Science.gov

Sample records for high-field proton magnetic

  1. High-field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals metabolic effects of normal brain aging.

    PubMed

    Harris, Janna L; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Swerdlow, Russell H; Choi, In-Young; Lee, Phil; Brooks, William M

    2014-07-01

    Altered brain metabolism is likely to be an important contributor to normal cognitive decline and brain pathology in elderly individuals. To characterize the metabolic changes associated with normal brain aging, we used high-field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo to quantify 20 neurochemicals in the hippocampus and sensorimotor cortex of young adult and aged rats. We found significant differences in the neurochemical profile of the aged brain when compared with younger adults, including lower aspartate, ascorbate, glutamate, and macromolecules, and higher glucose, myo-inositol, N-acetylaspartylglutamate, total choline, and glutamine. These neurochemical biomarkers point to specific cellular mechanisms that are altered in brain aging, such as bioenergetics, oxidative stress, inflammation, cell membrane turnover, and endogenous neuroprotection. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy may be a valuable translational approach for studying mechanisms of brain aging and pathology, and for investigating treatments to preserve or enhance cognitive function in aging.

  2. Multicomponent analysis of radiolytic products in human body fluids using high field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grootveld, Martin C.; Herz, Herman; Haywood, Rachel; Hawkes, Geoffrey E.; Naughton, Declan; Perera, Anusha; Knappitt, Jacky; Blake, David R.; Claxson, Andrew W. D.

    1994-05-01

    High field proton Hahn spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been employed to investigate radiolytic damage to biomolecules present in intact human body fluids. γ-Radiolysis of healthy or rheumatoid human serum (5.00 kGy) in the presence of atmospheric O 2 gave rise to reproducible elevations in the concentration of NMR-detectable acetate which are predominantly ascribable to the prior oxidation of lactate to pyruvate by hydroxyl radical (·OH) followed by oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate by radiolytically-generated hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2) and/or further ·OH radical. Increases in the serum levels of non-protein-bound, low-molecular-mass components such as citrate and glutamine were also observed subsequent to γ-radiolysis, an observation which may reflect their mobilisation from protein binding-sites by ·OH radical, superoxide anion and/or H 2O 2. Moreover, substantial radiolytically-mediated elevations in the concentration of serum formate were also detectable. In addition to the above modifications, γ-radiolysis of inflammatory knee-joint synovial fluid (SF) generated a low-molecular-mass oligosaccharide species derived from the radiolytic fragmentation of hyaluronate. The radiolytically-mediated production of acetate in SF samples was markedly greater than that observed in serum samples, a consequence of the much higher levels of ·OH radical-scavenging lactate present. Indeed, increases in SF acetate concentration were detectable at doses as low as 48 Gy. We conclude that high field proton NMR analysis provides much useful information regarding the relative radioprotectant abilities of endogenous components and the nature, status and levels of radiolytic products generated in intact biofluids. We also suggest that NMR-detectable radiolytic products with associated toxicological properties (e.g. formate) may play a role in contributing to the deleterious effects observed following exposure of living organisms to sources of

  3. High field superconducting magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  4. Space applications of superconductivity - High field magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fickett, F. R.

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses developments in superconducting magnets and their applications in space technology. Superconducting magnets are characterized by high fields (to 15T and higher) and high current densities combined with low mass and small size. The superconducting materials and coil design are being improved and new high-strength composites are being used for magnet structural components. Such problems as maintaining low cooling temperatures (near 4 K) for long periods of time and degradation of existing high-field superconductors at low strain levels can be remedied by research and engineering. Some of the proposed space applications of superconducting magnets include: cosmic ray analysis with magnetic spectrometers, energy storage and conversion, energy generation by magnetohydrodynamic and thermonuclear fusion techniques, and propulsion. Several operational superconducting magnet systems are detailed.

  5. Single-layer high field dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim V. Kashikhin and Alexander V. Zlobin

    2001-07-30

    Fermilab is developing high field dipole magnets for post-LHC hadron colliders. Several designs with a nominal field of 10-12 T, coil bore size of 40-50 mm based on both shell-type and block-type coil geometry are currently under consideration. This paper presents a new approach to magnet design, based on simple and robust single-layer coils optimized for the maximum field, good field quality and minimum number of turns.

  6. Strain sensors for high field pulse magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Christian; Zheng, Yan; Easton, Daniel; Farinholt, Kevin M; Park, Gyuhae

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present an investigation into several strain sensing technologies that are being considered to monitor mechanical deformation within the steel reinforcement shells used in high field pulsed magnets. Such systems generally operate at cryogenic temperatures to mitigate heating issues that are inherent in the coils of nondestructive, high field pulsed magnets. The objective of this preliminary study is to characterize the performance of various strain sensing technologies at liquid nitrogen temperatures (-196 C). Four sensor types are considered in this investigation: fiber Bragg gratings (FBG), resistive foil strain gauges (RFSG), piezoelectric polymers (PVDF), and piezoceramics (PZT). Three operational conditions are considered for each sensor: bond integrity, sensitivity as a function of temperature, and thermal cycling effects. Several experiments were conducted as part of this study, investigating adhesion with various substrate materials (stainless steel, aluminum, and carbon fiber), sensitivity to static (FBG and RFSG) and dynamic (RFSG, PVDF and PZT) load conditions, and sensor diagnostics using PZT sensors. This work has been conducted in collaboration with the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), and the results of this study will be used to identify the set of sensing technologies that would be best suited for integration within high field pulsed magnets at the NHMFL facility.

  7. 24 segment high field permanent sextupole magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliev, A.; Nelyubin, V.; Koptev, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Lorentz, B.; Marik, H. J.; Mikirtytchiants, M.; Nekipelov, M.; Rathmann, F.; Paetz gen. Schieck, H.; Seyfarth, H.; Steffens, E.

    2000-09-01

    We report on the design, construction, and magnetic field measurements of a system of high field sextupole magnets made from NdFeB compounds. The magnets are utilized as a focusing system for neutral hydrogen (or deuterium) atoms in a polarized atomic beam source based on Stern-Gerlach spin separation. Each magnet consists of 24 segments of permanently magnetized material differing in remanence and coercivity to reduce demagnetization. According to quadratic extrapolation to the pole tip the magnetic flux density reaches values of up to B0=1.69 T. Three-dimensional field calculations using the MAFIA code were carried out to optimize the magnet performance and to avoid demagnetization by selecting appropriate materials for the individual segments. Measurements of the radial, azimuthal, and longitudinal magnetic flux density distributions were carried out by means of a small Hall probe (100×200×15 μm3). The measurements with the small probe permitted to extract experimentally higher order multipole components very close (˜100 μm) to the inner surface. Experimental values obtained are compared to predictions based on MAFIA calculations and on the Halbach formalism.

  8. Comparing GABA-dependent physiological measures of inhibition with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurement of GABA using ultra-high-field MRI.

    PubMed

    Dyke, Katherine; Pépés, Sophia E; Chen, Chen; Kim, Soyoung; Sigurdsson, Hilmar P; Draper, Amelia; Husain, Masud; Nachev, Parashkev; Gowland, Penelope A; Morris, Peter G; Jackson, Stephen R

    2017-03-09

    Imbalances in glutamatergic (excitatory) and GABA (inhibitory) signalling within key brain networks are thought to underlie many brain and mental health disorders, and for this reason there is considerable interest in investigating how individual variability in localised concentrations of these molecules relate to brain disorders. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides a reliable means of measuring, in vivo, concentrations of neurometabolites such as GABA, glutamate and glutamine that can be correlated with brain function and dysfunction. However, an issue of much debate is whether the GABA observed and measured using MRS represents the entire pool of GABA available for measurement (i.e., metabolic, intracellular, and extracellular) or is instead limited to only some portion of it. GABA function can also be investigated indirectly in humans through the use of non-invasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) techniques that can be used to measure cortical excitability and GABA-mediated physiological inhibition. To investigate this issue further we collected in a single session both types of measurement, i.e., TMS measures of cortical excitability and physiological inhibition and ultra-high-field (7 T) MRS measures of GABA, glutamate and glutamine, from the left sensorimotor cortex of the same group of right-handed individuals. We found that TMS and MRS measures were largely uncorrelated with one another, save for the plateau of the TMS IO curve that was negatively correlated with MRS-Glutamate (Glu) and intra-cortical facilitation (10ms ISI) that was positively associated with MRS-Glutamate concentration. These findings are consistent with the view that the GABA concentrations measured using the MRS largely represent pools of GABA that are linked to tonic rather than phasic inhibition and thus contribute to the inhibitory tone of a brain area rather than GABAergic synaptic transmission.

  9. Structural alloys for high field superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1985-08-01

    Research toward structural alloys for use in high field superconducting magnets is international in scope, and has three principal objectives: the selection or development of suitable structural alloys for the magnet support structure, the identification of mechanical phenomena and failure modes that may influence service behavior, and the design of suitable testing procedures to provide engineering design data. This paper reviews recent progress toward the first two of these objectives. The structural alloy needs depend on the magnet design and superconductor type and differ between magnets that use monolithic and those that employ force-cooled or ICCS conductors. In the former case the central requirement is for high strength, high toughness, weldable alloys that are used in thick sections for the magnet case. In the latter case the need is for high strength, high toughness alloys that are used in thin welded sections for the conductor conduit. There is productive current research on both alloy types. The service behavior of these alloys is influenced by mechanical phenomena that are peculiar to the magnet environment, including cryogenic fatigue, magnetic effects, and cryogenic creep. The design of appropriate mechanical tests is complicated by the need for testing at 4/sup 0/K and by rate effects associated with adiabatic heating during the tests. 46 refs.

  10. Engineered Ceramic Insulators for High Field Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, J. A.

    2006-03-01

    High field magnet coils made from brittle A15 superconductors need to be rigidly contained by their support structure but yet be electrically insulated from it. Current insulators (end shoes, pole pieces, spacers, mandrels, etc.) are often made from coated metallic shapes that satisfy the mechanical and thermal requirements but are electrically unreliable. The insulating coating on the metal core too often chips or flakes, causing electrical shorts. Any replacement insulator materials must manage the thermal expansion mismatch to control the stress within the coil enabling the achievement of ultimate magnet performance. A novel ceramic insulator has been developed that eliminates the potential for shorting while maintaining high structural integrity and thermal performance. The insulator composition can be engineered to provide a thermal expansion that matches the coil expansion, minimizing detrimental stress on the superconductor. These ceramic insulators are capable of surviving high temperature heat treatments and are radiation resistant. The material can withstand high mechanical loads generated during magnet operation. These more robust insulators will lower the magnet production costs, which will help enable future devices to be constructed within budgetary restrictions.

  11. High field superconducting window-frame beam transport magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Allinger, J.; Carroll, A.; Danby, G.; Devito, B.; Jackson, J.; Leonhardt, W.; Prodell, A.; Skarita, J.

    1983-05-01

    The window-frame design for high field superconducting beam transport magnets was first applied to two, 2 m long, 4 T modules of an 8/sup 0/ bending magnet which has operated for nine years in the primary proton beam line at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). The design of two 1.5 m long, 7.6 cm cold bore superconducting window-frame magnets, described in this paper, intended for the external proton beam transport system at the AGS incorporated evolutionary changes. These magnets generated a maximum aperture field of 6.8 T with a peak field in the dipole coil of 7.1 T. Measured fields are very accurate and are compared to values calculated using the computer programs LINDA and POISSON. Results of quench propagation studies demonstrate the excellent thermal stability of the magnets. The magnets quench safely without energy extraction at a maximum current density, J = 130 kA/cm/sup 2/ in the superconductor, correspoding to J = 57.6 kA/cm/sup 2/ overall in the conductor at B = 6.7 T.

  12. High-field permanent-magnet structures

    SciTech Connect

    Leupoid, H.A.

    1989-08-29

    This patent describes a permanent magnet structure. It comprises an azimuthally circumscribed section of a hollow hemispherical magnetic flux source, the magnetic orientation in the section with respect to the polar axis being substantially equal to twice the polar angle, a superconducting planar sheet abutting one flat face of the section along a longitudinal meridian, and at least one other planar sheet of selected material abutting another flat face of the section and perpendicular to the first-mentioned sheet.

  13. High Field Pulse Magnets with New Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Lesch, B.; Cochran, V. G.; Eyssa, Y.; Tozer, S.; Mielke, C. H.; Rickel, D.; van Sciver, S. W.; Schneider-Muntau, H. J.

    2004-11-01

    High performance pulse magnets using the combination of CuNb conductor and Zylon fiber composite reinforcement with bore sizes of 24, 15 and 10 mm have been designed, manufactured and tested to destruction. The magnets successfully reached the peak fields of 64, 70 and 77.8 T respectively with no destruction. Failures occurred near the end flanges at the layer. The magnet design, manufacturing and testing, and the mode of the failure are described and analyzed.

  14. High-field superconducting nested coil magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laverick, C.; Lobell, G. M.

    1970-01-01

    Superconducting magnet, employed in conjunction with five types of superconducting cables in a nested solenoid configuration, produces total, central magnetic field strengths approaching 70 kG. The multiple coils permit maximum information on cable characteristics to be gathered from one test.

  15. High-Field Superconducting Magnets Supporting PTOLEMY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Ann; Luo, Audrey; Osherson, Benjamin; Gentile, Charles; Tully, Chris; Cohen, Adam

    2013-10-01

    The Princeton Tritium Observatory for Light, Early Universe, Massive Neutrino Yield (PTOLEMY) is an experiment planned to collect data on Big Bang relic neutrinos, which are predicted to be amongst the oldest and smallest particles in the universe. Currently, a proof-of-principle prototype is being developed at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to test key technologies associated with the experiment. A prominent technology in the experiment is the Magnetic Adiabatic Collimation with an Electrostatic Filter (MAC-E filter), which guides tritium betas along magnetic field lines generated by superconducting magnets while deflecting those of lower energies. B field mapping is performed to ensure the magnets produce a minimum field at the midpoint of the configuration of the magnets and to verify accuracy of existing models. Preliminary tests indicate the required rapid decrease in B field strength from the bore of the more powerful 3.35 T magnet, with the field dropping to 0.18 T approximately 0.5 feet from the outermost surface of the magnet.

  16. High Field Magnet Developments for the Future of High Field Compact Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, G.; Coppi, B.

    2014-10-01

    The adoption of ``All Superconducting Hybrid'' (ASH) magnets for the design of new high field confinement machines with relatively long plasma current pulses has been considered. These consist of MgB2 superconducting coils, in the outer portion of the magnet, that operate at about 10 K like those adopted for the Ignitor vertical field coils, but can produce up to 10 T as in the case of the hybrid magnet with a copper core under construction at Grenoble. In the case of the envisioned ASH magnets the inner core will be made of high temperature superconductors capable of operating at very high fields. The inclusion of advanced solutions such as that concerning the coupled toroidal magnet and central solenoid system for new advanced machines is envisioned. Sponsored in part by the US DOE.

  17. Conductor Development for High Field Dipole Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlan, R.M.; Dietderich, D.R.; Higley, H.C.

    2000-03-01

    Historically, improvements in dipole magnet performance have been paced by improvements in the superconductor available for use in these magnets. The critical conductor performance parameters for dipole magnets include current density, piece length, effective filament size, and cost. Each of these parameters is important for efficient, cost effective dipoles, with critical current density being perhaps the most important. Several promising magnet designs for the next hadron collider or a muon collider require fields of 12 T or higber, i.e. beyond the reach of NbTi. The conductor options include Nb{sub 3}Sn, Nb{sub 3}Al, or the high temperature superconductors. Although these conductors have the potential to provide the combination of performance and cost required, none of them have been developed sufficiently at this point to satisfy all the requirements. This paper will review the status of each class of advanced conductor and discuss the remaining problems that require solutions before these new conductors can be considered as practical. In particular, the plans for a new program to develop Nb{sub 3}Sn and Nb{sub 3}Al conductors for high energy physics applications will be presented. Also, the development of a multikiloamp Bi-2212 cable for dipole magnet applications will be reported.

  18. Ultra-high-field superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Hoard, R.W.; Cornish, D.N.; Scanlan, R.M.; Zbasnik, J.P.; Leber, R.L.; Hickman, R.B.; Lee, J.D.

    1983-08-01

    The following topics are considered: (1) superfluid helium for advanced magnets, (2) conductor reinforcement, (3) designing a 20-T, 2-m bore solenoidal coil, (4) coil size and conductor properties, (5) axial forces on the coil, (6) effect of radiation on the coil systems, and (7) helium-II transient heat transfer and coil protection. (MOW)

  19. A High Field Magnet Design for A Future Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.; Chow, K.; Dietderich, D.; Gourlay, S.; Millos, G.; McInturff, A.; Scanlan, R.

    1998-09-01

    US high energy physics community is exploring the possibilities of building a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) after the completion of LHC. This paper presents a high field magnet design option based on Nb{sub 3}Sn technology. A preliminary magnetic and mechanical design of a 14-16 T, 2-in-1 dipole based on the 'common coil design' approach is presented. The computer code ROXIE has been upgraded to perform the field quality optimization of magnets based on the racetrack coil geometry. A magnet R&D program to investigate the issues related to high field magnet designs is also outlined.

  20. High-field magnetization of Dy2O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    The magnetization of powdered samples of Dy2O3 has been measured at temperatures between 1.45 and 4.2 K, in applied magnetic fields ranging to 70 kilogauss. A linear dependence of magnetization on applied field is observable in the high-field region, the slope of which is independent of temperature over the range investigated. The extrapolated saturation magnetic moment is about 2.77 Bohr magnetons per ion.

  1. High-field magnetization of Dy2O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    The magnetization of powdered samples of Dy2O3 has been measured at temperatures between 1.45 deg and 4.2 K, in applied magnetic fields ranging to 7 Teslas. A linear dependence of magnetization on applied field is observable in high field region, the slope of which is independent of temperature over the range investigated. The extrapolated saturation magnetic moment is 2.77 + or - 0.08 Bohr magnetons per ion.

  2. A HIGH FIELD PULSED SOLENOID MAGNET FOR LIQUID METAL TARGET STUDIES.

    SciTech Connect

    KIRK,H.G.IAROCCI,M.SCADUTO,J.WEGGEL,R.J.MULHOLLAND,G.MCDONALD,K.T.

