.

  9. [High Energy Physics: Research in high energy physics]. Annual report, FY 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Barish, B C

    1982-12-31

    This report discusses high energy physics research on: Quantum chromodynamics; neutrinos; multiparticle spectrometers; inclusive scattering; Mark III detector; and cascade decays of phi resonances. (LSP)

  10. Waves on Reissner's membrane: a mechanism for the propagation of otoacoustic emissions from the cochlea.

    PubMed

    Reichenbach, Tobias; Stefanovic, Aleksandra; Nin, Fumiaki; Hudspeth, A J

    2012-04-19

    Sound is detected and converted into electrical signals within the ear. The cochlea not only acts as a passive detector of sound, however, but can also produce tones itself. These otoacoustic emissions are a striking manifestation of the cochlea's mechanical active process. A controversy remains of how these mechanical signals propagate back to the middle ear, from which they are emitted as sound. Here, we combine theoretical and experimental studies to show that mechanical signals can be transmitted by waves on Reissner's membrane, an elastic structure within the cochlea. We develop a theory for wave propagation on Reissner's membrane and its role in otoacoustic emissions. Employing a scanning laser interferometer, we measure traveling waves on Reissner's membrane in the gerbil, guinea pig, and chinchilla. The results are in accord with the theory and thus support a role for Reissner's membrane in otoacoustic emissions.

  11. High Energy Propulsion System (HEPS) Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    PL-TR-92-3025 APL-TR-PLTR92305 D A254 343 92-3025 1111I1111lI lllilllllllllltlllllllNll1111rýlr HIGH ENERGY PROPULSION SYSTEMS (HEPS) ANALYSIS Robert...T. Nachtrieb OLAC-PLIRKFE Edwards AFB, CA 93523-5000 July 1992 DTIC ELECTE AUG13 1992 Final Report S A 92-22749 PHILLIPS LABORATORY Propulsion ...NUMBERS HIGH ENERGY PROPULSION SYSTEM (HEPS) ANALYSIS PE: 62302F PR: 3058 6. AUTHOR(S) TA: OOP6 ROBERT T. NACHTRIEB 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S

  12. On the Future High Energy Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2015-09-28

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). A number of the next generation collider facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium and far-future of accelerator-based high energy physics. In this paper we offer a uniform approach to evaluation of various accelerators based on the feasibility of their energy reach, performance potential and cost range.

  13. Precision Crystal Calorimeters in High Energy Physics

    ScienceCinema

    Ren-Yuan Zhu

    2016-07-12

    Precision crystal calorimeters traditionally play an important role in high energy physics experiments. In the last two decades, it faces a challenge to maintain its precision in a hostile radiation environment. This paper reviews the performance of crystal calorimeters constructed for high energy physics experiments and the progress achieved in understanding crystal’s radiation damage as well as in developing high quality scintillating crystals for particle physics. Potential applications of new generation scintillating crystals of high density and high light yield, such as LSO and LYSO, in particle physics experiments is also discussed.

  14. High Energy Physics Research at Louisiana Tech

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Lee; Greenwood, Zeno; Wobisch, Marcus

    2013-06-28

    The goal of this project was to create, maintain, and strengthen a world-class, nationally and internationally recognized experimental high energy physics group at Louisiana Tech University, focusing on research at the energy frontier of collider-based particle physics, first on the DØ experiment and then with the ATLAS experiment, and providing leadership within the US high energy physics community in the areas of jet physics, top quark and charged Higgs decays involving tau leptons, as well as developing leadership in high performance computing.

  15. High-energy cosmic ray interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, Ralph; Orellana, Mariana; Reynoso, Matias M.; Vila, Gabriela S.

    2009-04-30

    Research into hadronic interactions and high-energy cosmic rays are closely related. On one hand--due to the indirect observation of cosmic rays through air showers--the understanding of hadronic multiparticle production is needed for deriving the flux and composition of cosmic rays at high energy. On the other hand the highest energy particles from the universe allow us to study the characteristics of hadronic interactions at energies far beyond the reach of terrestrial accelerators. This is the summary of three introductory lectures on our current understanding of hadronic interactions of cosmic rays.

  16. High energy particles and quanta in astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, F. B. (Editor); Fichtel, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    The various subdisciplines of high-energy astrophysics are surveyed in a series of articles which attempt to give an overall view of the subject as a whole by emphasizing the basic physics common to all fields in which high-energy particles and quanta play a role. Successive chapters cover cosmic ray experimental observations, the abundances of nuclei in the cosmic radiation, cosmic electrons, solar modulation, solar particles (observation, relationship to the sun acceleration, interplanetary medium), radio astronomy, galactic X-ray sources, the cosmic X-ray background, and gamma ray astronomy. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  17. COMPILATION OF CURRENT HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.; Horne, C.P.; Hutchinson, M.S.; Rittenberg, A.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Addis, L.; Ward, C.E.W.; Baggett, N.; Goldschmidt-Clermong, Y.; Joos, P.; Gelfand, N.; Oyanagi, Y.; Grudtsin, S.N.; Ryabov, Yu.G.

    1981-05-01

    This is the fourth edition of our compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about April 1981, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1977. We emphasize that only approved experiments are included.

  18. High Energy Astrophysics Research and Programmatic Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, Lorella

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  19. High Energy Astrophysics Research and Programmatic Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, L. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  20. Density distribution of high energy electrons in pulsed corona discharge of NO+N2 mixture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenchun; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Jialiang; Wang, Younian

    2003-12-01

    Emission spectroscopy of the high-voltage pulsed positive corona discharge in a line-cylinder reactor is used to investigate the high-energy electron density distribution in the discharge gap. The relative overall emission intensity spatial distribution profile of the A2Sigma+ --> X2Pi transition of NO is successfully recorded against a severe electromagnetic pulse interference coming from the corona discharge at one atmosphere. The spectroscopic investigation shows that the high-energy electron density in the discharge has a nonlinearly decline in the radial distribution. When varying the discharge voltage, the absolute emission intensity of NO is different but the radial distribution profile is similar. If an oxygen flow was introduced into the discharge reactor, the emission intensity of NO decreases tremendously and, therefore, the high-energy electron density decreases reasonably.

  1. Surfing the High Energy Output Branch of Nonlinear Energy Harvesters.

    PubMed

    Mallick, D; Amann, A; Roy, S

    2016-11-04

    Hysteresis and multistability are fundamental phenomena of driven nonlinear oscillators, which, however, restrict many applications such as mechanical energy harvesting. We introduce an electrical control mechanism to switch from the low to the high energy output branch of a nonlinear energy harvester by exploiting the strong interplay between its electrical and mechanical degrees of freedom. This method improves the energy conversion efficiency over a wide bandwidth in a frequency-amplitude-varying environment using only a small energy budget. The underlying effect is independent of the device scale and the transduction method and is explained using a modified Duffing oscillator model.

  2. Surfing the High Energy Output Branch of Nonlinear Energy Harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, D.; Amann, A.; Roy, S.

    2016-11-01

    Hysteresis and multistability are fundamental phenomena of driven nonlinear oscillators, which, however, restrict many applications such as mechanical energy harvesting. We introduce an electrical control mechanism to switch from the low to the high energy output branch of a nonlinear energy harvester by exploiting the strong interplay between its electrical and mechanical degrees of freedom. This method improves the energy conversion efficiency over a wide bandwidth in a frequency-amplitude-varying environment using only a small energy budget. The underlying effect is independent of the device scale and the transduction method and is explained using a modified Duffing oscillator model.

  3. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations of fundamental and harmonic radio plasma emission mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiklauri, D.; Thurgood, J. O.

    2015-12-01

    first co-author Jonathan O. Thurgood (QMUL) The simulation of three-wave interaction based plasma emission, an underlying mechanism for type III solar radio bursts, is a challenging task requiring fully-kinetic, multi-dimensional models. This paper aims to resolve a contradiction in past attempts, whereby some authors report that no such processes occur and others draw conflicting conclusions, by using 2D, fully kinetic, particle-in-cell simulations of relaxing electron beams. Here we present the results of particle-in-cell simulations which for different physical parameters permit or prohibit the plasma emission. We show that the possibility of plasma emission is contingent upon the frequency of the initial electrostatic waves generated by the bump-in-tail instability, and that these waves may be prohibited from participating in the necessary three-wave interactions due to the frequency beat requirements. We caution against simulating astrophysical radio bursts using unrealistically dense beams (a common approach which reduces run time), as the resulting non-Langmuir characteristics of the initial wave modes significantly suppresses the emission. Comparison of our results indicates that, contrary to the suggestions of previous authors, a plasma emission mechanism based on two counter-propagating beams is unnecessary in astrophysical context. Finally, we also consider the action of the Weibel instability, which generates an electromagnetic beam mode. As this provides a stronger contribution to electromagnetic energy than the emission, we stress that evidence of plasma emission in simulations must disentangle the two contributions and not simply interpret changes in total electromagnetic energy as the evidence of plasma emission. In summary, we present the first self-consistent demonstration of fundamental and harmonic plasma emission from a single-beam system via fully kinetic numerical simulation. Pre-print can be found at http://astro.qmul.ac.uk/~tsiklauri/jtdt1

  4. Bulk Materials Analysis Using High-Energy Positron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Glade, S C; Asoka-Kumar, P; Nieh, T G; Sterne, P A; Wirth, B D; Dauskardt, R H; Flores, K M; Suh, D; Odette, G R

    2002-11-11

    This article reviews some recent materials analysis results using high-energy positron beams at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We are combining positron lifetime and orbital electron momentum spectroscopic methods to provide electron number densities and electron momentum distributions around positron annihilation sites. Topics covered include: correlation of positron annihilation characteristics with structural and mechanical properties of bulk metallic glasses, compositional studies of embrittling features in nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel, pore characterization in Zeolites, and positron annihilation characteristics in alkali halides.

  5. Evaluation of Monte Carlo tools for high energy atmospheric physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutjes, Casper; Sarria, David; Broberg Skeltved, Alexander; Luque, Alejandro; Diniz, Gabriel; Østgaard, Nikolai; Ebert, Ute

    2016-11-01

    The emerging field of high energy atmospheric physics (HEAP) includes terrestrial gamma-ray flashes, electron-positron beams and gamma-ray glows from thunderstorms. Similar emissions of high energy particles occur in pulsed high voltage discharges. Understanding these phenomena requires appropriate models for the interaction of electrons, positrons and photons of up to 40 MeV energy with atmospheric air. In this paper, we benchmark the performance of the Monte Carlo codes Geant4, EGS5 and FLUKA developed in other fields of physics and of the custom-made codes GRRR and MC-PEPTITA against each other within the parameter regime relevant for high energy atmospheric physics. We focus on basic tests, namely on the evolution of monoenergetic and directed beams of electrons, positrons and photons with kinetic energies between 100 keV and 40 MeV through homogeneous air in the absence of electric and magnetic fields, using a low energy cutoff of 50 keV. We discuss important differences between the results of the different codes and provide plausible explanations. We also test the computational performance of the codes. The Supplement contains all results, providing a first benchmark for present and future custom-made codes that are more flexible in including electrodynamic interactions.

  6. High Energy 2-Micron Laser Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    A master oscillator power amplifier, high energy Q-switched 2-micron laser system has been recently demonstrated. The laser and amplifiers are all designed in side-pumped rod configuration, pumped by back-cooled conductive packaged GaAlAs diode laser arrays. This 2-micron laser system provides nearly transform limited beam quality.

  7. High Energy Explosive Yield Enhancer Using Microencapsulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The invention consists of a class of high energy explosive yield enhancers created through the use of microencapsulation techniques. The... microcapsules consist of combinations of highly reactive oxidizers that are encapsulated in either passivated inorganic fuels or inert materials and inorganic...fuels. Depending on the application, the availability of the various oxidizers and fuels within the microcapsules can be customized to increase the

  8. Intercomparison of high energy neutron personnel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.C.; Akabani, G.; Loesch, R.M.

    1993-03-01

    An intercomparison of high-energy neutron personnel dosimeters was performed to evaluate the uniformity of the response characteristics of typical neutron dosimeters presently in use at US Department of Energy (DOE) accelerator facilities. It was necessary to perform an intercomparison because there are no national or international standards for high-energy neutron dosimetry. The testing that is presently under way for the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is limited to the use of neutron sources that range in energy from about 1 keV to 2 MeV. Therefore, the high-energy neutron dosimeters presently in use at DOE accelerator facilities are not being tested effectively. This intercomparison employed neutrons produced by the {sup 9}Be(p,n){sup 9}B interaction at the University of Washington cyclotron, using 50-MeV protons. The resulting neutron energy spectrum extended to a maximum of approximately 50-MeV, with a mean energy of about 20-MeV. Intercomparison results for currently used dosimeters, including Nuclear Type A (NTA) film, thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-albedo, and track-etch dosimeters (TEDs), indicated a wide variation in response to identical doses of high-energy neutrons. Results of this study will be discussed along with a description of plans for future work.

