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  1. Acute Thermotherapy Prevents Impairments in Cutaneous Microvascular Function Induced by a High Fat Meal

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Jennifer C.; Roseguini, Bruno T.; Goerger, Benjamin M.; Fallon, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a high fat meal (HFM) would impair cutaneous vasodilation, while thermotherapy (TT) would reverse the detrimental effects. Eight participants were instrumented with skin heaters and laser-Doppler (LD) probes and tested in three trials: control, HFM, and HFM + TT. Participants wore a water-perfused suit perfused with 33°C (control and HFM) or 50°C (HFM + TT) water. Participants consumed 1 g fat/kg body weight. Blood samples were taken at baseline and two hours post-HFM. Blood pressure was measured every 5–10 minutes. Microvascular function was assessed via skin local heating from 33°C to 39°C two hours after HFM. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated and normalized to maximal vasodilation (%CVCmax). HFM had no effect on initial peak (48 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control (49 ± 4 %CVCmax) but attenuated the plateau (51 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control (63 ± 4 %CVCmax, P < 0.001). Initial peak was augmented in HFM + TT (66 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control and HFM (P < 0.05), while plateau (73 ± 3 % CVCmax) was augmented only compared to the HFM trial (P < 0.001). These data suggest that HFM negatively affects cutaneous vasodilation but can be minimized by TT. PMID:27595112

  2. Acute Thermotherapy Prevents Impairments in Cutaneous Microvascular Function Induced by a High Fat Meal.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Jennifer C; Roseguini, Bruno T; Goerger, Benjamin M; Fallon, Elizabeth A; Wong, Brett J

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a high fat meal (HFM) would impair cutaneous vasodilation, while thermotherapy (TT) would reverse the detrimental effects. Eight participants were instrumented with skin heaters and laser-Doppler (LD) probes and tested in three trials: control, HFM, and HFM + TT. Participants wore a water-perfused suit perfused with 33°C (control and HFM) or 50°C (HFM + TT) water. Participants consumed 1 g fat/kg body weight. Blood samples were taken at baseline and two hours post-HFM. Blood pressure was measured every 5-10 minutes. Microvascular function was assessed via skin local heating from 33°C to 39°C two hours after HFM. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated and normalized to maximal vasodilation (%CVCmax). HFM had no effect on initial peak (48 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control (49 ± 4 %CVCmax) but attenuated the plateau (51 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control (63 ± 4 %CVCmax, P < 0.001). Initial peak was augmented in HFM + TT (66 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control and HFM (P < 0.05), while plateau (73 ± 3 % CVCmax) was augmented only compared to the HFM trial (P < 0.001). These data suggest that HFM negatively affects cutaneous vasodilation but can be minimized by TT.

  3. A high-fat meal increases cardiovascular reactivity to psychological stress in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Jakulj, Fabijana; Zernicke, Kristin; Bacon, Simon L; van Wielingen, Laura E; Key, Brenda L; West, Sheila G; Campbell, Tavis S

    2007-04-01

    The consumption of high levels of saturated fat over the course of several weeks may lead to exaggerated cardiovascular reactivity. The consumption of a single high-fat meal has been associated with a transient impairment of vascular function. In a randomized, repeated measures, crossover study we tested whether the consumption of a single high-fat meal by healthy, normotensive participants would affect cardiovascular reactivity when compared with an isocaloric, low-fat meal. Thirty healthy participants ate a high-fat (42 g) and a low-fat (1 g) meal on 2 separate occasions, and their cardiovascular response to 2 standard laboratory stressors was measured. Systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and total peripheral resistance were greater in participants following the consumption of the high-fat meal relative to the low-fat meal. The findings of the present study are consistent with the hypothesis that even a single high-fat meal may be associated with heightened cardiovascular reactivity to stress and offer insight into the pathways through which a high-fat diet may affect cardiovascular function.

  4. Development of a Single High Fat Meal Challenge to Unmask ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stress tests are used clinically to determine the presence of underlying disease and predict future cardiovascular risk. In previous studies, we used treadmill exercise stress in rats to unmask the priming effects of air pollution inhalation. Other day-to-day activities stress the cardiovascular system, and when modeled experimentally, may be useful in identifying latent effects of air pollution exposure. For example, a single high fat (HF) meal can cause transient vascular endothelial dysfunction and increases in LDL cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), oxidative stress, and inflammation. Given the prevalence of HF meals in western diets, the goal of this study was to develop a HF meal challenge in rats to see if air pollution primes the body for a subsequent stress-induced adverse response. Healthy male Wistar Kyoto rats were fasted for six hours and then administered a single oral gavage of isocaloric lard-based HF or low fat (LF) suspensions, or a water vehicle control. We hypothesized that rats given a HF load would elicit postprandial changes in cardiopulmonary function that were distinct from LF and vehicle controls. One to four hours after gavage, rats underwent whole body plethysmography to assess breathing patterns, cardiovascular ultrasounds, blood draws for measurements of systemic lipids and hormones and a test for sensitivity to aconitine-induced arrhythmia. HF gavage caused an increase in circulating TG relative to LF and vehicle controls and an incre

  5. The effect of acute exercise on endothelial function following a high-fat meal.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Jaume; Harris, Ryan A; Fly, Alyce D; Rink, Lawrence D; Wallace, Janet P

    2006-10-01

    The transient impairment of endothelial function following a high-fat meal is well established. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) decreases between 2 and 6 h post ingestion. Whether this impairment can be reduced with acute aerobic exercise has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to investigate if a single sustained aerobic exercise session can counteract the postprandial attenuation in brachial artery FMD associated with the ingestion of a high-fat meal. Eight apparently healthy adults (five men, three women), age 25.5 +/- 0.8 years, performed three treatment conditions in a counter-balanced design: (1) low-fat meal alone (LFM), (2) high-fat meal alone (HFM), and (3) one session of aerobic exercise presented 2 h after ingesting a high-fat meal (HFM-EX). The examination of brachial artery FMD was performed at baseline and 4 h following the ingestion of the meal for each treatment condition. A 3 x 2 (treatment x time) repeated measures ANOVA exhibited a significant interaction (P = 0.019). Preprandial FMDs were similar (P = 0.863) among all three treatment conditions. The FMDs following the LFM (7.18 +/- 1.31%) and HFM-EX (8.72 +/- 0.94%) were significantly higher (P = 0.001) than the FMD following the HFM (4.29 +/- 1.64%). FMD was significantly elevated above preprandial values following the HFM-EX (5.61 +/- 1.54 to 8.72 +/- 0.94%, P = 0.005) but was unchanged following the LFM (6.17 +/- 0.94 to 7.18 +/- 1.31%, P = 0.317) and the HFM (5.73 +/- 1.23 to 4.29 +/- 1.64%, P = 0.160). These findings suggest that a single aerobic exercise session cannot only counteract the postprandial endothelial dysfunction induced by the ingestion of a high-fat meal, but also increase brachial artery FMD in apparently healthy adults.

  6. Acute exposure to a high-fat diet alters meal patterns and body composition

    PubMed Central

    Melhorn, Susan J; Krause, Eric G; Scott, Karen A; Mooney, Marie R; Johnson, Jeffrey D; Woods, Stephen C; Sakai, Randall R

    2009-01-01

    Weight gain and adiposity are often attributed to the overconsumption of unbalanced, high-fat diets however, the pattern of consumption can also contribute to associated body weight and compositional changes. The present study explored the rapid alterations in meal patterns of normal-weight rats given continuous access to high-fat diet and examined body weight and composition changes compared to chow fed controls. Ten Long-Evans rats were implanted with subcutaneous microchips for meal pattern analysis. Animals were body weight-matched and separated into two groups: high-fat or chow fed. Each group was maintained on their assigned diet for nine days and monitored for 22-hours each day for meal pattern behavior. Body weight was evaluated every other day, and body composition measures were taken prior and following diet exposure. High-fat fed animals gained more weight and adipose tissue than chow fed controls and displayed a reduced meal frequency and increased meal size. Furthermore, meal size was significantly correlated with the gain of adipose tissue. Together, these results suggest that consumption of a high-fat diet can rapidly alter meal patterns, which in turn contribute to the development of adiposity. PMID:19835896

  7. Inflammatory and metabolic responses to high-fat meals with and without dairy products in men.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Alexandra; Petry, Nicolai; Walther, Barbara; Bütikofer, Ueli; Luginbühl, Werner; Gille, Doreen; Chollet, Magali; McTernan, Philip G; Gijs, Martin A M; Vionnet, Nathalie; Pralong, François P; Laederach, Kurt; Vergères, Guy

    2015-06-28

    Postprandial inflammation is an important factor for human health since chronic low-grade inflammation is associated with chronic diseases. Dairy products have a weak but significant anti-inflammatory effect on postprandial inflammation. The objective of the present study was to compare the effect of a high-fat dairy meal (HFD meal), a high-fat non-dairy meal supplemented with milk (HFM meal) and a high-fat non-dairy control meal (HFC meal) on postprandial inflammatory and metabolic responses in healthy men. A cross-over study was conducted in nineteen male subjects. Blood samples were collected before and 1, 2, 4 and 6 h after consumption of the test meals. Plasma concentrations of insulin, glucose, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, TAG and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured at each time point. IL-6, TNF-α and endotoxin concentrations were assessed at baseline and endpoint (6 h). Time-dependent curves of these metabolic parameters were plotted, and the net incremental AUC were found to be significantly higher for TAG and lower for CRP after consumption of the HFM meal compared with the HFD meal; however, the HFM and HFD meals were not different from the HFC meal. Alterations in IL-6, TNF-α and endotoxin concentrations were not significantly different between the test meals. The results suggest that full-fat milk and dairy products (cheese and butter) have no significant impact on the inflammatory response to a high-fat meal.

  8. Proprietary tomato extract improves metabolic response to high-fat meal in healthy normal weight subjects

    PubMed Central

    Deplanque, Xavier; Muscente-Paque, Delphine; Chappuis, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation is a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Lycopene and tomato-based products have been described as potent inhibitors of LDL oxidation. Objectives To evaluate the effect of a 2-week supplementation with a carotenoid-rich tomato extract (CRTE) standardized for a 1:1 ratio of lycopene and phytosterols, on post-prandial LDL oxidation after a high-fat meal. Design In a randomized, double-blind, parallel-groups, placebo-controlled study, 146 healthy normal weight individuals were randomly assigned to a daily dose of CRTE standardized for tomato phytonutrients or placebo during 2 weeks. Oxidized LDL (OxLDL), glucose, insulin, and triglyceride (TG) responses were measured for 8 h after ingestion of a high-fat meal before and at the end of intervention. Results Plasma lycopene, phytofluene, and phytoene were increased throughout the study period in the CRTE group compared to placebo. CRTE ingestion significantly improved changes in OxLDL response to high-fat meal compared to placebo after 2 weeks (p<0.0001). Changes observed in glucose, insulin, and TG responses were not statistically significant after 2 weeks of supplementation, although together they may suggest a trend of favorable effect on metabolic outcomes after a high-fat meal. Conclusions Two-week supplementation with CRTE increased carotenoids levels in plasma and improved oxidized LDL response to a high-fat meal in healthy normal weight individuals. PMID:27707453

  9. CCK(1) receptor is essential for normal meal patterning in mice fed high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Michael J; Paulino, Gabriel; Raybould, Helen E

    2007-12-05

    Cholecystokinin (CCK), released by lipid in the intestine, initiates satiety by acting at cholecystokinin type 1 receptors (CCK(1)Rs) located on vagal afferent nerve terminals located in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, we determined the role of the CCK(1)R in the short term effects of a high fat diet on daily food intake and meal patterns using mice in which the CCK(1)R gene is deleted. CCK(1)R(-/-) and CCK(1)R(+/+) mice were fed isocaloric high fat (HF) or low fat (LF) diets ad libitum for 18 h each day and meal size, meal frequency, intermeal interval, and meal duration were determined. Daily food intake was unaltered by diet in the CCK(1)R(-/-) compared to CCK(1)R(+/+) mice. However, meal size was larger in the CCK(1)R(-/-) mice compared to CCK(1)R(+/+) mice when fed a HF diet, with a concomitant decrease in meal frequency. Meal duration was increased in mice fed HF diet regardless of phenotype. In addition, CCK(1)R(-/-) mice fed a HF diet had a 75% decrease in the time to 1st meal compared to CCK(1)R(+/+) mice following a 6 h fast. These data suggest that lack of the CCK(1)R results in diminished satiation, causing altered meal patterns including larger, less frequent meals when fed a high fat diet. These results suggest that the CCK(1)R is involved in regulating caloric intake on a meal to meal basis, but that other factors are responsible for regulation of daily food intake.

  10. Effects of a high-fat meal on resistance vessel reactivity and on indicators of oxidative stress in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Schinkovitz, A; Dittrich, P; Wascher, T C

    2001-07-01

    High fat meals postprandially impair macrovascular endothelial function and a link to increased oxidative stress is suggested. Few information, on the other hand, exists on the effect of postprandial hyperlipidaemia on resistance vessel function. Under normal circumstances this vascular bed regulates tissue perfusion and, by controlling flow, impacts on macrovascular nitric oxide formation. The impact of a high fat meal (1200 kcal, 90 g fat, 46 g protein and 47 g carbohydrates) on postprandial resistance vessel reactivity and on indicators of oxidative stress was studied in 11 healthy subjects by venous-occlusion plethysmography using another six subjects as time control group. Ingestion of the test meal resulted in a pronounced increase of serum triglycerides from 1.05 +/- 0.61 mmol l(-1) in the fasting state to peak postprandial values of 1.94 +/- 0.41 mmol l(-1) (P < 0.001) reached after 4 h and a return to baseline after 8 h. Fasting peak reactive hyperaemia (RH) was 19.6 +/- 2.4 ml min(-1) (100 ml)(-1). Two hours after ingestion of the test meal peak RH was transiently reduced to 16.8 +/- 2.2 ml min(-1) (100 ml)(-1) (P < 0.05). No alteration of resting forearm perfusion was observed. The time course of peak RH suggested a potential biphasic effect of the test meal with an early impairment and a late increase of RH. Ingestion of a lipid rich test meal did not exert any influence on either total plasma antioxidant capacity given in trolox equivalents (513 +/- 26 micromol l(-1) at baseline) or on plasma peroxides measured as H2O2 equivalents (469 +/- 117 micromol l(-1)). Our results suggest that ingestion of a meal containing 90 g of fat results in a transient impairment of reactive hyperaemia in healthy subjects but these vascular alterations are not accompanied by signs of systemically increased oxidative stress.

  11. Effects of Acute Active Video Games on Endothelial Function Following a High-Fat Meal in Overweight Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo Hyun; Yoon, Eun Sun; Lee, Yong Hee; Kim, Chul-Ho; Bunsawat, Kanokwan; Heffernan, Kevin S; Fernall, Bo; Jae, Sae Young

    2015-06-01

    We tested the hypothesis that an active video game following a high-fat meal would partially prevent the unfavorable effect of a high-fat meal on vascular function in overweight adolescents. Twenty-four overweight adolescents were randomized to either a 60-minute active video game (AVG) group (n = 12) or seated rest (SR) as a control group (n = 12) after a high-fat meal. Blood parameters were measured, and vascular function was measured using brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) at baseline and 3 hours after a high-fat meal. No significant interaction was found in any blood parameter. A high-fat meal significantly increased blood triglyceride and glucose concentrations in both groups in a similar manner. Brachial artery FMD significantly decreased in the SR group (13.8 ± 3.2% to 11.8 ± 2.5), but increased in the AVG group (11.4 ± 4.0% to 13.3 ± 3.5), with a significant interaction (P = .034). These findings show that an active video game attenuated high-fat meal-induced endothelial dysfunction. This suggests that an active video game may have a cardioprotective effect on endothelial function in overweight adolescents when exposed to a high-fat meal.

  12. High-fat diet meal patterns during and after continuous nicotine treatment in male rats.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Ian A; Carcoba, Luis; Wellman, Paul J; Cepeda-Benito, Antonio

    2016-12-01

    Smoking to control body weight is an obstacle to smoking cessation, particularly in western cultures where diets are often rich in calories derived from fat sources. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of continuous nicotine administration on meal patterns in rats fed a high-fat diet. Male rats were housed in cages designed to continuously monitor food intake and implanted with minipumps to deliver approximately 1.00 mg/kg/day of nicotine or saline. Meal patterns and body weights were assessed for 2 weeks of treatment and 1 week posttreatment. When compared with controls, rats with continuous nicotine treatment exhibited a decrease in the average meal duration(s) during the first week of treatment and a modest, yet sustained reduction in daily number of meals over the 14-day treatment period. Nicotine-induced decreases in body weight gain were observed throughout the 2 weeks of treatment. No differences in meal patterns or body weight gain were seen for 1 week following cessation of treatment. Results from this study suggest that while continuous nicotine treatment decreases daily food intake, meal durations, meal numbers, and weight gain, cessation of this treatment does not result in significant compensatory increases. Understanding the effects of nicotine on feeding patterns and weight gain may allow for improvements in treatment protocols aimed at addressing the factors that contribute to tobacco use. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Marital Discord, Past Depression, and Metabolic Responses to High-Fat Meals: Interpersonal Pathways to Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K.; Jaremka, Lisa; Andridge, Rebecca; Peng, Juan; Habash, Diane; Fagundes, Christopher P.; Glaser, Ronald; Malarkey, William B.; Belury, Martha A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Longitudinal studies have implicated both marital distress and depression in the development of the metabolic syndrome, a risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This study addressed the impact of hostile marital interactions and a mood disorder history on obesity-related metabolic responses to high-fat meals. Methods This double-blind, randomized crossover study included serial assessments of resting energy expenditure (REE), fat and carbohydrate oxidation, triglycerides, insulin, glucose, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) before and after two high-fat meals. During two separate 9.5 hour visits, 43 healthy married couples, ages 24 to 61 (mean=38.22), received either a high saturated fat meal or a high oleic sunflower oil meal, both 930 kcal and 60 g fat. The Structured Diagnostic Interview for DSM-IV assessed mood disorder history. Couples discussed a marital disagreement during both visits; behavioral coding of these interactions provided data on hostile marital behaviors. Results Men and women who displayed more hostile behaviors and who also had a mood disorder history had significantly lower post-meal REE, higher insulin, and higher peak triglyceride responses than other participants, with nonsignificant effects for fat and carbohydrate oxidation. Participants with a mood disorder history had a steeper rise in postprandial IL-6 and glucose than those without a past history. Higher levels of hostile behaviors were associated with higher post-meal TNF-α. The two meals did not differ on any outcome assessed. Conclusions People spend about 18 of every 24 hours in a postprandial state, and dining with one’s partner is a common daily event. Among subjects with a mood disorder history, the cumulative 6.75-hour difference between high and low hostile behaviors translates into 128 kcal, a difference that could add 7.6 pounds/year. Our findings illustrate novel pathways through which chronic marital stress and a

  14. Marital discord, past depression, and metabolic responses to high-fat meals: Interpersonal pathways to obesity.

    PubMed

    Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K; Jaremka, Lisa; Andridge, Rebecca; Peng, Juan; Habash, Diane; Fagundes, Christopher P; Glaser, Ronald; Malarkey, William B; Belury, Martha A

    2015-02-01

    Longitudinal studies have implicated both marital distress and depression in the development of the metabolic syndrome, a risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This study addressed the impact of hostile marital interactions and a mood disorder history on obesity-related metabolic responses to high-fat meals. This double-blind, randomized crossover study included serial assessments of resting energy expenditure (REE), fat and carbohydrate oxidation, triglycerides, insulin, glucose, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) before and after two high-fat meals. During two separate 9.5h visits, 43 healthy married couples, ages 24-61 (mean=38.22), received either a high saturated fat meal or a high oleic sunflower oil meal, both 930kcal and 60g fat. The Structured Diagnostic Interview for DSM-IV assessed mood disorder history. Couples discussed a marital disagreement during both visits; behavioral coding of these interactions provided data on hostile marital behaviors. Men and women who displayed more hostile behaviors and who also had a mood disorder history had significantly lower post-meal REE, higher insulin, and higher peak triglyceride responses than other participants, with nonsignificant effects for fat and carbohydrate oxidation. Participants with a mood disorder history had a steeper rise in postprandial IL-6 and glucose than those without a past history. Higher levels of hostile behaviors were associated with higher post-meal TNF-α. The two meals did not differ on any outcome assessed. People spend about 18 of every 24h in a postprandial state, and dining with one's partner is a common daily event. Among subjects with a mood disorder history, the cumulative 6.75-h difference between high and low hostile behaviors translates into 128kcal, a difference that could add 7.6pounds/year. Our findings illustrate novel pathways through which chronic marital stress and a mood disorder history synergistically heighten the risk for

  15. Rats acquire stronger preference for flavors consumed towards the end of a high-fat meal.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kevin P

    2013-02-17

    Rats learn to prefer flavors associated with postingestive effects of nutrients. The physiological signals underlying this postingestive reward are unknown. We have previously shown that rats readily learn to prefer a flavor that was consumed early in a multi-flavored meal when glucose is infused intragastrically (IG), suggesting rapid postingestive reward onset. The present experiments investigate the timing of postingestive fat reward, by providing distinctive flavors in the first and second halves of meals accompanied by IG fat infusion. Learning stronger preference for the earlier or later flavor would indicate when the rewarding postingestive effects are sensed. Rats consumed sweetened, calorically-dilute flavored solutions accompanied by IG high-fat infusion (+ sessions) or water (- sessions). Each session included an "Early" flavor for 8min followed by a "Late" flavor for 8min. Learned preferences were then assessed in two-bottle tests (no IG infusion) between Early(+) vs. Early(-), Late(+) vs. Late(-), Early(+) vs. Late(+), and Early(-) vs. Late(-). Rats only preferred Late(+), not Early(+), relative to their respective (-) flavors. In a second experiment rats trained with a higher fat concentration learned to prefer Early(+) but more strongly preferred Late(+). Learned preferences were evident when rats were tested deprived or recently satiated. Unlike with glucose, ingested fat appears to produce a slower-onset rewarding signal, detected later in a meal or after its termination, becoming more strongly associated with flavors towards the end of the meal. This potentially contributes to enhanced liking for dessert foods, which persists even when satiated.

  16. Effects of a high-fat meal on pulmonary function in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Rosenkranz, Sara K; Townsend, Dana K; Steffens, Suzanne E; Harms, Craig A

    2010-06-01

    Obesity has important health consequences, including elevating risk for heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. A high-fat diet is known to contribute to obesity. Little is known regarding the effect of a high-fat diet on pulmonary function, despite the dramatic increase in the prevalence of respiratory ailments (e.g., asthma). The purpose of our study was to determine whether a high-fat meal (HFM) would increase airway inflammation and decrease pulmonary function in healthy subjects. Pulmonary function tests (PFT) (forced expiratory volume in 1-s, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory flow at 25-75% of vital capacity) and exhaled nitric oxide (eNO; airway inflammation) were performed in 20 healthy (10 men, 10 women), inactive subjects (age 21.9 +/- 0.4 years) pre and 2 h post HFM (1 g fat/1 kg body weight; 74.2 +/- 4.1 g fat). Total cholesterol, triglycerides, and C-reactive protein (CRP; systemic inflammation) were determined via a venous blood sample pre and post HFM. Body composition was measured via dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The HFM significantly increased total cholesterol by 4 +/- 1%, and triglycerides by 93 +/- 3%. ENO also increased (p < 0.05) due to the HFM by 19 +/- 1% (pre 17.2 +/- 1.6; post 20.6 +/- 1.7 ppb). ENO and triglycerides were significantly related at baseline and post-HFM (r = 0.82, 0.72 respectively). Despite the increased eNO, PFT or CRP did not change (p > 0.05) with the HFM. These results demonstrate that a HFM, which leads to significant increases in total cholesterol, and especially triglycerides, increases exhaled NO. This suggests that a high-fat diet may contribute to chronic inflammatory diseases of the airway and lung.

  17. [Relationship between the effects of a high-fat meal and blood group in determination of alkaline phosphatase activity].

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Makoto; Komoda, Tsugikazu

    2011-10-01

    We previously reported that two isoforms of intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) are present in the serum, a high-molecular-weight isoform(HIAP) and a normal-molecular-weight isoform (NIAP), and that both are present at high levels in blood group B or O secretors. In the present paper, we investigated the relationship between effects of high-fat meal and blood groups on ALP activity. Subjects fasted for 14 hours after dinner the previous evening and ate a high-fat meal the following morning. Two types of meals were prepared; a low-calorie meal (470 kcal), and a high-calorie meal (950 kcal). Subjects ate the 2 types of meal on different days. Blood was collected 3 times; once preprandially, and at 3 and 6 h postprandially. Among B or O secretors (n = 24), the mean +/- SD for increase in ALP activity after the high-fat meal was 26.4 +/- 10.2 U/L and 23.3 +/- 9.0 U/L at 3 and 6 h postprandially, respectively, following the low-calorie meal, and 47.9 +/- 19.9 U/L and 55.1 +/- 21.9 U/L at 3 and 6 h postprandially, respectively, after the high-calorie meal. Thus, ALP activity increased 2-fold after the high-calorie meal. Similarly, among subjects with other blood groups (n = 28), the increase in ALP activity was 5.7 +/- 3.7 U/L and 4.2 +/- 3.1 U/L at 3 and 6 h postprandially, respectively, with the low-calorie meal and 8.5 +/- 5.2 U/L and 10.6 +/- 6.0 U/L at 3 and 6 h postprandially, respectively, with the high-calorie meal. Thus, significant differences were seen between the blood groups (p < 0.001). The increases in ALP activity after the high-fat meal were nearly identical to the increases in NIAP activity. These results suggest that a high-fat meal is more likely to affect ALP activity in blood group B or O secretors, and that this effect peaks between 3 and 6 h after the high-fat meal. Taken together, the present results indicate that, as a rule, blood samples for determining ALP activity should be collected in the early morning with the patient in a fasted state.

  18. Red wine ingestion prevents microparticle formation after a single high-fat meal--a crossover study in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Daniel; Jelich, Uta; Dacanay-Schwarz, Roland; Mügge, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    : The postprandial state after a high-fat meal favors endothelial dysfunction and contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Little is known about the course of circulating microparticles (MPs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) after the consumption of a high-fat meal. Both are important for the maintenance and function of endothelial cells. : Ten healthy males consumed a meal with French fries and hot pork sausage. In a crossover design (4 weeks, 1 meal per week) they coingested a drink (mineral water, coke, red wine, liquor). Before and 1 and 2 hours after the meal, blood samples were drawn and endothelial function (expressed as reactive hyperemia index) was measured by a peripheral arterial tone technology. Number of EPCs, total MPs, and endothelial-derived MPs were measured using flow cytometry. : Reactive hyperemia index decreased by about 5% in those tests drinking mineral water, and by about 20% in the coke group, but remained unaffected in the red wine and liquor group. The number of EPCs were not significantly affected. The number of total and endothelial-derived MPs increased after a single meal, most in the coke group (increase by about 62%), and less in the red wine group (by about 5%). : A single high-fat meal deteriorates endothelial function, associated with a significant increase in circulating MPs. These changes were modified by the drink coindigested to the meal. The postprandial state was getting worse when a cola was consumed, but less hazardous when red wine was consumed.

  19. Effects Of Two Combined Exercise Designs Associated With High-Fat Meal Consumption On Postprandial Lipemia, Insulinemia And Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Farinha, Juliano Boufleur; Olendzki de Macedo, Carlos Ernani; Rodrigues-Krause, Josianne; Krüger, Renata Lopes; Boeno, Francesco Pinto; Oliveira Macedo, Rodrigo Cauduro; Nascimento Queiroz, Jéssica do; Teixeira, Bruno Costa; Reischak-Oliveira, Alvaro

    2017-05-05

    Impaired postprandial lipaemia (PPL) response after the consumption of a high-fat meal (HFM) is linked to diabetes, oxidative stress, and cardiovascular events. The aim of this study was to investigate lipid and glucose metabolism, and oxidative stress responses of two different combined exercise designs associated with high-fat meal (HFM) consumption. Eleven healthy and physically active men (27.36 ± 5.04 years) participated in this study. After the pre-trial visits, participants were randomly assigned to perform two-day trials in three different conditions (interspaced by at least one week): resting (REST), circuit combined exercise (CIRC), or traditional combined exercise (COMB), on evening of day 1. On the morning of day 2, a HFM was provided and blood samples were obtained before and after 1, 3, and 5 h of HFM consumption. No differences were found with respect to glucose, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, or total thiol levels in between time points or conditions. One-way ANOVA demonstrated a difference between REST and CIRC (P = 0.029; reduction of 35.29%), and between REST and COMB (P = 0.041; reduction of 33.41 %) conditions with incremental area under the curve (iAUC) for triacylglycerol levels. A difference between REST and CIRC (P = 0.03; reduction of 34.22 %) conditions in terms of iAUC for insulin was also found. Both CIRC and COMB exercise designs can reduce PPL associated with HFM consumption. Moreover, circuit combined exercise reduces the incremental area under the curve for insulin, suggesting additional benefits for prescribing this type of exercise.

  20. Changes in Expression of Genes Regulating Airway Inflammation Following a High-Fat Mixed Meal in Asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Baines, Katherine J.; Gibson, Peter G.; Wood, Lisa G.

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of a high fat meal can increase neutrophilic airway inflammation in asthma subjects. This study investigates the molecular mechanisms driving airway neutrophilia following a high fat meal in asthmatics. Subjects with asthma (n = 11) and healthy controls (n = 8) consumed a high-fat/energy meal, containing total energy (TE) of 3846 kJ and 48 g of total fat (20.5 g saturated). Sputum was induced at 0 and 4 h, and gene expression was examined by microarray and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Following the high fat dietary challenge, 168 entities were significantly differentially expressed greater than >1.5 fold in subjects with asthma, whereas, in healthy controls, only 14 entities were differentially expressed. Of the 168 genes that were changed in asthma, several biological processes were overrepresented, with 25 genes involved in “immune system processes”. qPCR confirmed that S100P, S100A16, MAL and MUC1 were significantly increased in the asthma group post-meal. We also observed a strong correlation and a moderate correlation between the change in NLRP12 and S100A16 gene expression at 4 h compared to baseline, and the change in total and saturated non-esterified plasma fatty acid levels at 2 h compared to baseline. In summary, our data identifies differences in inflammatory gene expression that may contribute to increased airway neutrophilia following a high fat meal in subjects with asthma and may provide useful therapeutic targets for immunomodulation. This may be particularly relevant to obese asthmatics, who are habitually consuming diets with a high fat content. PMID:26751474

  1. Cognitive Impairment Following High Fat Diet Consumption is Associated with Brain Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pistell, Paul J.; Morrison, Christopher D.; Gupta, Sunita; Knight, Alecia G.; Keller, Jeffrey N.; Ingram, Donald K.; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J.

    2009-01-01

    C57Bl/6 mice were administered a high fat, Western diet (WD, 41% fat) or a very high fat lard diet (HFL, 60% fat), and evaluated for cognitive ability using the Stone T-maze and for biochemical markers of brain inflammation. WD consumption resulted in significantly increased body weight and astrocyte reactivity, but not impaired cognition, microglial reactivity, or heightened cytokine levels. HFL increased body weight, and impaired cognition, increased brain inflammation, and decreased BDNF. Collectively, these data suggest that while different diet formulations can increase body weight, the ability of high fat diets to disrupt cognition is linked to brain inflammation. PMID:20004026

  2. Effect of a high-fat meal on the pharmacokinetics of 300-milligram posaconazole in a solid oral tablet formulation.

    PubMed

    Kersemaekers, Wendy M; Dogterom, Peter; Xu, Jialin; Marcantonio, Eugene E; de Greef, Rik; Waskin, Hetty; van Iersel, Marlou L P S

    2015-01-01

    Posaconazole in oral suspension must be taken multiple times a day with food (preferably a high-fat meal) to ensure adequate exposure among patients. We evaluated the effect of food on the bioavailability of a new delayed-release tablet formulation of posaconazole at the proposed clinical dose of 300 mg once daily in a randomized, open-label, single-dose, two-period crossover study with 18 healthy volunteers. When a single 300-mg dose of posaconazole in tablet form (3 tablets × 100 mg) was administered with a high-fat meal, the posaconazole area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 72 h (AUC0-72) and maximum concentration in plasma (Cmax) increased 51% and 16%, respectively, compared to those after administration in the fasted state. The median time to Cmax (Tmax) shifted from 5 h in the fasted state to 6 h under fed conditions. No serious adverse events were reported, and no subject discontinued the study due to an adverse event. Six of the 18 subjects reported at least one clinical adverse event; all of these events were mild and short lasting. The results of this study demonstrate that a high-fat meal only modestly increases the mean posaconazole exposure (AUC), ∼1.5-fold, after administration of posaconazole tablets, in contrast to the 4-fold increase in AUC observed previously for a posaconazole oral suspension given with a high-fat meal.

  3. Depression, daily stressors and inflammatory responses to high-fat meals: when stress overrides healthier food choices.

    PubMed

    Kiecolt-Glaser, J K; Fagundes, C P; Andridge, R; Peng, J; Malarkey, W B; Habash, D; Belury, M A

    2017-03-01

    Depression, stress and diet can all alter inflammation. This double-blind, randomized crossover study addressed the impact of daily stressors and a history of major depressive disorder (MDD) on inflammatory responses to high-fat meals. During two separate 9.5 h admissions, 58 healthy women (38 breast cancer survivors and 20 demographically similar controls), mean age 53.1 years, received either a high saturated fat meal or a high oleic sunflower oil meal. The Daily Inventory of Stressful Events assessed prior day stressors and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV evaluated MDD. As expected, for a woman with no prior day stressors, C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) were higher following the saturated fat meal than the high oleic sunflower oil meal after controlling for pre-meal measures, age, trunk fat and physical activity. But if a woman had prior day stressors, these meal-related differences disappeared-because the stressors heightened CRP, SAA, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 responses to the sunflower oil meal, making it look more like the responses to the saturated fat meal. In addition, women with an MDD history had higher post-meal blood pressure responses than those without a similar history. These data show how recent stressors and an MDD history can reverberate through metabolic alterations, promoting inflammatory and atherogenic responses.

  4. Comparison of hormonal and metabolic markers after a high-fat, Western meal versus a low-fat, high-fiber meal in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Katcher, Heather I.; Kunselman, Allen R.; Dmitrovic, Romana; Demers, Laurence M.; Gnatuk, Carol L.; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.; Legro, Richard S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of meal composition on postprandial testosterone levels in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Design Randomized, crossover design. Setting Academic research center. Patients Fifteen women with PCOS. Intervention We evaluated changes in testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), DHEA-S, cortisol, glucose, and insulin for six hours after a high-fat, Western meal (HIFAT) (62% fat, 24% carbohydrate, 1g fiber) and an isocaloric low-fat, high-fiber meal (HIFIB) (6% fat, 81% carbohydrate, 27g fiber). Main outcome measure Change in testosterone. Results Testosterone decreased 27% within two hours after both meals (P<0.001). However, testosterone remained below premeal values for four hours after the HIFIB meal (P<0.004) and six hours after the HIFAT meal (P<0.004). Insulin was two fold higher for two hours after the HIFIB meal compared with the HIFAT meal (P<0.03). Glucose was higher for one hour after the HIFIB meal compared with the HIFAT meal (P<0.003). DHEA-S decreased 8−10% within 2−3 hours after both meals, then increased over the remainder of the study period (P<0.001). Cortisol decreased over the 6-hour period after both meals (P<0.001). Conclusions Diet plays a role in the regulation of testosterone levels in women with PCOS. Further studies are needed to determine the role of diet composition in the treatment of PCOS. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT0455338). PMID:18331737

  5. Meal pattern alterations associated with intermittent fasting for weight loss are normalized after high-fat diet re-feeding.

    PubMed

    Gotthardt, Juliet D; Bello, Nicholas T

    2017-05-15

    Alternate day, intermittent fasting (IMF) can be an effective weight loss strategy. However, the effects of IMF on eating behaviors are not well characterized. We investigated the acute and residual effects of IMF for weight loss on meal patterns in adult obese male C57BL/6 mice. After 8weeks of ad libitum high-fat diet to induce diet-induced obesity (DIO), mice were either continued on ad libitum high-fat diet (HFD) or placed on one of 5 diet strategies for weight loss: IMF of high-fat diet (IMF-HFD), pair-fed to IMF-HFD group (PF-HFD), ad libitum low-fat diet (LFD), IMF of low-fat diet (IMF-LFD), or pair-fed to IMF-LFD group (PF-LFD). After the 4-week diet period, all groups were refed the high-fat diet for 6weeks. By the end of the diet period, all 5 groups had lost weight compared with HFD group, but after 6weeks of HFD re-feeding all groups had similar body weights. On (Day 2) of the diet period, IMF-HFD had greater first meal size and faster eating rate compared with HFD. Also, first meal duration was greater in LFD and IMF-LFD compared with HFD. At the end of the diet period (Day 28), the intermittent fasting groups (IMF-HFD and IMF-LFD) had greater first meal sizes and faster first meal eating rate compared with their respective ad libitum fed groups on similar diets (HFD and LFD). Also, average meal duration was longer on Day 28 in the low-fat diet groups (LFD and IMF-LFD) compared with high-fat diet groups (HFD and IMF-HFD). After 6weeks of HFD re-feeding (Day 70), there were no differences in meal patterns in groups that had previously experienced intermittent fasting compared with ad libitum fed groups. These findings suggest that meal patterns are only transiently altered during alternate day intermittent fasting for weight loss in obese male mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Daily Stressors, Past Depression, and Metabolic Responses to High-Fat Meals: A Novel Path to Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K.; Habash, Diane L.; Fagundes, Christopher P.; Andridge, Rebecca; Peng, Juan; Malarkey, William B.; Belury, Martha A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression and stress promote obesity. This study addressed the impact of daily stressors and a history of major depressive disorder (MDD) on obesity-related metabolic responses to high-fat meals. Methods This double-blind, randomized crossover study included serial assessments of resting energy expenditure (REE), fat and carbohydrate oxidation, triglycerides, cortisol, insulin and glucose before and after two high-fat meals. During two separate 9.5 hour admissions, 58 healthy women (38 breast cancer survivors and 20 demographically-similar controls), mean age 53.1 years, received either a high saturated fat meal or a high oleic sunflower oil meal. Prior day stressors were assessed by the Daily Inventory of Stressful Events and MDD history by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Results Greater numbers of stressors were associated with lower post-meal REE (P=.008), lower fat oxidation (P=.04), and higher insulin (P=.01), with nonsignificant effects for cortisol (P=.25) and glucose (P=.33). Women with prior MDD had higher cortisol (P=.008), and higher fat oxidation (P=.004), without significant effects for REE (P=.26), insulin (P=.25), and glucose (P=.38). Women with a depression history who also had more prior day stressors had a higher peak triglyceride response than other participants (P=.01). The only difference between meals was higher postprandial glucose following sunflower oil compared to saturated fat (P=.03). Conclusions The cumulative 6-hour difference between one prior day stressor and no stressors translates into 104 kcal, a difference that could add almost 11 pounds/year. These findings illustrate how stress and depression alter metabolic responses to high-fat meals in ways that promote obesity. PMID:25034950

  7. Patients with type 1 diabetes show signs of vascular dysfunction in response to multiple high-fat meals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A high-fat diet promotes postprandial systemic inflammation and metabolic endotoxemia. We investigated the effects of three consecutive high-fat meals on endotoxemia, inflammation, vascular function, and postprandial lipid metabolism in patients with type 1 diabetes. Methods Non-diabetic controls (n = 34) and patients with type 1 diabetes (n = 37) were given three high-caloric, fat-containing meals during one day. Blood samples were drawn at fasting (8:00) and every two hours thereafter until 18:00. Applanation tonometry was used to assess changes in the augmentation index during the investigation day. Results Three consecutive high-fat meals had only a modest effect on serum LPS-activity levels and inflammatory markers throughout the day in both groups. Of note, patients with type 1 diabetes were unable to decrease the augmentation index in response to the high-fat meals. The most profound effects of the consecutive fat loads were seen in chylomicron and HDL-metabolism. The triglyceride-rich lipoprotein remnant marker, apoB-48, was elevated in patients compared to controls both at fasting (p = 0.014) and postprandially (p = 0.035). The activities of the HDL-associated enzymes PLTP (p < 0.001), and CETP (p = 0.007) were higher and paraoxonase (PON-1) activity, an anti-oxidative enzyme bound to HDL, decreased in patients with type 1 diabetes (p = 0.027). Conclusions In response to high-fat meals, early signs of vascular dysfunction alongside accumulation of chylomicron remnants, higher augmentation index, and decreased PON-1 activity were observed in patients with type 1 diabetes. The high-fat meals had no significant impact on postprandial LPS-activity in non-diabetic subjects or patients with type 1 diabetes suggesting that metabolic endotoxemia may be more central in patients with chronic metabolic disturbances such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, or diabetic kidney disease. PMID:24959195

  8. The effect of consuming low- versus high-glycemic index meals after exercise on postprandial blood lipid response following a next-day high-fat meal

    PubMed Central

    Kaviani, M; Chilibeck, P D; Yee, P; Zello, G A

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Exercise performed shortly before (that is, within half a day of) a high-fat meal is beneficial for stimulating fat oxidation after the meal and reducing postprandial triglycerides (TG). This benefit of exercise is unfortunately negated if the after-exercise food choice to replace the calories expended during exercise is one containing high-glycemic index (HGI) carbohydrates. We determined the effect of consuming low-glycemic index (LGI) carbohydrates after an exercise session on fat oxidation and TG after a subsequent high-fat meal. Subjects/Methods: Using a randomized, counterbalanced crossover design, 23 overweight or obese individuals (body mass index ⩾25 kg m−2) performed: walking exercise (90 min) at 1800 h followed by no meal (EX); exercise followed by a meal with LGI carbohydrates (that is, lentils, EX-LGI); exercise followed by a meal with HGI carbohydrates (that is, instant potatoes, white bread, EX-HGI); and a control condition with no exercise or meal. After a 10-h overnight fast, participants were given a standardized high-fat meal. Fat oxidation was estimated before and for 6 h after this meal from respiratory gas measures and TG determined from blood samples. Results: Fat oxidation (mean±s.d.) was higher with EX (6.9±1.7 g h−1) than EX-HGI (6.3±1.6 g h−1; P=0.007) and Control (5.9±1.7 g h−1; P=0.00002), and EX-LGI (6.6±1.7 g h−1) was higher than Control (P=0.002). TG total area under the curve was 18–32% lower with EX and EX-LGI compared with control (P=0.0005 and P=0.0001, respectively) and EX-HGI (P=0.05 and P=0.021, respectively). Conclusions: A meal containing HGI carbohydrates consumed after an evening exercise session cancels the beneficial effect of exercise for stimulating fat oxidation and lowering TG after a subsequent high-fat meal, whereas consuming a post-exercise meal with LGI carbohydrates retains the positive effect of exercise. PMID:27376698

  9. Feeding and metabolic consequences of scheduled consumption of large, binge-type meals of high fat diet in the Sprague–Dawley rat

    PubMed Central

    Bake, T.; Morgan, D.G.A.; Mercer, J.G.

    2014-01-01

    Providing rats and mice with access to palatable high fat diets for a short period each day induces the consumption of substantial binge-like meals. Temporal food intake structure (assessed using the TSE PhenoMaster/LabMaster system) and metabolic outcomes (oral glucose tolerance tests [oGTTs], and dark phase glucose and insulin profiles) were examined in Sprague–Dawley rats given access to 60% high fat diet on one of 3 different feeding regimes: ad libitum access (HF), daily 2 h-scheduled access from 6 to 8 h into the dark phase (2 h-HF), and twice daily 1 h-scheduled access from both 1–2 h and 10–11 h into the dark phase (2 × 1 h-HF). Control diet remained available during the scheduled access period. HF rats had the highest caloric intake, body weight gain, body fat mass and plasma insulin. Both schedule-fed groups rapidly adapted their feeding behaviour to scheduled access, showing large meal/bingeing behaviour with 44% or 53% of daily calories consumed from high fat diet during the 2 h or 2 × 1 h scheduled feed(s), respectively. Both schedule-fed groups had an intermediate caloric intake and body fat mass compared to HF and control (CON) groups. Temporal analysis of food intake indicated that schedule-fed rats consumed large binge-type high fat meals without a habitual decrease in preceding intake on control diet, suggesting that a relative hypocaloric state was not responsible or required for driving the binge episode, and substantiating previous indications that binge eating may not be driven by hypothalamic energy balance neuropeptides. In an oGTT, both schedule-fed groups had impaired glucose tolerance with higher glucose and insulin area under the curve, similar to the response in ad libitum HF fed rats, suggesting that palatable feeding schedules represent a potential metabolic threat. Scheduled feeding on high fat diet produces similar metabolic phenotypes to mandatory (no choice) high fat feeding and may be a more realistic

  10. Daily stressors, past depression, and metabolic responses to high-fat meals: a novel path to obesity.

    PubMed

    Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K; Habash, Diane L; Fagundes, Christopher P; Andridge, Rebecca; Peng, Juan; Malarkey, William B; Belury, Martha A

    2015-04-01

    Depression and stress promote obesity. This study addressed the impact of daily stressors and a history of major depressive disorder (MDD) on obesity-related metabolic responses to high-fat meals. This double-blind, randomized, crossover study included serial assessments of resting energy expenditure (REE), fat and carbohydrate oxidation, triglycerides, cortisol, insulin, and glucose before and after two high-fat meals. During two separate 9.5-hour admissions, 58 healthy women (38 breast cancer survivors and 20 demographically similar control subjects), mean age 53.1 years, received either a high saturated fat meal or a high oleic sunflower oil meal. Prior day stressors were assessed by the Daily Inventory of Stressful Events. Greater numbers of stressors were associated with lower postmeal REE (p = .008), lower fat oxidation (p = .04), and higher insulin (p = .01), with nonsignificant effects for cortisol and glucose. Women with prior MDD had higher cortisol (p = .008) and higher fat oxidation (p = .004), without significant effects for REE, insulin, and glucose. Women with a depression history who also had more stressors had a higher peak triglyceride response than other participants (p = .01). The only difference between meals was higher postprandial glucose following sunflower oil compared with saturated fat (p = .03). The cumulative 6-hour difference between one prior day stressor and no stressors translates into 435 kJ, a difference that could add almost 11 pounds per year. These findings illustrate how stress and depression alter metabolic responses to high-fat meals in ways that promote obesity. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A high-fat vs. a moderate-fat meal in obese boys: nutrient balance, appetite, and gastrointestinal hormone changes.

    PubMed

    Maffeis, Claudio; Surano, Maria G; Cordioli, Sira; Gasperotti, Sandra; Corradi, Massimiliano; Pinelli, Leonardo

    2010-03-01

    Meal composition is a contributing factor to fat gain. In this study, we investigated the relationship between postprandial nutrient balance, satiety, and hormone changes induced by a high-fat meal vs. a moderate-fat meal. Ten prepubertal obese boys (BMI z-score range: 1.3-3.0) were recruited. Two meals (energy: 590 kcal) were compared: (i) high-fat (HF) meal: 12% protein, 52% fat, 36% carbohydrates; (ii) moderate-fat (MF) meal: 12% protein, 27% fat, 61% carbohydrates. Pre- and postprandial (5 h) substrate oxidation (indirect calorimetry), appetite (visual analogue scale), biochemical parameters and gastrointestinal hormone concentrations were measured. Carbohydrate balance was significantly (P < 0.001) lower (31.3 (5.7) g/5 h vs. 66.9 (5.9) g/5 h) and fat balance was significantly (P < 0.001) higher (11.5 (3.3) g/5 h vs. -0.7 (2.9) g/5 h) after HF than MF meal. Appetite (area under the curve (AUC)) was significantly reduced after an MF than an HF meal (494 (55) cm.300 min vs. 595 (57) cm.300 min, P < 0.05). Postprandial triglyceride concentration (AUC) was significantly (P < 0.05) higher after an HF than an MF meal: 141.1 (30.3) mmol.300 min/l vs. 79.3 (23.8) mmol.300 min/l, respectively. Peptide YY (PYY), cholecystokinin (CCK), and ghrelin concentrations (AUC) were not significantly different after an HF and MF meal. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) was significantly (P < 0.05) higher after an HF than after an MF meal (72.3 (9.8) ng/ml vs. 22.7 (7.6) ng/ml, respectively), but it did not affect subjective appetite. In conclusion, an MF meal induced a better postprandial metabolic nutrient balance, triglyceride levels, and appetite suppression than an HF meal. Gastrointestinal hormones were not related to clinically assessed hunger suppression after both meals.

  12. Endothelial inflammation correlates with subject triglycerides and waist size after a high-fat meal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying I.; Schulze, John; Raymond, Nadine; Tomita, Tyler; Tam, Kayan; Simon, Scott I.

    2011-01-01

    A rise in postprandial serum triglycerides (PP-sTG) can potentiate inflammatory responses in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and thus serves as an independent risk factor for predicting increased cardiovascular morbidity. We examined postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (PP-TGRLs) in subjects ranging from normal to hypertriglyceridemic for their capacity to alter EC acute inflammatory responses. Cultured human aortic ECs (HAECs) were conditioned with PP-TGRLs isolated from human serum at the peak after a moderately high-fat meal. VLDL particle size increased postprandially and varied directly with the subject's PP-sTG level and waist circumference. PP-TGRL particles bound to HAECs and were internalized via LDL receptor-mediated endocytosis. PP-TGRL alone did not induce an inflammatory response over the range of individuals studied. However, combined with low-dose TNF-α stimulation (0.3 ng/ml), it elicited a net 10–15% increase above cytokine alone in the membrane expression of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and E-selectin, which was not observed with fasting TGRLs. In contrast to upregulation of ICAM-1 and E-selectin, VCAM-1 transcription and expression varied in direct proportion with individual PP-sTG and waist circumference. The extent of monocyte arrest on inflamed HAECs under shear stress also correlated closely with VCAM-1 expression induced by conditioning with PP-TGRL and TNF-α stimulation. This ex vivo approach provides a quantitative means to assess an individual's inflammatory potential, revealing a greater propensity for endothelial inflammation in hypertriglyceridemic individuals with abdominal obesity. PMID:21169396

  13. Daily Scheduled High Fat Meals Moderately Entrain Behavioral Anticipatory Activity, Body Temperature, and Hypothalamic c-Fos Activation

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Christian M.; Gunapala, Keith M.; King, Oliver D.; Steele, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    When fed in restricted amounts, rodents show robust activity in the hours preceding expected meal delivery. This process, termed food anticipatory activity (FAA), is independent of the light-entrained clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus, yet beyond this basic observation there is little agreement on the neuronal underpinnings of FAA. One complication in studying FAA using a calorie restriction model is that much of the brain is activated in response to this strong hunger signal. Thus, daily timed access to palatable meals in the presence of continuous access to standard chow has been employed as a model to study FAA in rats. In order to exploit the extensive genetic resources available in the murine system we extended this model to mice, which will anticipate rodent high fat diet but not chocolate or other sweet daily meals (Hsu, Patton, Mistlberger, and Steele; 2010, PLoS ONE e12903). In this study we test additional fatty meals, including peanut butter and cheese, both of which induced modest FAA. Measurement of core body temperature revealed a moderate preprandial increase in temperature in mice fed high fat diet but entrainment due to handling complicated interpretation of these results. Finally, we examined activation patterns of neurons by immunostaining for the immediate early gene c-Fos and observed a modest amount of entrainment of gene expression in the hypothalamus of mice fed a daily fatty palatable meal. PMID:22815954

  14. Differing effects of high-fat or high-carbohydrate meals on food hedonics in overweight and obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Mark; Gibbons, Catherine; Caudwell, Phillipa; Blundell, John E; Finlayson, Graham

    2016-05-28

    Although the effects of dietary fat and carbohydrate on satiety are well documented, little is known about the impact of these macronutrients on food hedonics. We examined the effects of ad libitum and isoenergetic meals varying in fat and carbohydrate on satiety, energy intake and food hedonics. In all, sixty-five overweight and obese individuals (BMI=30·9 (sd 3·8) kg/m2) completed two separate test meal days in a randomised order in which they consumed high-fat/low-carbohydrate (HFLC) or low-fat/high-carbohydrate (LFHC) foods. Satiety was measured using subjective appetite ratings to calculate the satiety quotient. Satiation was assessed by intake at ad libitum meals. Hedonic measures of explicit liking (subjective ratings) and implicit wanting (speed of forced choice) for an array of HFLC and LFHC foods were also tested before and after isoenergetic HFLC and LFHC meals. The satiety quotient was greater after ad libitum and isoenergetic meals during the LFHC condition compared with the HFLC condition (P=0·006 and P=0·001, respectively), whereas ad libitum energy intake was lower in the LFHC condition (P<0·001). Importantly, the LFHC meal also reduced explicit liking (P<0·001) and implicit wanting (P=0·011) for HFLC foods compared with the isoenergetic HFLC meal, which failed to suppress the hedonic appeal of subsequent HFLC foods. Therefore, when coupled with increased satiety and lower energy intake, the greater suppression of hedonic appeal for high-fat food seen with LFHC foods provides a further mechanism for why these foods promote better short-term appetite control than HFLC foods.

  15. Fruit juice drinks prevent endogenous antioxidant response to high-fat meal ingestion.

    PubMed

    Miglio, Cristiana; Peluso, Ilaria; Raguzzini, Anna; Villaño, Deborah V; Cesqui, Eleonora; Catasta, Giovina; Toti, Elisabetta; Serafini, Mauro

    2014-01-28

    High-fat meals (HFM) induce metabolic stress, leading to the activation of protective mechanisms, including inflammation and endogenous antioxidant defences. In the present study, we investigated the effects of antioxidant-rich fruit juice drinks on the endogenous antioxidant response induced by HFM. In a double-blind, cross-over design (10 d washout), fourteen overweight volunteers were randomly assigned to one of the following interventions: HFM+500 ml placebo beverage (HFM-PB, free from fruit); HFM+500 ml antioxidant beverage 1 (HFM-AB1; apple, grape, blueberry and pomegranate juices and grape skin, grape seed and green tea extracts); HFM+500 ml antioxidant beverage 2 (HFM-AB2; pineapple, black currant and plum juices). HFM-PB consumption increased the plasma levels of thiols (SH) (4 h, P< 0·001) and uric acid (UA) (2 h, P< 0·01) and total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter (TRAP) (4 h, P< 0·01). Following the consumption of drinks, UA production was significantly reduced with respect to placebo beverage consumption 8 h after HFM-AB2 consumption (P< 0·05). SH levels were reduced 0·5 (P< 0·05), 1 (P< 0·05) and 2 h (P< 0·01) after HFM-AB1 consumption and 2, 4 and 8 h (P< 0·05) after HFM-AB2 consumption. Plasma TRAP (2 h, P< 0·001) and urinary ferric reducing antioxidant power (0-8 h, P< 0·01) were increased by HFM-AB1 consumption, the drink with the highest in vitro antioxidant capacity, but not by HFM-AB2 consumption. In urine, UA levels were significantly increased from basal levels after the consumption of HFM-PB and HFM-AB2. However, neither of the beverages increased the urinary excretion of UA with respect to the placebo beverage. In conclusion, the increase in UA and SH levels induced by HFM as part of an endogenous antioxidant response to postprandial stress can be prevented by the concomitant ingestion of antioxidant-rich fruit juice drinks.

  16. Appetite regulation via exercise prior or subsequent to high-fat meal consumption.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mary Huey-Yu; Bushnell, Darcy; Cannon, Daniel T; Kern, Mark

    2009-02-01

    This study assessed the effect of exercise timing relative to meal consumption on appetite and its hormonal regulators (i.e., PYY(3-36), ghrelin and leptin) in moderately active young men. Twelve men performed three trials in a random order: (1) meal consumption, (2) exercise 2h after a meal, (3) exercise 1h before a meal. The test meal provided 16.5 kcal kg(-1) with 70% fat, 26% carbohydrate and 4% protein. Exercise was performed at a work rate eliciting 60% of VO(2max) for 50 min. Hunger ratings and plasma leptin concentrations were measured at baseline and hours 1, 3, 5, and 7 post-meal, and plasma concentrations of ghrelin and PYY(3-36) were measured at baseline and 1, 3, and 7h after meal consumption. Exercise performed 2h after meal consumption extended the appetite suppressing effect of food intake. Furthermore, plasma PYY(3-36) concentration tended to be elevated by exercise after meal consumption. Exercise prior to food intake decreased appetite and increased plasma ghrelin concentrations. No response to timing of exercise relative to food intake on plasma leptin concentration was detected. These data indicated the timing of exercise to meal consumption may influence appetite and its hormonal regulators. Post-meal exercise may extend the suppressive effects of meal consumption on appetite.

  17. Consumption of mixed fruit-juice drink and vitamin C reduces postprandial stress induced by a high fat meal in healthy overweight subjects.

    PubMed

    Peluso, Ilaria; Villano, Debora V; Roberts, Susan A; Cesqui, Eleonora; Raguzzini, Anna; Borges, Gina; Crozier, Alan; Catasta, Giovina; Toti, Elisabetta; Serafini, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Postprandial stress induced by acute consumption of meals with a high fat content results in an increase of markers of cardiometabolic risk. Repeated acute dietary stress may induce a persistent low-grade inflammation, playing a role in the pathogenesis of functional gut diseases. This may cause an impairment of the complex immune response of the gastrointestinal mucosa, which results in a breakdown of oral tolerance. We investigated the effect of ingestion of a fruit-juice drink (FJD) composed by multiple fruit juice and extracts, green tea extracts and vitamin C on postprandial stress induced by a High Fat Meal (HFM) in healthy overweight subjects. Following a double blind, placebo controlled, cross-over design, 15 healthy overweight subjects were randomized to a HFM providing 1334 Kcal (55% fat, 30% carbohydrates and 15% proteins) in combination with 500 mL of a placebo drink (HFM-P) or a fruit-juice drink (HFM-FJD). Ingestion of HFM-P led to an increase in circulating levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, insulin, TNF-α and IL-6. Ingestion of HFM-FJD significantly reduced plasma levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, decreasing inflammatory response mediated by TNF-α and IL-6. Ingestion of a fruit-juice drink reduce markers of postprandial stress induced by a HFM.

  18. Systemic oxidative stress is increased to a greater degree in young, obese women following consumption of a high fat meal

    PubMed Central

    Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H

    2009-01-01

    High fat meals induce oxidative stress, which is associated with the pathogenesis of disease. Obese individuals have elevated resting biomarkers of oxidative stress compared to non-obese. We compared blood oxidative stress biomarkers in obese (n = 14; 30 ± 2 years; BMI 35 ± 1 kg•m−2) and non-obese (n = 16; 24 ± 2 years; BMI 23 ± 1 kg•m−2) women, in response to a high fat meal. Blood samples were collected pre-meal (fasted), and at 1, 2, 4 and 6 hours post meal, and assayed for trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), xanthine oxidase activity (XO), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), malondialdehyde (MDA), triglycerides (TAG), and glucose. An obesity status effect was noted for all variables (p < 0.001; MDA p = 0.05), with obese women having higher values than non-obese, except for TEAC, for which values were lower. Time main effects were noted for all variables (p ≤ 0.01) except for TEAC and glucose, with XO, H2O2, MDA and TAG increasing following feeding with a peak response at the four or six hour post feeding time point. While values tended to decline by six hours post feeding in the non-obese women (agreeing with previous studies), they were maintained (MDA) or continued to increase (XO, H2O2 and TAG) in the obese women. While no interaction effects were noted (p > 0.05), contrasts revealed greater values in obese compared to non-obese women for XO, H2O2, MDA, TAG and glucose, and lower values for TEAC at times from 1–6 hours post feeding (p ≤ 0.03). We conclude that young, obese women experience a similar pattern of increase in blood oxidative stress biomarkers in response to a high fat meal, as compared to non-obese women. However, the overall oxidative stress is greater in obese women, and values appear to remain elevated for longer periods of time post feeding. These data provide insight into another potential mechanism related to obesity-mediated morbidity. PMID:20046641

  19. Does Moderate Intensity Exercise Attenuate the Postprandial Lipemic and Airway Inflammatory Response to a High-Fat Meal?

    PubMed Central

    Kurti, Stephanie P.; Rosenkranz, Sara K.; Levitt, Morton; Cull, Brooke J.; Teeman, Colby S.; Emerson, Sam R.; Harms, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether an acute bout of moderate intensity exercise in the postprandial period attenuates the triglyceride and airway inflammatory response to a high-fat meal (HFM) compared to remaining inactive in the postprandial period. Seventeen (11 M/6 F) physically active (≥150 min/week of moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA)) subjects were randomly assigned to an exercise (EX; 60% VO2peak) or sedentary (CON) condition after a HFM (10 kcal/kg, 63% fat). Blood analytes and airway inflammation via exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) were measured at baseline, and 2 and 4 hours after HFM. Airway inflammation was assessed with induced sputum and cell differentials at baseline and 4 hours after HFM. Triglycerides doubled in the postprandial period (~113 ± 18%, P < 0.05), but the increase did not differ between EX and CON. Percentage of neutrophils was increased 4 hours after HFM (~17%), but the increase did not differ between EX and CON. Exhaled nitric oxide changed nonlinearly from baseline to 2 and 4 hours after HFM (P < 0.05,  η2 = 0.36). Our findings suggest that, in active individuals, an acute bout of moderate intensity exercise does not attenuate the triglyceride or airway inflammatory response to a high-fat meal. PMID:26000301

  20. Effects of acute exercise on postprandial triglyceride response after a high-fat meal in overweight black and white adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, S; Burns, S F; White, D; Kuk, J L; Arslanian, S

    2013-07-01

    We examined the effects of acute exercise on postprandial triglyceride (TG) metabolism following a high-fat meal in overweight black vs white adolescents. Twenty-one black and 17 white adolescents (12-18 yrs, body mass index 85th percentile) were evaluated twice, during control versus exercise trials, 1-4 weeks apart, in a counterbalanced randomized design. In the control trial, participants performed no exercise on day 1. In the exercise trial, participants performed a single bout of 60-min exercise (50% VO2 peak) on a cycle ergometer on day 1. On day 2 of both trials, participants consumed a high-fat breakfast (70% calories from fat) and blood was sampled for TG concentration in the fasted state and for 6 h postprandially. There was a significant main effect of condition on postprandial peak TG concentration (P=0.01) and TG area under the curve (AUC) (P=0.003), suggesting that independent of race, peak TG and TG-AUC was lower in the exercise trial vs control trial. Including Tanner stage, gender, total fat (kg) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) as independent variables, stepwise multiple regression analyses revealed that in whites, VAT was the strongest (P<0.05) predictor of postprandial TG-AUC, explaining 56 and 25% of the variances in TG-AUC in the control and exercise trials, respectively. In blacks, VAT was not associated with postprandial TG-AUC, independent of trial. A single bout of aerobic exercise preceding a high-fat meal is beneficial to reduce postprandial TG concentrations in overweight white adolescents to a greater extent than black adolescents, particularly those with increased visceral adiposity.

  1. Large, binge-type meals of high fat diet change feeding behaviour and entrain food anticipatory activity in mice*

    PubMed Central

    Bake, T.; Murphy, M.; Morgan, D.G.A.; Mercer, J.G.

    2014-01-01

    Male C57BL/6 mice fed ad libitum on control diet but allowed access to a palatable high fat diet (HFD) for 2 h a day during the mid-dark phase rapidly adapt their feeding behaviour and can consume nearly 80% of their daily caloric intake during this 2 h-scheduled feed. We assessed food intake microstructure and meal pattern, and locomotor activity and rearing as markers of food anticipatory activity (FAA). Schedule fed mice reduced their caloric intake from control diet during the first hours of the dark phase but not during the 3-h period immediately preceding the scheduled feed. Large meal/binge-like eating behaviour during the 2-h scheduled feed was characterised by increases in both meal number and meal size. Rearing was increased during the 2-h period running up to scheduled feeding while locomotor activity started to increase 1 h before, indicating that schedule-fed mice display FAA. Meal number and physical activity changes were sustained when HFD was withheld during the anticipated scheduled feeding period, and mice immediately binged when HFD was represented after a week of this “withdrawal” period. These findings provide important context to our previous studies suggesting that energy balance systems in the hypothalamus are not responsible for driving these large, binge-type meals. Evidence of FAA in HFD dark phase schedule-fed mice implicates anticipatory processes in binge eating that do not involve immediately preceding hypophagia or regulatory homeostatic signalling. PMID:24631639

  2. Large, binge-type meals of high fat diet change feeding behaviour and entrain food anticipatory activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Bake, T; Murphy, M; Morgan, D G A; Mercer, J G

    2014-06-01

    Male C57BL/6 mice fed ad libitum on control diet but allowed access to a palatable high fat diet (HFD) for 2 h a day during the mid-dark phase rapidly adapt their feeding behaviour and can consume nearly 80% of their daily caloric intake during this 2 h-scheduled feed. We assessed food intake microstructure and meal pattern, and locomotor activity and rearing as markers of food anticipatory activity (FAA). Schedule fed mice reduced their caloric intake from control diet during the first hours of the dark phase but not during the 3-h period immediately preceding the scheduled feed. Large meal/binge-like eating behaviour during the 2-h scheduled feed was characterised by increases in both meal number and meal size. Rearing was increased during the 2-h period running up to scheduled feeding while locomotor activity started to increase 1 h before, indicating that schedule-fed mice display FAA. Meal number and physical activity changes were sustained when HFD was withheld during the anticipated scheduled feeding period, and mice immediately binged when HFD was represented after a week of this "withdrawal" period. These findings provide important context to our previous studies suggesting that energy balance systems in the hypothalamus are not responsible for driving these large, binge-type meals. Evidence of FAA in HFD dark phase schedule-fed mice implicates anticipatory processes in binge eating that do not involve immediately preceding hypophagia or regulatory homeostatic signalling. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. [Increase in Alkaline Phosphatase Activity after High-Fat Meal Ingestion is Correlated to the Amount of ABH Substances in Saliva].

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Makoto; Otani, Kana; Sakamoto, Yui; Arai, Tomoko; Yukimasa, Nobuyasu; Muramoto, Yoshimi; Komoda, Tsugikazu

    2015-05-01

    Intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) appears in the circulation more frequently in blood group B or O secretors than in blood group A or AB secretors and non-secretors, and serum IAP activity rises following the ingestion of a high-fat meal. In a previous study, the occurrence of two IAP isoforms, with high (HIAP) and normal molecular mass (NIAP), in healthy sera was demonstrated by 6.0% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of 1% Triton X-100. NIAP was present in the fasting serum of only healthy blood group B or O secretors, but was present in all subjects following ingestion of a high-fat meal. We classified 56 healthy subjects into 3 blood groups: B (n = 19), O (n = 17), and A (n = 20), and measured their serum ALP activity in a fasting state and 6 h after a high-fat meal. The amount of ABH substances in the saliva of each subject was determined by the hemagglutination inhibition test. Correlation coefficients between the change in ALP activity after high-fat meal ingestion and the hemagglutination inhibition values in saliva were 0.925 in blood group B, 0.879 in blood group O, and 0.906 in blood group A. These results suggest that increases in ALP activity in the circulation following the ingestion of a high-fat meal are closely related to the amount of ABH substances in saliva.

  4. Dietary trimethylamine N-oxide exacerbates impaired glucose tolerance in mice fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Liu, Xiaofang; Xu, Jie; Xue, Changhu; Xue, Yong; Wang, Yuming

    2014-10-01

    Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) is an oxidation product of trimethylamine (TMA) and is present in many aquatic foods. Here, we investigated the effects of TMAO on glucose tolerance in high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to the control, high fat (HF), and TMAO groups. The HF group was fed a diet containing 25% fat, and the TMAO group was fed the HFD plus 0.2% TMAO for 4 weeks. After 3 weeks of feeding, oral glucose tolerance tests were performed. Dietary TMAO increased fasting insulin levels and homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and exacerbated the impaired glucose tolerance in HFD-fed mice. These effects were associated with the expression of genes related to the insulin signal pathway, glycogen synthesis, gluconeogenesis and glucose transport in liver. mRNA levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine MCP-1 increased significantly and of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 greatly decreased in adipose tissue. Our results suggest that dietary TMAO exacerbates impaired glucose tolerance, obstructs the hepatic insulin signaling pathway, and causes adipose tissue inflammation in mice fed a high fat diet.

  5. Eating meals before wheel-running exercise attenuate high fat diet-driven obesity in mice under two meals per day schedule.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Yuta; Ikeda, Yuko; Kamagata, Mayo; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2015-06-01

    Mice that exercise after meals gain less body weight and visceral fat compared to those that exercised before meals under a one meal/exercise time per day schedule. Humans generally eat two or three meals per day, and rarely have only one meal. To extend our previous observations, we examined here whether a "two meals, two exercise sessions per day" schedule was optimal in terms of maintaining a healthy body weight. In this experiment, "morning" refers to the beginning of the active phase (the "morning" for nocturnal animals). We found that 2-h feeding before 2-h exercise in the morning and evening (F-Ex/F-Ex) resulted in greater attenuation of high fat diet (HFD)-induced weight gain compared to other combinations of feeding and exercise under two daily meals and two daily exercise periods. There were no significant differences in total food intake and total wheel counts, but feeding before exercise in the morning groups (F-Ex/F-Ex and F-Ex/Ex-F) increased the morning wheel counts. These results suggest that habitual exercise after feeding in the morning and evening is more effective for preventing HFD-induced weight gain. We also determined whether there were any correlations between food intake, wheel rotation, visceral fat volume and skeletal muscle volumes. We found positive associations between gastrocnemius muscle volumes and morning wheel counts, as well as negative associations between morning food intake volumes/body weight and morning wheel counts. These results suggest that morning exercise-induced increase of muscle volume may refer to anti-obesity. Evening exercise is negatively associated with fat volume increases, suggesting that this practice may counteract fat deposition. Our multifactorial analysis revealed that morning food intake helps to increase exercise, and that evening exercise reduced fat volumes. Thus, exercise in the morning or evening is important for preventing the onset of obesity.

  6. A Resveratrol and Polyphenol Preparation Suppresses Oxidative and Inflammatory Stress Response to a High-Fat, High-Carbohydrate Meal

    PubMed Central

    Ghanim, Husam; Sia, Chang Ling; Korzeniewski, Kelly; Lohano, Teekam; Abuaysheh, Sanaa; Marumganti, Anuritha; Chaudhuri, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    Background: High-fat, high-carbohydrate (HFHC) meals are known to induce oxidative and inflammatory stress, an increase in plasma endotoxin concentrations, and an increase in the expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS-3). Hypothesis: The intake of a nutritional supplement containing resveratrol and muscadine grape polyphenols reduces HFHC meal-induced oxidative and inflammatory stress and stimulates the activity of the antioxidant transcription factor, NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf-2), and its downstream targets. Methods: Ten normal, healthy subjects were given a 930-kcal HFHC meal either with placebo or with the supplement. Indices of oxidative stress, inflammation, Nrf-2 binding activity, the concentrations of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) and lipoprotein binding protein (LBP), and the expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4), CD14, IL-1β, TNFα, SOCS-3, Keap-1, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO-1), and GST-P1 were measured. Results: The intake of the supplement suppressed the meal-induced elevations of plasma endotoxin and LBP concentrations, the expression of p47phox, TLR-4, CD14, SOCS-3, IL-1β, and Keap-1, while enhancing Nrf-2 binding activity and the expression of NQO-1 and GST-P1 genes. Conclusion: A supplement containing resveratrol and muscadine polyphenols suppresses the increase in oxidative stress, lipopolysaccharide and LBP concentrations, and expression of TLR-4, CD14, IL-1β and SOCS-3 in mononuclear cells after an HFHC meal. It also stimulates specific Nrf-2 activity and induces the expression of the related antioxidant genes, NQO-1 and GST-P1. These results demonstrate the acute antioxidant and antiinflammatory effects of resveratrol and polyphenolic compounds in humans in the postprandial state. PMID:21289251

  7. A resveratrol and polyphenol preparation suppresses oxidative and inflammatory stress response to a high-fat, high-carbohydrate meal.

    PubMed

    Ghanim, Husam; Sia, Chang Ling; Korzeniewski, Kelly; Lohano, Teekam; Abuaysheh, Sanaa; Marumganti, Anuritha; Chaudhuri, Ajay; Dandona, Paresh

    2011-05-01

    High-fat, high-carbohydrate (HFHC) meals are known to induce oxidative and inflammatory stress, an increase in plasma endotoxin concentrations, and an increase in the expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS-3). The intake of a nutritional supplement containing resveratrol and muscadine grape polyphenols reduces HFHC meal-induced oxidative and inflammatory stress and stimulates the activity of the antioxidant transcription factor, NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf-2), and its downstream targets. Ten normal, healthy subjects were given a 930-kcal HFHC meal either with placebo or with the supplement. Indices of oxidative stress, inflammation, Nrf-2 binding activity, the concentrations of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) and lipoprotein binding protein (LBP), and the expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4), CD14, IL-1β, TNFα, SOCS-3, Keap-1, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO-1), and GST-P1 were measured. The intake of the supplement suppressed the meal-induced elevations of plasma endotoxin and LBP concentrations, the expression of p47(phox), TLR-4, CD14, SOCS-3, IL-1β, and Keap-1, while enhancing Nrf-2 binding activity and the expression of NQO-1 and GST-P1 genes. A supplement containing resveratrol and muscadine polyphenols suppresses the increase in oxidative stress, lipopolysaccharide and LBP concentrations, and expression of TLR-4, CD14, IL-1β and SOCS-3 in mononuclear cells after an HFHC meal. It also stimulates specific Nrf-2 activity and induces the expression of the related antioxidant genes, NQO-1 and GST-P1. These results demonstrate the acute antioxidant and antiinflammatory effects of resveratrol and polyphenolic compounds in humans in the postprandial state.

  8. Effect of high-fat meal intake on the pharmacokinetic profile of ivermectin in Japanese patients with scabies.

    PubMed

    Miyajima, Atsushi; Hirota, Takashi; Sugioka, Akihito; Fukuzawa, Masao; Sekine, Mari; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Yoshimasu, Takashi; Kigure, Akira; Anata, Taichi; Noguchi, Wataru; Akagi, Keita; Komoda, Masayo

    2016-09-01

    Ivermectin (IVM) is used as an anthelmintic agent in many countries. To evaluate the effect of high-fat (HF) meal intake on the pharmacokinetics of IVM, a clinical trial was conducted in Japanese patients with scabies. The patients were administrated Stromectol(®) tablets in the fasted state, and after 1 week they were also administrated it after a HF meal (fed state). After the administration, IVM concentrations in plasma and the stratum corneum were determined. The geometric mean of fed/fasted ratio of area under IVM concentration-time curve (AUC) in plasma was 1.25 (90% confidence interval, 1.09-1.43), suggesting the tendency to increased absorption after a HF meal. The fed/fasted ratio of the maximum IVM concentration in the stratum corneum was well correlated with that in plasma. In addition, no serious adverse events were observed during the trial, while a mild increase of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activity in plasma was observed under the fed state in two patients. The mean AUC of IVM in plasma of those two patients were approximately threefold higher than that of the other patients at that time. On the other hand, the treatment success rate was 76.9% at 7 days after the second administration, which was comparable with the expected level. The present study not only demonstrates that HF meal intake increases the IVM concentration in plasma and the stratum corneum in Japanese patients with scabies, but also suggests the possibility that HF meals increase the risk of hepatic dysfunction by the increased exposure of IVM. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  9. Postprandial Effect of a High-Fat Meal on Endotoxemia in Arab Women with and without Insulin-Resistance-Related Diseases.

    PubMed

    Al-Disi, Dara A; Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Khan, Nasiruddin; Alfadda, Assim A; Sallam, Reem M; Alsaif, Mohammed; Sabico, Shaun; Tripathi, Gyanendra; McTernan, Philip G

    2015-08-04

    This study determined the effects of a high-fat meal on circulating endotoxin and cardiometabolic indices in adult Arab women. The cohort consisted of 92 consenting Saudi women (18 non-diabetic (ND)) control subjects; Age 24.4 ± 7.9 year; body mass index (BMI) 22.2 ± 2.2 Kg/m2), 24 overweight/obese (referred to as overweight-plus (overweight+)) subjects (Age 32.0 ± 7.8 year; BMI 28.5 ± 1.5 Kg/m2) and 50 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients (Age 41.5 ± 6.2 year; BMI 35.2 ± 7.7 Kg/m2). All were given a high-fat meal (standardized meal: 75 g fat, 5 g carbohydrate, 6 g protein) after an overnight fast of 12-14 h. Anthropometrics were obtained and fasting blood glucose, lipids, and endotoxin were serially measured for four consecutive postprandial hours. Endotoxin levels were significantly elevated prior to a high-fat meal in the overweight+ and T2DM than the controls (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the postprandial cardiometabolic changes led to a more detrimental risk profile in T2DM subjects than other groups, with serial changes most notable in glucose, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-cholesterol), and insulin levels (p-values < 0.05). The same single meal given to subjects with different metabolic states had varying impacts on cardiometabolic health. Endotoxemia is exacerbated by a high-fat meal in Arab subjects with T2DM, accompanied by a parallel increase in cardiometabolic risk profile, suggesting disparity in disease pathogenesis of those with or without T2DM through the altered cardiometabolic risk profile rather than variance in metabolic endotoxinaemia with a high-fat meal.