    2003-05-12

    The target system for a muon collider/neutrino factory requires the conjunction of an intense proton beam, a high-Z liquid target and a high-field solenoid magnet. We describe here the design parameters for a pulsed solenoid, including the magnet cryogenic system and power supply, that can generate transient fields of greater than 10T with a flat-tops on the order of 1 second. It is envisioned to locate this device at the Brookhaven AGS for proof-of-principle testing of a liquid-jet target system with pulses of le13 protons.

  3. Developments in materials for high-field magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, J.R.; Hill, M.A.; Walsh, R.P.

    1993-10-01

    Results of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory`s program of characterization of materials and fabrication techniques used in the construction of high-field pulsed magnets are reported. High-field pulsed magnets require conductors with high mechanical strength (750 MPa or greater YS at 77K) and high electrical conductivity (70% IACS or greater at RT). Electrical insulation and resin systems for vacuum impregnation with high compressive strength (500 MPa at 77K) and moderate thermal conductivity (1kW/mK at 77K) are also required. Developments and future plans for the characterization of new magnet material systems are discussed. Testing result are reported: Mechanical and fatigue testing, electrical conductivity testing and thermal expansion measurements of high strength, high conductivity conductors at cryogenic and room temperature, mechanical testing of a coil support material at cryogenic and room temperature, thermal expansion and thermal conductivity tests of an electrical insulating system at cryogenic temperatures.

  4. High-field Magnet Development toward the High Luminosity LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, Giorgio

    2014-07-01

    The upcoming Luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) will rely on the use of Accelerator Quality Nb3Sn Magnets which have been the focus of an intense R&D effort in the last decade. This contribution will describe the R&D and results of Nb3Sn Accelerator Quality High Field Magnets development efforts, with emphasis on the activities considered for the HL-LHC upgrades.

  5. National Program on High Field Accelerator Magnet R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, G.; Cooley, L.; Zlobin, A. V.; Caspi, S.; Gourlay, S.; Prestemon, S.; Larbalestier, D.; Gupta, R.; Wanderer, P.

    2014-09-26

    A National High-Field Magnet (HFM) Program is proposed as a thrust of the updated DOE-HEP General Accelerator R&D Program. The program responds to Recommendation 24 of the 2014 Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel (P5) Report.

  6. Magnetostructural transitions in a frustrated magnet at high fields.

    PubMed

    Tsurkan, V; Zherlitsyn, S; Felea, V; Yasin, S; Skourski, Yu; Deisenhofer, J; von Nidda, H-A Krug; Lemmens, P; Wosnitza, J; Loidl, A

    2011-06-17

    Ultrasound and magnetization studies of bond-frustrated ZnCr(2)S(4) spinel are performed in static magnetic fields up to 18 T and in pulsed fields up to 62 T. At temperatures below the antiferromagnetic transition at T(N1)≈14  K, the sound velocity as a function of the magnetic field reveals a sequence of steps followed by plateaus indicating a succession of crystallographic structures with constant stiffness. At the same time, the magnetization evolves continuously with a field up to full magnetic polarization without any plateaus in contrast to geometrically frustrated chromium oxide spinels. The observed high-field magnetostructural states are discussed within a H-T phase diagram taking into account the field and temperature evolution of three coexisting spin structures and subsequent lattice transformations induced by the magnetic field.

  7. High Field Magnet R&D in the USA

    SciTech Connect

    Gourlay, Stephen A.

    2003-06-24

    Accelerator magnet technology is currently dominated by the use of NbTi superconductor. New and more demanding applications for superconducting accelerator magnets require the use of alternative materials. Several programs in the US are taking advantage of recent improvements in Nb{sub 3}Sn to develop high field magnets for new applications. Highlights and challenges of the US R&D program are presented along with the status of conductor development. In addition, a new R&D focus, the US LHC Accelerator Research Program, will be discussed.

  8. High Field Magnet R&D in the USA

    SciTech Connect

    Gourlay, S.A.

    2003-10-01

    Accelerator magnet technology is currently dominated by the use of NbTi superconductor. New and more demanding applications for superconducting accelerator magnets require the use of alternative materials. Several programs in the US are taking advantage of recent improvements in Nb{sub 3}Sn to develop high field magnets for new applications. Highlights and challenges of the US R and D program are presented along with the status of conductor development. In addition, a new R and D focus, the US LHC Accelerator Research Program, will be discussed.

  9. High field magnetic resonance imaging of rodents in cardiovascular research.

    PubMed

    Vanhoutte, Laetitia; Gerber, Bernhard L; Gallez, Bernard; Po, Chrystelle; Magat, Julie; Jean-Luc, Balligand; Feron, Olivier; Moniotte, Stéphane

    2016-07-01

    Transgenic and gene knockout rodent models are primordial to study pathophysiological processes in cardiovascular research. Over time, cardiac MRI has become a gold standard for in vivo evaluation of such models. Technical advances have led to the development of magnets with increasingly high field strength, allowing specific investigation of cardiac anatomy, global and regional function, viability, perfusion or vascular parameters. The aim of this report is to provide a review of the various sequences and techniques available to image mice on 7-11.7 T magnets and relevant to the clinical setting in humans. Specific technical aspects due to the rise of the magnetic field are also discussed.

  10. Homogenous BSCCO-2212 Round Wires for Very High Field Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Scott Campbell Dr. Terry Holesinger Dr. Ybing Huang

    2012-06-30

    The performance demands on modern particle accelerators generate a relentless push towards higher field magnets. In turn, advanced high field magnet development places increased demands on superconducting materials. Nb3Sn conductors have been used to achieve 16 T in a prototype dipole magnet and are thought to have the capability for {approx}18 T for accelerator magnets (primarily dipoles but also higher order multipole magnets). However there have been suggestions and proposals for such magnets higher than 20 T. The High Energy Physics Community (HEP) has identified important new physics opportunities that are enabled by extremely high field magnets: 20 to 50 T solenoids for muon cooling in a muon collider (impact: understanding of neutrinos and dark matter); and 20+ T dipoles and quadrupoles for high energy hadron colliders (impact: discovery reach far beyond present). This proposal addresses the latest SBIR solicitation that calls for grant applications that seek to develop new or improved superconducting wire technologies for magnets that operate at a minimum of 12 Tesla (T) field, with increases up to 15 to 20 T sought in the near future (three to five years). The long-term development of accelerator magnets with fields greater than 20 T will require superconducting wires having significantly better high-field properties than those possessed by current Nb{sub 3}Sn or other A15 based wires. Given the existing materials science base for Bi-2212 wire processing, we believe that Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} (Bi-2212) round wires can be produced in km-long piece lengths with properties suitable to meet both the near term and long term needs of the HEP community. The key advance will be the translation of this materials science base into a robust, high-yield wire technology. While the processing and application of A15 materials have advanced to a much higher level than those of the copper oxide-based, high T{sub c} (HTS) counterparts, the HTS materials have

  11. High-field small animal magnetic resonance oncology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokacheva, Louisa; Ackerstaff, Ellen; LeKaye, H. Carl; Zakian, Kristen; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the applications of high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) to cancer studies in small animals. High-field MRI can provide information about tumor physiology, the microenvironment, metabolism, vascularity and cellularity. Such studies are invaluable for understanding tumor growth and proliferation, response to treatment and drug development. The MR techniques reviewed here include 1H, 31P, chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging and hyperpolarized 13C MRS as well as diffusion-weighted, blood oxygen level dependent contrast imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. These methods have been proven effective in animal studies and are highly relevant to human clinical studies.

  12. High field magnetic resonance imaging of normal and pathologic human medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Vandersteen, M; Beuls, E; Gelan, J; Adriaensens, P; Vanormelingen, L; Palmers, Y; Freling, G

    1994-02-01

    High field proton magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been applied to depict the MR appearance of the normal excised human cervicomedullary junction, based on which neuropathologic specimens can be described. More specifically, two normal cases and one case of Chiari deformity were imaged in the transverse, sagittal, and coronal dimensions using a 9.4 Tesla vertical bore magnet. The MR images of the normal specimens reveal most of the neuroanatomical microstructures described in literature. An accurate description of the Chiari deformity could be made by comparing the MR reference images with those of the pathologic specimen. All MR detected abnormalities were confirmed by histopathology, by which no additional lesions could be found.

  13. Towards Integrated Design and Modeling of High Field Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Ferracin, P.

    2006-06-01

    The next generation of superconducting accelerator magnets will most likely use a brittle conductor (such as Nb{sub 3}Sn), generate fields around 18 T, handle forces that are 3-4 times higher than in the present LHC dipoles, and store energy that starts to make accelerator magnets look like fusion magnets. To meet the challenge and reduce the complexity, magnet design will have to be more innovative and better integrated. The recent design of several high field superconducting magnets have now benefited from the integration between CAD (e.g. ProE), magnetic analysis tools (e.g. TOSCA) and structural analysis tools (e.g. ANSYS). Not only it is now possible to address complex issues such as stress in magnet ends, but the analysis can be better detailed an extended into new areas previously too difficult to address. Integrated thermal, electrical and structural analysis can be followed from assembly and cool-down through excitation and quench propagation. In this paper we report on the integrated design approach, discuss analysis results and point out areas of future interest.

  14. Stepped Impedance Resonators for High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Akgun, Can E.; DelaBarre, Lance; Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Sohn, Sung-Min; Snyder, Carl J.; Adriany, Gregor; Ugurbil, Kamil; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multi-element volume radio-frequency (RF) coils are an integral aspect of the growing field of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In these systems, a popular volume coil of choice has become the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) multi-element transceiver coil consisting of microstrip resonators. In this paper, to further advance this design approach, a new microstrip resonator strategy in which the transmission line is segmented into alternating impedance sections referred to as stepped impedance resonators (SIRs) is investigated. Single element simulation results in free space and in a phantom at 7 tesla (298 MHz) demonstrate the rationale and feasibility of the SIR design strategy. Simulation and image results at 7 tesla in a phantom and human head illustrate the improvements in transmit magnetic field, as well as, RF efficiency (transmit magnetic field versus SAR) when two different SIR designs are incorporated in 8-element volume coil configurations and compared to a volume coil consisting of microstrip elements. PMID:23508243

  15. Stepped impedance resonators for high-field magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Akgun, Can E; DelaBarre, Lance; Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Sohn, Sung-Min; Snyder, Carl J; Adriany, Gregor; Ugurbil, Kamil; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Multi-element volume radio-frequency (RF) coils are an integral aspect of the growing field of high-field magnetic resonance imaging. In these systems, a popular volume coil of choice has become the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) transceiver coil consisting of microstrip resonators. In this paper, to further advance this design approach, a new microstrip resonator strategy in which the transmission line is segmented into alternating impedance sections, referred to as stepped impedance resonators (SIRs), is investigated. Single-element simulation results in free space and in a phantom at 7 T (298 MHz) demonstrate the rationale and feasibility of the SIR design strategy. Simulation and image results at 7 T in a phantom and human head illustrate the improvements in a transmit magnetic field, as well as RF efficiency (transmit magnetic field versus specific absorption rate) when two different SIR designs are incorporated in 8-element volume coil configurations and compared to a volume coil consisting of microstrip elements.

  16. Ultra-high field magnets for whole-body MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Rory

    2016-09-01

    For whole-body MRI, an ultra-high field (UHF) magnet is currently defined as a system operating at 7 T or above. Over 70 UHF magnets have been built, all with the same technical approach originally developed by Magnex Scientific Ltd. The preferred coil configuration is a compensated solenoid. In this case, the majority of the field is generated by a simple long solenoid that stretches the entire length of the magnet. Additional coils are wound on a separate former outside the main windings with the purpose of balancing the homogeneity. Most of the magnets currently in operation are passively shielded systems where the magnet is surrounded by a steel box of 200-870 tonnes of carbon steel. More recently actively shielded magnets have been built for operation at 7 T; in this case the stray field is controlled by with reverse turns wound on a separate former outside the primary coils. Protection against quench damage is much more complex with an actively shielded magnet design due to the requirement to prevent the stray field from increasing during a quench. In the case of the 7 T 900 magnet this controlled by combining some of the screening coils into each section of the protection circuit. Correction of the field variations caused by manufacturing tolerances and environmental effects are made with a combination of superconducting shims and passive shims. Modern UHF magnets operate in zero boil-off mode with the use of cryocoolers with cooling capacity at 4.2 K. Although there are no cryogen costs associated with normal operation UHF magnets require a significant volume (10 000-20 000 l) of liquid helium for the cool-down. Liquid helium is expensive therefore new methods of cool-down using high-power cryocoolers are being implemented to reduce the requirement.

  17. Developments at the High Field Magnet Laboratory in Nijmegen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perenboom, J. A. A. J.; Maan, J. C.; van Breukelen, M. R.; Wiegers, S. A. J.; den Ouden, A.; Wulffers, C. A.; van der Zande, W. J.; Jongma, R. T.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Redlich, B.

    2013-03-01

    The High Field Magnet Laboratory at the Radboud University Nijmegen is rapidly expanding its capabilities. The developments encompass both organizational changes and new possibilities for research. The organization of the HFML was strengthened as a consequence of stronger participation of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), and an increase of the core-funding. This change makes that HFML is now considered on a national level as large research facility that operates at an international scale. At the same time work is underway to build new and powerful magnets, and provide electromagnetic radiation for magneto-spectroscopic studies. Electromagnetic radiation in the infrared and far-infrared spectrum will soon be available in the HFML with wavelengths between 3 μm and 1.5 mm, produced by the `FELIX' facility, comprising the long-wavelength free electron laser `FLARE' that in September 2011 produced its first light and the free electron lasers that have been moved from Rijnhuizen to Nijmegen. In magnet technology great strides are made to make magnets available for the user community with unprecedented performance: late in 2012 we hope to commission a new all-resistive magnet system that will generate a steady magnetic field as high as 38 T, by fully exploiting the maximum power of the installation, i.e. 20 MW, and using all available improvements in the design and construction of `Florida-Bitter' resistive magnets. We are also well underway with the design of a 45 T hybrid magnet system, using Nb3Sn superconductors and wind-and-react Cable-in-Conduit technology.

  18. Internal Stresses in Wires for High Field Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Han, K.; Embury, J.D.; Lawson, A.C.; Von Dreele, R.B.; Wood, J.T.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.

    1998-10-01

    The codeformation of Cu-Ag or Cu-Nb composite wires used for high field magnets has a number of important microstructural consequences, including the production of very fine scale structures, the development of very high internal surface area to volume ratios during the drawing and the storage of defects at interphase interfaces. In addition, the fabrication and codeformation of phases which differ in crystal structure, thermal expansion, elastic modulus and lattice parameter lead to the development of short wavelength internal stresses. These internal stresses are measured by neutron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy as a function of the imposed drawing strain. The internal stresses lead to important changes in elastic plastic response which can be related to both magnet design and service life and these aspects will be described in detail.

  19. High Field Small Animal Magnetic Resonance Oncology Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bokacheva, Louisa; Ackerstaff, Ellen; LeKaye, H. Carl; Zakian, Kristen; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the applications of high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) to cancer studies in small animals. High field MRI can provide information about tumor physiology, the microenvironment, metabolism, vascularity and cellularity. Such studies are invaluable for understanding tumor growth and proliferation, response to treatment and drug development. The MR techniques reviewed here include 1H, 31P, Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) imaging, and hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy as well as diffusion-weighted, Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging. These methods have been proven effective in animal studies and are highly relevant to human clinical studies. PMID:24374985

  20. High-field magnetic resonance imaging using solenoid radiofrequency coils.

    PubMed

    Vegh, Viktor; Gläser, Philipp; Maillet, Donald; Cowin, Gary J; Reutens, David C

    2012-10-01

    High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging using dedicated high-field radiofrequency micro-coils at 16.4 T (700 MHz) was investigated. Specific solenoid coils primarily using silver and copper as conductors with enamel and polyurethane coatings were built to establish which coil configuration produces the best image. Image quality was quantified using signal-to-noise ratio and signal variation over regions of interest. Benchmarking was conducted using 5-mm diameter coils, as this size is comparable to an established coil of the same size. Our 1.4-mm-diameter coils were compared directly to each other, from which we deduce performance as a function of conductor material and coating. A variety of materials and conductor coatings allowed us to choose an optimal design, which we used to image a kidney section at 10-micron resolution. We applied zero-fill extrapolation to achieve 5-micron resolution.

  1. High-field superconducting window-frame beam-transport magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Allinger, J.; Carroll, A.; Danby, G.; DeVito, B.; Jackson, J.; Leonhardt, W.; Prodell, A.; Skarita, J.

    1982-01-01

    The window-frame design for high-field superconducting beam-transport magnets was first applied to two, 2-m-long, 4-T modules of an 8/sup 0/ bending magent which has operated for nine years in the primary proton beam line at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). The design of two 1.5-m long, 7.6-cm cold-bore superconducting windowframe magnets, described in this paper, intended for the external proton beam transport system at the AGS incorporated evolutionary changes. These magnets generated a maximum aperture field of 6.8 T with a peak field in the dipole coil of 7.1 T. Measured fields are very accurate and are compared to values calculated using the computer programs LINDA and POISSON. Results of quench-propagation studies demonstrate the excellent thermal stability of the magnets. The magnets quench safely without energy extraction at a maximum current density, J = 130 kA/cm/sup 2/ in the superconductor, corresponding to J = 57.6 kA/cm/sup 2/ overall the conductor at B = 6.7 T.

  2. [Problems and chances of high field magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Ladd, M E; Bock, M

    2013-05-01

    The spatial, temporal and spectral resolution in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is in many cases currently not sufficient to detect submillimeter lesions or to image the dynamics of the beating heart. At present MRI systems at 1.5 T and 3 T are the standard units for clinical imaging. The use of ultrahigh magnetic fields of 7 T and higher increases the signal-to-noise ratio, which holds promise for a significant improvement of the spatial and/or temporal resolution as well as for new contrast mechanisms. With 7 T MRI, images of the brain have been acquired routinely with a spatial resolution of 0.3 mm. The theoretical improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio is often not fully realized due to B1 inhomogeneities and contrast variations. With MRI at 7 T a notable increase in spatial resolution can be achieved. Methods such as time-of-flight MR angiography and susceptibility-weighted imaging (e.g. neurofunctional MRI, fMRI) profit especially from the higher field strengths. Transmission field inhomogeneities are still a major challenge for ultrahigh field (UHF) MRI and are also a partially unsolved safety problem. The use of UHF MRI is currently limited to special applications and the expected gain of the high field must be weighed against technical limitations in both image acquisition and interpretation.