  9. The HESP (High Energy Solar Physics) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kai, K.

    1986-01-01

    A project for space observations of solar flares for the coming solar maximum phase is briefly described. The main objective is to make a comprehensive study of high energy phenomena of flares through simultaneous imagings in both hard and soft X-rays. The project will be performed with collaboration from US scientists. The HESP (High Energy Solar Physics) WG of ISAS (Institute of Space and Astronautical Sciences) has extensively discussed future aspects of space observations of high energy phenomena of solar flares based on successful results of the Hinotori mission, and proposed a comprehensive research program for the next solar maximum, called the HESP (SOLAR-A) project. The objective of the HESP project is to make a comprehensive study of both high energy phenomena of flares and quiet structures including pre-flare states, which have been left uncovered by SMM and Hinotori. For such a study simultaneous imagings with better resolutions in space and time in a wide range of energy will be extremely important.

  10. Indiana University High Energy Physics, Task A

    SciTech Connect

    Brabson, B.; Crittenden, R.; Dzierba, A.; Hanson, G.; Martin, H.; Marshall, T.; Mir, R.; Mouthuy, T.; Ogren, H.; Rust, D.; Teige, S.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses research in High Energy Physics under the following experiments: Meson spectroscopy at BNL; dimuon production at FNAL; the DO collider experiment at FNAL; the Mark II experiment at SLC and PEP; the OPAL experiment at CERN; and the superconducting supercollider.

  11. Status of (US) High Energy Physics Networking

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, H.E.

    1987-02-01

    The current status of Networking to and between computers used by the High Energy Physics community is discussed. Particular attention is given to developments over the last year and to future prospects. Comparison between the current status and that of two years ago indicates that considerable strides have been made but that much remains to be done to achieve an acceptable level of functionality.

  12. Trends in experimental high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.

    1982-06-01

    Data from a scan of papers in Physical Review Letters and Physical Review are used to demonstrate that American high-energy physicists show a pattern of accelerator and instrumentation usage characteristic of that expected from the logistic-substitution model of Marchetti and of Fischer and Pry.

  13. High energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wosiek, B.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental results on high energy nucleus-nucleus interactions are presented. The data are discussed within the framework of standard super-position models and from the point-of-view of the possible formation of new states of matter in heavy ion collisions.

  14. Measurement of the circular polarization in radio emission from extensive air showers confirms emission mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholten, O.; Trinh, T. N. G.; Bonardi, A.; Buitink, S.; Correa, P.; Corstanje, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Falcke, H.; Hörandel, J. R.; Mitra, P.; Mulrey, K.; Nelles, A.; Rachen, J. P.; Rossetto, L.; Schellart, P.; Thoudam, S.; ter Veen, S.; de Vries, K. D.; Winchen, T.

    2016-11-01

    We report here on a novel analysis of the complete set of four Stokes parameters that uniquely determine the linear and/or circular polarization of the radio signal for an extensive air shower. The observed dependency of the circular polarization on azimuth angle and distance to the shower axis is a clear signature of the interfering contributions from two different radiation mechanisms, a main contribution due to a geomagnetically-induced transverse current and a secondary component due to the build-up of excess charge at the shower front. The data, as measured at LOFAR, agree very well with a calculation from first principles. This opens the possibility to use circular polarization as an investigative tool in the analysis of air shower structure, such as for the determination of atmospheric electric fields.

  15. Probing the birth of fast rotating magnetars through high-energy neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kohta; Meszaros, Peter; Zhang Bing

    2009-05-15

    We investigate the high-energy neutrino emission expected from newly born magnetars surrounded by their stellar ejecta. Protons might be accelerated up to 0.1-100 EeV energies possibly by, e.g., the wave dissipation in the winds, leading to hadronic interactions in the stellar ejecta. The resulting PeV-EeV neutrinos can be detected by IceCube/KM3Net with a typical peak time scale of a few days after the birth of magnetars, making the characteristic soft-hard-soft behavior. Detections would be important as a clue to the formation mechanism of magnetars, although there are ambiguities coming from uncertainties of several parameters such as velocity of the ejecta. Nondetections would also lead to useful constraints on the scenario.

  16. Electron emission mechanism during the nanosecond high-voltage pulsed discharge in pressurized air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, D.; Yatom, S.; Vekselman, V.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2012-02-01

    A comparison between the results of x-ray absorption spectroscopy of runaway electrons (RAEs) generated during nanosecond timescale high-voltage (HV) gas discharge and the simulated attenuation of the x-ray flux produced by the runaway electron spectrum calculated using particle-in-cell numerical modeling of such a type of discharge is presented. The particle-in-cell simulation considered the field and explosive emissions (EEs) of the electrons from the cathode. It is shown that the field emission is the dominant emission mechanism for the short-duration (<2.5 ns) high-voltage pulses, while for the long-duration (>5 ns) high-voltage pulses, the explosive emission is likely to play a significant role.

  17. Gamma-ray bursts at high and very high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piron, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are extra-galactic and extremely energetic transient emissions of gamma rays, which are thought to be associated with the death of massive stars or the merger of compact objects in binary systems. Their huge luminosities involve the presence of a newborn stellar-mass black hole emitting a relativistic collimated outflow, which accelerates particles and produces non-thermal emissions from the radio domain to the highest energies. In this article, I review recent progresses in the understanding of GRB jet physics above 100 MeV, based on Fermi observations of bright GRBs. I discuss the physical implications of these observations and their impact on GRB modeling, and I present some prospects for GRB observation at very high energies in the near future. xml:lang="fr"

  18. Local thermodynamic equilibrium in rapidly heated high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aslanyan, V.; Tallents, G. J.

    2014-06-15

    Emission spectra and the dynamics of high energy density plasmas created by optical and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) depend on the populations of atomic levels. Calculations of plasma emission and ionization may be simplified by assuming Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE), where populations are given by the Saha-Boltzmann equation. LTE can be achieved at high densities when collisional processes are much more significant than radiative processes, but may not be valid if plasma conditions change rapidly. A collisional-radiative model has been used to calculate the times taken by carbon and iron plasmas to reach LTE at varying densities and heating rates. The effect of different energy deposition methods, as well as Ionization Potential Depression are explored. This work shows regimes in rapidly changing plasmas, such as those created by optical lasers and FELs, where the use of LTE is justified, because timescales for plasma changes are significantly longer than the times needed to achieve an LTE ionization balance.

  19. Angular and Long Range Rapidity Correlations in Particle Production at High Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the general mechanism leading to long-range rapidity and angular correlations produced in high energy collisions (the "ridge"). This effect naturally appears in the high energy QCD and is strongly sensitive to physics of the gluon saturation. We comment on various recent practical realizations of the main idea, paying special attention to Nc counting and stress the relevance of Pomeron loops.

  20. New Prospects for High-energy Neutrinos from gamma-ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, K.; Nagataki, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2008-01-09

    High-energy neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been expected since the pre-Swift era. Such signals may be detected by future large neutrino detectors such as IceCube. Recently Swift has shown several novel phenomena. We suggest the new prospects for high-energy neutrino emission in the Swift era. Expected signals, if detected, are useful for revealing of the nature of GRBs.

  1. From QCD-based hard-scattering to nonextensive statistical mechanical descriptions of transverse momentum spectra in high-energy pp and pp¯ collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Wilk, Grzegorz; Cirto, Leonardo J. L.; Tsallis, Constantino

    2015-06-22

    Transverse spectra of both jets and hadrons obtained in high-energy $pp$ and $p\\bar p $ collisions at central rapidity exhibit power-law behavior of $1/p_T^n$ at high $p_T$. The power index $n$ is 4-5 for jet production and is slightly greater for hadron production. Furthermore, the hadron spectra spanning over 14 orders of magnitude down to the lowest $p_T$ region in $pp$ collisions at LHC can be adequately described by a single nonextensive statistical mechanical distribution that is widely used in other branches of science. This suggests indirectly the dominance of the hard-scattering process over essentially the whole $p_T$ region at central rapidity in $pp$ collisions at LHC. We show here direct evidences of such a dominance of the hard-scattering process by investigating the power index of UA1 jet spectra over an extended $p_T$ region and the two-particle correlation data of the STAR and PHENIX Collaborations in high-energy $pp$ and $p \\bar p$ collisions at central rapidity. We then study how the showering of the hard-scattering product partons alters the power index of the hadron spectra and leads to a hadron distribution that can be cast into a single-particle non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution. Lastly, because of such a connection, the non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution can be considered as a lowest-order approximation of the hard-scattering of partons followed by the subsequent process of parton showering that turns the jets into hadrons, in high energy $pp$ and $p\\bar p$ collisions.

  2. Magnetic-Assisted Noncontact Triboelectric Nanogenerator Converting Mechanical Energy into Electricity and Light Emissions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Long-Biao; Bai, Gongxun; Wong, Man-Chung; Yang, Zhibin; Xu, Wei; Hao, Jianhua

    2016-04-13

    A magnetic-assisted noncontact triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) is developed by combining a magnetic responsive layer with a TENG. The novel TENG device is applied to harvest mechanical energy which can be converted into electricity and light emissions. This work has potential for energy harvesting, magnetic sensors, self-powered electronics and optoelectronics applications.

  3. Implications of high-energy photons and electrons on target preheat at Z

    SciTech Connect

    Derzon, M.; Nash, T.; Chandler, G.

    1998-06-01

    High-energy photons and electrons on the Z accelerator will deposit energy into a capsule and fuel; this may create a potential preheat problem for ICF. In this paper the authors discuss heating of the capsule and fuel by high-energy photons and electrons. The fuel is heated to <2 eV, in a time-integrated sense, on Z by these particles. Because peak implosion occurs at the peak in the soft x-ray emission on Z, the heating at times of interest is reduced roughly an order of magnitude to {approximately}0.2 eV for times of interest and fuel preheat from this mechanism is concluded to be small. These estimates are generated from time-integrated bremsstrahlung measurements. The uncertainty in the heating is high because the electron spectrum is not known directly, but inferred. In addition the influence of the particles between 5 keV and 60 keV is not known. Given the uncertainties the authors do not know the impact on the feasibility of internal dynamic hohlraums on z-pinch driven ICF implosions on X-1. The authors discuss these issues and suggest directions for further study.

  4. Si film separation obtained by high energy proton implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Braley, C.; Mazen, F.; Papon, A.-M.; Rieutord, F.; Charvet, A.-M.; Ntsoenzok, E.

    2012-11-06

    High energy protons implantation in the 1-1.5 MeV range can be used to detach free-standing thin silicon films with thickness between 15 and 30 {mu}m. Recently, we showed that Si orientation has a strong effect on the layer separation threshold fluence and efficiency. While complete delamination of (111)Si films is achieved, (100)Si films separation is more challenging due to blistering phenomena or partial separation of the implanted layer. In this work, we study the fracture mechanism in (100) and (111)Si after high energy implantation in order to understand the origin of such a behavior. We notably point out that fracture precursor defects, i.e. the platelets, preferentially form on (111) planes, as a consequence of the low strain level in the damaged region in our implantation conditions. Fracture therefore propagates easily in (111)Si, while it requires higher fluence to overcome unfavorable precursors orientation and propagate in (100)Si.

  5. Site specific diel methane emission mechanisms in landfills: A field validated process based on vegetation and climate factors.

    PubMed

    Xin, Danhui; Hao, Yongxia; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Nakayama, Hirofumi; Chai, Xiaoli

    2016-11-01

    Diel methane emission fluxes from a landfill that was covered by vegetation were investigated to reveal the methane emission mechanisms based on the interaction of vegetation characteristics and climate factors. The methane emissions showed large variation between daytime and nighttime, and the trend of methane emissions exhibited clear bimodal patterns from both Setaria viridis- and Neyraudia reynaudiana-covered areas. Plants play an important role in methane transportation as well as methane oxidation. The notable decrease in methane emissions after plants were cut suggests that methane transportation via plants is the primary way of methane emissions in the vegetated areas of landfill. Within plants, the methane emission fluxes were enhanced due to a convection mechanism. Given that the methane emission flux is highly correlated with the solar radiation during daytime, the convection mechanism could be attributed to the increase in solar radiation. Whereas the methane emission flux is affected by a combined impact of the wind speed and pedosphere characteristics during nighttime. An improved understanding of the methane emission mechanisms in vegetated landfills is expected to develop a reliable model for landfill methane emissions and to attenuate greenhouse gas emissions from landfills.