  10. Caffeine prevents weight gain and cognitive impairment caused by a high-fat diet while elevating hippocampal BDNF.

    PubMed

    Moy, Gregory A; McNay, Ewan C

    2013-01-17

    Obesity, high-fat diets, and subsequent type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are associated with cognitive impairment. Moreover, T2DM increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and leads to abnormal elevation of brain beta-amyloid levels, one of the hallmarks of AD. The psychoactive alkaloid caffeine has been shown to have therapeutic potential in AD but the central impact of caffeine has not been well-studied in the context of a high-fat diet. Here we investigated the impact of caffeine administration on metabolism and cognitive performance, both in control rats and in rats placed on a high-fat diet. The effects of caffeine were significant: caffeine both (i) prevented the weight-gain associated with the high-fat diet and (ii) prevented cognitive impairment. Caffeine did not alter hippocampal metabolism or insulin signaling, likely because the high-fat-fed animals did not develop full-blown diabetes; however, caffeine did prevent or reverse a decrease in hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) seen in high-fat-fed animals. These data confirm that caffeine may serve as a neuroprotective agent against cognitive impairment caused by obesity and/or a high-fat diet. Increased hippocampal BDNF following caffeine administration could explain, at least in part, the effects of caffeine on cognition and metabolism.

  11. ASK1 is involved in cognitive impairment caused by long-term high-fat diet feeding in mice

    PubMed Central

    Toyama, Kensuke; Koibuchi, Nobutaka; Hasegawa, Yu; Uekawa, Ken; Yasuda, Osamu; Sueta, Daisuke; Nakagawa, Takashi; Ma, Mingjie; Kusaka, Hiroaki; Lin, Bowen; Ogawa, Hisao; Ichijo, Hidenori; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei

    2015-01-01

    Although high-fat diet intake is known to cause obesity and diabetes, the effect of high-fat diet itself on cognitive function remains to be clarified. We have previously shown that apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is responsible for cognitive impairment caused by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. The present work, by using ASK1 deficient mice, was undertaken to explore the influence of chronic high-fat diet intake on cognitive function and the role of ASK1. Cognitive function in wild-type mice fed high-fat diet from 2 to 24 months of age was significantly impaired compared to those fed control diet, which was associated with the significant white matter lesions, reduction of hippocampal capillary density, and decrement of hippocampal neuronal cell. However, ASK1 deficiency abolished the development of cognitive impairment and cerebral injury caused by high-fat diet. Our results provided the evidence that high-fat diet itself causes cognitive impairment and ASK1 participates in such cognitive impairment. PMID:26044555

  12. Differential responses of circulating amylin to high-fat vs. high-carbohydrate meal in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Eller, Lindsay K; Ainslie, Philip N; Poulin, Marc J; Reimer, Raylene A

    2008-06-01

    The success of an amylin analogue in weight loss trials has generated interest in amylin as a physiological satiety signal. Little is known about how plasma amylin responds to macronutrients. This study examined the effects of a high-carbohydrate meal (CHO), a high-fat meal (FAT) or a continued fast (FAST) on amylin concentrations and correlations among other satiety hormones and measures of appetite. In a randomized, crossover design, 10 healthy males consumed a meal high in carbohydrate or fat or continued fasted. Blood samples and subjective hunger scores were obtained at baseline and 30, 90 and 210 min postprandial. After CHO, amylin, insulin and C-peptide were greater and des-acyl ghrelin lower compared to FAT (P < 0.001). Area under the curve (AUC) was greater for amylin and insulin and lower for des-acyl ghrelin following CHO. Subjective satiety and fullness were higher for CHO and FAT than FAST at 30 and 90 min but only for CHO at 210 min (P < 0.01). Hunger and desire to eat were lower for CHO and FAT than FAST at 30 and 90 min but only for CHO at 210 min (P < 0.005). Amylin was negatively correlated to hunger, desire to eat, and nausea and positively related to satiety and insulin. Des-acyl ghrelin was negatively associated with C-peptide, insulin and GLP-1 and satiety. CHO enhances amylin and suppresses des-acyl ghrelin to a greater extent than FAT in healthy men. The mechanisms responsible for these changes and their implications in the physiology of satiety remain to be elucidated.

  13. Genome-wide association study of triglyceride response to a high-fat meal among participants of the NHLBI genetics of lipid lowering drugs and diet network (GOLDN)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective: The triglyceride (TG) response to a high-fat meal (postprandial lipemia, PPL) affects cardiovascular disease risk and is influenced by genes and environment. Genes involved in lipid metabolism have dominated genetic studies of PPL TG response. We sought to elucidate common genetic variant...

  14. Genome-wide association study of triglyceride response to a high-fat meal among participants of the NHLBI Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (GOLDN)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The triglyceride (TG) response to a high-fat meal (postprandial lipemia, PPL) affects cardiovascular disease risk and is influenced by genes and environment. Genes involved in lipid metabolism have dominated genetic studies of PPL TG response. We sought to elucidate common genetic variants through a...

  15. Melatonin prevents memory impairment induced by high-fat diet: Role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Alzoubi, Karem H; Mayyas, Fadia A; Mahafzah, Rania; Khabour, Omar F

    2018-01-15

    Consumption of high-fat diet (HFD) induces oxidative stress in the hippocampus that leads to memory impairment. Melatonin has antioxidant and neuroprotective effects. In this study, we hypothesized that chronic administration of melatonin can prevent memory impairment induced by consumption of HFD. Melatonin was administered to rats via oral gavage (100mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks. HFD was also instituted for the same duration. Behavioral studies were conducted to test spatial memory using the radial arm water maze. Additionally, oxidative stress biomarkers were assessed in the hippocampus. Results showed that HFD impaired both short- and long- term memory (P<0.05), while melatonin treatment prevented such effects. Furthermore, melatonin prevented HFD-induced reduction in levels of GSH, and ratio of GSH/GSSG, and increase in GSSG in the hippocampus. Melatonin also prevented reduction in the catalase activity in hippocampus of animals on HFD. In conclusion, HFD induced memory impairment and melatonin prevented this impairment probably by preventing alteration of oxidative stress in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Differential roles of breakfast only (one meal per day) and a bigger breakfast with a small dinner (two meals per day) in mice fed a high-fat diet with regard to induced obesity and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Yuta; Hirao, Akiko; Kuroda, Hiroaki; Otsuka, Makiko; Tahara, Yu; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2012-05-15

    Recent studies on humans and rodents have suggested that the timing of food intake plays an important role in circadian regulation and metabolic health. Consumption of high-fat foods during the inactive period or at the end of the awake period results in weight gain and metabolic syndrome in rodents. However, the distinct effects of breakfast size and the breakfast/dinner size ratio on metabolic health have not yet been fully examined in mice. We examined whether the parameters of metabolic syndrome were differentially affected in mice that consumed a large meal at the beginning of the awake period (breakfast; one meal group) and a relatively smaller meal at end of the awake period (dinner; two meals group). The mice of each group were provided equal food volume per day. Mice on one meal exhibited an increase in body weight gain, hyperinsulinemia, hyperleptinemia, and a decrease of gene expression associated with β-oxidation in adipose tissue and liver compared with those on two meals. The circadian expression pattern of the Clock gene in mice on one meal was disturbed compared with those on two meals. In conclusion, a bigger breakfast with a smaller dinner (two meals per day) but not breakfast only (one meal per day) helps control body weight and fat accumulation in mice on a high-fat meals schedule. The findings of this study suggest that dietary recommendations for weight reduction and/or maintenance should include information on the timing and quantity of dietary intake.

  17. Chronic High-Fat Diet Impairs Collecting Lymphatic Vessel Function in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Proulx, Steven T.; Ochsenbein, Alexandra M.; Luciani, Paola; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Wolfrum, Christian; Detmar, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels play an essential role in intestinal lipid uptake, and impairment of lymphatic vessel function leads to enhanced adipose tissue accumulation in patients with lymphedema and in genetic mouse models of lymphatic dysfunction. However, the effects of obesity on lymphatic function have been poorly studied. We investigated if and how adipose tissue accumulation influences lymphatic function. Using a lymphatic specific tracer, we performed in vivo near-infrared (NIR) imaging to assess the function of collecting lymphatic vessels in mice fed normal chow or high-fat diet (HFD). Histological and whole mount analyses were performed to investigate the morphological changes in initial and the collecting lymphatic vessels. HFD was associated with impaired collecting lymphatic vessel function, as evidenced by reduced frequency of contractions and diminished response to mechanostimulation. Moreover, we found a significant negative correlation between collecting lymphatic vessel function and body weight. Whole mount analyses showed an enlargement of contractile collecting lymphatic vessels of the hind limb. In K14-VEGF-C mice, HFD resulted in a reduced spreading of the tracer within dermal lymphatic vessels. These findings indicate that adipose tissue expansion due to HFD leads to a functional impairment of the lymphatic vasculature, predominantly in collecting lymphatic vessels. PMID:24714646

  18. A comparison of the changes in cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance during exercise following high-fat meals containing DHA or EPA.

    PubMed

    Rontoyanni, Victoria G; Hall, Wendy L; Pombo-Rodrigues, Sonia; Appleton, Amber; Chung, Roxanna; Sanders, Thomas A B

    2012-08-01

    Long-chain n-3 PUFA can lower blood pressure (BP) but their acute effects on cardiac output, BP and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) in response to dynamic exercise are uncertain. We compared the effects of high-fat meals rich in EPA (20 : 5n-3), DHA (22 : 6n-3) or oleic acid (control) on cardiac output, BP and SVR in response to exercise stress testing. High-fat meals (50 g fat) containing high-oleic sunflower oil enriched with 4·7 g of either EPA or DHA v. control (high-oleic sunflower oil only) were fed to twenty-two healthy males using a randomised cross-over design. Resting measurements of cardiac output, heart rate and BP were made before and hourly over 5 h following the meal. A standardised 12 min exercise test was then conducted with further measurements made during and post-exercise. Blood samples were collected at fasting, 5 h postprandially and immediately post-exercise for the analysis of lipid, glucose and 8-isoprostane-F2α (8-iso-PGF2α). Plasma concentrations of EPA and DHA increased by 0·22 mmol/l 5 h following the EPA and DHA meals, respectively, compared with the control (P < 0·001). Resting cardiac output and 8-iso-PGF2α increased similarly following all meals and there were no significant differences in cardiac output during exercise between the meals. SVR was lower at 5 h and during exercise following the DHA but not EPA meal, compared with the control meal, by 4·9 % (95 % CI 1·3, 8·4; P < 0·01). Meals containing DHA appear to differ from EPA with regard to their effects on cardiovascular haemodynamics during exercise.

  19. Methylphenidate prevents high-fat diet (HFD)-induced learning/memory impairment in juvenile mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarczyk, Melissa M.; Machaj, Agnieszka S.; Chiu, Gabriel S.; Lawson, Marcus A.; Gainey, Stephen J.; York, Jason M.; Meling, Daryl D.; Martin, Stephen A.; Kwakwa, Kristen A.; Newman, Andrew F.; Woods, Jeffrey A.; Kelley, Keith W.; Wang, Yanyan; Miller, Michael J.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity has risen dramatically and coincident with this upsurge is a growth in adverse childhood psychological conditions including impulsivity, depression, anxiety and attention deficit/hyperactive disorder (ADHD). Due to confounds that exist when determining causality of childhood behavioral perturbations, controversy remains as to whether overnutrition and/or childhood obesity is important. Therefore, we examined juvenile mice to determine if biobehaviors were impacted by a short-term feeding (1–3 wks) of a high-fat diet (HFD). After 1 wk of a HFD feeding, mouse burrowing and spontaneous wheel running were increased while mouse exploration of the open quadrants of a zero maze, perfect alternations in a Y-maze and recognition of a novel object were impaired. Examination of mouse cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus for dopamine and its metabolites demonstrated increased homovanillic acid (HVA) concentrations in the hippocampus and cortex that were associated with decreased cortical BDNF gene expression. In contrast, pro-inflammatory cytokine gene transcripts and serum IL-1α, IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 were unaffected by the short-term HFD feeding. Administration to mice of the psychostimulant methylphenidate prevented HFD-dependent impairment of learning/memory. HFD learning/memory impairment was not inhibited by the anti-depressants desipramine or reboxetine nor was it blocked in IDO or IL-1R1 knockout mice. In sum, a HFD rapidly impacts dopamine metabolism in the brain appearing to trigger anxiety-like behaviors and learning/memory impairments prior to the onset of weight gain and/or pre-diabetes. Thus, overnutrition due to fats may be central to childhood psychological perturbations such as anxiety and ADHD. PMID:23411461

  20. Methylphenidate prevents high-fat diet (HFD)-induced learning/memory impairment in juvenile mice.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Melissa M; Machaj, Agnieszka S; Chiu, Gabriel S; Lawson, Marcus A; Gainey, Stephen J; York, Jason M; Meling, Daryl D; Martin, Stephen A; Kwakwa, Kristin A; Newman, Andrew F; Woods, Jeffrey A; Kelley, Keith W; Wang, Yanyan; Miller, Michael J; Freund, Gregory G

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity has risen dramatically and coincident with this upsurge is a growth in adverse childhood psychological conditions including impulsivity, depression, anxiety and attention deficit/hyperactive disorder (ADHD). Due to confounds that exist when determining causality of childhood behavioral perturbations, controversy remains as to whether overnutrition and/or childhood obesity is important. Therefore, we examined juvenile mice to determine if biobehaviors were impacted by a short-term feeding (1-3wks) of a high-fat diet (HFD). After 1wk of a HFD feeding, mouse burrowing and spontaneous wheel running were increased while mouse exploration of the open quadrants of a zero maze, perfect alternations in a Y-maze and recognition of a novel object were impaired. Examination of mouse cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus for dopamine and its metabolites demonstrated increased homovanillic acid (HVA) concentrations in the hippocampus and cortex that were associated with decreased cortical BDNF gene expression. In contrast, pro-inflammatory cytokine gene transcripts and serum IL-1α, IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 were unaffected by the short-term HFD feeding. Administration to mice of the psychostimulant methylphenidate prevented HFD-dependent impairment of learning/memory. HFD learning/memory impairment was not inhibited by the anti-depressants desipramine or reboxetine nor was it blocked in IDO or IL-1R1 knockout mice. In sum, a HFD rapidly impacts dopamine metabolism in the brain appearing to trigger anxiety-like behaviors and learning/memory impairments prior to the onset of weight gain and/or pre-diabetes. Thus, overnutrition due to fats may be central to childhood psychological perturbations such as anxiety and ADHD.

  1. Effects of a liquid high-fat meal on postprandial lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetic patients with abdominal obesity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Lu, Huixia; Liu, Fukang; Cai, Huizhen; Song, Zhixiu; Guo, Fei; Xie, Yulan; Shu, Guofang; Sun, Guiju

    2017-01-01

    Postprandial lipemia and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of accelerated atherosclerosis. This study aimed to evaluate the postprandial lipid metabolism after the ingestion of a liquid high-fat meal in type 2 diabetic patients with abdominal obesity, and determine if the PvuII polymorphisms of LPL influence their postprandial lipid responses. Serum glucose, insulin, triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) were measured in fasting and postprandial state at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 h after a liquid high-fat meal in 51 type 2 diabetic patients with abdominal obesity, 31 type 2 diabetic patients without abdominal obesity and 39 controls. Their PvuII polymorphisms of LPL were tested in fasting. Type 2 diabetic patients with abdominal obesity had significantly higher postprandial areas under the curve (AUC) of glucose [least square mean difference (LSMD) = 30.763, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 23.071-38.455, F = 37.346, P < 0.05] and TC (LSMD = 3.995, 95% CI = 1.043-6.947, F = 3.681, P < 0.05) than controls. Postprandial AUCs for insulin, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and TG were higher (LSMD = 86.987, 95% CI = 37.421-136.553, F = 16.739, P < 0.05; LSMD = 37.456, 95% CI = 16.312-58.600, F = 27.012, P < 0.05; LSMD = 4.684, 95% CI = 2.662-6.705, F = 26.158, P < 0.05), whereas HDL-C AUC was lower (LSMD = -1.652, 95% CI = -2.685 - -0.620, F = 8.190, P < 0.05) in type 2 diabetic subjects with abdominal obesity than those without abdominal obesity. In type 2 diabetic patients with abdominal obesity, postprandial TG AUC was lower in P-/- than in P+/- (LSMD = -4.393, 95% CI = -9.278 - -0.491, F = 4.476, P < 0.05) and P+/+ (LSMD = -7.180, 95% CI = -12.319 - -2.014, F = 4.476, P < 0.05) phenotypes. Postprandial AUCs for glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, TC and HDL-C were not different according to Pvu

  2. Effect of exercise intensity on postprandial lipemia, markers of oxidative stress, and endothelial function after a high-fat meal.

    PubMed

    Lopes Krüger, Renata; Costa Teixeira, Bruno; Boufleur Farinha, Juliano; Cauduro Oliveira Macedo, Rodrigo; Pinto Boeno, Francesco; Rech, Anderson; Lopez, Pedro; Silveira Pinto, Ronei; Reischak-Oliveira, Alvaro

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of 2 different exercise intensities on postprandial lipemia, oxidative stress markers, and endothelial function after a high-fat meal (HFM). Eleven young men completed 2-day trials in 3 conditions: rest, moderate-intensity exercise (MI-Exercise) and heavy-intensity exercise (HI-Exercise). Subjects performed an exercise bout or no exercise (Rest) on the evening of day 1. On the morning of day 2, an HFM was provided. Blood was sampled at fasting (0 h) and every hour from 1 to 5 h during the postprandial period for triacylglycerol (TAG), thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS), and nitrite/nitrate (NOx) concentrations. Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) was also analyzed. TAG concentrations were reduced in exercise conditions compared with Rest during the postprandial period (P < 0.004). TAG incremental area under the curve (iAUC) was smaller after HI-Exercise compared with Rest (P = 0.012). TBARS concentrations were reduced in MI-Exercise compared with Rest (P < 0.041). FMD was higher in exercise conditions than Rest at 0 h (P < 0.02) and NOx concentrations were enhanced in MI-Exercise compared with Rest at 0 h (P < 0.01). These results suggest that acute exercise can reduce lipemia after an HFM. However, HI-Exercise showed to be more effective in reducing iAUC TAG, which might suggest higher protection against postprandial TAG enhancement. Conversely, MI-Exercise can be beneficial to attenuate the susceptibility of oxidative damage induced by an HFM and to increase endothelial function in the fasted state compared with Rest.

  3. Impaired glucose tolerance in rats fed low-carbohydrate, high-fat diets.

    PubMed

    Bielohuby, Maximilian; Sisley, Stephanie; Sandoval, Darleen; Herbach, Nadja; Zengin, Ayse; Fischereder, Michael; Menhofer, Dominik; Stoehr, Barbara J M; Stemmer, Kerstin; Wanke, Rüdiger; Tschöp, Matthias H; Seeley, Randy J; Bidlingmaier, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Moderate low-carbohydrate/high-fat (LC-HF) diets are widely used to induce weight loss in overweight subjects, whereas extreme ketogenic LC-HF diets are used to treat neurological disorders like pediatric epilepsy. Usage of LC-HF diets for improvement of glucose metabolism is highly controversial; some studies suggest that LC-HF diets ameliorate glucose tolerance, whereas other investigations could not identify positive effects of these diets or reported impaired insulin sensitivity. Here, we investigate the effects of LC-HF diets on glucose and insulin metabolism in a well-characterized animal model. Male rats were fed isoenergetic or hypocaloric amounts of standard control diet, a high-protein "Atkins-style" LC-HF diet, or a low-protein, ketogenic, LC-HF diet. Both LC-HF diets induced lower fasting glucose and insulin levels associated with lower pancreatic β-cell volumes. However, dynamic challenge tests (oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests, insulin-tolerance tests, and hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps) revealed that LC-HF pair-fed rats exhibited impaired glucose tolerance and impaired hepatic and peripheral tissue insulin sensitivity, the latter potentially being mediated by elevated intramyocellular lipids. Adjusting visceral fat mass in LC-HF groups to that of controls by reducing the intake of LC-HF diets to 80% of the pair-fed groups did not prevent glucose intolerance. Taken together, these data show that lack of dietary carbohydrates leads to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in rats despite causing a reduction in fasting glucose and insulin concentrations. Our results argue against a beneficial effect of LC-HF diets on glucose and insulin metabolism, at least under physiological conditions. Therefore, use of LC-HF diets for weight loss or other therapeutic purposes should be balanced against potentially harmful metabolic side effects.

  4. Impaired lipid and glucose homeostasis in hexabromocyclododecane-exposed mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Rie; Koike, Eiko; Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Yamamoto, Megumi; Takano, Hirohisa

    2014-03-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is an additive flame retardant used in the textile industry and in polystyrene foam manufacturing. Because of its lipophilicity and persistency, HBCD accumulates in adipose tissue and thus has the potential of causing metabolic disorders through disruption of lipid and glucose homeostasis. However, the association between HBCD and obesity remains unclear. We investigated whether exposure to HBCD contributes to initiation and progression of obesity and related metabolic dysfunction in mice fed a normal diet (ND) or a high-fat diet (HFD). Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a HFD (62.2 kcal% fat) or a ND and treated orally with HBCD (0, 1.75, 35, or 700 μg/kg body weight) weekly from 6 to 20 weeks of age. We examined body weight, liver weight, blood biochemistry, histopathological changes, and gene expression profiles in the liver and adipose tissue. In HFD-fed mice, body and liver weight were markedly increased in mice treated with the high (700 μg/kg) and medium (35 μg/kg) doses of HBCD compared with vehicle. This effect was more prominent in the high-dose group. These increases were paralleled by increases in random blood glucose and insulin levels and enhancement of microvesicular steatosis and macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue. HBCD-treated HFD-fed mice also had increased mRNA levels of Pparg (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ) in the liver and decreased mRNA levels of Glut4 (glucose transporter 4) in adipose tissue compared with vehicle-treated HFD-fed mice. Our findings suggest that HBCD may contribute to enhancement of diet-induced body weight gain and metabolic dysfunction through disruption of lipid and glucose homeostasis, resulting in accelerated progression of obesity. Yanagisawa R, Koike E, Win-Shwe TT, Yamamoto M, Takano H. 2014. Impaired lipid and glucose homeostasis in hexabromocyclododecane-exposed mice fed a high-fat diet. Environ Health Perspect 122:277-283; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307421.

  5. Impaired Lipid and Glucose Homeostasis in Hexabromocyclododecane-Exposed Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Eiko; Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Yamamoto, Megumi; Takano, Hirohisa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is an additive flame retardant used in the textile industry and in polystyrene foam manufacturing. Because of its lipophilicity and persistency, HBCD accumulates in adipose tissue and thus has the potential of causing metabolic disorders through disruption of lipid and glucose homeostasis. However, the association between HBCD and obesity remains unclear. Objectives: We investigated whether exposure to HBCD contributes to initiation and progression of obesity and related metabolic dysfunction in mice fed a normal diet (ND) or a high-fat diet (HFD). Methods: Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a HFD (62.2 kcal% fat) or a ND and treated orally with HBCD (0, 1.75, 35, or 700 μg/kg body weight) weekly from 6 to 20 weeks of age. We examined body weight, liver weight, blood biochemistry, histopathological changes, and gene expression profiles in the liver and adipose tissue. Results: In HFD-fed mice, body and liver weight were markedly increased in mice treated with the high (700 μg/kg) and medium (35 μg/kg) doses of HBCD compared with vehicle. This effect was more prominent in the high-dose group. These increases were paralleled by increases in random blood glucose and insulin levels and enhancement of microvesicular steatosis and macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue. HBCD-treated HFD-fed mice also had increased mRNA levels of Pparg (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ) in the liver and decreased mRNA levels of Glut4 (glucose transporter 4) in adipose tissue compared with vehicle-treated HFD-fed mice. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that HBCD may contribute to enhancement of diet-induced body weight gain and metabolic dysfunction through disruption of lipid and glucose homeostasis, resulting in accelerated progression of obesity. Citation: Yanagisawa R, Koike E, Win-Shwe TT, Yamamoto M, Takano H. 2014. Impaired lipid and glucose homeostasis in hexabromocyclododecane-exposed mice fed a high-fat diet. Environ Health

  6. Could a high-fat diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids impair the cardiovascular system?

    PubMed Central

    Medei, Emiliano; Lima-Leopoldo, Ana Paula; Pereira-Junior, Pedro Paulo; Leopoldo, André Soares; Campos, Dijon Henrique Salomé; Raimundo, Juliana Montani; Sudo, Roberto Takashi; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Bruder-Nascimento, Thiago; Cordellini, Sandra; Nascimento, José Hamilton Matheus; Cicogna, Antonio Carlos

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dyslipidemia results from consumption of a diet rich in saturated fatty acids and is usually associated with cardiovascular disease. A diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids is usually associated with improved cardiovascular condition. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether a high-fat diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids (U-HFD) – in which fatty acid represents approximately 45% of the total calories – impairs the cardiovascular system. METHODS: Male, 30-day-old Wistar rats were fed a standard (control) diet or a U-HFD containing 83% unsaturated fatty acid for 19 weeks. The in vivo electrocardiogram, the spectral analysis of heart rate variability, and the vascular reactivity responses to phenylephrine, acetylcholine, noradrenaline and prazosin in aortic ring preparations were analyzed to assess the cardiovascular parameters. RESULTS: After 19 weeks, the U-HFD rats had increased total body fat, baseline glucose levels and feed efficiency compared with control rats. However, the final body weight, systolic blood pressure, area under the curve for glucose, calorie intake and heart weight/final body weight ratio were similar between the groups. In addition, both groups demonstrated no alteration in the electrocardiogram or cardiac sympathetic parameters. There was no difference in the responses to acetylcholine or the maximal contractile response of the thoracic aorta to phenylephrine between groups, but the concentration necessary to produce 50% of maximal response showed a decrease in the sensitivity to phenylephrine in U-HFD rats. The cumulative concentration-effect curve for noradrenaline in the presence of prazosin was shifted similarly in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: The present work shows that U-HFD did not impair the cardiovascular parameters analyzed. PMID:21165364

  7. Could a high-fat diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids impair the cardiovascular system?

    PubMed

    Medei, Emiliano; Lima-Leopoldo, Ana Paula; Pereira-Junior, Pedro Paulo; Leopoldo, André Soares; Campos, Dijon Henrique Salomé; Raimundo, Juliana Montani; Sudo, Roberto Takashi; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Bruder-Nascimento, Thiago; Cordellini, Sandra; Nascimento, José Hamilton Matheus; Cicogna, Antonio Carlos

    2010-12-01

    Dyslipidemia results from consumption of a diet rich in saturated fatty acids and is usually associated with cardiovascular disease. A diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids is usually associated with improved cardiovascular condition. To investigate whether a high-fat diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids (U-HFD) - in which fatty acid represents approximately 45% of the total calories - impairs the cardiovascular system. Male, 30-day-old Wistar rats were fed a standard (control) diet or a U-HFD containing 83% unsaturated fatty acid for 19 weeks. The in vivo electrocardiogram, the spectral analysis of heart rate variability, and the vascular reactivity responses to phenylephrine, acetylcholine, noradrenaline and prazosin in aortic ring preparations were analyzed to assess the cardiovascular parameters. After 19 weeks, the U-HFD rats had increased total body fat, baseline glucose levels and feed efficiency compared with control rats. However, the final body weight, systolic blood pressure, area under the curve for glucose, calorie intake and heart weight⁄final body weight ratio were similar between the groups. In addition, both groups demonstrated no alteration in the electrocardiogram or cardiac sympathetic parameters. There was no difference in the responses to acetylcholine or the maximal contractile response of the thoracic aorta to phenylephrine between groups, but the concentration necessary to produce 50% of maximal response showed a decrease in the sensitivity to phenylephrine in U-HFD rats. The cumulative concentration- effect curve for noradrenaline in the presence of prazosin was shifted similarly in both groups. The present work shows that U-HFD did not impair the cardiovascular parameters analyzed.

  8. A high fat diet-induced impaired glucose metabolism in mice with targeted deletion of calpain in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Aki; Fein, Mikaela J; Shimada, Masako

    2011-06-03

    The ubiquitously expressed Calpains 1 and 2 belong to a family of calcium-dependent intracellular cysteine proteases. Both calpains are heterodimers consisting of a large subunit and a small regulatory subunit encoded by the gene Capns1. To investigate a role for the calpain small subunit in cells of the osteoblast lineage in vivo, we previously generated osteoblast-specific Capns1 knockout mice and characterized their bone phenotype. In this study, we further examined effects of low calcium and high fat diets on their bone, fat, and glucose homeostasis. Osteoblast-specific Capns1 knockout mice showed significantly reduced serum levels of total and uncarboxylated osteocalcin, and this was presumably due to their impaired bone formation and bone resorption. The reduced bone resorptive function of the mutant mice was also significant under a low calcium diet. Thus, these results suggest that reduced uncarboxylated osteocalcin levels of mutant mice were, at least in part, due to their osteoporotic bone with impaired bone resorptive function. Interestingly, unlike osteocalcin knockout mice, mutant mice on a normal chow diet were leaner than control littermates; this was likely due to their reduced food intake and overall lower energy homeostasis. To test this hypothesis, we next provided mutant mice with a high fat diet and further examined an effect of their reduced uncarboxylated osteocalcin levels on body composition and glucose metabolism. The average mean body weight of mutant mice became indistinguishable with that of controls after 2 weeks on a high fat diet, and continued to show an upward trend, at least, up to 6weeks. Moreover, mutant mice on a high fat diet exhibited a significant increase in serum levels of leptin and resistin, adipocyte-specific adipokines, and developed impaired glucose tolerance. Collectively, mice with osteoporosis and reduced bone resorptive function showed reduced serum uncarboxylated osteocalcin levels and were susceptible to

  9. Differential roles of breakfast only (one meal per day) and a bigger breakfast with a small dinner (two meals per day) in mice fed a high-fat diet with regard to induced obesity and lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent studies on humans and rodents have suggested that the timing of food intake plays an important role in circadian regulation and metabolic health. Consumption of high-fat foods during the inactive period or at the end of the awake period results in weight gain and metabolic syndrome in rodents. However, the distinct effects of breakfast size and the breakfast/dinner size ratio on metabolic health have not yet been fully examined in mice. Methods We examined whether the parameters of metabolic syndrome were differentially affected in mice that consumed a large meal at the beginning of the awake period (breakfast; one meal group) and a relatively smaller meal at end of the awake period (dinner; two meals group). The mice of each group were provided equal food volume per day. Results Mice on one meal exhibited an increase in body weight gain, hyperinsulinemia, hyperleptinemia, and a decrease of gene expression associated with β-oxidation in adipose tissue and liver compared with those on two meals. The circadian expression pattern of the Clock gene in mice on one meal was disturbed compared with those on two meals. Conclusions In conclusion, a bigger breakfast with a smaller dinner (two meals per day) but not breakfast only (one meal per day) helps control body weight and fat accumulation in mice on a high-fat meals schedule. The findings of this study suggest that dietary recommendations for weight reduction and/or maintenance should include information on the timing and quantity of dietary intake. PMID:22587351

  10. High-fat diet induces hepatic insulin resistance and impairment of synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhigang; Patil, Ishan Y; Jiang, Tianyi; Sancheti, Harsh; Walsh, John P; Stiles, Bangyan L; Yin, Fei; Cadenas, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    High-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity is associated with insulin resistance, which may affect brain synaptic plasticity through impairment of insulin-sensitive processes underlying neuronal survival, learning, and memory. The experimental model consisted of 3 month-old C57BL/6J mice fed either a normal chow diet (control group) or a HFD (60% of calorie from fat; HFD group) for 12 weeks. This model was characterized as a function of time in terms of body weight, fasting blood glucose and insulin levels, HOMA-IR values, and plasma triglycerides. IRS-1/Akt pathway was assessed in primary hepatocytes and brain homogenates. The effect of HFD in brain was assessed by electrophysiology, input/output responses and long-term potentiation. HFD-fed mice exhibited a significant increase in body weight, higher fasting glucose- and insulin levels in plasma, lower glucose tolerance, and higher HOMA-IR values. In liver, HFD elicited (a) a significant decrease of insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1) phosphorylation on Tyr608 and increase of Ser307 phosphorylation, indicative of IRS-1 inactivation; (b) these changes were accompanied by inflammatory responses in terms of increases in the expression of NFκB and iNOS and activation of the MAP kinases p38 and JNK; (c) primary hepatocytes from mice fed a HFD showed decreased cellular oxygen consumption rates (indicative of mitochondrial functional impairment); this can be ascribed partly to a decreased expression of PGC1α and mitochondrial biogenesis. In brain, HFD feeding elicited (a) an inactivation of the IRS-1 and, consequentially, (b) a decreased expression and plasma membrane localization of the insulin-sensitive neuronal glucose transporters GLUT3/GLUT4; (c) a suppression of the ERK/CREB pathway, and (d) a substantial decrease in long-term potentiation in the CA1 region of hippocampus (indicative of impaired synaptic plasticity). It may be surmised that 12 weeks fed with HFD induce a systemic insulin resistance that impacts

  11. Effects of carnitine supplementation on flow-mediated dilation and vascular inflammatory responses to a high-fat meal in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Volek, Jeff S; Judelson, Daniel A; Silvestre, Ricardo; Yamamoto, Linda M; Spiering, Barry A; Hatfield, Disa L; Vingren, Jakob L; Quann, Erin E; Anderson, Jeffrey M; Maresh, Carl M; Kraemer, William J

    2008-11-15

    Because carnitine has been shown to decrease oxidative stress and improve endothelial cell functioning, we examined the effects of carnitine supplementation on postprandial flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and circulating biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress after a high-fat meal. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study design was used. Thirty men and women (age 30 +/- 8 year, body mass 72.9 +/- 17.1 kg, body fat 13.0 +/- 6.4%) participated in 2 vascular testing days, each preceded by 3 weeks of supplementation with either 2 g/day of L-Carnitine (L-Carnitine L-Tartrate) or placebo with a 3- to 5-week washout period between trials. Brachial artery FMD in response to 5 minutes of upper arm occlusion and circulating markers of oxidative stress and inflammation were measured in the fasting state and after a standardized high-fat meal. After 3 weeks of supplementation, peak FMD in the fasting state was similar between the carnitine and placebo trials, averaging 6.6%. Peak FMD during the postprandial period decreased to 5.8% at 1.5 hours during placebo and increased to 7.7% during the carnitine trial (n = 30: p = 0.043 for supplement by time interaction effect). This improvement in postprandial vascular function was most dramatic in subjects who showed a decrease in peak FMD in response to the meal (n = 15: p = 0.003 for supplement by time interaction effect). There was a significant increase in postprandial lipemia and plasma interleukin-6 but no effect of supplementation. There were no significant postprandial changes or supplement effects for plasma tumor necrosis factor-alpha and malondialdehyde. In conclusion, consistent with other work showing a beneficial effect of carnitine on vascular function, these findings indicate that carnitine supplementation in healthy individuals improves postprandial FMD after a high-fat meal.

  12. ACUTE EFFECT OF A SINGLE HIGH-FAT MEAL ON FOREARM BLOOD FLOW, BLOOD PRESSURE AND HEART RATE IN HEALTHY MALE ASIANS AND CAUSASIANS: A PILOT STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Chumjit; Petrofsky, Jerrold; Berk, Lee; Shavlik, David; Remigio, Wilton; Montgomery, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Research has shown that ingestion of a single high-fat (HF) meal causes postprandial lipemia and produces a reduced brachial artery blood flow response to vascular occlusion in Caucasians. However, the forearm BF response to occlusion in Caucasian and Asian populations after a single HF meal has not been compared. Eleven healthy male Asians, mean age 26.4 (±4.2) years, height 174.2 (±7.4) cm, and weight 73.8 (±5.7) kg and eight Caucasians, mean age 26.8 (±4.6) years, height 182.9 (±5.9) cm, and weight 82.8 (±4.8) kg were studied. A randomized cross-over study design was used with a HF (50.1 g total fat) or low-fat (LF) (5.1 g total fat) test meal 1 week apart. Forearm blood flow was measured over a 2-minute period following a 4-minute occlusion (FBFO) at 2 and 4 hours following ingestion of a test meal. This study found that FBFO was significantly attenuated in Asians (19.3%; p=0.09) compared to Caucasians after the ingestion of a HF meal. When comparing LF vs HF meals in Asians, the FBFO were 336.9 ml/100 ml tissue/minute and 240.8 ml/100 ml tissue/minute, respectively (p=0.02), whereas in Caucasians, the FBFO were 344.8 ml/100 ml tissue/minute and 287.4 ml/100 ml tissue/minute, respectively. It appears Asians have a more sensitive response to a single HF meal which may be explained, in part, by genotypic variation. These findings suggest that a single HF meal may contribute to the detrimental effects on vascular health in Asian males and raises speculation regarding the cumulative impact of a chronic HF diet in this population. PMID:20578534

  13. Effect of Low- and High-Fat Meals on the Pharmacokinetics of Venetoclax, a Selective First-in-Class BCL-2 Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Salem, Ahmed Hamed; Agarwal, Suresh K; Dunbar, Martin; Nuthalapati, Silpa; Chien, David; Freise, Kevin J; Wong, Shekman L

    2016-11-01

    Venetoclax is a selective, first-in-class, B-cell lymphoma-2 inhibitor that has demonstrated clinical efficacy in several hematological malignancies. Two studies evaluated the relative bioavailability of venetoclax in healthy subjects: (1) a bioequivalence study to compare the bioavailability of the film-coated tablet with that of an earlier uncoated tablet and (2) a food effect study to evaluate the effect of food on venetoclax pharmacokinetics. Both studies were open-label, single-dose, crossover studies. In the bioequivalence study, 15 subjects received a single dose of venetoclax 50 mg under nonfasting conditions, in each of 2 periods; one period used the uncoated tablet, and the other used the film-coated tablet. In the food effect study, 24 subjects received a single dose of venetoclax film-coated 100-mg tablet under fasting conditions, after a low-fat breakfast or after a high-fat breakfast in different periods. The venetoclax film-coated tablet was bioequivalent to the uncoated tablet, which indicates that the film coating does not affect bioavailability. The median Tmax of venetoclax was delayed by about 2 hours when administered with food. Compared with fasting conditions, Cmax and AUC increased by approximately 3.4-fold following a low-fat breakfast. High-fat meals increased Cmax and AUC by approximately 50% relative to low-fat meals. The mean terminal half-life was comparable between the high-fat meal and fasting conditions (19.1 versus 16.1 hours). Based on these results and the venetoclax exposure-response profile, venetoclax should be administered with food and without specific recommendations for fat content to ensure adequate and consistent bioavailability. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  14. High-fat feeding impairs nutrient sensing and gut brain integration in the caudomedial nucleus of the solitary tract in mice.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, Althea R; Schwartz, Gary J; Blouet, Clémence

    2015-01-01

    Hyperphagic obesity is characterized in part by a specific increase in meal size that contributes to increased daily energy intake, but the mechanisms underlying impaired activity of meal size regulatory circuits, particularly those converging at the caudomedial nucleus of the solitary tract in the hindbrain (cmNTS), remain poorly understood. In this paper, we assessed the consequences of high-fat (HF) feeding and diet-induced obesity (DIO) on cmNTS nutrient sensing and metabolic integration in the control of meal size. Mice maintained on a standard chow diet, low-fat (LF) diet or HF diet for 2 weeks or 6 months were implanted with a bilateral brain cannula targeting the cmNTS. Feeding behavior was assessed using behavioral chambers and meal-pattern analysis following cmNTS L-leucine injections alone or together with ip CCK. Molecular mechanisms implicated in the feeding responses were assessed using western blot, immunofluorescence and pharmacological inhibition of the amino acid sensing mTORC1 pathway (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1). We found that HF feeding blunts the anorectic consequences of cmNTS L-leucine administration. Increased baseline activity of the L-leucine sensor P70 S6 kinase 1 and impaired L-leucine-induced activation of this pathway in the cmNTS of HF-fed mice indicate that HF feeding is associated with an impairment in cmNTS mTOR nutritional and hormonal sensing. Interestingly, the acute orexigenic effect of the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin was preserved in HF-fed mice, supporting the assertion that HF-induced increase in baseline cmNTS mTORC1 activity underlies the defect in L-leucine sensing. Last, the synergistic feeding-suppressive effect of CCK and cmNTS L-leucine was abrogated in DIO mice. These results indicate that HF feeding leads to an impairment in cmNTS nutrient sensing and metabolic integration in the regulation of meal size.

  15. IRF-1 and miRNA126 modulate inflammatory VCAM-1 expression in response to a high fat meal

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rationale: High-fat diets accompanied by hypertriglyceridemia increase an individual’s risk for developing atherosclerosis. An early event in this process is monocyte recruitment through binding to VCAM-1 on inflamed arterial endothelium. Diets high in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) may provide...

  16. Maternal high-fat diet impairs cardiac function in offspring of diabetic pregnancy through metabolic stress and mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Mdaki, Kennedy S.; Larsen, Tricia D.; Wachal, Angela L.; Schimelpfenig, Michelle D.; Weaver, Lucinda J.; Dooyema, Samuel D. R.; Louwagie, Eli J.

    2016-01-01

    Offspring of diabetic pregnancies are at risk of cardiovascular disease at birth and throughout life, purportedly through fuel-mediated influences on the developing heart. Preventative measures focus on glycemic control, but the contribution of additional offenders, including lipids, is not understood. Cellular bioenergetics can be influenced by both diabetes and hyperlipidemia and play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of adult cardiovascular disease. This study investigated whether a maternal high-fat diet, independently or additively with diabetes, could impair fuel metabolism, mitochondrial function, and cardiac physiology in the developing offspring's heart. Sprague-Dawley rats fed a control or high-fat diet were administered placebo or streptozotocin to induce diabetes during pregnancy and then delivered offspring from four groups: control, diabetes exposed, diet exposed, and combination exposed. Cardiac function, cellular bioenergetics (mitochondrial stress test, glycolytic stress test, and palmitate oxidation assay), lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial histology, and copy number were determined. Diabetes-exposed offspring had impaired glycolytic and respiratory capacity and a reduced proton leak. High-fat diet-exposed offspring had increased mitochondrial copy number, increased lipid peroxidation, and evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction. Combination-exposed pups were most severely affected and demonstrated cardiac lipid droplet accumulation and diastolic/systolic cardiac dysfunction that mimics that of adult diabetic cardiomyopathy. This study is the first to demonstrate that a maternal high-fat diet impairs cardiac function in offspring of diabetic pregnancies through metabolic stress and serves as a critical step in understanding the role of cellular bioenergetics in developmentally programmed cardiac disease. PMID:26801311

  17. Maternal high-fat diet impairs cardiac function in offspring of diabetic pregnancy through metabolic stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mdaki, Kennedy S; Larsen, Tricia D; Wachal, Angela L; Schimelpfenig, Michelle D; Weaver, Lucinda J; Dooyema, Samuel D R; Louwagie, Eli J; Baack, Michelle L

    2016-03-15

    Offspring of diabetic pregnancies are at risk of cardiovascular disease at birth and throughout life, purportedly through fuel-mediated influences on the developing heart. Preventative measures focus on glycemic control, but the contribution of additional offenders, including lipids, is not understood. Cellular bioenergetics can be influenced by both diabetes and hyperlipidemia and play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of adult cardiovascular disease. This study investigated whether a maternal high-fat diet, independently or additively with diabetes, could impair fuel metabolism, mitochondrial function, and cardiac physiology in the developing offspring's heart. Sprague-Dawley rats fed a control or high-fat diet were administered placebo or streptozotocin to induce diabetes during pregnancy and then delivered offspring from four groups: control, diabetes exposed, diet exposed, and combination exposed. Cardiac function, cellular bioenergetics (mitochondrial stress test, glycolytic stress test, and palmitate oxidation assay), lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial histology, and copy number were determined. Diabetes-exposed offspring had impaired glycolytic and respiratory capacity and a reduced proton leak. High-fat diet-exposed offspring had increased mitochondrial copy number, increased lipid peroxidation, and evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction. Combination-exposed pups were most severely affected and demonstrated cardiac lipid droplet accumulation and diastolic/systolic cardiac dysfunction that mimics that of adult diabetic cardiomyopathy. This study is the first to demonstrate that a maternal high-fat diet impairs cardiac function in offspring of diabetic pregnancies through metabolic stress and serves as a critical step in understanding the role of cellular bioenergetics in developmentally programmed cardiac disease. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Measuring the short-term substrate utilization response to high-carbohydrate and high-fat meals in the whole-body indirect calorimeter.

    PubMed

    Gribok, Andrei; Leger, Jayme L; Stevens, Michelle; Hoyt, Reed; Buller, Mark; Rumpler, William

    2016-06-01

    The paper demonstrates that minute-to-minute metabolic response to meals with different macronutrient content can be measured and discerned in the whole-body indirect calorimeter. The ability to discriminate between high-carbohydrate and high-fat meals is achieved by applying a modified regularization technique with additional constraints imposed on oxygen consumption rate. These additional constraints reduce the differences in accuracy between the oxygen and carbon dioxide analyzers. The modified technique was applied to 63 calorimeter sessions that were each 24 h long. The data were collected from 16 healthy volunteers (eight males, eight females, aged 22-35 years). Each volunteer performed four 24-h long calorimeter sessions. At each session, they received one of four treatment combinations involving exercise (high or low intensity) and diet (a high-fat or high-carbohydrate shake for lunch). One volunteer did not complete all four assignments, which brought the total number of sessions to 63 instead of 64. During the 24-h stay in the calorimeter, subjects wore a continuous glucose monitoring system, which was used as a benchmark for subject's postprandial glycemic response. The minute-by-minute respiratory exchange ratio (RER) data showed excellent agreement with concurrent subcutaneous glucose concentrations in postprandial state. The averaged minute-to-minute RER response to the high-carbohydrate shake was significantly different from the response to high-fat shake. Also, postprandial RER slopes were significantly different for two dietary treatments. The results show that whole-body respiration calorimeters can be utilized as tools to study short-term kinetics of substrate oxidation in humans.

  19. Combination of meal and exercise timing with a high-fat diet influences energy expenditure and obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Ohtsu, Teiji; Ikeda, Yuko; Tsubosaka, Miku; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2014-11-01

    In mice, obesity has been observed not only in those freely fed a high-fat diet (HFD) but also in those fed while physically inactive. In contrast, a HFD during physically active periods protects against obesity and the impairments in the circadian rhythm induced by free feeding of a HFD. Although exercise is known to be effective for obesity prevention and management, the optimal timing of exercise has not yet been determined. In the present experiments, we aimed to determine the best combination of daily timing of HFD consumption and exercise for the prevention of HFD-induced weight gain in mice. In this experiment, "morning" refers to the beginning of the active phase (the "morning" for nocturnal animals). Increases in body weight related to free feeding of a HFD was significantly reduced with 4 h of exercise during the late (evening) or middle (noon) active period compared to 4 h of exercise during the early (morning) active period or free access to exercise, which resulted in hours of exercise similar to that of morning exercise. These results suggested that eating in the morning or at noon followed by exercise in the evening could prevent weight gain more effectively than exercise in the morning followed by eating at noon or in the evening. The group fed a HFD for 4 h in the morning had lower body weight than the group fed a HFD for 4 h in the evening without exercise. The last group of experiments tested the hypothesis that there would be an interaction between mealtime and exercise time (i.e. time of day) versus order (i.e. which comes first) effects. We compared groups that exercised for 4 h at noon and were fed either in the morning or evening and groups that were fed for 4 h at noon and either exercised in the morning or evening. We found that the groups that were fed before exercise gained less body and fat weight and more skeletal muscle weight compared to the groups that exercised before eating. Corresponding to the body and fat weight

  20. A High-Fat Diet Causes Impairment in Hippocampal Memory and Sex-Dependent Alterations in Peripheral Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Erica L.; Thompson, Lucien T.

    2016-01-01

    While high-fat diets are associated with rising incidence of obesity/type-2 diabetes and can induce metabolic and cognitive deficits, sex-dependent comparisons are rarely systematically made. Effects of exclusive consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) on systemic metabolism and on behavioral measures of hippocampal-dependent memory were compared in young male and female LE rats. Littermates were fed from weaning either a HFD or a control diet (CD) for 12 wk prior to testing. Sex-different effects of the HFD were observed in classic metabolic signs associated with type-2 diabetes. Males fed the HFD became obese, and had elevated fasted blood glucose levels, elevated corticosterone, and impaired glucose-tolerance, while females on the HFD exhibited only elevated corticosterone. Regardless of peripheral metabolism alteration, rats of both sexes fed the HFD were equally impaired in a spatial object recognition memory task associated with impaired hippocampal function. While the metabolic changes reported here have been characterized previously in males, the set of diet-induced effects observed here in females are novel. Impaired memory can have significant cognitive consequences, over the short-term and over the lifespan. A significant need exists for comparative research into sex-dependent differences underlying obesity and metabolic syndromes relating systemic, cognitive, and neural plasticity mechanisms. PMID:26819773

  1. Chronic High Fat Diet Consumption Impairs Metabolic Health of Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Morselli, Eugenia; Criollo, Alfredo; Rodriguez-Navas, Carlos; Clegg, Deborah J

    We show that chronic high fat diet (HFD) feeding affects the hypothalamus of male but not female mice. In our study we demonstrate that palmitic acid and sphingolipids accumulate in the central nervous system of HFD-fed males. Additionally, we show that HFD-feeding reduces proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) thus reducing estrogen receptor α (ERα) and driving hypothalamic inflammation in male but not female mice. Hypothalamic inflammation correlates with markers of metabolic dysregulation as indicated by dysregulation in glucose intolerance and myocardial function. Lastly, we demonstrate that there are blockages in mitophagy and lipophagy in hypothalamic tissues in males. Our data suggest there is a sexually dimorphic response to chronic HDF exposure, females; despite gaining the same amount of body weight following HFD-feeding, appear to be protected from the adverse metabolic effects of the HFD.

  2. Chronic High Fat Diet Consumption Impairs Metabolic Health of Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Morselli, Eugenia; Criollo, Alfredo; Rodriguez-Navas, Carlos; Clegg, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    We show that chronic high fat diet (HFD) feeding affects the hypothalamus of male but not female mice. In our study we demonstrate that palmitic acid and sphingolipids accumulate in the central nervous system of HFD-fed males. Additionally, we show that HFD-feeding reduces proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) thus reducing estrogen receptor α (ERα) and driving hypothalamic inflammation in male but not female mice. Hypothalamic inflammation correlates with markers of metabolic dysregulation as indicated by dysregulation in glucose intolerance and myocardial function. Lastly, we demonstrate that there are blockages in mitophagy and lipophagy in hypothalamic tissues in males. Our data suggest there is a sexually dimorphic response to chronic HDF exposure, females; despite gaining the same amount of body weight following HFD-feeding, appear to be protected from the adverse metabolic effects of the HFD. PMID:26046098

  3. Gallic Acid Ameliorated Impaired Glucose and Lipid Homeostasis in High Fat Diet-Induced NAFLD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jung; Huo, Teh-Ia; Cheng, Hao-Yuan; Tsai, Jen-Chieh; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Lee, Meng-Shiou; Qin, Xue-Mei; Hsieh, Ming-Tsuen; Pao, Li-Heng; Peng, Wen-Huang

    2014-01-01

    Gallic acid (GA), a naturally abundant plant phenolic compound in vegetables and fruits, has been shown to have potent anti-oxidative and anti-obesity activity. However, the effects of GA on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the beneficial effects of GA administration on nutritional hepatosteatosis model by a more “holistic view” approach, namely 1H NMR-based metabolomics, in order to prove efficacy and to obtain information that might lead to a better understanding of the mode of action of GA. Male C57BL/6 mice were placed for 16 weeks on either a normal chow diet, a high fat diet (HFD, 60%), or a high fat diet supplemented with GA (50 and 100 mg/kg/day, orally). Liver histopathology and serum biochemical examinations indicated that the daily administration of GA protects against hepatic steatosis, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, and insulin resistance among the HFD-induced NAFLD mice. In addition, partial least squares discriminant analysis scores plots demonstrated that the cluster of HFD fed mice is clearly separated from the normal group mice plots, indicating that the metabolic characteristics of these two groups are distinctively different. Specifically, the GA-treated mice are located closer to the normal group of mice, indicating that the HFD-induced disturbances to the metabolic profile were partially reversed by GA treatment. Our results show that the hepatoprotective effect of GA occurs in part through a reversing of the HFD caused disturbances to a range of metabolic pathways, including lipid metabolism, glucose metabolism (glycolysis and gluconeogenesis), amino acids metabolism, choline metabolism and gut-microbiota-associated metabolism. Taken together, this study suggested that a 1H NMR-based metabolomics approach is a useful platform for natural product functional evaluation. The selected metabolites are potentially useful as preventive action biomarkers and could also be used to help

  4. The snacking rat as model of human obesity: effects of a free-choice high-fat high-sugar diet on meal patterns.

    PubMed

    la Fleur, S E; Luijendijk, M C M; van der Zwaal, E M; Brans, M A D; Adan, R A H

    2014-05-01

    Rats subjected to a free-choice high-fat high-sugar (fcHFHS) diet persistently overeat, exhibit increased food-motivated behavior and become overtly obese. Conversely, several studies using a non-choice (nc) high-energy diet showed only an initial increase in food intake with unaltered or reduced food-motivated behavior. This raises the question of the importance of choice in the persistence of hyperphagia in rats on a fcHFHS diet. Meal patterns, food intake and body weight gain were studied in male Wistar rats on free-choice diets with fat and/or sugar and in rats on nc diets with fat and sugar (custom made with ingredients similar to the fcHFHS diet). Rats on a ncHFHS diet initially overconsumed, but reduced intake thereafter, whereas rats on a fcHFHS diet remained hyperphagic. Because half of the sugar intake in the fcHFHS group occurred during the inactive period, we next determined whether sugar intake during the light phase was a necessary requirement for hyperphagia, by restricting access to liquid sugar to either the light or dark period with unlimited access to fat and chow. Results showed that hyperphagia occurred irrespective of the timing of sugar intake. Meal pattern analysis revealed consumption of larger but fewer meals in the ncHFHS group, as well as the fcHF group. Interestingly, meal number was increased in all rats drinking liquid sugar (whether on a fcHFHS or a fcHS diet), whereas a compensatory decrease in meal size was only observed in the fcHS group, but not the fcHFHS group. We hereby show the importance of choice in the observation of fcHFHS diet-induced hyperphagia, which results in increases in meal number due to sugar drinking without any compensatory decrease in meal size. We thus provide a novel dietary model in rats that mimics important features of human overconsumption that have been ignored in rodent models of obesity.

  5. Effects of a high-fat meal on postprandial incretin responses, appetite scores and ad libitum energy intake in women with obesity.

    PubMed

    Penaforte, Fernanda Rodrigues O; Japur, Camila C; Diez-Garcia, Rosa W; Chiarello, Paula G

    2017-03-30

    Considering the possible role of triglycerides (TG), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in the regulation of appetite, this study aimed to compare high fat meal-induced response of GIP and GLP-1, appetite scores and ad libitum energy intake in women with obesity, according to postprandial increment in triglyceridemia (∆TG).  Methods: Thirty-three no-diabetic women (BMI = 35.0 ± 3.2 kg.m-2) were divided into two groups: Group with ∆TG ≤ median were called "Low TG change -LTG" and ∆TG > median, "High TG change - HTG". Plasma concentrations of GIP, GLP-1 and appetite sensations were measured prior to, and every 30 min for 180 min after ingestion of a high-fat breakfast. An ad libitum lunch was served 3 h after the test meal. The AUC incrementalGIP were significant lower in HTG vs. LTG group (p = 0.03). The same was observed for GIP levels at 150 min (p = 0.03) and at 180 min (p < 0.01). Satiety was lower in HTG at 120 min (p = 0.03) and 150 min (p < 0.01). The AUC totalGLP1 were similar between groups and there were no between-group differences for the GLP-1 at each time point. Ad libitum food intake were also similar between groups. The HTG group exhibited differences in satiety scores and lower postprandial secretion of GIP, however with no impact on ad libitum food intake in short term.

  6. Caffeine prevents cognitive impairment induced by chronic psychosocial stress and/or high fat-high carbohydrate diet.

    PubMed

    Alzoubi, K H; Abdul-Razzak, K K; Khabour, O F; Al-Tuweiq, G M; Alzubi, M A; Alkadhi, K A

    2013-01-15

    Caffeine alleviates cognitive impairment associated with a variety of health conditions. In this study, we examined the effect of caffeine treatment on chronic stress- and/or high fat-high carbohydrate Western diet (WD)-induced impairment of learning and memory in rats. Chronic psychosocial stress, WD and caffeine (0.3 g/L in drinking water) were simultaneously administered for 3 months to adult male Wistar rats. At the conclusion of the 3 months, and while the previous treatments continued, rats were tested in the radial arm water maze (RAWM) for learning, short-term and long-term memory. This procedure was applied on a daily basis to all animals for 5 consecutive days or until the animal reaches days to criterion (DTC) in the 12th learning trial and memory tests. DTC is the number of days that the animal takes to make zero error in two consecutive days. Chronic stress and/or WD groups caused impaired learning, which was prevented by chronic caffeine administration. In the memory tests, chronic caffeine administration also prevented memory impairment during chronic stress conditions and/or WD. Furthermore, DTC value for caffeine treated stress, WD, and stress/WD groups indicated that caffeine normalizes memory impairment in these groups. These results showed that chronic caffeine administration prevented stress and/or WD-induced impairment of spatial learning and memory.

  7. Evidence of impairment of normal inflammatory reaction by a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Laflamme, C; Bertheau-Mailhot, G; Giambelluca, M S; Cloutier, N; Boilard, E; Pouliot, M

    2014-04-01

    The murine dorsal air pouch model is a valuable tool for studying acute peripheral inflammatory reactions. We used this model to study the effect of diet on the onset of acute inflammation. Mice were fed a normal or a high-fat diet (HFD) for 5 weeks. Air pouches were raised and injected with non-stimulating (saline) or stimulating solution (saline containing lipopolysaccharides). After 4 h, leukocytes in the pouch fluid were enumerated, sorted and their viability measured. Cytokine/chemokine levels in the cell-free fluid were measured using a cytometric bead assay. Gene expression level was measured in leukocytes and in lining tissues using comparative real-time PCR. Leukocyte migration and cytokine/chemokine secretion were decreased substantially in mice fed the HFD. In contrast, leptin levels were elevated. Gene expression profiles in leukocytes recovered from the pouch and in the pouch-lining tissue (believed to have an important role in the initiation of granulocyte recruitment) were depressed. Genes encoding CC and CXC family chemokines were among the most negatively affected. These results suggest that a HFD can alter peripheral tissue activation as well as leukocyte recruitment and response, thereby affecting the development of an effective local immune response, which could have deleterious consequences.

  8. Bile sequestration potential of an edible mineral (clinoptilolite) under simulated digestion of a high-fat meal: an in vitro investigation.

    PubMed

    Kristo, Aleksandra S; Tzanidaki, Garyfallia; Lygeros, Andreas; Sikalidis, Angelos K

    2015-12-01

    Bile, important for cholesterol homeostasis, is a potential target of hypercholesterolemia management. Bile sequestration by orally administered resins, while mostly effective in reducing blood cholesterol, presents several side effects and disadvantages. Thus, widely available natural edible minerals such as clinoptilolite with adsorptive properties offer an alternative for bile sequestration. In an experimental setting mimicking the physiological conditions of digestion/absorption (pH, temperature, and retention times) with a series of assessment methods, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersion X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared analysis (FT-IR), thermogravimetric differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), and molecular docking modeling, the ability of natural unmodified clinoptilolite to retain bile, while mixed with a simulated high-fat meal, was investigated. Our results demonstrate that clinoptilolite sequesters bile via adsorption of macromicelles at 75.4% efficiency, when the former is administered at a reasonable dose of 4% (w/w) of a meal's weight. This work provides the possibility of clinoptilolite utilization as a bile-sequestering/cholesterol-reducing agent.

  9. Lack of effect of a high-fat meal on the bioavailability of 17 beta-estradiol/norgestimate in healthy postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Gisclon, L G; Curtin, C R; Larson, K L; Natarajan, J; Wong, F A; Morrison, D N; Bourg, D

    2000-07-01

    The effect of a high-fat meal on the absorption and pharmacokinetics of 17 beta-estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), estrone sulfate (E1S), and 17-deacetylnorgestimate (17d-NGM) were determined in this two-way complete crossover study of a single dose of E2/NGM (2 mg/180 micrograms) in 24 postmenopausal women. Equal numbers of subjects were randomly assigned to two treatment sequences indicated by the order of fed and fasting treatments. Serial blood samples were collected before and after dosing and assayed using validated methods. Food had no effect on the pharmacokinetics of E2, the pharmacologically active estrogen species. Food increased the rates of formation of E1 and E1S and slowed the formation of 17d-NGM. However, because E1 and E1S are pharmacologically less active metabolites of E2, and since the pharmacokinetic alterations in 17d-NGM were observed over a short time period, these results are probably of no clinical relevance. The extent of formation of all analytes, as measured by AUC, was not affected by food. In conclusion, administration of a tablet containing 17 beta-estradiol/norgestimate (2 mg/180 micrograms) was safe and well tolerated by healthy postmenopausal women and may be given without regard to the timing of meals in relation to dosing.

  10. Early impairment of coronary microvascular perfusion capacity in rats on a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    van Haare, Judith; Kooi, M Eline; Vink, Hans; Post, Mark J; van Teeffelen, Jurgen W G E; Slenter, Jos; Munts, Chantal; Cobelens, Hanneke; Strijkers, Gustav J; Koehn, Dennis; van Bilsen, Marc

    2015-11-17

    It remains to be established if, and to what extent, the coronary microcirculation becomes compromised during the development of obesity and insulin resistance. Recent studies suggest that changes in endothelial glycocalyx properties contribute to microvascular dysfunction under (pre-)diabetic conditions. Accordingly, early effects of diet-induced obesity on myocardial perfusion and function were studied in rats under baseline and hyperaemic conditions. Rats were fed a high fat diet (HFD) for 6 weeks and myocardial microvascular perfusion was determined using first-pass perfusion MRI before and after adenosine infusion. The effect of HFD on microcirculatory properties was also assessed by sidestream darkfield (SDF) imaging of the gastrocnemius muscle. HFD-fed rats developed central obesity and insulin sensitivity was reduced as evidenced by the marked reduction in insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt in both cardiac and gastrocnemius muscle. Early diet-induced obesity did not lead to hypertension or cardiac hypertrophic remodeling. In chow-fed, control rats a robust increase in cardiac microvascular perfusion was observed upon adenosine infusion (+40%; p < 0.05). In contrast, the adenosine response was abrogated in rats on a HFD (+8%; N.S.). HFD neither resulted in rarefaction or loss of glycocalyx integrity in skeletal muscle, nor reduced staining intensity of the glycocalyx of cardiac capillaries. Alterations in coronary microcirculatory function as assessed by first-pass perfusion MRI represent one of the earliest obesity-related cardiac adaptations that can be assessed non-invasively. In this early stage of insulin resistance, disturbances in glycocalyx barrier properties appeared not to contribute to the observed changes in coronary microvascular function.

  11. Treadmill exercise alleviates impairment of cognitive function by enhancing hippocampal neuroplasticity in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Woon; Choi, Hyun-Hee; Chung, Yong-Rak

    2016-06-01

    Physical exercise is one of the most effective methods for managing obesity, and exercise exerts positive effects on various brain functions. Excessive weight gain is known to be related to the impairment of cognitive function. High-fat diet-induced obesity impairs hippocampal neuroplasticity, which impedes cognitive function, such as learning ability and memory function. In this study, we investigated the effect of treadmill exercise on impairment of cognitive function in relation with hippocampal neuroplasticity using high-fat diet-induced obese mice. After obesity was induced by a 20-week high-fat (60%) diet, treadmill exercise was performed for 12 weeks. In the present results, cognitive function was impaired in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosin kinase B (TrkB) expression and cell proliferation were decreased in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Treadmill exercise improved cognitive function through enhancing neuroplasticity, including increased expression of BDNF and TrkB and enhanced cell proliferation. The present results suggest that treadmill exercise enhances hippocampal neuroplasticity, and then potentially plays a protective role against obesity-induced cognitive impairment.

  12. Treadmill exercise alleviates impairment of cognitive function by enhancing hippocampal neuroplasticity in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Woon; Choi, Hyun-Hee; Chung, Yong-Rak

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise is one of the most effective methods for managing obesity, and exercise exerts positive effects on various brain functions. Excessive weight gain is known to be related to the impairment of cognitive function. High-fat diet-induced obesity impairs hippocampal neuroplasticity, which impedes cognitive function, such as learning ability and memory function. In this study, we investigated the effect of treadmill exercise on impairment of cognitive function in relation with hippocampal neuroplasticity using high-fat diet-induced obese mice. After obesity was induced by a 20-week high-fat (60%) diet, treadmill exercise was performed for 12 weeks. In the present results, cognitive function was impaired in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosin kinase B (TrkB) expression and cell proliferation were decreased in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Treadmill exercise improved cognitive function through enhancing neuroplasticity, including increased expression of BDNF and TrkB and enhanced cell proliferation. The present results suggest that treadmill exercise enhances hippocampal neuroplasticity, and then potentially plays a protective role against obesity-induced cognitive impairment. PMID:27419109

  13. No difference in acute effects of supplemental v. dietary calcium on blood pressure and microvascular function in obese women challenged with a high-fat meal: a cross-over randomised study.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Thaís da Silva; Leal, Priscila Mansur; Antunes, Vanessa Parada; Sanjuliani, Antonio Felipe; Klein, Márcia Regina Simas Torres

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that supplemental Ca (SC) increases the risk of cardiovascular events, whereas dietary Ca (DC) decreases the risk of cardiovascular events. Although frequently consumed with meals, it remains unclear whether Ca can mitigate or aggravate the deleterious effects of a high-fat meal on cardiovascular risk factors. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of SC or DC on blood pressure (BP) and microvascular function (MVF) in the postprandial period in obese women challenged with a high-fat meal. In this cross-over controlled trial, sixteen obese women aged 20-50 years were randomly assigned to receive three test meals (2908 kJ (695 kcal); 48 % fat): high DC (HDCM; 547 mg DC), high SC (HSCM; 500 mg SC-calcium carbonate) and low Ca (LCM; 42 mg DC). BP was continuously evaluated from 15 min before to 120 min after meals by digital photoplethysmography. Before and 120 min after meals, participants underwent evaluation of serum Ca and microvascular flow after postocclusive reactive hyperaemia (PORH) by laser speckle contrast imaging. Ionised serum Ca rose significantly only after HSCM. Systolic BP increased after the three meals, whereas diastolic BP increased after LCM and HDCM. Hyperaemia peak, hyperaemia amplitude and AUC evaluated after PORH decreased with LCM. After HDCM, there was a reduction in hyperaemia peak and hyperaemia amplitude, whereas HSCM decreased only hyperaemia peak. However, comparative analyses of the effects of three test meals on serum Ca, BP and MVF revealed no significant meal×time interaction. This study suggests that in obese women SC and DC do not interfere with the effects of a high-fat meal on BP and MVF.

  14. High-fat feeding and Staphylococcus intermedius infection impair beta cell function and insulin sensitivity in mongrel dogs.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Evgeni; Georgiev, Ivan Penchev; Dzhelebov, Petko; Kanelov, Ivan; Andonova, Maria; Mircheva Georgieva, Teodora; Dimitrova, Silviya

    2010-03-01

    As obesity is a state of low-grade inflammation, we aimed to investigate the combined effect of high-fat diet and bacterial infection on beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity in dogs. We used 20 healthy, male, mongrel dogs randomly divided into four groups: control group-healthy, non-obese dogs; infected group-non-obese dogs with experimentally induced infection (Staphylococcus intermedius); obese group-obese dogs (after 90 day high-fat diet) and obese-infected group-obese dogs with experimentally induced infection (Staphylococcus intermedius). To evaluate insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) was performed. Plasma insulin increased in all group after glucose infusion. The lowest values were found in obese-infected group. Blood glucose also increased on 3 min after glucose infusion and then gradually decreased. In obese-infected group glucose concentration on 30 min was still significantly higher than initial levels, while in other groups glucose concentration returned to the initial values. The lowest rate of glucose elimination was found in infected group. In dogs of obese group and obese-infected group AUC(ins 0-60 min) was lower compared to controls. AUC(glucose 0-60 min) values were lowest in infected group, while in obese-infected group values were the highest. Levels of I/G in dogs of obese-infected group were significantly lower compared to controls and infected group. In conclusion, these results reveal that infection in obese dogs leads to impaired glucose tolerance, which is result of impairment in both insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity.

  15. Vitamin E prevents high-fat high-carbohydrates diet-induced memory impairment: the role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Alzoubi, Karem H; Khabour, Omar F; Salah, Heba A; Hasan, Zuheir

    2013-07-02

    Memory and learning are impaired by imbalanced diet consumption. High-fat high-carbohydrate diet (HFCD) induces oxidative stress, which results in neuronal damage and interference with synaptic transmission; hence, a decline in cognitive function. Vitamin E is a fat soluble antioxidant that is believed to have positive effects on learning and memory. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that chronic administration of vitamin E prevents learning and memory impairment induced by HFCD. In addition, possible molecular targets for HFCD, and vitamin E that lead to cognitive effects were examined. Vitamin E and/or HFCD were concurrently administered to animals for 6 weeks. Thereafter, behavioral studies were conducted to test the spatial learning and memory using radial arm water maze (RAWM). Additionally, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) level and antioxidant markers were assessed in the hippocampus. The results of this project revealed that HFCD impairs both short-term and long-term memories (p<0.05). The administration of vitamin E prevented the memory impairment induced by HFCD consumption (p<0.05). The consumption of HFCD reduced activities of hippocampal superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (p<0.05); whereas the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) were elevated (p<0.05). The administration of vitamin E normalized the effect of HFCD on the oxidative stress markers. None of the treatments induced changes in the levels of BDNF or glutathione peroxidase (GPx). In conclusion, HFCD induces memory impairment, and the administration of vitamin E prevented this impairment probably through normalizing antioxidant mechanisms in the hippocampus.

  16. Postprandial lymphatic pump function after a high-fat meal: a characterization of contractility, flow, and viscosity.

    PubMed

    Kassis, Timothy; Yarlagadda, Sri Charan; Kohan, Alison B; Tso, Patrick; Breedveld, Victor; Dixon, J Brandon

    2016-05-15

    Dietary lipids are transported from the intestine through contractile lymphatics. Chronic lipid loads can adversely affect lymphatic function. However, the acute lymphatic pump response in the mesentery to a postprandial lipid meal has gone unexplored. In this study, we used the rat mesenteric collecting vessel as an in vivo model to quantify the effect of lipoproteins on vessel function. Lipid load was continuously monitored by using the intensity of a fluorescent fatty-acid analog, which we infused along with a fat emulsion through a duodenal cannula. The vessel contractility was simultaneously quantified. We demonstrated for the first time that collecting lymphatic vessels respond to an acute lipid load by reducing pump function. High lipid levels decreased contraction frequency and amplitude. We also showed a strong tonic response through a reduction in the end-diastolic and systolic diameters. We further characterized the changes in flow rate and viscosity and showed that both increase postprandially. In addition, shear-mediated Ca(2+) signaling in lymphatic endothelial cells differed when cultured with lipoproteins. Together these results show that the in vivo response could be both shear and lipid mediated and provide the first evidence that high postprandial lipid has an immediate negative effect on lymphatic function even in the acute setting. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. High-fat diet with stress impaired islets' insulin secretion by reducing plasma estradiol and pancreatic GLUT2 protein levels in rats' proestrus phase.

    PubMed

    Salimi, M; Zardooz, H; Khodagholi, F; Rostamkhani, F; Shaerzadeh, F

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether two estrus phases (proestrus and diestrus) in female rats may influence the metabolic response to a high-fat diet and/or stress, focusing on pancreatic insulin secretion and content. Animals were divided into high-fat and normal diet groups, then each group was subdivided into stress and non-stress groups, and finally, each one of these was divided into proestrus and diestrus subgroups. At the end of high-fat diet treatment, foot-shock stress was applied to the animals. Then, blood samples were taken to measure plasma factors. Finally, the pancreas was removed for determination of glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) protein levels and assessment of insulin content and secretion of the isolated islets. In the normal and high-fat diet groups, stress increased plasma corticosterone concentration in both phases. In both study phases, high-fat diet consumption decreased estradiol and increased leptin plasma levels. In the high-fat diet group in response to high glucose concentration, a reduction in insulin secretion was observed in the proestrus phase compared with the same phase in the normal diet group in the presence and absence of stress. Also, high-fat diet decreased the insulin content of islets in the proestrus phase compared with the normal diet. High-fat diet and/or stress caused a reduction in islet GLUT2 protein levels in both phases. In conclusion, it seems possible that high-fat diet alone or combined with foot-shock, predispose female rats to impaired insulin secretion, at least in part, by interfering with estradiol levels in the proestrus phase and decreasing pancreatic GLUT2 protein levels.

  18. Early postprandial low-grade inflammation after high-fat meal in healthy rats: possible involvement of visceral adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Magné, Joëlle; Mariotti, François; Fischer, Romy; Mathé, Véronique; Tomé, Daniel; Huneau, Jean François

    2010-06-01

    In the postprandial period, low-grade inflammation may contribute to vascular endothelial dysfunction, a hallmark of atherogenesis. Little is known about the involvement of the adipose tissue in the initiation of the postprandial inflammatory response such as obtained after a high-saturated fat meal (HFM). In the present study, we first studied the time course of appearance of systemic inflammation after a HFM in healthy rats, and then we investigated whether a HFM activates the inflammatory signaling in the visceral adipose tissue, with a focus on the key component, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB). Two hours after the HFM, plasma IL-6 and PAI-1, but not plasma C-reactive protein and soluble intracellular adhesion molecule-1, showed a marked, transient increase. These changes were specific to the postprandial state as not observed after a control water load. Neutrophils count and activation markers CD11B and CD62L, assessed by flow cytometry, also rose significantly 2 h after the HFM, while remaining steady after the control. At the same time, the HFM decreased significantly B-cell count and expression of the activation marker CD62L. Interestingly, at the same early time after the HFM, in the visceral adipose tissue, there was a 2.2-fold increase in the activation of NF-kappaB (p65) in nuclear extract and an increase in IL-6 mRNA. As far as we know, this is the first study evidencing an acute, postprandial activation of inflammation in visceral adipose tissue. This early activation of NF-kappaB pathway after a HFM may play a triggering role in the initiation of the complex postprandial proatherogenic phenotype. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION STUDY OF TRIGLYCERIDE RESPONSE TO A HIGH-FAT MEAL AMONG PARTICIPANTS OF THE NHLBI GENETICS OF LIPID LOWERING DRUGS AND DIET NETWORK (GOLDN)

    PubMed Central

    Wojczynski, M.K.; Parnel, L.D.; Pollin, T.I.; Lai, C.Q.; Feitosa, M.F.; O’Connell, J.R.; Frazier-Wood, A.C.; Gibson, Q.; Aslibekyan, S.; Ryan, K.A.; Province, M.A.; Tiwari, H.K.; Ordovas, J.M.; Shuldiner, A.R.; Arnett, D.K.; Borecki, I.B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The triglyceride (TG) response to a high-fat meal (postprandial lipemia, PPL) affects cardiovascular disease risk and is influenced by genes and environment. Genes involved in lipid metabolism have dominated genetic studies of PPL TG response. We sought to elucidate common genetic variants through a genome-wide association (GWA) study in the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (GOLDN). Methods The GOLDN GWAS discovery sample consisted of 872 participants within families of European ancestry. Genotypes for 2,543,887 variants were measured or imputed from HapMap. Replication of our top results was performed in the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention (HAPI) Heart Study (n=843). PPL TG response phenotypes were constructed from plasma TG measured at baseline (fasting, 0 hour), 3.5 and 6 hours after a high-fat meal, using a random coefficient regression model. Association analyses were adjusted for covariates and principal components, as necessary, in a linear mixed model using the kinship matrix; additional models further adjusted for fasting TG were also performed. Meta-analysis of the discovery and replication studies (n=1,715) was performed on the top SNPs from GOLDN. Results GOLDN revealed 111 suggestive (p<1E-05) associations, with two SNPs meeting GWA significance level (p<5E-08). Of the two significant SNPs, rs964184 demonstrated evidence of replication (p=1.20E-03) in the HAPI Heart Study and in a joint analysis, was GWA significant (p=1.26E-09). Rs964184 has been associated with fasting lipids (TG and HDL) and is near ZPR1 (formerly ZNF259), close to the APOA1/C3/A4/A5 cluster. This association was attenuated upon additional adjustment for fasting TG. Conclusion This is the first report of a genome-wide significant association with replication for a novel phenotype, namely PPL TG response. Future investigation into response phenotypes is warranted using pathway analyses, or newer genetic technologies such as metabolomics. PMID:26256467

  20. Lack of Effects of a Single High-Fat Meal Enriched with Vegetable n-3 or a Combination of Vegetable and Marine n-3 Fatty Acids on Intestinal Peptide Release and Adipokines in Healthy Female Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Narverud, Ingunn; Myhrstad, Mari C. W.; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Karhu, Toni; Dahl, Tuva B.; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulven, Stine M.; Holven, Kirsten B.

