Science.gov

Sample records for high-energy neutron dosimetry

  1. Practical neutron dosimetry at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    McCaslin, J.B.; Thomas, R.H.

    1980-10-01

    Dosimetry at high energy particle accelerators is discussed with emphasis on physical measurements which define the radiation environment and provide an immutable basis for the derivation of any quantities subsequently required for risk evaluation. Results of inter-laboratory dosimetric comparisons are reviewed and it is concluded that a well-supported systematic program is needed which would make possible detailed evaluations and inter-comparisons of instruments and techniques in well characterized high energy radiation fields. High-energy dosimetry is so coupled with radiation transport that it is clear their study should proceed concurrently.

  2. Neutron dosimetry with TL albedo dosemeters at high energy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Haninger, T; Fehrenbacher, G

    2007-01-01

    The GSF-Personal Monitoring Service uses the TLD albedo dosemeter as standard neutron personal dosemeter. Due to its low sensitivity for fast neutrons however, it is generally not recommended for workplaces at high-energy accelerators. Test measurements with the albedo dosemeter were performed at the accelerator laboratories of GSI in Darmstadt and DESY in Hamburg to reconsider this hypothesis. It revealed that the albedo dosemeter can also be used as personal dosemeter at these workplaces, because at all measurement locations a significant part of neutrons with lower energies could be found, which were produced by scattering at walls or the ground.

  3. High-energy neutron dosimetry at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mallett, M.W.; Vasilik, D.G.; Littlejohn, G.J.; Cortez, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Neutron energy spectrum measurements performed at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility indicated potential areas for high energy neutron exposure to personnel. The low sensitivity of the Los Alamos thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) to high energy neutrons warranted issuing a NTA dosimeter in addition to the TLD badge to employees entering these areas. The dosimeter consists of a plastic holder surrounding NTA film that has been desiccated and sealed in a dry nitrogen environment. A study of the fading of latent images in NTA film demonstrated the success of this packaging method to control the phenomenon. The Los Alamos NTA dosimeter is characterized and the fading study discussed. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. High energy neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-06-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos.

  5. Improving the neutron-to-photon discrimination capability of detectors used for neutron dosimetry in high energy photon beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Irazola, L; Terrón, J A; Bedogni, R; Pola, A; Lorenzoli, M; Sánchez-Nieto, B; Gómez, F; Sánchez-Doblado, F

    2016-09-01

    The increasing interest of the medical community to radioinduced second malignancies due to photoneutrons in patients undergoing high-energy radiotherapy, has stimulated in recent years the study of peripheral doses, including the development of some dedicated active detectors. Although these devices are designed to respond to neutrons only, their parasitic photon response is usually not identically zero and anisotropic. The impact of these facts on measurement accuracy can be important, especially in points close to the photon field-edge. A simple method to estimate the photon contribution to detector readings is to cover it with a thermal neutron absorber with reduced secondary photon emission, such as a borated rubber. This technique was applied to the TNRD (Thermal Neutron Rate Detector), recently validated for thermal neutron measurements in high-energy photon radiotherapy. The positive results, together with the accessibility of the method, encourage its application to other detectors and different clinical scenarios. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Neutron personnel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, R.V.

    1981-06-16

    The current state-of-the-art in neutron personnel dosimetry is reviewed. Topics covered include dosimetry needs and alternatives, current dosimetry approaches, personnel monitoring devices, calibration strategies, and future developments. (ACR)

  7. Neutron dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Quinby, Thomas C.

    1976-07-27

    A method of measuring neutron radiation within a nuclear reactor is provided. A sintered oxide wire is disposed within the reactor and exposed to neutron radiation. The induced radioactivity is measured to provide an indication of the neutron energy and flux within the reactor.

  8. Intercomparison of high energy neutron personnel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.C.; Akabani, G.; Loesch, R.M.

    1993-03-01

    An intercomparison of high-energy neutron personnel dosimeters was performed to evaluate the uniformity of the response characteristics of typical neutron dosimeters presently in use at US Department of Energy (DOE) accelerator facilities. It was necessary to perform an intercomparison because there are no national or international standards for high-energy neutron dosimetry. The testing that is presently under way for the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is limited to the use of neutron sources that range in energy from about 1 keV to 2 MeV. Therefore, the high-energy neutron dosimeters presently in use at DOE accelerator facilities are not being tested effectively. This intercomparison employed neutrons produced by the {sup 9}Be(p,n){sup 9}B interaction at the University of Washington cyclotron, using 50-MeV protons. The resulting neutron energy spectrum extended to a maximum of approximately 50-MeV, with a mean energy of about 20-MeV. Intercomparison results for currently used dosimeters, including Nuclear Type A (NTA) film, thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-albedo, and track-etch dosimeters (TEDs), indicated a wide variation in response to identical doses of high-energy neutrons. Results of this study will be discussed along with a description of plans for future work.

  9. High energy neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Rai Ko S.F.

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring dose equivalents in neutron radiation fields. The device includes nested symmetrical hemispheres (forming spheres) of different neutron moderating materials that allow the measurement of dose equivalents from 0.025 eV to past 1 GeV. The layers of moderating material surround a spherical neutron counter. The neutron counter is connected by an electrical cable to an electrical sensing means which interprets the signal from the neutron counter in the center of the moderating spheres. The spherical shape of the device allows for accurate measurement of dose equivalents regardless of its positioning.

  10. Neutron beam measurement dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro, C.R.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes animal dosimetry studies and phantom measurements. During 1994, 12 dogs were irradiated at BMRR as part of a 4 fraction dose tolerance study. The animals were first infused with BSH and irradiated daily for 4 consecutive days. BNL irradiated 2 beagles as part of their dose tolerance study using BPA fructose. In addition, a dog at WSU was irradiated at BMRR after an infusion of BPA fructose. During 1994, the INEL BNCT dosimetry team measured neutron flux and gamma dose profiles in two phantoms exposed to the epithermal neutron beam at the BMRR. These measurements were performed as a preparatory step to the commencement of human clinical trials in progress at the BMRR.

  11. Fast neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report concentrates on two major areas of dosimetry research: measurement of fast neutron kerma factors for several elements for monochromatic and white spectrum neutron fields and determination of the response of thermoluminescent phosphors to various ultra-soft X-ray energies and beta-rays. Dr. Zhixin Zhou from the Shanghai Institute of Radiation Medicine, People's Republic of China brought with him special expertise in the fabrication and use of ultra-thin TLD materials. Such materials are not available in the USA. The rather unique properties of these materials were investigated during this grant period.

  12. A comparison of the response of PADC neutron dosemeters in high-energy neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Trompier, F; Boschung, M; Buffler, A; Domingo, C; Cale, E; Chevallier, M-A; Esposito, A; Ferrarini, M; Geduld, D R; Hager, L; Hohmann, E; Mayer, S; Musso, A; Romero-Esposito, M; Röttger, S; Smit, F D; Sashala Naik, A; Tanner, R; Wissmann, F; Caresana, M

    2014-10-01

    Within the framework of the EURADOS Working Group 11, a comparison of passive neutron dosemeters in high-energy neutron fields was organised in 2011. The aim of the exercise was to evaluate the response of poly-allyl-glycol-carbonate neutron dosemeters from various European dosimetry laboratories to high-energy neutron fields. Irradiations were performed at the iThemba LABS facility in South Africa with neutrons having energies up to 66 and 100 MeV. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Neutron dosimetry in boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Miola, U.J.; Ettinger, K.V.

    1981-01-01

    The recent development of various borated compounds and the utilization of one of these (Na/sub 2/B/sub 12/H/sub 11/SH) to treat brain tumors in clinical studies in Japan has renewed interest in neutron capture therapy. In these procedures thermal neutrons interact with /sup 10/B in boron containing cells through the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction producing charged particles with a maximum range of approx. 10..mu..m in tissue. Borated analogs of chlorpromazine, porphyrin, thiouracil and deoxyuridine promise improved tumor uptake and blood clearance. The therapy beam from the Medical Research Reactor in Brookhaven contains neutrons from a modified and filtered fission spectrum and dosimetric consequences of the use of the above mentioned compounds in conjunction with thermal and epithermal fluxes are discussed in the paper. One of the important problems of radiation dosimetry in capture therapy is determination of the flux profile and, hence, the dose profile in the brain. This has been achieved by constructing a brain phantom made of TE plastic. The lyoluminescence technique provides a convenient way of monitoring the neutron flux distributions; the detectors for this purpose utilize /sup 6/Li and /sup 10/B compounds. Such compounds have been synthesized specially for the purpose of dosimetry of thermal and epithermal beams. In addition, standard lyoluminescent phosphors, like glutamine, could be used to determine the collisional component of the dose as well as the contribution of the /sup 14/N(n,p)/sup 14/C reaction. Measurements of thermal flux were compared with calculations and with measurements done with activation foils.

  14. Advances in personnel neutron dosimetry: part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Vallario, E.; Faust, L.

    1983-08-01

    A continuation of the advances in personnel neutron dosimetry research programs and technology transfer reviews work on active dosimeters, electronic devices that determine the dose equivalent to a worker during an exposure to neutron radiation. Active dosemeters are routinely used for gamma radiation dosimetry. Experience with neutron-sensitive pocket rem-meters at several DOE laboratories covers three prototypes. Pocket rem-meters work well for detecting neutrons over a wide energy range. They give instantaneous readout of the accumulated neutron dose-equivalent. 1 figure.

  15. Neutron dose per fluence and weighting factors for use at high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cossairt, J.Donald; Vaziri, Kamran; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    In June 2007, the United States Department of Energy incorporated revised values of neutron weighting factors into its occupational radiation protection Regulation 10 CFR Part 835 as part of updating its radiation dosimetry system. This has led to a reassessment of neutron radiation fields at high energy proton accelerators such as those at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). Values of dose per fluence factors appropriate for accelerator radiation fields calculated elsewhere are collated and radiation weighting factors compared. The results of this revision to the dosimetric system are applied to americium-beryllium neutron energy spectra commonly used for instrument calibrations. A set of typical accelerator neutron energy spectra previously measured at Fermilab are reassessed in light of the new dosimetry system. The implications of this revision are found to be of moderate significance.

  16. Neutron dose per fluence and weighting factors for use at high energy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Cossairt, J Donald; Vaziri, Kamran

    2009-06-01

    In June 2007, the United States Department of Energy incorporated revised values of neutron weighting factors into its occupational radiation protection regulation Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, as part of updating its radiation dosimetry system. This has led to a reassessment of neutron radiation fields at high energy accelerators such as those at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in the context of the amended regulation and contemporary guidance of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Values of dose per fluence factors appropriate for accelerator radiation fields calculated elsewhere are collated and radiation weighting factors compared. The results of this revision to the dosimetric system are applied to americium-beryllium neutron energy spectra commonly used for instrument calibrations. Also, a set of typical accelerator neutron energy spectra previously measured at Fermilab are reassessed in light of the new dosimetry system. The implications of this revision and of recent ICRP publications are found to be of moderate significance.

  17. The Efficiency of the BC-720 Scintillator in a High-Energy (20--800 MeV) Accelerator Neutron Field

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Leslie H.

    2005-12-01

    High-energy neutron doses (>20 MeV) are of little importance to most radiation workers. However, space and flight crews, and people working around medical and scientific accelerators receive over half of their radiation dose from high-energy neutrons. Unfortunately, neutrons are difficult to measure, and no suitable dosimetry has yet been developed to measure this radiation. In this paper, basic high-energy neutron interactions, characteristics of high-energy neutron environments, present neutron dosimetry, and quantities used in neutron dosimetry are discussed before looking into the potential of the BC-720 scintillator to improve dosimetry. This research utilized 800 MeV protons impinging upon the WNR Facility spallation neutron source at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Time-of-flight methods and a U-238 Fission Chamber were used to aid evaluation of the efficiency of the BC-720. Results showed that the efficiency is finite over the 20–650 MeV energy region studied, although it decreases by a factor of ten between 40 and 100 MeV. This limits the use of this dosimeter to measure doses at sitespecific locations. It also encourages modifications to use this dosimeter for any unknown neutron field. As such, this dosimeter has the potential for a small, lightweight, real-time dose measurement, which could impact neutron dosimetry in all high-energy neutron environments.

  18. Personnel neutron dosimetry at Department of Energy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Endres, G.W.R.; Selby, J.M.; Vallario, E.J.

    1980-08-01

    This study assesses the state of personnel neutron dosimetry at DOE facilities. A survey of the personnel dosimetry systems in use at major DOE facilities was conducted, a literature search was made to determine recent advances in neutron dosimetry, and several dosimetry experts were interviewed. It was concluded that personnel neutron dosimeters do not meet current needs and that serious problems exist now and will increase in the future if neutron quality factors are increased and/or dose limits are lowered.

  19. High-energy neutron spectroscopy with thick silicon detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinnison, James D.; Maurer, Richard H.; Roth, David R.; Haight, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    The high-energy neutron component of the space radiation environment in thick structures such as the International Space Station contributes to the total radiation dose received by an astronaut. Detector design constraints such as size and mass have limited the energy range of neutron spectrum measurements in orbit to about 12 MeV in Space Shuttle studies. We present a new method for high-energy neutron spectroscopy using small silicon detectors that can extend these measurements to more than 500 MeV. The methodology is based on measurement of the detector response function for high-energy neutrons and inversion of this response function with measured deposition data to deduce neutron energy spectra. We also present the results of an initial shielding study performed with the thick silicon detector system for high-energy neutrons incident on polyethylene.

  20. Advances in personnel neutron dosimetry: part 3

    SciTech Connect

    Vallario, E.J.; Faust, L.G.

    1983-09-01

    DOE-sponsored evaluation and upgrading of personnel neutron dosimetry includes a review of new devices involving unique concepts: resonance ionization spectroscopy and organic semiconductor detectors. Resonance ionization spectroscopy uses a laser to detect atoms released by neutron interactions, while organic semiconductors contain large amounts of hydrogen. Although these and other research and evaluation projects reviewed in the first two articles appear promising, there is much more research needed, such as finding a chemically stable organic semiconductor that will be suitable.

  1. Comparison of high-energy photon and electron dosimetry for various dosimetry protocols.

    PubMed

    Araki, Fujio; Kubo, H Dale

    2002-05-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 51 (TG-51) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) published a new high-energy photon and electron dosimetry protocol, in 1999 and 2000, respectively. These protocols are based on the use of an ion chamber having an absorbed-dose to water calibration factor with a 60Co beam. These are different from the predecessors, the TG-21 and IAEA TRS-277 protocols, which require a 60Co exposure or air-kerma calibration factor. The purpose of this work is to present the dose comparison between various dosimetry protocols and the AAPM TG-51 protocol for clinical reference dosimetry of high-energy photon and electron beams. The absorbed-dose to water calculated according to the Japanese Association of Radiological Physics (JARP), International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Report Series No. 277 (IAEA TRS-277) and No. 398 (IAEA TRS-398) protocols is compared to that calculated using the TG-51 protocol. For various Farmer-type chambers in photon beams, TG-51 is found to predict 0.6-2.1% higher dose than JARP. Similarly, TG-51 is found to be higher by 0.7-1.7% than TRS-277. For electron beams TG-51 is higher than JARP by 1.5-3.8% and TRS-277 by 0.2-1.9%. The reasons for these differences are presented in terms of the cavity-gas calibration factor, Ngas, and a dose conversion factor, Fw, which converts the absorbed-dose to air in the chamber to the absorbed-dose to water. The ratio of cavity-gas calibration factors based on absorbed-dose to water calibration factors, N60Co(D,w), in TG-51 and cavity-gas calibration factors which are equivalent to absorbed-dose to air chamber factors, N(D,air), based on the IAEA TRS-381 protocol is 1.008 on average. However, the estimated uncertainty of the ratio between the two cavity-gas calibration factors is 0.9% (1 s.d.) and consequently, the observed difference of 0.8% is not significant. The absorbed-dose to water and exposure or air-kerma calibration factors are based on

  2. Neutron dosimetry of the Little Boy device

    SciTech Connect

    Pederson, R.A.; Plassmann, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    Neutron dose rates at several angular locations and at distances out to 0.5 mile have been measured during critical operation of the Little Boy replica. We used modified remmetes and thermoluminescent dosimetry techniques for the measurements. The present status of our analysis is presented including estimates of the neutron-dose-relaxation length in air and the variation of the neutron-to-gamma-ray dose ratio with distance from the replica. These results are preliminary and are subject to detector calibration measurements.

  3. First observations of power MOSFET burnout with high energy neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Oberg, D.L.; Wert, J.L.; Normand, E.; Majewski, P.P.; Wender, S.A.

    1996-12-01

    Single event burnout was seen in power MOSFETs exposed to high energy neutrons. Devices with rated voltage {ge}400 volts exhibited burnout at substantially less than the rated voltage. Tests with high energy protons gave similar results. Burnout was also seen in limited tests with lower energy protons and neutrons. Correlations with heavy-ion data are discussed. Accelerator proton data gave favorable comparisons with burnout rates measured on the APEX spacecraft. Implications for burnout at lower altitudes are also discussed.

  4. High energy neutrons at balloon altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpar, D. M.; Lockwood, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    The flux and energy spectrum of fast neutrons (3 to 20 MeV) has been measured near the top of the atmosphere with an organic liquid scintillator. The omnidirectional neutron energy spectrum from 3 to 20 MeV at 3.5 g/sq cm over Palestine, Texas can be described by a power law with an energy dependent spectral index which varies from 1.8 (plus or minus .2) between 1 and 10 MeV to 0.3 (plus or minus .3) between 15 and 20 MeV. From 20 to 50 MeV, a neutron spectrum independence of E is consistent with our data.

  5. Microchannel plate response to high-energy neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Persing, R.; Medley, S.S.

    1981-07-01

    The response of a chevron microchannel plate (MCP) to high energy neutrons was measured. The large area (4.6 cm x 13 cm) multi-anode MCP performance characteristics in the saturated pulse counting mode of operation were examined prior to neutron testing. This established a linear operating regime in which the neutron detection efficiency was measured to be 0.17% for 2.5 MeV-DD neutrons and 0.64% for 14 MeV-DT neutrons. The higher response measured for the 14 MeV-DT neutrons is attributed to gamma ray contamination induced by neutron collisions with materials located between the neutron source and the MCP detector. Due to their lower energy, the 2.5 MeV-DD response measurements are expected to be relatively free of gamma contamination and, hence, indicative of actual response of the MCP detector to neutrons in the 1 to 10 MeV energy range.

  6. Improving neutron dosimetry using bubble detector technology

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.A.

    1993-02-01

    Providing accurate neutron dosimetry for a variety of neutron energy spectra is a formidable task for any dosimetry system. Unless something is known about the neutron spectrum prior to processing the dosimeter, the calculated dose may vary greatly from that actually encountered; that is until now. The entrance of bubble detector technology into the field of neutron dosimetry has eliminated the necessity of having an a priori knowledge of the neutron energy spectra. Recently, a new approach in measuring personnel neutron dose equivalent was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. By using bubble detectors in combination with current thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a Combination Personnel Neutron Dosimeter (CPND), not only is it possible to provide accurate dose equivalent results, but a simple four-interval neutron energy spectrum is obtained as well. The components of the CPND are a Harshaw albedo TLD and two bubble detectors with theoretical energy thresholds of 100 key and 1500 keV. Presented are (1) a synoptic history surrounding emergence of bubble detector technology, (2) a brief overview of the current theory on mechanisms of interaction, (3) the data and analysis process involved in refining the response functions, (4) performance evaluation of the original CPND and a reevaluation of the same data under the modified method, (5) the procedure used to determine the reference values of component fluence and dose equivalent for field assessment, (6) analysis of the after-modification results, (7) a critique of some currently held assumptions, offering some alternative explanations, and (8) thoughts concerning potential applications and directions for future research.

  7. Improving neutron dosimetry using bubble detector technology

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.A.

    1993-02-01

    Providing accurate neutron dosimetry for a variety of neutron energy spectra is a formidable task for any dosimetry system. Unless something is known about the neutron spectrum prior to processing the dosimeter, the calculated dose may vary greatly from that actually encountered; that is until now. The entrance of bubble detector technology into the field of neutron dosimetry has eliminated the necessity of having an a priori knowledge of the neutron energy spectra. Recently, a new approach in measuring personnel neutron dose equivalent was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. By using bubble detectors in combination with current thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a Combination Personnel Neutron Dosimeter (CPND), not only is it possible to provide accurate dose equivalent results, but a simple four-interval neutron energy spectrum is obtained as well. The components of the CPND are a Harshaw albedo TLD and two bubble detectors with theoretical energy thresholds of 100 key and 1500 keV. Presented are (1) a synoptic history surrounding emergence of bubble detector technology, (2) a brief overview of the current theory on mechanisms of interaction, (3) the data and analysis process involved in refining the response functions, (4) performance evaluation of the original CPND and a reevaluation of the same data under the modified method, (5) the procedure used to determine the reference values of component fluence and dose equivalent for field assessment, (6) analysis of the after-modification results, (7) a critique of some currently held assumptions, offering some alternative explanations, and (8) thoughts concerning potential applications and directions for future research.

  8. Accidental neutron dosimetry with human hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekendahl, Daniela; Bečková, Věra; Zdychová, Vlasta; Bulánek, Boris; Prouza, Zdeněk; Štefánik, Milan

    2014-11-01

    Human hair contains sulfur, which can be activated by fast neutrons. The 32S(n,p)32P reaction with a threshold of 2.5 MeV was used for fast neutron dose estimation. It is a very important parameter for individual dose reconstruction with regards to the heterogeneity of the neutron transfer to the human body. Samples of human hair were irradiated in a radial channel of a training reactor VR-1. 32P activity in hair was measured both, directly by means of a proportional counter, and as ash dispersed in a liquid scintillator. Based on neutron spectrum estimation, a relationship between the neutron dose and induced activity was derived. The experiment verified the practical feasibility of this dosimetry method in cases of criticality accidents or malevolent acts with nuclear materials.

  9. Neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations for HFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron dosimetry measurements have been conducted for various positions of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in order to measure the neutron flux and energy spectra. Neutron dosimetry results and radiation damage calculations are presented for positions V10, V14, and V15.

  10. High-Energy Neutron Spectra and Flux Measurements Below Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roecker, Caleb; Bernstein, Adam; Marleau, Peter; Vetter, Kai

    2016-03-01

    High-energy neutrons are a ubiquitous and often poorly measured background. Below ground, these neutrons could potentially interfere with antineutrino based reactor monitoring experiments as well as other rare-event neutral particle detectors. We have designed and constructed a transportable fast neutron detection system for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The spectrometer uses a multiplicity technique in order to have a higher effective area than traditional transportable high-energy neutron spectrometers. Transportability ensures a common detector-related systematic bias for future measurements. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. A high-energy neutron may interact in the lead producing many secondary neutrons. The detector records the correlated secondary neutron multiplicity. Over many events, the response can be used to infer the incident neutron energy spectrum and flux. As a validation of the detector response, surface measurements have been performed; results confirm agreement with previous experiments. Below ground measurements have been performed at 3 depths (380, 600, and 1450 m.w.e.); results from these measurements will be presented.

  11. High Energy Neutron Induced Gamma Production

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D A; Johnson, M; Navratil, P

    2007-09-28

    N Division has an interest in improving the physics and accuracy of the gamma data it provides to its customers. It was asked to look into major gamma producing reactions for 14 MeV incident neutrons for several low-Z materials and determine whether LLNL's processed data files faithfully represent the current state of experimental and theoretical knowledge for these reactions. To address this, we surveyed the evaluations of the requested materials, made recommendations for the next ENDL release and noted isotopes that will require further experimental study. This process uncovered several major problems in our translation and processing of the ENDF formatted evaluations, most of which have been resolved.

  12. Advances in personnel neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Vallario, E.; Faust, L.

    1983-07-01

    A program to assess current personnel neutron dosimeter capabilities and to develop improved personnel neutron dosimeters examines the two types of passive dosimeters in use at DOE facilities: NTA film and TLD-albedo dosimeters. Two new neutron dosimeters under development to overcome some of their problems are combination/track-etch dosimeters and pocket rem-meters. The DOE program is investigating new materials and improved manufacturing processes using the CR-39 polymer and that is nearly free of surface defects. 1 figure.

  13. Eleventh DOE workshop on personnel neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    Since its formation, the Office of Health (EH-40) has stressed the importance of the exchange of information related to and improvements in neutron dosimetry. This Workshop was the eleventh in the series sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). It provided a forum for operational personnel at DOE facilities to discuss current issues related to neutron dosimetry and for leading investigators in the field to discuss promising approaches for future research. A total of 26 papers were presented including the keynote address by Dr. Warren K. Sinclair, who spoke on, ``The 1990 Recommendations of the ICRP and their Biological Background.`` The first several papers discussed difficulties in measuring neutrons of different energies and ways of compensating or deriving correction factors at individual facilities. Presentations were also given by the US Navy and Air Force. Current research in neutron dosimeter development was the subject of the largest number of papers. These included a number on the development of neutron spectrometers. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  14. Neutron generator (HIRRAC) and dosimetry study.

    PubMed

    Endo, S; Hoshi, M; Takada, J; Tauchi, H; Matsuura, S; Takeoka, S; Kitagawa, K; Suga, S; Komatsu, K

    1999-12-01

    Dosimetry studies have been made for neutrons from a neutron generator at Hiroshima University (HIRRAC) which is designed for radiobiological research. Neutrons in an energy range from 0.07 to 2.7 MeV are available for biological irradiations. The produced neutron energies were measured and evaluated by a 3He-gas proportional counter. Energy spread was made certain to be small enough for radiobiological studies. Dose evaluations were performed by two different methods, namely use of tissue equivalent paired ionization chambers and activation of method with indium foils. Moreover, energy deposition spectra in small targets of tissue equivalent materials, so-called lineal energy spectrum, were also measured and are discussed. Specifications for biological irradiation are presented in terms of monoenergetic beam conditions, dose rates and deposited energy spectra.

  15. Computational Transport Modeling of High-Energy Neutrons Found in the Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brad; Theriot, Corey A.; Rohde, Larry H.; Wu, Honglu

    2012-01-01

    The high charge and high energy (HZE) particle radiation environment in space interacts with spacecraft materials and the human body to create a population of neutrons encompassing a broad kinetic energy spectrum. As an HZE ion penetrates matter, there is an increasing chance of fragmentation as penetration depth increases. When an ion fragments, secondary neutrons are released with velocities up to that of the primary ion, giving some neutrons very long penetration ranges. These secondary neutrons have a high relative biological effectiveness, are difficult to effectively shield, and can cause more biological damage than the primary ions in some scenarios. Ground-based irradiation experiments that simulate the space radiation environment must account for this spectrum of neutrons. Using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System (PHITS), it is possible to simulate a neutron environment that is characteristic of that found in spaceflight. Considering neutron dosimetry, the focus lies on the broad spectrum of recoil protons that are produced in biological targets. In a biological target, dose at a certain penetration depth is primarily dependent upon recoil proton tracks. The PHITS code can be used to simulate a broad-energy neutron spectrum traversing biological targets, and it account for the recoil particle population. This project focuses on modeling a neutron beamline irradiation scenario for determining dose at increasing depth in water targets. Energy-deposition events and particle fluence can be simulated by establishing cross-sectional scoring routines at different depths in a target. This type of model is useful for correlating theoretical data with actual beamline radiobiology experiments. Other work exposed human fibroblast cells to a high-energy neutron source to study micronuclei induction in cells at increasing depth behind water shielding. Those findings provide supporting data describing dose vs. depth across a water-equivalent medium. This

  16. High-Energy Neutron Backgrounds for Underground Dark Matter Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Direct dark matter detection experiments usually have excellent capability to distinguish nuclear recoils, expected interactions with Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) dark matter, and electronic recoils, so that they can efficiently reject background events such as gamma-rays and charged particles. However, both WIMPs and neutrons can induce nuclear recoils. Neutrons are then the most crucial background for direct dark matter detection. It is important to understand and account for all sources of neutron backgrounds when claiming a discovery of dark matter detection or reporting limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross section. One type of neutron background that is not well understood is the cosmogenic neutrons from muons interacting with the underground cavern rock and materials surrounding a dark matter detector. The Neutron Multiplicity Meter (NMM) is a water Cherenkov detector capable of measuring the cosmogenic neutron flux at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, which has an overburden of 2090 meters water equivalent. The NMM consists of two 2.2-tonne gadolinium-doped water tanks situated atop a 20-tonne lead target. It detects a high-energy (>~ 50 MeV) neutron via moderation and capture of the multiple secondary neutrons released when the former interacts in the lead target. The multiplicity of secondary neutrons for the high-energy neutron provides a benchmark for comparison to the current Monte Carlo predictions. Combining with the Monte Carlo simulation, the muon-induced high-energy neutron flux above 50 MeV is measured to be (1.3 ± 0.2) ~ 10-9 cm-2s-1, in reasonable agreement with the model prediction. The measured multiplicity spectrum agrees well with that of Monte Carlo simulation for multiplicity below 10, but shows an excess of approximately a factor of three over Monte Carlo prediction for multiplicities ~ 10 - 20. In an effort to reduce neutron backgrounds for the dark matter experiment SuperCDMS SNO- LAB, an active neutron veto was developed

  17. Effect of high-energy neutrons on MuGFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilchytska, V.; Alvarado, J.; Collaert, N.; Rooyakers, R.; Militaru, O.; Berger, G.; Flandre, D.

    2010-02-01

    This paper investigates, for the first time, the influence of high-energy neutrons on Multiple-Gate FETs (MuGFETs) with various gate lengths and fin widths. Neutron-induced degradation is addressed through the variation of major device parameters such as threshold voltage, subthreshold slope, maximum transconductance and DIBL. We demonstrate that high-energy neutrons result in total-dose effects largely similar to those caused by γ- and proton-irradiations. It is shown that, contrarily to the generally-believed immunity to irradiation, very short-channel MuGFETs can become extremely sensitive to the total-dose effect. The possible reasons of such length-dependent neutron-induced degradation are discussed and finally related to gate edges.

  18. High Energy Telescope With Neutron Detection Capabilities (HETn)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posner, A.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Böhm, E.; Böttcher, s.; Connell, J. J.; Dröge, W.; Hassler, D. M.; Heber, B.; Lopate, C.; McKibben, R. B.; Steigies, C. T.

    2007-01-01

    The High-Energy Telescope with neutron detection capabilities (HETn) for the Solar Orbiter will measure and resolve energetic charged particles, in particular electrons, proton, and heavy ions up to Fe including selected isotopes up to energies equivalen to the penetration depth of 100 MeV protons. The full active anti-coincidence encloses detectors sensitive to 1-30 MeV neutrons and 0.5-5 MeV X-/gamma-rays. The sensor consists of the angle-detecting inclined sensors (ADIS) solid-state detector detector telescope utilizing a shared calorimeter for total energy and X-/gamma-ray measurement. A separate plastic detector provides sensitivity to neutrons via the recoil process. HETn will open a new window on solar eruptive events with its neutron detection capability and allows determination of high-energy close to the Sun. Timing and spectral information on neutral particles (neutrons and X-/gamma rays ), on relativistic electrons and high-energy heavy ions will provide new insights into the processes which accelerate particles to high energies at the sun and into transport processes between the source and the spacecraft in the near-Sun environment.

  19. Dosimetry in mixed neutron-gamma fields

    SciTech Connect

    Remec, I.

    1998-04-01

    The gamma field accompanying neutrons may, in certain circumstances, play an important role in the analysis of neutron dosimetry and even in the interpretation of radiation induced steel embrittlement. At the High Flux Isotope Reactor pressure vessel the gamma induced reactions dominate the responses of {sup 237}Np and {sup 238}U dosimeters, and {sup 9}Be helium accumulation fluence monitors. The gamma induced atom displacement rate in steel is higher than corresponding neutron rate, and is the cause of ``accelerated embrittlement`` of HFIR materials. In a large body of water, adjacent to a fission plate, photofissions contribute significantly to the responses of fission monitors and need to be taken into account if the measurements are used for the qualification of the transport codes and cross-section libraries.

  20. Superheated emulsions as high-energy neutron dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Das, Mala; Sawamura, Teruko; Abe, Masashi; Kaneko, Junichi H; Homma, Akira; Fujita, Fumiyuki; Tsuda, Shuichi; Nishitani, Takeo

    2004-01-01

    Superheated emulsions being inexpensive, easy to fabricate, and having tissue equivalent composition make them as one of the popular neutron dosemeters. One more advantage is that they can be made insensitive to gamma rays by the choice of the sensitive liquid. It is observed that the response of commercially available bubble detector to neutron decreases above 20 MeV while its response is roughly flat in the 0.1-15 MeV region. This restricts its application as a dosemeter to high-energy neutrons. The response of bubble detector from Bubble Technology Industries, has been observed by using Pb-breeder for high-energy neutrons from different facilities in Japan. It is observed that 2-3 cm Pb-breeder is effective in increasing the response of the detector to the nominal value. Theoretical calculation using MCNPX code indicates an increase in neutrons in the energy range of 0.1-10 MeV with Pb-breeder. The present work indicates the possibility of using the bubble detector as a dosemeter to high-energy neutron using a Pb-breeder of proper thickness.

  1. Neutron dosimetry using optically stimulated luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. D.; Eschbach, P. A.

    1991-06-01

    The addition of thermoluminescent (TL) materials within hydrogenous matrices to detect neutron induced proton recoils for radiation dosimetry is a well known concept. Previous attempts to implement this technique have met with limited success, primarily due to the high temperatures required for TL readout and the low melting temperatures of hydrogen-rich plastics. Research in recent years PNL has produced a new Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) technique known as the Cooled Optically Stimulated Luminescence (COSL) that offers, for the first time, the capability of performing extremely sensitive radiation dosimetry at low temperatures. In addition to its extreme sensitivity, the COSL technique offers multiple readout capability, limited fading in a one year period, and the capability of analyzing single grains within a hydrogenous matrix.

  2. High-Energy Neutron Imaging Development at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, J M; Rusnak, B; Shen, S

    2005-02-16

    We are proceeding with the development of a high-energy (10 MeV) neutron imaging system for use as an inspection tool in nuclear stockpile stewardship applications. Our goal is to develop and deploy an imaging system capable of detecting cubic-mm-scale voids, cracks or other significant structural defects in heavily-shielded low-Z materials within nuclear device components. The final production-line system will be relatively compact (suitable for use in existing facilities within the DOE complex) and capable of acquiring both radiographic and tomographic (CT) images. In this report, we will review our recent programmatic accomplishments, focusing primarily on progress made in FY04. The design status of the high-intensity, accelerator-driven neutron source and large-format imaging detector associated with the system will be discussed and results from a recent high-energy neutron imaging experiment conducted at the Ohio University Accelerator Laboratory (OUAL) will also be presented.

  3. Dosimetry of very high energy electrons (VHEE) for radiotherapy applications: using radiochromic film measurements and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Subiel, A; Moskvin, V; Welsh, G H; Cipiccia, S; Reboredo, D; Evans, P; Partridge, M; DesRosiers, C; Anania, M P; Cianchi, A; Mostacci, A; Chiadroni, E; Di Giovenale, D; Villa, F; Pompili, R; Ferrario, M; Belleveglia, M; Di Pirro, G; Gatti, G; Vaccarezza, C; Seitz, B; Isaac, R C; Brunetti, E; Wiggins, S M; Ersfeld, B; Islam, M R; Mendonca, M S; Sorensen, A; Boyd, M; Jaroszynski, D A

    2014-10-07

    Very high energy electrons (VHEE) in the range from 100-250 MeV have the potential of becoming an alternative modality in radiotherapy because of their improved dosimetry properties compared with MV photons from contemporary medical linear accelerators. Due to the need for accurate dosimetry of small field size VHEE beams we have performed dose measurements using EBT2 Gafchromic® film. Calibration of the film has been carried out for beams of two different energy ranges: 20 MeV and 165 MeV from conventional radio frequency linear accelerators. In addition, EBT2 film has been used for dose measurements with 135 MeV electron beams produced by a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator. The dose response measurements and percentage depth dose profiles have been compared with calculations carried out using the general-purpose FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport code. The impact of induced radioactivity on film response for VHEEs has been evaluated using the MC simulations. A neutron yield of the order of 10(-5) neutrons cm(-2) per incident electron has been estimated and induced activity due to radionuclide production is found to have a negligible effect on total dose deposition and film response. Neutron and proton contribution to the equivalent doses are negligible for VHEE. The study demonstrates that EBT2 Gafchromic film is a reliable dosimeter that can be used for dosimetry of VHEE. The results indicate an energy-independent response of the dosimeter for 20 MeV and 165 MeV electron beams and has been found to be suitable for dosimetry of VHEE.

  4. Dosimetry of very high energy electrons (VHEE) for radiotherapy applications: using radiochromic film measurements and Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subiel, A.; Moskvin, V.; Welsh, G. H.; Cipiccia, S.; Reboredo, D.; Evans, P.; Partridge, M.; DesRosiers, C.; Anania, M. P.; Cianchi, A.; Mostacci, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Di Giovenale, D.; Villa, F.; Pompili, R.; Ferrario, M.; Belleveglia, M.; Di Pirro, G.; Gatti, G.; Vaccarezza, C.; Seitz, B.; Isaac, R. C.; Brunetti, E.; Wiggins, S. M.; Ersfeld, B.; Islam, M. R.; Mendonca, M. S.; Sorensen, A.; Boyd, M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2014-10-01

    Very high energy electrons (VHEE) in the range from 100-250 MeV have the potential of becoming an alternative modality in radiotherapy because of their improved dosimetry properties compared with MV photons from contemporary medical linear accelerators. Due to the need for accurate dosimetry of small field size VHEE beams we have performed dose measurements using EBT2 Gafchromic® film. Calibration of the film has been carried out for beams of two different energy ranges: 20 MeV and 165 MeV from conventional radio frequency linear accelerators. In addition, EBT2 film has been used for dose measurements with 135 MeV electron beams produced by a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator. The dose response measurements and percentage depth dose profiles have been compared with calculations carried out using the general-purpose FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport code. The impact of induced radioactivity on film response for VHEEs has been evaluated using the MC simulations. A neutron yield of the order of 10-5 neutrons cm-2 per incident electron has been estimated and induced activity due to radionuclide production is found to have a negligible effect on total dose deposition and film response. Neutron and proton contribution to the equivalent doses are negligible for VHEE. The study demonstrates that EBT2 Gafchromic film is a reliable dosimeter that can be used for dosimetry of VHEE. The results indicate an energy-independent response of the dosimeter for 20 MeV and 165 MeV electron beams and has been found to be suitable for dosimetry of VHEE.

  5. High-Energy Neutron Imaging Development at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, J; Rusnak, B; Fitsos, P

    2006-12-06

    We are proceeding with the development of a high-energy (10 MeV) neutron imaging system for use as an inspection tool in nuclear stockpile stewardship applications. Our goal is to develop and deploy an imaging system capable of detecting cubic-mm-scale voids, cracks or other significant structural defects in heavily-shielded low-Z materials within nuclear device components. The final production-line system will be relatively compact (suitable for use in existing or proposed facilities within the DOE complex) and capable of acquiring both radiographic and tomographic (CT) images. In this report, we will review our programmatic accomplishments to date, highlighting recent (FY06) progress on engineering and technology development issues related to the proposed imaging system. We will also discuss our preliminary project plan for FY07, including engineering initiatives, proposed radiation damage experiments (neutrons and x rays) and potential options for conducting classified neutron imaging experiments at LLNL.

  6. Recent trends in radioprotection dosimetry: Promising solutions for personal neutron dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasino, L.

    1987-03-01

    Conventional detectors used in radiation protection dosimetry (for a given amount of energy deposited in their macroscopic volumes) are more sensitive to sparse radiations (electrons, X or gamma) than to fast neutrons or high-LET particles, i.e. those particles characterized by high biological effectiveness. By contrast, detectors needed in radiation protection monitoring should have a registration sensitivity which follows the opposite trend. With conventional detectors, in order to register the high-LET component in mixed fields, it is necessary to count individual energy-depositing tracks thus requiring elaborate electronics or complex automatic systems. In this paper new detecting methods will be described, which are very sensitive to fast neutrons and are completely insensitive to gamma radiations. These new detectors are based on the same properties of highly ionizing particles which determine their high biological effectiveness, namely the high deposition of energy at microscopic and submicroscopic distances from the particle trajectory in solid materials. Another important characteristic, common to these new detecting methods, is the exploitation of the high-energy deposition in the vicinity of the track to initiate avalanche-type of processes, which can be easily detected. These new registration techniques are respectively the electrochemically etched damage track detectors and the bubble damage polymer detectors. The simplicity, low cost and small size of these new detecting systems, together with their high sensitivity and their ability to discriminate against large fluxes of sparsely ionizing radiations make it possible to tackle some of the most difficult problems yet to be solved in radioprotection monitoring, such as personnel neutron dosimetry.

  7. Albedo neutron dosimetry in Germany: regulations and performance.

    PubMed

    Luszik-Bhadra, M; Zimbal, A; Busch, F; Eichelberger, A; Engelhardt, J; Figel, M; Frasch, G; Günther, K; Jordan, M; Martini, E; Haninger, T; Rimpler, A; Seifert, R

    2014-12-01

    Personal neutron dosimetry has been performed in Germany using albedo dosemeters for >20 y. This paper describes the main principles, the national standards, regulations and recommendations, the quality management and the overall performance, giving some examples.

  8. Neutron emission and fragment yield in high-energy fission

    SciTech Connect

    Grudzevich, O. T. Klinov, D. A.

    2013-07-15

    The KRIS special library of spectra and emission probabilities in the decays of 1500 nuclei excited up to energies between 150 and 250 MeV was developed for correctly taking into account the decay of highly excited nuclei appearing as fission fragments. The emission of neutrons, protons, and photons was taken into account. Neutron emission fromprimary fragments was found to have a substantial effect on the formation of yields of postneutron nuclei. The library was tested by comparing the calculated and measured yields of products originating from the fission of nuclei that was induced by high-energy protons. The method for calculating these yields was tested on the basis of experimental data on the thermal-neutroninduced fission of {sup 235}U nuclei.

  9. Absorbed dose to water based dosimetry versus air kerma based dosimetry for high-energy photon beams: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Palmans, Hugo; Nafaa, Laila; De, Jans Jo; Gillis, Sofie; Hoornaert, Marie-Thérèse; Martens, Chantal; Piessens, Marleen; Thierens, Hubert; Van der Plaetsen, Ann; Vynckier, Stefaan

    2002-02-07

    In recent years, a change has been proposed from air kerma based reference dosimetry to absorbed dose based reference dosimetry for all radiotherapy beams of ionizing radiation. In this paper, a dosimetry study is presented in which absorbed dose based dosimetry using recently developed formalisms was compared with air kerma based dosimetry using older formalisms. Three ionization chambers of each of three different types were calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water and air kerma and sent to five hospitals. There, reference dosimetry with all the chambers was performed in a total of eight high-energy clinical photon beams. The selected chamber types were the NE2571, the PTW-30004 and the Wellhöfer-FC65G (previously Wellhöfer-IC70). Having a graphite wall, they exhibit a stable volume and the presence of an aluminium electrode ensures the robustness of these chambers. The data were analysed with the most important recommendations for clinical dosimetry: IAEA TRS-398, AAPM TG-51, IAEA TRS-277, NCS report-2 (presently recommended in Belgium) and AAPM TG-21. The necessary conversion factors were taken from those protocols, or calculated using the data in the different protocols if data for a chamber type are lacking. Polarity corrections were within 0.1% for all chambers in all beams. Recombination corrections were consistent with theoretical predictions, did not vary within a chamber type and only slightly between different chamber types. The maximum chamber-to-chamber variations of the dose obtained with the different formalisms within the same chamber type were between 0.2% and 0.6% for the NE2571, between 0.2% and 0.6% for the PTW-30004 and 0.1% and 0.3% for the Wellhöfer-FC65G for the different beams. The absorbed dose results for the NE2571 and Wellhöfer-FC65G chambers were in good agreement for all beams and all formalisms. The PTW-30004 chambers gave a small but systematically higher result compared to the result for the NE2571 chambers (on the

  10. Challenges of dosimetry of ultra-short pulsed very high energy electron beams.

    PubMed

    Subiel, Anna; Moskvin, Vadim; Welsh, Gregor H; Cipiccia, Silvia; Reboredo, David; DesRosiers, Colleen; Jaroszynski, Dino A

    2017-05-11

    Very high energy electrons (VHEE) in the range from 100 to 250MeV have the potential of becoming an alternative modality in radiotherapy because of their improved dosimetric properties compared with 6-20MV photons generated by clinical linear accelerators (LINACs). VHEE beams have characteristics unlike any other beams currently used for radiotherapy: femtosecond to picosecond duration electron bunches, which leads to very high dose per pulse, and energies that exceed that currently used in clinical applications. Dosimetry with conventional online detectors, such as ionization chambers or diodes, is a challenge due to non-negligible ion recombination effects taking place in the sensitive volumes of these detectors. FLUKA and Geant4 Monte Carlo (MC) codes have been employed to study the temporal and spectral evolution of ultrashort VHEE beams in a water phantom. These results are complemented by ion recombination measurements employing an IBA CC04 ionization chamber for a 165MeV VHEE beam. For comparison, ion recombination has also been measured using the same chamber with a conventional 20MeV electron beam. This work demonstrates that the IBA CC04 ionization chamber exhibits significant ion recombination and is therefore not suitable for dosimetry of ultrashort pulsed VHEE beams applying conventional correction factors. Further study is required to investigate the applicability of ion chambers in VHEE dosimetry. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Neutron detection and dosimetry using polycrystalline CVD diamond detectors with high collection efficiency.

    PubMed

    Angelone, M; Marinelli, M; Milani, E; Tucciarone, A; Pillon, M; Pucella, G; Verona-Rinati, G

    2006-01-01

    Polycrystalline chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond film is an interesting material for neutron detection and dosimetry. However, the use of CVD diamond detectors is still limited by the low-level signal pulse produced because of the high energy required to produce an electron-hole pair in diamond (13.2 eV) and by the reduced charge collection efficiency owing to several types of traps for electrons and holes in CVD films. A new type of CVD diamond detector with high gain (HG) contacts was produced as part of the collaboration between the ENEA Fusion Division and the Faculty of Engineering of Rome 'Tor Vergata' University. In this paper the performance of the HG CVD diamond detector is presented and possible applications of CVD diamond detectors to neutron dosimetry are also discussed.

  12. Workplace characterisation in mixed neutron-gamma fields, specific requirements and available methods at high-energy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Silari, Marco

    2007-01-01

    A good knowledge of the radiation field present outside the shielding of high-energy particle accelerators is very important to be able to select the type of detectors (active and/or passive) to be employed for area monitoring and the type of personal dosemeter required for estimating the doses received by individuals. Around high-energy electron and proton accelerators the radiation field is usually dominated by neutrons and photons, with minor contributions from other charged particles. Under certain circumstances, muon radiation in the forward beam direction may also be present. Neutron dosimetry and spectrometry are of primary importance to characterise the radiation field and thus to correctly evaluate personnel exposure. Starting from the beam parameters important for radiation monitoring, the paper first briefly reviews the stray radiation fields encountered around high-energy accelerators and then addresses the relevant techniques employed for their monitoring. Recent developments to increase the response of neutron measuring devices beyond 10-20 MeV are illustrated. Instruments should be correctly calibrated either in reference monoenergetic radiation fields or in a field similar to the field in which they are used (workplace calibration). The importance of the instrument calibration is discussed and available neutron calibration facilities are briefly reviewed.

  13. Passive neutron dosimetry on cruise missile tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.I.

    1980-01-01

    One of the components exercised during development tests of cruise missiles is the neutron generator that supplies the burst of neutrons needed to initiate a nuclear explosion. The subject of this report is a method of verifying the production of neutrons using a passive neutron activation technique that is sufficiently sensitive to detect a decay rate of a few atoms per hour.

  14. The fission track detector revisited: application to individual neutron dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Prêtre, S; Aroua, A; Boschung, M; Grecescu, M; Valley, J F; Wernli, C

    1996-08-01

    A system based on fission fragment tracks had previously been developed for individual neutron dosimetry. The dosimeter detects both fast neutrons by means of the 232Th(n,f) reaction, and thermal and albedo neutrons by means of the 235U(n,f) reaction. The fission tracks produced in a plastic foil are chemically etched and counted by spark discharges. The response of the dosimeter has recently been re-investigated in 36 different neutron fields: monoenergetic beams, reference fields near isotopic sources, and radiation fields encountered in a variety of situations inside nuclear power plants. The results obtained have been compared to those computed by convolution of the neutron spectra with the energy response functions of the dosimeters. In practical situations, it is essential to know the shape of the neutron spectrum, approximately at least, in order to perform an acceptably accurate dose evaluation. For that purpose, the neutron fields encountered inside nuclear power plants have been grouped into four categories, for which algorithms for dose evaluation have been developed. Concerning the neutron equivalent dose, the error associated with this approach does not exceed a factor of 2, a performance which is comparable to other detection systems used in the field of individual neutron dosimetry.

  15. Absolute dose determination in high-energy electron beams: Comparison of IAEA dosimetry protocols

    PubMed Central

    Sathiyan, S.; Ravikumar, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, absorbed doses were measured and compared for high-energy electrons (6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV) using International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Technical Reports Series No. 277 (TRS), TRS 381, and TRS 398 dosimetry protocols. Absolute dose measurements were carried out using FC65-G Farmer chamber and Nordic Association of Clinical Physicists (NACP) parallel plate chamber with DOSE1 electrometer in WP1-D water phantom for reference field size of 15 × 15 cm2 at 100 cm source-to-surface distance. The results show that the difference between TRS 398 and TRS 381 was about 0.24% to 1.3% depending upon the energy, and the maximum difference between TRS 398 and TRS 277 was 1.5%. The use of cylindrical chamber in electron beam gives the maximum dose difference between the TRS 398 and TRS 277 in the order of 1.4% for energies above 10 MeV (R50 > 4 g/cm2). It was observed that the accuracy of dose estimation was better with the protocols based on the water calibration procedures, as no conversion quantities are involved for conversion of dose from air to water. The cross-calibration procedure of parallel plate chamber with high-energy electron beams is recommended as it avoids pwall correction factor entering into the determination of kQ,Qo. PMID:19893700

  16. The influence of neutron contamination on dosimetry in external photon beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Horst, Felix; Czarnecki, Damian; Zink, Klemens

    2015-11-01

    low relative to that of the primary photons. For most practical reasons the neutrons' influence on dosimetry might be neglected while for absolute precise thermoluminescence dosimetry in high energy photon fields, the use of TLD-700H (<0.03% 6Li) instead of the commonly used TLD-100 (7.4% 6Li) or even the extra neutron sensitive TLD-600H is recommended (95.6% 6Li) due to the additional inaccuracy in measurement for TLD materials with a high 6Li fraction.

  17. Spectrometry and dosimetry of fast neutrons using pin diode detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki Dizaji, H.; Kakavand, T.; Abbasi Davani, F.

    2014-03-01

    Elastic scattering of light nuclei, especially hydrogen, is widely used for detection of fast neutrons. Semiconductor devices based on silicon detectors are frequently used for different radiation detections. In this work, a neutron spectrometer consisting of a pin diode coupled with a polyethylene converter and aluminum degrader layers has been developed. Aluminum layers are used as discriminators of different neutron energies for detectors. The response of the converter-degrader-pin diode configuration, the optimum thickness of the converter and the degrader layers have been extracted using MCNP and SRIM simulation codes. The possibility of using this type of detector for fast neutron spectrometry and dosimetry has been investigated. A fairly good agreement was seen between neutron energy spectrum and dose obtained from our configurations and these specifications from an 241Am-Be neutron source.

  18. EPR dosimetry in a mixed neutron and gamma radiation field.

    PubMed

    Trompier, F; Fattibene, P; Tikunov, D; Bartolotta, A; Carosi, A; Doca, M C

    2004-01-01

    Suitability of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy for criticality dosimetry was evaluated for tooth enamel, mannose and alanine pellets during the 'international intercomparison of criticality dosimetry techniques' at the SILENE reactor held in Valduc in June 2002, France. These three materials were irradiated in neutron and gamma-ray fields of various relative intensities and spectral distributions in order to evaluate their neutron sensitivity. The neutron response was found to be around 10% for tooth enamel, 45% for mannose and between 40 and 90% for alanine pellets according their type. According to the IAEA recommendations on the early estimate of criticality accident absorbed dose, analyzed results show the EPR potentiality and complementarity with regular criticality techniques.

  19. Dosimetry in Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility at BMRR

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J. P.; Holden, N. E.; Reciniello, R. N.

    2014-05-23

    Radiation dosimetry for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) has been performed since 1959 at Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility (TNIF) of the three-megawatt light-water cooled Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). In the early 1990s when more effective drug carriers were developed for NCT, in which the eye melanoma and brain tumors in rats were irradiated in situ, extensive clinical trials of small animals began using a focused thermal neutron beam. To improve the dosimetry at irradiation facility, a series of innovative designs and major modifications made to enhance the beam intensity and to ease the experimental sampling at BMRR were performed; including (1) in-core fuel addition to increase source strength and balance flux of neutrons towards two ports, (2) out of core moderator remodeling, done by replacing thicker D2O tanks at graphite-shutter interfacial areas, to expedite neutron thermalization, (3) beam shutter upgrade to reduce strayed neutrons and gamma dose, (4) beam collimator redesign to optimize the beam flux versus dose for animal treatment, (5) beam port shielding installation around the shutter opening area (lithium-6 enriched polyester-resin in boxes, attached with polyethylene plates) to reduce prompt gamma and fast neutron doses, (6) sample holder repositioning to optimize angle versus distance for a single organ or whole body irradiation, and (7) holder wall buildup with neutron reflector materials to increase dose and dose rate from scattered thermal neutrons. During the facility upgrade, reactor dosimetry was conducted using thermoluminescent dosimeters TLD for gamma dose estimate, using ion chambers to confirm fast neutron and gamma dose rate, and by the activation of gold-foils with and without cadmium-covers, for fast and thermal neutron flux determination. Based on the combined effect from the size and depth of tumor cells and the location and geometry of dosimeters, the measured flux from cadmium-difference method was 4 - 7

  20. Dosimetry in Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility at BMRR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.-P.; Holden, N. E.; Reciniello, R. N.

    2016-02-01

    Radiation dosimetry for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) has been performed since 1959 at Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility (TNIF) of the three-megawatt light-water cooled Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). In the early 1990s when more effective drug carriers were developed for NCT, in which the eye melanoma and brain tumors in rats were irradiated in situ, extensive clinical trials of small animals began using a focused thermal neutron beam. To improve the dosimetry at irradiation facility, a series of innovative designs and major modifications made to enhance the beam intensity and to ease the experimental sampling at BMRR were performed; including (1) in-core fuel addition to increase source strength and balance flux of neutrons towards two ports, (2) out of core moderator remodeling, done by replacing thicker D2O tanks at graphite-shutter interfacial areas, to expedite neutron thermalization, (3) beam shutter upgrade to reduce strayed neutrons and gamma dose, (4) beam collimator redesign to optimize the beam flux versus dose for animal treatment, (5) beam port shielding installation around the shutter opening area (lithium-6 enriched polyester-resin in boxes, attached with polyethylene plates) to reduce prompt gamma and fast neutron doses, (6) sample holder repositioning to optimize angle versus distance for a single organ or whole body irradiation, and (7) holder wall buildup with neutron reflector materials to increase dose and dose rate from scattered thermal neutrons. During the facility upgrade, reactor dosimetry was conducted using thermoluminescent dosimeters TLD for gamma dose estimate, using ion chambers to confirm fast neutron and gamma dose rate, and by the activation of gold-foils with and without cadmium-covers, for fast and thermal neutron flux determination. Based on the combined effect from the size and depth of tumor cells and the location and geometry of dosimeters, the measured flux from cadmium-difference method was 4-7% lower than

  1. Neutron dosimetry in solid water phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Benites-Rengifo, Jorge Luis; Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2014-11-07

    The neutron spectra, the Kerma and the absorbed dose due to neutrons were estimated along the incoming beam in a solid water phantom. Calculations were carried out with the MCNP5 code, where the bunker, the phantom and the model of the15 MV LINAC head were modeled. As the incoming beam goes into the phantom the neutron spectrum is modified and the dosimetric values are reduced.

  2. Applying an analytical method to study neutron behavior for dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirazi, S. A. Mousavi

    2016-12-01

    In this investigation, a new dosimetry process is studied by applying an analytical method. This novel process is associated with a human liver tissue. The human liver tissue has compositions including water, glycogen and etc. In this study, organic compound materials of liver are decomposed into their constituent elements based upon mass percentage and density of every element. The absorbed doses are computed by analytical method in all constituent elements of liver tissue. This analytical method is introduced applying mathematical equations based on neutron behavior and neutron collision rules. The results show that the absorbed doses are converged for neutron energy below 15MeV. This method can be applied to study the interaction of neutrons in other tissues and estimating the absorbed dose for a wide range of neutron energy.

  3. Advanced passive detectors for neutron dosimetry and spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tommasino, L

    2004-01-01

    Different neutron detectors have been developed in the past which exploit electrical and electrochemical processes in plastic foils and thin-film capacitors (namely metal-oxide-silicon devices) to trigger avalanche processes, which greatly facilitate the detection of neutron-induced charged particles. These detectors are: (i) spark-replica counter of neutron-induced fission-fragment holes in plastic films, thin-film breakdown counter of neutron-induced fission fragments, and electrochemically etched detectors of neutron-induced recoils in plastic foils. The major shortcomings of damage-track detectors for the measurement of low neutron fluencies, such as those of cosmic ray neutrons at civil aviation altitudes, are their large and unpredictable background and their small signal-to-noise ratio. These shortcomings have been overcome respectively by using long exposure times and large detector areas and counting coincidence-track events on matched pairs of detectors even for a few-micron-long tracks such as those of neutron recoils. The responses of all these detectors have been analysed both with neutrons with energy up to approximately 200 MeV and protons up to tens of gigaelectron volts. Applications of these detectors for the cosmic ray neutron dosimetry and/or spectrometry will be mentioned.

  4. A phoswich detector for high-energy neutrons.

    PubMed

    Takada, M; Nakamura, T

    2007-01-01

    A phoswich detector was developed to measure neutron energy spectra from a few MeV to a few hundreds MeV in aircrafts and space crafts. Radiation fields, which both crafts are exposured, consist of neutrons, gamma rays, protons, etc. The phoswich detector can measure neutrons separately from gamma rays and protons. The capability of particle discrimination was tested at HIMAC and was found to be excellent. Detector response functions to neutrons were simulated with the MCNPX code using the measured light outputs of charged particles and were measured with quasi-mono-energetic neutrons produced by the p-Li reaction at the NIRS cyclotron. Test flight measurements at high altitudes, 6.5 and 8.5 km, were performed above the middle part of Japan (cut-off rigidity, 12 GV).

  5. Characterization of the high-energy neutron beam of the PRISMA beamline using a diamond detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Frost, C. D.; Minniti, T.; Schooneveld, E.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Tardocchi, M.; Rebai, M.; Gorini, G.

    2016-07-01

    The high-energy neutron component (En > 10 MeV) of the neutron spectrum of PRISMA, a beam-line at the ISIS spallation source, has been characterized for the first time. Neutron measurements using a Single-crystal Diamond Detector at a short-pulse source are obtained by a combination of pulse height and time of flight analysis. An XY scan provides a 2D map of the high-energy neutron beam which has a diameter of about 40 mm. The high neutron flux, that has been found to be (3.8 ± 0.7) · 105 cm-2s-1 for En > 10 MeV in the centre, opens up for a possible application of the beam-line as a high-energy neutron irradiation position. Results are of interest for the development of the ChipIR beam-line, which will feature an atmospheric-like neutron spectrum for chip irradiation experiment. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that diamond detectors can be used at spallation sources to investigate the transport of high-energy neutrons down instruments which is of interest in general to designers as high-energy neutrons are a source of background in thermal beamlines.

  6. Neutron dosimetry using aqueous solutions of lithium acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Rakovan, Lance John

    1996-01-01

    A thermal neutron dosimetry system using the 6Li(n,α)3H reaction and liquid scintillation counting of tritium was developed. Lithium acetate was chosen to supply the 6Li in the aqueous dosimetry solutions. Neutron irradiations were completed using The Ohio State University Research Reactor. After two sets of samples were irradiated, variables in the system such as the mass of lithium acetate in the solutions and the counting window of the liquid scintillation counter used to analyze the sample were chosen. The system was evaluated by completing two sets of 23 minute irradiations with the reactor at 500 kW, 50 kW, 5 kW, and one irradiation at 500 W. The samples irradiated at 500 W were below the threshold of the system, and could not be used. Prompt analysis was essential due to loss of detectable emissions in the dosimetry solutions over time. The thermal neutron fluences calculated with the data from the samples were compared to the fluences determined from gold wire irradiations. The fluence values differed at most by 6%. The fluence values calculated from the samples were consistently less than those determined from the gold wires.

  7. Neutron discrepancies in the DS86 Hiroshima dosimetry system.

    PubMed

    Straume, T; Egbert, S D; Woolson, W A; Finkel, R C; Kubik, P W; Gove, H E; Sharma, P; Hoshi, M

    1992-10-01

    More than a decade has passed since a complete revision was initiated of the radiation doses received by survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings. The new dosimetry system (DS86) was completed in 1986 and adopted shortly thereafter. Overall, DS86 was noted to be a clear improvement over the old dosimetry system. However, based on limited validation measurements, troublesome inconsistencies were suggested for neutrons. Since 1986, a substantial number of additional neutron activation measurements have been made in mineral and metal samples from Hiroshima. Importantly, a large number of measurements have now been made at distances beyond 1 km. Here, inconsistencies between neutron activation measurements and DS86 calculations for Hiroshima are examined using all available measurement data, including new measurements for 36Cl which extend the measurement range to more than 1.7 km from the epicenter, and Monte Carlo modeling calculations for each sample measured. Results show that thermal neutron activation measured beyond approximately 1 km in Hiroshima (at distances most relevant for radiation-risk evaluation) is two to 10, or more, times higher than that calculated based on DS86. Similar trends observed when comparing results by several independent measurement laboratories, using different analytical methods, suggest that the DS86 calculations for low-energy neutrons are in error. Because of the importance of the Hiroshima data in radiation risk evaluation, this large discrepancy is in need of resolution.