  6. A Search for Very High Energy Gamma Rays from the Missing Link Binary Pulsar J1023+0038 with VERITAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Archer, A.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Biteau, J.; Buchovecky, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cardenzana, J. V.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickinson, H. J.; Eisch, J. D.; Falcone, A.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Flinders, A.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hütten, M.; Håkansson, N.; Holder, J.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kelley-Hoskins, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Krause, M.; Lang, M. J.; Loo, A.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Meagher, K.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nguyen, T.; Nieto, D.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Park, N.; Pelassa, V.; Petrashyk, A.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Pueschel, E.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Rulten, C.; Santander, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tucci, J. V.; Tyler, J.; Varlotta, A.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weiner, O. M.; Weinstein, A.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.; Chernyakova, M.; Roberts, M. S. E.

    2016-11-01

    The binary millisecond radio pulsar PSR J1023+0038 exhibits many characteristics similar to the gamma-ray binary system PSR B1259-63/LS 2883, making it an ideal candidate for the study of high-energy nonthermal emission. It has been the subject of multiwavelength campaigns following the disappearance of the pulsed radio emission in 2013 June, which revealed the appearance of an accretion disk around the neutron star. We present the results of very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray observations carried out by the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System before and after this change of state. Searches for steady and pulsed emission of both data sets yield no significant gamma-ray signal above 100 GeV, and upper limits are given for both a steady and pulsed gamma-ray flux. These upper limits are used to constrain the magnetic field strength in the shock region of the PSR J1023+0038 system. Assuming that VHE gamma rays are produced via an inverse Compton mechanism in the shock region, we constrain the shock magnetic field to be greater than ˜2 G before the disappearance of the radio pulsar and greater than ˜10 G afterward.

  7. Microwave emission from lead zirconate titanate induced by impulsive mechanical load

    SciTech Connect

    Aman, A.; Majcherek, S.; Hirsch, S.; Schmidt, B.

    2015-10-28

    This paper focuses on microwave emission from Lead zirconate titanate Pb [Zr{sub x}Ti{sub 1−x}] O{sub 3} (PZT) induced by mechanical stressing. The mechanical stress was initiated by impact of a sharp tungsten indenter on the upper surface of PZT ceramic. The sequences of microwave and current impulses, which flew from indenter to electric ground, were detected simultaneously. The voltage between the upper and lower surface of ceramic was measured to obtain the behavior of mechanical force acting on ceramic during the impact. It was found that the amplitude, form, and frequency of measured microwave impulses were different by compression and restitution phase of impact. Two different mechanisms of electron emission, responsible for microwave impulse generation, were proposed based on the dissimilar impulse behavior. The field emission from tungsten indenter is dominant during compression, whereas ferroemission dominates during restitution phase. Indeed, it was observed that the direction of the current flow, i.e., sign of current impulses is changed by transitions from compression to restitution phase of impact. The observed dissimilar behavior of microwave impulses, caused by increasing and decreasing applied force, can be used to calculate the contact time and behavior of mechanical force during mechanical impact on ceramic surface. It is shown that the generation of microwave impulses exhibits high reproducibility, impulse intensity, a low damping factor, and high mechanical failure resistance. Based on these microwave emission properties of PZT, the development of new type of stress sensor with spatial resolution of few microns becomes possible.

  8. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The family of High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) instruments consisted of three unmarned scientific observatories capable of detecting the x-rays emitted by the celestial bodies with high sensitivity and high resolution. The celestial gamma-ray and cosmic-ray fluxes were also collected and studied to learn more about the mysteries of the universe. High-Energy rays cannot be studied by Earth-based observatories because of the obscuring effects of the atmosphere that prevent the rays from reaching the Earth's surface. They had been observed initially by sounding rockets and balloons, and by small satellites that do not possess the needed instrumentation capabilities required for high data resolution and sensitivity. The HEAO carried the instrumentation necessary for this capability. In this photograph, an artist's concept of three HEAO spacecraft is shown: HEAO-1, launched on August 12, 1977; HEAO-2, launched on November 13, 1978; and HEAO-3, launched on September 20. 1979.

  9. High energy physics at UC Riverside

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    This report discusses progress made for the following two tasks: experimental high energy physics, Task A, and theoretical high energy physics, Task B. Task A1 covers hadron collider physics. Information for Task A1 includes: personnel/talks/publications; D0: proton-antiproton interactions at 2 TeV; SDC: proton-proton interactions at 40 TeV; computing facilities; equipment needs; and budget notes. The physics program of Task A2 has been the systematic study of leptons and hadrons. Information covered for Task A2 includes: personnel/talks/publications; OPAL at LEP; OPAL at LEP200; CMS at LHC; the RD5 experiment; LSND at LAMPF; and budget notes. The research activities of the Theory Group are briefly discussed and a list of completed or published papers for this period is given.

  10. Power Supplies for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Pranab Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The on-going research and the development projects with Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland has generated enormous enthusiasm and interest amongst all to know about the ultimate findings on `God's Particle'. This paper has made an attempt to unfold the power supply requirements and the methodology adopted to provide the stringent demand of such high energy particle accelerators during the initial stages of the search for the ultimate particles. An attempt has also been made to highlight the present status on the requirement of power supplies in some high energy accelerators with a view that, precautionary measures can be drawn during design and development from earlier experience which will be of help for the proposed third generation synchrotron to be installed in India at a huge cost.

  11. Cosmic ray antiprotons at high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Martin Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    Cosmic ray antiprotons provide a powerful tool to probe dark matter annihilations in our galaxy. The sensitivity of this important channel is, however, diluted by sizable uncertainties in the secondary antiproton background. In this work, we improve the calculation of secondary antiproton production with a particular focus on the high energy regime. We employ the most recent collider data and identify a substantial increase of antiproton cross sections with energy. This increase is driven by the violation of Feynman scaling as well as by an enhanced strange hyperon production. The updated antiproton production cross sections are made publicly available for independent use in cosmic ray studies. In addition, we provide the correlation matrix of cross section uncertainties for the AMS-02 experiment. At high energies, the new cross sections improve the compatibility of the AMS-02 data with a pure secondary origin of antiprotons in cosmic rays.

  12. Strongly Interacting Matter at High Energy Density

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran,L.

    2008-09-07

    This lecture concerns the properties of strongly interacting matter (which is described by Quantum Chromodynamics) at very high energy density. I review the properties of matter at high temperature, discussing the deconfinement phase transition. At high baryon density and low temperature, large N{sub c} arguments are developed which suggest that high baryonic density matter is a third form of matter, Quarkyonic Matter, that is distinct from confined hadronic matter and deconfined matter. I finally discuss the Color Glass Condensate which controls the high energy limit of QCD, and forms the low x part of a hadron wavefunction. The Glasma is introduced as matter formed by the Color Glass Condensate which eventually thermalizes into a Quark Gluon Plasma.

  13. ANTARES: a high energy neutrino undersea telescope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, J. J.

    1999-07-01

    Neutrinos can reveal a brand new Universe at high energies. The ANTARES collaboration, formed in 1996, works towards the building and deployment of a neutrino telescope. This detector could observe and study high energy astrophysical sources such as X-ray binary systems, young supernova remnants or Active Galactic Nuclei and help to discover or set exclusion limits on some of the elementary particles and objects that have been put forward as candidates to fill the Universe (WIMPS, neutralinos, topological defects, Q-balls, etc.). A neutrino telescope will certainly open a new observational window and can shed light on the most energetic phenomena of the Universe. A review of the progress made by the ANTARES collaboration to achieve this goal is presented.

  14. MASS SEPARATION OF HIGH ENERGY PARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, L.

    1962-09-25

    An apparatus and method are described for separating charged, high energy particles of equal momentum forming a beam where the particles differ slightly in masses. Magnetic lenses are utilized to focus the beam and maintain that condition while electrostatic fields located between magnetic lenses are utilized to cause transverse separation of the particles into two beams separated by a sufficient amount to permit an aperture to block one beam. (AEC)

  15. UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherfoord, John P.; Johns, Kenneth A.; Shupe, Michael A.; Cheu, Elliott C.; Varnes, Erich W.; Dienes, Keith; Su, Shufang; Toussaint, William Doug; Sarcevic, Ina

    2013-07-29

    The High Energy Physics Group at the University of Arizona has conducted forefront research in elementary particle physics. Our theorists have developed new ideas in lattice QCD, SUSY phenomenology, string theory phenomenology, extra spatial dimensions, dark matter, and neutrino astrophysics. The experimentalists produced significant physics results on the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider and on the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. In addition, the experimentalists were leaders in detector development and construction, and on service roles in these experiments.

  16. Enhanced adhesion by high energy bombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, Joseph E. (Inventor); Qiu, Yuanxun (Inventor); Tombrello, Thomas A. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Films (12) of gold, copper, silicon nitride, or other materials are firmly bonded to insulator substrates (12) such as silica, a ferrite, or Teflon (polytetrafluorethylene) by irradiating the interface with high energy ions. Apparently, track forming processes in the electronic stopping region cause intermixing in a thin surface layer resulting in improved adhesion without excessive doping. Thick layers can be bonded by depositing or doping the interfacial surfaces with fissionable elements or alpha emitters.

  17. High-energy capacitance electrostatic micromotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baginsky, I. L.; Kostsov, E. G.

    2003-03-01

    The design and parameters of a new electrostatic micromotor with high energy output are described. The motor is created by means of microelectronic technology. Its operation is based on the electromechanic energy conversion during the electrostatic rolling of the metallic films (petals) on the ferroelectric film surface. The mathematical simulation of the main characteristics of the rolling process is carried out. The experimentally measured parameters of the petal step micromotors are shown. The motor operation and its efficiency are investigated.

  18. Infrared astronomy and high energy astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazio, G. G.; Stecker, F. W.

    1977-01-01

    Observations of the diffuse far-infrared flux from the galactic plane, as well as far-infrared measurements of the properties of dense molecular clouds, when combined with recent high-energy gamma-ray measurements and radio observations of carbon monoxide, yield information about the total mass of molecular clouds, the large-scale structure of the inner galaxy, and the density of cosmic rays.

  19. Infrared astronomy and high energy astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazio, G. G.

    1976-01-01

    Observations of the diffuse far infrared flux from the galactic plane as well as far infrared measurements of the properties of dense molecular clouds, when combined with recent high-energy gamma ray measurements and radio observations of carbon monoxide, can yield new information about the total mass of molecular clouds, the large scale structure of the inner galaxy, and the density of cosmic rays. These observations are discussed.

  20. HIGH ENERGY RATE EXTRUSION OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, L.

    1963-07-23

    A method of extruding uranium at a high energy rate is described. Conditions during the extrusion are such that the temperature of the metal during extrusion reaches a point above the normal alpha to beta transition, but the metal nevertheless remains in the alpha phase in accordance with the Clausius- Clapeyron equation. Upon exiting from the die, the metal automatically enters the beta phase, after which the metal is permitted to cool. (AEC)

  1. High Energy Density Film Capacitors (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    capacitor film, and the test of our first generation prototype capacitors . II. HIGH-K POLYMER DIELECTRIC MATERIALS Commercial polypropylene (PP...metallized polypropylene energy storage capacitors ”, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., 30(5): 1939 (2002). [2] W. Clelland, et al., Paktron Division of...AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2010-2127 HIGH ENERGY DENSITY FILM CAPACITORS (PREPRINT) Shihai Zhang, Brian Zellers, Jim Henrish, Shawn Rockey, and Dean

  2. Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D A; Vogt, R

    2005-03-31

    The authors propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interface. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from Bevalac, AGS and SPS to RHIC and CERN-LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems, and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for inertial confinement fusion and target and source development for upcoming facilities such as the Next Linear Collider. To enhance the utility of this database, they propose periodically performing evaluations of the data and summarizing the results in topical reviews.

  3. High energy neutrinos from big bang particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezinskij, V. S.

    1992-10-01

    The production of high energy neutrinos by big bang particles is reviewed. The big bang particles are divided into two categories: dark matter particles (DMP) and the exotic relics whose mass density can be smaller than the critical one. For the case of DMP the neutralino and the gravitino are considered. High energy neutrinos can be produced due to the capture of the neutralinos in the earth and the sun, with the subsequent annihilation of these particles there. If R-parity is weakly violated, the neutralino decay can be a source of high energy neutrinos. The gravitino as DMP is unobservable directly, unless R-parity is violated and the gravitino decays. For thermal exotic relics a very general conclusion is reached: the detectable neutrino flux can be produced only by long-lived particles with τx > t0, where t0 is the age of the universe. Very large neutrino fluxes can be produced by superheavy metastable relics in the particular cosmological scenario where the violent entropy production occurs.