    2016-01-01

    Peptides released from the small intestine and colon regulate short-term food intake by suppressing appetite and inducing satiety. Intake of marine omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FAs) from fish and fish oils is associated with beneficial health effects, whereas the relation between intake of the vegetable n-3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid and diseases is less clear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the postprandial effects of a single high-fat meal enriched with vegetable n-3 or a combination of vegetable and marine n-3 FAs with their different unsaturated fatty acid composition on intestinal peptide release and the adipose tissue. Fourteen healthy lean females consumed three test meals with different fat quality in a fixed order. The test meal consisted of three cakes enriched with coconut fat, linseed oil, and a combination of linseed and cod liver oil. The test days were separated by 2 weeks. Fasting and postprandial blood samples at 3 and 6 h after intake were analyzed. A significant postprandial effect was observed for cholecystokinin, peptide YY, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, amylin and insulin, which increased, while leptin decreased postprandially independent of the fat composition in the high-fat meal. In conclusion, in healthy, young, lean females, an intake of a high-fat meal enriched with n-3 FAs from different origin stimulates intestinal peptide release without any difference between the different fat compositions. PMID:27630989

  1. Thermosensing mechanisms and their impairment by high-fat diet in orexin neurons.

    PubMed

    Belanger-Willoughby, N; Linehan, V; Hirasawa, M

    2016-06-02

    In homeotherms, the hypothalamus controls thermoregulatory and adaptive mechanisms in energy balance, sleep-wake and locomotor activity to maintain optimal body temperature. Orexin neurons may be involved in these functions as they promote thermogenesis, food intake and behavioral arousal, and are sensitive to temperature and metabolic status. How thermal and energy balance signals are integrated in these neurons is unknown. Thus, we investigated the cellular mechanisms of thermosensing in orexin neurons and their response to a change in energy status using whole-cell patch clamp on rat brain slices. We found that warming induced an increase in miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) frequency, which was blocked by the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptor antagonist AMG9810 and mimicked by its agonist capsaicin, suggesting that the synaptic effect is mediated by heat-sensitive TRPV1 channels. Furthermore, warming inhibits orexin neurons by activating ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, an effect regulated by uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), as the UCP2 inhibitor genipin abolished this response. These properties are unique to orexin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus, as neighboring melanin-concentrating hormone neurons showed no response to warming within the physiological temperature range. Interestingly, in rats fed with western diet for 1 or 11weeks, orexin neurons had impaired synaptic and KATP response to warming. In summary, this study reveals several mechanisms underlying thermosensing in orexin neurons and their attenuation by western diet. Overeating induced by western diet may in part be due to impaired orexin thermosensing, as post-prandial thermogenesis may promote satiety and lethargy by inhibiting orexin neurons.

  2. Maternal high-fat diet during lactation impairs thermogenic function of brown adipose tissue in offspring mice

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xingwei; Yang, Qiyuan; Zhang, Lupei; Maricelli, Joseph W; Rodgers, Buel D.; Zhu, Mei-Jun; Du, Min

    2016-01-01

    Maternal obesity and high-fat diet (HFD) predisposes offspring to obesity and metabolic diseases. Due to uncoupling, brown adipose tissue (BAT) dissipates energy via heat generation, mitigating obesity and diabetes. The lactation stage is a manageable period for improving the health of offspring of obese mothers, but the impact of maternal HFD during lactation on offspring BAT function is unknown. To determine, female mice were fed either a control or HFD during lactation. At weaning, HFD offspring gained more body weight and had greater body fat mass compared to the control, and these differences maintained into adulthood, which correlated with glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in HFD offspring. Adaptive thermogenesis of BAT was impaired in HFD offspring at weaning. In adulthood, HFD offspring BAT had lower Ucp1 expression and thermogenic activity. Mechanistically, maternal HFD feeding during lactation elevated peripheral serotonin, which decreased the sensitivity of BAT to sympathetic β3-adrenergic signaling. Importantly, early postnatal metformin administration decreased serotonin concentration and ameliorated the impairment of offspring BAT due to maternal HFD. Our data suggest that attenuation of BAT thermogenic function may be a key mechanism linking maternal HFD during lactation to persisted metabolic disorder in the offspring. PMID:27686741

  3. Effects of a high fat meal matrix and protein complexation on the bioaccessibility of blueberry anthocyanins using the TNO gastrointestinal model (TIM-1)

    PubMed Central

    Ribnicky, David M.; Roopchand, Diana E.; Oren, Andrew; Grace, Mary; Poulev, Alexander; Lila, Mary Ann; Havenaar, Robert; Raskin, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    The TNO intestinal model (TIM-1) of the human upper gastrointestinal tract was used to compare intestinal absorption/bioaccessibility of blueberry anthocyanins under different digestive conditions. Blueberry polyphenol-rich extract was delivered to TIM-1 in the absence or presence of a high-fat meal. HPLC analysis of seventeen anthocyanins showed that delphinidin-3-glucoside, delphinidin-3-galactoside, delphinidin-3-arabinoside and petunidin-3-arabinoside were twice as bioaccessible in fed state, whilst delphinidin-3-(6″-acetoyl)-glucoside and malvidin-3-arabinoside were twice as bioaccessible under fasted conditions, suggesting lipid-rich matrices selectively effect anthocyanin bioaccessibility. TIM-1 was fed blueberry juice (BBJ) or blueberry polyphenol-enriched defatted soybean flour (BB-DSF) containing equivalent amounts of free or DSF-sorbed anthocyanins, respectively. Anthocyanin bioaccessibility from BB-DSF (36.0 ± 10.4) was numerically, but not significantly, greater than that from BBJ (26.3 ± 10.3). Ileal efflux samples collected after digestion of BB-DSF contained 2.8-fold more anthocyanins than same from BBJ, suggesting that protein-rich DSF protects anthocyanins during transit through upper digestive tract for subsequent colonic delivery/metabolism. PMID:24001852

  4. Effects of a high fat meal matrix and protein complexation on the bioaccessibility of blueberry anthocyanins using the TNO gastrointestinal model (TIM-1).

    PubMed

    Ribnicky, David M; Roopchand, Diana E; Oren, Andrew; Grace, Mary; Poulev, Alexander; Lila, Mary Ann; Havenaar, Robert; Raskin, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    The TNO intestinal model (TIM-1) of the human upper gastrointestinal tract was used to compare intestinal absorption/bioaccessibility of blueberry anthocyanins under different digestive conditions. Blueberry polyphenol-rich extract was delivered to TIM-1 in the absence or presence of a high-fat meal. HPLC analysis of seventeen anthocyanins showed that delphinidin-3-glucoside, delphinidin-3-galactoside, delphinidin-3-arabinoside and petunidin-3-arabinoside were twice as bioaccessible in fed state, whilst delphinidin-3-(6″-acetoyl)-glucoside and malvidin-3-arabinoside were twice as bioaccessible under fasted conditions, suggesting lipid-rich matrices selectively effect anthocyanin bioaccessibility. TIM-1 was fed blueberry juice (BBJ) or blueberry polyphenol-enriched defatted soybean flour (BB-DSF) containing equivalent amounts of free or DSF-sorbed anthocyanins, respectively. Anthocyanin bioaccessibility from BB-DSF (36.0±10.4) was numerically, but not significantly, greater than that from BBJ (26.3±10.3). Ileal efflux samples collected after digestion of BB-DSF contained 2.8-fold more anthocyanins than same from BBJ, suggesting that protein-rich DSF protects anthocyanins during transit through upper digestive tract for subsequent colonic delivery/metabolism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The effects of short-term fish oil supplementation on pulmonary function and airway inflammation following a high-fat meal.

    PubMed

    Ade, Carl J; Rosenkranz, S K; Harms, C A

    2014-04-01

    Many environmental and dietary influences can cause immune cells to produce biological mediators that increase airway inflammation. A high-fat meal (HFM) is one stimulus that increases airway inflammation in healthy individuals. Supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids can reduce inflammation systemically and may be beneficial to the airways. To determine if omega-3 fatty acid supplementation via fish oil would mitigate the airway inflammatory response induced by a single HFM. Seventeen non-asthmatic men (22 ± 2 years.) were supplemented with 3,000 mg × day(-1) fish oil or a placebo for 3 weeks. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO; a marker of airway inflammation), impulse oscillometry (a measure of respiratory impedance), pulmonary function, and triglycerides were measured prior to and 2 h following a HFM. Following a HFM, triglycerides increased in both fish oil and placebo groups compared to pre-HFM (~59 and ~49 %, respectively, p < 0.05). The percent increase in FENO was greater in the placebo group compared to the fish oil group (25.7 ± 16.7 vs. -1.99 ± 10.5 %, respectively, p < 0.05). A significant correlation was observed between blood triglycerides and FENO in the placebo group (r = 0.61; p < 0.05), but not the fish oil group (p = 0.21). A single HFM increases airway inflammation and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation via fish oil protects against HFM associated changes in airway health.

  6. A dose-response strategy reveals differences between normal-weight and obese men in their metabolic and inflammatory responses to a high-fat meal.

    PubMed

    Schwander, Flurina; Kopf-Bolanz, Katrin A; Buri, Caroline; Portmann, Reto; Egger, Lotti; Chollet, Magali; McTernan, Philip G; Piya, Milan K; Gijs, Martin A M; Vionnet, Nathalie; Pralong, François; Laederach, Kurt; Vergères, Guy

    2014-10-01

    A dose-response strategy may not only allow investigation of the impact of foods and nutrients on human health but may also reveal differences in the response of individuals to food ingestion based on their metabolic health status. In a randomized crossover study, we challenged 19 normal-weight (BMI: 20-25 kg/m(2)) and 18 obese (BMI: >30 kg/m(2)) men with 500, 1000, and 1500 kcal of a high-fat (HF) meal (60.5% energy from fat). Blood was taken at baseline and up to 6 h postprandially and analyzed for a range of metabolic, inflammatory, and hormonal variables, including plasma glucose, lipids, and C-reactive protein and serum insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and endotoxin. Insulin was the only variable that could differentiate the postprandial response of normal-weight and obese participants at each of the 3 caloric doses. A significant response of the inflammatory marker IL-6 was only observed in the obese group after ingestion of the HF meal containing 1500 kcal [net incremental AUC (iAUC) = 22.9 ± 6.8 pg/mL × 6 h, P = 0.002]. Furthermore, the net iAUC for triglycerides significantly increased from the 1000 to the 1500 kcal meal in the obese group (5.0 ± 0.5 mmol/L × 6 h vs. 6.0 ± 0.5 mmol/L × 6 h; P = 0.015) but not in the normal-weight group (4.3 ± 0.5 mmol/L × 6 h vs. 4.8 ± 0.5 mmol/L × 6 h; P = 0.31). We propose that caloric dose-response studies may contribute to a better understanding of the metabolic impact of food on the human organism. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01446068. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  7. A Dose-Response Strategy Reveals Differences between Normal-Weight and Obese Men in Their Metabolic and Inflammatory Responses to a High-Fat Meal123

    PubMed Central

    Schwander, Flurina; Kopf-Bolanz, Katrin A.; Buri, Caroline; Portmann, Reto; Egger, Lotti; Chollet, Magali; McTernan, Philip G.; Piya, Milan K.; Gijs, Martin A. M.; Vionnet, Nathalie; Pralong, François; Laederach, Kurt; Vergères, Guy

    2014-01-01

    A dose-response strategy may not only allow investigation of the impact of foods and nutrients on human health but may also reveal differences in the response of individuals to food ingestion based on their metabolic health status. In a randomized crossover study, we challenged 19 normal-weight (BMI: 20–25 kg/m2) and 18 obese (BMI: >30 kg/m2) men with 500, 1000, and 1500 kcal of a high-fat (HF) meal (60.5% energy from fat). Blood was taken at baseline and up to 6 h postprandially and analyzed for a range of metabolic, inflammatory, and hormonal variables, including plasma glucose, lipids, and C-reactive protein and serum insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and endotoxin. Insulin was the only variable that could differentiate the postprandial response of normal-weight and obese participants at each of the 3 caloric doses. A significant response of the inflammatory marker IL-6 was only observed in the obese group after ingestion of the HF meal containing 1500 kcal [net incremental AUC (iAUC) = 22.9 ± 6.8 pg/mL × 6 h, P = 0.002]. Furthermore, the net iAUC for triglycerides significantly increased from the 1000 to the 1500 kcal meal in the obese group (5.0 ± 0.5 mmol/L × 6 h vs. 6.0 ± 0.5 mmol/L × 6 h; P = 0.015) but not in the normal-weight group (4.3 ± 0.5 mmol/L × 6 h vs. 4.8 ± 0.5 mmol/L × 6 h; P = 0.31). We propose that caloric dose-response studies may contribute to a better understanding of the metabolic impact of food on the human organism. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01446068. PMID:24812072

  8. Heterozygous SOD2 deletion impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, but not insulin action, in high-fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Li; Dai, Chunhua; Lustig, Mary E; Bonner, Jeffrey S; Mayes, Wesley H; Mokshagundam, Shilpa; James, Freyja D; Thompson, Courtney S; Lin, Chien-Te; Perry, Christopher G R; Anderson, Ethan J; Neufer, P Darrell; Wasserman, David H; Powers, Alvin C

    2014-11-01

    Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) are linked to insulin resistance and islet dysfunction. Manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) is a primary defense against mitochondrial oxidative stress. To test the hypothesis that heterozygous SOD2 deletion impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and insulin action, wild-type (sod2(+/+)) and heterozygous knockout mice (sod2(+/-)) were fed a chow or high-fat (HF) diet, which accelerates ROS production. Hyperglycemic (HG) and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic (HI) clamps were performed to assess GSIS and insulin action in vivo. GSIS during HG clamps was equal in chow-fed sod2(+/-) and sod2(+/+) but was markedly decreased in HF-fed sod2(+/-). Remarkably, this impairment was not paralleled by reduced HG glucose infusion rate (GIR). Decreased GSIS in HF-fed sod2(+/-) was associated with increased ROS, such as superoxide ion. Surprisingly, insulin action determined by HI clamps did not differ between sod2(+/-) and sod2(+/+) of either diet. Since insulin action was unaffected, we hypothesized that the unchanged HG GIR in HF-fed sod2(+/-) was due to increased glucose effectiveness. Increased GLUT-1, hexokinase II, and phospho-AMPK protein in muscle of HF-fed sod2(+/-) support this hypothesis. We conclude that heterozygous SOD2 deletion in mice, a model that mimics SOD2 changes observed in diabetic humans, impairs GSIS in HF-fed mice without affecting insulin action. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  9. Mice lacking C1q are protected from high fat diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance and impaired glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hillian, Antoinette D; McMullen, Megan R; Sebastian, Becky M; Roychowdhury, Sanjoy; Rowchowdhury, Sanjoy; Kashyap, Sangeeta R; Schauer, Philip R; Kirwan, John P; Feldstein, Ariel E; Nagy, Laura E

    2013-08-02

    Complement activation is implicated in the development of obesity and insulin resistance, and loss of signaling by the anaphylatoxin C3a prevents obesity-induced insulin resistance in mice. Here we have identified C1q in the classical pathway as required for activation of complement in response to high fat diets. After 8 weeks of high fat diet, wild-type mice became obese and developed glucose intolerance. This was associated with increased apoptotic cell death and accumulation of complement activation products (C3b/iC3b/C3c) in liver and adipose tissue. Previous studies have shown that high fat diet-induced apoptosis is dependent on Bid; here we report that Bid-mediated apoptosis was required for complement activation in adipose and liver. Although C1qa deficiency had no effect on high fat diet-induced apoptosis, accumulation of complement activation products and the metabolic complications of high fat diet-induced obesity were dependent on C1q. When wild-type mice were fed a high fat diet for only 3 days, hepatic insulin resistance was associated with the accumulation of C3b/iC3b/C3c in the liver. Mice deficient in C3a receptor were protected against this early high fat diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance, whereas mice deficient in the negative complement regulator CD55/DAF were more sensitive to the high fat diet. C1qa(-/-) mice were also protected from high fat diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance and complement activation. Evidence of complement activation was also detected in adipose tissue of obese women compared with lean women. Together, these studies reveal an important role for C1q in the classical pathway of complement activation in the development of high fat diet-induced insulin resistance.

  10. A high-fat diet impairs reproduction by decreasing the IL1β level in mice treated at immature stage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Li, Kai; Yuan, Miao; Zhang, Jie; Huang, Guizen; Ao, Jie; Tan, Haoze; Li, Yanyan; Gong, Di; Li, Jun; Kang, Lei; An, Nini; Li, Fei; Lin, Ping; Huang, Lugang

    2017-04-03

    Obesity causes low-grade inflammation that is involved in male infertility. Interleukin 1 beta (IL1β) plays an important role in this process. A high-fat diet (HFD) is the most common cause of obesity. However, the effect of a HFD on IL1β and its consequence in reproduction remain unclear. We established a HFD model in mice treated at immature stage (mice-TIS) and mice treated at mature stage (mice-TMS). Surprisingly, we found that a HFD decreased IL1β levels and was accompanied by an increase in testosterone in mice-TIS, while the reverse results were observed in mice-TMS. In addition, a HFD caused a reduction in testis macrophages and in the expression of inflammasome-related genes and proteins in mice-TIS. Furthermore, we found that IL1β inhibited testosterone secretion through down-regulating the gene expression of P450SCC and P450c17. However, the influence on mice-TIS that were induced by a HFD was recovered by stopping the HFD. In this study, we are the first to report that a HFD impairs the reproductive system by decreasing IL1β and enhancing testosterone levels in mice-TIS, which are different from the effects in mice-TMS. This provides new ideas for the treatment of obesity-induced infertility.

  11. The MST3/STK24 kinase mediates impaired fasting blood glucose after a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Cristina; Floridia, Ebel; Sartages, Miriam; Porteiro, Begoña; Fraile, María; Guerrero, Ana; Santos, Diana; Cuñarro, Juan; Tovar, Sulay; Nogueiras, Rubén; Pombo, Celia M; Zalvide, Juan

    2017-09-27

    The identification of mediators in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus is essential for the full understanding of this disease. Protein kinases are especially important because of their potential as pharmacological targets. The goal of this study was to investigate whether mammalian sterile-20 3 (MST3/STK24), a stress-regulated kinase, is involved in metabolic alterations in obesity. Glucose regulation of Mst3 (also known as Stk24)-knockout mice was analysed both in 129;C57 mixed background mice and in C57/BL6J mice fed normally or with a high-fat diet (HFD). This work was complemented with an analysis of the insulin signalling pathway in cultured human liver cells made deficient in MST3 using RNA interference. MST3 is phosphorylated in the livers of mice subject to an obesity-promoting HFD, and its deficiency lowers the hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance that the animals develop with this diet, an effect that is seen even without complete inactivation of the kinase. Lack of MST3 results in activation of the insulin signalling pathway downstream of IRS1, in both cultured liver cells and the liver of animals after HFD. This effect increases the inhibition of forkhead box (FOX)O1, with subsequent downregulation of the expression of gluconeogenic enzymes. MST3 inhibits the insulin signalling pathway and is important in the development of insulin resistance and impaired blood glucose levels after an HFD.

  12. High Fat Diet Inhibits Dendritic Cell and T Cell Response to Allergens but Does Not Impair Inhalational Respiratory Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Pizzolla, Angela; Oh, Ding Yuan; Luong, Suzanne; Prickett, Sara R.; Henstridge, Darren C.; Febbraio, Mark A.; O’Hehir, Robyn E.; Rolland, Jennifer M.; Hardy, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of obesity has risen to epidemic proportions in recent decades, most commonly attributed to an increasingly sedentary lifestyle, and a ‘western’ diet high in fat and low in fibre. Although non-allergic asthma is a well-established co-morbidity of obesity, the influence of obesity on allergic asthma is still under debate. Allergic asthma is thought to result from impaired tolerance to airborne antigens, so-called respiratory tolerance. We sought to investigate whether a diet high in fats affects the development of respiratory tolerance. Mice fed a high fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks showed weight gain, metabolic disease, and alteration in gut microbiota, metabolites and glucose metabolism compared to age-matched mice fed normal chow diet (ND). Respiratory tolerance was induced by repeated intranasal (i.n.) administration of ovalbumin (OVA), prior to induction of allergic airway inflammation (AAI) by sensitization with OVA in alum i.p. and subsequent i.n. OVA challenge. Surprisingly, respiratory tolerance was induced equally well in HFD and ND mice, as evidenced by decreased lung eosinophilia and serum OVA-specific IgE production. However, in a pilot study, HFD mice showed a tendency for impaired activation of airway dendritic cells and regulatory T cells compared with ND mice after induction of respiratory tolerance. Moreover, the capacity of lymph node cells to produce IL-5 and IL-13 after AAI was drastically diminished in HFD mice compared to ND mice. These results indicate that HFD does not affect the inflammatory or B cell response to an allergen, but inhibits priming of Th2 cells and possibly dendritic cell and regulatory T cell activation. PMID:27483441

  13. A high-fat diet impairs learning that is dependent on the dorsal hippocampus but spares other forms of learning.

    PubMed

    Stouffer, Eric M; Warninger, Elizabeth E; Michener, Paige N

    2015-12-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of a high-fat diet (HFD) on two tasks that were either dependent on the dorsal hippocampus (DH) or independent of the DH. A total of 80 adult male Sprague Dawley rats were administered either a lard-based HFD (60% of calories from fat) or a control diet (10% of calories from fat) for 8 weeks, and then were trained and tested on either the latent cue preference (LCP) task or the conditioned cue preference (CCP) task in a 3-compartment box apparatus (2 end-compartments and 1 middle-compartment). The end compartments of the box apparatus contained either a single environmental cue (DH-independent) or multiple environmental cues (DH-dependent). During training trials for the LCP and CCP tasks, on alternating days, rats were given access to water in 1 of the 2 end compartments and no water in the opposite end compartment. Rats were water-replete during LCP training and were water-deprived during CCP training. During testing for both tasks, all rats were water-deprived and given free access to all compartments while the amounts of time spent in each compartment were recorded. Results showed that rats given the HFD demonstrated no compartment preferences during both LCP and CCP testing when the compartments contained multiple cues, while rats fed the control diet demonstrated normal compartment preference behavior. However, when the compartments contained a single environmental cue, rats given either the HFD and control diet demonstrated normal LCP and CCP learning. These results demonstrate that consumption of a HFD disrupted both LCP and CCP learning in a multiple-cue (DH-dependent) environment, but did not impair either type of learning in a single-cue (DH-independent) environment. This may be due to selective impairment of the DH caused by increased oxidative stress, inflammation, and/or disrupted neurotransmission produced by consumption of the HFD.

  14. Ameliorating effect and potential mechanism of Rehmannia glutinosa oligosaccharides on the impaired glucose metabolism in chronic stress rats fed with high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruxue; Zhou, Jun; Li, Maoxing; Ma, Haigang; Qiu, Jianguo; Luo, Xiaohong; Jia, Zhengping

    2014-04-15

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the Rehmannia glutinosa oligosaccharides (ROS) ameliorate the impaired glucose metabolism and the potential mechanism in chronic stress rats fed with high-fat diet. The rats were fed by a high-fat diet and simultaneously stimulated by chronic stress over 5 weeks. Body weight, fasting plasma glucose, intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT), plasma lipids, gluconeogenesis test (GGT), glycogen content, and corticosterone, insulin and leptin levels were measured. The results showed that ROS administration (100, 200 mg/kg, i.g.) for 5 weeks exerted the effects of increasing the organ weights of thymus and spleen, lowering the fasting plasma glucose level, improving impaired glucose tolerance, increasing the contents of liver and muscle glycogen, decreasing the gluconeogenesis ability, plasma-free fatty acid's level, as well as plasma triglyceride and total cholesterol levels in chronic stress and high-fat fed rats, especially in the group of 200mg/kg; while the plasma corticosterone level was decreased, and plasma leptin level was increased. These results suggest that ROS exert an ameliorating effect of impaired glucose metabolism in chronic stress rats fed with high-fat diet, and the potential mechanism may be mediated through rebuilding the glucose homeostasis in the neuroendocrine immuno-modulation (NIM) network through multilinks and multitargets. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Intragastric pH and pressure profiles after intake of the high-caloric, high-fat meal as used for food effect studies.

    PubMed

    Koziolek, M; Schneider, F; Grimm, M; Modeβ, Chr; Seekamp, A; Roustom, T; Siegmund, W; Weitschies, W

    2015-12-28

    The intraluminal conditions of the fed stomach are critical for drug release from solid oral dosage forms and thus, often associated with the occurrence of food effects on oral bioavailability. In this study, intragastric pH and pressure profiles present after the ingestion of the high-caloric, high-fat (964 kcal) FDA standard breakfast were investigated in 19 healthy human subjects by using the telemetric SmartPill® capsule system (26 × 13 mm). Since the gastric emptying of such large non-digestible objects is typically accomplished by the migrating motor complex phase III activity, the time required for recurrence of fasted state motility determined the gastric emptying time (GET). Following the diet recommendations of the FDA guidance on food effect studies, the mean GET of the telemetric motility capsule was 15.3 ± 4.7 h. Thus, the high caloric value of the standard breakfast impeded gastric emptying before lunch in 18 out of 19 subjects. During its gastric transit, the capsule was exposed to highly dynamic conditions in terms of pH and pressure, which were mainly dependent on further meal and liquid intake, as well as the intragastric capsule deposition behavior. Maximum pH values in the stomach were measured immediately after capsule intake. The median pH value of the 5 min period after capsule ingestion ranged between pH 3.3 and 5.3. Subsequently, the pH decreased relatively constantly and reached minimum values of pH 0-1 after approximately 4 h. The maximum pressure within the stomach amounted to 293 ± 109 mbar and was clearly higher than the maximum pressure measured at the ileocaecal junction (60 ± 35 mbar). The physiological data on the intraluminal conditions within the fed stomach generated in this study will hopefully contribute to a better understanding of food effects on oral drug product performance.

  16. Consumption of a liquid high-fat meal increases triglycerides but decreases high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in abdominally obese subjects with high postprandial insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Lu, Huixia; Liu, Fukang; Cai, Huizhen; Xia, Hui; Guo, Fei; Xie, Yulan; Huang, Guiling; Miao, Miao; Shu, Guofang; Sun, Guiju

    2017-07-01

    Abdominal obesity is associated with an increased risk of insulin resistance, which may be a potential contributor to dyslipidemia. However, the relationship between postprandial insulin resistance and lipid metabolism in abdominally obese subjects remains unknown. We hypothesized that postprandial dyslipidemia would be exaggerated in abdominally obese subjects with high postprandial insulin resistance. To test this hypothesis, serum glucose, insulin, triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B were measured at baseline and postprandial state at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 hours after a liquid high-fat meal in non-abdominally obese controls (n=44) and abdominally obese subjects with low (AO-LPIR, n=40), middle (n=40), and high postprandial insulin resistance (AO-HPIR, n=40) based on the tertiles ratio of the insulin to glucose areas under the curve (AUC). Their serum adipokines were tested at baseline only. Fasting serum leptin was higher (P<.05) in AO-HPIR than that in AO-LPIR and controls. Postprandial triglycerides AUC was higher (P<.05), whereas high-density lipoprotein cholesterol AUC was lower (P<.05), in AO-HPIR than those in AO-LPIR and controls. Postprandial AUCs for total cholesterol and apolipoprotein B were similar in abdominally obese subjects with different degrees of postprandial insulin resistance and controls. The present study indicated that the higher degree of postprandial insulin resistance, the more adverse lipid profiles in abdominally obese subjects, which provides insight into opportunity for screening in health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Serum metabolic variables associated with impaired glucose tolerance induced by high-fat-high-cholesterol diet in Macaca mulatta.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinli; Chen, Younan; Liu, Jingping; Yang, Guang; Zhao, Jiuming; Liao, Guangneng; Shi, Meimei; Yuan, Yujia; He, Sirong; Lu, Yanrong; Cheng, Jingqiu

    2012-11-01

    Dyslipidemia caused by 'Western-diet pattern' is a strong risk factor for the onset of diabetes. This study aimed to disclose the relationship between the serum metabolite changes induced by habitual intake of high-fat and high-cholesterol (HFHC) diet and the development of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and insulin resistance through animal models of Macaca mulatta. Sixteen M. mulatta (six months old) were fed a control diet or a HFHC diet for 18 months. The diet effect on serum metabolic profiles was investigated by longitudinal research. Islet function was assessed by intravenous glucose tolerance and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp test. Metabonomics were determined by (1)H proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Prolonged diet-dependent hyperlipidemia facilitated visceral fat accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle and disorder of glucose homeostasis in juvenile monkeys. Glucose disappearance rate (K(Glu)) and insulin response to the glucose challenge effects in HFHC monkeys were significantly lower than in control monkeys. Otherwise, serum trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), lactate and leucine/isoleucine were significantly higher in HFHC monkeys. Sphingomyelin and choline were the most positively correlated with K(Glu) (R(2) = 0.778), as well as negative correlation (R(2) = 0.64) with total cholesterol. The HFHC diet induced visceral fat, abnormal lipid metabolism and IGT prior to weight gain and body fat content increase in juvenile monkeys. We suggest that increased serum metabolites, such as TMAO, lactate, branched-chain amino acids and decreased sphingomyelin and choline, may serve as possible predictors for the evaluation of IGT and insulin resistance risks in the prediabetic state.

  18. A high-fat diet fed during different periods of life impairs steroidogenesis of rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Fochi, Maria Etelvina; Pytlowanciv, Eloísa Zanin; Reame, Vanessa; Rafacho, Alex; Ribeiro, Daniele Lisboa; Taboga, Sebastião Roberto; Góes, Rejane Maira

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluated the impact of a high-fat diet (HFD) during different stages of rat life, associated or not with maternal obesity, on the content of sex steroid hormones and morphophysiology of Leydig cells. The following periods of development were examined: gestation (O1), gestation and lactation (O2), from weaning to adulthood (O3), from lactation to adulthood (O4), gestation to adulthood (O5), and after sexual maturation (O6). The HFD contained 20% unsaturated fat, whereas the control diet had 4% fat. Maternal obesity was induced by feeding HFD 15 weeks before mating. All HFD groups presented increased body weight, hyperinsulinemia and reduced insulin sensitivity. Except for O1, all HFD groups exhibited a higher adiposity index, hyperleptinemia, reduced testosterone and estradiol testicular levels, and decreased testicular 17β-HSD enzyme . Morphometrical analyses indicated atrophy of Leydig cells in the O2 group. Myelin vesicles were observed in the mitochondrial matrix of Leydig cells in O3, O4, O5 and O6, and autophagosomes containing mitochondria were found in O5 and O6. In conclusion, HFD feeding, before or after sexual maturation, reduces the functional capacity of rat Leydig cells. Maternal obesity associated with HFD during pregnancy/lactation prejudices Leydig cell steroidogenesis and induces its atrophy in adulthood, even if it is replaced by a conventional diet at later stages of life. Regardless of the life period of exposure to HFD, deregulation of leptin is the main factor related to steroidogenic impairment of Leydig cells, and, in groups exposed for longer periods (O3, O4, O5 and O6), this is worsened by structural damage and mitochondrial degeneration of these cells. © 2016 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  19. Low carbohydrate, high fat diet impairs exercise economy and negates the performance benefit from intensified training in elite race walkers.

    PubMed

    Burke, Louise M; Ross, Megan L; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Welvaert, Marijke; Heikura, Ida A; Forbes, Sara G; Mirtschin, Joanne G; Cato, Louise E; Strobel, Nicki; Sharma, Avish P; Hawley, John A

    2017-05-01

    Three weeks of intensified training and mild energy deficit in elite race walkers increases peak aerobic capacity independent of dietary support. Adaptation to a ketogenic low carbohydrate, high fat (LCHF) diet markedly increases rates of whole-body fat oxidation during exercise in race walkers over a range of exercise intensities. The increased rates of fat oxidation result in reduced economy (increased oxygen demand for a given speed) at velocities that translate to real-life race performance in elite race walkers. In contrast to training with diets providing chronic or periodised high carbohydrate availability, adaptation to an LCHF diet impairs performance in elite endurance athletes despite a significant improvement in peak aerobic capacity. We investigated the effects of adaptation to a ketogenic low carbohydrate (CHO), high fat diet (LCHF) during 3 weeks of intensified training on metabolism and performance of world-class endurance athletes. We controlled three isoenergetic diets in elite race walkers: high CHO availability (g kg(-1)  day(-1) : 8.6 CHO, 2.1 protein, 1.2 fat) consumed before, during and after training (HCHO, n = 9); identical macronutrient intake, periodised within or between days to alternate between low and high CHO availability (PCHO, n = 10); LCHF (< 50 g day(-1) CHO; 78% energy as fat; 2.1 g kg(-1)  day(-1) protein; LCHF, n = 10). Post-intervention, V̇O2 peak during race walking increased in all groups (P < 0.001, 90% CI: 2.55, 5.20%). LCHF was associated with markedly increased rates of whole-body fat oxidation, attaining peak rates of 1.57 ± 0.32 g min(-1) during 2 h of walking at ∼80% V̇O2 peak . However, LCHF also increased the oxygen (O2 ) cost of race walking at velocities relevant to real-life race performance: O2 uptake (expressed as a percentage of new V̇O2 peak ) at a speed approximating 20 km race pace was reduced in HCHO and PCHO (90% CI: -7.047, -2.55 and -5.18, -0.86, respectively), but was

  20. Low carbohydrate, high fat diet impairs exercise economy and negates the performance benefit from intensified training in elite race walkers

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Megan L.; Garvican‐Lewis, Laura A.; Welvaert, Marijke; Heikura, Ida A.; Forbes, Sara G.; Mirtschin, Joanne G.; Cato, Louise E.; Strobel, Nicki; Sharma, Avish P.; Hawley, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Key points Three weeks of intensified training and mild energy deficit in elite race walkers increases peak aerobic capacity independent of dietary support.Adaptation to a ketogenic low carbohydrate, high fat (LCHF) diet markedly increases rates of whole‐body fat oxidation during exercise in race walkers over a range of exercise intensities.The increased rates of fat oxidation result in reduced economy (increased oxygen demand for a given speed) at velocities that translate to real‐life race performance in elite race walkers.In contrast to training with diets providing chronic or periodised high carbohydrate availability, adaptation to an LCHF diet impairs performance in elite endurance athletes despite a significant improvement in peak aerobic capacity. Abstract We investigated the effects of adaptation to a ketogenic low carbohydrate (CHO), high fat diet (LCHF) during 3 weeks of intensified training on metabolism and performance of world‐class endurance athletes. We controlled three isoenergetic diets in elite race walkers: high CHO availability (g kg−1 day−1: 8.6 CHO, 2.1 protein, 1.2 fat) consumed before, during and after training (HCHO, n = 9); identical macronutrient intake, periodised within or between days to alternate between low and high CHO availability (PCHO, n = 10); LCHF (< 50 g day−1 CHO; 78% energy as fat; 2.1 g kg−1 day−1 protein; LCHF, n = 10). Post‐intervention, V˙O2 peak during race walking increased in all groups (P < 0.001, 90% CI: 2.55, 5.20%). LCHF was associated with markedly increased rates of whole‐body fat oxidation, attaining peak rates of 1.57 ± 0.32 g min−1 during 2 h of walking at ∼80% V˙O2 peak . However, LCHF also increased the oxygen (O2) cost of race walking at velocities relevant to real‐life race performance: O2 uptake (expressed as a percentage of new V˙O2 peak ) at a speed approximating 20 km race pace was reduced in HCHO and PCHO (90% CI: −7.047, −2.55 and −5.18, −0

  1. Effect of a high-fat meal on thalidomide pharmacokinetics and the relative bioavailability of oral formulations in healthy men and women.

    PubMed

    Teo, S K; Scheffler, M R; Kook, K A; Tracewell, W G; Colburn, W A; Stirling, D I; Thomas, S D

    2000-01-01

    The effect of food on the oral pharmacokinetics of thalidomide and the relative bioavailability of two oral thalidomide formulations were determined in an open label, single dose, randomized, three-way crossover study. Five male and eight female healthy volunteers received a single oral dose of 200 mg Celgene thalidomide capsules under fasted and non-fasted conditions, and a single dose of 200 mg tablets of Serral thalidomide under fasted conditions. The high-fat meal resulted in a 0.5-1.5 h absorption lag time, an increased mean C(max), a decreased mean AUC and a delay in mean T(max). The Serral tablet formulation resulted in a lower mean C(max), and slower terminal decline in plasma thalidomide concentrations compared with both Celgene treatments. Mean C(max) concentrations were 1.99+/-0.41 microg/mL (range 1.28-2.76) within 4.00+/-1.13 h (2-5) for the Celgene formulation fasted, 2.17+/-0.51 microg/mL (1.43-3.01) within 6.08+/-2.33 h (3-12) for the Celgene formulation with food, and 1. 05+/-0.31 microg/mL (0.62-1.65) within 6.23+/-1.88 h (5-10) for the Serral formulation fasted. Mean terminal half-lives were 13.50+/-6. 77 h for the Serral product, compared with 5.80+/-1.72 h and 5. 09+/-1.03 h for Celgene fasted and fed, respectively. Celgene's formulation exhibited slightly greater bioavailability than Serral's formulation, with mean ratios of 122% and 110% for Ln-transformed AUC(0-t) and AUC(0-infinity), respectively. The mean C(max) for the Celgene formulation was approximately two times greater than Serral's. Food delayed the onset of absorption of by 0.5-1.5 h, but had little effect on the extent of absorption from the Celgene capsule. Under fasted conditions, the Celgene thalidomide resulted in a two-fold greater C(max) and 10% greater AUC(0-infinity) than the Serral formulation.

  2. High-fat meal effect on LDL, HDL, and VLDL particle size and number in the Genetics of Lipid-Lowering drugs and diet network (GOLDN): an interventional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Postprandial lipemia (PPL) is likely a risk factor for cardiovascular disease but these changes have not been well described and characterized in a large cohort. We assessed acute changes in the size and concentration of total and subclasses of LDL, HDL, and VLDL particles in response to a high-fat meal. Participants (n = 1048) from the Genetics of Lipid-Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (GOLDN) Study who ingested a high-fat meal were included in this analysis. Lipids were measured at 0 hr (fasting), 3.5 hr, and 6 hr after a standardized fat meal. Particle size distributions were determined using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Analyses were stratified by baseline triglycerides (normal vs. elevated) and gender. The effect of PPL on changes in lipoprotein subclasses was assessed using repeated measures ANOVA. Results Postprandially, LDL-C, HDL-C, VLDL-C, and triglycerides increased regardless of baseline triglyceride status, with the largest increases in VLDL-C and TG; however, those with elevated triglycerides demonstrated larger magnitude of response. Total LDL particle number decreased over the 6-hour time interval, mostly from a decrease in the number of small LDL particles. Similarly, total VLDL particle number decreased due to reductions in medium and small VLDL particles. Large VLDL particles and chylomicrons demonstrated the largest increase in concentration. HDL particles demonstrated minimal overall changes in total particle number. Conclusions We have characterized the changes in LDL and VLDL particle number, and their subclass patterns following a high-fat meal. PMID:22008512

  3. Consumption of a high-fat meal containing cheese compared with a vegan alternative lowers postprandial C-reactive protein in overweight and obese individuals with metabolic abnormalities: a randomised controlled cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Demmer, Elieke; Van Loan, Marta D; Rivera, Nancy; Rogers, Tara S; Gertz, Erik R; German, J Bruce; Zivkovic, Angela M; Smilowitz, Jennifer T

    2016-01-01

    Dietary recommendations suggest decreased consumption of SFA to minimise CVD risk; however, not all foods rich in SFA are equivalent. To evaluate the effects of SFA in a dairy food matrix, as Cheddar cheese, v. SFA from a vegan-alternative test meal on postprandial inflammatory markers, a randomised controlled cross-over trial was conducted in twenty overweight or obese adults with metabolic abnormalities. Individuals consumed two isoenergetic high-fat mixed meals separated by a 1- to 2-week washout period. Serum was collected at baseline, and at 1, 3 and 6 h postprandially and analysed for inflammatory markers (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-17, IL-18, TNFα, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1)), acute-phase proteins C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid-A (SAA), cellular adhesion molecules and blood lipids, glucose and insulin. Following both high-fat test meals, postprandial TAG concentrations rose steadily (P < 0·05) without a decrease by 6 h. The incremental AUC (iAUC) for CRP was significantly lower (P < 0·05) in response to the cheese compared with the vegan-alternative test meal. A treatment effect was not observed for any other inflammatory markers; however, for both test meals, multiple markers significantly changed from baseline over the 6 h postprandial period (IL-6, IL-8, IL-18, TNFα, MCP-1, SAA). Saturated fat in the form of a cheese matrix reduced the iAUC for CRP compared with a vegan-alternative test meal during the postprandial 6 h period. The study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov under NCT01803633.

  4. Incorporating freeze-dried strawberry powder into a high-fat meal does not alter postprandial vascular function or blood markers of cardiovascular disease risk: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Richter, Chesney K; Skulas-Ray, Ann C; Gaugler, Trent L; Lambert, Joshua D; Proctor, David N; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2017-02-01

    Postprandial dysmetabolism-an exaggerated spike in triglycerides, glucose, and insulin-increases cardiovascular disease risk by inducing oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction. Polyphenol-rich foods may blunt these effects when they are incorporated into a high-fat, calorie-dense meal. Strawberries are a rich source of polyphenols, but there is little research on their postprandial effects. This study was designed to investigate the effect of adding 40 g freeze-dried strawberry powder (∼1 lb. or 0.45 kg fresh strawberries) to a high-fat (50 g total fat) meal on postprandial vascular function, as well as triglyceride, glucose, and insulin responses. Healthy, overweight or obese [mean ± SEM body mass index (in kg/m(2)): 31 ± 0.5] adults (mean ± SEM age: 28 ± 2 y; 17 men and 13 women) consumed a control meal and a strawberry meal in a randomized crossover design. Testing sessions were separated by ≥1 wk for men and ∼1 mo for women to control for hormonal variations. Blood samples were obtained before the meal and 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 h after the meal. Central blood pressure and arterial stiffness indexes were measured at baseline and 2 and 4 h postmeal with the use of pulse waveform analysis. There were no significant differences between the strawberry and control meals for any outcomes. Consumption of either meal significantly decreased the augmentation index at 2 and 4 h (P < 0.002) and significantly increased triglycerides, insulin, and glucose at all time points (P < 0.001) relative to baseline. The strawberry intervention did not alter vascular function or attenuate postprandial metabolic derangements in triglycerides, glucose, or insulin relative to the control meal. Additional research is needed to clarify whether strawberries or other polyphenol-rich interventions improve postprandial responses, and future studies should take into account the acute meal-induced improvements in measures of vascular function. This trial was registered

  5. Selective overexpression of Toll-like receptor-4 in skeletal muscle impairs metabolic adaptation to high-fat feeding

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Ryan P.; Wu, Yaru; Voelker, Kevin; Fundaro, Gabrielle; Kavanaugh, John; Stevens, Joseph R.; Shabrokh, Elika; Ali, Mostafa; Harvey, Mordecai; Anderson, Angela S.; Boutagy, Nabil E.; Mynatt, Randall L.; Frisard, Madlyn I.

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) is elevated in skeletal muscle of obese humans, and data from our laboratory have shown that activation of TLR-4 in skeletal muscle via LPS results in decreased fatty acid oxidation (FAO). The purpose of this study was to determine whether overexpression of TLR-4 in skeletal muscle alters mitochondrial function and whole body metabolism in the context of a chow and high-fat diet. C57BL/6J mice (males, 6–8 mo of age) with skeletal muscle-specific overexpression of the TLR-4 (mTLR-4) gene were created and used for this study. Isolated mitochondria and whole muscle homogenates from rodent skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius and quadriceps) were investigated. TLR-4 overexpression resulted in a significant reduction in FAO in muscle homogenates; however, mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production did not appear to be affected on a standard chow diet. To determine the role of TLR-4 overexpression in skeletal muscle in response to high-fat feeding, mTLR-4 mice and WT control mice were fed low- and high-fat diets for 16 wk. The high-fat diet significantly decreased FAO in mTLR-4 mice, which was observed in concert with elevated body weight and fat, greater glucose intolerance, and increase in production of ROS and cellular oxidative damage compared with WT littermates. These findings suggest that TLR-4 plays an important role in the metabolic response in skeletal muscle to high-fat feeding. PMID:26084695

  6. Selective overexpression of Toll-like receptor-4 in skeletal muscle impairs metabolic adaptation to high-fat feeding.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Ryan P; Wu, Yaru; Voelker, Kevin; Fundaro, Gabrielle; Kavanaugh, John; Stevens, Joseph R; Shabrokh, Elika; Ali, Mostafa; Harvey, Mordecai; Anderson, Angela S; Boutagy, Nabil E; Mynatt, Randall L; Frisard, Madlyn I; Hulver, Matthew W

    2015-08-01

    Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) is elevated in skeletal muscle of obese humans, and data from our laboratory have shown that activation of TLR-4 in skeletal muscle via LPS results in decreased fatty acid oxidation (FAO). The purpose of this study was to determine whether overexpression of TLR-4 in skeletal muscle alters mitochondrial function and whole body metabolism in the context of a chow and high-fat diet. C57BL/6J mice (males, 6-8 mo of age) with skeletal muscle-specific overexpression of the TLR-4 (mTLR-4) gene were created and used for this study. Isolated mitochondria and whole muscle homogenates from rodent skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius and quadriceps) were investigated. TLR-4 overexpression resulted in a significant reduction in FAO in muscle homogenates; however, mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production did not appear to be affected on a standard chow diet. To determine the role of TLR-4 overexpression in skeletal muscle in response to high-fat feeding, mTLR-4 mice and WT control mice were fed low- and high-fat diets for 16 wk. The high-fat diet significantly decreased FAO in mTLR-4 mice, which was observed in concert with elevated body weight and fat, greater glucose intolerance, and increase in production of ROS and cellular oxidative damage compared with WT littermates. These findings suggest that TLR-4 plays an important role in the metabolic response in skeletal muscle to high-fat feeding. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Comparison of Postprandial Responses to a High-Fat Meal in Hypertriglyceridemic Men and Women before and after Treatment with Fenofibrate in the Genetics and Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (GOLDN) Study

    PubMed Central

    Glasser, Stephen P.; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Oberman, A. I.; Kabagambe, Edmond K.; Tsai, Michael Y.; Ordovas, Jose M.; Straka, Robert J.; Arnett, Donna K.

    2013-01-01

    Context The fenofibrate effect on the subclass size distribution of lipoproteins before and after a high-fat challenge is not well studied. Objective To characterize the baseline and post-prandial response (PPL) to a high-fat challenge following fenofibrate therapy, on changes in LDL, HDL, and VLDL particle subclasses, number, and size in 271 hypertriglyceridemic participants. Methods Participants from the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (GOLDN) study who conducted PPL studies both before and after three weeks of fenofibrate (160 mg/d) treatment were analyzed. Particle size distributions were determined using nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, and lipid determinations were measured at fasting (0 hr), 3.5 hours, and 6 hours after ingestion of a standardized high-fat meal. Analyses were stratified by gender. Changes in particle subclass distributions were assessed using repeated measures analysis of variance adjusted for pedigree. Results Before PPL, fenofibrate in men (adjusted for age, field center, smoking status, diabetes, and weight circumference) lowered fasting and postprandial VLDL primarily due to reductions in postprandial levels of large and medium VLDL particles (9 SE +/–0.7 to 4 +/–0.4 and 78 / –4 to 36 / –3 nmol/L both P < .0001, resp.). Fenofibrate also reduced fasting and postprandial total LDL particles, primarily a result of reduced small LDL particles (1497 = / – 37 to 1088 = / – 36 nmol/L, P < .0001). Directional changes were similar in men and women but the magnitude of change was different for some parameters. Conclusion Fenofibrate treatment resulted in a lower triglyceride excursion following a high-fat meal. This investigation provides new knowledge of the magnitude and time course of fenofibrate induced attenuation of Lipoprotein subclass size distribution following a postprandial lipid challenge. PMID:24971173

  8. Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb. aqueous extract improves impaired glucose tolerance in high-fat diet-fed rats by decreasing the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hwan Hee; Nam, Song Yee; Kim, Mi Ju; Kim, Jung Bong; Choi, Jeong Sook; Kim, Haeng Ran; Lee, Young Min

    2017-09-05

    Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb. is a medicinal plant with physiological activities such as anti-cancer, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory activities and in vitro anti-diabetic activity. However, the effects of aqueous extracts from A. pilosa on insulin-resistant rats have not yet been examined. We investigated the effects of aqueous extract from A. pilosa on impaired glucose metabolism induced by a high-fat diet in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to the following groups: normal-fat diet (NF, n = 9); high-fat diet (HF, n = 9); high-fat diet with 0.1% A. pilosa aqueous extract (HFA, n = 10). Experimental diets were administered for 16 weeks. At the end of the treatment, liver and fat tissues were isolated, and serum was collected for biochemical analysis. The HF group rats had a significantly higher liver weight than the NF group rats did, and increased hepatic lipid accumulation (p < 0.05); however, supplementation with A. pilosa decreased liver weight. Blood glucose levels in the HFA group were lower than levels measured in the HF group 30, 60, and 120 min after glucose administration (p < 0.05). In addition, dietary A. pilosa supplementation decreased tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 6 levels, while increasing serum adiponectin concentrations (p < 0.05 vs. the HF group). These effects were accompanied by reduced hepatic and adipose tissue expression of inflammation-related genes such as Tnf and Il1b (p < 0.05). Our findings indicate that A. pilosa aqueous extract can ameliorate insulin resistance in high-fat diet-fed rats by decreasing the inflammatory response.

  9. Nitrosamine exposure exacerbates high fat diet-mediated type 2 diabetes mellitus, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, and neurodegeneration with cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The current epidemics of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and Alzheimer's disease (AD) all represent insulin-resistance diseases. Previous studies linked insulin resistance diseases to high fat diets or exposure to streptozotocin, a nitrosamine-related compound that causes T2DM, NASH, and AD-type neurodegeneration. We hypothesize that low-level exposure to nitrosamines that are widely present in processed foods, amplifies the deleterious effects of high fat intake in promoting T2DM, NASH, and neurodegeneration. Methods Long Evans rat pups were treated with N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) by i.p. Injection, and upon weaning, they were fed with high fat (60%; HFD) or low fat (5%; LFD) chow for 6 weeks. Rats were evaluated for cognitive impairment, insulin resistance, and neurodegeneration using behavioral, biochemical, molecular, and histological methods. Results NDEA and HFD ± NDEA caused T2DM, NASH, deficits in spatial learning, and neurodegeneration with hepatic and brain insulin and/or IGF resistance, and reductions in tau and choline acetyltransferase levels in the temporal lobe. In addition, pro-ceramide genes, which promote insulin resistance, were increased in livers and brains of rats exposed to NDEA, HFD, or both. In nearly all assays, the adverse effects of HFD+NDEA were worse than either treatment alone. Conclusions Environmental and food contaminant exposures to low, sub-mutagenic levels of nitrosamines, together with chronic HFD feeding, function synergistically to promote major insulin resistance diseases including T2DM, NASH, and AD-type neurodegeneration. Steps to minimize human exposure to nitrosamines and consumption of high-fat content foods are needed to quell these costly and devastating epidemics. PMID:20034403

  10. Casein Compared with Whey Proteins Affects the Organization of Dietary Fat during Digestion and Attenuates the Postprandial Triglyceride Response to a Mixed High-Fat Meal in Healthy, Overweight Men.

    PubMed

    Mariotti, François; Valette, Marion; Lopez, Christelle; Fouillet, Hélène; Famelart, Marie-Hélène; Mathé, Véronique; Airinei, Gheorghe; Benamouzig, Robert; Gaudichon, Claire; Tomé, Daniel; Tsikas, Dimitrios; Huneau, Jean François

    2015-12-01

    Postprandial lipemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The potential impacts of the type/nature of dietary protein on postprandial lipemia and associated dysregulations have been insufficiently investigated. We investigated the postprandial effect of including in a high-fat meal some milk protein fractions that markedly differ in their physicochemical properties and composition [either casein (CAS), whey protein (WHE), or α-lactalbumin-enriched whey protein (LAC)]. The protein fractions were incorporated as 15% energy in a high-fat meal in a 3-period, crossover postprandial study of 10 healthy overweight men with an elevated waist circumference (>94 cm). We measured postprandial changes in plasma lipids, amino acids, glucose, and oxidative stress markers, vascular function (using pulse contour analysis), and low-grade inflammation (using plasma markers). We also characterized in vitro the meal structures, including the size of the fat globule, and possible changes during digestion. The type of protein did not affect postprandial plasma glucose, amino acids, insulin, or nonesterified fatty acids, but, compared with WHE and LAC, which did not differ, CAS markedly reduced postprandial triglycerides (TGs), achieving a 22 ± 10% reduction in the 6-h area under the curve (P < 0.05). Similar trends were shown for plasma chylomicrons [apolipoprotein (apo)B-48; P < 0.05]. However, there were no significant differences between the meals regarding postprandial oxidative stress (plasma hydroperoxides and malondialdehyde), endothelial dysfunction (salbutamol-induced changes in pulse contour analysis), or low-grade inflammation. In vitro studies showed that when the pH of the meal decreased to stomach pH values, the reduction in the solubility of casein resulted in a phase separation between fat and protein, whereas the proteins in the other meals remained suspended with fat globules. In healthy overweight men, casein has specific physical interactions with fat that

  11. Endocrine Disruptor DDE Associated with a High-Fat Diet Enhances the Impairment of Liver Fatty Acid Composition in Rats.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Alcalá, Luis M; Sá, Carla; Pimentel, Lígia L; Pestana, Diogo; Teixeira, Diana; Faria, Ana; Calhau, Conceição; Gomes, Ana

    2015-10-28

    The banned pesticide dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its main metabolite, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), are commonly found in the food chain and in all tissues of living organisms. DDE is associated with metabolic diseases acting as an endocrine disruptor and more recently with the obesity pandemic. This study focuses on using fatty acid analysis to relate DDE exposure and metabolic dysfunction: liver and adipose tissue (visceral and subcutaneous) composition from male Wistar rats fed a standard (STD) or high-fat (HF) diet versus the addition of DDE in water. DDE exposure increased liver levels of palmitic, stearic, oleic, trans fatty, and linoleic acids having altered the n6 and n3 pathways leading to high concentrations of arachidonic acid and DHA (C22:6 n3). The results of this study confirm the close relationship between this pesticide metabolite and hepatic lipid dysfunction, underscoring its role as an emerging target for the prevention and therapy of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

  12. Impaired Transcriptional Response of the Murine Heart to Cigarette Smoke in the Setting of High Fat Diet and Obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Karin, Norman J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Mikheev, Vladimir B.; Lee, K. M.; Corley, Richard A.; Pounds, Joel G.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2013-07-01

    Smoking and obesity are each well-established risk factors for cardiovascular heart disease, which together impose earlier onset and greater severity of disease. To identify early signaling events in the response of the heart to cigarette smoke exposure within the setting of obesity, we exposed normal weight and high fat diet-induced obese (DIO) C57BL/6 mice to repeated inhaled doses of mainstream (MS) or sidestream (SS) cigarette smoke administered over a two week period, monitoring effects on both cardiac and pulmonary transcriptomes. MS smoke (250 μg wet total particulate matter (WTPM)/L, 5 h/day) exposures elicited robust cellular and molecular inflammatory responses in the lung with 1466 differentially expressed pulmonary genes (p < 0.01) in normal weight animals and a much-attenuated response (463 genes) in the hearts of the same animals. In contrast, exposures to SS smoke (85 μg WTPM/L) with a CO concentration equivalent to that of MS smoke (250 CO ppm) induced a weak pulmonary response (328 genes) but an extensive cardiac response (1590 genes). SS smoke and to a lesser extent MS smoke preferentially elicited hypoxia- and stress-responsive genes as well as genes predicting early changes of vascular smooth muscle and endothelium, precursors of cardiovascular disease. The most sensitive smoke-induced cardiac transcriptional changes of normal weight mice were largely absent in DIO mice after smoke exposure, while genes involved in fatty acid utilization were unaffected. At the same time, smoke exposure suppressed multiple proteome maintenance genes induced in the hearts of DIO mice. Together, these results underscore the sensitivity of the heart to SS smoke and reveal adaptive responses in healthy individuals that are absent in the setting of high fat diet and obesity.

  13. Umbelliferone Improves an Impaired Glucose and Lipid Metabolism in High-Fat Diet/Streptozotocin-Induced Type 2 Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Naowaboot, Jarinyaporn; Somparn, Nuntiya; Saentaweesuk, Suphaket; Pannangpetch, Patchareewan

    2015-06-08

    Umbelliferone (UMB) is a natural product that has several pharmacological effects including antihyperglycemic activity in diabetic rats. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the effect of UMB on insulin resistance and on the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetic rats. Type 2 diabetes was induced in rats by feeding a high-fat diet (45 kcal% fat) and a single dose of streptozotocin injection. After 8 weeks of treatment, UMB significantly reduced the elevated blood glucose levels and insulin resistance and increased the liver glycogen and serum adiponectin. Moreover, the serum lipid and the storages of triglyceride and non-esterified fatty acid in liver tissue were reduced. From histological examination, the lipid droplets in liver tissue were clearly decreased, and the fat cell size in the fat tissue was smaller in diabetic rats treated with UMB. Interestingly, UMB increased fat cell adiponectin, plasma membrane glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), and liver PPARα protein expressions. Our findings demonstrate that UMB improves glucose and lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetes by stimulating the insulin secretion and the related mechanisms via stimulating expression of adiponectin, GLUT4, PPARγ, and PPARα-protein expressions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. 1H NMR-based metabolic fingerprinting of urine metabolites after consumption of lingonberries (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) with a high-fat meal.

    PubMed

    Lehtonen, Henna-Maria; Lindstedt, Anni; Järvinen, Riikka; Sinkkonen, Jari; Graça, Gonçalo; Viitanen, Matti; Kallio, Heikki; Gil, Ana M

    2013-06-01

    The use of NMR metabolomics in clinical trials is growing; however, reports of postprandial experiments in humans are scarce. The present study investigated whether consumption of lingonberries as a supplement to an oil-rich meal modifies the postprandial fingerprints of human urine. Urine samples were analysed by (1)H NMR, and untargeted multivariate analysis was applied to the data for comprehensive fingerprinting. A clear separation of postprandial lingonberry meal samples was revealed. To evaluate statistical differences, a targeted approach was applied for the informative spectral areas. Significantly (p<0.05) increased levels of polyphenol metabolites, hippuric acid and 4-hydroxyhippuric acid, and decreased creatinine and dimethylamine levels were the major explanations for the grouping of the postprandial samples after the different meals. Thus, inclusion of polyphenol-rich lingonberry powder in a rapeseed oil-rich meal modifies the metabolic profile of urine which may be used to reveal both consumption of berries and health-promoting changes in the common metabolism.

  15. Apolipoprotein A5 deficiency aggravates high-fat diet-induced obesity due to impaired central regulation of food intake.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Sjoerd A A; Heemskerk, Mattijs M; Geerling, Janine J; van Klinken, Jan-Bert; Schaap, Frank G; Bijland, Silvia; Berbée, Jimmy F P; van Harmelen, Vanessa J A; Pronk, Amanda C M; Schreurs, Marijke; Havekes, Louis M; Rensen, Patrick C N; van Dijk, Ko Willems

    2013-08-01

    Mutations in apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) have been associated with hypertriglyceridemia in humans and mice. This has been attributed to a stimulating role for APOA5 in lipoprotein lipase-mediated triglyceride hydrolysis and hepatic clearance of lipoprotein remnant particles. However, because of the low APOA5 plasma abundance, we investigated an additional signaling role for APOA5 in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Wild-type (WT) and Apoa5(-/-) mice fed a chow diet showed no difference in body weight or 24-h food intake (Apoa5(-/-), 4.5±0.6 g; WT, 4.2±0.5 g), while Apoa5(-/-) mice fed an HFD ate more in 24 h (Apoa5(-/-), 2.8±0.4 g; WT, 2.5±0.3 g, P<0.05) and became more obese than WT mice. Also, intravenous injection of APOA5-loaded VLDL-like particles lowered food intake (VLDL control, 0.26±0.04 g; VLDL+APOA5, 0.11±0.07 g, P<0.01). In addition, the HFD-induced hyperphagia of Apoa5(-/-) mice was prevented by adenovirus-mediated hepatic overexpression of APOA5. Finally, intracerebroventricular injection of APOA5 reduced food intake compared to injection of the same mouse with artificial cerebral spinal fluid (0.40±0.11 g; APOA5, 0.23±0.08 g, P<0.01). These data indicate that the increased HFD-induced obesity of Apoa5(-/-) mice as compared to WT mice is at least partly explained by hyperphagia and that APOA5 plays a role in the central regulation of food intake.

  16. Impaired learning and memory in rats induced by a high-fat diet: Involvement with the imbalance of nesfatin-1 abundance and copine 6 expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Xu, Y-Y; Wu, R; Han, Y-X; Yu, Y; Ge, J-F; Chen, F-H

    2017-04-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease, resulting not only in liver dysfunction, glucose and lipid metabolism disorder, but also in neuropsychiatric damage. In the present study, a NAFLD rat model was established via feeding of a high-fat diet, and behaviour was observed via the open field test (OFT), the sucrose preference test (SPT), the elevated plus maze (EPM), the forced swimming test (FST) and the Morris water maze (MWM). The plasma concentrations of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), glucose, free fatty acid (FFA), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were detected using chemiluminescence technique. The plasma levels of nesfatin-1, leptin and insulin were measured via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the protein expressions of p-glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), GSK-3β, p-β-catenin, β-catenin, cyclinD and copine 6 in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) were detected using western blotting. After 4 consecutive weeks of feeding with a high-fat diet, the rats showed obesity; increased plasma concentrations of ALT, glucose, FFA, TC, TG, HDL-C and LDL-C; decreased plasma levels of leptin and insulin; and inflammation and mild hepatocyte steatosis in the liver. Although there was no significant difference between groups with regard to performance in the OFT, EPM or FST, the NAFLD rats showed a decreased sucrose preference index in the SPT and impaired learning and memory in the MWM task. Moreover, the present study provides the first evidence of an increased plasma nesfatin-1 concentration in NAFLD rats, which was significantly correlated with plasma lipid concentrations and behavioural performance. Furthermore, copine 6 and p-β-catenin protein expression decreased and p-GSK-3β increased in the hippocampus and PFC of NAFLD rats. These results suggest that consuming of a high-fat diet for 4

  17. Toll-like receptor 2 mediates high-fat diet-induced impairment of vasodilator actions of insulin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rationale - Obesity is characterized by a chronic pro-inflammatory state that promotes insulin resistance in liver, adipose tissue, and skeletal muscle as well as impairing insulin action in vascular endothelium that contributes to endothelial dysfunction. Cadiovascular complications of obesity are ...

  18. High-fat diet and aging interact to produce neuroinflammation and impair hippocampal- and amygdalar-dependent memory.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Sarah J; D'Angelo, Heather; Soch, Alita; Watkins, Linda R; Maier, Steven F; Barrientos, Ruth M

    2017-10-01

    More Americans are consuming diets higher in saturated fats and refined sugars than ever before, and based on increasing obesity rates, this is a growing trend among older adults as well. While high saturated fat diet (HFD) consumption has been shown to sensitize the inflammatory response to a subsequent immune challenge in young adult rats, the inflammatory effect of HFD in the already-vulnerable aging brain has not yet been assessed. Here, we explored whether short-term (3 days) consumption of HFD would serve as a neuroinflammatory trigger in aging animals, leading to cognitive deficits. HFD impaired long-term contextual (hippocampal dependent) and auditory-cued fear (amygdalar dependent) memory in aged, but not young adult rats. Short-term memory performance for both tasks was intact, suggesting that HFD impairs memory consolidation processes. Microglial markers of activation Iba1 and cd11b were only increased in the aged rats, while MHCII was further amplified by HFD. Furthermore, these HFD-induced long-term memory impairments were accompanied by IL-1β protein increases in both the hippocampus and amygdala in aged rats. Central administration of IL-1RA in aged rats following conditioning mitigated both contextual and auditory-cued fear memory impairments caused by HFD, strongly suggesting that IL-1β plays a critical role in these effects. Voluntary wheel running, known to have anti-inflammatory effects in the hippocampus, rescued hippocampal-dependent but not amygdalar-dependent memory impairments caused by HFD. Together, these data suggest that short-term consumption of HFD can lead to memory deficits and significant brain inflammation in the aged animal, and strongly suggest that appropriate diet is crucial for cognitive health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of high-fat, high-protein, and high-carbohydrate meals on the pharmacokinetics of a small dose of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Jones, A W; Jönsson, K A; Kechagias, S

    1997-12-01

    To investigate whether the relative amounts of fat, carbohydrate (CHO), or protein in a meal influence the pharmacokinetics of a small dose of ethanol. Nine healthy men received ethanol (0.30 g kg-1 body weight) on five occasions in a randomized cross-over fashion. On three occasions the dose of ethanol was consumed within 15 min of eating a standardized breakfast of similar volume and calorific value but containing different amounts of fat, CHO, and protein. On two other occasions the same dose of ethanol was ingested on an empty stomach (overnight fast) or administered by intravenous (i.v.) infusion over 30 min. The blood-ethanol profiles showed large inter and intraindividual variations, especially when ethanol was ingested after eating food. The peak blood-alcohol concentrations (BAC) were 16.6 +/- 4.0, 17.7 +/- 7.1, and 13.3 +/- 4.0 mg dl-1 (mean +/- s.d.) after fat, CHO, and protein-rich meals and 30.8 +/- 4.3 and 54.3 +/- 6.4 mg dl-1 after fasting and i.v. infusion, respectively. The corresponding areas under the concentration-time profiles (AUC) were 1767 +/ -549, 1619 +/- 760 1270 +/- 406 mg dl-1 min after fat, CHO, and protein-rich meals compared with 3210 +/- 527 and 4786 +/- 446 mg dl-1 min after fasting and i.v. infusion, respectively. The time required to eliminate ethanol from the blood was shortened by 1-2 h in the fed-state. Drinking ethanol after eating a meal, regardless of the nutritional composition, decreases the systemic availability of ethanol. Because gastric emptying is slow and more prolonged with food in the stomach, the delivery of ethanol to the duodenum and the liver will be highly variable as will the hepatic clearance of ethanol. Provided that portal venous BAC remains fairly low and ethanol metabolizing enzymes are not fully saturated then part of the dose of ethanol can be cleared by hepatic first-pass metabolism (FPM), as one consequence of Michaelis-Menten elimination kinetics.

  20. Effect of high-fat, high-protein, and high-carbohydrate meals on the pharmacokinetics of a small dose of ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Jones, A. W.; Jönsson, K. Å.; Kechagias, S.

    1997-01-01

    Aims To investigate whether the relative amounts of fat, carbohydrate (CHO), or protein in a meal influence the pharmacokinetics of a small dose of ethanol. Methods Nine healthy men received ethanol (0.30 g kg−1 body weight) on five occasions in a randomized cross-over fashion. On three occasions the dose of ethanol was consumed within 15 min of eating a standardized breakfast of similar volume and calorific value but containing different amounts of fat, CHO, and protein. On two other occasions the same dose of ethanol was ingested on an empty stomach (overnight fast) or administered by intravenous (i.v.) infusion over 30 min. Results The blood-ethanol profiles showed large inter and intraindividual variations, especially when ethanol was ingested after eating food. The peak blood-alcohol concentrations (BAC) were 16.6±4.0, 17.7±7.1, and 13.3±4.0 mg dl−1 (mean±s.d.) after fat, CHO, and protein-rich meals and 30.8±4.3 and 54.3±6.4 mg dl−1 after fasting and i.v. infusion, respectively. The corresponding areas under the concentration-time profiles (AUC) were 1767±549, 1619±760, 1270±406 mg dl−1 min after fat, CHO, and protein-rich meals compared with 3210±527 and 4786±446 mg dl−1 min after fasting and i.v. infusion, respectively. The time required to eliminate ethanol from the blood was shortened by 1–2 h in the fed-state. Conclusions Drinking ethanol after eating a meal, regardless of the nutritional composition, decreases the systemic availability of ethanol. Because gastric emptying is slow and more prolonged with food in the stomach, the delivery of ethanol to the duodenum and the liver will be highly variable as will the hepatic clearance of ethanol. Provided that portal venous BAC remains fairly low and ethanol metabolizing enzymes are not fully saturated then part of the dose of ethanol can be cleared by hepatic first-pass metabolism (FPM), as one consequence of Michaelis-Menten elimination kinetics

  1. High-fat diet induces protein kinase A and G-protein receptor kinase phosphorylation of β2 -adrenergic receptor and impairs cardiac adrenergic reserve in animal hearts.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qin; Hu, Yuting; Wang, Qingtong; Liu, Yongming; Li, Ning; Xu, Bing; Kim, Sungjin; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Xiang, Yang K

    2017-03-15

    Patients with diabetes show a blunted cardiac inotropic response to β-adrenergic stimulation despite normal cardiac contractile reserve. Acute insulin stimulation impairs β-adrenergically induced contractile function in isolated cardiomyocytes and Langendorff-perfused hearts. In this study, we aimed to examine the potential effects of hyperinsulinaemia associated with high-fat diet (HFD) feeding on the cardiac β2 -adrenergic receptor signalling and the impacts on cardiac contractile function. We showed that 8 weeks of HFD feeding leads to reductions in cardiac functional reserve in response to β-adrenergic stimulation without significant alteration of cardiac structure and function, which is associated with significant changes in β2 -adrenergic receptor phosphorylation at protein kinase A and G-protein receptor kinase sites in the myocardium. The results suggest that clinical intervention might be applied to subjects in early diabetes without cardiac symptoms to prevent further cardiac complications. Patients with diabetes display reduced exercise capability and impaired cardiac contractile reserve in response to adrenergic stimulation. We have recently uncovered an insulin receptor and adrenergic receptor signal network in the heart. The aim of this study was to understand the impacts of high-fat diet (HFD) on the insulin-adrenergic receptor signal network in hearts. After 8 weeks of HFD feeding, mice exhibited diabetes, with elevated insulin and glucose concentrations associated with body weight gain. Mice fed an HFD had normal cardiac structure and function. However, the HFD-fed mice displayed a significant elevation of phosphorylation of the β2 -adrenergic receptor (β2 AR) at both the protein kinase A site serine 261/262 and the G-protein-coupled receptor kinase site serine 355/356 and impaired adrenergic reserve when compared with mice fed on normal chow. Isolated myocytes from HFD-fed mice also displayed a reduced contractile response to adrenergic

  2. Short-Term High-Fat Diet (HFD) Induced Anxiety-Like Behaviors and Cognitive Impairment Are Improved with Treatment by Glyburide

    PubMed Central

    Gainey, Stephen J.; Kwakwa, Kristin A.; Bray, Julie K.; Pillote, Melissa M.; Tir, Vincent L.; Towers, Albert E.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity-associated comorbidities such as cognitive impairment and anxiety are increasing public health burdens that have gained prevalence in children. To better understand the impact of childhood obesity on brain function, mice were fed with a high-fat diet (HFD) from weaning for 1, 3 or 6 weeks. When compared to low-fat diet (LFD)-fed mice (LFD-mice), HFD-fed mice (HFD-mice) had impaired novel object recognition (NOR) after 1 week. After 3 weeks, HFD-mice had impaired NOR and object location recognition (OLR). Additionally, these mice displayed anxiety-like behavior by measure of both the open-field and elevated zero maze (EZM) testing. At 6 weeks, HFD-mice were comparable to LFD-mice in NOR, open-field and EZM performance but they remained impaired during OLR testing. Glyburide, a second-generation sulfonylurea for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, was chosen as a countermeasure based on previous data exhibiting its potential as an anxiolytic. Interestingly, a single dose of glyburide corrected deficiencies in NOR and mitigated anxiety-like behaviors in mice fed with HFD-diet for 3-weeks. Taken together these results indicate that a HFD negatively impacts a subset of hippocampal-independent behaviors relatively rapidly, but such behaviors normalize with age. In contrast, impairment of hippocampal-sensitive memory takes longer to develop but persists. Since single-dose glyburide restores brain function in 3-week-old HFD-mice, drugs that block ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels may be of clinical relevance in the treatment of obesity-associated childhood cognitive issues and psychopathologies. PMID:27563288

  3. Early Impairment of Transmural Principal Strains in the Left Ventricle Wall Following Short-Term, High Fat Feeding of Mice Predisposed to Cardiac Steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Hankiewicz, Janusz H.; Banke, Natasha H.; Farjah, Mariam; Lewandowski, E. Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Background Myocardial lipid accumulation precedes some cardiomyopathies, but little is known of concurrent effects on ventricular mechanics. We tested the hypothesis that intramyocardial lipid accumulation, during short term high fat diet (HFD), affects 2-D strains in the heart. We examined hearts of nontransgenic (NTG) mice and transgenic mice predisposed to elevated triacylglyceride (TAG) storage linked to low-level overexpression of PPARα. Methods and Results Myocardial lipid and transmural, principal strains E1 and E2 were determined in vivo with 1H MRS/MRI before and after 2 weeks of HFD in both PPARα and NTG littermate mice. Baseline lipid was elevated in PPARα over NTG. HFD increased mobile lipid by 174% in NTG (P<0.05) and 79% in PPARα (P<0.05). After HFD, lipid and TAG were higher in PPARα versus NTG, by 63% and 81%, respectively. However, TAG in PPARα after HFD was similar to TAG in PPARα on regular diet, suggesting that the MRS signal from lipid is not exclusive to TAG. Only at the highest lipid contents, achieved in PPARα, were strains affected. Endocardial strain was most compromised, with a negative correlation to lipid (P<0.05), Conclusions Short term high fat diet elevated myocardial lipid measures via MRS which became dissociated from TAG content in hearts predisposed to cardiac steatosis. The increased lipid was associated with concurrent, transmural reductions in E1 and E2 strains across the LV wall. Strains were attenuated at the highest levels of lipid accumulation suggesting a threshold response. Thus, 2-D strains are impaired early and without LV diastolic dysfunction due to cardiac steatosis. PMID:20837747

  4. A high-fat high-sugar diet-induced impairment in place-recognition memory is reversible and training-dependent.

    PubMed

    Tran, Dominic M D; Westbrook, R Frederick

    2017-03-01

    A high-fat high-sugar (HFHS) diet is associated with cognitive deficits in people and produces spatial learning and memory deficits in rodents. Notable, such diets rapidly impair place-, but not object-recognition memory in rats within one week of exposure. Three experiments examined whether this impairment was reversed by removal of the diet, or prevented by pre-diet training. Experiment 1 showed that rats switched from HFHS to chow recovered from the place-recognition impairment that they displayed while on HFHS. Experiment 2 showed that control rats ("Untrained") who were exposed to an empty testing arena while on chow, were impaired in place-recognition when switched to HFHS and tested for the first time. However, rats tested ("Trained") on the place and object task while on chow, were protected from the diet-induce deficit and maintained good place-recognition when switched to HFHS. Experiment 3 examined the conditions of this protection effect by training rats in a square arena while on chow, and testing them in a rectangular arena while on HFHS. We have previously demonstrated that chow rats, but not HFHS rats, show geometry-based reorientation on a rectangular arena place-recognition task (Tran & Westbrook, 2015). Experiment 3 assessed whether rats switched to the HFHS diet after training on the place and object tasks in a square area, would show geometry-based reorientation in a rectangular arena. The protective benefit of training was replicated in the square arena, but both Untrained and Trained HFHS failed to show geometry-based reorientation in the rectangular arena. These findings are discussed in relation to the specificity of the training effect, the role of the hippocampus in diet-induced deficits, and their implications for dietary effects on cognition in people.