  8. Neutron dosimetry, moderated energy spectrum, and neutron capture therapy for californium-252 medical sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivard, Mark Joseph

    Examination of neutron dosimetry for 252Cf has been conducted using calculative and experimental means. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code was used in a distributed computing environment as a parallel virtual machine (PVM) to determine the absorbed neutron dose and neutron energy spectrum from 252Cf in a variety of clinically relevant materials. Herein, a Maxwellian spectrum was used to model the 252Cf neutron emissions within these materials. 252Cf mixed-field dosimetry of Applicator Tube (AT) type sources was measured using 1.0 and 0.05 cm3 tissue-equivalent ion chambers and a miniature GM counter. A dosimetry protocol was formulated similar that of ICRU 45. The 252Cf AT neutron dosimetry was determined in the cylindrical coordinate system formalism recommended by the AAPM Task Group 43. These results demonstrated the overwhelming dependence of dosimetry on the source geometry factor as there was no significant neutron attenuation within the source or encapsulation. Gold foils and TLDs were used to measure the thermal flux in the vicinity of 252Cf AT sources to compare with the results calculated using MCNP. As the fast neutron energy spectrum did not markedly changed at increasing distances from the AT source, neutron dosimetry results obtained with paired ion chambers using fixed sensitivity factors agreed well with MCNP results and those in the literature. Calculations of moderated 252Cf neutron energy spectrum with various loadings of 10B and 157Gd were performed, in addition to analysis of neutron capture therapy dosimetry with these isotopes. Radiological concerns such as personnel exposure and shielding of 252Cf emissions were examined. Feasibility of a high specific-activity 252Cf HDR source was investigated through radiochemical and metallurgical studies using stand-ins such as Tb, Gd and 249Cf. Issues such as capsule burst strength due to helium production for a variety of proposed HDR sources were addressed. A recommended 252Cf source

  9. Personnel neutron dose assessment upgrade: Volume 1, Personnel neutron dosimetry assessment: (Final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Hadlock, D.E.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Griffith, R.V.; Hankins, D.E.; Parkhurst, M.A.; Stroud, C.M.; Faust, L.G.; Vallario, E.J.

    1988-07-01

    This report provides guidance on the characteristics, use, and calibration criteria for personnel neutron dosimeters. The report is applicable for neutrons with energies ranging from thermal to less than 20 MeV. Background for general neutron dosimetry requirements is provided, as is relevant federal regulations and other standards. The characteristics of personnel neutron dosimeters are discussed, with particular attention paid to passive neutron dosimetry systems. Two of the systems discussed are used at DOE and DOE-contractor facilities (nuclear track emulsion and thermoluminescent-albedo) and another (the combination TLD/TED) was recently developed. Topics discussed in the field applications of these dosimeters include their theory of operation, their processing, readout, and interpretation, and their advantages and disadvantages for field use. The procedures required for occupational neutron dosimetry are discussed, including radiation monitoring and the wearing of dosimeters, their exchange periods, dose equivalent evaluations, and the documenting of neutron exposures. The coverage of dosimeter testing, maintenance, and calibration includes guidance on the selection of calibration sources, the effects of irradiation geometries, lower limits of detectability, fading, frequency of calibration, spectrometry, and quality control. 49 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. High energy neutron and gamma-radiation generated during the solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocharov, G. E.; Mandzhavidze, N. Z.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of high energy neutrons and gamma rays generation in the solar conditions is considered. It is shown that due to a peculiarity of generation and propagation of neutrons corresponding solar flares should be localized at high helio-longitudes.

  11. Neutron ESR dosimetry through ammonium tartrate with low Gd content.

    PubMed

    Marrale, M; Brai, M; Longo, A; Panzeca, S; Tranchina, L; Tomarchio, E; Parlato, A; Buttafava, A; Dondi, D

    2014-06-01

    This paper continues analyses on organic compounds for application in neutron dosimetry performed through electron spin resonance (ESR). Here, the authors present the results obtained by ESR measurements of a blend of ammonium tartrate dosemeters and gadolinium oxide (5 % by weight). The choice of low amount of Gd is due to the need of improving neutron sensitivity while not significantly influencing tissue equivalence. A study of the effect of gadolinium presence on tissue equivalence was carried out. The experiments show that the neutron sensitivity is enhanced by more than an order of magnitude even with this small additive content. Monte Carlo simulations on the increment of energy release due to gadolinium presence were carried, and the results were in good agreement with the experimental data. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. A Canadian high-energy neutron spectrometry system for measurements in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonkmans, G.; Andrews, H. R.; Clifford, E. T. H.; Frketich, G.; Ing, H.; Koslowsky, V. T.; Noulty, R. A.; Miller, R. C.; Zhou, Y.; Mortimer, A.; Peterson, D.; Wilkinson, R.

    2005-05-01

    Bubble Technology Industries Inc. (BTI), with the support of the Canadian Space Agency, has finished the construction of the Canadian High-Energy Neutron Spectrometry System (CHENSS). This spectrometer is intended to measure the high-energy neutron spectrum ( ˜1-100MeV) encountered in spacecraft in low earth orbit. CHENSS is designed to fly aboard a US space shuttle and its scientific results should facilitate the prediction of neutron dose to astronauts in space from readings of different types of radiation dosimeters that are being used in various missions.

  13. Neutron dosimetry in low-earth orbit using passive detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes neutron dosimetry measurements made by the USF Physics Research Laboratory aboard US and Russian LEO spacecraft over the past 20 years using two types of passive detector. Thermal/resonance neutron detectors exploiting the 6Li(n,T) alpha reaction were used to measure neutrons of energies <1 MeV. Fission foil neutron detectors were used to measure neutrons of energies above 1 MeV. While originally analysed in terms of dose equivalent using the NCRP-38 definition of quality factor, for the purposes of this paper the measured neutron data have been reanalyzed and are presented in terms of ambient dose equivalent. Dose equivalent rate for neutrons <1 MeV ranged from 0.80 microSv/d on the low altitude, low inclination STS-41B mission to 22.0 microSv/d measured in the Shuttle's cargo bay on the highly inclined STS-51F Spacelab-2 mission. In one particular instance a detector embedded within a large hydrogenous mass on STS-61 (in the ECT experiment) measured 34.6 microSv/d. Dose equivalent rate measurements of neutrons >1 MeV ranged from 4.5 microSv/d on the low altitude STS-3 mission to 172 microSv/d on the 6 year LDEF mission. Thermal neutrons (<0.3 eV) were observed to make a negligible contribution to neutron dose equivalent in all cases. The major fraction of neutron dose equivalent was found to be from neutrons >1 MeV and, on LDEF, neutrons >1 MeV are responsible for over 98% of the total neutron dose equivalent. Estimates of the neutron contribution to the total dose equivalent are somewhat lower than model estimates, ranging from 5.7% at a location under low shielding on LDEF to 18.4% on the highly inclined (82.3 degrees) Biocosmos-2044 mission. c2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A SOLUTION FOR NEUTRON PERSONAL DOSIMETRY IN THE ABSENCE OF WORKPLACE SPECTROMETRY.

    PubMed

    Hajek, M; Cruz Suárez, R

    2016-09-01

    In view of the widely varying energy spectra encountered in practical situations, accuracy of neutron dose assessment requires detailed knowledge of detector responses and workplace conditions to achieve an adequate level of protection. If the neutron spectrum should be a priori unknown and no measurement of the workplace spectrum is available, the 'Compendium of Neutron Spectra and Detector Responses for Radiation Protection Purposes' published in the International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Report Series offers a broad range of reference spectra that may be appropriate for many applications. The proposed approach applies a correction factor based on the ratio of 'personal dose equivalent indices' for a particular workplace spectrum and a reference field used for calibration of the dosemeter response. Amendments in the definition of operational quantities as well as introduction of new modalities that, for example, may be expected to give increased importance to high-energy neutrons necessitate frequent revision of the Compendium. Results from the European Radiation Dosimetry Group Intercomparison 2012 for neutron personal dosemeters provide evidence that workplace fields are insufficiently reflected. This is proposed to be considered as an improvement opportunity.

  15. Neutron productions in the fragmentation of relativistic heavy nuclei and formation of a beam of high-energy neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Yurevich, V. I.

    2016-03-15

    The production of quasimonoenergetic high-energy neutrons at zero angle (0°) in the spallation of relativistic heavy nuclei is discussed by considering the example of the interaction of lead nuclei with light target nuclei. It is shown that this process can be used to generate a beam of high-energy neutrons at existing heavy ion accelerators. At the same time, itmay lead to the appearance of a parasitic neutron beam because of the interaction of the heavy-ion beam used with beam line and experimental setup materials.

  16. Measurement of High-Energy Neutron Flux Above Ground Utilizing a Spallation Based Multiplicity Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roecker, Caleb; Bernstein, Adam; Marleau, Peter; Vetter, Kai

    2016-12-01

    Cosmogenic high-energy neutrons are a ubiquitous, difficult to shield, poorly measured background. Above ground the high-energy neutron energy-dependent flux has been measured, with significantly varying results. Below ground, high-energy neutron fluxes are largely unmeasured. Here we present a reconstruction algorithm to unfold the incident neutron energy-dependent flux measured using the Multiplicity and Recoil Spectrometer (MARS), simulated test cases to verify the algorithm, and provide a new measurement of the above ground high-energy neutron energy-dependent flux with a detailed systematic uncertainty analysis. Uncertainty estimates are provided based upon the measurement statistics, the incident angular distribution, the surrounding environment of the Monte Carlo model, and the MARS triggering efficiency. Quantified systematic uncertainty is dominated by the assumed incident neutron angular distribution and surrounding environment of the Monte Carlo model. The energy-dependent neutron flux between 90 MeV and 400 MeV is reported. Between 90 MeV and 250 MeV the MARS results are comparable to previous Bonner sphere measurements. Over the total energy regime measured, the MARS result are located within the span of previous measurements. These results demonstrate the feasibility of future below ground measurements with MARS.

  17. Measurement of high-energy neutron flux above ground utilizing a spallation based multiplicity technique

    DOE PAGES

    Roecker, Caleb; Bernstein, Adam; Marleau, Peter; ...

    2016-11-14

    Cosmogenic high-energy neutrons are a ubiquitous, difficult to shield, poorly measured background. Above ground the high-energy neutron energy-dependent flux has been measured, with significantly varying results. Below ground, high-energy neutron fluxes are largely unmeasured. Here we present a reconstruction algorithm to unfold the incident neutron energy-dependent flux measured using the Multiplicity and Recoil Spectrometer (MARS), simulated test cases to verify the algorithm, and provide a new measurement of the above ground high-energy neutron energy-dependent flux with a detailed systematic uncertainty analysis. Uncertainty estimates are provided based upon the measurement statistics, the incident angular distribution, the surrounding environment of the Montemore » Carlo model, and the MARS triggering efficiency. Quantified systematic uncertainty is dominated by the assumed incident neutron angular distribution and surrounding environment of the Monte Carlo model. The energy-dependent neutron flux between 90 MeV and 400 MeV is reported. Between 90 MeV and 250 MeV the MARS results are comparable to previous Bonner sphere measurements. Over the total energy regime measured, the MARS result are located within the span of previous measurements. Lastly, these results demonstrate the feasibility of future below ground measurements with MARS.« less

  18. Measurement of high-energy neutron flux above ground utilizing a spallation based multiplicity technique

    SciTech Connect

    Roecker, Caleb; Bernstein, Adam; Marleau, Peter; Vetter, Kai

    2016-11-14

    Cosmogenic high-energy neutrons are a ubiquitous, difficult to shield, poorly measured background. Above ground the high-energy neutron energy-dependent flux has been measured, with significantly varying results. Below ground, high-energy neutron fluxes are largely unmeasured. Here we present a reconstruction algorithm to unfold the incident neutron energy-dependent flux measured using the Multiplicity and Recoil Spectrometer (MARS), simulated test cases to verify the algorithm, and provide a new measurement of the above ground high-energy neutron energy-dependent flux with a detailed systematic uncertainty analysis. Uncertainty estimates are provided based upon the measurement statistics, the incident angular distribution, the surrounding environment of the Monte Carlo model, and the MARS triggering efficiency. Quantified systematic uncertainty is dominated by the assumed incident neutron angular distribution and surrounding environment of the Monte Carlo model. The energy-dependent neutron flux between 90 MeV and 400 MeV is reported. Between 90 MeV and 250 MeV the MARS results are comparable to previous Bonner sphere measurements. Over the total energy regime measured, the MARS result are located within the span of previous measurements. Lastly, these results demonstrate the feasibility of future below ground measurements with MARS.

  19. [Determination of absorbed dose to water for high energy photon and electron beams--comparison of different dosimetry protocols].

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Golam Abu; Schütte, Wilhelm

    2003-01-01

    The determination of absorbed dose to water for high-energy photon and electron beams is performed in Germany according to the dosimetry protocol DIN 6800-2 (1997). At an international level, the main protocols used are the AAPM dosimetry protocol TG-51 (1999) and the IAEA Code of Practice TRS-398 (2000). The present paper systematically compares these three dosimetry protocols, and identifies similarities and differences. The investigations were performed using 4 and 10 MV photon beams, as well as 6, 8, 9, 10, 12 and 14 MeV electron beams. Two cylindrical and two plane-parallel type chambers were used for measurements. In general, the discrepancies among the three protocols were 1.0% for photon beams and 1.6% for electron beams. Comparative measurements in the context of measurement technical control (MTK) with TLD showed a deviation of less than 1.3% between the measurements obtained according to protocols DIN 6800-2 and MTK (exceptions: 4 MV photons with 2.9% and 6 MeV electrons with 2.4%). While only cylindrical chambers were used for photon beams, measurements of electron beams were performed using both cylindrical and plane-parallel chambers (the latter used after a cross-calibration to a cylindrical chamber, as required by the respective dosimetry protocols). Notably, unlike recommended in the corresponding protocols, we found out that cylindrical chambers can be used also for energies from 6 to 10 MeV.

  20. Measurement of the neutron energy spectrum on the Godiva IV fast burst assembly for application to neutron dosimetry studies

    SciTech Connect

    Casson, W.H.; Hsu, H.H.; Paternoster, R.R.; Butterfield, K.B.

    1996-06-01

    In June, 1995, Los Alamos National Laboratory hosted the 23rd U.S. Department of Energy sponsored Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Study at the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility. The participants tested their facilities accident dosimeters under a variety of neutrons fields produced by the Solution High Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA) and the Godiva IV fast burst assembly. To provide useful information for the evaluation of the results, the neutron energy Spectrum was determined and the delivered absorbed dose to tissue. The measurement of the neutron energy spectrum on Godiva provides a unique problem in that the burst, which is nearly Gaussian in time, has a full width at half maximum of around 50 microseconds. The neutron spectrum was first determined at low-power while running at delayed critical using a standard set of Bonner spheres. At the same time, the response of a set of TLD dosimeters were measured. After that, measurements were conducted during a burst with another set of TLDs and with sulfur pellets.

  1. Maine Yankee dosimetry capsule and pressure vessel neutron fluence calculations

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.R.; Spinney, K.B.; Morrissey, K.J.; Cacciapouti, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    In-house capability for deterministic neutron and gamma transport analyses has been implemented at Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC). A detailed R-Theta (R-{theta}) calculational model of Maine Yankee was developed to help in validation of the methods and to establish appropriate models for support of the ongoing Maine Yankee pressure vessel surveillance program. Several data and modeling sensitivity studies were performed and comparisons to measured dosimetry capsule data were emphasized. The calculated results establish confidence in the YAEC in-house computational methodology for general pressure vessel fluence analyses.

  2. Neutron Dosimetry of the HFIR Hydraulic Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, S.T.

    1995-01-01

    The total, fast, and thermal neutron fluxes at five axial positions in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) hydraulic tube have been measured using bare and/or cadmium-covered activation, fission, and helium accumulation flux monitors. The spectrum-averaged, one-group cross sections over selected energy ranges for the reactions used in the measurements were obtained using cross sections from the ENDF/B-V file, and the target region volume-integrated spectrum was calculated with DORT, a two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport code. The fluxes obtained from various monitors are in good agreement. The total and fast (>1 MeV) neutron fluxes vary from 1.6 x 10{sup 19} n/m{sup 2} {center_dot} s and 1.6 x 10{sup 18} n/m{sup 2} {center_dot} s, respectively, at the ends (HT-1 and -9) of the facility to 4.0 x 10{sup 19} n/m{sup 2} {center_dot} s and 4.6 x 10{sup 18} n/m{sup 2} {center_dot} s, respectively, at the center (HT-5) of the facility. The thermal-to-fast (> 1 MeV) flux ratio varies from about 5.4 at the center to about 6.7 at the ends of the facility. The ratio of fast flux greater than 0.1 MeV to that greater than 1 MeV is 2.0 and stays almost constant along the length of the tube.

  3. FIELD CALIBRATION OF A TLD ALBEDO DOSEMETER IN THE HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRON FIELD OF CERF.

    PubMed

    Haninger, T; Kleinau, P; Haninger, S

    2016-07-15

    The new albedo dosemeter-type AWST-TL-GD 04 has been calibrated in the CERF neutron field (Cern-EU high-energy Reference Field). This type of albedo dosemeter is based on thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) and used by the individual monitoring service of the Helmholtz Zentrum München (AWST) since 2015 for monitoring persons, who are exposed occupationally against photon and neutron radiation. The motivation for this experiment was to gain a field specific neutron correction factor Nn for workplaces at high-energy particle accelerators. Nn is a dimensionless factor relative to a basic detector calibration with (137)Cs and is used to calculate the personal neutron dose in terms of Hp(10) from the neutron albedo signal. The results show that the sensitivity of the albedo dosemeter for this specific neutron field is not significantly lower as for fast neutrons of a radionuclide source like (252)Cf. The neutron correction factor varies between 0.73 and 1.16 with a midrange value of 0.94. The albedo dosemeter is therefore appropriate to monitor persons, which are exposed at high-energy particle accelerators.

  4. Upgraded Neutron Dosimetry Procedure for VVER-440 Surveilance Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochkin, V.; Erak, D.; Zaritsky, S.; Egorov, A.; Makhotin, D.

    2009-08-01

    The control of Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) metal during lifetime is one of the basic conditions of the reliable and safe operation of a reactor and NPP as a whole. The substantiation of safe RPV operation is based on Surveillance Specimens (SS) testing results and their transfer to the RPV. Since the reliability of the SS program directly depends on the dosimetry accuracy, one of the most important tasks in the investigation of SS is precision estimation of fast neutron fluence (E > 0.5MeV) for each specimen. The upgraded procedure of neutron fluence evaluation for surveillance specimens of VVER-440/213 reactor has been developed and is presented in this paper. This procedure based on measurements of the 54Mn activity of each of the surveillance specimens and neutron field computations. In contrast to the earlier procedures the new one takes into account correctly all pressure vessel internals, influence of core pattern on the neutron field in SS channel, and dependence of spectral index SI0.5/3.0 on the axial coordinate of surveillance specimens. The upgraded procedure is used for neutron fluence evaluation of VVER-440 surveillance and research programs in RRC "Kurchatov institute".

  5. 1982 US-CEC neutron personnel dosimetry intercomparison study

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Greene, R.T.; Schraube, H.; Burger, G.

    1983-11-01

    A neutron personnel dosimetry intercomparison study was conducted during April 19-23, 1982, as a joint effort between the United States and the Commission of European Communities. Dosimeters from 48 participating agencies were mounted on cylindrical phantoms and exposed to a range of low-level dose equivalents (0.48-13.91 mSv neutron and 0.02-1.32 mSv gamma) in nine different radiation fields. Exposure conditions considered in this study included four mixed-field spectra produced using the Health Physics Research Reactor, four monoenergetic neutron fields generated by accelerators, and one 15-cm D/sub 2/O-moderated californium source spectrum. In general, neutron results reported by the participating agencies were consistent with expected dosimeter performance based on energy response characteristics of the detection systems. Albedo dosimeters, which were the most popular neutron monitoring systems used in this study, provided the best overall accuracy for all exposure conditions. Film, Cr-39 recoil track, and Th-232 fission track systems generally underestimated dose equivalents relative to reference values. Associated gamma measurements showed that TLD monitors produced more accurate results than film dosimeters although both systems overestimated gamma dose equivalents in mixed radiation fields. 24 references, 10 figures, 19 tables.

  6. Generation of high-energy neutron beam by fragmentation of relativistic heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurevich, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    The phenomenon of multiple production of neutrons in reactions with heavy nuclei induced by high-energy protons and light nuclei is analyzed using a Moving Source Model. The Lorentz transformation of the obtained neutron distributions is used to study the neutron characteristics in the inverse kinematics where relativistic heavy nuclei bombard a light-mass target. The neutron beam generated at 0∘has a Gaussian shape with a maximum at the energy of the projectile nucleons and an energy resolution σE/E < 4% above 6 GeV.

  7. ICF ignition capsule neutron, gamma ray, and high energy x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, P. A.; Wilson, D. C.; Swenson, F. J.; Morgan, G. L.

    2003-03-01

    Post-processed total neutron, RIF neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray images from 2D LASNEX calculations of burning ignition capsules are presented. The capsules have yields ranging from tens of kilojoules (failures) to over 16 MJ (ignition), and their implosion symmetry ranges from prolate (flattest at the hohlraum equator) to oblate (flattest towards the laser entrance hole). The simulated total neutron images emphasize regions of high DT density and temperature; the reaction-in-flight neutrons emphasize regions of high DT density; the gamma rays emphasize regions of high shell density; and the high energy x rays (>10 keV) emphasize regions of high temperature.

  8. Biological effects of high-energy neutrons measured in vivo using a vertebrate model.

    PubMed

    Kuhne, Wendy W; Gersey, Brad B; Wilkins, Richard; Wu, Honglu; Wender, Stephen A; George, Varghese; Dynan, William S

    2009-10-01

    Interaction of solar protons and galactic cosmic radiation with the atmosphere and other materials produces high-energy secondary neutrons from below 1 to 1000 MeV and higher. Although secondary neutrons may provide an appreciable component of the radiation dose equivalent received by space and high-altitude air travelers, the biological effects remain poorly defined, particularly in vivo in intact organisms. Here we describe the acute response of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos to a beam of high-energy spallation neutrons that mimics the energy spectrum of secondary neutrons encountered aboard spacecraft and high-altitude aircraft. To determine RBE, embryos were exposed to 0-0.5 Gy of high-energy neutron radiation or 0-15 Gy of reference gamma radiation. The radiation response was measured by imaging apoptotic cells in situ in defined volumes of the embryo, an assay that provides a quantifiable, linear dose response. The slope of the dose response in the developing head, relative to reference gamma radiation, indicates an RBE of 24.9 (95% CI 13.6-40.7). A higher RBE of 48.1 (95% CI 30.0-66.4) was obtained based on overall survival. A separate analysis of apoptosis in muscle showed an overall nonlinear response, with the greatest effects at doses of less than 0.3 Gy. Results of this experiment indicate that medaka are a useful model for investigating biological damage associated with high-energy neutron exposure.

  9. Effect of wall thickness on measurement of dose for high energy neutrons.

    PubMed

    Perez-Nunez, Delia; Braby, Leslie A

    2010-01-01

    Neutrons produced from the interaction between galactic cosmic rays and spacecraft materials are responsible for a very important portion of the dose received by astronauts. The neutron energy spectrum depends on the incident charged particle spectrum and the scattering environment but generally extends to beyond 100 MeV. Tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) are used to measure the dose during the space mission, but their weight and size are very important factors for their design and construction. To achieve ideal neutron dosimetry, the wall thickness should be at least the range of a proton having the maximum energy of the neutrons to be monitored. This proton range is 0.1 cm for 10 MeV neutrons and 7.6 cm for 100 MeV neutrons. A 7.6 cm wall thickness TEPC would provide charged particle equilibrium (CPE) for neutrons up to 100 MeV, but for space applications it would not be reasonable in terms of weight and size. In order to estimate the errors in measured dose due to absence of CPE, MCNPX simulations of energy deposited by 10 MeV and 100 MeV neutrons in sites with wall thickness between 0.1 cm and 8.5 cm were performed. The results for 100 MeV neutrons show that energy deposition per incident neutron approaches a plateau as the wall thickness approaches 7.6 cm. For the 10 MeV neutrons, energy deposition per incident neutron decreases as the wall thickness increases above 0.1 cm due to attenuation.

  10. Neutron skin and centrality classification in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paukkunen, Hannu

    2015-05-01

    The concept of centrality in high-energy nuclear collisions has recently become a subject of an active debate. In particular, the experimental methods to determine the centrality that have given reasonable results for many observables in high-energy lead-lead collisions at the LHC have led to surprising behavior in the case of proton-lead collisions. In this letter, we discuss the possibility to calibrate the experimental determination of centrality by asymmetries caused by mutually different spatial distributions of protons and neutrons inside the nuclei - a well-known phenomenon in nuclear physics known as the neutron-skin effect.

  11. Neutron production from flattening filter free high energy medical linac: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najem, M. A.; Abolaban, F. A.; Podolyák, Z.; Spyrou, N. M.

    2015-11-01

    One of the problems arising from using a conventional linac at high energy (>8 MV) is the production of neutrons. One way to reduce neutron production is to remove the flattening filter (FF). The main purpose of this work was to study the effect of FF removal on neutron fluence and neutron dose equivalent inside the treatment room at different photon beam energies. Several simulations based on Monte Carlo techniques were carried out in order to calculate the neutron fluence at different locations in the treatment room from different linac energies with and without a FF. In addition, a step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy (SnS IMRT) for prostate cancer was modelled using the 15 MV photon beam with and without a FF on a water phantom to calculate the neutron dose received in a full treatment. The results obtained show a significant drop-off in neutrons fluence and dose equivalent when the FF was removed. For example, the neutron fluence was decreased by 54%, 76% and 75% for 10, 15 and 18 MV, respectively. This can decrease the neutron dose to the patient as well as reduce the shielding cost of the treatment room. The neutron dose equivalent of the SnS IMRT for prostate cancer was reduced significantly by 71.3% when the FF was removed. It can be concluded that the flattening filter removal from the head of the linac could reduce the risk of causing secondary cancers and the shielding cost of radiotherapy treatment rooms.

  12. A diamond 14 MeV neutron energy spectrometer with high energy resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Shimaoka, Takehiro Kaneko, Junichi H.; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Shimmyo, Hiroaki; Ochiai, Kentaro; Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Umezawa, Hitoshi; Shikata, Shin-ichi; Watanabe, Hideyuki; Isobe, Mitsutaka; Osakabe, Masaki

    2016-02-15

    A self-standing single-crystal chemical vapor deposited diamond was obtained using lift-off method. It was fabricated into a radiation detector and response function measurements for 14 MeV neutrons were taken at the fusion neutronics source. 1.5% of high energy resolution was obtained by using the {sup 12}C(n, α){sup 9}Be reaction at an angle of 100° with the deuteron beam line. The intrinsic energy resolution, excluding energy spreading caused by neutron scattering, slowing in the target and circuit noises was 0.79%, which was also the best resolution of the diamond detector ever reported.

  13. Energy and angular dependence of active-type personal dosemeter for high-energy neutron.

    PubMed

    Rito, Hirotaka; Yamauchi, Tomoya; Oda, Keiji

    2011-07-01

    In order to develop an active-type personal dosemeter having suitable sensitivity to high-energy neutrons, the characteristic response of silicon surface barrier detector has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. An agreement of the shape of pulse-height distribution, its change with radiator thickness and the relative sensitivity was confirmed between the calculated and experimental results for 14.8-MeV neutrons. The angular dependence was estimated for other neutron energies, and found that the angular dependence decreased with the incident energy. The reason was also discussed with regard to the radiator thickness relative to maximum range of recoil protons.

  14. Intercomparisons of neutron dosimeters in support of dosimetry measurements in containment

    SciTech Connect

    Auman, L.E.; Miller, W.H. ); Graham, C.C.; Stretch, C.D. ); Welty, T.J.; West, L. )

    1991-01-01

    In support of neutron dosimetry needs at Union Electric's Callaway nuclear plant, an intercomparison of a variety of neutron detection systems was performed. Eight different neutron detection systems were tested in four different neutron fields, utilizing facilities at the Missouri University research reactor (MURR) and the Southwest Radiation Calibration Center at the University of Arkansas. In general, all results agreed within a factor of 2 in predicting the neutron dose equivalent.

  15. Development and Characterization of a High-Energy Neutron Time-of-Flight Imaging System

    DOE PAGES

    Madden, Amanda Christine; Schirato, Richard C.; Swift, Alicia L.; ...

    2017-02-09

    We present that Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a prototype of a high-energy neutron time-of-flight imaging system for the non-destructive evaluation of dense, massive, and/or high atomic number objects. High-energy neutrons provide the penetrating power, and thus the high dynamic range necessary to image internal features and defects of such objects. The addition of the time gating capability allows for scatter rejection when paired with a pulsed monoenergetic beam, or neutron energy selection when paired with a pulsed broad-spectrum neutron source. The Time Gating to Reject Scatter and Select Energy (TiGReSSE) system was tested at the Los Alamos Neutronmore » Science Center’s (LANSCE) Weapons Nuclear Research (WNR) facility, a spallation neutron source, to provide proof of concept measurements and to characterize the instrument response. This paper will show results of several objects imaged during this run cycle. In addition, results from system performance metrics such as the Modulation Transfer Function and the Detective Quantum Efficiency measured as a function of neutron energy, characterize the current system performance and inform the next generation of neutron imaging instrument.« less

  16. Monte Carlo calibration of the SMM gamma ray spectrometer for high energy gamma rays and neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Reppin, C.; Forrest, D. J.; Chupp, E. L.; Share, G. H.; Kinzer, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft was primarily designed and calibrated for nuclear gamma ray line measurements, but also has a high energy mode which allows the detection of gamma rays at energies above 10 MeV and solar neutrons above 20 MeV. The GRS response has been extrapolated until now for high energy gamma rays from an early design study employing Monte Carlo calculations. The response to 50 to 600 MeV solar neutrons was estimated from a simple model which did not consider secondary charged particles escaping into the veto shields. In view of numerous detections by the GRS of solar flares emitting high energy gamma rays, including at least two emitting directly detectable neutrons, the calibration of the high energy mode in the flight model has been recalculated by the use of more sophisticated Monte Carlo computer codes. New results presented show that the GRS response to gamma rays above 20 MeV and to neutrons above 100 MeV is significantly lower than the earlier estimates.

  17. Development of high-energy neutron imaging for use in NDE applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, F; Hall, J; Logan, C; Schmid, G

    1999-06-01

    We are currently developing a high-energy (10 - 15 MeV) neutron imaging system for use in NDE applications. Our goal is to develop an imaging system capable of detecting cubic-mm-scale voids or other structural defects in heavily-shielded low-Z materials within thick sealed objects. The system will be relatively compact (suitable for use in a small laboratory) and capable of acquiring tomographic image data sets. The design of a prototype imaging detector and multi-axis staging system will be discussed and selected results from recent imaging experiments will be presented. The development of an intense, accelerator-driven neutron source suitable for use with the imaging system will also be discussed. Keywords: neutron imaging, neutron radiography, computed tomography, non-destructive inspection, neutron sources

  18. Neutron dose measurements with the GSI ball at high-energy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbacher, G; Gutermuth, F; Kozlova, E; Radon, T; Schuetz, R

    2007-01-01

    A moderator-type neutron monitor containing pairs of TLD 600/700 elements (Harshaw) modified with the addition of a lead layer (GSI ball) for the measurement of the ambient dose equivalent from neutrons at medium- and high-energy accelerators, is introduced in this work. Measurements were performed with the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) ball as well as with conventional polyethylene (PE) spheres at the high-energy accelerator SPS at European Organization for Nuclear Research [CERN (CERF)] and in Cave A of the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS at GSI. The measured dose values are compared with dose values derived from calculated neutron spectra folded with dose conversion coefficients. The estimated reading of the spheres calculated by means of the response functions and the neutron spectra is also included in the comparison. The analysis of the measurements shows that the PE/Pb sphere gives an improved estimate on the ambient dose equivalent of the neutron radiation transmitted through shielding of medium- and high-energy accelerators.

  19. Liquid lithium target as a high intensity, high energy neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Parkin, Don M.; Dudey, Norman D.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a target jet for charged particles. In one embodiment the charged particles are high energy deuterons that bombard the target jet to produce high intensity, high energy neutrons. To this end, deuterons in a vacuum container bombard an endlessly circulating, free-falling, sheet-shaped, copiously flowing, liquid lithium jet that gushes by gravity from a rectangular cross-section vent on the inside of the container means to form a moving web in contact with the inside wall of the vacuum container. The neutrons are produced via break-up of the beam in the target by stripping, spallation and compound nuclear reactions in which the projectiles (deuterons) interact with the target (Li) to produce excited nuclei, which then "boil off" or evaporate a neutron.

  20. Measurement of the High-Energy Neutron Flux Above and Below Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roecker, Caleb Daniel

    This dissertation introduces the new multiplicity measurement approach, the MCMC inversion algorithm, the Monte Carlo model and associated calibrations, and presents results from the four measurements. Above ground, the MARS measurement results agree with most of the previous measurements in the energy range between 90 MeV and 250 MeV. Above 250 MeV the MARS results report slightly lower flux than most of the previous measurements, but are still within the spread of all previous measurements. Below ground, no direct comparison can be made to the MARS results at 377 m.w.e. The MARS result at 540 m.w.e. appears to be in rough agreement with one of the previous below ground measurements, at the one measured energy where the results overlap. At 1450 m.w.e., the MARS results shows reasonable agreement with previous simulation predictions. The rough agreement of the MARS results, at all relevant locations, with previous measurements and existing simulation where applicable, provide confidence that all MARS measurements have produced the correct high-energy neutron energy-dependent flux. Above ground, the new independent results strengthen the results of previous measurements. Below ground, the three measurements provide consistent results with minimal detector related bias between measurements due to the transportable nature of MARS, that will be used to produce a depth-dependent model of the high-energy neutron energy-dependent flux. For the rare-event particle and nuclear physics experiments affected by high-energy neutron backgrounds, this model will allow for the prediction of the high-energy neutron background at different measurement locations, a more robust instrumental design, and the ability to estimate the high-energy neutron background contribution in their final measured data; the confidence in the results of these experiments will be improved. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  1. Biological Effects of High-Energy Neutrons Measured In Vivo Using a Vertebrate Model

    PubMed Central

    Kuhne, Wendy W.; Gersey, Brad B.; Wilkins, Richard; Wu, Honglu; Wender, Stephen A.; George, Varghese; Dynan, William S.

    2009-01-01

    Interaction of solar protons and galactic cosmic radiation with the atmosphere and other materials produces high-energy secondary neutrons from below 1 to 1000 MeV and higher. Although secondary neutrons may provide an appreciable component of the radiation dose equivalent received by space and high-altitude air travelers, the biological effects remain poorly defined, particularly in vivo in intact organisms. Here we describe the acute response of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos to a beam of high-energy spallation neutrons that mimics the energy spectrum of secondary neutrons encountered aboard spacecraft and high-altitude aircraft. To determine RBE, embryos were exposed to 0–0.5 Gy of high-energy neutron radiation or 0–15 Gy of reference γ radiation. The radiation response was measured by imaging apoptotic cells in situ in defined volumes of the embryo, an assay that provides a quantifiable, linear dose response. The slope of the dose response in the developing head, relative to reference γ radiation, indicates an RBE of 24.9 (95% CI 13.6–40.7). A higher RBE of 48.1 (95% CI 30.0–66.4) was obtained based on overall survival. A separate analysis of apoptosis in muscle showed an overall nonlinear response, with the greatest effects at doses of less than 0.3 Gy. Results of this experiment indicate that medaka are a useful model for investigating biological damage associated with high-energy neutron exposure. PMID:19772468

  2. Test study of boron nitride as a new detector material for dosimetry in high-energy photon beams.

    PubMed

    Poppinga, D; Halbur, J; Lemmer, S; Delfs, B; Harder, D; Looe, H K; Poppe, B

    2017-09-05

    The aim of this test study is to check whether boron nitride (BN) might be applied as a detector material in high-energy photon-beam dosimetry. Boron nitride exists in various crystalline forms. Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) possesses high mobility of the electrons and holes as well as a high volume resistivity, so that ionizing radiation in the clinical range of the dose rate can be expected to produce a measurable electrical current at low background current. Due to the low atomic numbers of its constituents, its density (2.0 g cm(-3)) similar to silicon and its commercial availability, h-BN appears as possibly suitable for the dosimetry of ionizing radiation. Five h-BN plates were contacted to triaxial cables, and the detector current was measured in a solid-state ionization chamber circuit at an applied voltage of 50 V. Basic dosimetric properties such as formation by pre-irradiation, sensitivity, reproducibility, linearity and temporal resolution were measured with 6 MV photon irradiation. Depth dose curves at quadratic field sizes of 10 cm and 40 cm were measured and compared to ionization chamber measurements. After a pre-irradiation with 6 Gy, the devices show a stable current signal at a given dose rate. The current-voltage characteristic up to 400 V shows an increase in the collection efficiency with the voltage. The time-resolved detector current behavior during beam interrupts is comparable to diamond material, and the background current is negligible. The measured percentage depth dose curves at 10 cm  ×  10 cm field size agreed with the results of ionization chamber measurements within  ±2%. This is a first study of boron nitride as a detector material for high-energy photon radiation. By current measurements on solid ionization chambers made from boron nitride chips we could demonstrate that boron nitride is in principle suitable as a detector material for high-energy photon-beam dosimetry.

  3. Test study of boron nitride as a new detector material for dosimetry in high-energy photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppinga, D.; Halbur, J.; Lemmer, S.; Delfs, B.; Harder, D.; Looe, H. K.; Poppe, B.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this test study is to check whether boron nitride (BN) might be applied as a detector material in high-energy photon-beam dosimetry. Boron nitride exists in various crystalline forms. Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) possesses high mobility of the electrons and holes as well as a high volume resistivity, so that ionizing radiation in the clinical range of the dose rate can be expected to produce a measurable electrical current at low background current. Due to the low atomic numbers of its constituents, its density (2.0 g cm‑3) similar to silicon and its commercial availability, h-BN appears as possibly suitable for the dosimetry of ionizing radiation. Five h-BN plates were contacted to triaxial cables, and the detector current was measured in a solid-state ionization chamber circuit at an applied voltage of 50 V. Basic dosimetric properties such as formation by pre-irradiation, sensitivity, reproducibility, linearity and temporal resolution were measured with 6 MV photon irradiation. Depth dose curves at quadratic field sizes of 10 cm and 40 cm were measured and compared to ionization chamber measurements. After a pre-irradiation with 6 Gy, the devices show a stable current signal at a given dose rate. The current–voltage characteristic up to 400 V shows an increase in the collection efficiency with the voltage. The time-resolved detector current behavior during beam interrupts is comparable to diamond material, and the background current is negligible. The measured percentage depth dose curves at 10 cm  ×  10 cm field size agreed with the results of ionization chamber measurements within  ±2%. This is a first study of boron nitride as a detector material for high-energy photon radiation. By current measurements on solid ionization chambers made from boron nitride chips we could demonstrate that boron nitride is in principle suitable as a detector material for high-energy photon-beam dosimetry.

  4. Micronuclei Induction in Human Fibroblasts Exposed In Vitro to Los Alamos High-Energy Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gersey, Brad; Sodolak, John; Hada, Megumi; Saganti, Prem; Wilkins, Richard; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2006-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute to a significant fraction to the dose equivalent in crew members and passengers during commercial aviation travel, and astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility#s ICE House 30L beamline is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectra of earth#s atmosphere. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecraft like the MIR and International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human fibroblasts in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams without degrader at an entrance dose rate of 25 mGy/hr and analyzed the micronuclei (MN) induction. The cells were also placed behind a 9.9 cm water column to study effect of shielding in the protection of neutron induced damages. It was found that the dose response in the MN frequency was linear for the samples with and without shielding and the slope of the MN yield behind the shielding was reduced by a factor of 3.5. Compared to the MN induction in human fibroblasts exposed to a gamma source at a low dose rate, the RBE was found to be 16.7 and 10.0 for the neutrons without and with 9.9 cm water shielding, respectively.

  5. DT High Energy Measurements and Comparison of Multiple Spectra in a He-4 Gas Neutron Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Hannah E.; Zhu, Ting; Gokhale, Sasmit; Parker, Cody; Richard, Andrea; Massey, Thomas; Baciak, James E.; Enqvisst, Andreas; Jordan, Kelly A.

    2016-09-01

    Neutron spectroscopy is important for a variety of applications to nuclear energy, national security, and basic science research. Currently, organic scintillator neutron detectors are used as a diagnostic tool for neutron spectroscopy in DT fusion research. However, these neutron measurements generate contaminants in common organics from deuteron or carbon break-up that affects the light output spectrum. A potential solution to this problem is to use a He-4 fast neutron gas scintillator detector system. He-4 has excellent gamma rejection due to a low charge density, pulse shape discrimination, and lower light yield and deposited energy from gamma interactions. The detector will also not degrade due to high intensity background gamma radiation. The detector was irradiated with 14.1 MeV neutrons at the Edwards Accelerator Lab at Ohio University. We report on the effectiveness of the He-4 detector system to measure the resulting high energy neutrons and compare this spectrum to other neutron spectra taken with this detector.

  6. The CERN-EU high-energy reference field (CERF) facility for dosimetry at commercial flight altitudes and in space.

    PubMed

    Mitaroff, A; Cern, M Silari

    2002-01-01

    A reference facility for the calibration and intercomparison of active and passive detectors in broad neutron fields has been available at CERN since 1992. A positively charged hadron beam (a mixture of protons and pions) with momentum of 120 GeV/c hits a copper target, 50 cm thick and 7 cm in diameter. The secondary particles produced in the interaction traverse a shield, at 90 degrees with respect to the direction of the incoming beam. made of either 80 to 160 cm of concrete or 40 cm of iron. Behind the iron shield, the resulting neutron spectrum has a maximum at about 1 MeV, with an additional high-energy component. Behind the 80 cm concrete shield, the neutron spectrum has a second pronounced maximum at about 70 MeV and resembles the high-energy component of the radiation field created by cosmic rays at commercial flight altitudes. This paper describes the facility, reports on the latest neutron spectral measurements, gives an overview of the most important experiments performed by the various collaborating institutions over recent years and briefly addresses the possible application of the facility to measurements related to the space programme.

  7. AAPM's TG-51 protocol for clinical reference dosimetry of high-energy photon and electron beams.

    PubMed

    Almond, P R; Biggs, P J; Coursey, B M; Hanson, W F; Huq, M S; Nath, R; Rogers, D W

    1999-09-01

    A protocol is prescribed for clinical reference dosimetry of external beam radiation therapy using photon beams with nominal energies between 60Co and 50 MV and electron beams with nominal energies between 4 and 50 MeV. The protocol was written by Task Group 51 (TG-51) of the Radiation Therapy Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and has been formally approved by the AAPM for clinical use. The protocol uses ion chambers with absorbed-dose-to-water calibration factors, N(60Co)D,w which are traceable to national primary standards, and the equation D(Q)w = MkQN(60Co)D,w where Q is the beam quality of the clinical beam, D(Q)w is the absorbed dose to water at the point of measurement of the ion chamber placed under reference conditions, M is the fully corrected ion chamber reading, and kQ is the quality conversion factor which converts the calibration factor for a 60Co beam to that for a beam of quality Q. Values of kQ are presented as a function of Q for many ion chambers. The value of M is given by M = PionP(TP)PelecPpolMraw, where Mraw is the raw, uncorrected ion chamber reading and Pion corrects for ion recombination, P(TP) for temperature and pressure variations, Pelec for inaccuracy of the electrometer if calibrated separately, and Ppol for chamber polarity effects. Beam quality, Q, is specified (i) for photon beams, by %dd(10)x, the photon component of the percentage depth dose at 10 cm depth for a field size of 10x10 cm2 on the surface of a phantom at an SSD of 100 cm and (ii) for electron beams, by R50, the depth at which the absorbed-dose falls to 50% of the maximum dose in a beam with field size > or =10x10 cm2 on the surface of the phantom (> or =20x20 cm2 for R50>8.5 cm) at an SSD of 100 cm. R50 is determined directly from the measured value of I50, the depth at which the ionization falls to 50% of its maximum value. All clinical reference dosimetry is performed in a water phantom. The reference depth for calibration

  8. Reference dosimetry in clinical high-energy photon beams: comparison of the AAPM TG-51 and AAPM TG-21 dosimetry protocols.

    PubMed

    Saiful Huq, M; Andreo, P

    2001-01-01

    Task Group 51 (TG-51) of the Radiation Therapy Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) has recently developed a new protocol for the calibration of high-energy photon and electron beams used in radiation therapy. The formalism and the dosimetry procedures recommended in this protocol are based on the use of an ionization chamber calibrated in terms of absorbed dose-to-water in a standards laboratory's 60Co gamma ray beam. This is different from the recommendations given in the AAPM TG-21 protocol, which are based on an exposure calibration factor of an ionization chamber in a 60Co beam. The purpose of this work is to compare the determination of absorbed dose-to-water in reference conditions in high-energy photon beams following the recommendations given in the two dosimetry protocols. This is realized by performing calibrations of photon beams with nominal accelerating potential of 6, 18 and 25 MV, generated by an Elekta MLCi and SL25 series linear accelerator. Two widely used Farmer-type ionization chambers having different composition, PTW 30001 (PMMA wall) and NE 2571 (graphite wall), were used for this study. Ratios of AAPM TG-51 to AAPM TG-21 doses to water are found to be 1.008, 1.007 and 1.009 at 6, 18 and 25 MV, respectively when the PTW chamber is used. The corresponding results for the NE chamber are 1.009, 1.010 and 1.013. The uncertainties for the ratios of the absorbed dose determined by the two protocols are estimated to be about 1.5%. A detailed analysis of the reasons for the discrepancies is made which includes comparing the formalisms, correction factors and quantities in the two protocols, as well as the influence of the implementation of the different standards for chamber calibration. The latter has been found to have a considerable influence on the differences in clinical dosimetry, even larger than the adoption of the new data and recommended procedures, as most intrinsic differences cancel out due to the

  9. Induction of Micronuclei in Human Fibroblasts from the Los Alamos High Energy Neutron Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    The space radiation field includes a broad spectrum of high energy neutrons. Interactions between these neutrons and a spacecraft, or other material, significantly contribute to the dose equivalent for astronauts. The 15 degree beam line in the Weapons Neutron Research beam at Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center generates a neutron spectrum relatively similar to that seen in space. Human foreskin fibroblast (AG1522) samples were irradiated behind 0 to 20 cm of water equivalent shielding. The cells were exposed to either a 0.05 or 0.2 Gy entrance dose. Following irradiation, micronuclei were counted to see how the water shield affects the beam and its damage to cell nuclei. Micronuclei induction was then compared with dose equivalent data provided from a tissue equivalent proportional counter.

  10. Demonstrating a directional detector based on neon for characterizing high energy neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hexley, Allie

    2016-03-01

    MITPC is a gas-based time projection chamber used for detecting fast, MeV-scale neutrons. The standard version of the detector relies on a mixture of 600 torr gas composed of 87.5% helium-4 and 12.5% tetrafluoromethane for precisely measuring the energy and direction of neutron-induced nuclear recoils. I describe studies performed with a prototype detector investigating the use of neon, as a replacement for helium-4, in the gas mixture. My discussion focuses on the advantages of neon as the fast neutron target for high energy neutron events (100 MeV) and a demonstration that the mixture will be effective for this event class. I show that the achievable gain and transverse diffusion of drifting electrons in the neon mixture are acceptable and that the detector uptime lost due to voltage breakdowns in the amplification plane is negligible, compared to 20% with the helium-4 mixture.

  11. Induction of Micronuclei in Human Fibroblasts from the Los Alamos High Energy Neutron Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    The space radiation field includes a broad spectrum of high energy neutrons. Interactions between these neutrons and a spacecraft, or other material, significantly contribute to the dose equivalent for astronauts. The 15 degree beam line in the Weapons Neutron Research beam at Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center generates a neutron spectrum relatively similar to that seen in space. Human foreskin fibroblast (AG1522) samples were irradiated behind 0 to 20 cm of water equivalent shielding. The cells were exposed to either a 0.05 or 0.2 Gy entrance dose. Following irradiation, micronuclei were counted to see how the water shield affects the beam and its damage to cell nuclei. Micronuclei induction was then compared with dose equivalent data provided from a tissue equivalent proportional counter.

  12. Neutron spectra and dose equivalents calculated in tissue for high-energy radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kry, Stephen F.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Salehpour, Mohammad; Followill, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrons are by-products of high-energy radiation therapy and a source of dose to normal tissues. Thus, the presence of neutrons increases a patient’s risk of radiation-induced secondary cancer. Although neutrons have been thoroughly studied in air, little research has been focused on neutrons at depths in the patient where radiosensitive structures may exist, resulting in wide variations in neutron dose equivalents between studies. In this study, we characterized properties of neutrons produced during high-energy radiation therapy as a function of their depth in tissue and for different field sizes and different source-to-surface distances (SSD). We used a previously developed Monte Carlo model of an accelerator operated at 18 MV to calculate the neutron fluences, energy spectra, quality factors, and dose equivalents in air and in tissue at depths ranging from 0.1 to 25 cm. In conjunction with the sharply decreasing dose equivalent with increased depth in tissue, the authors found that the neutron energy spectrum changed drastically as a function of depth in tissue. The neutron fluence decreased gradually as the depth increased, while the average neutron energy decreased sharply with increasing depth until a depth of approximately 7.5 cm in tissue, after which it remained nearly constant. There was minimal variation in the quality factor as a function of depth. At a given depth in tissue, the neutron dose equivalent increased slightly with increasing field size and decreasing SSD; however, the percentage depth-dose equivalent curve remained constant outside the primary photon field. Because the neutron dose equivalent, fluence, and energy spectrum changed substantially with depth in tissue, we concluded that when the neutron dose equivalent is being determined at a depth within a patient, the spectrum and quality factor used should be appropriate for depth rather than for in-air conditions. Alternately, an appropriate percent depth-dose equivalent curve should

  13. Simulation of a high energy neutron irradiation facility at beamline 11 of the China Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tairan, Liang; Zhiduo, Li; Wen, Yin; Fei, Shen; Quanzhi, Yu; Tianjiao, Liang

    2017-07-01

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) will accommodate 20 neutron beamlines at its first target station. These beamlines serve different purposes, and beamline 11 is designed to analyze the degraded models and damage mechanisms, such as Single Event Effects in electronic components and devices for aerospace electronic systems. This paper gives a preliminary discussion on the scheme of a high energy neutron irradiation experiment at the beamline 11 shutter based on the Monte Carlo simulation method. The neutron source term is generated by calculating the neutrons scattering into beamline 11 with a model that includes the target-moderator-reflector area. Then, the neutron spectrum at the sample position is obtained. The intensity of neutrons with energy of hundreds of MeV is approximately 1E8 neutron/cm2/s, which is useful for experiments. The displacement production rate and gas productions are calculated for common materials such as tungsten, tantalum and SS316. The results indicate that the experiment can provide irradiation dose rate ranges from 1E-5 to 1E-4 dpa per operating year. The residual radioactivity is also calculated for regular maintenance work. These results give the basic reference for the experimental design.

  14. High-energy quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields: existing facilities and future needs.

    PubMed

    Pomp, S; Bartlett, D T; Mayer, S; Reitz, G; Röttger, S; Silari, M; Smit, F D; Vincke, H; Yasuda, H

    2014-10-01

    The argument that well-characterised quasi-monoenergetic neutron (QMN) sources reaching into the energy domain >20 MeV are needed is presented. A brief overview of the existing facilities is given, and a list of key factors that an ideal QMN source for dosimetry and spectrometry should offer is presented. The authors conclude that all of the six QMN facilities currently in existence worldwide operate in sub-optimal conditions for dosimetry. The only currently available QMN facility in Europe capable of operating at energies >40 MeV, TSL in Uppsala, Sweden, is threatened with shutdown in the immediate future. One facility, NFS at GANIL, France, is currently under construction. NFS could deliver QMN beams up to about 30 MeV. It is, however, so far not clear if and when NFS will be able to offer QMN beams or operate with only so-called white neutron beams. It is likely that by 2016, QMN beams with energies >40 MeV will be available only in South Africa and Japan, with none in Europe.

  15. High energy neutron treatment for pelvic cancers: study stopped because of increased mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Errington, R D; Ashby, D; Gore, S M; Abrams, K R; Myint, S; Bonnett, D E; Blake, S W; Saxton, T E

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare high energy fast neutron treatment with conventional megavoltage x ray treatment in the management of locally advanced pelvic carcinomas (of the cervix, bladder, prostate, and rectum). DESIGN--Randomised study from February 1986; randomisation to neutron treatment or photon treatment was unstratified and in the ratio of 3 to 1 until January 1988, when randomisation was in the ratio 1 to 1 and stratified by site of tumour. SETTING--Mersey regional radiotherapy centre at Clatterbridge Hospital, Wirral. PATIENTS--151 patients with locally advanced, non-metastatic pelvic cancer (27 cervical, 69 of the bladder, seven prostatic, and 48 of the rectum). INTERVENTION--Randomisation to neutron treatment was stopped in February 1990. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patient survival and causes of death in relation to the development of metastatic disease and treatment related morbidity. RESULTS--In the first phase of the trial 42 patients were randomised to neutron treatment and 14 to photon treatment, and in the second phase 48 to neutron treatment and 47 to photon treatment. The relative risk of mortality for photons compared with neutrons was 0.66 (95% confidence interval 0.40 to 1.10) after adjustment for site of tumour and other important prognostic factors. Short term and long term complications were similar in both groups. CONCLUSIONS--The trial was stopped because of the increased mortality in patients with cancer of the cervix, bladder, or rectum treated with neutrons. PMID:1903663

  16. Superconducting gamma and fast-neutron spectrometers with high energy resolution

    DOEpatents

    Friedrich, Stephan; , Niedermayr, Thomas R.; Labov, Simon E.

    2008-11-04

    Superconducting Gamma-ray and fast-neutron spectrometers with very high energy resolution operated at very low temperatures are provided. The sensor consists of a bulk absorber and a superconducting thermometer weakly coupled to a cold reservoir, and determines the energy of the incident particle from the rise in temperature upon absorption. A superconducting film operated at the transition between its superconducting and its normal state is used as the thermometer, and sensor operation at reservoir temperatures around 0.1 K reduces thermal fluctuations and thus enables very high energy resolution. Depending on the choice of absorber material, the spectrometer can be configured either as a Gamma-spectrometer or as a fast-neutron spectrometer.

  17. Activation Counter Using Liquid Light-Guide for Dosimetry of Neutron Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Mitsunobu; Kawarabayashi, Jun; Tomita, Hideki; Asai, Keisuke; Maeda, Shigetaka; Tsuji, Hiroki; Iguchi, Tetsuo

    2009-08-01

    A novel activation counter is proposed using a liquid light-guide (LLG) and a suitable group of activation foils for dosimetry of neutron burst. The LLG that works as a position sensitive radiation detector, has been covered with appropriate activation materials whose threshold energies are different to each other, with a distance of a few tens of cm between them. Since the induced activities of activation foils irradiated by neutrons are detected independently by the LLG, the neutron energy distribution and its flux can be derived from the activities and their neutron cross-sections by numerical de-convolution calculation. The proposed activation counter would be suitable for the dosimetry of intense neutron burst including fast neutrons because the LLG and the activation foils have a high tolerance for radiation damage. We have designed the system configuration of the proposed activation counter. The preliminary results of the responses due to thermal and fast neutrons have been obtained successfully.

  18. Fast neutron dosimetry. Progress report, July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Attix, F.H.

    1980-01-01

    Progress is reported in: the development and testing of new gas mixtures more suitable for fast neutron dosimetry using the common A150-type Tissue-equivalent plastic ion chambers; comparison of photon doses determined with a graphite-walled proportional counter and with paired dosimeters irradiated by 14.8-MeV neutrons; a detector for the direct measurement of LET distributions from irradiation with fast neutrons; LET distributions from fast neutron irradiation of TE-plastic and graphite measured in a cylindrically symmetric geometry; progress in development of a tandem fast neutron and /sup 60/Co gamma ray source irradiation facility; an approach to the correlation of cellular response with lineal energy; calculated and measured HTO atmospheric dispersion rates within meters of a release site; application of cavity theory to fast neutrons; and fast neutron dosimetry by thermally stimulated currents in Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. (GHT)

  19. Graded-gap AlxGa1-xAs detector for high-energy electron beam dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silenas, Aldis; Miller, Albert; Pozela, Juras; Pozela, Karolis; Dapkus, Leonas; Juciene, Vida

    2011-05-01

    A new graded-gap p-Al0.2Ga0.8As-p-AlxGa1-xAs-n-GaAs detector structure with internal optical response was developed and investigated as a detector for high-energy electron beam dosimetry. An additional p-Al0.2Ga0.8As top layer was grown on the narrow-gap side of the structure. This thin (2 μm) top layer significantly reduces nonradiative surface recombination and increases detector sensitivity for high-energy electron beams by about 10-13%. The increase in doping level of the graded-gap AlxGa1-xAs layer from p=3×1017 to 1.9×1018 cm-3 increases detector sensitivity by about 2.3 times. The detector was encapsulated into a plastic body and fitted for dosimetric measurements in a water phantom. Linear response on absorbed dose and dose rate was obtained for beams with electron energies of 6, 12 and 20 MeV. A good agreement of relative depth dose distribution measured by the AlxGa1-xAs detector and ionization chamber is obtained for the 6 MeV energy electron beam, but a discernible discrepancy is observed for the higher electron energies.

  20. Neutron-induced electronic failures around a high-energy linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Kry, Stephen F; Johnson, Jennifer L; White, R Allen; Howell, Rebecca M; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Gillin, Michael T

    2011-01-01

    After a new in-vault CT-on-rails system repeatedly malfunctioned following use of a high-energy radiotherapy beam, we investigated the presence and impact of neutron radiation on this electronic system, as well as neutron shielding options. We first determined the CT scanner's failure rate as a function of the number of 18 MV monitor units (MUs) delivered. We then re-examined the failure rate with both 2.7-cm-thick and 7.6-cm-thick borated polyethylene (BPE) covering the linac head for neutron shielding. To further examine shielding options, as well as to explore which neutrons were relevant to the scanner failure, Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the neutron fluence and spectrum in the bore of the CT scanner. Simulations included BPE covering the CT scanner itself as well as covering the linac head. We found that the CT scanner had a 57% chance of failure after the delivery of 200 MUs. While the addition of neutron shielding to the accelerator head reduced this risk of failure, the benefit was minimal and even 7.6 cm of BPE was still associated with a 29% chance of failure after the delivery of 200 MU. This shielding benefit was achieved regardless of whether the linac head or CT scanner was shielded. Additionally, it was determined that fast neutrons were primarily responsible for the electronic failures. As illustrated by the CT-on-rails system in the current study, physicists should be aware that electronic systems may be highly sensitive to neutron radiation. Medical physicists should therefore monitor electronic systems that have not been evaluated for potential neutron sensitivity. This is particularly relevant as electronics are increasingly common in the therapy vault and newer electronic systems may exhibit increased sensitivity.

  1. Neutron-induced electronic failures around a high-energy linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kry, Stephen F.; Johnson, Jennifer L.; White, R. Allen; Howell, Rebecca M.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Gillin, Michael T.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: After a new in-vault CT-on-rails system repeatedly malfunctioned following use of a high-energy radiotherapy beam, we investigated the presence and impact of neutron radiation on this electronic system, as well as neutron shielding options. Methods: We first determined the CT scanner's failure rate as a function of the number of 18 MV monitor units (MUs) delivered. We then re-examined the failure rate with both 2.7-cm-thick and 7.6-cm-thick borated polyethylene (BPE) covering the linac head for neutron shielding. To further examine shielding options, as well as to explore which neutrons were relevant to the scanner failure, Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the neutron fluence and spectrum in the bore of the CT scanner. Simulations included BPE covering the CT scanner itself as well as covering the linac head. Results: We found that the CT scanner had a 57% chance of failure after the delivery of 200 MUs. While the addition of neutron shielding to the accelerator head reduced this risk of failure, the benefit was minimal and even 7.6 cm of BPE was still associated with a 29% chance of failure after the delivery of 200 MU. This shielding benefit was achieved regardless of whether the linac head or CT scanner was shielded. Additionally, it was determined that fast neutrons were primarily responsible for the electronic failures. Conclusions: As illustrated by the CT-on-rails system in the current study, physicists should be aware that electronic systems may be highly sensitive to neutron radiation. Medical physicists should therefore monitor electronic systems that have not been evaluated for potential neutron sensitivity. This is particularly relevant as electronics are increasingly common in the therapy vault and newer electronic systems may exhibit increased sensitivity.

  2. High-energy response of the PRESCILA and WENDI-II neutron rem meters.

    PubMed

    Olsher, Richard H; McLean, Thomas D

    2008-01-01

    WENDI-II was designed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) specifically as a wide-range rem meter, suitable for applications at particle accelerators, with response extension to 5 GeV. PRESCILA was also designed at LANL, mainly as a lightweight alternative to traditional rem meters, but has shown excellent response characteristics above 20 MeV. This Note summarises measurements performed over a span of 4 y to characterise the high-energy neutron response (>20 MeV) of these meters to several hundred million electron volts. High-energy quasi-monoenergetic beams utilised as part of this study were produced by the cyclotron facilities at the Université Catholique de Louvain (33 and 60 MeV) and the T. Svedberg Laboratory ( 46, 95, 143 and 173 MeV). In addition, measurements were also conducted at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, 800 MeV spallation neutron source, in broad energy fields with an average energy of 345 MeV. For the sake of completeness, data collected between 2.5 and 19 MeV in monoenergetic neutron fields at the German Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) facility are also included in this study.

  3. The silicon photomultipliers for inelastic neutron scattering at high energy transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietropaolo, Antonino

    2010-01-01

    The silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is a photo sensor of recent technology. It is mostly used in particle physics, for example in the detection of minimum ionizing particles and/or Cherenkov radiation. Its performance is comparable to that of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), but with advantages in terms of reduced volume and magnetic field insensitivity. In the present study, the performance of a SiPM as a readout for a γ-ray detector made of a yttrium-aluminum-perovskite (YAP) scintillation crystal is assessed for use in time of flight inelastic neutron spectroscopy at high energy transfers. This was done by performing explorative measurements at the Italian Neutron Experimental Station (INES) beam line at the ISIS spallation neutron source. The measurements, carried out in the so-called resonance detector (RD) configuration, demonstrate the suitability of the SiPM for this kind of application.

  4. Magnetized neutron stars as gamma-ray bursters - Detection rates at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.; Bagoly, Z.; Riffert, H.