  4. High energy neutrinos from big bang particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezinsky, V. S.

    1993-04-01

    The production of high energy neutrinos by big bang particles is reviewed. The big bang particles are divided into two categories: dark matter particles (DMP), i.e. those with the critical mass density (ϱX = ϱc) at present, and the exotic relics whose mass density can be smaller than the critical one. For the case of DMP the neutralino and the gravitino are considered. High energy neutrinos can be produced due to the capture of the neutralinos in the earth and the sun, with the subsequent annihilation of these particles there. If R-parity is weakly violated, the neutralino decay can be a source of high energy neutrinos. The gravitino as DMP is unobservable directly, unless R-parity is violated and the gravitino decays. For thermal exotic relics a very general conclusion is reached: the detectable neutrino flux can be produced only by long-lived particles with τX > to, where to is the age of the Universe (the exceptional case is the decay only to the neutrinos). Very large neutrino fluxes can be produced by superheavy (up to ~ 1018 GeV) metastable relics in the particular cosmological scenario where the violent entropy production occurs.

  5. High energy photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; Zerwas, P.M.

    1994-07-01

    The collisions of high energy photons produced at a electron-positron collider provide a comprehensive laboratory for testing QCD, electroweak interactions and extensions of the standard model. The luminosity and energy of the colliding photons produced by back-scattering laser beams is expected to be comparable to that of the primary e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions. In this overview, we shall focus on tests of electroweak theory in photon-photon annihilation, particularly {gamma}{gamma} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}, {gamma}{gamma} {yields} Higgs bosons, and higher-order loop processes, such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, Z{gamma} and ZZ. Since each photon can be resolved into a W{sup +}W{sup minus} pair, high energy photon-photon collisions can also provide a remarkably background-free laboratory for studying WW collisions and annihilation. We also review high energy {gamma}{gamma} tests of quantum chromodynamics, such as the scaling of the photon structure function, t{bar t} production, mini-jet processes, and diffractive reactions.

  6. High-energy laser plasma diagnostic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mingjun M.; Aye, Tin M.; Fruehauf, Norbert; Savant, Gajendra D.; Erwin, Daniel A.; Smoot, Brayton E.; Loose, Richard W.

    2000-07-01

    This paper describes the development of a non-contact diagnosis system for analyzing the plasma density profile, temperature profile, and ionic species of a high energy laser-generated plasma. The system was developed by Physical Optics Corporation in cooperation with the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command, High Energy Laser Systems Test Facility at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. The non- contact diagnostic system consists of three subsystems: an optical fiber-based interferometer, a plasma spectrometer, and a genetic algorithm-based fringe-image processor. In the interferometer subsystem, the transmitter and the receiver are each packaged as a compact module. A narrow notch filter rejects strong plasma light, passing only the laser probing beam, which carries the plasma density information. The plasma spectrum signal is collected by an optical fiber head, which is connected to a compact spectrometer. Real- time genetic algorithm-based data processing/display permits instantaneous analysis of the plasma characteristics. The research effort included design and fabrication of a vacuum chamber, and high-energy laser plasma generation. Compactness, real-time operation, and ease of use make the laser plasma diagnosis system well suited for dual use applications such as diagnosis of electric arc and other industrial plasmas.

  7. Breakthrough in 4π ion emission mechanism understanding in plasma focus devices

    PubMed Central

    Sohrabi, Mehdi; Zarinshad, Arefe; Habibi, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Ion emission angular distribution mechanisms in plasma focus devices (PFD) have not yet been well developed and understood being due to the lack of an efficient wide-angle ion distribution image detection system to characterize a PFD space in detail. Present belief is that the acceleration of ions points from “anode top” upwards in forward direction within a small solid angle. A breakthrough is reported in this study, by mega-size position-sensitive polycarbonate ion image detection systems invented, on discovery of 4π ion emission from the “anode top” in a PFD space after plasma pinch instability and radial run-away of ions from the “anode cathodes array” during axial acceleration of plasma sheaths before the radial phase. These two ion emission source mechanisms behave respectively as a “Point Ion Source” and a “Line Ion Source” forming “Ion Cathode Shadows” on mega-size detectors. We believe that the inventions and discoveries made here will open new horizons for advanced ion emission studies towards better mechanisms understanding and in particular will promote efficient applications of PFDs in medicine, science and technology. PMID:27941832

  8. Breakthrough in 4π ion emission mechanism understanding in plasma focus devices.

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, Mehdi; Zarinshad, Arefe; Habibi, Morteza

    2016-12-12

    Ion emission angular distribution mechanisms in plasma focus devices (PFD) have not yet been well developed and understood being due to the lack of an efficient wide-angle ion distribution image detection system to characterize a PFD space in detail. Present belief is that the acceleration of ions points from "anode top" upwards in forward direction within a small solid angle. A breakthrough is reported in this study, by mega-size position-sensitive polycarbonate ion image detection systems invented, on discovery of 4π ion emission from the "anode top" in a PFD space after plasma pinch instability and radial run-away of ions from the "anode cathodes array" during axial acceleration of plasma sheaths before the radial phase. These two ion emission source mechanisms behave respectively as a "Point Ion Source" and a "Line Ion Source" forming "Ion Cathode Shadows" on mega-size detectors. We believe that the inventions and discoveries made here will open new horizons for advanced ion emission studies towards better mechanisms understanding and in particular will promote efficient applications of PFDs in medicine, science and technology.

  9. Breakthrough in 4π ion emission mechanism understanding in plasma focus devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, Mehdi; Zarinshad, Arefe; Habibi, Morteza

    2016-12-01

    Ion emission angular distribution mechanisms in plasma focus devices (PFD) have not yet been well developed and understood being due to the lack of an efficient wide-angle ion distribution image detection system to characterize a PFD space in detail. Present belief is that the acceleration of ions points from “anode top” upwards in forward direction within a small solid angle. A breakthrough is reported in this study, by mega-size position-sensitive polycarbonate ion image detection systems invented, on discovery of 4π ion emission from the “anode top” in a PFD space after plasma pinch instability and radial run-away of ions from the “anode cathodes array” during axial acceleration of plasma sheaths before the radial phase. These two ion emission source mechanisms behave respectively as a “Point Ion Source” and a “Line Ion Source” forming “Ion Cathode Shadows” on mega-size detectors. We believe that the inventions and discoveries made here will open new horizons for advanced ion emission studies towards better mechanisms understanding and in particular will promote efficient applications of PFDs in medicine, science and technology.

  10. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations of fundamental and harmonic plasma radio emission mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurgood, J. O.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2015-12-01

    Aims: The simulation of three-wave interaction based plasma emission, thought to be the underlying mechanism for Type III solar radio bursts, is a challenging task requiring fully-kinetic, multi-dimensional models. This paper aims to resolve a contradiction in past attempts, whereby some studies indicate that no such processes occur. Methods: We self-consistently simulate three-wave based plasma emission through all stages by using 2D, fully kinetic, electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations of relaxing electron beams using the EPOCH2D code. Results: Here we present the results of two simulations; Run 1 (nb/n0 = 0.0057, vb/ Δvb = vb/Ve = 16) and Run 2 (nb/n0 = 0.05, vb/ Δvb = vb/Ve = 8), which we find to permit and prohibit plasma emission respectively. We show that the possibility of plasma emission is contingent upon the frequency of the initial electrostatic waves generated by the bump-in-tail instability, and that these waves may be prohibited from participating in the necessary three-wave interactions due to frequency conservation requirements. In resolving this apparent contradiction through a comprehensive analysis, in this paper we present the first self-consistent demonstration of fundamental and harmonic plasma emission from a single-beam system via fully kinetic numerical simulation. We caution against simulating astrophysical radio bursts using unrealistically dense beams (a common approach which reduces run time), as the resulting non-Langmuir characteristics of the initial wave modes significantly suppresses emission. Comparison of our results also indicates that, contrary to the suggestions of previous authors, an alternative plasma emission mechanism based on two counter-propagating beams is unnecessary in an astrophysical context. Finally, we also consider the action of the Weibel instability which generates an electromagnetic beam mode. As this provides a stronger contribution to electromagnetic energy than the emission, we stress that

  11. Understanding nature's particle accelerators using high energy gamma-ray survey instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeysekara, Anushka Udara

    Nature's particle accelerators, such as Pulsars, Pulsar Wind Nebulae, Active Galactic Nuclei and Supernova Remnants accelerate charged particles to very high energies that then produce high energy photons. The particle acceleration mechanisms and the high energy photon emission mechanisms are poorly understood phenomena. These mechanisms can be understood either by studying individual sources in detail or, alternatively, using the collective properties of a sample of sources. Recent development of GeV survey instruments, such as Fermi-LAT, and TeV survey instruments, such as Milagro, provides a large sample of high energy gamma-ray flux measurements from galactic and extra-galactic sources. In this thesis I provide constraints on GeV and TeV radiation mechanisms using the X-ray-TeV correlations and GeV-TeV correlations. My data sample was obtained from three targeted searches for extragalactic sources and two targeted search for galactic sources, using the existing Milagro sky maps. The first extragalactic candidate list consists of Fermi-LAT GeV extragalactic sources, and the second extragalactic candidate list consists of TeVCat extragalactic sources that have been detected by Imaging Atmospheric Cerenkov Telescopes (IACTs). In both extragalactic candidate lists Markarian 421 was the only source detected by Milagro. A comparison between the Markarian 421 time-averaged flux, measured by Milagro, and the flux measurements of transient states, measured by IACTs, is discussed. The third extragalactic candidate list is a list of potential TeV emitting BL Lac candidates that was synthesized using X-ray observations of BL Lac objects and a Synchrotron Self-Compton model. Milagro's sensitivity was not sufficient to detect any of those candidates. However, the 95% confidence flux upper limits of those sources were above the predicted flux. Therefore, these results provide evidence to conclude that the Synchrotron Self-Compton model for BL Lac objects is still a viable

  12. Gaseous emissions from the storage of untreated slurries and the fractions obtained after mechanical separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinuccio, E.; Berg, W.; Balsari, P.

    A laboratory-scale study was set up to investigate ammonia (NH 3), nitrous oxide (N 2O), carbon dioxide (CO 2) and methane (CH 4) emissions during storage of untreated pig and cattle slurry and the fractions (solid and liquid) obtained by mechanical separation. The solid and liquid fractions were obtained from the same untreated slurry by means of a lab-scale mechanical separator. The manures were stored for a period of 30 days in open vessels (1500 cm 3 capacity) in two temperature-controlled rooms, which were kept at 5±0.5 and 25±0.2 °C. Gaseous emissions were determined using a dynamic chamber method and infrared photoacoustic detection (IPD). Over the storage period, gaseous emissions from pig manures were significantly ( P<0.05) higher than those from cattle manures. N 2O fluxes of up to 232 mg m -2 h -1 were measured, but from pig solid fraction only. Between 40.8% (from pig liquid fraction stored at 25 °C) and 3.60% (from untreated cattle slurry stored at 25 °C) of the initial nitrogen content of the manures was lost as NH 3. Over the 30-day-storage period, the predominant emission of carbon was in the CO 2 form. Total C-CH 4 losses, expressed as a percent of the carbon initially present in the volatile solids (C-VS), ranged from 0.60% to 12.8% for pig manures and from 0.23% to 1.56% for cattle manures. The mechanical separation of cattle slurry increased by up to 30% the emissions of CO 2 equivalents to the atmosphere, during the storage of the separated fractions, when compared with the slurries. Results indicated that NH 3, N 2O, CO 2 and CH 4 emissions were affected by the interaction between a number of variables, including storage temperature, chemical characteristics and type of manure. Results also indicated that mechanical separation does not reduce emissions, but has the potential to increase the emissions of CO 2 equivalents to the atmosphere during the storage of the separated fractions.