  5. Sesamin prevents decline in exercise capacity and impairment of skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in mice with high-fat diet-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Takada, Shingo; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Matsushima, Shouji; Takemoto, Daisuke; Furihata, Takaaki; Mizushima, Wataru; Fukushima, Arata; Yokota, Takashi; Ono, Yoshiko; Shibata, Hiroshi; Okita, Koichi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-01

    What is the central question of this study? Our aim was to examine whether sesamin can prevent a decline in exercise capacity in high-fat diet-induced diabetic mice. Our hypothesis was that maintenance of mitochondrial function and attenuation of oxidative stress in the skeletal muscle would contribute to this result. What is the main finding and its importance? The new findings are that sesamin prevents the diabetes-induced decrease in exercise capacity and impairment of mitochondrial function through the inhibition of NAD(P)H oxidase-dependent oxidative stress in the skeletal muscle. Sesamin may be useful as a novel agent for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. We previously reported that exercise capacity and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in diabetic mice were impaired, in association with the activation of NAD(P)H oxidase. It has been reported that sesamin inhibits NAD(P)H oxidase-induced superoxide production. Therefore, we examined whether the antioxidant sesamin could prevent a decline in exercise capacity in mice with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced diabetes. C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal diet (ND) or HFD, then treated or not with sesamin (0.2%) to yield the following four groups: ND, ND+Sesamin, HFD and HFD+Sesamin (n = 10 each). After 8 weeks, body weight, fat weight, blood glucose, insulin, triglyceride, total cholesterol and fatty acid were significantly increased in HFD compared with ND mice. Sesamin prevented the increases in blood insulin and lipid levels in HFD-fed mice, but did not affect the plasma glucose. Exercise capacity determined by treadmill tests was significantly reduced in HFD mice, but almost completely recovered in HFD+Sesamin mice. Citrate synthase activity was significantly decreased in the skeletal muscle of HFD mice, and these decreases were also inhibited by sesamin. Superoxide anion and NAD(P)H oxidase activity were significantly increased in HFD mice compared with the ND mice and were ameliorated by sesamin. Sesamin

  6. In utero exposure to prepregnancy maternal obesity and postweaning high-fat diet impair regulators of mitochondrial dynamics in rat placenta and offspring

    PubMed Central

    Borengasser, Sarah J.; Faske, Jennifer; Kang, Ping; Blackburn, Michael L.; Badger, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The proportion of pregnant women who are obese at conception continues to rise. Compelling evidence suggests the intrauterine environment is an important determinant of offspring health. Maternal obesity and unhealthy diets are shown to promote metabolic programming in the offspring. Mitochondria are maternally inherited, and we have previously shown impaired mitochondrial function in rat offspring exposed to maternal obesity in utero. Mitochondrial health is maintained by mitochondrial dynamics, or the processes of fusion and fission, which serve to repair damaged mitochondria, remove irreparable mitochondria, and maintain mitochondrial morphology. An imbalance between fusion and fission has been associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and reproduction complications. In the present study, we examined the influence of maternal obesity and postweaning high-fat diet (HFD) on key regulators of mitochondrial fusion and fission in rat offspring at important developmental milestones which included postnatal day (PND)35 (2 wk HFD) and PND130 (∼16 wk HFD). Our results indicate HFD-fed offspring had reduced mRNA expression of presenilin-associated rhomboid-like (PARL), optic atrophy (OPA)1, mitofusin (Mfn)1, Mfn2, fission (Fis)1, and nuclear respiratory factor (Nrf)1 at PND35, while OPA1 and Mfn2 remained decreased at PND130. Putative transcriptional regulators of mitochondrial dynamics were reduced in rat placenta and offspring liver and skeletal muscle [peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC1)α, PGC1β, and estrogen-related receptor (ERR)α], consistent with indirect calorimetry findings revealing reduced energy expenditure and impaired fat utilization. Overall, maternal obesity detrimentally alters mitochondrial targets that may contribute to impaired mitochondrial health and increased obesity susceptibility in later life. PMID:25336449

  7. In utero exposure to prepregnancy maternal obesity and postweaning high-fat diet impair regulators of mitochondrial dynamics in rat placenta and offspring.

    PubMed

    Borengasser, Sarah J; Faske, Jennifer; Kang, Ping; Blackburn, Michael L; Badger, Thomas M; Shankar, Kartik

    2014-12-01

    The proportion of pregnant women who are obese at conception continues to rise. Compelling evidence suggests the intrauterine environment is an important determinant of offspring health. Maternal obesity and unhealthy diets are shown to promote metabolic programming in the offspring. Mitochondria are maternally inherited, and we have previously shown impaired mitochondrial function in rat offspring exposed to maternal obesity in utero. Mitochondrial health is maintained by mitochondrial dynamics, or the processes of fusion and fission, which serve to repair damaged mitochondria, remove irreparable mitochondria, and maintain mitochondrial morphology. An imbalance between fusion and fission has been associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and reproduction complications. In the present study, we examined the influence of maternal obesity and postweaning high-fat diet (HFD) on key regulators of mitochondrial fusion and fission in rat offspring at important developmental milestones which included postnatal day (PND)35 (2 wk HFD) and PND130 (∼16 wk HFD). Our results indicate HFD-fed offspring had reduced mRNA expression of presenilin-associated rhomboid-like (PARL), optic atrophy (OPA)1, mitofusin (Mfn)1, Mfn2, fission (Fis)1, and nuclear respiratory factor (Nrf)1 at PND35, while OPA1 and Mfn2 remained decreased at PND130. Putative transcriptional regulators of mitochondrial dynamics were reduced in rat placenta and offspring liver and skeletal muscle [peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC1)α, PGC1β, and estrogen-related receptor (ERR)α], consistent with indirect calorimetry findings revealing reduced energy expenditure and impaired fat utilization. Overall, maternal obesity detrimentally alters mitochondrial targets that may contribute to impaired mitochondrial health and increased obesity susceptibility in later life.

  8. Impairment of hippocampal-dependent memory induced by juvenile high-fat diet intake is associated with enhanced hippocampal inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Boitard, Chloé; Cavaroc, Amandine; Sauvant, Julie; Aubert, Agnès; Castanon, Nathalie; Layé, Sophie; Ferreira, Guillaume

    2014-08-01

    In addition to metabolic and cardiovascular disorders, obesity pandemic is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation as well as adverse cognitive outcomes. However, the existence of critical periods of development that differ in terms of sensitivity to the effects of diet-induced obesity remains unexplored. Using short exposure to a high-fat diet (HFD) exerting no effects when given to adult mice, we recently found impairment of hippocampal-dependent memory and plasticity after similar HFD exposure encompassing adolescence (from weaning to adulthood) showing the vulnerability of the juvenile period (Boitard et al., 2012). Given that inflammatory processes modulate hippocampal functions, we evaluated in rats whether the detrimental effect of juvenile HFD (jHFD) on hippocampal-dependent memory is associated with over-expression of hippocampal pro-inflammatory cytokines. jHFD exposure impaired long-term spatial reference memory in the Morris water maze without affecting acquisition or short-term memory. This suggests an effect on consolidation processes. Moreover, jHFD consumption delayed spatial reversal learning. jHFD intake did neither affect basal expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines at the periphery nor in the brain, but potentiated the enhancement of Interleukin-1-beta and Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha expression specifically in the hippocampus after a peripheral immune challenge with lipopolysaccharide. Interestingly, whereas the same duration of HFD intake at adulthood induced similar weight gain and metabolic alterations as jHFD intake, it did neither affect spatial performance (long-term memory or reversal learning) nor lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine expression in the hippocampus. Finally, spatial reversal learning enhanced Interleukin-1-beta in the hippocampus, but not in the frontal cortex and the hypothalamus, of jHFD-fed rats. These results indicate that juvenile HFD intake promotes exaggerated pro-inflammatory cytokines expression in the

  9. Ameliorative effects of α-lipoic acid on high-fat diet-induced oxidative stress and glucose uptake impairment of T cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jue; Huang, Dejian; Zheng, Yi

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of obesity and metabolic disease continues to rise, mainly associated with consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD). Previous studies have indicated that HFD could disturb the immune system, leading to immunodeficiency and inflammation. Several mechanisms have been postulated to account for immunodeficiency associated with HFD, one being oxidative stress. To further investigate the effects of HFD on glucose metabolism and proliferative capability of T cells and the protective effects of α-lipoic acid (LA), male C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal chow (10% fat), an HFD (60% fat), an LA supplement (HFD +0.1%LA), and a N-acetyl-L-cysteine supplement (HFD +0.1% NAC) for 10 weeks. Results showed that 10-week HFD increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, induced oxidative stress state formation, inhibited glucose uptake, decreased ATP concentration, reduced proliferative rate, and dampened IL-2 production of T cells of mice. Administration of LA significantly alleviated these changes induced by HFD. These findings reveal that oxidative stress of T cells caused by HFD may be a key factor leading to glucose metabolism reduction and proliferative capability and function impairment of T cells. LA, as a potent agonist, could promote Nrf2 nuclear translocation and up-regulate expression of Nrf2 target genes (Ho-1 and Prdx1), which can eliminate excess ROS and restore redox balance of cells.

  10. Obesity Resistance and Enhanced Insulin Sensitivity in Ahnak-/- Mice Fed a High Fat Diet Are Related to Impaired Adipogenesis and Increased Energy Expenditure.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae Hoon; Kim, Il Yong; Kim, Yo Na; Shin, Sun Mee; Roh, Kyung Jin; Lee, Seo Hyun; Sohn, Mira; Cho, Soo Young; Lee, Sang Hyuk; Ko, Chang-Yong; Kim, Han-Sung; Choi, Cheol Soo; Bae, Yun Soo; Seong, Je Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that AHNAK expression is altered in obesity, although its role in adipose tissue development remains unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the molecular mechanism by which Ahnak influences adipogenesis and glucose homeostasis. We investigated the in vitro role of AHNAK in adipogenesis using adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) and C3H10T1/2 cells. AHNAK-KO male mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD; 60% calories from fat) and examined for glucose and insulin tolerances, for body fat compositions, and by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamping. Energy expenditures were assessed using metabolic cages and by measuring the expression levels of genes involved in thermogenesis in white or brown adipose tissues. Adipogenesis in ADSCs was impaired in AHNAK-KO mice. The loss of AHNAK led to decreased BMP4/SMAD1 signaling, resulting in the downregulation of key regulators of adipocyte differentiation (P<0.05). AHNAK directly interacted with SMAD1 on the Pparγ2 promoter. Concomitantly, HFD-fed AHNAK-KO mice displayed reduced hepatosteatosis and improved metabolic profiles, including improved glucose tolerance (P<0.001), enhanced insulin sensitivity (P<0.001), and increased energy expenditure (P<0.05), without undergoing alterations in food intake and physical activity. AHNAK plays a crucial role in body fat accumulation by regulating adipose tissue development via interaction with the SMAD1 protein and can be involved in metabolic homeostasis.

  11. Obesity Resistance and Enhanced Insulin Sensitivity in Ahnak-/- Mice Fed a High Fat Diet Are Related to Impaired Adipogenesis and Increased Energy Expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yo Na; Shin, Sun Mee; Roh, Kyung Jin; Lee, Seo Hyun; Sohn, Mira; Cho, Soo Young; Lee, Sang Hyuk; Ko, Chang-Yong; Kim, Han-Sung; Choi, Cheol Soo; Bae, Yun Soo; Seong, Je Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Objective Recent evidence has suggested that AHNAK expression is altered in obesity, although its role in adipose tissue development remains unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the molecular mechanism by which Ahnak influences adipogenesis and glucose homeostasis. Design We investigated the in vitro role of AHNAK in adipogenesis using adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) and C3H10T1/2 cells. AHNAK-KO male mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD; 60% calories from fat) and examined for glucose and insulin tolerances, for body fat compositions, and by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamping. Energy expenditures were assessed using metabolic cages and by measuring the expression levels of genes involved in thermogenesis in white or brown adipose tissues. Results Adipogenesis in ADSCs was impaired in AHNAK-KO mice. The loss of AHNAK led to decreased BMP4/SMAD1 signaling, resulting in the downregulation of key regulators of adipocyte differentiation (P<0.05). AHNAK directly interacted with SMAD1 on the Pparγ2 promoter. Concomitantly, HFD-fed AHNAK-KO mice displayed reduced hepatosteatosis and improved metabolic profiles, including improved glucose tolerance (P<0.001), enhanced insulin sensitivity (P<0.001), and increased energy expenditure (P<0.05), without undergoing alterations in food intake and physical activity. Conclusion AHNAK plays a crucial role in body fat accumulation by regulating adipose tissue development via interaction with the SMAD1 protein and can be involved in metabolic homeostasis. PMID:26466345

  12. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism induces browning of white adipose tissue through impairment of autophagy and prevents adipocyte dysfunction in high-fat-diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Armani, Andrea; Cinti, Francesca; Marzolla, Vincenzo; Morgan, James; Cranston, Greg A; Antelmi, Antonella; Carpinelli, Giulia; Canese, Rossella; Pagotto, Uberto; Quarta, Carmelo; Malorni, Walter; Matarrese, Paola; Marconi, Matteo; Fabbri, Andrea; Rosano, Giuseppe; Cinti, Saverio; Young, Morag J; Caprio, Massimiliano

    2014-08-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) controls adipocyte function, but its role in the conversion of white adipose tissue (WAT) into thermogenic fat has not been elucidated. We investigated responses to the MR antagonists spironolactone (spiro; 20 mg/kg/d) and drospirenone (DRSP; 6 mg/kg/d) in C57BL/6 mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet for 90 d. DRSP and spiro curbed HF diet-induced impairment in glucose tolerance, and prevented body weight gain and white fat expansion. Notably, either MR antagonist induced up-regulation of brown adipocyte-specific transcripts and markedly increased protein levels of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in visceral and inguinal fat depots when compared with the HF diet group. Positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy confirmed acquisition of brown fat features in WAT. Interestingly, MR antagonists markedly reduced the autophagic rate both in murine preadipocytes in vitro (10(-5) M) and in WAT depots in vivo, with a concomitant increase in UCP1 protein expression. Moreover, the autophagy repressor bafilomycin A1 (10(-8) M) mimicked the effect of MR antagonists, increasing UCP1 protein expression in primary preadipocytes. Hence, we showed that adipocyte MR regulates brown remodeling of WAT through a modulation of autophagy. These results provide a rationale for the use of MR antagonists to prevent the adverse metabolic consequences of adipocyte dysfunction. © FASEB.

  13. Magnolia Bioactive Constituent 4-O-Methylhonokiol Prevents the Impairment of Cardiac Insulin Signaling and the Cardiac Pathogenesis in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiguo; Chen, Jing; Zhou, Shanshan; Wang, Shudong; Cai, Xiaohong; Conklin, Daniel J.; Kim, Ki-Soo; Kim, Ki Ho; Tan, Yi; Zheng, Yang; Kim, Young Heui; Cai, Lu

    2015-01-01

    In obesity, cardiac insulin resistance is a putative cause of cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction. In our previous study, we observed that Magnolia extract BL153 attenuated high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced cardiac pathogenic changes. In this study, we further investigated the protective effects of the BL153 bioactive constituent, 4-O-methylhonokiol (MH), against HFD-induced cardiac pathogenesis and its possible mechanisms. C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal diet or a HFD with gavage administration of vehicle, BL153, or MH (low or high dose) daily for 24 weeks. Treatment with MH attenuated HFD-induced obesity, as evidenced by body weight gain, and cardiac pathogenesis, as assessed by the heart weight and echocardiography. Mechanistically, MH treatment significantly reduced HFD-induced impairment of cardiac insulin signaling by preferentially augmenting Akt2 signaling. MH also inhibited cardiac expression of the inflammatory factors tumor necrosis factor-α and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and increased the phosphorylation of nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2) as well as the expression of a Nrf2 downstream target gene heme oxygenase-1. The increased Nrf2 signaling was associated with decreased oxidative stress and damage, as reflected by lowered malondialdehyde and 3-nitrotyrosine levels. Furthermore, MH reduced HFD-induced cardiac lipid accumulation along with lowering expression of cardiac fatty acid translocase/CD36 protein. These results suggest that MH, a bioactive constituent of Magnolia, prevents HFD-induced cardiac pathogenesis by attenuating the impairment of cardiac insulin signaling, perhaps via activation of Nrf2 and Akt2 signaling to attenuate CD36-mediated lipid accumulation and lipotoxicity. PMID:26157343

  14. Investigation of thymol effect on learning and memory impairment induced by intrahippocampal injection of amyloid beta peptide in high fat diet- fed rats.

    PubMed

    Asadbegi, Masoumeh; Yaghmaei, Parichehreh; Salehi, Iraj; Komaki, Alireza; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh

    2017-03-02

    Obesity and consumption of a high fat diet (HFD) are known to increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we have examined the protective and therapeutic effects of thymol (main monoterpene phenol found in thyme essential oil) on a HFD-fed rat model of AD. Fourty adult male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 5 groups:(n = 8 rats/group): group 1, control, consumed an ordinary diet, group 2 consumed a HFD for 8 weeks, then received phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) via intrahippocampal (IHP) injection, group 3 consumed HFD for 8 weeks, then received beta-amyloid (Aβ)1-42 via IHP injections to induce AD, group 4 consumed HFD for 8 weeks, then received Aβ1-42, and was treated by thymol (30 mg/kg in sunflower oil) daily for 4 weeks, and group 5 consumed HFD for 8 week, then received Aβ1-42 after what sunflower oil was administered by oral gavage daily for 4 weeks. Biochemical tests showed an impaired lipid profile and higher glucose levels upon consumption of HFD, which was ameliorated by thymol treatment. In behavioral results, spatial memory in group 3 was significantly impaired, but groups treated with thymol showed better spatial memory compared to group 3 (p ≤ 0.01). In histological results, formation of Aβ plaque in hippocampus of group 3 increased significantly compared to group 1 and group 2 (p ≤ 0.05), but group 4 showed decreased Aβ plaques compared to group 3 (p ≤ 0.01). In conclusion, thymol decreased the effects of Aβ on memory and could be considered as neuroprotective.

  15. Knockdown of neuropeptide Y in the dorsomedial hypothalamus reverses high-fat diet-induced obesity and impaired glucose tolerance in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yonwook J; Bi, Sheng

    2016-01-15

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) plays an important role in the regulation of energy balance. While DMH NPY overexpression causes hyperphagia and obesity in rats, knockdown of NPY in the DMH via adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated RNAi (AAVshNPY) ameliorates these alterations. Whether this knockdown has a therapeutic effect on obesity and glycemic disorder has yet to be determined. The present study sought to test this potential using a rat model of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and insulin resistance, mimicking human obesity with impaired glucose homeostasis. Rats had ad libitum access to rodent regular chow (RC) or HFD. Six weeks later, an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed for verifying HFD-induced glucose intolerance. After verification, obese rats received bilateral DMH injections of AAVshNPY or the control vector AAVshCTL, and OGTT and insulin tolerance test (ITT) were performed at 16 and 18 wk after viral injection (23 and 25 wk on HFD), respectively. Rats were killed at 26 wk on HFD. We found that AAVshCTL rats on HFD remained hyperphagic, obese, glucose intolerant, and insulin resistant relative to lean control RC-fed rats receiving DMH injection of AAVshCTL, whereas these alterations were reversed in NPY knockdown rats fed a HFD. NPY knockdown rats exhibited normal food intake, body weight, glucose tolerance, and insulin sensitivity, as seen in lean control rats. Together, these results demonstrate a therapeutic action of DMH NPY knockdown against obesity and impaired glucose homeostasis in rats, providing a potential target for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Exercise prevents high-fat diet-induced impairment of flexible memory expression in the water maze and modulates adult hippocampal neurogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Klein, C; Jonas, W; Iggena, D; Empl, L; Rivalan, M; Wiedmer, P; Spranger, J; Hellweg, R; Winter, Y; Steiner, B

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is currently one of the most serious threats to human health in the western civilization. A growing body of evidence suggests that obesity is associated with cognitive dysfunction. Physical exercise not only improves fitness but it has also been shown in human and animal studies to increase hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. High-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and physical exercise both modulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Adult neurogenesis has been demonstrated to play a role in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory, particularly flexible memory expression. Here, we investigated the effects of twelve weeks of HFD vs. control diet (CD) and voluntary physical activity (wheel running; -R) vs. inactivity (sedentary; -S) on hippocampal neurogenesis and spatial learning and flexible memory function in female C57Bl/6 mice assessed in the Morris water maze. HFD was initiated either in adolescent mice combined with long-term concurrent exercise (preventive approach) or in young adult mice with 14days of subsequent exercise (therapeutic approach). HFD resulted in impaired flexible memory expression only when initiated in adolescent (HFD-S) but not in young adult mice, which was successfully prevented by concurrent exercise (HFD-R). Histological analysis revealed a reduction of immature neurons in the hippocampus of the memory-impaired HFD-S mice of the preventive approach. Long-term physical exercise also led to accelerated spatial learning during the acquisition period, which was accompanied by increased numbers of newborn mature neurons (HFD-R and CD-R). Short-term exercise of 14days in the therapeutic group was not effective in improving spatial learning or memory. We show that (1) alterations in learning and flexible memory expression are accompanied by changes in the number of neuronal cells at different maturation stages; (2) these neuronal cells are in turn differently affected by HFD; (3) adolescent mice are specifically susceptible to the

  17. Increased intramyocellular lipid/impaired insulin sensitivity is associated with altered lipid metabolic genes in muscle of high responders to a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Kakehi, Saori; Tamura, Yoshifumi; Takeno, Kageumi; Sakurai, Yuko; Kawaguchi, Minako; Watanabe, Takahiro; Funayama, Takashi; Sato, Fumihiko; Ikeda, Shin-Ichi; Kanazawa, Akio; Fujitani, Yoshio; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Watada, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) is recognized as an important determinant of insulin resistance, and is increased by a high-fat diet (HFD). However, the effects of HFD on IMCL and insulin sensitivity are highly variable. The aim of this study was to identify the genes in muscle that are related to this inter-individual variation. Fifty healthy men were recruited for this study. Before and after HFD for 3 days, IMCL levels in the tibialis anterior were measured by (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and peripheral insulin sensitivity was evaluated by glucose infusion rate (GIR) during the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Subjects who showed a large increase in IMCL and a large decrease in GIR by HFD were classified as high responders (HRs), and subjects who showed a small increase in IMCL and a small decrease in GIR were classified as low responders (LRs). In five subjects from each group, the gene expression profile of the vastus lateralis muscle was analyzed by DNA microarray analysis. Before HFD, gene expression profiles related to lipid metabolism were comparable between the two groups. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis demonstrated that five gene sets related to lipid metabolism were upregulated by HFD in the HR group but not in the LR group. Changes in gene expression patterns were confirmed by qRT-PCR using more samples (LR, n = 9; HR, n = 11). These results suggest that IMCL accumulation/impaired insulin sensitivity after HFD is closely associated with changes in the expression of genes related to lipid metabolism in muscle. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Characterization of the impaired glucose homeostasis produced in C57BL/6 mice by chronic exposure to arsenic and high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Paul, David S; Walton, Felecia S; Saunders, R Jesse; Stýblo, Miroslav

    2011-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Obesity is the leading cause of type 2 diabetes. Growing evidence suggests that chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) also produces symptoms consistent with diabetes. Thus, iAs exposure may further increase the risk of diabetes in obese individuals. Our goal was to characterize diabetogenic effects of iAs exposure and high-fat diet (HFD) in weaned C57BL/6 mice. Mice were fed HFD or low-fat diet (LFD) while exposed to iAs in drinking water (25 or 50 ppm As) for 20 weeks; control HFD and LFD mice drank deionized water. Body mass and adiposity were monitored throughout the study. We measured glucose and insulin levels in fasting blood and in blood collected during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) to evaluate the diabetogenic effects of the treatment. Control mice fed HFD accumulated more fat, had higher fasting blood glucose, and were more insulin resistant than were control LFD mice. However, these diabetes indicators decreased with iAs intake in a dose-dependent manner. OGTT showed impaired glucose tolerance for both control and iAs-treated HFD mice compared with respective LFD mice. Notably, glucose intolerance was more pronounced in HFD mice treated with iAs despite a significant decrease in adiposity, fasting blood glucose, and insulin resistance. Our data suggest that iAs exposure acts synergistically with HFD-induced obesity in producing glucose intolerance. However, mechanisms of the diabetogenic effects of iAs exposure may differ from the mechanisms associated with the obesity-induced type 2 diabetes.

  19. Long-term, but not short-term high-fat diet induces fiber composition changes and impaired contractile force in mouse fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Eshima, Hiroaki; Tamura, Yoshifumi; Kakehi, Saori; Kurebayashi, Nagomi; Murayama, Takashi; Nakamura, Kyoko; Kakigi, Ryo; Okada, Takao; Sakurai, Takashi; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Watada, Hirotaka

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of a short-term and long-term high-fat diet (HFD) on morphological and functional features of fast-twitch skeletal muscle. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a HFD (60% fat) for 4 weeks (4-week HFD) or 12 weeks (12-week HFD). Subsequently, the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus muscle was isolated, and the composition of muscle fiber type, expression levels of proteins involved in muscle contraction, and force production on electrical stimulation were analyzed. The 12-week HFD, but not the 4-week HFD, resulted in a decreased muscle tetanic force on 100 Hz stimulation compared with control (5.1 ± 1.4 N/g in the 12-week HFD vs. 7.5 ± 1.7 N/g in the control group; P < 0.05), whereas muscle weight and cross-sectional area were not altered after both HFD protocols. Morphological analysis indicated that the percentage of type IIx myosin heavy chain fibers, mitochondrial oxidative enzyme activity, and intramyocellular lipid levels increased in the 12-week HFD group, but not in the 4-week HFD group, compared with controls (P < 0.05). No changes in the expression levels of calcium handling-related proteins and myofibrillar proteins (myosin heavy chain and actin) were detected in the HFD models, whereas fast-troponin T-protein expression was decreased in the 12-week HFD group, but not in the 4-week HFD group (P < 0.05). These findings indicate that a long-term HFD, but not a short-term HFD, impairs contractile force in fast-twitch muscle fibers. Given that skeletal muscle strength largely depends on muscle fiber type, the impaired muscle contractile force by a HFD might result from morphological changes of fiber type composition. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  20. A low-carbohydrate high-fat diet decreases lean mass and impairs cardiac function in pair-fed female C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Jessica; Ericsson, Madelene; Joibari, Masoumeh Motamedi; Anderson, Fredrick; Carlsson, Leif; Nilsson, Stefan K; Sjödin, Anna; Burén, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Excess body fat is a major health issue and a risk factor for the development of numerous chronic diseases. Low-carbohydrate diets like the Atkins Diet are popular for rapid weight loss, but the long-term consequences remain the subject of debate. The Scandinavian low-carbohydrate high-fat (LCHF) diet, which has been popular in Scandinavian countries for about a decade, has very low carbohydrate content (~5 E %) but is rich in fat and includes a high proportion of saturated fatty acids. Here we investigated the metabolic and physiological consequences of a diet with a macronutrient composition similar to the Scandinavian LCHF diet and its effects on the organs, tissues, and metabolism of weight stable mice. Female C57BL/6J mice were iso-energetically pair-fed for 4 weeks with standard chow or a LCHF diet. We measured body composition using echo MRI and the aerobic capacity before and after 2 and 4 weeks on diet. Cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography before and after 4 weeks on diet. The metabolic rate was measured by indirect calorimetry the fourth week of the diet. Mice were sacrificed after 4 weeks and the organ weight, triglyceride levels, and blood chemistry were analyzed, and the expression of key ketogenic, metabolic, hormonal, and inflammation genes were measured in the heart, liver, and adipose tissue depots of the mice using real-time PCR. The increase in body weight of mice fed a LCHF diet was similar to that in controls. However, while control mice maintained their body composition throughout the study, LCHF mice gained fat mass at the expense of lean mass after 2 weeks. The LCHF diet increased cardiac triglyceride content, impaired cardiac function, and reduced aerobic capacity. It also induced pronounced alterations in gene expression and substrate metabolism, indicating a unique metabolic state. Pair-fed mice eating LCHF increased their percentage of body fat at the expense of lean mass already after 2 weeks, and after 4 weeks the

  1. Oral salmon calcitonin protects against impaired fasting glycemia, glucose intolerance, and obesity induced by high-fat diet and ovariectomy in rats.

    PubMed

    Feigh, Michael; Andreassen, Kim V; Hjuler, Sara T; Nielsen, Rasmus H; Christiansen, Claus; Henriksen, Kim; Karsdal, Morten A

    2013-07-01

    Oral salmon calcitonin (sCT) has demonstrated clinical efficacy in treating osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. The postmenopausal state is also associated with obesity-related insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate the preventive effects of oral sCT on energy and glucose homeostasis in high-fat diet (HFD)- and ovariectomy (OVX)-induced obese rats. Furthermore, the weight-regulatory and gluco-regulatory effects of short-term oral sCT intervention on HFD-induced obese rats were explored. For prevention, female rats exposed to HFD with or without OVX were treated with oral sCT for 5 weeks. As intervention, HFD-induced obese male rats were treated with oral sCT for 4 days. Body weight, food intake, and plasma glucose, insulin, and leptin levels were measured, and the clinical homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index was calculated. In addition, oral glucose tolerance was evaluated in the systemic and portal circulations. For prevention, oral sCT reduced body weight by ∼16% to 19% (P < 0.001), reduced plasma insulin and leptin by ∼50%, and improved impaired fasting glycemia (P < 0.05) concomitantly with amelioration of IR (HOMA-IR; P < 0.01) in HFD- and OVX-induced obesity. Furthermore, oral sCT significantly reduced the incremental area under the curve for plasma glucose and insulin by ∼40% and ∼70%, respectively, during glucose tolerance testing. As intervention in HFD-induced obese rats, oral sCT reduced body weight, fasting glycemia, and insulinemia in conjunction with HOMA-IR (P < 0.001). Finally, oral sCT alleviated glucose intolerance predominantly in the portal circulation. Oral sCT treatment displays weight-regulatory and glucoregulatory efficacy in HFD- and OVX-induced obese rats, indicating the clinical usefulness of oral sCT in postmenopausal obesity-related IR and type 2 diabetes.

  2. Fish oil supplementation to rats fed high-fat diet during pregnancy prevents development of impaired insulin sensitivity in male adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Albert, Benjamin B; Vickers, Mark H; Gray, Clint; Reynolds, Clare M; Segovia, Stephanie A; Derraik, José G B; Garg, Manohar L; Cameron-Smith, David; Hofman, Paul L; Cutfield, Wayne S

    2017-07-17

    We examined whether maternal fish oil supplementation during pregnancy could prevent development of insulin resistance in adult male offspring of rat dams fed a high-fat diet. Time-mated Sprague-Dawley rat dams were randomised into four treatment groups: Con-Con, dams fed a control diet (fat: 15% kcal) and administered water by gavage; Con-FO, control diet with unoxidised fish oil by gavage; HF-Con, high-fat diet (fat: 45% kcal) and water by gavage; and HF-FO, high-fat diet and unoxidised fish oil by gavage. Dams were fed the allocated diet ad libitum during pregnancy and lactation, but daily gavage occurred only during pregnancy. After weaning, male offspring consumed a chow diet ad libitum until adulthood. Maternal high-fat diet led to increased food consumption, adiposity, systolic blood pressure, and triglycerides and plasma leptin in adult HF-Con offspring. HF-Con offspring also exhibited lower insulin sensitivity than Con-Con rats. Male offspring from HF-FO group were similar to HF-Con regarding food consumption and most metabolic parameters. However, insulin sensitivity in the HF-FO group was improved relative to the HF-Con offspring. Supplementation with unoxidised n-3 PUFA rich oils in the setting of a maternal obesogenic diet improved insulin sensitivity, but had no impact on body composition of adult male offspring.

  3. Oligomeric cocoa procyanidins possess enhanced bioactivity compared to monomeric and polymeric cocoa procyanidins for preventing the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and impaired glucose tolerance during high-fat feeding.

    PubMed

    Dorenkott, Melanie R; Griffin, Laura E; Goodrich, Katheryn M; Thompson-Witrick, Katherine A; Fundaro, Gabrielle; Ye, Liyun; Stevens, Joseph R; Ali, Mostafa; O'Keefe, Sean F; Hulver, Matthew W; Neilson, Andrew P

    2014-03-12

    There is interest in the potential of cocoa flavanols, including monomers and procyanidins, to prevent obesity and type-2 diabetes. Fermentation and processing of cocoa beans influence the qualitative and quantitative profiles of individual cocoa constituents. Little is known regarding how different cocoa flavanols contribute to inhibition of obesity and type-2 diabetes. The objective of this study was to compare the impacts of long-term dietary exposure to cocoa flavanol monomers, oligomers, and polymers on the effects of high-fat feeding. Mice were fed a high-fat diet supplemented with either a cocoa flavanol extract or a flavanol fraction enriched with monomeric, oligomeric, or polymeric procyanidins for 12 weeks. The oligomer-rich fraction proved to be most effective in preventing weight gain, fat mass, impaired glucose tolerance, and insulin resistance in this model. This is the first long-term feeding study to examine the relative activities of cocoa constituents on diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

  4. High-Fructose Intake Impairs the Hepatic Hypolipidemic Effects of a High-Fat Fish-Oil Diet in C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Joshua S; Nick, Tayler N; Seija, Andrew; Poole, Kaylee E; Stout, Kelsey B

    2016-12-01

    Overnutrition of saturated fats and fructose is one of the major factors for the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Because omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3fa) have established lipid lowering properties, we tested the hypothesis that n-3fa prevents high-fat and fructose-induced fatty liver disease in mice. Male C57BL/6J mice were randomly assigned to one of the following diet groups for 14 weeks: normal diet (ND), high-fat lard-based diet (HFD), HFD with fructose (HFD + Fru), high-fat fish-oil diet (FOD), or FOD + Fru. Despite for the development of obesity and insulin resistance, FOD had 65.3% lower (P < 0.001) hepatic triglyceride levels than HFD + Fru, which was blunted to a 38.5% difference (P = 0.173) in FOD + Fru. The lower hepatic triglyceride levels were associated with a lower expression of lipogenic genes LXRα and FASN, as well as the expression of genes associated with fatty acid uptake and triglyceride synthesis, CD36 and SCD1, respectively. Conversely, the blunted hypotriglyceride effect of FOD + Fru was associated with a higher expression of CD36 and SCD1. During overnutrition, a diet rich in n-3fa may prevent the severity of hepatic steatosis; however, when juxtaposed with a diet high in fructose, the deleterious effects of overnutrition blunted the hypolipidemic effects of n-3fa.

  5. High-fat meal effect on LDL, HDL, and VLDL particle size and number in the Genetics of Lipid-Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (GOLDN): an interventional study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Postprandial lipemia (PPL) is likely a risk factor for cardiovascular disease but these changes have not been well described and characterized in a large cohort. We assessed acute changes in the size and concentration of total and subclasses of LDL, HDL, and VLDL particles in response to a high-fat ...

  6. A 5-day high-fat, high-calorie diet impairs insulin sensitivity in healthy, young South Asian men but not in Caucasian men.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Leontine E H; van Schinkel, Linda D; Guigas, Bruno; Streefland, Trea C M; Jonker, Jacqueline T; van Klinken, Jan B; van der Zon, Gerard C M; Lamb, Hildo J; Smit, Johannes W A; Pijl, Hanno; Meinders, A Edo; Jazet, Ingrid M

    2014-01-01

    South Asians (SAs) develop type 2 diabetes at a younger age and lower BMI compared with Caucasians (Cs). The underlying cause is still poorly understood but might result from an innate inability to adapt to the Westernized diet. This study aimed to compare the metabolic adaptation to a high-fat, high-calorie (HFHC) diet between both ethnicities. Twelve healthy, young lean male SAs and 12 matched Cs underwent a two-step hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp with skeletal muscle biopsies and indirect calorimetry before and after a 5-day HFHC diet. Hepatic triglyceride content (HTG) and abdominal fat distribution were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. At baseline, SAs had higher insulin clamp levels than Cs, indicating reduced insulin clearance rate. Despite the higher insulin levels, endogenous glucose production was comparable between groups, suggesting lower hepatic insulin sensitivity in SAs. Furthermore, a 5-day HFHC diet decreased the insulin-stimulated (nonoxidative) glucose disposal rate only in SA. In skeletal muscle, no significant differences were found between groups in insulin/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, metabolic gene expression, and mitochondrial respiratory chain content. Furthermore, no differences in (mobilization of) HTG and abdominal fat were detected. We conclude that HFHC feeding rapidly induces insulin resistance only in SAs. Thus, distinct adaptation to Western food may partly explain their propensity to develop type 2 diabetes.

  7. High-fat diet during pregnancy and lactation impairs the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in the liver and white adipose tissue of mouse offspring.

    PubMed

    Payolla, Tanyara Baliani; Lemes, Simone Ferreira; de Fante, Thaís; Reginato, Andressa; Mendes da Silva, Cristiano; de Oliveira Micheletti, Thayana; Rodrigues, Hosana Gomes; Torsoni, Adriana Souza; Milanski, Marciane; Torsoni, Marcio Alberto

    2016-02-15

    Cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP) prevents inflammatory cytokines production. The main was to evaluate the effect of maternal obesity on cholinergic pathway in the offspring. Female mice were subjected to either standard chow (SC) or high-fat diet (HFD) during pregnancy and the lactation period. After weaning, only male offspring from HFD dams (HFD-O) and from SC dams (SC-O) were fed the SC diet. Key proteins of the CAP were downregulated and serum TNF-α was elevated in the HFD-O mice. STAT3 and NF-κB activation in HFD-O mice ICV injected with nicotine (agonist) were lower than SC-O mice. Basal cholinesterase activity was upregulated in HFD-O mice in both investigated tissues. Lipopolysaccharide increased TNF-α and IL-1β expression in the liver and WAT of SC-O mice, but this effect was greater in HFD-O mice. In conclusion these changes exacerbated cytokine production in response to LPS and contributed to the reduced sensitivity of the CAP. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. Influence of high carbohydrate versus high fat diet in ozone induced pulmonary injury and systemic metabolic impairment in a Brown Norway (BN) rat model of healthy aging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Air pollution has been recently linked to the increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome. It has been postulated that dietary risk factors might exacerbate air pollution-induced metabolic impairment. We have recently reported that ozone exposure induces acute systemic ...

  9. Influence of high carbohydrate versus high fat diet in ozone induced pulmonary injury and systemic metabolic impairment in a Brown Norway (BN) rat model of healthy aging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Air pollution has been recently linked to the increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome. It has been postulated that dietary risk factors might exacerbate air pollution-induced metabolic impairment. We have recently reported that ozone exposure induces acute systemic ...

  10. High fat diet induced-obesity facilitates anxiety-like behaviors due to GABAergic impairment within the dorsomedial hypothalamus in rats.

    PubMed

    de Noronha, Sylvana Rendeiro; Campos, Glenda Viggiano; Abreu, Aline Rezende; de Souza, Aline Arlindo; Chianca, Deoclécio A; de Menezes, Rodrigo C

    2017-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are conditions associated with an overall range of clinical health consequences, and they could be involved with the development of neuropsychiatric diseases, such as generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic disorder (PD). A crucial brain nuclei involved on the physiological functions and behavioral responses, especially fear, anxiety and panic, is the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH). However, the mechanisms underlying the process whereby the DMH is involved in behavioral changes in obese rats still remains unclear. The current study further investigates the relation between obesity and generalized anxiety, by investigating the GABAA sensitivity to pharmacological manipulation within the DMH in obese rats during anxiety conditions. Male Wistar rats were divided in two experimental groups: the first was fed a control diet (CD; 11% w/w) and second was fed a high fat diet (HFD; 45% w/w). Animals were randomly treated with muscimol, a GABAA agonist and bicuculline methiodide (BMI), a GABAA antagonist. Inhibitory avoidance and escape behaviors were investigated using the Elevated T-Maze (ETM) apparatus. Our results revealed that the obesity facilitated inhibitory avoidance acquisition, suggesting a positive relation between obesity and the development of an anxiety-like state. The injection of muscimol (an anxiolytic drug), within the DMH, increased the inhibitory avoidance latency in obese animals (featuring an anxiogenic state). Besides, muscimol prolonged the escape latency and controlling the possible panic-like behavior in these animals. Injection of BMI into the DMH was ineffective to produce an anxiety-like effect in obese animals opposing the results observed in lean animals. These findings support the hypotheses that obese animals are susceptible to develop anxiety-like behaviors, probably through changes in the GABAergic neurotransmission within the DMH.

  11. Impaired fear extinction retention and increased anxiety-like behaviours induced by limited daily access to a high-fat/high-sugar diet in male rats: Implications for diet-induced prefrontal cortex dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kathryn D; Reichelt, Amy C

    2016-12-01

    Anxiety disorders and obesity are both common in youth and young adults. Despite increasing evidence that over-consumption of palatable high-fat/high-sugar "junk" foods leads to adverse neurocognitive outcomes, little is known about the effects of palatable diets on emotional memories and fear regulation. In the present experiments we examined the effects of daily 2h consumption of a high-fat/high-sugar (HFHS) food across adolescence on fear inhibition and anxiety-like behaviour in young adult rats. Rats exposed to the HFHS diet exhibited impaired retention of fear extinction and increased anxiety-like behaviour in an emergence test compared to rats fed a standard diet. The HFHS-fed rats displayed diet-induced changes in prefrontal cortex (PFC) function which were detected by altered expression of GABAergic parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory interneurons and the stable transcription factor ΔFosB which accumulates in the PFC in response to chronic stimuli. Immunohistochemical analyses of the medial PFC revealed that animals fed the HFHS diet had fewer parvalbumin-expressing cells and increased levels of FosB/ΔFosB expression in the infralimbic cortex, a region implicated in the consolidation of fear extinction. There was a trend towards increased IBA-1 immunoreactivity, a marker of microglial activation, in the infralimbic cortex after HFHS diet exposure but expression of the extracellular glycoprotein reelin was unaffected. These findings demonstrate that a HFHS diet during adolescence is associated with reductions of prefrontal parvalbumin neurons and impaired fear inhibition in adulthood. Adverse effects of HFHS diets on the mechanisms of fear regulation may precipitate a vulnerability in obese individuals to the development of anxiety disorders.

  12. Short-term high-fat diet increases macrophage markers in skeletal muscle accompanied by impaired insulin signalling in healthy male subjects.

    PubMed

    Boon, Mariëtte R; Bakker, Leontine E H; Haks, Mariëlle C; Quinten, Edwin; Schaart, Gert; Van Beek, Lianne; Wang, Yanan; Van Schinkel, Linda; Van Harmelen, Vanessa; Meinders, A Edo; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Van Dijk, Ko Willems; Guigas, Bruno; Jazet, Ingrid M; Rensen, Patrick C N

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage markers in skeletal muscle of obese subjects are elevated and inversely relate to insulin sensitivity. The present study aimed to investigate whether short-term high-fat high-calorie (HFHC) diet already increases macrophage markers and affects glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle of healthy lean subjects. Muscle biopsies were obtained from 24 healthy lean young men before and after a 5-day HFHC-diet. mRNA expression levels of relevant genes in muscle and glucose, insulin, C-peptide and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) levels in plasma were measured. In addition, we assessed hepatic triacylglycerol ('triglyceride') (HTG) content by magnetic resonance spectroscopy and subcutaneous white adipose tissue (sWAT) biopsies were analysed histologically from a subset of subjects (n=8). A 5-day HFHC-diet markedly increased skeletal muscle mRNA expression of the general macrophage markers CD68 (3.7-fold, P<0.01) and CD14 (3.2-fold, P<0.01), as well as the M1 macrophage markers MARCO (11.2-fold, P<0.05), CD11c (1.8-fold, P<0.05) and MRC1 (1.7-fold, P<0.05). This was accompanied by down-regulation of SLC2A4 and GYS1 mRNA expression, and elevated plasma glucose (+4%, P<0.001) and insulin (+55%, P<0.001) levels together with homoeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (+48%, P<0.001), suggesting development of insulin resistance (IR). Furthermore, the HFHC-diet markedly increased HTG (+118%, P<0.001) and plasma CETP levels (+21%, P<0.001), a marker of liver macrophage content, whereas sWAT macrophage content remained unchanged. In conclusion, short-term HFHC-diet increases expression of macrophage markers in skeletal muscle of healthy men accompanied by reduced markers of insulin signalling and development of IR. Therefore, recruitment of macrophages into muscle may be an early event in development of IR in response to short-term HFHC-feeding.

  13. High-fat simple carbohydrate (HFSC) diet impairs hypothalamic and corpus striatal serotonergic metabolic pathway in metabolic syndrome (MetS) induced C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Stephen, DSouza Serena; Abraham, Asha

    2017-07-26

    To study the effect of specially formulated high-fat simple carbohydrate diet (HFSC) on the serotonin metabolic pathway in male C57BL/6J mice. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that specially formulated HFSC induces metabolic syndrome in C57BL/6J mice. In the present investigation, 5-hydroxytryptophan, serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were analyzed in two brain regions (hypothalamus, corpus striatum), urine and plasma of HFSC-fed mice on a monthly basis up to 5 months using high-performance liquid chromatography fitted with electrochemical detector. The data were analyzed using Graph pad Prism v7.3 by two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's test (to assess the effect of time on the serotonergic metabolic pathway). HFSC feed was observed to lower the hypothalamic serotonergic tone as compared to the age-matched control-fed C57BL/6J mice. Although the hypothalamic serotonergic tone was unaltered over time due to consumption of diet per se, hypothalamic 5-HTP levels were observed to be lower on consumption of HFSC feed over duration of 5 months as compared to 1st month of consumption of HFSC feed. The striatal 5-HTP levels were lowered in the HFSC-fed mice after 4 months of feeding as compared to the age-matched control-fed mice. The striatal 5-HTP levels were also lower in both control and HFSC-fed mice due to consumption of the respective diet over a duration of 5 months. Increased plasma 5-HTP levels were observed due to consumption of HFSC feed over duration of 5 months in the HFSC-fed group. However, higher breakdown of serotonin was observed in both the plasma and urine of HFSC-fed C57BL/6J mice as per the turnover studies. The central and peripheral serotonergic pathway is affected differentially by both the type of diet consumed and the duration for which the diet is consumed. The hypothalamic, striatal and plasma serotonergic pathway were altered both by the type of feed consumed and the duration of feeding. The urine serotonergic pathway was

  14. Consumption of high-fat meal containing cheese compared with vegan alternative lowers postprandial C-reactive protein in overweight and obese individuals with metabolic abnormalities: a randomized controlled cross-over study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dietary recommendations suggest decreased consumption of SFA to minimize CVD risk; however, not all foods rich in SFA are equivalent. To evaluate the effects of SFA in a dairy food matrix, as Cheddar cheese, v. SFA from a vegan-alternative test meal on postprandial inflammatory markers, a randomized...

  15. Glucosamine enhances body weight gain and reduces insulin response in mice fed chow diet but mitigates obesity, insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance in mice high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ji-Sun; Park, Ji-Won; Nam, Moon-Suk; Cho, Hyeongjin; Han, Inn-Oc

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the potential of glucosamine (GlcN) to affect body weight gain and insulin sensitivity in mice normal and at risk for developing diabetes. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed either chow diet (CD) or a high fat diet (HFD) and the half of mice from CD and HFD provided with a solution of 10% (w/v) GlcN. Total cholesterol and nonesterified free fatty acid levels were determined. Glucose tolerance test and insulin tolerance test were performed. HepG2 human hepatoma cells or differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes were stimulated with insulin under normal (5 mM) or high glucose (25 mM) conditions. Effect of GlcN on 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) uptake was determined. JNK and Akt phosphorylation and nucleocytoplasmic protein O-GlcNAcylation were assayed by Western blotting. GlcN administration stimulated body weight gain (6.58±0.82 g vs. 11.1±0.42 g), increased white adipose tissue fat mass (percentage of bodyweight, 3.7±0.32 g vs. 5.61±0.34 g), and impaired the insulin response in livers of mice fed CD. However, GlcN treatment in mice fed HFD led to reduction of body weight gain (18.02±0.66 g vs. 16.22±0.96 g) and liver weight (2.27±0.1 vs. 1.85±0.12 g). Furthermore, obesity-induced insulin resistance and impaired Akt insulin signaling in the liver were alleviated by GlcN administration. GlcN inhibited the insulin response under low (5 mM) glucose conditions, whereas it restored the insulin response for Akt phosphorylation under high (25 mM) glucose conditions in HepG2 and 3T3-L1 cells. Uptake of 2-DG increased upon GlcN treatment under 5 mM glucose compared to control, whereas insulin-stimulated 2-DG uptake decreased under 5 mM and increased under 25 mM glucose in differentiated 3T3-L1 cells. Our results show that GlcN increased body weight gain and reduced the insulin response for glucose maintenance when fed to normal CD mice, whereas it alleviated body weight gain and insulin resistance in HFD mice. Therefore, the current data support the integrative

  16. Obese adolescents show impaired meal responses of the appetite-regulating hormones ghrelin and PYY.

    PubMed

    Mittelman, Steven D; Klier, Katie; Braun, Sharon; Azen, Colleen; Geffner, Mitchell E; Buchanan, Thomas A

    2010-05-01

    Ghrelin and peptide YY (PYY) stimulate hunger and satiety, respectively. The physiology of these hormones during normal meal intake remains unclear. This study was designed to compare the responses of these two hormones to meal intake between lean and obese Hispanic adolescents. A total of 10 obese and 7 lean Hispanic youth, aged 11-14 years, consumed two mixed meals, one small and one large, during which plasma measurements of active and total ghrelin and total PYY were obtained. Obese subjects tended to consume more calories during the small meal than lean subjects, although this did not reach statistical significance. Intake of the small meal significantly suppressed active ghrelin and stimulated PYY levels in the lean subjects, and these changes were further accentuated by the large meals. In obese subjects, the suppression of active ghrelin and stimulation of PYY by caloric intake were blunted. Interestingly, a paradoxical stimulation of active ghrelin levels was noted during the small meals in both lean and obese subjects. This stimulation was not seen during the larger meals in lean subjects, but remained present in the obese subjects. Thus, meal-related changes in active ghrelin and PYY are blunted in obese as compared to lean Hispanic subjects. This blunting could contribute to the development or worsening of obesity.

  17. High-fat feeding alters the clock synchronization to light.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Jorge; Pévet, Paul; Challet, Etienne

    2008-12-15

    High-fat feeding in rodents leads to metabolic abnormalities mimicking the human metabolic syndrome, including obesity and insulin resistance. These metabolic diseases are associated with altered temporal organization of many physiological functions. The master circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei controls most physiological functions and metabolic processes. Furthermore, under certain conditions of feeding (hypocaloric diet), metabolic cues are capable of altering the suprachiasmatic clock's responses to light. To determine whether high-fat feeding (hypercaloric diet) can also affect resetting properties of the suprachiasmatic clock, we investigated photic synchronization in mice fed a high-fat or chow (low-fat) diet for 3 months, using wheel-running activity and body temperature rhythms as daily phase markers (i.e. suprachiasmatic clock's hands). Compared with the control diet, mice fed with the high-fat diet exhibited increased body mass index, hyperleptinaemia, higher blood glucose, and increased insulinaemia. Concomitantly, high-fat feeding led to impaired adjustment to local time by photic resetting. At the behavioural and physiological levels, these alterations include slower rate of re-entrainment of behavioural and body temperature rhythms after 'jet-lag' test (6 h advanced light-dark cycle) and reduced phase-advancing responses to light. At a molecular level, light-induced phase shifts have been correlated, within suprachiasmatic cells, with a high induction of c-FOS, the protein product of immediate early gene c-fos, and phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases I/II (P-ERK). In mice fed a high-fat diet, photic induction of both c-FOS and P-ERK in the suprachiasmatic nuclei was markedly reduced. Taken together, the present data demonstrate that high-fat feeding modifies circadian synchronization to light.

  18. Blueberry supplementation improves memory in middle-aged mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Carey, Amanda N; Gomes, Stacey M; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    2014-05-07

    Consuming a high-fat diet may result in behavioral deficits similar to those observed in aging animals. It has been demonstrated that blueberry supplementation can allay age-related behavioral deficits. To determine if supplementation of a high-fat diet with blueberries offers protection against putative high-fat diet-related declines, 9-month-old C57Bl/6 mice were maintained on low-fat (10% fat calories) or high-fat (60% fat calories) diets with and without 4% freeze-dried blueberry powder. Novel object recognition memory was impaired by the high-fat diet; after 4 months on the high-fat diet, mice spent 50% of their time on the novel object in the testing trial, performing no greater than chance performance. Blueberry supplementation prevented recognition memory deficits after 4 months on the diets, as mice on this diet spent 67% of their time on the novel object. After 5 months on the diets, mice consuming the high-fat diet passed through the platform location less often than mice on low-fat diets during probe trials on days 2 and 3 of Morris water maze testing, whereas mice consuming the high-fat blueberry diet passed through the platform location as often as mice on the low-fat diets. This study is a first step in determining if incorporating more nutrient-dense foods into a high-fat diet can allay cognitive dysfunction.

  19. Differential Effects of Meal Challenges on Cognition, Metabolism, and Biomarkers for Apolipoprotein E ɛ4 Carriers and Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Angela J; Bayer, Jennifer L; Baker, Laura D; Cholerton, Brenna; VanFossen, Brian; Trittschuh, Emily; Rissman, Robert A; Donohue, Michael C; Moghadam, Setareh H; Plymate, Stephen R; Craft, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    High intake of saturated fat (SF) and glycemic index (GI) foods is a risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer's disease. Meal challenges may elucidate mechanisms that contribute to this risk, enabling development of targeted interventions. To assess cognitive and metabolic changes after a meal high in SF and GI calories (HIGH) versus a meal low in these macronutrients (LOW) in older adults with and without cognitive impairment, and with and without the apolipoprotein E4 risk factor. 46 adults with either cognitive impairment (CI) or normal cognition (NC) ingested a LOW (25% total fat, 7% SF, GI <55) and a HIGH meal (50% total fat, 25% SF, GI >70) in a blinded random fashion. Participants then underwent cognitive testing and blood sampling for metabolic and Alzheimer's disease biomarkers. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA and Spearman correlations. E4-adults with NC demonstrated lower delayed memory scores after the HIGH compared to the LOW meal, whereas normal E4+ and CI E4- groups had higher scores after the HIGH meal (ANOVA p = 0.03). These findings were associated with meal-induced changes in glucose (p = 0.05), insulin (p = 0.004), triglycerides (p <  0.01), and plasma Aβ42 (p = 0.05). These preliminary data suggest that cognitive performance of adults without CI may worsen following high SF and sugar meals, whereas adults with CI or those at risk for CI due to E4 status may benefit acutely from such meals. Furthermore, plasma Aβ was affected by meal type, suggesting a relationship between metabolic response and amyloid regulation.

  20. Short-term high-fat diet increases postprandial trimethylamine-N-oxide in humans.

    PubMed

    Boutagy, Nabil E; Neilson, Andrew P; Osterberg, Kristin L; Smithson, Andrew T; Englund, Tessa R; Davy, Brenda M; Hulver, Matthew W; Davy, Kevin P

    2015-10-01

    The gut microbiota plays an obligatory role in the metabolism of nutrients containing trimethylamine moieties, such as L-carnitine and choline, leading to the production of the proatherogenic trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO). We hypothesized that a short-term, high-fat diet would increase fasting and postprandial plasma concentrations of TMAO in response to a high-fat meal challenge. Following a 2-week eucaloric control diet, 10 nonobese men (18-30 years) consumed a eucaloric, high-fat diet (55% fat) for 5 days. Plasma TMAO was measured after a 12-hour fast and each hour after for 4 hours following a high-fat meal (63% fat) at baseline and after the high-fat diet using ultraperformance liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry. Fasting plasma TMAO did not increase significantly following the high-fat diet (1.83 ± 0.21 vs 1.6 ± 0.24 μmol/L). However, plasma TMAO was higher at hour 1 (2.15 ± 0.28 vs 1.7 ± 0.30 μmol/L), hour 2 (2.3 ± 0.29 vs 1.8 ± 0.32 μmol/L), hour 3 (2.4 ± 0.34 vs 1.58 ± 0.19 μmol/L), and hour 4 (2.51 ± 0.33 vs 1.5 ± 0.12 μmol/L) (all P < .05) following the high-fat diet as compared with the baseline postprandial response. In conclusion, a short-term, high-fat diet does not increase fasting plasma TMAO concentrations but appears to increase postprandial TMAO concentrations in healthy, nonobese, young men. Future studies are needed to determine the mechanisms responsible for these observations.

  1. Caffeinated coffee consumption impairs blood glucose homeostasis in response to high and low glycemic index meals in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Moisey, Lesley L; Kacker, Sita; Bickerton, Andrea C; Robinson, Lindsay E; Graham, Terry E

    2008-05-01

    The ingestion of caffeine (5 mg/kg body weight) and a 75-g oral glucose load has been shown to elicit an acute insulin-insensitive environment in healthy and obese individuals and in those with type 2 diabetes. In this study we investigated whether a similar impairment in blood glucose management exists when coffee and foods typical of a Western diet were used in a similar protocol. Ten healthy men underwent 4 trials in a randomized order. They ingested caffeinated (5 mg/kg) coffee (CC) or the same volume of decaffeinated coffee (DC) followed 1 h later by either a high or low glycemic index (GI) cereal (providing 75 g of carbohydrate) mixed meal tolerance test. CC with the high GI meal resulted in 147%, 29%, and 40% greater areas under the curve for glucose (P < 0.001), insulin (NS), and C-peptide (P < 0.001), respectively, compared with the values for DC. Similarly, with the low GI treatment, CC elicited 216%, 44%, and 36% greater areas under the curve for glucose (P < 0.001), insulin (P < 0.01), and C-peptide (P < 0.01), respectively. Insulin sensitivity was significantly reduced (40%) with the high GI treatment after CC was ingested compared with DC; with the low GI treatment, CC ingestion resulted in a 29% decrease in insulin sensitivity, although this difference was not significant. The ingestion of CC with either a high or low GI meal significantly impairs acute blood glucose management and insulin sensitivity compared with ingestion of DC. Future investigations are warranted to determine whether CC is a risk factor for insulin resistance.

  2. Food shopping, sensory determinants of food choice and meal preparation by visually impaired people. Obstacles and expectations in daily food experiences.

    PubMed

    Kostyra, Eliza; Żakowska-Biemans, Sylwia; Śniegocka, Katarzyna; Piotrowska, Anna

    2017-06-01

    The number of visually impaired and blind people is rising worldwide due to ageing of the global population, but research regarding the impact of visual impairment on the ability of a person to choose food and to prepare meals is scarce. The aim of this study was threefold: to investigate factors determining the choices of food products in people with various levels of impaired vision; to identify obstacles they face while purchasing food, preparing meals and eating out; and to determine what would help them in the areas of food shopping and meal preparation. The data was collected from 250 blind and visually impaired subjects, recruited with the support of the National Association of the Blind. The study revealed that majority of the visually impaired make food purchases at a supermarket or local grocery and they tend to favour shopping for food via the Internet. Direct sale channels like farmers markets were rarely used by the visually impaired. The most frequently mentioned factors that facilitated their food shopping decisions were the assistance of salespersons, product labelling in Braille, scanners that enable the reading of labels and a permanent place for products on the shop shelves. Meal preparation, particularly peeling, slicing and frying, posed many challenges to the visually impaired. More than half of the respondents ate meals outside the home, mainly with family or friends. The helpfulness of the staff and a menu in Braille were crucial for them to have a positive dining out experience. The results of the study provide valuable insights into the food choices and eating experiences of visually impaired people, and also suggest some practical implications to improve their independence and quality of life.

  3. Exercise Improves Glucose Disposal and Insulin Signaling in Pregnant Mice Fed a High Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Lindsay G; Ngo Tenlep, Sara Y; Woollett, Laura A; Pearson, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Physical activity has been suggested as a non-pharmacological intervention that can be used to improve glucose homeostasis in women with gestational diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of voluntary exercise on glucose tolerance and body composition in pregnant high fat diet fed mice. Methods Female mice were put on a standard diet or high fat diet for two weeks. The mice were then split into 4 groups; control standard diet fed, exercise standard diet fed, control high fat diet fed, and exercise high fat diet fed. Exercise mice had voluntary access to a running wheel in their home cage one week prior to mating, during mating, and throughout pregnancy. Glucose tolerance and body composition were measured during pregnancy. Akt levels were quantified in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue isolated from saline or insulin injected pregnant dams as a marker for insulin signaling. Results Consumption of the high fat diet led to significantly increased body weight, fat mass, and impaired glucose tolerance in control mice. However, voluntary running in the high fat diet fed dams significantly reduced weight gain and fat mass and ultimately improved glucose tolerance compared to control high fat diet fed dams. Further, body weight, fat mass, and glucose disposal in exercise high fat diet dams were indistinguishable from control dams fed the standard diet. High fat diet fed exercise dams also had significantly increased insulin stimulated phosphorylated Akt expression in adipose tissue, but not skeletal muscle, compared to control dams on high fat diet. Conclusion The use of voluntary exercise improves glucose homeostasis and body composition in pregnant female mice. Thus, future studies could investigate potential long-term health benefits in offspring born to obese exercising dams. PMID:26966635

  4. High-fat feeding, but not strenuous exercise, increases blood oxidative stress in trained men.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Cameron G; Farney, Tyler M; Canale, Robert E; Dessoulavy, Michael E; Bloomer, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Two prevalent origins of oxidative stress in Western society are the ingestion of high-fat meals and the performance of strenuous exercise. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the magnitude of increase in blood oxidative stress following acute feeding and acute exercise. Twelve exercise-trained men consumed a high-fat meal or performed 1 of 3 exercise bouts (steady-state aerobic; high-intensity, moderate-duration interval sprints; maximal intensity, short-duration interval sprints) in a random order, crossover design. Blood was collected before and at times following feeding and exercise. Samples were analyzed for trigylcerides, malondialdehyde (MDA), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), nitrate/nitrite (NOx), trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). A significant condition effect was noted for MDA (p = 0.01), H(2)O(2) (p < 0.0001), and AOPP (p = 0.0006), with values highest for the meal condition. An increase of 88%, 247%, and 96% was noted from pre- to post-feeding for MDA, H(2)O(2), and AOPP, respectively. A condition effect was also noted for TEAC (p = 0.04) and CAT (p = 0.05), with values lowest for the meal condition (TEAC) and the meal and aerobic exercise condition (CAT). NOx, SOD, and GPx were relatively unaffected by feeding and exercise, while MDA, H(2)O(2), and AOPP experienced little change from pre- to postexercise (p > 0.05). These results illustrate that the magnitude of blood oxidative stress following a high-fat meal is significantly greater than that elicited by either aerobic or anaerobic exercise in a sample of exercise-trained men.

  5. Prenatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide combined with pre- and postnatal high-fat diet result in lowered blood pressure and insulin resistance in offspring rats.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xue-Qin; Du, Jing-Xia; Li, Yan; Li, Meng; Zhang, Shou-Yan

    2014-01-01

    Adult metabolic syndrome may in part have origins in fetal or early life. This study was designed to explore the effect of prenatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide and high-fat diet on metabolic syndrome in offspring rats. 32 pregnant rats were randomly divided into four groups, including Control group; LPS group (pregnant rats were injected with LPS 0.4 mg/kg intraperitoneally on the 8(th), 10(th) and 12(th) day of pregnancy); High-fat group (maternal rats had high-fat diet during pregnancy and lactation period, and their pups also had high-fat diet up to the third month of life); LPS + High-fat group (rats were exposed to the identical experimental scheme with LPS group and High-fat group). Blood pressure elevated in LPS group and High-fat group, reduced in LPS+High-fat group, accompanied by the increase of serum leptin level in LPS and High-fat group and increase of serum IL-6, TNF-a in High-fat group; both serum insulin and cholesterol increased in High-fat and LPS+High-fat group, as well as insulin in LPS group. HOMA-IR value increased in LPS, High-fat and LPS+High-fat group, and QUICKI decreased in these groups; H-E staining showed morphologically pathological changes in thoracic aorta and liver tissue in the three groups. Increased serum alanine and aspartate aminotransferase suggest impaired liver function in LPS+High-fat group. Prenatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide combined with pre- and postnatal high-fat diet result in lowered blood pressure, insulin resistance and impaired liver function in three-month old offspring rats. The lowered blood pressure might benefit from the predictive adaptive response to prenatal inflammation.

  6. Epigenome-wide association study of triglyceride postprandial responses to high-fat dietary challenge in the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Postprandial lipemia (PPL), the increased plasma triglyceride (TG) concentration after consuming a high-fat meal, is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Individual responses to a meal high in fat vary greatly, depending on genetic and lifestyle factors. However, only a few ...

  7. A high-fat diet supplemented with fish oil improves metabolic features associated with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jelinek, David; Castillo, Joseph J; Arora, Surpreet L; Richardson, Lisa M; Garver, William S

    2013-09-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of a high-fat diet supplemented with fish oil or olive oil, fed to C57BL/6J mice for an extended period, on metabolic features associated with type 2 diabetes. Mice were fed one of four diets for 30 wk: a low-fat diet, a high-fat diet supplemented with lard, a high-fat diet supplemented with fish oil, or a high-fat diet supplemented with olive oil. Phenotypic and metabolic analysis were determined at 15 and 25 to 30 wk, thereby providing comparative analysis for weight gain, energy consumption, fat distribution, glucose and insulin tolerance, and hepatic/plasma lipid analysis. Mice fed a high-fat diet supplemented with fish oil had improved glucose tolerance after an extended period compared with mice fed a high-fat diet supplemented with lard. Moreover, mice fed a high-fat diet supplemented with fish oil had significantly decreased concentrations of liver cholesterol, cholesteryl ester, and triacylglycerol compared with mice fed a high-fat diet supplemented with either lard or olive oil. Mice fed a high-fat diet supplemented with fish oil improved metabolic features associated with type 2 diabetes such as impaired glucose tolerance and hepatic steatosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. High-fat diet induces early-onset diabetes in heterozygous Pax6 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Feng, Ruopeng; Wang, Hong; Wei, Rui; Yang, Jin; Wang, Liang; Wang, Haining; Zhang, Lin; Hong, Tian-pei; Wen, Jinhua

    2014-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes is caused by interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Our previous studies reported that paired box 6 mutation heterozygosity (Pax6(m/+)) led to defective proinsulin processing and subsequent abnormal glucose metabolism in mice at 6  months of age. However, high-fat diet exposure could be an important incentive for diabetes development. In this study, we aimed to develop a novel diabetic model imitating human type 2 diabetes by exposing Pax6(m/+) mice to high-fat diet and to explore the underlying mechanism of diabetes in this model. Over 300 Pax6(m/+) and wild-type male weanling mice were randomly divided into two groups and were fed an high-fat diet or chow diet for 6-10  weeks. Blood glucose and glucose tolerance levels were monitored during this period. Body weights, visceral adipose weights, blood lipid profiles and insulin sensitivity (determined with an insulin tolerance test) were used to evaluate obesity and insulin resistance. Proinsulin processing and insulin secretion levels were used to evaluate pancreatic β cell function. After 6  weeks of high-fat diet exposure, only the Pax6(m/+) mice showed dramatic postloading hyperglycaemia. These mice exhibited significant high-fat diet-induced visceral obesity and insulin resistance and displayed defective prohormone convertase 1/3 production, an increased proinsulin:total insulin ratio and impaired early-phase insulin secretion, because of the Pax6 mutation. Hyperglycaemia worsened progressively over time with the high-fat diet, and most Pax6(m/+) mice on high-fat diet developed diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance after 10  weeks. Furthermore, high-fat diet withdrawal partly improved blood glucose levels in the diabetic mice. By combining the Pax6(m/+) genetic background with an high-fat diet environment, we developed a novel diabetic model to mimic human type 2 diabetes. This model is characterized by impaired insulin secretion, caused by the Pax6 mutation, and

  9. High-Fat-Diet-Induced Deficits in Dopamine Terminal Function Are Reversed by Restoring Insulin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Fordahl, Steve C; Jones, Sara R

    2017-02-15

    Systemically released insulin crosses the blood-brain barrier and binds to insulin receptors on several neural cell types, including dopaminergic neurons. Insulin has been shown to decrease dopamine neuron firing in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), but potentiate release and reuptake at dopamine terminals in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Here we show that prolonged consumption of a high fat diet blocks insulin's effects in the NAc, but insulin's effects are restored by inhibiting protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, which supports insulin receptor signaling. Mice fed a high fat diet (60% kcals from fat) displayed significantly higher fasting blood glucose 160 mg/dL, compared to 101 mg/dL for control-diet-fed mice, and high-fat-diet-fed mice showed reduced blood glucose clearance after an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. Using fast scan cyclic voltammetry to measure electrically evoked dopamine in brain slices containing the NAc core, high-fat-diet-fed mice exhibited slower dopamine reuptake compared to control-diet-fed mice (2.2 ± 0.1 and 2.67 ± 0.15 μM/s, respectively). Moreover, glucose clearance rate was negatively correlated with Vmax. Insulin (10 nM to 1 μM) dose dependently increased reuptake rates in control-diet-fed mice compared with in the high-fat-diet group; however, the small molecule insulin receptor sensitizing agent, TCS 401 (300 nM), restored reuptake in high-fat-diet-fed mice to control-diet levels, and a small molecule inhibitor of the insulin receptor, BMS 536924 (300 nM), attenuated reuptake, similar to high-fat-diet-fed mice. These data show that a high-fat diet impairs dopamine reuptake by attenuating insulin signaling at dopamine terminals.

  10. Perinatal high-fat diet increases hippocampal vulnerability to the adverse effects of subsequent high-fat feeding.

    PubMed

    Lépinay, Amandine L; Larrieu, Thomas; Joffre, Corinne; Acar, Niyazi; Gárate, Iciar; Castanon, Nathalie; Ferreira, Guillaume; Langelier, Bénédicte; Guesnet, Philippe; Brétillon, Lionel; Parnet, Patricia; Layé, Sophie; Darnaudéry, Muriel

    2015-03-01

    Epidemiological observations report an increase in fat consumption associated with low intake of n-3 relative to n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in women of childbearing age. However, the impact of these maternal feeding habits on cognitive function in the offspring is unknown. This study aims to investigate the impact of early exposure to a high-fat diet (HFD) with an unbalanced n-6/n-3 PUFAs ratio on hippocampal function in adult rats. Furthermore, we explored the effects of perinatal HFD combined with exposure to HFD after weaning. Dams were fed a control diet (C, 12% of energy from lipids, n-6/n-3 PUFAs ratio: 5) or HFD (HF, 39% of energy from lipids, n-6/n-3 PUFAs ratio: 39) throughout gestation and lactation. At weaning, offspring were placed either on control (C-C, HF-C) or high-fat (HF-HF) diets. In adulthood, hippocampus-dependent memory was assessed using the water-maze task and potential hippocampal alterations were determined by studying PUFA levels, gene expression, neurogenesis and astrocyte morphology. Perinatal HFD induced long-lasting metabolic alterations and some changes in gene expression in the hippocampus, but had no effect on memory. In contrast, spatial memory was impaired in animals exposed to HFD during the perinatal period and maintained on this diet. HF-HF rats also exhibited low n-3 and high n-6 PUFA levels, decreased neurogenesis and downregulated expression of several plasticity-related genes in the hippocampus. To determine the contribution of the perinatal diet to the memory deficits reported in HF-HF animals, an additional experiment was conducted in which rats were only exposed to HFD starting at weaning (C-HF). Interestingly, memory performance in this group was similar to controls. Overall, our results suggest that perinatal exposure to HFD with an unbalanced n-6/n-3 ratio sensitizes the offspring to the adverse effects of subsequent high-fat intake on hippocampal function.

  11. Resistance Exercise Attenuates High-Fructose, High-Fat-Induced Postprandial Lipemia

    PubMed Central

    Wilburn, Jessie R; Bourquin, Jeffrey; Wysong, Andrea; Melby, Christopher L

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Meals rich in both fructose and fat are commonly consumed by many Americans, especially young men, which can produce a significant postprandial lipemic response. Increasing evidence suggests that aerobic exercise can attenuate the postprandial increase in plasma triacylglycerols (TAGs) in response to a high-fat or a high-fructose meal. However, it is unknown if resistance exercise can dampen the postprandial lipemic response to a meal rich in both fructose and fat. METHODS Eight apparently healthy men (Mean ± SEM; age = 27 ± 2 years) participated in a crossover study to examine the effects of acute resistance exercise on next-day postprandial lipemia resulting from a high-fructose, high-fat meal. Participants completed three separate two-day conditions in a random order: (1) EX-COMP: a full-body weightlifting workout with the provision of additional kilocalories to compensate for the estimated net energy cost of exercise on day 1, followed by the consumption of a high-fructose, high-fat liquid test meal the next morning (day 2) (~600 kcal) and the determination of the plasma glucose, lactate, insulin, and TAG responses during a six-hour postprandial period; (2) EX-DEF: same condition as EX-COMP but without exercise energy compensation on day 1; and (3) CON: no exercise control. RESULTS The six-hour postprandial plasma insulin and lactate responses did not differ between conditions. However, the postprandial plasma TAG concentrations were 16.5% and 24.4% lower for EX-COMP (551.0 ± 80.5 mg/dL × 360 minutes) and EX-DEF (499.4 ± 73.5 mg/dL × 360 minutes), respectively, compared to CON (660.2 ± 95.0 mg/dL × 360 minutes) (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS A single resistance exercise bout, performed ~15 hours prior to a high-fructose, high-fat meal, attenuated the postprandial TAG response, as compared to a no-exercise control condition, in healthy, resistance-trained men. PMID:26508874

  12. Sitagliptin improves glycaemic excursion after a meal or after an oral glucose load in Japanese subjects with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Kaku, K; Kadowaki, T; Terauchi, Y; Okamoto, T; Sato, A; Okuyama, K; Arjona Ferreira, J C; Goldstein, B J

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of sitagliptin in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). In a double-blind, parallel-group study, 242 Japanese subjects with IGT, determined by a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at week -1, were randomized (1 : 1 : 1) to placebo (n = 83), sitagliptin 25 mg (n = 82) or 50 mg (n = 77) once daily for 8 weeks. Glycaemic variables were assessed using another OGTT at week 7 and meal tolerance tests (MTTs) at weeks 0 and 8. Primary and secondary endpoints were percent change from baseline in glucose total area under the curve 0-2 h (AUC(0 -2 h)) during the MTT and OGTT, respectively. Least squares mean percent change from baseline in glucose AUC(0 -2 h) during the MTT were -2.4, -9.5 and -11.5%, and during the OGTT were -3.7, -21.4 and -20.1% with placebo, sitagliptin 25 mg once daily, and 50 mg once daily, respectively (p < 0.001 for either sitagliptin dose vs placebo in both tests). Sitagliptin treatment enhanced early insulin response during the OGTT and decreased total insulin response, assessed as the total AUC(0 -2 h) during the MTT. Sitagliptin treatment also suppressed glucagon response during the MTT. The incidence of adverse events, including hypoglycaemia, was low and generally similar in all treatment groups. Treatment with sitagliptin significantly reduced glucose excursions during both an MTT and an OGTT; this effect was associated with an increase in early insulin secretion after oral glucose loading as well as a blunted glucagon response during an MTT. Sitagliptin was generally well tolerated in subjects with IGT. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Effect of blueberries on the immune response of obese mice induced by high fat diet

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Both high fat diet and obesity have been linked to impaired cell-mediated immune response. Blueberry, rich in antioxidant phytochemicals, has been shown to impact biologic functions in several tissues. However, no information is available on immune cells. We investigated whether blueberry consumptio...

  14. High-fat diet induced insulin resistance in pregnant rats through pancreatic pax6 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Liu, Yunyun; Wang, Hongkun; Xu, Xianming

    2015-01-01

    To explore the changes in pancreas islet function of pregnant rats after consumption of high-fat diet and the underlying mechanism. Thirty pregnant Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: high-fat diet group and normal control group. Twenty days after gestation, fasting blood glucose concentration (FBG) and fasting serum insulin concentration (FINS) were measured. Then, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and insulin release test (IRT) were performed. Finally, all the rats were sacrificed and pancreas were harvested. Insulin sensitivity index (ISI) and insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) were calculated according to FBG and FINS. RT-PCR and Real-time PCR were performed to study the expression of paired box 6 transcription factor (Pax6) and its target genes in pancreatic tissues. The body weight was significantly increased in the high-fat diet group compared with that of normal control rats (P<0.05). The fasting plasma glucose of rats in high-fat diet group was significantly increased compared with that of normal control rats (6.62 mmol/L vs. 4.96 mmol/L, P<0.05), however there was no significant difference in fasting serum insulin concentration between the two groups. OGTT and IRT were abnormal in the high-fat diet group. The high-fat diet rats were more prone to impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. The level of the expression of Pax6 transcription factor and its target genes in pancreas, such as pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor-1 (Pdx1), v-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog A (MafA) and glucose transporter 2 (Glut2) were decreased significantly compared with those of normal control group. High-fat diet feeding during pregnancy may induce insulin resistance in maternal rats by inhibiting pancreatic Pax6 and its target genes expression.

  15. Cathepsin K Knockout Mitigates High-Fat Diet–Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy and Contractile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yinan; Zhang, Yingmei; Dolence, Julia; Shi, Guo-Ping; Ren, Jun; Nair, Sreejayan

    2013-01-01

    The cysteine protease cathepsin K has been implicated in pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that ablation of cathepsin K protects against obesity-associated cardiac dysfunction. Wild-type mice fed a high-fat diet exhibited elevated heart weight, enlarged cardiomyocytes, increased left ventricular wall thickness, and decreased fractional shortening. All these changes were reconciled in cathepsin K knockout mice. Cathepsin K knockout partly reversed the impaired cardiomyocyte contractility and dysregulated calcium handling associated with high-fat diet. Additionally, cathepsin K knockout alleviated whole-body glucose intolerance and improved insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in high-fat diet–fed mice. High-fat feeding increased the expression of cardiac hypertrophic proteins and apoptotic markers, which were inhibited by cathepsin K knockout. Furthermore, high-fat feeding resulted in cathepsin K release from lysosomes into the cytoplasm. In H9c2 myoblasts, silencing of cathepsin K inhibited palmitic acid–induced release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and expression of proapoptotic signaling molecules. Collectively, our data indicate that cathepsin K contributes to the development of obesity-associated cardiac hypertrophy and may represent a potential target for the treatment to obesity-associated cardiac anomalies. PMID:23069627

  16. High fat diet causes rebound weight gain.

    PubMed

    McNay, David E G; Speakman, John R

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is at epidemic proportions but treatment options remain limited. Treatment of obesity by calorie restriction (CR) despite having initial success often fails due to rebound weight gain. One possibility is that this reflects an increased body weight (BW) set-point. Indeed, high fat diets (HFD) reduce adult neurogenesis altering hypothalamic neuroarchitecture. However, it is uncertain if these changes are associated with weight rebound or if long-term weight management is associated with reversing this. Here we show that obese mice have an increased BW set-point and lowering this set-point is associated with rescuing hypothalamic remodelling. Treating obesity by CR using HFD causes weight loss, but not rescued remodelling resulting in rebound weight gain. However, treating obesity by CR using non-HFD causes weight loss, rescued remodelling and attenuates rebound weight gain. We propose that these phenomena may explain why successful short-term weight loss improves obesity in some people but not in others.