  3. High Field Magnetization measurements of uranium dioxide single crystals (P08358- E003-PF)

    SciTech Connect

    Gofryk, K.; Harrison, N.; Jaime, M.

    2014-12-01

    Our preliminary high field magnetic measurements of UO2 are consistent with a complex nature of the magnetic ordering in this material, compatible with the previously proposed non-collinear 3-k magnetic structure. Further extensive magnetic studies on well-oriented (<100 > and <111>) UO2 crystals are planned to address the puzzling behavior of UO2 in both antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic states at high fields.

  4. Advances in high-field magnetic resonance spectroscopy in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ningnannan; Song, Xiaowei; Bartha, Robert; Beyea, Steven; D'Arcy, Ryan; Zhang, Yunting; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2014-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) affects several important molecules in brain metabolism. The resulting neurochemical changes can be quantified non-invasively in localized brain regions using in vivo single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (SV 1H MRS). Although the often heralded diagnostic potential of MRS in AD largely remains unfulfilled, more recent use of high magnetic fields has led to significantly improved signal-to-noise ratios and spectral resolutions, thereby allowing clinical applications with increased measurement reliability. The present article provides a comprehensive review of SV 1H MRS studies on AD at high magnetic fields (3.0 Tesla and above). This review suggests that patterned regional differences and longitudinal alterations in several neurometabolites are associated with clinically established AD. Changes in multiple metabolites are identifiable even at early stages of AD development. By combining information of neurochemicals in different brain regions revealing either pathological or compensatory changes, high field MRS can be evaluated in AD diagnosis and in the detection of treatment effects. To achieve this, standardization of data acquisition and analytical approaches is needed.

  5. ADVANCED MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF CEREBRAL CAVERNOUS MALFORMATIONS: I. HIGH FIELD IMAGING OF EXCISED HUMAN LESIONS

    PubMed Central

    Shenkar, Robert; Venkatasubramanian, Palamadai N.; Zhao, Jin-cheng; Batjer, H. Hunt; Wyrwicz, Alice M.; Awad, Issam A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives We hypothesized that structural details would be revealed in cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) through the use of high field magnetic resonance (MR) and confocal microscopy, which have not been described previously. The structural details of CCMs excised from human patients were sought by examination with high field MR imaging, and correlated with confocal microscopy of the same specimens. Novel features of CCM structure are outlined, including methodological limitations, venues for future research and possible clinical implications. Methods CCM lesions excised from four patients were fixed in 2% paraformaldehyde and subjected to high resolution MR imaging at 9.4 or 14.1 Tesla by spin-echo and gradient recalled echo methods. Histological validation of angioarchitecture was conducted on thick sections of CCM lesions using fluorescent probes to endothelium under confocal microscopy. Results Images of excised human CCM lesions were acquired with proton density-weighted, T1-weighted, T2-weighted spin echo and T2*-weighted gradient-recalled echo MR. These images revealed large “bland” regions with thin walled caverns, and “honeycombed” regions with notable capillary proliferation and smaller caverns surrounding larger caverns. Proliferating capillaries and caverns of various sizes were also associated with the wall of apparent larger blood vessels in the lesions. Similar features were confirmed within thick sections of CCMs by confocal microscopy. MR relaxation times in different regions of interest suggested the presence of different states of blood breakdown products in areas with apparent angiogenic proliferative activity. Conclusions The high field MR imaging techniques demonstrate novel features of CCM angioarchitecture, visible at near histological resolution, including regions with apparently different biologic activity. These preliminary observations will motivate future research, correlating lesion biologic and clinical activity with

  6. Superconductor Requirements and Characterization for High Field Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Barzi, E.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2015-05-01

    The 2014 Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel (P5) strategic plan for U.S. High Energy Physics (HEP) endorses a continued world leadership role in superconducting magnet technology for future Energy Frontier Programs. This includes 10 to 15 T Nb3Sn accelerator magnets for LHC upgrades and a future 100 TeV scale pp collider, and as ultimate goal that of developing magnet technologies above 20 T based on both High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) and Low Temperature Superconductors (LTS) for accelerator magnets. To achieve these objectives, a sound conductor development and characterization program is needed and is herein described. This program is intended to be conducted in close collaboration with U.S. and International labs, Universities and Industry.

  7. Helical Dipole Magnets for Polarized Protons in RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syphers, M.; Courant, E.; Fischer, W.; Luccio, A.; Mariam, F.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Willen, E.; Katayama, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Kawaguchi, T.; Okamura, M.; Tominaka, T.; Wu, H.; Ptitsin, V.; Shatunov, Y.

    1997-05-01

    The Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) will be able to support experiments using polarized proton beams. Siberian Snakes are used to maintain polarization in this high energy superconducting collider. To make efficient use of available space while taking advantage of high field superconducting magnets, 4 Tesla helical dipole magnets will be used. These magnets generate a central dipole field in which the field direction rotates through 360^circ about the longitudinal axis over the length of the device. An arrangement of four such magnets can produce the desired change in the spin direction while keeping the proton orbit outside of the ``Snake'' unaltered. Similar magnet arrangements will be used to produce longitudinal polarization at the two major interaction points in RHIC. The basic requirements and layout of these magnets are described, as well as tolerances on field quality and integrated field strengths. First results of tests of prototype helical magnets will be discussed.

  8. Quasi permanent superconducting magnet of very high field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, Y.; Liu, J.; Weinstein, R.; Chen, I. G.; Parks, D.; Xu, J.; Obot, V.; Foster, C.

    1993-01-01

    We report on persistent field in a quasi-permanent magnet made of high temperature superconductor. The material has an average of 40 percent molar excess of Y, relative to Y1Ba2Cu3O7 and has been irradiated with high energy light ions at 200 MeV. The magnet, which traps 1.52 T at 77.3 K, traps nearly 4 T at 64.5 K. No evidence of giant flux jump or sample cracking was observed.

  9. Quasi permanent superconducting magnet of very high field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, Y.; Liu, J.; Weinstein, R.; Chen, I. G.; Parks, D.; Xu, J.; Obot, V.; Foster, C.

    1993-01-01

    We report on persistent field in a quasi-permanent magnet made of high temperature superconductor. The material has an average of 40 percent molar excess of Y, relative to Y1Ba2Cu3O7 and has been irradiated with high energy light ions at 200 MeV. The magnet, which traps 1.52 T at 77.3 K, traps nearly 4 T at 64.5 K. No evidence of giant flux jump or sample cracking was observed.

  10. 15 Years of R&D on high field accelerator magnets at FNAL

    DOE PAGES

    Barzi, Emanuela; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2016-07-01

    The High Field Magnet (HFM) Program at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) has been developing Nb3Sn superconducting magnets, materials and technologies for present and future particle accelerators since the late 1990s. This paper summarizes the main results of the Nb3Sn accelerator magnet and superconductor R&D at FNAL and outlines the Program next steps.

  11. Correlating Hemodynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging with high-field Intracranial Vessel Wall Imaging in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Weston; Donahue, Manus J.; van der Kolk, Anja G.; Rane, Swati; Strother, Megan K.

    2014-01-01

    Vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field (7 Tesla) can be used to visualize vascular lesions noninvasively and holds potential for improving stroke-risk assessment in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease. We present the first multi-modal comparison of such high-field vessel wall imaging with more conventional (i) 3 Tesla hemodynamic magnetic resonance imaging and (ii) digital subtraction angiography in a 69-year-old male with a left temporal ischemic infarct. PMID:25426229

  12. Correlating hemodynamic magnetic resonance imaging with high-field intracranial vessel wall imaging in stroke.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Weston; Donahue, Manus J; van der Kolk, Anja G; Rane, Swati; Strother, Megan K

    2014-06-01

    Vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field (7 Tesla) can be used to visualize vascular lesions noninvasively and holds potential for improving stroke-risk assessment in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease. We present the first multi-modal comparison of such high-field vessel wall imaging with more conventional (i) 3 Tesla hemodynamic magnetic resonance imaging and (ii) digital subtraction angiography in a 69-year-old male with a left temporal ischemic infarct.

  13. DOUBLE DEGENERATE MERGERS AS PROGENITORS OF HIGH-FIELD MAGNETIC WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Berro, Enrique; Loren-Aguilar, Pablo; Aznar-Siguan, Gabriela; Torres, Santiago; Camacho, Judit

    2012-04-10

    High-field magnetic white dwarfs have been long suspected to be the result of stellar mergers. However, the nature of the coalescing stars and the precise mechanism that produces the magnetic field are still unknown. Here, we show that the hot, convective, differentially rotating corona present in the outer layers of the remnant of the merger of two degenerate cores can produce magnetic fields of the required strength that do not decay for long timescales. Using a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo simulator, we also show that the expected number of high-field magnetic white dwarfs produced in this way is consistent with that found in the solar neighborhood.

  14. Quench Protection of High Field Nb{sub 3}Sn Magnets for VLHC

    SciTech Connect

    Linda Imbasciati et al.

    2001-07-30

    Fermilab is developing high field magnets for a possible future VLHC. The high levels of stored energy in these magnets present significant challenges to the magnet quench protection. Simulation programs have been developed and used to analyze temperature and voltage distributions during a quench and to performed parametric studies on conductor and quench-heater requirements. This paper concludes with a proposal for a set of quench protection parameters for the VLHC magnets.

  15. Magnetic optics for proton radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Mottershead, C.T.; Zumbro, J.D.

    1997-10-01

    High energy protons of 10 to 50 GeV can be used to radiograph dense objects. Because the transmitted beam particles undergo multiple coulomb scattering (MCS) in the object, a magnetic lens system is used to focus the particles exiting each point of the object onto a distant image plane. Without the lens, the MCS would seriously blur the radiographic image. Correlations can be introduced in the illuminating beam to cancel a major part of the chromatic and geometric aberrations in the lens, while providing locations inside the lens where the rays are sorted by MCS angle. This allows the introduction of angle cut apertures to aid material identification. The requirement for a matched multistage lens system with successively smaller angle-cut apertures leads to the use of minus-identity ({minus}I) lenses, in which the angle sorting is in the longitudinal mid plane of the lens, and the exit beam correlations are the same as the input correlations. A single stage {minus}I lens has been successfully tested at Brookhaven with 10-GeV protons and another is being used in dynamic experiments with 0.8-GeV protons at Los Alamos. The resolution achievable at higher energies is briefly surveyed.

  16. Chemical Principles Revisited. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how to interpret nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and how to use them to determine molecular structures. This discussion is limited to spectra that are a result of observation of only the protons in a molecule. This type is called proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectra. (CW)

  17. Chemical Principles Revisited. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how to interpret nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and how to use them to determine molecular structures. This discussion is limited to spectra that are a result of observation of only the protons in a molecule. This type is called proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectra. (CW)

  18. 15 Years of R&D on high field accelerator magnets at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Barzi, Emanuela; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2016-07-01

    The High Field Magnet (HFM) Program at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) has been developing Nb3Sn superconducting magnets, materials and technologies for present and future particle accelerators since the late 1990s. This paper summarizes the main results of the Nb3Sn accelerator magnet and superconductor R&D at FNAL and outlines the Program next steps.

  19. 15 Years of R&D on high field accelerator magnets at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Barzi, Emanuela; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2016-07-01

    The High Field Magnet (HFM) Program at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) has been developing Nb3Sn superconducting magnets, materials and technologies for present and future particle accelerators since the late 1990s. This paper summarizes the main results of the Nb3Sn accelerator magnet and superconductor R&D at FNAL and outlines the Program next steps.

  20. Nb3Sn High Field Magnets for the High Luminosity LHC Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosio, Giorgio

    2015-06-01

    The High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN requires a new generation of high field superconducting magnets. High field large aperture quadrupoles (MQXF) are needed for the low-beta triplets close to the ATLAS and CMS detectors, and high field two-in-one dipoles (11 T dipoles) are needed to make room for additional collimation. The MQXF quadrupoles, with a field gradient of 140 T/m in 150 mm aperture, have a peak coil field of 12.1 T at nominal current. The 11 T dipoles, with an aperture of 60 mm, have a peak coil field of 11.6 T at nominal current. Both magnets require Nb3Sn conductor and are the first applications of this superconductor to actual accelerator magnets.

  1. High-field magnetization and magnetic phase diagram of α -Cu2V2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitgeatpong, G.; Suewattana, M.; Zhang, Shiwei; Miyake, A.; Tokunaga, M.; Chanlert, P.; Kurita, N.; Tanaka, H.; Sato, T. J.; Zhao, Y.; Matan, K.

    2017-06-01

    High-field magnetization of the spin-1 /2 antiferromagnet α -Cu2V2O7 was measured in pulsed magnetic fields of up to 56 T in order to study its magnetic phase diagram. When the field was applied along the easy axis (the a axis), two distinct transitions were observed at Hc 1=6.5 T and Hc 2=18.0 T. The former is a spin-flop transition typical for a collinear antiferromagnet and the latter is believed to be a spin-flip transition of canted moments. The canted moments, which are induced by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions, anti-align for Hc 1magnetic susceptibility data. Contrary to our previous report in Phys. Rev. B 92, 024423 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.024423, the dominant exchange interaction is between the third nearest-neighbor spins, which form zigzag spin chains that are coupled with one another through an intertwining network of the nonnegligible nearest and second nearest-neighbor interactions. In addition, elastic neutron scattering under the applied magnetic fields of up to 10 T reveals the incommensurate helical spin structure in the spin-flop state.

  2. New high homogeneity 55T pulsed magnet for high field NMR.

    PubMed

    Orlova, A; Frings, P; Suleiman, M; Rikken, G L J A

    2016-07-01

    Pulsed magnets can produce magnetic fields largely exceeding those achieved with resistive or even hybrid magnets. This kind of magnet is indispensable in studies of field-induced phenomena which occur only in high magnetic field. A new high homogeneous pulsed magnet capable of producing field up to 55T and specially designed for NMR experiments was built and tested. Experimentally observed homogeneity of magnetic field in central part of the magnet is 10ppm over a sample volume of 2-3mm(3) at 12T and 30ppm at 47T, which are the best values ever reported for a pulsed magnet. Reasons which affect the field profile and reduce homogeneity at high field are discussed.

  3. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, F.; Hoard, R.W.

    1994-05-10

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla are disclosed. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field. 4 figures.

  4. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Hoard, Ronald W.

    1994-01-01

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field.

  5. The spheromak as a prototype for ultra-high-field superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.; Jardin, S.C.

    1987-08-01

    In view of current progress in the development of superconductor materials, the ultimate high-field limit of superconducting magnets is likely to be set by mechanical stress problems. Maximum field strength should be attainable by means of approximately force-free magnet windings having favorable ''MHD'' stability properties (so that small winding errors will not grow). Since a low-beta finite-flux-hole spheromak configuration qualifies as a suitable prototype, the theoretical and experimental spheromak research effort of the past decade has served to create a substantial technical basis for the design of ultra-high-field superconducting coils. 11 refs.

  6. High-field magnetization measurements on a ferromagnetic amorphous alloy from 295 to 5K

    SciTech Connect

    Szymczak, P. ); Graham, C.D. Jr. ); Gibbs, M.R.J. )

    1994-11-01

    Magnetization measurements on an amorphous ferromagnetic alloy Fe[sub 78](SiB)[sub 22] have been made over the temperature range from 5 to 295K and in fields to 5T, using a SQUID magnetometer and a superconducting magnet. As-received and field-annealed samples were measured. Having data over a range of temperatures allows the spin-wave contribution to the magnetization to be determined, and then subtracted. When the spin-wave contribution is removed, a substantial high-field susceptibility remains, which is independent of temperature. Attempts to fit the corrected curves to one of two theoretical equations were not conclusive, but the best fit seems to be to M = M[sub 0] + aH[sup [minus]0.5] + bH. The annealing treatment has no significant effect on the high-field magnetization.

  7. Development of High-Field Permanent Magnetic Circuits for NMRI/MRI and Imaging on Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangxin; Xie, Huantong; Hou, Shulian; Chen, Wei; Yang, Xiuhong

    2016-01-01

    The high-field permanent magnetic circuits of 1.2 T and 1.5 T with novel magnetic focusing and curved-surface correction are developed. The permanent magnetic circuit comprises a magnetic yoke, main magnetic steel, nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles, plugging magnetic steel, and side magnetic steel. In this work, a novel shimming method is proposed for the effective correction of base magnetic field (B 0) inhomogeneities, which is based on passive shimming on the telescope aspheric cutting, grinding, and fine processing technology of the nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles and active shimming adding higher-order gradient coils. Meanwhile, the magnetic resonance imaging dedicated alloy with high-saturation magnetic field induction intensity and high electrical resistivity is developed, and nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles which are made of the dedicated alloy have very good anti-eddy-current effect. In addition, the large temperature coefficient problem of permanent magnet can be effectively controlled by using a high quality temperature controller and deuterium external locking technique. Combining our patents such as gradient coil, RF coil, and integration computer software, two kinds of small animal Micro-MRI instruments are developed, by which the high quality MRI images of mice were obtained.

  8. Development of High-Field Permanent Magnetic Circuits for NMRI/MRI and Imaging on Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangxin; Xie, Huantong; Hou, Shulian; Chen, Wei; Yang, Xiuhong

    2016-01-01

    The high-field permanent magnetic circuits of 1.2 T and 1.5 T with novel magnetic focusing and curved-surface correction are developed. The permanent magnetic circuit comprises a magnetic yoke, main magnetic steel, nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles, plugging magnetic steel, and side magnetic steel. In this work, a novel shimming method is proposed for the effective correction of base magnetic field (B 0) inhomogeneities, which is based on passive shimming on the telescope aspheric cutting, grinding, and fine processing technology of the nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles and active shimming adding higher-order gradient coils. Meanwhile, the magnetic resonance imaging dedicated alloy with high-saturation magnetic field induction intensity and high electrical resistivity is developed, and nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles which are made of the dedicated alloy have very good anti-eddy-current effect. In addition, the large temperature coefficient problem of permanent magnet can be effectively controlled by using a high quality temperature controller and deuterium external locking technique. Combining our patents such as gradient coil, RF coil, and integration computer software, two kinds of small animal Micro-MRI instruments are developed, by which the high quality MRI images of mice were obtained. PMID:27034951

  9. Polywater: proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum.

    PubMed

    Page, T F; Jakobsen, R J; Lippincott, E R

    1970-01-02

    In the presence of water, the resonance of the strongly hydrogenbonded protons characteristic of polywater appears at 5 parts per million lower applied magnetic field than water. Polywater made by a new method confirms the infrared spectrum reported originally.