  13. Adventures in high energy theory and phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Dean Jonathan

    Various studies of high energy theory and phenomenology are presented. We first present a mechanism that naturally produces light Dirac neutrinos. The central idea is that the right-handed neutrinos are composite. Any realistic composite model must involve 'hidden flavor' chiral symmetries. In general some of these symmetries may survive confinement, and in particular, if a U(1) survives it must imply an exact B -- L symmetry at low energies. Dirac neutrinos are therefore produced, which are naturally light due to compositeness. In general, elementary keV sterile Dirac neutrinos can be a natural ingredient of this composite neutrino scenario. For a certain class of composite neutrino theories, these sterile neutrinos naturally have the appropriate mixing angles to be resonantly produced warm dark matter (WDM). Alternatively, we show these sterile neutrinos can be WDM produced by an entropy-diluted thermal freeze-out, with the necessary entropy production arising not from an out-of-equilibrium decay, but rather from the confinement of the composite neutrino sector, provided there is sufficient supercooling. We next present a formalism for the flavor oscillation of unstable particles that relies only upon the analytic structure of the time Fourier-transformed two-point function. We derive exact oscillation probability and integrated oscillation probability formulae, and verify that our results reproduce the known results for both neutrino and neutral meson oscillation in the expected regimes of parameter space. The generality of our approach permits us to investigate flavor oscillation in exotic parameter regimes, and present the corresponding oscillation formulae. Kinematic edges in cascade decays provide a probe of the masses of new particles. In some new physics scenarios the decay chain involves intermediate particles of different flavors that can mix and oscillate. We discuss the implication of such oscillation, and in particular its interplay with the non

  14. Mechanisms and modeling of the effects of additives on the nitrogen oxides emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Krishna P.; Nguyen, Hung Lee; Kang, M. Paul

    1991-01-01

    A theoretical study on the emission of the oxides of nitrogen in the combustion of hydrocarbons is presented. The current understanding of the mechanisms and the rate parameters for gas phase reactions were used to calculate the NO(x) emission. The possible effects of different chemical species on thermal NO(x), on a long time scale were discussed. The mixing of these additives at various stages of combustion were considered and NO(x) concentrations were calculated; effects of temperatures were also considered. The chemicals such as hydrocarbons, H2, CH3OH, NH3, and other nitrogen species were chosen as additives in this discussion. Results of these calculations can be used to evaluate the effects of these additives on the NO(x) emission in the industrial combustion system.

  15. Silicon photomultipliers for next generation high-energy space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, K.; Knödlseder, J.; Delaigue, S.; Galliano, M.; Houret, B.; Ramon, P.; Rouaix, G.; Virmontois, C.

    2015-08-01

    Photon detection is a central element of any high-energy astronomy instrumentation. One classical setup that has proven successful in many missions is the combination of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) with scintillators, converting incoming high-energy photons into visible light, which in turn is converted in an electrical impulse. Although being extremely sensitive and rapid, PMTs have the drawback of being bulky, fragile, and are requiring a high-voltage power supply of up to several thousand volts. Recent technological advances in the development of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) make them a promising alternative to PMTs in essentially all their applications. We have started an R and D program to assess the possibility of using SiPMs for space-based applications in the domain of high-energy astronomy. We have setup a test bench using a vacuum vessel to reproduce a space-representative environment in our lab. We will present our test bench as well as first results of a characterization campaign of SiPM detectors from 3 different suppliers. We have planned to select after the characterization campaign one baseline detector for which we will design a dedicated front-end electronics and mechanical system. Furthermore, we plan to develop a specific low noise voltage power supply that ensures the stability of the SiPMs. Our ultimate goal is to qualify the system for a Technical Readiness Level of 5.

  16. PANCHROMATIC OBSERVATIONS OF THE TEXTBOOK GRB 110205A: CONSTRAINING PHYSICAL MECHANISMS OF PROMPT EMISSION AND AFTERGLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, W.; Shen, R. F.; Sakamoto, T.; Beardmore, A. P.; De Pasquale, M.; Wu, X. F.; Zhang, B.; Gorosabel, J.; Urata, Y.; Sugita, S.; Pozanenko, A.; Sahu, D. K.; Im, M.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Andreev, M.; Klunko, E. E-mail: rfshen@astro.utoronto.ca; and others

    2012-06-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of a bright, long-duration (T{sub 90} {approx} 257 s) GRB 110205A at redshift z = 2.22. The optical prompt emission was detected by Swift/UVOT, ROTSE-IIIb, and BOOTES telescopes when the gamma-ray burst (GRB) was still radiating in the {gamma}-ray band, with optical light curve showing correlation with {gamma}-ray data. Nearly 200 s of observations were obtained simultaneously from optical, X-ray, to {gamma}-ray (1 eV to 5 MeV), which makes it one of the exceptional cases to study the broadband spectral energy distribution during the prompt emission phase. In particular, we clearly identify, for the first time, an interesting two-break energy spectrum, roughly consistent with the standard synchrotron emission model in the fast cooling regime. Shortly after prompt emission ({approx}1100 s), a bright (R = 14.0) optical emission hump with very steep rise ({alpha} {approx} 5.5) was observed, which we interpret as the reverse shock (RS) emission. It is the first time that the rising phase of an RS component has been closely observed. The full optical and X-ray afterglow light curves can be interpreted within the standard reverse shock (RS) + forward shock (FS) model. In general, the high-quality prompt and afterglow data allow us to apply the standard fireball model to extract valuable information, including the radiation mechanism (synchrotron), radius of prompt emission (R{sub GRB} {approx} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm), initial Lorentz factor of the outflow ({Gamma}{sub 0} {approx} 250), the composition of the ejecta (mildly magnetized), the collimation angle, and the total energy budget.

  17. Greenhouse gas emissions from mechanical and biological waste treatment of municipal waste.

    PubMed

    Clemens, J; Cuhls, C

    2003-06-01

    The mechanical and biological waste treatment (MBT) is an increasingly important technology for the treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW) before landfilling. This process includes composting of the material with intensive aeration in order to minimize the organic fraction that may induce methane and leachate emissions after landfilling. The exhaust air is treated by biofilters to remove odorous and volatile organic compounds. The emission of direct and indirect greenhouse gases, namely methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), ammonia (NH3), nitric (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) was studied in four existing treatment plants. All gases except NO were emitted from the composting material. The emission factors were 12 to 185 kg ton(-1) substrate for CO2, 6-12 x 10(3) g ton(-1) substrate for CH4, 1.44 to 378 g ton(-1) substrate for N2O and 18-1150 g ton(-1) for NH3. In general, emission factors increased with increasing treatment time. The biofilters had no net effect on CH4, but removed 13-89% of the NH3. For CO2 the biofilters were a small, for N2O a major and for NO the exclusive source. Approximately 26% of the NH3-N that was removed in the biofilter was transformed into N2O when NH3 was the exclusive nitrogen source. Assuming that all municipal waste was treated by MBT, the emissions would account for 0.3 to 5% of the N2O and for 0.1 to 3% of the CH4 emissions in Germany, respectively. Optimising aeration and removing NH3 before the exhaust gas enters the biofilter could lead to reduced greenhouse gas emissions.

  18. 14 CFR 27.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 27... Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must be able to...

  19. 14 CFR 29.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 29... § 29.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  20. 14 CFR 25.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 25... § 25.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  1. 14 CFR 25.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 25... § 25.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  2. 14 CFR 27.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 27... Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must be able to...

  3. 14 CFR 29.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 29... § 29.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  4. 14 CFR 29.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 29... § 29.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  5. 14 CFR 25.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 25... § 25.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  6. 14 CFR 27.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 27... Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must be able to...

  7. 14 CFR 29.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 29... § 29.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  8. 14 CFR 27.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 27... Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must be able to...

  9. 14 CFR 25.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 25... § 25.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  10. 14 CFR 25.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 25... § 25.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  11. 14 CFR 27.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 27... Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must be able to...

  12. 14 CFR 29.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 29... § 29.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  13. High energy hadron collisions in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, E. M.; Ryskin, M. G.

    1990-05-01

    In this review we present the microscopic approach to large cross section physics at high energy, based on the leading logarithmic approximation of perturbative QCD and the reggeon diagram technique. We insist that at high energy the main source of secondary hadrons is the production and fragmentation of the gluon minijets with transverse momentum qt ≈ q0, which rapidly growswith energy, namely q2t≈ q20≈Λ 2 exp(2.5√ln s). Such a large value of the transverse momentum allows us to adopt perturbative QCD for high hadron collisions. The completely avoid the unknown confinement problem, a new scale overlineQ0 ( overlineQ0≈1 GeV, α s( overlineQ20)<1) is introduced in our calculations and only momenta qt> overlineQ0 for gluons are taken into account in any integration. All our results only slightly depend on the value of overlineQ0. It is shown that perturbative QCD is able to describe the main properties of the hedron interactions at high energy, namely, the inclusive spectra of secondary hadrons as functions of y and qt, including small qt⪅300MeV, in a wide energy range √ s=50-900 GeV, the multiplicity distribution, the mean transverse momentum versus multiplicity and so on. We use only three phenomenological parameters in such a description of the experimental data; these values are in agreement with theoretical estimates. Our approach predicts a rapid increase of the mean transverse momentum for secondary hadrons, qt≈ q0, where q0=2.5 GeV at √ S=0.5 TeV, and q0⋍7 GeV at √ S=40 TeV, the total multiplicity N≈ q20, the total cross section σ t≈ln 2s and a comparatively slow increase of the diffraction dissociation cross section σ D≈ln s.

  14. The evolution of high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.

    1994-08-01

    Accelerators have been devised and built for two reasons: In the first place, by physicists who needed high energy particles in order to have a means to explore the interactions between particles that probe the fundamental elementary forces of nature. And conversely, sometimes accelerator builders produce new machines for higher energy than ever before just because it can be done, and then challenge potential users to make new discoveries with the new means at hand. These two approaches or motivations have gone hand in hand. This lecture traces how high energy particle accelerators have grown from tools used for esoteric small-scale experiments to the gigantic projects of today. So far all the really high-energy machines built and planned in the world--except the SLC--have been ring accelerators and storage rings using the strong-focusing method. But this method has not removed the energy limit, it has only pushed it higher. It would seem unlikely that one can go beyond the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)--but in fact a workshop was held in Sicily in November 1991, concerned with the question of extrapolating to 100 TeV. Other acceleration and beam-forming methods are now being discussed--collective fields, laser acceleration, wake-field accelerators etc., all aimed primarily at making linear colliders possible and more attractive than with present radiofrequency methods. So far it is not entirely clear which of these schemes will dominate particle physics in the future--maybe something that has not been thought of as yet.

  15. Toward an Understanding of GRB Prompt Emission Mechanism. I. The Origin of Spectral Lags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Z. Lucas; Zhang, Bing

    2016-07-01

    Despite decades of investigations, the physical mechanism that powers the bright prompt γ-ray emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is still not identified. One important observational clue that still has not been properly interpreted is the existence of time lags of broad light curve pulses in different energy bands, referred to as “spectral lags.” Here, we show that the traditional view invoking the high-latitude emission “curvature effect” of a relativistic jet cannot account for spectral lags. Rather, the observed spectral lags demand the sweep of a spectral peak across the observing energy band in a specific manner. The duration of the broad pulses and inferred typical Lorentz factor of GRBs require that the emission region be in an optically thin emission region far from the GRB central engine. We construct a simple physical model invoking synchrotron radiation from a rapidly expanding outflow. We show that the observed spectral lags appear naturally in our model light curves given that (1) the gamma-ray photon spectrum is curved (as observed), (2) the magnetic field strength in the emitting region decreases with radius as the region expands in space, and (3) the emission region itself undergoes rapid bulk acceleration as the prompt γ-rays are produced. These requirements are consistent with a Poynting-flux-dominated jet abruptly dissipating magnetic energy at a large distance from the engine.

  16. Cooperative research in high energy astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Details of the activities conducted under the joint effort of the University of Maryland and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics are detailed for the period July 1989 through April 1994. The research covered a variety of topics including: (1) detection of cosmic rays and studies of the solar modulation of galactic cosmic rays; (2) support work for several x-ray satellites; (3) high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy of celestial sources; (4)theoretical astrophysics; and (5) active galaxies.

  17. Three Decades of Explosive High Energy Transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts are the most brilliant explosions in space. The first GRB was discovered on 1967, just 40 years ago. It took several years and multiple generations of space and ground instruments to unravel some of the mysteries of this phenomenon. However, many questions remain open today. I will discuss the history, evolution and current status of the GRB field and its contributions in our understanding of the transient high energy sky. Finally, I will describe how GRBs can be utilized in future missions as tools, to probe the cosmic chemical evolution of the Universe and the star formation rates.

  18. High-energy neutrinos from radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker Tjus, J.; Eichmann, B.; Halzen, F.; Kheirandish, A.; Saba, S. M.

    2014-06-01

    The IceCube experiment has recently reported the first observation of high-energy cosmic neutrinos. Their origin is still unknown. In this paper, we investigate the possibility that they originate in active galaxies. We show that hadronic interactions (pp) in the generally less powerful, more frequent, FR-I radio galaxies are one of the candidate source classes being able to accommodate the observation while the more powerful, less frequent, class of FR-II radio galaxies has too low of a column depths to explain the signal.