  17. A single Mediterranean meal does not impair postprandial flow-mediated dilatation in healthy men with subclinical metabolic dysregulations.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Sébastien; Des Rosiers, Christine; Gayda, Mathieu; Nozza, Anna; Thorin, Éric; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Nigam, Anil

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors are known to exacerbate high-saturated fatty acid meal (HSFAM)-induced endothelial dysfunction, but the influence of subclinical metabolic dysregulations and the acute impact of a single mixed Mediterranean-type meal (MMM) remains unknown. Thus, this study has the objective to evaluate the metabolic and vascular effect of such meals in healthy subjects with or without subclinical fasting metabolic dysregulations. Twenty-eight healthy males without overt cardiovascular risk factors randomly ingested 1 of 2 isocaloric meals on separate days. Plasma metabolic markers, fatty acid (FA) profile, and endothelial function (flow-mediated dilatation; FMD) were assessed at baseline and 2 and 4 h after meal ingestion. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering identified 2 subgroups of participants (n = 11 and 17) differing by their baseline metabolic profiles. The MMM did not significantly alter postprandial endothelial function in all subjects, irrespective of baseline metabolic parameters. In contrast, the HSFAM induced postprandial endothelial dysfunction (Δ%FMDabsolute = -5.28 ± 2.54, p < 0.01 vs. MMM) in a subgroup of individuals with significantly greater body mass index, fasting insulinemia, and lipid parameters (n = 11). Finally, the postprandial plasma FA profiles were differentially enriched by the HSFAM and MMM, notably with saturated FAs and omega-3 polyunsaturated FAs, respectively. Collectively, our results highlight the detrimental impact of a single HSFAM on endothelial function in healthy individuals displaying subclinical fasting metabolic dysregulations. Such individuals could benefit from MMM, demonstrated herein to be without any acute detriment to endothelial function.

  18. Feeding behavior and body weight development: lessons from rats subjected to gastric bypass surgery or high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Furnes, M W; Zhao, C-M; Stenstrom, B; Arum, C-J; Tommeras, K; Kulseng, B; Chen, D

    2009-12-01

    Weight loss treatments include diets, drugs, physical training, and surgery, namely bariatric or obesity surgery. The current standard for bariatric surgery is gastric bypass. There are common beliefs that gastric bypass induces body weight loss because of a reduced food intake and that high-fat diet induces overweight and obesity because of overnutrition. The principal aim of the studies on rats summarized herein was to better understand the physiological mechanisms by which gastric bypass achieves body weight loss and by which high-fat diet induces obesity. The results indicated that gastric bypass efficiently reduced body weight, particularly the fat compartment, which was unlikely to be caused by early satiety, reduced food intake or malabsorption, and that large meal size, but not overnutrition, was mainly responsible for high-fat diet-induced obesity. It was unclear whether gastric ghrelin, obestatin and/or amine in the A-like cells were involved in this context.

  19. Supplementary chromium(III) propionate complex does not protect against insulin resistance in high-fat-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Król, Ewelina; Krejpcio, Zbigniew; Iwanik, Katarzyna

    2014-02-01

    Improper eating habits such as high-fat or high-carbohydrate diets are responsible for metabolic changes resulting in impaired glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and ultimately diabetes. Although the essentiality of trivalent chromium for humans has been recently questioned by researchers, pharmacological dosages of this element can improve insulin sensitivity in experimental animals and diabetic subjects. The aim of the study was to assess the preventive potential of the supplementary chromium(III) propionate complex (CrProp) in rats fed a high-fat diet. The experiment was conducted on 32 male Wistar rats divided into four groups and fed the following diets: the control (C, AIN-93G), high-fat diets (HF, 40% energy from fat), and a high-fat diet supplemented with CrProp at dosages of 10 and 50 mg Cr/kg diet (HF + Cr10 and HF + Cr50, respectively). After 8 weeks, high-fat feeding led to an increased body mass, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, a decreased serum urea concentration, accumulation of lipid droplets in hepatocytes, and increased renal Fe and splenic Cu contents. Supplementary CrProp in both dosages did not alleviate these changes but increased renal Cr content and normalized splenic Cu content in high-fat-fed rats. Supplementary CrProp does not prevent the development of insulin resistance in rats fed a high-fat diet.

  20. Luteolin protects against high fat diet-induced cognitive deficits in obesity mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Fu, Xiaobin; Lan, Nuo; Li, Sai; Zhang, Jingzheng; Wang, Shuaishuai; Li, Cheng; Shang, Yanguo; Huang, Tonghui; Zhang, Ling

    2014-07-01

    The epidemic and experimental studies have confirmed that the obesity can lead to neuroinflammation, neurodegenerative diseases and adversely affect cognition. Despite the numerous elucidations on the impact of obesity on cognition decline, the contributors to the impairments in obesity remain unclear. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed either a control or high-fat diet (HFD) for 16 weeks and then randomized into four groups treated with their respective diets for 4 weeks including control diet (CD); control diet+luteolin (CDL); high-fat diet (HFD), high-fat diet+luteolin (HFDL). The dose of luteolin was 10mg/kg, oral. We showed that adding luteolin in high-fat diet can significantly reduce body weight gain, food intake and plasma cytokines as well as improving glucose metabolism of mice on HFD. Importantly, we showed that luteolin treatment had the effects of alleviating neuroinflammation, oxidative stress and neuronal insulin resistance in the mouse brain, restored blood adipocytokines level to normal. Furthermore, luteolin increased the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), the action of synapsin I (SYP) and postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) in the cortex and hippocampus as to that the behavioral performance in Morris water maze (MWM) and step-through task were significantly improved. These results indicate a previously unrecognized potential of luteolin in alleviating obesity-induced cognitive impairment for type-2 diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer disease (AD). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of cinnamon on gastric emptying, arterial stiffness, postprandial lipemia, glycemia, and appetite responses to high-fat breakfast

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cinnamon has been shown to delay gastric emptying of a high-carbohydrate meal and reduce postprandial glycemia in healthy adults. However, it is dietary fat which is implicated in the etiology and is associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We aimed to determine the effect of 3 g cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) on GE, postprandial lipemic and glycemic responses, oxidative stress, arterial stiffness, as well as appetite sensations and subsequent food intake following a high-fat meal. Methods A single-blind randomized crossover study assessed nine healthy, young subjects. GE rate of a high-fat meal supplemented with 3 g cinnamon or placebo was determined using the 13C octanoic acid breath test. Breath, blood samples and subjective appetite ratings were collected in the fasted and during the 360 min postprandial period, followed by an ad libitum buffet meal. Gastric emptying and 1-day fatty acid intake relationships were also examined. Results Cinnamon did not change gastric emptying parameters, postprandial triacylglycerol or glucose concentrations, oxidative stress, arterial function or appetite (p < 0.05). Strong relationships were evident (p < 0.05) between GE Thalf and 1-day palmitoleic acid (r = -0.78), eiconsenoic acid (r = -0.84) and total omega-3 intake (r = -0.72). The ingestion of 3 g cinnamon had no effect on GE, arterial stiffness and oxidative stress following a HF meal. Conclusions 3 g cinnamon did not alter the postprandial response to a high-fat test meal. We find no evidence to support the use of 3 g cinnamon supplementation for the prevention or treatment of metabolic disease. Dietary fatty acid intake requires consideration in future gastrointestinal studies. Trial registration Trial registration number: at http://www.clinicaltrial.gov: NCT01350284 PMID:21899741

  2. Resistance and susceptibility to weight gain: individual variability in response to a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Blundell, J E; Stubbs, R J; Golding, C; Croden, F; Alam, R; Whybrow, S; Le Noury, J; Lawton, C L

    2005-12-15

    An obesigenic environment is a potent force for promoting weight gain. However, not all people exposed to such an environment become obese; some remain lean. This means that some people are susceptible to weight gain (in a weight-promoting environment) and others are resistant. Identifying the characteristics of appetite control and food motivation in these two groups could throw light on the causes of weight gain and how this can be either treated or prevented. We have investigated the issue experimentally by identifying people who habitually consume a high-fat diet (greater than 43% fat energy). These individuals have been termed high-fat phenotypes. We have compared individuals, of the same age (mean=37 years old) and gender (male), who have gained weight (BMI=34) or who have remained lean (BMI=22). The susceptible individuals are characterised by a cluster of characteristics including a weak satiety response to fatty meals, a maintained preference for high-fat over low-energy foods in the post-ingestive satiety period, a strong hedonic attraction to palatable foods and to eating, and high scores on the TFEQ factors of Disinhibition and Hunger. The analysis of large databases suggests that this profile of factors contributes to an average daily positive energy balance from food of approximately 0.5 MJ. This profile of characteristics helps to define the symptomatology of a thrifty phenotype.

  3. Fructose intervention for 12 weeks does not impair glycemic control or incretin hormone responses during oral glucose or mixed meal tests in obese men.

    PubMed

    Matikainen, N; Söderlund, S; Björnson, E; Bogl, L H; Pietiläinen, K H; Hakkarainen, A; Lundbom, N; Eliasson, B; Räsänen, S M; Rivellese, A; Patti, L; Prinster, A; Riccardi, G; Després, J-P; Alméras, N; Holst, J J; Deacon, C F; Borén, J; Taskinen, M-R

    2017-06-01

    Incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) are affected early on in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Epidemiologic studies consistently link high fructose consumption to insulin resistance but whether fructose consumption impairs the incretin response remains unknown. As many as 66 obese (BMI 26-40 kg/m(2)) male subjects consumed fructose-sweetened beverages containing 75 g fructose/day for 12 weeks while continuing their usual lifestyle. Glucose, insulin, GLP-1 and GIP were measured during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and triglycerides (TG), GLP-1, GIP and PYY during a mixed meal test before and after fructose intervention. Fructose intervention did not worsen glucose and insulin responses during OGTT, and GLP-1 and GIP responses during OGTT and fat-rich meal were unchanged. Postprandial TG response increased significantly, p = 0.004, and we observed small but significant increases in weight and liver fat content, but not in visceral or subcutaneous fat depots. However, even the subgroups who gained weight or liver fat during fructose intervention did not worsen their glucose, insulin, GLP-1 or PYY responses. A minor increase in GIP response during OGTT occurred in subjects who gained liver fat (p = 0.049). In obese males with features of metabolic syndrome, 12 weeks fructose intervention 75 g/day did not change glucose, insulin, GLP-1 or GIP responses during OGTT or GLP-1, GIP or PYY responses during a mixed meal. Therefore, fructose intake, even accompanied with mild weight gain, increases in liver fat and worsening of postprandial TG profile, does not impair glucose tolerance or gut incretin response to oral glucose or mixed meal challenge. Copyright © 2017 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University

  4. Effect of ethyl pyruvate on skeletal muscle metabolism in rats fed on a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Olek, Robert A; Ziolkowski, Wieslaw; Wierzba, Tomasz H; Kaczor, Jan J

    2013-07-01

    Impaired mitochondrial capacity may be implicated in the pathology of chronic metabolic diseases. To elucidate the effect of ethyl pyruvate supplementation on skeletal muscles metabolism we examined changes in activities of mitochondrial and antioxidant enzymes, as well as sulfhydryl groups oxidation (an indirect marker of oxidative stress) during the development of obesity. After 6 weeks feeding of control or high fat diet, Wistar rats were divided into four groups: control diet, control diet and ethyl pyruvate, high fat diet, and high fat diet and ethyl pyruvate. Ethyl pyruvate was administered as 0.3% solution in drinking water, for the following 6 weeks. High fat diet feeding induced the increase of activities 3-hydroxyacylCoA dehydrogenase, citrate synthase, and fumarase. Moreover, higher catalase and superoxide dismutase activities, as well as sulfhydryl groups oxidation, were noted. Ethyl pyruvate supplementation did not affect the mitochondrial enzymes' activities, but induced superoxide dismutase activity and sulfhydryl groups oxidation. All of the changes were observed in soleus muscle, but not in extensor digitorum longus muscle. Additionally, positive correlations between fasting blood insulin concentration and activities of catalase (p = 0.04), and superoxide dismutase (p = 0.01) in soleus muscle were noticed. Prolonged ethyl pyruvate consumption elevated insulin concentration, which may cause modifications in oxidative type skeletal muscles.

  5. [Effect of chronic high-fat diet on predation behavior in rats].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenhao; Jia, Yan; Cao, Shuhui; Chen, Yaru; Duan, Liting; Li, Changqi

    2014-12-01

    To observe the eff ect and mechanism of chronic high-fat diet on predation behavior in rats. Ten female SD rats with 4-week-old were randomly divided into a normal control group (NC group, n=5) and a chronic high-fat diet group (HF group, n=5). The rats in the NC group received the regular diet while rats in the HF group were fed with high-fat diet. Fift een weeks later, the predation behavior of rats was evaluated by open fi eld test and food foraging tests. At the end of experiments, the rats were killed and brain tissues were collected for evaluation of c-Fos protein expression in anterior cingulate cortex by immunohistochemical assay. Th e predation behavior of rats in the HF group was signifi cantly impaired in the competitive or non-competitive food foraging test compared with the control rats (P< 0.001). Th e c-fos protein expression in anterior cingulate cortex of rats from the HF group was signifi cantly decreased (P< 0.001). Long time high-fat diet can aff ect the predation behavior of rats, which is related to dysfunction of neuron in anterior cingulate cortex.

  6. Adipose tissue chromium and vanadium disbalance in high-fat fed Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Tinkov, Alexey A; Popova, Elizaveta V; Polyakova, Valentina S; Kwan, Olga V; Skalny, Anatoly V; Nikonorov, Alexandr A

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of the current study is to investigate the relationship between adipose tissue chromium and vanadium content and adipose tissue dysfunction in a model of diet-induced obesity. A total of 26 female Wistar rats were fed either standard or high-fat diet (31.6% of fat from total caloric content) for 3 months. High-fat-feeding resulted in 21 and 33% decrease in adipose tissue chromium and vanadium content, respectively. No change was seen in hair chromium or vanadium levels. Statistical analysis revealed a significant inverse correlation of adipose tissue Cr and V with animal morphometric parameters and adipocyte size. Significant inverse dependence was observed between adipose tissue Cr and V and serum leptin and proinflammatory cytokines' levels. At the same time, adipose tissue Cr and V levels were characterized by positive correlation between serum adiponectin and adiponectin/leptin ratio. Adipose tissue Cr and V were inversely correlated (p<0.05) with insulin and homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) levels. Cr and V concentrations were not correlated with serum glucose in either high-fat fed or control rats; however, both serum glucose and HOMA-IR levels were significantly higher in high-fat fed, compared to control, rats. The results allow to hypothesize that impairment of adipose tissue Cr and V content plays a certain role in the development of adipose tissue endocrine dysfunction in obesity.

  7. Effects of lifestyle intervention and meal replacement on glycaemic and body-weight control in Chinese subjects with impaired glucose regulation: a 1-year randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dan-Feng; Sun, Jian-Qin; Chen, Min; Chen, Yan-Qiu; Xie, Hua; Sun, Wei-Jia; Lin, Yi-Fan; Jiang, Jing-Jing; Sun, Wei; Chen, Ai-Fang; Tang, Qian-Ru

    2013-02-14

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the impact of a lifestyle intervention programme, combined with a daily low-glycaemic index meal replacement, on body-weight and glycaemic control in subjects with impaired glucose regulation (IGR). Subjects with IGR were randomly assigned to an intervention group (n 46) and a control group (n 42). Both groups received health counselling at baseline. The intervention group also received a daily meal replacement and intensive lifestyle intervention to promote healthy eating habits during the first 3 months of the study, and follow-up visits performed monthly until the end of the 1-year study. Outcome measurements included changes in plasma glucose, glycated Hb (HbA1c), plasma lipids, body weight, blood pressure and body composition (such as body fat mass and visceral fat area). The results showed that body-weight loss after 1 year was significant in the intervention group compared with the control group (-1·8 (SEM 0·35) v. -0·6 (SEM 0·40) 2·5 kg, P<0·05). The 2 h plasma glucose concentration decreased 1·24 mmol/l in the intervention group and increased 0·85 mmol/l in the control group (P<0·05) compared with their baseline, respectively. A 5 kg body-weight loss at 1 year was associated with a decrease of 1·49 mmol/l in 2 h plasma glucose (P<0·01). The incidence of normal glucose regulation (NGR) in the two groups was significantly different (P=0·001). In conclusion, the combination of regular contact, lifestyle advice and meal replacement is beneficial in promoting IGR to NGR.

  8. The Lidose hard capsule formulation of fenofibrate is suprabioavailable compared to the nanoparticle tablet formulation under high-fat fed conditions.

    PubMed

    Verbeeck, Roger K; De Niet, Sophie; Lebrun, Sonia; Tremege, Mickael; Rennie, Tim W; Coffiner, Monte; Streel, Bruno; Cahay, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic equivalence of multiple registered fenofibrate formulations, several of which are suprabioavailable and therefore marketed at lower dosage strengths than their reference products, is based on the results of bioequivalence studies. Most of these formulations show a higher bioavailability when taken with a high-fat meal. The relative bioavailability of two of these formulations, the 200 mg Lidose hard capsules and the 145 mg nanoparticle tablets, was assessed when taken with a high-fat meal. In this single dose, 2-way, randomized, crossover study, 24 healthy subjects received a 200 mg fenofibrate Lidose hard capsule (Test) and a 145 mg nanoparticle tablet (Reference) under high-fat fed conditions. Plasma concentrations of fenofibric acid were measured up to 72 hours by using a validated LC-MS/MS method. The geometric mean ratios (Test/Reference) and the 90% confidence intervals for AUC0-t and Cmax were 1.37 (131.58 - 142.88) and 1.38 (124.60 - 152.93), respectively. The median (range) Tmax- values of fenofibric acid were 4.5 h (3.0 - 8.0 h) and 3.25 h (1.0 - 6.5 h) after administration of the Lidose hard capsule and the nanoparticle tablet, respectively. Under high-fat fed conditions the extent of fenofibrate absorption was 37% higher for the 200 mg Lidose hard capsule compared to the 145 mg nanoparticle tablet, which is exactly as expected based on a mg-to-mg weight basis. The results of the present study underline the importance of assessing bioequivalence of fenofibrate formulations under identical fed conditions, and preferentially after a high-fat meal as this condition represents the worst-case scenario. Furthermore, the results of this study demonstrate that the 145 mg nanoparticle tablet is not bioequivalent to the 200 mg Lidose hard capsule when administered under high-fat meal conditions.

  9. Fat Quality Influences the Obesogenic Effect of High Fat Diets

    PubMed Central

    Crescenzo, Raffaella; Bianco, Francesca; Mazzoli, Arianna; Giacco, Antonia; Cancelliere, Rosa; di Fabio, Giovanni; Zarrelli, Armando; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    High fat and/or carbohydrate intake are associated with an elevated risk for obesity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The harmful effects of a high fat diet could be different, depending on dietary fat quality. In fact, high fat diets rich in unsaturated fatty acids are considered less deleterious for human health than those rich in saturated fat. In our previous studies, we have shown that rats fed a high fat diet developed obesity and exhibited a decrease in oxidative capacity and an increase in oxidative stress in liver mitochondria. To investigate whether polyunsaturated fats could attenuate the above deleterious effects of high fat diets, energy balance and body composition were assessed after two weeks in rats fed isocaloric amounts of a high-fat diet (58.2% by energy) rich either in lard or safflower/linseed oil. Hepatic functionality, plasma parameters, and oxidative status were also measured. The results show that feeding on safflower/linseed oil diet attenuates the obesogenic effect of high fat diets and ameliorates the blood lipid profile. Conversely, hepatic steatosis and mitochondrial oxidative stress appear to be negatively affected by a diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:26580650

  10. Palatable Meal Anticipation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Cynthia T.; Patton, Danica F.; Mistlberger, Ralph E.; Steele, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to sense time and anticipate events is a critical skill in nature. Most efforts to understand the neural and molecular mechanisms of anticipatory behavior in rodents rely on daily restricted food access, which induces a robust increase of locomotor activity in anticipation of daily meal time. Interestingly, rats also show increased activity in anticipation of a daily palatable meal even when they have an ample food supply, suggesting a role for brain reward systems in anticipatory behavior, and providing an alternate model by which to study the neurobiology of anticipation in species, such as mice, that are less well adapted to “stuff and starve” feeding schedules. To extend this model to mice, and exploit molecular genetic resources available for that species, we tested the ability of wild-type mice to anticipate a daily palatable meal. We observed that mice with free access to regular chow and limited access to highly palatable snacks of chocolate or “Fruit Crunchies” avidly consumed the snack but did not show anticipatory locomotor activity as measured by running wheels or video-based behavioral analysis. However, male mice receiving a snack of high fat chow did show increased food bin entry prior to access time and a modest increase in activity in the two hours preceding the scheduled meal. Interestingly, female mice did not show anticipation of a daily high fat meal but did show increased activity at scheduled mealtime when that meal was withdrawn. These results indicate that anticipation of a scheduled food reward in mice is behavior, diet, and gender specific. PMID:20941366

  11. Epigenome-wide association study of triglyceride postprandial responses to a high-fat dietary challenge.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chao-Qiang; Wojczynski, Mary K; Parnell, Laurence D; Hidalgo, Bertha A; Irvin, Marguerite Ryan; Aslibekyan, Stella; Province, Michael A; Absher, Devin M; Arnett, Donna K; Ordovás, José M

    2016-12-01

    Postprandial lipemia (PPL), the increased plasma TG concentration after consuming a high-fat meal, is an independent risk factor for CVD. Individual responses to a meal high in fat vary greatly, depending on genetic and lifestyle factors. However, only a few loci have been associated with TG-PPL response. Heritable epigenomic changes may be significant contributors to the unexplained inter-individual PPL variability. We conducted an epigenome-wide association study on 979 subjects with DNA methylation measured from CD4(+) T cells, who were challenged with a high-fat meal as a part of the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network study. Eight methylation sites encompassing five genes, LPP, CPT1A, APOA5, SREBF1, and ABCG1, were significantly associated with PPL response at an epigenome-wide level (P < 1.1 × 10(-7)), but no methylation site reached epigenome-wide significance after adjusting for baseline TG levels. Higher methylation at LPP, APOA5, SREBF1, and ABCG1, and lower methylation at CPT1A methylation were correlated with an increased TG-PPL response. These PPL-associated methylation sites, also correlated with fasting TG, account for a substantially greater amount of phenotypic variance (14.9%) in PPL and fasting TG (16.3%) when compared with the genetic contribution of loci identified by our previous genome-wide association study (4.5%). In summary, the epigenome is a large contributor to the variation in PPL, and this has the potential to be used to modulate PPL and reduce CVD.

  12. Soy protein isolate inhibits high fat diet-induced senescence pathways in osteoblasts to maintain bone acquisition in rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chronic consumption by experimental animals of a typical Western diet high in saturated fats and cholesterol during postnatal life has been demonstrated to impair skeletal development. However, the underlying mechanism by which high fat, energy dense diets affect bone-forming cell phenotypes is poor...

  13. Increased caloric intake after a high-fat preload: relation to circulating triglycerides and orexigenic peptides.

    PubMed

    Gaysinskaya, V A; Karatayev, O; Chang, G-Q; Leibowitz, S F

    2007-05-16

    To investigate mechanisms that mediate the greater food intake induced by a fat-rich diet, the present study tested an acute "preload-to-test meal" paradigm in normal-weight rats. In this paradigm, the rats were given a small high-fat (HF) compared to low-fat (LF) preload and, after an intermeal interval, allowed to consume freely on a subsequent test meal. Modified versions of this paradigm were tested to determine the robustness of the greater caloric intake induced by the HF preload while standardizing the test protocol. A HF preload of 10-15 kcals, compared to an equicaloric LF preload, significantly increased food intake by 40-50% in the subsequent test meal. This effect, a 4-6 kcal increase, was observed with HF preloads equal in energy density and palatability to the LF preloads. It was evident with preloads or test meals that were liquid or solid, preloads that were injected, test meals that had variable fat content, and natural intermeal intervals of 60-120 min. This overeating after a HF preload was invariably associated with a 2- to 3-fold increase in circulating levels of triglycerides (TG), with no change in leptin or insulin. It was also accompanied by increased expression of the orexigenic peptides, galanin in the paraventricular nucleus and orexin in the perifornical lateral hypothalamus. Moreover, if given repeatedly over several days, the HF compared to equicaloric LF preload significantly increased 24-h food intake. These results establish a protocol for studying the phenomenon of increased feeding on a HF diet under controlled conditions and suggest possible underlying mechanisms involving circulating lipids and orexigenic peptides.

  14. Time-dependent regulation of muscle caveolin activation and insulin signalling in response to high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Ruiz, Ana; de Miguel, Carlos; Campión, Javier; Martínez, J Alfredo; Milagro, Fermín I

    2009-10-06

    We studied the effect of high-fat diet on the expression and activation of the three caveolins in rat skeletal muscle and their association with the insulin signalling cascade. Initial response was characterized by increased signalling through Cav-1 and Cav-3 phosphorylation, suggesting that both participate in an initial acute response to the calorie surplus. Afterwards, Cav-1 signalling was slightly reduced, whereas Cav-3 remained active. Late chronic phase signalling through both proteins was impaired inducing a prediabetic state. Summarizing, caveolins seem to mediate a time-dependent regulation of insulin cascade in response to high-fat diet in muscle.

  15. Centrally administered urocortin 2 decreases gorging on high-fat diet in both diet-induced obesity-prone and -resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Cottone, P; Sabino, V; Nagy, T R; Coscina, D V; Levin, B E; Zorrilla, E P

    2013-12-01

    Obesity is a costly, deadly public health problem for which new treatments are needed. Individual differences in meal pattern have been proposed to have a role in obesity risk. The present study tested the hypothesis that (i) the microstructure of chronic high-fat diet intake differs between genetically selected diet-induced obesity (DIO) and diet-resistant (DR) rats, and (ii) central administration of urocortin 2 (Ucn 2), a corticotropin-releasing factor type 2 agonist, decreases high-fat diet intake not only in lean DR rats, but also in obese DIO rats. Male, selectively bred DIO and DR rats (n=10/genotype) were chronically fed a high-fat diet. Food and water intake as well as ingestion microstructure were then compared under baseline conditions and following third intracerebroventricular injection of Ucn 2 (0, 0.1, 0.3, 1, 3 μg). Irrespective of genotype, Ucn 2 reduced nocturnal food intake with a minimum effective dose of 0.3 μg, suppressing high-fat diet intake by ∼40% at the 3 μg dose. Ucn 2 also made rats of both genotypes eat smaller and briefer meals, including at doses that did not reduce drinking. Obese DIO rats ate fewer but larger meals than DR rats, which they ate more quickly and consumed with two-third less water. Unlike leptin and insulin, Ucn 2 retains its full central anorectic efficacy to reduce high-fat diet intake even in obese, genetically prone DIO rats, which otherwise show a 'gorging' meal pattern. These results open new opportunities of investigation toward treating some forms of DIO.

  16. Centrally administered urocortin 2 decreases gorging on high-fat diet in in both diet induced obesity-prone and -resistant rats

    PubMed Central

    Cottone, Pietro; Sabino, Valentina; Nagy, Tim R.; Coscina, Donald V.; Levin, Barry E.; Zorrilla, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Obesity is a costly, deadly public health problem for which new treatments are needed. Individual differences in meal pattern have been proposed to play a role in obesity risk. The present study tested the hypothesis that i) the microstructure of chronic high-fat diet intake differs between genetically selected Diet-Induced Obesity (DIO) and Diet Resistant (DR) rats, and ii) central administration of urocortin 2 (Ucn 2), a corticotropin-releasing factor type 2 (CRF2) agonist, decreases high-fat diet intake not only in lean DR rats, but also in obese DIO rats. Design Male, selectively bred DIO and DR rats (n=10/genotype) were chronically fed a high-fat diet. Food and water intake as well as ingestion microstructure were then compared under baseline conditions and following third intracerebroventricular injection of Ucn 2 (0, 0.1, 0.3, 1, 3 µg). Results Irrespective of genotype, Ucn 2 reduced nocturnal food intake with a minimum effective dose of 0.3 µg, suppressing high-fat diet intake by ~40% at the 3 µg dose. Ucn 2 also made rats of both genotypes eat smaller and briefer meals, including at doses that did not reduce drinking. Obese DIO rats ate fewer but larger meals than DR rats, which they ate more quickly and consumed with 2/3rd less water. Conclusions Unlike leptin and insulin, Ucn 2 retains its full central anorectic efficacy to reduce high-fat diet intake even in obese, genetically-prone DIO rats, which otherwise show a “gorging” meal pattern. These results open new opportunities of investigation towards treating some forms of diet-induced obesity. PMID:23478425

  17. Easy Meal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The woman pictured below is sitting down to a nutritious, easily-prepared meal similar to those consumed by Apollo astronauts. The appetizing dishes shown were created simply by adding water to the contents of a Mountain House* Easy Meal package of freeze dried food. The Easy Meal line is produced by Oregon Freeze Dry Foods, Inc., Albany, Oreaon, a pioneer in freeze drying technology and a company long associated with NASA in developing suitable preparations for use on manned spacecraft. Designed to provide nutritionally balanced, attractive hot meals for senior adults, Easy Meal is an offshoot of a 1975-77 demonstration project managed by Johnson Space Center and called Meal System for the Elderly. The project sought ways to help the estimated 3.5 million elderly Americans who are unable to take advantage of existing meal programs. Such services are provided by federal, state and local agencies, but they are not available to many who live in rural areas, or others who are handicapped, temporarily ill or homebound for other reasons. Oregon Freeze Dry Foods was a participant in that multi-agency cooperative project. With its Easy Meal assortment of convenience foods pictured above left, the company is making commercially available meal packages similar to those distributed in the Meal System for the Elderly program. In the freeze drying process, water is extracted from freshly-cooked foods by dehydration at very low temperatures, as low as 50 I degrees below zero. Flavor is locked in by packaging the dried food in pouches which block out moisture and oxygen, the principal causes of food deterioration; thus the food can be stored for long periods without refrigeration. Meals are reconstituted by adding hot or cold water, depending on the type of food, and they are table ready in five to 10 minutes. Oregon Freeze Dry Foods offers five different meal packages and plans to expand the line.

  18. Dietary fat and corticosterone levels are contributing factors to meal anticipation.

    PubMed

    Namvar, Sara; Gyte, Amy; Denn, Mark; Leighton, Brendan; Piggins, Hugh D

    2016-04-15

    Daily restricted access to food leads to the development of food anticipatory activity and metabolism, which depends upon an as yet unidentified food-entrainable oscillator(s). A premeal anticipatory peak in circulating hormones, including corticosterone is also elicited by daily restricted feeding. High-fat feeding is associated with elevated levels of corticosterone with disrupted circadian rhythms and a failure to develop robust meal anticipation. It is not clear whether the disrupted corticosterone rhythm, resulting from high-fat feeding contributes to attenuated meal anticipation in high-fat fed rats. Our aim was to better characterize meal anticipation in rats fed a low- or high-fat diet, and to better understand the role of corticosterone in this process. To this end, we utilized behavioral observations, hypothalamic c-Fos expression, and indirect calorimetry to assess meal entrainment. We also used the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, RU486, to dissect out the role of corticosterone in meal anticipation in rats given daily access to a meal with different fat content. Restricted access to a low-fat diet led to robust meal anticipation, as well as entrainment of hypothalamic c-Fos expression, metabolism, and circulating corticosterone. These measures were significantly attenuated in response to a high-fat diet, and animals on this diet exhibited a postanticipatory rise in corticosterone. Interestingly, antagonism of glucocorticoid activity using RU486 attenuated meal anticipation in low-fat fed rats, but promoted meal anticipation in high-fat-fed rats. These findings suggest an important role for corticosterone in the regulation of meal anticipation in a manner dependent upon dietary fat content. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Dietary fat and corticosterone levels are contributing factors to meal anticipation

    PubMed Central

    Gyte, Amy; Denn, Mark; Leighton, Brendan; Piggins, Hugh D.

    2016-01-01

    Daily restricted access to food leads to the development of food anticipatory activity and metabolism, which depends upon an as yet unidentified food-entrainable oscillator(s). A premeal anticipatory peak in circulating hormones, including corticosterone is also elicited by daily restricted feeding. High-fat feeding is associated with elevated levels of corticosterone with disrupted circadian rhythms and a failure to develop robust meal anticipation. It is not clear whether the disrupted corticosterone rhythm, resulting from high-fat feeding contributes to attenuated meal anticipation in high-fat fed rats. Our aim was to better characterize meal anticipation in rats fed a low- or high-fat diet, and to better understand the role of corticosterone in this process. To this end, we utilized behavioral observations, hypothalamic c-Fos expression, and indirect calorimetry to assess meal entrainment. We also used the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, RU486, to dissect out the role of corticosterone in meal anticipation in rats given daily access to a meal with different fat content. Restricted access to a low-fat diet led to robust meal anticipation, as well as entrainment of hypothalamic c-Fos expression, metabolism, and circulating corticosterone. These measures were significantly attenuated in response to a high-fat diet, and animals on this diet exhibited a postanticipatory rise in corticosterone. Interestingly, antagonism of glucocorticoid activity using RU486 attenuated meal anticipation in low-fat fed rats, but promoted meal anticipation in high-fat-fed rats. These findings suggest an important role for corticosterone in the regulation of meal anticipation in a manner dependent upon dietary fat content. PMID:26818054

  20. Adult offspring of high-fat diet-fed dams can have normal glucose tolerance and body composition.

    PubMed

    Platt, K M; Charnigo, R J; Pearson, K J

    2014-06-01

    Maternal high-fat diet consumption and obesity have been shown to program long-term obesity and lead to impaired glucose tolerance in offspring. Many rodent studies, however, use non-purified, cereal-based diets as the control for purified high-fat diets. In this study, primiparous ICR mice were fed purified control diet (10-11 kcal% from fat of lard or butter origin) and lard (45 or 60 kcal% fat) or butter (32 or 60 kcal% fat)-based high-fat diets for 4 weeks before mating, throughout pregnancy, and for 2 weeks of nursing. Before mating, female mice fed the 32 and 60% butter-based high-fat diets exhibited impaired glucose tolerance but those females fed the lard-based diets showed normal glucose disposal following a glucose challenge. High-fat diet consumption by female mice of all groups decreased lean to fat mass ratios during the 4th week of diet treatment compared with those mice consuming the 10-11% fat diets. All females were bred to male mice and pregnancy and offspring outcomes were monitored. The body weight of pups born to 45% lard-fed dams was significantly increased before weaning, but only female offspring born to 32% butter-fed dams exhibited long-term body weight increases. Offspring glucose tolerance and body composition were measured for at least 1 year. Minimal, if any, differences were observed in the offspring parameters. These results suggest that many variables should be considered when designing future high-fat diet feeding and maternal obesity studies in mice.

  1. Aspirin prevents bone loss with little mechanical improvement in high-fat-fed ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sien; Lee, Wayne Y W; Huang, Meiling; Fu, Ziwei; Liang, Yanlong; Wu, Haiyou; Xu, Liangliang; Suen, Chun Wai; Huang, Jianping; Wu, Tie; Cui, Liao; Li, Gang

    2016-11-15

    Obesity and osteoporosis are often concurrently happened in the menopausal women. Obesity in menopausal women is not only related to a high risk of cardiovascular disease, but also results in a detrimental effect on bone health. This study aimed to investigate the effects of aspirin, a popular anti-thrombosis drug, on bone quantity and quality in the high-fat-fed animal model. Adult female rats were subjected to either sham operations or ovariectomized operations. The ovariectomized rats were orally administered with deionized water or standardized high fat emulsion with or without aspirin. All rats were injected with calcein before killed for the purpose of double in vivo labeling. Biochemistry, histomorphometry, micro-computed tomography analysis, mechanical test, and component analysis were performed after 12 weeks. In vitro cell culture was also performed to observe the effect of aspirin in osteogenesis. We found that high fat remarkably impaired bone formation and bone biomechanics. Aspirin treatment significantly prevented bone loss by increasing bone formation. In vitro studies also validated the enhancement of osteogenic differentiation. However, aspirin presented no significant improvement in bone mechanical properties. Component analysis shown aspirin could significantly increase the content of mineral, but had limited effect on the content of collagen. In conclusion, aspirin is beneficial for the prevention of bone loss; meanwhile, it may cause an imbalance in the components of bone which may weaken the mechanical properties. The current study provided further evidence that aspirin might not be powerful for the prevention of fracture in osteoporotic patients.

  2. The Antiinflammatory Cytokine Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist Protects from High-Fat Diet-Induced Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Nadine S.; Schulthess, Fabienne T.; Galasso, Ryan; Castellani, Lawrence W.; Maedler, Kathrin

    2008-01-01

    Subclinical inflammation is a recently discovered phenomenon in type 2 diabetes. Elevated cytokines impair β-cell function and survival. A recent clinical trial shows that blocking IL-1β signaling by IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) improves β-cell secretory function in patients with type 2 diabetes. In the present study, we provide further mechanisms of the protective role of IL-1Ra on the β-cell. IL-1Ra prevented diabetes in vivo in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat/high-sucrose diet (HFD) for 12 wk; it improved glucose tolerance and insulin secretion. High-fat diet treatment increased serum levels of free fatty acids and of the adipokines resistin and leptin, which were reduced by IL-1Ra treatment. In addition, IL-1Ra counteracted adiponectin levels, which were decreased by high-fat feeding. Studies on isolated islets revealed that IL-1Ra specifically acted on the β-cell. IL-1Ra protected islets from HFD treated animals from β-cell apoptosis, induced β-cell proliferation, and improved glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Insulin mRNA was reduced in islets from mice fed a HFD but normalized in the IL-1Ra group. Our results show that IL-1Ra improves β-cell survival and function, and support the potential role for IL-1Ra in the treatment of diabetes. PMID:18239070

  3. Voluntary exercise improves murine dermal connective tissue status in high-fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Lőrincz, Kende; Haluszka, Dóra; Kiss, Norbert; Gyöngyösi, Nóra; Bánvölgyi, András; Szipőcs, Róbert; Wikonkál, Norbert M

    2017-04-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for several cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Its influence on the skin is less obvious, yet certain negative effects of adipose tissue inflammation on the dermis have been suggested. Excess weight is closely associated with sedentary behavior, so any increase in physical activity is considered beneficial against obesity. To investigate the effects of obesity and physical exercise on the skin, we established a mouse model in which mice were kept either on a high-fat diet or received standard chow. After the two groups achieved a significant weight difference, physical exercise was introduced to both. Animals were given the opportunity to perform voluntary exercise for 40 min daily in a hamster wheel for a period of 8 weeks. We evaluated the status of the dermis at the beginning and at the end of the exercise period by in vivo nonlinear microscopy. Obese mice kept on high-fat diet lost weight steadily after they started to exercise. In the high-fat diet group, we could detect significantly larger adipocytes and a thicker layer of subcutaneous tissue; both changes started to normalize after exercise. Nonlinear microscopy revealed an impaired collagen structure in obese mice that improved considerably after physical activity was introduced. With the ability to detect damage on collagen structure, we set out to address the question whether this process is reversible. With the use of a novel imaging method, we were able to show the reversibility of connective tissue deterioration as a benefit of physical exercise.

  4. Maternal and postweaning high-fat diets disturb hippocampal gene expression, learning, and memory function.

    PubMed

    Page, Kathleen C; Jones, Elizabeth K; Anday, Endla K

    2014-04-15

    We tested the hypothesis that excess saturated fat consumption during pregnancy, lactation, and/or postweaning alters the expression of genes mediating hippocampal synaptic efficacy and impairs spatial learning and memory in adulthood. Dams were fed control chow or a diet high in saturated fat before mating, during pregnancy, and into lactation. Offspring were weaned to either standard chow or a diet high in saturated fat. The Morris Water Maze was used to evaluate spatial learning and memory. Open field testing was used to evaluate motor activity. Hippocampal gene expression in adult males was measured using RT-PCR and ELISA. Offspring from high fat-fed dams took longer, swam farther, and faster to try and find the hidden platform during the 5-day learning period. Control offspring consuming standard chow spent the most time in memory quadrant during the probe test. Offspring from high fat-fed dams consuming excess saturated fat spent the least. The levels of mRNA and protein for brain-derived neurotrophic factor and activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein were significantly decreased by maternal diet effects. Nerve growth factor mRNA and protein levels were significantly reduced in response to both maternal and postweaning high-fat diets. Expression levels for the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA) receptor subunit NR2B as well as synaptophysin were significantly decreased in response to both maternal and postweaning diets. Synaptotagmin was significantly increased in offspring from high fat-fed dams. These data support the hypothesis that exposure to excess saturated fat during hippocampal development is associated with complex patterns of gene expression and deficits in learning and memory.

  5. Berberine reverts hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction in high-fat fed rats: a possible role for SirT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Teodoro, João Soeiro; Duarte, Filipe Valente; Gomes, Ana Patrícia; Varela, Ana Teresa; Peixoto, Francisco Manuel; Rolo, Anabela Pinto; Palmeira, Carlos Marques

    2013-11-01

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid with anti-diabetic properties. Despite the central role of liver and thus hepatic mitochondria in whole-body metabolism, berberine effects on hepatic mitochondrial function in an obesity model are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that berberine treatment recovers mitochondrial efficiency when altered by a high-fat feeding. Mitochondria isolated from the liver of high-fat fed rats exhibited decreased capacity to accumulate calcium and impaired oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity, as shown by impaired mitochondrial membrane potential, oxygen consumption and cellular ATP levels. Interestingly, the recovery of mitochondrial function by berberine was associated with an increased activity of the mitochondrial sirtuin 3 (SirT3). In conclusion, berberine potent protective effects against metabolic syndrome may rely on increasing mitochondrial SirT3 activity, normalizing mitochondrial function and preventing a state of energetic deficit caused by impaired OXPHOS.

  6. The acute effects of time-of-day-dependent high fat feeding on whole body metabolic flexibility in mice.

    PubMed

    Joo, J; Cox, C C; Kindred, E D; Lashinger, L M; Young, M E; Bray, M S

    2016-09-01

    Both circadian disruption and timing of feeding have important roles in the development of metabolic disease. Despite growing acceptance that the timing of food consumption has long-term impact on metabolic homeostasis, little is known regarding the immediate influence on whole body metabolism, or the mechanisms involved. We aimed to examine the acute effects of time-of-day-dependent high fat feeding on whole body substrate metabolism and metabolic plasticity, and to determine the potential contribution of the adipocyte circadian clock. Mice were fed a regimen of 4-h meal at the beginning and end of the dark (waking) cycle, separated by 4 h of fasting. Daily experimental conditions consisted of either an early very high fat or high fat (EVHF or EHF, 60 or 45% kcals from fat, respectively) or late (LVHF or LHF) meal, paired with a low fat (LF, 10% kcals from fat) meal. Metabolic parameters, glucose tolerance, body fat composition and weight were assessed. To determine the role of the adipocyte circadian clock, an aP2-CLOCK mutant (ACM) mouse model was used. Mice in the EVHF or EHF groups showed a 13.2 or 8.84 higher percentage of caloric intake from fat and had a 0.013 or 0.026 lower daily average respiratory exchange ratio, respectively, compared with mice eating the opposite feeding regime. Changes in glucose tolerance, body fat composition and weight were not significant at the end of the 9-day restricted feeding period. ACM mice did not exhibit different metabolic responses to the feeding regimes compared with wild-type littermates. Circadian clock disruption did not influence the short-term response to timed feeding. Both the total fat composition of diet and the timing of fat intake may differentially mediate the effect of timed feeding on substrate metabolism, but may not induce acute changes in metabolic flexibility.

  7. The acute effects of time-of-day-dependent high fat feeding on whole body metabolic flexibility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Joo, J; Cox, C C; Kindred, E D; Lashinger, L M; Young, M E; Bray, M S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Both circadian disruption and timing of feeding have important roles in the development of metabolic disease. Despite growing acceptance that the timing of food consumption has long-term impact on metabolic homeostasis, little is known regarding the immediate influence on whole body metabolism, or the mechanisms involved. We aimed to examine the acute effects of time-of-day-dependent high fat feeding on whole body substrate metabolism and metabolic plasticity, and to determine the potential contribution of the adipocyte circadian clock. Methods: Mice were fed a regimen of 4-h meal at the beginning and end of the dark (waking) cycle, separated by 4 h of fasting. Daily experimental conditions consisted of either an early very high fat or high fat (EVHF or EHF, 60 or 45% kcals from fat, respectively) or late (LVHF or LHF) meal, paired with a low fat (LF, 10% kcals from fat) meal. Metabolic parameters, glucose tolerance, body fat composition and weight were assessed. To determine the role of the adipocyte circadian clock, an aP2-CLOCK mutant (ACM) mouse model was used. Results: Mice in the EVHF or EHF groups showed a 13.2 or 8.84 higher percentage of caloric intake from fat and had a 0.013 or 0.026 lower daily average respiratory exchange ratio, respectively, compared with mice eating the opposite feeding regime. Changes in glucose tolerance, body fat composition and weight were not significant at the end of the 9-day restricted feeding period. ACM mice did not exhibit different metabolic responses to the feeding regimes compared with wild-type littermates. Circadian clock disruption did not influence the short-term response to timed feeding. Conclusions: Both the total fat composition of diet and the timing of fat intake may differentially mediate the effect of timed feeding on substrate metabolism, but may not induce acute changes in metabolic flexibility. PMID:27133618

  8. Appetite dysfunction in obese males: evidence for role of hyperinsulinaemia in passive overconsumption with a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Speechly, D P; Buffenstein, R

    2000-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that caloric and fat intake in a pre-load meal have no subsequent effects upon blood glucose and insulin concentrations, perceived hunger, subsequent food intake and appetite control in lean and obese men. Lean and obese men reported to the laboratory in the morning in a fasted state where they were subject to an eating test based on the pre-load-test meal paradigm, using a double-blind protocol. The breakfast pre-load was either a reduced caloric low-fat (LF) meal or an overfeeding high-fat (HF) meal. LF was 20% of each individual's average daily energy requirement (ADER) and comprised 60% carbohydrate, 27% protein, and 13% fat, whilst HF was adjusted to yield 55% of the ADER, and comprised 45% carbohydrate, 22% protein and 43% fat. The pre-loads on both trials were administered as one single mean, and were given in a random order. After 5(1/2) h, an ad libitum test-lunch was given to determine how much energy was consumed. Between the two meals, blood samples were collected and subjective hunger ratings were assessed hourly. These variables were measured at 30-min intervals for 75 min after the ad libitum meal. Twelve healthy men, six of whom were lean (BMI 22. 50+/-1.08 kg.m2) and six of whom were obese (BMI 39.05+/-11.63 kg. m2) were recruited. When given 55% of their ADER in a HF pre-load meal, the obese group consumed more energy (5426+/-1126 kJ; F1,20=11.45, P<0.01), than the lean group did (3473+/-1114 kJ), accounting for 45% of the ADER in that meal setting. However, no differences between lean and obese intake were noted at the test meal following a LF pre-load. The lean group exhibited a significant inverse correlation (r=0.628, P<0.05) between serum insulin concentration before eating the test meal and the amount of energy consumed at the test meal, while such a relationship was absent in the obese group. The obese males were unable to compensate for the caloric overloading when fed a HF (55% ADER) pre-load at a subsequent test

  9. The association between LRP-1 variants and chylomicron uptake after a high fat meal

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In vitro studies suggest that low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) plays a role in the secondary uptake of chylomicrons. In addition, in vivo studies using LRP-1 knockout mice show these animals exhibit delayed chylomicron clearance. Whether this is true in humans is unknown. We...

  10. Long-term globular adiponectin administration improves adipose tissue dysmetabolism in high-fat diet-fed Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Matafome, P; Rodrigues, T; Pereira, A; Letra, L; Azevedo, H; Paixão, A; Silvério, M; Almeida, A; Sena, C; Seiça, R

    2014-10-01

    Adiponectin administration to obese or type 2 diabetic patients is still far off, due to its expensive costs and absence of studies demonstrating the effectiveness of its chronic administration. We performed long-term globular adiponectin administration, testing its usefulness in improving adipose tissue metabolism. Adiponectin (98 υg/day) was administered through a subcutaneous minipump with continued release (28 days) to Wistar rats fed a high-fat diet. Adiponectin decreased body weight and adipocyte size, while decreasing circulating leptin levels. More, adiponectin was able to increase IkappaBalpha and PPARgamma levels and to prevent high-fat diet-induced impairment of insulin signalling, especially in epididymal adipose tissue. This resulted in improved glucose profile. High-fat diet caused an impairment of lipolysis in epididymal adipose tissue, which was partially restored by adiponectin treatment. Long-term globular adiponectin administration was able to improve pathways of insulin signalling and lipid storage in adipose tissue of high-fat diet-fed rats, contributing to a better metabolic profile.

  11. Optimal time of administration of insulin lispro. Importance of meal composition.

    PubMed

    Strachan, M W; Frier, B M

    1998-01-01

    To compare the glucodynamics of pre- and postprandial administration of insulin lispro using test meals of differing composition. Twenty subjects with IDDM were studied on four separate occasions. Ten subjects ingested high-carbohydrate and high-fat breakfasts with a large liquid component, and 10 subjects ingested high-carbohydrate and high-fat breakfasts in a more solid form. With each meal, insulin lispro was injected 10 min preprandial on one occasion and 20 min postprandial on another. The magnitude and temporal pattern of postprandial glucose excursions were observed. With all meal types studied, postprandial blood glucose excursions were significantly smaller when insulin lispro was administered preprandially (P < 0.05). With both high-carbohydrate meals and the liquid high-fat meal, preprandial administration of lispro was associated with modest postprandial increments of blood glucose. With the solid high-fat meal, preprandial lispro produced a cumulative decline in postprandial blood glucose, whereas blood glucose rose when lispro was administered postprandially. For meals with a high carbohydrate content, the optimal time of administration of lispro is preprandial. However, for meals with a high solid fat content, postprandial administration of lispro may be preferable.

  12. Lipid droplet-associated proteins in high-fat fed mice with the effects of voluntary running and diet change.

    PubMed

    Rinnankoski-Tuikka, Rita; Hulmi, Juha J; Torvinen, Sira; Silvennoinen, Mika; Lehti, Maarit; Kivelä, Riikka; Reunanen, Hilkka; Kujala, Urho M; Kainulainen, Heikki

    2014-08-01

    The relation between lipid accumulation and influence of exercise on insulin sensitivity is not straightforward. A proper balance between lipid droplet synthesis, lipolysis, and oxidative metabolism would ensure low local intramyocellular fatty acid levels, thereby possibly protecting against lipotoxicity-associated insulin resistance. This study investigated whether the accumulation of triglycerides and lipid droplets in response to high availability of fatty acids after high-fat feeding would parallel the abundance of intramyocellular perilipin proteins, especially PLIN5. The effects on these variables after diet change or voluntary running exercise intervention in skeletal muscle were also investigated. During a 19-week experiment, C57BL/6J mice were studied in six different groups: low-fat diet sedentary, low-fat diet active, high-fat diet sedentary, high-fat diet active and two groups which were high-fat sedentary for nine weeks, after which divided into low-fat sedentary or low-fat active groups. Myocellular triglyceride concentration and perilipin protein expression levels were assessed. We show that, concurrently with impaired insulin sensitivity, the expression level of PLIN5 and muscular triglyceride concentration increased dramatically after high-fat diet. These adaptations were reversible after the diet change intervention with no additional effect of exercise. After high-fat diet, lipid droplets become larger providing more surface area for PLIN5. We suggest that PLIN5 is an important regulator of lipid droplet turnover in altered conditions of fatty acid supply and consumption. Imbalances in lipid droplet metabolism and turnover might lead to lipotoxicity-related insulin resistance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Folic acid supplementation during high-fat diet feeding restores AMPK activation via an AMP-LKB1-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Sid, Victoria; Wu, Nan; Sarna, Lindsei K.; Siow, Yaw L.; House, James D.

    2015-01-01

    AMPK is an endogenous energy sensor that regulates lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is regarded as a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome with impaired lipid and glucose metabolism and increased oxidative stress. Our recent study showed that folic acid supplementation attenuated hepatic oxidative stress and lipid accumulation in high-fat diet-fed mice. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of folic acid on hepatic AMPK during high-fat diet feeding and the mechanisms involved. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a control diet (10% kcal fat), a high-fat diet (60% kcal fat), or a high-fat diet supplemented with folic acid (26 mg/kg diet) for 5 wk. Mice fed a high-fat diet exhibited hyperglycemia, hepatic cholesterol accumulation, and reduced hepatic AMPK phosphorylation. Folic acid supplementation restored AMPK phosphorylation (activation) and reduced blood glucose and hepatic cholesterol levels. Activation of AMPK by folic acid was mediated through an elevation of its allosteric activator AMP and activation of its upstream kinase, namely, liver kinase B1 (LKB1) in the liver. Consistent with in vivo findings, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (bioactive form of folate) restored phosphorylation (activation) of both AMPK and LKB1 in palmitic acid-treated HepG2 cells. Activation of AMPK by folic acid might be responsible for AMPK-dependent phosphorylation of HMG-CoA reductase, leading to reduced hepatic cholesterol synthesis during high-fat diet feeding. These results suggest that folic acid supplementation may improve cholesterol and glucose metabolism by restoration of AMPK activation in the liver. PMID:26400185

  14. Impact of high-fat diet and voluntary running on body weight and endothelial function in LDL receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Langbein, Heike; Hofmann, Anja; Brunssen, Coy; Goettsch, Winfried; Morawietz, Henning

    2015-05-01

    Obesity and physical inactivity are important cardiovascular risk factors. Regular physical exercise has been shown to mediate beneficial effects in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. However, the impact of physical exercise on endothelial function in proatherosclerotic low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (LDLR(-/-)) mice has not been studied so far. Six-week-old male LDLR(-/-) mice were fed a standard diet or a high-fat diet (39 kcal% fat diet) for 20 weeks. The impact of high-fat diet and voluntary running on body weight and amount of white adipose tissue was monitored. Basal tone and endothelial function was investigated in aortic rings using a Mulvany myograph. LDLR(-/-) mice on high-fat diet had increased cumulative food energy intake, but also higher physical activity compared to mice on control diet. Body weight and amount of visceral and retroperitoneal white adipose tissue of LDLR(-/-) mice were significantly increased by high-fat diet and partially reduced by voluntary running. Endothelial function in aortae of LDLR(-/-) mice was impaired after 20 weeks on standard and high-fat diet and could not be improved by voluntary running. Basal tone showed a trend to be increased by high-fat diet. Voluntary running reduced body weight and amount of white adipose tissue in LDLR(-/-) mice. Endothelial dysfunction in LDLR(-/-) mice could not be improved by voluntary running. In a clinical context, physical exercise alone might not have an influence on functional parameters and LDL-C levels in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia. However, physical activity in these patients may be in general beneficial and should be performed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Folic acid supplementation during high-fat diet feeding restores AMPK activation via an AMP-LKB1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sid, Victoria; Wu, Nan; Sarna, Lindsei K; Siow, Yaw L; House, James D; O, Karmin

    2015-11-15

    AMPK is an endogenous energy sensor that regulates lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is regarded as a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome with impaired lipid and glucose metabolism and increased oxidative stress. Our recent study showed that folic acid supplementation attenuated hepatic oxidative stress and lipid accumulation in high-fat diet-fed mice. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of folic acid on hepatic AMPK during high-fat diet feeding and the mechanisms involved. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a control diet (10% kcal fat), a high-fat diet (60% kcal fat), or a high-fat diet supplemented with folic acid (26 mg/kg diet) for 5 wk. Mice fed a high-fat diet exhibited hyperglycemia, hepatic cholesterol accumulation, and reduced hepatic AMPK phosphorylation. Folic acid supplementation restored AMPK phosphorylation (activation) and reduced blood glucose and hepatic cholesterol levels. Activation of AMPK by folic acid was mediated through an elevation of its allosteric activator AMP and activation of its upstream kinase, namely, liver kinase B1 (LKB1) in the liver. Consistent with in vivo findings, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (bioactive form of folate) restored phosphorylation (activation) of both AMPK and LKB1 in palmitic acid-treated HepG2 cells. Activation of AMPK by folic acid might be responsible for AMPK-dependent phosphorylation of HMG-CoA reductase, leading to reduced hepatic cholesterol synthesis during high-fat diet feeding. These results suggest that folic acid supplementation may improve cholesterol and glucose metabolism by restoration of AMPK activation in the liver.

  16. Effects of sleep disruption and high fat intake on glucose metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jacqueline M; Barf, R Paulien; Opp, Mark R

    2016-06-01

    Poor sleep quality or quantity impairs glycemic control and increases risk of disease under chronic conditions. Recovery sleep may offset adverse metabolic outcomes of accumulated sleep debt, but the extent to which this occurs is unclear. We examined whether recovery sleep improves glucose metabolism in mice subjected to prolonged sleep disruption, and whether high fat intake during sleep disruption exacerbates glycemic control. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were subjected to 18-h sleep fragmentation daily for 9 days, followed by 1 day of recovery. During sleep disruption, one group of mice was fed a high-fat diet (HFD) while another group was fed standard laboratory chow. Insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance were assessed by insulin and glucose tolerance testing at baseline, after 3 and 7 days of sleep disruption, and at the end of the protocol after 24h of undisturbed sleep opportunity (recovery). To characterize changes in sleep architecture that are associated with sleep debt and recovery, we quantified electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings during sleep fragmentation and recovery periods from an additional group of mice. We now report that 9 days of 18-h daily sleep fragmentation significantly reduces rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS). Mice respond with increases in REMS, but not NREMS, during the daily 6-h undisturbed sleep opportunity. However, both REMS and NREMS increase significantly during the 24-h recovery period. Although sleep disruption alone has no effect in this protocol, high fat feeding in combination with sleep disruption impairs glucose tolerance, effects that are reversed by recovery sleep. Insulin sensitivity modestly improves after 3 days of sleep fragmentation and after 24h of recovery, with significantly greater improvements in mice exposed to HFD during sleep disruption. Improvements in both glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity are associated with NREMS rebound, raising the possibility that this

  17. Supplementation of a high-fat diet with chlorogenic acid is associated with insulin resistance and hepatic lipid accumulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Mubarak, Aidilla; Hodgson, Jonathan M; Considine, Michael J; Croft, Kevin D; Matthews, Vance B

    2013-05-08

    The increasing prevalence of the metabolic syndrome requires a greater need for therapeutic and prevention strategies. Higher coffee consumption is consistently associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes in population studies. Dietary polyphenols have been linked to benefits on several features of the metabolic syndrome. Chlorogenic acid (CGA), a major component of coffee, is one of the most consumed polyphenols in the diet. In our study, we conducted a controlled dietary intervention over 12 weeks in male mice. There were three dietary groups: (i) normal diet, (ii) high-fat diet, and (iii) high-fat diet + CGA. We assessed the effect of CGA at a physiologically obtainable dose (1 g/kg of diet) on high-fat-diet-induced obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and also fatty acid oxidation and insulin signaling in C57BL/6 male mice. Supplementation of CGA in the high-fat diet did not reduce body weight compared to mice fed the high-fat diet alone (p = 0.32). CGA resulted in increased insulin resistance compared to mice fed a high-fat diet only (p < 0.05). CGA resulted in decreased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (p < 0.001) and acetyl carboxylase β (ACCβ), a downstream target of AMPK (p < 0.05), in liver. The liver of mice fed a high-fat diet supplemented with CGA had a higher lipid content (p < 0.05) and more steatosis relative to mice fed a high-fat diet only, indicating impaired fatty acid oxidation. This study suggests that CGA supplementation in a high-fat diet does not protect against features of the metabolic syndrome in diet-induced obese mice.

  18. Chronic high fat feeding increases anxiety-like behaviour and reduces transcript abundance of glucocorticoid signalling genes in the hippocampus of female rats.

    PubMed

    Sivanathan, Shathveekan; Thavartnam, Kabriya; Arif, Shahneen; Elegino, Trisha; McGowan, Patrick O

    2015-06-01

    The consumption of diets high in saturated fats and obesity have been associated with impaired physical and mental health. Previous studies indicate that chronic high fat diet consumption leads to systemic inflammation in humans and non-human animal models. Studies in non-human animals suggest that altered physiological responses to stress are also a consequence of high fat diet consumption. Glucocorticoid signalling mechanisms may link immune and stress-related pathways in the brain, and were shown to be significantly altered in the brains of female rat offspring of mothers exposed to chronic high fat diet during pregnancy and lactation. For adult females, the consequence of chronic high fat diet consumption on these signalling pathways and their relationship to stress-related behaviour is not known. In this study, we examined the effects of chronic consumption of a high fat diet compared to a low fat control diet among adult female Long Evans rats. We found significant differences in weight gain, caloric intake, anxiety-related behaviours, and glucocorticoid-related gene expression over a 10-week exposure period. As expected, rats in the high fat diet group gained the most weight and consumed the greatest number of calories. Rats in the high fat diet group showed significantly greater levels of anxiety-related behaviour in the Light Dark and Open Field tasks compared to rats in the low fat diet group. Rats consuming high fat diet also exhibited reduced transcript abundance in the hippocampus of stress-related mineralocorticoid receptor and glucocorticoid receptor genes, as well as nuclear factor kappa beta gene expression, implicated in inflammatory processes. Together, these data indicate that chronic high fat diet consumption may increase anxiety-like behaviour at least in part via alterations in glucocorticoid signalling mechanisms in limbic brain regions.

  19. Exercise training promotes cardioprotection through oxygen-sparing action in high fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Lund, J; Hafstad, A D; Boardman, N T; Rossvoll, L; Rolim, N P; Ahmed, M S; Florholmen, G; Attramadal, H; Wisløff, U; Larsen, T S; Aasum, E

    2015-04-15

    Although exercise training has been demonstrated to have beneficial cardiovascular effects in diabetes, the effect of exercise training on hearts from obese/diabetic models is unclear. In the present study, mice were fed a high-fat diet, which led to obesity, reduced aerobic capacity, development of mild diastolic dysfunction, and impaired glucose tolerance. Following 8 wk on high-fat diet, mice were assigned to 5 weekly high-intensity interval training (HIT) sessions (10 × 4 min at 85-90% of maximum oxygen uptake) or remained sedentary for the next 10 constitutive weeks. HIT increased maximum oxygen uptake by 13%, reduced body weight by 16%, and improved systemic glucose homeostasis. Exercise training was found to normalize diastolic function, attenuate diet-induced changes in myocardial substrate utilization, and dampen cardiac reactive oxygen species content and fibrosis. These changes were accompanied by normalization of obesity-related impairment of mechanical efficiency due to a decrease in work-independent myocardial oxygen consumption. Finally, we found HIT to reduce infarct size by 47% in ex vivo hearts subjected to ischemia-reperfusion. This study therefore demonstrated for the first time that exercise training mediates cardioprotection following ischemia in diet-induced obese mice and that this was associated with oxygen-sparing effects. These findings highlight the importance of optimal myocardial energetics during ischemic stress. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Actions of exendin-4 therapy on cognitive function and hippocampal synaptic plasticity in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Gault, V A; Porter, W D; Flatt, P R; Hölscher, C

    2010-08-01

    High-calorie diet has been shown to impair learning ability and hippocampal synaptic plasticity in rodents. This study examined effects of daily treatment with the glucagon-like peptide-1 mimetic, exendin-4, on cognitive function and hippocampal synaptic plasticity in a model of diet-induced obesity, which exhibits compromised cognitive performance. Mice fed a high-fat diet were treated with exendin-4 (25 nmol kg(-1) bodyweight; twice daily) or saline vehicle (0.9% (w/v) NaCl) over 21 days. In addition to improving metabolic control, exendin-4-treated mice exhibited a marked increase in recognition index highlighting improved learning and memory. High-fat diet resulted in the elimination of in vivo electrophysiological long-term potentiation, which was rescued following exendin-4 treatment. This study shows that exendin-4 therapy improves cognitive function and ameliorates impaired hippocampal synaptic plasticity in dietary-induced obesity.

  1. Hepatic NAD salvage pathway is enhanced in mice on a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Penke, Melanie; Larsen, Per S; Schuster, Susanne; Dall, Morten; Jensen, Benjamin A H; Gorski, Theresa; Meusel, Andrej; Richter, Sandy; Vienberg, Sara G; Treebak, Jonas T; Kiess, Wieland; Garten, Antje

    2015-09-05

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) is the rate-limiting enzyme for NAD salvage and the abundance of Nampt has been shown to be altered in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. It is, however, unknown how hepatic Nampt is regulated in response to accumulation of lipids in the liver of mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). HFD mice gained more weight, stored more hepatic lipids and had an impaired glucose tolerance compared with control mice. NAD levels as well as Nampt mRNA expression, protein abundance and activity were significantly increased in HFD mice. Enhanced NAD levels were associated with deacetylation of p53 and Nfκb indicating increased activation of Sirt1. Despite impaired glucose tolerance and increased hepatic lipid levels in HFD mice, NAD metabolism was significantly enhanced. Thus, improved NAD metabolism may be a compensatory mechanism to protect against negative impact of hepatic lipid accumulation.

  2. Shift of circadian feeding pattern by high-fat diets is coincident with reward deficits in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Morales, Lidia; Del Olmo, Nuria; Valladolid-Acebes, Ismael; Fole, Alberto; Cano, Victoria; Merino, Beatriz; Stucchi, Paula; Ruggieri, Daniela; López, Laura; Alguacil, Luis Fernando; Ruiz-Gayo, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies provide evidence that high-fat diets (HF) trigger both i) a deficit of reward responses linked to a decrease of mesolimbic dopaminergic activity, and ii) a disorganization of circadian feeding behavior that switch from a structured meal-based schedule to a continuous snacking, even during periods normally devoted to rest. This feeding pattern has been shown to be a cause of HF-induced overweight and obesity. Our hypothesis deals with the eventual link between the rewarding properties of food and the circadian distribution of meals. We have investigated the effect of circadian feeding pattern on reward circuits by means of the conditioned-place preference (CPP) paradigm and we have characterized the rewarding properties of natural (food) and artificial (cocaine) reinforcers both in free-feeding ad libitum HF mice and in HF animals submitted to a re-organized feeding schedule based on the standard feeding behavior displayed by mice feeding normal chow ("forced synchronization"). We demonstrate that i) ad libitum HF diet attenuates cocaine and food reward in the CPP protocol, and ii) forced synchronization of feeding prevents this reward deficit. Our study provides further evidence that the rewarding impact of food with low palatability is diminished in mice exposed to a high-fat diet and strongly suggest that the decreased sensitivity to chow as a positive reinforcer triggers a disorganized feeding pattern which might account for metabolic disorders leading to obesity.

  3. High-fat and ketogenic diets in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Paganoni, Sabrina; Wills, Anne-Marie

    2013-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a fatal neurodegenerative disease. Epidemiologic data suggest that malnutrition is a common feature in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and being overweight or obese confers a survival advantage in this patient population. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mouse models, a high-fat diet has been shown to lead to weight gain and prolonged survival. However, little research has been conducted to test whether nutritional interventions might ameliorate the disease course in humans. Here we review the currently available evidence supporting the potential role of dietary interventions as a therapeutic tool for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Ultimately, determining whether a high-fat or ketogenic diet could be beneficial in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis will require large randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials.

  4. Imidacloprid Promotes High Fat Diet-Induced Adiposity and Insulin Resistance in Male C57BL/6J Mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Quancai; Xiao, Xiao; Kim, Yoo; Kim, Daeyoung; Yoon, Kyoon Sup; Clark, John M; Park, Yeonhwa

    2016-12-14

    Imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid insecticide widely used in agriculture worldwide, has been reported to promote adipogenesis and cause insulin resistance in vitro. The purpose of the current study was to determine the effects of imidacloprid and its interaction with dietary fat in the development of adiposity and insulin resistance using male C57BL/6J mice. Imidacloprid (0.06, 0.6, or 6 mg/kg bw/day) was mixed in a low-fat (4% w/w) or high-fat (20% w/w) diet and given to mice ad libitum for 12 weeks. Imidacloprid significantly promoted high fat diet-induced body weight gain and adiposity. In addition, imidacloprid treatment with the high fat diet resulted in impaired glucose metabolism. Consistently, there were significant effects of imidacloprid on genes regulating lipid and glucose metabolisms, including the AMP-activated protein kinase-α (AMPKα) pathway in white adipose tissue and liver. These results suggest that imidacloprid may potentiate high fat diet-induced adiposity and insulin resistance in male C57BL/6J mice.

  5. Actions of incretin metabolites on locomotor activity, cognitive function and in vivo hippocampal synaptic plasticity in high fat fed mice.

    PubMed

    Porter, David; Faivre, Emilie; Flatt, Peter R; Hölscher, Christian; Gault, Victor A

    2012-05-01

    The incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) improve markers of cognitive function in obesity-diabetes, however, both are rapidly degraded to their major metabolites, GLP-1(9-36)amide and GIP(3-42), respectively. Therefore, the present study investigated effects of GLP-1(9-36)amide and GIP(3-42) on locomotor activity, cognitive function and hippocampal synaptic plasticity in mice with diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. High-fat fed Swiss TO mice treated with GLP-1(9-36)amide, GIP(3-42) or exendin(9-39)amide (twice-daily for 60 days) did not exhibit any changes in bodyweight, non-fasting plasma glucose and plasma insulin concentrations or glucose tolerance compared with high-fat saline controls. Similarly, locomotor and feeding activity, O(2) consumption, CO(2) production, respiratory exchange ratio and energy expenditure were not altered by chronic treatment with incretin metabolites. Administration of the truncated metabolites did not alter general behavior in an open field test or learning and memory ability as recorded during an object recognition test. High-fat mice exhibited a significant impairment in hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) which was not affected by treatment with incretin metabolites. These data indicate that incretin metabolites do not influence locomotor activity, cognitive function and hippocampal synaptic plasticity when administered at pharmacological doses to mice fed a high-fat diet.

  6. Imidacloprid Promotes High Fat Diet-Induced Adiposity and Insulin Resistance in Male C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid insecticide widely used in agriculture worldwide, has been reported to promote adipogenesis and cause insulin resistance in vitro. The purpose of the current study was to determine the effects of imidacloprid and its interaction with dietary fat in the development of adiposity and insulin resistance using male C57BL/6J mice. Imidacloprid (0.06, 0.6, or 6 mg/kg bw/day) was mixed in a low-fat (4% w/w) or high-fat (20% w/w) diet and given to mice ad libitum for 12 weeks. Imidacloprid significantly promoted high fat diet-induced body weight gain and adiposity. In addition, imidacloprid treatment with the high fat diet resulted in impaired glucose metabolism. Consistently, there were significant effects of imidacloprid on genes regulating lipid and glucose metabolisms, including the AMP-activated protein kinase-α (AMPKα) pathway in white adipose tissue and liver. These results suggest that imidacloprid may potentiate high fat diet-induced adiposity and insulin resistance in male C57BL/6J mice. PMID:27960282

  7. Mori Folium and Mori Fructus Mixture Attenuates High-Fat Diet-Induced Cognitive Deficits in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyun Uk; Park, Gunhyuk; Kim, Hocheol; Lim, Yunsook; Oh, Myung Sook

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has become a global health problem, contributing to various diseases including diabetes, hypertension, cancer, and dementia. Increasing evidence suggests that obesity can also cause neuronal damage, long-term memory loss, and cognitive impairment. The leaves and the fruits of Morus alba L., containing active phytochemicals, have been shown to possess antiobesity and hypolipidemic properties. Thus, in the present study, we assessed their effects on cognitive functioning in mice fed a high-fat diet by performing immunohistochemistry, using antibodies against c-Fos, synaptophysin, and postsynaptic density protein 95 and a behavioral test. C57BL/6 mice fed a high-fat diet for 21 weeks exhibited increased body weight, but mice coadministered an optimized Mori Folium and Mori Fructus extract mixture (2 : 1; MFE) for the final 12 weeks exhibited significant body weight loss. Additionally, obese mice exhibited not only reduced neural activity, but also decreased presynaptic and postsynaptic activities, while MFE-treated mice exhibited recovery of these activities. Finally, cognitive deficits induced by the high-fat diet were recovered by cotreatment with MFE in the novel object recognition test. Our findings suggest that the antiobesity effects of MFE resulted in recovery of the cognitive deficits induced by the high-fat diet by regulation of neural and synaptic activities. PMID:25945108

  8. Attentional bias in restrictive eating disorders. Stronger attentional avoidance of high-fat food compared to healthy controls?

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Esther M; de Jong, Peter J

    2012-02-01

    A striking feature of the restricting subtype of anorexia nervosa (AN) is that these patients are extremely successful in restricting their food intake. Possibly, they are highly efficient in avoiding attentional engagement of food cues, thereby preventing more elaborate processing of food cues and thus subsequent craving. This study examined whether patients diagnosed with restrictive eating disorders ('restricting AN-like patients'; N=88) indeed show stronger attentional avoidance of visual food stimuli than healthy controls (N=76). Attentional engagement and disengagement were assessed by means of a pictorial exogenous cueing task, and (food and neutral) pictures were presented for 300, 500, or 1000 ms. In the 500 ms condition, both restricting AN-like patients and healthy controls demonstrated attentional avoidance of high-fat food as indexed by a negative cue-validity effect and impaired attentional engagement with high-fat food, whereas no evidence was found for facilitated disengagement from high-fat food. Within the group of restricting AN-like patients, patients with relatively severe eating pathology showed relatively strong attentional engagement with low-fat food. There was no evidence for attentional bias in the 300 and 1000 ms condition. The pattern of findings indicate that attentional avoidance of high-fat food is a common phenomenon that may become counterproductive in restricting AN-like patients, as it could facilitate their restricted food intake.

  9. High dietary protein decreases fat deposition induced by high-fat and high-sucrose diet in rats.

    PubMed

    Chaumontet, Catherine; Even, Patrick C; Schwarz, Jessica; Simonin-Foucault, Angélique; Piedcoq, Julien; Fromentin, Gilles; Azzout-Marniche, Dalila; Tomé, Daniel

    2015-10-28

    High-protein diets are known to reduce adiposity in the context of high carbohydrate and Western diets. However, few studies have investigated the specific high-protein effect on lipogenesis induced by a high-sucrose (HS) diet or fat deposition induced by high-fat feeding. We aimed to determine the effects of high protein intake on the development of fat deposition and partitioning in response to high-fat and/or HS feeding. A total of thirty adult male Wistar rats were assigned to one of the six dietary regimens with low and high protein, sucrose and fat contents for 5 weeks. Body weight (BW) and food intake were measured weekly. Oral glucose tolerance tests and meal tolerance tests were performed after 4th and 5th weeks of the regimen, respectively. At the end of the study, the rats were killed 2 h after ingestion of a calibrated meal. Blood, tissues and organs were collected for analysis of circulating metabolites and hormones, body composition and mRNA expression in the liver and adipose tissues. No changes were observed in cumulative energy intake and BW gain after 5 weeks of dietary treatment. However, high-protein diets reduced by 20 % the adiposity gain induced by HS and high-sucrose high-fat (HS-HF) diets. Gene expression and transcriptomic analysis suggested that high protein intake reduced liver capacity for lipogenesis by reducing mRNA expressions of fatty acid synthase (fasn), acetyl-CoA carboxylase a and b (Acaca and Acacb) and sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1c (Srebf-1c). Moreover, ketogenesis, as indicated by plasma β-hydroxybutyrate levels, was higher in HS-HF-fed mice that were also fed high protein levels. Taken together, these results suggest that high-protein diets may reduce adiposity by inhibiting lipogenesis and stimulating ketogenesis in the liver.

  10. High-fat diet-related stimulation of sweetness desire is greater in women than in men despite high vegetable intake.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bei; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Adachi, Chisaki; Kawakami, Yuka; Katayama, Takafumi; Takeda, Eiji

    2015-05-01

    To examine the effects of lunches with different dietary energy densities on food preferences between genders. Randomized crossover study. Participants were administered the following packed test meals once weekly on a specified day during six sessions: control (150 g of rice with a sautéed beef entrée containing 40 g of raw beef and 240 g of vegetables), high-meat/low-rice, low-vegetable, medium-fat/low-vegetable, high-fat and high-fat/low-vegetable meals. Subjective levels of sensory properties were assessed over time using visual analogue scales. University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima, Japan. Sixty-five men and sixty-five women matched by age and BMI. Men showed significantly stronger desires for salty and fatty foods after meals (P<0.05). Women showed a significantly stronger desire for sweetness from 2 h after the low-vegetable meal, and increasing fat content under high-vegetable conditions caused a significant stimulated sweetness desire in women more than in men (P<0.05). Moreover, after a high-meat/low-rice meal with 100 g of rice, sweetness desire was stronger in women (P=0.024), whereas no significant differences in sweetness desire were shown between genders after another low-energy-density control meal with 150 g of rice. Men had significantly stronger desires for salty and fatty foods, whereas women preferred sweet food after meals. The sweetness desire in women was stimulated by increasing fat content, even with a high vegetable intake. Low rice intake in a low-energy-density diet also caused a relative stimulation of sweetness desire in women.