  10. Proton magnetic resonance spectrum of polywater.

    PubMed

    Petsko, G A

    1970-01-09

    With the aid of a time average computer, the proton magnetic resonance spectrum of anomalous water (polywater) is obtained. The spectrum conisists of a single broad resonance shifted approximately 300 hertz downfield from the resonance of ordinary water.

  11. Post-acceleration of laser driven protons with a compact high field linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinigardi, Stefano; Londrillo, Pasquale; Rossi, Francesco; Turchetti, Giorgio; Bolton, Paul R.

    2013-05-01

    We present a start-to-end 3D numerical simulation of a hybrid scheme for the acceleration of protons. The scheme is based on a first stage laser acceleration, followed by a transport line with a solenoid or a multiplet of quadrupoles, and then a post-acceleration section in a compact linac. Our simulations show that from a laser accelerated proton bunch with energy selection at ~ 30MeV, it is possible to obtain a high quality monochromatic beam of 60MeV with intensity at the threshold of interest for medical use. In the present day experiments using solid targets, the TNSA mechanism describes accelerated bunches with an exponential energy spectrum up to a cut-off value typically below ~ 60MeV and wide angular distribution. At the cut-off energy, the number of protons to be collimated and post-accelerated in a hybrid scheme are still too low. We investigate laser-plasma acceleration to improve the quality and number of the injected protons at ~ 30MeV in order to assure efficient post-acceleration in the hybrid scheme. The results are obtained with 3D PIC simulations using a code where optical acceleration with over-dense targets, transport and post-acceleration in a linac can all be investigated in an integrated framework. The high intensity experiments at Nara are taken as a reference benchmarks for our virtual laboratory. If experimentally confirmed, a hybrid scheme could be the core of a medium sized infrastructure for medical research, capable of producing protons for therapy and x-rays for diagnosis, which complements the development of all optical systems.

  12. A COMMON COIL DESIGN FOR HIGH FIELD 2 IN 1 ACCELERATOR MAGNETS.

    SciTech Connect

    GUPTA,R.

    2002-05-12

    A common coil design concept for 2-in-1 superconducting accelerator magnets is presented. It practically eliminates the major problems in the ends of high field magnets built with either high temperature superconductors (HTS) or conventional superconductors. Racetrack coils, consisting of rectangular blocks built with either superconducting tapes or cables, are common to both apertures with each aperture containing one half of each coil. The ends are easy to wind with the conductors experiencing little strain. The overall magnet design, construction and tooling are also expected to be simpler than in the conventional cosine theta magnets. The concept is also suitable for superferric and combined function magnet designs. A modular design for an HTS based R&D magnet is also presented.

  13. Quench problems of Nb3 Sn cosine theta high field dipole model magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Ryuji; Wake, Masayoshi; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2004-12-01

    We have developed and tested several cosine theta high field dipole model magnets for accelerator application, utilizing Nb{sub 3}Sn strands made by MJR method and PIT method. With Rutherford cables made with PIT strand we achieved 10.1 Tesla central field at 2.2 K operation, and 9.5 Tesla at 4.5 K operation. The magnet wound with the MJR cable prematurely quenched at 6.8 Tesla at 4.5 K due to cryo-instability. Typical quench behaviors of these magnets are described for both types of magnets, HFDA-04 of MJR and HFDA-05 of PIT. Their characteristics parameters are compared on d{sub eff}, RRR, thermal conductivity and others, together with other historical Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets. It is suggested a larger RRR value is essential for the stability of the epoxy impregnated high field magnets made with high current density strands. It is shown that a magnet with a larger RRR value has a longer MPZ value and more stable, due to its high thermal conductivity and low resistivity.

  14. Superconducting Magnet Technology for Future High Energy Proton Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourlay, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Interest in high field dipoles has been given a boost by new proposals to build a high-energy proton-proton collider to follow the LHC and programs around the world are taking on the task to answer the need. Studies aiming toward future high-energy proton-proton colliders at the 100 TeV scale are now being organized. The LHC and current cost models are based on technology close to four decades old and point to a broad optimum of operation using dipoles with fields between 5 and 12T when site constraints, either geographical or political, are not a factor. Site geography constraints that limit the ring circumference can drive the required dipole field up to 20T, which is more than a factor of two beyond state-of-the-art. After a brief review of current progress, the talk will describe the challenges facing future development and present a roadmap for moving high field accelerator magnet technology forward. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, High Energy Physics, US Department of Energy, under contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  15. Development of superconducting magnet for high-field MR systems in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zanming; van Oort, Johannes M.; Zou, Mark X.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we describe the development of superconducting magnets for high-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) by various businesses and institutions in China. As the Chinese MR market rapidly expands, many foreign and domestic companies and research institutions are joining the race to meet the burgeoning demand by developing key MRI components for various magnetic field configurations. After providing a brief introduction to research on MRI superconducting magnets that dates back to the 1980s, the first large-bore 1.5 T superconducting magnet with 50-cm DSV for whole-body MRI - successfully developed and manufactured by AllTech Medical Systems in Chengdu, China-is presented and its specifications are described.

  16. Retinotopic mapping in cat visual cortex using high-field functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Olman, Cheryl; Ronen, Itamar; Ugurbil, Kamil; Kim, Dae-Shik

    2003-12-30

    In the field of neuroscience, there has always been a need for imaging techniques that provide high-resolution, large field-of-view measurements of neural activity. Functional MRI has this capability, but the link between the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal and neural activity is indirect. High magnetic field strengths (>3 T) improve the strength and specificity of the BOLD signal, but there are additional concerns about imaging artifacts at high field. We have tested the capabilities of ultra high field fMRI in the anesthetized juvenile cat, demonstrating rapid, non-invasive retinotopic mapping of early visual areas. Maps of topographic organization and measured cortical magnification factors are in good agreement with electrophysiological studies. Measurement precision was estimated at 1 mm. This mapping, performed with an MRI scanner at ultra high field (9.4 T), demonstrates the capabilities of high-resolution functional mapping of the visual system at ultra high field.

  17. Research and Development of Wires and Cables for High-Field Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Barzi, Emanuela; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2016-04-01

    The latest strategic plans for High Energy Physics endorse steadfast superconducting magnet technology R&D for future Energy Frontier Facilities. This includes 10 to 16 T Nb3Sn accelerator magnets for the luminosity upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider and eventually for a future 100 TeV scale proton-proton (pp) collider. This paper describes the multi-decade R&D investment in the Nb3Sn superconductor technology, which was crucial to produce the first reproducible 10 to 12 T accelerator-quality dipoles and quadrupoles, as well as their scale-up. We also indicate prospective research areas in superconducting Nb3Sn wires and cables to achieve the next goals for superconducting accelerator magnets. Emphasis is on increasing performance and decreasing costs while pushing the Nb3Sn technology to its limits for future pp colliders.

  18. Research and Development of Nb3Sn Wires and Cables for High-Field Accelerator Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzi, Emanuela; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2016-04-01

    The latest strategic plans for high energy physics endorse steadfast superconducting magnet technology R&D for future energy frontier facilities. This includes 10 to 16 T Nb3Sn accelerator magnets for the luminosity upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider and eventually for a future 100 TeV-scale proton-proton (pp) collider. This paper describes the multi-decade R&D investment in the Nb3Sn superconductor technology, which was crucial to produce the first reproducible 10 to 12 T accelerator-quality dipoles and quadrupoles, as well as their scale-up. We also indicate prospective research areas in superconducting Nb3Sn wires and cables to achieve the next goals for superconducting accelerator magnets. Emphasis is on increasing performance and decreasing costs while pushing the Nb3Sn technology to its limits for future pp colliders.

  19. Project Overview of HTS Magnet for Ultra-high-field MRI System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosaka, Taizo; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Iwai, Sadanori; Otani, Yasumi; Takahashi, Masahiko; Tasaki, Kenji; Nomura, Shunji; Kurusu, Tsutomu; Ueda, Hiroshi; Noguchi, So; Ishiyama, Atsushi; Urayama, Shinichi; Fukuyama, Hidenao

    A project to develop an ultra-high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system based on HTS magnets using (RE)Ba2Cu3O7 (REBCO; RE=rear earth) coils is underway. The project is supported by the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry and aims to establish magnet technologies for a whole-body 9.4 T MRI system. REBCO wires have high critical current density in high magnetic fields and high strength against hoop stresses, and therefore, MRI magnets using REBCO coils are expected to have cryogenic systems that are smaller, lighter, and simpler than the conventional ones. A major problem in using REBCO coils for MRI magnets is the huge irregular magnetic field generated by the screening current in REBCO tapes. Thus, the main purpose of this project is to make the influence of this screening current predictable and controllable. Fundamental technologies, including treatment of the screening currents, were studied via experiments and numerical simulations using small coils. Two types of model magnets are planned to be manufactured, and the knowledge gained in the development of the model magnets will be reflected in the magnet design of a whole-body 9.4 T MRI system.

  20. High field superconducting magnets (12 T and greater) for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.R.; Summers, L.T.; Kerns, J.A.

    1986-07-09

    The technology for producing high fields in large superconducting magnets has increased greatly in recent years, but must increase still more in the future. In this paper, we examine the present state of the art vis-a-vis the needs of a next-generation fusion machine and outline a program to provide for those needs. We also highlight recent developments that suggest the program goals are within reach.

  1. Design of a High Field Nb3Al Common Coil Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Qingjin; Sasaki, Kenichi; Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Terashima, Akio; Tsuchiya, Kiyosumi; Yamamoto, Akira; Kikuchi, Akihiro; Takeuchi, Takao; Sabbi, GianLuca; Caspi, Shlomo; Ferracin, Paolo; Felice, Helene; Hafalia, Ray; Zlobin, Alexander; Barzi, Emauela; Yamada, Ryuji

    2009-10-19

    A high field Nb{sub 3}Al common coil magnet is under development as an R&D of 'Advanced Superconducting Magnets for the LHC Luminosity Upgrade', in the framework of the CERN-KEK cooperation program. The goal of this research is to demonstrate the feasibility of high field magnet wound with Nb{sub 3}Al cable. The common coil approach and the shell-based structure were adopted in the design of this magnet. Besides three Nb{sub 3}Al coils, two Nb{sub 3}Sn coils were included to increase the peak field of the whole magnet. The two types of coils were designed with different straight lengths to reduce the peak field of the Nb{sub 3}Sn coils. The peak fields of the Nb{sub 3}Al and Nb{sub 3}Sn coils are 13.1 T and 11.8 T respectively. An aluminum shell together with four aluminum rods applies stress to the coils to overcome the Lorenz force during excitation. Two different support structures for the superconducting coils were introduced in this paper. The development status is also presented.

  2. Formation of high-field magnetic white dwarfs from common envelopes.

    PubMed

    Nordhaus, Jason; Wellons, Sarah; Spiegel, David S; Metzger, Brian D; Blackman, Eric G

    2011-02-22

    The origin of highly magnetized white dwarfs has remained a mystery since their initial discovery. Recent observations indicate that the formation of high-field magnetic white dwarfs is intimately related to strong binary interactions during post-main-sequence phases of stellar evolution. If a low-mass companion, such as a planet, brown dwarf, or low-mass star, is engulfed by a post-main-sequence giant, gravitational torques in the envelope of the giant lead to a reduction of the companion's orbit. Sufficiently low-mass companions in-spiral until they are shredded by the strong gravitational tides near the white dwarf core. Subsequent formation of a super-Eddington accretion disk from the disrupted companion inside a common envelope can dramatically amplify magnetic fields via a dynamo. Here, we show that these disk-generated fields are sufficiently strong to explain the observed range of magnetic field strengths for isolated, high-field magnetic white dwarfs. A higher-mass binary analogue may also contribute to the origin of magnetar fields.

  3. Formation of high-field magnetic white dwarfs from common envelopes

    PubMed Central

    Nordhaus, Jason; Wellons, Sarah; Spiegel, David S.; Metzger, Brian D.; Blackman, Eric G.

    2011-01-01

    The origin of highly magnetized white dwarfs has remained a mystery since their initial discovery. Recent observations indicate that the formation of high-field magnetic white dwarfs is intimately related to strong binary interactions during post-main-sequence phases of stellar evolution. If a low-mass companion, such as a planet, brown dwarf, or low-mass star, is engulfed by a post-main-sequence giant, gravitational torques in the envelope of the giant lead to a reduction of the companion’s orbit. Sufficiently low-mass companions in-spiral until they are shredded by the strong gravitational tides near the white dwarf core. Subsequent formation of a super-Eddington accretion disk from the disrupted companion inside a common envelope can dramatically amplify magnetic fields via a dynamo. Here, we show that these disk-generated fields are sufficiently strong to explain the observed range of magnetic field strengths for isolated, high-field magnetic white dwarfs. A higher-mass binary analogue may also contribute to the origin of magnetar fields. PMID:21300910

  4. High Field Pulsed Magnets for Neutron Scattering at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granroth, G. E.; Lee, J.; Fogh, E.; Christensen, N. B.; Toft-Petersen, R.; Nojiri, H.

    2015-03-01

    A High Field Pulsed Magnet (HFPM) setup, is in use at the Spallation Nuetron Source(SNS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory. With this device, we recently measured the high field magnetic spin structure of LiNiPO4. The results of this study will be highlighted as an example of possible measurements that can be performed with this device. To further extend the HFPM capabilities at SNS, we have learned to design and wind these coils in house. This contribution will summarize the magnet coil design optimization procedure. Specifically by varying the geometry of the multi-layer coil, we arrive at a design that balances the maximum field strength, neutron scattering angle, and the field homogeneity for a specific set of parameters. We will show that a 6.3kJ capacitor bank, can provide a magnetic field as high as 30T for a maximum scattering angle around 40° with homogeneity of +/- 4 % in a 2mm diameter spherical volume. We will also compare the calculations to measurements from a recently wound test coil. This work was supported in part by the Lab Directors' Research and Development Fund of ORNL.

  5. Quantification of local geometric distortion in structural magnetic resonance images: Application to ultra-high fields.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jonathan C; Khan, Ali R; Zeng, Tony Y; MacDougall, Keith W; Parrent, Andrew G; Peters, Terry M

    2017-01-06

    Ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides superior visualization of brain structures compared to lower fields, but images may be prone to severe geometric inhomogeneity. We propose to quantify local geometric distortion at ultra-high fields in in vivo datasets of human subjects scanned at both ultra-high field and lower fields. By using the displacement field derived from nonlinear image registration between images of the same subject, focal areas of spatial uncertainty are quantified. Through group and subject-specific analysis, we were able to identify regions systematically affected by geometric distortion at air-tissue interfaces prone to magnetic susceptibility, where the gradient coil non-linearity occurs in the occipital and suboccipital regions, as well as with distance from image isocenter. The derived displacement maps, quantified in millimeters, can be used to prospectively evaluate subject-specific local spatial uncertainty that should be taken into account in neuroimaging studies, and also for clinical applications like stereotactic neurosurgery where accuracy is critical. Validation with manual fiducial displacement demonstrated excellent correlation and agreement. Our results point to the need for site-specific calibration of geometric inhomogeneity. Our methodology provides a framework to permit prospective evaluation of the effect of MRI sequences, distortion correction techniques, and scanner hardware/software upgrades on geometric distortion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. High-field magnetization of Heusler compound Fe2Mn1 -xVxSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroi, Masahiko; Tazoko, Tomoya; Sano, Hiroaki; Shigeta, Iduru; Koyama, Keiichi; Kondo, Akihiro; Kindo, Koich; Manaka, Hirotaka; Terada, Norio

    2017-01-01

    Fe2MnSi exhibits a ferromagnetic transition at TC˜230 K and another transition to a phase with antiferromagnetic components at TA˜60 K. By substituting V for Mn, so as to obtain Fe2Mn1 -xVxSi , TA is revealed to decrease with x and then vanish around x ˜0.2 . In this study, the phase boundary of the transition at TA in the high-field range is found for 0 ≤x ≤0.15 with pulsed fields up to ˜70 T. The magnetization of Fe2Mn1 -xVxSi slowly increases even at the highest field of ˜70 T, though it occurs more gradually as x increases. We compare the magnetization for 0 ≤x ≤0.20 at 62 T with the Slater-Pauling rule, which holds when a Heusler compound is a half-metal, and find fairly good agreement. This suggests an intimate relation between the high-field phase and the half-metallic electronic structure, and that at the high-field limit the phase approaches the half-metallic state, which has been predicted by band-structure calculations.

  7. Identification and minimization of sources of temporal instabilities in high field (>23 T) resistive magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soghomonian, Victoria; Sabo, M.; Powell, A.; Murphy, P.; Rosanske, Richard; Cross, T. A.; Schneider-Muntau, H. J.

    2000-07-01

    Resistive magnets offer very high field strengths, unmatched by superconducting technology. However, the spatial and temporal characteristics of raw magnetic fields generated by resistive high powered and water cooled magnets, are unadapted to most nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory has installed a 24 T (˜1 GHz 1H), 32 mm bore, 13 MW resistive magnet to study the feasibility of utilizing such fields for NMR applications. Herein we present our efforts in identifying, characterizing, and improving the temporal properties of the magnets. The temporal instabilities arise mainly from two sources: power supply ripple and inlet cooling water temperature variations. To compensate for power supply ripple, flux stabilization was employed, whereas for long term variations, arising from variations in the water temperature, a field frequency lock unit was utilized. Moreover, a novel flow based water temperature control scheme was implemented. The stabilization and improved control reduced the initial 16 ppm peak-to-peak variation to ˜2 ppm. Implementation of a field frequency lock unit further reduced the temporal variation to 0.8 ppm peak-to-peak. Sharp NMR linewidths — 1.7 ppm at full width at half height of 2H in liquid D2O — are observed in small volume samples, enabling moderate resolution NMR experiments to be performed at 24 T.

  8. High-field magnetic white dwarfs as the progeny of early-type stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbie, P. D.; Külebi, B.; Casewell, S. L.; Burleigh, M. R.; Parker, Q. A.; Baxter, R.; Lawrie, K. A.; Jordan, S.; Koester, D.