  19. (Studies of high energy phenomena using muons)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This report covers the activities of the NIU high energy physics group as supported by DOE contract FG02-91ER40641 during the period from March 1991 to December 1991. Our group has three main efforts. The first is the D0 experiment at the Fermilab proton-antiproton collider, with major emphasis on its muon system. The second is the involvement of a portion of the group in Fermilab Experiment 789. Finally, we are also members of the SDC collaboration at the SSC.

  20. [Experimental and theoretical high energy physics program

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, J.; Gaidos, J.A.; Loeffler, F.J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Palfrey, T.R.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.

    1993-04-01

    Experimental and theoretical high-energy physics research at Purdue is summarized in a number of reports. Subjects treated include the following: the CLEO experiment for the study of heavy flavor physics; gas microstrip detectors; particle astrophysics; affine Kac{endash}Moody algebra; nonperturbative mass bounds on scalar and fermion systems due to triviality and vacuum stability constraints; resonance neutrino oscillations; e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions at CERN; {bar p}{endash}p collisions at FNAL; accelerator physics at Fermilab; development work for the SDC detector at SSC; TOPAZ; D-zero physics; physics beyond the standard model; and the Collider Detector at Fermilab. (RWR)

  1. Global Λ polarization in high energy collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yilong; Wang, Dujuan; Csernai, László P.

    2017-03-01

    With a Yang-Mills flux-tube initial state and a high-resolution (3+1)D particle-in-cell relativistic (PICR) hydrodynamics simulation, we calculate the Λ polarization for different energies. The origination of polarization in high energy collisions is discussed, and we find linear impact parameter dependence of the global Λ polarization. Furthermore, the global Λ polarization in our model decreases very quickly in the low energy domain, and the decline curve fits well the recent results of Beam Energy Scan (BES) program launched by the STAR Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The time evolution of polarization is also discussed.

  2. GEM Applications Outside High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Serge Duarte

    2013-04-01

    From its invention in 1997, the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) has been applied in nuclear and high energy physics experiments. Over time however, other applications have also exploited the favorable properties of GEMs. The use of GEMs in these applications will be explained in principle and practice. This paper reviews applications in research, beam instrumentation and homeland security. The detectors described measure neutral radiations such as photons, x-rays, gamma rays and neutrons, as well as all kinds of charged radiation. This paper provides an overview of the still expanding range of possibilities of this versatile detector concept.

  3. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, R. C.

    1983-03-01

    Sources of very high energy gamma rays (E(BETA) (11) eV) and improvement of the instrumentation of detectors in this energy regime were investigated. Approximately 4 x 10(5) Cerepkov air shower events from the region of Cygnus X-3 and the Crab nebula were collected with the JPL instrumentation during the fall of 1982. Significant improvement on the 1981 sensitivity to source variations and the development of a Cerenkov air shower camera are reported. A suitable mirror and mount for use as a detector auxiliary to the primary 10 inch Mt. Hopkins detector is located.

  4. Energy spectra of high energy atmospheric neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitsui, K.; Minorikawa, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Focusing on high energy neutrinos ( or = 1 TeV), a new calculation of atmospheric neutrino intensities was carried out taking into account EMC effects observed in P-A collisions by accelerator, recent measurement of primary cosmic ray spectrum and results of cosmic ray muon spectrum and charge ratio. Other features of the present calculation are (1) taking into account kinematics of three body decays of kaons and charm particles in diffusion equations and (2) taking into account energy dependence of kaon production.

  5. High-energy supersymmetry at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Caron-Huot, Simon

    2009-06-15

    We study the leading thermal corrections to various observables in the high-energy limit in supersymmetric theories and observe that they preserve supersymmetry. Our findings generalize previous observations on the equality of asymptotic thermal masses in weakly coupled plasmas. We observe supersymmetry in the leading thermal effects for both the real and imaginary parts of self-energies, on the light cone and away from it, in both weakly and strongly interacting theories. All observed supersymmetry violations are found to be suppressed by more than two powers of the (large) energy.

  6. Diffuse fluxes of cosmic high energy neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1978-01-01

    Production spectra of high-energy neutrinos from galactic cosmic ray interactions with interstellar gas and extragalactic ultrahigh energy cosmic-ray interactions with microwave black-body photons are presented and discussed. These production processes involve the decay of charged pions and are thus related to the production of cosmic gamma-rays from the decay of neutral pions. Estimates of the neutrino fluxes from various diffuse cosmic sources are then made and the reasons fro significant differences with previous estimates are discussed. Predicted event rates for a DUMAND type detection system are significantly lower than early estimates indicated.

  7. Computing support for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, P.; Yelton, J.

    1996-12-01

    This computing proposal (Task S) is submitted separately but in support of the High Energy Experiment (CLEO, Fermilab, CMS) and Theory tasks. The authors have built a very strong computing base at Florida over the past 8 years. In fact, computing has been one of the main contributions to their experimental collaborations, involving not just computing capacity for running Monte Carlos and data reduction, but participation in many computing initiatives, industrial partnerships, computing committees and collaborations. These facts justify the submission of a separate computing proposal.

  8. High energy H- ion transport and stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    During the Proton Driver design study based on an 8 GeV superconducting RF H{sup -} linac, a major concern is the feasibility of transport and injection of high energy H{sup -} ions because the energy of H{sup -} beam would be an order of magnitude higher than the existing ones. This paper will focus on two key technical issues: (1) stripping losses during transport (including stripping by blackbody radiation, magnetic field and residual gases); (2) stripping efficiency of carbon foil during injection.

  9. EXTRACTOR FOR HIGH ENERGY CHARGED PARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Lambertson, G.R.

    1964-04-01

    A particle-extracting apparatus for use with a beam of high-energy charged particles such as travel in an evacuated chamber along a circular equilibrium axis is described. A magnetized target is impacted relatively against the beam whereby the beam particles are deflected from the beam by the magnetic induction in the target. To this end the target may be moved into the beam or the beam may coast into the target and achieve high angular particle deflection and slow extraction. A deflecting septum magnet may additionally be used for deflection at even sharper angles. (AEC)

  10. High-energy pulsar models: Developments and new questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.

    2014-03-01

    The past few years have seen a major advance in observational knowledge of high-energy (HE) pulsars. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and {AGILE} have increased the number of known γ-ray pulsars by an order of magnitude, its members being divided roughly equally among millisecond pulsars (MSPs), young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. Many new and diverse emission characteristics are being measured, while radio and X-ray follow-up observations increase the pulsar detection rate and enrich our multiwavelength picture of these extreme sources. The wealth of new data has provided impetus for further development and improvement of existing theoretical pulsar models. Geometric light curve (LC) modelling has uncovered three broad classes into which HE pulsars fall: those where the radio profile leads, is aligned with, or lags the γ-ray profile. For example, the original MSP and original black widow system are members of the second class, requiring co-located emission regions and thereby breaking with traditional notions of radio emission origin. These models imply narrow accelerator gaps in the outer magnetosphere, indicating copious pair production even in MSP magnetospheres that were previously thought to be pair-starved. The increased quality and variety of the LCs necessitate construction of ever more sophisticated models. We will review progress in global magnetosphere solutions which specify a finite conductivity on field lines above the stellar surface, filling the gap between the standard vacuum and force-free (FF; plasma-filled) models. The possibility of deriving phase-resolved spectra for the brightest pulsars, coupled with the fact that the HE pulsar population is sizable enough to allow sampling of various pulsar geometries, will enable much more stringent testing of future radiation models. Reproduction of the observed phase-resolved behavior of this disparate group will be one of the next frontiers in pulsar science, impacting on our

  11. High-Energy Pulsar Models: Developments and New Questions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.

    2014-01-01

    The past few years have seen a major advance in observational knowledge of high-energy (HE) pulsars. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and AGILE have increased the number of known gamma-ray pulsars by an order of magnitude, its members being divided roughly equally among millisecond pulsars (MSPs), young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. Many new and diverse emission characteristics are being measured, while radio and X-ray follow-up observations increase the pulsar detection rate and enrich our multiwavelength picture of these extreme sources. The wealth of new data has provided impetus for further development and improvement of existing theoretical pulsar models. Geometric light curve (LC) modelling has uncovered three broad classes into which HE pulsars fall: those where the radio profile leads, is aligned with, or lags the gamma-ray profile. For example, the original MSP and original black widow system are members of the second class, requiring co-located emission regions and thereby breaking with traditional notions of radio emission origin. These models imply narrow accelerator gaps in the outer magnetosphere, indicating copious pair production even in MSP magnetospheres that were previously thought to be pair-starved. The increased quality and variety of the LCs necessitate construction of ever more sophisticated models. We will review progress in global magnetosphere solutions which specify a finite conductivity on field lines above the stellar surface, filling the gap between the standard vacuum and force-free (FF; plasma-filled) models. The possibility of deriving phase-resolved spectra for the brightest pulsars, coupled with the fact that the HE pulsar population is sizable enough to allow sampling of various pulsar geometries, will enable much more stringent testing of future radiation models. Reproduction of the observed phase-resolved behavior of this disparate group will be one of the next frontiers in pulsar science, impacting on

  12. A future very-high-energy view of our Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; Hinton, J. A.; Hermann, G.; Digel, S.

    2008-12-24

    The survey of the inner Galaxy with H.E.S.S. [1, 2] was remarkably successful in detecting a wide range of new very-high-energy gamma-ray sources. New TeV gamma-ray emitting source classes were established, although several of the sources remain unidentified, and progress has been made in understanding particle acceleration in astrophysical sources. In this work, we constructed a model of a population of such very-high-energy gamma-ray emitters and normalised the flux and size distribution of this population model to the H.E.S.S.-discovered sources. Extrapolating that population of objects to lower flux levels we investigate what a future array of imaging atmospheric telescopes (IACTs) such as AGIS or CTA might detect in a survey of the Inner Galaxy with an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity. The sheer number of sources detected together with the improved resolving power will likely result in a huge improvement in our understanding of the populations of galactic gamma-ray sources. A deep survey of the inner Milky Way would also support studies of the interstellar diffuse gamma-ray emission in regions of high cosmic-ray density. In the final section of this paper we investigate the science potential for the Galactic Centre region for studying energy-dependent diffusion with such a future array.

  13. High-energy antiprotons from old supernova remnants.

    PubMed

    Blasi, Pasquale; Serpico, Pasquale D

    2009-08-21

    A recently proposed model explains the rise in energy of the positron fraction measured by the PAMELA satellite in terms of hadronic production of positrons in aged supernova remnants, and acceleration therein. Here we present a preliminary calculation of the antiproton flux produced by the same mechanism. While the model is consistent with present data, a rise of the antiproton to proton ratio is predicted at high energy, which strikingly distinguishes this scenario from other astrophysical explanations of the positron fraction (such as pulsars). We briefly discuss important implications for dark matter searches via antimatter.

  14. Formation of ions by high-energy photons

    SciTech Connect

    Drukarev, E. G.; Mikhailov, A. I.; Mikhailov, I. A.; Rakhimov, Kh. Yu.; Scheid, W.

    2007-03-15

    We calculate the electron energy spectrum of ionization by a high-energy photon, accompanied by creation of an e{sup -}e{sup +} pair. The total cross section of the process is also obtained. The asymptotics of the cross section does not depend on the photon energy. At the photon energies exceeding a certain value {omega}{sub 0} this appears to be the dominant mechanism of formation of the ions. The dependence of {omega}{sub 0} on the value of nuclear charge is obtained. Our results are consistent with experimental data.

  15. High energy microlaser and compact MOPA transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brickeen, Brian K.; Bernot, Dave; Geathers, Eliot; Mosovsky, Joseph

    2011-06-01

    A compact micro-oscillator incorporating a dual-bounce, grazing incidence gain module with a folded resonator cavity is presented. The gain module, previously developed for Nd:YVO4, is embodied in highly doped ceramic Nd:YAG to generate improved Q-switch performance while maintaining localized pump absorption. The cavity design utilizes a doubly folded optics path around the gain crystal to increase the intra-cavity mode for a more optimum overlap with the pump light volume produced by standard lensed laser diode bars. A modified CS-package diode mount is developed to facilitate the reduced size of the oscillator without sacrificing the ability to use a high-energy, side-pumping arrangement. The oscillator is combined with a high gain, high energy extraction VHGM amplifier to generate a transmitter source on the order of 50 mJ. Cooling for both the oscillator and amplifier modules is provided via a conductive path through the base of the package. Both devices are mounted on opposite sides of a phase-change cooling reservoir to enable self-contained, burst-mode operation. Beam shaping of the oscillator output, in preparation for injection into the amplifier, is contained in a small cut-away path on the reservoir side.