  11. Beneficial effects of hydro-alcoholic extract of Caralluma fimbriata against high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance and oxidative stress in Wistar male rats.

    PubMed

    Sudhakara, G; Mallaiah, P; Sreenivasulu, N; Sasi Bhusana Rao, B; Rajendran, R; Saralakumari, D

    2014-06-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the beneficial effects of hydro-alcoholic extract of Caralluma fimbriata (CFE) on the effects of high-fat diet feeding on insulin resistance and oxidative stress in Wistar rats. High-fat diet (60% of fat) and CFE (200 mg/kg body weight/day) were given concurrently to the rats for a period of 90 days. Feeding with high-fat diet resulted in the development of hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperleptinemia, and hypertriglyceridemia and impaired insulin sensitivity (P < 0.05). Administration of CFE to high-fat diet-fed rats for 90 days resulted in a significant improvement in plasma glucose, insulin, leptin, and triglycerides. Regarding liver antioxidant status, high-fat fed rats showed higher levels of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and lower GSH levels and lower activities of enzymatic antioxidants, while CFE treatment prevented all these observed abnormalities. In conclusion, intake of CFE may be beneficial for the suppression of high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance and oxidative stress.

  12. Meal Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pence, John T.

    Changing life styles for college students are causing food service directors to change their ways of serving students. Students today seem to prefer living in privately owned apartments and houses where they can provide and cook their own food to living on campus and having meals prepared for them. Many colleges and universities are eliminating…

  13. High-fat diets induce changes in hippocampal glutamate metabolism and neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Valladolid-Acebes, Ismael; Merino, Beatriz; Principato, Antonio; Fole, Alberto; Barbas, Coral; Lorenzo, María P; García, Antonia; Del Olmo, Nuria; Ruiz-Gayo, Mariano; Cano, Victoria

    2012-02-15

    Obesity and high-fat (HF) diets have a deleterious impact on hippocampal function and lead to impaired synaptic plasticity and learning deficits. Because all of these processes need an adequate glutamatergic transmission, we have hypothesized that nutritional imbalance triggered by these diets might eventually concern glutamate (Glu) neural pathways within the hippocampus. Glu is withdrawn from excitatory synapses by specific uptake mechanisms involving neuronal (EAAT-3) and glial (GLT-1, GLAST) transporters, which regulate the time that synaptically released Glu remains in the extracellular space and, consequently, the duration and location of postsynaptic receptor activation. The goal of the present study was to evaluate in mouse hippocampus the effect of a short-term high-fat dietary treatment on 1) Glu uptake kinetics, 2) the density of Glu carriers and Glu-degrading enzymes, 3) the density of Glu receptor subunits, and 4) synaptic transmission and plasticity. Here, we show that HF diet triggers a 50% decrease of the Michaelis-Menten constant together with a 300% increase of the maximal velocity of the uptake process. Glial Glu carriers GLT-1 and GLAST were upregulated in HF mice (32 and 27%, respectively), whereas Glu-degrading enzymes glutamine synthase and GABA-decarboxilase appeared to be downregulated in these animals. In addition, HF diet hippocampus displayed diminished basal synaptic transmission and hindered NMDA-induced long-term depression (NMDA-LTD). This was coincident with a reduced density of the NR2B subunit of NMDA receptors. All of these results are compatible with the development of leptin resistance within the hippocampus. Our data show that HF diets upregulate mechanisms involved in Glu clearance and simultaneously impair Glu metabolism. Neurochemical changes occur concomitantly with impaired basal synaptic transmission and reduced NMDA-LTD. Taken together, our results suggest that HF diets trigger neurochemical changes, leading to a

  14. Evaluation of coronary endothelial function by catheter-type NO sensor in high-fat-diet-induced obese dogs.

    PubMed

    Kume, Teruyoshi; Kawamoto, Takahiro; Okura, Hiroyuki; Neishi, Yoji; Hashimoto, Ken; Hayashida, Akihiro; Watanabe, Nozomi; Kanda, Yukiko; Mochizuki, Seiichi; Goto, Masami; Yoshida, Kiyoshi

    2009-03-01

    Direct measurement of plasma nitric oxide (NO) concentration is possible with a newly developed catheter-type sensor. Adult mongrel dogs (n=5) were fed a high-fat diet (120 kcal . kg(-1) . day(-1)) for 8 months, then endothelial function was assessed by the change in NO concentration induced by acetylcholine (ACh) (DeltaNO). Simultaneously, average peak velocity (APV) was obtained by Doppler guide wire. Although fasting plasma glucose levels did not change after high-fat diet, fasting plasma insulin levels increased significantly (103+/-36 vs 106+/-27 mg/dl, P=0.89 and 0.15+/-0.15 vs 0.26+/-0.07 ng/ml, P=0.04, respectively). ACh-induced peak APV after high-fat feeding was not significantly different from that at baseline (ACh 0.1 microg/kg; 43+/-17 vs 51+/-7 cm/s, P=NS, ACh 0.4 microg/kg; 45+/-20 vs 47+/-16 cm/s, P=NS, respectively). The DeltaNO was significantly smaller after high-fat diet than at baseline (ACh 0.1 microg/kg; 2.6+/-1.6 vs 1.0+/-0.5 nmol/L, P=0.03, ACh 0.4 microg/kg; 3.8+/-2.3 vs 1.8+/-1.1 nmol/L, P=0.04, respectively). In high-fat-diet-induced obese dogs NO production was impaired in the early stage when the coronary flow response to ACh may be preserved.

  15. Obesity and metabolomics: metallothioneins protect against high-fat diet-induced consequences in metallothionein knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Lindeque, Jeremie Z; Jansen van Rensburg, Peet J; Louw, Roan; van der Westhuizen, Francois H; Florit, Sergi; Ramírez, Lorena; Giralt, Mercedes; Hidalgo, Juan

    2015-02-01

    Obesity continues to rise as an alarming global epidemic. System level mechanisms, diagnostics, and therapeutics are sorely needed so as to identify at risk individuals and design appropriate population scale interventions. The present study evaluated the protective role of metallothioneins (MTs) against obesity and high-fat diet-induced effects such as insulin resistance in both male and female MT-1+2 knockout and MT-3 knockout mice. As the metabolome is closest to the functional phenotype, changes in metabolite levels were also evaluated, and the direct or indirect involvement of MTs in metabolism examined. MT-1+2-, MT-3 knockout, and wild-type mice were given a high-fat diet for 2 months. Variation in body weight gain, tissue weight, and response to oral glucose tolerance test and insulin tolerance test were determined and compared to mice that received the control diet. Effect of the high-fat diet on the knockout mice were investigated on the metabolome level in specific tissues using metabolomics. Both knockout mice strains were more susceptible to high-fat diet-induced effects, such as weight gain and moderate insulin resistance, with the MT-3 knockout mice most susceptible. Brain tissue of the knockout mice showed most metabolic variation and pointed to possible impairment of mitochondrial function. The protective effect of MTs against high-fat diet and obesity-induced effects such as insulin resistance was evident from our observations. The putative role MTs play in mitochondrial function is possibly the main contributor to the lack of these effects in wild-type mice. Considering the expression profiles of the MT isoforms and similarity in brain metabolic variation in the knockout strains, it appears that they promote mitochondrial function in the hypothalamus, thereby limiting weight gain and insulin resistance. Furthermore, metabolomics research in preclinical models of obesity and in the clinic is warranted in the near future.

  16. Epigenome-wide association study of triglyceride postprandial responses to a high-fat dietary challenge[S

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chao-Qiang; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Parnell, Laurence D.; Hidalgo, Bertha A.; Irvin, Marguerite Ryan; Aslibekyan, Stella; Province, Michael A.; Absher, Devin M.; Arnett, Donna K.; Ordovás, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Postprandial lipemia (PPL), the increased plasma TG concentration after consuming a high-fat meal, is an independent risk factor for CVD. Individual responses to a meal high in fat vary greatly, depending on genetic and lifestyle factors. However, only a few loci have been associated with TG-PPL response. Heritable epigenomic changes may be significant contributors to the unexplained inter-individual PPL variability. We conducted an epigenome-wide association study on 979 subjects with DNA methylation measured from CD4+ T cells, who were challenged with a high-fat meal as a part of the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network study. Eight methylation sites encompassing five genes, LPP, CPT1A, APOA5, SREBF1, and ABCG1, were significantly associated with PPL response at an epigenome-wide level (P < 1.1 × 10−7), but no methylation site reached epigenome-wide significance after adjusting for baseline TG levels. Higher methylation at LPP, APOA5, SREBF1, and ABCG1, and lower methylation at CPT1A methylation were correlated with an increased TG-PPL response. These PPL-associated methylation sites, also correlated with fasting TG, account for a substantially greater amount of phenotypic variance (14.9%) in PPL and fasting TG (16.3%) when compared with the genetic contribution of loci identified by our previous genome-wide association study (4.5%). In summary, the epigenome is a large contributor to the variation in PPL, and this has the potential to be used to modulate PPL and reduce CVD. PMID:27777315

  17. Nox2 mediates skeletal muscle insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Souto Padron de Figueiredo, Alvaro; Salmon, Adam B; Bruno, Francesca; Jimenez, Fabio; Martinez, Herman G; Halade, Ganesh V; Ahuja, Seema S; Clark, Robert A; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Abboud, Hanna E; El Jamali, Amina

    2015-05-22

    Inflammation and oxidative stress through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are consistently associated with metabolic syndrome/type 2 diabetes. Although the role of Nox2, a major ROS-generating enzyme, is well described in host defense and inflammation, little is known about its potential role in insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet was mitigated in Nox2-null mice compared with wild-type mice after 3 or 9 months on the diet. High fat feeding increased Nox2 expression, superoxide production, and impaired insulin signaling in skeletal muscle tissue of wild-type mice but not in Nox2-null mice. Exposure of C2C12 cultured myotubes to either high glucose concentration, palmitate, or H2O2 decreases insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation and glucose uptake. Pretreatment with catalase abrogated these effects, indicating a key role for H2O2 in mediating insulin resistance. Down-regulation of Nox2 in C2C12 cells by shRNA prevented insulin resistance induced by high glucose or palmitate but not H2O2. These data indicate that increased production of ROS in insulin resistance induced by high glucose in skeletal muscle cells is a consequence of Nox2 activation. This is the first report to show that Nox2 is a key mediator of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

  18. Maternal High Fat Diet Alters Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Catalytic Activity in Adult Male Rat Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Pileggi, Chantal A.; Hedges, Christopher P.; Segovia, Stephanie A.; Markworth, James F.; Durainayagam, Brenan R.; Gray, Clint; Zhang, Xiaoyuan D.; Barnett, Matthew P. G.; Vickers, Mark H.; Hickey, Anthony J. R.; Reynolds, Clare M.; Cameron-Smith, David

    2016-01-01

    A maternal high-fat (HF) diet during pregnancy can lead to metabolic compromise, such as insulin resistance in adult offspring. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction is one mechanism contributing to metabolic impairments in insulin resistant states. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate whether mitochondrial dysfunction is evident in metabolically compromised offspring born to HF-fed dams. Sprague-Dawley dams were randomly assigned to receive a purified control diet (CD; 10% kcal from fat) or a high fat diet (HFD; 45% kcal from fat) for 10 days prior to mating, throughout pregnancy and during lactation. From weaning, all male offspring received a standard chow diet and soleus muscle was collected at day 150. Expression of the mitochondrial transcription factors nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) were downregulated in HF offspring. Furthermore, genes encoding the mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) respiratory complex subunits were suppressed in HF offspring. Moreover, protein expression of the complex I subunit, NDUFB8, was downregulated in HF offspring (36%), which was paralleled by decreased maximal catalytic linked activity of complex I and III (40%). Together, these results indicate that exposure to a maternal HF diet during development may elicit lifelong mitochondrial alterations in offspring skeletal muscle. PMID:27917127

  19. Nox2 Mediates Skeletal Muscle Insulin Resistance Induced by a High Fat Diet*

    PubMed Central

    Souto Padron de Figueiredo, Alvaro; Salmon, Adam B.; Bruno, Francesca; Jimenez, Fabio; Martinez, Herman G.; Halade, Ganesh V.; Ahuja, Seema S.; Clark, Robert A.; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Abboud, Hanna E.; El Jamali, Amina

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are consistently associated with metabolic syndrome/type 2 diabetes. Although the role of Nox2, a major ROS-generating enzyme, is well described in host defense and inflammation, little is known about its potential role in insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet was mitigated in Nox2-null mice compared with wild-type mice after 3 or 9 months on the diet. High fat feeding increased Nox2 expression, superoxide production, and impaired insulin signaling in skeletal muscle tissue of wild-type mice but not in Nox2-null mice. Exposure of C2C12 cultured myotubes to either high glucose concentration, palmitate, or H2O2 decreases insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation and glucose uptake. Pretreatment with catalase abrogated these effects, indicating a key role for H2O2 in mediating insulin resistance. Down-regulation of Nox2 in C2C12 cells by shRNA prevented insulin resistance induced by high glucose or palmitate but not H2O2. These data indicate that increased production of ROS in insulin resistance induced by high glucose in skeletal muscle cells is a consequence of Nox2 activation. This is the first report to show that Nox2 is a key mediator of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. PMID:25825489

  20. High Fat Diet Produces Brain Insulin Resistance, Synaptodendritic Abnormalities and Altered Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Steven E.; Lucki, Irwin; Brookshire, Bethany R.; Carlson, Gregory C.; Browne, Carolyn A.; Kazi, Hala; Bang, Sookhee; Choi, Bo-Ran; Chen, Yong; McMullen, Mary F.; Kim, Sangwon F.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance and other features of the metabolic syndrome are increasingly recognized for their effects on cognitive health. To ascertain mechanisms by which this occurs, we fed mice a very high fat diet (60% kcal by fat) for 17 days or a moderate high fat diet (HFD, 45% kcal by fat) for 8 weeks and examined changes in brain insulin signaling responses, hippocampal synaptodendritic protein expression, and spatial working memory. Compared to normal control diet mice, cerebral cortex tissues of HFD mice were insulin-resistant as evidenced by failed activation of Akt, S6 and GSK3β with ex-vivo insulin stimulation. Importantly, we found that expression of brain IPMK, which is necessary for mTOR/Akt signaling, remained decreased in HFD mice upon activation of AMPK. HFD mouse hippocampus exhibited increased expression of serine-phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1-pS616), a marker of insulin resistance, as well as decreased expression of PSD-95, a scaffolding protein enriched in post-synaptic densities, and synaptopodin, an actin-associated protein enriched in spine apparatuses. Spatial working memory was impaired as assessed by decreased spontaneous alternation in a T-maze. These findings indicate that HFD is associated with telencephalic insulin resistance and deleterious effects on synaptic integrity and cognitive behaviors. PMID:24686304

  1. Tocotrienols Reverse Cardiovascular, Metabolic and Liver Changes in High Carbohydrate, High Fat Diet-Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Weng-Yew; Poudyal, Hemant; Ward, Leigh C.; Brown, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    Tocotrienols have been reported to improve lipid profiles, reduce atherosclerotic lesions, decrease blood glucose and glycated haemoglobin concentrations, normalise blood pressure in vivo and inhibit adipogenesis in vitro, yet their role in the metabolic syndrome has not been investigated. In this study, we investigated the effects of palm tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) on high carbohydrate, high fat diet-induced metabolic, cardiovascular and liver dysfunction in rats. Rats fed a high carbohydrate, high fat diet for 16 weeks developed abdominal obesity, hypertension, impaired glucose and insulin tolerance with increased ventricular stiffness, lower systolic function and reduced liver function. TRF treatment improved ventricular function, attenuated cardiac stiffness and hypertension, and improved glucose and insulin tolerance, with reduced left ventricular collagen deposition and inflammatory cell infiltration. TRF improved liver structure and function with reduced plasma liver enzymes, inflammatory cell infiltration, fat vacuoles and balloon hepatocytes. TRF reduced plasma free fatty acid and triglyceride concentrations but only omental fat deposition was decreased in the abdomen. These results suggest that tocotrienols protect the heart and liver, and improve plasma glucose and lipid profiles with minimal changes in abdominal obesity in this model of human metabolic syndrome. PMID:23201770

  2. Odontella aurita-enriched diet prevents high fat diet-induced liver insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Amine, Hamza; Benomar, Yacir; Haimeur, Adil; Messaouri, Hafida; Meskini, Nadia; Taouis, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    The beneficial effect of polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acid (w-3 FA) consumption regarding cardiovascular diseases, insulin resistance and inflammation has been widely reported. Fish oil is considered as the main source of commercialized w-3 FAs, and other alternative sources have been reported such as linseed or microalgae. However, despite numerous reports, the underlying mechanisms of action of w-3 FAs on insulin resistance are still not clearly established, especially those from microalgae. Here, we report that Odontella aurita, a microalga rich in w-3 FAs eicosapentaenoic acid, prevents high fat diet-induced insulin resistance and inflammation in the liver of Wistar rats. Indeed, a high fat diet (HFD) increased plasma insulin levels associated with the impairment of insulin receptor signaling and the up-regulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expressions. Importantly, Odontella aurita-enriched HFD (HFOA) reduces body weight and plasma insulin levels and maintains normal insulin receptor expression and responsiveness. Furthermore, HFOA decreased TLR4 expression, JNK/p38 phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory factors. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that diet supplementation with whole Ondontella aurita overcomes HFD-induced insulin resistance through the inhibition of TLR4/JNK/p38 MAP kinase signaling pathways.

  3. The effects of a high-fat, high-fructose, and combination diet on learning, weight, and glucose regulation in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Messier, Claude; Whately, Katie; Liang, Jacky; Du, Lei; Puissant, David

    2007-03-12

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of a high-fructose diet, a high-fat diet and a combination high-fructose/high-fat diet on weight gain, blood glucose regulation, and cognitive function in C57BL/6 mice. Thirty-eight male mice aged 7 weeks were placed on one of four different diets for 3 months: standard chow and water (n=8), standard diet and access to a fructose solution as the only intake of water (n=8), high-fat diet and water (n=11), and high-fat diet and fructose solution (n=11). Weights were measured 10 times over a 3-month period. Blood glucose regulation was measured using a glucose tolerance test. Cognitive testing consisted of learning an operant bar-pressing task and was performed in the absence of fructose intake. At the end of the experiment, the density of the fructose-specific glucose transporter GLUT5 was measured in the hippocampus, frontal cortex, sensori-motor cortex and cerebellum. The high-fat and the combined high-fat/high-fructose groups gained significantly more weight than the control group. The high-fat group and combined group had significantly higher levels of blood glucose than the control group. The high-fructose group learned the operant task faster than the control group, but the high-fat/high-fructose group was not different from control indicating that the facilitative effect of prior fructose intake was abolished when a high-fat diet was added. Addition of fructose to the diet did not result in an increase of brain GLUT5 density suggesting that the learning improvement were not dependent on plastic upregulation of GLUT5 fructose transporter. The results show that, contrary to high-fat diets, access to fructose in mice did not lead to increased weight and impaired glucose tolerance. The present experiment confirm the deleterious impact of high-fat diets on glucose regulation and weight but suggest that high-fructose diets, contrary to what has been observed in hamsters, do not have the same effect.

  4. Cinnamon counteracts the negative effects of a high fat/high fructose diet on behavior, brain insulin signaling and Alzheimer-associated changes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Insulin resistance leads to memory impairment. Cinnamon (CN) improves whole body insulin resistance but its effects in the brain are not known. Changes in behavior, insulin signaling, and Alzheimer-associated gene expression in the brain were measured in male Wistar rats fed a high fat/high fructose...

  5. Protective effects of berberine on high fat-induced kidney damage by increasing serum adiponectin and promoting insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ueyue; Cha, Ying; Huang, Xinmei; Liu, Jun; Chen, Zaoping; Wang, Fang; Xu, Jiong; Sheng, Li; Ding, Heyuan

    2015-01-01

    Berberine (BBR) has been reported in several studies in cell and animal models. However, the mechanism of actions is not fully understood. The present study was therefore aimed to explore the effects of berberine on insulin sensitivity and kidney damage in a high fat diet rat model. Impaired glucose tolerance rats induced by injection of berberine while fed with high fat laboratory chow. After rats were treated for 4 weeks, OGTT and IPITT were determined. Mass and PAS were used to study the kidney tissue. ELISA was used to detect the protein concentration of CRP and TNF-α. Western blot was used to detect the proteins adiponectin, adipoR1, adipoR2 and p-AMPK expression level. These encouraging findings suggest that berberine has excellent pharmacological potential to prevent kidney damage.

  6. The effects of high-fat diet on implant osseointegration: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In this study, we investigated whether a high-fat diet (HFD) affected the bone implant connection (BIC) in peri-implant bone. Materials and Methods Four male rabbits were used in this study. Dental implant surgery was introduced into each tibia, and four implants were integrated into each animal. In both the normal diet (ND) group (n=2) and HFD group (n=2), 8 implants were integrated, for a total of 16 integrated implants. The animals continued with their respective diets for 12 weeks post-surgery. Afterward, the rabbits were sacrificed, and the BIC was assessed histomorphometrically. Results Histologic and histomorphometric analyses demonstrated that BIC was not impaired in the HFD group compared to the ND group. Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, we found that HFD did not decrease the BIC in rabbit tibias. PMID:27595085

  7. Persistent Chromatin Modifications Induced by High Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Leung, Amy; Trac, Candi; Du, Juan; Natarajan, Rama; Schones, Dustin E

    2016-05-13

    Obesity is a highly heritable complex disease that results from the interaction of multiple genetic and environmental factors. Formerly obese individuals are susceptible to metabolic disorders later in life, even after lifestyle changes are made to mitigate the obese state. This is reminiscent of the metabolic memory phenomenon originally observed for persistent complications in diabetic patients, despite subsequent glycemic control. Epigenetic modifications represent a potential mediator of this observed memory. We previously demonstrated that a high fat diet leads to changes in chromatin accessibility in the mouse liver. The regions of greatest chromatin changes in accessibility are largely strain-dependent, indicating a genetic component in diet-induced chromatin alterations. We have now examined the persistence of diet-induced chromatin accessibility changes upon diet reversal in two strains of mice. We find that a substantial fraction of loci that undergo chromatin accessibility changes with a high fat diet remains in the remodeled state after diet reversal in C57BL/6J mice. In contrast, the vast majority of diet-induced chromatin accessibility changes in A/J mice are transient. Our data also indicate that the persistent chromatin accessibility changes observed in C57BL/6J mice are associated with specific transcription factors and histone post-translational modifications. The persistent loci identified here are likely to be contributing to the overall phenotype and are attractive targets for therapeutic intervention.

  8. High-fat diet alters gut microbiota physiology in mice

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Hannelore; Gholami, Amin Moghaddas; Berry, David; Desmarchelier, Charles; Hahne, Hannes; Loh, Gunnar; Mondot, Stanislas; Lepage, Patricia; Rothballer, Michael; Walker, Alesia; Böhm, Christoph; Wenning, Mareike; Wagner, Michael; Blaut, Michael; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Kuster, Bernhard; Haller, Dirk; Clavel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is known to regulate host energy homeostasis and can be influenced by high-calorie diets. However, changes affecting the ecosystem at the functional level are still not well characterized. We measured shifts in cecal bacterial communities in mice fed a carbohydrate or high-fat (HF) diet for 12 weeks at the level of the following: (i) diversity and taxa distribution by high-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing; (ii) bulk and single-cell chemical composition by Fourier-transform infrared- (FT-IR) and Raman micro-spectroscopy and (iii) metaproteome and metabolome via high-resolution mass spectrometry. High-fat diet caused shifts in the diversity of dominant gut bacteria and altered the proportion of Ruminococcaceae (decrease) and Rikenellaceae (increase). FT-IR spectroscopy revealed that the impact of the diet on cecal chemical fingerprints is greater than the impact of microbiota composition. Diet-driven changes in biochemical fingerprints of members of the Bacteroidales and Lachnospiraceae were also observed at the level of single cells, indicating that there were distinct differences in cellular composition of dominant phylotypes under different diets. Metaproteome and metabolome analyses based on the occurrence of 1760 bacterial proteins and 86 annotated metabolites revealed distinct HF diet-specific profiles. Alteration of hormonal and anti-microbial networks, bile acid and bilirubin metabolism and shifts towards amino acid and simple sugars metabolism were observed. We conclude that a HF diet markedly affects the gut bacterial ecosystem at the functional level. PMID:24030595

  9. High-fat diet alters gut microbiota physiology in mice.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Hannelore; Gholami, Amin Moghaddas; Berry, David; Desmarchelier, Charles; Hahne, Hannes; Loh, Gunnar; Mondot, Stanislas; Lepage, Patricia; Rothballer, Michael; Walker, Alesia; Böhm, Christoph; Wenning, Mareike; Wagner, Michael; Blaut, Michael; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Kuster, Bernhard; Haller, Dirk; Clavel, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    The intestinal microbiota is known to regulate host energy homeostasis and can be influenced by high-calorie diets. However, changes affecting the ecosystem at the functional level are still not well characterized. We measured shifts in cecal bacterial communities in mice fed a carbohydrate or high-fat (HF) diet for 12 weeks at the level of the following: (i) diversity and taxa distribution by high-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing; (ii) bulk and single-cell chemical composition by Fourier-transform infrared- (FT-IR) and Raman micro-spectroscopy and (iii) metaproteome and metabolome via high-resolution mass spectrometry. High-fat diet caused shifts in the diversity of dominant gut bacteria and altered the proportion of Ruminococcaceae (decrease) and Rikenellaceae (increase). FT-IR spectroscopy revealed that the impact of the diet on cecal chemical fingerprints is greater than the impact of microbiota composition. Diet-driven changes in biochemical fingerprints of members of the Bacteroidales and Lachnospiraceae were also observed at the level of single cells, indicating that there were distinct differences in cellular composition of dominant phylotypes under different diets. Metaproteome and metabolome analyses based on the occurrence of 1760 bacterial proteins and 86 annotated metabolites revealed distinct HF diet-specific profiles. Alteration of hormonal and anti-microbial networks, bile acid and bilirubin metabolism and shifts towards amino acid and simple sugars metabolism were observed. We conclude that a HF diet markedly affects the gut bacterial ecosystem at the functional level.

  10. Long-term high-fat diet induces hippocampal microvascular insulin resistance and cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhuo; Wu, Jing; Nesil, Tanseli; Li, Ming D; Aylor, Kevin W; Liu, Zhenqi

    2017-02-01

    Insulin action on hippocampus improves cognitive function, and obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with decreased cognitive function. Cerebral microvasculature plays a critical role in maintaining cerebral vitality and function by supplying nutrients, oxygen, and hormones such as insulin to cerebral parenchyma, including hippocampus. In skeletal muscle, insulin actively regulates microvascular opening and closure, and this action is impaired in the insulin-resistant states. To examine insulin's action on hippocampal microvasculature and parenchyma and the impact of diet-induced obesity, we determined cognitive function and microvascular insulin responses, parenchyma insulin responses, and capillary density in the hippocampus in 2- and 8-mo-old rats on chow diet and 8-mo-old rats on a long-term high-fat diet (6 mo). Insulin infusion increased hippocampal microvascular perfusion in rats on chow diet by ~80-90%. High-fat diet feeding completely abolished insulin-mediated microvascular responses and protein kinase B phosphorylation but did not alter the capillary density in the hippocampus. This was associated with a significantly decreased cognitive function assessed using both the two-trial spontaneous alternation behavior test and the novel object recognition test. As the microvasculature provides the needed endothelial surface area for delivery of nutrients, oxygen, and insulin to hippocampal parenchyma, we conclude that hippocampal microvascular insulin resistance may play a critical role in the development of cognitive impairment seen in obesity and diabetes. Our results suggest that improvement in hippocampal microvascular insulin sensitivity might help improve or reverse cognitive function in the insulin-resistant states.

  11. Green tea (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate counteracts daytime overeating induced by high-fat diet in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyu; Kek, Huiling Calvina; Lim, Joy; Gelling, Richard Wayne; Han, Weiping

    2016-12-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) induces overeating and obesity. Green tea (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) reduces HFD-induced body weight and body fat gain mainly through increased lipid metabolism and fat oxidation. However, little is known about its effect on HFD-induced alterations in feeding behavior. Three diet groups of wildtype C57B/6j male mice at 5 months old were fed on normal chow diet, 1 week of HFD (60% of energy) and 3 months of HFD (diet-induced obesity (DIO)) prior to EGCG supplement in respective diet. EGCG had no effect on feeding behavior in normal chow diet group. Increased daytime feeding induced by HFD was selectively corrected by EGCG treatment in HFD groups, including reversed food intake, feeding frequency and meal size in HFD + EGCG group, and reduced food intake and feeding frequency in DIO + EGCG group. Moreover, EGCG treatment altered diurnally oscillating expression pattern of key appetite-regulating genes, including AGRP, POMC, and CART, and key circadian genes Clock and Bmal1 in hypothalamus of DIO mice, indicating its central effect on feeding regulation. Our study demonstrates that EGCG supplement specifically counteracts daytime overeating induced by HFD in mice, suggesting its central role in regulating feeding behavior and energy homeostasis. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. [Effect of the duration of high-fat diet and the dosage of streptozotocin on establishing experimental animal model of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Wang, Baowei; Li, Ying; Liu, Xiaohong; Liu, Shuang; Sun, Changhao

    2011-01-01

    To explore the influencing factors of establishing diabetes mellitus animal model by the combination of feeding high-fat diet for different periods of time and different dosage of streptozotocin (STZ). Eight-week-aged male Wistar rats were injected (i.p.) with 30 mg/kg STZ after high-fat diet being fed for 0, 4, 6 or 8 weeks respectively, and another 100 male rats were injected (i.p.) with 20 mg/kg, 30 mg/kg and 60 mg/kg STZ respectively after high-fat diet being fed for 4 weeks to establish diabetes mellitus models. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test and insulin tolerance test were carried out, and plasma indices were also measured. The type of models was verified by the administration (i.p.) of rosiglitazone. The successful rate of modeling in rats fed with high-fat diet for 4 weeks and received 30 mg/kg STZ injection (i.p.) was the highest (85% & 80%). Their plasma triglyceride and free fatty acid were increased significantly (P < 0.05), but the fasting plasma insulin was not different from the control group, these rats also presented impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. The hyperglycemia and blood lipid disorders of these model rats were recovered by the treatment with rosiglitazone. With increasing age and the duration of high-fat diet, the death rate increased rapidly (50% & 65%). The successful rate of modeling at low dose of STZ (20 mg/kg, i.p.) was only 40%. The highest death rate (75%) was observed in rats treated with high dose of STZ (60 mg/kg, i.p.). The duration of high-fat diet, the dosage of STZ and the age of rats were the most important factors for the successful rate and death rate while establishing diabetic animal model by the combination of high-fat diet and STZ.

  13. High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity Ablates Gastric Vagal Afferent Circadian Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Kentish, Stephen J; Vincent, Andrew D; Kennaway, David J; Wittert, Gary A; Page, Amanda J

    2016-03-16

    Rats with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity increase daytime eating, suggesting an alteration in circadian food intake mechanisms. Gastric vagal afferents (GVAs) respond to mechanical stimuli to initiate satiety. These signals are dampened in HFD mice and exhibit circadian variations inversely with food intake in lean mice. Furthermore, leptin shows circadian variation in its circulating level and is able to modulate GVA mechanosensitivity. However, whether leptin's ability to modulate GVAs occurs in a circadian manner is unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether changes in the circadian intake of food in HFD-induced obesity is associated with a disruption in GVA circadian rhythms. Eight-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were fed a standard laboratory diet (SLD) or a HFD for 12 weeks. A subgroup of SLD and HFD mice were housed in metabolic cages. After 12 weeks, ex vivo GVA recordings were taken at 3 h intervals starting at zeitgeber time 0 (ZT0) and stomach content was measured. After 12 weeks, HFD mice consumed more food during the light phase through larger and more frequent meals compared with SLD mice. SLD mice exhibited circadian fluctuation in stomach content, which peaked at ZT18 and reached a nadir at ZT9. At these time points, both tension and mucosal receptor mechanosensitivity were the lowest and highest, respectively. HFD mice exhibited little circadian variation in stomach content or GVA mechanosensitivity. Leptin potentiated mucosal receptor mechanosensitivity only in SLD mice and with reduced potency during the dark phase. In conclusion, loss of circadian variation in GVA signaling may underpin changes in eating behavior in HFD-induced obesity. Appropriate circadian control of food intake is vital for maintaining metabolic health. Diet-induced obesity is associated with strong circadian changes in food intake, but the contributing mechanisms have yet to be determined. Vagal afferents are involved in regulation of feeding behavior, particularly meal

  14. Studies of the effects of high fat diets on cognitive function in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Winocur, Gordon; Greenwood, Carol E

    2005-12-01

    This research summarises a research program that is concerned with the effects of high fat diets on cognitive function in rats. The diets selected accurately represent current upper limits of human fat consumption in western societies. Rats fed with diets high in saturated or unsaturated fat for 3 months, were severely impaired on a range of learning and memory tasks. Related studies showed that these effects were modulated by concentration of fat, environmental influences, and treatment with glucose. More work is needed to identify the neurobiological mechanisms underlying this impairment but saturated fatty acid intake, as well as insulin resistance and glucose intolerance may be important factors. In demonstrating a clear relationship between obesity and cognitive impairment, this research has important implications for aging. Older adults are particularly vulnerable to the adverse effects of dietary fat and the present results underscore the importance of evidence that seniors with marginal levels of nutrient intake often perform poorly on tests of cognitive function, and are at increased risk for various forms of dementia.

  15. Consequences of a Maternal High-Fat Diet and Late Gestation Diabetes on the Developing Rat Lung

    PubMed Central

    Forred, Benjamin J.; Larsen, Tricia D.; Jensen, Danielle N.; Wachal, Angela L.; Khan, Muhammad Ali; Vitiello, Peter F.

    2016-01-01

    expression, and an impaired Txnip/VEGF pathway that are important for vessel growth and migration. After 3 weeks, mortality remained highest and static lung compliance and hysteresis were lowest in combination-exposed offspring. Conclusion This study emphasizes the effects of a maternal high-fat diet, especially alongside late-gestation diabetes, on pulmonary vasculogenesis, demonstrates adverse consequences beyond the perinatal period and directs attention to mechanistic pathways of interest. Findings provide a foundation for additional investigation of preventative and therapeutic strategies aimed at decreasing pulmonary morbidity in at-risk infants. PMID:27518105

  16. The Ameliorative Effects of a Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction on the AGE-RAGE Axis and Hypertension in High-Fat-Diet-Fed Rats with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ton, So Ha; Tan, Joash Ban Lee; Abdul Kadir, Khalid

    2017-01-01

    The clinical value of tocotrienols is increasingly appreciated because of the unique therapeutic effects that are not shared by tocopherols. However, their effect on metabolic syndrome is not well-established. This study aimed to investigate the effects of a tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) from palm oil in high-fat-diet-treated rats. Male, post-weaning Sprague Dawley rats were provided high-fat (60% kcal) diet for eight weeks followed by a TRF (60 mg/kg) treatment for another four weeks. Physical, metabolic, and histological changes were compared to those on control and high-fat diets respectively. High-fat feeding for eight weeks induced all hallmarks of metabolic syndrome. The TRF reversed systolic and diastolic hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hepatic steatosis, impaired antioxidant defense, and myeloperoxidase hyperactivity triggered by the high-fat diet. It also conferred an inhibitory effect on protein glycation to reduce glycated hemoglobin A1c and advanced glycation end products (AGE). This was accompanied by the suppression of the receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE) expression in the liver. The treatment effects on visceral adiposity, glycemic control, triglyceride level, as well as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and γ expression were negligible. To conclude, treatment with a TRF exhibited protective effects on the cardiovascular and liver health in addition to the amelioration of plasma redox imbalance and AGE-RAGE activation. Further investigation as a therapy for metabolic syndrome is therefore worthwhile. PMID:28880217

  17. Maternal high-fat diet modulates hepatic glucose, lipid homeostasis and gene expression in the PPAR pathway in the early life of offspring.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jia; Xiao, Xinhua; Zhang, Qian; Yu, Miao; Xu, Jianping; Wang, Zhixin

    2014-08-25

    Maternal dietary modifications determine the susceptibility to metabolic diseases in adult life. However, whether maternal high-fat feeding can modulate glucose and lipid metabolism in the early life of offspring is less understood. Furthermore, we explored the underlying mechanisms that influence the phenotype. Using C57BL/6J mice, we examined the effects on the offspring at weaning from dams fed with a high-fat diet or normal chow diet throughout pregnancy and lactation. Gene array experiments and quantitative real-time PCR were performed in the liver tissues of the offspring mice. The offspring of the dams fed the high-fat diet had a heavier body weight, impaired glucose tolerance, decreased insulin sensitivity, increased serum cholesterol and hepatic steatosis at weaning. Bioinformatic analyses indicated that all differentially expressed genes of the offspring between the two groups were mapped to nine pathways. Genes in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) signaling pathway were verified by quantitative real-time PCR and these genes were significantly up-regulated in the high-fat diet offspring. A maternal high-fat diet during pregnancy and lactation can modulate hepatic glucose, lipid homeostasis, and gene expression in the PPAR signaling in the early life of offspring, and our results suggested that potential mechanisms that influences this phenotype may be related partially to up-regulate some gene expression in the PPAR signalling pathway.

  18. Effect of chronic consumption of blackberry extract on high-fat induced obesity in rats and its correlation with metabolic and brain outcomes.

    PubMed

    Meireles, Manuela; Rodríguez-Alcalá, Luís M; Marques, Cláudia; Norberto, Sónia; Freitas, Joana; Fernandes, Iva; Mateus, Nuno; Gomes, Ana; Faria, Ana; Calhau, Conceição

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids have been presented as potential protectors against metabolic and cognitive dysfunction. However, mechanisms underlying these 'claims' have not been sufficiently explored. To analyse the effect of long-term supplementation with blackberry extract (BE) in the context of a high-fat or a standard diet, Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups (n = 6) fed with a standard or a high-fat diet, with or without BE supplementation at 25 mg per kg body weight per day. A high-fat diet significantly impaired glucose tolerance and increased body weight, caloric ingestion, very-low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides and cholesterol. Furthermore, it was observed that a high-fat diet increased dopamine content in the prefrontal cortex and decreased brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels both in the prefrontal cortex and in plasma. BE supplementation only affected some of these aspects. BE slightly improved glucose metabolism and significantly decreased levels of lactate, independent of diet. BE decreased levels of BDNF and also interacted with the dopaminergic system, increasing dopamine turnover in the striatum, and reverting dopamine content induced by a high-fat diet in the prefrontal cortex. This study shows that, despite some particular benefits of anthocyanin supplementation, some long-term effects may not be desirable and further studies are needed to optimize ingestion conditions.

  19. Sphingolipids in High Fat Diet and Obesity-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Songhwa; Snider, Ashley J.

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient oversupply associated with a high fat diet (HFD) significantly alters cellular metabolism, and specifically including sphingolipid metabolism. Sphingolipids are emerging as bioactive lipids that play key roles in regulating functions, in addition to their traditional roles as membrane structure. HFD enhances de novo sphingolipid synthesis and turnover of sphingolipids via the salvage pathway, resulting in the generation of ceramide, and more specifically long chain ceramide species. Additionally, HFD elevates sphingomyelin and sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P) levels in several tissues including liver, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and cardiovascular tissues. HFD-stimulated sphingolipid generation contributes to systemic insulin resistance, dysregulated lipid accumulation, and cytokine expression and secretion from skeletal muscle and adipose tissues, exacerbating obesity-related conditions. Furthermore, altered sphingolipid levels, particularly ceramide and sphingomyelin, are involved in obesity-induced endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. In this review, HFD-mediated sphingolipid metabolism and its impact on HFD-induced biology and pathobiology will be discussed. PMID:26648664

  20. Leucine supplementation at the onset of high-fat feeding does not prevent weight gain or improve glycemic regulation in male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Baum, Jamie I; Washington, Tyrone A; Shouse, Stephanie A; Bottje, Walter; Dridi, Sami; Davis, Gina; Smith, Dameon

    2016-12-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern and it is essential to identify effective treatments and preventative strategies to stop continued increases in obesity rates. The potential functional roles of the branched chain amino acid leucine make this amino acid an attractive candidate for the treatment and/or prevention of obesity. The objective of this study was to determine if long-term leucine supplementation could prevent the development of obesity and reduce the risk factors for chronic disease in rats fed a high-fat (60 % fat) diet. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 30 per dietary treatment) were meal-fed (3 meals/day) either a control, low-fat diet (LF), control + leucine (LFL), high-fat (HF), or high-fat + leucine (HFL) for 42 days. On day 42, rats were sacrificed at 0, 30, or 90 min postprandial. Animals fed the HF and HFL diets had higher (P < 0.05) final body weights and weight gain compared to animals fed the LF and LFL diets. Leucine supplementation increased epididymal fat mass (P < 0.05) and decreased muscle mass (P < 0.05). There was no effect of leucine supplementation on postprandial glucose or insulin response. However, there was a significant effect (P < 0.05) of diet and time on free fatty acid concentrations. There was no effect of leucine on muscle markers of protein synthesis (4E-BP1, p70S6K) or energy metabolism (Akt, AMPK). Leucine supplementation decreased (P < 0.05) PGC1α expression and increased (P < 0.05) PPARγ expression in skeletal muscle. In conclusion, long-term leucine supplementation does not prevent weight gain, improve body composition, or improve glycemic control in rats fed a high-fat diet.

  1. Effects of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide receptor knockout and a high-fat diet on cognitive function and hippocampal gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Lennox, Rachel; Lennox, Rachael R; Moffett, R Charlotte; Moffett, Charlotte; Porter, David W; Irwin, Nigel; Gault, Victor A; Flatt, Peter R

    2015-07-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that compromise of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide receptor (GIPR) action and chronic consumption of a high-fat diet can independently impair memory and learning ability, however, the underlying pathology remain to be elucidated. The present study investigated the effects of GIPR knockout (KO), alone and in combination with a high-fat diet, on aspects of cognitive function and hippocampal gene expression in mice. In object recognition tests, normal mice exhibited effective memory, preferring to investigate the novel over the familiar object. However, wild-type (WT) mice fed a high-fat diet and GIPR KO mice fed a standard or high-fat diet demonstrated no such discrimination, suggesting the impairment of memory function. This decline in cognitive function was associated with marked changes in the expression levels of hippocampal genes involved in memory and learning. The chronic consumption of a high-fat diet decreased the hippocampal gene expression levels of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 2 (NTRK2) and synaptophysin. Notably, the GIPR KO mice fed a high-fat diet exhibited no reduction in the hippocampal expression of synaptophysin expression, however, the GIPR KO mice fed a standard rodent maintenance diet exhibited reduced hippocampal expression of mTOR compared with the WT controls. These data highlighted the importance of intact GIPR signalling and dietary composition in modulating memory and learning, and hippocampal pathways involved in the maintenance of synaptic plasticity, including mTOR and NTRK2, appear to be key in this regard.

  2. Ventricular remodelling in rabbits with sustained high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Zarzoso, M; Mironov, S; Guerrero-Serna, G; Willis, B Cicero; Pandit, S V

    2014-05-01

    Excess weight gain and obesity are one of the most serious health problems in the western societies. These conditions enhance risk of cardiac disease and have been linked with increased prevalence for cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death. Our goal was to study the ventricular remodelling occurring in rabbits fed with high-fat diet (HFD) and its potential arrhythmogenic mechanisms. We used 15 NZW rabbits that were randomly assigned to a control (n = 7) or HFD group (n = 8) for 18 weeks. In vivo studies included blood glucose, electrocardiographic, and echocardiographic measurements. Optical mapping was performed in Langendorff-perfused isolated hearts. Body weight (3.69 ± 0.31 vs. 2.94 ± 0.18 kg, P < 0.001) and blood glucose levels (230 ± 61 vs. 141 ± 14 mg dL(-1) , P < 0.05) were higher in the HFD group vs. controls. The rate-corrected QT interval and its dispersion were increased in HFD rabbits vs. controls (169 ± 10 vs. 146 ± 13 ms and 37 ± 11 vs. 9 ± 2 ms, respectively; P < 0.05). Echocardiographic analysis showed morphological and functional alterations in HFD rabbits indicative of left ventricle (LV) hypertrophy. Isolated heart studies revealed no changes in repolarization and propagation properties under conditions of normal extracellular K(+) , suggesting that extrinsic factors could underlie those electrocardiographic modifications. There were no differences in the dynamics of ventricular fibrillation (frequency, wave breaks) in the presence of isoproterenol. However, HFD rabbits showed a small reduction in action potential duration and an increased incidence of arrhythmias during hyperkalaemia. High-fat feeding during 18 weeks in rabbits induced a type II diabetes phenotype, LV hypertrophy, abnormalities in repolarization and susceptibility to arrhythmias during hyperkalaemia. © 2013 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Excess Folic Acid Increases Lipid Storage, Weight Gain, and Adipose Tissue Inflammation in High Fat Diet-Fed Rats.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Karen B; Kennelly, John P; Ordonez, Marta; Nelson, Randal; Leonard, Kelly; Stabler, Sally; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio; Field, Catherine J; Jacobs, René L

    2016-09-23

    Folic acid intake has increased to high levels in many countries, raising concerns about possible adverse effects, including disturbances to energy and lipid metabolism. Our aim was to investigate the effects of excess folic acid (EFA) intake compared to adequate folic acid (AFA) intake on metabolic health in a rodent model. We conducted these investigations in the setting of either a 15% energy low fat (LF) diet or 60% energy high fat (HF) diet. There was no difference in weight gain, fat mass, or glucose tolerance in EFA-fed rats compared to AFA-fed rats when they were fed a LF diet. However, rats fed EFA in combination with a HF diet had significantly greater weight gain and fat mass compared to rats fed AFA (p < 0.05). Gene expression analysis showed increased mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and some of its target genes in adipose tissue of high fat-excess folic acid (HF-EFA) fed rats. Inflammation was increased in HF-EFA fed rats, associated with impaired glucose tolerance compared to high fat-adequate folic acid (HF-AFA) fed rats (p < 0.05). In addition, folic acid induced PPARγ expression and triglyceride accumulation in 3T3-L1 cells. Our results suggest that excess folic acid may exacerbate weight gain, fat accumulation, and inflammation caused by consumption of a HF diet.

  4. Excess Folic Acid Increases Lipid Storage, Weight Gain, and Adipose Tissue Inflammation in High Fat Diet-Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Karen B.; Kennelly, John P.; Ordonez, Marta; Nelson, Randal; Leonard, Kelly; Stabler, Sally; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio; Field, Catherine J.; Jacobs, René L.

    2016-01-01

    Folic acid intake has increased to high levels in many countries, raising concerns about possible adverse effects, including disturbances to energy and lipid metabolism. Our aim was to investigate the effects of excess folic acid (EFA) intake compared to adequate folic acid (AFA) intake on metabolic health in a rodent model. We conducted these investigations in the setting of either a 15% energy low fat (LF) diet or 60% energy high fat (HF) diet. There was no difference in weight gain, fat mass, or glucose tolerance in EFA-fed rats compared to AFA-fed rats when they were fed a LF diet. However, rats fed EFA in combination with a HF diet had significantly greater weight gain and fat mass compared to rats fed AFA (p < 0.05). Gene expression analysis showed increased mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and some of its target genes in adipose tissue of high fat-excess folic acid (HF-EFA) fed rats. Inflammation was increased in HF-EFA fed rats, associated with impaired glucose tolerance compared to high fat-adequate folic acid (HF-AFA) fed rats (p < 0.05). In addition, folic acid induced PPARγ expression and triglyceride accumulation in 3T3-L1 cells. Our results suggest that excess folic acid may exacerbate weight gain, fat accumulation, and inflammation caused by consumption of a HF diet. PMID:27669293

  5. Over-the-counter analgesics normalize blood glucose and body composition in mice fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Kendig, Eric L; Schneider, Scott N; Clegg, Deborah J; Genter, Mary Beth; Shertzer, Howard G

    2008-07-15

    Type 2 diabetes (noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus) develops from a pre-diabetic condition that is characterized by insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, and is exacerbated by obesity. In this study, we compared the ability of over-the-counter analgesic drugs (OTCAD) [acetaminophen (APAP); ibuprofen (IBU); naproxen (NAP); aspirin (ASA)], to protect against the development of a pre-diabetic state in mice fed a high fat diet. After 10 weeks on the high fat diet, mice had normal fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels, but exhibited impaired glucose tolerance. Treatment with 20 mg OTCADs/kg body weight improved glucose tolerance, with the order of efficacy, APAP=ASA>IBU, while NAP proved ineffective. Mice fed the high fat diet also exhibited increases in weight gain associated with an increase in body fat. OTCADs prevented in part this increase in body fat, in the order of efficacy, APAP=IBU>NAP=ASA. In isolated liver mitochondria, OTCADs inhibited succinate-dependent H2O2 production, while in white adipose tissue, APAP inhibited NADPH-oxidase mediated H2O2 production and lipid peroxidation. Thus, OTCADs diminish pro-oxidant processes that might otherwise exacerbate inflammation and a pre-diabetic state. We conclude that OTCADs, especially APAP and IBU, may be valuable tools to delay or prevent the development of type 2 diabetes from a pre-diabetic condition.

  6. Intraperitoneal injection of d-serine inhibits high-fat diet intake and preference in male mice.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tsutomu; Yasoshima, Yasunobu; Matsui, Sho; Yokota-Hashimoto, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Masaki; Kitamura, Tadahiro

    2017-11-01

    d-serine is a co-agonist of the N-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, an important modulator of glutamatergic excitatory synaptic transmission. We previously reported that oral d-serine ingestion inhibited the intake of highly preferred food and promoted the intake of less preferred food in mice. Here, we analyzed the effects of intraperitoneal (IP) d-serine injections on feeding behavior in mice. We assessed the effects of d-serine during both the acquisition and maintenance of a preference for high-fat diets (HFDs). Aversiveness of IP d-serine was analyzed in the conditioned taste aversion paradigm. The effects on food intake were assessed by providing liquid meals with different fat contents. Finally, we measured brain d-serine and l-serine levels after d-serine administration. We found that IP-injected d-serine effectively inhibited the acquisition of a HFD preference, but failed to prevent expression of a previously learned HFD preference. IP-injected d-serine was not sufficient to condition taste aversion. The effect on HFD preference acquisition was associated with increases in d-serine levels in the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, and cerebellum. IP-injected d-serine most effectively inhibited the intake of liquid meals with high fat content. This effect was dose-dependent, but the responses varied significantly among male C57BL/6J mice. The differential responses to d-serine were consistent among multiple trials in each mouse. In summary, IP-injected d-serine inhibited HFD intake and the acquisition of an HFD preference. Individual mice with the same genetic background showed different sensitivities to d-serine; thus, d-serine sensitivity may be associated with unidentified traits. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Cocos nucifera water improves metabolic functions in offspring of high fat diet fed Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Kunle-Alabi, Olufadekemi T; Akindele, Opeyemi O; Raji, Yinusa

    2017-10-09

    Maternal high fat diet has been implicated in the aetiology of metabolic diseases in their offspring. The hypolipidaemic actions of Cocos nucifera water improve metabolic indices of dams consuming a high fat diet during gestation. This study investigated the effects of C. nucifera water on metabolism of offspring of dams exposed to high fat diet during gestation. Four groups of pregnant Wistar rat dams (n=6) were treated orally from Gestation Day (GD) 1 to GD 21 as follows: standard rodent feed+10 mL/kg distilled water (Control), standard rodent feed+10 mL/kg C. nucifera water, high fat feed+10 mL/kg distilled water (high fat diet), and high fat feed+10 mL/kg C. nucifera water (high fat diet+C. nucifera water). The feeds were given ad libitum and all dams received standard rodent feed after parturition. Fasting blood glucose was measured in offspring before being euthanized on Postnatal Day (PND) 120. Serum insulin, leptin, lipid profile and liver enzymes were measured. Serum total cholesterol (TC), insulin, alanine transaminase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase levels were significantly increased (p<0.05) in high fat diet offspring compared with controls. Similar changes were not observed in high fat diet+C. nucifera water offspring. Results suggest that the adverse effects of maternal high fat diet on offspring's metabolism can be ameliorated by C. nucifera water.

  8. Novel insulin delivery profiles for mixed meals for sensor-augmented pump and closed-loop artificial pancreas therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Asavari; Lee, Joon Bok; Dassau, Eyal; Doyle, Francis J

    2014-09-01

    Maintaining euglycemia for people with type 1 diabetes is highly challenging, and variations in glucose absorption rates with meal composition require meal type specific insulin delivery profiles for optimal blood glucose control. Traditional basal/bolus therapy is not fully optimized for meals of varied fat contents. Thus, regimens for low- and high-fat meals were developed to improve current insulin pump therapy. Simulations of meals with varied fat content demonstrably replicated published data. Subsequently, an insulin profile library with optimized delivery regimens under open and closed loop for various meal compositions was constructed using particle swarm optimization. Calculations showed that the optimal basal bolus insulin profiles for low-fat meals comprise a normal bolus or a short wave. The preferred delivery for high-fat meals is typically biphasic, but can extend to multiple phases depending on meal characteristics. Results also revealed that patients that are highly sensitive to insulin could benefit from biphasic deliveries. Preliminary investigations of the optimal closed-loop regimens also display bi- or multiphasic patterns for high-fat meals. The novel insulin delivery profiles present new waveforms that provide better control of postprandial glucose excursions than existing schemes. Furthermore, the proposed novel regimens are also more or similarly robust to uncertainties in meal parameter estimates, with the closed-loop schemes demonstrating superior performance and robustness. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  9. High-fat diet-induced brain region-specific phenotypic spectrum of CNS resident microglia.

    PubMed

    Baufeld, Caroline; Osterloh, Anja; Prokop, Stefan; Miller, Kelly R; Heppner, Frank L

    2016-09-01

    Diets high in fat (HFD) are known to cause an immune response in the periphery as well as the central nervous system. In peripheral adipose tissue, this immune response is primarily mediated by macrophages that are recruited to the tissue. Similarly, reactivity of microglia, the innate immune cells of the brain, has been shown to occur in the hypothalamus of mice fed a high-fat diet. To characterize the nature of the microglial response to diets high in fat in a temporal fashion, we studied the phenotypic spectrum of hypothalamic microglia of mice fed high-fat diet for 3 days and 8 weeks by assessing their tissue reaction and inflammatory signature. While we observed a significant increase in Iba1+ myeloid cells and a reaction of GFAP+ astrocytes in the hypothalamus after 8 weeks of HFD feeding, we found the hypothalamic myeloid cell reaction to be limited to endogenous microglia and not mediated by infiltrating myeloid cells. Moreover, obese humans were found to present with signs of hypothalamic gliosis and exacerbated microglia dystrophy, suggesting a targeted microglia response to diet in humans as well. Notably, the glial reaction occurring in the mouse hypothalamus was not accompanied by an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines, but rather by an anti-inflammatory reaction. Gene expression analyses of isolated microglia not only confirmed this observation, but also revealed a downregulation of microglia genes important for sensing signals in the microenvironment. Finally, we demonstrate that long-term exposure of microglia to HFD in vivo does not impair the cell's ability to respond to additional stimuli, like lipopolysaccharide. Taken together, our findings support the notion that microglia react to diets high in fat in a region-specific manner in rodents as well as in humans; however, this response changes over time as it is not exclusively pro-inflammatory nor does exposure to HFD prime microglia in the hypothalamus.

  10. Fish oil ameliorates trimethylamine N-oxide-exacerbated glucose intolerance in high-fat diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Xu, Jie; Jiang, Chengzi; Zhang, Yi; Xue, Yong; Li, Zhaojie; Wang, Jingfeng; Xue, Changhu; Wang, Yuming

    2015-04-01

    Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), a component commonly present in seafood, has been found to have a harmful impact on glucose tolerance in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. However, seafood also contains fish oil (FO), which has been shown to have beneficial effects on metabolism. Here, we investigated the effect of FO on TMAO-induced impaired glucose tolerance in HFD-fed mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to the high fat (HF), TMAO, and fish oil groups. The HF group was fed a diet containing 25% fat, the TMAO group was fed the HFD plus 0.2% TMAO, and the FO group was fed the HFD plus 0.2% TMAO and 2% fish oil for 12 weeks. After 10 weeks of feeding, oral glucose tolerance tests were performed. Dietary FO improved the fasting glucose level, the fasting insulin level, HOMA-IR value, QUICKI score and ameliorated TMAO-induced exacerbated impaired glucose tolerance in HFD-fed mice. These effects were associated with the expression of genes related to the insulin signalling pathway, glycogen synthesis, gluconeogenesis, and glucose transport in peripheral tissues. Dietary fish oil also decreased TMAO-aggravated adipose tissue inflammation. Our results suggested that dietary FO ameliorated TMAO-induced impaired glucose tolerance, insulin signal transduction in peripheral tissue, and adipose tissue inflammation in HFD-fed mice.

  11. Impaired gastric emptying of a solid test meal in patients with Parkinson's disease using 13C-sodium octanoate breath test.

    PubMed

    Goetze, Oliver; Wieczorek, Joerg; Mueller, Thomas; Przuntek, Horst; Schmidt, Wolfgang E; Woitalla, Dirk

    2005-03-03

    Up to now gastric emptying in patients with Parkinson's disease was determined by radioscintigraphy. The 13C-sodium octanoate breath test (OBT) has been established for the non-invasive evaluation of gastric emptying with a solid test meal. The aim of the study was to evaluate the OBT in patients with Parkinson's disease and to investigate the prevalence of delayed gastric emptying for solids in PD and the relationship to clinical staging patterns. Twenty-two healthy subjects and 36 patients with different clinical stages of PD classified using Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) were studied. Each fasting control and patient received a solid test meal (241 kcal) labelled with 100 mg of 13C-sodium octanoate. Breath samples were obtained before substrate administration and then in 15-min intervals over 4 h. The 13CO2/12CO2 ratio was determined in each breath sample as delta over baseline. Time to peak (t(peak)), gastric half emptying time (t1/2b), lag phase (t(lagb)) and gastric emptying coefficient (GEC) were calculated. Significant differences in t(peak), t1/2b, t(lagb) and GEC were found between patients and healthy volunteers (p<0.0001), with a 60% delay in gastric half emptying time in the patient group. Gastric half emptying time was different between clinical disease groups (H&Y 0-2 versus H&Y 2.5-5, p=0.001; UPDRS 0-30 versus UPDRS 61-92, p<0.05). The OBT detects a significant delay in gastric emptying of a solid test meal in patients with PD. Delayed gastric emptying for solids is associated with disease severity.

  12. Time-restricted feeding reduces adiposity in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Sneha; Yan, Lin

    2016-06-01

    Disruption of the circadian rhythm contributes to obesity. This study tested the hypothesis that time-restricted feeding (TRF) reduces high-fat diet-induced increase in adiposity. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed the AIN93G or the high-fat diet ad libitum (ad lib); TRF of the high-fat diet for 12 or 8hours during the dark cycle was initiated when high-fat diet-fed mice exhibited significant increases in body weight. Energy intake of the TRF 12-hour group was not different from that of the high-fat ad lib group, although that of the TRF 8-hour group was slightly but significantly lower. Restricted feeding of the high-fat diet reduced body fat mass and body weight compared with mice fed the high-fat diet ad lib. There were no differences in respiratory exchange ratio (RER) among TRF and high-fat ad lib groups, but the RER of these groups was lower than that of the AIN93G group. Energy expenditure of the TRF groups was slightly but significantly lower than that of the high-fat ad lib group. Plasma concentrations of ghrelin were increased in TRF groups compared with both AIN93G and high-fat ad lib groups. Elevations of plasma concentrations of insulin, leptin, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase-1 by high-fat ad lib feeding were reduced by TRF to the levels of mice fed the AIN93G diet. In conclusion, TRF during the dark cycle reduces high-fat diet-induced increases in adiposity and proinflammatory cytokines. These results indicate that circadian timing of food intake may prevent obesity and abate obesity-related metabolic disturbance.

  13. Unaltered Prion Pathogenesis in a Mouse Model of High-Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Caihong; Schwarz, Petra; Abakumova, Irina; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological, clinical, and experimental animal studies suggest a strong correlation between insulin resistance and Alzheimer’s disease. In fact, type-2 diabetes is considered an important risk factor of developing Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, impaired insulin signaling in the Alzheimer’s disease brain may promote Aβ production, impair Aβ clearance and induce tau hyperphosphorylation, thereby leading to deterioration of the disease. The pathological prion protein, PrPSc, deposits in the form of extracellular aggregates and leads to dementia, raising the question as to whether prion pathogenesis may also be affected by insulin resistance. We therefore established high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance in tga20 mice, which overexpress the prion protein. We then inoculated the insulin-resistant mice with prions. We found that insulin resistance in tga20 mice did not affect prion disease progression, PrPSc deposition, astrogliosis or microglial activation, and had no effect on survival. Our study demonstrates that in a mouse model, insulin resistance does not significantly contribute to prion pathogenesis. PMID:26658276

  14. Hippocampal memory processes are modulated by insulin and high-fat-induced insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    McNay, Ewan C.; Ong, Cecilia T.; McCrimmon, Rory J.; Cresswell, James; Bogan, Jonathan S.; Sherwin, Robert S

    2010-01-01

    Insulin regulates glucose uptake and storage in peripheral tissues, and has been shown to act within the hypothalamus to acutely regulate food intake and metabolism. The machinery for transduction of insulin signaling is also present in other brain areas, particularly in the hippocampus, but a physiological role for brain insulin outside the hypothalamus has not been established. Recent studies suggest that insulin may be able to modulate cognitive functions including memory. Here we report that local delivery of insulin to the rat hippocampus enhances spatial memory, in a PI-3-kinase dependent manner, and that intrahippocampal insulin also increases local glycolytic metabolism. Selective blockade of endogenous intrahippocampal insulin signaling impairs memory performance. Further, a rodent model of type 2 diabetes mellitus produced by a high-fat diet impairs basal cognitive function and attenuates both cognitive and metabolic responses to hippocampal insulin administration. Our data demonstrate that insulin is required for optimal hippocampal memory processing. Insulin resistance within the telencephalon may underlie the cognitive deficits commonly reported to accompany type 2 diabetes. PMID:20176121

  15. Hemin improves insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle in high fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Ju, Tae-Jin; Kwon, Woo-Young; Kim, Yong-Woon; Kim, Jong-Yeon; Kim, Yong-Dae; Lee, In-Kyu; Park, So-Young

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined whether hemin could prevent the development of high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance in the liver and skeletal muscle using a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. A four-week high-fat feeding to mice increased the body weight, fat mass, and plasma levels of insulin and lipid, which were reduced by hemin. High-fat diet reduced whole body glucose uptake, which were increased by hemin. Insulin-stimulated hepatic glucose production (HGP) was increased by high-fat diet, but hemin had no significant effect on HGP. Skeletal muscle glucose uptake was reduced by high-fat diet, and hemin normalized the glucose uptake. High-fat diet increased triglyceride levels and mRNA levels of lipogenic enzymes, and decreased mRNA levels of enzymes involved in lipid β-oxidation, which was reversed by hemin. Phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase levels were increased in the skeletal muscle of high fat-fed hemin-injected mice. High-fat diet reduced mRNA levels of antioxidant enzymes and increased mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines and nitrotyrosine levels, which was normalized by hemin in the skeletal muscle. However, hemin had no significant effect on these factors in the liver. These results suggest that hemin prevents the development of high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance by increased insulin sensitivity in the skeletal muscle.

  16. Effects of Glycyrrhiza glabra polysaccharides on immune and antioxidant activities in high-fat mice.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ying-Kai; Wu, Hua-Tao; Ma, Tao; Liu, Wei-Juan; He, Xue-Jun

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the immune and antioxidant activities of Glycyrrhiza glabra polysaccharides (GGP) in rats fed high-fat diet. The experiment was performed on four groups of growing Kunming mice. The results of the experiment showed a statistically significant decrease in serum antioxidant enzyme activities in high-fat group. Administration of GGP dose-dependently significantly enhanced immune and antioxidant enzyme activities in the GGP-treated mice compared to the high-fat model mice. It is concluded that GGP treatment can enhance immune activities, and reduce oxidative stress in high-fat mice.

  17. Comparisons of the Postprandial Inflammatory and Endotoxaemic Responses to Mixed Meals in Young and Older Individuals: A Randomised Trial

    PubMed Central

    Milan, Amber M.; Pundir, Shikha; Pileggi, Chantal A.; Markworth, James F.; Lewandowski, Paul A.; Cameron-Smith, David

    2017-01-01

    Postprandial inflammation and endotoxaemia are determinants of cardiovascular and metabolic disease risk which are amplified by high fat meals. We aimed to examine the determinants of postprandial inflammation and endotoxaemia in older and younger adults following a high fat mixed meal. In a randomised cross-over trial, healthy participants aged 20–25 and 60–75 years (n = 15/group) consumed a high-fat breakfast and a low-fat breakfast. Plasma taken at baseline and post-meal for 5 h was analysed for circulating endotoxin, cytokines (monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)), lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), and inflammatory gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Older subjects had lower baseline PBMC expression of glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX-1) but greater insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) and circulating MCP-1 compared to younger subjects. After either meal, there were no age differences in plasma, chylomicron endotoxin, or plasma LBP concentrations, nor in inflammatory cytokine gene and protein expression (MCP-1, IL-1β, and TNF-α). Unlike younger participants, the older group had decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD)-2 expression after the meals. After a high-fat meal, older adults have no increased inflammatory or endotoxin response, but an altered oxidative stress gene response compared with younger adults. Healthy older adults, without apparent metabolic dysfunction, have a comparable postprandial inflammatory and endotoxaemia response to younger adults. PMID:28368340

  18. Serotonin Improves High Fat Diet Induced Obesity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Akasaka, Daisuke; Saito, Kazuki; Ogasawara, Hideki; Minashima, Takeshi; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Kanaya, Takashi; Takakura, Ikuro; Inoue, Nao; Ikeda, Ikuo; Chen, Xiangning; Miyake, Masato; Kitazawa, Haruki; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Sato, Kan; Tahara, Kohji; Nagasawa, Yuya; Rose, Michael T.; Ohwada, Shyuichi; Watanabe, Kouichi; Aso, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    There are two independent serotonin (5-HT) systems of organization: one in the central nervous system and the other in the periphery. 5-HT affects feeding behavior and obesity in the central nervous system. On the other hand, peripheral 5-HT also may play an important role in obesity, as it has been reported that 5-HT regulates glucose and lipid metabolism. Here we show that the intraperitoneal injection of 5-HT to mice inhibits weight gain, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance and completely prevented the enlargement of intra-abdominal adipocytes without having any effect on food intake when on a high fat diet, but not on a chow diet. 5-HT increased energy expenditure, O2 consumption and CO2 production. This novel metabolic effect of peripheral 5-HT is critically related to a shift in the profile of muscle fiber type from fast/glycolytic to slow/oxidative in soleus muscle. Additionally, 5-HT dramatically induced an increase in the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1α (PGC-1α)-b and PGC-1α-c in soleus muscle. The elevation of these gene mRNA expressions by 5-HT injection was inhibited by treatment with 5-HT receptor (5HTR) 2A or 7 antagonists. Our results demonstrate that peripheral 5-HT may play an important role in the relief of obesity and other metabolic disorders by accelerating energy consumption in skeletal muscle. PMID:26766570

  19. Red Blood Cell Dysfunction Induced by High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Unruh, Dusten; Srinivasan, Ramprasad; Benson, Tyler; Haigh, Stephen; Coyle, Danielle; Batra, Neil; Keil, Ryan; Sturm, Robert; Blanco, Victor; Palascak, Mary; Franco, Robert S.; Tong, Wilson; Chatterjee, Tapan; Hui, David Y.; Davidson, W. Sean; Aronow, Bruce J.; Kalfa, Theodosia; Manka, David; Peairs, Abigail; Blomkalns, Andra; Fulton, David J.; Brittain, Julia E.; Weintraub, Neal L.; Bogdanov, Vladimir Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background High-fat diet (HFD) promotes endothelial dysfunction and proinflammatory monocyte activation, which contribute to atherosclerosis in obesity. We investigated whether HFD also induces the dysfunction of red blood cells (RBCs), which serve as a reservoir for chemokines via binding to Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC). Methods and Results A 60% HFD for 12 weeks, which produced only minor changes in lipid profile in C57/BL6 mice, markedly augmented the levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 bound to RBCs, which in turn stimulated macrophage migration through an endothelial monolayer. Levels of RBC-bound KC were also increased by HFD. These effects of HFD were abolished in DARC−/− mice. In RBCs from HFD-fed wild-type and DARC−/− mice, levels of membrane cholesterol and phosphatidylserine externalization were increased, fostering RBC-macrophage inflammatory interactions and promoting macrophage phagocytosis in vitro. When labeled ex vivo and injected into wild-type mice, RBCs from HFD-fed mice exhibited ≈3-fold increase in splenic uptake. Finally, RBCs from HFD-fed mice induced increased macrophage adhesion to the endothelium when they were incubated with isolated aortic segments, indicating endothelial activation. Conclusions RBC dysfunction, analogous to endothelial dysfunction, occurs early during diet-induced obesity and may serve as a mediator of atherosclerosis. These findings may have implications for the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in obesity, a worldwide epidemic. PMID:26467254

  20. High fat diet enhances stemness and tumorigenicity of intestinal progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Beyaz, Semir; Mana, Miyeko D.; Roper, Jatin; Kedrin, Dmitriy; Saadatpour, Assieh; Hong, Sue-Jean; Bauer-Rowe, Khristian E.; Xifaras, Michael E.; Akkad, Adam; Arias, Erika; Pinello, Luca; Katz, Yarden; Shinagare, Shweta; Abu-Remaileh, Monther; Mihaylova, Maria M.; Lamming, Dudley W.; Dogum, Rizkullah; Guo, Guoji; Bell, George W.; Selig, Martin; Nielsen, G. Petur; Gupta, Nitin; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Deshpande, Vikram; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Orkin, Stuart H.; Sabatini, David M.; Yilmaz, Ömer H.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how pro-obesity diets regulate tissue stem and progenitor cell function. Here we find that high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity augments the numbers and function of Lgr5+ intestinal stem-cells (ISCs) of the mammalian intestine. Mechanistically, HFD induces a robust peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPAR-d) signature in intestinal stem and (non-ISC) progenitor cells, and pharmacologic activation of PPAR-d recapitulates the effects of a HFD on these cells. Like a HFD, ex vivo treatment of intestinal organoid cultures with fatty acid constituents of the HFD enhances the self-renewal potential of these organoid bodies in a PPAR-d dependent manner. Interestingly, HFD- and agonist-activated PPAR-d signaling endow organoid-initiating capacity to progenitors, and enforced PPAR-d signaling permits these progenitors to form in vivo tumors upon loss of the tumor suppressor Apc. These findings highlight how diet-modulated PPAR-d activation alters not only the function of intestinal stem and progenitor cells, but also their capacity to initiate tumors. PMID:26935695

  1. High Fat Diet-induced Obesity Enhances Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Molinero, Luciana L; Yin, Dengping; Lei, Kevin; Chen, Luqiu; Wang, Ying; Chong, Anita S; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity promotes a state of low-grade inflammation that exacerbates chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease. In transplantation, the survival of organs transplanted into obese patients is reduced compared to allografts in lean recipients. However, whether this is due to increased alloimmunity remains to be addressed conclusively. Methods We used a mouse model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and assessed immune responses to allogeneic stimulation in vitro, allogeneic splenocyte immunization in vivo, and allogeneic heart transplantation. Results Our results indicate that HFD altered the composition and phenotype of splenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that led to their enhanced capacity to stimulate T cells. Immunization with allogeneic splenocytes in vivo resulted in increased alloreactivity, as determined by IFNγ production. Moreover, cardiac allograft rejection in HFD mice was modestly accelerated compared to aged-matched control animals fed a low fat diet (LFD), correlating with enhanced alloreactive T cell function. Conclusions Our results highlight the increased alloresponse triggered by HFD-induced obesity and its negative impact on transplant outcome. PMID:27007226

  2. Serotonin Improves High Fat Diet Induced Obesity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hitoshi; Nakano, Tatsuya; Saito, Ryo; Akasaka, Daisuke; Saito, Kazuki; Ogasawara, Hideki; Minashima, Takeshi; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Kanaya, Takashi; Takakura, Ikuro; Inoue, Nao; Ikeda, Ikuo; Chen, Xiangning; Miyake, Masato; Kitazawa, Haruki; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Sato, Kan; Tahara, Kohji; Nagasawa, Yuya; Rose, Michael T; Ohwada, Shyuichi; Watanabe, Kouichi; Aso, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    There are two independent serotonin (5-HT) systems of organization: one in the central nervous system and the other in the periphery. 5-HT affects feeding behavior and obesity in the central nervous system. On the other hand, peripheral 5-HT also may play an important role in obesity, as it has been reported that 5-HT regulates glucose and lipid metabolism. Here we show that the intraperitoneal injection of 5-HT to mice inhibits weight gain, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance and completely prevented the enlargement of intra-abdominal adipocytes without having any effect on food intake when on a high fat diet, but not on a chow diet. 5-HT increased energy expenditure, O2 consumption and CO2 production. This novel metabolic effect of peripheral 5-HT is critically related to a shift in the profile of muscle fiber type from fast/glycolytic to slow/oxidative in soleus muscle. Additionally, 5-HT dramatically induced an increase in the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1α (PGC-1α)-b and PGC-1α-c in soleus muscle. The elevation of these gene mRNA expressions by 5-HT injection was inhibited by treatment with 5-HT receptor (5HTR) 2A or 7 antagonists. Our results demonstrate that peripheral 5-HT may play an important role in the relief of obesity and other metabolic disorders by accelerating energy consumption in skeletal muscle.

  3. Curcumin ameliorates high-fat diet-induced spermatogenesis dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yang; Yan, Wen-Jie; Yin, Tai-Lang; Yang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin, a type of natural active ingredient, is derived from rhizoma of Curcuma, which possesses antioxidant, antitumorigenic and anti-inflammatory activities. The present study aimed to investigate whether treatment with curcumin reduced high-fat diet (HFD)-induced spermatogenesis dysfunction. Sprague-Dawley rats fed a HFD were treated with or without curcumin for 8 weeks. The testis/body weight, histological analysis and serum hormone levels were used to evaluate the effects of curcumin treatment on spermatogenesis dysfunction induced by the HFD. In addition, the expression levels of apoptosis associated proteins, Fas, B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-xl, Bcl-associated X protein (Bax) and cleaved-caspase 3, were determined in the testis. The results of the present study suggested that curcumin treatment attenuated decreased testis/body weight and abnormal hormone levels. Morphological changes induced by a HFD were characterized as atrophied seminiferous tubules, decreased spermatogenetic cells and interstitial cells were improved by curcumin treatment. In addition, curcumin treatment reduced apoptosis in the testis, and decreased expression of Fas, Bax and cleaved-caspase 3, as well as increased expression of Bcl-xl. In conclusion, the present study revealed that curcumin treatment reduced HFD-induced spermatogenesis dysfunction in male rats. PMID:27600729

  4. High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity Enhances Allograft Rejection.

    PubMed

    Molinero, Luciana L; Yin, Dengping; Lei, Yuk Man; Chen, Luqiu; Wang, Ying; Chong, Anita S; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2016-05-01

    Obesity promotes a state of low-grade inflammation that exacerbates chronic inflammatory diseases, such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease. In transplantation, the survival of organs transplanted into obese patients is reduced compared with allografts in lean recipients. However, whether this is due to increased alloimmunity remains to be addressed conclusively. We used a mouse model of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and assessed immune responses to allogeneic stimulation in vitro, allogeneic splenocyte immunization in vivo, and allogeneic heart transplantation. Our results indicate that HFD altered the composition and phenotype of splenic antigen-presenting cells that led to their enhanced capacity to stimulate T cells. Immunization with allogeneic splenocytes in vivo resulted in increased alloreactivity, as determined by IFNγ production. Moreover, cardiac allograft rejection in HFD mice was modestly accelerated compared to aged-matched control animals fed a low-fat diet, correlating with enhanced alloreactive T cell function. Our results highlight the increased alloresponse triggered by HFD-induced obesity and its negative impact on transplant outcome.