    1989-01-01

    Detailed calculations of the escape of high-energy gamma-rays from the dipolar magnetosphere of general relativistic neutron star models are used to model the detection rate of bursters at high photon energies between 0.3 and 10 MeV. This analysis shows the SMM detection rates to be compatible with a magnetized neutron star origin, with a distribution of magnetic field strengths extending at least up to about 4 x 10 to the 12th G, as expected if the (20-60) keV features reported from Konus and Ginga measurements are interpreted as cyclotron lines. Additional implications are discussed for the emission geometry and the neutron star radius.

  5. A diamond detector in the dosimetry of high-energy electron and photon beams.

    PubMed

    Laub, W U; Kaulich, T W; Nüsslin, F

    1999-09-01

    A diamond detector type 60003 (PTW Freiburg) was examined for the purpose of dosimetry with 4-20 MeV electron beams and 4-25 MV photon beams. Results were compared with those obtained by using a Markus chamber for electron beams and an ionization chamber for photon beams. Dose distributions were measured in a water phantom with the detector connected to a Unidos electrometer (PTW Freiburg). After a pre-irradiation of about 5 Gy the diamond detector shows a stability in response which is better than that of an ionization chamber. The current of the diamond detector was measured under variation of photon beam dose rate between 0.1 and 7 Gy min(-1). Different FSDs were chosen. Furthermore the pulse repetition frequency and the depth of the detector were changed. The electron beam dose rate was varied between 0.23 and 4.6 Gy min(-1) by changing the pulse-repetition frequency. The response shows no energy dependence within the covered photon-beam energy range. Between 4 MeV and 18 MeV electron beam energy it shows only a small energy dependence of about 2%, as expected from theory. For smaller electron energies the response increases significantly and an influence of the contact material used for the diamond detector can be surmised. A slight sublinearity of the current and dose rate was found. Detector current and dose rate are related by the expression i alpha Ddelta, where i is the detector current, D is the dose rate and delta is a correction factor of approximately 0.963. Depth-dose curves of photon beams, measured with the diamond detector, show a slight overestimation compared with measurements with the ionization chamber. This overestimation is compensated for by the above correction term. The superior spatial resolution of the diamond detector leads to minor deviations between depth-dose curves of electron beams measured with a Markus chamber and a diamond detector.

  6. Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry in 100 and 300 MeV quasi-mono-energetic neutron field at RCNP, Osaka University, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mares, Vladimir; Trinkl, Sebastian; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Masuda, Akihiko; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Satoh, Daiki; Yashima, Hiroshi; Shima, Tatsushi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2017-09-01

    This paper describes the results of neutron spectrometry and dosimetry measurements using an extended range Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (ERBSS) with 3He proportional counter performed in quasi-mono-energetic neutron fields at the ring cyclotron facility of the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Japan. Using 100 MeV and 296 MeV proton beams, neutron fields with nominal peak energies of 96 MeV and 293 MeV were generated via 7Li(p,n)7Be reactions. Neutrons produced at 0° and 25° emission angles were extracted into the 100 m long time-of-flight (TOF) tunnel, and the energy spectra were measured at a distance of 35 m from the target. To deduce the corresponding neutron spectra from thermal to the nominal maximum energy, the ERBSS data were unfolded using the MSANDB unfolding code. At high energies, the neutron spectra were also measured by means of the TOF method using NE213 organic liquid scintillators. The results are discussed in terms of ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), and compared with the readings of other instruments operated during the experiment.

  7. A diamond detector in the dosimetry of high-energy electron and photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laub, Wolfram U.; Kaulich, Theodor W.; Nüsslin, Fridtjof

    1999-09-01

    A diamond detector type 60003 (PTW Freiburg) was examined for the purpose of dosimetry with 4-20 MeV electron beams and 4-25 MV photon beams. Results were compared with those obtained by using a Markus chamber for electron beams and an ionization chamber for photon beams. Dose distributions were measured in a water phantom with the detector connected to a Unidos electrometer (PTW Freiburg). After a pre-irradiation of about 5 Gy the diamond detector shows a stability in response which is better than that of an ionization chamber. The current of the diamond detector was measured under variation of photon beam dose rate between 0.1 and 7 Gy min-1. Different FSDs were chosen. Furthermore the pulse repetition frequency and the depth of the detector were changed. The electron beam dose rate was varied between 0.23 and 4.6 Gy min-1 by changing the pulse-repetition frequency. The response shows no energy dependence within the covered photon-beam energy range. Between 4 MeV and 18 MeV electron beam energy it shows only a small energy dependence of about 2%, as expected from theory. For smaller electron energies the response increases significantly and an influence of the contact material used for the diamond detector can be surmised. A slight sublinearity of the current and dose rate was found. Detector current and dose rate are related by the expression ipropto(dotD)Delta, where i is the detector current, (dotD) is the dose rate and Delta is a correction factor of approximately 0.963. Depth-dose curves of photon beams, measured with the diamond detector, show a slight overestimation compared

  8. COMPTEL measurements of the omnidirectional high-energy neutron flux in near-earth orbit.

    PubMed

    Morris, D J; Aarts, H; Bennett, K; Lockwood, J A; McConnell, M L; Ryan, J M; Schonfelder, V; Steinle, H; Weidenspointner, G

    1998-01-01

    On four occasions, twice in 1991 (near solar maximum) and twice in 1994 (near solar minimum), one COMPTEL D1 detector module was used as an omnidirectional detector to measure the high-energy (> 12.8 MeV) neutron flux near an altitude of 450 km. The D1 modules are cylindrical, with radius 13.8 cm and depth 8 cm, and are filled with liquid scintillator (NE213A). The combined flux measurements can be fit reasonably well by a product of the Mt. Washington neutron monitor rate, a linear function in the spacecraft geocenter zenith angle, and an exponential function of the vertical geomagnetic cutoff rigidity in which the coefficient of the rigidity is a linear function of the neutron monitor rate. When pointed at the nadir, the flux is consistent with that expected from the atmospheric neutron albedo alone. When pointed at the zenith the flux is reduced by a factor of about 0.54. Thus the production of secondary neutrons in the massive (16000 kg) Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory spacecraft is negligible. Rather, the mass of the spacecraft provides shielding from the earth albedo.

  9. The 12B counter: an active dosemeter for high-energy neutrons.

    PubMed

    Leuschner, A

    2005-01-01

    High-energy accelerators can produce strong time-structured radiation fields. Such dose shots are generated at linear machines with low duty cycles as well as at circular machines when complete fills are instantaneously lost. The main dose component behind thick shielding is due to high-energy neutrons occurring at that time structure. Dosemeters based on Geiger-Mueller tubes or proportional counters fail here completely. The 12B counter, a novel dosemeter made of a plastic scintillator using carbon activation for event-like exposure, has been introduced. High-energy neutrons activate the carbon nuclei by three inelastic reactions. The decay patterns with half-lives between 20 ms and 20 min can be exploited depending on the time structure of the radiation field. The response of the 12B counter was measured along with some other dosemeters, both active and passive, in the radiation field behind the lateral concrete shielding of a 7.5 GeV proton transfer line.

  10. Gadolinium-doped water cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma-ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Dazeley, Steven A; Svoboda, Robert C; Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel

    2013-02-12

    A water Cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system using water doped with a Gadolinium (Gd)-based compound as the Cerenkov radiator. An optically opaque enclosure is provided surrounding a detection chamber filled with the Cerenkov radiator, and photomultipliers are optically connected to the detect Cerenkov radiation generated by the Cerenkov radiator from incident high energy gamma rays or gamma rays induced by neutron capture on the Gd of incident neutrons from a fission source. The PMT signals are then used to determine time correlations indicative of neutron multiplicity events characteristic of a fission source.

  11. Dysprosium detector for neutron dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostinelli, A.; Berlusconi, C.; Conti, V.; Duchini, M.; Gelosa, S.; Guallini, F.; Vallazza, E.; Prest, M.

    2014-09-01

    Radiotherapy treatments with high-energy (>8 MeV) photon beams are a standard procedure in clinical practice, given the skin and near-target volumes sparing effect, the accurate penetration and the uniform spatial dose distribution. On the other hand, despite these advantages, neutrons may be produced via the photo-nuclear (γ,n) reactions of the high-energy photons with the high-Z materials in the accelerator head, in the treatment room and in the patient, resulting in an unwanted dose contribution which is of concern, given its potential to induce secondary cancers, and which has to be monitored. This work presents the design and the test of a portable Dysprosium dosimeter to be used during clinical treatments to estimate the "in vivo" dose to the patient. The dosimeter has been characterized and validated with tissue-equivalent phantom studies with a Varian Clinical iX 18 MV photon beam, before using it with a group of patients treated at the S. Anna Hospital in Como. The working principle of the dosimeter together with the readout chain and the results in terms of delivered dose are presented.

  12. The properties of gamma-radiation and high-energy neutron fluxes in "MIR" station orbit.

    PubMed

    Bogomolov, A V; Bogomolov, V V; Denisov, Yu I; Logachev, Yu I; Svertilov, S I; Kudryavtsev, M I; Lyagushin, V I; Ershova, T V

    2002-10-01

    The study of radiation background components in the near-Earth space is very important for different branches of space research, in particular for space dosimetry and for the planning of gamma-astronomy experiments. Detailed information on the neutral components (gamma-quanta, neutrons) of background radiation was obtained during the Grif-1 experiment onboard Mir orbital station (OS). The measurements of fluxes of 0.05-50 MeV gamma-quanta and >30 MeV neutrons with a large area instrument (approximately 250 cm2 for gamma-quanta, approximately 30 cm2 for neutrons) as well as corresponding charged particle measurements (0.4-1.5 MeV electrons, 1-200 MeV protons) were made during this experiment. The background components induced by the station's own radiation as well as the albedo gamma-rays from the Earth's atmosphere were revealed as the result of data analysis for about 600 h of observation. A mathematical model describing the latitude and energy dependences of atmospheric albedo gamma-rays as well as of those of gamma-quanta produced in the material of the station due to cosmic ray interactions was developed. An analytical approximation of the spectrum of induced gamma-rays from radioactive isotopes stored in the station and instrument's materials is presented. The dynamics of gamma-quantum background fluxes during the geomagnetic disturbances of January 10-11, 1997 are discussed. An analytical representation of the latitude dependence of the integral flux of neutrons with >30 MeV is given.

  13. Apparatus, Method and Program Storage Device for Determining High-Energy Neutron/Ion Transport to a Target of Interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W. (Inventor); Tripathi, Ram K. (Inventor); Badavi, Francis F. (Inventor); Cucinotta, Francis A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An apparatus, method and program storage device for determining high-energy neutron/ion transport to a target of interest. Boundaries are defined for calculation of a high-energy neutron/ion transport to a target of interest; the high-energy neutron/ion transport to the target of interest is calculated using numerical procedures selected to reduce local truncation error by including higher order terms and to allow absolute control of propagated error by ensuring truncation error is third order in step size, and using scaling procedures for flux coupling terms modified to improve computed results by adding a scaling factor to terms describing production of j-particles from collisions of k-particles; and the calculated high-energy neutron/ion transport is provided to modeling modules to control an effective radiation dose at the target of interest.

  14. BNCT of skin tumors using the high-energy D-T neutrons.

    PubMed

    Masoudi, S Farhad; Rasouli, Fatemeh S; Ghasemi, Marjan

    2017-04-01

    Owing to the continuing need for providing improved and universally accepted facilities to be used in radiation therapies, a number of recently published BNCT-related studies have focused on investigating appropriate neutron sources as alternatives for nuclear reactors. Of special interest are D-T neutron generators, which theoretically have shown the potential to be utilized as neutron sources for BNCT of deep-seated tumors. This work is devoted to investigate the feasibility of using the high-energy neutrons emitted from these generators for treatment of surface tumors, especially skin. Using a set of MCNPX simulations, the D-T neutrons are passed through an optimized arrangement of materials to slow-down toward the desired energy range, and to remove the neutron and gamma contamination considering the IAEA recommended criteria, especially determined for pre-clinical survey for treatment of surface tumors. By assessment with these parameters, it is shown that the designed beam, corresponding to a configuration composed of natural uranium as neutron multiplier, D2O as moderator, Pb as reflector, Bi as gamma filter, and polyethylene and BeO as collimators provides high-intensity of desired neutrons, and low-background doses as well. It was found that an appropriate material for collimator, if accompanied with an optimized geometry, is an important parameter for keeping the undesired components to the recommended level. A typical simulated phantom, subjected to the irradiation of the designed spectrum, is used to study the performance of the resultant beam in shallow tissue. For an arbitrary chosen (10)B concentration, the evaluated depth-dose curves show that the proposed configuration establishes acceptable agreement between the appropriate neutron intensity and penetration to desired depth in tissue in a reasonable treatment time of about 25-38min. Considering the simulations carried out, the total dose delivered to the tumor is expected to be of about 4.2 times

  15. The influence of neutron contamination on dosimetry in external photon beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, Felix Czarnecki, Damian; Zink, Klemens

    2015-11-15

    of TLD chips was quantified and was as expected found to be very low relative to that of the primary photons. For most practical reasons the neutrons’ influence on dosimetry might be neglected while for absolute precise thermoluminescence dosimetry in high energy photon fields, the use of TLD-700H (<0.03% {sup 6}Li) instead of the commonly used TLD-100 (7.4% {sup 6}Li) or even the extra neutron sensitive TLD-600H is recommended (95.6% {sup 6}Li) due to the additional inaccuracy in measurement for TLD materials with a high {sup 6}Li fraction.

  16. Disk-accreting magnetic neutron stars as high-energy particle accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Russell J.; Lamb, Frederick K.; Miller, M. Coleman

    1994-01-01

    Interaction of an accretion disk with the magnetic field of a neutron star produces large electromotive forces, which drive large conduction currents in the disk-magnetosphere-star circuit. Here we argue that such large conduction currents will cause microscopic and macroscopic instabilities in the magnetosphere. If the minimum plasma density in the magnetosphere is relatively low is less than or aproximately 10(exp 9)/cu cm, current-driven micro-instabilities may cause relativistic double layers to form, producing voltage differences in excess of 10(exp 12) V and accelerating charged particles to very high energies. If instead the plasma density is higher (is greater than or approximately = 10(exp 9)/cu cm, twisting of the stellar magnetic field is likely to cause magnetic field reconnection. This reconnection will be relativistic, accelerating plasma in the magnetosphere to relativistic speeds and a small fraction of particles to very high energies. Interaction of these high-energy particles with X-rays, gamma-rays, and accreting plasma may produce detectable high-energy radiation.

  17. Disk-accreting magnetic neutron stars as high-energy particle accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Russell J.; Lamb, Frederick K.; Miller, M. Coleman

    1994-01-01

    Interaction of an accretion disk with the magnetic field of a neutron star produces large electromotive forces, which drive large conduction currents in the disk-magnetosphere-star circuit. Here we argue that such large conduction currents will cause microscopic and macroscopic instabilities in the magnetosphere. If the minimum plasma density in the magnetosphere is relatively low is less than or aproximately 10(exp 9)/cu cm, current-driven micro-instabilities may cause relativistic double layers to form, producing voltage differences in excess of 10(exp 12) V and accelerating charged particles to very high energies. If instead the plasma density is higher (is greater than or approximately = 10(exp 9)/cu cm, twisting of the stellar magnetic field is likely to cause magnetic field reconnection. This reconnection will be relativistic, accelerating plasma in the magnetosphere to relativistic speeds and a small fraction of particles to very high energies. Interaction of these high-energy particles with X-rays, gamma-rays, and accreting plasma may produce detectable high-energy radiation.

  18. The Fascinating High-Energy World of Neutron Stars and Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi-Harb, Samar

    2006-06-01

    The past few years have witnessed a fast growth in the high-energy astrophysics community in Canada, thanks to new opportunities including the University Faculty Award (UFA) program introduced by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) to appoint promising female researchers to faculty positions in science and engineering. As a UFA fellow at the University of Manitoba, I have had the unique opportunity to contribute to the launch of a new astronomy program in the department of Physics (renamed to Physics and Astronomy). My research focuses on observational studies of neutron stars, pulsar wind nebulae, and supernova remnants. The study of these exotic objects helps address the physics of the extreme and probe some of the most energetic events in the Universe. I will highlight exciting discoveries in this field and some of the questions to be addressed with current and future high-energy missions.

  19. Neutron personnel dosimetry intercomparison studies at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory: a summary (1981-1986).

    PubMed

    Swaja, R E; Sims, C S

    1988-09-01

    To provide an opportunity for dosimetrists to test and calibrate their neutron personnel monitoring systems, the staff of the Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted personnel dosimetry intercomparison studies (PDIS) periodically since 1974. During these studies, personnel dosimeters are mailed to ORNL, exposed to low-level (less than 15 mSv) neutron dose equivalents in a variety of mixed-radiation fields, and then returned to the participants for evaluation. These intercomparisons have provided more data on neutron dosimeter performance than any other periodic test program conducted to date. This report presents a summary and analysis of about 3450 neutron dose equivalent measurements reported for PDIS 7 through 12 (1981-1986) with emphasis on low dose equivalent sensitivity, accuracy and precision, and performance relative to accreditation standards for the basic types of personnel dosimetry systems. Relationships of the PDIS results to occupational neutron monitoring, accreditation testing, and methods to improve personnel neutron dosimetry performance are also discussed.

  20. Intercalibration of physical neutron dosimetry for the RA-3 and MURR thermal neutron sources for BNCT small-animal research.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Thorp, Silvia; Brockman, John; Miller, Marcelo; Nigg, David W; Hawthorne, M Frederick

    2011-12-01

    New thermal neutron irradiation facilities to perform cell and small-animal irradiations for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy research have been installed at the Missouri University Research Reactor and at the RA-3 research reactor facility in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Recognizing the importance of accurate and reproducible physical beam dosimetry as an essential tool for combination and intercomparisons of preclinical and clinical results from the different facilities, we have conducted an experimental intercalibration of the neutronic performance of the RA-3 and MURR thermal neutron sources. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Hexagonal boron nitride thin film thermal neutron detectors with high energy resolution of the reaction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, T. C.; Majety, S.; Grenadier, S.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2015-05-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is highly promising for solid-state thermal neutron detector applications due to its many outstanding physical properties, especially its very large thermal neutron capture cross-section (~3840 barns for 10B), which is several orders of magnitude larger than those of most other isotopes. The focus of the present work is to carry out studies on h-BN thin film and detector properties to lay the foundation for the development of a direct-conversion solid-state thermal neutron detector with high sensitivity. The measured carrier mobility-lifetime (μτ) product of h-BN thin films grown on sapphire substrates is 2.83×10-7 cm2/V for electrons and holes, which is comparable to the value of about 10-7 cm2/V for GaN thin films grown on sapphire. Detectors based on h-BN thin films were fabricated and the nuclear reaction product pulse height spectra were measured. Under a bias of 20 V, very narrow individual peaks corresponding to the reaction product energies of α and Li particles as well as the sum peaks have been clearly resolved in the pulse height spectrum for the first time by a B-based direct-conversion semiconductor neutron detector. Our results indicate that h-BN thin film detectors possess unique advantages including small size, low weight, portability, low voltage operation and high energy resolution of specific reaction products.

  2. Comparison of neutron and high-energy X-ray dual-beam radiography for air cargo inspection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Sowerby, B D; Tickner, J R

    2008-04-01

    Dual-beam radiography techniques utilising various combinations of high-energy X-rays and neutrons are attractive for screening bulk cargo for contraband such as narcotics and explosives. Dual-beam radiography is an important enhancement to conventional single-beam X-ray radiography systems in that it provides additional information on the composition of the object being imaged. By comparing the attenuations of transmitted dual high-energy beams, it is possible to build a 2D image, colour coded to indicate material. Only high-energy X-rays, gamma-rays and neutrons have the required penetration to screen cargo containers. This paper reviews recent developments and applications of dual-beam radiography for air cargo inspection. These developments include dual high-energy X-ray techniques as well as fast neutron and gamma-ray (or X-ray) radiography systems. High-energy X-ray systems have the advantage of generally better penetration than neutron systems, depending on the material being interrogated. However, neutron systems have the advantage of much better sensitivity to material composition compared to dual high-energy X-ray techniques. In particular, fast neutron radiography offers the potential to discriminate between various classes of organic material, unlike dual energy X-ray techniques that realistically only offer the ability to discriminate between organic and metal objects.

  3. 90° Neutron emission from high energy protons and lead ions on a thin lead target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Birattari, C.; Foglio Para, A.; Mitaroff, A.; Silari, M.; Ulrici, L.

    2002-01-01

    The neutron emission from a relatively thin lead target bombarded by beams of high energy protons/pions and lead ions was measured at CERN in one of the secondary beam lines of the Super Proton Synchrotron for radiation protection and shielding calculations. Measurements were performed with three different beams: 208Pb 82+ lead ions at 40 GeV/ c per nucleon and 158 GeV/ c per nucleon, and 40 GeV/ c mixed protons/pions. The neutron yield and spectral fluence per incident ion on target were measured at 90° with respect to beam direction. Monte-Carlo simulations with the FLUKA code were performed for the case of protons and pions and the results found in good agreement with the experimental data. A comparison between simulations and experiment for protons, pions and lead ions have shown that—for such high energy heavy ion beams—a reasonable estimate can be carried out by scaling the result of a Monte-Carlo calculation for protons by the projectile mass number to the power of 0.80-0.84.

  4. Tolerance of the human spinal cord to high energy p(66)Be(49) neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, L.; Ten Haken, R.K.; Mansell, J.; Yalavarthi, S.D.; Hendrickson, F.R.; Awschalom, M.

    1985-04-01

    The risk of post irradiation myelopathy was evaluated in 76 patients followed for 1-5 years after neutron irradiation of the cervical and thoracic regions. No overt myelopathy was observed. Forty-six patients received doses (central cord dose) in excess of 10 Gy, 9 received doses in excess of 12 Gy, and 5 received doses between 13 and 17 Gy, all without any evidence of spinal cord injury. A review of available literature revealed a total of 14 patients with myelopathy, 13 of whom received doses in excess of 13 Gy delivered with relatively low energy neutrons generated by the deuteron + beryllium reaction. It is concluded from these studies that the tolerance limit for the human spinal cord irradiated with high energy (p(66)Be(49)) neutrons is close to 15 Gy, above which the risk of cord injury becomes significant. Central cord doses of 13 Gy or less appear to be well tolerated with little, if any, risk of myelopathy. These conclusions are valid for a treatment time of 4 weeks or more with two or more fractions per week (9 or more fractions). The RBE for the human spinal cord irradiated under the above conditions compared with conventionally fractionated photon therapy does not exceed 4.0.

  5. The DS86 neutron dosimetry enigma: Some missing pieces to the puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, R.

    1994-12-31

    International programs have been conducted over the last four decades to quantify the exposure of atom bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Unfortunately, the quest for accurate gamma-ray and neutron exposure doses of atom bomb survivors has proven illusive. Efforts in the most recent of these programs, designated as Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86), have revealed a serious and persistent discrepancy between neutron transport calculations and thermal neutron activation measurements at the Hiroshima site, which will be called the DS86 neutron dosimetry enigma. It is established that this enigma is a complex puzzle that precludes simple solutions. This conclusion is deduced through the identification of a number of missing pieces to the puzzle. Implications and conclusions that can be inferred from these missing puzzle pieces are advanced.

  6. Calibration of a Bonner sphere extension (BSE) for high-energy neutron spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Howell, R.M.; Burgett, E.A.; Wiegel, B.; Hertel, N.E.

    2011-01-01

    In a recent work, we constructed modular multisphere system which expands upon the design of an existing, commercially available Bonner sphere system by adding concentric shells of copper, tungsten, or lead. Our modular multisphere system is referred to as the Bonner Sphere Extension (BSE). The BSE was tested in a high energy neutron beam (thermal to 800 MeV) at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and provided improvement in the measurement of the neutron spectrum in the energy regions above 20 MeV when compared to the standard BSS (Burgett, 2008 and Howell et al., 2009). However, when the initial test of the system was carried-out at LANSCE, the BSE had not yet been calibrated. Therefore the objective of the present study was to perform calibration measurements. These calibration measurements were carried out using monoenergetic neutron ISO 8529-1 reference beams at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig, Germany. The following monoenergetic reference beams were used for these experiments: 14.8 MeV, 1.2 MeV, 565 keV, and 144 keV. Response functions for the BSE were calculated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Code, eXtended (MCNPX). The percent difference between the measured and calculated responses was calculated for each sphere and energy. The difference between measured and calculated responses for individual spheres ranged between 7.9 % and 16.7 % and the arithmetic mean for all spheres was (10.9 ± 1.8) %. These sphere specific correction factors will be applied for all future measurements carried-out with the BSE. PMID:22888283

  7. Arrangement of high-energy neutron irradiation field and shielding experiment using 4 m concrete at KENS.

    PubMed

    Nakao, N; Yashima, H; Kawai, M; Oishi, K; Nakashima, H; Masumoto, K; Matsumura, H; Sasaki, S; Numajiri, M; Sanami, T; Wang, Q; Toyoda, A; Takahashi, K; Iijima, K; Eda, K; Ban, S; Hirayama, H; Muto, S; Nunomiya, T; Yonai, S; Rasolonjatovo, D R H; Terunuma, K; Yamauchi, K; Sarkar, P K; Kim, E; Nakamura, T; Maruhashi, A

    2005-01-01

    An irradiation field of high-energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from a thick tungsten target bombarded by 500 MeV protons was arranged at the KENS spallation neutron source facility. In this facility, shielding experiment was performed with an ordinary concrete shield of 4 m thickness assembled in the irradiation room, 2.5 m downstream from the target centre. Activation detectors of bismuth, aluminium, indium and gold were inserted into eight slots inside the shield and attenuations of neutron reaction rates were obtained by measurements of gamma-rays from the activation detectors. A MARS14 Monte Carlo simulation was also performed down to thermal energy, and comparisons between the calculations and measurements show agreements within a factor of 3. This neutron field is useful for studies of shielding, activation and radiation damage of materials for high-energy neutrons, and experimental data are useful to check the accuracies of the transmission and activation calculation codes.

  8. Neutron therapy facility at the Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.C.

    1983-12-01

    The 10 MeV proton linac which was designed as preinjector for the Beijing 50 GeV Proton Synchrotron (BPS) was completed by the end of 1982. Because of the economic readjustment in the People's Republic of China the BPS project was cancelled. Then, the Institute of High Energy Physics decided to increase the energy of the linac from 10 MeV to 35.5 MeV. This increase will take place using the primary five megawatts RF system of the 10 MeV linac. This 35.5 MeV proton linac will be used for research in radiomedicine and radiobiology in general and in particular for research in fast neutron therapy and radiopharmaceutical production. This project has been approved by the Academia Sinica.

  9. Neutron Scattering Study of the High-energy Graphitic Phonons in Superconducting CaC6

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, M.P.; Walters, A.C.; Howard, C.A.; Weller, T.E.; Calandra, M.; Mauri, F.; Ellerby, M.; Saxena, S.S.; Ivanov, A.; McMorrow, D.F.

    2010-07-28

    We present the results of a neutron scattering study of the high energy phonons in the superconducting graphite intercalation compound CaC{sub 6}. The study was designed to address hitherto unexplored aspects of the lattice dynamics in CaC{sub 6}, and in particular any renormalization of the out-of-plane and in-plane graphitic phonon modes. We present a detailed comparison between the data and the results of density functional theory (DFT). A description is given of the analysis methods developed to account for the highly-textured nature of the samples. The DFT calculations are shown to provide a good description of the general features of the experimental data. This is significant in light of a number of striking disagreements in the literature between other experiments and DFT on CaC{sub 6}. The results presented here demonstrate that the disagreements are not due to any large inaccuracies in the calculated phonon frequencies.

  10. Neutron scattering study of the high-energy graphitic phonons in sperconducting CaC6

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, M.P.M.; Walters, A.C.; Howard, C.A.; Weller, T.E.; Calandra, M.; Mauri, F.; Ellerby, M.; Saxena, S.S.; Ivanov, A.; McMorrow, D.F.

    2010-07-28

    We present the results of a neutron scattering study of the high-energy phonons in the superconducting graphite intercalation compound CaC{sub 6} . The study was designed to address hitherto unexplored aspects of the lattice dynamics in CaC{sub 6} , and, in particular, any renormalization of the out-of-plane and in-plane graphitic phonon modes. We present a detailed comparison between the data and the results of density-functional theory (DFT). A description is given of the analysis methods developed to account for the highly textured nature of the samples. The DFT calculations are shown to provide a good description of the general features of the experimental data. This is significant in light of a number of striking disagreements in the literature between other experiments and DFT on CaC{sub 6} . The results presented here demonstrate that the disagreements are not due to any large inaccuracies in the calculated phonon frequencies.

  11. Spectra and Neutron Dosimetry Inside a PET Cyclotron Vault Room

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene; Mendez, Roberto; Iniguez, Maria Pilar; Marti-Climent, Joseph; Penuelas, Ivan; Barquero, Raquel

    2006-09-08

    The neutron field around a PET cyclotron was investigated during 18F radioisotope production with an 18 MeV proton beam. Pairs of thermoluminescent dosemeters, TLD600 and TLD700, were used as thermal neutron detector inside a Bonner Spheres Spectrometer to measure the neutron spectra at three different positions inside the cyclotron's vault room. Neutron spectra were also determined by Monte Carlo calculations. The hardest spectrum was observed in front of cyclotron target and the softest was noticed at the antipode of target. Neutron doses derived from the measured spectra vary between 11 and 377 mSv/{mu}A-h of proton integrated current, Doses were also measured with a single-moderator remmeter, with an active thermal neutron detector, whose response in affected by the radiation field in the vault room.

  12. Artificial Neural Networks in Spectrometry and Neutron Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Martinez-Blanco, M. R.; Ortiz-Rodriguez, J. M.; Hernandez-Davila, V. M.

    2010-12-07

    The ANN technology has been applied to unfold the neutron spectra of three neutron sources and to estimate their dosimetric features. To compare these results, neutron spectra were also unfolded with the BUNKIUT code. Both unfolding procedures were carried out using the count rates of a Bonner sphere spectrometer. The spectra unfolded with ANN result similar to those unfolded with the BUNKIUT code. The H*(10) values obtained with ANN agrees well with H*(10) values calculated with the BUNKIUT code.

  13. Verification analysis of thermoluminescent albedo neutron dosimetry at MOX fuel facilities.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Takahiro; Takada, Chie; Tsujimura, Norio

    2011-07-01

    Radiation workers engaging in the fabrication of MOX fuels at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency-Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories are exposed to neutrons. Accordingly, thermoluminescent albedo dosemeters (TLADs) are used for individual neutron dosimetry. Because dose estimation using TLADs is susceptible to variation of the neutron energy spectrum, the authors have provided TLADs incorporating solid-state nuclear tracks detectors (SSNTDs) to selected workers who are routinely exposed to neutrons and have continued analysis of the relationship between the SSNTD and the TLAD (T/R(f)) over the past 6 y from 2004 to 2009. Consequently, the T/R(f) value in each year was less than the data during 1991-1993, although the neutron spectra had not changed since then. This decrease of the T/R(f) implies that the ratio of operation time nearby gloveboxes and the total work time has decreased.

  14. Iridium and tantalum foils for spaceflight neutron dosimetry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, R. A.; Liles, E. D.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a two-foil system of iridium and tantalum which can measure thermal and intermediate energy neutrons at flux densities of 1 neutron/sq cm-sec over a ten-day lunar mission (1,000,000 neutrons/sq cm). The foils are chemically inert and nontoxic, weigh less than 1 g each, and require only routine gamma pulse height analysis for activation measurement. Detection of fluences below 1,000,000 neutrons/sq cm are achieved for counts of foil activity made as late as two months following neutron exposure. Tantalum foils flown in Apollo 11 indicated a mean dose equivalent to the astronauts of less than 16 mrem from thermal plus intermediate energy neutrons, while nuclear emulsion track analysis indicated approximately 17 mrem from neutrons of energy greater than 0.6 MeV. Iridium foils flown on Apollo 12 indicated dose equivalents of 1.8 to 2.8 mrem from thermal neutrons, excluding tissue thermalized SNAP-27 neutrons.

  15. Use of accelerator mass spectrometry in the dosimetry of Hiroshima neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straume, T.; Finkel, R. C.; Eddy, D.; Kubik, P. W.; Gove, H. E.; Sharma, P.; Fujita, S.; Hoshi, M.

    1990-12-01

    A substantial discrepancy exists between the measured values for thermal neutron activation and the values calculated using the new A-bomb dosimetry system, DS86. As part of a joint US-Japan effort aimed at resolving this discrepancy, we have shown that 36Cl/Cl in mineral samples (i.e., concrete, granite, tiles) can be measured with sufficient precision using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to quantify the very low thermal neutron activation levels at distances between 1000 and 2000 m from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. Our initial measurement results show that activation of Cl by the bomb neutrons disagree with calculations based on the new DS86 dosimetry system (measurements of 36Cl at 1450 m from the hypocenter indicate thermal neutron activation that is ˜15 times higher than obtained from DS86 calculations; discrepancies are even larger at 1606 m). This is a preliminary report of work in progress. The principal objectives of this work are to reconstruct the thermal neutron fluence as a function of distance from the hypocenters in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki using 36Cl/Cl and obtain information about fast neutron fluence.

  16. Applicability of the two-angle differential method to response measurement of neutron-sensitive devices at the RCNP high-energy neutron facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Akihiko; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Satoh, Daiki; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Iwase, Hiroshi; Yashima, Hiroshi; Nakane, Yoshihiro; Nishiyama, Jun; Shima, Tatsushi; Tamii, Atsushi; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Harano, Hideki; Nakamura, Takashi

    2017-03-01

    Quasi-monoenergetic high-energy neutron fields induced by 7Li(p,n) reactions are used for the response evaluation of neutron-sensitive devices. The quasi-monoenergetic high-energy field consists of high-energy monoenergetic peak neutrons and unwanted continuum neutrons down to the low-energy region. A two-angle differential method has been developed to compensate for the effect of the continuum neutrons in the response measurements. In this study, the two-angle differential method was demonstrated for Bonner sphere detectors, which are typical examples of moderator-based neutron-sensitive detectors, to investigate the method's applicability and its dependence on detector characteristics. Experiments were performed under 96-387 MeV quasi-monoenergetic high-energy neutron fields at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The measurement results for large high-density polyethylene (HDPE) sphere detectors agreed well with Monte Carlo calculations, which verified the adequacy of the two-angle differential method. By contrast, discrepancies were observed in the results for small HDPE sphere detectors and metal-induced sphere detectors. The former indicated that detectors that are particularly sensitive to low-energy neutrons may be affected by penetrating neutrons owing to the geometrical features of the RCNP facility. The latter discrepancy could be consistently explained by a problem in the evaluated cross-section data for the metals used in the calculation. Through those discussions, the adequacy of the two-angle differential method was experimentally verified, and practical suggestions were made pertaining to this method.

  17. Applications of Bonner sphere detectors in neutron field dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Awschalom, M.; Sanna, R.S.

    1983-09-01

    The theory of neutron moderation and spectroscopy are briefly reviewed, and moderators that are useful for Bonner sphere spectrometers are discussed. The choice of the neutron detector for a Bonner sphere spectrometer is examined. Spectral deconvolution methods are briefly reviewed, including derivative, parametric, quadrature, and Monte Carlo methods. Calibration is then discussed. (LEW)

  18. DOE personnel neutron dosimetry evaluation and upgrade program

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, L.G.; Stroud, C.M.; Vallario, E.J.

    1988-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsors an extensive research program to improve the methods, dosimeters, and instruments available to DOE facilities for measuring neutron dose and assessing its effects on the work force. The Total Dose Meter was recently developed for measuring in real time the adsorbed dose of mixed neutron and gamma radiation and for calculating the dose equivalent. The Field Neutron Spectrometer was developed to provide a portable instrument for determining neutron spectra in the workplace for flux-to-dose equivalent conversion and quality factor calculation. The Combination Thermoluminescence/Track Etch Dosimeter (TLD/TED) was developed to extend the effective neutron energy range of the conventional TLDs to improve detection of fast-energy neutrons. An Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dosimeter is presently being developed for application to gamma, neutron, and beta radiation. An Effective Dose Equivalent System is being developed to provide guidance in implementing the January 1987 Presidential Directive to determine effective dose equivalent. Superheated Drop Detectors are being investigated for their potential as real time neutron dosimeters. This paper includes discussions of these improvements brought about by the DOE research program. 3 refs.

  19. Neutron Exposure Parameters for the Dosimetry Capsule in the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program Tenth Irradiation Series

    SciTech Connect

    C.A. Baldwin; F.B.K. Kam; I. Remec

    1998-10-01

    This report describes the computational methodology for the least-squares adjustment of the dosimetry data from the HSSI 10.OD dosimetry capsule with neutronics calculations. It presents exposure rates at each dosimetry location for the neutron fluence greater than 1.0 MeV, fluence greater than 0.1 MeV, and displacements per atom. Exposure parameter distributions are also described in terms of three- dimensional fitting functions. When fitting functions are used it is suggested that an uncertainty of 6% (1 o) should be associated with the exposure rate values. The specific activity of each dosimeter at the end of irradiation is listed in the Appendix.

  20. Neutron production in tissue-like media and shielding materials irradiated with high-energy ion beams.

    PubMed

    Gudowska, I; Kopec, M; Sobolevsky, N

    2007-01-01

    Secondary neutrons produced in high-energy therapeutic ion beams require special attention since they contribute to the dose delivered to patient, both to tumour and to the healthy tissues. Moreover, monitoring of neutron production in the beam line elements and the patient is of importance for radiation protection aspects around ion therapy facility. Monte Carlo simulations of light ion transport in the tissue-like media (water, A-150, PMMA) and materials of interest for shielding devices (graphite, steel and Pb) were performed using the SHIELD-HIT and MCNPX codes. The capability of the codes to reproduce the experimental data on neutron spectra differential both in energy and angle is demonstrated for neutron yield from the thick targets. Both codes show satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. The absorbed dose due to neutrons produced in the water and A-150 phantoms is calculated for proton (200 MeV) and carbon (390 MeV/u) beams. Secondary neutron dose contribution is approximately 0.6% of the total dose delivered to the phantoms by proton beam and at the similar level for both materials. For carbon beam the neutron dose contribution is approximately 1.0 and 1.2% for the water and A-150 phantoms, respectively. The neutron ambient dose equivalent, H(10), was determined for neutrons leaving different shielding materials after irradiation with ions of various energies.

  1. A feasibility study using radiochromic films for fast neutron 2D passive dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Samuel L; Gunasingha, Rathnayaka; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Howell, Calvin R; Crowell, Alexander S; Fallin, Brent; Tonchev, Anton P; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is threefold: (1) to establish sensitivity of XRQA and EBT radiochromic films to fast neutron exposure; (2) to develop a film response to radiation dose calibration curve and (3) to investigate a two-dimensional (2D) film dosimetry technique for use in establishing an experimental setup for a radiobiological irradiation of mice and to assess the dose to the mice in this setup. The films were exposed to a 10 MeV neutron beam via the 2H(d,n)3He reaction. The XRQA film response was a factor of 1.39 greater than EBT film response to the 10 MeV neutron beam when exposed to a neutron dose of 165 cGy. A film response-to-soft tissue dose calibration function was established over a range of 0–10 Gy and had a goodness of fit of 0.9926 with the calibration data. The 2D film dosimetry technique estimated the neutron dose to the mice by measuring the dose using a mouse phantom and by placing a piece of film on the exterior of the experimental mouse setup. The film results were benchmarked using Monte Carlo and aluminum (Al) foil activation measurements. The radiochromic film, Monte Carlo and Al foil dose measurements were strongly correlated, and the film within the mouse phantom agreed to better than 7% of the externally mounted films. These results demonstrated the potential application of radiochromic films for passive 2D neutron dosimetry. PMID:20693612

  2. Feasibility study on pinhole camera system for online dosimetry in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Katabuchi, Tatsuya; Hales, Brian; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Igashira, Masayuki; Khan, Zareen; Kobayashi, Tooru; Matsuhashi, Taihei; Miyazaki, Koichi; Ogawa, Koichi; Terada, Kazushi

    2014-06-01

    The feasibility of a pinhole camera system for online dosimetry in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was studied. A prototype system was designed and built. Prompt γ-rays from the (10)B(n,α)(7)Li reaction from a phantom irradiated with neutrons were detected with the prototype system. An image was reconstructed from the experimental data. The reconstructed image showed a good separation of the two borated regions in the phantom. The counting rates and signal-to-noise ratio when using the system in actual BNCT applications are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Neutron dosimetry at commercial nuclear plants. Final report of Subtask B: dosimeter response

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, F.M.; Endres, G.W.R.; Brackenbush, L.W.

    1983-03-01

    As part of a larger program to evaluate personnel neutron dosimetry at commercial nuclear power plants, this study was designed to characterize neutron dosimeter responses inside the containment structure of commercial nuclear plants. In order to characterize those responses, dosimeters were irradiated inside containment at 2 pressurized water reactors and at pipe penetrations outside the biological shield at two boiling water reactors. The reactors were operating at full power during the irradiations. Measurements were also performed with electronic instruments, the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC), and portable remmeters, SNOOPY, RASCAL and PNR-4.

  4. Test of Prototype Detector for Retrospective Neutron Dosimetry of Reactor Internals and Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Katsumi; Nemezawa, Shigeki; Kubota, Isamu; Hayashi, Haruhisa

    2009-08-01

    A prototype detector for simple and non-destructive retrospective neutron dosimetry was made. A Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detector was used as a detector to measure the nuclides 54Mn, 58Co, and 60Co that were generated in reactor internals and vessels. The detector is surrounded by a tungsten collimator which shields background gamma-rays and detects gamma-rays originating from the measuring point. Neutron fluence is calculated using the pre-calculated response, measuring time, decay time and reactor power history. The applicability of this detector was tested by measuring parts of irradiated reactor internals.

  5. Neutron dosimetry for Hiroshima A-bomb survivors using AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry)

    SciTech Connect

    Straume, T.; Finkel, R.C.; Eddy, D. ); Kubik, P.W.; Gove, H.E.; Sharma, P. . Nuclear Structure Research Lab.); Fujita, S. ); Hoshi, M. )

    1990-05-01

    A substantial discrepancy exists between the measured values for thermal neutron activation and the values calculated using the new A-bomb dosimetry system, DS86. As part of a joint US-Japan effort aimed at resolving this discrepancy, we have shown that {sup 36}Cl/Cl in mineral samples (i.e., concrete, granite, tiles) can be measured with sufficient precision using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to quantify the very low thermal neutron activation levels at distances up to {approximately}2000 m from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. Our initial measurement results show that activation of Cl by the bomb neutrons disagree with calculations based on the new DS86 dosimetry system, in the same direction as previous findings for Co and Eu. This is a preliminary report of work in progress. The principal objectives of this work are to reconstruct the thermal neutron fluence as a function of distance from the hypocenters in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki using {sup 36}Cl/Cl and obtain information about fast neutron fluence. 11 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  6. Experimental Transport Benchmarks for Physical Dosimetry to Support Development of Fast-Neutron Therapy with Neutron Capture Augmentation

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Nigg; J. K. Hartwell; J. R. Venhuizen; C. A. Wemple; R. Risler; G. E. Laramore; W. Sauerwein; G. Hudepohl; A. Lennox

    2006-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the University of Washington (UW) Neutron Therapy Center, the University of Essen (Germany) Neutron Therapy Clinic, and the Northern Illinois University(NIU) Institute for Neutron Therapy at Fermilab have been collaborating in the development of fast-neutron therapy (FNT) with concurrent neutron capture (NCT) augmentation [1,2]. As part of this effort, we have conducted measurements to produce suitable benchmark data as an aid in validation of advanced three-dimensional treatment planning methodologies required for successful administration of FNT/NCT. Free-beam spectral measurements as well as phantom measurements with Lucite{trademark} cylinders using thermal, resonance, and threshold activation foil techniques have now been completed at all three clinical accelerator facilities. The same protocol was used for all measurements to facilitate intercomparison of data. The results will be useful for further detailed characterization of the neutron beams of interest as well as for validation of various charged particle and neutron transport codes and methodologies for FNT/NCT computational dosimetry, such as MCNP [3], LAHET [4], and MINERVA [5].

  7. Evaluation of neutron dosimetry on pancreatic cancer phantom model for application of intraoperative boron neutron-capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Yanagie, Hironobu; Sakurai, Yosiyuki; Ogura, Koichi; Kobayashi, Tooru; Furuya, Yoshitaka; Sugiyama, Hirotaka; Kobayashi, Hisao; Ono, Koji; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Nakazawa, Masaharu; Eriguchi, Masazumi

    2007-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most difficult neoplasms to cure and there is a need for new combinated therapy. If sufficient boron compound can be targeted accurate to the tumour, Boron Neutron-Capture Therapy (BNCT) can be applied to pancreatic cancer. We administrated BNCT to a cancer with pancreatic cancer patient using intraoperative irradiation. In this study, we performed preliminary dosimetry of a phantom model of the abdominal cavity. The flux of 8>x10(7)n/cm(2)/s (0.1 ratio) was 4.5 cm in depth from the surface in the case of simple irradiation, and the field of thermal neutrons was spread as 13 cm and 11.5 cm were usage of Void and Void with LiF collimation, respectively in thermal (OO-0011) mode. In the case of epithermal (CO-0000) mode, epithermal and fast components are four times higher at the surface level. In the case of mixed beam (OO-0000) mode, thermal neutron flux was the same as thermal neutron mode at a depth of 10 cm, but the gamma-ray component was two times higher than that of thermal neutron mode. With the use of Void and LiF collimation, thermal neutrons were selectively applied to the tumour combined with the CT-imaging of the cancer patient. This means that we could irradiate the tumour selectively and safely as possible, reducing the effects on neighboring healthy tissues. High resolution whole body dosimetry will be necessary to extend the application of BNCT to pancreatic cancer.

  8. A new electronic neutron dosimeter (END) for reliable personal dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ing, H.; Cousins, T.; Andrews, H. R.; Machrafi, R.; Voevodskiy, A.; Kovaltchouk, V.; Clifford, E. T. H.; Robins, M.; Larsson, C.; Hugron, R.; Brown, J.

    2008-04-01

    Tests of existing electronic neutron dosimeters by military and civilian groups have revealed significant performance limitations. To meet the operational requirements of emergency response personnel to a radiological/nuclear incident as well as those in the nuclear industry, a new END has been developed. It is patterned after a unique commercial neutron spectral dosemeter known as the N-probe. It uses a pair of small special scintillators on tiny photomultiplier tubes. Special electronics were designed to minimize power consumption to allow for weeks of operation on a single charge. The size, performance, and data analysis for the END have been designed to meet/exceed international standards for electronic neutron dosimeters. Results obtained with the END prototype are presented.

  9. Solid state track recorder neutron dosimetry measurements for fuel debris assessment of TMI-2 demineralizer-A

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, F.H.; Roberts, J.H.; Gold, R.; Preston, C.C.; Ulseth, J.A.

    1982-12-01

    Solid State Track Recorder (SSTR) neutron dosimetry measurements have been made in TMI-2 makeup Demineralizer A Cubicle in order to assess the amount of fuel debris present by means of the specific neutron activity of TMI-2 fuel. Based on recent calibration data and the results of the TMI-2 SSTR neutron dosimetry, the amount of fuel present is estimated to be 1.7 +- 0.6 kg. This value is in excellent agreement with a value determined independently by Compton recoil gamma-ray spectrometry. Sources of uncertainty in and proposed refinements of the present SSTR measurements are discussed.

  10. An international dosimetry exchange for boron neutron capture therapy. Part I: Absorbed dose measurements.

    PubMed

    Binns, P J; Riley, K J; Harling, O K; Kiger, W S; Munck af Rosenschöld, P M; Giusti, V; Capala, J; Sköld, K; Auterinen, I; Serén, T; Kotiluoto, P; Uusi-Simola, J; Marek, M; Viererbl, L; Spurny, F

    2005-12-01

    An international collaboration was organized to undertake a dosimetry exchange to enable the future combination of clinical data from different centers conducting neutron capture therapy trials. As a first step (Part I) the dosimetry group from the Americas, represented by MIT, visited the clinical centers at Studsvik (Sweden), VTT Espoo (Finland), and the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) at Rez (Czech Republic). A combined VTT/NRI group reciprocated with a visit to MIT. Each participant performed a series of dosimetry measurements under equivalent irradiation conditions using methods appropriate to their clinical protocols. This entailed in-air measurements and dose versus depth measurements in a large water phantom. Thermal neutron flux as well as fast neutron and photon absorbed dose rates were measured. Satisfactory agreement in determining absorbed dose within the experimental uncertainties was obtained between the different groups although the measurement uncertainties are large, ranging between 3% and 30% depending upon the dose component and the depth of measurement. To improve the precision in the specification of absorbed dose amongst the participants, the individually measured dose components were normalized to the results from a single method. Assuming a boron concentration of 15 microg g(-1) that is typical of concentrations realized clinically with the boron delivery compound boronophenylalanine-fructose, systematic discrepancies in the specification of the total biologically weighted dose of up to 10% were apparent between the different groups. The results from these measurements will be used in future to normalize treatment plan calculations between the different clinical dosimetry protocols as Part II of this study.

  11. Neutron response of the chlorobenzene-ethanol-trimethylpentane dosimetry system.

    PubMed

    Miljanić, S; Razem, D

    2007-01-01

    The dosimetric use of the chemical solution chlorobenzene-ethanol-trimethylpentane (CET) is based on the radiolytic formation of hydrochloric acid, which protonates a pH indicator thymolsulphonphthalein. On the basis of the CET solution, an accident and emergency personal dosemeter was designed allowing doses in the range 0.2-15 Gy can be measured. Radiation-chemical yields, G(HCl), for the CET system, and the responses of dosemeters in different neutron fields, ranging from 0.35 to 19.3 MeV mean energy neutrons, are summarised. The relation of G(HCl) to linear energy transfer (LET) of incident heavy charged particles is also evaluated on the basis of the previously published data. The response of the CET system to monoenergetic neutrons was calculated from the measured dependence of the G value upon LET of heavy charged particles and data about the LET distribution for monoenergetic neutrons. A very good agreement between this calculation and the experimental results was obtained. These results enable predictions of the response to be made in radiation fields with the known LET distributions.

  12. Measurements of liquid and glass structures using in-situ high energy x-ray and neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Richard; Benmore, C. J.; Skinner, Lawrie; Neuefeind, Joerg C; Tumber, Sonia; Jennings, G; Santodonato, Louis J; Jin, D; Du, Jincheng; Parise, John B

    2013-01-01

    Investigation of high temperature molten materials and their evolution to the amorphous state is often hampered by unwanted reactions with container surfaces. This work used aerodynamic levitation in combination with laser beam heating to study high melting point materials that can form supercooled liquids or glasses. Details of the instruments that are being used at the Advanced Photon Source and the Spallation Neutron Source to study molten oxides with high energy x-ray scattering and neutron diffraction with isotope substitution are presented. Examples of measurements are used to illustrate the use of the instruments. Plans for further development and application of the capabilities are presented.

  13. Characteristics of high-energy neutrons estimated using the radioactive spallation products of Au at the 500-MeV neutron irradiation facility of KENS.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hiroshi; Masumoto, Kazuyoshi; Nakao, Noriaki; Wang, Qingbin; Toyoda, Akihiro; Kawai, Masayoshi; Aze, Takahiro; Fujimura, Masatsugu

    2005-01-01

    We carried out a shielding experiment of high-energy neutrons, generated from a tungsten target bombarded with primary 500-MeV protons at KENS, which penetrated through a concrete shield in the zero-degree direction. We propose a new method to evaluate the spectra of high-energy neutrons ranging from 8 to 500 MeV. Au foils were set in a concrete shield, and the reaction rates for 13 radionuclides produced by the spallation reactions on the Au targets were measured by radiochemical techniques. The experimental results were compared with those obtained by the MARS14 Monte-Carlo code. A good agreement (between them) was found for energies beyond 100 MeV. The profile of the neutron spectrum, ranging from 8 to 500 MeV, does not depend on the thickness of the concrete shield.

  14. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geslot, B.; Vermeeren, L.; Filliatre, P.; Lopez, A. Legrand; Barbot, L.; Jammes, C.; Bréaud, S.; Oriol, L.; Villard, J.-F.

    2011-03-01

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 × 1020 n/cm2. A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  15. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions.

    PubMed

    Geslot, B; Vermeeren, L; Filliatre, P; Lopez, A Legrand; Barbot, L; Jammes, C; Bréaud, S; Oriol, L; Villard, J-F

    2011-03-01

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 × 10(20) n∕cm(2). A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  16. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Geslot, B.; Filliatre, P.; Barbot, L.; Jammes, C.; Breaud, S.; Oriol, L.; Villard, J.-F.; Lopez, A. Legrand

    2011-03-15

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2}. A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  17. Korean standard nuclear plant ex-vessel neutron dosimetry program Ulchin 4

    SciTech Connect

    Duo, J.I.; Chen, J.; Kulesza, J.A.; Fero, A.H.; Yoo, C.S.; Kim, B.C.

    2011-07-01

    A comprehensive ex-vessel neutron dosimetry (EVND) surveillance program has been deployed in 16 pressurized water reactors (PWR) in South Korea and EVND dosimetry sets have already been installed and analyzed in Westinghouse reactor designs. In this paper, the unique features of the design, training, and installation in the Korean standard nuclear plant (KSNP) Ulchin Unit 4 are presented. Ulchin Unit 4 Cycle 9 represents the first dosimetry analyzed from the EVND design deployed in KSNP plants: Yonggwang Units 3 through 6 and Ulchin Units 3 through 6. KSNP's cavity configuration precludes a conventional installation from the cavity floor. The solution, requiring the installation crew to access the cavity at an elevation of the active core, places a premium on rapid installation due to high area dose rates. Numerous geometrical features warranted the use of a detailed design in true 3D mechanical design software to control interferences. A full-size training mockup maximized the crew ability to correctly install the instrument in minimum time. The analysis of the first dosimetry set shows good agreements between measurement and calculation within the associated uncertainties. A complete EVND system has been successfully designed, installed, and analyzed for a KNSP plant. Current and future EVND analyses will continue supporting the successful operation of PWR units in South Korea. (authors)

  18. Non-reference condition correction factor kNR of typical radiation detectors applied for the dosimetry of high-energy photon fields in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn

    2012-09-01

    According to accepted dosimetry protocols, the "radiation quality correction factor"k(Q) accounts for the energy-dependent changes of detector responses under the conditions of clinical dosimetry for high-energy photon radiations. More precisely, a factor k(QR) is valid under reference conditions, i.e. at a point on the beam axis at depth 10 cm in a large water phantom, for 10×10 cm(2) field size, SSD 100 cm and the given radiation quality with quality index Q. Therefore, a further correction factor k(NR) has been introduced to correct for the influences of spectral quality changes when detectors are used under non-reference conditions such as other depths, field sizes and off-axis distances, while under reference conditions k(NR) is normalized to unity. In this paper, values of k(NR) are calculated for 6 and 15 MV photon beams, using published data of the energy-dependent responses of various radiation detectors to monoenergetic photon radiations, and weighting these responses with validated photon spectra of clinical high-energy photon beams from own Monte-Carlo-calculations for a wide variation of the non-reference conditions within a large water phantom. Our results confirm the observation by Scarboro et al. [26] that k(NR) can be represented by a unique function of the mean energy Em, weighted by the spectral photon fluence. Accordingly, the numerical variations of Em with depth, field size and off-axis distance have been provided. Throughout all considered conditions, the deviations of the k(NR) values from unity are at most 2% for a Farmer type ion chamber, and they remain below 15% for the thermoluminescent detectors LiF:Mg,Ti and LiF:Mg,Cu,P. For the shielded diode EDP-10, k(NR) varies from unity up to 20%, while the unshielded diode EDD-5 shows deviations up to 60% in the peripheral region. Thereby, the restricted application field of unshielded diodes has been clarified. For small field dosimetry purposes k(NR) can be converted into k(NCSF), the non

  19. SU-E-T-90: Accuracy of Calibration of Lithium-6 and -7 Enriched LiF TLDs for Neutron Measurements in High Energy Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Keehan, S; Franich, R; Taylor, M; Lonski, P; Kron, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the potential error involved in the interpretation of neutron measurements from medical linear accelerators (linacs) using TLD-600H and TLD-700H if standard AmBe and {sup 252}Cf neutron sources are used for calibration without proper inclusion of neutron energy spectrum information. Methods: The Kerma due to neutrons can be calculated from the energy released by various nuclear interactions (elastic and inelastic scatter, (n,α), (n,p), (n,d), (n,t), (n,2n), etc.). The response of each TLD can be considered the sum of the neutron and gamma components; each proportional to the Kerma. Using the difference between the measured TLD responses and the ratio of the calculated Kerma for each material, the neutron component of the response can be calculated. The Monte Carlo code MCNP6 has been used to calculate the neutron energy spectra resulting from photonuclear interactions in a Varian 21EX linac. TLDs have been exposed to the mixed (γ-n) field produced by a linac and AmBe and {sup 252}Cf standard neutron sources. Results: For dosimetry of neutrons from AmBe or {sup 252}Cf sources, assuming TLD-700H insensitivity to neutrons will Result in 10% or 20% overestimation of neutron doses respectively.For dosimetry of neutrons produced in a Varian 21EX, applying a calibration factor derived from a standard AmBe or {sup 252}Cf source will Result in an overestimation of neutron fluence, by as much as a factor of 47.The assumption of TLD-700H insensitivity to neutrons produced by linacs leads to a negligible error due to the extremely high Kerma ratio (600H/700H) of 3000 for the assumed neutron spectrum. Conclusion: Lithium-enriched TLDs calibrated with AmBe and/or {sup 252}Cf neutron sources are not accurate for use under the neutron energy spectrum produced by a medical linear accelerator.

  20. Gamma-ray, neutron, and hard X-ray studies and requirements for a high-energy solar physics facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Dennis, B. R.; Emslie, A. G.

    1988-01-01

    The requirements for future high-resolution spatial, spectral, and temporal observation of hard X-rays, gamma rays and neutrons from solar flares are discussed in the context of current high-energy flare observations. There is much promise from these observations for achieving a deep understanding of processes of energy release, particle acceleration and particle transport in a complicated environment such as the turbulent and highly magnetized atmosphere of the active sun.

  1. Gamma-ray, neutron, and hard X-ray studies and requirements for a high-energy solar physics facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Dennis, B. R.; Emslie, A. G.

    1988-01-01

    The requirements for future high-resolution spatial, spectral, and temporal observation of hard X-rays, gamma rays and neutrons from solar flares are discussed in the context of current high-energy flare observations. There is much promise from these observations for achieving a deep understanding of processes of energy release, particle acceleration and particle transport in a complicated environment such as the turbulent and highly magnetized atmosphere of the active sun.

  2. Computational Dosimetry and Treatment Planning Considerations for Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, David Waler

    2003-03-01

    Specialized treatment planning software systems are generally required for neutron capture therapy (NCT) research and clinical applications. The standard simplifying approximations that work well for treatment planning computations in the case of many other modalities are usually not appropriate for application to neutron transport. One generally must obtain an explicit three-dimensional numerical solution of the governing transport equation, with energy-dependent neutron scattering completely taken into account. Treatment planning systems that have been successfully introduced for NCT applications over the past 15 years rely on the Monte Carlo stochastic simulation method for the necessary computations, primarily because of the geometric complexity of human anatomy. However, historically, there has also been interest in the application of deterministic methods, and there have been some practical developments in this area. Most recently, interest has turned toward the creation of treatment planning software that is not limited to any specific therapy modality, with NCT as only one of several applications. A key issue with NCT treatment planning has to do with boron quantification, and whether improved information concerning the spatial biodistribution of boron can be effectively used to improve the treatment planning process. Validation and benchmarking of computations for NCT are also of current developmental interest. Various institutions have their own procedures, but standard validation models are not yet in wide use.

  3. Absolute neutron dosimetry: Effects of ionization chamber wall thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Ten Haken, R.K.; Awschalom, M.; Rosenberg, I.

    1985-01-01

    To assess the effect of ionization chamber wall thickness on absolute neutron absorbed dose determinations, measurements were made of the charge collected by an A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic ionization chamber irradiated by a p(66)Be(49) neutron therapy beam as a function of chamber wall thickness both in air and in four different media: tissue-equivalent solution, water, motor oil, and glycerin. Wall thicknesses ranged from 1 to 31 mm, where isolation of the chamber gas volume from protons originating outside the chamber wall was assured. The in-air measurements compare favorably with earlier buildup measurements performed with an A-150 extrapolation chamber in an A-150 phantom. The in-phantom results may be explained if the effect of charged particles reaching the gas volume from the medium and the wall as well as the differences in neutron attenuation by the wall and the medium displaced by the wall are taken into account. The errors in absolute absorbed dose determination caused by ignoring the above processes are assessed.

  4. Dose planning with comparison to in vivo dosimetry for epithermal neutron irradiation of the dog brain.

    PubMed

    Seppälä, Tiina; Auterinen, Iiro; Aschan, Carita; Serén, Tom; Benczik, Judit; Snellman, Marjatta; Huiskamp, René; Ramadan, Usama Abo; Kankaanranta, Leena; Joensuu, Heikki; Savolainen, Sauli

    2002-11-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is an experimental type of radiotherapy, presently being used to treat glioblastoma and melanoma. To improve patient safety and to determine the radiobiological characteristics of the epithermal neutron beam of Finnish BNCT facility (FiR 1) dose-response studies were carried on the brain of dogs before starting the clinical trials. A dose planning procedure was developed and uncertainties of the epithermal neutron-induced doses were estimated. The accuracy of the method of computing physical doses was assessed by comparing with in vivo dosimetry. Individual radiation dose plans were computed using magnetic resonance images of the heads of 15 Beagle dogs and the computational model of the FiR 1 epithermal neutron beam. For in vivo dosimetry, the thermal neutron fluences were measured using Mn activation foils and the gamma-ray doses with MCP-7s type thermoluminescent detectors placed both on the skin surface of the head and in the oral cavity. The degree of uncertainty of the reference doses at the thermal neutron maximum was estimated using a dose-planning program. The estimated uncertainty (+/-1 standard deviation) in the total physical reference dose was +/-8.9%. The calculated and the measured dose values agreed within the uncertainties at the point of beam entry. The conclusion is that the dose delivery to the tissue can be verified in a practical and reliable fashion by placing an activation dosimeter and a TL detector at the beam entry point on the skin surface with homogeneous tissues below. However, the point doses cannot be calculated correctly in the inhomogeneous area near air cavities of the head model with this type of dose-planning program. This calls for attention in dose planning in human clinical trials in the corresponding areas.