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the newly resolved components of two hot, double-degenerate systems, SDSS J074853.07+302543.5 + J074852.95+302543.4 and SDSS J150813.24+394504.9 + J150813.31+394505.6 (CBS 229). We confirm that each system has widely separated components (a > 100 au) consisting of a H-rich, non-magnetic white dwarf and a H-rich, high-field magnetic white dwarf (HFMWD). The masses of the non-magnetic degenerates are found to be larger than typical of field white dwarfs. We use these components to estimate the total ages of the binaries and demonstrate that both magnetic white dwarfs are the progeny of stars with Minit > 2 M⊙. We briefly discuss the traits of all known hot, wide, magnetic + non-magnetic double degenerates in the context of HFMWD formation theories. These are broadly consistent (chance probability, P ≈ 0.065) with HFMWDs forming primarily from early-type stars and, in the most succinct interpretation, link their magnetism to the fields of their progenitors. Our results do not, however, rule out that HFMWDs can form through close binary interactions and studies of more young, wide double degenerates are required to reach firm conclusions on these formation pathways.

  9. Characterization of Plasma Discharges in a High-Field Magnetic Tandem Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.

    1998-01-01

    High density magnetized plasma discharges in open-ended geometries, like Tandem Mirrors, have a variety of space applications. Chief among them is the production of variable Specific Impulse (I(sub sp)) and variable thrust in a magnetic nozzle. Our research group is pursuing the experimental characterization of such discharges in our high-field facility located at the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory (ASPL). These studies focus on identifying plasma stability criteria as functions of density, temperature and magnetic field strength. Plasma heating is accomplished by both Electron and Ion Cyclotron Resonance (ECR and ICR) at frequencies of 2-3 Ghz and 1-30 Mhz respectively, for both Hydrogen and Helium. Electron density and temperature has measured by movable Langmuir probes. Macroscopic plasma stability is being investigated in ongoing research.

  10. Cryogenic Design of the New High Field Magnet Test Facility at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benda, V.; Pirotte, O.; De Rijk, G.; Bajko, M.; Craen, A. Vande; Perret, Ph.; Hanzelka, P.

    In the framework of the R&D program related to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) upgrades, a new High Field Magnet (HFM) vertical test bench is required. This facility located in the SM18 cryogenic test hall shall allow testing of up to 15 tons superconducting magnets with energy up to 10 MJ in a temperature range between 1.9 K and 4.5 K. The article describes the cryogenic architecture to be inserted in the general infrastructure of SM18 including the process and instrumentation diagram, the different operating phases including strategy for magnet cool down and warm up at controlled speed and quench management as well as the design of the main components.

  11. Ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging of the basal ganglia and related structures

    PubMed Central

    Plantinga, Birgit R.; Temel, Yasin; Roebroeck, Alard; Uludağ, Kâmil; Ivanov, Dimo; Kuijf, Mark L.; ter Haar Romenij, Bart M.

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation is a treatment for Parkinson's disease and other related disorders, involving the surgical placement of electrodes in the deeply situated basal ganglia or thalamic structures. Good clinical outcome requires accurate targeting. However, due to limited visibility of the target structures on routine clinical MR images, direct targeting of structures can be challenging. Non-clinical MR scanners with ultra-high magnetic field (7T or higher) have the potential to improve the quality of these images. This technology report provides an overview of the current possibilities of visualizing deep brain stimulation targets and their related structures with the aid of ultra-high field MRI. Reviewed studies showed improved resolution, contrast- and signal-to-noise ratios at ultra-high field. Sequences sensitive to magnetic susceptibility such as T2* and susceptibility weighted imaging and their maps in general showed the best visualization of target structures, including a separation between the subthalamic nucleus and the substantia nigra, the lamina pallidi medialis and lamina pallidi incompleta within the globus pallidus and substructures of the thalamus, including the ventral intermediate nucleus (Vim). This shows that the visibility, identification, and even subdivision of the small deep brain stimulation targets benefit from increased field strength. Although ultra-high field MR imaging is associated with increased risk of geometrical distortions, it has been shown that these distortions can be avoided or corrected to the extent where the effects are limited. The availability of ultra-high field MR scanners for humans seems to provide opportunities for a more accurate targeting for deep brain stimulation in patients with Parkinson's disease and related disorders. PMID:25414656

  12. Stress management as an enabling technology for high-field superconducting dipole magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holik, Eddie Frank, III

    This dissertation examines stress management and other construction techniques as means to meet future accelerator requirement demands by planning, fabricating, and analyzing a high-field, Nb3Sn dipole. In order to enable future fundamental research and discovery in high energy accelerator physics, bending magnets must access the highest fields possible. Stress management is a novel, propitious path to attain higher fields and preserve the maximum current capacity of advanced superconductors by managing the Lorentz stress so that strain induced current degradation is mitigated. Stress management is accomplished through several innovative design features. A block-coil geometry enables an Inconel pier and beam matrix to be incorporated in the windings for Lorentz Stress support and reduced AC loss. A laminar spring between windings and mica paper surrounding each winding inhibit any stress transferral through the support structure and has been simulated with ALGORRTM. Wood's metal filled, stainless steel bladders apply isostatic, surface-conforming preload to the pier and beam support structure. Sufficient preload along with mica paper sheer release reduces magnet training by inhibiting stick-slip motion. The effectiveness of stress management is tested with high-precision capacitive stress transducers and strain gauges. In addition to stress management, there are several technologies developed to assist in the successful construction of a high-field dipole. Quench protection has been designed and simulated along with full 3D magnetic simulation with OPERARTM. Rutherford cable was constructed, and cable thermal expansion data was analysed after heat treatment. Pre-impregnation analysis techniques were developed due to elemental tin leakage in varying quantities during heat treatment from each coil. Robust splicing techniques were developed with measured resistivites consistent with nO joints. Stress management has not been incorporated by any other high field dipole

  13. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wolinsky, J.S.; Narayana, P.A.; Fenstermacher, M.J. )

    1990-11-01

    Regional in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides quantitative data on selected chemical constituents of brain. We imaged 16 volunteers with clinically definite multiple sclerosis on a 1.5 tesla magnetic resonance scanner to define plaque-containing volumes of interest, and obtained localized water-suppressed proton spectra using a stimulated echo sequence. Twenty-five of 40 plaque-containing regions provided spectra of adequate quality. Of these, 8 spectra from 6 subjects were consistent with the presence of cholesterol or fatty acids; the remainder were similar to those obtained from white matter of normal volunteers. This early experience with regional proton spectroscopy suggests that individual plaques are distinct. These differences likely reflect dynamic stages of the evolution of the demyelinative process not previously accessible to in vivo investigation.

  14. 2D/3D quench simulation using ANSYS for epoxy impregnated Nb3Sn high field magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuji Yamada et al.

    2002-09-19

    A quench program using ANSYS is developed for the high field collider magnet for three-dimensional analysis. Its computational procedure is explained. The quench program is applied to a one meter Nb{sub 3}Sn high field model magnet, which is epoxy impregnated. The quench simulation program is used to estimate the temperature and mechanical stress inside the coil as well as over the whole magnet. It is concluded that for the one meter magnet with the presented cross section and configuration, the thermal effects due to the quench is tolerable. But we need much more quench study and improvements in the design for longer magnets.

  15. Imaging Intelligence with Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Rex E.; Gasparovic, Charles; Chavez, Robert S.; Caprihan, Arvind; Barrow, Ranee; Yeo, Ronald A.

    2009-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([to the first power]H-MRS) is a technique for the assay of brain neurochemistry "in vivo." N-acetylaspartate (NAA), the most prominent metabolite visible within the [to the first power]H-MRS spectrum, is found primarily within neurons. The current study was designed to further elucidate NAA-cognition…

  16. Imaging Intelligence with Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Rex E.; Gasparovic, Charles; Chavez, Robert S.; Caprihan, Arvind; Barrow, Ranee; Yeo, Ronald A.

    2009-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([to the first power]H-MRS) is a technique for the assay of brain neurochemistry "in vivo." N-acetylaspartate (NAA), the most prominent metabolite visible within the [to the first power]H-MRS spectrum, is found primarily within neurons. The current study was designed to further elucidate NAA-cognition…

  17. Proton acceleration from magnetized overdense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuri, Deep Kumar; Das, Nilakshi; Patel, Kartik

    2017-01-01

    Proton acceleration by an ultraintense short pulse circularly polarized laser from an overdense three dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell (PIC) 3D-PIC simulations. The axial magnetic field modifies the dielectric constant of the plasma, which causes a difference in the behaviour of ponderomotive force in case of left and right circularly polarized laser pulse. When the laser is right circularly polarized, the ponderomotive force gets enhanced due to cyclotron effects generating high energetic electrons, which, on reaching the target rear side accelerates the protons via target normal sheath acceleration process. On the other hand, in case of left circular polarization, the effects get reversed causing a suppression of the ponderomotive force at a short distance and lead towards a rise in the radiation pressure, which results in the effective formation of laser piston. Thus, the axial magnetic field enhances the effect of radiation pressure in case of left circularly polarized laser resulting in the generation of high energetic protons at the target front side. The transverse motion of protons get reduced as they gyrate around the axial magnetic field which increases the beam collimation to some extent. The optimum thickness of the overdense plasma target is found to be increased in the presence of an axial magnetic field.

  18. Tuning magnetic disorder in diluted magnetic semiconductors using high fields to 89 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Crooker, Scott A; Samarth, Nitin

    2008-01-01

    We describe recent and ongoing studies at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos using the new '100 Tesla Multi-Shot Magnet', which is presently delivering fields up to {approx}89 T during its commissioning. We discuss the first experiments performed in this magnet system, wherein the linewidth of low-temperature photoluminescence spectra was used to directly reveal the degree of magnetic alloy disorder 'seen' by excitons in single Zn{sub 0.80}Cd{sub 0.22}Mn{sub 0.08}Se quantum wells. The magnetic potential landscape in II-VI diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) is typically smoothed when the embedded Mn{sup 2+} spins align in an applied field. However, an important (but heretofore untested) prediction of current models of compositional disorder is that magnetic alloy fluctuations in many DMS compounds should increase again in very large magnetic fields approaching 100 T. We observed precisely this increase above {approx}70 T, in agreement with a simple model of magnetic alloy disorder.

  19. Magnetic Semiconductor Quantum Wells in High Fields to 60 Tesla: Photoluminescence Linewidth Annealing at Magnetization Steps

    SciTech Connect

    Awschalom, D.D.; Crooker, S.A.; Lyo, S.K.; Rickel, D.G.; Samarth, N.

    1999-05-24

    Magnetic semiconductors offer a unique possibility for strongly tuning the intrinsic alloy disorder potential with applied magnetic field. We report the direct observation of a series of step-like reductions in the magnetic alloy disorder potential in single ZnSe/Zn(Cd,Mn)Se quantum wells between O and 60 Tesla. This disorder, measured through the linewidth of low temperature photoluminescence spectra drops abruptly at -19, 36, and 53 Tesla, in concert with observed magnetization steps. Conventional models of alloy disorder (developed for nonmagnetic semiconductors) reproduce the general shape of the data, but markedly underestimate the size of the linewidth reduction.

  20. MAGNET ENGINEERING AND TEST RESULTS OF THE HIGH FIELD MAGNET R AND D PROGRAM AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    COZZOLINO,J.; ANERELLA,M.; ESCALLIER,J.; GANETIS,G.; GHOSH,A.; GUPTA,R.; HARRISON,M.; JAIN,A.; MARONE,A.; MURATORE,J.; PARKER,B.; SAMPSON,W.; SOIKA,R.; WANDERER,P.

    2002-08-04

    The Superconducting Magnet Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has been carrying out design, engineering, and technology development of high performance magnets for future accelerators. High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) play a major role in the BNL vision of a few high performance interaction region (IR) magnets that would be placed in a machine about ten years from now. This paper presents the engineering design of a ''react and wind'' Nb{sub 3}Sn magnet that will provide a 12 Tesla background field on HTS coils. In addition, the coil production tooling as well as the most recent 10-turn R&D coil test results will be discussed.

  1. Magic angle effect in normal collateral ligaments of the distal interphalangeal joint in horses imaged with a high-field magnetic resonance imaging system.

    PubMed

    Werpy, Natasha M; Ho, Charles P; Kawcak, Christopher E

    2010-01-01

    Distal forelimb specimens of eight skeletally mature horses were imaged using proton density turbo spin echo, T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo, T2*-weighted gradient echo, short tau inversion recovery and T2-weighted fast spin echo sequences with the limb parallel to the main magnetic field, and with angulation of the limb relative to the main magnetic field. The magic angle effect can be identified in the collateral ligaments of the distal interphalangeal joint when imaged in a high-field magnetic resonance (MR) imaging system with a horizontally oriented main magnetic field. This effect has previously been described in the collateral ligaments of the distal interphalangeal joint in a low-field system with a vertically oriented main magnetic field. The curvature of the ligaments places the fibers at the magic angle in both horizontally and vertically orientated main magnetic fields. This effect can be identified on short time of echo sequences and impacts the signal pattern of the ligaments at the level of the middle phalanx with the limb in a neutral position and with angulation of the limb. Magic angle effect should be considered as a possible cause of an asymmetrical signal pattern, depending on the positioning of the limb and the sequences used for imaging, when evaluating the collateral ligaments of the distal interphalangeal joint on images acquired with a high-field MR imaging system that has a horizontally oriented main magnetic field.

  2. High-field magnetization and magnetic phase transition in CeOs2Al10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Akihiro; Wang, Junfeng; Kindo, Koichi; Ogane, Yuta; Kawamura, Yukihiro; Tanimoto, Sakiyo; Nishioka, Takashi; Tanaka, Daiki; Tanida, Hiroshi; Sera, Masafumi

    2011-05-01

    We have studied the magnetization of CeOs2Al10 in high magnetic fields up to 55 T for H∥a and constructed the magnetic phase diagram for H∥a. The magnetization curve shows a concave H dependence below Tmax~40 K, which is higher than the transition temperature T0~29 K. The magnetic susceptibility along the a axis, χa, shows a smooth and continuous decrease down to ~20 K below Tmax~40 K without showing an anomaly at T0. From these two results, a Kondo singlet is formed below Tmax and coexists with the antiferromagnetic order below T0. We also propose that the larger suppression of the spin degrees of freedom along the a axis than along the c axis below Tmax is associated with the origin of the antiferromagnetic component.

  3. High-field, high-current-density, stable superconducting magnets for fusion machines

    SciTech Connect

    Lue, J.W.; Dresner, L.; Lubell, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Designs for large fusion machines require high-performance superconducting magnets to reduce cost or increase machine performance. By employing force-flow cooling, cable-in-conduit conductor configuration, and NbTi superconductor, it is now possible to design superconducting magnets that operate a high fields (8-12 T) with high current densities (5-15 kA/cm/sup 2/ over the winding pack) in a stable manner. High current density leads to smaller, lighter, and thus less expensive coils. The force-flow cooling provides confined helium, full conductor insulation, and a rigid winding pack for better load distribution. The cable-in-conduit conductor configuration ensures a high stability margin for the magnet. The NbTi superconductor has reached a good engineering material standard. Its strain-insensitive critical parameters are particularly suitable for complex coil windings of a stellarator machine. The optimization procedure for such a conductor design, developed over the past decade, is summarized here. If desired a magnet built on the principles outlines in this paper can be extended to a field higher than the design value without degrading its stability by simply lowering the operating temperature below 4.2 K. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  4. A low-cost, high-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging-compatible actuator.

    PubMed

    Secoli, Riccardo; Robinson, Matthew; Brugnoli, Michele; Rodriguez y Baena, Ferdinando

    2015-03-01

    To perform minimally invasive surgical interventions with the aid of robotic systems within a magnetic resonance imaging scanner offers significant advantages compared to conventional surgery. However, despite the numerous exciting potential applications of this technology, the introduction of magnetic resonance imaging-compatible robotics has been hampered by safety, reliability and cost concerns: the robots should not be attracted by the strong magnetic field of the scanner and should operate reliably in the field without causing distortion to the scan data. Development of non-conventional sensors and/or actuators is thus required to meet these strict operational and safety requirements. These demands commonly result in expensive actuators, which mean that cost effectiveness remains a major challenge for such robotic systems. This work presents a low-cost, high-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging-compatible actuator: a pneumatic stepper motor which is controllable in open loop or closed loop, along with a rotary encoder, both fully manufactured in plastic, which are shown to perform reliably via a set of in vitro trials while generating negligible artifacts when imaged within a standard clinical scanner.

  5. Cost Effective Open Geometry HTS MRI System amended to BSCCO 2212 Wire for High Field Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kennth Marken

    2006-08-11

    the project start and that date a substantial shift in the MRI marketplace occurred, with rapid growth for systems at higher fields (1.5 T and above) and a consequent decline in the low field market (<1.0 T). While the project aim appeared technically attainable at that time, the conclusion was reached that the system and market economics do not warrant additional investment. The program was redirected to develop BSCCO 2212 multifilament wire development for high field superconducting magnets for NMR and other scientific research upon an agreement between DOE and Oxford Instruments, Superconducting Technology. The work t took place between September, 2004 and the project end in early 2006 was focused on 2212 multifilamentary wire. This report summarizes the technical achievements both in 2212 dip coated for an HTS MRI system and in BSCCO 2212 multifilamentary wire for high field magnets.

  6. Tunable High-Field Magnetization in Strongly Exchange-Coupled Freestanding Co/CoO Core/Shell Coaxial Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Alvarez, German; Geshev, Julian; Agramunt-Puig, Sebastià; Navau, Carles; Sanchez, Alvaro; Sort, Jordi; Nogués, Josep

    2016-08-31

    The exchange bias properties of Co/CoO coaxial core/shell nanowires were investigated with cooling and applied fields perpendicular to the wire axis. This configuration leads to unexpected exchange-bias effects. First, the magnetization value at high fields is found to depend on the field-cooling conditions. This effect arises from the competition between the magnetic anisotropy and the Zeeman energies for cooling fields perpendicular to the wire axis. This allows imprinting predefined magnetization states to the antiferromagnetic (AFM) shell, as corroborated by micromagnetic simulations. Second, the system exhibits a high-field magnetic irreversibility, leading to open hysteresis loops attributed to the AFM easy axis reorientation during the reversal (effect similar to athermal training). A distinct way to manipulate the high-field magnetization in exchange-biased systems, beyond the archetypical effects, was thus experimentally and theoretically demonstrated.