  5. Amino Acid-Induced Activation of mTORC1 in Rat Liver Is Attenuated by Short-Term Consumption of a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Scot R; Ravi, Suhana; Gordon, Bradley S; Dennis, Michael D; Jefferson, Leonard S

    2015-11-01

    The chronic activation of the mechanistic (mammalian) target of rapamycin in complex 1 (mTORC1) in response to excess nutrients contributes to obesity-associated pathologies. To understand the initial events that ultimately lead to obesity-associated pathologies, the present study assessed mTORC1 responses in the liver after a relatively short exposure to a high-fat diet (HFD). Male, obesity-prone rats were meal-trained to consume either a control (CON; 10% of energy from fat) diet or an HFD (60% of energy from fat) for 2 wk. Livers were collected and analyzed for mTORC1 signaling [assessed by changes in phosphorylation of 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (p70S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1)] and potential regulatory mechanisms, including changes in the association of Ras-related GTP binding (Rag) A and RagC with mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and expression of Sestrin1, Sestrin2, and Sestrin3. Feeding-induced activation of mTORC1 was blunted in the livers of rats fed the HFD compared with those fed the CON diet (p70S6K1 phosphorylation, 19% of CON; 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, 61% of CON). The attenuated response was not due to a change in a kinase also referred to as protein kinase B (Akt) signaling but rather to resistance to amino acid-induced activation of mTORC1, as evidenced by a reduction in the interaction of RagA (69% of CON) and RagC (66% of CON) with mTOR and enhanced expression of the mTORC1 repressors Sestrin2 (132% of CON) and Sestrin3 (143% of CON). The consumption of an HFD led to impaired amino acid-induced activation of mTORC1 as assessed in livers perfused in situ with medium containing various concentrations of amino acids. These results in rats support a model in which the initial response of the liver to an HFD is an attenuation of, rather than the expected activation of, mTORC1. The initial response likely represents a counterregulatory mechanism to handle the onset of excess nutrients and is caused

  6. The effects of chromium complex and level on glucose metabolism and memory acquisition in rats fed high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Kazim; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Orhan, Cemal; Agca, Can A; Sahin, Nurhan; Guvenc, Mehmet; Krejpcio, Zbigniew; Staniek, Halina; Hayirli, Armagan

    2011-11-01

    Conditions in which glucose metabolism is impaired due to insulin resistance are associated with memory impairment. It was hypothesized that supplemental chromium (Cr) may alleviate insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes and consequently improve memory acquisition, depending upon its source and level. In a complete randomized design experiment, male Wistar rats (n=60; weighing 200-220 g) were fed either normal (8%, normal diet (ND)) or high-fat (40%, high-fat diet (HFD)) diet and supplemented with Cr as either chromium-glycinate (CrGly) or chromium-acetate (CrAc) at doses of 0, 40, or 80 μg/kg body weight (BW) via drinking water from 8 to 20 weeks of age. Feeding HFD induced type 2 diabetes, as reflected by greater glucose/insulin ratio (2.98 vs. 2.74) comparing to feeding ND. Moreover, HFD rats had greater BW (314 vs. 279 g) and less serum (53 vs. 68 μg/L) and brain (14 vs. 24 ng/g) Cr concentrations than ND rats. High-fat diet caused a 32% reduction in expressions of glucose transporters 1 and 3 (GLUTs) in brain tissue and a 27% reduction in mean percentage time spent in the target quadrant and a 38% increase in spatial memory acquisition phase (SMAP) compared with ND. Compared with supplemental Cr as CrAc, CrGly was more effective to ameliorate response variables (i.e., restoration of tissue Cr concentration, enhancement of cerebral GLUTs expressions, and reduction of the glucose/insulin ratio and SMAP) in a dose-response manner, especially in rats fed HFD. Supplemental Cr as CrGly may have therapeutic potential to enhance insulin action and alleviate memory acquisition in a dose-dependent manner, through restoring tissue Cr reserve and enhancing cerebral GLUTs expressions.

  7. Effect of high fluoride and high fat on serum lipid levels and oxidative stress in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liyan; Gao, Yanhui; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Hui; Sun, Dianjun

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of high fluoride and high fat on triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), lipid peroxide (LPO) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in rabbits. A factorial experimental design was used, with two factors (fluoride and fat) and three levels. Seventy-two male rabbits were randomly assigned into nine groups according to initial weight and serum lipid levels. The rabbits were fed with basic feed, moderate fat feed or high fat feed and drank tap water, fluoridated water at levels of 50 and 100mgfluorion/L freely. Biological materials were collected after 5 months, and serum lipid, T-AOC, LPO, and MDA levels were then measured. Using these data, the separate and interactive effects of high fluoride and high fat were analyzed. High fluoride and high fat both increased serum levels of TC, HDL-C and LDL-C significantly (P<0.05), and there was also a synergistic effect between high fluoride and high fat (P<0.05). High fluoride and high fat had different effects on TG levels: high fat significantly increased TG levels (P<0.01) whereas high fluoride had nothing to do with TG levels (P>0.05). High fat significantly elevated LPO and MDA levels and lowered T-AOC levels in serum (P<0.05). Similarly, high fluoride significantly increased LPO and MDA levels in serum (P<0.05). However, there was no interactive effect between high fat and high fluoride on these indexes. In summary, high fluoride and high fat increased serum TC and LDL-C levels individually and synergistically, and this would cause and aggravate hypercholesterolemia in rabbits. At the same time, high fluoride and high fat both made the accumulation of product of oxidative stress in experimental animals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Direct effects of fatty meals and adiposity on oxidised low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Laguna-Camacho, Antonio; Alonso-Barreto, Arely S; Mendieta-Zerón, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    High-fat intake and high adiposity contribute to hyperlipaemia. In a hyperlipaemic state, lipoproteins infiltrate arterial wall where they are modified and cause an immune response characteristic of atherosclerosis. A small fraction of modified lipoproteins including oxidised low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) returns to circulation. The present study tracked high-fat meals during four weeks as to find effects of sustained frequency change on adiposity and ox-LDL. The findings indicated that changes in frequency of consumption of high-fat eating episodes correlated directly with changes in adiposity and ox-LDL. Hence the number of fatty meals consumed by people with overweight or obesity in few weeks could affect the atherogenic process.

  9. Intrauterine growth retardation increases the susceptibility of pigs to high-fat diet-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingbo; Chen, Daiwen; Yao, Ying; Yu, Bing; Mao, Xiangbing; He, Jun; Huang, Zhiqing; Zheng, Ping

    2012-01-01

    It has been recognized that there is a relationship between prenatal growth restriction and the development of metabolic-related diseases in later life, a process involved in mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) increases the susceptibility of offspring to high-fat (HF) diet-induced metabolic syndrome. Recent findings suggested that HF feeding decreased mitochondrial oxidative capacity and impaired mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle. Therefore, we hypothesized that the long-term consequences of IUGR on mitochondrial biogenesis and function make the offspring more susceptible to HF diet-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Normal birth weight (NBW), and IUGR pigs were allotted to control or HF diet in a completely randomized design, individually. After 4 weeks of feeding, growth performance and molecular pathways related to mitochondrial function were determined. The results showed that IUGR decreased growth performance and plasma insulin concentrations. In offspring fed a HF diet, IUGR was associated with enhanced plasma leptin levels, increased concentrations of triglyceride and malondialdehyde (MDA), and reduced glycogen and ATP contents in skeletal muscle. High fat diet-fed IUGR offspring exhibited decreased activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). These alterations in metabolic traits of IUGR pigs were accompanied by impaired mitochondrial respiration function, reduced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) contents, and down-regulated mRNA expression levels of genes responsible for mitochondrial biogenesis and function. In conclusion, our results suggest that IUGR make the offspring more susceptible to HF diet-induced mitochondrial dysfunction.

  10. Nicotine plus a high-fat diet triggers cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sinha-Hikim, Indrani; Friedman, Theodore C; Falz, Mark; Chalfant, Victor; Hasan, Mohammad Kamrul; Espinoza-Derout, Jorge; Lee, Desean L; Sims, Carl; Tran, Peter; Mahata, Sushil K; Sinha-Hikim, Amiya P

    2017-04-01

    Cigarette smoking is an important risk factor for diabetes, cardiovascular disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The health risk associated with smoking can be aggravated by obesity. Smoking might also trigger cardiomyocyte (CM) apoptosis. Given that CM apoptosis has been implicated as a potential mechanism in the development of cardiomyopathy and heart failure, we characterize the key signaling pathways in nicotine plus high-fat diet (HFD)-induced CM apoptosis. Adult C57BL6 male mice were fed a normal diet (ND) or HFD and received twice-daily intraperitoneal (IP) injections of nicotine (0.75 mg/kg body weight [BW]) or saline for 16 weeks. An additional group of nicotine-treated mice on HFD received twice-daily IP injections of mecamylamine (1 mg/kg BW), a non-selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, for 16 weeks. Nicotine when combined with HFD led to a massive increase in CM apoptosis that was fully prevented by mecamylamine treatment. Induction of CM apoptosis was associated with increased oxidative stress and activation of caspase-2-mediated intrinsic pathway signaling coupled with inactivation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Furthermore, nicotine treatment significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated the HFD-induced decrease in fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) and silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1). We conclude that nicotine, when combined with HFD, triggers CM apoptosis through the generation of oxidative stress and inactivation of AMPK together with the activation of caspase-2-mediated intrinsic apoptotic signaling independently of FGF21 and SIRT1.

  11. High-Fat Diet–Induced Retinal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Richard Cheng-An; Shi, Liheng; Huang, Cathy Chia-Yu; Kim, Andy Jeesu; Ko, Michael L.; Zhou, Beiyan; Ko, Gladys Y.-P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of obesity-induced prediabetes/early diabetes on the retina to provide new evidence on the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes–associated diabetic retinopathy (DR). Methods. A high-fat diet (HFD)–induced obesity mouse model (male C57BL/6J) was used in this study. At the end of the 12-week HFD feeding regimen, mice were evaluated for glucose and insulin tolerance, and retinal light responses were recorded by electroretinogram (ERG). Western immunoblot and immunohistochemical staining were used to determine changes in elements regulating calcium homeostasis between HFD and control retinas, as well as unstained human retinal sections from DR patients and age-appropriate controls. Results. Compared to the control, the scotopic and photopic ERGs from HFD mice were decreased. There were significant decreases in molecules related to cell signaling, calcium homeostasis, and glucose metabolism from HFD retinas, including phosphorylated protein kinase B (pAKT), glucose transporter 4, L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (L-VGCC), and plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA). Similar changes for pAKT, PMCA, and L-VGCC were also observed in human retinal sections from DR patients. Conclusions. Obesity-induced hyperglycemic and prediabetic/early diabetic conditions caused detrimental impacts on retinal light sensitivities and health. The decrease of the ERG components in early diabetes reflects the decreased neuronal activity of retinal light responses, which may be caused by a decrease in neuronal calcium signaling. Since PI3K-AKT is important in regulating calcium homeostasis and neural survival, maintaining proper PI3K-AKT signaling in early diabetes or at the prediabetic stage might be a new strategy for DR prevention. PMID:25788653

  12. Long-term rates of mitochondrial protein synthesis are increased in mouse skeletal muscle with high fat feeding regardless of insulin sensitizing treatment.

    PubMed

    Newsom, Sean A; Miller, Benjamin F; Hamilton, Karyn L; Ehrlicher, Sarah E; Stierwalt, Harrison D; Robinson, Matthew M

    2017-07-11

    Skeletal muscle mitochondrial protein synthesis is regulated in part by insulin. The development of insulin resistance with diet-induced obesity may therefore contribute to impairments to protein synthesis and decreased mitochondrial respiration. Yet, the impact of diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance on mitochondrial energetics is controversial with reports varying from decreases to increases in mitochondrial respiration. We investigated the impact of changes in insulin sensitivity on long-term rates of mitochondrial protein synthesis as a mechanism for changes to mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle. Insulin resistance was induced in C57BL/6J mice using 4 weeks of high-fat compared with low-fat diet. For 8 additional weeks, diets were enriched in pioglitazone to restore insulin sensitivity as compared with non-enriched control low-fat or high-fat diet. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial protein synthesis was measured using deuterium oxide labeling during weeks 10 to 12. High-resolution respirometry was performed using palmitoyl-L-carnitine, glutamate+malate and glutamate+malate+succinate as substrates for mitochondria isolated from quadriceps. Mitochondrial protein synthesis and palmitoyl-L-carnitine oxidation were increased in mice consuming high-fat diet, regardless of differences in insulin sensitivity with pioglitazone treatment. There was no effect of diet or pioglitazone treatment on ADP-stimulated respiration or H2O2 emission using glutamate+malate or glutamate+malate+succinate. The results demonstrate no impairments to mitochondrial protein synthesis or respiration following induction of insulin resistance. Instead, mitochondrial protein synthesis was increased with high-fat diet and may contribute to remodeling of the mitochondria to increase lipid oxidation capacity. Mitochondrial adaptations with high-fat diet appear driven by nutrient availability, not intrinsic defects that contribute to insulin resistance. Copyright © 2017, American

  13. You Are What You Eat: Linking High-Fat Diet to Stem Cell Dysfunction and Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Haller, Samantha; Jasper, Heinrich

    2016-05-05

    A high-fat diet is linked to elevated cancer risk, yet this link remains poorly understood. New studies in mice are now beginning to obtain mechanistic insight into how high-fat diets perturb stem cell function and cause cancers.

  14. Protection of brain and pancreas from high-fat diet: effects of catechin and caffeine.

    PubMed

    Unno, Keiko; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Ken-Ichi; Takabayashi, Fumiyo; Yoshida, Hirotoshi; Kikunaga, Naomi; Takamori, Nina; Asahina, Shunsuke; Iguchi, Kazuaki; Sayama, Kazutoshi; Hoshino, Minoru

    2009-02-16

    To investigate the effect of a high-fat diet on brain and pancreas functions, we used SAMP10 mice that have characteristics of brain atrophy and cognitive dysfunction with aging. Simultaneously, we investigated the effect of green tea catechin consumption on high-fat diet feeding, because green tea catechin has been reported to improve brain atrophy, brain dysfunction and obesity. The body weight of mice fed a high-fat diet from 2 to 12 months was higher than that of the control, although the calorie intake was not. The high-fat diet also increased insulin secretion; however, the hypersecretion of insulin and obesity were suppressed when mice were fed a high-fat diet with green tea catechin and caffeine. Furthermore, brain atrophy was suppressed and the working memory, tested using Y-maze, improved in mice fed a high-fat diet containing green tea catechin and caffeine. The secretion of insulin might affect both obesity and brain function. A strong correlation was found between working memory and insulin release in mice fed a high-fat diet with green tea catechin and/or caffeine. The results indicate the protective effect of green tea catechin and caffeine on the functions of brain and pancreas in mice fed a high-fat diet.

  15. Blueberry supplementation improves memory in middle-aged mice fed a high-fat diet

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Consuming a high-fat diet may result in behavioral deficits similar to those observed in aging animals; our lab has demonstrated that blueberry supplementation can allay age-related behavioral deficits. To determine if supplementation of a high-fat diet with blueberries offers protection against put...

  16. What causes high fat diet-induced postprandial inflammation: endotoxin or free fatty acids?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction High fat (saturated fat) diet has been generally used to induce tissue inflammation, insulin resistance and obesity in animal models. High fat diet can also induce postprandial inflammation in humans. Importantly, postprandial inflammation is linked to elevated cardiovascular and metabo...

  17. Time-restricted feeding reduces adiposity in mice fed a high-fat diet

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Disruption of the circadian rhythm contributes to obesity. The present study investigated the effects of time-restricted feeding (TRF) of a high-fat diet on adiposity in male C57BL/6 mice. Three-week-old mice were fed a low-fat or high-fat diet (16% or 45% of energy from corn oil) ad libitum (ad l...

  18. Combination of high fat diet and chronic stress retracts hippocampal dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Sarah E.; Campbell, Adam M.; Kleen, Jonathan K.; Foltz, Cainan H.; Wright, Ryan L.; Diamond, David M.; Conrad, Cheryl D.

    2006-01-01

    Adult male rats were fed a low or high fat diet and given psychosocial stress (crowded and unstable housing with daily predator exposure) for 3 weeks. Neither stress nor high fat diet, alone, produced dendritic atrophy; only the group given the combination of stress and high fat diet developed a reduction of the length and number of branch points of apical dendrites of CA3 neurons. These findings indicate that a synergy between high fat diet and stress caused a retraction of CA3 dendrites. The findings are consistent with work on peripheral (e.g., cardiovascular) systems demonstrating a synergy between stress and high fat diet, and are relevant toward understanding how diet and stress interact to adversely a¡ectbrain and memory processing. PMID:15618887

  19. High protein high fibre snack bars reduce food intake and improve short term glucose and insulin profiles compared with high fat snack bars.

    PubMed

    Williams, Gemma; Noakes, Manny; Keogh, Jennifer; Foster, Paul; Clifton, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The replacement in the diet of refined carbohydrate and fat with fibre and protein has been shown to promote satiety and improve glucose and insulin profiles. It is less clear whether the macronutrient composition of individual foods such as snacks have any meaningful impact on metabolic parameters and satiety. We examined if the consumption of higher protein higher fibre snack bars would result in reducing outcome measures such as food intake and glucose and insulin patterns compared to a conventional isocaloric high fat high refined carbohydrate snack bar. Twenty three women were randomized in a single blind cross over study with 2 interventions, a high fat high sugar snack bar and a comparatively higher protein, higher fibre snack bar intervention. Snack bars were eaten at mid morning and mid afternoon, and a standard breakfast and ad libitum buffet lunch. The glucose and insulin responses over 9 hours were significantly lower (P = 0.014 and P = 0.012 respectively) during the high protein snack bar intervention. Peak glucose levels were also 16% lower after the morning HP bar (P <0.001). The morning high protein bar reduced the energy intake at the buffet lunch meal by 5% (4657 +/- 1025KJ vs 4901 +/- 1186KJ, P < 0.05). Altering the macronutrient composition of a snack bar can assist in reducing the energy intake at a subsequent meal and improve short term glucose and insulin profiles.

  20. Dietary high-fat lard intake induces thyroid dysfunction and abnormal morphology in rats.

    PubMed

    Shao, Shan-shan; Zhao, Yuan-fei; Song, Yong-feng; Xu, Chao; Yang, Jian-mei; Xuan, Shi-meng; Yan, Hui-li; Yu, Chun-xiao; Zhao, Meng; Xu, Jin; Zhao, Jia-jun

    2014-11-01

    Excess dietary fat intake can induce lipotoxicity in non-adipose tissues. The aim of this study was to observe the effects of dietary high-fat lard intake on thyroid in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high-fat lard diet for 24 weeks, and then the rats were fed a normal control diet (acute dietary modification) or the high-fat lard diet for another 6 weeks. The serum lipid profile, total thyroxine (TT4), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyrotropin (TSH) levels were determined at the 12, 18, 24 and 30 weeks. High-frequency ultrasound scanning of the thyroid glands was performed at the 24 or 30 weeks. After the rats were sacrificed, the thyroid glands were collected for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. The high-fat lard diet significantly increased triglyceride levels in both the serum and thyroid, and decreased serum TT4 and FT4 levels in parallel with elevated serum TSH levels. Ultrasonic imaging revealed enlarged thyroid glands with lowered echotexture and relatively heterogeneous features in the high-fat lard fed rats. The thyroid glands from the high-fat lard fed rats exhibited enlarged follicle cavities and flattened follicular epithelial cells under light microscopy, and dilated endoplasmic reticulum cisternae, twisted nuclei, fewer microvilli and secretory vesicles under transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, the thyroid glands from the high-fat lard fed rats showed markedly low levels of thyroid hormone synthesis-related proteins TTF-1 and NIS. Acute dietary modification by withdrawal of the high-fat lard diet for 6 weeks failed to ameliorate the high-fat lard diet-induced thyroid changes. Dietary high-fat lard intake induces significant thyroid dysfunction and abnormal morphology in rats, which can not be corrected by short-term dietary modification.

  1. Dietary high-fat lard intake induces thyroid dysfunction and abnormal morphology in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Shan-shan; Zhao, Yuan-fei; Song, Yong-feng; Xu, Chao; Yang, Jian-mei; Xuan, Shi-meng; Yan, Hui-li; Yu, Chun-xiao; Zhao, Meng; Xu, Jin; Zhao, Jia-jun

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Excess dietary fat intake can induce lipotoxicity in non-adipose tissues. The aim of this study was to observe the effects of dietary high-fat lard intake on thyroid in rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high-fat lard diet for 24 weeks, and then the rats were fed a normal control diet (acute dietary modification) or the high-fat lard diet for another 6 weeks. The serum lipid profile, total thyroxine (TT4), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyrotropin (TSH) levels were determined at the 12, 18, 24 and 30 weeks. High-frequency ultrasound scanning of the thyroid glands was performed at the 24 or 30 weeks. After the rats were sacrificed, the thyroid glands were collected for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Results: The high-fat lard diet significantly increased triglyceride levels in both the serum and thyroid, and decreased serum TT4 and FT4 levels in parallel with elevated serum TSH levels. Ultrasonic imaging revealed enlarged thyroid glands with lowered echotexture and relatively heterogeneous features in the high-fat lard fed rats. The thyroid glands from the high-fat lard fed rats exhibited enlarged follicle cavities and flattened follicular epithelial cells under light microscopy, and dilated endoplasmic reticulum cisternae, twisted nuclei, fewer microvilli and secretory vesicles under transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, the thyroid glands from the high-fat lard fed rats showed markedly low levels of thyroid hormone synthesis-related proteins TTF-1 and NIS. Acute dietary modification by withdrawal of the high-fat lard diet for 6 weeks failed to ameliorate the high-fat lard diet-induced thyroid changes. Conclusion: Dietary high-fat lard intake induces significant thyroid dysfunction and abnormal morphology in rats, which can not be corrected by short-term dietary modification. PMID:25263336

  2. A high-fat diet inhibits the progression of diabetes mellitus in type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Yukihito; Ohta, Takeshi; Sasase, Tomohiko; Morinaga, Hisayo; Hata, Takahiro; Miyajima, Katsuhiro; Katusda, Yoshiaki; Masuyama, Taku; Shinohara, Masami; Kakutani, Makoto; Matsushita, Mutsuyoshi

    2010-07-01

    It is well known that rats and mice, when fed a high-fat diet, develop obesity associated with abnormal glycolipid metabolism. In this study, we investigated the effects of a high-fat diet on a diabetic rat model, Spontaneously Diabetic Torii (SDT), which develops diabetes due to decreased insulin production and secretion with age. We hypothesized that a high-fat diet would accelerate the induction of diabetes in this model. The SDT rats were divided into 2 groups, which were fed a high-fat diet or standard diet for 16 weeks. The group fed a high-fat diet developed obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and hyperlipidemia until 16 weeks of age. Before 16 weeks of age, hyperglycemia accompanied by hypoinsulinemia developed in the group on a standard diet, but serum glucose levels were comparable in both groups. After 16 weeks of age, the group on a standard diet showed an increase in serum glucose levels and a decrease in serum insulin levels. Unexpectedly, in the group on the high-fat diet, we observed a suppressed of the progression of hyperglycemia/hypoinsulinemia. Histopathological observation revealed more pancreatic beta cells in the group on the high-fat diet. This study suggests that feeding SDT rats a high-fat diet induces obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and hyperlipidemia, but not hyperglycemia, until 16 weeks of age. Thereafter, age-dependent progress of hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia was delayed by a high-fat diet. The hyperfunction of pancreatic beta cells induced by a high-fat diet before the onset of hyperglycemia appears to suppress development of hyperglycemia/hypoinsulinemia. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A Lipoprotein Lipase–Promoting Agent, NO-1886, Improves Glucose and Lipid Metabolism in High Fat, High Sucrose–Fed New Zealand White Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhonghua; Tsutsumi, Kazuhiko; Xie, Yuxiang; Zhang, Qiuju; Wang, Zongbao; fu, Guoxiang; Long, Guang; Yang, Yongzong

    2003-01-01

    The synthetic compound NO-1886 is a lipoprotein lipase activator that lowers plasma triglycerides and elevates high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Recently, the authors found that NO-1886 also had an action of reducing plasma glucose in high-fat/high-sucrose diet–induced diabetic rabbits. In the current study, we investigated the effects of NO-1886 on insulin resistance and β-cell function in rabbits. Our results showed that high-fat/high-sucrose feeding increased plasma triglyceride, free fatty acid (FFA), and glucose levels and decreased HDL-C level. This diet also induced insulin resistance and impairment of acute insulin response to glucose loading. Supplementing 1% NO-1886 into the high-fat/high-sucrose diet resulted in decreased plasma triglyceride, FFA, and glucose levels and increased HDL-C level. The authors also found a clear increased glucose clearance and a protected acute insulin response to intravenous glucose loading by NO-1886 supplementation. These data suggest that NO-1886 suppresses the elevation of blood glucose in rabbits induced by feeding a high-fat/high-sucrose diet, probably through controlling lipid metabolism and improving insulin resistance. PMID:12745668

  4. Tissue Specific Expression Of Sprouty1 In Mice Protects Against High Fat Diet Induced Fat Accumulation, Bone Loss, And Metabolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Urs, Sumithra; Henderson, Terry; Le, Phuong; Rosen, Clifford J.; Liaw, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    We recently characterized Sprouty1 (Spry1), a growth factor signaling inhibitor as a regulator of marrow progenitor cells promoting osteoblast differentiation at the expense of adipocytes. Adipose tissue specific Spry1 expression in mice resulted in increased bone mass and reduced body fat while conditional knockout of Spry1 had the opposite effect with decreased bone and increased body fat. Because Spry1 suppresses normal fat development, we tested the hypothesis that Spry1 expression prevents high fat diet-induced obesity, bone loss, and associated lipid abnormalities and demonstrate that Spry1 has a long-term protective effect on mice fed a high caloric diet. We studied diet-induced obesity in mice with fatty acid binding promoter (aP2)-driven expression or conditional knockout of Spry1 in adipocytes. Phenotyping was performed by whole body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, microCT, histology and blood analysis. In conditional Spry1 null mice, high fat diet increased body fat by 40%, impaired glucose regulation, and led to liver steatosis. However, over-expression of Spry1 led to 35% lower body fat, reduced bone loss, and normal metabolic function compared to single transgenics. This protective phenotype was associated with decreased circulating insulin (70%) and leptin (54%) compared to controls on a high fat diet. Additionally, Spry1 expression decreased adipose tissue inflammation by 45%. We show that conditional Spry1 expression in adipose tissue protects against high fat diet-induced obesity and associated bone loss. PMID:22142492

  5. Maternal high-fat diet programming of the neuroendocrine system and behavior.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Elinor L; Riper, Kellie M; Lockard, Rachel; Valleau, Jeanette C

    2015-11-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "SBN 2014". Maternal obesity, metabolic state, and diet during gestation have profound effects on offspring development. The prevalence of neurodevelopmental and mental health disorders has risen rapidly in the last several decades in parallel with the rise in obesity rates. Evidence from epidemiological studies indicates that maternal obesity and metabolic complications increase the risk of offspring developing behavioral disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and schizophrenia. Animal models show that a maternal diet high in fat similarly disrupts behavioral programming of offspring, with animals showing social impairments, increased anxiety and depressive behaviors, reduced cognitive development, and hyperactivity. Maternal obesity, metabolic conditions, and high fat diet consumption increase maternal leptin, insulin, glucose, triglycerides, and inflammatory cytokines. This leads to increased risk of placental dysfunction, and altered fetal neuroendocrine development. Changes in brain development that likely contribute to the increased risk of behavioral and mental health disorders include increased inflammation in the brain, as well as alterations in the serotonergic system, dopaminergic system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis.

  6. Maternal High-Fat Diet Programming of the Neuroendocrine System and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Elinor L.; Riper, Kellie M.; Lockard, Rachel; Valleau, Jeanette C.

    2015-01-01

    Maternal obesity, metabolic state, and diet during gestation have profound effects on offspring development. The prevalence of neurodevelopmental and mental health disorders has risen rapidly in the last several decades in parallel with the rise in obesity rates. Evidence from epidemiological studies indicates that maternal obesity and metabolic complications increase the risk of offspring developing behavioral disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and schizophrenia. Animal models show that a maternal diet high in fat similarly disrupts behavioral programming of offspring, with animals showing social impairments, increased anxiety and depressive behaviors, reduced cognitive development, and hyperactivity. Maternal obesity, metabolic conditions, and high fat diet consumption increase maternal leptin, insulin, glucose, triglycerides, and inflammatory cytokines. This leads to increased risk of placental dysfunction, and altered fetal neuroendocrine development. Changes in brain development that likely contribute to the increased risk of behavioral and mental health disorders include increased inflammation in the brain, as well as alterations in the serotonergic system, dopaminergic system and hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. PMID:25913366

  7. Switching Adolescent High-Fat Diet to Adult Control Diet Restores Neurocognitive Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Boitard, Chloé; Parkes, Shauna L.; Cavaroc, Amandine; Tantot, Frédéric; Castanon, Nathalie; Layé, Sophie; Tronel, Sophie; Pacheco-Lopez, Gustavo; Coutureau, Etienne; Ferreira, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    In addition to metabolic and cardiovascular disorders, obesity is associated with adverse cognitive and emotional outcomes. Its growing prevalence in adolescents is particularly alarming since this is a period of ongoing maturation for brain structures (including the hippocampus and amygdala) and for the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) stress axis, which is required for cognitive and emotional processing. We recently demonstrated that adolescent, but not adult, high-fat diet (HF) exposure leads to impaired hippocampal function and enhanced amygdala function through HPA axis alteration (Boitard et al., 2012, 2014, 2015). Here, we assessed whether the effects of adolescent HF consumption on brain function are permanent or reversible. After adolescent exposure to HF, switching to a standard control diet restored levels of hippocampal neurogenesis and normalized enhanced HPA axis reactivity, amygdala activity and avoidance memory. Therefore, while the adolescent period is highly vulnerable to the deleterious effects of diet-induced obesity, adult exposure to a standard diet appears sufficient to reverse alterations of brain function. PMID:27917115

  8. Gomisin N inhibits adipogenesis and prevents high-fat diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Min-Kyung; Yun, Ye-Rang; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Park, Mi-Hee; Jung, Myeong Ho

    2017-01-01

    Gomisin N (GN) is a physiological lignan derived from Schisandra chinensis. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of GN on differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and the anti-obesity effects of GN in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. Incubation with GN significantly inhibited the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in a dose-dependent manner. This inhibitory effect primarily occurred at an early adipogenic stage through impairment of mitotic clonal expansion (MCE) caused by cell cycle arrest at the G1/S phase transition. GN inhibited the extracellular signal-regulated kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B signaling in the MCE process and activated AMP-activated protein kinase. Furthermore, GN downregulated CCAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and histone H3K9 demethylase JMJD2B during early stages of adipogenesis, and therefore repressed the expression of C/EBPβ-targeted cell cycle genes. In addition, GN also repressed the expression of histone H3K4 methyltransferase MLL4 and reduced PPARγ expression. Moreover, GN effectively lowered the final body weight, adipose tissue mass, and reduced the serum levels of glucose, total triglyceride, and cholesterol in the HFD-induced obese mice. GN also markedly reduced hepatic triglyceride level induced by HFD. Collectively, these findings suggest that GN has potential as a novel agent for the prevention and treatment of obesity. PMID:28067305

  9. CMKLR1 deficiency influences glucose tolerance and thermogenesis in mice on high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chen; Wang, Miaomiao; Ren, Lirong; Xiang, Liang; Chen, Jie; Li, Mengxia; Xiao, Tianxia; Ren, Peigen; Xiong, Likuan; Zhang, Jian V

    2016-04-29

    Obesity has become a global epidemic disease, contributing to increases in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. CMKLR1, one of the receptors for chemerin, has a wide range of functions in physiological and pathological activity, including innate and adaptive immunity, inflammation, metabolism and reproduction. In our study, CMKLR1 deficiency did not influence the gain of body weight but did exacerbate glucose intolerance, increase serum insulin level, and promote insulin resistance in mice on high fat diets. The expression of thermogenesis related genes was examined and indicated to decrease in CMKLR1 knockout (KO) mice in both normal and cold environments, which indicated CMKLR1 influence the thermogenesis process. Cold exposure induced significant body mass decrease and improved glucose tolerance and insulin resistance in wild type HFD mice but had no obvious effect on CMKLR1 KO HFD mice. In vitro, loss of CMKLR1 did not significantly influence the differentiation of stromal vascular fibroblasts (SVFs) derived from adipose tissue, but did suppress the expression of thermogenesis related genes. Collectively, these data demonstrate that CMKLR1 deficiency induces inbalance of glucose metabolism and impairs the cold induced-thermogenesis process in high diet models.

  10. High Fat Diets Induce Colonic Epithelial Cell Stress and Inflammation that is Reversed by IL-22

    PubMed Central

    Gulhane, Max; Murray, Lydia; Lourie, Rohan; Tong, Hui; Sheng, Yong H.; Wang, Ran; Kang, Alicia; Schreiber, Veronika; Wong, Kuan Yau; Magor, Graham; Denman, Stuart; Begun, Jakob; Florin, Timothy H.; Perkins, Andrew; Cuív, Páraic Ó.; McGuckin, Michael A.; Hasnain, Sumaira Z.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged high fat diets (HFD) induce low-grade chronic intestinal inflammation in mice, and diets high in saturated fat are a risk factor for the development of human inflammatory bowel diseases. We hypothesized that HFD-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER)/oxidative stress occur in intestinal secretory goblet cells, triggering inflammatory signaling and reducing synthesis/secretion of proteins that form the protective mucus barrier. In cultured intestinal cells non-esterified long-chain saturated fatty acids directly increased oxidative/ER stress leading to protein misfolding. A prolonged HFD elevated the intestinal inflammatory cytokine signature, alongside compromised mucosal barrier integrity with a decrease in goblet cell differentiation and Muc2, a loss in the tight junction protein, claudin-1 and increased serum endotoxin levels. In Winnie mice, that develop spontaneous colitis, HFD-feeding increased ER stress, further compromised the mucosal barrier and increased the severity of colitis. In obese mice IL-22 reduced ER/oxidative stress and improved the integrity of the mucosal barrier, and reversed microbial changes associated with obesity with an increase in Akkermansia muciniphila. Consistent with epidemiological studies, our experiments suggest that HFDs are likely to impair intestinal barrier function, particularly in early life, which partially involves direct effects of free-fatty acids on intestinal cells, and this can be reversed by IL-22 therapy. PMID:27350069

  11. Arctium lappa ameliorates endothelial dysfunction in rats fed with high fat/cholesterol diets.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Jung; Choi, Deok Ho; Cho, Guk Hyun; Kim, Jin Sook; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2012-08-06

    Arctium lappa L. (Asteraceae), burdock, is a medicinal plant that is popularly used for treating hypertension, gout, hepatitis, and other inflammatory disorders. This study was performed to test the effect of ethanol extract of Arctium lappa L. (EAL) seeds on vascular reactivity and inflammatory factors in rats fed a high fat/cholesterol diet (HFCD). EAL-I (100 mg·kg-1/day), EAL-II (200 mg·kg-1/day), and fluvastatin (3 mg·kg-1/day) groups initially received HFCD alone for 8 weeks, with EAL supplementation provided during the final 6 weeks. Treatment with low or high doses of EAL markedly attenuated plasma levels of triglycerides and augmented plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in HFCD-fed rats. Chronic treatment with EAL markedly reduced impairments of acetylcholine (ACh)-induced relaxation of aortic rings. Furthermore, chronic treatment with EAL significantly lowered systolic blood pressure (SBP) and maintained smooth and flexible intimal endothelial layers in HFCD-fed rats. Chronic treatment with EAL suppressed upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, and E-selectin in the aorta. Chronic treatment with EAL also suppressed increases in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 expression. These results suggested that EAL can inhibit HFCD-induced vascular inflammation in the rat model. The present study provides evidence that EAL ameliorates HFCD-induced vascular dysfunction through protection of vascular relaxation and suppression of vascular inflammation.

  12. Arctium lappa ameliorates endothelial dysfunction in rats fed with high fat/cholesterol diets

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Arctium lappa L. (Asteraceae), burdock, is a medicinal plant that is popularly used for treating hypertension, gout, hepatitis, and other inflammatory disorders. This study was performed to test the effect of ethanol extract of Arctium lappa L. (EAL) seeds on vascular reactivity and inflammatory factors in rats fed a high fat/cholesterol diet (HFCD). Method EAL-I (100 mg·kg−1/day), EAL-II (200 mg·kg−1/day), and fluvastatin (3 mg·kg−1/day) groups initially received HFCD alone for 8 weeks, with EAL supplementation provided during the final 6 weeks. Results Treatment with low or high doses of EAL markedly attenuated plasma levels of triglycerides and augmented plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in HFCD-fed rats. Chronic treatment with EAL markedly reduced impairments of acetylcholine (ACh)-induced relaxation of aortic rings. Furthermore, chronic treatment with EAL significantly lowered systolic blood pressure (SBP) and maintained smooth and flexible intimal endothelial layers in HFCD-fed rats. Chronic treatment with EAL suppressed upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, and E-selectin in the aorta. Chronic treatment with EAL also suppressed increases in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 expression. These results suggested that EAL can inhibit HFCD-induced vascular inflammation in the rat model. Conclusion The present study provides evidence that EAL ameliorates HFCD-induced vascular dysfunction through protection of vascular relaxation and suppression of vascular inflammation. PMID:22866890

  13. Pubertal high fat diet: effects on mammary cancer development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Epidemiological studies linking dietary fat intake and obesity to breast cancer risk have produced inconsistent results. This may be due to the difficulty of dissociating fat intake from obesity, and/or the lack of defined periods of exposure in these studies. The pubertal mammary gland is highly sensitive to cancer-causing agents. We assessed how high fat diet (HFD) affects inflammation, proliferative, and developmental events in the pubertal gland, since dysregulation of these can promote mammary tumorigenesis. To test the effect of HFD initiated during puberty on tumorigenesis, we utilized BALB/c mice, for which HFD neither induces obesity nor metabolic syndrome, allowing dissociation of HFD effects from other conditions associated with HFD. Methods Pubertal BALB/c mice were fed a low fat diet (12% kcal fat) or a HFD (60% kcal fat), and subjected to carcinogen 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced tumorigenesis. Results HFD elevated mammary gland expression of inflammatory and growth factor genes at 3 and 4 weeks of diet. Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), robustly induced at 4 weeks, has direct mitogenic activity in mammary epithelial cells and, as a potent inducer of NF-κB activity, may induce inflammatory genes. Three weeks of HFD induced a transient influx of eosinophils into the mammary gland, consistent with elevated inflammatory factors. At 10 weeks, prior to the appearance of palpable tumors, there were increased numbers of abnormal mammary epithelial lesions, enhanced cellular proliferation, increased growth factors, chemokines associated with immune-suppressive regulatory T cells, increased vascularization, and elevated M2 macrophages. HFD dramatically reduced tumor latency. Early developing tumors were more proliferative and were associated with increased levels of tumor-related growth factors, including increased plasma levels of HGF in tumor-bearing animals. Early HFD tumors also had increased

  14. Endothelium-Specific Interference with PPARγ Causes Cerebral Vascular Dysfunction in Response to a High Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Andreas M.; de Lange, Willem J.; Halabi, Carmen M.; Modrick, Mary L.; Keen, Henry L.; Faraci, Frank M.; Sigmund, Curt D.

    2008-01-01

    The ligand-activated transcription factor PPARγ is expressed in vascular endothelium where it exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. However, its role in regulating vascular function remains undefined. We examined endothelial function in transgenic mice expressing dominant negative mutants of PPARγ under the control of an endothelial-specific promoter to test the hypothesis that endothelial PPARγ plays a protective role in the vasculature. Under baseline conditions, responses to the endothelium-dependent agonist acetylcholine (Ach) were not affected in either aorta or the basilar artery in vitro. In response to feeding a high fat diet for 12 weeks, Ach produced dilation that was markedly impaired in the basilar artery of mice expressing dominant negative mutants, but not in mice expressing wildtype PPARγ controlled by the same promoter. Unlike basilar artery, 12 weeks of high fat diet was not sufficient to cause endothelial dysfunction in the aorta of mice expressing dominant negative PPARγ, although it became evident after 25 weeks. The responses to Ach in basilar artery were restored to normal after treatment with a scavenger of superoxide. Baseline blood pressure was only slightly elevated in the transgenic mice, but the pressor response to angiotensin-II was augmented. Thus, interference with PPARγ in the endothelium produces endothelial dysfunction in the cerebral circulation via a mechanism involving oxidative stress. Consistent with its role as a fatty acid sensor, these findings provide genetic evidence that endothelial PPARγ plays a critical role in protecting a range of blood vessels in response to a high fat diet. PMID:18676352

  15. Withania somnifera leaf alleviates cognitive dysfunction by enhancing hippocampal plasticity in high fat diet induced obesity model.

    PubMed

    Manchanda, Shaffi; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2017-03-03

    Sedentary lifestyle, psychological stress and labor saving devices in this current society often disrupts the energy gain and expenditure balance leading to obesity. High caloric diet is associated with the high prevalence of cognitive dysfunction and neuropsychiatric disorders in addition to cardiovascular and metabolic abnormalities. The present study was aimed to elucidate the potential beneficial effect of dry leaf powder of Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha) in preventing the cognitive decline associated with diet induced obesity. Experiments were performed on four groups of young adult female rats: [Low fat diet (LFD) rats fed on regular low fat chow, High fat diet (HFD) rats on feed containing 30% fat by weight, Low fat diet extract (LFDE) rats given regular chow and dry leaf powder of Ashwagandha 1 mg/g of body weight (ASH) and high fat diet extract (HFDE) rats fed on diet containing high fat and dry leaf powder of ASH. All the rats were kept on their respective diet regimen for 12 weeks. ASH treated rats showed significant improvement in their working memory and locomotor coordination during behavioral studies as compared to HFD rats. At the molecular level, ASH treatment was observed to restore the levels of BDNF and its receptor TRKB as well as the expression of other synaptic regulators, which are highly implicated in synaptic plasticity. Further, ASH triggered the activation of PI3/AKT pathway of cell survival and plasticity by enhancing the levels of phosphorylated Akt-1 and immediate early genes viz. c-Jun and c-fos. ASH could be a key regulator in maintaining the synaptic plasticity in HFD induced obesity and can serve as a nootropic candidate against obesity induced cognitive impairments.

  16. Prenatal high-fat diet alters the cerebrovasculature and clearance of β-amyloid in adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Cheryl A; Gentleman, Steve M; Nicoll, James Ar; Carare, Roxana O

    2015-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides in the extracellular spaces of the brain as plaques and in the walls of blood vessels as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Failure of perivascular drainage of Aβ along cerebrovascular basement membranes contributes to the development of CAA. Mid-life hypercholesterolaemia is a risk factor for the development of AD. Maternal obesity is associated with the development of obesity, hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia in adulthood, suggesting that the risk for AD and CAA may also be influenced by the early-life environment. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that early-life exposure to a high-fat diet results in changes to the cerebrovasculature and failure of Aβ clearance from the brain. We also assessed whether vascular Aβ deposition is greater in the brains of aged humans with a history of hyperlipidaemia, compared to age-matched controls with normal lipidaemia. Using a mouse model of maternal obesity, we found that exposure to a high-fat diet during gestation and lactation induced changes in multiple components of the neurovascular unit, including a down-regulation in collagen IV, fibronectin and apolipoprotein E, an up-regulation in markers of astrocytes and perivascular macrophages and altered blood vessel morphology in the brains of adult mice. Sustained high-fat diet over the entire lifespan resulted in additional decreases in levels of pericytes and impaired perivascular clearance of Aβ from the brain. In humans, vascular Aβ load was significantly increased in the brains of aged individuals with a history of hypercholesterolaemia. These results support a critical role for early dietary influence on the brain vasculature across the lifespan, with consequences for the development of age-related cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Inulin oligofructose attenuates metabolic syndrome in high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Senthil A; Ward, Leigh C; Brown, Lindsay

    2016-11-01

    Prebiotics alter bacterial content in the colon, and therefore could be useful for obesity management. We investigated the changes following addition of inulin oligofructose (IO) in the food of rats fed either a corn starch (C) diet or a high-carbohydrate, high-fat (H) diet as a model of diet-induced metabolic syndrome. IO did not affect food intake, but reduced body weight gain by 5·3 and 12·3 % in corn starch+inulin oligofructose (CIO) and high-carbohydrate, high-fat with inulin oligofructose (HIO) rats, respectively. IO reduced plasma concentrations of free fatty acids by 26·2 % and TAG by 75·8 % in HIO rats. IO increased faecal output by 93·2 %, faecal lipid excretion by 37·9 % and weight of caecum by 23·4 % and colon by 41·5 % in HIO rats. IO improved ileal morphology by reducing inflammation and improving the density of crypt cells in HIO rats. IO attenuated H diet-induced increases in abdominal fat pads (C 275 (sem 19), CIO 264 (sem 40), H 688 (sem 55), HIO 419 (sem 32) mg/mm tibial length), fasting blood glucose concentrations (C 4·5 (sem 0·1), CIO 4·2 (sem 0·1), H 5·2 (sem 0·1), HIO 4·3 (sem 0·1) mmol/l), systolic blood pressure (C 124 (sem 2), CIO 118 (sem 2), H 152 (sem 2), HIO 123 (sem 3) mmHg), left ventricular diastolic stiffness (C 22·9 (sem 0·6), CIO 22·9 (sem 0·5), H 27·8 (sem 0·5), HIO 22·6 (sem 1·2)) and plasma alanine transaminase (C 29·6 (sem 2·8), CIO 32·1 (sem 3·0), H 43·9 (sem 2·6), HIO 33·6 (sem 2·0) U/l). IO attenuated H-induced increases in inflammatory cell infiltration in the heart and liver, lipid droplets in the liver and plasma lipids as well as impaired glucose and insulin tolerance. These results suggest that increasing soluble fibre intake with IO improves signs of the metabolic syndrome by decreasing gastrointestinal carbohydrate and lipid uptake.

  18. Neurodegeneration Alters Metabolic Profile and Sirt 1 Signaling in High-Fat-Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Lima, Leandro Ceotto Freitas; Saliba, Soraya Wilke; Andrade, João Marcus Oliveira; Cunha, Maria Luisa; Cassini-Vieira, Puebla; Feltenberger, John David; Barcelos, Lucíola Silva; Guimarães, André Luiz Sena; de-Paula, Alfredo Mauricio Batista; de Oliveira, Antônio Carlos Pinheiro; Santos, Sérgio Henrique Sousa

    2016-05-16

    Different factors may contribute to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. Among them, metabolic syndrome (MS), which has reached epidemic proportions, has emerged as a potential element that may be involved in neurodegeneration. Furthermore, studies have shown the importance of the sirtuin family in neuronal survival and MS, which opens the possibility of new pharmacological targets. This study investigates the influence of sirtuin metabolic pathways by examining the functional capacities of glucose-induced obesity in an excitotoxic state induced by a quinolinic acid (QA) animal model. Mice were divided into two groups that received different diets for 8 weeks: one group received a regular diet, and the other group received a high-fat diet (HF) to induce MS. The animals were submitted to a stereotaxic surgery and subdivided into four groups: Standard (ST), Standard-QA (ST-QA), HF and HF-QA. The QA groups were given a 250 nL quinolinic acid injection in the right striatum and PBS was injected in the other groups. Obese mice presented with a weight gain of 40 % more than the ST group beyond acquiring an insulin resistance. QA induced motor impairment and neurodegeneration in both ST-QA and HF-QA, although no difference was observed between these groups. The HF-QA group showed a reduction in adiposity when compared with the groups that received PBS. Therefore, the HF-QA group demonstrated a commitment-dependent metabolic pathway. The results suggest that an obesogenic diet does not aggravate the neurodegeneration induced by QA. However, the excitotoxicity induced by QA promotes a sirtuin pathway impairment that contributes to metabolic changes.

  19. Androgen Deficiency Exacerbates High-Fat Diet-Induced Metabolic Alterations in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël R; Jardi, Ferran; Antonio, Leen; Lemaire, Katleen; Goyvaerts, Lotte; Deldicque, Louise; Carmeliet, Geert; Decallonne, Brigitte; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Androgen deficiency is associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus in men, but the mechanisms behind these associations remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the combined effects of androgen deficiency and high-fat diet (HFD) on body composition and glucose homeostasis in C57BL/6J male mice. Two models of androgen deficiency were used: orchidectomy (ORX) and androgen receptor knockout mice. Both models displayed higher adiposity and serum leptin levels upon HFD, whereas no differences were seen on a regular diet. Fat accumulation in HFD ORX animals was accompanied by increased sedentary behavior and occurred in spite of reduced food intake. HFD ORX mice showed white adipocyte hypertrophy, correlated with decreased mitochondrial content but not function as well as increased lipogenesis and decreased lipolysis suggested by the up-regulation of fatty acid synthase and the down-regulation of hormone-sensitive lipase. Both ORX and androgen receptor knockout exacerbated HFD-induced glucose intolerance by impairing insulin action in liver and skeletal muscle, as evidenced by the increased triglyceride and decreased glycogen content in these tissues. In addition, serum IL-1β levels were elevated, and pancreatic insulin secretion was impaired after ORX. Testosterone but not dihydrotestosterone supplementation restored the castration effects on body composition and glucose homeostasis. We conclude that sex steroid deficiency in combination with HFD exacerbates adiposity, insulin resistance, and β-cell failure in 2 preclinical male mouse models. Our findings stress the importance of a healthy diet in a clinical context of androgen deficiency and may have implications for the prevention of metabolic alterations in hypogonadal men.

  20. Histopathological changes in rat pancreas and skeletal muscle associated with high fat diet induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ickin Gulen, M; Guven Bagla, A; Yavuz, O; Hismiogullari, A A

    2015-01-01

    The effects of a high fat diet on the development of diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance and secretion have been widely investigated. We investigated the effects of a high fat diet on the pancreas and skeletal muscle of normal rats to explore diet-induced insulin resistance mechanisms. Forty-four male Wistar rats were divided into six groups: a control group fed standard chow, a group fed a 45% fat diet and a group fed a 60% fat diet for 3 weeks to measure acute effects; an additional three groups were fed the same diet regimens for 8 weeks to measure chronic effects. The morphological effects of the two high fat diets were examined by light microscopy. Insulin in pancreatic islets was detected using immunohistochemistry. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index and insulin staining intensity in islets increased significantly with acute administration of high fat diets, whereas staining intensity decreased with chronic administration of the 45% fat diet. Islet areas increased significantly with chronic administration. High fat diet administration led to islet degeneration, interlobular adipocyte accumulation and vacuolization in the pancreatic tissue, as well as degeneration and lipid droplet accumulation in the skeletal muscle tissue. Vacuolization in the pancreas and lipid droplets in skeletal muscle tissue increased significantly with chronic high fat diet administration. We suggest that the glucolipotoxic effects of high fat diet administration depend on the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acid content in the diet and to the total fat content of the diet.

  1. [Effect of early high fat diet on pancreatic β cellularity and insulin sensibility in young rats].

    PubMed

    Xie, Kun-Xia; Xiao, Yan-Feng; Xu, Er-Di; Yin, Chun-Yan; Yi, Xiao-Qing; Chang, Ming

    2010-09-01

    To study the effects of early high fat diet on sugar metaboliam, insulin sensibility and pancreatic β cellularity in young rats. Sixty male weaned young rats were randomly fed with high fat diet (high fat group) and normal diet (control group). The body weight, viscus fattiness and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) were measured after 3, 6 and 9 weeks. Serum insulin level was measured with radioimmunoassay. The ultrastructure of pancreas was observed under an electricmicroscope. The high fat group had significantly higher body weight and visceral fat weight than the control group after 3 weeks. There were no significant differences in the FPG level between the two groups at all time points. The levels of fasting insulin and HOMAIR in the high fat group were significantly higher than those in the control group after 3, 6 and 9 weeks (P<0.01). Dilation of rough endoplasmic reticulum and mild swelling of mitochondria of islet β-cells were observed in the high fat group after 6 weeks. Early high fat diet may induce a reduction in insulin sensitivity and produce insulin resistance in young rats. Endoplasmic reticulum expansion in β-cells may be an early sign of β-cell damage due to obesity.

  2. Rat Models of Diet-Induced Obesity and High Fat/Low Dose Streptozotocin Type 2 Diabetes: Effect of Reversal of High Fat Diet Compared to Treatment with Enalapril or Menhaden Oil on Glucose Utilization and Neuropathic Endpoints.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Amey; Coppey, Lawrence J; Davidson, Eric P; Yorek, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether reversal of high fat diet, stimulating weight loss, compared to two treatments previously shown to have beneficial effects, could improve glucose utilization and peripheral neuropathy in animal models of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Rats were fed a high fat diet and treated with a low dose of streptozotocin to create models of diet induced obesity or type 2 diabetes, respectively. Afterwards, rats were transferred to a normal diet or treated with enalapril or dietary enrichment with menhaden oil for 12 weeks. Obesity and to a greater extent type 2 diabetes were associated with impaired glucose utilization and peripheral neuropathy. Placing obese rats on a normal diet improved glucose utilization. Steatosis but not peripheral neuropathy was improved after placing obese or diabetic rats on a normal diet. Treating obese and diabetic rats with enalapril or a menhaden oil enriched diet generally improved peripheral neuropathy endpoints. In summary, dietary improvement with weight loss in obese or type 2 diabetic rats was not sufficient to correct peripheral neuropathy. These results further stress the need for discovery of a comprehensive treatment for peripheral neuropathy.

  3. High fat diet promotes achievement of peak bone mass in young rats

    SciTech Connect

    Malvi, Parmanand; Piprode, Vikrant; Chaube, Balkrishna; Pote, Satish T.; Mittal, Monika; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Wani, Mohan R.; Bhat, Manoj Kumar

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • High fat diet helps in achieving peak bone mass at younger age. • Shifting from high fat to normal diet normalizes obese parameters. • Bone parameters are sustained even after withdrawal of high fat diet. - Abstract: The relationship between obesity and bone is complex. Epidemiological studies demonstrate positive as well as negative correlation between obesity and bone health. In the present study, we investigated the impact of high fat diet-induced obesity on peak bone mass. After 9 months of feeding young rats with high fat diet, we observed obesity phenotype in rats with increased body weight, fat mass, serum triglycerides and cholesterol. There were significant increases in serum total alkaline phosphatase, bone mineral density and bone mineral content. By micro-computed tomography (μ-CT), we observed a trend of better trabecular bones with respect to their microarchitecture and geometry. This indicated that high fat diet helps in achieving peak bone mass and microstructure at younger age. We subsequently shifted rats from high fat diet to normal diet for 6 months and evaluated bone/obesity parameters. It was observed that after shifting rats from high fat diet to normal diet, fat mass, serum triglycerides and cholesterol were significantly decreased. Interestingly, the gain in bone mineral density, bone mineral content and trabecular bone parameters by HFD was retained even after body weight and obesity were normalized. These results suggest that fat rich diet during growth could accelerate achievement of peak bone mass that is sustainable even after withdrawal of high fat diet.

  4. Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid Mitigates High Fat Diet-Induced Cardiomyocyte Contractile and Intracellular Ca2+ Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Turdi, Subat; Hu, Nan; Ren, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) has exhibited promises in the treatment of obesity, although its impact on obesity-induced cardiac dysfunction is unknown. This study examined the effect of TUDCA on cardiomyocyte function in high-fat diet-induced obesity. Methods Adult mice were fed low or high fat diet for 5 months prior to treatment of TUDCA (300 mg/kg. i.p., for 15d). Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT), cardiomyocyte mechanical and intracellular Ca2+ property, insulin signaling molecules including IRS-1, Akt, AMPK, ACC, GSK-3β, c-Jun, ERK and c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK) as well as ER stress and intracellular Ca2+ regulatory proteins were examined. Myocardial ultrastructure was evaluated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results High-fat diet depressed peak shortening (PS) and maximal velocity of shortening/relengthenin as well as prolonged relengthening duration. TUDCA reversed or overtly ameliorated high fat diet-induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction including prolongation in relengthening. TUDCA alleviated high-fat diet-induced decrease in SERCA2a and phosphorylation of phospholamban, increase in ER stress (GRP78/BiP, CHOP, phosphorylation of PERK, IRE1α and eIF2α), ultrastructural changes and mitochondrial permeation pore opening. High-fat diet feeding inhibited phosphorylation of AMPK and promoted phosphorylation of GSK-3β. TUDCA prevented high fat-induced dephosphorylation of AMPK but not GSK-3β. High fat diet promoted phosphorylation of IRS-1 (Ser307), JNK, and ERK without affecting c-Jun phosphorylation, the effect of which with the exception of ERK phosphorylation was attenuated by TUDCA. Conclusions These data depict that TUDCA may ameliorate high fat diet feeding-induced cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca2+ defects through mechanisms associated with mitochondrial integrity, AMPK, JNK and IRS-1 serine phosphorylation. PMID:23667647

  5. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid mitigates high fat diet-induced cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca2+ anomalies.

    PubMed

    Turdi, Subat; Hu, Nan; Ren, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) has exhibited promises in the treatment of obesity, although its impact on obesity-induced cardiac dysfunction is unknown. This study examined the effect of TUDCA on cardiomyocyte function in high-fat diet-induced obesity. Adult mice were fed low or high fat diet for 5 months prior to treatment of TUDCA (300 mg/kg. i.p., for 15d). Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT), cardiomyocyte mechanical and intracellular Ca(2+) property, insulin signaling molecules including IRS-1, Akt, AMPK, ACC, GSK-3β, c-Jun, ERK and c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK) as well as ER stress and intracellular Ca(2+) regulatory proteins were examined. Myocardial ultrastructure was evaluated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). High-fat diet depressed peak shortening (PS) and maximal velocity of shortening/relengthenin as well as prolonged relengthening duration. TUDCA reversed or overtly ameliorated high fat diet-induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction including prolongation in relengthening. TUDCA alleviated high-fat diet-induced decrease in SERCA2a and phosphorylation of phospholamban, increase in ER stress (GRP78/BiP, CHOP, phosphorylation of PERK, IRE1α and eIF2α), ultrastructural changes and mitochondrial permeation pore opening. High-fat diet feeding inhibited phosphorylation of AMPK and promoted phosphorylation of GSK-3β. TUDCA prevented high fat-induced dephosphorylation of AMPK but not GSK-3β. High fat diet promoted phosphorylation of IRS-1 (Ser(307)), JNK, and ERK without affecting c-Jun phosphorylation, the effect of which with the exception of ERK phosphorylation was attenuated by TUDCA. These data depict that TUDCA may ameliorate high fat diet feeding-induced cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) defects through mechanisms associated with mitochondrial integrity, AMPK, JNK and IRS-1 serine phosphorylation.

  6. High-fat-induced intestinal permeability dysfunction associated with altered fecal bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Stenman, Lotta K; Holma, Reetta; Korpela, Riitta

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether high-fat-feeding is associated with increased intestinal permeability via alterations in bile acid metabolism. METHODS: Male C57Bl/6J mice were fed on a high-fat (n = 26) or low-fat diet (n = 24) for 15 wk. Intestinal permeability was measured from duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon in an Ussing chamber system using 4 kDa FITC-labeled dextran as an indicator. Fecal bile acids were analyzed with gas chromatography. Segments of jejunum and colon were analyzed for the expression of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF). RESULTS: Intestinal permeability was significantly increased by high-fat feeding in jejunum (median 0.334 for control vs 0.393 for high-fat, P = 0.03) and colon (0.335 for control vs 0.433 for high-fat, P = 0.01), but not in duodenum or ileum. The concentration of nearly all identified bile acids was significantly increased by high-fat feeding (P < 0.001). The proportion of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in all bile acids was decreased (1.4% ± 0.1% in high-fat vs 2.8% ± 0.3% in controls, P < 0.01) and correlated inversely with intestinal permeability (r = -0.72, P = 0.01). High-fat feeding also increased jejunal FXR expression, as well as TNF expression along the intestine, especially in the colon. CONCLUSION: High-fat-feeding increased intestinal permeability, perhaps by a mechanism related to bile acid metabolism, namely a decreased proportion of fecal UDCA and increased FXR expression. PMID:22408351

  7. Effect of high-fat diet on hepatic proteomics of hamsters.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chen-Chung; Lin, Ya-Lin; Kuo, Chia-Feng

    2015-02-18

    A high-fat diet contributes to the etiology of metabolic diseases. As the liver plays a crucial role in metabolism, an insight into the hepatic proteomics will help to illustrate the physiological effect of a high-fat diet. Fourteen nine-week old male Syrian hamsters were maintained on either control (C) or high-fat (HF) diets (0.2% cholesterol +22% fat) for 8 weeks. Hamsters were chosen because they show close similarity to human lipid metabolism. At the end of study, blood and livers were collected for analysis. Liver proteins were fractionated by electrophoresis, digested by trypsin, and then separated by label-free nano-LC/MS/MS. The TurboSequest algorithm was used to identify the peptide sequences against the hamster database in Universal Proteins Resource Knowledgebase (UniProt). The results indicate that 1191 hepatic proteins were identified and 135 of them were expressed differentially in the high-fat group (p < 0.05). Some of these 135 proteins that involve in metabolic diseases were further validated by Western blotting. The animals maintained on the high-fat diet had significantly (p < 0.05) higher serum triglyceride, cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and uric acid. Animals consuming a high-fat diet also had significantly (p < 0.05) more accumulation of triglyceride and cholesterol in livers. Xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH), which plays an important role in uric acid synthesis, was up-regulated by the high-fat diet (p < 0.05). The α-subunit of hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase/3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase/enoyl-CoA hydratase (HADHA), which catalyzes the second and third reactions of β-oxidation, was down-regulated by the high-fat diet (p < 0.05). Aconitate hydratase 2 (ACO2), which catalyzes the conversion of citrate to isocitrate in TCA cycle, was down-regulated in animals of the high-fat group (p < 0.05). Inflammatory markers annexin A3 (ANXA3) and annexin A5 (ANXA5) were up-regulated by the high-fat diet (p < 0

  8. Learning through school meals?

    PubMed

    Benn, Jette; Carlsson, Monica

    2014-07-01

    This article is based on a qualitative multiple case study aimed at evaluating the effects of free school meal interventions on pupils' learning, and on the learning environment in schools. The study was conducted at four schools, each offering free school meals for 20 weeks. At each school individual and focus group interviews were conducted with students in grades 5 to 7 and grades 8 to 9. Furthermore, students were observed during lunch breaks, and interviews were conducted with the class teacher, headmaster and/or the person responsible for school meals. The purpose of the article is to explore the learning potentials of school meals. The cross-case analysis focuses on the involved actors' perceptions of the school meal project and the meals, including places, times and contexts, and the pupils' concepts and competences in relation to food, meals and health, as well as their involvement in the school meal project. The analysis indicates that the pupils have developed knowledge and skills related to novel foods and dishes, and that school meals can contribute to pupils' learning, whether this learning is planned or not. However, if school meals are to be further developed as an arena for learning, greater consideration must be given to the interaction between pupil, school meal and teacher than in the school meal projects presented in this study, and the potentials for learning through school meals clarified and discussed in the schools. Studying the school meal projects raises a number of dilemmas, such as whether the lunch break should be a part of or a break from education, are school meals a common (school) or private (parent) responsibility, and questions about pupils' and teachers' roles and participation in school meals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Increased body fat mass and tissue lipotoxicity associated with ovariectomy or high-fat diet differentially affects bone and skeletal muscle metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Tagliaferri, Camille; Salles, Jérôme; Landrier, Jean-François; Giraudet, Christophe; Patrac, Véronique; Lebecque, Patrice; Davicco, Marie-Jeanne; Chanet, Audrey; Pouyet, Corinne; Dhaussy, Amélie; Huertas, Alain; Boirie, Yves; Wittrant, Yohann; Coxam, Véronique; Walrand, Stéphane

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the musculoskeletal effects induced by ovariectomy-related fat mass deposition against the musculoskeletal effects caused by a high-fat diet. A group of adult female rats was ovariectomized and fed a control diet. Two additional groups were sham-operated and fed a control or a high-fat diet for 19 weeks. Distal femur and serum bone parameters were measured to assess bone metabolism. Muscle protein metabolism, mitochondrial markers and triglyceride content were evaluated in tibialis anterior. Triglyceride content was evaluated in liver. Circulating inflammatory and metabolic markers were determined. The high-fat diet and ovariectomy led to similar increases in fat mass (+36.6-56.7%; p < 0.05) but had different impacts on bone and muscle tissues and inflammatory markers. Consumption of the high-fat diet led to decreased bone formation (-38.4%; p < 0.05), impaired muscle mitochondrial metabolism, muscle lipotoxicity and a 20.9% increase in tibialis anterior protein synthesis rate (p < 0.05). Ovariectomy was associated with higher bone turnover as bone formation increased +72.7% (p < 0.05) and bone resorption increased +76.4% (p < 0.05), leading to bone loss, a 17.9% decrease in muscle protein synthesis rate (p < 0.05) and liver lipotoxicity. In female rats, high-fat diet and ovariectomy triggered similar gains in fat mass but had different impacts on bone and muscle metabolism. The ovariectomy-induced mechanisms affecting the musculoskeletal system are mainly caused by estrogen depletion, which surpasses the potential-independent effect of adiposity.

  10. Genetic ablation of calcium-independent phospholipase A2gamma prevents obesity and insulin resistance during high fat feeding by mitochondrial uncoupling and increased adipocyte fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, David J; Sims, Harold F; Yang, Kui; Kiebish, Michael A; Su, Xiong; Jenkins, Christopher M; Guan, Shaoping; Moon, Sung Ho; Pietka, Terri; Nassir, Fatiha; Schappe, Timothy; Moore, Kristin; Han, Xianlin; Abumrad, Nada A; Gross, Richard W

    2010-11-19

    Phospholipases are critical enzyme mediators participating in many aspects of cellular function through modulating the generation of lipid 2nd messengers, membrane physical properties, and cellular bioenergetics. Here, we demonstrate that mice null for calcium-independent phospholipase A(2)γ (iPLA(2)γ(-/-)) are completely resistant to high fat diet-induced weight gain, adipocyte hypertrophy, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance, which occur in iPLA(2)γ(+/+) mice after high fat feeding. Notably, iPLA(2)γ(-/-) mice were lean, demonstrated abdominal lipodystrophy, and remained insulin-sensitive despite having a marked impairment in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion after high fat feeding. Respirometry of adipocyte explants from iPLA(2)γ(-/-) mice identified increased rates of oxidation of multiple different substrates in comparison with adipocyte explants from wild-type littermates. Shotgun lipidomics of adipose tissue from wild-type mice demonstrated the anticipated 2-fold increase in triglyceride content after high fat feeding. In sharp contrast, the adipocyte triglyceride content was identical in iPLA(2)γ(-/-) mice fed either a standard diet or a high fat diet. Respirometry of skeletal muscle mitochondria from iPLA(2)γ(-/-) mice demonstrated marked decreases in state 3 respiration using multiple substrates whose metabolism was uncoupled from ATP production. Shotgun lipidomics of skeletal muscle revealed a decreased content of cardiolipin with an altered molecular species composition thereby identifying the mechanism underlying mitochondrial uncoupling in the iPLA(2)γ(-/-) mouse. Collectively, these results identify iPLA(2)γ as an obligatory upstream enzyme that is necessary for efficient electron transport chain coupling and energy production through its participation in the alterations of cellular bioenergetics that promote the development of the metabolic syndrome.

  11. Carnitine supplementation in high-fat diet-fed rats does not ameliorate lipid-induced skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wessels, Bart; van den Broek, Nicole M A; Ciapaite, Jolita; Houten, Sander M; Wanders, Ronald J A; Nicolay, Klaas; Prompers, Jeanine J

    2015-10-01

    Muscle lipid overload and the associated accumulation of lipid intermediates play an important role in the development of insulin resistance. Carnitine insufficiency is a common feature of insulin-resistant states and might lead to incomplete fatty acid oxidation and impaired export of lipid intermediates out of the mitochondria. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that carnitine supplementation reduces high-fat diet-induced lipotoxicity, improves muscle mitochondrial function, and ameliorates insulin resistance. Wistar rats were fed either normal chow or a high-fat diet for 15 wk. One group of high-fat diet-fed rats was supplemented with 300 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) L-carnitine during the last 8 wk. Muscle mitochondrial function was measured in vivo by (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and ex vivo by high-resolution respirometry. Muscle lipid status was determined by (1)H MRS (intramyocellular lipids) and tandem mass spectrometry (acylcarnitines). High-fat diet feeding induced insulin resistance and was associated with decreases in muscle and blood free carnitine, elevated levels of muscle lipids and acylcarnitines, and an increased number of muscle mitochondria that showed an improved capacity to oxidize fat-derived substrates when tested ex vivo. This was, however, not accompanied by an increase in muscle oxidative capacity in vivo, indicating that in vivo mitochondrial function was compromised. Despite partial normalization of muscle and blood free carnitine content, carnitine supplementation did not induce improvements in muscle lipid status, in vivo mitochondrial function, or insulin sensitivity. Carnitine insufficiency, therefore, does not play a major role in high-fat diet-induced muscle mitochondrial dysfunction in vivo.

  12. Effects of four different meal types on the population pharmacokinetics of single-dose rifapentine in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Zvada, Simbarashe P; Van Der Walt, Jan-Stefan; Smith, Peter J; Fourie, P Bernard; Roscigno, Giorgio; Mitchison, Denis; Simonsson, Ulrika S H; McIlleron, Helen M

    2010-08-01

    Rifapentine and its primary metabolite, 25-desacetyl rifapentine, are active against mycobacterium tuberculosis. The objectives of this study were to describe the population pharmacokinetics of rifapentine and 25-desacetyl rifapentine in fasting and fed states. Thirty-five male healthy volunteers were enrolled in an open-label, randomized, sequential, five-way crossover study. Participants received a single 900-mg dose of rifapentine after meals with high fat (meal A), bulk and low fat (meal B), bulk and high fat (meal C), high fluid and low fat (meal D), or 200 ml of water (meal E). Venous blood samples were collected over 72 h after each rifapentine dose, and plasma was analyzed for rifapentine and 25-desacetyl rifapentine using high-performance liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic data were analyzed by nonlinear mixed-effect modeling using NONMEM. Compared with the fasting state, meal A had the greatest effect on rifapentine oral bioavailability, increasing it by 86%. Meals B, C, and D resulted in 33%, 46%, and 49% increases in rifapentine oral bioavailability, respectively. Similar trends were observed for 25-desacetyl rifapentine. As meal behavior has a substantial impact on rifapentine exposure, it should be considered in the evaluation of optimal dosing approaches.

  13. Effects of Four Different Meal Types on the Population Pharmacokinetics of Single-Dose Rifapentine in Healthy Male Volunteers▿

    PubMed Central

    Zvada, Simbarashe P.; Van Der Walt, Jan-Stefan; Smith, Peter J.; Fourie, P. Bernard; Roscigno, Giorgio; Mitchison, Denis; Simonsson, Ulrika S. H.; McIlleron, Helen M.

    2010-01-01

    Rifapentine and its primary metabolite, 25-desacetyl rifapentine, are active against mycobacterium tuberculosis. The objectives of this study were to describe the population pharmacokinetics of rifapentine and 25-desacetyl rifapentine in fasting and fed states. Thirty-five male healthy volunteers were enrolled in an open-label, randomized, sequential, five-way crossover study. Participants received a single 900-mg dose of rifapentine after meals with high fat (meal A), bulk and low fat (meal B), bulk and high fat (meal C), high fluid and low fat (meal D), or 200 ml of water (meal E). Venous blood samples were collected over 72 h after each rifapentine dose, and plasma was analyzed for rifapentine and 25-desacetyl rifapentine using high-performance liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic data were analyzed by nonlinear mixed-effect modeling using NONMEM. Compared with the fasting state, meal A had the greatest effect on rifapentine oral bioavailability, increasing it by 86%. Meals B, C, and D resulted in 33%, 46%, and 49% increases in rifapentine oral bioavailability, respectively. Similar trends were observed for 25-desacetyl rifapentine. As meal behavior has a substantial impact on rifapentine exposure, it should be considered in the evaluation of optimal dosing approaches. PMID:20516273

  14. Transcriptome analysis of the effects of chitosan on the hyperlipidemia and oxidative stress in high-fat diet fed mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Zhang, Sicong; Wang, Xiaoya; Yang, Shuo; Jiang, Qixing; Xu, Yanshun; Xia, Wenshui

    2017-09-01

    Transcriptome analysis was performed to investigate the alterations in gene expression after chitosan (CS) treatment on the liver of mice fed with high-fat diet (HFD). The results showed that the body weight, the liver weight and the epididymal fat mass of HFD mice, which were 62.98%, 46.51% and 239.37%, respectively, higher than those of control mice, could be significantly decreased by chitosan supplementation. Also, high-fat diet increased both plasma lipid and liver lipid as compared with the control mice. Chitosan supplementation decreased the plasma lipid and liver lipid, increased the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic lipase (HL) activity, increased T-AOC and decreased MDA in the liver and the epididymis adipose as compared with the HFD mice. Transcriptome analysis indicated that increased Mups, Lcn2, Gstm3 and CYP2E1 expressions clearly indicated HFD induced lipid metabolism disorder and oxidative damage. Especially, chitosan treatment decreased the Mup17 and Lcn2 expressions by 64.32% and 82.43% respectively as compared with those of HFD mice. These results indicated that chitosan possess the ability to improve the impairment of lipid metabolism as strongly associated with increased Mups expressions and gene expressions related to oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Adipose tissue inflammation contributes to short-term high-fat diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Michael S F; Wueest, Stephan; Item, Flurin; Schoenle, Eugen J; Konrad, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    High-fat feeding for 3-4 days impairs glucose tolerance and hepatic insulin sensitivity. However, it remains unclear whether the evolving hepatic insulin resistance is due to acute lipid overload or the result of induced adipose tissue inflammation and consequent dysfunctional adipose tissue-liver cross-talk. In the present study, feeding C57Bl6/J mice a fat-enriched diet [high-fat diet (HFD)] for 4 days induced glucose intolerance, hepatic insulin resistance (as assessed by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp studies), and hepatic steatosis as well as adipose tissue inflammation (i.e., TNFα expression) compared with standard chow-fed mice. Adipocyte-specific depletion of the antiapoptotic/anti-inflammatory factor Fas (CD95) attenuated adipose tissue inflammation and improved glucose tolerance as well as hepatic insulin sensitivity without altering the level of hepatic steatosis induced by HFD. In summary, our results identify adipose tissue inflammation and resulting dysfunctional adipose tissue-liver cross-talk as an early event in the development of HFD-induced hepatic insulin resistance.

  16. Effects of diurnal variation of gut microbes and high fat feeding on host circadian clock function and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Vanessa; Gibbons, Sean M.; Martinez, Kristina; Hutchison, Alan L.; Huang, Edmond Y.; Cham, Candace M.; Pierre, Joseph F.; Heneghan, Aaron F.; Nadimpalli, Anuradha; Hubert, Nathaniel; Zale, Elizabeth; Wang, Yunwei; Huang, Yong; Theriault, Betty; Dinner, Aaron R.; Musch, Mark W.; Kudsk, Kenneth A.; Prendergast, Brian J.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Chang, Eugene B.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Circadian clocks and metabolism are inextricably intertwined, where central and hepatic circadian clocks coordinate metabolic events in response to light-dark and sleep-wake cycles. We reveal an additional key element involved in maintaining host circadian rhythms, the gut microbiome. Despite persistence of light-dark signals, germ-free mice fed low or high fat diets exhibit markedly impaired central and hepatic circadian clock gene expression and do not gain weight compared to conventionally-raised counterparts. Examination of gut microbiota in conventionally-raised mice showed differential diurnal variation in microbial structure and function dependent upon dietary composition. Additionally, specific microbial metabolites induced under low or high fat feeding, particularly short chain fatty acids, but not hydrogen sulfide, directly modulate circadian clock gene expression within hepatocytes. These results underscore the ability of microbially-derived metabolites to regulate or modify central and hepatic circadian rhythm and host metabolic function, the latter following intake of a Westernized diet. PMID:25891358

  17. Naringin Improves Neuronal Insulin Signaling, Brain Mitochondrial Function, and Cognitive Function in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongmei; Yan, Junqiang; Chen, Jing; Wu, Wenlan; Zhu, Xiaoying; Wang, Yong

    2015-10-01

    The epidemic and experimental studies have confirmed that the obesity induced by high-fat diet not only caused neuronal insulin resistance, but also induced brain mitochondrial dysfunction as well as learning impairment in mice. Naringin has been reported to posses biological functions which are beneficial to human cognitions, but its protective effects on HFD-induced cognitive deficits and underlying mechanisms have not been well characterized. In the present study Male C57BL/6 J mice were fed either a control or high-fat diet for 20 weeks and then randomized into four groups treated with their respective diets including control diet, control diet + naringin, high-fat diet (HFD), and high-fat diet + naringin (HFDN). The behavioral performance was assessed by using novel object recognition test and Morris water maze test. Hippocampal mitochondrial parameters were analyzed. Then the protein levels of insulin signaling pathway and the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the hippocampus were detected by Western blot method. Our results showed that oral administration of naringin significantly improved the learning and memory abilities as evidenced by increasing recognition index by 52.5% in the novel object recognition test and inducing a 1.05-fold increase in the crossing-target number in the probe test, and ameliorated mitochondrial dysfunction in mice caused by HFD consumption. Moreover, naringin significantly enhanced insulin signaling pathway as indicated by a 34.5% increase in the expression levels of IRS-1, a 47.8% decrease in the p-IRS-1, a 1.43-fold increase in the p-Akt, and a 1.89-fold increase in the p-GSK-3β in the hippocampus of the HFDN mice versus HFD mice. Furthermore, the AMPK activity significantly increased in the naringin-treated (100 mg kg(-1) d(-1)) group. These findings suggest that an enhancement in insulin signaling and a decrease in mitochondrial dysfunction through the activation of AMPK may be one of the mechanisms that naringin

  18. Maternal high-fat diet is associated with impaired fetal lung development.

    PubMed

    Mayor, Reina S; Finch, Katelyn E; Zehr, Jordan; Morselli, Eugenia; Neinast, Michael D; Frank, Aaron P; Hahner, Lisa D; Wang, Jason; Rakheja, Dinesh; Palmer, Biff F; Rosenfeld, Charles R; Savani, Rashmin C; Clegg, Deborah J

    2015-08-15

    Maternal nutrition has a profound long-term impact on infant health. Poor maternal nutrition influences placental development and fetal growth, resulting in low birth weight, which is strongly associated with the risk of developing chronic diseases, including heart disease, hypertension, asthma, and type 2 diabetes, later in life. Few studies have delineated the mechanisms by which maternal nutrition affects fetal lung development. Here, we report that maternal exposure to a diet high in fat (HFD) causes placental inflammation, resulting in placental insufficiency, fetal growth restriction (FGR), and inhibition of fetal lung development. Notably, pre- and postnatal exposure to maternal HFD also results in persistent alveolar simplification in the postnatal period. Our novel findings provide a strong association between maternal diet and fetal lung development.