  5. Fast neutron irradiation effects on organic polymers: Suitability for dosimetry purposes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivaton, Agnès; Lao, Ludovic; Arnold, Jack

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports measurements of irradiation effects of low doses transferred by 14 MeV neutrons on polymers. Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM), Poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) and Polyethylene oxide (PEO) were exposed within the dose range of 50-210 cGy. The structural and morphological changes, modification of the photo-physical properties and formation of radiation-induced species were analysed by fluorescence emission, differential scanning calorimetry, electron paramagnetic resonance and infrared and UV-visible spectroscopy. Dose dependences of the changes in the physico-chemical properties of the polymers are shown. Discussion is focused on the suitability of the materials in conjunction with analytical technique, for simple direct readout dosimetry purposes. The results suggest that the monitoring of EPDM oxidation by infrared spectrometry could be of value for dosimetry applications in an industrial environment using an easily implementable protocol.

  6. Retrospective assessment of personnel neutron dosimetry for workers at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, J.J.; Wilson, R.H.; Baumgartner, W.B.

    1996-09-01

    This report was prepared to examine the specific issue of the potential for unrecorded neutron dose for Hanford workers, particularly in comparison with the recorded whole body (neutron plus photon) dose. During the past several years, historical personnel dosimetry practices at Hanford have been documented in several technical reports. This documentation provides a detailed history of the technology, radiation fields, and administrative practices used to measure and record dose for Hanford workers. Importantly, documentation has been prepared by personnel whose collective experience spans nearly the entire history of Hanford operations beginning in the mid-1940s. Evaluations of selected Hanford radiation dose records have been conducted along with statistical profiles of the recorded dose data. The history of Hanford personnel dosimetry is complex, spanning substantial evolution in radiation protection technology, concepts, and standards. Epidemiologic assessments of Hanford worker mortality and radiation dose data were initiated in the early 1960s. In recent years, Hanford data have been included in combined analyses of worker cohorts from several Department of Energy (DOE) sites and from several countries through the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Hanford data have also been included in the DOE Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR). In the analysis of Hanford, and other site data, the question of comparability of recorded dose through time and across the respective sites has arisen. DOE formed a dosimetry working group composed of dosimetrists and epidemiologists to evaluate data and documentation requirements of CEDR. This working group included in its recommendations the high priority for documentation of site-specific radiation dosimetry practices used to measure and record worker dose by the respective DOE sites.

  7. Measurements of high-energy neutron and proton fluxes on-board "Mir-Spectr" orbital complex.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtsev, M I; Bogomolov, A V; Bogomolov, V V; Denisov YuI; Svertilov, S I

    1998-01-01

    The measurements of high-energy neutron (with energies approximately 30-300 MeV) and proton (with energies approximately 1-200 MeV) fluxes are being conducted on-board "Mir-Spectr" orbital complex. Neutrons are detected by the undirected (FOV approximately 4 pi sr) scintillator spectrometer, consisting of 4 identical CsI(T1) detector units (the effective area for neutrons approximately 30 cm2). The gamma-quanta, which can be also detected by this instrument, are separated from neutrons by the analysis of the scintillator output pulse shape. To exclude registration of charged particles an anticoincidence plastic scintillator shield is realized in each detector unit. The proton fluxes are measured by the telescope based on 3 semiconductor detectors with small geometry factor (approximately 1 cm2 x sr). As the first result of the experiment the upper limit of the integral flux of local and albedo neutrons in the equatorial region (L<1. 1) was estimated. The results of this measurements can be useful for the radiation security. Also, the neutrons of solar flares can be detected in this experiment.

  8. The dose rate dependence of synthetic diamond detectors in the relative dosimetry of high-energy electron therapy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ade, N.; Nam, T. L.; Derry, T. E.; Mhlanga, S. H.

    2014-05-01

    Evaluation of the linear response of a radiation detector with absorbed dose rate should be of paramount importance in clinical dosimetry. As modelled by Fowler, electrical conductivity, σ, of a solid-state detector and absorbed dose rate, Dr, are related by σ~DrΔ where Δ is the linearity index. The detector is thus independent of dose rate if Δ is unity. This contribution investigates and evaluates the dependence of Δ of synthetic diamond detectors of various types on therapy electron energy and its influence in relative electron dosimetry with the aim of selecting a suitable crystal. The study was conducted initially on one HPHT and eight CVD synthesised diamonds of optical grade (OG) and detector grade (DG) qualities using 6-14 MeV electron therapy beams. For quality control, the diamond specimens were characterised by Raman spectroscopy and electron spin resonance (ESR). Values of Δ ranging between 0.79 and 1.03 were obtained for all the nine diamond detectors at 1000 V/cm for 7 and 12 MeV electron beams. Whereas the Δ values of the HPHT diamond were found not to vary with the electron energies, those of three CVD samples of a given class varied with the electron energies within 2%. In addition, a very strong variation of about 9% was observed for two OG crystals of another class. The Δ values were found to decrease with increasing dose rate and there was a tendency for the Δ values to change with defect levels present within the crystals. Due to the independence of the HPHT diamond's Δ values on electron energy and its better stability of response to radiation, a small-size HPHT crystal was then evaluated of its potential applications in small radiation fields. Relative dose distributions measured with the diamond probe on exposure to 6, 12 and 14 MeV electron beams between 1×1 cm2 and 10×10 cm2 fields were compared with those obtained with reference ion chambers and a Dosimetry Diode E. The results showed that with careful selection of a suitable

  9. Automatic neutron dosimetry system based on fluorescent nuclear track detector technology.

    PubMed

    Akselrod, M S; Fomenko, V V; Bartz, J A; Haslett, T L

    2014-10-01

    For the first time, the authors are describing an automatic fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD) reader for neutron dosimetry. FNTD is a luminescent integrating type of detector made of aluminium oxide crystals that does not require electronics or batteries during irradiation. Non-destructive optical readout of the detector is performed using a confocal laser scanning fluorescence imaging with near-diffraction limited resolution. The fully automatic table-top reader allows one to load up to 216 detectors on a tray, read their engraved IDs using a CCD camera and optical character recognition, scan and process simultaneously two types of images in fluorescent and reflected laser light contrast to eliminate false-positive tracks related to surface and volume crystal imperfections. The FNTD dosimetry system allows one to measure neutron doses from 0.1 mSv to 20 Sv and covers neutron energies from thermal to 20 MeV. The reader is characterised by a robust, compact optical design, fast data processing electronics and user-friendly software.

  10. Are high energy proton beams ideal for AB-BNCT? A brief discussion from the viewpoint of fast neutron contamination control.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pei-Yi; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2014-06-01

    High energy proton beam (>8MeV) is favorable for producing neutrons with high yield. However, the produced neutrons are of high energies. These high energy neutrons can cause severe fast neutron contamination and degrade the BNCT treatment quality if they are not appropriately moderated. Hence, this study aims to briefly discuss the issue, from the viewpoint of fast neutron contamination control, whether high energy proton beam is ideal for AB-BNCT or not. In this study, D2O, PbF4, CaF2, and Fluental(™) were used standalone as moderator materials to slow down 1-, 6-, and 10-MeV parallelly incident neutrons. From the calculated results, we concluded that neutrons produced by high energy proton beam could not be easily moderated by a single moderator to an acceptable contamination level and still with reasonable epithermal neutron beam intensity. Hence, much more complicated and sophisticated designs of beam shaping assembly have to be developed when using high energy proton beams. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Performance characteristics of a gated fiber-optic-coupled dosimeter in high-energy pulsed photon radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Tanyi, James A; Krafft, Shane P; Ushino, Toshihide; Huston, Alan L; Justus, Brian L

    2010-02-01

    Fiber-optic-coupled dosimeters (FOCDs) are a new class of in vivo dosimetry systems that are finding increased clinical applications. Utility of FOCDs has been limited in dosimetric applications due Cerenkov-ray signal contamination. The current study reports on the characterization of a novel FOCD, with a gated detection system for the discrimination and effective elimination of the direct contribution of Cerenkov radiation, for use in the radiotherapeutic realm. System reproducibility, linearity and output dependence on dose rate, energy, field size, and temperature response were characterized for 6, 10, and 15MV photon energies. The system exhibited a linear response to absorbed dose ranging from 1 to 2400cGy and showed little dependence to dose rate variations. Overall system reproducibility was 0.52% with no field-geometry and temperature dependence.

  12. Simulation experiments for gamma-ray mapping of planetary surfaces: Scattering of high-energy neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, J.; Englert, P.; Reedy, R. C.; Waenke, H.

    1986-01-01

    The concentration and distribution of certain elements in surface layers of planetary objects specify constraints on models of their origin and evolution. This information can be obtained by means of remote sensing gamma-ray spectroscopy, as planned for a number of future space missions, i.e., Mars, Moon, asteroids, and comets. To investigate the gamma-rays made by interactions of neutrons with matter, thin targets of different composition were placed between a neutron-source and a high-resolution germanium spectrometer. Gamma-rays in the range of 0.1 to 8 MeV were accumulated. In one set of experiments a 14-MeV neutron generator using the T(d,n) reaction as neutron-source was placed in a small room. Scattering in surrounding walls produced a spectrum of neutron energies from 14 MeV down to thermal. This complex neutron-source induced mainly neutron-capture lines and only a few scattering lines. As a result of the set-up, there was a considerable background of discrete lines from surrounding materials. A similar situation exists under planetary exploration conditions: gamma-rays are induced in the planetary surface as well as in the spacecraft. To investigate the contribution of neutrons with higher energies, an experiment for the measurement of prompt gamma radiation was set up at the end of a beam-line of an isochronous cyclotron.

  13. Fast neutron spectrometry and dosimetry using a spherical moderator with position-sensitive detectors.

    PubMed

    Li, Taosheng; Yang, Lianzhen; Ma, Jizeng; Fang, Dong

    2007-01-01

    A neutron spectrometry and dosimetry measurement system has been developed based on a different design of the divided regions for a sphere, with three position-sensitive counters. The characteristics of the measurement system have been investigated in the reference radiation fields of Am-Be and (252)Cf sources. When realistic input spectra are used for the unfolding, the overall deviations of the calculated results for four dosimetric quantities are less than +/-10%. The results of other input spectra are also discussed in this report.

  14. Computer dosimetry for flattened and wedged fast-neutron beams.

    PubMed

    Hogstrom, K R; Smith, A R; Almond, P R; Otte, V A; Smathers, J B

    1976-01-01

    Beam flattening by the use of polyethylene filters has been developed for the 50-MeV d in equilibrium Be fast-neutron therapy beam at the Texas A&M Variable-Energy Cyclotron (TAMVEC) as a result of the need for a more uniform dose distribution at depth within the patient. A computer algorithm has been developed that allows the use of a modified decrement line method to calculate dose distributions; standards decrement line methods do not apply because of off-axis peaking. The dose distributions for measured flattened beams are transformed into distributions that are physically equivalent to an unflattened distribution. In the transformed space, standard decrement line theory yields a distribution for any field size which, by applying the inverse transformation, generates the flattened dose distribution, including the off-axis peaking. A semiempirical model has been constructed that allows the calculation of dose distributions for wedged beams from open-beam data.

  15. OER and RBE of high energy neutron beams for growth inhibition in Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Van Dam, J; Billiet, G; Zoetelief, J; Broerse, J J; Wambersie, A

    1983-01-01

    The radiobiologic characteristics of 15 MeV neutrons produced by the d + T reaction at the TNO of Rijswijk and of neutrons produced by the d(50) + Be and p(75) + Be reactions at the cyclotron Cyclone of Louvain-la- Neuve were compared. Growth inhibition in Vicia faba bean roots was used as biologic system. An OER value of 1.5 +/- 0.1 ws obtained for the neutron beams compared. The RBE of 15 MeV, d(50) + Be and p(75) + Be neutrons was found equal to 3.4 +/- 0.2, 3.2 +/- 0.2 and 2.9 +/- 0.3, respectively, relative to gamma rays, for a total (n + gamma) absorbed dose of 0.6 Gy.

  16. Measurements of high-energy neutron-induced fission ofnatPb and 209Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Audouin, L.; Berthier, B.; Duran, I.; Ferrant, L.; Isaev, S.; Le Naour, C.; Paradela, C.; Stephan, C.; Trubert, D.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez, H.; Álvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvár, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Gonçalves, I.; González-Romero, E.; Gramegna, F.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsig, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Kossionides, E.; Krticka, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Oshima, M.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M. T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vicente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2010-10-01

    The CERN Neutron Time-Of-Flight (n_TOF) facility is well suited to measure low cross sections as those of neutron-induced fission in subactinides. The cross section ratios of natPb and 209Bi relative to 235U and 238U were measured using PPAC detectors and a fragment coincidence method that allows us to identify the fission events. The present experiment provides first results for neutron-induced fission up to 1 GeV. Good agreement is found with previous experimental data below 200 MeV. The comparison with proton-induced fission indicates that the limiting regime where neutron-induced and proton-induced fission reach equal cross sections is close to 1 GeV.

  17. Study on Response Function of Organic Liquid Scintillator for High-Energy Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Daiki; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Endo, Akira; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro; Takada, Masashi; Ishibashi, Kenji

    2005-05-01

    Response functions of liquid organic scintillator for neutrons up to 800 MeV have been measured at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). 800-MeV/u Si ions and 400-MeV/u C ions bombarded a thick carbon target to produce neutrons. The kinetic energies of emitted neutrons were determined by the time-of-flight (TOF) method. Light output for neutrons was evaluated by eliminating events due to gamma-rays and charged particles. The measured response functions were compared with calculations using SCINFUL-QMD and CECIL codes. It was found that SCINFUL-QMD reproduced our experimental data adequately.

  18. Personal neutron dosimetry in the space station MIR and the Space Shuttle.

    PubMed

    Luszik-Bhadra, M; Matzke, M; Otto, T; Reitz, G; Schuhmacher, H

    1999-06-01

    A passive neutron dosemeter based on nuclear track detectors and TLD's was used in 1995 and 1997 on the MIR station and in Space Shuttle flights to MIR. As it is equipped with neutron converters and shieldings of different types the track detector system allows the neutron dose equivalent to be determined in rough energy intervals. The results of the measurements on the MIR station and in the Space Shuttle flights are presented and the influence of charged particles in the complex mixed radiation field in space is discussed. Improvements are possible by means of a new active neutron dosemeter which is under development at the PTB. First measurements with a prototype in the high-energy reference fields at CERN are presented and discussed.

  19. Argon/propane ionization-chamber dosimetry for mixed x-ray/neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Schulz, R J

    1978-01-01

    The photoneutrons produced by high-energy x-ray machines can diffuse through the mazes usually employed at the treatment-room entrance and readily penetrate the lead-lined doors used for x-ray shielding. The measurement of these neutrons in the presence of x-rays and the determination of dose equivalent poses a problem for which there is currently no standard method of solution. In order to separate x-ray dose from neutron dose, the author employed an ionization chamber alternately filled with argon or propane. The response characteristics of this chamber to x-ray and neutrons are described. Quality factors were determined from a calculated neutron spectrum. As a result of these measurements, a 10-in. polyethylene door was added to the entranceway of a 25-MV linear accelerator.

  20. Development of highly efficient proton recoil counter telescope for absolute measurement of neutron fluences in quasi-monoenergetic neutron calibration fields of high energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikaze, Yoshiaki; Tanimura, Yoshihiko; Saegusa, Jun; Tsutsumi, Masahiro

    2010-04-01

    Precise calibration of monitors and dosimeters for use with high energy neutrons necessitates reliable and accurate neutron fluences being evaluated with use of a reference point. A highly efficient Proton Recoil counter Telescope (PRT) to make absolute measurements with use of a reference point was developed to evaluate neutron fluences in quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields. The relatively large design of the PRT componentry and relatively thick, approximately 2 mm, polyethylene converter contributed to high detection efficiency at the reference point over a large irradiation area at a long distance from the target. The polyethylene converter thickness was adjusted to maintain the same carbon density per unit area as the graphite converter for easy background subtraction. The high detection efficiency and thickness adjustment resulted in efficient absolute measurements being made of the neutron fluences of sufficient statistical precision over a short period of time. The neutron detection efficiencies of the PRT were evaluated using MCNPX code at 2.61×10-6, 2.16×10-6 and 1.14×10-6 for the respective neutron peak energies of 45, 60 and 75 MeV. The neutron fluences were determined to have been evaluated at an uncertainty of within 6.5% using analysis of measured data and the detection efficiencies. The PRT was also designed so as to be capable of simultaneously obtaining TOF data. The TOF data also increased the reliability of neutron fluence measurements and provided useful information for use in interpreting the source of proton events.

  1. Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Exposed Los Alamos High-Energy Secondary Neutrons: M-BAND Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute a significant fraction to the dose equivalent radiation measurement in crew members and passengers of commercial aviation travel as well as astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility's 30L beam line (4FP30L-A/ICE House) is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecrafts like the MIR and the International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams with an entrance dose rate of 2.5 cGy/hr, and studied the induction of chromosome aberrations that were identified with multicolor-banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of inter-chromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra-chromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Compared to our previous results with gamma-rays and 600 MeV/nucleon Fe ions of high dose rate at NSRL (NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory), the neutron data from the LANSCE experiments showed significantly higher frequency of chromosome aberrations. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Most of the inversions in gamma-ray irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosomal aberrations but few inversions were accompanied by interchromosomal aberrations. In contrast, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both

  2. Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Exposed Los Alamos High-Energy Secondary Neutrons: M-BAND Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute a significant fraction to the dose equivalent radiation measurement in crew members and passengers of commercial aviation travel as well as astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility's 30L beam line (4FP30L-A/ICE House) is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecrafts like the MIR and the International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams with an entrance dose rate of 2.5 cGy/hr, and studied the induction of chromosome aberrations that were identified with multicolor-banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of inter-chromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra-chromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Compared to our previous results with gamma-rays and 600 MeV/nucleon Fe ions of high dose rate at NSRL (NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory), the neutron data from the LANSCE experiments showed significantly higher frequency of chromosome aberrations. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Most of the inversions in gamma-ray irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosomal aberrations but few inversions were accompanied by interchromosomal aberrations. In contrast, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both

  3. Verification of the computational dosimetry system in JAERI (JCDS) for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumada, H; Yamamoto, K; Matsumura, A; Yamamoto, T; Nakagawa, Y; Nakai, K; Kageji, T

    2004-08-07

    Clinical trials for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) by using the medical irradiation facility installed in Japan Research Reactor No. 4 (JRR-4) at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) have been performed since 1999. To carry out the BNCT procedure based on proper treatment planning and its precise implementation, the JAERI computational dosimetry system (JCDS) which is applicable to dose planning has been developed in JAERI. The aim of this study was to verify the performance of JCDS. The experimental data with a cylindrical water phantom were compared with the calculation results using JCDS. Data of measurements obtained from IOBNCT cases at JRR-4 were also compared with retrospective evaluation data with JCDS. In comparison with phantom experiments, the calculations and the measurements for thermal neutron flux and gamma-ray dose were in a good agreement, except at the surface of the phantom. Against the measurements of clinical cases, the discrepancy of JCDS's calculations was approximately 10%. These basic and clinical verifications demonstrated that JCDS has enough performance for the BNCT dosimetry. Further investigations are recommended for precise dose distribution and faster calculation environment.

  4. Verification of the computational dosimetry system in JAERI (JCDS) for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumada, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Matsumura, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Nakagawa, Y.; Nakai, K.; Kageji, T.

    2004-08-01

    Clinical trials for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) by using the medical irradiation facility installed in Japan Research Reactor No. 4 (JRR-4) at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) have been performed since 1999. To carry out the BNCT procedure based on proper treatment planning and its precise implementation, the JAERI computational dosimetry system (JCDS) which is applicable to dose planning has been developed in JAERI. The aim of this study was to verify the performance of JCDS. The experimental data with a cylindrical water phantom were compared with the calculation results using JCDS. Data of measurements obtained from IOBNCT cases at JRR-4 were also compared with retrospective evaluation data with JCDS. In comparison with phantom experiments, the calculations and the measurements for thermal neutron flux and gamma-ray dose were in a good agreement, except at the surface of the phantom. Against the measurements of clinical cases, the discrepancy of JCDS's calculations was approximately 10%. These basic and clinical verifications demonstrated that JCDS has enough performance for the BNCT dosimetry. Further investigations are recommended for precise dose distribution and faster calculation environment.

  5. Simulation of neutron displacement damage in bipolar junction transistors using high-energy heavy ion beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Buller, Daniel L.; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Fleming, Robert M; Bielejec, Edward Salvador; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2006-12-01

    Electronic components such as bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) are damaged when they are exposed to radiation and, as a result, their performance can significantly degrade. In certain environments the radiation consists of short, high flux pulses of neutrons. Electronics components have traditionally been tested against short neutron pulses in pulsed nuclear reactors. These reactors are becoming less and less available; many of them were shut down permanently in the past few years. Therefore, new methods using radiation sources other than pulsed nuclear reactors needed to be developed. Neutrons affect semiconductors such as Si by causing atomic displacements of Si atoms. The recoiled Si atom creates a collision cascade which leads to displacements in Si. Since heavy ions create similar cascades in Si we can use them to create similar damage to what neutrons create. This LDRD successfully developed a new technique using easily available particle accelerators to provide an alternative to pulsed nuclear reactors to study the displacement damage and subsequent transient annealing that occurs in various transistor devices and potentially qualify them against radiation effects caused by pulsed neutrons.

  6. SU-E-T-263: Luminescent Dosimetry to Measure the Out-Of-Field Low and High LET Dose Components in High Energy Photon and Proton Therapy Beams.

    PubMed

    Reft, C

    2012-06-01

    Luminescent dosimetry using thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) and optically stimulated luminescent detectors (OSLDs) were used in mixed radiation fields containing both low LET (photons and protons) and high LET (neutrons)components to obtain their out-of-field absorbed dose, dose equivalent and quality factor. LiF Thermoluminescent Detectors (TLDs) 600 and 700 chips with dimensions 0.31×0.31×0.038 cm(3) were used in a 25.4 cm diameter Bonner sphere centered 42 cm from the isocenter of a 15×x15 cm(2) field to measure the secondary doses for 10, 15 and 18 MV photons and a 200 MeV proton therapy beam. From the sensitivity difference to LET radiation between the210 and 280 C peaks in the glow curve, the areas under the peaks were used to obtain the absorbed dose, dose equivalent and QF of the secondary radiation. The OSLD detector measured the low LET dose component to compare with the TLD dose measurement. The neutron calibration of the TLDs was obtained from an Am-Be source at the Argonne National Laboratory. The photon and proton TLD and OSLD calibrations were obtained in 6 MV and 200 MeV beams, respectively. From the two-peak analysis of the TLDs in the Bonner sphere the ratios of the neutron dose to photon dose were 0.001, 0.014 and 0.17 for 10, 15 and 18 MV, respectively. The low LET OSLD measurements agreed within 10% of the TLD results. From the dose equivalent measurements the QFs (+/-14%) obtained were 4.5, 3.9 and 4.0 for these beam energies. For the 200 MeV proton beam the ratio of neutron to proton dose was 0.28 with a measured QF of 13. Luminescent detectors in a Bonner Sphere provide measurements of the secondary photon, proton and neutron doses and provide an estimate of the neutron QF. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  7. Dosimetry and fast neutron energies characterization of photoneutrons produced in some medical linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaled, N. E.; Attalla, E. M.; Ammar, H.; Khalil, W.

    2011-12-01

    This work focusses on the estimation of induced photoneutrons energy, fluence, and strength using nuclear track detector (NTD) (CR-39). Photoneutron energy was estimated for three different linear accelerators, LINACs as an example for the commonly used accelerators. For high-energy linear accelerators, neutrons are produced as a consequence of photonuclear reactions in the target nuclei, accelerator head, field-flattening filters and beam collimators, and other irradiated objects. NTD (CR-39) is used to evaluate energy and fluence of the fast neutron. Track length is used to estimate fast photoneutrons energy for linear accelerators (Elekta 10 MV, Elekta 15 MV, and Varian 15 MV). Results show that the estimated neutron energies for the three chosen examples of LINACs reveals neutron energies in the range of 1-2 MeV for 10 and 15 MV X-ray beams. The fluence of neutrons at the isocenter (Φtotal) is found to be (4×106 n cm2 Gy-1) for Elekta machine 10 MV. The neutron source strengths Q are calculated. It was found to be 0.2×1012 n Gy-1 X-ray at the isocenter. This work represents simple, low cost, and accurate methods of measuring fast neutrons dose and energies.

  8. High-energy astrophysics: A theoretical analysis of thermal radiation from neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applegate, James H.

    1994-01-01

    The unambiguous detection of thermal radiation from the surface of a cooling neutron star was one of the most anxiously awaited results in neutron star physics. This particular Holy Grail was found by Halpern and Holt, who used ROSAT to detect pulsed X-rays from the gamma-ray source Geminga and demonstrate that it was a neutron star, probably a radio pulsar beamed away from us. At an age of approximately 3.4 x 10(exp 5) years, Geminga is in the photon cooling era. Its surface temperature of 5.2 x 10(exp 5) K can be explained within the contexts of both the slow and fast cooling scenarios. In the slow cooling scenario, the surface temperature is too high unless the specific heat of the interior is reduced by extensive baryon pairing. In the fast cooling scenario, the surface temperature will be much too low unless the fast neutrino cooling is shut off by baryon pairing. Two other pulsars, PSR 0656+14 and PSR 1055-52, have also been detected in thermal X-rays by ROSAT. They are also in the photon cooling era. All of this research's neutron star cooling models to date have used the unmagnetized effective temperature-interior temperature relation for the outer boundary condition. Models are being improved by using published magnetic envelope calculations and assumed geometried for the surface magnetic field to determine local interior temperature-emitted flux relations for the surface of the star.

  9. Measurement of high-energy neutrons at ISS by SEDA-AP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, K.; Goka, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Obara, T.; Muraki, Y.; Yamamoto, T.

    2011-09-01

    A new type of solar neutron detector (NEM) was launched by the space shuttle Endeavour on 16 July 2009 and it began collecting data on 25 August 2009 at the International Space Station (ISS). In this paper we introduce preliminary results obtained by the NEM.

  10. New estimation method of neutron skyshine for a high-energy particle accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Joo-Hee; Jung, Nam-Suk; Lee, Hee-Seock; Ko, Seung-Kook

    2016-09-01

    A skyshine is the dominant component of the prompt radiation at off-site. Several experimental studies have been done to estimate the neutron skyshine at a few accelerator facilities. In this work, the neutron transports from a source place to off-site location were simulated using the Monte Carlo codes, FLUKA and PHITS. The transport paths were classified as skyshine, direct (transport), groundshine and multiple-shine to understand the contribution of each path and to develop a general evaluation method. The effect of each path was estimated in the view of the dose at far locations. The neutron dose was calculated using the neutron energy spectra obtained from each detector placed up to a maximum of 1 km from the accelerator. The highest altitude of the sky region in this simulation was set as 2 km from the floor of the accelerator facility. The initial model of this study was the 10 GeV electron accelerator, PAL-XFEL. Different compositions and densities of air, soil and ordinary concrete were applied in this calculation, and their dependences were reviewed. The estimation method used in this study was compared with the well-known methods suggested by Rindi, Stevenson and Stepleton, and also with the simple code, SHINE3. The results obtained using this method agreed well with those using Rindi's formula.

  11. Van der Waals Type Model for Neutron-Proton Elastic Scattering at High Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleem, F.

    1980-12-01

    The most recent measurements of the angular distribution and total cross-section for neutron-proton elastic scattering between 70< pL <400 GeV/c with squared four momentum transfer -t ≤ 3.6 (GeV/c)2 have been explained using Van der Waals type model.

  12. Time gating for energy selection and scatter rejection: High-energy pulsed neutron imaging at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Alicia; Schirato, Richard; McKigney, Edward; Hunter, James; Temple, Brian

    2015-09-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a linear accelerator in Los Alamos, New Mexico that accelerates a proton beam to 800 MeV, which then produces spallation neutron beams. Flight path FP15R uses a tungsten target to generate neutrons of energy ranging from several hundred keV to ~600 MeV. The beam structure has micropulses of sub-ns width and period of 1.784 ns, and macropulses of 625 μs width and frequency of either 50 Hz or 100 Hz. This corresponds to 347 micropulses per macropulse, or 1.74 x 104 micropulses per second when operating at 50 Hz. Using a very fast, cooled ICCD camera (Princeton Instruments PI-Max 4), gated images of various objects were obtained on FP15R in January 2015. Objects imaged included blocks of lead and borated polyethylene; a tungsten sphere; and a tungsten, polyethylene, and steel cylinder. Images were obtained in 36 min or less, with some in as little as 6 min. This is novel because the gate widths (some as narrow as 10 ns) were selected to reject scatter and other signal not of interest (e.g. the gamma flash that precedes the neutron pulse), which has not been demonstrated at energies above 14 MeV. This proof-of-principle experiment shows that time gating is possible above 14MeV and is useful for selecting neutron energy and reducing scatter, thus forming clearer images. Future work (simulation and experimental) is being undertaken to improve camera shielding and system design and to precisely determine optical properties of the imaging system.

  13. A dosimetry study of deuterium-deuterium neutron generator-based in vivo neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowers, Daniel A.

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo Neutron Activation Analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator which produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 x 108 +/-30% s-1. A moderator/reflector/shielding (5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite & 5.7 cm borated HDPE) assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeter (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and photon dose by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10 min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 +/- 0.8 mSv for neutron and 4.2 +/- 0.2 mSv for photon for 10 mins; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population.

  14. A Dosimetry Study of Deuterium-Deuterium Neutron Generator-based In Vivo Neutron Activation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sowers, Daniel; Liu, Yingzi; Mostafaei, Farshad; Blake, Scott; Nie, Linda H

    2015-12-01

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator that produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 × 10(8) ± 30% s(-1). A moderator/reflector/shielding [5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite and 5.7 cm borated (HDPE)] assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeters (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and the photon dose was measured by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10-min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 ± 0.8 mSv for neutrons and 4.2 ± 0.2 mSv for photons for 10 min; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population.

  15. (A neutron scattering experiment to study the high-energy spin dynamics of the itinerant antiferromagnet Mn sub 90 Cu sub 10 )

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Baca, J.A.

    1990-10-26

    The traveler performed a neutron scattering experiment to study the high-energy spin dynamics of the itinerant antiferromagnet. This experiment was conducted at a unique instrument located at the hot-neutron source at the ILL. The traveler also held various scientific discussions with ILL research staff members and visiting scientists.

  16. High-energy transients. [from weakly and strongly magnetic neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, D. Q.

    1991-01-01

    The observational characteristics of X-ray bursts are reviewed and the thermonuclear-flash model is examined to assess the suitability of the model and the sources of X- and gamma-ray bursts. The profiles of X-ray bursts from five different sources are delineated, and the global analysis of nuclear burning is discussed to review th range possible X-ray burst behavior. The analysis by Fushiki and Lamb (1987) is noted for the description of regions which lie away from the steady-state cut. The discussion of cyclotron lines in gamma-ray bursts emphasizes the source GB880205, and it is shown that Raman and cyclotron resonant scattering can explain the observed positions, strengths, and widths of the dips in the spectrum. X-ray bursts are theorized to emanate from weakly magnetic neutron stars, and gamma-ray bursts are shown to be the products of strongly magnetic neutron stars.

  17. Characterization of extended range Bonner Sphere Spectrometers in the CERF high-energy broad neutron field at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Bedogni, R.; Caresana, M.; Charitonidis, N.; Chiti, M.; Esposito, A.; Ferrarini, M.; Severino, C.; Silari, M.

    2012-12-01

    The accurate determination of the ambient dose equivalent in the mixed neutron-photon fields encountered around high-energy particle accelerators still represents a challenging task. The main complexity arises from the extreme variability of the neutron energy, which spans over 10 orders of magnitude or more. Operational survey instruments, which response function attempts to mimic the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficient up to GeV neutrons, are available on the market, but their response is not fully reliable over the entire energy range. Extended range rem counters (ERRC) do not require the exact knowledge of the energy distribution of the neutron field and the calibration can be done with a source spectrum. If the actual neutron field has an energy distribution different from the calibration spectrum, the measurement is affected by an added uncertainty related to the partial overlap of the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion curve and the response function. For this reason their operational use should always be preceded by an "in-field" calibration, i.e. a calibration made against a reference instrument exposed in the same field where the survey-meter will be employed. In practice the extended-range Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (ERBSS) is the only device which can serve as reference instrument in these fields, because of its wide energy range and the possibility to assess the neutron fluence and the ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) values with the appropriate accuracy. Nevertheless, the experience gained by a number of experimental groups suggests that mandatory conditions for obtaining accurate results in workplaces are: (1) the use of a well-established response matrix, thus implying validation campaigns in reference monochromatic neutrons fields, (2) the expert and critical use of suitable unfolding codes, and (3) the performance test of the whole system (experimental set-up, elaboration and unfolding procedures) in a well

  18. Transport analysis of measured neutron leakage spectra from spheres as tests of evaluated high energy cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogart, D. D.; Shook, D. F.; Fieno, D.

    1973-01-01

    Integral tests of evaluated ENDF/B high-energy cross sections have been made by comparing measured and calculated neutron leakage flux spectra from spheres of various materials. An Am-Be (alpha,n) source was used to provide fast neutrons at the center of the test spheres of Be, CH2, Pb, Nb, Mo, Ta, and W. The absolute leakage flux spectra were measured in the energy range 0.5 to 12 MeV using a calibrated NE213 liquid scintillator neutron spectrometer. Absolute calculations of the spectra were made using version 3 ENDF/B cross sections and an S sub n discrete ordinates multigroup transport code. Generally excellent agreement was obtained for Be, CH2, Pb, and Mo, and good agreement was observed for Nb although discrepancies were observed for some energy ranges. Poor comparative results, obtained for Ta and W, are attributed to unsatisfactory nonelastic cross sections. The experimental sphere leakage flux spectra are tabulated and serve as possible benchmarks for these elements against which reevaluated cross sections may be tested.

  19. Monte Carlo simulations for external neutron dosimetry based on the visible Chinese human phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guozhi; Liu, Qian; Luo, Qingming

    2007-12-01

    A group of Monte Carlo simulations has been performed for external neutron dosimetry calculation based on a whole-body anatomical model, the visible Chinese human (VCH) phantom, which was newly developed from high-resolution cryosectional color photographic images of a healthy Chinese adult male cadaver. Physical characteristics of the VCH computational phantom that consists of 230 × 120 × 892 voxels corresponding to an element volume of 2 × 2 × 2 mm3 are evaluated through comparison against a variety of other anthropomorphic models. Organ-absorbed doses and the effective doses for monoenergic neutron beams ranging from 10-9 MeV to 10 GeV under six idealized irradiation geometries (AP, PA, LLAT, RLAT, ROT and ISO) were calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX2.5. Absorbed dose results for selected organs and the effective doses are presented in the form of tables. Dose results are also compared with currently available neutron data form ICRP Publication 74 and those of VIP-Man. Anatomical variations between different models, as well as their influence on dose distributions, are explored. Detailed information derived from the VCH phantom is able to lend quantitative references to the widespread application of human computational models in radiology.

  20. Measurement of high-energy prompt gamma-rays from neutron induced fission of U-235

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makii, Hiroyuki; Nishio, Katsuhisa; Hirose, Kentaro; Orlandi, Riccardo; Léguillon, Romain; Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Soldner, Torsten; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Astier, Alain; Pollitt, Andrew; Petrache, Costel; Tsekhanovich, Igor; Mathieu, Ludovic; Aïche, Mourad; Frost, Robert; Czajkowski, Serge; Guo, Song; Köster, Ulli

    2017-09-01

    We have developed a new setup to measure prompt γ-rays from the 235U(nth,f) reaction. The setup consists of two multi-wire proportional counters (MWPCs) to detect the fission fragments, two LaBr3(Ce) scintillators to measure the γ-rays. The highly efficient setup was installed at the PF1B beam line of the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). We have successfully measured the γ-ray spectrum up to about 20 MeV for the fist time in neutron-induced fission.

  1. SU-E-T-543: Measurement of Neutron Activation From Different High Energy Varian Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Thatcher, T; Madsen, S; Sudowe, R; Meigooni, A Soleimani

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Linear accelerators producing photons above 10 MeV may induce photonuclear reactions in high Z components of the accelerator. These liberated neutrons can then activate the structural components of the accelerator and other materials in the beam path through neutron capture reactions. The induced activity within the accelerator may contribute to additional dose to both patients and personnel. This project seeks to determine the total activity and activity per activated isotope following irradiation in different Varian accelerators at energies above 10 MeV. Methods: A Varian 21IX accelerator was used to irradiate a 30 cm × 30 cm × 20 cm solid water phantom with 15 MV x-rays. The phantom was placed at an SSD of 100 cm and at the center of a 20 cm × 20 cm field. Activation induced gamma spectra were acquired over a 5 minute interval after 1 and 15 minutes from completion of the irradiation. All measurements were made using a CANBERRA Falcon 5000 Portable HPGe detector. The majority of measurements were made in scattering geometry with the detector situated at 90° to the incident beam, 30 cm from the side of the phantom and approximately 10 cm from the top. A 5 minute background count was acquired and automatically subtracted from all subsequent measurements. Photon spectra were acquired for both open and MLC fields. Results: Based on spectral signatures, nuclides have been identified and their activities calculated for both open and MLC fields. Preliminary analyses suggest that activities from the activation products in the microcurie range. Conclusion: Activation isotopes have been identified and their relative activities determined. These activities are only gross estimates since efficiencies have not been determined for this source-detector geometry. Current efforts are focused on accurate determination of detector efficiencies using Monte Carlo calculations.

  2. Investigation and Application of Neutron Damage to Bipolar Transistors in Light Water Reactor Dosimetry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roknizadeh, Mansour

    A method of fast neutron metrology and a basis for prediction of changes in performance parameters of semiconductor devices in power plant radiation environments has been established using Cf-252 sources. Three general purpose NPN bipolar transistors (PN2222A, ECG-196, and ECG-184) were chosen as the neutron damage monitors and the change in inverse d.c. current gain before and after irradiation was chosen as the damage parameter for the measurement. The ECG-196 and ECG-184 transistors have been calibrated for neutron fluences ranging from 1.0E10 n(1MeV)/ {rm cm}^2 to 1.0E12 n(1MeV)/{rm cm}^2. PN2222A transistors have been calibrated for neutron fluences ranging from 1.0E12 to 2.0E15 n(1MeV)/cm^2 . The main findings of the investigation were as follows:. The change in inverse d.c. current gain for PN2222A transistors was approximately a linear function of the neutron fluence up to 2.0E15 n(1MeV)/{rm cm}^2. The departure from linearity has been represented by a quadratic function. The concept of 1-MeV equivalent neutron fluence which characterizes an incident energy-fluence spectrum in terms of the fluence of monoenergetic neutrons at 1 MeV, is in error for application to common transistors in a typical power plant environment. This has been proven to be due to the fact that low energy neutron effects are not correctly accounted for when using the silicon displacement kerma to calculate 1-MeV equivalent neutron fluence. Therefore, a model has been developed by which the damage response is corrected in order to account for the low energy neutron effects. The normalized damage coefficient which is the ratio of damage to 1-MeV equivalent neutron fluence divided by the measured base transit time of individual transistors, for all three types of transistors is nearly the same with an average value of 1.27E - 7 +/- 15.0% {rm cm}^2 /m(1MeV).Sec. This supports the theory that base transit time is a parameter from which the neutron vulnerability in a nuclear radiation

  3. High energy neutron and pion-decay gamma-ray emissions from solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupp, Edward L.; Ryan, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Solar flare gamma-ray emissions from energetic ions and electrons have been detected and measured to GeV energies since 1980. In addition, neutrons produced in solar flares with 100 MeV to GeV energies have been observed at the Earth. These emissions are produced by the highest energy ions and electrons accelerated at the Sun and they provide our only direct (albeit secondary) knowledge about the properties of the accelerator(s) acting in a solar flare. The solar flares, which have direct evidence for pion-decay gamma-rays, are unique and are the focus of this paper. We review our current knowledge of the highest energy solar emissions, and how the characteristics of the acceleration process are deduced from the observations. Results from the RHESSI, INTEGRAL and CORONAS missions will also be covered. The review will also cover the solar flare capabilities of the new mission, FERMI GAMMA RAY SPACE TELESCOPE, launched on 2008 June 11. Finally, we discuss the requirements for future missions to advance this vital area of solar flare physics.

  4. Characterization of neutron-irradiated HT-UPS steel by high-energy X-ray diffraction microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Park, Jun-Sang; Almer, Jonathan; Li, Meimei

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the first measurement of neutron-irradiated microstructure using far-field high-energy X-ray diffraction microscopy (FF-HEDM) in a high-temperature ultrafine-precipitate-strengthened (HT-UPS) austenitic stainless steel. Grain center of mass, grain size distribution, crystallographic orientation (texture), diffraction spot broadening and lattice constant distributions of individual grains were obtained for samples in three different conditions: non-irradiated, neutron-irradiated (3dpa/500 °C), and irradiated + annealed (3dpa/500 °C + 600 °C/1 h). It was found that irradiation caused significant increase in grain-level diffraction spot broadening, modified the texture, reduced the grain-averaged lattice constant, but had nearly no effect on the average grain size and grain size distribution, as well as the grain size-dependent lattice constant variations. Post-irradiation annealing largely reversed the irradiation effects on texture and average lattice constant, but inadequately restored the microstrain.

  5. Laser-driven high-energy-density deuterium and tritium ions for neutron production in a double-cone configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Li-Xiang; Yu, Tong-Pu Shao, Fu-Qiu; Yin, Yan; Ma, Yan-Yun; Zhu, Qing-Jun

    2015-12-15

    By using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate laser-driven ion acceleration and compression from a thin DT foil in a double-cone configuration. By using two counterpropagating laser pulses, it is shown that a double-cone structure can effectively guide, focus, and strengthen the incident laser pulses, resulting in the enhanced acceleration and compression of D{sup +} and T{sup +}. Due to the ion Coulomb repulsion and the effective screening from the external laser electric fields, the transverse diffusion of ions is significantly suppressed. Finally, the peak energy density of the compressed ions exceeds 2.73 × 10{sup 16 }J/m{sup 3}, which is about five orders of magnitude higher than the threshold for high energy density physics, 10{sup 11 }J/m{sup 3}. Under this condition, DT fusion reactions are initiated and the neutron production rate per volume is estimated to be as high as 7.473 × 10{sup 35}/m{sup 3} s according to Monte Carlo simulations. It is much higher than that of the traditional large neutron sources, which may facilitate many potential applications.

  6. The impact of possible modifications to the DS86 dosimetry on neutron risk and relative biological effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Nezahat; Charles, Monty W

    2002-12-01

    The current DS86 dosimetry system for the Japanese bomb survivors indicates that neutron doses were so low that they prevent the direct derivation of any useful estimates of neutron risk. However, the large body of thermal neutron activation measurements carried out over many years in Hiroshima and Nagasaki appear to indicate that current DS86 neutron doses may have been significantly underestimated in Hiroshima. An earlier companion paper has provided an update of neutron activation measurements. While a large body of data appears to support a significant increase, there is ongoing debate and review regarding its validity. However, as yet, there are no detailed, peer-reviewed, published refutations of the neutron activation data which appear to support an increase in neutron doses. In this paper, we consider the impact of possible future revisions in the DS86 dosimetry on radiation risk estimates. We consider the extreme range of possibilities from maintaining the existing DS86 values, to changes in neutron doses in accord with the majority of existing neutron activation data. We have used the latest cancer incidence data and cancer mortality data for the A-bomb survivors, and neutron doses have been modified using a neutron revision factor (NRF) in line with the latest thermal neutron activation measurements in Hiroshima. In contrast to previous analyses, a nonlinear relationship between log(NRF) and slant range has been used which better represents the data beyond slant ranges of approximately 1 km. The impact on the evaluation of neutron relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and gamma radiation risk estimates has been assessed. While DS86 neutron doses are too low to allow any useful direct evaluation of neutron risk or neutron RBE, it becomes possible to derive more meaningful values if neutron doses are increased in Hiroshima in line with the broad range of thermal neutron activation measurements. The uncertainties are smallest for the cancer incidence data

  7. High-energy gamma rays in Hiroshima and Nagasaki: implications for risk and WR.

    PubMed

    Straume, T

    1995-12-01

    Based on the DS86 dosimetry system, nearly all of the dose to survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki was due to unusually high-energy gamma rays, predominantly in the 2- to 5-MeV range. These high energies resulted in part from neutron capture gamma rays as the bomb neutrons penetrated large distances of air. Because of the inverse relationship between energy and biological effectiveness, these high-energy gamma rays are expected to be substantially less effective in producing biological damage than the radiations commonly used in radiobiology and risk assessment. This observation has implications for radiation protection and risk assessment.

  8. The Application of Experimental Microdosimetry to Mixed-Field Neutron-Gamma Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Bayati, Saad Najm

    interactions, alpha and recoil nuclei. The energy deposition patterns in these micro-scale targets are strongly dependent on radiation quality, so differences of linear energy transfer (LET) of the components in a mixed radiation field are significant. Accordingly, in a radiation field with an unknown gamma ray energy spectrum, absorbed dose for neutrons can be obtained by the separation of neutron induced events from gamma events using their distribution in lineal energy. To separate neutron dose from gamma dose a simple lineal energy threshold technique has been used in addition to a more sophisticated methods using γ-fitting and the graphite-walled counter measurements. The results of this study will establish the degree of error introduced by using a lineal energy threshold, which is likely to be used in any hand-held neutron monitor based on TEPCs. Keywords : Microdosimetry, TEPC, GPC, Mixed Field Dosimetry, Am-Be Neutron Source.

  9. Applicability of self-activation of an NaI scintillator for measurement of photo-neutrons around a high-energy X-ray radiotherapy machine.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Genichiro; Nohtomi, Akihiro; Yahiro, Eriko; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Fukunaga, Junichi; Umezu, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Hosono, Makoto; Itoh, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of the activation of an NaI scintillator for neutron monitoring at a clinical linac was investigated experimentally. Thermal neutron fluence rates are derived by measurement of the I-128 activity generated in an NaI scintillator irradiated by neutrons; β-rays from I-128 are detected efficiently by the NaI scintillator. In order to verify the validity of this method for neutron measurement, we irradiated an NaI scintillator at a research reactor, and the neutron fluence rate was estimated. The method was then applied to neutron measurement at a 10-MV linac (Varian Clinac 21EX), and the neutron fluence rate was estimated at the isocenter and at 30 cm from the isocenter. When the scintillator was irradiated directly by high-energy X-rays, the production of I-126 was observed due to photo-nuclear reactions, in addition to the generation of I-128 and Na-24. From the results obtained by these measurements, it was found that the neutron measurement by activation of an NaI scintillator has a great advantage in estimates of a low neutron fluence rate by use of a quick measurement following a short-time irradiation. Also, the future application of this method to quasi real-time monitoring of neutrons during patient treatments at a radiotherapy facility is discussed, as well as the method of evaluation of the neutron dose.

  10. SU-E-T-484: In Vivo Dosimetry Tolerances in External Beam Fast Neutron Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L; Gopan, O

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimetry with Landauer Al2O3:C nanodots was developed at our institution as a passive in vivo dosimetry (IVD) system for patients treated with fast neutron therapy. The purpose of this study was to establish clinically relevant tolerance limits for detecting treatment errors requiring further investigation. Methods: Tolerance levels were estimated by conducting a series of IVD expected dose calculations for square field sizes ranging between 2.8 and 28.8 cm. For each field size evaluated, doses were calculated for open and internal wedged fields with angles of 30°, 45°, or 60°. Theoretical errors were computed for variations of incorrect beam configurations. Dose errors, defined as the percent difference from the expected dose calculation, were measured with groups of three nanodots placed in a 30 x 30 cm solid water phantom, at beam isocenter (150 cm SAD, 1.7 cm Dmax). The tolerances were applied to IVD patient measurements. Results: The overall accuracy of the nanodot measurements is 2–3% for open fields. Measurement errors agreed with calculated errors to within 3%. Theoretical estimates of dosimetric errors showed that IVD measurements with OSL nanodots will detect the absence of an internal wedge or a wrong wedge angle. Incorrect nanodot placement on a wedged field is more likely to be caught if the offset is in the direction of the “toe” of the wedge where the dose difference in percentage is about 12%. Errors caused by an incorrect flattening filter size produced a 2% measurement error that is not detectable by IVD measurement alone. Conclusion: IVD with nanodots will detect treatment errors associated with the incorrect implementation of the internal wedge. The results of this study will streamline the physicists’ investigations in determining the root cause of an IVD reading that is out of normally accepted tolerances.

  11. Collaborative Physical and Biological Dosimetry Studies for Neutron Capture Therapy at the RA-1 Research Reactor Facility

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; Amanda E. Schwint; John K. Hartwell; Elisa M. Heber; Veronica Trivillin; Jorge Castillo; Luis Wentzeis; Patrick Sloan; Charles A. Wemple

    2004-10-01

    Initial physical dosimetry measurements have been completed using activation spectrometry and thermoluminiscent dosimeters to characterize the BNCT irradiation facility developed at the RA-1 research reactor operated by the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission in Buenos Aires. Some biological scoping irradiations have also been completed using a small-animal (hamster) oral mucosa tumor model. Results indicate that the RA-1 neutron source produces useful dose rates but that some improvements in the initial configuration will be needed to optimize the spectrum for thermal-neutron BNCT research applications.

  12. Collaborative Physical and Biological Dosimetry Studies for Neutron Capture Therapy at the RA-1 Research Reactor Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D.W.; Schwint, A.E.; Hartwell, J.K.; Heber, E.M.; Trivillin, V.; Castillo, J.; Wentzeis, L.; Sloan, P.; Wemple, C.A.

    2004-10-04

    Initial physical dosimetry measurements have been completed using activation spectrometry and thermoluminiscent dosimeters to characterize the BNCT irradiation facility developed at the RA-1 research reactor operated by the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission in Buenos Aires. Some biological scoping irradiations have also been completed using a small-animal (hamster) oral mucosa tumor model. Results indicate that the RA-1 neutron source produces useful dose rates but that some improvements in the initial configuration will be needed to optimize the spectrum for thermal-neutron BNCT research applications.

  13. Validating the ENDF-B/VII{sup 235}U(n{sub th},f) prompt fission neutron spectrum using updated dosimetry cross sections (IRDFF)

    SciTech Connect

    Capote, R.; Zolotarev, K. I.; Pronyaev, V. G.; Trkov, A.

    2012-07-01

    The International Reactor Dosimetry File IRDF-2002 released in 2004 by the IAEA contains cross-section data and corresponding uncertainties for 66 dosimetry reactions. New cross-section evaluations have become available recently that re-define some of these dosimetry reactions for reactor applications including: 1) high fidelity evaluation work undertaken by one of the authors (KIZ); 2) evaluations from the ENDF/B-VII libraries that cover reactions within the International Evaluation of Neutron Cross-Section Standards; and 3) evaluations from JENDL-3.1 and JENDL-4 libraries. Overall, 37 new evaluations of dosimetry reactions have been assessed to determine whether they should be adopted to update and improve IRDF-2002. A new dosimetry library (International Reactor Dosimetry File for Fission and Fusion - IRDFF) was assembled based on new evaluations combined with selected IRDF-2002 evaluations. A grand-total of 74 dosimetry reactions are included into the IRDFF dosimetry library available at www-nds.iaea.org/IRDFFI. The assembled library was used to validate the {sup 235}U(n{sub th},f) ENDF-B/VII.0 prompt fission neutron spectrum. An excellent average C/E value of 1.002 +/- 0.02 is achieved for reactions with mean neutron energy of the integrated response (E50%) lower than 11 MeV. C/E data for reactions with E50%-response higher than 11 MeV decreases up to 0.8. We conclude that the ENDF-B/VII.0 {sup 235}U(n{sub th},f) prompt fission neutron spectrum from 1-11 MeV is validated within quoted uncertainties by available integral measurements in {sup 235}U(n{sub th},f) neutron field. Further investigations for high-threshold reactions are needed and new measurements of spectrum average cross sections for those reactions in the {sup 235}U(n{sub th},f) neutron field are recommended. (authors)

  14. Are neutrons responsible for the dose discrepancies between Monte Carlo calculations and measurements in the build-up region for a high-energy photon beam?

    PubMed

    Ding, George X; Duzenli, Cheryl; Kalach, Nina I

    2002-09-07

    This study presents measured neutron dose using a neutron dosimeter in a water phantom and investigates a hypothesis that neutrons in a high-energy photon beam may be responsible for the reported significant dose discrepancies between Monte Carlo calculations and measurements at the build-up region in large fields. Borated polyethylene slabs were inserted between the accelerator head and the phantom in order to remove neutrons generated in the accelerator head. The thickness of the slab ranged from 2.5 cm to 10 cm. A lead slab of 3 mm thickness was also used in the study. The superheated drop neutron dosimeter was used to measure the depth-dose curve of neutrons in a high-energy photon beam and to verify the effectiveness of the slab to remove these neutrons. Total dose measurements were performed in water using a WELLHOFER WP700 beam scanner with an IC-10 ionization chamber. The Monte Carlo code BEAM was used to simulate an 18 MV photon beam from a Varian Clinac-2100EX accelerator. Both EGS4/DOSXYZ and EGSnrc/DOSRZnrc were used in the dose calculations. Measured neutron dose equivalents as a function of depth per unit total dose in water were presented for 10 x 10 and 40 x 40 cm2 fields. The measured results have shown that a 5-10 cm thick borated polyethylene slab can reduce the neutron dose by a factor of 2 when inserted between the accelerator head and the detector. In all cases the measured neutron dose equivalent was less than 0.5% of the photon dose. In order to study if the ion chamber was highly sensitive to the neutron dose, we have investigated the disagreement between the Monte Carlo calculated and measured central-axis depth-dose curves in the build-up region when different shielding materials were used. The result indicated that the IC-10 chamber was not highly sensitive to the neutron dose. Therefore, neutrons present in a high-energy photon beam were unlikely to be responsible for the reported discrepancies in the build-up region for large fields.

  15. Characterization of the PTW 34031 ionization chamber (PMI) at RCNP with high energy neutrons ranging from 100 - 392 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theis, C.; Carbonez, P.; Feldbaumer, E.; Forkel-Wirth, D.; Jaegerhofer, L.; Pangallo, M.; Perrin, D.; Urscheler, C.; Roesler, S.; Vincke, H.; Widorski, M.; Iwamoto, Y.; Hagiwara, M.; Satoh, D.; Iwase, H.; Yashima, H.; Matsumoto, T.; Masuda, A.; Nishiyama, J.; Harano, H.; Itoga, T.; Nakamura, T.; Sato, T.; Nakane, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Sakamoto, Y.; Taniguchi, S.; Nakao, N.; Tamii, A.; Shima, T.; Hatanaka, K.

    2017-09-01

    Radiation monitoring at high energy proton accelerators poses a considerable challenge due to the complexity of the encountered stray radiation fields. These environments comprise a wide variety of different particle types and span from fractions of electron-volts up to several terra electron-volts. As a consequence the use of Monte Carlo simulation programs like FLUKA is indispensable to obtain appropriate field-specific calibration factors. At many locations of the LHC a large contribution to the particle fluence is expected to originate from high-energy neutrons and thus, benchmark experiments with mono-energetic neutron beams are of high importance to verify the aforementioned detector response calculations. This paper summarizes the results of a series of benchmark experiments with quasi mono-energetic neutrons of 100, 140, 200, 250 and 392 MeV that have been carried out at RCNP - Osaka University, during several campaigns between 2006 and 2014.

  16. Gadolinium dosimetry, a problematic issue in the neutron capture therapy. Comparison between experiments and computational simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufalino, D.; Cerullo, N.; Colli, V.; Gambarini, G.; Rosi, G.

    2006-05-01

    In GdNCT the interested isotope is 157Gd that captures neutrons with (n, ) reaction and also emits internal conversion and Auger electrons. These electrons have an important effect on DNA strands, mainly due to the property of gadolinium to link to DNA. The emitted gamma rays partially interacts with tumours but mainly diffuse in the body damaging healthy tissues. Therefore in the study of Gd therapeutical effect both dosimetric and microdosimetric analyses must be performed. At Pisa University, in the last years some works were performed by NCT group. At the present these researches are continued on these topics carrying out also a PhD thesis. In this frame some simulations, using MC code, were performed in order to evaluate the dose distribution due to Gd reactions. It is however necessary to calibrate the calculations on experimental results, though they are scarce in GdNCT. Some experiments with 157Gd were performed by Milan group using gel dosimetry [1, 2, 3]. Therefore some computational comparisons were done. In these article the results of this comparisons are shown and discussed.

  17. The dosimetry system DS86 and the neutron discrepancy in Hiroshima--historical review, present status, and future options.

    PubMed

    Rühm, W; Kellerer, A M; Korschinek, G; Faestermann, T; Knie, K; Rugel, G; Kato, K; Nolte, E

    1998-12-01

    The historical development of the dosimetry systems for Hiroshima and Nagasaki is outlined from the time immediately after the A-bomb explosions to the publication of the dosimetry system DS86 in 1987, and the present status of the so-called Hiroshima neutron discrepancy is summarized. Several long-lived radionuclides are discussed with regard to their production by neutrons from the A-bomb explosions. With the exception of 63Ni, these radionuclides have not, up to now, been measured in samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Two of them, 63Ni in copper samples and 39Ar in granite samples, were predominantly produced by fast neutrons. 63Ni can be determined by accelerator mass spectrometry with a gas-filled analyzing magnet. It should be measurable, in the near future, in copper samples up to 1500 m from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. 39Ar can be measured in terms of low-level beta-counting. This should be feasible up to a distance of about 1000 m from the hypocenter. Three radionuclides, 10Be, 14C, and 59Ni, were produced predominantly by thermal neutrons with smaller fractions due to the epithermal and fast neutrons, which contribute increasingly more at larger distances from the hypocenter. State-of-the-art accelerator mass spectrometry is likely to permit the determination of 10Be close to the hypocenter and of 14C up to a distance of about 1000 m. 59Ni should be detectable up to a distance of about 1000 m in terms of accelerator mass spectrometry with a gas-filled magnet. The measurements of 10Be, 14C, 39Ar, 59Ni -- and potentially of 131Xe -- can be performed in the same granitic sample that was already analyzed for 36Cl, 41Ca, 6Co, 152Eu, and 154Eu. This will provide extensive information on the neutron spectrum at the specified location, and similarly complete analyses can conceivably be performed on granite samples at other locations.

  18. A broad-group cross-section library based on ENDF/B-VII.0 for fast neutron dosimetry Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alpan, F.A.

    2011-07-01

    A new ENDF/B-VII.0-based coupled 44-neutron, 20-gamma-ray-group cross-section library was developed to investigate the latest evaluated nuclear data file (ENDF) ,in comparison to ENDF/B-VI.3 used in BUGLE-96, as well as to generate an objective-specific library. The objectives selected for this work consisted of dosimetry calculations for in-vessel and ex-vessel reactor locations, iron atom displacement calculations for reactor internals and pressure vessel, and {sup 58}Ni(n,{gamma}) calculation that is important for gas generation in the baffle plate. The new library was generated based on the contribution and point-wise cross-section-driven (CPXSD) methodology and was applied to one of the most widely used benchmarks, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pool Critical Assembly benchmark problem. In addition to the new library, BUGLE-96 and an ENDF/B-VII.0-based coupled 47-neutron, 20-gamma-ray-group cross-section library was generated and used with both SNLRML and IRDF dosimetry cross sections to compute reaction rates. All reaction rates computed by the multigroup libraries are within {+-} 20 % of measurement data and meet the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission acceptance criterion for reactor vessel neutron exposure evaluations specified in Regulatory Guide 1.190. (authors)

  19. Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry study at two research nuclear reactors using Bonner sphere spectrometer (BSS), rotational spectrometer (ROSPEC) and cylindrical nested neutron spectrometer (NNS).

    PubMed

    Atanackovic, J; Matysiak, W; Hakmana Witharana, S S; Aslam, I; Dubeau, J; Waker, A J

    2013-01-01

    Neutron spectrometry and subsequent dosimetry measurements were undertaken at the McMaster Nuclear Reactor (MNR) and AECL Chalk River National Research Universal (NRU) Reactor. The instruments used were a Bonner sphere spectrometer (BSS), a cylindrical nested neutron spectrometer (NNS) and a commercially available rotational proton recoil spectrometer. The purposes of these measurements were to: (1) compare the results obtained by three different neutron measuring instruments and (2) quantify neutron fields of interest. The results showed vastly different neutron spectral shapes for the two different reactors. This is not surprising, considering the type of the reactors and the locations where the measurements were performed. MNR is a heavily shielded light water moderated reactor, while NRU is a heavy water moderated reactor. The measurements at MNR were taken at the base of the reactor pool, where a large amount of water and concrete shielding is present, while measurements at NRU were taken at the top of the reactor (TOR) plate, where there is only heavy water and steel between the reactor core and the measuring instrument. As a result, a large component of the thermal neutron fluence was measured at MNR, while a negligible amount of thermal neutrons was measured at NRU. The neutron ambient dose rates at NRU TOR were measured to be between 0.03 and 0.06 mSv h⁻¹, while at MNR, these values were between 0.07 and 2.8 mSv h⁻¹ inside the beam port and <0.2 mSv h⁻¹ between two operating beam ports. The conservative uncertainty of these values is 15 %. The conservative uncertainty of the measured integral neutron fluence is 5 %. It was also found that BSS over-responded slightly due to a non-calibrated response matrix.

  20. Comparison of the IAEA TRS-398 and AAPM TG-51 absorbed dose to water protocols in the dosimetry of high-energy photon and electron beams.