  7. High-field electron transport in GaN under crossed electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochelap, V. A.; Korotyeyev, V. V.; Syngayivska, G. I.; Varani, L.

    2015-10-01

    High-field electron transport studied in crossed electric and magnetic fields in bulk GaN with doping of 1016 cm-3, compensation around 90% at the low lattice temperature (30 K). It was found the range of the magnetic and electric fields where the non-equilibrium electron distribution function has a complicated topological structure in the momentum space with a tendency to the formation of the inversion population. Field dependences of dissipative and Hall components of the drift velocity were calculated for the samples with short- and open- circuited Hall contacts in wide ranges of applied electric (0 — 20 kV/cm) and magnetic (1 — 10 T) fields. For former sample, field dependences of dissipative and Hall components of the drift velocity have a non-monotonic behavior. The dissipative component has the inflection point which corresponds to the maximum point of the Hall component. For latter sample, the drift velocity demonstrate a usual sub-linear growth without any critical points. We found that GaN samples with controlled resistance of the Hall circuit can be utilized as a electronic high-power switch.

  8. Microstructure and jc Improvements in Multifilamentary Bi-2212/Ag Wires for High Field Magnet Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, H.; Meinesz, M.; Czabaj, B.; Parrell, J.; Hong, S.

    2008-03-01

    Bi-2212/Ag conductor is one of the most promising materials for extending the field strength of superconducting magnets over present low temperature superconductor systems. From the view point of practical application, Bi-2212/Ag round wires have significant advantages over more typical HTS tape conductors, such as no anisotropy, and easier handling and coil winding, which allows considerable flexibility in the magnet design. Recent development efforts at Oxford Superconducting Technology have been aimed at manufacturing high quality multifilamentary Bi-2212/Ag round wires with the varied sizes to fabricate HTS insert coils for high field magnet applications. However, further improvement of critical current density (Jc) and engineering current density (JE) in larger diameter wires is desirable for practical applications. Recent results show a strong dependence of the wire JE and Jc performance on its microstructure, in particularly, the interface of Bi-2212/Ag. Significant improvements of microstructure and Jc have resulted from the optimization of wire size and filament numbers, but not obviously on starting powder fill factors. The highest JE of 320 A/mm2 (non-Ag Jc of 1103 A/mm2) at 4.2 K, 25 T was obtained in 1.15 mm wire with 85×19 filament configuration.

  9. High field nuclear magnetic resonance in transition metal substituted BaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garitezi, T. M.; Lesseux, G. G.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Adriano, C.; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P. L.; Pagliuso, P. G.; Urbano, R. R.

    2014-05-01

    We report high field 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on Co and Cu substituted BaFe2As2 single crystals displaying same structural/magnetic transition T0≃128 K. From our anisotropy studies in the paramagnetic state, we strikingly found virtually identical quadrupolar splitting and consequently the quadrupole frequency νQ≃2.57(1) MHz for both compounds, despite the claim that each Cu delivers 2 extra 3d electrons in BaFe2As2 compared to Co substitution. These results allow us to conclude that a subtle change in the crystallographic structure, particularly in the Fe-As tetrahedra, must be the most probable tuning parameter to determine T0 in this class of superconductors rather than electronic doping. Furthermore, our NMR data around T0 suggest coexistence of tetragonal/paramagnetic and orthorhombic/antiferromagnetic phases between the structural and the spin density wave magnetic phase transitions, similarly to what was reported for K-doped BaFe2As2 [Urbano et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 107001 (2010)].

  10. Disorder-induced domain wall velocity shift at high fields in perpendicularly magnetized thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voto, Michele; Lopez-Diaz, Luis; Torres, Luis; Moretti, Simone

    2016-11-01

    Domain wall dynamics in a perpendicularly magnetized system is studied by means of micromagnetic simulations in which disorder is introduced as a dispersion of both the easy-axis orientation and the anisotropy constant over regions reproducing a granular structure of the material. High field dynamics show a linear velocity-field relationship and an additional grain size dependent velocity shift, weakly dependent on both applied field and intrinsic Gilbert's damping parameter. We find the origin of this velocity shift in the nonhomogeneous in-plane effective field generated by the tilting of anisotropy easy axis introduced by disorder. We show that a one-dimensional analytical approach cannot predict the observed velocities and we augment it with the additional dissipation of energy arising from internal domain wall dynamics triggered by disorder. This way we prove that the main cause of higher velocity is the ability of the domain wall to irradiate energy into the domains, acquired with a precise feature of disorder.

  11. High field septum magnet using a superconducting shield for the Future Circular Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barna, Dániel

    2017-04-01

    A zero-field cooled superconducting shield is proposed to realize a high-field (3-4 T) septum magnet for the Future Circular Collider hadron-hadron (FCC-hh) ring. Three planned prototypes using different materials and technical solutions are presented, which will be used to evaluate the feasibility of this idea as a part of the FCC study. The numerical simulation methods are described to calculate the field patterns around such a shield. A specific excitation current configuration is presented that maintains a fairly homogeneous field outside of a rectangular shield in a wide range of field levels from 0 to 3 Tesla. It is shown that a massless septum configuration (with an opening in the shield) is also possible and gives satisfactory field quality with realistic superconducting material properties.

  12. High-field magnetic resonance imaging of the human temporal lobe☆

    PubMed Central

    Colon-Perez, Luis M.; King, Michael; Parekh, Mansi; Boutzoukas, Angelique; Carmona, Eduardo; Couret, Michelle; Klassen, Rosemary; Mareci, Thomas H.; Carney, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Emerging high-field diffusion weighted MR imaging protocols, along with tractography, can elucidate microstructural changes associated with brain disease at the sub-millimeter image resolution. Epilepsy and other neurological disorders are accompanied by structural changes in the hippocampal formation and associated regions; however, these changes can be subtle and on a much smaller scale than the spatial resolution commonly obtained by current clinical magnetic resonance (MR) protocols in vivo. Methods We explored the possibility of studying the organization of fresh tissue with a 17.6 Tesla magnet using diffusion MR imaging and tractography. The mesoscale organization of the temporal lobe was estimated using a fresh unfixed specimen obtained from a subject who underwent anterior temporal lobectomy for medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Following ex vivo imaging, the tissue was fixed, serial-sectioned, and stained for correlation with imaging. Findings We resolved tissue microstructural organizational features in the temporal lobe from diffusion MR imaging and tractography in fresh tissue. Conclusions Fresh ex vivo MR imaging, along with tractography, revealed complex intra-temporal structural variation corresponding to neuronal cell body layers, dendritic fields, and axonal projection systems evident histologically. This is the first study to describe in detail the human temporal lobe structural organization using high-field MR imaging and tractography. By preserving the 3-dimensional structures of the hippocampus and surrounding structures, specific changes in anatomy may inform us about the changes that occur in TLE in relation to the disease process and structural underpinnings in epilepsy-related memory dysfunction. PMID:26413472

  13. High-field magnetization of band ferromagnets Co2 YAl ( Y = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourov, N. I.; Marchenkov, V. V.; Perevozchikova, Yu. A.; Korolev, A. V.; Weber, H. W.

    2016-12-01

    The temperature dependences of the magnetization of ferromagnetic Heusler alloys Co2 YAl, where Y = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Ni have been studied at H = 50 kOe in the range 2 K < T < 1100 K. It is shown that the high-field ( H ≥ 20 kOe) magnetization is described within the Stoner model.

  14. Slotted cage resonator for high-field magnetic resonance imaging of rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrufo, O.; Vasquez, F.; Solis, S. E.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2011-04-01

    A variation of the high-frequency cavity resonator coil was experimentally developed according to the theoretical frame proposed by Mansfield in 1990. Circular slots were used instead of cavities to form the coil endplates and it was called the slotted cage resonator coil. The theoretical principles were validated via a coil equivalent circuit and also experimentally with a coil prototype. The radio frequency magnetic field, B1, produced by several coil configurations was numerically simulated using the finite-element approach to investigate their performances. A transceiver coil, 8 cm long and 7.6 cm in diameter, and composed of 4 circular slots with a 15 mm diameter on both endplates, was built to operate at 300 MHz and quadrature driven. Experimental results obtained with the slotted cage resonator coil were presented and showed very good agreement with the theoretical expectations for the resonant frequency as a function of the coil dimensions and slots. A standard birdcage coil was also built for performance comparison purposes. Phantom images were then acquired to compute the signal-to-noise ratio of both coils showing an important improvement of the slotted cage coil over the birdcage coil. The whole-body images of the mouse were also obtained showing high-quality images. Volume resonator coils can be reliably built following the physical principles of the cavity resonator design for high-field magnetic resonance imaging applications of rodents.

  15. Flux pinning study of RE barium coper oxide coated conductors for high field magnet applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Aixia

    REBa2Cu3O7-δ (REBCO, RE = rare earth) coated conductor (CC) holds great promise for high field magnet applications owing to its strong irreversibility field (Hirr), low electromagnetic anisotropy (γ2), and high critical current density (Jc). The work of this thesis is tightly related to the development of the funded 32 T, all-superconducting magnet project at the NHMFL. My concern is thus for understanding the optimizing of the working parameters of REBCO CC at low temperatures T, and very high magnetic fields H, focusing on how to enhance Ic and to reduce its angular dependence. Increasing the active cross-section is a direct and economical strategy to enhance the current-carrying capability for REBCO coated conductors. Unfortunately, the high Jc in thin REBCO layers is seldom sustained in thick layers because of difficulties of thick film growth control. In the presence of strong 3D (pin separation far less than film thickness) pins, a high and thickness-independent (Jc) should result. One of major tasks of this thesis is to explore what are the effective strong 3D pins that develop a high and thickness-independent Jc. High and weak thickness-dependent Jc at 77 K is obtained on most recent coated conductors, and BZO nanorods and RE2O 3 nanoparticles are identified as strong 3D pins contributing to this respectable Jc performance. At 77 K, we found that the strong pinning of BZO nanorods remains at least up to 9 T, whereas the strong pinning of RE2O3 nanoparticles gradually evolves to weak collective pinning as the irreversibility field is approached. The second principal part of this thesis concentrates on understanding and minimizing the angular dependence of Jc. Our study is based on the following procedure. First, we investigated the angular dependence of Jc (Jc(θ)) in the working condition of the future 32 T all-superconducting magnet, i.e. 4.2 K and high magnetic field up to 31 T. Our work shows that the low temperature Jc(θ) is Ginzburg-Landau-like at

  16. Feasibility study of Nb3Al Rutherford cable for high field accelerator magnet application

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.; Kikuchi, A.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Cooper, C.; Feher, S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.; Novitski, I.; Takeuchi, T.; Tartaglia, M.; Turrioni, D.; Verweij, A.P.; Wake, M.; Willering, G; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    Feasibility study of Cu stabilized Nb{sub 3}Al strand and Rutherford cable for the application to high field accelerator magnets are being done at Fermilab in collaboration with NIMS. The Nb{sub 3}Al strand, which was developed and manufactured at NIMS in Japan, has a non-copper Jc of about 844 A/mm{sup 2} at 15 Tesla at 4.2 K, a copper content of 50%, and filament size of about 50 microns. Rutherford cables with 27 Nb{sub 3}Al strands of 1.03 mm diameter were fabricated and tested. Quench tests on a short cable were done to study its stability with only its self field, utilizing a high current transformer. A pair of 2 meter long Nb{sub 3}Al cables was tested extensively at CERN at 4.3 and 1.9 K up to 11 Tesla including its self field with a high transport current of 20.2 kA. In the low field test we observed instability near splices and in the central region. This is related to the flux-jump like behavior, because of excessive amount of Nb in the Nb{sub 3}Al strand. There is possibility that the Nb in Nb{sub 3}Al can cause instability below 2 Tesla field regions. We need further investigation on this problem. Above 8 Tesla, we observed quenches near the critical surface at fast ramp rate from 1000 to 3000 A/sec, with quench velocity over 100 m/sec. A small racetrack magnet was made using a 14 m of Rutherford cable and successfully tested up to 21.8 kA, corresponding to 8.7 T.

  17. A Method to Localize RF B1 Field in High-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging Systems

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, B0 fields of 7 and 9.4 T, the RF field shows greater inhomogeneity compared to clinical MRI systems with B0 fields of 1.5 and 3.0 T. In multichannel RF coils, the magnitude and phase of the input to each coil element can be controlled independently to reduce the nonuniformity of the RF field. The convex optimization technique has been used to obtain the optimum excitation parameters with iterative solutions for homogeneity in a selected region of interest. The pseudoinverse method has also been used to find a solution. The simulation results for 9.4- and 7-T MRI systems are discussed in detail for the head model. Variation of the simulation results in a 9.4-T system with the number of RF coil elements for different positions of the regions of interest in a spherical phantom are also discussed. Experimental results were obtained in a phantom in the 9.4-T system and are compared to the simulation results and the specific absorption rate has been evaluated. PMID:22929360

  18. Tracking superparamagnetic iron oxide labeled monocytes in brain by high-field magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zelivyanskaya, Marina L; Nelson, Jay A; Poluektova, Larissa; Uberti, Mariano; Mellon, Melissa; Gendelman, Howard E; Boska, Michael D

    2003-08-01

    Inflammatory cells, most notably mononuclear phagocytes (MP; macrophages and microglia), play a critical role in brain homeostasis, repair and disease. One important event in cellular biodynamics is how MP move in and throughout the nervous system. Prior studies have focused principally on cell migration across the blood-brain barrier during neuroinflammatory processes with little work done on cell movement within the brain. During the past decade our laboratories have studied the role of MP in HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD). In HAD MP incite sustained glial inflammatory reactions causing significant neuronal damage. To extend these works we investigated cell movement in brain and its influence for disease in a novel co-registration system integrating neuropathology with high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Human monocytes labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles were injected into the brain of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. MRI was recorded 1, 7, and 14 days after cell injection. MRI co-registered with histology verified that the MRI signal modification was due to the labeled cells. MRI showed human monocyte-derived macrophages along the injection site, the corpus callosum, the ventricular system and in other brain sites. These data support the idea that cell migration can be monitored in vivo and provides an opportunity to assess monocyte mobility in brain and its affects on neurodegenerative processes and notably HAD.

  19. Rapid and effective correction of RF inhomogeneity for high field magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M S; DuBois, R M; Zeineh, M M

    2000-08-01

    The well-known variability in the distribution of high frequency electromagnetic fields in the human body causes problems in the analysis of structural information in high field magnetic resonance images. We describe a method of compensating for the purely intensity-based effects. In our simple and rapid correction algorithm, we first use statistical means to determine the background image noise level and the edges of the image features. We next populate all "noise" pixels with the mean signal intensity of the image features. These data are then smoothed by convolution with a gaussian filter using Fourier methods. Finally, the original data that are above the noise level are normalized to the smoothed images, thereby eliminating the lowest spatial frequencies in the final, corrected data. Processing of a 124 slice, 256 x 256 volume dataset requires under 70 sec on a laptop personal computer. Overall, the method is less prone to artifacts from edges or from sensitivity to absolute head position than are other correction techniques. Following intensity correction, the images demonstrated obvious qualitative improvement and, when subjected to automated segmentation tools, the accuracy of segmentation improved, in one example, from 35.3% to 84.7% correct, as compared to a manually-constructed gold standard.

  20. Magnetic monopole catalysis of proton decay

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.; Salvino, D.

    1986-09-01

    Catalysis of proton decay by GUT magnetic monopoles (the Rubakov-Callan effect) is discussed. Combining a short-distance cross section calculation by Bernreuther and Craigie with the long-distance velocity dependent distortion factors of Arafune and Fukugita, catalysis rate predictions which can be compared with experiment are obtained. At present, hydrogen rich detectors such as water (H/sub 2/O) and methane (CH/sub 4/) appear to be particularly well suited for observing catalysis by very slow monopoles. 17 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Coupled microstrip line transverse electromagnetic resonator model for high-field magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, G; Ludwig, R

    2002-03-01

    The performance modeling of RF resonators at high magnetic fields of 4.7 T and more requires a physical approach that goes beyond conventional lumped circuit concepts. The treatment of voltages and currents as variables in time and space leads to a coupled transmission line model, whereby the electric and magnetic fields are assumed static in planes orthogonal to the length of the resonator, but wave-like along its longitudinal axis. In this work a multiconductor transmission line (MTL) model is developed and successfully applied to analyze a 12-element unloaded and loaded microstrip line transverse electromagnetic (TEM) resonator coil for animal studies. The loading involves a homogeneous cylindrical dielectric insert of variable radius and length. This model formulation is capable of estimating the resonance spectrum, field distributions, and certain types of losses in the coil, while requiring only modest computational resources. The boundary element method is adopted to compute all relevant transmission line parameters needed to set up the transmission line matrices. Both the theoretical basis and its engineering implementation are discussed and the resulting model predictions are placed in context with measurements. A comparison between a conventional lumped circuit model and this distributed formulation is conducted, showing significant departures in the resonance response at higher frequencies. This MTL model is applied to simulate two small-bore animal systems: one of 7.5-cm inner diameter, tuned to 200 MHz (4.7 T for proton imaging), and one of 13.36-cm inner diameter, tuned to both 200 and 300 MHz (7 T).

  2. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy editing techniques of coupled spin systems at high field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Jeff

    , the effect of radiofrequency interference effects was studied at high field to investigate signal losses due to reduced excitation and refocusing in spectroscopic images. Possible differences between coupled and uncoupled spin systems were investigated in spectroscopic imaging at 4.7 T.

  3. Assessment of Abdominal Fat Using High-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Anthropometric and Biochemical Parameters.

    PubMed

    Al-Radaideh, Ali; Tayyem, Reema; Al-Fayomi, Kholoud; Nimer, Nisreen; Malkawi, Amer; Al-Zu Bi, Rana; Agraib, Lana; Athamneh, Imad; Hijjawi, Nawal

    2016-12-01

    To measure the abdominal subcutaneous fat (SF) and visceral fat (VF) volumes using high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to investigate their association with selected anthropometric and biochemical parameters among obese and nonobese apparently healthy participants. A cross-sectional study was conducted by recruiting 167 healthy participants. Abdominal scans were acquired at 3T MRI, and the SF and VF were segmented and their volumes were calculated. Selected anthropometric and biochemical measurements were also determined. A significant difference (P < 0.05) was observed between normal body weight and overweight and obese participants for SF and VF, total abdominal fat volumes, leptin, resistin, adiponectin and waist circumference. Waist circumferences were measured by tape and MRI. Findings revealed that MRI-measured fat volumes were different between males and females and had a significant (P < 0.01) strong positive correlation with body mass index, leptin, resistin and WC and had a negative correlation with adiponectin level. MRI-measured fat volumes were found to correlate moderately with interleukin-6 and weakly with cholesterol, serum triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein. Except for cholesterol, all measured biochemical variables and abdominal fat volumes in the current study were significantly associated with body mass index. All anthropometric and biochemical parameters showed weak-to-strong associations with the MRI-measured fat volumes. Abdominal fat distribution was different between males and females and their correlations with some lipid profiles were found to be sex dependent. These findings revealed that MRI can be used as an alternative tool for obesity assessment. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. An intra-neural microstimulation system for ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging and magnetoencephalography.