  19. Development of a Single High Fat Meal Challenge to Unmask Latent Cardiopulmonary Effects of Air Pollution Exposure in Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stress tests are used clinically to determine the presence of underlying disease and predict future cardiovascular risk. In previous studies, we used treadmill exercise stress in rats to unmask the priming effects of air pollution inhalation. Other day-to-day activities stress th...

  20. The nutritional content and cost of supermarket ready-meals. Cross-sectional analysis☆

    PubMed Central

    Remnant, Jennifer; Adams, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Background: Over-reliance on convenience foods, including ready-meals, has been suggested as one contributor to obesity. Little research has systematically explored the nutritional content of supermarket ready-meals. We described the nutritional content and cost of UK supermarket ready-meals. Methods: We conducted a survey of supermarket own-brand chilled and frozen ready-meals available in branches of ten national supermarket chains in one city in northern England. Data on price, weight and nutritional content of meals in four ranges (‘healthier’, luxury, economy and standard) and of six types (macaroni cheese, meat lasagne, cottage pie, chicken tikka masala, fish pie, and sweet and sour chicken) were collected. Nutritional content was compared to ranges used to identify low, medium and high fat, saturated fat, sugar and salt in nationally recommended front-of-pack labelling. Results: 166 ready-meals were included from 41 stores. Overall, ready-meals were high in saturated fat and salt, and low in sugar. One-fifth of meals were low in fat, saturated fat, salt and sugar, including two-thirds of ‘healthier’ meals. Meals that were low for three out of the four front-of-pack nutrients were the cheapest. Conclusions: Supermarket ready-meals do not have a healthful nutritional profile overall. However, a number of healthier meals were available – particularly amongst meals specifically marked as ‘healthier’. There was little evidence that healthier meals necessarily cost more. Further effort is required to encourage producers to improve the nutritional profile of the full range of ready-meals, and not just those specifically labelled as ‘healthier’. PMID:25963106

  1. The nutritional content and cost of supermarket ready-meals. Cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Remnant, Jennifer; Adams, Jean

    2015-09-01

    Over-reliance on convenience foods, including ready-meals, has been suggested as one contributor to obesity. Little research has systematically explored the nutritional content of supermarket ready-meals. We described the nutritional content and cost of UK supermarket ready-meals. We conducted a survey of supermarket own-brand chilled and frozen ready-meals available in branches of ten national supermarket chains in one city in northern England. Data on price, weight and nutritional content of meals in four ranges ('healthier', luxury, economy and standard) and of six types (macaroni cheese, meat lasagne, cottage pie, chicken tikka masala, fish pie, and sweet and sour chicken) were collected. Nutritional content was compared to ranges used to identify low, medium and high fat, saturated fat, sugar and salt in nationally recommended front-of-pack labelling. 166 ready-meals were included from 41 stores. Overall, ready-meals were high in saturated fat and salt, and low in sugar. One-fifth of meals were low in fat, saturated fat, salt and sugar, including two-thirds of 'healthier' meals. Meals that were low for three out of the four front-of-pack nutrients were the cheapest. Supermarket ready-meals do not have a healthful nutritional profile overall. However, a number of healthier meals were available - particularly amongst meals specifically marked as 'healthier'. There was little evidence that healthier meals necessarily cost more. Further effort is required to encourage producers to improve the nutritional profile of the full range of ready-meals, and not just those specifically labelled as 'healthier'. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. The protein oxidation of soybean meal induced by heating decreases its protein digestion in vitro and impairs growth performance and digestive function in broilers.

    PubMed

    Lu, P; Zhang, X L; Xue, W Y; Wu, D W; Ding, L R; Wen, C; Zhou, Y M

    2017-09-12

    1. The soybean meal (SBM) was heated at 100°C for 1, 2, 4 and 8 h, respectively, and their resultant oxidative status was evaluated. 2. A total of 400 one-day-old Arbor Acres broilers were randomly divided into 5 treatments with 8 replicates of 10 birds each, and fed with diets containing non-heated SBM (NHSBM) or 1 of 4 heated SBMs (HSBMs, SBMs heated at 100°C for 1, 2, 4 and 8 h, respectively) for 42 d. 3. The contents of carbonyl in the SBMs were both linearly and quadratically increased, whereas the nitrogen solubility index, and in vitro digestibility of crude protein (CP) and dry matter (DM) in the SBMs were both linearly and quadratically decreased as heating time increased (P < 0.05). The concentrations of sulfhydryl and total sulfhydryl in the SBMs were linearly decreased as heating time increased (P < 0.05). 4. The average daily gain was linearly decreased while the feed conversion ratio (FCR) was linearly increased in broilers as heating time of dietary HSBMs increased during both d 22-42 and d 1-42 of study (P < 0.05), though FCR of broilers during d 22-42 study were unaffected when the heating time of dietary HSBMs was 1 h (P > 0.05). The serum glucose concentration and the activity of trypsin at d 42, and the apparent total digestibility of CP and DM were all linearly reduced in broilers when heating time of dietary HSBMs increased (P < 0.05). However, 1 h HSBM has a numerical higher CP and DM digestibility than NHSBM. The serum urea nitrogen contents were both linearly and quadratically increased at both d 21 and 42 (P < 0.05), and relative pancreas weight was linearly increased at d 42 in broilers as heating time of dietary HSBMs increased (P < 0.05).

  3. Coffee and caffeine improve insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yuji; Kobayashi, Misato; Yamauchi, Rie; Ojika, Makoto; Hiramitsu, Masanori; Inoue, Takashi; Katagiri, Takao; Murai, Atsushi; Horio, Fumihiko

    2011-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that coffee and caffeine ameliorated hyperglycemia in spontaneously diabetic KK-A(y) mice. This present study evaluates the antidiabetic effects of coffee and caffeine on high-fat-diet-induced impaired glucose tolerance in C57BL/6J mice. C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet were given regular drinking water (control group), or a 2.5-fold-diluted coffee or caffeine solution (200 mg/L) for 17 weeks. The ingestion of coffee or caffeine improved glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and hyperinsulinemia when compared with mice in the control group. The adipose tissue mRNA levels of inflammatory adipocytokines (MCP-1 and IL-6) and the liver mRNA levels of genes related to fatty acid synthesis were lower in the coffee and caffeine groups than those in the control group. These results suggest that coffee and caffeine exerted an ameliorative effect on high-fat-diet-induced impaired glucose tolerance by improving insulin sensitivity. This effect might be attributable in part to the reduction of inflammatory adipocytokine expression.

  4. High-fat diet alters the dopamine and opioid systems: effects across development

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, T M

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of a high-fat diet has been linked to obesity, dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. Less well appreciated are adverse effects on the brain and behavior. Recent research has shown that consumption of a high-fat diet can alter gene expression within the brain, and the dopamine and opioid neurotransmitter systems appear to be vulnerable to dysregulation. This review will focus on recent reports in both humans and animal models that describe adverse effects of high-fat diet consumption on the central reward circuitry. In addition, the importance of different development windows will be discussed, with effects observed in both the prenatal/perinatal time period and with chronic high-fat diet consumption in adulthood. PMID:27152150

  5. Citrus flavanones prevent systemic inflammation and ameliorate oxidative stress in C57BL/6J mice fed high fat diet

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It was investigated the preventive effects of the flavanones hesperidin, eriocitrin and eriodictyol on the oxidative stress and systemic inflammation induced by high-fat diet in C57BL/6J mice. The mice received a standard diet (9.5% kcal from fat), high-fat diet (45% kcal from fat) or high fat diet ...

  6. Adiponectin knockout accentuates high fat diet-induced obesity and cardiac dysfunction: role of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rui; Zhang, Yingmei; Turdi, Subat; Ren, Jun

    2013-08-01

    Adiponectin (APN), an adipose-derived adipokine, offers cardioprotective effects although the precise mechanism of action remains unclear. This study was designed to examine the role of APN in high fat diet-induced obesity and cardiac pathology. Adult C57BL/6 wild-type and APN knockout mice were fed a low or high fat diet for 22weeks. After 40day feeding, mice were treated with 2mg/kg rapamycin or vehicle every other day for 42days on respective fat diet. Cardiomyocyte contractile and Ca(2+) transient properties were evaluated. Myocardial function was evaluated using echocardiography. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to evaluate adiposity. Energy expenditure, metabolic rate and physical activity were monitored using a metabolic cage. Lipid deposition, serum triglyceride, glucose tolerance, markers of autophagy and fatty acid metabolism including LC3, p62, Beclin-1, AMPK, mTOR, fatty acid synthase (FAS) were evaluated. High fat diet intake induced obesity, systemic glucose intolerance, cardiac hypertrophy, dampened metabolic ability, cardiac and intracellular Ca(2+) derangements, the effects of which were accentuated by APN knockout. Furthermore, APN deficiency augmented high fat diet-induced upregulation in the autophagy adaptor p62 and the decline in AMPK without affecting high fat diet-induced decrease in LC3II and LC3II-to-LC3I ratio. Neither high fat diet nor APN deficiency altered Beclin-1. Interestingly, rapamycin negated high fat diet-induced/APN-deficiency-accentuated obesity, cardiac hypertrophy and contractile dysfunction as well as AMPK dephosphorylation, mTOR phosphorylation and p62 buildup. Our results collectively revealed that APN deficiency may aggravate high fat diet-induced obesity, metabolic derangement, cardiac hypertrophy and contractile dysfunction possibly through decreased myocardial autophagy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Derangement of ghrelin secretion after long-term high-fat diet feeding in rats.

    PubMed

    Sugiishi, Aya; Kimura, Masaki; Kamiya, Ryo; Ueki, Satomi; Yoneya, Mikiko; Saito, Yoshimasa; Saito, Hidetsugu

    2013-10-01

    Appetite control is an important goal for the management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes mellitus and obesity; however, little is known about how hormones concerning appetite regulation are affected by long-term consumption of a high-fat diet. We investigated the effect of high-fat diet on secretory regulation of ghrelin and leptin in rats. Rats were fed a control or a high-fat diet for 18 weeks and then killed. Before being killed, a glucose tolerance test was performed. Weight, total calorie intake and blood glucose levels were measured, and the plasma levels of total and active ghrelin, and leptin were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Body and fat weight and total calorie intake were significantly higher in the high-fat diet group than in the control, although blood glucose levels did not differ. Plasma leptin was significantly higher in the high-fat diet group, and a significant positive correlation was observed between bodyweight and leptin levels in both groups. The levels of active and total ghrelin were not significantly changed by high-fat diet, and active ghrelin levels in the control group significantly correlated negatively with bodyweight, while its correlation was lost in the high-fat diet group. The glucose tolerance test showed that ghrelin levels were significantly higher than those of controls even 60 min after glucose loading. These results indicate that secretion of ghrelin, but not leptin, are deranged by consumption of a high-fat diet, and active ghrelin levels lose their correlation with bodyweight and food intake. © 2013 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  8. Adiponectin knockout accentuates high fat diet-induced obesity and cardiac dysfunction: Role of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Zhang, Yingmei; Turdi, Subat; Ren, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin (APN), an adipose-derived adipokine, offers cardioprotective effects although the precise mechanism of action remains unclear. This study was designed to examine the role of APN in high fat diet-induced obesity and cardiac pathology. Adult C57BL/6 wild-type and APN knockout mice were fed a low or high fat diet for 22 weeks. After 40 day feeding, mice were treated with 2 mg/kg rapamycin or vehicle every other day for 42 days on respective fat diet. Cardiomyocyte contractile and Ca2+ transient properties were evaluated. Myocardial function was evaluated using echocardiography. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to evaluate adiposity. Energy expenditure, metabolic rate and physical activity were monitored using a metabolic cage. Lipid deposition, serum triglyceride, glucose tolerance, markers of autophagy and fatty acid metabolism including LC3, p62, Beclin-1, AMPK, mTOR, fatty acid synthase (FAS) were evaluated. High fat diet intake induced obesity, systemic glucose intolerance, cardiac hypertrophy, dampened metabolic ability, cardiac and intracellular Ca2+ derangements, the effects of which were accentuated by APN knockout. Furthermore, APN deficiency augmented high fat diet-induced upregulation in the autophagy adaptor p62 and the decline in AMPK without affecting high fat diet-induced decrease in LC3II and LC3II-to-LC3I ratio. Neither high fat diet nor APN deficiency altered Beclin-1. Interestingly, rapamycin negated high fat diet-induced/APN-deficiency-accentuated obesity, cardiac hypertrophy and contractile dysfunction as well as AMPK dephosphorylation, mTOR phosphorylation and p62 buildup. Our results collectively revealed that APN deficiency may aggravate high fat diet-induced obesity, metabolic derangement, cardiac hypertrophy and contractile dysfunction possibly through decreased myocardial autophagy. PMID:23524376

  9. Hypercaloric diets with increased meal frequency, but not meal size, increase intrahepatic triglycerides: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Koopman, Karin E; Caan, Matthan W A; Nederveen, Aart J; Pels, Anouk; Ackermans, Mariette T; Fliers, Eric; la Fleur, Susanne E; Serlie, Mireille J

    2014-08-01

    American children consume up to 27% of calories from high-fat and high-sugar snacks. Both sugar and fat consumption have been implicated as a cause of hepatic steatosis and obesity but the effect of meal pattern is largely understudied. We hypothesized that a high meal frequency, compared to consuming large meals, is detrimental in the accumulation of intrahepatic and abdominal fat. To test this hypothesis, we randomized 36 lean, healthy men to a 40% hypercaloric diet for 6 weeks or a eucaloric control diet and measured intrahepatic triglyceride content (IHTG) using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1) H-MRS), abdominal fat using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and insulin sensitivity using a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp with a glucose isotope tracer before and after the diet intervention. The caloric surplus consisted of fat and sugar (high-fat-high-sugar; HFHS) or sugar only (high-sugar; HS) and was consumed together with, or between, the three main meals, thereby increasing meal size or meal frequency. All hypercaloric diets similarly increased body mass index (BMI). Increasing meal frequency significantly increased IHTG (HFHS mean relative increase of 45%; P = 0.016 and HS mean relative increase of 110%; P = 0.047), whereas increasing meal size did not (2-way analysis of variance [ANOVA] size versus frequency P = 0.03). Abdominal fat increased in the HFHS-frequency group (+63.3 ± 42.8 mL; P = 0.004) and tended to increase in the HS-frequency group (+46.5 ± 50.7 mL; P = 0.08). Hepatic insulin sensitivity tended to decrease in the HFHS-frequency group while peripheral insulin sensitivity was not affected. A hypercaloric diet with high meal frequency increased IHTG and abdominal fat independent of caloric content and body weight gain, whereas increasing meal size did not. This study suggests that snacking, a common feature in the Western diet, independently contributes to hepatic steatosis and obesity. ( www

  10. Hypercaloric diets with increased meal frequency, but not meal size, increase intrahepatic triglycerides: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Karin E; Caan, Matthan WA; Nederveen, Aart J; Pels, Anouk; Ackermans, Mariette T; Fliers, Eric; la Fleur, Susanne E; Serlie, Mireille J

    2014-01-01

    American children consume up to 27% of calories from high-fat and high-sugar snacks. Both sugar and fat consumption have been implicated as a cause of hepatic steatosis and obesity but the effect of meal pattern is largely understudied. We hypothesized that a high meal frequency, compared to consuming large meals, is detrimental in the accumulation of intrahepatic and abdominal fat. To test this hypothesis, we randomized 36 lean, healthy men to a 40% hypercaloric diet for 6 weeks or a eucaloric control diet and measured intrahepatic triglyceride content (IHTG) using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS), abdominal fat using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and insulin sensitivity using a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp with a glucose isotope tracer before and after the diet intervention. The caloric surplus consisted of fat and sugar (high-fat-high-sugar; HFHS) or sugar only (high-sugar; HS) and was consumed together with, or between, the three main meals, thereby increasing meal size or meal frequency. All hypercaloric diets similarly increased body mass index (BMI). Increasing meal frequency significantly increased IHTG (HFHS mean relative increase of 45%; P = 0.016 and HS mean relative increase of 110%; P = 0.047), whereas increasing meal size did not (2-way analysis of variance [ANOVA] size versus frequency P = 0.03). Abdominal fat increased in the HFHS-frequency group (+63.3 ± 42.8 mL; P = 0.004) and tended to increase in the HS-frequency group (+46.5 ± 50.7 mL; P = 0.08). Hepatic insulin sensitivity tended to decrease in the HFHS-frequency group while peripheral insulin sensitivity was not affected. Conclusion: A hypercaloric diet with high meal frequency increased IHTG and abdominal fat independent of caloric content and body weight gain, whereas increasing meal size did not. This study suggests that snacking, a common feature in the Western diet, independently contributes to hepatic steatosis and obesity. (Trial

  11. The timing of meals.

    PubMed

    Strubbe, Jan H; Woods, Stephen C

    2004-01-01

    In most individuals, food intake occurs as discrete bouts or meals, and little attention has been paid to the factors that normally determine when meals will occur when food is freely available. On the basis of experiments using rats, the authors suggest that when there are no constraints on obtaining food and few competing activities, 3 levels of interacting controls normally dictate when meals will start. The first is the genetically determined circadian activity pattern on which nocturnal animals tend to initiate most meals in the dark. The second is the regularly occurring changing of the light cycle: These changes provide temporal anchors. The third relates to the size of the preceding meal, such that larger meals cause a longer delay until the onset of the next meal. Superimposed on these 3 are factors related to learning, convenience, and opportunity.

  12. Hypothyroidism Exacerbates Thrombophilia in Female Rats Fed with a High Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Mangge, Harald; Prüller, Florian; Zelzer, Sieglinde; Ainödhofer, Herwig; Pailer, Sabine; Kieslinger, Petra; Haybaeck, Johannes; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Cvirn, Gerhard; Gruber, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Clotting abnormalities are discussed both in the context with thyroid dysfunctions and obesity caused by a high fat diet. This study aimed to investigate the impact of hypo-, or hyperthyroidism on the endogenous thrombin potential (ETP), a master indicator of clotting activation, on Sprague Dawley rats fed a normal or high fat diet. Female Sprague Dawley rats (n = 66) were grouped into normal diet (ND; n = 30) and high-fat diet (HFD; n = 36) groups and subdivided into controls, hypothyroid and hyperthyroid groups, induced through propylthiouracil or triiodothyronine (T3) treatment, respectively. After 12 weeks of treatment ETP, body weight and food intake were analyzed. Successfully induced thyroid dysfunction was shown by T3 levels, both under normal and high fat diet. Thyroid dysfunction was accompanied by changes in calorie intake and body weight. In detail, compared to euthyroid controls, hypothyroid rats showed significantly increased—and hyperthyroid animals significantly decreased—ETP levels. High fat diet potentiated these effects in both directions. In summary, we are the first to show that hypothyroidism and high fat diet potentiate the thrombotic capacity of the clotting system in Sprague Dawley rats. This effect may be relevant for cardiovascular disease where thyroid function is poorly understood as a pathological contributor in the context of clotting activity and obesogenic nutrition. PMID:26184174

  13. Hypothyroidism Exacerbates Thrombophilia in Female Rats Fed with a High Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Mangge, Harald; Prüller, Florian; Zelzer, Sieglinde; Ainödhofer, Herwig; Pailer, Sabine; Kieslinger, Petra; Haybaeck, Johannes; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Cvirn, Gerhard; Gruber, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-07-10

    Clotting abnormalities are discussed both in the context with thyroid dysfunctions and obesity caused by a high fat diet. This study aimed to investigate the impact of hypo-, or hyperthyroidism on the endogenous thrombin potential (ETP), a master indicator of clotting activation, on Sprague Dawley rats fed a normal or high fat diet. Female Sprague Dawley rats (n = 66) were grouped into normal diet (ND; n = 30) and high-fat diet (HFD; n = 36) groups and subdivided into controls, hypothyroid and hyperthyroid groups, induced through propylthiouracil or triiodothyronine (T3) treatment, respectively. After 12 weeks of treatment ETP, body weight and food intake were analyzed. Successfully induced thyroid dysfunction was shown by T3 levels, both under normal and high fat diet. Thyroid dysfunction was accompanied by changes in calorie intake and body weight. In detail, compared to euthyroid controls, hypothyroid rats showed significantly increased-and hyperthyroid animals significantly decreased-ETP levels. High fat diet potentiated these effects in both directions. In summary, we are the first to show that hypothyroidism and high fat diet potentiate the thrombotic capacity of the clotting system in Sprague Dawley rats. This effect may be relevant for cardiovascular disease where thyroid function is poorly understood as a pathological contributor in the context of clotting activity and obesogenic nutrition.

  14. Protective effect of Caralluma fimbriata against high-fat diet induced testicular oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Gujjala, Sudhakara; Putakala, Mallaiah; Gangarapu, Venkatanarayana; Nukala, Srinivasulu; Bellamkonda, Ramesh; Ramaswamy, Rajendran; Desireddy, Saralakumari

    2016-10-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) promotes the oxidative stress formation, which in turn has hazardous effects on reproductive system and fertility. The objective of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of Caralluma fimbriata on high-fat diet-induced oxidative stress in the testis of rat. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups: Control (C), Control treated with CFE (C+ CFE), High fat diet fed (HFD), High fat diet fed treated with CFE (HFD+CFE) and High fat diet fed treated with Metformin (HFD+Met). CFE was orally administered (200mg/kg body weight) for 90days to groups-C+CFE and HFD+CFE rats. The effects of HF-diet on the reproductive organs were determined by measuring relative and absolute testes and epididymal fat pads weights. Regarding testes antioxidant status, high-fat fed rats showed higher levels of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, polyol pathway enzymes and lower GSH levels and lower activities of antioxidants, while CFE treatment prevented all these observed abnormalities. The present study clearly indicates that CFE offers a significant protection against HF-diet induced testicular oxidative stress in rats.

  15. Beneficial effects of noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) juice on livers of high-fat dietary hamsters.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Ling; Chang, Yuan-Yen; Yang, Deng-Jye; Tzang, Bor-Show; Chen, Yi-Chen

    2013-09-01

    Polyphenols in noni juice (NJ) are mainly composed of phenolic acids, mainly gentisic, p-hydroxybenoic, and chlorogenic acids. To investigate the beneficial effects of NJ on the liver, hamsters were fed with two diets, normal-fat and high-fat diets. Furthermore, high-fat dietary hamsters were received distilled water, and 3, 6, and 9 mL NJ/kg BW, respectively. After a 6-week feeding period, the increased (p<0.05) sizes of liver and visceral fat in high-fat dietary hamsters compared to the control hamsters were ameliorated (p<0.05) by NJ supplementation. NJ also decreased (p<0.05) serum/liver lipids but enhanced (p<0.05) daily faecal lipid/bile acid outputs in the high-fat dietary hamsters. High-fat dietary hamsters supplemented with NJ had higher (p<0.05) liver antioxidant capacities but lowered (p<0.05) liver iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, and IL-1β expressions, gelatinolytic levels of MMP9, and serum ALT values compared to those without NJ. Hence, NJ protects liver against a high-fat dietary habit via regulations of antioxidative and anti-inflammatory responses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Coacervate whey protein improves inflammatory milieu in mice fed with high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Functional foods with bioactive properties may help in treat obesity, as they can lead to a decreased risks of inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chitosan coacervate whey protein on the proinflammatory processes in mice fed with high-fat diet. Methods Mice were divided into two groups receiving either a normolipidic or high-fat diet; the animals in each of the two diet groups were given a diet supplement of either coacervate (gavage, 36 mg protein/kg of body weight) or tap water for four weeks [groups: normolipidic diet plus water (C); normolipidic diet and coacervate (CC); high-fat diet and water (H); and high-fat diet and coacervate (HC)]. Results The high-fat diet promoted inflammation, possibly by decreased adiponectin/sum of adipose tissues ratio and increased phosphorylation of NF-κB p50. In HC we observed a positive correlation between IL-10 and TNF-α in mesenteric adipose tissue, retroperitoneal adipose tissue and liver tissue. We also observed a positive correlation between lipopolisaccharide with IL-10 in the liver tissue. Conclusions High-fat diet treatment promoted metabolic alterations and inflammation, and chitosan coacervate whey protein modulated inflammatory milieu. PMID:24673809

  17. [Effect of dietary mineral nutrients and vitamins on metabolism of rat fed with high fat].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liying; Sun, Changhao; Zhou, Xiaorong; Wang, Haiying; Ren, Lina

    2004-07-01

    To explore dietary mineral nutrients (calcium, magnesium, zinc, ferric, chromium) and vitamins (vitamin A, B1, B2, C, D, E) on the effect of metabolic disorder of Wistar rat fed with high fat diet. Fifty obesity-prone male rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: A group were fed with basic diet, B group were fed with high fat diet and normal minerals and vitamins, C group were fed with high fat diet with lower minerals and vitamins, D group were fed with high fat diet with higher minerals and vitamins, E group were fed with high fat diet with only higher calcium. After 8 weeks, blood glucose, serum insulin and leptin, serum triglycerides, cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein were measured respectively. The body weight and fat content in B group were significantly higher than those of other groups. The body weight in D, E group decreased significantly compared with B group, both of which are similar with A group. In the case of blood glucose, serum insulin, leptin,triglycerides, cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein, they all have the tendency of decreasing in D group compared with E group. In addition to reducing body weight and fat content, dietary mineral nutrients and vitamins can also ameliorate the blood glucose and improve hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia, modify the metabolic disordor of rat fed with high fat diet.

  18. B56alpha/protein phosphatase 2A inhibits adipose lipolysis in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Brice P; Qiao, Liping; Levaugh, Justin M; Shao, Jianhua

    2010-08-01

    Lipolysis and lipogenesis are two opposite processes that control lipid storage in adipocytes. Impaired adipose lipolysis has been observed in both obese human subjects and animal models. This study investigated the mechanisms underlying impaired adipose lipolysis in a high-fat diet-induced obese (DIO) mouse model. DIO models were created using male C57BL/6 mice. Our results show that beta3 adrenergic receptor-specific agonist BRL37344 induced adipose lipolysis was significantly blunted in DIO mice. The levels of Ser660 phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) were significantly decreased in the epididymal fat of DIO mice. However, protein levels of HSL, adipose triglyceride lipase and its coactivator comparative gene identification-58 were similar between DIO and control mice. It is known that upon lipolytic hormone stimulation, protein kinase A phosphorylates HSL Ser660 and activates HSL, whereas protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) dephosphorylates and inactivates HSL. Interestingly, our study shows that high-fat feeding did not alter epididymal fat cAMP and protein kinase A protein levels but significantly increased the expression of the alpha-isoform of PP2A regulatory subunit B' (B56alpha). To study the role of B56alpha in obesity-associated lipolytic defect, B56alpha was overexpressed or knocked down by adenovirus-mediated gene transduction in cultured 3T3-L1CARDelta1 adipocytes. Overexpression of B56alpha significantly decreased HSL Ser660 phosphorylation. In contrast, knocking down B56alpha increased hormone-stimulated HSL activation and lipolysis in mature 3T3-L1CARDelta1 adipocytes. These results strongly suggest that elevated B56alpha/PP2A inhibits HSL and lipolysis in white adipose tissue of DIO mice.

  19. Green tea extract improves high fat diet-induced hypothalamic inflammation, without affecting the serotoninergic system.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Marcos H; Zemdegs, Juliane C S; de Santana, Aline A; Santamarina, Aline B; Moreno, Mayara F; Hachul, Ana C L; dos Santos, Bruno; do Nascimento, Claudia M Oller; Ribeiro, Eliane B; Oyama, Lila M

    2014-10-01

    To investigate possible mechanisms of green tea's anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects in the hypothalamus, the central regulator of metabolism, of mice fed with high-fat diet (HFD), we analyzed proteins of the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathway and serotoninergic proteins involved in energy homeostasis. Thirty-day-old male Swiss mice were fed with HFD rich in saturated fat and green tea extract (GTE) for 8 weeks. After that, body weight and mass of fat depots were evaluated. Oral glucose tolerance test was performed 3 days prior to euthanasia; serum glucose, insulin and adiponectin were measured in fasted mice. Hypothalamic TLR4 pathway proteins, serotonin receptors 1B and 2C and serotonin transporter were analyzed by Western blotting or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A second set of animals was used to measure food intake in response to fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Mice fed with HFD had increased body weight and mass of fat depots, impaired oral glucose tolerance, elevated glucose and insulin and decreased adiponectin serum levels. TLR4, IκB-α, nuclear factor κB p50 and interleukin 6 were increased by HFD. Concomitant GTE treatment ameliorated these parameters. The serotoninergic system remained functional after HFD treatment despite a few alterations in protein content of serotonin receptors 1B and 2C and serotonin transporter. In summary, the GTE attenuated the deleterious effects of the HFD investigated in this study, partially due to reduced hypothalamic inflammation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mice Chronically Fed High-Fat Diet Have Increased Mortality and Disturbed Immune Response in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Strandberg, Louise; Verdrengh, Margareta; Enge, Maria; Andersson, Niklas; Amu, Sylvie; Önnheim, Karin; Benrick, Anna; Brisslert, Mikael; Bylund, Johan; Bokarewa, Maria; Nilsson, Staffan; Jansson, John-Olov

    2009-01-01

    Background Sepsis is a potentially deadly disease that often is caused by gram-positive bacteria, in particular Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). As there are few effective therapies for sepsis, increased basic knowledge about factors predisposing is needed. Methodology/Principal Findings The purpose of this study was to study the effect of Western diet on mortality induced by intravenous S. aureus inoculation and the immune functions before and after bacterial inoculation. Here we show that C57Bl/6 mice on high-fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks, like genetically obese Ob/Ob mice on low-fat diet (LFD), have increased mortality during S. aureus-induced sepsis compared with LFD-fed C57Bl/6 controls. Bacterial load in the kidneys 5–7 days after inoculation was increased 10-fold in HFD-fed compared with LFD-fed mice. At that time, HFD-fed mice had increased serum levels and fat mRNA expression of the immune suppressing cytokines interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) and IL-10 compared with LFD-fed mice. In addition, HFD-fed mice had increased serum levels of the pro-inflammatory IL-1β. Also, HFD-fed mice with and without infection had increased levels of macrophages in fat. The proportion and function of phagocytosing granulocytes, and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by peritoneal lavage cells were decreased in HFD-fed compared with LFD-fed mice. Conclusions Our findings imply that chronic HFD disturb several innate immune functions in mice, and impairs the ability to clear S. aureus and survive sepsis. PMID:19865485

  1. GLP-2 as Beneficial Factor in the Glucose Homeostasis in Mice Fed a High Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Baldassano, Sara; Rappa, Francesca; Amato, Antonella; Cappello, Francesco; Mulè, Flavia

    2015-12-01

    Glucagon like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a gastrointestinal hormone released in response to dietary nutrients, which acts through a specific receptor, the GLP-2 receptor (GLP-2R). The physiological effects of GLP-2 are multiple, involving also the intestinal adaptation to high fat diet (HFD). In consideration of the well-known relationship between chronic HFD and impaired glucose metabolism, in the present study we examined if the blocking of the GLP-2 signaling by chronic treatment with the GLP-2R antagonist, GLP-2 (3-33), leads to functional consequences in the regulation of glucose metabolism in HFD-fed mice. Compared with animals fed standard diet (STD), mice at the 10th week of HFD showed hyperglycaemia, glucose intolerance, high plasma insulin level after glucose load, increased pancreas weight and β cell expansion, but not insulin resistance. In HFD fed mice, GLP-2 (3-33) treatment for 4 weeks (from the 6th to the 10th week of diet) did not affect fasting glycaemia, but it significantly increased the glucose intolerance, both fasting and glucose-induced insulin levels, and reduced the sensitivity to insulin leading to insulin-resistance. In GLP-2 (3-33)-treated HFD mice pancreas was significantly heavier and displayed a significant increase in β-cell mass in comparison with vehicle-treated HFD mice. In STD mice, the GLP-2 (3-33) treatment did not affect fasted or glucose-stimulated glycemia, insulin, insulin sensitivity, pancreas weight and beta cell mass. The present study suggests that endogenous GLP-2 may act as a protective factor against the dysregulation of the glucose metabolism that occurs in HFD mice, because GLP-2 (3-33) worsens glucose metabolism disorders.

  2. Hepatic gene therapy rescues high-fat diet responses in circadian Clock mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Kovac, Judit; Kolbe, Isa; Ehrhardt, Lea; Leliavski, Alexei; Husse, Jana; Salinas, Gabriela; Lingner, Thomas; Tsang, Anthony H; Barclay, Johanna L; Oster, Henrik

    2017-06-01

    Circadian Clock gene mutant mice show dampened 24-h feeding rhythms and an increased sensitivity to high-fat diet (HFD) feeding. Restricting HFD access to the dark phase counteracts its obesogenic effect in wild-type mice. The extent to which altered feeding rhythms are causative for the obesogenic phenotype of Clock mutant mice, however, remains unknown. Metabolic parameters of wild-type (WT) and Clock(Δ19) mutant mice (MT) were investigated under ad libitum and nighttime restricted HFD feeding. Liver circadian clock function was partially rescued by hydrodynamic tail vein delivery of WT-Clock DNA vectors in mutant mice and transcriptional, metabolic, endocrine and behavioral rhythms studied. Nighttime-restricted feeding restored food intake, but not body weight regulation in MT mice under HFD, suggesting Clock-dependent metabolic dysregulation downstream of circadian appetite control. Liver-directed Clock gene therapy partially restored liver circadian oscillator function and transcriptome regulation without affecting centrally controlled circadian behaviors. Under HFD, MT mice with partially restored liver clock function (MT-LR) showed normalized body weight gain, rescued 24-h food intake rhythms, and WT-like energy expenditure. This was associated with decreased nighttime leptin and daytime ghrelin levels, reduced hepatic lipid accumulation, and improved glucose tolerance. Transcriptome analysis revealed that hepatic Clock rescue in MT mice affected a range of metabolic pathways. Liver Clock gene therapy improves resistance against HFD-induced metabolic impairments in mice with circadian clock disruption. Restoring or stabilizing liver clock function might be a promising target for therapeutic interventions in obesity and metabolic disorders.

  3. Vascular smooth muscle cell alterations triggered by mice adipocytes: role of high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    El Akoum, Souhad; Cloutier, Isabelle; Tanguay, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    Inherent mechanisms leading to vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) alterations in obesitylinked type 2 diabetes (T2D) situation remain to be clarified. This study evaluates the impact of supernatant of adipocytes extracted from mice fed high-fat-diets (HFD) on the proliferation and apoptosis of VSMC. Adipocytes were extracted from visceral white fat pads of male and female C57Bl6 mice showing different stages of metabolic alterations after 20 weeks of vegetal or animal HFD feeding. These cells were stimulated or not with insulin or glucose to condition VSMC media. After 24h of stimulation with adipocyte supernatants (AdS), VSMC proliferation and sustainability were assessed in the absence and presence of AdS. CD36 and insulin receptor mRNA levels were also evaluated. Proliferation and viability of VSMC were significantly modulated by the nature of the AdS used and the gender of mice from which adipocytes have been extracted. The most extensive effects on VSMC were triggered by adipocytes from males fed animal HFD and females fed vegetal HFD. These effects were concurrent with increased leptin concentration and decreased adiponectin levels in AdS. In addition, adipocytes of HFD-fed mice increased caspase-3 activity and apoptosis in VSMC. Significant up-regulation of CD36 mRNA was also found in these cells. Adipocytes of HFD-fed mice induce VSMC alterations. These changes involved mouse gender, most probably correlated to the diet-induced adipocyte secretion profile. Greater sensitivity to AdS effects in VSMC raises concerns about the more frequent cardiovascular events associated with obesity in the presence of T2D, which impairs adipocyte activity.

  4. Chronic rhein treatment improves recognition memory in high-fat diet-induced obese male mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Huang, Xu-Feng; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Hongqin; Zhang, Qingsheng; Yu, Shijia; Yu, Yinghua

    2016-10-01

    High-fat (HF) diet modulates gut microbiota and increases plasma concentration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) which is associated with obesity and its related low-grade inflammation and cognitive decline. Rhein is the main ingredient of the rhubarb plant which has been used as an anti-inflammatory agent for several millennia. However, the potential effects of rhein against HF diet-induced obesity and its associated alteration of gut microbiota, inflammation and cognitive decline have not been studied. In this study, C57BL/6J male mice were fed an HF diet for 8 weeks to induce obesity, and then treated with oral rhein (120 mg/kg body weight/day in HF diet) for a further 6 weeks. Chronic rhein treatment prevented the HF diet-induced recognition memory impairment assessed by the novel object recognition test, neuroinflammation and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) deficits in the perirhinal cortex. Furthermore, rhein inhibited the HF diet-induced increased plasma LPS level and the proinflammatory macrophage accumulation in the colon and alteration of microbiota, including decreasing Bacteroides-Prevotella spp. and Desulfovibrios spp. DNA and increasing Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. DNA. Moreover, rhein also reduced body weight and improved glucose tolerance in HF diet-induced obese mice. In conclusion, rhein improved recognition memory and prevented obesity in mice on a chronic HF diet. These beneficial effects occur via the modulation of microbiota, hypoendotoxinemia, inhibition of macrophage accumulation, anti-neuroinflammation and the improvement of BDNF expression. Therefore, supplementation with rhein-enriched food or herbal medicine could be beneficial as a preventive strategy for chronic HF diet-induced cognitive decline, microbiota alteration and neuroinflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Suppression of myocardial 18F-FDG uptake by preparing patients with a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet.

    PubMed

    Williams, Gethin; Kolodny, Gerald M

    2008-02-01

    Myocardial 18F-FDG uptake in PET scans in patients prepared by the usual fasting protocol may result in difficulties in interpretation because variable uptake may yield false-positive results regarding mediastinal abnormalities. We aimed to analyze, retrospectively, the effect of diet on myocardial FDG uptake. The "fasting" group comprised 101 consecutive patients before a clinical change in the patient preparation protocol. The "new diet" group comprised 60 consecutive patients after the clinical protocol change who were directed to consume a very high-fat, low-carbohydrate, protein-permitted (VHFLCPP) diet before FDG injection. All patients were given a questionnaire that was used to verify diet adherence. Nonadherers or patients failing to complete questionnaires were excluded from analysis. Myocardial uptake was evaluated by measuring the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) in areas defined by CT as being cardiac. The average SUVmax for the fasting group (n = 101) was 8.8 +/- 5.7, and the average SUVmax for the VHFLCPP group (n = 60) was 3.9 +/- 3.6. The one-tailed Student's t test yielded a p value of < 0.00001. A VHFLCPP meal eaten 3-6 hours before FDG injection suppresses myocardial FDG uptake. This should facilitate definition of mediastinal abnormalities on FDG PET, particularly with stand-alone PET. Furthermore, this patient preparation protocol may permit the detection of biologically active coronary artery disease.

  6. Meal conditions affect the absorption of supplemental vitamin D3 but not the plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D response to supplementation.

    PubMed

    Dawson-Hughes, Bess; Harris, Susan S; Palermo, Nancy J; Ceglia, Lisa; Rasmussen, Helen

    2013-08-01

    It is sometimes assumed that dietary fat is required for vitamin D absorption, although the impact of different amounts of dietary fat on vitamin D absorption is not established. This study was conducted to determine whether the presence of a meal and the fat content of the meal influences vitamin D absorption or the 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] response to supplemental vitamin D3 . Based on earlier studies in rats we postulated that absorption would be greatest in the low-fat meal group. Sixty-two healthy older men and women were randomly assigned to one of three meal groups: no meal, high-fat meal, or low-fat meal; each was given a monthly 50,000 IU vitamin D3 supplement with the test breakfast meal (or after a fast for the no-meal group) and followed for 90 days. Plasma vitamin D3 was measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC/MS) before and 12 hours after the first dose; plasma 25(OH)D was measured by radioimmunoassay at baseline and after 30 and 90 days. The mean 12-hour increments in vitamin D3 , after adjusting for age and sex, were 200.9 nmol/L in the no-meal group, 207.4 nmol/L in the high-fat meal group, and 241.1 nmol/L in the low-fat meal group (p = 0.038), with the increase in the low-fat group being significantly greater than the increases in the other two groups. However, increments in 25(OH)D levels at 30 and 90 days did not differ significantly in the three groups. We conclude that absorption was increased when a 50,000 IU dose of vitamin D was taken with a low-fat meal, compared with a high-fat meal and no meal, but that the greater absorption did not result in higher plasma 25(OH)D levels in the low-fat meal group.

  7. Programming Effects of Prenatal Glucocorticoid Exposure with a Postnatal High-Fat Diet in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Hsieh, Chih-Sung; Tain, You-Lin; Li, Shih-Wen; Yu, Hong-Ren; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Tiao, Miao-Meng; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Huang, Li-Tung

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that many chronic diseases originate from early life, even before birth, through what are termed as fetal programming effects. Glucocorticoids are frequently used prenatally to accelerate the maturation of the lungs of premature infants. High-fat diets are associated with insulin resistance, but the effects of prenatal glucocorticoid exposure plus a postnatal high-fat diet in diabetes mellitus remain unclear. We administered pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats’ intraperitoneal dexamethasone (0.1 mg/kg body weight) or vehicle at gestational days 14–20. Male offspring were administered a normal or high-fat diet starting from weaning. We assessed the effects of prenatal steroid exposure plus postnatal high-fat diet on the liver, pancreas, muscle and fat at postnatal day 120. At 15 and 30 min, sugar levels were higher in the dexamethasone plus high-fat diet (DHF) group than the vehicle plus high-fat diet (VHF) group in the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT). Serum insulin levels at 15, 30 and 60 min were significantly higher in the VHF group than in the vehicle and normal diet group. Liver insulin receptor and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase mRNA expressions and protein levels were lower in the DHF group. Insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1 mRNA expressions were lower in the epididymal adipose tissue in the VHF and DHF groups. “Programming” of liver or epididymal adipose tissue resulted from prenatal events. Prenatal steroid exposure worsened insulin resistance in animals fed a high-fat diet. PMID:27070590

  8. Response of immature bone-ligament junction to a high-fat-sucrose diet.

    PubMed

    Li, K C; Zernicke, R F; Barnard, R J; Li, A F

    1993-05-01

    A high-fat-sucrose diet can adversely affect calcium absorption, and thus bone-ligament junction strength may be compromised. To test this premise we examined the influence of a high-fat-sucrose diet on the femur-medial collateral ligament-tibia complex of rats. The mechanics and geometry of this bone-ligament-bone complex were measured, and the histomorphometry of the distal bone-ligament junction (tibial-medial collateral ligament) was examined. After 10 weeks the high-fat-sucrose and control (low-fat, complex-carbohydrate) diet groups showed no difference in medial collateral ligament cross-sectional area, but the mechanical integrity of high-fat-sucrose bone-ligament-bone complex was significantly less than the controls; for example, the maximum and failure loads were significantly less (30%) with the high-fat-sucrose diet. Cell density was also significantly less in the medial collateral ligaments of those rats on the high-fat-sucrose diet. Diets with relatively high proportions of fat and sucrose are not uncommon in North American and European nations, but little is known about the effects that these diets may have on growing bone and fibrous connective tissues. The results from the current study provide both a caution and a stimulus. The caution arises from the pronounced and adverse effects that a diet rich in fat and sucrose can have on the mechanical properties and structure of bone-ligament junctions in growing animals. The stimulus provided by these results is to examine the long-term consequences of such a diet on bone-ligament integrity and to assess the implications of a high-fat-sucrose diet for humans. Copyright © 1993. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Programming Effects of Prenatal Glucocorticoid Exposure with a Postnatal High-Fat Diet in Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Hsieh, Chih-Sung; Tain, You-Lin; Li, Shih-Wen; Yu, Hong-Ren; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Tiao, Miao-Meng; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Huang, Li-Tung

    2016-04-08

    Increasing evidence has shown that many chronic diseases originate from early life, even before birth, through what are termed as fetal programming effects. Glucocorticoids are frequently used prenatally to accelerate the maturation of the lungs of premature infants. High-fat diets are associated with insulin resistance, but the effects of prenatal glucocorticoid exposure plus a postnatal high-fat diet in diabetes mellitus remain unclear. We administered pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats' intraperitoneal dexamethasone (0.1 mg/kg body weight) or vehicle at gestational days 14-20. Male offspring were administered a normal or high-fat diet starting from weaning. We assessed the effects of prenatal steroid exposure plus postnatal high-fat diet on the liver, pancreas, muscle and fat at postnatal day 120. At 15 and 30 min, sugar levels were higher in the dexamethasone plus high-fat diet (DHF) group than the vehicle plus high-fat diet (VHF) group in the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT). Serum insulin levels at 15, 30 and 60 min were significantly higher in the VHF group than in the vehicle and normal diet group. Liver insulin receptor and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase mRNA expressions and protein levels were lower in the DHF group. Insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1 mRNA expressions were lower in the epididymal adipose tissue in the VHF and DHF groups. "Programming" of liver or epididymal adipose tissue resulted from prenatal events. Prenatal steroid exposure worsened insulin resistance in animals fed a high-fat diet.

  10. Bolus Estimation—Rethinking the Effect of Meal Fat Content

    PubMed Central

    Laxminarayan, Srinivas; Reifman, Jaques; Edwards, Stephanie S.; Wolpert, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Traditionally, insulin bolus calculations for managing postprandial glucose levels in individuals with type 1 diabetes rely solely on the carbohydrate content of a meal. However, recent studies have reported that other macronutrients in a meal can alter the insulin required for good postprandial control. Specifically, studies have shown that high-fat (HF) meals require more insulin than low-fat (LF) meals with identical carbohydrate content. Our objective was to assess the mechanisms underlying the higher insulin requirement observed in one of these studies. Materials and Methods: We used a combination of previously validated metabolic models to fit data from a study comparing HF and LF dinners with identical carbohydrate content in seven subjects with type 1 diabetes. For each subject and dinner type, we estimated the model parameters representing the time of peak meal-glucose appearance (τm), insulin sensitivity (SI), the net hepatic glucose balance, and the glucose effect at zero insulin in four time windows (dinner, early night, late night, and breakfast) and assessed the differences in model parameters via paired Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results: During the HF meal, the τm was significantly delayed (mean and standard error [SE]: 102 [14] min vs. 71 [4] min; P = 0.02), and SI was significantly lower (7.25 × 10−4 [1.29 × 10−4] mL/μU/min vs. 8.72 × 10−4 [1.08 × 10−4] mL/μU/min; P = 0.02). Conclusions: In addition to considering the putative delay in gastric emptying associated with HF meals, we suggest that clinicians reviewing patient records consider that the fat content of these meals may alter SI. PMID:26270134

  11. High-fat diet induces cardiac remodelling and dysfunction: assessment of the role played by SIRT3 loss.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Heng; Vaka, Venkata Ramana; He, Xiaochen; Booz, George W; Chen, Jian-Xiong

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in obesity-induced cardiac impairment. SIRT3 is a mitochondrial protein associated with increased human life span and metabolism. This study investigated the functional role of SIRT3 in obesity-induced cardiac dysfunction. Wild-type (WT) and SIRT3 knockout (KO) mice were fed a normal diet (ND) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 16 weeks. Body weight, fasting glucose levels, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, myocardial capillary density, cardiac function and expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α/-2α were assessed. HFD resulted in a significant reduction in SIRT3 expression in the heart. Both HFD and SIRT3 KO mice showed increased ROS formation, impaired HIF signalling and reduced capillary density in the heart. HFD induced cardiac hypertrophy and impaired cardiac function. SIRT3 KO mice fed HFD showed greater ROS production and a further reduction in cardiac function compared to SIRT3 KO mice on ND. Thus, the adverse effects of HFD on cardiac function were not attributable to SIRT3 loss alone. However, HFD did not further reduce capillary density in SIRT3 KO hearts, implicating SIRT3 loss in HFD-induced capillary rarefaction. Our study demonstrates the importance of SIRT3 in preserving heart function and capillary density in the setting of obesity. Thus, SIRT3 may be a potential therapeutic target for obesity-induced heart failure.

  12. High-fat diet induces cardiac remodelling and dysfunction: assessment of the role played by SIRT3 loss

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Heng; Vaka, Venkata Ramana; He, Xiaochen; Booz, George W; Chen, Jian-Xiong

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in obesity-induced cardiac impairment. SIRT3 is a mitochondrial protein associated with increased human life span and metabolism. This study investigated the functional role of SIRT3 in obesity-induced cardiac dysfunction. Wild-type (WT) and SIRT3 knockout (KO) mice were fed a normal diet (ND) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 16 weeks. Body weight, fasting glucose levels, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, myocardial capillary density, cardiac function and expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α/-2α were assessed. HFD resulted in a significant reduction in SIRT3 expression in the heart. Both HFD and SIRT3 KO mice showed increased ROS formation, impaired HIF signalling and reduced capillary density in the heart. HFD induced cardiac hypertrophy and impaired cardiac function. SIRT3 KO mice fed HFD showed greater ROS production and a further reduction in cardiac function compared to SIRT3 KO mice on ND. Thus, the adverse effects of HFD on cardiac function were not attributable to SIRT3 loss alone. However, HFD did not further reduce capillary density in SIRT3 KO hearts, implicating SIRT3 loss in HFD-induced capillary rarefaction. Our study demonstrates the importance of SIRT3 in preserving heart function and capillary density in the setting of obesity. Thus, SIRT3 may be a potential therapeutic target for obesity-induced heart failure. PMID:25782072

  13. Single vegetable meal content equivalence as an alternative to fat for satiety: a randomised trial in Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Chisaki; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Katayama, Takafumi; Taketani, Yutaka; Takeda, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Although high energy density foods are highly palatable, their overconsumption leads to obesity because of high fat content. Low energy density foods are more effective for preventing individuals from becoming overweight. We investigated how different amounts of a single vegetable affect the sensory properties of meals with different energy densities. In a randomized crossover design, 40 young Japanese women consumed control and high-fat (HF) lunches. Control meals contained the same amount of rice and hamburger and 80 g (C80), 120 g (C120), 160 g (C160), 200 g (C200), 240 g (C240), or 280 g (C280) of broccoli. HF meals were control meals to which 38.1 g of oil was added (HF80, HF120, HF160, HF200, HF240, and HF280). Sensory properties before intake and 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 h after meals were assessed using a visual analog scale. Fullness was significantly lower with C80 than with C200 and C280 at 0.5 h and all time points, respectively, after consumption. In contrast, satisfaction with all HF meals was similar at all time points. Fullness and satisfaction were higher with almost all HF meals than with control meals; however, fullness and satisfaction were similar between HF200 and all control meals 1-4 h after consumption. Fat increases satiety when a single vegetable is included in the meal; however, at least of 200 g of vegetable in a 500- kcal meal with low fat content provides fullness and satisfaction similar to those provided by an HF meal.

  14. Lack of suppression of circulating free fatty acids and hypercholesterolemia during weight loss on a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Teri L; Sutherland, Julie P; Wolfe, Pamela; Allian-Sauer, Marybeth; Capell, Warren H; Talley, Natalie D; Wyatt, Holly R; Foster, Gary D; Hill, James O; Eckel, Robert H

    2010-03-01

    Little is known about the comparative effect of weight-loss diets on metabolic profiles during dieting. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of a low-carbohydrate diet (< or =20 g/d) with a high-carbohydrate diet (55% of total energy intake) on fasting and hourly metabolic variables during active weight loss. Healthy, obese adults (n = 32; 22 women, 10 men) were randomly assigned to receive either a carbohydrate-restricted diet [High Fat; mean +/- SD body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)): 35.8 +/- 2.9] or a calorie-restricted, low-fat diet (High Carb; BMI: 36.7 +/- 4.6) for 6 wk. A 24-h in-patient feeding study was performed at baseline and after 6 wk. Glucose, insulin, free fatty acids (FFAs), and triglycerides were measured hourly during meals, at regimented times. Remnant lipoprotein cholesterol was measured every 4 h. Patients lost a similar amount of weight in both groups (P = 0.57). There was an absence of any diet treatment effect between groups on fasting triglycerides or on remnant lipoprotein cholesterol, which was the main outcome. Fasting insulin decreased (P = 0.03), and both fasting (P = 0.040) and 24-h FFAs (P < 0.0001) increased within the High Fat group. Twenty-four-hour insulin decreased (P < 0.05 for both groups). Fasting LDL cholesterol decreased in the High Carb group only (P = 0.003). In both groups, the differences in fasting and 24-h FFAs at 6 wk were significantly correlated with the change in LDL cholesterol (fasting FFA: r = 0.41, P = 0.02; 24-h FFA: r = 0.52, P = 0.002). Weight loss was similar between diets, but only the high-fat diet increased LDL-cholesterol concentrations. This effect was related to the lack of suppression of both fasting and 24-h FFAs.

  15. Mouse Maternal High-Fat Intake Dynamically Programmed mRNA m⁶A Modifications in Adipose and Skeletal Muscle Tissues in Offspring.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Yang, Jing; Zhu, Youbo; Liu, Yuan; Shi, Xin'e; Yang, Gongshe

    2016-08-19

    Epigenetic mechanisms have an important role in the pre- and peri-conceptional programming by maternal nutrition. Yet, whether or not RNA m⁶A methylation-an old epigenetic marker receiving increased attention recently-is involved remains an unknown question. In this study, mouse high-fat feeding prior to conception was shown to induce overweight and glucose intolerant dams, which then continued to be exposed to a high-fat diet during gestation and lactation. The dams on a standard diet throughout the whole experiment were used as a control. Results showed that maternal high-fat intake impaired postnatal growth in male offspring, indicated by decreased body weight and Lee's index at 3, 8 and 15 weeks old, but the percentages of visceral fat and tibialis anterior relative to the whole body weights were significantly increased at eight weeks of age. The maternal high-fat exposure significantly increased mRNA N⁶-methyladenosine (m⁶A) levels in visceral fat at three weeks old, combined with downregulated Fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO) and upregulated Methyltransferase like 3 (METTL3) transcription, and these changes were reversed at eight weeks of age. In the tibialis anterior muscle, the maternal high-fat diet significantly enhanced m⁶A modifications at three weeks, and lowered m⁶A levels at 15 weeks of age. Accordingly, FTO transcription was significantly inhibited at three weeks and stimulated at 15 weeks of age, and METTL3 transcripts were significantly improved at three weeks. Interestingly, both FTO and METTL3 transcription was significantly elevated at eight weeks of age, and yet the m⁶A modifications remained unchanged. Our study showed that maternal high-fat intake could affect mRNA m⁶A modifications and its related genes in offspring in a tissue-specific and development-dependent way, and provided an interesting indication of the working of the m⁶A system during the transmission from maternal nutrition to subsequent generations.

  16. Mouse Maternal High-Fat Intake Dynamically Programmed mRNA m6A Modifications in Adipose and Skeletal Muscle Tissues in Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao; Yang, Jing; Zhu, Youbo; Liu, Yuan; Shi, Xin’e; Yang, Gongshe

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms have an important role in the pre- and peri-conceptional programming by maternal nutrition. Yet, whether or not RNA m6A methylation—an old epigenetic marker receiving increased attention recently—is involved remains an unknown question. In this study, mouse high-fat feeding prior to conception was shown to induce overweight and glucose intolerant dams, which then continued to be exposed to a high-fat diet during gestation and lactation. The dams on a standard diet throughout the whole experiment were used as a control. Results showed that maternal high-fat intake impaired postnatal growth in male offspring, indicated by decreased body weight and Lee’s index at 3, 8 and 15 weeks old, but the percentages of visceral fat and tibialis anterior relative to the whole body weights were significantly increased at eight weeks of age. The maternal high-fat exposure significantly increased mRNA N6-methyladenosine (m6A) levels in visceral fat at three weeks old, combined with downregulated Fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO) and upregulated Methyltransferase like 3 (METTL3) transcription, and these changes were reversed at eight weeks of age. In the tibialis anterior muscle, the maternal high-fat diet significantly enhanced m6A modifications at three weeks, and lowered m6A levels at 15 weeks of age. Accordingly, FTO transcription was significantly inhibited at three weeks and stimulated at 15 weeks of age, and METTL3 transcripts were significantly improved at three weeks. Interestingly, both FTO and METTL3 transcription was significantly elevated at eight weeks of age, and yet the m6A modifications remained unchanged. Our study showed that maternal high-fat intake could affect mRNA m6A modifications and its related genes in offspring in a tissue-specific and development-dependent way, and provided an interesting indication of the working of the m6A system during the transmission from maternal nutrition to subsequent generations. PMID:27548155

  17. Krill Oil Ameliorates Mitochondrial Dysfunctions in Rats Treated with High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Conte, Annalea; Zara, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several studies focused their attention on the role of dietary fats in the pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis. It has been demonstrated that a high-fat diet is able to induce hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, obesity, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. On the other hand, krill oil, a novel dietary supplement of n-3 PUFAs, has the ability to improve lipid and glucose metabolism, exerting possible protective effects against hepatic steatosis. In this study we have investigated the effects of krill oil on mitochondrial energetic metabolism in animals fed a high-fat diet. To this end, male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups and fed for 4 weeks with a standard diet (control group), a diet with 35% fat (HF group), or a high-fat diet supplemented with 2.5% krill oil (HF+KO group). The obtained results suggest that krill oil promotes the burning of fat excess introduced by the high-fat diet. This effect is obtained by stimulating mitochondrial metabolic pathways such as fatty acid oxidation, Krebs cycle, and respiratory chain complexes activity. Modulation of the expression of carrier proteins involved in mitochondrial uncoupling was also observed. Overall, krill oil counteracts the negative effects of a high-fat diet on mitochondrial energetic metabolism.

  18. Effect of high-fat diet, surrounding temperature, and enterostatin on uncoupling protein gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rippe, C; Berger, K; Böiers, C; Ricquier, D; Erlanson-Albertsson, C

    2000-08-01

    Nonshivering thermogenesis induced in brown adipose tissue (BAT) during high-fat feeding is mediated through uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). UCP2 is a recently identified homologue found in many tissues. To determine the role of UCP1 and UCP2 in thermoregulation and energy balance, we investigated the long-term effect of high-fat feeding on mRNA levels in mice at two different ambient temperatures. We also treated mice with the anorectic peptide enterostatin and compared mRNA levels in BAT, white adipose tissue (WAT), stomach, and duodenum. Here, we report that high-fat feeding at 23 degrees C increased UCP1 and UCP2 levels in BAT four- and threefold, respectively, and increased UCP2 levels fourfold in WAT. However, at 29 degrees C, UCP1 decreased, whereas UCP2 remained unchanged in BAT and increased twofold in WAT. Enterostatin increased UCP1 and decreased UCP2 mRNA in BAT. In stomach and duodenum, high-fat feeding decreased UCP2 mRNA, whereas enterostatin increased it. Our results suggest that the regulation of uncoupling protein mRNA levels by high-fat feeding is dependent on ambient temperature and that enterostatin is able to modulate it.

  19. Telmisartan prevents high-fat diet-induced hypertension and decreases perirenal fat in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaping; Song, Yan; Suo, Meng; Jin, Xin; Tian, Gang

    2012-01-01

    We sought to investigate the effects of telmisartan on high-fat diet-induced hypertension and to explore the possible underlying mechanisms. Rats receiving high-fat diet were randomly divided into two groups, the telmisartan group (n = 9) and the high-fat diet group (n = 10). The control group consisted of age-matched rats on a regular diet (n = 10). At the end of the treatment, the body weight, blood pressure, insulin sensitivity and serum adiponectin levels of all rats were examined, and their visceral fat was extracted and weighed. Our results showed that telmisartan improved insulin resistance and dyslipidemia and increased serum adiponectin levels. Telmisartan also lowered both systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, and decreased the accumulation of perirenal fat associated with high-fat diet. Furthermore, telmisartan increased adiponectin mRNA expression in the perirenal fat. Correlation analysis showed that both systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure were positively correlated with perirenal fat. These effects of telmisartan may be mediated through decreases in perirenal fat and contributed to the improvement of perirenal fat function. Our findings suggested a strong link between perirenal fat and high-fat diet-induced hypertension, and identified telmisartan as a potential drug for the treatment of obesity-related hypertension. PMID:23554752

  20. Ameliorating effect of Allium Sativum on high-fat diet induced fatty liver in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Qamar, Aisha; Usmani, Ambreen; Waqar, Humera; Siddiqui, Asma; Kumar, Hemant

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the hepatoprotective effect provided by fresh garlic on fatty liver induced by high-fat diet. Methods: This experimental study was carried out at BMSI, JPMC from October to November 2008. Thirty adult albino rats, 200-240 gram weight, were divided into three groups. Group A received control diet, Group B received high-fat diet (20 mg butter/100 gm diet) and Group C received high-fat diet with fresh garlic (20 mg butter with 6 gm fresh garlic/100 gm diet). The groups were further divided on the basis of duration of treatment, four weeks and eight weeks respectively. The rats were sacrificed, liver removed, weighed and relative liver weight calculated. Hepatic tissue was processed and tissue slides stained with haematoxylin and eosin. Results: There was significant increase in relative liver weight in group B animals as compared to the control animals, which decreased significantly in group C. Haematoxylin and eosin stained sections revealed ballooned hepatocytes having vesicular appearance with pyknotic nuclei in high-fat group which were preserved to a great extent in group C animals. Conclusion: This study has shown that use of fresh garlic along with high-fat diet prevents its damaging effects on liver to a great extent. PMID:27182249

  1. Krill Oil Ameliorates Mitochondrial Dysfunctions in Rats Treated with High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Conte, Annalea; Zara, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several studies focused their attention on the role of dietary fats in the pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis. It has been demonstrated that a high-fat diet is able to induce hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, obesity, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. On the other hand, krill oil, a novel dietary supplement of n-3 PUFAs, has the ability to improve lipid and glucose metabolism, exerting possible protective effects against hepatic steatosis. In this study we have investigated the effects of krill oil on mitochondrial energetic metabolism in animals fed a high-fat diet. To this end, male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups and fed for 4 weeks with a standard diet (control group), a diet with 35% fat (HF group), or a high-fat diet supplemented with 2.5% krill oil (HF+KO group). The obtained results suggest that krill oil promotes the burning of fat excess introduced by the high-fat diet. This effect is obtained by stimulating mitochondrial metabolic pathways such as fatty acid oxidation, Krebs cycle, and respiratory chain complexes activity. Modulation of the expression of carrier proteins involved in mitochondrial uncoupling was also observed. Overall, krill oil counteracts the negative effects of a high-fat diet on mitochondrial energetic metabolism. PMID:26301251

  2. Low Carbohydrate/High Fat Diet Attenuates Pressure Overload Induced Ventricular Remodeling and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Duda, Monika K.; O’Shea, Karen M.; Lei, Biao; Barrows, Brian R.; Azimzadeh, Agnes M.; McElfresh, Tracy E.; Hoit, Brian D.; Kop, Willem J.; Stanley, William C.

    2009-01-01

    Background It is not known how carbohydrate and fat intake impact the development of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and contractile dysfunction in response to pressure overload. We hypothesized that a low carbohydrate/high fat diet prevents LV hypertrophy and dysfunction compared to high carbohydrate diets. Methods and Results Rats were fed high carbohydrate diets comprised of either starch or sucrose, or a low carbohydrate/high fat diet, and underwent abdominal aortic banding (AAB) for two months. AAB increased LV mass with all diets. LV end diastolic and systolic volumes, and the ratio of the mRNA for myosin heavy chainβ/α were increased with both high carbohydrate diets, but not with the low carbohydrate/high fat diet. Circulating levels of insulin and leptin, both stimulants for cardiac growth, were lower, and free fatty acids higher, with the low carbohydrate/high fat diet compared to high carbohydrate diets. Among AAB animals LV volumes were positively correlated with insulin, and LV mass correlated with leptin. Conclusion A low carbohydrate/high fat diet attenuated pressure overload-induced LV remodeling compared to high carbohydrate diets. This effect corresponded to lower insulin and leptin concentrations, suggesting they may contribute to the development of LV hypertrophy and dysfunction under conditions of pressure overload. PMID:18474346

  3. Effect of Chlorella vulgaris on lipid metabolism in Wistar rats fed high fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Sun; Park, Hoon Jung

    2008-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate effects of Chlorella vulgaris on lipid metabolism in rats fed high fat diet. Sixty 6-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into two groups; normal diet group and high fat diet group, then the rats in each group were further divided into three subgroups and fed 0%, 5% and 10% (w/w) chlorella-containing diets, respectively, and raised for 9 weeks. Serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity and total protein and albumin concentration were not different among groups. Serum total lipids and liver TG concentration were significantly lower in 5% and 10% chlorella groups than 0% chlorella group in high fat diet groups (p<0.05). Serum TG, serum total cholesterol, liver total lipid and liver total cholesterol concentrations were significantly lower in 10% chlorella groups than 0% chlorella group in high fat diet groups (p<0.05). Fecal total lipid, TG and total cholesterol excretions were significantly higher in 5% and 10% chlorella groups than 0% chlorella groups in normal diet and high fat diet groups, respectively (p<0.05). These results suggest that Chlorella vulgaris is effective for prevention of dyslipidemia which may be due to the modulation of lipid metabolism and increased fecal excretion of lipid. PMID:20016720

  4. Neonatal overfeeding attenuates acute central pro-inflammatory effects of short-term high fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Guohui; Dinan, Tara; Barwood, Joanne M.; De Luca, Simone N.; Soch, Alita; Ziko, Ilvana; Chan, Stanley M. H.; Zeng, Xiao-Yi; Li, Songpei; Molero, Juan; Spencer, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal obesity predisposes individuals to obesity throughout life. In rats, neonatal overfeeding also leads to early accelerated weight gain that persists into adulthood. The phenotype is associated with dysfunction in a number of systems including paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) responses to psychological and immune stressors. However, in many cases weight gain in neonatally overfed rats stabilizes in early adulthood so the animal does not become more obese as it ages. Here we examined if neonatal overfeeding by suckling rats in small litters predisposes them to exacerbated metabolic and central inflammatory disturbances if they are also given a high fat diet in later life. In adulthood we gave the rats normal chow, 3 days, or 3 weeks high fat diet (45% kcal from fat) and measured peripheral indices of metabolic disturbance. We also investigated hypothalamic microglial changes, as an index of central inflammation, as well as PVN responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Surprisingly, neonatal overfeeding did not predispose rats to the metabolic effects of a high fat diet. Weight changes and glucose metabolism were unaffected by the early life experience. However, short term (3 day) high fat diet was associated with more microglia in the hypothalamus and a markedly exacerbated PVN response to LPS in control rats; effects not seen in the neonatally overfed. Our findings indicate neonatally overfed animals are not more susceptible to the adverse metabolic effects of a short-term high fat diet but may be less able to respond to the central effects. PMID:25628527

  5. Dynamics of insulin signalling in liver during hyperinsulinemic euglycaemic clamp conditions in vivo and the effects of high-fat feeding in male mice.

    PubMed

    Korsheninnikova, E; Voshol, P J; Baan, B; van der Zon, G C M; Havekes, L M; Romijn, J A; Maassen, J A; Ouwens, D M

    2007-01-01

    Insulin is an important regulator of hepatic carbohydrate, lipid, and protein metabolism, and the regulation of these processes by insulin is disturbed under conditions of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Despite these alterations, the impact of insulin resistance on insulin signalling in the liver is not well defined. Variations in time and dose of insulin stimulation as well as plasma glucose levels may underlie this. The present study aimed at determining the dynamics of activation of hepatic insulin signalling in vivo at insulin concentrations resembling those achieved after a meal, and addressing the effects of high-fat feeding. An unexpected finding of this study was the biphasic activation pattern of the IRS-PI3K-PKB/Akt pathway. Our findings indicate that the first burst of activation contributes to regulation of glucose metabolism. The physiological function of the second peak is still unknown, but may involve regulation of protein synthesis. Finally, high-fat feeding caused hepatic insulin resistance, as illustrated by a reduced suppression of hepatic glucose production. A sustained increased phosphorylation of the serine/threonine kinases p70S6kinase and Jun N-terminal kinase in the absence of insulin may underlie the abrogated phosphorylation of the IRS proteins and their downstream targets.

  6. Whey protein isolate counteracts the effects of a high-fat diet on energy intake and hypothalamic and adipose tissue expression of energy balance-related genes.

    PubMed

    McAllan, Liam; Keane, Deirdre; Schellekens, Harriët; Roche, Helen M; Korpela, Riitta; Cryan, John F; Nilaweera, Kanishka N

    2013-12-14

    The intake of whey protein isolate (WPI) is known to reduce high-fat diet (HFD)-induced body-weight gain and adiposity. However, the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. To this end, we fed C57BL/6J mice for 8 weeks with diets containing 10 % energy as fat (low-fat diet, LFD) or 45 % energy as fat (HFD) enriched with either 20 % energy as casein (LFD and HFD) or WPI (high-fat WPI). Metabolic parameters and the hypothalamic and epididymal adipose tissue expression of energy balance-related genes were investigated. The HFD increased fat mass and plasma leptin levels and decreased the dark-phase energy intake, meal number, RER, and metabolic (VO₂ and heat) and locomotor activities compared with the LFD. The HFD increased the hypothalamic tissue mRNA expression of the leptin receptor, insulin receptor (INSR) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1b (CPT1b). The HFD also reduced the adipose tissue mRNA expression of GLUT4 and INSR. In contrast, WPI reduced fat mass, normalised dark-phase energy intake and increased meal size in HFD-fed mice. The dietary protein did not have an impact on plasma leptin, insulin, glucose or glucagon-like peptide 1 levels, but increased plasma TAG levels in HFD-fed mice. At a cellular level, WPI significantly reduced the HFD-associated increase in the hypothalamic tissue mRNA expression of the leptin receptor, INSR and CPT1b. Also, WPI prevented the HFD-induced reduction in the adipose tissue mRNA expression of INSR and GLUT4. In comparison with casein, the effects of WPI on energy intake and hypothalamic and adipose tissue gene expression may thus represent a state of reduced susceptibility to weight gain on a HFD.

  7. Purple Sweet Potato Attenuate Weight Gain in High Fat Diet Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Ju, Ronghui; Zheng, Shujuan; Luo, Hongxia; Wang, Changgang; Duan, Lili; Sheng, Yao; Zhao, Changhui; Xu, Wentao; Huang, Kunlun

    2017-03-01

    Purple sweet potato (PSP) is widely grown in Asia and considered as a healthy vegetable. The objective of the current study was to determine the anti-obesity effect of the PSP on high fat diet induced obese C57BL/6J mice. The mice were administrated with high fat diet supplemented with the sweet potato (SP) or PSP at the concentration of 15% and 30% for 12 wk, respectively. The results showed that the supplementation of SP or PSP at 30% significantly ameliorated high fat diet induced obesity and its associated risk factors, including reduction of body weight and fat accumulation, improvement of lipid profile and modulation of energy expenditure. Moreover, PSP also posed beneficial effect on the liver and kidney functions. These results indicate that PSP and SP have anti-obesity effect and are effective to reduce the metabolic risk.

  8. Tissue-specific expression of Sprouty1 in mice protects against high-fat diet-induced fat accumulation, bone loss and metabolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Urs, Sumithra; Henderson, Terry; Le, Phuong; Rosen, Clifford J; Liaw, Lucy

    2012-09-28

    We recently characterised Sprouty1 (Spry1), a growth factor signalling inhibitor as a regulator of marrow progenitor cells promoting osteoblast differentiation at the expense of adipocytes. Adipose tissue-specific Spry1 expression in mice resulted in increased bone mass and reduced body fat, while conditional knockout of Spry1 had the opposite effect with decreased bone mass and increased body fat. Because Spry1 suppresses normal fat development, we tested the hypothesis that Spry1 expression prevents high-fat diet-induced obesity, bone loss and associated lipid abnormalities, and demonstrate that Spry1 has a long-term protective effect on mice fed a high-energy diet. We studied diet-induced obesity in mice with fatty acid binding promoter-driven expression or conditional knockout of Spry1 in adipocytes. Phenotyping was performed by whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, microCT, histology and blood analysis. In conditional Spry1-null mice, a high-fat diet increased body fat by 40 %, impaired glucose regulation and led to liver steatosis. However, overexpression of Spry1 led to 35 % (P < 0·05) lower body fat, reduced bone loss and normal metabolic function compared with single transgenics. This protective phenotype was associated with decreased circulating insulin (70 %) and leptin (54 %; P < 0·005) compared with controls on a high-fat diet. Additionally, Spry1 expression decreased adipose tissue inflammation by 45 %. We show that conditional Spry1 expression in adipose tissue protects against high-fat diet-induced obesity and associated bone loss.

  9. Chronic high-fat diet-induced obesity decreased survival and increased hypertrophy of rats with experimental eccentric hypertrophy from chronic aortic regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Dhahri, Wahiba; Drolet, Marie-Claude; Roussel, Elise; Couet, Jacques; Arsenault, Marie

    2014-09-24

    The composition of a diet can influence myocardial metabolism and development of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). The impact of a high-fat diet in chronic left ventricular volume overload (VO) causing eccentric LVH is unknown. This study examined the effects of chronic ingestion of a high-fat diet in rats with chronic VO caused by severe aortic valve regurgitation (AR) on LVH, function and on myocardial energetics and survival. Male Wistar rats were divided in four groups: Shams on control or high-fat (HF) diet (15 rats/group) and AR rats fed with the same diets (ARC (n = 56) and ARHF (n = 32)). HF diet was started one week before AR induction and the protocol was stopped 30 weeks later. As expected, AR caused significant LV dilation and hypertrophy and this was exacerbated in the ARHF group. Moreover, survival in the ARHF group was significantly decreased compared the ARC group. Although the sham animals on HF also developed significant obesity compared to those on control diet, this was not associated with heart hypertrophy. The HF diet in AR rats partially countered the expected shift in myocardial energy substrate preference usually observed in heart hypertrophy (from fatty acids towards glucose). Systolic function was decreased in AR rats but HF diet had no impact on this parameter. The response to HF diet of different fatty acid oxidation markers as well as the increase in glucose transporter-4 translocation to the plasma membrane compared to ARC was blunted in AR animals compared to those on control diet. HF diet for 30 weeks decreased survival of AR rats and worsened eccentric hypertrophy without affecting systolic function. The expected adaptation of myocardial energetics to volume-overload left ventricle hypertrophy in AR animals seemed to be impaired by the high-fat diet suggesting less metabolic flexibility.

  10. Longitudinal study of the effects of a high-fat diet on glucose regulation, hippocampal function, and cerebral insulin sensitivity in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Mielke, John G; Nicolitch, Katarina; Avellaneda, Vanessa; Earlam, Karen; Ahuja, Tarun; Mealing, Geoffrey; Messier, Claude

    2006-12-15

    Although the increasing rate of obesity has stimulated interest in the effects of diet composition on peripheral systems, comparatively little work has been done to examine effects upon the brain. A diet high in fat is one of many factors that can promote obesity, and previous research has shown that such a diet can produce learning and memory impairment in rodents. In the present study, C57BL/6 mice were placed on either a high-fat (45% kcal fat) or regular (5% kcal fat) diet, and examined at different points during the subsequent year. The high-fat diet led to increased weight gain, significant impairment in glucoregulation, and altered insulin-mediated signaling within the hippocampus, an area of the brain believed to be important for the acquisition of memory. Following ten months on either diet, synaptic function in ex vivo hippocampal slices was examined, and neither stimulus-response curves nor electrically induced long-term potentiation were found to be different. As well, performance in the Morris water maze, a hippocampal-dependent test of spatial memory, was not influenced by diet. However, mice consuming a high-fat diet failed to perform an operant bar-pressing task, indicating a significant impairment to procedural learning and consolidation processes. Despite causing broad peripheral changes in C57BL/6 mice, consuming a large proportion of calories from saturated fat had only a limited effect upon learning and memory, which suggests that certain aspects of brain function are selectively vulnerable to the influences of diet.

  11. Postexercise High-Fat Feeding Suppresses p70S6K1 Activity in Human Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Kelly M; Impey, Samuel G; Currell, Kevin; Mitchell, Nigel; Shepherd, Sam O; Jeromson, Stewart; Hawley, John A; Close, Graeme L; Hamilton, Lee D; Sharples, Adam P; Morton, James P

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of reduced CHO but high postexercise fat availability on cell signaling and expression of genes with putative roles in regu