    PubMed

    Huq, M S; Andreo, P; Song, H

    2001-11-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA TRS-398) and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM TG-51) have published new protocols for the calibration of radiotherapy beams. These protocols are based on the use of an ionization chamber calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water in a standards laboratory's reference quality beam. This paper compares the recommendations of the two protocols in two ways: (i) by analysing in detail the differences in the basic data included in the two protocols for photon and electron beam dosimetry and (ii) by performing measurements in clinical photon and electron beams and determining the absorbed dose to water following the recommendations of the two protocols. Measurements were made with two Farmer-type ionization chambers and three plane-parallel ionization chamber types in 6, 18 and 25 MV photon beams and 6, 8, 10, 12, 15 and 18 MeV electron beams. The Farmer-type chambers used were NE 2571 and PTW 30001, and the plane-parallel chambers were a Scanditronix-Wellhöfer NACP and Roos, and a PTW Markus chamber. For photon beams, the measured ratios TG-51/TRS-398 of absorbed dose to water Dw ranged between 0.997 and 1.001, with a mean value of 0.999. The ratios for the beam quality correction factors kQ were found to agree to within about +/-0.2% despite significant differences in the method of beam quality specification for photon beams and in the basic data entering into kQ. For electron beams, dose measurements were made using direct N(D,w) calibrations of cylindrical and plane-parallel chambers in a 60Co gamma-ray beam, as well as cross-calibrations of plane-parallel chambers in a high-energy electron beam. For the direct N(D,w) calibrations the ratios TG-51/TRS-398 of absorbed dose to water Dw were found to lie between 0.994 and 1.018 depending upon the chamber and electron beam energy used, with mean values of 0.996, 1.006, and 1.017, respectively, for the cylindrical, well-guarded and not well

  1. High-energy gamma rays in Hiroshima and Nagasaki: Implications for risk and W{sub R}

    SciTech Connect

    Straume, T.

    1995-12-01

    Based on the DS86 dosimetry system, nearly all of the dose to survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki was due to unusually high-energy gamma rays, predominantly in the 2- to 5-MeV range. These high energies resulted in part from neutron capture gamma rays as the bomb neutrons penetrated large distances of air. Because of the inverse relationship between energy and biological effectiveness, these high-energy gamma rays are expected to be substantially less effective in producing biological damage than the radiations commonly used in radiobiology and risk assessment. This observation has implications for radiation protection and risk assessment.

  2. Out-of-field neutron and leakage photon exposures and the associated risk of second cancers in high-energy photon radiotherapy: current status.

    PubMed

    Takam, R; Bezak, E; Marcu, L G; Yeoh, E

    2011-10-01

    Determination and understanding of out-of-field neutron and photon doses in accelerator-based radiotherapy is an important issue since linear accelerators operating at high energies (>10 MV) produce secondary radiations that irradiate parts of the patient's anatomy distal to the target region, potentially resulting in detrimental health effects. This paper provides a compilation of data (technical and clinical) reported in the literature on the measurement and Monte Carlo simulations of peripheral neutron and photon doses produced from high-energy medical linear accelerators and the reported risk and/or incidence of second primary cancer of tissues distal to the target volume. Information in the tables facilitates easier identification of (1) the various methods and measurement techniques used to determine the out-of-field neutron and photon radiations, (2) reported linac-dependent out-of-field doses, and (3) the risk/incidence of second cancers after radiotherapy due to classic and modern treatment methods. Regardless of the measurement technique and type of accelerator, the neutron dose equivalent per unit photon dose ranges from as low as 0.1 mSv/Gy to as high as 20.4 mSv/Gy. This radiation dose potentially contributes to the induction of second primary cancer in normal tissues outside the treated area.

  3. Development and first flight of the high energy focusing telescope and analysis of spectral features in the isolated neutron star 1E1207.4-5209

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chonko, James C.

    Research efforts in this thesis are focused on two areas: (1) the High Energy Focusing Telescope (HEFT), a next-generation, focusing, hard X-ray telescope, and (2) the spectral analysis of the isolated neutron star 1E1207.4-5209. I describe the production, calibration, and flight performance of the High Energy Focusing Telescope (HEFT), a balloon-borne focusing hard X-ray telescope sensitive to X-rays in the 20--70 keV energy band. A number of new technologies were developed and implemented to achieve significant improvements in effective area and angular resolution over previous instruments. HEFT's balloon flight in the Spring of 2005 was highly successful, making HEFT the first focusing hard X-ray instrument to yield scientific results. The thermal emission from isolated neutron stars provides a clean probe of the extreme physical conditions present at the surface and in the interior of neutron stars. In particular, the identification of spectral features in these spectra can be used to determine neutron star parameters, such as temperature, magnetic field, surface chemical composition, and equation of state. The isolated neutron star 1E1207.4-5209 differentiates itself from all other known neutron stars by possessing multiple X-ray absorption lines. We have reanalyzed the 260 ksec XMM-Newton observation and applied more rigorous statistical analysis to the data. We do not find a third and fourth spectral feature as previously reported in 1E1207.4-5209 with our improved analysis, but only the two broad absorption features.

  4. Internal exposure to neutron-activated (56)Mn dioxide powder in Wistar rats: part 1: dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, Valeriy; Rakhypbekov, Tolebay; Otani, Keiko; Endo, Satoru; Satoh, Kenichi; Kawano, Noriyuki; Shichijo, Kazuko; Nakashima, Masahiro; Takatsuji, Toshihiro; Sakaguchi, Aya; Kato, Hiroaki; Onda, Yuichi; Fujimoto, Nariaki; Toyoda, Shin; Sato, Hitoshi; Dyussupov, Altay; Chaizhunusova, Nailya; Sayakenov, Nurlan; Uzbekov, Darkhan; Saimova, Aisulu; Shabdarbaeva, Dariya; Skakov, Mazhin; Vurim, Alexandr; Gnyrya, Vyacheslav; Azimkhanov, Almas; Kolbayenkov, Alexander; Zhumadilov, Kasym; Kairikhanova, Yankar; Kaprin, Andrey; Galkin, Vsevolod; Ivanov, Sergey; Kolyzhenkov, Timofey; Petukhov, Aleksey; Yaskova, Elena; Belukha, Irina; Khailov, Artem; Skvortsov, Valeriy; Ivannikov, Alexander; Akhmedova, Umukusum; Bogacheva, Viktoria; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2017-03-01

    There were two sources of ionizing irradiation after the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki: (1) initial gamma-neutron irradiation at the moment of detonation and (2) residual radioactivity. Residual radioactivity consisted of two components: radioactive fallout containing fission products, including radioactive fissile materials from nuclear device, and neutron-activated radioisotopes from materials on the ground. The dosimetry systems DS86 and DS02 were mainly devoted to the assessment of initial radiation exposure to neutrons and gamma rays, while only brief considerations were given for the estimation of doses caused by residual radiation exposure. Currently, estimation of internal exposure of atomic bomb survivors due to dispersed radioactivity and neutron-activated radioisotopes from materials on the ground is a matter of some interest, in Japan. The main neutron-activated radionuclides in soil dust were (24)Na, (28)Al, (31)Si, (32)P, (38)Cl, (42)K, (45)Ca, (46)Sc, (56)Mn, (59)Fe, (60)Co, and (134)Cs. The radionuclide (56)Mn (T 1/2 = 2.58 h) is known as one of the dominant beta- and gamma emitters during the first few hours after neutron irradiation of soil and other materials on ground, dispersed in the form of dust after a nuclear explosion in the atmosphere. To investigate the peculiarities of biological effects of internal exposure to (56)Mn in comparison with external gamma irradiation, a dedicated experiment with Wistar rats exposed to neutron-activated (56)Mn dioxide powder was performed recently by Shichijo and coworkers. The dosimetry required for this experiment is described here. Assessment of internal radiation doses was performed on the basis of measured (56)Mn activity in the organs and tissues of the rats and of absorbed fractions of internal exposure to photons and electrons calculated with the MCNP-4C Monte Carlo using a mathematical rat phantom. The first results of this international multicenter study show that the internal

  5. Determination of Neutron Exposure of AISI 304 Stainless Steel from a BWR Top Guide using Retrospective Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Garner, Francis A.; Oliver, Brian M.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2007-03-31

    Retrospective dosimetry was used to determine the accumulated neutron exposure of AISI 304 stainless steel removed from the top guide of a boiling water reactor located at the Oyster Creek nuclear power station. The material was removed from areas adjacent to cracks that were observed after ~20 years of operation. Using the plant operational history and a variety of measurements of various radioisotopes or non-radioactive transmutation products produced by irradiation, it was possible to determine the integrated flux spectra experienced by the cracked region and to specify the accumulated displacement dose. Dose estimates on two separate specimens adjacent to the cracks were found to average 1.5 ± 0.2 dpa, possibly reflecting some uncertainty in measurement but more likely suggesting a small gradient in neutron flux-spectra within the section from which the various analysis specimens were cut. This report demonstrates that it is possible to examine defective components lying outside of the core region and where neutron flux-spectra are not well known, and to use the induced transmutation products to determine the neutron exposure with some confidence by using the examined specimen as its own dosimeter.

  6. Reactor Dosimetry State of the Art 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorbraak, Wim; Debarberis, Luigi; D'Hondt, Pierre; Wagemans, Jan

    2009-08-01

    nuclides - 2008 / T. Golashvili -- Oral session 6: Test reactors, accelerators and advanced systems. Neutronic analyses in support of the HFIR beamline modifications and lifetime extension / I. Remec and E. D. Blakeman. Characterization of neutron test facilities at Sandia National Laboratories / D. W. Vehar ... [et al.]. LYRA irradiation experiments: neutron metrology and dosimetry / B. Acosta and L. Debarberis. Calculated neutron and gamma-ray spectra across the prismatic very high temperature reactor core / J. W. Sterbentz. Enhancement of irradiation capability of the experimental fast reactor joyo / S. Maeda ... [et al.]. Neutron spectrum analyses by foil activation method for high-energy proton beams / C. H. Pyeon ... [et al.] -- Oral session 7: Cross sections, nuclear data, damage correlations. Investigation of new reaction cross-section evaluations in order to update and extend the IRDF-2002 reactor dosimetry library / É. M. Zsolnay, H. J. Nolthenius and A. L. Nichols. A novel approach towards DPA calculations / A. Hogenbirk and D. F. Da Cruz. A new ENDFIB-VII.O based multigroup cross-section library for reactor dosimetry / F. A. Alpan and S. L. Anderson. Activities at the NEA for dosimetry applications / H. Henriksson and I. Kodeli. Validation and verification of covariance data from dosimetry reaction cross-section evaluations / S. Badikov. Status of the neutron cross section standards / A. D. Carlson -- Oral session 8: transport calculations. A dosimetry assessment for the core restraint of an advanced gas cooled reactor / D. A. Thornton ... [et al.]. Neutron dosimetry study in the region of the support structure of a VVER-1000 type reactor / G. Borodkin ... [et al.]. SNS moderator poison design and experiment validation of the moderator performance / W. Lu ... [et al.]. Analysis of OSIRIS in-core surveillance dosimetry for GONDOLE steel irradiation program by using TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo code / Y. K. Lee and F. Malouch.Reactor dosimetry applications using RAPTOR

  7. (41)Ca in Tooth Enamel. Part II: A means for retrospective biological neutron dosimetry in atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Rühm, W; Wallner, A; Cullings, H; Egbert, S D; El-Faramawy, N; Faestermann, T; Kaul, D; Knie, K; Korschinek, G; Nakamura, N; Roberts, J; Rugel, G

    2010-08-01

    (41)Ca is produced mainly by absorption of low-energy neutrons on stable (40)Ca. We used accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to measure (41)Ca in enamel of 16 teeth from 13 atomic bomb survivors who were exposed to the bomb within 1.2 km from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. In our accompanying paper (Wallner et al., Radiat. Res. 174, 000-000, 2010), we reported that the background-corrected (41)Ca/Ca ratio decreased from 19.5 x 10(-15) to 2.8 x 10(-15) with increasing distance from the hypocenter. Here we show that the measured ratios are in good correlation with gamma-ray doses assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in the same enamel samples, and agree well with calculated ratios based on either the current Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02) or more customized dose estimates where the regression slope as obtained from an errors-in-variables linear model was about 0.85. The calculated DS02 neutron dose to the survivors was about 10 to 80 mGy. The low-energy neutrons responsible for (41)Ca activation contributed variably to the total neutron dose depending on the shielding conditions. Namely, the contribution was smaller (10%) when shielding conditions were lighter (e.g., outside far away from a single house) and was larger (26%) when they were heavier (e.g., in or close to several houses) because of local moderation of neutrons by shielding materials. We conclude that AMS is useful for verifying calculated neutron doses under mixed exposure conditions with gamma rays.

  8. Scintillating Fiber Array Characterization and Alignment for Neutron Imaging using the High Energy X-ray (HEX) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Buckles, R. A., Ali, Z. A., Cradick, J. R., Traille, A. J., Warthan, W. A.

    2009-09-04

    The Neutron Imager diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will produce high-resolution, gated images of neutron-generating implosions. A similar pinhole imaging experiment (PINEX) diagnostic was recently deployed at the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Both the SNL and LLNL neutron imagers use similar fiber array scintillators (BCF-99-555). Despite diverse resolution and magnification requirements, both diagnostics put significant onus on the scintillator spatial quality and alignment precision to maintain optimal point spread. Characterization and alignment of the Z-PINEX scintillator and imaging system were done at NSTec/Livermore Operations in 2009, and is currently underway for the NIF Neutron Imager.

  9. Multi-layer plastic scintillation detector for intermediate- and high-energy neutrons with n- γ discrimination capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Terashima, S.; Ong, H. J.; Chan, P. Y.; Tanihata, I.; Iwamoto, C.; Tran, D. T.; Tamii, A.; Aoi, N.; Fujioka, H.; Gey, G.; Sakaguchi, H.; Sakaue, A.; Sun, B. H.; Tang, T. L.; Wang, T. F.; Watanabe, Y. N.; Zhang, G. X.

    2017-09-01

    A new type of neutron detector, named Stack Structure Solid organic Scintillator (S4), consisting of multi-layer plastic scintillators with capability to suppress low-energy γ rays under high-counting rate has been constructed and tested. To achieve n- γ discrimination, we exploit the difference in the ranges of the secondary charged particles produced by the interactions of neutrons and γ rays in the scintillator material. The thickness of a plastic scintillator layer was determined based on the results of Monte Carlo simulations using the Geant4 toolkit. With layer thicknesses of 5 mm, we have achieved a good separation between neutrons and γ rays at 5 MeVee threshold setting. We have also determined the detection efficiencies using monoenergetic neutrons at two energies produced by the d + d → n+3He reaction. The results agree well with the Geant4 simulations implementing the Li e ̀ge Intranuclear Cascade hadronic model (INCL++) and the high-precision model of low-energy neutron interactions (NeutronHP).

  10. Seasonal redistribution of water in the surficial Martian regolith: Results from the Mars Odyssey high-energy neutron detector (HEND)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, R. O.; Zabalueva, E. V.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Litvak, M. L.; Rodin, A. V.; Boynton, W. V.; Saunders, R. S.

    2007-04-01

    The seasonal variation of neutron emissions from Mars in different spectral intervals measured by the HEND neutron detector for the entire Martian year are analyzed. Based on these data, the spatial variations of the neutron emissions from the planet are globally mapped as a function of season, and the dynamics of seasonal variation of neutron fluxes with different energies is analyzed in detail. No differences were found between seasonal regimes of neutron fluxes in different energy ranges in the southern hemisphere of Mars, while the regime of fast neutrons (with higher energies) during the northern winter strongly differs from that during the southern winter. In winter ( L s = 270° 330°), the fast neutron fluxes are noticeably reduced in the northern hemisphere (along with the consecutive thickening of the seasonal cap of solid carbon dioxide). This provides evidence of a temporary increase in the water content in the effective layer of neutron generation. According to the obtained estimates, the observed reduction of the flux of fast neutrons in the effective layer corresponds to an increase in the water abundance of up to 5% in the seasonal polar cap (70° 90°N), about 3% at mid-latitudes, and from 1.5 to 2% at low latitudes. The freezing out of atmospheric water at the planetary surface (at middle and high latitudes) and the hydration of salt minerals composing the Martian soil are considered as the main processes responsible for the temporary increase in the water content in the soil and upper layer of the seasonal polar cap. The meridional atmospheric transport of water vapor from the summer southern to the winter northern hemisphere within the Hadley circulation cell is a basic process that delivers water to the subsurface soil layer and ensures the observed scale of the seasonal increase in water abundance. In the summer northern hemisphere, the similar Hadley circulation cell transports mainly dry air masses to the winter southern hemisphere. The

  11. The DOS 1 neutron dosimetry experiment at the HB-4-A key 7 surveillance site on the HFIR pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, K.; Kam, F.B.; Baldwin, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive neutron dosimetry experiment was made at one of the prime surveillance sites at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel to aid radiation embrittlement studies of the vessel and to benchmark neutron transport calculations. The thermal neutron flux at the key 7, position 5 site was found, from measurements of radioactivation of four cobalt wires and four silver wires, to be 2.4 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}s{sup {minus}1}. The thermal flux derived from two helium accumulation monitors was 2.3 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}{sup {minus}1}. The thermal flux estimated by neutron transport calculations was 3.7 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. The fast flux, >1 MeV, determined from two nickel activation wires, was 1.5 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}s{sup {minus}1}, in keeping with values obtained earlier from stainless steel surveillance monitors and with a computed value of 1.2 {times} 10{sup 13} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}{sup {minus}1}. The fast fluxes given by two reaction-product-type monitors, neptunium-237 and beryllium, were 2.6 {times} 10{sup 13} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}s {sup {minus}1} and 2.2 {times} 10{sup 13} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Follow-up experiments indicate that these latter high values of fast flux are reproducible but are false; they are due to the creation of greater levels of reaction products by photonuclear events induced by an exceptionally high ratio of gamma flux to fast neutron flux at the vessel.

  12. Dosimetry and stability studies of the boron neutron capture therapy agent F-BPA-Fr using PET and MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyke, Jonathan Paul

    The treatment of deep seated brain tumors such as glioblastoma Multiforme has been unsuccessful for many patients. Surgical debulking, chemotherapy and standard radiotherapy have met with limited success. Boron neutron capture therapy offers a binary mode brachytherapy based on the following capture reaction that may provide an innovative alternative to standard forms of treatment:10B + n /to/ 11B /to 7Li + 4He + 2.31 MeVBoron is chemically attached to a tumor binding compound creating a non-toxic neutron absorber. A dose of epithermal neutrons provides the catalyst to produce the lithium and alpha particles which destroy any tissue within a length of one cell diameter from the boron compound. This dissertation uses 19F-MRI and 18F-PET to provide answers to the localization and biodistribution questions that arise in such a treatment modality. Practical patient dosimetry and actual treatment planning using the PET data is also examined. Finally, theoretical work done in the areas of compartmental modelling dealing with pharmacokinetic uptake of the PET radiotracer and dose analysis in microdosimetry is also presented.

  13. Generation and application of LET calibration curve for neutron dosimetry using CR-39 detector and microwave induced chemical etching.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, S P; Sahoo, G S; Paul, S; Kumar, P; Sharma, S D; Santra, S; Pal, A; Kundu, A; Bandyopadhyay, T; Avasthi, D K

    2017-06-01

    Microwave induced chemical etching (MICE) has been established as a faster and improved technique compared to other contemporary etching techniques for the development of tracks in a CR-39 detector. However, the methodology could not be applied for LET (linear energy transfer) spectrometry due to lack of a calibration curve using this method. For this purpose, a new LET calibration curve in the range of 12 keV/μm-799 keV/μm was generated considering different ions such as H, Li, C, O, and F on CR-39 having different LETs in water. An empirical relation was established from the obtained calibration curve for determining the value of LET (in water) from the value of V, the ratio of track etch rate to bulk etch rate. For application of this calibration curve in neutron dosimetry, CR-39 detectors were irradiated to neutrons generated from 120 and 142 MeV (16)O+(27)Al systems followed by a similar MICE procedure. The absorbed dose (DLET) and the dose equivalent (HLET) were obtained from the LET spectra and were found to be 13% and 10% higher for 142 MeV (16)O+(27)Al system than those for 120 MeV (16)O+(27)Al system, respectively. The outcome of the study demonstrates the possibility of using the MICE technique for neutron dose estimation by CR-39 via LET spectrometry.

  14. Generation and application of LET calibration curve for neutron dosimetry using CR-39 detector and microwave induced chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, S. P.; Sahoo, G. S.; Paul, S.; Kumar, P.; Sharma, S. D.; Santra, S.; Pal, A.; Kundu, A.; Bandyopadhyay, T.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2017-06-01

    Microwave induced chemical etching (MICE) has been established as a faster and improved technique compared to other contemporary etching techniques for the development of tracks in a CR-39 detector. However, the methodology could not be applied for LET (linear energy transfer) spectrometry due to lack of a calibration curve using this method. For this purpose, a new LET calibration curve in the range of 12 keV/μm-799 keV/μm was generated considering different ions such as H, Li, C, O, and F on CR-39 having different LETs in water. An empirical relation was established from the obtained calibration curve for determining the value of LET (in water) from the value of V, the ratio of track etch rate to bulk etch rate. For application of this calibration curve in neutron dosimetry, CR-39 detectors were irradiated to neutrons generated from 120 and 142 MeV 16O+27Al systems followed by a similar MICE procedure. The absorbed dose (DLET) and the dose equivalent (HLET) were obtained from the LET spectra and were found to be 13% and 10% higher for 142 MeV 16O+27Al system than those for 120 MeV 16O+27Al system, respectively. The outcome of the study demonstrates the possibility of using the MICE technique for neutron dose estimation by CR-39 via LET spectrometry.

  15. NEUDOSE: A CubeSat Mission for Dosimetry of Charged Particles and Neutrons in Low-Earth Orbit.

    PubMed

    Hanu, A R; Barberiz, J; Bonneville, D; Byun, S H; Chen, L; Ciambella, C; Dao, E; Deshpande, V; Garnett, R; Hunter, S D; Jhirad, A; Johnston, E M; Kordic, M; Kurnell, M; Lopera, L; McFadden, M; Melnichuk, A; Nguyen, J; Otto, A; Scott, R; Wagner, D L; Wiendels, M

    2017-01-01

    During space missions, astronauts are exposed to a stream of energetic and highly ionizing radiation particles that can suppress immune system function, increase cancer risks and even induce acute radiation syndrome if the exposure is large enough. As human exploration goals shift from missions in low-Earth orbit (LEO) to long-duration interplanetary missions, radiation protection remains one of the key technological issues that must be resolved. In this work, we introduce the NEUtron DOSimetry & Exploration (NEUDOSE) CubeSat mission, which will provide new measurements of dose and space radiation quality factors to improve the accuracy of cancer risk projections for current and future space missions. The primary objective of the NEUDOSE CubeSat is to map the in situ lineal energy spectra produced by charged particles and neutrons in LEO where most of the preparatory activities for future interplanetary missions are currently taking place. To perform these measurements, the NEUDOSE CubeSat is equipped with the Charged & Neutral Particle Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (CNP-TEPC), an advanced radiation monitoring instrument that uses active coincidence techniques to separate the interactions of charged particles and neutrons in real time. The NEUDOSE CubeSat, currently under development at McMaster University, provides a modern approach to test the CNP-TEPC instrument directly in the unique environment of outer space while simultaneously collecting new georeferenced lineal energy spectra of the radiation environment in LEO.

  16. High energy neutron response characteristics of a passive survey instrument for the determination of cosmic radiation fields in aircraft.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, D T; Tanner, R J; Hager, L G

    2002-01-01

    A passive survey instrument has been developed for the determination of cosmic radiation fields in aircraft. The instrument contains 30 TLDs and 36 PADC etched track detectors in order to obtain the required precision and an isotropic response. Two active electronic personal dosemeters are included to record the time profile of the field intensity. The instrument is robust and reliable, and is particularly useful to verify values of route doses based on calculations. The energy of the neutron component of the field to be determined extends to over 500 MeV, but with the majority of the dose equivalent below 200 MeV. The results are reported of measurements at Uppsala University and Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt of the response characteristics of the instrument to quasi-monoenergetic neutrons in the energy range 60 to 180 MeV and for monoenergetic neutrons of energy from 70 keV to 14.7 MeV.

  17. Design and characterization of a tissue-equivalent CVD-diamond detector for clinical dosimetry in high-energy photon beams.

    PubMed

    Górka, B; Nilsson, B; Svensson, R; Brahme, A; Ascarelli, P; Trucchi, D M; Conte, G; Kalish, R

    2008-09-01

    New solid-state detectors, based on chemical vapour deposited (CVD) polycrystalline diamonds produced by hot-filament (HF) or microwave plasma (MW) assisted deposition methods, were constructed for radiation therapy dosimetry. Properties of diamond crystals, such as high radiation sensitivity, resistance to radiation damage and tissue-equivalence giving a low-energy dependence are very advantageous for clinical dosimetry. Therefore the encapsulation was specially designed for these detectors to have as little influence as possible on the radiation response. The prototypes were irradiated with use of a wide range of photon beam qualities ((60)Co gamma-rays, 6 and 18 MV X-rays). The radiation sensitivity varied considerably between samples deposited with HF (9 nC Gy(-1)mm(-3)) and MW (66 and 144 nC Gy(-1)mm(-3)) methods. For all detectors the leakage current was of the order of 10% of the radiation-induced current (bias voltage 100 V, dose rate 0.3 Gy/min). When irradiated with (60)Co gamma-rays, the detectors showed a dose-rate linearity with an exponential Delta parameter close to unity. However, a difference of 8% was found between Delta values for the different beam qualities. A small energy dependence was observed, for which the most probable sources are interface effects due to the silver electrodes and partly the geometry of the encapsulation which needs to be further optimized. Despite some limitations in the performance of present prototype detectors, with an improved CVD technique producing crystals of better electrical and dosimetric properties, and with a well-designed tissue-equivalent encapsulation, CVD-diamonds could serve as very good dosimeters for radiotherapy.

  18. Method for detecting and correcting for isotope burn-in during long-term neutron dosimetry exposure

    DOEpatents

    Ruddy, Francis H.

    1988-01-01

    A method is described for detecting and correcting for isotope burn-in during-long term neutron dosimetry exposure. In one embodiment, duplicate pairs of solid state track recorder fissionable deposits are used, including a first, fissionable deposit of lower mass to quantify the number of fissions occuring during the exposure, and a second deposit of higher mass to quantify the number of atoms of for instance .sup.239 Pu by alpha counting. In a second embodiment, only one solid state track recorder fissionable deposit is used and the resulting higher track densities are counted with a scanning electron microscope. This method is also applicable to other burn-in interferences, e.g., .sup.233 U in .sup.232 Th or .sup.238 Pu in .sup.237 Np.

  19. Impact of intermediate and high energy nuclear data on the neutronic safety parameters of MYRRHA accelerator driven system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankovskiy, Alexey; Çelik, Yurdunaz; Eynde, Gert Van den

    2017-09-01

    Perturbation of external neutron source can cause significant local power changes transformed into undesired safety-related events in an accelerator driven system. Therefore for the accurate design of MYRRHA sub-critical core it is important to evaluate the uncertainty of power responses caused by the uncertainties in nuclear reaction models describing the particle transport from primary proton energy down to the evaluated nuclear data table range. The calculations with a set of models resulted in quite low uncertainty on the local power caused by significant perturbation of primary neutron yield from proton interactions with lead and bismuth isotopes. The considered accidental event of prescribed proton beam shape loss causes drastic increase in local power but does not practically change the total core thermal power making this effect difficult to detect. In the same time the results demonstrate a correlation between perturbed local power responses in normal operation and misaligned beam conditions indicating that generation of covariance data for proton and neutron induced neutron multiplicities for lead and bismuth isotopes is needed to obtain reliable uncertainties for local power responses.

  20. Alterations in dose and lineal energy spectra under different shieldings in the Los Alamos high-energy neutron field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Huff, H.; Wilkins, R.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear interactions of space radiation with shielding materials result in alterations in dose and lineal energy spectra that depend on the specific elemental composition, density and thickness of the material. The shielding characteristics of materials have been studied using charged-particle beams and radiation transport models by examining the risk reduction using the conventional dose-equivalent approach. Secondary neutrons contribute a significant fraction of the total radiation exposure in space. An experiment to study the changes in dose and lineal energy spectra by shielding materials was carried out at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center neutron facility. In the energy range of about 2 to 200 MeV, this neutron spectrum is similar in shape within a factor of about 2 to the spectrum expected in the International Space Station habitable modules. It is shown that with a shielding thickness of about 5 g cm(-2), the conventional radiation risk increases, in some cases by as much as a factor of 2, but decreases with thicknesses of about of 20 g cm(-2). This suggests that care must be taken in evaluating the shielding effectiveness of a given material by including both the charged-particle and neutron components of space radiation.

  1. Alterations in dose and lineal energy spectra under different shieldings in the Los Alamos high-energy neutron field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Huff, H.; Wilkins, R.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear interactions of space radiation with shielding materials result in alterations in dose and lineal energy spectra that depend on the specific elemental composition, density and thickness of the material. The shielding characteristics of materials have been studied using charged-particle beams and radiation transport models by examining the risk reduction using the conventional dose-equivalent approach. Secondary neutrons contribute a significant fraction of the total radiation exposure in space. An experiment to study the changes in dose and lineal energy spectra by shielding materials was carried out at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center neutron facility. In the energy range of about 2 to 200 MeV, this neutron spectrum is similar in shape within a factor of about 2 to the spectrum expected in the International Space Station habitable modules. It is shown that with a shielding thickness of about 5 g cm(-2), the conventional radiation risk increases, in some cases by as much as a factor of 2, but decreases with thicknesses of about of 20 g cm(-2). This suggests that care must be taken in evaluating the shielding effectiveness of a given material by including both the charged-particle and neutron components of space radiation.

  2. Albedo Neutron Dosimetry in a Deep Geological Disposal Repository for High-Level Nuclear Waste.

    PubMed

    Pang, Bo; Becker, Frank

    2016-06-24

    Albedo neutron dosemeter is the German official personal neutron dosemeter in mixed radiation fields where neutrons contribute to personal dose. In deep geological repositories for high-level nuclear waste, where neutrons can dominate the radiation field, it is of interest to investigate the performance of albedo neutron dosemeter in such facilities. In this study, the deep geological repository is represented by a shielding cask loaded with spent nuclear fuel placed inside a rock salt emplacement drift. Due to the backscattering of neutrons in the drift, issues concerning calibration of the dosemeter arise. Field-specific calibration of the albedo neutron dosemeter was hence performed with Monte Carlo simulations. In order to assess the applicability of the albedo neutron dosemeter in a deep geological repository over a long time scale, spent nuclear fuel with different ages of 50, 100 and 500 years were investigated. It was found out, that the neutron radiation field in a deep geological repository can be assigned to the application area 'N1' of the albedo neutron dosemeter, which is typical in reactors and accelerators with heavy shielding.

  3. An intercomparison of neutron dosimeters and detectors for in-containment dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Auman, L.E.; Miller, W.H.; Graham, C.C.; Stretch, C.D.; Welty, T.J.; West, L. Jr. )

    1992-02-01

    To improve the methodology for assessing neutron dose at Union Electric's Callaway Nuclear Power Plant, an intercomparison of neutron detectors and dosimeters was performed. Seven different neutron detectors and dosimeters were tested in four different neutron fields utilizing facilities at the Missouri University Research Reactor and at the Southwest Radiation Calibration Center at the University of Arkansas. In general, all results agree within a factor of 2 in predicting the neutron dose equivalent. It was concluded that measurements of dose in containment should utilize the Tissue-Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC), the Bonner-sphere system, and the proton recoil spectrometer to accurately assess the neutron dose. These data can then be used to provide correction factors for more traditionally used dosimeters in containment, such as thermoluminescent dosimeters and survey meters.

  4. Monte Carlo based dosimetry for neutron capture therapy of brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Lilia; Belgaid, Mohamed; Khelifi, Rachid

    2016-11-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a biologically targeted, radiation therapy for cancer which combines neutron irradiation with a tumor targeting agent labeled with a boron10 having a high thermal neutron capture cross section. The tumor area is subjected to the neutron irradiation. After a thermal neutron capture, the excited 11B nucleus fissions into an alpha particle and lithium recoil nucleus. The high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) emitted particles deposit their energy in a range of about 10μm, which is of the same order of cell diameter [1], at the same time other reactions due to neutron activation with body component are produced. In-phantom measurement of physical dose distribution is very important for BNCT planning validation. Determination of total absorbed dose requires complex calculations which were carried out using the Monte Carlo MCNP code [2].

  5. Measurements of High Energy Neutron Spectrum (> 10 MeV) by Using Yttrium Foils in a U/Pb Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielewicz, M.; Strugalska-Gola, E.; Szuta, M.; Wojciechowski, A.; Kadykov, M.; Tyutyunnikov, S.

    2014-05-01

    Study of deep subcritical electronuclear systems and radioactive waste transmutation using relativistic beams were performed. This work is a preliminary step toward the study of the physical properties of Accelerator Driven Systems, in which a deeply subcritical active core is irradiated by a pulsed beam of relativistic ions. The long-range goal of the project is to study the capabilities of such systems with a hard neutron spectrum, for transmutation of radioactive nuclear wastes. Two experimental assemblies, “Energy plus Transmutation” (2006-2009) and “Quinta” (2011-), were irradiated by 1 to 6 GeV deuteron beams using the JINR NUCLOTRON accelerator. The main difference between the two experimental setups is the spallation target - lead or natural uranium. We attempt to obtain neutron energy spectra inside the volume of these assemblies using threshold reactions in natural yttrium (89Y) foils. Some results from three different experiments are presented.

  6. NEUTRON AND GAMMA DOSIMETRY MEASUREMENTS AT THE AFRRI=DASA TRIGA REACTOR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    IONIZATION CHAMBERS, THERMAL NEUTRONS, FOILS(MATERIALS), RADIATION MEASURING INSTRUMENTS, PLUTONIUM, NEPTUNIUM , URANIUM, SULFUR, GRAPHITE, SILVER COMPOUNDS, PHOSPHATES, CARBON DIOXIDE, CADMIUM, GOLD, INDIUM.

  7. High-energy particle production in solar flares (SEP, gamma-ray and neutron emissions). [solar energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, E. L.

    1987-01-01

    Electrons and ions, over a wide range of energies, are produced in association with solar flares. Solar energetic particles (SEPs), observed in space and near earth, consist of electrons and ions that range in energy from 10 keV to about 100 MeV and from 1 MeV to 20 GeV, respectively. SEPs are directly recorded by charged particle detectors, while X-ray, gamma-ray, and neutron detectors indicate the properties of the accelerated particles (electrons and ions) which have interacted in the solar atmosphere. A major problem of solar physics is to understand the relationship between these two groups of charged particles; in particular whether they are accelerated by the same mechanism. The paper reviews the physics of gamma-rays and neutron production in the solar atmosphere and the method by which properties of the primary charged particles produced in the solar flare can be deduced. Recent observations of energetic photons and neutrons in space and at the earth are used to present a current picture of the properties of impulsively flare accelerated electrons and ions. Some important properties discussed are time scale of production, composition, energy spectra, accelerator geometry. Particular attention is given to energetic particle production in the large flare on June 3, 1982.

  8. Search for Sources of High-energy Neutrons with Four Years of Data from the IceTop Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Archinger, M.; Argüelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Burgman, A.; Carver, T.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; del Pino Rosendo, E.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; di Lorenzo, V.; Dujmovic, H.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Eller, P.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Fösig, C.-C.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Giang, W.; Gladstone, L.; Glagla, M.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansen, E.; Hansmann, B.; Hansmann, T.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfel, K.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jurkovic, M.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, M.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, M.; Krückl, G.; Krüger, C.; Kunnen, J.; Kunwar, S.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lennarz, D.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lu, L.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mancina, S.; Mandelartz, M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meier, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Moulai, M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Penek, Ö.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Quinnan, M.; Raab, C.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Sabbatini, L.; Sanchez Herrera, S. E.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schimp, M.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schumacher, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stössl, A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tatar, J.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Rossem, M.; van Santen, J.; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch.; Weiss, M. J.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wickmann, S.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woolsey, E.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zoll, M.; IceCube Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    IceTop is an air-shower array located on the Antarctic ice sheet at the geographic South Pole. IceTop can detect an astrophysical flux of neutrons from Galactic sources as an excess of cosmic-ray air showers arriving from the source direction. Neutrons are undeflected by the Galactic magnetic field and can typically travel 10 (E/PeV) pc before decay. Two searches are performed using 4 yr of the IceTop data set to look for a statistically significant excess of events with energies above 10 PeV (1016 eV) arriving within a small solid angle. The all-sky search method covers from -90° to approximately -50° in declination. No significant excess is found. A targeted search is also performed, looking for significant correlation with candidate sources in different target sets. This search uses a higher-energy cut (100 PeV) since most target objects lie beyond 1 kpc. The target sets include pulsars with confirmed TeV energy photon fluxes and high-mass X-ray binaries. No significant correlation is found for any target set. Flux upper limits are determined for both searches, which can constrain Galactic neutron sources and production scenarios.

  9. High Energy Neutrinos Produced in the Accretion Disks by Neutrons from Nuclei Disintegrated in the AGN Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarek, W.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the consequences of acceleration of nuclei in jets of active galaxies not far from the surface of an accretion disk. The nuclei can be accelerated in the re-connection regions in the jet and/or at the jet boundary, between the relativistic jet and its cocoon. It is shown that the relativistic nuclei can efficiently fragment onto specific nucleons in collisions with the disk radiation. Neutrons, directed toward the accretion disk, take a significant part of energy from the relativistic nuclei. These neutrons develop a cascade in the dense accretion disk. We calculate the neutrino spectra produced in such a hadronic cascade within the accretion disk. We propose that the neutrinos produced in such a scenario, from the whole population of super-massive black holes in active galaxies, can explain the extragalactic neutrino background recently measured by the IceCube neutrino detector, provided that a 5% fraction of galaxies have an active galactic nucleus and a few percent of neutrons reach the accretion disk. We predict that the neutrino signals in the present neutrino detectors, produced in terms of such a model, will not be detectable even from the nearby radio galaxies similar to M87.

  10. High-energy particle production in solar flares (SEP, gamma-ray and neutron emissions). [solar energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, E. L.

    1987-01-01

    Electrons and ions, over a wide range of energies, are produced in association with solar flares. Solar energetic particles (SEPs), observed in space and near earth, consist of electrons and ions that range in energy from 10 keV to about 100 MeV and from 1 MeV to 20 GeV, respectively. SEPs are directly recorded by charged particle detectors, while X-ray, gamma-ray, and neutron detectors indicate the properties of the accelerated particles (electrons and ions) which have interacted in the solar atmosphere. A major problem of solar physics is to understand the relationship between these two groups of charged particles; in particular whether they are accelerated by the same mechanism. The paper reviews the physics of gamma-rays and neutron production in the solar atmosphere and the method by which properties of the primary charged particles produced in the solar flare can be deduced. Recent observations of energetic photons and neutrons in space and at the earth are used to present a current picture of the properties of impulsively flare accelerated electrons and ions. Some important properties discussed are time scale of production, composition, energy spectra, accelerator geometry. Particular attention is given to energetic particle production in the large flare on June 3, 1982.

  11. Application of low-cost Gallium Arsenide light-emitting-diodes as kerma dosemeter and fluence monitor for high-energy neutrons.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, B; Simrock, S; Khachan, J; Rybka, D; Romaniuk, R

    2007-01-01

    Displacement damage (DD) caused by fast neutrons in unbiased Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) light emitting diodes (LED) resulted in a reduction of the light output. On the other hand, a similar type of LED irradiated with gamma rays from a (60)Co source up to a dose level in excess of 1.0 kGy (1.0 x 10(5) rad) was found to show no significant drop of the light emission. This phenomenon was used to develop a low cost passive fluence monitor and kinetic energy released per unit mass dosemeter for accelerator-produced neutrons. These LED-dosemeters were used to assess the integrated fluence of photoneutrons, which were contaminated with a strong bremsstrahlung gamma-background generated by the 730 MeV superconducting electron linac driving the free electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron. The applications of GaAs LED as a routine neutron fluence monitor and DD precursor for the electronic components located in high-energy accelerator environment are highlighted.

  12. Neutron Dosimetry on the Full-Core First Generation VVER-440 Aimed at Reactor Support Structure Load Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodkin, P.; Borodkin, G.; Khrennikov, N.; Konheiser, J.; Noack, K.

    2009-08-01

    Reactor support structures (RSS), especially the ferritic steel wall of the water tank, of first-generation VVER-440 are non-restorable reactor equipment, and their lifetime may restrict plant-life. All operated Russian first generation VVER-440 have a reduced core with dummy assemblies except Unit 4 of Novovoronezh nuclear power plant (NPP). In comparison with other reactors, the full-core loading scheme of this reactor provides the highest neutron fluence on the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and RSS accumulated over design service-life and its prolongation. The radiation load parameters on the RPV and RSS that have resulted from this core loading scheme should be evaluated by means of precise calculations and validated by ex-vessel neutron dosimetry to provide the reliable assessment of embrittlement parameters of these reactor components. The results of different types of calculations and their comparison with measured data have been analyzed in this paper. The calculational analysis of RSS fluence rate variation in dependence on the core loading scheme, including the standard and low leakage core as well as the introduction of dummy assemblies, is presented in this paper.

  13. Testing and linearity calibration of films of phenol compounds exposed to thermal neutron field for EPR dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Gallo, S; Panzeca, S; Longo, A; Altieri, S; Bentivoglio, A; Dondi, D; Marconi, R P; Protti, N; Zeffiro, A; Marrale, M

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the preliminary results obtained by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) measurements on films of IRGANOX® 1076 phenols with and without low content (5% by weight) of gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) exposed in the thermal column of the Triga Mark II reactor of LENA (Laboratorio Energia Nucleare Applicata) of Pavia (Italy). Thanks to their size, the phenolic films here presented are good devices for the dosimetry of beams with high dose gradient and which require accurate knowledge of the precise dose delivered. The dependence of EPR signal as function of neutron dose was investigated in the fluence range between 10(11) cm(-2) and 10(14) cm(-2). Linearity of EPR response was found and the signal was compared with that of commercial alanine films. Our analysis showed that gadolinium oxide (5% by weight) can enhance the thermal neutron sensitivity more than 18 times. Irradiated dosimetric films of phenolic compound exhibited EPR signal fading of about 4% after 10 days from irradiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanism of thermoluminescence in high energy carbon ion irradiated Tb3+ doped Al2O3 phosphor for carbon ion beam dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyanarayana Reddy, S.; Nagabhushana, K. R.; Singh, Fouran

    2017-09-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) properties of 80 MeV C6+ ion irradiated pure and Tb3+ doped Al2O3 phosphors are reported. Undoped and Tb3+ doped Al2O3 phosphors are synthesized by solution combustion method. Crystalline phase is analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and average crystallite size is found to be ~64 nm. XRD pattern of Al2O3:Tb3+ (0.05 mol%) is analyzed by Rietveld refinement using the FULLPROF program. TL glow curves of C6+ ion irradiated pure and Tb3+ doped Al2O3 phosphors are recorded for low fluence (5.06  ×  106 to 2.05  ×  108 ions cm‑2) and high fluence (1  ×  1010 to 5  ×  1012 ions cm‑2). TL glow curves of C6+ ion irradiated pure Al2O3 shows prominent peaks at ~466 K and ~623 K with shoulder at ~569 K. These glow peaks are ascribed to Cr3+and Mn4+ emissions. The effect of Tb3+ concentration on TL is investigated and optimum Tb3+ concentration is found to be 0.05 mol%. These Tb3+ doped TL glow curves exhibit a new well resolved prominent peak at 569 K with small humps at 466 K and 623 K. This new TL glow peak is due to Tb3+ characteristic emission. Further, linearity, kinetic parameters, repeatability and fading effect of pure and Tb3+ doped Al2O3 phosphors are studied and they exhibit appropriate properties for carbon beam dosimetry in radiation therapy.

  15. Phosphorus activation neutron dosimetry and its application to an 18-MV radiotherapy accelerator.

    PubMed

    Bading, J R; Zeitz, L; Laughlin, J S

    1982-01-01

    Neutron fluxes and dose rates in and near the 18-MV x-ray beam of a Therac-20 accelerator were determined with measured activities from the nuclear reactions 31P(n, rho)31Si (fast neutrons) and 31P(n, gamma)32P (thermal neutrons), published cross sections, and neutron energy spectra from Monte Carlo calculations. Measurements were made in the patient plane in air and at a 10-cm depth in a tissue-similar phantom, and in a plane containing the x-ray target. Orthophosphoric acid solution was identified as a suitable and convenient phosphorus dosimeter material. In the 31P activation method, fluxes and dose rates are determined as the product of measured saturation activity per 31P atom and a conversion factor, which depends on the shape of the assumed neutron spectrum. For fast neutrons, which deliver most of the dose, the accuracy error in the saturation activity determinations was shown to be approximately less than 25%. An inconsistency resulting from neglect of the accelerator's adjustable collimator in the Monte Carlo calculations was demonstrated between the measured saturation activities and the theoretical neutron spectra. The maximum neutron dose equivalent rate observed was 5.9 mSv/Gy of x-ray absorbed dose at the accelerator calibration point. Surface dose equivalent rates of the present study are less than those of fluxmeter and remmeter studies at sites outside Therac-20 treatment fields by as much as factors of 2.4 and 2.8, respectively. The phantom study showed that at 18 MV internally produced neutrons have a negligible effect on the neutron field within the patient.

  16. Measurement of activation cross-sections for high-energy neutron-induced reactions of Bi and Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Muhammad; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Kwangsoo; Naik, Haladhara; Shahid, Muhammad; Lee, Manwoo

    2015-08-01

    The cross-sections for 209Bi(n, 4n)206Bi, 209Bi(n, 5n)205Bi, natPb(n, xn)204mPb, natPb(n, xn)203Pb, natPb(n, xn)202mPb,natPb(n, xn)201Pb, natPb(n, xn)200Pb, natPb(n, αxn)203Hg and natPb(n, p xn)202Tl reactions were determined at the Korean Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Korea in the neutron energy range of 15.2 to 37.2 MeV. The above cross-sections were obtained by using the activation and off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique. The quasi-monoenergetic neutron used for the above reactions are based on the 9Be(p, n) reaction. Simulations of the spectral flux from the Be target were done using the MCNPX program. The cross-sections were estimated with the TALYS 1.6 code using the default parameter. The data from the present work and literature were compared with the data from the EAF-2010 and the TENDL-2013 libraries, and calculated values of TALYS 1.6 code. It shows that appropriate level density model, the γ-ray strength function, and the spin cut-off parameter are needed to obtain a good agreement between experimental data and theoretical values from TALYS 1.6 code.

  17. Neutron dosimetry at commercial nuclear plants. Annual report of Subtask D: TEPC feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, F.M.; Endres, G.W.R.; McDonald, J.C.; Brackenbush, L.W.

    1984-06-01

    This study was designed to observe the feasibility of the use by NRC licensees of the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) system as a neutron monitoring instrument. Laboratory tissue equivalent proportional counters were irradiated using /sup 252/Cf sources at NBS and PNL and were irradiated inside containment of four operating nuclear power plants (two boiling water reactors and two pressurized water reactors). On the average, neutron dose-equivalent rates determined using the TEPC were 1.05 times the calculated dose-equivalent rates for the bare and moderated /sup 252/Cf sources and 0.86 times the dose-equivalent rates determined using the multispheres inside containment of nuclear power plants. Further, neutron dose equivalent rates determined using portable remmeters were an average of 1.71 times the dose equivalent determined using the multispheres inside the containment of nuclear power plants. It was observed that while electronic noise from temperature and vibrational effects inside containment prohibited an adequate measure of absorbed dose from gammas, the measurement of neutron absorbed dose was unaffected by these environmental parameters. It is recommended that for use inside containment at nuclear power plants: (1) the laboratory scale TEPC is the superior technique for accurate determination of neutron dose equivalent, (2) for remmeters similar to the one evaluated in this study, neutron dose equivalent response should be corrected to account for dependence of response on neutron energy or the remmeters should be calibrated using a moderated neutron source, and (3) at present, the TEPC should not be used to measure absorbed dose from gammas. Upon the advent of a proven miniaturized TEPC, this instrument may prove to be a desirable replacement for current portable neutron monitoring devices for the determination of dose equivalent inside containment of commercial nuclear power plants.

  18. A calibration method for realistic neutron dosimetry in radiobiological experiments assisted by MCNP simulation

    PubMed Central

    Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Krstic, Dragana; Nikezic, Dragoslav; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2016-01-01

    Many studies on biological effects of neutrons involve dose responses of neutrons, which rely on accurately determined absorbed doses in the irradiated cells or living organisms. Absorbed doses are difficult to measure, and are commonly surrogated with doses measured using separate detectors. The present work describes the determination of doses absorbed in the cell layer underneath a medium column (DA) and the doses absorbed in an ionization chamber (DE) from neutrons through computer simulations using the MCNP-5 code, and the subsequent determination of the conversion coefficients R (= DA/DE). It was found that R in general decreased with increase in the medium thickness, which was due to elastic and inelastic scattering. For 2-MeV neutrons, conspicuous bulges in R values were observed at medium thicknesses of about 500, 1500, 2500 and 4000 μm, and these were attributed to carbon, oxygen and nitrogen nuclei, and were reflections of spikes in neutron interaction cross sections with these nuclei. For 0.1-MeV neutrons, no conspicuous bulges in R were observed (except one at ~2000 μm that was due to photon interactions), which was explained by the absence of prominent spikes in the interaction cross-sections with these nuclei for neutron energies <0.1 MeV. The ratio R could be increased by ~50% for small medium thickness if the incident neutron energy was reduced from 2 MeV to 0.1 MeV. As such, the absorbed doses in cells (DA) would vary with the incident neutron energies, even when the absorbed doses shown on the detector were the same. PMID:27380801

  19. SU-E-T-126: Non-Reference Condition Correction Factor KNR of Typical Radiation Detectors for the Dosimetry of High-Energy Photons.

    PubMed

    Chofor, N; Poppe, B; Harder, D

    2012-06-01

    To correct for the deviations of the detector response when typical radiation detectors are used under non-reference conditions, factor kNR was calculated from the known energy dependence of the detector response at photon energies from 10 keV upwards and from clinical photon spectra within a large water phantom beneath a Siemens Primus 6/15 MV linac. A Farmer type ion chamber (NE2571), two TLD detector types and two diodes were investigated. Factor kNR was obtained as the ratio of the weighted responses Yt of a given detector t under reference conditions xref (axial distance r = 0 cm, depth d = 10 cm, field size 10 × 10 cm(2) and SSD = 100 cm) and that under non-reference conditions × (off-axis points and depths for various field sizes); kNR = Yt(xref)/Yt(x). For small field (SF) dosimetry, we evaluated correction factor kNRSF, which refers to small field reference conditions (4 × 4 cm(2) field). For all detectors investigated, the deviations of kNR from unity were highest outside the field, due to prevailing low-energy scatter contributions. For the Farmer chamber and EDP-10 diode, the kNR deviations did not exceed 2%, but were up to 60% for the EDD-5 diode, while kNR values for LiF:Mg,Cu,P and LiF:Mg,Ti deviated at most 15% and 5% respectively. kNR values appear as unique functions of the mean photon energy at the point of interest. Air-filled ion chambers show only small kNR variations, while for non-water equivalent detectors, kNR variations depend on the detector response at low photon energy. kNR can be presented as a unique function of the mean photon energy at the point of interest. A 4 × 4 cm(2) reference field is recommended for small fields, with correction factor kNRSF varying almost negligibly from kNR except for unshielded Si diodes. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. Preliminary treatment planning and dosimetry for a clinical trial of neutron capture therapy using a fission converter epithermal neutron beam.

    PubMed

    Kiger, W S; Lu, X Q; Harling, O K; Riley, K J; Binns, P J; Kaplan, J; Patel, H; Zamenhof, R G; Shibata, Y; Kaplan, I D; Busse, P M; Palmer, M R

    2004-11-01

    A Phase I/II clinical trial of neutron capture therapy (NCT) was conducted at Harvard-MIT using a fission converter epithermal neutron beam. This epithermal neutron beam has nearly ideal performance characteristics (high intensity and purity) and is well-suited for clinical use. Six glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients were treated with NCT by infusion of the tumor-selective amino acid boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-F) at a dose of 14.0 g/m(2) body surface area over 90 min followed by irradiation with epithermal neutrons. Treatments were planned using NCTPlan and an accelerated version of the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP 4B. Treatments were delivered in two fractions with two or three fields. Field order was reversed between fractions to equalize the average blood boron concentration between fields. The initial dose in the dose escalation study was 7.0 RBEGy, prescribed as the mean dose to the whole brain volume. This prescription dose was increased by 10% to 7.7 RBEGy in the second cohort of patients. A pharmacokinetic model was used to predict the blood boron concentration for determination of the required beam monitor units with good accuracy; differences between prescribed and delivered doses were 1.5% or less. Estimates of average tumor doses ranged from 33.7 to 83.4 RBEGy (median 57.8 RBEGy), a substantial improvement over our previous trial where the median value of the average tumor dose was 25.8 RBEGy.

  1. Neutron Doses to the Concrete Vessel and Tendons of a Magnox Reactor Using Retrospective Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, D. A.; Thornton, D. A.; Wright, G. A.; Bird, A. J.; Rycroft, S.

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes the assessment of neutron doses to the concrete pressure vessels and stressing tendons above the cores of the Wylfa nuclear power plant. Following the observation of unexpected levels of activation in a routinely removed tendon from the top cap gallery, it was thought prudent to assess neutron doses to the vessel and its tendons and to consider the effect of potential radiation damage to the vessel integrity. To achieve this, the opportunity was taken to perform neutron activation measurements on tendon samples and to compare them with the results of predictions using the Monte Carlo code MCBEND. The results were used to underwrite neutron dose predictions for the concrete vessel and earlier results for the standpipes in this region of the reactor.

  2. Comparison of graphite, aluminum, and TransHab shielding material characteristics in a high-energy neutron field.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Huff, H; Wilkins, R; Thibeault, Sheila

    2002-12-01

    Space radiation transport models clearly show that low atomic weight materials provide a better shielding protection for interplanetary human missions than high atomic weight materials. These model studies have concentrated on shielding properties against charged particles. A light-weight, inflatable habitat module called TransHab was built and shown to provide adequate protection against micrometeoroid impacts and good shielding properties against charged particle radiation in the International Space Station orbits. An experiment using a tissue equivalent proportional counter, to study the changes in dose and lineal energy spectra with graphite, aluminum, and a TransHab build-up as shielding, was carried out at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center neutron facility. It is a continuation of a previous study using regolith and doped polyethylene materials. This paper describes the results and their comparison with the previous study.

  3. Comparison of graphite, aluminum, and TransHab shielding material characteristics in a high-energy neutron field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Huff, H.; Wilkins, R.; Thibeault, Sheila

    2002-01-01

    Space radiation transport models clearly show that low atomic weight materials provide a better shielding protection for interplanetary human missions than high atomic weight materials. These model studies have concentrated on shielding properties against charged particles. A light-weight, inflatable habitat module called TransHab was built and shown to provide adequate protection against micrometeoroid impacts and good shielding properties against charged particle radiation in the International Space Station orbits. An experiment using a tissue equivalent proportional counter, to study the changes in dose and lineal energy spectra with graphite, aluminum, and a TransHab build-up as shielding, was carried out at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center neutron facility. It is a continuation of a previous study using regolith and doped polyethylene materials. This paper describes the results and their comparison with the previous study. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  4. Comparison of graphite, aluminum, and TransHab shielding material characteristics in a high-energy neutron field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Huff, H.; Wilkins, R.; Thibeault, Sheila

    2002-01-01

    Space radiation transport models clearly show that low atomic weight materials provide a better shielding protection for interplanetary human missions than high atomic weight materials. These model studies have concentrated on shielding properties against charged particles. A light-weight, inflatable habitat module called TransHab was built and shown to provide adequate protection against micrometeoroid impacts and good shielding properties against charged particle radiation in the International Space Station orbits. An experiment using a tissue equivalent proportional counter, to study the changes in dose and lineal energy spectra with graphite, aluminum, and a TransHab build-up as shielding, was carried out at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center neutron facility. It is a continuation of a previous study using regolith and doped polyethylene materials. This paper describes the results and their comparison with the previous study. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  5. Ground-based observations of thunderstorm-correlated fluxes of high-energy electrons, gamma rays, and neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chilingarian, A.; Daryan, A.; Arakelyan, K.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Mailyan, B.; Melkumyan, L.; Hovsepyan, G.; Chilingaryan, S.; Reymers, A.; Vanyan, L.

    2010-08-15

    The Aragats Space Environmental Center facilities continuously measure fluxes of neutral and charged secondary cosmic ray incidents on the Earth's surface. Since 2003 in the 1-minute time series we have detected more than 100 enhancements in the electron, gamma ray, and neutron fluxes correlated with thunderstorm activities. During the periods of the count rate enhancements, lasting tens of minutes, millions of additional particles were detected. Based on the largest particle event of September 19, 2009, we show that our measurements support the existence of long-lasting particle multiplication and acceleration mechanisms in the thunderstorm atmosphere. For the first time we present the energy spectra of electrons and gamma rays from the particle avalanches produced in the thunderstorm atmosphere, reaching the Earth's surface.

  6. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the ATR-A1 irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1998-09-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the collaborative US/Japan ATR-A1 irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The maximum total neutron fluence at midplane was 9.4 {times} 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (5.5 {times} 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} above 0.1 MeV), resulting in about 4.6 dpa in vanadium.

  7. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the EBRII COBRA-1A irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1997-04-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint U.S. and Japanese COBRA-1A1 and 1A2 irradiations in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. The maximum total neutron fluences at midplane were 2.0E+22 and 7.5E+22 n/cm{sup 2}, for the 1A1 and 1A2 irradiations, respectively, resulting in about 8.0 and 30.3 dpa in stainless steel.

  8. Gamma-rays and fast neutron responses calculations for personal electronic dosimetry purpose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, M.; Teissier, C.; Siffert, P.

    2001-02-01

    Real-time dosimeters with small size N-type silicon diodes are proposed here for low-dose rate controls. Numerical simulations are used to predict the responses of various associated filters, neutron converters and sensors. The monitor is foreseen to work as a counter with acceptance cut-offs set on each individual pulse height. Discussions are undertaken against the minimal outline necessary to reach convenient measurement accuracies in unknown gamma-neutron fields.

  9. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the HFIR-JP-23 irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1997-04-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint U.S. Japanese experiment JP-23, which was conducted in target position G6 of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The maximum neutron fluence at midplanes was 4.4E+22 n/cm{sup 2} resulting in about 9.0 dpa in type 316 stainless steel.

  10. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the HFIR-JP-23 irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1996-10-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US-Japanese experiment JP-23, which was conducted in target position G6 of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The maximum neutron fluence at midplane was 4.4E+22 n/cm{sup 2} resulting in about 9.0 dpa in type 316 stainless steel.

  11. The International Reactor Dosimetry File.

    SciTech Connect

    DUNFORD, CHARLIE

    2008-08-07

    Version 01 The International Reactor Dosimetry File (IRDF-2002) contains recommended neutron cross-section data to be used for reactor neutron dosimetry by foil activation and subsequent neutron spectrum unfolding. It also contains selected recom�mended values for radiation damage cross-sections and benchmark neutron spectra. Two related programs available from NEADB and RSICC are: SPECTER-ANL (PSR-263) & STAY’SL (PSR-113).

  12. Improvement of ESR dosimetry for thermal neutron beams through the addition of gadolinium.

    PubMed

    Brai, M; Marrale, M; Gennaro, G; Bartolotta, A; D'Oca, M C; Rosi, G

    2007-09-07

    In this paper, the addition of gadolinium is proposed as a useful tool to enhance the electron spin resonance (ESR) sensitivity of organic compounds to thermal neutrons. The target of this work is the detection, through the ESR technique, of the thermal neutron fluence in a mixed field of photons and neutrons. Gadolinium was chosen because it has a very high capture cross section to thermal neutrons; its nuclear reaction with thermal neutrons induces complex inner shell transitions that generate, besides other particles, Auger electrons, which in turn release their energy in the neighborhood (only several nanometers) of the place of reaction. Gadolinium was added to two organic molecules: alanine and ammonium tartrate. The main result obtained was a greater neutron sensitivity for dosimeters with gadolinium than for those without gadolinium for both organic molecules used. Since a dosimeter pair is required to discriminate between the two components of a mixed field, we studied the response of each dosimeter pair irradiated in a mixed field. Through a blind test we verified the usefulness of this dosimetric system and we obtained an estimate of the fluence in the mixed field with a relative uncertainty of 3%, when the pair composed of an alanine dosimeter and a dosimeter with alanine and gadolinium is used.