  16. Precision timing measurements for high energy photons

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Dustin; Apreysan, Artur; Bornheim, Adi; Duarte, Javier; Newman, Harvey; Pena, Cristian; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2014-11-21

    Particle colliders operating at high luminosities present challenging environments for high energy physics event reconstruction and analysis. We discuss how timing information, with a precision on the order of 10 ps, can aid in the reconstruction of physics events under such conditions. We present calorimeter based timing measurements from test beam experiments in which we explore the ultimate timing precision achievable for high energy photons or electrons of 10 GeV and above. Using a prototype calorimeter consisting of a 1.7×1.7×1.7 cm3 lutetium–yttrium oxyortho-silicate (LYSO) crystal cube, read out by micro-channel plate photomultipliers, we demonstrate a time resolution of 33.5±2.1 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV. In a second measurement, using a 2.5×2.5×20 cm3 LYSO crystal placed perpendicularly to the electron beam, we achieve a time resolution of 59±11 ps using a beam energy of 4 GeV. We also present timing measurements made using a shashlik-style calorimeter cell made of LYSO and tungsten plates, and demonstrate that the apparatus achieves a time resolution of 54±5 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV.

  17. PASOTRON high-energy microwave source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Schumacher, Robert W.; Butler, Jennifer M.; Hyman, Jay, Jr.; Santoru, Joseph; Watkins, Ron M.; Harvey, Robin J.; Dolezal, Franklin A.; Eisenhart, Robert L.; Schneider, Authur J.

    1992-04-01

    A unique, high-energy microwave source, called PASOTRON (Plasma-Assisted Slow-wave Oscillator), has been developed. The PASOTRON utilizes a long-pulse E-gun and plasma- filled slow-wave structure (SWS) to produce high-energy pulses from a simple, lightweight device that utilizes no externally produced magnetic fields. Long pulses are obtained from a novel E-gun that employs a low-pressure glow discharge to provide a stable, high current- density electron source. The electron accelerator consists of a high-perveance, multi-aperture array. The E-beam is operated in the ion-focused regime where the plasma filling the SWS space-charge neutralizes the beam, and the self-pinch force compresses the beamlets and increases the beam current density. A scale-model PASOTRON, operating as a backward- wave oscillator in C-band with a 100-kV E-beam, has produced output powers in the 3 to 5 MW range and pulse lengths of over 100 microsecond(s) ec, corresponding to an integrated energy per pulse of up to 500 J. The E-beam to microwave-radiation power conversion efficiency is about 20%.

  18. High Energy Polarized e+e- Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatunov, Yu.; Koop, I.; Otboev, A.; Mane, S.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the wide discussion about Higgs-factory design again returns to problem of high energy polarized electrons and positrons. It’s good known the radiative beam polarization at LEP-collider. It was obtained after spin resonance suppression at Z0 pick, but didn’t appear at energies above 70 GeV due to an enhancement of unavoidable depolarization effects. We examine in this paper various ideas for radiative polarization at TLEP/FCC-ee and formulate some estimates for the polarization buildup time and the asymptotic polarization. Using wigglers, a useful degree of polarization (for energy calibration), with a time constant of about 1 h, may be possible up to the threshold of W pair production. At higher energies such as the threshold of Higgs production, attaining a useful level of polarization may be difficult in a planar ring. With Siberian Snakes, wigglers and some imagination, polarization of reasonable magnitude, with a reasonable time constant (of not more than about 1 h), may be achievable at very high energies.

  19. High energy laser demonstrators for defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, M.; Riesbeck, Th.; Schmitz, J.; Baumgärtel, Th.; Ludewigt, K.; Graf, A.

    2017-01-01

    Rheinmetall Waffe Munition has worked since 30 years in the area of High Energy Laser (HEL) for defence applications, starting from pulsed CO2 to pulsed glass rods lasers. In the last decade Rheinmetall Waffe Munition changed to diode pumped solid state laser (DPSSL) technology and has successfully developed, realised and tested a variety of versatile HEL weapon demonstrators for air- and ground defence scenarios like countering rocket, artillery, mortar, missile (RAMM), unmanned aerial systems (UAS) and unexploded ordnances clearing. By employing beam superimposing technology and a modular laser weapon concept, the total optical power has been successively increased. Stationary weapon platforms, military vehicles and naval platforms have been equipped with high energy laser effectors. The contribution gives a summary of the most recent development stages of Rheinmetalls HEL weapon program. In addition to the stationary 30 kW laser weapon demonstrator, we present vehicle based HEL demonstrators: the 5 kW class Mobile HEL Effector Track V, the 20 kW class Mobile HEL Effector Wheel XX and the 50 kW class Mobile HEL Effector Container L and the latest 10 kW HEL effector integrated in the naval weapon platform MLG 27. We describe the capabilities of these demonstrators against different potential targets. Furthermore, we will show the capability of the 30 kW stationary Laser Weapon Demonstrator integrated into an existing ground based air defence system to defeat saturated attacks of RAMM and UAS targets.

  20. Nucleon structure and the high energy interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selyugin, O. V.

    2015-06-01

    On the basis of the representation of the generalized structure of nucleons a new model of the hadron interaction at high energies is presented. A new t dependence of the generalized parton distributions is obtained from the comparative analysis of different sets of the parton distribution functions, based on the description of the entire set of experimental data for the electromagnetic form factors of the proton and neutron. Taking into account the different moments of the generalized parton distributions of the hadron, quantitative descriptions of all existing experimental data of the proton-proton and proton-antiproton elastic scatterings from √{s }=9.8 GeV to 8 TeV, including the Coulomb range and large momentum transfers up to -t =15 GeV2 , are obtained with a few free high-energy fitting parameters. The real part of the hadronic elastic scattering amplitude is determined only through the complex s that satisfies the dispersion relations. The negligible contributions of the hard Pomeron and the presence of the non-small contributions of the maximal Odderon are obtained. The non-dying form of the spin-flip amplitude is examined as well. The structures of the Born term and unitarized scattering amplitude are analyzed. It is shown that the black disk limit for the elastic scattering amplitude is not reached at LHC energies. Predictions for LHC energies are made.

  1. Photochemical modeling in California with two chemical mechanisms: model intercomparison and response to emission reductions.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chenxia; Kelly, James T; Avise, Jeremy C; Kaduwela, Ajith P; Stockwell, William R

    2011-05-01

    An updated version of the Statewide Air Pollution Research Center (SAPRC) chemical mechanism (SAPRC07C) was implemented into the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) version 4.6. CMAQ simulations using SAPRC07C and the previously released version, SAPRC99, were performed and compared for an episode during July-August, 2000. Ozone (O3) predictions of the SAPRC07C simulation are generally lower than those of the SAPRC99 simulation in the key areas of central and southern California, especially in areas where modeled concentrations are greater than the federal 8-hr O3 standard of 75 parts per billion (ppb) and/or when the volatile organic compound (VOC)/nitrogen oxides (NOx) ratio is less than 13. The relative changes of ozone production efficiency (OPE) against the VOC/NOx ratio at 46 sites indicate that the OPE is reduced in SAPRC07C compared with SAPRC99 at most sites by as much as approximately 22%. The SAPRC99 and SAPRC07C mechanisms respond similarly to 20% reductions in anthropogenic VOC emissions. The response of the mechanisms to 20% NOx emissions reductions can be grouped into three cases. In case 1, in which both mechanisms show a decrease in daily maximum 8-hr O3 concentration with decreasing NOx emissions, the O3 decrease in SAPRC07C is smaller. In case 2, in which both mechanisms show an increase in O3 with decreasing NOx emissions, the O3 increase is larger in SAPRC07C. In case 3, SAPRC07C simulates an increase in O3 in response to reduced NOx emissions whereas SAPRC99 simulates a decrease in O3 for the same region. As a result, the areas where NOx controls would be disbeneficial are spatially expanded in SAPRC07C. Although the results presented here are valuable for understanding differences in predictions and model response for SAPRC99 and SAPRC07C, the study did not evaluate the impact of mechanism differences in the context of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's guidance for using numerical models in demonstrating air quality attainment

  2. Recent high energy gamma-ray results from SAS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Ogelman, H. B.; Ozel, M. E.; Tumer, T.; Lamb, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Recent developments in gamma-ray astronomy due to the results from SAS-2 have focused on two areas. First, the emission from the plane of the Galaxy is the dominant feature in the gamma-ray sky. The galactic latitude and longitude distributions are consistent with the concept that the high-energy radiation originates from cosmic rays interacting with interstellar matter, and the measurements support a galactic origin for cosmic rays. Second, searches of the SAS-2 data for emission from localized sources have shown three strong discrete gamma-ray sources: the Crab nebula and PSR 0531 + 21, the Vela supernova remnant and PSR 0833-45, and a source near galactic coordinates 193 deg longitude, +3 deg latitude, which does not appear to be associated with other known celestial objects. Evidence has also been found for pulsed gamma-ray emission from two other radio pulsars, PSR 1818-04 and PSR 1747-46. A localized source near longitudes 76-80 deg may be associated with the X-ray source Cyg X-3.

  3. Study of fracture mechanisms of short fiber reinforced AS composite by acoustic emission technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kida, Sotoaki; Suzuki, Megumu

    1995-11-01

    The fracture mechanisms of short fiber reinforced AS composites are studied by acoustic emission technique for examining the effects of fiber contents. The loads P{sub b} and P{sub c} which the damage mechanisms change are obtained at the inflection points of the total AE energy curve the energy gradient method. The damages are generated by fiber breaking at the load point of P{sub b} and P{sub c} in B material, and by the fiber breaking and the debonding between resin and fiber at the load points of P{sub b} and P{sub c} in C material.

  4. Mechanical Modulation of Phonon-Assisted Field Emission in a Silicon Nanomembrane Detector for Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jonghoo; Blick, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate mechanical modulation of phonon-assisted field emission in a free-standing silicon nanomembrane detector for time-of-flight mass spectrometry of proteins. The impacts of ion bombardment on the silicon nanomembrane have been explored in both mechanical and electrical points of view. Locally elevated lattice temperature in the silicon nanomembrane, resulting from the transduction of ion kinetic energy into thermal energy through the ion bombardment, induces not only phonon-assisted field emission but also a mechanical vibration in the silicon nanomembrane. The coupling of these mechanical and electrical phenomenon leads to mechanical modulation of phonon-assisted field emission. The thermal energy relaxation through mechanical vibration in addition to the lateral heat conduction and field emission in the silicon nanomembrane offers effective cooling of the nanomembrane, thereby allowing high resolution mass analysis. PMID:26861329

  5. Proceedings of the 8th high energy heavy ion study

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.W.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    This was the eighth in a series of conferences jointly sponsored by the Nuclear Science Division of LBL and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in West Germany. Sixty papers on current research at both relativistic and intermediate energies are included in this report. Topics covered consisted of: Equation of State of Nuclear Matter, Pion and High Energy Gamma Emission, Theory of Multifragmentation, Intermediate Energies, Fragmentation, Atomic Physics, Nuclear Structure, Electromagnetic Processes, and New Facilities planned for SIS-ESR. The latest design parameters of the Bevalac Upgrade Proposal were reviewed for the user community. Also, the design of a new electronic 4..pi.. detector, a time projection chamber which would be placed at the HISS facility, was presented.

  6. EXTRAGALACTIC VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAY BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Neronov, A.; Semikoz, D. V.

    2012-09-20

    We study the origin of the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray background using the data from the Fermi telescope. To estimate the background level, we count photons at high Galactic latitudes |b| > 60 Degree-Sign . Subtracting photons associated with known sources and the residual cosmic-ray and Galactic diffuse backgrounds, we estimate the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB) flux. We find that the spectrum of EGB in the very high energy band above 30 GeV follows the stacked spectrum of BL Lac objects. Large Area Telescope data reveal the positive (1 + z) {sup k}, 1 < k < 4 cosmological evolution of the BL Lac source population consistent with that of their parent population, Fanaroff-Riley type I radio galaxies. We show that EGB at E > 30 GeV could be completely explained by emission from unresolved BL Lac objects if k {approx_equal} 3.

  7. Rugged TDLAS system for High Energy Laser atmospheric propagation characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perram, Glen; Rice, Christopher

    2008-10-01

    An active remote sensing instrument for the characterization of atmospheric absorption, scattering, and scintillation at several key high energy laser wavelengths is in development. The instrument is based on narrow band tunable diode lasers fiber coupled to a 12'' Ritchey-Chretien transmit telescope and a second receive telescope with visible or near infrared imager. For example, tunable diode lasers have been used to obtain absorption spectra in the laboratory for the Cs D2 lines near 852 nm and the oxygen X-b lines near 760 nm, key to the Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) concept. Absorbencies of less than 0.5% are observable. Applications will be assessed including effects to HEL atmospheric propagation from molecular and aerosol absorption and scattering, Cn2 estimation from atmospheric turbulence, hazardous chemical emission detection, and laser communication interception from side scattering. The system will soon be deployed to a military laser test range to characterize path lengths of greater than 1 km.