    PubMed

    Glover, Paul M; Watkins, Roger H; O'Neill, George C; Ackerley, Rochelle; Sanchez-Panchuelo, Rosa; McGlone, Francis; Brookes, Matthew J; Wessberg, Johan; Francis, Susan T

    2017-10-01

    Intra-neural microstimulation (INMS) is a technique that allows the precise delivery of low-current electrical pulses into human peripheral nerves. Single unit INMS can be used to stimulate individual afferent nerve fibres during microneurography. Combining this with neuroimaging allows the unique monitoring of central nervous system activation in response to unitary, controlled tactile input, with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) providing exquisite spatial localisation of brain activity and magnetoencephalography (MEG) high temporal resolution. INMS systems suitable for use within electrophysiology laboratories have been available for many years. We describe an INMS system specifically designed to provide compatibility with both ultra-high field (7T) fMRI and MEG. Numerous technical and safety issues are addressed. The system is fully analogue, allowing for arbitrary frequency and amplitude INMS stimulation. Unitary recordings obtained within both the MRI and MEG screened-room environments are comparable with those obtained in 'clean' electrophysiology recording environments. Single unit INMS (current <7μA, 200μs pulses) of individual mechanoreceptive afferents produces appropriate and robust responses during fMRI and MEG. This custom-built MRI- and MEG-compatible stimulator overcomes issues with existing INMS approaches; it allows well-controlled switching between recording and stimulus mode, prevents electrical shocks because of long cable lengths, permits unlimited patterns of stimulation, and provides a system with improved work-flow and participant comfort. We demonstrate that the requirements for an INMS-integrated system, which can be used with both fMRI and MEG imaging systems, have been fully met. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Compatible Needles and Interactive Sequences for Musculoskeletal Interventions Using an Open High-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Wonneberger, Uta; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Streitparth, Florian Walter, Thula Rump, Jens Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M.

    2010-04-15

    In this article, we study in vitro evaluation of needle artefacts and image quality for musculoskeletal laser-interventions in an open high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner at 1.0T with vertical field orientation. Five commercially available MRI-compatible puncture needles were assessed based on artefact characteristics in a CuSO4 phantom (0.1%) and in human cadaveric lumbar spines. First, six different interventional sequences were evaluated with varying needle orientation to the main magnetic field B0 (0{sup o} to 90{sup o}) in a sequence test. Artefact width, needle-tip error, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Second, a gradient-echo sequence used for thermometric monitoring was assessed and in varying echo times, artefact width, tip error, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured. Artefact width and needle-tip error correlated with needle material, instrument orientation to B0, and sequence type. Fast spin-echo sequences produced the smallest needle artefacts for all needles, except for the carbon fibre needle (width <3.5 mm, tip error <2 mm) at 45{sup o} to B0. Overall, the proton density-weighted spin-echo sequences had the best CNR (CNR{sub Muscle/Needle} >16.8). Concerning the thermometric gradient echo sequence, artefacts remained <5 mm, and the SNR reached its maximum at an echo time of 15 ms. If needle materials and sequences are accordingly combined, guidance and monitoring of musculoskeletal laser interventions may be feasible in a vertical magnetic field at 1.0T.

  6. Strange magnetism and the anapole structure of the proton.

    SciTech Connect

    Hasty, R.; Hawthorne-Allen, A. M.; Averett, T.; Barkhuff, D.; Beck, D. H.; Mueller, B.; SAMPLE Collaboration; Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.; Coll. of William and Mary; Lab. for Nuclear Science and Department of Physics

    2000-12-15

    The violation of mirror symmetry in the weak force provides a powerful tool to study the internal structure of the proton. Experimental results have been obtained that address the role of strange quarks in generating nuclear magnetism. The measurement reported here provides an unambiguous constraint on strange quark contributions to the proton's magnetic moment through the electron-proton weak interaction. We also report evidence for the existence of a parity-violating electromagnetic effect known as the anapole moment of the proton. The proton's anapole moment is not yet well understood theoretically, but it could have important implications for precision weak interaction studies in atomic systems such as cesium.

  7. Magnetic properties of superconducting GdBa2Cu3O(6 + delta) at low temperature and high field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. Y.; Shapira, Y.; Hor, P. H.; Meng, R. L.; Chu, C. W.

    1988-01-01

    The magnetization of antiferromagnetic superconducting GdBa2Cu3O(6 + delta) has been measured for T in the range of 1.5 - 4.2 K for magnetic fields up to about 20 T. It is found that all Gd(3+) spins are nearly parallel at very high fields, and that this saturated spin subsystem coexists with superconductivity. Below the Neel temperature, 2.22 K, the transition from the 'canted' phase to the paramagnetic phase is observed by the application of a high magnetic field. The temperature dependence of this phase transition is also reported.

  8. Porphyrin protonation studied by magnetic circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Štěpánek, Petr; Andrushchenko, Valery; Ruud, Kenneth; Bouř, Petr

    2012-01-12

    Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy provides valuable information about electronic excited states in molecules. The interpretation of spectra is however difficult, often requiring additional theoretical calculations to rationalize the observed signal. Recent developments in time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) bring hope that the applicability of MCD spectroscopy for chemical problems may be significantly extended. In this study, two modern analytical TDDFT implementations are compared and used to understand experimental MCD spectra of a model porphyrin system upon protonation. Changes in porphyrin geometry and electronic structure are related to MCD intensities by comparing the spectra of 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphyrintetrasulfonic acid (TPPS) measured at different pH values with the TDDFT calculations. Although the theoretical results slightly depended on the chosen exchange-correlation functional, the computations provided MCD curves that could well rationalize the experimental data. The protonation of the porphyrin core causes marked changes in the MCD spectrum, whereas the role of the substituents is limited. Also, different conformations of the porphyrin substituents cause relatively minor changes of the MCD pattern, mostly in the Soret region, where the porphine and phenyl electronic transitions start to mix. The solvent environment simulated by the dielectric model caused a shift (~20 nm) of the absorption bands but only minor variations in the absorption and MCD spectral shapes. The study thus demonstrates that the recently available first-principles interpretations of MCD spectra significantly enhance the applicability of the technique for molecular structural studies.

  9. High-field EPR study of a ReCl4(CN)2 molecular magnet building block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junjie; Harris, T. David; Long, Jeffrey; Hill, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    Slow magnetic relaxation has been observed in the single-chain magnet (DMF)4 MReCl 4 (CN)2 (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) [D. Harris et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 3980 (2010)]. The ReCl 4 (CN)2 (1) molecule has been synthesized in which the local environment of the Re IV ion is same as in the single-chain magnet. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) measurements have been performed on single crystal of complex 1 to determine the magnetic anisotropy of the Re IV ions. Both intra and inter Kramer's doublet transitions are observed in high-field (up to 36T) EPR experiments. The data indicate a significant axial anisotropy of the easy-plane type (D> 0) , withsizeablerhombic E term. In light of these findings, we are developing a theoretical model to account for the slow relaxation in the single-chain magnet.

  10. High field magnetic behavior in Boron doped Fe2VAl Heusler alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, Ch.; Vasundhara, M.; Srinivas, V.; Rao, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    We have investigated the magnetic behavior of Fe2VAl1-xBx (x=0, 0.03, 0.06 and 0.1) alloys under high temperature and high magnetic field conditions separately. Although, the low temperature DC magnetization data for the alloys above x>0 show clear magnetic transitions, the zero field cooled (ZFC) and field cooled (FC) curves indicate the presence of spin cluster like features. Further, critical exponent (γ) deduced from the initial susceptibility above the Tc, does not agree with standard models derived for 3 dimensional long range magnetic systems. The deviation in γ values are consistent with the short range magnetic nature of these alloys. We further extend the analysis of magnetic behavior by carrying the magnetization measurements at high temperatures and high magnetic fields distinctly. We mainly emphasize the following observations; (i) The magnetic hysteresis loops show sharp upturns at lower fields even at 900 K for all the alloys. (ii) High temperature inverse susceptibility do not overlap until T=900 K, indicating the persistent short range magnetic correlations even at high temperatures. (iii) The Arrott's plot of magnetization data shows spontaneous moment (MS) for the x=0 alloy at higher magnetic fields which is absent at lower fields (<50 kOe), while the Boron doped samples show feeble MS at lower fields. The origin of this short range correlation is due to presence of dilute magnetic heterogeneous phases which are not detected from the X-ray diffraction method.

  11. Enhanced proton acceleration in an applied longitudinal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefiev, A.; Toncian, T.; Fiksel, G.

    2016-10-01

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we examine how an externally applied strong magnetic field impacts proton acceleration in laser-irradiated solid-density targets. We find that a kT-level external magnetic field can sufficiently inhibit transverse transport of hot electrons in a flat laser-irradiated target. While the electron heating by the laser remains mostly unaffected, the reduced electron transport during proton acceleration leads to an enhancement of maximum proton energies and the overall number of energetic protons. The resulting proton beam is much better collimated compared to a beam generated without applying a kT-level magnetic field. A factor of three enhancement of the laser energy conversion efficiency into multi-MeV protons is another effect of the magnetic field. The required kT-level magnetic fields are becoming feasible due to a significant progress that has been made in generating magnetic fields with laser-driven coils using ns-long laser pulses. The possibility of improving characteristics of laser-driven proton beams using such fields is a strong motivation for further development of laser-driven magnetic field capabilities.

  12. Fabrication and test results of a high field, Nb3Sn superconducting racetrack dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Benjegerdes, R.; Bish, P.; Byford, D.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D.R.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hafalia, R.; Hannaford, R.; Higley, H.; Jackson, A.; Lietzke, A.; Liggins, N.; McInturff, A.D.; O'Neill, J.; Palmerston, E.; Sabbi, G.; Scanlan, R.M.; Swanson, J.

    2001-06-15

    The LBNL Superconducting Magnet Program is extending accelerator magnet technology to the highest possible fields. A 1 meter long, racetrack dipole magnet, utilizing state-of-the-art Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor, has been built and tested. A record dipole filed of 14.7 Tesla has been achieved. Relevant features of the final assembly and tested results are discussed.

  13. Studies of $${\\rm Nb}_{3}{\\rm Sn}$$ Strands Based on the Restacked-Rod Process for High Field Accelerator Magnets

    DOE PAGES

    Barzi, E.; Bossert, M.; Gallo, G.; ...

    2011-12-21

    A major thrust in Fermilab's accelerator magnet R&D program is the development of Nb3Sn wires which meet target requirements for high field magnets, such as high critical current density, low effective filament size, and the capability to withstand the cabling process. The performance of a number of strands with 150/169 restack design produced by Oxford Superconducting Technology was studied for round and deformed wires. To optimize the maximum plastic strain, finite element modeling was also used as an aid in the design. Results of mechanical, transport and metallographic analyses are presented for round and deformed wires.

  14. Analytical studies of advanced high-field designs: 20-tesla large-bore superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Hoard, R.W.; Cornish, D.N.; Scanlan, R.M.; Zbasnik, J.P.; Leber, R.L.; Hickman, R.B.; Lee, J.D.

    1983-09-30

    Several emerging technologies have been combined in a conceptual design study demonstrating the feasibility of producing ultrahigh magnetic fields from large-bore superconducting solenoid magnets. Several designs have been produced that approach peak fields of 20-T in 2.0-m diameter inner bores. The analytical expressions comprising the main features of CONDUCTOR and ADVMAGNET, the two computer programs used in the design of these advanced magnets, are also discussed. These magnets and design techniques will make a paramount contribution to the national mirror-fusion endeavor and to the newly emerging field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) whole-body scanners.

  15. Limits of NbTi and Nb3Sn, and development of W& R Bi-2212 High Field Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Daniel; Dietderich, Daniel; Ferrracin, Paolo; Prestemon, Soren; Sabbi, GianLuca; Scanlan, Ron; Godeke, A.

    2007-06-01

    NbTi accelerator dipoles are limited to magnetic fields (H) of about 10 T, due to an intrinsic upper critical field (H{sub c2}) limitation of 14 T. To surpass this restriction, prototype Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets are being developed which have reached 16 T. We show that Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole technology is practically limited to 17 to 18 T due to insufficient high field pinning, and intrinsically to 20 to 22 T due to H{sub c2} limitations. Therefore, to obtain magnetic fields approaching 20 T and higher, a material is required with a higher H{sub c2} and sufficient high field pinning capacity. A realistic candidate for this purpose is Bi-2212, which is available in round wires and sufficient lengths for the fabrication of coils based on Rutherford-type cables. We initiated a program to develop the required technology to construct accelerator magnets from 'wind-and-react' (W&R) Bi-2212 coils. We outline the complications that arise through the use of Bi-2212, describe the development paths to address these issues, and conclude with the design of W&R Bi-2212 sub-scale magnets.

  16. Proton magnetometers for measurement of the Earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrvoic, Ivan

    1990-02-01

    Proton magnetometers are an excellent example of nuclear physics phenomena brought into and exploited in our normal, macroscopic world. Relatively easy and efficient manipulation of nuclear precession phenomena is possible and very often done even without proper understanding of the underlying physics. Overhauser effect is based on the same nuclear physics phenomena, although marginally more complex and again macroscopically engineered to improve on simple proton precession effects in order to achieve much better precession signals from smaller sensors and using less power. Since the polarization of protons (generation of proton precession signal) does not require strong static magnetic fields but uses strong radio frequency magnetic field transparent to protons, measurements can be done concurrently with it. Furthermore, in the ultimate triumph of the method, one can produce a stationary, nondecaying proton precession signal, in vague similarity to alkali vapor magnetometers using simple feedback techniques. The underlying physics of the two methods are examined.

  17. Enhanced proton acceleration in an applied longitudinal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toncian, Toma; Arefiev, Alexey; Fiksel, Gennady

    2016-10-01

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we examine how an externally applied strong magnetic impacts proton acceleration in laser-irradiated solid-density targets. We find that a kT-level external magnetic field can sufficiently inhibit transverse transport of hot electrons in a flat laser-irradiated target. While the electron heating by the laser remains mostly unaffected, the reduced electron transport during proton acceleration leads to an enhancement of maximum proton energies and the overall number of energetic protons. The resulting proton beam is much better collimated compared to a beam generated without applying a kT-level magnetic field. A factor of three enhancement of the laser energy conversion efficiency into multi-MeV protons is another effect of the magnetic field. The required kT magnetic fields are becoming feasible due to a significant progress that has been made in generating magnetic fields with laser-driven coils using ns-long laser pulses. The predicted improved characteristics of laser-driven proton beams would be critical for a number of applications. The work was supported by U.S. Department of Energy - National Nuclear Security Administration Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NA0002008. HPC resources were provided by the Texas Advanced Computing Center at The University of Texas.

  18. Cortical mapping and frameless stereotactic navigation in the high-field intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging suite

    PubMed Central

    Weingarten, David M.; Asthagiri, Ashok R.; Butman, John A.; Sato, Susumu; Wiggs, Edythe A.; Damaska, Bonita; Heiss, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Frameless stereotactic neuronavigation provides tracking of surgical instruments on radiographic images and orients the surgeon to tumor margins at surgery. Bipolar electrical stimulation mapping (ESM) delineates safe limits for resection of brain tumors adjacent to eloquent cortex. These standard techniques could complement the capability of intraoperative MR (iMR) imaging to evaluate for occult residual disease during surgery and promote more complete tumor removal. The use of frameless neuronavigation in the high-field iMR imaging suite requires that a few pieces of standard equipment be replaced by nonferromagnetic instruments. Specific use of ESM in a high-field iMR imaging suite has not been reported in the literature. To study whether frameless neuronavigation and electrical stimulation mapping could be successfully integrated in the high-field iMR imaging suite, the authors employed these modalities in 10 consecutive cases involving patients undergoing conscious craniotomy for primary brain tumors located in or adjacent to eloquent cortices. Equipment included a custom high-field MR imaging–compatible head holder and dynamic reference frame attachment, a standard MR imaging–compatible dynamic reference frame, a standard MR imaging machine with a table top that could be translated to a pedestal outside the 5-gauss line for the operative intervention, and standard neuronavigational and cortical stimulation equipment. Both ESM and frameless stereotactic guidance were performed outside the 5-gauss line. The presence of residual neoplasm was evaluated using iMR imaging; resection was continued until eloquent areas were encountered or iMR imaging confirmed complete removal of any residual tumor. Mapping identified essential language (5 patients), sensory (6), and motor (7) areas. The combined use of frameless stereotactic navigation, ESM, and iMR imaging resulted in complete radiographic resection in 7 cases and resection to an eloquent margin in 3 cases

  19. High-field QCPMG NMR of large quadrupolar patterns using resistive magnets.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ivan; Shetty, Kiran; Ellis, Paul D; Brey, William W; Gan, Zhehong

    2009-12-01

    Spectroscopy in a high magnetic field reduces second-order quadrupolar shift while increasing chemical shift. It changes the scale between quadrupolar and chemical shift of half-integer quadrupolar spins. The application of QCPMG multiple echo for acquiring large quadrupolar pattern under the high magnetic field of a 25 T resistive magnet is presented for acquiring large quadrupolar patterns. It shows that temporal field fluctuations and spatial homogeneity of the Keck magnet at the NHMFL contribute about +/- 20 ppm in line broadening. NMR patterns which have breadths of hundreds to thousands of kilohertz can be efficiently recorded using a combination of QCPMG and magnetic field stepping with negligible hindrance from the inhomogeneity and field fluctuations of powered magnets.

  20. Halbach arrays consisting of cubic elements optimised for high field gradients in magnetic drug targeting applications.