  13. Determination of neutron spectra within the energy of 1 keV to 1 MeV by means of reactor dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sergeyeva, Victoria; Destouches, Christophe; Lyoussi, Abdallah; Thiollay, Nicolas; Vigneau, Olivier; Korschinek, Gunther; Carcreff, Hubert

    2015-07-01

    The standard procedure for neutron reactor dosimetry is based on neutron irradiation of a target and its post-irradiation analysis by Gamma and/or X-ray spectrometry. Nowadays, the neutron spectra can be easily characterized for thermal and fast energies (respectively 0.025 eV and >1 MeV). In this work we propose a new target and an innovating post-irradiation technique of analysis in order to detect the neutron spectra within the energy of 1 keV to 1 MeV. This article will present the calculations performed for the selection of a suitable nuclear reaction and isotope, the results predicted by simulations, the irradiation campaign that is proposed and the post-irradiation technique of analysis. (authors)

  14. The alanine detector in BNCT dosimetry: dose response in thermal and epithermal neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, T; Bassler, N; Blaickner, M; Ziegner, M; Hsiao, M C; Liu, Y H; Koivunoro, H; Auterinen, I; Serén, T; Kotiluoto, P; Palmans, H; Sharpe, P; Langguth, P; Hampel, G

    2015-01-01

    The response of alanine solid state dosimeters to ionizing radiation strongly depends on particle type and energy. Due to nuclear interactions, neutron fields usually also consist of secondary particles such as photons and protons of diverse energies. Various experiments have been carried out in three different neutron beams to explore the alanine dose response behavior and to validate model predictions. Additionally, application in medical neutron fields for boron neutron capture therapy is discussed. Alanine detectors have been irradiated in the thermal neutron field of the research reactor TRIGA Mainz, Germany, in five experimental conditions, generating different secondary particle spectra. Further irradiations have been made in the epithermal neutron beams at the research reactors FiR 1 in Helsinki, Finland, and Tsing Hua open pool reactor in HsinChu, Taiwan ROC. Readout has been performed with electron spin resonance spectrometry with reference to an absorbed dose standard in a (60)Co gamma ray beam. Absorbed doses and dose components have been calculated using the Monte Carlo codes fluka and mcnp. The relative effectiveness (RE), linking absorbed dose and detector response, has been calculated using the Hansen & Olsen alanine response model. The measured dose response of the alanine detector in the different experiments has been evaluated and compared to model predictions. Therefore, a relative effectiveness has been calculated for each dose component, accounting for its dependence on particle type and energy. Agreement within 5% between model and measurement has been achieved for most irradiated detectors. Significant differences have been observed in response behavior between thermal and epithermal neutron fields, especially regarding dose composition and depth dose curves. The calculated dose components could be verified with the experimental results in the different primary and secondary particle fields. The alanine detector can be used without

  15. The alanine detector in BNCT dosimetry: Dose response in thermal and epithermal neutron fields

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, T.; Bassler, N.; Blaickner, M.; Ziegner, M.; Hsiao, M. C.; Liu, Y. H.; Koivunoro, H.; Auterinen, I.; Serén, T.; Kotiluoto, P.; Palmans, H.; Sharpe, P.; Langguth, P.; Hampel, G.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The response of alanine solid state dosimeters to ionizing radiation strongly depends on particle type and energy. Due to nuclear interactions, neutron fields usually also consist of secondary particles such as photons and protons of diverse energies. Various experiments have been carried out in three different neutron beams to explore the alanine dose response behavior and to validate model predictions. Additionally, application in medical neutron fields for boron neutron capture therapy is discussed. Methods: Alanine detectors have been irradiated in the thermal neutron field of the research reactor TRIGA Mainz, Germany, in five experimental conditions, generating different secondary particle spectra. Further irradiations have been made in the epithermal neutron beams at the research reactors FiR 1 in Helsinki, Finland, and Tsing Hua open pool reactor in HsinChu, Taiwan ROC. Readout has been performed with electron spin resonance spectrometry with reference to an absorbed dose standard in a {sup 60}Co gamma ray beam. Absorbed doses and dose components have been calculated using the Monte Carlo codes FLUKA and MCNP. The relative effectiveness (RE), linking absorbed dose and detector response, has been calculated using the Hansen and Olsen alanine response model. Results: The measured dose response of the alanine detector in the different experiments has been evaluated and compared to model predictions. Therefore, a relative effectiveness has been calculated for each dose component, accounting for its dependence on particle type and energy. Agreement within 5% between model and measurement has been achieved for most irradiated detectors. Significant differences have been observed in response behavior between thermal and epithermal neutron fields, especially regarding dose composition and depth dose curves. The calculated dose components could be verified with the experimental results in the different primary and secondary particle fields. Conclusions: The

  16. Anharmonicity and disorder in simple and complex perovskites: a high energy synchrotron and hot neutron diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiat, Jean-Michel; Baldinozzi, Gianguido; Dunlop, Muriel; Malibert, Charlotte; Dkhil, Brahim; Ménoret, Carole; Masson, Olivier; Fernandez-Diaz, Maria-Teresa

    2000-10-01

    We report a study of simple ABO3 type perovskites BaTiO3, PbTiO3, KNbO3, SrTiO3 and the relaxor perovskites PbSc1/2Nb1/2O3 (PSN) in their cubic phase using hard synchrotron radiation and hot neutrons. Gram-Charlier expansions of the thermal parameters have been performed and have revealed interesting features about the probability density function and the one-particle potential of the different atoms. This description is compared with other descriptions in terms of the split atom model and in terms of the rotator model. Structural trends regarding the order-disorder versus displacive character of the phase transitions have been obtained. It is concluded that SrTiO3 and BaTiO3 are quasi-harmonic systems whereas KNbO3 shows weak anharmonicity and PbTiO3 and PSN display strong anharmonic features.

  17. In situ high-energy X-ray diffraction study of tensile deformation of neutron-irradiated polycrystalline Fe-9%Cr alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xuan; Li, Meimei; Park, Jun -Sang; Kenesei, Peter; Almer, Jonathan; Xu, Chi; Stubbins, James F.

    2016-12-30

    The effect of neutron irradiation on tensile deformation of a Fe-9wt.%Cr alloy was investigated using in situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction during room-temperature uniaxial tensile tests. New insights into the deformation mechanisms were obtained through the measurements of lattice strain evolution and the analysis of diffraction peak broadening using the modified Williamson-Hall method. Two neutron-irradiated specimens, one irradiated at 300 °C to 0.01 dpa and the other at 450 °C to 0.01dpa, were tested along with an unirradiated specimen. The macroscopic stress–strain curves of the irradiated specimens showed increased strength, reduced ductility and work-hardening exponent compared to the unirradiated specimen. The evolutions of the lattice strain, the dislocation density and the coherent scattering domain size in the deformation process revealed different roles of the submicroscopic defects in the 300°C/0.01 dpa specimen and the TEM-visible nanometer-sized dislocation loops in the 450°C/0.01 dpa specimen: submicroscopic defects extended the linear work hardening stage (stage II) to a higher strain, while irradiation-induced dislocation loops were more effective in dislocation pinning. Lastly, while the work hardening rate of stage II was unaffected by irradiation, significant dynamic recovery in stage III in the irradiated specimens led to the early onset of necking without stage IV as observed in the unirradiated specimen.

  18. Lattice dynamics of α-AlH3 and α-AlD3 by inelastic neutron scattering: High-energy band of optical bond-stretching vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, A. I.; Antonov, V. E.; Markushkin, Yu. E.; Natkaniec, I.; Sakharov, M. K.

    2007-08-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectra of trigonal α-AlH3 and α-AlD3 have been measured in a wide range (5-150meV) of energy transfers with a much better statistical accuracy than previously using the inverted-geometry NERA-PR spectrometer at JINR, Dubna. The studied energy interval covers the range of low-frequency lattice vibrations and a broad band of optical H vibrations. By using a direct-geometry HRMECS spectrometer at ANL, Argonne, the AlH3 hydride was also examined by INS at energy transfers up to 315meV in the regime of small momentum transfers. This significantly enhanced the contribution from the one-phonon neutron scattering and allowed an observation and accurate examination of one more, high-energy band of optical H vibrations predicted theoretically [C. Wolverton , Phys. Rev. B 69, 144109 (2004)]. Combining the obtained experimental data, the entire spectrum of phonon density of states was reconstructed for both α-AlH3 and α-AlD3 .

  19. High energy x-ray and neutron studies of disordered energy-related materials at extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Parise, John

    2016-05-16

    The fundamental scientific accomplishments are: (1) advances in a general description of the liquid state by employing structural models constrained by measurements to interpret experimental results and extend them to liquids in general, with special emphasis on (2) The structure of the high-temperature crystal and molten UO2 and 3) water. Specifically, samples of UO2 and water were probed using high-energy x-rays at the Advanced Photon Source. The high Z of UO2, and the 2-3mm diameter droplet shape of the molten sample, means that >100keV X-rays are required to minimize absorption and multiple scattering, which can distort the measured structure factor. A high flux of x-rays is also required to obtain sufficient statistical accuracy in short (a few seconds) measurement times. The scattered x-ray data were analyzed and pair distribution functions, extracted that characterize the local and long-range atomic structure of the material. The measurements of the hot UO2 solid show a substantial increase in oxygen disorder and, upon melting, the average U-O coordination was found to decrease from 8 to 6.7±0.5. The research incorporated development of diffraction techniques, sample environment optimization and state-of-the-art simulation techniques. The symbiotic nature of the advances in simulation and experiment allowed for a more focused and informed development of future experiments, effective use of expensive beam time and generated new research agendas for the growing number of research groups, within the US and internationally, that focus on the structure of liquids. Molecular dynamics (MD) provided detailed information when combined with high-quality XN data including addressing key issues in liquids; the relationship between cooling path, structure and fictive temperature, and the trade-offs between network over connectedness in liquids containing low-coordination cations.

  20. Neutron Dosimetry in Edf Experimental Surveillance Programme for VVER-440 Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumovsky, Milan; Erben, Oldrich; Zerola, Ladislav; Hogel, Josef; Massoud, Jean-Paul; Trollat, Christophe

    2003-06-01

    Fourteen chains containing experimental surveillance material specimens of the VVER 440/213 nuclear power reactor pressure vessels were irradiated in the surveillance channels of the Nuclear Power Plant Dukovany in the Czech Republic. The irradiation periods were one, two or three cycles. For the absolute fluence values evaluation account was taken of the time history of the reactor power and of local changes of the neutron flux along the reactor core height, and of correction factors due to the orientation of monitors with respect to the reactor core centre. Neutron fluence values above 0.5 MeV energy and above 1.0 MeV energy in the container axis at the axial positions of the sample centres and fluence values in the geometric centre of the samples were calculated making use the exponential attenuation model of the incident neutron beam.

  1. EPR/alanine pellets with low Gd content for neutron dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Marrale, M; Brai, M; Longo, A; Panzeca, S; Carlino, A; Tranchina, L; Tomarchio, E; Parlato, A; Buttafava, A; Dondi, D; Zeffiro, A

    2014-10-01

    This paper reports on results obtained by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation on a blend of alanine added with low content of gadolinium oxide (5 % by weight) to improve the sensitivity to thermal neutron without excessively affecting tissue equivalence. The sensitivity is enhanced by this doping procedure of more an order of magnitude. The results are compared with those obtained with the addition of boric acid (50 % by weight) where boron is in its natural isotopic composition in order to produce low-cost EPR dosemeters. The gadolinium addition influences neutron sensitivity more than the boron addition. The presence of additives does not substantially change the fading of the EPR signal induced by neutrons. The MC simulations agree the experimental results in case of gadolinium addition. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Systematic out-of-field secondary neutron spectrometry and dosimetry in pencil beam scanning proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Trinkl, Sebastian; Mares, Vladimir; Englbrecht, Franz Siegfried; Wilkens, Jan Jakob; Wielunski, Marek; Parodi, Katia; Rühm, Werner; Hillbrand, Martin

    2017-05-01

    Systematic investigation of the energy and angular dependence of secondary neutron fluence energy distributions and ambient dose equivalents values (H*(10)) inside a pencil beam scanning proton therapy treatment room using a gantry. Neutron fluence energy distributions were measured with an extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometer featuring ³He proportional counters, at four positions at 0°, 45°, 90°, and 135° with respect to beam direction and at a distance of 2 m from the isocenter. The energy distribution of secondary neutrons was investigated for initial proton beam energies of 75 MeV, 140 MeV, and 200 MeV, respectively, using a 2D scanned irradiation field of 11 × 11 cm² delivered to a 30 × 30 × 30 cm³ PMMA phantom. Additional measurements were performed at a proton energy of 118 MeV including a 5 cm range-shifter (PMMA), yielding a Bragg peak position similar to that of 75 MeV protons. Ambient dose equivalent values from 0.3 μSv/Gy (75 MeV; 90°) to 24 μSv/Gy (200 MeV; 0°) were measured inside the treatment room at a distance of 2 m from the isocenter. H*(10) values were lower (by factors of up to 7.2 (at 45°)) at 75 MeV compared to those at 118 MeV with the 5 cm range-shifter. At 0° and 45°, an evaporation peak was found in the measured neutron fluence energy distributions, at neutron energies around MeV, which contributes about 50% to total H*(10) values, for all investigated proton beam energies. This study showed a pronounced increase of secondary neutron H*(10) values inside the proton treatment room with increasing proton energy without beam modifiers. For example, in beam direction this increase was about a factor of 50 when protons of 75 MeV and 200 MeV were compared. The existence of a peak of secondary neutrons in the MeV region was demonstrated in beam direction (0°). This peak is due to evaporation neutrons produced in the existing surrounding materials such as those used for the gantry. Therefore, any simulation of the secondary

  3. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the HFIR-JP-20 irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Baldwin, C.A.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US-Japanese experiment JP-20, which was conducted in a target position of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The maximum total neutron fluence at midplane was 4.2 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (1.0 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} above 0.1 MeV), resulting in about 8.4 dpa and 388 appm helium in type 316 stainless steel.

  4. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the HFIR-JP-9, -12, and -15 irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Baldwin, C.A.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US-Japanese experiments JP-9, -12, and -15. These experiments were conducted in target positions of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for a period of nearly four years. The maximum neutron fluence at midplane was 2.6 {times} 10{sup 23} n/cm{sup 2} (7.1 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} above 0.1 MeV), resulting in about 60 dpa and 3900 appm helium in type 316 stainless steel.

  5. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the HFIR-MFE-200J-1 irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Baldwin, C.A.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US-Japanese experiment MFE-200-J-, which was conducted in the removable beryllium (RB) position of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The maximum neutron fluence at midplane was 4.1 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (1.9 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} above 0.1 MeV), resulting in about 12 dpa and 28 appm helium in type 316 stainless steel.

  6. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the JP-17, 18 and 19 experiments in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Baldwin, C.A.

    1996-04-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US-Japanese experiments JP-17, 18, and 19 in the target of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These experiments were irradiated at 85 MW for two cycles resulting in 43.55 EFPD for JP-17 and 42.06 EFPD for JP-18 and 19. The maximum fast neutron fluence > 0.1 MeV was about 3.7E + 21 n/cm{sup 2} for all three irradiations, resulting in about 3 dpa in 316 stainless steel.

  7. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculation for the JP-10, 11, 13, and 16 experiments in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1996-04-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint U.S./Japanese experiments JP-10, 11, 13, and 16 in the target of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL). These experiments were irradiated at 85 MW for 238.5 EFPD. The maximum fast neutron fluence >0.1 MeV was about 2.1E + 22 n/cm{sup 2} for all of the experiments resulting in about 17.3 dpa in 316 stainless steel.

  8. The use of ultrasonic properties of CR-39 track detectors in neutron dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afifi, H.; El-Sersy, A.; Khaled, N.

    2004-01-01

    The longitudinal and shear wave ultrasonic velocities have been measured before and after exposing 5-mm thick CR-39 solid state nuclear track detectors to both a mixed field of gamma-rays and fast neutrons from an Am-Be source in the ranges from 0 to 10 4 mSv. The change in the intermolecular structure as caused by the fast neutron exposure was studied by the ultrasonic pulse echo method at a frequency of 2 MHz and at room temperature. The elastic coefficients, Poisson's ratio, microhardness, ultrasonic absorption coefficient and internal friction have been determined. The study shows that the gamma-ray irradiation had no effect on the ultrasonic properties of CR-39 at least at the used doses. However, all the ultrasonic properties are influenced by the fast neutrons at doses up to 10 4 mSv. Our experimental results confirmed that the ultrasonic technique is useful for fast neutron detection, by exploiting the differences in mechanical properties of CR-39.

  9. Intracavitary moderator balloon combined with 252Cf brachytherapy and boron neutron capture therapy, improving dosimetry in brain tumour and infiltrations

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, S F

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This article proposes a combination of californium-252 (252Cf) brachytherapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and an intracavitary moderator balloon catheter applied to brain tumour and infiltrations. Methods: Dosimetric evaluations were performed on three protocol set-ups: 252Cf brachytherapy combined with BNCT (Cf-BNCT); Cf-BNCT with a balloon catheter filled with light water (LWB) and the same set-up with heavy water (HWB). Results: Cf-BNCT-HWB has presented dosimetric advantages to Cf-BNCT-LWB and Cf-BNCT in infiltrations at 2.0–5.0 cm from the balloon surface. However, Cf-BNCT-LWB has shown superior dosimetry up to 2.0 cm from the balloon surface. Conclusion: Cf-BNCT-HWB and Cf-BNCT-LWB protocols provide a selective dose distribution for brain tumour and infiltrations, mainly further from the 252Cf source, sparing the normal brain tissue. Advances in knowledge: Malignant brain tumours grow rapidly and often spread to adjacent brain tissues, leading to death. Improvements in brain radiation protocols have been continuously achieved; however, brain tumour recurrence is observed in most cases. Cf-BNCT-LWB and Cf-BNCT-HWB represent new modalities for selectively combating brain tumour infiltrations and metastasis. PMID:25927876

  10. Intracavitary moderator balloon combined with (252)Cf brachytherapy and boron neutron capture therapy, improving dosimetry in brain tumour and infiltrations.

    PubMed

    Brandão, S F; Campos, T P R

    2015-07-01

    This article proposes a combination of californium-252 ((252)Cf) brachytherapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and an intracavitary moderator balloon catheter applied to brain tumour and infiltrations. Dosimetric evaluations were performed on three protocol set-ups: (252)Cf brachytherapy combined with BNCT (Cf-BNCT); Cf-BNCT with a balloon catheter filled with light water (LWB) and the same set-up with heavy water (HWB). Cf-BNCT-HWB has presented dosimetric advantages to Cf-BNCT-LWB and Cf-BNCT in infiltrations at 2.0-5.0 cm from the balloon surface. However, Cf-BNCT-LWB has shown superior dosimetry up to 2.0 cm from the balloon surface. Cf-BNCT-HWB and Cf-BNCT-LWB protocols provide a selective dose distribution for brain tumour and infiltrations, mainly further from the (252)Cf source, sparing the normal brain tissue. Malignant brain tumours grow rapidly and often spread to adjacent brain tissues, leading to death. Improvements in brain radiation protocols have been continuously achieved; however, brain tumour recurrence is observed in most cases. Cf-BNCT-LWB and Cf-BNCT-HWB represent new modalities for selectively combating brain tumour infiltrations and metastasis.

  11. Effect of fast neutrons on the electric resistivity of porcelain for application in fast-neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Fadel, M.A.; Abdel-Fattah, W.I.; Abdulla, A.A.; Kadum, A.A.

    1982-11-01

    The electric resistivity (rho) of quartz and alumina porcelain was measured before and after irradiation with different fluences (phi) of fission neutrons in the range of 10/sup 7/-10/sup 12/ n/cm/sup 2/ and at different temperatures in the range of 20-90/sup 0/C. The results showed that the activation energy (..delta..E) for quartz porcelain decreased progressively with the increase of phi, while it remained approximately constant for alumina porcelain. Moreover, the electric resistivity of alumina porcelain decreased with the increase of phi. However, there were no measureable effects of /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. doses up to 0.6 Mrad on the electric resistivities of the samples. An empirical formula for calculating phi from the measured value of ..delta..E for quartz porcelain was achieved. A semiempirical formula for calculating phi for the resistivity data for the alumina porcelain is given. The effect of neutron energies on the induced changes in (rho) for the alumina porcelain was investigated. Additionally, the effect of storage at 50/sup 0/C for periods up to 3 weeks on these changes were also measured.

  12. High-energy magnetic excitations in overdoped La2-xSrxCuO4 studied by neutron and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Wakimoto, S.; Ishii, K.; Kimura, H.; ...

    2015-05-21

    We have performed neutron inelastic scattering and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the Cu-L3 edge to study high-energy magnetic excitations at energy transfers of more than 100 meV for overdoped La2₋xSrxCuO4 with x=0.25 (Tc=15 K) and x=0.30 (nonsuperconducting) using identical single-crystal samples for the two techniques. From constant-energy slices of neutron-scattering cross sections, we have identified magnetic excitations up to ~250 meV for x=0.25. Although the width in the momentum direction is large, the peak positions along the (π,π) direction agree with the dispersion relation of the spin wave in the nondoped La2CuO4 (LCO), which is consistent with themore » previous RIXS results of cuprate superconductors. Using RIXS at the Cu-L3 edge, we have measured the dispersion relations of the so-called paramagnon mode along both (π,π) and (π,0) directions. Although in both directions the neutron and RIXS data connect with each other and the paramagnon along (π,0) agrees well with the LCO spin-wave dispersion, the paramagnon in the (π,π) direction probed by RIXS appears to be less dispersive and the excitation energy is lower than the spin wave of LCO near (π/2,π/2). Thus, our results indicate consistency between neutron inelastic scattering and RIXS, and elucidate the entire magnetic excitation in the (π,π) direction by the complementary use of two probes. The polarization dependence of the RIXS profiles indicates that appreciable charge excitations exist in the same energy range of magnetic excitations, reflecting the itinerant character of the overdoped sample. Lastly, we find a possible anisotropy in the charge excitation intensity might explain the apparent differences in the paramagnon dispersion in the (π,π) direction as detected by the x-ray scattering.« less

  13. Calorimetric and ionimetric dosimetry intercomparisons II: d + T neutron source at the Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek hospital.

    PubMed

    McDonald, J C; Ma, I C; Mijhnheer, B J; Zoetelief, H

    1981-01-01

    A series of dosimetric measurements was carried out at the Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam, using a Philips d + T generator, which produced neutrons with energies of approximately 14 MeV. A-150 plastic ionization chambers, an A-150 plastic calorimeter, and a GM dosimeter were used to determine total absorbed dose and the photon absorbed dose fraction. The ion chambers were calibrated in a 60Co gamma-ray field in air and compared in a phantom placed in the 60Co gamma-ray beam. Comparison of the total absorbed dose derived from the ionization chamber measurements to that determined using the calorimeter indicated agreement for the neutron measurements between the techniques to within +/- 2%.

  14. Neutron response of GafChromic® EBT2 film.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Ming-Chen; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Chen, Wei-Lin; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2013-03-07

    Neutron and gamma-ray mixed field dosimetry remains one of the most challenging topics in radiation dosimetry studies. However, the requirement for accurate mixed field dosimetry is increasing because of the considerable interest in high-energy radiotherapy machines, medical ion beams and BNCT epithermal neutron beams. Therefore, this study investigated the GafChromic® EBT2 film. The linearity, reproducibility, energy dependence and homogeneity of the film were tested in a (60)Co medical beam, 6-MV LINAC and 10-MV LINAC. The linearity and self-developing effect of the film irradiated in an epithermal neutron beam were also examined. These basic detector characteristics showed that EBT2 film can be effectively applied in mixed field dosimetry. A general detector response model was developed to determine the neutron relative effectiveness (RE) values. The RE value of fast neutrons varies with neutron spectra. By contrast, the RE value of thermal neutrons was determined as a constant; it is only 32.5% in relation to gamma rays. No synergy effect was observed in this study. The lithium-6 capture reaction dominates the neutron response in the thermal neutron energy range, and the recoil hydrogen dose becomes the dominant component in the fast neutron energy region. Based on this study, the application of the EBT2 film in the neutron and gamma-ray mixed field is feasible.

  15. In situ high-energy X-ray diffraction study of tensile deformation of neutron-irradiated polycrystalline Fe-9%Cr alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Xuan; Li, Meimei; Park, Jun -Sang; ...

    2016-12-30

    The effect of neutron irradiation on tensile deformation of a Fe-9wt.%Cr alloy was investigated using in situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction during room-temperature uniaxial tensile tests. New insights into the deformation mechanisms were obtained through the measurements of lattice strain evolution and the analysis of diffraction peak broadening using the modified Williamson-Hall method. Two neutron-irradiated specimens, one irradiated at 300 °C to 0.01 dpa and the other at 450 °C to 0.01dpa, were tested along with an unirradiated specimen. The macroscopic stress–strain curves of the irradiated specimens showed increased strength, reduced ductility and work-hardening exponent compared to the unirradiated specimen.more » The evolutions of the lattice strain, the dislocation density and the coherent scattering domain size in the deformation process revealed different roles of the submicroscopic defects in the 300°C/0.01 dpa specimen and the TEM-visible nanometer-sized dislocation loops in the 450°C/0.01 dpa specimen: submicroscopic defects extended the linear work hardening stage (stage II) to a higher strain, while irradiation-induced dislocation loops were more effective in dislocation pinning. Lastly, while the work hardening rate of stage II was unaffected by irradiation, significant dynamic recovery in stage III in the irradiated specimens led to the early onset of necking without stage IV as observed in the unirradiated specimen.« less

  16. Neutron transport simulation (selected topics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, P.

    2009-10-01

    Neutron transport simulation is usually performed for criticality, power distribution, activation, scattering, dosimetry and shielding problems, among others. During the last fifteen years, innovative technological applications have been proposed (Accelerator Driven Systems, Energy Amplifiers, Spallation Neutron Sources, etc.), involving the utilization of intermediate energies (hundreds of MeV) and high-intensity (tens of mA) proton accelerators impinging in targets of high Z elements. Additionally, the use of protons, neutrons and light ions for medical applications (hadrontherapy) impose requirements on neutron dosimetry-related quantities (such as kerma factors) for biologically relevant materials, in the energy range starting at several tens of MeV. Shielding and activation related problems associated to the operation of high-energy proton accelerators, emerging space-related applications and aircrew dosimetry-related topics are also fields of intense activity requiring as accurate as possible medium- and high-energy neutron (and other hadrons) transport simulation. These applications impose specific requirements on cross-section data for structural materials, targets, actinides and biologically relevant materials. Emerging nuclear energy systems and next generation nuclear reactors also impose requirements on accurate neutron transport calculations and on cross-section data needs for structural materials, coolants and nuclear fuel materials, aiming at improved safety and detailed thermal-hydraulics and radiation damage studies. In this review paper, the state-of-the-art in the computational tools and methodologies available to perform neutron transport simulation is presented. Proton- and neutron-induced cross-section data needs and requirements are discussed. Hot topics are pinpointed, prospective views are provided and future trends identified.

  17. Brain tumour and infiltrations dosimetry of boron neutron capture therapy combined with 252Cf brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Sâmia F; Campos, Tarcísio P R

    2012-04-01

    This article presents a dosimetric investigation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) combined with (252)Cf brachytherapy for brain tumour control. The study was conducted through computational simulation in MCNP5 code, using a precise and discrete voxel model of a human head, in which a hypothetical brain tumour was incorporated. A boron concentration ratio of 1:5 for healthy-tissue: tumour was considered. Absorbed and biologically weighted dose rates and neutron fluency in the voxel model were evaluated. The absorbed dose rate results were exported to SISCODES software, which generates the isodose surfaces on the brain. Analyses were performed to clarify the relevance of boron concentrations in occult infiltrations far from the target tumour, with boron concentration ratios of 1:1 up to 1:50 for healthy-tissue:infiltrations and healthy-tissue:tumour. The average biologically weighted dose rates at tumour area exceed up to 40 times the surrounding healthy tissue dose rates. In addition, the biologically weighted dose rates from boron have the main contribution at the infiltrations, especially far from primary tumour. In conclusion, BNCT combined with (252)Cf brachytherapy is an alternative technique for brain tumour treatment because it intensifies dose deposition at the tumour and at infiltrations, sparing healthy brain tissue.

  18. Flare physics at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.

    1990-01-01

    High-energy processes, involving a rich variety of accelerated particle phenomena, lie at the core of the solar flare problem. The most direct manifestation of these processes are high-energy radiations, gamma rays, hard X-rays and neutrons, as well as the accelerated particles themselves, which can be detected in interplanetary space. In the study of astrophysics from the moon, the understanding of these processes should have great importance. The inner solar system environment is strongly influenced by activity on the sun; the physics of solar flares is of great intrinsic interest; and much high-energy astrophysics can be learned from investigations of flare physics at high energies.

  19. Applicability of thermoluminescent dosimeters in X-ray organ dose determination and in the dosimetry of systemic and boron neutron capture radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschan, Agneta Carita

    The main detectors used for clinical dosimetry are ionisation chambers and semiconductors. Thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters are also of interest because of their following advantages: (i)wide useful dose range, (ii)small physical size, (iii)no need for high voltage or cables, i.e. stand alone character, and (iv)tissue equivalence (LiF) for most radiation types. TL detectors can particularly be used for the absorbed dose measurements performed with the aim to investigate cases where dose prediction is difficult and not as part of a routine verification procedure. In this thesis, the applicability of TL detectors was studied in different clinical applications. Particularly, the major phenomena (e.g. energy dependence, sensitivity to high LET radiation, reproducibility) affecting on the precision and accuracy of TL detectors in the dose estimations were considered in this work. In organ dose determinations of diagnostic X-ray examinations, the TL detectors were found to be accurate within 5% (1 S.D.). For in vivo studies using internal irradiation source, i.e. for systemic radiation therapy, a method for determining the absorbed doses to organs was introduced. The TL method developed was found to be able to estimate the absorbed doses to those critical organs near the body surface within 50%. In the mixed neutron-gamma field of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), TL detectors were used for gamma dose and neutron fluence measurements. They were found able to measure the neutron dose component with the accuracy of 16%, and therefore to be a useful addition to the activation foils in BNCT neutron dosimetry. The absorbed gamma doses can be measured with TL detectors within 20% in the mixed neutron-gamma field, which enables in vivo measurements at BNCT beams with approximately the same accuracy. In this study, the uncertainties of TL dosimeters were found to be high but not essentially greater than those in other measurement techniques used for clinical dosimetry

  20. The Role of Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry in Reactor Vessel Surveillance in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byoung-Chul; Yoo, Choon Sung; Anderson, Stanwood L.; Fero, Arnold H.; Kim, Charles C.

    2009-08-01

    Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power (KHNP) is the sole nuclear utility in South Korea. KHNP operates 20 nuclear power plants. This fleet consists of 16 PWRs and four PHWRs. Of the PWRs, two are Westinghouse-design two-loop plants, four are Westinghouse-design three-loop plants, two are Framatome-design three-loop plants, and the remainder are the Korea Standard Nuclear Plant (KSNP), similar to CE-design plants where the reactor was supplied by CE and DOOSAN. In addition, KHNP has six new reactors under construction at the Shin-Kori and Shin-Wolsong sites. This large and diverse reactor fleet introduces significant challenges to the task of reactor vessel surveillance and of measuring the neutron exposure of the reactor vessel.

  1. EPR/PTFE dosimetry for test reactor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Vehar, D.W.; Griffin, P.J.; Quirk, T.J.

    2011-07-01

    The use of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy with materials such as alanine is well established as a technique for measurement of ionizing radiation absorbed dose in photon and electron fields such as Co-60, high-energy bremsstrahlung and electron-beam fields [1]. In fact, EPR/Alanine dosimetry has become a routine transfer standard for national standards bodies such as NIST and NPL. In 1992 the Radiation Metrology Laboratory (RML) at Sandia National Laboratories implemented EPR/Alanine capabilities for use in routine and calibration activities at its Co-60 and pulsed-power facilities. At that time it also investigated the usefulness of the system for measurement of absorbed dose in the mixed neutron/photon environments of reactors such as the Sandia Pulsed Reactor and the Annular Core Research Reactor used for hardness testing of electronics. The RML concluded that the neutron response of alanine was a sufficiently high fraction of the overall dosimeter response that the resulting uncertainties in the photon dose would be unacceptably large for silicon-device testing. However, it also suggested that non-hydrogenous materials such as polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) would exhibit smaller neutron response and might be useful in mixed environments. Preliminary research with PTFE in photon environments indicated considerable promise, but further development was not pursued at that time. Because of renewed interest in absorbed dose measurements that could better define the individual contributions of photon and neutron components to the overall dose delivered to a test object, the RML has re-initiated the development of an EPR/PTFE dosimetry system. This effort consists of three stages: 1) Identification of PTFE materials that may be suitable for dosimetry applications. It was speculated that the inconsistency of EPR signatures in the earlier samples may have been due to variability in PTFE manufacturing processes. 2) Characterization of dosimetry in

  2. Development of JCDS, a computational dosimetry system at JAEA for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumada, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Matsumura, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Nakagawa, Y.

    2007-06-01

    Clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are being carried out using several research reactors throughout the world. In Japan, many medical groups perform clinical trials of BNCT using Japan Research Reactor No.4 (JRR-4) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). JAEA has developed a treatment planning system, JCDS, in order to evaluate radiation dose given to a patient in the BNCT. JCDS employs a voxel calculation method to compute the radiation dose given to a patient. An initial version of JCDS created a voxel model, dividing a space into 1 × 1 × 1 cm3voxel cells. JCDS was improved to create a detailed voxel model consisting of minute voxel cells such as 2 × 2 × 2 mm3voxel cells. Verification of accuracy of calculations with the detailed voxel mode demonstrated that the detailed voxel model enables JCDS to evaluate more accurately the radiation doses to a patient undergoing BNCT. Furthermore, the calculation code of JCDS is being incorporated into the PHITS system as a Monte-Carlo transport code. By employing the PHITS system in the dose evaluation, total doses given to a patient by combined modality therapy such as BNCT and X-ray therapy can be estimated accurately. Here, an outline and the performances of the latest version of JCDS are presented, and a future system integrated with JCDS is introduced.

  3. Protocols for the dosimetry of high-energy photon and electron beams: a comparison of the IAEA TRS-398 and previous international codes of practice. International Atomic Energy Agency.

    PubMed

    Andreo, Pedro; Huq, M Saiful; Westermark, Mathias; Song, Haijun; Tilikidis, Aris; DeWerd, Larry; Shortt, Ken

    2002-09-07

    A new international Code of Practice for radiotherapy dosimetry co-sponsored by several international organizations has been published by the IAEA, TRS-398. It is based on standards of absorbed dose to water, whereas previous protocols (TRS-381 and TRS-277) were based on air kerma standards. To estimate the changes in beam calibration caused by the introduction of TRS-398, a detailed experimental comparison of the dose determination in reference conditions in high-energy photon and electron beams has been made using the different IAEA protocols. A summary of the formulation and reference conditions in the various Codes of Practice, as well as of their basic data, is presented first. Accurate measurements have been made in 25 photon and electron beams from 10 clinical accelerators using 12 different cylindrical and plane-parallel chambers, and dose ratios under different conditions of TRS-398 to the other protocols determined. A strict step-by-step checklist was followed by the two participating clinical institutions to ascertain that the resulting calculations agreed within tenths of a per cent. The maximum differences found between TRS-398 and the previous Codes of Practice TRS-277 (2nd edn) and TRS-381 are of the order of 1.5-2.0%. TRS-398 yields absorbed doses larger than the previous protocols, around 1.0% for photons (TRS-277) and for electrons (TRS-381 and TRS-277) when plane-parallel chambers are cross-calibrated. For the Markus chamber, results show a very large variation, although a fortuitous cancellation of the old stopping powers with the ND,w/NK ratios makes the overall discrepancy between TRS-398 and TRS-277 in this case smaller than for well-guarded plane-parallel chambers. Chambers of the Roos-type with a 60Co ND,w calibration yield the maximum discrepancy in absorbed dose, which varies between 1.0% and 1.5% for TRS-381 and between 1.5% and 2.0% for TRS-277. Photon beam calibrations using directly measured or calculated TPR20,10 from a percentage

  4. Study of an improved Allyl Di-Glycol carbonate sheet for high energy proton detection.

    PubMed

    Ohguchi, H; Juto, N; Fujisaki, S; Migita, S; Koguchi, Y; Takada, M

    2006-01-01

    An allyl di-glycol carbonate (ADC) sheet which has been utilised as a neutron detector for personal dosimetry has recently been studied for its application as a device for radiation exposure control for astronauts in space, where protons are the dominant radiation. It is known that the fabrication process, modified by adding some kind of antioxidant to improve the sensitivity of ADC to high energy protons, causes a substantial increase in false tracks, which disturb the automatic counting of proton tracks using the auto-image analyser. This made clear the difficulty of fabricating ADC sheets which have sufficient sensitivity to high energy protons, while maintaining a good surface. In this study, we have tried to modify the fabrication process to improve the sensitivity to high energy protons without causing a deterioration of the surface condition of ADC sheets. We have successfully created fairly good products.

  5. Choice of model and uncertainties of the gamma-ray and neutron dosimetry in relation to the chromosome aberrations data in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    PubMed

    Rühm, W; Walsh, L; Chomentowski, M

    2003-07-01

    Chromosome data pertaining to blood samples from 1,703 survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bombs, were utilized and different models for chromosome aberration dose response investigated. Models applied included those linear or linear-quadratic in equivalent dose. Models in which neutron and gamma doses were treated separately (LQ-L model) were also used, which included either the use of a low-dose limiting value for the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons of R(0)=70+/-10 or an RBE value of R(1)=15+/-5 at 1 Gy. The use of R(1) incorporates the assumption that it is much better known than R(0), with much less associated uncertainty. In addition, error-reducing transformations were included which were found to result in a 50% reduction of the standard error associated with one of the model fit parameters which is associated with the proportion of cells with at least one aberration, at 1 Gy gamma dose. Several justifiable modifications to the DS86 doses according to recent nuclear retrospective dosimetry measurements were also investigated. Gamma-dose modifications were based on published thermoluminescence measurements of quartz samples from Hiroshima and on a tentative reduction for Nagasaki factory worker candidates by a factor of 0.6. Neutron doses in Hiroshima were modified to become consistent with recent fast neutron activation data based on copper samples. The applied dose modifications result in an increase in non-linearity of the dose-response curve for Hiroshima, and a corresponding decrease in that for Nagasaki, an effect found to be most pronounced for the LQ-L models investigated. As a result the difference in the dose-response curves observed for both cities based on DS86 doses, is somewhat reduced but cannot be entirely explained by the dose modifications applied. The extent to which the neutrons contribute to chromosome aberration induction in Hiroshima depends significantly on the model used. The LQ-L model including an R(1

  6. Initial radiation dosimetry at Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W.E.

    1983-09-01

    The dosimetry of A-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki is discussed in light of the new dosimetry developed in 1980 by the author. The important changes resulting from the new dosimetry are the ratios of neutron to gamma doses, particularly at Hiroshima. The implications of these changes in terms of epidemiology and radiation protection standards are discussed. (ACR)

  7. Historical Evaluation of Film Badge Dosimetry Y-12 Plant: Part 2–Neutron Radiation ORAUT-OTIB-0045

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr GD, Frome EL, Watkins JP, Tankersley WG

    2009-12-14

    A summary of the major neutron sources involved in radiation exposures to Y-12 workers is presented in this TIB. Graphical methods are used to evaluate available neutron dose data from quarterly exposures to Y-12 workers and to determine how the data could be used to derive neutron-to-gamma dose ratios for dose reconstruction purposes. This TIB provides estimates of neutron-to-gamma dose ratios for specific departments and a default value for the neutron-to-gamma dose ratio based on the pooled neutron dose data for all Y-12 departments.

  8. Optimization of Beam-Shaping Assemblies for BNCS Using the High-Energy Neutron Sources D-D and D-T

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, Jerome M.; Chen, Allen S.; Vujic, Jasmina L.; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2001-06-15

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy is a novel approach for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The goal of the treatment is the ablation of diseased synovial membranes in articulating joints. The treatment of knee joints is the focus of this work. A method was developed, as discussed previously, to predict the dose distribution in a knee joint from any neutron and photon beam spectra incident on the knee. This method is validated and used to design moderators for the deuterium-deuterium (D-D) and deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron sources. Treatment times >2 h were obtained with the D-D reaction. They could potentially be reduced if the {sup 10}B concentration in the synovium was increased. For D-T neutrons, high therapeutic ratios and treatment times <5 min were obtained for neutron yields of 10{sup 14} s{sup -1}. This treatment time makes the D-T reaction attractive for boron neutron capture synovectomy.

  9. Measurements of high energy neutrons penetrated through iron shields using the Self-TOF detector and an NE213 organic liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, M.; Nakao, N.; Nunomiya, T.; Nakamura, T.; Fukumura, A.; Takada, M.

    2002-11-01

    Neutron energy spectra penetrated through iron shields were measured using the Self-TOF detector and an NE213 organic liquid scintillator which have been newly developed by our group at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Japan. Neutrons were generated by bombarding 400 MeV/nucleon C ion on a thick (stopping-length) copper target. The neutron spectra in the energy range from 20 to 800 MeV were obtained through the FORIST unfolding code with their response functions and compared with the MCNPX calculations combined with the LA150 cross section library. The neutron fluence measured by the NE213 detector was simulated by the track length estimator in the MCNPX, and evaluated the contribution of the room-scattered neutrons. The calculations are in fairly good agreement with the measurements. Neutron fluence attenuation lengths were obtained from the experimental results and the calculation.

  10. Investigating in-field and out-of-field neutron contamination in high-energy medical linear accelerators based on the treatment factors of field size, depth, beam modifiers, and beam type.

    PubMed

    Biltekin, Fatih; Yeginer, Mete; Ozyigit, Gokhan

    2015-07-01

    We analysed the effects of field size, depth, beam modifier and beam type on the amount of in-field and out-of-field neutron contamination for medical linear accelerators (linacs). Measurements were carried out for three high-energy medical linacs of Elekta Synergy Platform, Varian Clinac DHX High Performance and Philips SL25 using bubble detectors. The photo-neutron measurements were taken in the first two linacs with 18 MV nominal energy, whereas the electro-neutrons were measured in the three linacs with 9 MeV, 10 MeV, 15 MeV and 18 MeV. The central neutron doses increased with larger field sizes as a dramatic drop off was observed in peripheral areas. Comparing with the jaws-shaped open-field of 10 × 10 cm, the motorised and physical wedges contributed to neutron contamination at central axis by 60% and 18%, respectively. The similar dose increment was observed in MLC-shaped fields. The contributions of MLCs were in the range of 55-59% and 19-22% in Elekta and Varian linacs comparing with 10 × 10 and 20 × 20 cm open fields shaped by the jaws, respectively. The neutron doses at shallow depths were found to be higher than the doses found at deeper regions. The electro-neutron dose at the 18 MeV energy was higher than the doses at the electron energies of 15 MeV and 9 MeV by a factor of 3 and 50, respectively. The photo- and electro-neutron dose should be taken into consideration in the radiation treatment with high photon and electron energies. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    industry, from the initial fuel enrichment and fabrication processes right through to storage or reprocessing, and neutron metrology is clearly important in this area. Neutron fields do, however, occur in other areas, for example where neutron sources are used in oil well logging and moisture measurements. They also occur around high energy accelerators, including photon linear accelerators used for cancer therapy, and are expected to be a more serious problem around the new hadron radiation therapy facilities. Roughly 50% of the cosmic ray doses experienced by fliers at the flight altitudes of commercial aircraft are due to neutrons. Current research on fusion presents neutron metrology with a whole new range of challenges because of the very high fluences expected. One of the most significant features of neutron fields is the very wide range of possible neutron energies. In the nuclear industry, for example, neutrons occur with energies from those of thermal neutrons at a few meV to the upper end of the fission spectrum at perhaps 10 MeV. For cosmic ray dosimetry the energy range extends into the GeV region. This enormous range sets a challenge for designing measuring devices and a parallel challenge of developing measurement standards for characterizing these devices. One of the major considerations when deciding on topics for this special issue was agreeing on what not to include. Modelling, i.e. the use of radiation transport codes, is now a very important aspect of neutron measurements. These calculations are vital for shielding and for instrument design; nevertheless, the topic has only been included here where it has a direct bearing on metrology and the development of standards. Neutron spectrometry is an increasingly important technique for unravelling some of the problems of dose equivalent measurements and for plasma diagnostics in fusion research. However, this topic is at least one step removed from primary metrology and so it was felt that it should not be

  12. Ion-kill dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  13. Ion-kill dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  14. Neutrons and carcinogenesis: a cautionary tale.

    PubMed

    Hall, E J

    1996-01-01

    The best estimates for radiation induced cancer and leukemia are based on the Japanese survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. With the earlier dosimetry systems of the 1960s, it was possible to drive an RBE (relative biological effectiveness) for neutrons from the Japanese data, because it was thought that there was a significant neutron dose at Hiroshima compared with Nagasaki. The estimated RBE of about 20 was consistent with laboratory estimates for oncogenic transformation in vitro and tumors in animals. The revised dosimetry of the 1980s [DS 86] essentially eliminated the neutron component at Hiroshima, and consequently removed the only neutron RBE estimate based on human data. However, recent neutron activation measurements indicate that there may indeed have been thermal neutrons at Hiroshima, and measurements of the ratio of inter- to intra-chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes of survivors also tend to indicate that the biologically effective dose was dominated by neutrons. Another area in which the large biological effectiveness of neutrons assumes importance is the production of photoneutrons in high energy medical linear accelerators (Linacs). An increasing number of accelerators operating in the 18 to 20 MV range are coming into routine clinical use and at this energy, photoneutrons generated largely in the collimators result in a total body dose to the patient. The increased risk of second malignancies must be balanced against the slight improvement in percentage depth doses compared with more conventional machines operating at 6 to 10 MV, below the threshold for photoneutron production.

  15. The evaluation of neutron and gamma ray dose equivalent distributions in patients and the effectiveness of shield materials for high energy photons radiotherapy facilities.

    PubMed

    Ghassoun, J; Senhou, N

    2012-04-01

    In this study, the MCNP5 code was used to model radiotherapy room of a medical linear accelerator operating at 18 MV and to evaluate the neutron and the secondary gamma ray fluences, the energy spectra and the dose equivalent distributions inside a liquid tissue-equivalent (TE) phantom. The obtained results were compared with measured data published in the literature. Moreover, the shielding effects of various neutron material shields on the radiotherapy room wall were also investigated. Our simulation results showed that paraffin wax containing boron carbide presents enough effectiveness to reduce both neutron and secondary gamma ray doses.

  16. Understanding the potentiality of accelerator based-boron neutron capture therapy for osteosarcoma: dosimetry assessment based on the reported clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Bortolussi, Silva; Postuma, Ian; Protti, Nicoletta; Provenzano, Lucas; Ferrari, Cinzia; Cansolino, Laura; Dionigi, Paolo; Galasso, Olimpio; Gasparini, Giorgio; Altieri, Saverio; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; González, Sara J

    2017-08-15

    Osteosarcoma is the most frequent primary malignant bone tumour, and its incidence is higher in children and adolescents, for whom it represents more than 10% of solid cancers. Despite the introduction of adjuvant and neo-adjuvant chemotherapy that markedly increased the success rate in the treatment, aggressive surgery is still needed and a considerable percentage of patients do not survive due to recurrences or early metastases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), an experimental radiotherapy, was investigated as a treatment that could allow a less aggressive surgery by killing infiltrated tumour cells in the surrounding healthy tissues. BNCT requires an intense neutron beam to ensure irradiation times of the order of 1 h. In Italy, a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) proton accelerator has been designed and constructed for BNCT, and a suitable neutron spectrum was tailored by means of Monte Carlo calculations. This paper explores the feasibility of BNCT to treat osteosarcoma using this neutron source based on accelerator. The therapeutic efficacy of BNCT was analysed evaluating the dose distribution obtained in a clinical case of femur osteosarcoma. Mixed field dosimetry was assessed with two different formalisms whose parameters were specifically derived from radiobiological experiments involving in vitro UMR-106 osteosarcoma cell survival assays and boron concentration assessments in an animal model of osteosarcoma. A clinical case of skull osteosarcoma treated with BNCT in Japan was re-evaluated from the point of view of dose calculation and used as a reference for comparison. The results in the case of femur osteosarcoma show that the RFQ beam would ensure a suitable tumour dose painting in a total irradiation time of less than an hour. Comparing the dosimetry between the analysed case and the treated patient in Japan it turns out that doses obtained in the femur tumour are at least as good as the ones delivered in the skull osteosarcoma. The same is

  17. Measurement of the High Energy Neutron Flux on the Surface of the Natural Uranium Target Assembly QUINTA Irradiated by Deuterons of 4 and 8 GeV Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Baldin, A. A.; Chilap, V.; Furman, W.; Katovsky, K.; Khushvaktov, J.; Kumar, V.; Pronskikh, V.; Mar'in, I.; Solnyshkin, A.; Suchopar, M.; Tsupko-Sitnikov, V.; Tyutyunnikov, S.; Vrzalova, J.; Wagner, V.; Zavorka, L.

    Experiments with the natural uranium target assembly "QUINTA" exposed to 4 and 8 GeV deuteron beams of the Nuclotron accelerator at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna) are analyzed. The reaction rates of 27Al(n,y1)24Na, 27Al(n,y2)22Na and 27Al(n,y3)7Be reactions with effective threshold energies of 5, 27, and 119 MeV were measured at both 4 GeV and 8 GeV deuteron beam energies. The average neutron fluxes between the effective threshold energies and the effective ends of the neutron spectra (which are 800 or 1000 MeV for 4 or 8 GeV deuterons) were determined. The evidence for the intensity shift of the neutron spectra to higher neutron energies with the increase of the deuteron energy from 4 GeV to 8 GeV was found from the ratios of the average neutron fluxes. The reaction rates and the average neutron fluxes were calculated with the MCNPX 2.7 code.

  18. Nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies.

    PubMed

    Sims, C S

    1989-09-01

    Twenty-two nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies utilizing the fast-pulse Health Physics Research Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been conducted since 1965. These studies have provided a total of 62 different organizations a forum for discussion of criticality accident dosimetry, an opportunity to test their neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry systems under a variety of simulated criticality accident conditions, and the experience of comparing results with reference dose values as well as with the measured results obtained by others making measurements under identical conditions. Sixty-nine nuclear accidents (27 with unmoderated neutron energy spectra and 42 with eight different shielded spectra) have been simulated in the studies. Neutron doses were in the 0.2-8.5 Gy range and gamma doses in the 0.1-2.0 Gy range. A total of 2,289 dose measurements (1,311 neutron, 978 gamma) were made during the intercomparisons. The primary methods of neutron dosimetry were activation foils, thermoluminescent dosimeters, and blood sodium activation. The main methods of gamma dose measurement were thermoluminescent dosimeters, radiophotoluminescent glass, and film. About 68% of the neutron measurements met the accuracy guidelines (+/- 25%) and about 52% of the gamma measurements met the accuracy criterion (+/- 20%) for accident dosimetry.

  19. US Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program for personnel dosimetry systems (DOELAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.D.; Gesell, T.F.; Kalbeitzer, F.L.; Roberson, P.L.; Jones, K.L.; MacDonald, J.C.; Vallario, E.J.; Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA; USDOE Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy, Washington, DC . Office of Nuclear Safety)

    1988-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Safety has developed and initiated the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) for personnel dosimetry systems to assure and improve the quality of personnel dosimetry at DOE and DOE contractor facilities. It consists of a performance evaluation program that measures current performance and an applied research program that evaluates and recommends additional or improved test and performance criteria. It also provides guidance to DOE, identifying areas where technological improvements are needed. The two performance evaluation elements in the accreditation process are performance testing and onsite assessment by technical experts. Performance testing evaluates the participant's ability to accurately and reproducibly measure dose equivalent. Tests are conducted in accident level categories for low- and high-energy photons as well as protection level categories for low- and high-energy photons, beta particles, neutrons and mixtures of these.

  20. Study of optical model parameters for high energy neutron cross sections from 5 to 50 MeV in the mass-140 region

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T.W.; Camarda, H.S.; White, R.M.

    1980-05-08

    A study of the neutron optical potential on nuclei near mass-140 was begun to extend the energy range and improve the precision of previous neutron total cross section measurements. The extended energy range of this measurement reveals maxima and minima in the total cross section that are evidence of the nuclear Ramsauer effect. A 100-MeV linear accelerator is used to produce a continuum of neutron energies from a Ta-Be conversion target. A 250-meter flight path is used to measure neutron energies by the time-of-flight method. Transmission data for /sup 140/Ce and transmission ratios for /sup 142/Ce, /sup 141/Pr, and /sup 139/La relative to /sup 140/Ce were obtained. The /sup 140/Ce data have a precision of 1 to 3% and the ratios are obtained with a precision of about 0.3%. To analyze these total cross section data a computer code was developed to calculate the total elastic, reaction, and differential elastic scattering cross sections for a neutron interacting with a nucleus. The interaction is represented by a spherically symmetric complex potential that includes spin-orbit coupling. The parameters of this potential were adjusted to approximate the /sup 140/Ce total cross over the energy range from 2.5 to 60 MeV. The energy dependence of these parameters is described. 5 figures, 1 table.

  1. Measurements of cross sections for the 209Bi(n, 4n) reaction by using high energy neutrons with continuous energy spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Kyung Joo; Bak, Sang-In; Ham, Cheolmin; In, Eun Jin; Kim, Do Yoon; Myung, Hyunjeong; Shim, Chungbo; Shin, Jae Won; Zhou, Yujie; Park, Tae-Sun; Hong, Seung-Woo; Bhoraskar, V. N.

    2017-09-01

    We measured 209Bi(n, 4n) cross sections at neutron energies En = 29.8 ± 1.8 MeV and En = 34.8 ± 1.8 MeV. Bismuth oxide samples were irradiated with the neutrons produced by impinging 30, 35 and 40 MeV proton beams on a 1.05 cm thick beryllium target, where the proton beams were from the MC-50 Cyclotron of Korea Institute of Radiological Medical Sciences (KIRAMS). The neutron flux for each proton beam energy Ep, ΦEp(En), has a broad spectrum with respect to En. By taking the difference in the neutron fluxes, the difference spectra, Φ40(En) -Φ35(En) and Φ35(En) -Φ30(En), are obatined and found to be peaked at En = 29.8 and 34.8 MeV, respectively, with a width of about 3.6 MeV. By making use of this observation and employing the TENDL-2009 library we could extract the 209Bi(n, 4n)206Bi cross sections at the aforementioned neutron energies.

  2. Nucleon-induced excitation of collective bands in /sup 12/C and the application to neutron dosimetry at E/sub n/ > 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Soleimani Meigooni, A.

    1984-01-01

    This work involves the measurement and analysis of neutron elastic and inelastic scattering cross section from /sup 12/C at incident neutron energies between 20 and 26 MeV. These data cover an energy range that has not previously been investigated with neutrons and where the direct interaction mechanism should be dominant. These energies are also of particular interest in the fields of radiation protection and radio-therapy. The objectives of the present work are to analyze excitation of the measured collective states in /sup 12/C and to develop an energy dependent optical model potential that can be used to calculate quantities of importance to neutron dosimetry at all energies between 20 and 100 MeV. In addition, a separate series of experiments was performed using a large sample (47.45 gm) at 22 and 24 MeV to investigate the weakly excited states above the 3/sub 1/..sqrt..(9.641 MeV) level in /sup 12/C. Differential cross sections for nine excited states in the first 15 MeV excitation of /sup 12/C were resolved and measured. New rotation-vibration formalisms were developed to be used with the code ECIS79 in order to analyze the collective motions of /sup 12/C. Excellent agreement between experimental data and theoretical calculation is obtained for (a) the ground state rotation band, (b) O/sub 2//sup +/ (7.655 MeV) state using ..beta..-vibration plus breathing mode, (c) the 1/sub 1//sup -/ (10.84 MeV) and 2/sub 1//sup -/ (11.83 MeV) states using K/sup ..pi../ = 1/sup -/ octupole vibration, and (d) the 3/sub 1//sup -/ (9.64 MeV) and 4/sub 1//sup -/ (13.35 MeV) states using K/sup ..pi../ = 3/sup -/ octupole vibration. An energy dependent optical model potential has been obtained that describes the present neutron scattering data, differential proton scattering data of higher energies and total neutron cross sections between 20 and 100 MeV.

  3. Application of ex-vessel neutron dosimetry combined with in-core measurements for correction of neutron source used for RPV fluence calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Borodkin, P.G.; Borodkin, G.I.; Khrennikov, N.N.

    2011-07-01

    This paper deals with calculated and semi-analytical evaluations of VVER-1000 reactor core neutron source distributions and their influence on measurements and calculations of the integral through-vessel neutron leakage. Neutron activation measurements analyzed in the paper were carried out in an ex-vessel air cavity at different nuclear power plant units with VVER-1000 during different fuel cycles. The time-integrated neutron source distributions used for DORT calculations were prepared via two different approaches based on (a) calculated fuel burnup (standard routine procedure) and (b) in-core measurements by means of self-powered detectors (SPDs) and thermocouples (TCs) (new approach). Considering that fuel burnup distributions in operating VVER may be evaluated now by the use of analytical methods (calculations) only, it is necessary to develop new approaches for the testing and correction of calculated evaluations of a neutron source. The results presented in this paper allow one to consider the reverse task of the alternative estimation of fuel burnup distributions. The proposed approach is based on the adjustment (fitting) of time-integrated neutron source distributions, and thus fuel burnup patterns, in some part of the reactor core, taking into account neutron leakage measurements, neutron-physical calculations, and in-core SPD and TC measurement data. (authors)

  4. Neutron dosimetry, damage calculations, and helium measurements for the HFIR-MFE-60J-1 and MFE-330J-1 spectral tailoring experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Baldwin, C.A.; Oliver, B.M.

    1995-04-01

    The objective is to provide dosimetry and damage analysis for fusion materials irradiation experiments. Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US -Japanese MFE-60J-1 and MFE-330J-1 experiments in the hafnium-lined removable beryllium (RB{sup *}) position of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These experiments were continuations of the ORR-6J and 7J irradiations performed in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The combination of irradiations was designed to tailor the neutron spectrum in order to achieve fusion reactor helium/dpa levels in stainless steel. These experiments produced maximum helium (appm)/dpa(displacement per atom) levels of 10.2 at 18.5 dpa for the ORR-6J and HFIR-MFE-60J-1 combination and 11.8 at 19.0 dpa for the ORR-7J and HFIR-MFE-330J-1 combination. A helium measurement in one JPCA sample was in good agreement with helium calculations.

  5. Towards an optimum design of a P-MOS radiation detector for use in high-energy medical photon beams and neutron facilities: analysis of activation materials.

    PubMed

    Price, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    The behaviour of packaged and unpackaged ESAPMOS4 RadFET radiation detectors (NMRC Cork, Ireland) was investigated when used in the mixed photon and neutron environment of a medical linear accelerator operating above the nucleon separation energy and in a 14 MeV neutron field provided by a D-T generator. Within the uncertainty of the experimental set-up (4% at 95% confidence level) the unpackaged device was found to have essentially zero activation dose-burden whereas the packaged device exhibits a considerable degree of post irradiation absorbed dose due to deactivation radiation.

  6. Beyond Californium-A Neutron Generator Alternative for Dosimetry and Instrument Calibration in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Piper, Roman K; Mozhayev, Andrey V; Murphy, Mark K; Thompson, Alan K

    2017-09-01

    Evaluations of neutron survey instruments, area monitors, and personal dosimeters rely on reference neutron radiations, which have evolved from the heavy reliance on (α,n) sources to a shared reliance on (α,n) and the spontaneous fission neutrons of californium-252 (Cf). Capable of producing high dose equivalent rates from an almost point source geometry, the characteristics of Cf are generally more favorable when compared to the use of (α,n) and (γ,n) sources or reactor-produced reference neutron radiations. Californium-252 is typically used in two standardized configurations: unmoderated, to yield a fission energy spectrum; or with the capsule placed within a heavy-water moderating sphere to produce a softened spectrum that is generally considered more appropriate for evaluating devices used in nuclear power plant work environments. The U.S. Department of Energy Cf Loan/Lease Program, a longtime origin of affordable Cf sources for research, testing and calibration, was terminated in 2009. Since then, high-activity sources have become increasingly cost-prohibitive for laboratories that formerly benefited from that program. Neutron generators, based on the D-T and D-D fusion reactions, have become economically competitive with Cf and are recognized internationally as important calibration and test standards. Researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are jointly considering the practicality and technical challenges of implementing neutron generators as calibration standards in the U.S. This article reviews the characteristics of isotope-based neutron sources, possible isotope alternatives to Cf, and the rationale behind the increasing favor of electronically generated neutron options. The evaluation of a D-T system at PNNL has revealed characteristics that must be considered in adapting generators to the task of calibration and testing where accurate determination of a dosimetric quantity is

  7. Validation of Three-Dimensional Synthesis RPV Neutron Fluence Calculations Using VVER-1000 Ex-Vessel Reference Dosimetry Results

    SciTech Connect

    G. Borodkin; B. Boehmer

    2000-06-04

    According to Russian federal norms and the safety guide of the nuclear regulatory body of Russia, the maximum fast neutron fluence above 0.5 MeV at critical positions of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of VVER-type reactors is used for prediction of the RPV lifetime. For the computation of neutron fluences in the RPV near the reactor core midplane level, the three-dimensional (3-D) synthesis method based on two- and one-dimensional S{sub N} calculations may be acceptable but needs validation. The present validation analysis was carried out on the basis of neutron transport calculations for a VVER-1000 model by means of the well-known codes DORT (R, {Theta}- and R, Z geometry) and ANISN (R geometry) using the multigroup library BUGLE-96. The 3-D spatial neutron source distribution, including pin-to-pin power variations and the complex baffle construction, were modeled in detail.

  8. Criteria for personal dosimetry in mixed radiation fields in space. [analyzing trapped protons, tissue disintegration stars, and neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, H. J.

    1974-01-01

    The complexity of direct reading and passive dosimeters for monitoring radiation is studied to strike the right balance of compromise to simplify the monitoring procedure. Trapped protons, tissue disintegration stars, and neutrons are analyzed.

  9. Cosmic Ray Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si Belkhir, F.; Attallah, R.

    2010-10-01

    Radiation levels at aircraft cruising altitudes are twenty times higher than at sea level. Thus, on average, a typical airline pilot receives a larger annual radiation dose than some one working in nuclear industry. The main source of this radiation is from galactic cosmic radiation, high energy particles generated by exploding stars within our own galaxy. In this work we study cosmic rays dosimetry at various aviation altitudes using the PARMA model.

  10. Nuclear reactions induced by high-energy alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear reactions induced by high energy protons and heavier ions are included. Fundamental data needed in the shielding, dosimetry, and radiobiology of high energy particles produced by accelerators were generated, along with data on cosmic ray interaction with matter. The mechanism of high energy nucleon-nucleus reactions is also examined, especially for light target nuclei of mass number comparable to that of biological tissue.

  11. Results from 2010 Caliban Criticality Dosimetry Intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    Veinot, K. G.

    2011-10-12

    The external dosimetry program participated in a criticality dosimetry intercomparison conducted at the Caliban facility in Valduc, France in 2010. Representatives from the dosimetry and instrumentation groups were present during testing which included irradiations of whole-body beta/gamma (HBGT) and neutron thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), a fixed nuclear accident dosimeter (FNAD), electronic alarming dosimeters, and a humanoid phantom filled with reference man concentrations of sodium. This report reviews the testing procedures, preparations, irradiations, and presents results of the tests.

  12. Multipolarity analysis for {sup 14}C high-energy resonance populated by ({sup 18}O,{sup 16}O) two-neutron transfer reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, D. Cavallaro, M.; Bondì, M.; Agodi, C.; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Azaiez, F.; Franchoo, S.; Khan, E.; Bonaccorso, A.; Fortunato, L.; Foti, A.; Linares, R.; Lubian, J.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Vitturi, A.

    2015-10-15

    The {sup 12}C({sup 18}O,{sup 16}O){sup 14}C reaction at 84 MeV incident energy has been explored up to high excitation energy of the residual nucleus thanks to the use of the MAGNEX spectrometer to detect the ejectiles. In the region above the two-neutron separation energy, a resonance has been observed at 16.9 MeV. A multipolarity analysis of the cross section angular distribution indicates an L = 0 character for such a transition.