  8. High-energy gamma radiation from Geminga observed by EGRET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.; Bertsch, D. L.; Brazier, K. T. S.; Chiang, J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Fierro, J. M.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kwok, P. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) has carried out extensive studies of the gamma-ray source Geminga. Following the detection of pulsed X-rays (Halpern and Holt 1992) from Geminga, Bertsch et al. (1992) reported the same 237 ms periodicity to be visible in the EGRET data. A full analysis of the Geminga source shows that the energy spectrum is compatible with a power law with a spectral index of -1.50 +/- 0.08 between 30 MeV and 2 GeV. A falloff relative to the power law is observed for energies above 2 GeV. Phase-resolved spectra also show power laws with high-energy cutoffs, but with significant variation of the spectral index with phase. No unpulsed emission is observed. No evidence for time variation was found within the EGRET observations.

  9. High-energy particles associated with solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.; Klimas, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    High-energy particles, the so-called solar cosmic rays, are often generated in association with solar flares, and then emitted into interplanetary space. These particles, consisting of electrons, protons, and other heavier nuclei, including the iron-group, are accelerated in the vicinity of the flare. By studying the temporal and spatial varation of these particles near the earth's orbit, their storage and release mechanisms in the solar corona and their propagation mechanism can be understood. The details of the nuclear composition and the rigidity spectrum for each nuclear component of the solar cosmic rays are important for investigating the acceleration mechanism in solar flares. The timing and efficiency of the acceleration process can also be investigated by using this information. These problems are described in some detail by using observational results on solar cosmic rays and associated phenomena.

  10. Fermi-LAT Observations of High-energy Behind-the-limb Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Ciprini, S.; Costanza, F.; Cutini, S.; D’Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Grenier, I. A.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kashapova, L.; Krucker, S.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Liu, W.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J. D.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Pal’shin, V.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Principe, G.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, O.; Rubio da Costa, F.; Sgrò, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Tajima, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Torres, D. F.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the Fermi-LAT detection of high-energy emission from the behind-the-limb (BTL) solar flares that occurred on 2013 October 11, and 2014 January 6 and September 1. The Fermi-LAT observations are associated with flares from active regions originating behind both the eastern and western limbs, as determined by STEREO. All three flares are associated with very fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and strong solar energetic particle events. We present updated localizations of the >100 MeV photon emission, hard X-ray (HXR) and EUV images, and broadband spectra from 10 keV to 10 GeV, as well as microwave spectra. We also provide a comparison of the BTL flares detected by Fermi-LAT with three on-disk flares and present a study of some of the significant quantities of these flares as an attempt to better understand the acceleration mechanisms at work during these occulted flares. We interpret the HXR emission to be due to electron bremsstrahlung from a coronal thin-target loop top with the accelerated electron spectra steepening at semirelativistic energies. The >100 MeV gamma-rays are best described by a pion-decay model resulting from the interaction of protons (and other ions) in a thick-target photospheric source. The protons are believed to have been accelerated (to energies >10 GeV) in the CME environment and precipitate down to the photosphere from the downstream side of the CME shock and landed on the front side of the Sun, away from the original flare site and the HXR emission.

  11. Pulsar Astrophysics at Very High Energies in the Fermi-HAWC Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saz Parkinson, Pablo; Belfiore, A.; HAWC Collaboration; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2013-04-01

    Pulsar astrophysics has received a major boost in recent years with the tremendous progress achieved in the gamma-ray regime. In the 0.1-100 GeV energy range, where pulsars emit a large fraction of their energy, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) is providing an abundance of high-quality data, greatly improving our understanding of the pulsar mechanism. In addition to detecting over 120 pulsars, the improved statistics from the LAT have enabled studies of some of the brightest pulsars with exquisite detail, up to unprecedented energies (in some cases above 25 GeV), finally bridging the gap with ground-based instruments. At very high energies (VHE, > 100 GeV), recent detections by VERITAS and MAGIC of pulsations from the Crab pose a serious challenge to pulsar models. It is unclear whether the Crab is unique in this respect, or whether VHE emission is common in other pulsars. Some models predict that such emission should smoothly connect with the standard GeV emission seen by the LAT, while others point instead to a different spectral (e.g. inverse Compton) component altogether. If present in other pulsars, such a component might be found at higher energies (> 1 TeV), but its flux is highly uncertain. Further VHE observations of pulsars are crucial to distinguish between (and constrain) the competing scenarios. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC), currently under construction in Mexico, is well-suited to perform observations of pulsars above 100 GeV. The HAWC detector has a wide field of view, high duty cycle, and excellent sensitivity 15 times better than its predecessor Milagro), and its contemporaneous operation with Fermi should enable it to carry out the first comprehensive survey of northern-hemisphere gamma-ray pulsars above 100 GeV. I will discuss the motivations, goals, timeline, and sensitivity of HAWC searches for VHE emission from pulsars.

  12. Effects of Spin on High-energy Radiation from Accreting Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O' Riordan, Michael; Pe'er, Asaf; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2016-11-01

    Observations of jets in X-ray binaries show a correlation between radio power and black hole spin. This correlation, if confirmed, points toward the idea that relativistic jets may be powered by the rotational energy of black holes. In order to examine this further, we perform general relativistic radiative transport calculations on magnetically arrested accretion flows, which are known to produce powerful jets via the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) mechanism. We find that the X-ray and γ-ray emission strongly depend on spin and inclination angle. Surprisingly, the high-energy power does not show the same dependence on spin as the BZ jet power, but instead can be understood as a redshift effect. In particular, photons observed perpendicular to the spin axis suffer little net redshift until originating from close to the horizon. Such observers see deeper into the hot, dense, highly magnetized inner disk region. This effect is largest for rapidly rotating black holes due to a combination of frame dragging and decreasing horizon radius. While the X-ray emission is dominated by the near horizon region, the near-infrared (NIR) radiation originates at larger radii. Therefore, the ratio of X-ray to NIR power is an observational signature of black hole spin.

  13. Revealing the underlying absorption and emission mechanism of nitrogen doped graphene quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xianghong; Li, Yunhai; Shu, Huabing; Wang, Jinlan

    2016-11-24

    Nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots (N-GQDs) hold promising application in electronics and optoelectronics because of their excellent photo-stability, tunable photoluminescence and high quantum yield. However, the absorption and emission mechanisms have been debated for years. Here, by employing time-dependent density functional theory, we demonstrate that the different N-doping types and positions give rise to different absorption and emission behaviors, which successfully addresses the inconsistency observed in different experiments. Specifically, center doping creates mid-states, rendering non-fluorescence, while edge N-doping modulates the energy levels of excited states and increases the radiation transition probability, thus enhancing fluorescence strength. More importantly, the even hybridization of frontier orbitals between edge N atoms and GQDs leads to a blue-shift of both absorption and emission spectra, while the uneven hybridization of frontier orbitals induces a red-shift. Solvent effects on N-GQDs are further explored by the conductor-like screening model and it is found that strong polarity of the solvent can cause a red-shift and enhance the intensity of both absorption and emission spectra.

  14. Ultra-weak photon emission from biological samples: definition, mechanisms, properties, detection and applications.

    PubMed

    Cifra, Michal; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2014-10-05

    This review attempts to summarize molecular mechanisms, spectral and intensity properties, detection techniques and applications of ultra-weak photon emission. Ultra-weak photon emission is the chemiluminescence from biological systems where electronically excited species are formed during oxidative metabolic or oxidative stress processes. It is generally accepted that photons are emitted (1) at near UVA, visible, and near IR spectral ranges from 350 to 1300nm and (2) at the intensity of photon emission in the range of several units to several hundreds (oxidative metabolic process) and several hundreds to several thousands (oxidative stress process) photons s(-1)cm(-2). Current development in detection using low-noise photomultiplier tubes and imaging using highly sensitive charge coupled device cameras allows temporal and spatial visualization of oxidative metabolic or oxidative stress processes, respectively. As the phenomenon of ultra-weak photon emission reflects oxidative metabolic or oxidative stress processes, it can be widely used as a non-invasive tool for monitoring of the physiological state of biological systems.

  15. High energy factorization in electroweak processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camici, G.; Ciafaloni, M.

    1994-06-01

    We propose to use high energy, k⊥-dependent, factorization (HEF) in electroweak fusion processes in order to systematically improve the effective W approximation (EWA) at collider energies. Starting from the example of top production, we show that HEF provides correctly all quasi constant terms in the production cross section, i.e. not only the ones O(1/ Mw2) which are typical of the EWA and are due to longitudinal polarizations of exchanged bosons, but also the ones O(1/ Mw2) which are partly due to transverse polarizations. It turns out that latter contributions cannot be accounted for by collinear factorization only, but also come from longitudinal off-shell effects, typical of broken gauge theories, which are explicitly evaluated here.

  16. Atmospheric applications of high-energy lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Joung R.

    2005-03-01

    It has been over forty years since the invention of the laser, which has inspired the imagination of scientists and science fiction writers alike. Many ideas have been realized, many still remain as dreams, and new ones are still being conceived. The High Energy Laser (HEL) has been associated with weapon applications during the past three decades. Much of the same technology can be directly applied to power beaming, laser propulsion, and other potential remote energy and power transfer applications. Economically, these application areas are becoming increasingly more viable. This paper reviews the evolutionarey history of the HEL device technologies. It points out the basic system components and layouts with associated key technologies that drive the effectiveness and efficiency of the system level performance. It describes the fundamental properties and wavelength dependencies of atmospheric propagation that in turn have become the prescription for wavelength properties that are desired from the device.

  17. High Energy Neutrinos from the Fermi Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzaque, Soebur; Lunardini, Cecilia

    2012-03-01

    Recent discovery of two gamma-ray emitting bubble-shaped structures (Fermi Bubbles) at the Galactic center opens up a possibility to detect high-energy neutrinos from them as well, if the observed gamma rays have hadronic origin. This new predicted Galactic neutrino flux is hard, following gamma-ray data, compared to the atmospheric neutrino flux and can be detected with a kilometer scale neutrino telescope in the northern hemisphere, such as the planned KM3NeT, above 20-50 TeV. IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South pole can also provide interesting constraints on the flux model. A detection or exclusion of this neutrino flux can discriminate between a leptonic or hadronic origin of the gamma-rays, as well as bring unique information on the activities at the Galactic center.

  18. High energy photon-neutrino interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasabadi, A.; Devoto, A. |; Dicus, D.A.; Repko, W.W.

    1998-07-14

    A general decomposition of the amplitudes for the 2 {r_arrow} 2 processes {gamma}{nu} {r_arrow} {gamma}{nu} and {gamma}{gamma} {r_arrow} {nu}{bar {nu}} is obtained using gauge invariance and Bose symmetry. The restrictions implied by this decomposition are investigated for the reaction {gamma}{gamma} {r_arrow} {nu}{bar {nu}} by computing the one-loop helicity amplitudes in the standard model. In the center of mass, where {radical}s = 2{omega}, the cross section grows roughly as {omega}{sup 6} up to the threshold for W-boson production, {radical}s = 2m{sub W}. Astrophysical implications of very high energy photon-neutrino interactions are discussed.

  19. The High-Energy Astrophysics Learning Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlock, L. A.; Lochner, J. C.; Allen, J. S.

    1996-12-01

    As part of the education outreach efforts of the HEASARC (High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center), we have developed a cosmic X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy World Wide Web site which contains information and activities for all ages and education levels. Additional associated sites are now being added, such as StarChild, which broaden the range of topics to cover other astronomy issues. Also included is a "Teacher's Corner", which contains educator-prepared Study Guides for the site and multi-level, multi-disciplinary Lesson Plans based on actual satellite data and analyses. We intend to provide high visibility and easy access to the site for teachers and students by exhibiting it at NSTA (and other) conventions, giving mini-workshops at such conventions, and distributing a CD-ROM version of the site. The development, growth, and use of the site are presented.

  20. High Energy Antimatter Telescope (HEAT) Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    This grant supported our work on the High Energy Antimatter Telescope(HEAT) balloon experiment. The HEAT payload is designed to perform a series of experiments focusing on the cosmic ray positron, electron, and antiprotons. Thus far two flights of the HEAT -e+/- configuration have taken place. During the period of this grant major accomplishments included the following: (1) Publication of the first results of the 1994 HEAT-e+/- flight in Physical Review Letters; (2) Successful reflight of the HEAT-e+/- payload from Lynn Lake in August 1995; (3) Repair and refurbishment of the elements of the HEAT payload damaged during the landing following the 1995 flight; and (4) Upgrade of the ground support equipment for future flights of the HEAT payload.