  13. (n,xn) cross section measurements for Y-89 foils used as detectors for high energy neutron measurements in the deeply subcritical assembly "QUINTA"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielewicz, Marcin; Kilim, Stanisław; Strugalska-Gola, Elżbieta; Szuta, Marcin; Wojciechowski, Andrzej; Tyutyunnikov, Sergey; Prokofiev, Alexander; Passoth, Elke

    2017-09-01

    Study of the deep subcritical systems (QUINTA) using relativistic beams is performed within the project "Energy and Transmutation of Radioactive Wastes" (E&T - RAW). The experiment assembly was irradiated by deuteron/proton beam (Dubna NUCLOTRON). We calculated the neutron energy spectrum inside the whole assembly by using threshold energy (n,xn) reactions in yttrium (Y-89) foils. There are almost no experimental cross section data for those reactions. New Y-89(n,xn) cross section measurements were carried out at The Svedberg laboratory (TSL) in Uppsala, Sweden in 2015. In this paper we present preliminary results of those experiments.

  14. Local Neutron Flux Distribution Measurements by Wire-Dosimetry in the AMMON Experimental Program in the EOLE Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruel, A.; Di Salvo, J.; Roche, A.; Girard, J.-M.; Philibert, H.; Bonora, J.; Ledoux, J.-F.; Morel, C.; Lecluze, A.; Foucras, A.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Colombier, A.-C.

    2016-02-01

    Dosimetry measurements were carried out during the AMMON experimental program, in the EOLE facility. Al-0.1 wt% Au wires were positioned along curved fuel plates of JHR-type assemblies to investigate the azimuthal and axial gold capture rate profiles, directly linked to the thermal and epithermal flux. After irradiation, wires were cut into small segments (a few mm), and the gold capture rate of each part was measured by gamma spectrometry on the MADERE platform. This paper presents results in the "hafnium" configuration, and more specifically the azimuthal flux profile characterization. The final uncertainty on each measured wire lies below 1% (at 2 standard deviations). Experimental profiles are in a good agreement against Monte Carlo calculations, and the 4% capture rate increase at the plate edge is well observed. The flux dissymmetry due to assembly position in the core is also measured, and shows a 10% discrepancy between the two edges of the plate.

  15. Inelastic Neutron Scattering Studies of High-Energy Spin Excitations in Superconducting BaFe1.9Ni0.1As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mengshu; Abernathy, Douglas; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Chenglin; Wang, Miaoyin; Dai, Pengcheng

    2010-03-01

    Understanding how the spin fluctuations evolve with doping in iron pnictide superconductors is important because spin fluctuations may mediate electron pairing for superconductivity in these materials. Upon doping, the spin fluctuation persists long after the long-range antiferromagnetism is destroyed. More importantly, spin excitations are coupled to superconductivity in the appearance of a neutron magnetic resonance and a superconductivity-induced spin gap. However, all current neutron scattering results in iron based superconductors are confined to low energy excitations except for the ``11'' FeTe1-xSex system, which shows incommensurate excitations that are not found in other iron pnictide systems. Therefore, how the spin waves in parent compounds of the ``122'' (AFe2As2, A = Ca, Sr, Ba) system will evolve when the system becomes an optimal superconductor is still an open question. We use time-of-flight spectroscopy to determine S (Q,φ) at energy regions not accessed before. We compare spin fluctuations of iron arsenide superconductors with those of high-Tc copper oxides and discuss their role in the superconductivity of these materials.

  16. High-Energy Astrophysics: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy astrophysics is the study of objects and phenomena in space with energy densities much greater than that found in normal stars and galaxies. These include black holes, neutron stars, cosmic rays, hypernovae and gamma-ray bursts. A history and an overview of high-energy astrophysics will be presented, including a description of the objects that are observed. Observing techniques, space-borne missions in high-energy astrophysics and some recent discoveries will also be described. Several entirely new types of astronomy are being employed in high-energy astrophysics. These will be briefly described, along with some NASA missions currently under development.

  17. Treatment planning and dosimetry for the Harvard-MIT Phase I clinical trial of cranial neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Matthew R; Goorley, J Timothy; Kiger, W S; Busse, Paul M; Riley, Kent J; Harling, Otto K; Zamenhof, Robert G

    2002-08-01

    A Phase I trial of cranial neutron capture therapy (NCT) was conducted at Harvard-MIT. The trial was designed to determine maximum tolerated NCT radiation dose to normal brain. Twenty-two patients with brain tumors were treated by infusion of boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-f) followed by exposure to epithermal neutrons. The study began with a prescribed biologically weighted dose of 8.8 RBE (relative biologic effectiveness) Gy, escalated in compounding 10% increments, and ended at 14.2 RBE Gy. BPA-f was infused at a dose 250-350 mg/kg body weight. Treatments were planned using MacNCTPlan and MCNP 4B. Irradiations were delivered as one, two, or three fields in one or two fractions. Peak biologically weighted normal tissue dose ranged from 8.7 to 16.4 RBE Gy. The average dose to brain ranged from 2.7 to 7.4 RBE Gy. Average tumor dose was estimated to range from 14.5 to 43.9 RBE Gy, with a mean of 25.7 RBE Gy. We have demonstrated that BPA-f-mediated NCT can be precisely planned and delivered in a carefully controlled manner. Subsequent clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy at Harvard and MIT will be initiated with a new high-intensity, high-quality epithermal neutron beam.

  18. Neutron dosimetry in organs of an adult human phantom using linacs with multileaf collimator in radiotherapy treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Ovalle, S. A.; Barquero, R.; Gomez-Ros, J. M.; Lallena, A. M.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To calculate absorbed doses due to neutrons in 87 organs/tissues for anthropomorphic phantoms, irradiated in position supine (head first into the gantry) with orientations anteroposterior (AP) and right-left (RLAT) with a 18 MV accelerator. Conversion factors from monitor units to {mu}Gy per neutron in organs, equivalent doses in organs/tissues, and effective doses, which permit to quantify stochastic risks, are estimated. Methods: MAX06 and FAX06 phantoms were modeled with MCNPX and irradiated with a 18 MV Varian Clinac 2100C/D accelerator whose geometry included a multileaf collimator. Two actual fields of a pelvic treatment were simulated using electron-photon-neutron coupled transport. Absorbed doses due to neutrons were estimated from kerma. Equivalent doses were estimated using the radiation weighting factor corresponding to an average incident neutron energy 0.47 MeV. Statistical uncertainties associated to absorbed doses, as calculated by MCNPX, were also obtained. Results: Largest doses were absorbed in shallowest (with respect to the neutron pathway) organs. In {mu}GyMU{sup -1}, values of 2.66 (for penis) and 2.33 (for testes) were found in MAX06, and 1.68 (for breasts), 1.05 (for lenses of eyes), and 0.94 (for sublingual salivary glands) in FAX06, in AP orientation. In RLAT, the largest doses were found for bone tissues (leg) just at the entrance of the beam in the body (right side in our case). Values, in {mu}GyMU{sup -1}, of 1.09 in upper leg bone right spongiosa, for MAX06, and 0.63 in mandible spongiosa, for FAX06, were found. Except for gonads, liver, and stomach wall, equivalent doses found for FAX06 were, in both orientations, higher than for MAX06. Equivalent doses in AP are higher than in RLAT for all organs/tissues other than brain and liver. Effective doses of 12.6 and 4.1 {mu}SvMU{sup -1} were found for AP and RLAT, respectively. The organs/tissues with larger relative contributions to the effective dose were testes and breasts, in

  19. Neutron dosimetry in organs of an adult human phantom using linacs with multileaf collimator in radiotherapy treatments.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Ovalle, S A; Barquero, R; Gomez-Ros, J M; Lallena, A M

    2012-05-01

    To calculate absorbed doses due to neutrons in 87 organs/tissues for anthropomorphic phantoms, irradiated in position supine (head first into the gantry) with orientations anteroposterior (AP) and right-left (RLAT) with a 18 MV accelerator. Conversion factors from monitor units to μGy per neutron in organs, equivalent doses in organs/tissues, and effective doses, which permit to quantify stochastic risks, are estimated. MAX06 and FAX06 phantoms were modeled with MCNPX and irradiated with a 18 MV Varian Clinac 2100C/D accelerator whose geometry included a multileaf collimator. Two actual fields of a pelvic treatment were simulated using electron-photon-neutron coupled transport. Absorbed doses due to neutrons were estimated from kerma. Equivalent doses were estimated using the radiation weighting factor corresponding to an average incident neutron energy 0.47 MeV. Statistical uncertainties associated to absorbed doses, as calculated by MCNPX, were also obtained. Largest doses were absorbed in shallowest (with respect to the neutron pathway) organs. In μGyMU(-1), values of 2.66 (for penis) and 2.33 (for testes) were found in MAX06, and 1.68 (for breasts), 1.05 (for lenses of eyes), and 0.94 (for sublingual salivary glands) in FAX06, in AP orientation. In RLAT, the largest doses were found for bone tissues (leg) just at the entrance of the beam in the body (right side in our case). Values, in μGyMU(-1), of 1.09 in upper leg bone right spongiosa, for MAX06, and 0.63 in mandible spongiosa, for FAX06, were found. Except for gonads, liver, and stomach wall, equivalent doses found for FAX06 were, in both orientations, higher than for MAX06. Equivalent doses in AP are higher than in RLAT for all organs/tissues other than brain and liver. Effective doses of 12.6 and 4.1 μSvMU(-1) were found for AP and RLAT, respectively. The organs/tissues with larger relative contributions to the effective dose were testes and breasts, in AP, and breasts and red marrow, in RLAT

  20. Fundamentals of materials, techniques and instrumentation for OSL and FNTD dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akselrod, M. S.

    2013-02-01

    The optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique has already become a successful commercial tool in personal radiation dosimetry, medical dosimetry, diagnostic imaging, geological and archeological dating. This review briefly describes the history and fundamental principles of OSL materials, methods and instrumentation. The advantages of OSL technology and instrumentation in comparison with thermoluminescent technique are analyzed. Progress in material and detector engineering has allowed new and promising developments regarding OSL applications in the medical field. Special attention is dedicated to Al2O3:C as a material of choice for many dosimetric applications including fiberoptic OSL/RL sensors with diameters as small as 300 μm. A new RL/OSL fiberoptic system has a high potential for in vivo and in vitro dosimetry in both radiation therapy and diagnostic mammography. Different aspects of instrumentation, data processing algorithms, post-irradiation and real-time measurements are described. The next technological breakthrough was done with Fluorescent Nuclear Track detectors (FNTD) that has some important advantages in measuring fast neutron and high energy heavy charge particles that became the latest tool in radiation therapy. New Mg-doped aluminum oxide crystals and novel type of imaging instrumentation for FNTD technology were engineered and successfully demonstrated for occupational and accident dosimetry, for medical dosimetry and radiobiological research.

  1. Proliferative characteristics of intestinal stem cells. Response and protection to high-energy or fission spectrum neutrons or photons. Technical report, 1 December 1983-1 December 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, W.R.

    1986-04-30

    Cytosine Arabinoside (Ara/C) is an S-phase cytoxic agent. Since nearly half the proliferating cells in the murine crypt are in the S phase, Ara/c treatment, the clonogenic cells (the cells responsible for tissue regeneration) in the crypt are considerably less sensitive to photon radiation than colonogenic cells of control animals. Evidence suggests that the reason for this radioprotection by a toxic agent is the Ara/c-induced alteration in the cell age distribution of the clonogenic cells. Normally, the clonogenic cells are in a G/sub 1/ or G/sub 0/ stage of the cell cycle and are unaffected directly by Ara/c; however, following Ara/c treatment of an animal, the clonogenic cells enter the cell cycle. By 12 hours, the clonogenic cells proceed in a partially synchronized fashion to a mid toi late S phase of the cell cycle where they are less sensitive. WR-2721 appears to protect cells from radiation throughout the cell cycle and most likely acts through a mechanism different from Ara/c. Results of this contrast showed that the combination of Ara/c and WR-2721 protected the gut from photon injury to a greater extent than each agent alone. The protection from Fermilab neutrons by the combination was slightly better than each agent and there was no additional protection of Ara/c combined with WR-2721 for injury by JANUS fission spectrum neutrons. These treatments did not alter the animal response at doses in the bone marrow lethal range.

  2. Neutron beam design, development, and performance for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harling, O.K.; Bernard, J.A. ); Zamenhof, R.G. )

    1990-01-01

    The report presents topics presented at a workshop on neutron beams and neutron capture therapy. Topics include: neutron beam design; reactor-based neutron beams; accelerator-based neutron beams; and dosimetry and treatment planning. Individual projects are processed separately for the databases. (CBS)

  3. Ex-vessel neutron dosimetry analysis for westinghouse 4-loop XL pressurized water reactor plant using the RadTrack{sup TM} Code System with the 3D parallel discrete ordinates code RAPTOR-M3G

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Alpan, F. A.; Fischer, G.A.; Fero, A.H.

    2011-07-01

    Traditional two-dimensional (2D)/one-dimensional (1D) SYNTHESIS methodology has been widely used to calculate fast neutron (>1.0 MeV) fluence exposure to reactor pressure vessel in the belt-line region. However, it is expected that this methodology cannot provide accurate fast neutron fluence calculation at elevations far above or below the active core region. A three-dimensional (3D) parallel discrete ordinates calculation for ex-vessel neutron dosimetry on a Westinghouse 4-Loop XL Pressurized Water Reactor has been done. It shows good agreement between the calculated results and measured results. Furthermore, the results show very different fast neutron flux values at some of the former plate locations and elevations above and below an active core than those calculated by a 2D/1D SYNTHESIS method. This indicates that for certain irregular reactor internal structures, where the fast neutron flux has a very strong local effect, it is required to use a 3D transport method to calculate accurate fast neutron exposure. (authors)

  4. TU-F-CAMPUS-T-01: Dose and Energy Spectra From Neutron Induced Radioactivity in Medical Linear Accelerators Following High Energy Total Body Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Keehan, S; Taylor, M; Franich, R; Smith, R; Dunn, L; Kron, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the risk posed by neutron induced activation of components in medical linear accelerators (linacs) following the delivery of high monitor unit 18 MV photon beams such as used in TBI. Methods: Gamma spectroscopy was used to identify radioisotopes produced in components of a Varian 21EX and an Elekta Synergy following delivery of photon beams. Dose and risk estimates for TBI were assessed using dose deliveries from an actual patient treatment. A 1 litre spherical ion chamber (PTW, Germany) has been used to measure the dose at the beam exit window and at the total body irradiation (TBI) treatment couch following large and small field beams with long beam-on times. Measurements were also made outside of the closed jaws to quantify the benefit of the attenuation provided by the jaws. Results: The radioisotopes produced in the linac head have been identified as {sup 187}W, {sup 56}Mn, {sup 24}Na and {sup 28}Al, which have half-lives from between 2.3 min to 24 hours. The dose at the beam exit window following an 18 MV 2197 MU TBI beam delivery was 12.6 µSv in ten minutes. The dose rate at the TBI treatment couch 4.8 m away is a factor of ten lower. For a typical TBI delivered in six fractions each consisting of four beams and an annual patient load of 24, the annual dose estimate for a staff member at the treatment couch for ten minutes is 750 µSv. This can be further reduced by a factor of about twelve if the jaws are closed before entering the room, resulting in a dose estimate of 65 µSv. Conclusion: The dose resulting from the activation products for a representative TBI workload at our clinic of 24 patients per year is 750 µSv, which can be further reduced to 65 µSv by closing the jaws.

  5. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This is an artist's concept describing the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO). The HEAO project involved the launching of three unmarned scientific observatories into low Earth orbit between 1977 and 1979 to study some of the most intriguing mysteries of the universe; pulsars, black holes, neutron stars, and super nova. This concept was painted by Jack Hood of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Hardware support for the imaging instruments was provided by American Science and Engineering. The HEAO spacecraft were built by TRW, Inc. under project management of the MSFC.

  6. Application of dosimetry measurements to analyze the neutron activation of a stainless steel sample in a training nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ródenas, J.; Gallardo, S.; Weirich, F.; Hansen, W.

    2014-11-01

    All materials present in the core of a nuclear reactor are activated by neutron irradiation. The activity so generated produces a dose around the material. This dose is a potential risk for workers in the surrounding area when materials are withdrawn from the reactor. Therefore, it is necessary to assess the activity generated and the dose produced. In previous works, neutron activation of control rods and doses around the storage pool where they are placed have been calculated for a Boiling Water Reactor using the MCNP5 code based on the Monte Carlo method. Most of the activation is produced indeed in stainless steel components of the nuclear reactor core not only control rods. In this work, a stainless steel sample is irradiated in the Training Reactor AKR-2 of the Technical University Dresden. Dose measurements around the sample have been performed for different times after the irradiation. Experimental dosimetric values are compared with results of Monte Carlo simulation of the irradiation. Comparison shows a good agreement. Hence, the activation Monte Carlo model can be considered as validated.

  7. TOPICAL REVIEW: Polymer gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldock, C.; De Deene, Y.; Doran, S.; Ibbott, G.; Jirasek, A.; Lepage, M.; McAuley, K. B.; Oldham, M.; Schreiner, L. J.

    2010-03-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters are fabricated from radiation sensitive chemicals which, upon irradiation, polymerize as a function of the absorbed radiation dose. These gel dosimeters, with the capacity to uniquely record the radiation dose distribution in three-dimensions (3D), have specific advantages when compared to one-dimensional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, and two-dimensional dosimeters, such as film. These advantages are particularly significant in dosimetry situations where steep dose gradients exist such as in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery. Polymer gel dosimeters also have specific advantages for brachytherapy dosimetry. Potential dosimetry applications include those for low-energy x-rays, high-linear energy transfer (LET) and proton therapy, radionuclide and boron capture neutron therapy dosimetries. These 3D dosimeters are radiologically soft-tissue equivalent with properties that may be modified depending on the application. The 3D radiation dose distribution in polymer gel dosimeters may be imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical-computerized tomography (optical-CT), x-ray CT or ultrasound. The fundamental science underpinning polymer gel dosimetry is reviewed along with the various evaluation techniques. Clinical dosimetry applications of polymer gel dosimetry are also presented.

  8. Topical Review: Polymer gel dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Baldock, C; De Deene, Y; Doran, S; Ibbott, G; Jirasek, A; Lepage, M; McAuley, K B; Oldham, M; Schreiner, L J

    2010-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters are fabricated from radiation sensitive chemicals which, upon irradiation, polymerize as a function of the absorbed radiation dose. These gel dosimeters, with the capacity to uniquely record the radiation dose distribution in three-dimensions (3D), have specific advantages when compared to one-dimensional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, and two-dimensional dosimeters, such as film. These advantages are particularly significant in dosimetry situations where steep dose gradients exist such as in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery. Polymer gel dosimeters also have specific advantages for brachytherapy dosimetry. Potential dosimetry applications include those for low-energy x-rays, high-linear energy transfer (LET) and proton therapy, radionuclide and boron capture neutron therapy dosimetries. These 3D dosimeters are radiologically soft-tissue equivalent with properties that may be modified depending on the application. The 3D radiation dose distribution in polymer gel dosimeters may be imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical-computerized tomography (optical-CT), x-ray CT or ultrasound. The fundamental science underpinning polymer gel dosimetry is reviewed along with the various evaluation techniques. Clinical dosimetry applications of polymer gel dosimetry are also presented. PMID:20150687

  9. Health physics research reactor reference dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, C.S.; Ragan, G.E.

    1987-06-01

    Reference neutron dosimetry is developed for the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) in the new operational configuration directly above its storage pit. This operational change was physically made early in CY 1985. The new reference dosimetry considered in this document is referred to as the 1986 HPRR reference dosimetry and it replaces any and all HPRR reference documents or papers issued prior to 1986. Reference dosimetry is developed for the unshielded HPRR as well as for the reactor with each of five different shield types and configurations. The reference dosimetry is presented in terms of three different dose and six different dose equivalent reporting conventions. These reporting conventions cover most of those in current use by dosimetrists worldwide. In addition to the reference neutron dosimetry, this document contains other useful dosimetry-related data for the HPRR in its new configuration. These data include dose-distance measurements and calculations, gamma dose measurements, neutron-to-gamma ratios, ''9-to-3 inch'' ratios, threshold detector unit measurements, 56-group neutron energy spectra, sulfur fluence measurements, and details concerning HPRR shields. 26 refs., 11 figs., 31 tabs.

  10. Computational dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Siebert, B.R.L.; Thomas, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents a definition of the term ``Computational Dosimetry`` that is interpreted as the sub-discipline of computational physics which is devoted to radiation metrology. It is shown that computational dosimetry is more than a mere collection of computational methods. Computational simulations directed at basic understanding and modelling are important tools provided by computational dosimetry, while another very important application is the support that it can give to the design, optimization and analysis of experiments. However, the primary task of computational dosimetry is to reduce the variance in the determination of absorbed dose (and its related quantities), for example in the disciplines of radiological protection and radiation therapy. In this paper emphasis is given to the discussion of potential pitfalls in the applications of computational dosimetry and recommendations are given for their avoidance. The need for comparison of calculated and experimental data whenever possible is strongly stressed.

  11. Ion storage dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, V. K.

    2001-09-01

    The availability of a reliable, accurate and cost-effective real-time personnel dosimetry system is fascinating to radiation workers. Electronic dosimeters are contemplated to meet this demand of active dosimetry. The development of direct ion storage (DIS) dosimeters, a member of the electronic dosimeter family, for personnel dosimetry is also an attempt in this direction. DIS dosimeter is a hybrid of the well-established technology of ion chambers and the latest advances in data storage using metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) analog memory device. This dosimeter is capable of monitoring legal occupational radiation doses of gamma, X-rays, beta and neutron radiation. Similar to an ion chamber, the performance of the dosimeter for a particular application can be optimized through the selection of appropriate wall materials. The use of the floating gate of a MOSFET as one of the electrodes of the ion chamber allows the miniaturization of the device to the size of a dosimetry badge and avoids the use of power supplies during dose accumulation. The concept of the device, underlying physics and the design of the DIS dosimeter are discussed. The results of preliminary testing of the device are also provided.

  12. Solid-state track recorder dosimetry device to measure absolute reaction rates and neutron fluence as a function of time

    DOEpatents

    Gold, Raymond; Roberts, James H.

    1989-01-01

    A solid state track recording type dosimeter is disclosed to measure the time dependence of the absolute fission rates of nuclides or neutron fluence over a period of time. In a primary species an inner recording drum is rotatably contained within an exterior housing drum that defines a series of collimating slit apertures overlying windows defined in the stationary drum through which radiation can enter. Film type solid state track recorders are positioned circumferentially about the surface of the internal recording drum to record such radiation or its secondary products during relative rotation of the two elements. In another species both the recording element and the aperture element assume the configuration of adjacent disks. Based on slit size of apertures and relative rotational velocity of the inner drum, radiation parameters within a test area may be measured as a function of time and spectra deduced therefrom.

  13. High-energy magnetic excitations in overdoped La2-xSrxCuO4 studied by neutron and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wakimoto, S.; Ishii, K.; Kimura, H.; Fujita, M.; Dellea, G.; Kummer, K.; Braicovich, L.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Debeer-Schmitt, Lisa M.; Granroth, Garrett E.

    2015-05-21

    We have performed neutron inelastic scattering and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the Cu-L3 edge to study high-energy magnetic excitations at energy transfers of more than 100 meV for overdoped La2₋xSrxCuO4 with x=0.25 (Tc=15 K) and x=0.30 (nonsuperconducting) using identical single-crystal samples for the two techniques. From constant-energy slices of neutron-scattering cross sections, we have identified magnetic excitations up to ~250 meV for x=0.25. Although the width in the momentum direction is large, the peak positions along the (π,π) direction agree with the dispersion relation of the spin wave in the nondoped La2CuO4 (LCO), which is consistent with the previous RIXS results of cuprate superconductors. Using RIXS at the Cu-L3 edge, we have measured the dispersion relations of the so-called paramagnon mode along both (π,π) and (π,0) directions. Although in both directions the neutron and RIXS data connect with each other and the paramagnon along (π,0) agrees well with the LCO spin-wave dispersion, the paramagnon in the (π,π) direction probed by RIXS appears to be less dispersive and the excitation energy is lower than the spin wave of LCO near (π/2,π/2). Thus, our results indicate consistency between neutron inelastic scattering and RIXS, and elucidate the entire magnetic excitation in the (π,π) direction by the complementary use of two probes. The polarization dependence of the RIXS profiles indicates that appreciable charge excitations exist in the same energy range of magnetic excitations, reflecting the itinerant character of the overdoped sample. Lastly, we find a possible anisotropy in the charge excitation intensity might explain the apparent differences in the paramagnon dispersion in the (π,π) direction as detected by the x-ray scattering.

  14. High-level dosimetry at the demagnetization experiments of permanent magnets.

    PubMed

    Lee, H S; Qiu, R; Hong, S; Chung, C W; Bizen, T; Li, J

    2007-01-01

    The measurements of high-energy and high dose mixed radiation from high-energy electron accelerator are carried out using a radiation damage monitor. It consists of two Radiation-Sensing Field-Effect Transistors (RADFETs) for total absorbed dose from mainly gamma ray and other charged particles and a Si PIN diode for neutron fluence. This is a part of the demagnetization study of rare earth permanent magnet irradiated by 2.5-GeV electron beam. The sensitivities of damage detectors are measured using 65-MeV quasi-monoenergic neutron, 14-MeV D-T neutron, (252)Cf neutron for Si PIN diode and (60)Co and (137)Cs gamma ray for RADFETs. Measured sensitivities are in acceptable range in the comparison of producer's proposed values. The dose and fluence measurements are carried out for the same target condition, Cu and Ta, as that for the demagnetization study. The 5 x 5 cm(2) cross-sectional and 5.5-cm-thick Pb target is also used for the general comparison with photoneutron yields. All measured dose and fluence are compared with the calculated results using the FLUKA code and agree well each other. The application of this kind of radiation damage monitor to high-level dosimetry at high-energy electron accelerator has been discussed.

  15. High Energy Missile Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    hypervelocity missile concept has been investigated. This research and development project called High Energy Missile (HEMi) technology...currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 00 DEC 2004 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High Energy

  16. Dosimetry of an Implantable 252 Californium Source

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, G.D. Jr.

    2001-08-29

    The radiation dose from 252 Californium needles designed for use as a source of neutrons for radiotherapy has been measured. The dosimetry information presented in this paper will enable clinical studies of neutron radiotherapy with 252 Californium needles to be planned and begun.

  17. Heavy-ion dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmerling, W.

    1980-03-01

    This lecture deals with some of the more important physical characteristics of relativistic heavy ions and their measurement, with beam delivery and beam monitoring, and with conventional radiation dosimetry as used in the operation of the BEVALAC biomedical facility for high energy heavy ions (Lyman and Howard, 1977; BEVALAC, 1977). Even so, many fundamental aspects of the interaction of relativistic heavy ions with matter, including important atomic physics and radiation chemical considerations, are not discussed beyond the reminder that such additional understanding is required before an adequte perspective of the problem can be attained.

  18. Nuclear data needs for radiation protection and therapy dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, M.B.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Haight, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    New nuclear data are required for improved neutron and proton radiotherapy treatment planning as well as future applications of high-energy particle accelerators. Modern neutron radiotherapy employs energies extending to 70 MeV, while industrial applications such as transmutation and tritium breeding may generate neutrons exceeding energies of 100 MeV. Secondary neutrons produced by advanced proton therapy facilities can have energies as high as 250 MeV. Each use requires nuclear data for transport calculations and analysis of radiation effects (dosimetry). We discuss the nuclear data needs supportive of these applications including the different information requirements. As data in this energy region are sparse and likely to remain so, advanced nuclear model calculations can provide some of the needed information. ln this context, we present new evaluated nuclear data for C, N, and O. Additional experimental information, including integral and differential data, are required to confirm these results and to bound further calculations. We indicate the required new data to be measured and the difficulties in carrying out such experiments.

  19. Epid Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Peter B.; Vial, Philip

    2011-05-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were introduced originally for patient position verification. The idea of using EPIDs for dosimetry was realised in the 1980s. Little was published on the topic until the mid 1990's, when the interest in EPIDs for dosimetry increased rapidly and continues to grow. The increasing research on EPID dosimetry coincided with the introduction of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). EPIDs are well suited to IMRT dosimetry because they are high resolution, two-dimensional (2D) digital detectors. They are also pre-existing on almost all modern linear accelerators. They generally show a linear response to increasing dose. Different types of EPIDs have been clinically implemented, and these have been described in several review papers. The current generation of commercially available EPIDs are indirect detection active matrix flat panel imagers, also known as amorphous silicon (a-Si) EPIDs. Disadvantages of a-Si EPIDs for dosimetry include non-water equivalent construction materials, and the energy sensitivity and optical scatter of the phosphor scintillators used to create optical signal from the megavoltage beam. This report discusses current knowledge regarding a-Si EPIDs for dosimetry.

  20. Fundamentals of Materials, Techniques, and Instrumentation for OSL and FNTD Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akselrod, M. S.

    2011-05-01

    The optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique has already become a successful commercial tool in personal radiation dosimetry, medical dosimetry, diagnostic imaging, geological and archeological dating. This review briefly describes the history and fundamental principles of OSL materials, methods and instrumentation. The advantages of OSL technology and instrumentation in comparison with thermoluminescent technique are analyzed. Progress in material and detector engineering has allowed new and promising developments regarding OSL applications in the medical field. Special attention is dedicated to Al2O3:C as a material of choice for many dosimetric applications. Different aspects of OSL theory, materials optical and dosimetric properties, instrumentation, and data processing algorithms are described. The next technological breakthrough was done with Fluorescent Nuclear Track Detectors (FNTD) that have some important advantages in measuring fast neutron and high energy heavy charge particles that have become the latest tool in radiation therapy. New Mg-doped aluminum oxide crystals and novel type of imaging instrumentation for FNTD technology are discussed with regard to application in mixed neutron-gamma fields, medical dosimetry and radiobiological research.

  1. Determination of the response function for two personal neutron dosemeter designs based on PADC.

    PubMed

    Mayer, S; Assenmacher, F; Boschung, M

    2014-10-01

    Since 1998 neutron dosimetry based on PADC (poly allyl diglycol carbonate) is done with a so-called original Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) design at PSI. The original design (i.e. holder) was later changed. Both designs are optimised for use in workplaces around high-energy accelerators, where the neutron energy spectra are dominated by fast neutrons ranging up to some 100 MeV. In addition to the change of the dosemeter design a new evaluation method based on a microscope scanning technique has been introduced and the etching conditions have been optimised. In the present work, the responses obtained with the original and the new dosemeter designs are compared for fields of radionuclide sources and monoenergetic reference fields using the new evaluation method. The response curves in terms of the personal dose equivalent for normally incident neutrons were built as functions of the incident neutron energy.

  2. Emerging technological bases for retrospective dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Straume, T; Anspaugh, L R; Haskell, E H; Lucas, J N; Marchetti, A A; Likhtarev, I A; Chumak, V V; Romanyukha, A A; Khrouch, V T; Gavrilin YuI; Minenko, V F

    1997-01-01

    In this article we discuss examples of challenging problems in retrospective dosimetry and describe some promising solutions. The ability to make measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry and luminescence techniques promises to provide improved dosimetry for regions of Belarus, Ukraine and Russian Federation contaminated by radionuclides from the Chernobyl accident. In addition, it may soon be possible to resolve the large neutron discrepancy in the dosimetry system for Hiroshima through novel measurement techniques that can be used to reconstruct the fast-neutron fluence emitted by the bomb some 51 years ago. Important advances in molecular cytogenetics and electron paramagnetic resonance measurements have produced biodosimeters that show potential in retrospective dosimetry. The most promising of these are the frequency of reciprocal translocations measured in chromosomes of blood lymphocytes using fluorescence in situ hybridization and the electron paramagnetic resonance signal in tooth enamel.

  3. High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A

    2004-11-11

    High-energy-density (HED) physics refers broadly to the study of macroscopic collections of matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density. The experimental facilities most widely used for these studies are high-power lasers and magnetic-pinch generators. The HED physics pursued on these facilities is still in its infancy, yet new regimes of experimental science are emerging. Examples from astrophysics include work relevant to planetary interiors, supernovae, astrophysical jets, and accreting compact objects (such as neutron stars and black holes). In this paper, we will review a selection of recent results in this new field of HED laboratory astrophysics and provide a brief look ahead to the coming decade.

  4. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1982-01-01

    This artist's conception depicts the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-1 in orbit. The first observatory, designated HEAO-1, was launched on August 12, 1977 aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle and was designed to survey the sky for additional x-ray and gamma-ray sources as well as pinpointing their positions. The HEAO-1 was originally identified as HEAO-A but the designation was changed once the spacecraft achieved orbit. The HEAO project involved the launching of three unmarned scientific observatories into low Earth orbit between 1977 and 1979 to study some of the most intriguing mysteries of the universe; pulsars, black holes, neutron stars, and super nova. Hardware support for the imaging instruments was provided by American Science and Engineeing. The HEAO spacecraft were built by TRW, Inc. under project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  5. Boron dose determination for BNCT using Fricke and EPR dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Ciesielski, B.

    1995-02-01

    In Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) the dominant dose delivered to the tumor is due to {alpha} and {sup 7}Li charged particles resulting from a neutron capture by {sup 10}B and is referred to herein as the boron dose. Boron dose is directly attributable to the following two independent factors, one boron concentration and the neutron capture energy dependent cross section of boron, and two the energy spectrum of the neutrons that interact with boron. The neutron energy distribution at a given point is dictated by the incident neutron energy distribution, the depth in tissue, geometrical factors such as beam size and patient`s dimensions. To account for these factors can be accommodated by using Monte Carlo theoretical simulations. However, in conventional experimental BNCT dosimetry, e.g., using TLDs or ionization chambers, it is only possible to estimate the boron dose. To overcome some of the limitations in the conventional dosimetry, modifications in ferrous sulfate dosimetry (Fricke) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) dosimetry in alanine, enable to measure specifically boron dose in a mixed gamma neutron radiation fields. The boron dose, in either of the dosimeters, is obtained as a difference between measurements with boronated and unboronated dosimeters. Since boron participates directly in the measurements, the boron dosimetry reflects the true contribution, integral of the neutron energy spectrum with boron cross section, of the boron dose to the total dose. Both methods are well established and used extensively in dosimetry, they are presented briefly here.

  6. Beam shaping assembly of a D-T neutron source for BNCT and its dosimetry simulation in deeply-seated tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faghihi, F.; Khalili, S.

    2013-08-01

    This article involves two aims for BNCT. First case includes a beam shaping assembly estimation for a D-T neutron source to find epi-thermal neutrons which are the goal in the BNCT. Second issue is the percent depth dose calculation in the adult Snyder head phantom. Monte-Carlo simulations and verification of a suggested beam shaping assembly (including internal neutron multiplier, moderator, filter, external neutron multiplier, collimator, and reflector dimensions) for thermalizing a D-T neutron source as well as increasing neutron flux are carried out and our results are given herein. Finally, we have simulated its corresponding doses for treatment planning of a deeply-seated tumor.

  7. High-energy detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E [South Setauket, NY; Camarda, Giuseppe [Farmingville, NY; Cui, Yonggang [Upton, NY; James, Ralph B [Ridge, NY

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  8. (Biological dosimetry)

    SciTech Connect

    Sega, G.A.

    1990-11-06

    The traveler participated in an International Symposium on Trends in Biological Dosimetry and presented an invited paper entitled, Adducts in sperm protamine and DNA vs mutation frequency.'' The purpose of the Symposium was to examine the applicability of new methods to study quantitatively the effects of xenobiotic agents (radiation and chemicals) on molecular, cellular and organ systems, with special emphasis on human biological dosimetry. The general areas covered at the meeting included studies on parent compounds and metabolites; protein adducts; DNA adducts; gene mutations; cytogenetic end-points and reproductive methods.

  9. High Energy Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA (Universities Space Research Association) contract team during the six months during the reporting period (10/95 - 3/96) and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science, Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  10. High Energy Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed-by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, visiting the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA); X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE); X-ray Spectrometer (XRS); Astro-E; High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  11. High Energy Exoplanet Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llama, Joe; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.

    2017-10-01

    X-ray and ultraviolet transits of exoplanets allow us to probe the atmospheres of these worlds. High energy transits have been shown to be deeper but also more variable than in the optical. By simulating exoplanet transits using high-energy observations of the Sun, we can test the limits of our ability to accurately measure the properties of these planets in the presence of stellar activity. We use both disk-resolved images of the Solar disk spanning soft X-rays, the ultraviolet, and the optical and also disk-integrated Sun-as-a-star observations of the Lyα irradiance to simulate transits over a wide wavelength range. We find that for stars with activity levels similar to the Sun, the planet-to-star radius ratio can be overestimated by up to 50% if the planet occults an active region at high energies. We also compare our simulations to high energy transits of WASP-12b, HD 189733, 55 Cnc b, and GJ 436b.

  12. High energy colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-02-01

    The authors consider the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, p{anti p}), lepton (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}) and photon-photon colliders. Technical problems in obtaining increased energy in each type of machine are presented. The machines relative size are also discussed.

  13. High energy particle astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffington, A.; Muller, R. A.; Smith, L. H.; Smoot, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of techniques currently used in high energy particle astronomy for measuring charged and neutral cosmic rays and their isotope and momentum distribution. Derived from methods developed for accelerator experiments in particle physics, these techniques help perform important particle astronomy experiments pertaining to nuclear cosmic ray and gamma ray research, electron and position probes, and antimatter searches.

  14. High energy particle astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffington, A.; Muller, R. A.; Smith, L. H.; Smoot, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of techniques currently used in high energy particle astronomy for measuring charged and neutral cosmic rays and their isotope and momentum distribution. Derived from methods developed for accelerator experiments in particle physics, these techniques help perform important particle astronomy experiments pertaining to nuclear cosmic ray and gamma ray research, electron and position probes, and antimatter searches.

  15. Inorganic High Energy Oxidisers,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    properties may contribute significantly to the energy of the whole system. A book entitled ’Inorganic High - Energy Oxidisers’ by E.W. Lawless and I.C. Smith is the subject of this Essay Review by W.E. Batty.

  16. High Energy Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    An overview of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory 2 contributions to X-ray astronomy is presented along with a brief description of the satellite and onboard telescope. Observations relating to galaxies and galactic clusters, black holes, supernova remnants, quasars, and cosmology are discussed.

  17. Three-Dimensional (X,Y,Z) Deterministic Analysis of the PCA-Replica Neutron Shielding Benchmark Experiment using the TORT-3.2 Code and Group Cross Section Libraries for LWR Shielding and Pressure Vessel Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pescarini, Massimo; Orsi, Roberto; Frisoni, Manuela

    2016-02-01

    The PCA-Replica 12/13 (H2O/Fe) neutron shielding benchmark experiment was analysed using the ORNL TORT-3.2 3D SN code. PCA-Replica, specifically conceived to test the accuracy of nuclear data and transport codes employed in LWR shielding and radiation damage calculations, reproduces a PWR ex-core radial geometry with alternate layers of water and steel including a PWR pressure vessel simulator. Three broad-group coupled neutron/photon working cross section libraries in FIDO-ANISN format with the same energy group structure (47 n + 20 γ) and based on different nuclear data were alternatively used: the ENEA BUGJEFF311.BOLIB (JEFF-3.1.1) and BUGENDF70.BOLIB (ENDF/B-VII.0) libraries and the ORNL BUGLE-96 (ENDF/B-VI.3) library. Dosimeter cross sections derived from the IAEA IRDF-2002 dosimetry file were employed. The calculated reaction rates for the Rh-103(n,n')Rh-103 m, In-115(n,n')In-115m and S-32(n,p)P-32 threshold activation dosimeters and the calculated neutron spectra are compared with the corresponding experimental results.

  18. (Biological dosimetry)

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.J.

    1990-12-17

    The traveler attended the 1st International Conference on Biological Dosimetry in Madrid, Spain. This conference was organized to provide information to a general audience of biologists, physicists, radiotherapists, industrial hygiene personnel and individuals from related fields on the current ability of cytogenetic analysis to provide estimates of radiation dose in cases of occupational or environmental exposure. There is a growing interest in Spain in biological dosimetry because of the increased use of radiation sources for medical and occupational uses, and with this the anticipated and actual increase in numbers of overexposure. The traveler delivered the introductory lecture on Biological Dosimetry: Mechanistic Concepts'' that was intended to provide a framework by which the more applied lectures could be interpreted in a mechanistic way. A second component of the trip was to provide advice with regard to several recent cases of overexposure that had been or were being assessed by the Radiopathology and Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital General Gregorio Maranon'' in Madrid. The traveler had provided information on several of these, and had analyzed cells from some exposed or purportedly exposed individuals. The members of the biological dosimetry group were referred to individuals at REACTS at Oak Ridge Associated Universities for advice on follow-up treatment.

  19. What is learned from high energy bursts and flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneid, Edward J.

    1990-01-01

    The Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) with its large Nal Total Absorption Shower Counter (TASC) has the scientific capability of performing spectroscopy of high energy cosmic gamma ray bursts and solar flares. EGRET, with a spectroscopy energy range from 0.6 to 140 MeV, provides an opportunity to increase the understanding of the high energy mechanisms of gamma ray bursts and solar flares. A likely interpretation of gamma ray burst sources is that they are rotating, magnetized neutron stars. High magnetic fields can influence the emission of high energy gamma rays, so observational spectroscopic data at high energies can provide information on the upper limits of the magnetic fields in the GRB regions of magnetized neutron stars. Likewise, spectroscopy of high energy gamma rays can provide information useful for deriving the flare proton spectrum which in turn can lead to an understanding of high energy solar flare particle acceleration mechanisms.

  20. Characterisation of neutron fields at Cernavoda NPP.

    PubMed

    Cauwels, Vanessa; Vanhavere, Filip; Dumitrescu, Dorin; Chirosca, Alecsandru; Hager, Luke; Million, Marc; Bartz, James

    2013-04-01

    Near a nuclear reactor or a fuel container, mixed neutron/gamma fields are very common, necessitating routine neutron dosimetry. Accurate neutron dosimetry is complicated by the fact that the neutron effective dose is strongly dependent on the neutron energy and the direction distribution of the neutron fluence. Neutron field characterisation is indispensable if one wants to obtain a reliable estimate for the neutron dose. A measurement campaign at CANDU nuclear power plant located in Cernavoda, Romania, was set up to characterise the neutron fields in four different locations and to investigate the behaviour of different neutron personal dosemeters. This investigation intends to assist in choosing a suitable neutron dosimetry system at this nuclear power plant.

  1. High energy transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woosley, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    A meeting was convened on the campus of the University of California at Santa Cruz during the two-week interval July 11 through July 22, 1983. Roughly 100 participants were chosen so as to give broad representation to all aspects of high energy transients. Ten morning review sessions were held in which invited speakers discussed the current status of observations and theory of the above subjects. Afternoon workshops were also held, usually more than one per day, to informally review various technical aspects of transients, confront shortcomings in theoretical models, and to propose productive courses for future research. Special attention was also given to the instrumentation used to study high energy transient and the characteristics and goals of a dedicated space mission to study transients in the next decade were determined. A listing of articles written by various members of the workshop is included.

  2. High energy from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, Bruce; Canizares, Claude; Catura, Richard C.; Clark, George W.; Fichtel, Carl E.; Friedman, Herbert; Giacconi, Riccardo; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Helfand, David J.; Holt, Stephen S.

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) important scientific problems for high energy astrophysics (stellar activity, the interstellar medium in galaxies, supernovae and endpoints of stellar evolution, nucleosynthesis, relativistic plasmas and matter under extreme conditions, nature of gamma-bursts, identification of black holes, active nuclei, accretion physics, large-scale structures, intracluster medium, nature of dark matter, and the X- and gamma-ray background); (2) the existing experimental programs (Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO), X-Ray Timing Explorer (XTE), High Energy Transient Experiment (HETE), U.S. participation in foreign missions, and attached Shuttle and Space Station Freedom payloads); (3) major missions for the 1990's; (4) a new program of moderate missions; (5) new opportunities for small missions; (6) technology development issues; and (7) policy issues.

  3. High energy beam lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetto, M.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    The ISAC post accelerator comprises an RFQ, DTL and SC-linac. The high energy beam lines connect the linear accelerators as well as deliver the accelerated beams to two different experimental areas. The medium energy beam transport (MEBT) line connects the RFQ to the DTL. The high energy beam transport (HEBT) line connects the DTL to the ISAC-I experimental stations (DRAGON, TUDA-I, GPS). The DTL to superconducting beam (DSB) transport line connects the ISAC-I and ISAC-II linacs. The superconducting energy beam transport (SEBT) line connects the SC linac to the ISAC-II experimental station (TUDA-II, HERACLES, TIGRESS, EMMA and GPS). All these lines have the function of transporting and matching the beams to the downstream sections by manipulating the transverse and longitudinal phase space. They also contain diagnostic devices to measure the beam properties.

  4. Dosimetry of in situ activated dysprosium microspheres.

    PubMed

    Adnani, N

    2004-03-07

    This paper presents the results of a study aimed at investigating the dosimetry of stable dysprosium microspheres activated, in situ, by a linac generated photon beam. In phantom measurements of the neutron flux within an 18 MV photon beam were performed using CR-39 detectors and gold activation. The results were used in conjunction with a Monte Carlo computer simulation to investigate the dose distribution resulting from the activation of dysprosium (Dy) microspheres using an 18 MV photon beam. Different depths, lesion volumes and volume concentrations of microspheres are investigated. The linac lower collimator jaws are assumed completely closed to shield the tumour volume from the photon dose. Using a single AP field with 0 x 0 cm2 field size (closed jaws), a photon dose rate of 600 MU min(-1) and 80 cm SSD for 10 min, an average dose exceeding 1 Gy can be delivered to spherical lesions of 0.5 cm and higher diameter. The variation of the average dose with the size of the lesion reaches saturation for tumour volumes exceeding 1 cm in diameter. This report shows that the photon beam of a high-energy linac can be used to activate Dy microspheres in situ and, as a result, deliver a significant dose of beta radiation. Non-radioactive Dy microspheres do not have the toxicity and imaging problems associated with commercially available yttrium-90 based products.

  5. Hardness ratios of different neutron spectra.

    PubMed

    Tommasino, L; Tripathy, S P

    2004-01-01

    Extensive data have been gathered in the past on the response of different detectors, based on the registration of neutron-induced fissions in bismuth, gold, tantalum and thorium by the spark-replica counter and the thin film breakdown counter. These detectors make it possible to exploit the excellent characteristics of the fission reactions for the measurements of high-energy neutrons. Most of the investigations have been carried out at the quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam facility at The Svedberg Laboratory-TSL of the Uppsala University in cooperation with the Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI). The responses of different fission detectors in the neutron energy range 35-180 MeV have been evaluated: a region where the predictive power of available nuclear reaction models and codes is not reliable yet. For neutron energy >200 MeV, the fission-detector responses have been derived from the data of the proton fission cross sections. By using the ratio of the responses of these detectors, a simple and accurate way to evaluate the spectrum hardness can be obtained, thus providing a tool to obtain spectral information needed for neutron dosimetry without the need to know the entire spectrum. Extensive data have been already obtained for the high-energy neutron spectrum from the CERN concrete facility. In the present paper, the measured values of the response ratios for different fissile detectors exposed at the CERN facility are compared with those calculated for the spectra from the same facility and from different altitudes in the atmosphere, respectively.

  6. Dose Control System in the Optima XE Single Wafer High Energy Ion Implanter

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Shu; Yoon, Jongyoon; David, Jonathan

    2011-01-07

    Photoresist outgassing can significantly compromise accurate dosimetry of high energy implants. High energy implant even at a modest beam current produces high beam powers which create significantly worse outgassing than low and medium energy implants and the outgassing continues throughout the implant due to the low dose in typical high energy implant recipes. In the previous generation of high energy implanters, dose correction by monitoring of process chamber pressure during photoresist outgassing has been used. However, as applications diversify and requirements change, the need arises for a more versatile photoresist correction system to match the versatility of a single wafer high energy ion implanter. We have successfully developed a new dosimetry system for the Optima XE single wafer high energy ion implanter which does not require any form of compensation due to the implant conditions. This paper describes the principles and performance of this new dose system.

  7. Radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the basic facts about the measurement of ionizing radiation, usually referred to as radiation dosimetry. The article defines the common radiation quantities and units; gives typical levels of natural radiation and medical exposures; and describes the most important biological effects of radiation and the methods used to measure radiation. Finally, a proposal is made for a new radiation risk unit to make radiation risks more understandable to nonspecialists. PMID:2040250

  8. Neutron detection on the Foton-M2 satellite by a track etch detector stack.

    PubMed

    Pálfalvi, J K; Szabó, J; Dudás, B

    2007-01-01

    In the frame of a European Space Agency (ESA) project called 'Biology and Physics in Space', a returning satellite, Foton-M2, was orbiting a container, the BIOPAN-5, loaded with biological experiments and facilities for radiation dosimetry (RADO) in the open space. One of the RADO experiments was dedicated to the detection of the primary cosmic rays and secondary neutrons by a track etch detector stack. The system was calibrated at high-energy particle accelerators and neutron generators. The developed detectors were investigated by an image analyser, and from the track parameters the linear energy transfer spectra and the absorbed dose were determined (26 microGy/d). Also, the neutron flux was estimated below 5 MeV and found to be 2.4 cm(-2) s(-1) directly from the space. The construction of the stack allowed to investigate the neutrons also from the direction of the carrying satellite, where the flux was found somewhat higher.

  9. Theoretical High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, Norman H.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    2014-07-14

    we provide reports from each of the six faculty supported by the Department of Energy High Energy Physics Theory grant at Columbia University. Each is followed by a bibliography of the references cited. A complete list of all of the publications in the 12/1/2010-04/30/2014 period resulting from research supported by this grant is provided in the following section. The final section lists the Ph.D. dissertations based on research supported by the grant that were submitted during this period.

  10. High energy electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    High energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. The questions of using electron cooling with and without a magnetic field are presented for discussion at this workshop. The electron cooling method was suggested by G. Budker in the middle sixties. The original idea of the electron cooling was published in 1966. The design activities for the NAP-M project was started in November 1971 and the first run using a proton beam occurred in September 1973. The first experiment with both electron and proton beams was started in May 1974. In this experiment good result was achieved very close to theoretical prediction for a usual two component plasma heat exchange.

  11. Introduction to High-Energy Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosswog, Stephan; Bruggen, Marcus

    2003-04-01

    High-energy astrophysics covers cosmic phenomena that occur under the most extreme physical conditions. It explores the most violent events in the Universe: the explosion of stars, matter falling into black holes, and gamma-ray bursts - the most luminous explosions since the Big Bang. Driven by a wealth of new observations, the last decade has seen a large leap forward in our understanding of these phenomena. Exploring modern topics of high-energy astrophysics, such as supernovae, neutron stars, compact binary systems, gamma-ray bursts, and active galactic nuclei, this textbook is ideal for undergraduate students in high-energy astrophysics. It is a self-supporting, timely overview of this exciting field of research. Assuming a familiarity with basic physics, it introduces all other concepts, such as gas dynamics or radiation processes, in an instructive way. An extended appendix gives an overview of some of the most important high-energy astrophysics instruments, and each chapter ends with exercises.• New, up-to-date, introductory textbook providing a broad overview of high-energy phenomena and the many advances in our knowledge gained over the last decade • Written especially for undergraduate teaching use, it introduces the necessary physics and includes many exercises • This book fills a valuable niche at the advanced undergraduate level, providing professors with a new modern introduction to the subject

  12. Czech results at criticality dosimetry intercomparison 2002.

    PubMed

    Frantisek, Spurný; Jaroslav, Trousil

    2004-01-01

    Two criticality dosimetry systems were tested by Czech participants during the intercomparison held in Valduc, France, June 2002. The first consisted of the thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) (Al-P glasses) and Si-diodes as passive neutron dosemeters. Second, it was studied to what extent the individual dosemeters used in the Czech routine personal dosimetry service can give a reliable estimation of criticality accident exposure. It was found that the first system furnishes quite reliable estimation of accidental doses. For routine individual dosimetry system, no important problems were encountered in the case of photon dosemeters (TLDs, film badge). For etched track detectors in contact with the 232Th or 235U-Al alloy, the track density saturation for the spark counting method limits the upper dose at approximately 1 Gy for neutrons with the energy >1 MeV.

  13. A Monte Carlo dosimetry-based evaluation of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction near threshold for accelerator boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, C L; Zhou, X L; Kudchadker, R J; Harmon, F; Harker, Y D

    2000-01-01

    Advanced methods of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) use an epithermal neutron beam in conjunction with tumor-targeting boron compounds for irradiation of glioblastomas and metastatic melanomas. A common neutron-producing reaction considered for accelerator-based BNCT is 7Li(p,n)7Be, whose cross section increases very rapidly within several tens of keV of the reaction threshold at 1.88 MeV. Operation in the proton energy region near threshold will have an appreciable thick target neutron yield, but the neutrons produced will have relatively low energies that require little moderation to reach the epithermal range desirable for BNCT. Because of its relatively low projected accelerator cost and the portability of the neutron source/target assembly, BNCT based on the near-threshold technique is considered an attractive candidate for widespread hospital use. A systematic Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) investigation of the dosimetric properties of near-threshold neutron beams has been performed. Results of these studies indicate that accelerator proton energies between 1.93 and 1.99 MeV, using 5 cm of H2O moderator followed by thin 6Li and Pb shields, can provide therapeutically useful beams with treatment times less than one hour and accelerator currents less than 5 mA.

  14. High energy reactor neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raper, Neill

    We present the first measurement of a nonzero reactor neutrino flux with energies above 8 MeV. Measurements are taken with the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiments detectors, using the Guangdong Nuclear Power Station as a source. Disagreement between data and theory regarding rate and shape of reactor neutrino spectra have made the need for direct measurement clear. Data are especially useful at high energies, where far fewer isotopes contribute. Neutrino candidates are correlated to reactor power and reactor power is extrapolated to zero in order to separate neutrino events from background. We find evidence of reactor neutrinos up to ˜12.5 MeV at 1.92 sigma above 0 and include a survey of isotopes likely to be contributing neutrinos in this energy range.

  15. Prospects at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, C.

    1988-11-01

    I discuss some possibilities for neutrino experiments in the fixed-target environment of the SPS, Tevatron, and UNK, with their primary proton beams of 0.4, 0.9, and 3.0 TeV. The emphasis is on unfinished business: issues that have been recognized for some time, but not yet resolved. Then I turn to prospects for proton-proton colliders to explore the 1-TeV scale. I review the motivation for new physics in the neighborhood of 1 TeV and mention some discovery possibilities for high-energy, high-luminosity hadron colliders and the implications they would have for neutrino physics. I raise the possibility of the direct study of neutrino interactions in hadron colliders. I close with a report on the status of the SSC project. 38 refs., 17 figs.

  16. Personnel radiation dosimetry symposium: program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    The purpose was to provide applied and research dosimetrists with sufficient information to evaluate the status and direction of their programs relative to the latest guidelines and techniques. A technical program was presented concerning experience, requirements, and advances in gamma, beta, and neutron personnel dosimetry.

  17. The Response of an Albedo Neutron Dosimeter to Moderated AmBe and 252(Cf) Neutron Sources.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    20814 G. K. RIEL, K. Woo, J. C . Y. WANG, AND N . E. SCOFIELD Naval Surjace Weapons Center, White Oak Silver Spring, MD 20910 July 23, 1985 NAVAL RESEARCH...LA80RATORY Approved for public release-, distribution unlimited. -z Z-VP 9 S C .- ,1CASS- c CAflON OF TH!S PAGE- REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE * ~ ! R...GROUP -~Persunnel radiation monitoring, Neutron dosimetry, .2 ___________________________Radiation dosimetry / Albedo neutron dosimetry N ~~Neutrons

  18. Retrospective dosimetry analyses of reactor vessel cladding samples

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L. R.; Soderquist, C. Z.; Fero, A. H.

    2011-07-01

    Reactor pressure vessel cladding samples for Ringhals Units 3 and 4 in Sweden were analyzed using retrospective reactor dosimetry techniques. The objective was to provide the best estimates of the neutron fluence for comparison with neutron transport calculations. A total of 51 stainless steel samples consisting of chips weighing approximately 100 to 200 mg were removed from selected locations around the pressure vessel and were sent to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for analysis. The samples were fully characterized and analyzed for radioactive isotopes, with special interest in the presence of Nb-93m. The RPV cladding retrospective dosimetry results will be combined with a re-evaluation of the surveillance capsule dosimetry and with ex-vessel neutron dosimetry results to form a comprehensive 3D comparison of measurements to calculations performed with 3D deterministic transport code. (authors)

  19. Characterization of high-energy quasi-monoenergetic neutron energy spectra and ambient dose equivalents of 80-389 MeV 7Li(p,n) reactions using a time-of-flight method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Yosuke; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Satoh, Daiki; Araki, Shouhei; Yashima, Hiroshi; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Masuda, Akihiko; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Nakao, Noriaki; Shima, Tatsushi; Kin, Tadahiro; Watanabe, Yukinobu; Iwase, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    We completed a series of measurements on mono-energetic neutron energy spectra of the 7Li(p,n) reaction with 80-389-MeV protons in the 100-m time-of-flight (TOF) tunnel at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics cyclotron facility. For that purpose, we measured neutron energy spectra of the 80-, 100- and 296-MeV proton incident reactions, which had not been investigated in our previous studies. The neutron peak intensity was 0.9-1.1×1010 neutrons/sr/μC in the incident proton energy region of 80-389 MeV, and it was almost independent of the incident proton energy. The contribution of peak intensity of the spectrum to the total intensity integrated with energies above 3 MeV varied between 0.38 and 0.48 in the incident proton energy range of 80-389 MeV. To consider the correction required to derive a response in the peak region from the measured total responses of neutron monitors in the 100-m TOF tunnel, we proposed the subtraction method using energy spectra between 0° and 25°. The normalizing factor k against 25° neutron fluence to equalize it to 0° neutron fluence in the continuum region ranges from 0.74 to 1.02 depending on the incident proton energy and angle measured. Even without the TOF method, the subtraction method with the k factor almost decreases the response in the continuum region of a neutron spectrum against the total response of neutron monitors.

  20. FSU High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Prosper, Harrison B.; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Berg, Bernd; Blessing, Susan K.; Okui, Takemichi; Owens, Joseph F.; Reina, Laura; Wahl, Horst D.

    2014-12-01

    The High Energy Physics group at Florida State University (FSU), which was established in 1958, is engaged in the study of the fundamental constituents of matter and the laws by which they interact. The group comprises theoretical and experimental physicists, who sometimes collaborate on projects of mutual interest. The report highlights the main recent achievements of the group. Significant, recent, achievements of the group’s theoretical physicists include progress in making precise predictions in the theory of the Higgs boson and its associated processes, and in the theoretical understanding of mathematical quantities called parton distribution functions that are related to the structure of composite particles such as the proton. These functions are needed to compare data from particle collisions, such as the proton-proton collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with theoretical predictions. The report also describes the progress in providing analogous functions for heavy nuclei, which find application in neutrino physics. The report highlights progress in understanding quantum field theory on a lattice of points in space and time (an area of study called lattice field theory), the progress in constructing several theories of potential new physics that can be tested at the LHC, and interesting new ideas in the theory of the inflationary expansion of the very early universe. The focus of the experimental physicists is the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN. The report, however, also includes results from the D0 experiment at Fermilab to which the group made numerous contributions over a period of many years. The experimental group is particularly interested in looking for new physics at the LHC that may provide the necessary insight to extend the standard model (SM) of particle physics. Indeed, the search for new physics is the primary task of contemporary particle physics, one motivated by the need to explain certain facts, such as the

  1. ATR neutron spectral characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.W.; Anderl, R.A.

    1995-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INEL provides intense neutron fields for irradiation-effects testing of reactor material samples, for production of radionuclides used in industrial and medical applications, and for scientific research. Characterization of the neutron environments in the irradiation locations of the ATR has been done by means of neutronics calculations and by means of neutron dosimetry based on the use of neutron activation monitors that are placed in the various irradiation locations. The primary purpose of this report is to present the results of an extensive characterization of several ATR irradiation locations based on neutron dosimetry measurements and on least-squares-adjustment analyses that utilize both neutron dosimetry measurements and neutronics calculations. This report builds upon the previous publications, especially the reference 4 paper. Section 2 provides a brief description of the ATR and it tabulates neutron spectral information for typical irradiation locations, as derived from the more historical neutron dosimetry measurements. Relevant details that pertain to the multigroup neutron spectral characterization are covered in section 3. This discussion includes a presentation on the dosimeter irradiation and analyses and a development of the least-squares adjustment methodology, along with a summary of the results of these analyses. Spectrum-averaged cross sections for neutron monitoring and for displacement-damage prediction in Fe, Cr, and Ni are given in section 4. In addition, section4 includes estimates of damage generation rates for these materials in selected ATR irradiation locations. In section 5, the authors present a brief discussion of the most significant conclusions of this work and comment on its relevance to the present ATR core configuration. Finally, detailed numerical and graphical results for the spectrum-characterization analyses in each irradiation location are provided in the Appendix.

  2. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics program at the University of California at Riverside. In hadron collider physics the authors will complete their transition from experiment UA1 at CERN to the DZERO experiment at Fermilab. On experiment UA1 their effort will concentrate on data analysis at Riverside. At Fermilab they will coordinate the high voltage system for all detector elements. They will also carry out hardware/software development for the D0 muon detector. The TPC/Two-Gamma experiment has completed its present phase of data-taking after accumulating 160 pb{sup {minus}}1 of luminosity. The UC Riverside group will continue data and physics analysis and make minor hardware improvement for the high luminosity run. The UC Riverside group is participating in design and implementation of the data acquisition system for the OPAL experiment at LEP. Mechanical and electronics construction of the OPAL hadron calorimeter strip readout system is proceeding on schedule. Data analysis and Monte Carlo detector simulation efforts are proceeding in preparation for the first physics run when IEP operation comenses in fall 1989.

  3. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics Program at the University of California, Riverside. In 1990, we will concentrate on analysis of LEP data from the OPAL detector. We expect to record 10{sup 5} Z`s by the end of 1989 and 10{sup 6} in 1990. This data will be used to measure the number of quark-lepton families in the universe. In the second half of 1990 we will also be occupied with the installation of the D-Zero detector in the Tevatron Collider and the preparation of software for the 1991 run. A new initiative made possible by generous university support is a laboratory for detector development at UCR. The focus will be on silicon strip tracking detectors both for the D-Zero upgrade and for SSC physics. The theory program will pursue further various mass-generating radiative mechanisms for understanding small quark and lepton masses as well as some novel phenomenological aspects of supersymmetry.

  4. High Energy Astrophysics Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Ormes, Jonathan F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The nature of gravity and its relationship to the other three forces and to quantum theory is one of the major challenges facing us as we begin the new century. In order to make progress we must challenge the current theories by observing the effects of gravity under the most extreme conditions possible. Black holes represent one extreme, where the laws of physics as we understand them break down. The Universe as whole is another extreme, where its evolution and fate is dominated by the gravitational influence of dark matter and the nature of the Cosmological constant. The early universe represents a third extreme, where it is thought that gravity may somehow be unified with the other forces. NASA's "Cosmic Journeys" program is part of a NASA/NSF/DoE tri-agency initiative designed to observe the extremes of gravity throughout the universe. This program will probe the nature of black holes, ultimately obtaining a direct image of the event horizon. It will investigate the large scale structure of the Universe to constrain the location and nature of dark matter and the nature of the cosmological constant. Finally it will search for and study the highest energy processes, that approach those found in the early universe. I will outline the High Energy Astrophysics part of this program.

  5. High Energy Astrophysics Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Ormes, Jonathan F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The nature of gravity and its relationship to the other three forces and to quantum theory is one of the major challenges facing us as we begin the new century. In order to make progress we must challenge the current theories by observing the effects of gravity under the most extreme conditions possible. Black holes represent one extreme, where the laws of physics as we understand them break down. The Universe as whole is another extreme, where its evolution and fate is dominated by the gravitational influence of dark matter and the nature of the Cosmological constant. The early universe represents a third extreme, where it is thought that gravity may somehow be unified with the other forces. NASA's "Cosmic Journeys" program is part of a NASA/NSF/DoE tri-agency initiative designed to observe the extremes of gravity throughout the universe. This program will probe the nature of black holes, ultimately obtaining a direct image of the event horizon. It will investigate the large scale structure of the Universe to constrain the location and nature of dark matter and the nature of the cosmological constant. Finally it will search for and study the highest energy processes, that approach those found in the early universe. I will outline the High Energy Astrophysics part of this program.

  6. Applicability of Topaz Composites to Electron Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomfim, K. S.; Souza, D. N.

    2010-11-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimetric topaz properties have been investigated and the results have shown that this mineral presents characteristics of a good dosimeter mainly in doses evaluation in radiotherapy with photons beams in radiotherapy. Typical applications of thermoluminescent dosimeters in radiotherapy are: in vivo dosimetry on patients (either as a routine quality assurance procedure or for dose monitoring in special cases); verification of treatment techniques; dosimetry audits; and comparisons among hospitals. The mean aim of this work was to evaluate the efficiency of topaz-Teflon pellets as thermoluminescent dosimeters in high-energy electron beams used to radiotherapy. Topaz-Teflon pellets were used as TLD.

  7. Fission foil detector calibrations with high energy protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Fission foil detectors (FFD's) are passive devices composed of heavy metal foils in contact with muscovite mica films. The heavy metal nuclei have significant cross sections for fission when irradiated with neutrons and protons. Each isotope is characterized by threshold energies for the fission reactions and particular energy-dependent cross sections. In the FFD's, fission fragments produced by the reactions are emitted from the foils and create latent particle tracks in the adjacent mica films. When the films are processed surface tracks are formed which can be optically counted. The track densities are indications of the fluences and spectra of neutrons and/or protons. In the past, detection efficiencies have been calculated using the low energy neutron calibrated dosimeters and published fission cross sections for neutrons and protons. The problem is that the addition of a large kinetic energy to the (n,nucleus) or (p,nucleus) reaction could increase the energies and ranges of emitted fission fragments and increase the detector sensitivity as compared with lower energy neutron calibrations. High energy calibrations are the only method of resolving the uncertainties in detector efficiencies. At high energies, either proton or neutron calibrations are sufficient since the cross section data show that the proton and neutron fission cross sections are approximately equal. High energy proton beams have been utilized (1.8 and 4.9 GeV, 80 and 140 MeV) for measuring the tracks of fission fragments emitted backward and forward.

  8. Fission foil detector calibrations with high energy protons

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, E.V.; Frank, A.L.

    1995-03-01

    Fission foil detectors (FFD`s) are passive devices composed of heavy metal foils in contact with muscovite mica films. The heavy metal nuclei have significant cross sections for fission when irradiated with neutrons and protons. Each isotope is characterized by threshold energies for the fission reactions and particular energy-dependent cross sections. In the FFD`s, fission fragments produced by the reactions are emitted from the foils and create latent particle tracks in the adjacent mica films. When the films are processed surface tracks are formed which can be optically counted. The track densities are indications of the fluences and spectra of neutrons and/or protons. In the past, detection efficiencies have been calculated using the low energy neutron calibrated dosimeters and published fission cross sections for neutrons and protons. The problem is that the addition of a large kinetic energy to the (n,nucleus) or (p,nucleus) reaction could increase the energies and ranges of emitted fission fragments and increase the detector sensitivity as compared with lower energy neutron calibrations. High energy calibrations are the only method of resolving the uncertainties in detector efficiencies. At high energies, either proton or neutron calibrations are sufficient since the cross section data show that the proton and neutron fission cross sections are approximately equal. High energy proton beams have been utilized (1.8 and 4.9 GeV, 80 and 140 MeV) for measuring the tracks of fission fragments emitted backward and forward.

  9. (High energy physics)

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, B.E.; Roberts, J.B. Jr.

    1991-09-01

    An intense analysis effort on the data we obtained in a seven month run on E704 last year has produced a flood of new results on polarization effects in particle production at 200 GeV/c. We are fortunate to be able to report in detail on those results. Our other Fermilab experiment, E683 (photoproduction of jets) has been delayed an unbelievable amount of time by Fermilab schedule slippages. It was scheduled and ready for beam two years ago As this report is being written, we have been running for two months and are expecting four months of production data taking. In this report we show some of our preliminary results. In addition we are near the end of a six month run on our CERN experiment, NA47 (SMC) which will measure the spin dependent structure functions for the proton and neutron. It is with a sense of relief, mixed with pride, that we report that all the equipment which we constructed for that experiment is currently working as designed. The random coincidence of accelerator schedules has left us slightly dazed, but all experiments are getting done and analyzed in a timely fashion. As members of the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration, we have been preparing for the only currently approved experiment at the SSC. Here we report on our scintillating fiber tracker design and simulation activities. In addition we report the results of our investigation of the detector response to heavy Z particles. Since our last report, we have joined the D0 collaboration with the primary aim of contributing to the D0 upgrade over the next few years. It is also important for us to gain experience in collider physics during the period leading up to the SDC turn-on.

  10. Dosimetry and radiobiology at the new RA-3 reactor boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility: application to the treatment of experimental oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, E; Nigg, D W; Miller, M; Thorp, S I; Heber, E M; Zarza, L; Estryk, G; Monti Hughes, A; Molinari, A J; Garabalino, M; Itoiz, M E; Aromando, R F; Quintana, J; Trivillin, V A; Schwint, A E

    2009-07-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina (CNEA) constructed a novel thermal neutron source for use in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) applications at the RA-3 research reactor facility located in Buenos Aires. The aim of the present study was to perform a dosimetric characterization of the facility and undertake radiobiological studies of BNCT in an experimental model of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch. The free-field thermal flux was 7.1 x 10(9) n cm(-2)s(-1) and the fast neutron flux was 2.5 x 10(6) n cm(-2)s(-1), indicating a very well-thermalized neutron field with negligible fast neutron dose. For radiobiological studies it was necessary to shield the body of the hamster from the neutron flux while exposing the everted cheek pouch bearing the tumors. To that end we developed a lithium (enriched to 95% in (6)Li) carbonate enclosure. Groups of tumor-bearing hamsters were submitted to BPA-BNCT, GB-10-BNCT, (GB-10+BPA)-BNCT or beam only treatments. Normal (non-cancerized) hamsters were treated similarly to evaluate normal tissue radiotoxicity. The total physical dose delivered to tumor with the BNCT treatments ranged from 6 to 8.5 Gy. Tumor control at 30 days ranged from 73% to 85%, with no normal tissue radiotoxicity. Significant but reversible mucositis in precancerous tissue surrounding tumors was associated to BPA-BNCT. The therapeutic success of different BNCT protocols in treating experimental oral cancer at this novel facility was unequivocally demonstrated.

  11. GEM Applications Outside High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Serge Duarte

    2013-04-01

    From its invention in 1997, the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) has been applied in nuclear and high energy physics experiments. Over time however, other applications have also exploited the favorable properties of GEMs. The use of GEMs in these applications will be explained in principle and practice. This paper reviews applications in research, beam instrumentation and homeland security. The detectors described measure neutral radiations such as photons, x-rays, gamma rays and neutrons, as well as all kinds of charged radiation. This paper provides an overview of the still expanding range of possibilities of this versatile detector concept.

  12. High-energy proton radiation belt.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    The experiments and theories to explain the high-energy protons trapped in the earth's radiation belt are reviewed. The theory of cosmic ray albedo neutron decay injection of protons into the radiation belt is discussed. Radial diffusion and change in the earth's dipole moment are considered along with losses of protons by ionization and nuclear collision. It is found that the measured albedo neutron escape current is sufficient to supply trapped protons above 30 MeV. The theoretical calculations of the trapped protons are in agreement with the measurements for L less than or equal to 1.7 both on and off the equator. For L greater than or equal to 1.7, additional trapped proton differential energy measurements should be made before the theory can be adequately tested. It appears that an additional loss mechanism such as pitch angle scattering may be required.

  13. (A clinical trial of neutron capture therapy for brain tumors)

    SciTech Connect

    Zamenhof, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes progress made in refining of neutron-induced alpha tract autoradiography, in designing epithermal neutron bean at MITR-II and in planning treatment dosimetry using Monte Carlo techniques.

  14. International intercomparison for criticality dosimetry: the case of biological dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Roy, L; Buard, V; Delbos, M; Durand, V; Paillole, N; Grégoire, E; Voisin, P

    2004-01-01

    The Institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) organized a biological dosimetry international intercomparison with the purpose of comparing (i) dicentrics yield produced in human lymphocytes; (ii) the gamma and neutron dose estimate according to the corresponding laboratory calibration curve. The experimental reactor SILENE was used with different configurations: bare source 4 Gy, lead shield 1 and 2 Gy and a 60Co source 2 Gy. An increasing variation of dicentric yield per cell was observed between participants when there were more damages in the samples. Doses were derived from the observed dicentric rates according to the dose-effect relationship provided by each laboratory. Differences in dicentric rate values are more important than those in the corresponding dose values. The doses obtained by the participants were found to be in agreement with the given physical dose within 20%. The evaluation of the respective gamma and neutron dose was achieved only by four laboratories, with some small variations among them.

  15. Seventh Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Greene, R.T.

    1981-12-01

    The Seventh Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted March 31-April 10, 1981, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Dosimeters from 34 participating agencies were mounted on anthropomorphic phantoms and exposed to a range of low-level dose equivalents (1.5-15.0mSv neutron and 0.1-2.8 mSv gamma) which could be encountered during routine personnel monitoring in mixed radiation fields. The Health Physics Research Reactor, operating in the steady-state mode, served as the source of radiation for two equivalent sets of six separate exposures. Lucite and concrete shields along with the unshielded reactor provided three different neutron and gamma spectra for five of the exposures in each set. Results reported by the participating agencies showed that no single type of neutron dosimeter exhibited acceptable performance characteristics for all mixed-field environments encountered in this study. Film, TLD, and TLD-albed dosimeters were found to be inadequate for neutron dose equivalent measurements when large numbers of slow neutrons are present unless significant corrections are made to measured results. Track dosimeters indicated the least sensitivity to spectral characteristics, but did not always yield to the most accurate results. Gamma dose measurements showed that TLD-700 dosimeters produced significantly more accurate results than film dosimeters which tend to overestimate gamma doses in mixed radiation fields.

  16. Dosimetry analyses of the Ringhals 3 and 4 reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Kulesza, J.A.; Fero, A.H.; Rouden, J.; Green, E.L.

    2011-07-01

    A comprehensive series of neutron dosimetry measurements consisting of surveillance capsules, reactor pressure vessel cladding samples, and ex-vessel neutron dosimetry has been analyzed and compared to the results of three-dimensional, cycle-specific neutron transport calculations for the Ringhals Unit 3 and Unit 4 reactors in Sweden. The comparisons show excellent agreement between calculations and measurements. The measurements also demonstrate that it is possible to perform retrospective dosimetry measurements using the {sup 93}Nb (n,n') {sup 93m}Nb reaction on samples of 18-8 austenitic stainless steel with only trace amounts of elemental niobium. (authors)

  17. Dosimetry and quantitative radionuclide imaging in radioimmunotherapy: Final report, July 15, 1992-July 14, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Leichner, P.K.

    1996-09-01

    Brief summaries of the principal accomplishments of this project on the development of quantitative SPECT for high energy photons (87Y, 19F) and stability testing of 87Y-labeled antibodies in the nude mouse model, development of an unified approach to photon and beta particle dosimetry, quantitative SPECT for nonuniform attenuation, and development of patient-specific dosimetry in radioimmunotherapy.

  18. Optical polarizing neutron devices designed for pulsed neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, M.; Kurahashi, K.; Endoh, Y.; Itoh, S.

    1997-09-01

    We have designed two polarizing neutron devices for pulsed cold neutrons. The devices have been tested at the pulsed neutron source at the Booster Synchrotron Utilization Facility of the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. These two devices proved to have a practical use for experiments to investigate condensed matter physics using pulsed cold polarized neutrons.

  19. Tomsk Polytechnic University cyclotron as a source for neutron based cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Lisin, V. A.; Bogdanov, A. V.; Golovkov, V. M.; Sukhikh, L. G.; Verigin, D. A.; Musabaeva, L. I.

    2014-02-15

    In this paper we present our cyclotron based neutron source with average energy 6.3 MeV generated during the 13.6 MeV deuterons interactions with beryllium target, neutron field dosimetry, and dosimetry of attendant gamma fields. We also present application of our neutron source for cancer treatment.

  20. The US Department of Energy Personnel Dosimetry Evaluation and Upgrade Program

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, L.G.; Stroud, C.M.; Swinth, K.L.; Vallario, E.J.

    1987-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Personnel Dosimetry Evaluation and Upgrade Program is designed to identify and evaluate dosimetry deficiencies and to conduct innovative research and development programs that will improve overall capabilities, thus ensuring that DOE can comply with applicable standards and regulations for dose measurement. To achieve these goals, two programs were initiated to evaluate and upgrade beta measurement and neutron dosimetry. 3 refs.

  1. Neutron dosimetric measurements in shuttle and MIR.

    PubMed

    Reitz, G

    2001-06-01

    Detector packages consisting of thermoluminescence detectors (TLD), nuclear emulsions and plastic track detectors were exposed at identical positions inside MIR space station and on shuttle flights inside Spacelab and Spacehab during different phases of the solar cycle. The objectives of the investigations are to provide data on charge and energy spectra of heavy ions, and the contribution of events with low-energy deposit (protons, electrons, gamma, etc.) to the dose, as well as the contribution of secondaries, such as nuclear disintegration stars and neutrons. For neutron dosimetry 6LiF (TLD600) and 7LiF (TLD700) chips were used both of which have almost the same response to gamma rays but different response to neutrons. Neutrons in space are produced mainly in evaporation and knock-on processes with energies mainly of 1-10 MeV and up to several 100 MeV, respectively. The energy spectrum undergoes continuous changes toward greater depth in the attenuating material until an equilibrium is reached. In equilibrium, the spectrum is a wide continuum extending down to thermal energies to which the 6LiF is sensitive. Based on the difference of absorbed doses in the 6LiF and 7LiF chips, thermal neutron fluxes from 1 to 2.3 cm-2 s-1 are calculated using the assumption that the maximum induced dose in TLD600 for 1 neutron cm-2 is 1.6 x 10(-10) Gy (Horowitz and Freeman, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. 157 (1978) 393). It is assumed that the flux of high-energy neutrons is at least of that quantity. Tissue doses were calculated taking as a mean ambient absorbed dose per neutron 6 x10(-12) Gy cm2 (for a10 MeV neutron). The neutron equivalent doses for the above-mentioned fluxes are 52 micro Gy d-1 and 120 micro Gy d-1. In recent experiments, a personal neutron dosimeter was integrated into the dosimeter packages. First results of this dosimeter which is based on nuclear track detectors with converter foils are reported. For future measurements, a scintillator counter with

  2. Gamma-ray and neutron dosimetry by EPR and AMS, using tooth enamel from atomic-bomb survivors: a mini review.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Nori; Hirai, Yuko; Kodama, Yoshiaki

    2012-03-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR, or electron spin resonance) method was used to measure CO₂⁻· radicals recorded in tooth enamel by exposure to atomic-bomb gamma rays. The EPR-estimated doses (i.e. ⁶⁰Co gamma-ray equivalent dose) were generally in good correlation with cytogenetic data of the same survivors, whereas plots of EPR-estimated dose or cytogenetically estimated dose against DS02 doses turned out to scatter more widely. Because those survivors whose EPR doses were higher (or lower) than DS02 doses tended to show also higher (or lower) responses for cytogenetic responses, the apparent variation appears primarily due to problems in individual DS02 doses rather than the measurement errors associated with the EPR or cytogenetic technique. A part of the enamel samples were also used for evaluation of neutron doses by measuring ⁴¹Ca/⁴⁰Ca ratios using the accelerator mass spectrometry technique. The results for the measured ratios were on average ~85 % of the calculated ratios by DS02 (but within the 95 % confidence bounds of the simulated results), which lends support to DS02-derived neutron doses to the survivors.

  3. Chemical dosimetry system for criticality accidents.

    PubMed

    Miljanić, Saveta; Ilijas, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Ruder Bosković Institute (RBI) criticality dosimetry system consists of a chemical dosimetry system for measuring the total (neutron + gamma) dose, and a thermoluminescent (TL) dosimetry system for a separate determination of the gamma ray component. The use of the chemical dosemeter solution chlorobenzene-ethanol-trimethylpentane (CET) is based on the radiolytic formation of hydrochloric acid, which protonates a pH indicator, thymolsulphonphthalein. The high molar absorptivity of its red form at 552 nm is responsible for a high sensitivity of the system: doses in the range 0.2-15 Gy can be measured. The dosemeter has been designed as a glass ampoule filled with the CET solution and inserted into a pen-shaped plastic holder. For dose determinations, a newly constructed optoelectronic reader has been used. The RBI team took part in the International Intercomparison of Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems at the SILENE Reactor, Valduc, June 2002, with the CET dosimetry system. For gamma ray dose determination TLD-700 TL detectors were used. The results obtained with CET dosemeter show very good agreement with the reference values.

  4. High-energy spectroscopic astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güdel, Manuel; Walter, Roland

    After three decades of intense research in X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, the time was ripe to summarize basic knowledge on X-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy for interested students and researchers ready to become involved in new high-energy missions. This volume exposes both the scientific basics and modern methods of high-energy spectroscopic astrophysics. The emphasis is on physical principles and observing methods rather than a discussion of particular classes of high-energy objects, but many examples and new results are included in the three chapters as well.

  5. Experimental High Energy Neutrino Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Distefano, Carla

    2005-10-12

    Neutrinos are considered promising probes for high energy astrophysics. More than four decades after deep water Cerenkov technique was proposed to detect high energy neutrinos. Two detectors of this type are successfully taking data: BAIKAL and AMANDA. They have demonstrated the feasibility of the high energy neutrino detection and have set first constraints on TeV neutrino production astrophysical models. The quest for the construction of km3 size detectors have already started: in the South Pole, the IceCube neutrino telescope is under construction; the ANTARES, NEMO and NESTOR Collaborations are working towards the installation of a neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea.

  6. Measurements of fast neutrons in Hiroshima by use of (39)Ar.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Eckehart; Rühm, Werner; Loosli, H Hugo; Tolstikhin, Igor; Kato, Kazuo; Huber, Thomas C; Egbert, Stephen D

    2006-03-01

    The survivors of the A-bomb explosions over Hiroshima and Nagasaki were exposed to a mixed neutron and gamma radiation field. To validate the high-energy portion of the neutron field and thus the neutron dose to the survivors, a method is described that allows retrospective assessment of the fast neutrons from the A-bombs. This is accomplished by the extraction of the noble gas argon from biotites separated from Hiroshima granite samples, and then the detection of the (39)Ar activity that was produced by the capture of the fast neutrons on potassium. Adjusted to the year 1945, activities measured in the first samples taken at distances of 94, 818, 992, and 1,173 m from the hypocenter were 6.9+/-0.2, 0.32+/-0.01, 0.14+/-0.02, and 0.09+/-0.01 mBq/g K, respectively. All signals were significantly above detector background and show low uncertainties. Considering their uncertainties they agree with the calculated (39)Ar activation in the samples, based on the most recent dosimetry system DS02. It is concluded that this method can be used to investigate samples obtained from large distances in Hiroshima, where previous data on fast neutrons are characterized by considerable uncertainties. Additionally, the method can be used to reconstruct the fast neutron fluence in Nagasaki, where no experimental data exist.

  7. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1979-01-01

    Managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and built by TRW, the third High Energy Astronomy Observatory was launched September 20, 1979. HEAO-3 was designed to study gamma-rays and cosmic ray particles.

  8. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  9. Polarized targets in high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Cates, G.D. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    Various approaches are discussed for producing polarized nuclear targets for high energy physics experiments. As a unifying theme, examples are drawn from experiments to measure spin dependent structure functions of nucleons in deep inelastic scattering. This single physics goal has, over roughly two decades, been a driving force in advances in target technology. Actual or planned approaches have included solid targets polarized by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), several types of internal targets for use in storage rings, and gaseous {sup 3}He targets polarized by spin-exchange optical pumping. This last approach is the type of target adopted for SLAC E-142, an experiment to measure the spin structure function of the neutron, and is described in detail.

  10. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This drawing is a schematic of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-1. The first observatory, designated HEAO-1, was launched on August 12, 1977 aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle and was designed to survey the sky for additional x-ray and gamma-ray sources as well as pinpointing their positions. The HEAO-1 was originally identified as HEAO-A but the designation was changed once the spacecraft achieved orbit. The HEAO project involved the launching of three unmarned scientific observatories into low Earth orbit between 1977 and 1979 to study some of the most intriguing mysteries of the universe; pulsars, black holes, neutron stars, and super nova. Hardware support for the imaging instruments was provided by American Science and Engineeing. The HEAO spacecraft were built by TRW, Inc. under project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  11. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This artist's conception depicts the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-1 in orbit. The first observatory, designated HEAO-1, was launched on August 12, 1977 aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle and was designed to survey the sky for additional x-ray and gamma-ray sources as well as pinpointing their positions. The HEAO-1 was originally identified as HEAO-A but the designation was changed once the spacecraft achieved orbit. The HEAO project involved the launching of three unmarned scientific observatories into low Earth orbit between 1977 and 1979 to study some of the most intriguing mysteries of the universe; pulsars, black holes, neutron stars, and super nova. Hardware support for the imaging instruments was provided by American Science and Engineeing. The HEAO spacecraft were built by TRW, Inc. under project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  12. Thin film tritium dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Moran, Paul R.

    1976-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for tritium dosimetry. A dosimeter comprising a thin film of a material having relatively sensitive RITAC-RITAP dosimetry properties is exposed to radiation from tritium, and after the dosimeter has been removed from the source of the radiation, the low energy electron dose deposited in the thin film is determined by radiation-induced, thermally-activated polarization dosimetry techniques.

  13. Nucleon structure and the high energy interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selyugin, O. V.

    2015-06-01

    On the basis of the representation of the generalized structure of nucleons a new model of the hadron interaction at high energies is presented. A new t dependence of the generalized parton distributions is obtained from the comparative analysis of different sets of the parton distribution functions, based on the description of the entire set of experimental data for the electromagnetic form factors of the proton and neutron. Taking into account the different moments of the generalized parton distributions of the hadron, quantitative descriptions of all existing experimental data of the proton-proton and proton-antiproton elastic scatterings from √{s }=9.8 GeV to 8 TeV, including the Coulomb range and large momentum transfers up to -t =15 GeV2 , are obtained with a few free high-energy fitting parameters. The real part of the hadronic elastic scattering amplitude is determined only through the complex s that satisfies the dispersion relations. The negligible contributions of the hard Pomeron and the presence of the non-small contributions of the maximal Odderon are obtained. The non-dying form of the spin-flip amplitude is examined as well. The structures of the Born term and unitarized scattering amplitude are analyzed. It is shown that the black disk limit for the elastic scattering amplitude is not reached at LHC energies. Predictions for LHC energies are made.

  14. Extreme Transients in the High Energy Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2013-01-01

    The High Energy Universe is rich in diverse populations of objects spanning the entire cosmological (time)scale, from our own present-day Milky Way to the re-ionization epoch. Several of these are associated with extreme conditions irreproducible in laboratories on Earth. Their study thus sheds light on the behavior of matter under extreme conditions, such as super-strong magnetic fields (in excess of 10^14 G), high gravitational potentials (e.g., Super Massive Black Holes), very energetic collimated explosions resulting in relativistic jet flows (e.g., Gamma Ray Bursts, exceeding 10^53 ergs). In the last thirty years, my work has been mostly focused on two apparently different but potentially linked populations of such transients: magnetars (highly magnetized neutron stars) and Gamma Ray Bursts (strongly beamed emission from relativistic jets), two populations that constitute unique astrophysical laboratories, while also giving us the tools to probe matter conditions in the Universe to redshifts beyond z=10, when the first stars and galaxies were assembled. I did not make this journey alone I have either led or participated in several international collaborations studying these phenomena in multi-wavelength observations; solitary perfection is not sufficient anymore in the world of High Energy Astrophysics. I will describe this journey, present crucial observational breakthroughs, discuss key results and muse on the future of this field.

  15. High energy cosmic ray composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, E. S.

    Cosmic rays are understood to result from energetic processes in the galaxy, probably from supernova explosions. However, cosmic ray energies extend several orders of magnitude beyond the limit thought possible for supernova blast waves. Over the past decade several ground-based and space-based investigations were initiated to look for evidence of a limit to supernova acceleration in the cosmic-ray chemical composition at high energies. These high-energy measurements are difficult because of the very low particle fluxes in the most interesting regions. The space-based detectors must be large enough to collect adequate statistics, yet stay within the weight limit for space flight. Innovative approaches now promise high quality measurements over an energy range that was not previously possible. The current status of high energy cosmic-ray composition measurements and planned future missions are discussed in this paper.

  16. Future of high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Panofsky, W.K.H.

    1984-06-01

    A rough overview is given of the expectations for the extension of high energy colliders and accelerators into the xtremely high energy range. It appears likely that the SSC or something like it will be the last gasp of the conventional method of producing high energy proton-proton collisions using synchrotron rings with superconducting magnets. It is likely that LEP will be the highest energy e+e/sup -/ colliding beam storage ring built. The future beyond that depends on the successful demonstrations of new technologies. The linear collider offers hope in this respect for some extension in energy for electrons, and maybe even for protons, but is too early to judge whether, by how much, or when such an extension will indeed take place.

  17. High Energy Astrophysics Program (HEAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, Lorella; Corcoran, Michael; Drake, Stephen; McGlynn, Thomas A.; Snowden, Stephen; Mukai, Koji; Cannizzo, John; Lochner, James; Rots, Arnold; Christian, Eric; hide

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by the members of the USRA contract team during the 6 months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming 6 months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in astrophysics. Supported missions include advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-Ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) and others.

  18. High Energy Astrophysics Program (HEAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, L.

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  19. Proceedings of the Specialists' Meeting on High Energy Nuclear Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukahori, Tokio

    1992-03-01

    This report consists of the Proceedings of the Specialists' Meeting on High Energy Nuclear Data. The meeting was held on October 3-4, 1991, at the Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute with the participation of forty-odd specialists, who were the evaluators, theorists, experimentalists, and users of high energy nuclear data including the members of Japanese Nuclear Data Committee. The need of the nuclear data in the high energy region up to a few GeV was stressed in the meeting for many applications, such as spallation neutron sources for radioactive waste treatment, accelerator shielding design, medical isotope production, radiation therapy, the effects of space radiation on astronauts and their equipment, and the cosmic history of meteorites and other galactic substances. Although the neutron nuclear data below 20 MeV have been well evaluated for fission and fusion reactor applications, the nuclear data in the high energy region have never been prepared in Japan. With the view of producing an evaluated high energy nuclear data file, theoretical models and codes, available and necessary measurements, needs of nuclear data, and various applications were reviewed and discussed. The consensus, that the wide collaboration was necessary to produce the evaluated file and should be established, has been obtained.

  20. A comprehensive spectrometry study of a stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mares, Vladimir; Romero-Expósito, Maite; Farah, Jad; Trinkl, Sebastian; Domingo, Carles; Dommert, Martin; Stolarczyk, Liliana; Van Ryckeghem, Laurent; Wielunski, Marek; Olko, Pawel; Harrison, Roger M.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy considering a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom and a clinically-relevant beam condition. Using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry systems (ERBSS), Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group measured neutron spectra at ten different positions around a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom irradiated for a brain tumor with a scanning proton beam. This study compares the different systems and unfolding codes as well as neutron spectra measured in similar conditions around a water tank phantom. The ten spectra measured with two ERBSS systems show a generally similar thermal component regardless of the position around the phantom while high energy neutrons (above 20 MeV) were only registered at positions near the beam axis (at 0°, 329° and 355°). Neutron spectra, fluence and ambient dose equivalent, H *(10), values of both systems were in good agreement (<15%) while the unfolding code proved to have a limited effect. The highest H *(10) value of 2.7 μSv Gy-1 was measured at 329° to the beam axis and 1.63 m from the isocenter where high-energy neutrons (E  ⩾  20 MeV) contribute with about 53%. The neutron mapping within the gantry room showed that H *(10) values significantly decreased with distance and angular position with respect to the beam axis dropping to 0.52 μSv Gy-1 at 90° and 3.35 m. Spectra at angles of 45° and 135° with respect to the beam axis measured here with an anthropomorphic phantom showed a similar peak structure at the thermal, fast and high energy range as in the previous water-tank experiments. Meanwhile, at 90°, small differences at the high-energy range were observed. Using ERBSS systems, neutron spectra mapping was performed to characterize the exposure of scanning proton therapy patients. The ten measured spectra provide precise information about the exposure of healthy organs to thermal

  1. A comprehensive spectrometry study of a stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Mares, Vladimir; Romero-Expósito, Maite; Farah, Jad; Trinkl, Sebastian; Domingo, Carles; Dommert, Martin; Stolarczyk, Liliana; Van Ryckeghem, Laurent; Wielunski, Marek; Olko, Pawel; Harrison, Roger M

    2016-06-07

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy considering a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom and a clinically-relevant beam condition. Using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry systems (ERBSS), Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group measured neutron spectra at ten different positions around a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom irradiated for a brain tumor with a scanning proton beam. This study compares the different systems and unfolding codes as well as neutron spectra measured in similar conditions around a water tank phantom. The ten spectra measured with two ERBSS systems show a generally similar thermal component regardless of the position around the phantom while high energy neutrons (above 20 MeV) were only registered at positions near the beam axis (at 0°, 329° and 355°). Neutron spectra, fluence and ambient dose equivalent, H (*)(10), values of both systems were in good agreement (<15%) while the unfolding code proved to have a limited effect. The highest H (*)(10) value of 2.7 μSv Gy(-1) was measured at 329° to the beam axis and 1.63 m from the isocenter where high-energy neutrons (E  ⩾  20 MeV) contribute with about 53%. The neutron mapping within the gantry room showed that H (*)(10) values significantly decreased with distance and angular position with respect to the beam axis dropping to 0.52 μSv Gy(-1) at 90° and 3.35 m. Spectra at angles of 45° and 135° with respect to the beam axis measured here with an anthropomorphic phantom showed a similar peak structure at the thermal, fast and high energy range as in the previous water-tank experiments. Meanwhile, at 90°, small differences at the high-energy range were observed. Using ERBSS systems, neutron spectra mapping was performed to characterize the exposure of scanning proton therapy patients. The ten measured spectra provide precise information about the exposure of healthy organs to

  2. Mexican High Energy Physics Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Olivo, J. C.; Napsuciale, M.; Pérez-Angón, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    The Mexican High Energy Physics Network is one of CONACYT's thematic research networks, created with the aim of increasing the communication and cooperation of the scientific and technology communities of Mexico in strategic areas. In this report we review the evolution, challenges, achievements and opportunities faced by the network.

  3. Extraterrestrial high energy neutrino fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    Using the most recent cosmic ray spectra up to 2x10 to the 20th power eV, production spectra of high energy neutrinos from cosmic ray interactions with interstellar gas and extragalactic interactions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays with 3K universal background photons are presented and discussed. Estimates of the fluxes from cosmic diffuse sources and the nearby quasar 3C273 are made using the generic relationship between secondary neutrinos and gammas and using recent gamma ray satellite data. These gamma ray data provide important upper limits on cosmological neutrinos. Quantitative estimates of the observability of high energy neutrinos from the inner galaxy and 3C273 above atmospheric background for a DUMAND type detector are discussed in the context of the Weinberg-Salam model with sq sin theta omega = 0.2 and including the atmospheric background from the decay of charmed mesons. Constraints on cosmological high energy neutrino production models are also discussed. It appears that important high energy neutrino astronomy may be possible with DUMAND, but very long observing times are required.

  4. HIGH ENERGY CRYSTALLINE LASER MATERIALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The object of this research is to obtain improved laser materials for high energy lasers. During the third quarter of this contract, the study of... energy transfer from Cr to Nd in GdAlO3 and YAlG continued. In order to study the Nd fluorescence arising via transfer from Cr, the material was excited

  5. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1978-01-01

    Managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and built by TRW, the second High Energy Astronomy Observatory was launched November 13, 1978. The observatory carried the largest X-ray telescope ever built and was renamed the Einstein Observatory after achieving orbit.

  6. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1977-01-01

    Managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and designed by TRW, the first High Energy Astronomy Observatory was launched August 12, 1977 aboard an Atlas Centaur rocket. HEAO-1, devoted to the study of X-rays in space, carried four instruments all used primarily in a scarning mode. The mission lasted seventeen months.

  7. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1977-08-01

    This picture is of an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle, carrying the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-1, on Launch Complex 36 at the Air Force Eastern Test Range prior to launch on August 12, 1977. The Kennedy Space Center managed the launch operations that included a pre-aunch checkout, launch, and flight, up through the observatory separation in orbit.

  8. Review of retrospective dosimetry techniques for external ionising radiation exposures.

    PubMed

    Ainsbury, E A; Bakhanova, E; Barquinero, J F; Brai, M; Chumak, V; Correcher, V; Darroudi, F; Fattibene, P; Gruel, G; Guclu, I; Horn, S; Jaworska, A; Kulka, U; Lindholm, C; Lloyd, D; Longo, A; Marrale, M; Monteiro Gil, O; Oestreicher, U; Pajic, J; Rakic, B; Romm, H; Trompier, F; Veronese, I; Voisin, P; Vral, A; Whitehouse, C A; Wieser, A; Woda, C; Wojcik, A; Rothkamm, K

    2011-11-01

    The current focus on networking and mutual assistance in the management of radiation accidents or incidents has demonstrated the importance of a joined-up approach in physical and biological dosimetry. To this end, the European Radiation Dosimetry Working Group 10 on 'Retrospective Dosimetry' has been set up by individuals from a wide range of disciplines across Europe. Here, established and emerging dosimetry methods are reviewed, which can be used immediately and retrospectively following external ionising radiation exposure. Endpoints and assays include dicentrics, translocations, premature chromosome condensation, micronuclei, somatic mutations, gene expression, electron paramagnetic resonance, thermoluminescence, optically stimulated luminescence, neutron activation, haematology, protein biomarkers and analytical dose reconstruction. Individual characteristics of these techniques, their limitations and potential for further development are reviewed, and their usefulness in specific exposure scenarios is discussed. Whilst no single technique fulfils the criteria of an ideal dosemeter, an integrated approach using multiple techniques tailored to the exposure scenario can cover most requirements.

  9. On the neutron contribution to the exposure level onboard space vehicles.

    PubMed

    Spurny, F; Ploc, O; Dachev, T

    2007-01-01

    The neutron contribution to the spacecraft crew exposure could represent an important part of the total dose equivalent value. The determination of this contribution represents a rather complex and difficult task, both through experimental and theoretical estimation. This paper will present an attempt to determine the neutron contribution onboard the International Space Station and Foton capsule using the data measured by means of a Si-diode based energy deposition spectrometer. As such a spectrometer, the MDU-Liulin equipment, developed in one of our laboratories was used. The equipment allows the data accumulated during the passage in or out of the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). In this paper, only the data obtained out of the SAA were analysed, assuming that the neutron spectra are similar to those onboard aircraft and/or at the CERF high-energy radiation field. The excess of deposited energy in the region above 1 MeV, when comparing with the aircraft field, was expected to represent the primary high-energy charged particles. Total dosimetry characteristics obtained in this way are in reasonable agreement with other data, neutron contribution representing approximately 40% of the total dose equivalent for the flight duration outside of the SAA.

  10. REVIEW OF DOSIMETRY FIELD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    three, oxalic acid , polyisobutylene, and Mylar film, seem sufficiently promising to warrant further development. Their current states of development...ceric sulfate dosimeters be included in the dosimetry handbook, but that additional work should be done on oxalic acid , polyisobutylene, and Mylar as dosimetry materials. (Author)

  11. High energy cosmic ray signature of quark nuggets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audouze, J.; Schaeffer, R.; Silk, J.

    1985-01-01

    It has been recently proposed that dark matter in the Universe might consist of nuggets of quarks which populate the nuclear desert between nucleons and neutron star matter. It is further suggested that the Centauro events which could be the signature of particles with atomic mass A approx. 100 and energy E approx. 10 to 15th power eV might also be related to debris produced in the encounter of two neutron stars. A further consequence of the former proposal is examined, and it is shown that the production of relativistic quark nuggets is accompanied by a substantial flux of potentially observable high energy neutrinos.

  12. WENDI: an improved neutron rem meter.

    PubMed

    Olsher, R H; Hsu, H H; Beverding, A; Kleck, J H; Casson, W H; Vasilik, D G; Devine, R T

    2000-08-01

    Neutron rem meters are routinely used for real-time field measurements of neutron dose equivalent where neutron spectra are unknown or poorly characterized. These meters are designed so that their response per unit fluence approximates an appropriate fluence-to-dose conversion function. Typically, a polyethylene moderator assembly surrounds a thermal neutron detector, such as a BF3 counter tube. Internal absorbers may also be used to further fine-tune the detector response to the shape of the desired fluence conversion function. Historical designs suffer from a number of limitations. Accuracy for some designs is poor at intermediate energies (50 keV-250 keV) critical for nuclear power plant dosimetry. The well-known Andersson-Braun design suffers from angular dependence because of its lack of spherical symmetry. Furthermore, all models using a pure polyethylene moderator have no useful high-energy response, which makes them inaccurate around high-energy accelerator facilities. This paper describes two new neutron rem meter designs with improved accuracy over the energy range from thermal to 5 GeV. The Wide Energy Neutron Detection Instrument (WENDI) makes use of both neutron generation and absorption to contour the detector response function. Tungsten or tungsten carbide (WC) powder is added to a polyethylene moderator with the expressed purpose of generating spallation neutrons in tungsten nuclei and thus enhance the high-energy response of the meter beyond 8 MeV. Tungsten's absorption resonance structure below several keV was also found to be useful in contouring the meter's response function. The WENDI rem meters were designed and optimized using the Los Alamos Monte Carlo codes MCNP, MCNPX, and LAHET. A first generation prototype (WENDI-I) was built in 1995 and its testing was completed in 1996. This design placed a BF3 counter in the center of a spherical moderator assembly, whose outer shell consisted of 30% by weight WC in a matrix of polyethylene. A borated

  13. [A clinical trial of neutron capture therapy for brain tumors]. Technical progress report 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Zamenhof, R.G.

    1988-12-31

    This report describes progress made in refining of neutron-induced alpha tract autoradiography, in designing epithermal neutron bean at MITR-II and in planning treatment dosimetry using Monte Carlo techniques.

  14. Simulations of the High-Energy Beam-Transport (HEBT) section at FRANZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, O.; Arda, C.; Claessens, C.; Fiebiger, S.; Meusel, O.; Noll, D.; Reich, M.; Reifarth, R.; Schmidt, S.; Schwarz, M.; Sonnabend, K.; Thomas, B.

    2016-11-01

    The neutron source FRANZ (Frankfurter Neutronenquelle am Stern-Gerlach-Zentrum), which is currently under construction, will be the neutron source with the highest intensity in the nuclear-astrophysically relevant energy region. The TraceWin code was used to design the High-Energy Beam-Transport section with regard to the experimental requirements at different target positions.

  15. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1975-01-01

    The family of High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) instruments consisted of three unmarned scientific observatories capable of detecting the x-rays emitted by the celestial bodies with high sensitivity and high resolution. The celestial gamma-ray and cosmic-ray fluxes were also collected and studied to learn more about the mysteries of the universe. High-Energy rays cannot be studied by Earth-based observatories because of the obscuring effects of the atmosphere that prevent the rays from reaching the Earth's surface. They had been observed initially by sounding rockets and balloons, and by small satellites that do not possess the needed instrumentation capabilities required for high data resolution and sensitivity. The HEAO carried the instrumentation necessary for this capability. In this photograph, an artist's concept of three HEAO spacecraft is shown: HEAO-1, launched on August 12, 1977; HEAO-2, launched on November 13, 1978; and HEAO-3, launched on September 20. 1979.

  16. High energy density aluminum battery

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Gilbert M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Dudney, Nancy J.; Manthiram, Arumugan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Hansan

    2016-10-11

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for a high energy density aluminum battery. The battery comprises an anode comprising aluminum metal. The battery further comprises a cathode comprising a material capable of intercalating aluminum or lithium ions during a discharge cycle and deintercalating the aluminum or lithium ions during a charge cycle. The battery further comprises an electrolyte capable of supporting reversible deposition and stripping of aluminum at the anode, and reversible intercalation and deintercalation of aluminum or lithium at the cathode.

  17. Cosmology for high energy physicists

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, A.

    1987-11-01

    The standard big bang model of cosmology is presented. Although not perfect, its many successes make it a good starting point for most discussions of cosmology. Places are indicated where well understood laboratory physics is incorporated into the big bang, leading to successful predictions. Much less established aspects of high energy physics and some of the new ideas they have introduced into the field of cosmology are discussed, such as string theory, inflation and monopoles. 49 refs., 5 figs.

  18. A high energy physics perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1997-01-13

    The status of the Standard model and role of symmetry in its development are reviewed. Some outstanding problems are surveyed and possible solutions in the form of additional {open_quotes}Hidden Symmetries {close_quotes} are discussed. Experimental approaches to uncover {open_quotes}New Physics{close_quotes} associated with those symmetries are described with emphasis on high energy colliders. An outlook for the future is given.

  19. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-01-01

    This schematic details the third High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-3. The HEAO-3's mission was to survey and map the celestial sphere for gamma-ray flux and make detailed measurements of cosmic-ray particles. It carried three scientific experiments: a gamma-ray spectrometer, a cosmic-ray isotope experiment, and a heavy cosmic-ray nuclei experiment. The HEAO-3 was originally identified as HEAO-C but the designation was changed once the spacecraft achieved orbit.

  20. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1978-11-13

    The launch of an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle is shown in this photograph. The Atlas/Centaur, launched on November 13, 1978, carried the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2 into the required orbit. The second observatory, the HEAO-2 (nicknamed the Einstein Observatory in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein) carried the first telescope capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects.

  1. High energy gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    High energy gamma ray astronomy has evolved with the space age. Nonexistent twenty-five years ago, there is now a general sketch of the gamma ray sky which should develop into a detailed picture with the results expected to be forthcoming over the next decade. The galactic plane is the dominant feature of the gamma ray sky, the longitude and latitude distribution being generally correlated with galactic structural features including the spiral arms. Two molecular clouds were already seen. Two of the three strongest gamma ray sources are pulsars. The highly variable X-ray source Cygnus X-3 was seen at one time, but not another in the 100 MeV region, and it was also observed at very high energies. Beyond the Milky Way Galaxy, there is seen a diffuse radiation, whose origin remains uncertain, as well as at least one quasar, 3C 273. Looking to the future, the satellite opportunities for high energy gamma ray astronomy in the near term are the GAMMA-I planned to be launched in late 1987 and the Gamma Ray Observatory, scheduled for launch in 1990. The Gamma Ray Observatory will carry a total of four instruments covering the entire energy range from 30,000 eV to 3 x 10 to the 10th eV with over an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity relative to previous satellite instruments.

  2. Evaluation of equivalent dose from neutrons and activation products from a 15-MV X-ray LINAC.

    PubMed

    Israngkul-Na-Ayuthaya, Isra; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Pengvanich, Phongpheath

    2015-11-01

    A high-energy photon beam that is more than 10 MV can produce neutron contamination. Neutrons are generated by the [γ,n] reactions with a high-Z target material. The equivalent neutron dose and gamma dose from activation products have been estimated in a LINAC equipped with a 15-MV photon beam. A Monte Carlo simulation code was employed for neutron and photon dosimetry due to mixed beam. The neutron dose was also experimentally measured using the Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) under various conditions to compare with the simulation. The activation products were measured by gamma spectrometer system. The average neutron energy was calculated to be 0.25 MeV. The equivalent neutron dose at the isocenter obtained from OSL measurement and MC calculation was 5.39 and 3.44 mSv/Gy, respectively. A gamma dose rate of 4.14 µSv/h was observed as a result of activations by neutron inside the treatment machine. The gamma spectrum analysis showed (28)Al, (24)Na, (54)Mn and (60)Co. The results confirm that neutrons and gamma rays are generated, and gamma rays remain inside the treatment room after the termination of X-ray irradiation. The source of neutrons is the product of the [γ,n] reactions in the machine head, whereas gamma rays are produced from the [n,γ] reactions (i.e. neutron activation) with materials inside the treatment room. The most activated nuclide is (28)Al, which has a half life of 2.245 min. In practice, it is recommended that staff should wait for a few minutes (several (28)Al half-lives) before entering the treatment room after the treatment finishes to minimize the dose received.

  3. Evaluation of equivalent dose from neutrons and activation products from a 15-MV X-ray LINAC

    PubMed Central

    Israngkul-Na-Ayuthaya, Isra; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Pengvanich, Phongpheath

    2015-01-01

    A high-energy photon beam that is more than 10 MV can produce neutron contamination. Neutrons are generated by the [γ,n] reactions with a high-Z target material. The equivalent neutron dose and gamma dose from activation products have been estimated in a LINAC equipped with a 15-MV photon beam. A Monte Carlo simulation code was employed for neutron and photon dosimetry due to mixed beam. The neutron dose was also experimentally measured using the Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) under various conditions to compare with the simulation. The activation products were measured by gamma spectrometer system. The average neutron energy was calculated to be 0.25 MeV. The equivalent neutron dose at the isocenter obtained from OSL measurement and MC calculation was 5.39 and 3.44 mSv/Gy, respectively. A gamma dose rate of 4.14 µSv/h was observed as a result of activations by neutron inside the treatment machine. The gamma spectrum analysis showed 28Al, 24Na, 54Mn and 60Co. The results confirm that neutrons and gamma rays are generated, and gamma rays remain inside the treatment room after the termination of X-ray irradiation. The source of neutrons is the product of the [γ,n] reactions in the machine head, whereas gamma rays are produced from the [n,γ] reactions (i.e. neutron activation) with materials inside the treatment room. The most activated nuclide is 28Al, which has a half life of 2.245 min. In practice, it is recommended that staff should wait for a few minutes (several 28Al half-lives) before entering the treatment room after the treatment finishes to minimize the dose received. PMID:26265661

  4. Internal dosimetry - a review.

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Charles Augustus

    2004-06-01

    The field history and current status of internal dosimetry is reviewed in this article. Elements of the field that are reviewed include standards and models, derivation of dose coefficients and intake retention fractions, bioassay measurements, and intake and dose calculations. In addition, guidance is developed and provided as to the necessity of internal dosimetry for a particular facility or operation and methodology for implementing a program. A discussion of the purposes of internal dosimetry is included as well as recommendations for future development and direction.

  5. Internal dosimetry: a review.

    PubMed

    Potter, Charles A

    2005-06-01

    The field history and current status of internal dosimetry is reviewed in this article. Elements of the field that are reviewed include standards and models, derivation of dose coefficients and intake retention fractions, bioassay measurements, and intake and dose calculations. In addition, guidance is developed and provided as to the necessity of internal dosimetry for a particular facility or operation and methodology for implementing a program. A discussion of the purposes of internal dosimetry is included as well as recommendations for future development and direction.

  6. Terrestrial Effects of High Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atri, Dimitra

    2011-01-01

    On geological timescales, the Earth is likely to be exposed to an increased flux of high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) from astrophysical sources such as nearby supernovae, gamma ray bursts or by galactic shocks. These high-energy particles strike the Earth's atmosphere initiating an extensive air shower. As the air shower propagates deeper, it ionizes the atmosphere by producing charged secondary particles. Increased ionization could lead to changes in atmospheric chemistry, resulting in ozone depletion. This could increase the flux of solar UVB radiation at the surface, which is potentially harmful to living organisms. Increased ionization affects the global electrical circuit can could possibly enhance the low-altitude cloud formation rate. Secondary particles such as muons and thermal neutrons produced as a result of nuclear interactions are able to reach the ground, enhancing the biological radiation dose. The muon flux dominates radiation dose from cosmic rays causing DNA damage and increase in the mutation rates, which can have serious biological implications for terrestrial and sub-terrestrial life. This radiation dose is an important constraint on the habitability of a planet. Using CORSIKA, we perform massive computer simulations and construct lookup tables from 10 GeV - 1 PeV primaries (1 PeV - 0.1 ZeV in progress), which can be used to quantify these effects. These tables are freely available to the community and can be used for other studies, not necessarily relevant to Astrobiology. We use these tables to study the terrestrial implications of galactic shock generated by the infall of our galaxy toward the Virgo cluster. This could be a possible mechanism explaining the observed periodicity in biodiversity in paleobiology databases.

  7. Terrestrial effects of high energy cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atri, Dimitra

    On geological timescales, the Earth is likely to be exposed to higher than the usual flux of high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) from astrophysical sources such as nearby supernovae, gamma ray bursts or by galactic shocks. These high-energy particles strike the Earth's atmosphere, initiating an extensive air shower. As the air shower propagates deeper, it ionizes the atmosphere by producing charged secondary particles and photons. Increased ionization leads to changes in atmospheric chemistry, resulting in ozone depletion. This increases the flux of solar UVB radiation at the surface, which is potentially harmful to living organisms. Increased ionization affects the global electrical circuit, which could enhance the low-altitude cloud formation rate. Secondary particles such as muons and thermal neutrons produced as a result of hadronic interactions of the primary cosmic rays with the atmosphere are able to reach the ground, enhancing the biological radiation dose. The muon flux dominates the radiation dose from cosmic rays causing damage to DNA and an increase in mutation rates and cancer, which can have serious biological implications for surface and sub-surface life. Using CORSIKA, we perform massive computer simulations and construct lookup tables for 10 GeV - 1 PeV primaries, which can be used to quantify these effects from enhanced cosmic ray exposure to any astrophysical source. These tables are freely available to the community and can be used for other studies. We use these tables to study the terrestrial implications of galactic shock generated by the infall of our galaxy toward the Virgo cluster. Increased radiation dose from muons could be a possible mechanism explaining the observed periodicity in biodiversity in paleobiology databases.

  8. A review on photoneutrons characteristics in radiation therapy with high-energy photon beams.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Alireza; Mesbahi, Asghar

    2010-09-22

    In radiation therapy with high-energy photon beams (E > 10 MeV) neutrons are generated mainly in linacs head thorough (γ,n) interactions of photons with nuclei of high atomic number materials that constitute the linac head and the beam collimation system. These neutrons affect the shielding requirements in radiation therapy rooms and also increase the out-of-field radiation dose of patients undergoing radiation therapy with high-energy photon beams. In the current review, the authors describe the factors influencing the neutron production for different medical linacs based on the performed measurements and Monte Carlo studies in the literature.

  9. A review on photoneutrons characteristics in radiation therapy with high-energy photon beams

    PubMed Central

    Naseri, Alireza; Mesbahi, Asghar

    2010-01-01

    In radiation therapy with high-energy photon beams (E > 10 MeV) neutrons are generated mainly in linacs head thorough (γ,n) interactions of photons with nuclei of high atomic number materials that constitute the linac head and the beam collimation system. These neutrons affect the shielding requirements in radiation therapy rooms and also increase the out-of-field radiation dose of patients undergoing radiation therapy with high-energy photon beams. In the current review, the authors describe the factors influencing the neutron production for different medical linacs based on the performed measurements and Monte Carlo studies in the literature. PMID:24376940

  10. Neutron dose measurements of Varian and Elekta linacs by TLD600 and TLD700 dosimeters and comparison with MCNP calculations

    PubMed Central

    Nedaie, Hassan Ali; Darestani, Hoda; Banaee, Nooshin; Shagholi, Negin; Mohammadi, Kheirollah; Shahvar, Arjang; Bayat, Esmaeel

    2014-01-01

    High-energy linacs produce secondary particles such as neutrons (photoneutron production). The neutrons have the important role during treatment with high energy photons in terms of protection and dose escalation. In this work, neutron dose equivalents of 18 MV Varian and Elekta accelerators are measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) 600 and TLD700 detectors and compared with the Monte Carlo calculations. For neutron and photon dose discrimination, first TLDs were calibrated separately by gamma and neutron doses. Gamma calibration was carried out in two procedures; by standard 60Co source and by 18 MV linac photon beam. For neutron calibration by 241Am-Be source, irradiations were performed in several different time intervals. The Varian and Elekta linac heads and the phantom were simulated by the MCNPX code (v. 2.5). Neutron dose equivalent was calculated in the central axis, on the phantom surface and depths of 1, 2, 3.3, 4, 5, and 6 cm. The maximum photoneutron dose equivalents which calculated by the MCNPX code were 7.06 and 2.37 mSv.Gy-1 for Varian and Elekta accelerators, respectively, in comparison with 50 and 44 mSv.Gy-1 achieved by TLDs. All the results showed more photoneutron production in Varian accelerator compared to Elekta. According to the results, it seems that TLD600 and TLD700 pairs are not suitable dosimeters for neutron dosimetry inside the linac field due to high photon flux, while MCNPX code is an appropriate alternative for studying photoneutron production. PMID:24600167

  11. Neutron dose measurements of Varian and Elekta linacs by TLD600 and TLD700 dosimeters and comparison with MCNP calculations.

    PubMed

    Nedaie, Hassan Ali; Darestani, Hoda; Banaee, Nooshin; Shagholi, Negin; Mohammadi, Kheirollah; Shahvar, Arjang; Bayat, Esmaeel

    2014-01-01

    High-energy linacs produce secondary particles such as neutrons (photoneutron production). The neutrons have the important role during treatment with high energy photons in terms of protection and dose escalation. In this work, neutron dose equivalents of 18 MV Varian and Elekta accelerators are measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) 600 and TLD700 detectors and compared with the Monte Carlo calculations. For neutron and photon dose discrimination, first TLDs were calibrated separately by gamma and neutron doses. Gamma calibration was carried out in two procedures; by standard 60Co source and by 18 MV linac photon beam. For neutron calibration by (241)Am-Be source, irradiations were performed in several different time intervals. The Varian and Elekta linac heads and the phantom were simulated by the MCNPX code (v. 2.5). Neutron dose equivalent was calculated in the central axis, on the phantom surface and depths of 1, 2, 3.3, 4, 5, and 6 cm. The maximum photoneutron dose equivalents which calculated by the MCNPX code were 7.06 and 2.37 mSv.Gy(-1) for Varian and Elekta accelerators, respectively, in comparison with 50 and 44 mSv.Gy(-1) achieved by TLDs. All the results showed more photoneutron production in Varian accelerator compared to Elekta. According to the results, it seems that TLD600 and TLD700 pairs are not suitable dosimeters for neutron dosimetry inside the linac field due to high photon flux, while MCNPX code is an appropriate alternative for studying photoneutron production.

  12. Unexpected high-energy γ emission from decaying exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottardo, A.; Verney, D.; Deloncle, I.; Péru, S.; Delafosse, C.; Roccia, S.; Matea, I.; Sotty, C.; Andreoiu, C.; Costache, C.; Delattre, M.-C.; Etilé, A.; Franchoo, S.; Gaulard, C.; Guillot, J.; Ibrahim, F.; Lebois, M.; MacCormick, M.; Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Martini, M.; Mihai, C.; Mitu, I.; Olivier, L.; Portail, C.; Qi, L.; Roussière, B.; Stan, L.; Testov, D.; Wilson, J.; Yordanov, D. T.

    2017-09-01

    The N = 5283Gaβ decay was studied at ALTO. The radioactive 83Ga beam was produced through the ISOL photofission technique and collected on a movable tape for the measurement of γ-ray emission following β decay. While β-delayed neutron emission has been measured to be 56-85% of the decay path, in this experiment an unexpected high-energy 5-9 MeV γ-ray yield of 16(4)% was observed, coming from states several MeVs above the neutron separation threshold. This result is compared with cutting-edge QRPA calculations, which show that when neutrons deeply bound in the core of the nucleus decay into protons via a Gamow-Teller transition, they give rise to a dipolar oscillation of nuclear matter in the nucleus. This leads to large electromagnetic transition probabilities which can compete with neutron emission, thus affecting the β-decay path. This process is enhanced by an excess of neutrons on the nuclear surface and may thus be a common feature for very neutron-rich isotopes, challenging the present understanding of decay properties of exotic nuclei.

  13. High-energy neutrino astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halzen, Francis

    2017-03-01

    The chargeless, weakly interacting neutrinos are ideal astronomical messengers as they travel through space without scattering, absorption or deflection. But this weak interaction also makes them notoriously di cult to detect, leading to neutrino observatories requiring large-scale detectors. A few years ago, the IceCube experiment discovered neutrinos originating beyond the Sun with energies bracketed by those of the highest energy gamma rays and cosmic rays. I discuss how these high-energy neutrinos can be detected and what they can tell us about the origins of cosmic rays and about dark matter.

  14. HIGH ENERGY GASEOUS DISCHARGE DEVICES

    DOEpatents

    Josephson, V.

    1960-02-16

    The high-energy electrical discharge device described comprises an envelope, a pair of main discharge electrodes supported in opposition in the envelope, and a metallic shell symmetrically disposed around and spaced from the discharge path between the electrodes. The metallic shell comprises a first element of spaced helical turns of metallic material and a second element of spaced helical turns of methllic material insulatedly supported in superposition outside the first element and with the turns overlapping the gap between the turns of the first element.

  15. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-01-01

    This artist's concept depicts the third observatory, the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-3 in orbit. Designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center, the HEAO-3's mission was to survey and map the celestial sphere for gamma-ray flux and make detailed measurements of cosmic-ray particles. It carried three scientific experiments: a gamma-ray spectrometer, a cosmic-ray isotope experiment, and a heavy cosmic-ray nuclei experiment. The HEAO-3 was originally identified as HEAO-C but the designation was changed once the spacecraft achieved orbit.

  16. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1978-01-01

    This photograph was taken during the assembly of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2 at TRW, Inc., the prime contractor for the HEAOs. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. TRW, Inc. designed and developed the HEAO, under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center. The HEAO-2 was originally identified as HEAO-B but the designation was changed once the spacecraft achieved orbit.

  17. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1977-01-01

    This photograph shows the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-1 being assembled at TRW Systems of Redondo Beach, California. The HEAO was designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center. The first observatory, designated HEAO-1, was launched on August 12, 1977 aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle and was designed to survey the sky for additional x-ray and gamma-ray sources as well as pinpointing their positions. The HEAO-1 was originally identified as HEAO-A but the designation was changed once the spacecraft achieved orbit.

  18. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1979-09-20

    This Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle, carrying the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-3, lifted off on September 20, 1979. The HEAO-3's mission was to survey and map the celestial sphere for gamma-ray flux and make detailed measurements of cosmic-ray particles. It carried three scientific experiments: a gamma-ray spectrometer, a cosmic-ray isotope experiment, and a heavy cosmic-ray nuclei experiment. The HEAO-3 was originally identified as HEAO-C but the designation was changed once the spacecraft achieved orbit.

  19. The Extreme and Variable High Energy Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A critically important region of the astrophysical spectrum is the hard X-ray/gamma-ray band, from the keV to the GeV energy range. In this band, an unusually rich range of astrophysical processes occur: this is the energy domain where fundamental changes from thermal to non-thermal sources/phenomena are expected, where the effects of absorption are drastically reduced and a clearer picture of the Universe is possible. This is also the energy range where most of the extreme astrophysical behavior is taking place, e.g. cosmic acceleration, explosions and accretion onto black holes and neutron stars; where variability is more the rule than the exception and where a number of instruments are actively working (e.g. INTEGRAL, SWIFT, Suzaku, MAXI, AGILE, Fermi and HESS). These telescopes are providing an unprecedented view of the high energy sky. Combined with data obtained at lower energies from a number of satellites and ground based telescopes we have for the first time the possibility of studying this extreme and variable sky over a very broad energy band and with unprecedented sensitivity.The workshop is aimed at bringing together scientists active across the field of high energy astrophysics in order to focus on the opportunities offered by the high energy window both from the observational and theoretical viewpoints, while a dedicated section will also be devoted to discuss the current status of planned and future missions. The meeting will consist of invited talks and contributions which are welcome as either posters or as short presentations. There will be time for open discussions throughout.We intend to cover the most extreme phenomena associated with acceleration, explosions and accretion onto galactic and extragalactic objects as well as to study variability in all types of objects and environments. In view of the extension of INTEGRAL operational lifetime, the workshop will provide a unique opportunity to prepare for extra observational possibility and to

  20. Mixed radiation field dosimetry utilizing Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Hintenlang, D.

    1991-01-01

    This project has proposed to develop a novel dosimetry system that is capable of directly evaluating the chemical/biological damage caused by neutrons, photons, or both in a single measurement. The dosimeter itself will consist of a small volume of biological equivalent material that is probed for radiation damage with Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques. NQR has previously been utilized as a sensitive probe of structural and chemical changes at the molecular level for a variety of organic compounds. The biological equivalent materials used in this study will not only have a density similar to tissue (tissue equivalent) but will have the same atomic components as tissue. This is a significant requirement if the important neutron interactions that occur in tissue are to occur in the dosimeter as well. The overall objective of this study is to investigate a methodology to perform accurate mixed-field (neutron and photon) dosimetry for biological systems.