    PubMed

    Barnsley, Lester C; Carugo, Dario; Owen, Joshua; Stride, Eleanor

    2015-11-07

    A key challenge in the development of magnetic drug targeting (MDT) as a clinically relevant technique is designing systems that can apply sufficient magnetic force to actuate magnetic drug carriers at useful tissue depths. In this study an optimisation routine was developed to generate designs of Halbach arrays consisting of multiple layers of high grade, cubic, permanent magnet elements, configured to deliver the maximum pull or push force at a position of interest between 5 and 50 mm from the array, resulting in arrays capable of delivering useful magnetic forces to depths past 20 mm. The optimisation routine utilises a numerical model of the magnetic field and force generated by an arbitrary configuration of magnetic elements. Simulated field and force profiles of optimised arrays were evaluated, also taking into account the forces required for assembling the array in practice. The resultant selection for the array, consisting of two layers, was then constructed and characterised to verify the simulations. Finally the array was utilised in a set of in vitro experiments to demonstrate its capacity to separate and retain microbubbles loaded with magnetic nanoparticles against a constant flow. The optimised designs are presented as light-weight, inexpensive options for applying high-gradient, external magnetic fields in MDT applications.

  1. Using High-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Estimate Distensibility of the Middle Cerebral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Warnert, Esther A.H.; Verbree, Jasper; Wise, Richard G.; van Osch, Matthias J.P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although cerebral arterial stiffness may be an important marker for cerebrovascular health, there is not yet a measurement that accurately reflects the distensibility of major intracranial arteries. Herein, we aim to noninvasively measure distension of the human middle cerebral artery (MCA). Methods Ten healthy volunteers (age: 30.3 ± 10.8 years) underwent ultra-high-field (7-tesla) MRI scanning. Time-of-flight angiography and phase-contrast flow imaging were used to locate the M1 segment of the MCA and to determine the occurrence of systole and diastole. High-resolution cross-sectional cardiac triggered T2-weighted images of the M1 segment of the MCA were acquired in systole and diastole. Results The average distension of the MCA area from diastole to systole was 2.58% (range: 0.08%-6.48%). There was no significant correlation between MCA distension and the pulsatility index, calculated from the phase-contrast flow velocity profiles. Conclusion These results lead to the first noninvasive image-based estimation of distensibility of the MCA (approx. 5.8 × 10-4 mm Hg-1) and demonstrate that ultra-high-field MRI could be a promising tool for investigating distensibility of intracranial arteries in relation to cerebrovascular pathology. PMID:27449212

  2. A Field-Sweep/Field-Lock System for Superconducting Magnets-Application to High-Field EPR

    PubMed Central

    Maly, Thorsten; Bryant, Jeff; Ruben, David; Griffin, Robert G.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a field-lock/field-sweep system for the use in superconducting magnets. The system is based on a commercially available field mapping unit and a custom designed broad-band 1H-NMR probe. The NMR signal of a small water sample is used in a feedback loop to set and control the magnetic field to high accuracy. The current instrumental configuration allows field sweeps of ± 0.4 T and a resolution of up to 10-5 T (0.1 G) and the performance of the system is demonstrated in a high-field electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) application. The system should also be of utility in other experiments requiring precise and reproducible sweeps of the magnetic field such as DNP, ENDOR or PELDOR. PMID:17027306

  3. A field-sweep/field-lock system for superconducting magnets--Application to high-field EPR.

    PubMed

    Maly, Thorsten; Bryant, Jeff; Ruben, David; Griffin, Robert G

    2006-12-01

    We describe a field-lock/field-sweep system for the use in superconducting magnets. The system is based on a commercially available field mapping unit and a custom designed broad-band 1H NMR probe. The NMR signal of a small water sample is used in a feedback loop to set and control the magnetic field to high accuracy. The current instrumental configuration allows field sweeps of +/-0.4 T and a resolution of up to 10(-5) T (0.1 G) and the performance of the system is demonstrated in a high-field electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) application. The system should also be of utility in other experiments requiring precise and reproducible sweeps of the magnetic field such as DNP, ENDOR or PELDOR.

  4. Thermal and mechanical effects of quenches on Nb{sub 3}Sn high field hadron collider magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuji Yamada et al.

    2001-11-05

    Thermal and its resulting mechanical stress due to quenches inside short and long epoxy impregnated Nb{sub 3}Sn high field magnets are studied with a quench simulation program, Kuench, and ANSYS program. For the protection of a long high field magnet, we have to use heaters to dump the stored energy uniformly inside the magnet, after detection of a spontaneous quench. The time delay of starting a forced quench with heaters, is estimated using ANSYS. Using this information, the thermal distribution in two-dimensional magnet cross section is studied. First a one meter model magnet with a dump resistor is used to estimate the effects and then a 10 meter long magnet is studied. The two-dimensional temperature distributions in the magnet cross sections are recorded every 5 ms, and visually displayed. With this visual animation displays we can understand intuitively the thermal and quench propagation in 2-dimensional field. The quenching cables get heated locally much more than the surrounding material and non-quenching conductor cables. With a one meter magnet with a dump resistor of 30 m{Omega}, typically only the quench starting cables and its neighbor cables get heated up to 100 K without significant effects from the heaters. With a10 meter magnet, heaters cause the quenches to most of the conductor blocks. The quench initiating cables get up to 250 to 300 K in 100 ms, but the surrounding and wedges are not heated up significantly. This causes the excessive stress in the quenching conductors and in their insulation material locally. The stress and strain in the conductor as well as in the insulation become excessive, and they are studied using the ANSYS stress analysis, using Von Mises criterion. It is concluded that for the one meter magnet with the presented cross section and configuration, the thermal effects due to the quench is tolerable. But we need much more quench study and improvements in the design for the extended ten meter long magnet [1].

  5. Propagation of magnetic avalanches in Mn12Ac at high field sweep rates.

    PubMed

    Decelle, W; Vanacken, J; Moshchalkov, V V; Tejada, J; Hernández, J M; Macià, F

    2009-01-16

    Time-resolved measurements of the magnetization reversal in single crystals of Mn12Ac in pulsed magnetic fields, at magnetic field sweep rates from 1.5 kT/s up to 7 kT/s, suggest a new process that cannot be scaled onto a deflagrationlike propagation driven by heat diffusion. The sweep rate dependence of the propagation velocity, increasing from a few 100 m/s up to the speed of sound in Mn12Ac, indicates the existence of two new regimes at the highest sweep rates, with a transition around 4 kT/s that can be understood as a magnetic deflagration-to-detonation transition.

  6. Design and analysis of high-field quasi-continuous magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Boenig, H.J.; Campbell, L.J.; Rickel, D.G.; Rogers, J.D.; Schillig, J.B.; Sims, J.R.; Pernambuco-Wise, P.; Schneider-Muntau, H.J.; Van Bockstal, L.

    1993-10-01

    Pulsed magnets of 60 tesla or more with a flat-top of 100 ms (quasi-continuous) are among the user facilities to be provided by the NHMFL. The design of such magnets is constrained by available materials and thermal recycle time. The design path discussed here tailors materials and current densities or independent concentric coils. The progressive design steps are Illustrated by a specific example of an eight-coil, 60T magnet. In the preliminary design stage closed form calculations of magnetic, structural, thermal, and electrical circuit behavior are used to achieve a practical design that meets Initial requirements. Design refinement incorporates finite element analyses and test results on materials, fabrication and prototypes. Higher fields are possible without large changes.

  7. A portable high-field pulsed magnet system for x-ray scattering studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Z.; Ruff, J.P.C.; Nojiri, H.; Matsuda, Y. H.; Ross, K. A.; Gaulin, B. D.; Qu, Z.; Lang, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    We present a portable pulsed-magnet system for x-ray studies of materials in high magnetic fields (up to 30 T). The apparatus consists of a split-pair of minicoils cooled on a closed-cycle cryostat, which is used for x-ray diffraction studies with applied field normal to the scattering plane. A second independent closed-cycle cryostat is used for cooling the sample to near liquid helium temperatures. Pulsed magnetic fields (- 1 ms in total duration) are generated by discharging a configurable capacitor bank into the magnet coils. Time-resolved scattering data are collected using a combination of a fast single-photon counting detector, a multichannel scaler, and a high-resolution digital storage oscilloscope. The capabilities of this instrument are used to study a geometrically frustrated system revealing strong magnetostrictive effects in the spin-liquid state.

  8. Progress with high-field superconducting magnets for high-energy colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, Giorgio; Prestemon, Soren; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2015-10-01

    One of the possible next steps for high-energy physics research relies on a high-energy hadron or muon collider. The energy of a circular collider is limited by the strength of bending dipoles, and its maximum luminosity is determined by the strength of final focus quadrupoles. For this reason, the high-energy physics and accelerator communities have shown much interest in higher-field and higher-gradient superconducting accelerator magnets. The maximum field of NbTi magnets used in all present high-energy machines, including the LHC, is limited to ~10 T at 1.9 K. Fields above 10 T became possible with the use of Nb$_3$Sn superconductors. Nb$_3$Sn accelerator magnets can provide operating fields up to ~15 T and can significantly increase the coil temperature margin. Accelerator magnets with operating fields above 15 T require high-temperature superconductors. Furthermore, this review discusses the status and main results of Nb$_3$Sn accelerator magnet research and development and work toward 20-T magnets.

  9. Progress with high-field superconducting magnets for high-energy colliders

    DOE PAGES

    Apollinari, Giorgio; Prestemon, Soren; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2015-10-01

    One of the possible next steps for high-energy physics research relies on a high-energy hadron or muon collider. The energy of a circular collider is limited by the strength of bending dipoles, and its maximum luminosity is determined by the strength of final focus quadrupoles. For this reason, the high-energy physics and accelerator communities have shown much interest in higher-field and higher-gradient superconducting accelerator magnets. The maximum field of NbTi magnets used in all present high-energy machines, including the LHC, is limited to ~10 T at 1.9 K. Fields above 10 T became possible with the use of Nbmore » $$_3$$Sn superconductors. Nb$$_3$$Sn accelerator magnets can provide operating fields up to ~15 T and can significantly increase the coil temperature margin. Accelerator magnets with operating fields above 15 T require high-temperature superconductors. Furthermore, this review discusses the status and main results of Nb$$_3$$Sn accelerator magnet research and development and work toward 20-T magnets.« less

  10. The LLNL HFTF (High-Field Test Facility): A flexible superconducting test facility for fusion magnet development

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.R.; Chaplin, M.R.; Leber, R.L.; Rosdahl, A.R.

    1987-09-17

    The High-Field Test Facility (HFTF) is a flexible and, in many ways, unique facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for providing the test capabilities needed to develop the superconducting magnet systems of the next generation fusion machines. The superconducting coil set in HFTF has been operated successfully at LLNL, but in its original configuration, its utility as a test facility was somewhat restricted and cryogenic losses were intolerable. A new cryostat for the coil set allows the magnet system to remain cold indefinitely so the system is available on short notice to provide high fields (about 11 T) inside a reasonably large test volume (0.3-m diam). The test volume is physically and thermally isolated from the coil volume, allowing test articles to be inserted and removed without disturbing the coil cryogenic volume, which is maintained by an on-line refrigerator. Indeed, with the proper precautions, it is even unnecessary to drop the field in the HFTF during such an operation. The separate test volume also allows reduced temperature operation without the expense and complication of subcooling the entire coil set (about 20-t cold mass). The HFTF has thus become a key facility in the LLNL magnet development program, where the primary goal is to demonstrate the technology for producing fields to 15 T with winding-pack current densities of 40 A.mm/sup -2/ in coils sized for fusion applications. 4 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Monitoring of pistachio (Pistacia Vera) ripening by high field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sciubba, Fabio; Avanzato, Damiano; Vaccaro, Angela; Capuani, Giorgio; Spagnoli, Mariangela; Di Cocco, Maria Enrica; Tzareva, Irina Nikolova; Delfini, Maurizio

    2017-04-01

    The metabolic profiling of pistachio (Pistacia vera) aqueous extracts from two different cultivars, namely 'Bianca' and 'Gloria', was monitored over the months from May to September employing high field NMR spectroscopy. A large number of water-soluble metabolites were assigned by means of 1D and 2D NMR experiments. The change in the metabolic profiles monitored over time allowed the pistachio development to be investigated. Specific temporal trends of amino acids, sugars, organic acids and other metabolites were observed and analysed by multivariate Partial Least Squares (PLS) analysis. Statistical analysis showed that while in the period from May to September there were few differences between the two cultivars, the ripening rate was different.

  12. Recent Test Results of the High Field Nb3Sn Dipole Magnet HD2

    SciTech Connect

    Ferracin, P.; Bingham, B.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D. W.; Dietderich, D. R.; Felice, H.; Hafalia, A. R.; Hannaford, C. R.; Joseph, J.; Lietzke, A. F.; Lizarazo, J.; Sabbi, G.; Wang, X.

    2009-10-19

    The 1 m long Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole magnet HD2, fabricated and tested at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, represents a step towards the development of block-type accelerator quality magnets operating in the range of 13-15 T. The magnet design features two coil modules composed of two layers wound around a titanium-alloy pole. The layer 1 pole includes a round cutout to provide room for a bore tube with a clear aperture of 36 mm. After a first series of tests where HD2 reached a maximum bore field of 13.8 T, corresponding to an estimated peak field on the conductor of 14.5 T, the magnet was disassembled and reloaded without the bore tube and with a clear aperture increased to 43 mm. We describe in this paper the magnet training observed in two consecutive tests after the removal of the bore tube, with a comparison of the quench performance with respect to the previous tests. An analysis of the voltage signals recorded before and after training quenches is then presented and discussed, and the results of coil visual inspections reported.

  13. Windows on the human body--in vivo high-field magnetic resonance research and applications in medicine and psychology.

    PubMed

    Moser, Ewald; Meyerspeer, Martin; Fischmeister, Florian Ph S; Grabner, Günther; Bauer, Herbert; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2010-01-01

    Analogous to the evolution of biological sensor-systems, the progress in "medical sensor-systems", i.e., diagnostic procedures, is paradigmatically described. Outstanding highlights of this progress are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS), which enable non-invasive, in vivo acquisition of morphological, functional, and metabolic information from the human body with unsurpassed quality. Recent achievements in high and ultra-high field MR (at 3 and 7 Tesla) are described, and representative research applications in Medicine and Psychology in Austria are discussed. Finally, an overview of current and prospective research in multi-modal imaging, potential clinical applications, as well as current limitations and challenges is given.

  14. Fiber optic quench detection via optimized Rayleigh Scattering in high-field YBCO accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, Gene

    2016-02-17

    Yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) coated conductors are known for their ability to operate in the superconducting state at relatively high temperatures, even above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K). When these same conductors are operated at lower temperatures, they are able to operate in much higher magnetic fields than traditional superconductors like NiTi or Nb3Sn. Thus, YBCO superconducting magnets are one of the primary options for generating the high magnetic fields needed for future high energy physics devices. Due to slow quench propagation, quench detection remains one of the primary limitations to YBCO magnets. Fiber optic sensing, based upon Rayleigh scattering, has the potential for spatial resolution approaching the wavelength of light, or very fast temporal resolution at low spatial resolution, and a continuum of combinations in between. This project has studied, theoretically and experimentally, YBCO magnets and Rayleigh scattering quench detection systems to demonstrate feasibility of the systems for YBCO quench protection systems. Under this grant an experimentally validated 3D quench propagation model was used to accurately define the acceptable range of spatial and temporal resolutions for effective quench detection in YBCO magnets and to evaluate present-day and potentially improved YBCO conductors. The data volume and speed requirements for quench detection via Rayleigh scattering required the development of a high performance fiber optic based quench detection/data acquisition system and its integration with an existing voltage tap/thermo-couple based system. In this project, optical fibers are tightly co-wound into YBCO magnet coils, with the fiber on top of the conductor as turn-to-turn insulation. Local changes in the temperature or strain of the conductor are sensed by the optical fiber, which is in close thermal and mechanical contact with the conductor. Intrinsic imperfections in the fiber reflect Rayleigh

  15. Design of HQ -- a High Field Large Bore Nb3Sn Quadrupole Magnet for LARP

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, H.; Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; Bossert, R.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D.; Ferracin, P.; Ghosh, A. K.; Hafalia, R.; Hannaford, C. R.; Kashikhin, V.; Schmalze, J.; Prestemon, S.; Sabbi, G. L.; Wanderer, P.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2008-08-17

    In support of the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade, a large bore (120 mm) Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupole with 15 T peak coil field is being developed within the framework of the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP). The 2-layer design with a 15 mm wide cable is aimed at pre-stress control, alignment and field quality while exploring the magnet performance limits in terms of gradient, forces and stresses. In addition, HQ will determine the magnetic, mechanical, and thermal margins of Nb{sub 3}Sn technology with respect to the requirements of the luminosity upgrade at the LHC.

  16. Insert Coil Test for HEP High Field Magnets Using YBCO Coated Conductor Tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, V.; Barzi, E.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-15

    The final beam cooling stages of a Muon Collider may require DC solenoid magnets with magnetic fields of 30-50 T. In this paper we present progress in insert coil development using commercially available YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} Coated Conductor. Technological aspects covered in the development, including coil geometry, insulation, manufacturing process and testing are summarized and discussed. Test results of double pancake coils operated in liquid nitrogen and liquid helium are presented and compared with the performance of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} tape short samples.

  17. AC loss evaluation of an HTS insert for high field magnet cooled by cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajikawa, Kazuhiro; Awaji, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2016-12-01

    AC losses in a high temperature superconducting (HTS) insert coil for 25-T cryogen-free superconducting magnet during its initial energization are numerically calculated under the assumption of slab approximation. The HTS insert consisting of 68 single pancakes wound using coated conductors generates a central magnetic field of 11.5 T in addition to the contribution of 14.0 T from a set of low temperature superconducting (LTS) outsert coils. Both the HTS insert and the LTS coils are cooled using cryocoolers, and energized simultaneously up to the central field of 25.5 T with a constant ramp rate for 60 min. The influences of the magnitudes and orientations of locally applied magnetic fields, magnetic interactions between turns and transport currents flowing in the windings are taken into account in the calculations of AC losses. The locally applied fields are separated into axial and radial components, and the individual contributions of these field components to the AC losses are simply summed up to obtain the total losses. The AC losses due to the axial fields become major in the beginning of energization, whereas the total losses monotonically increase with time after the AC losses due to the radial fields become major.

  18. Survey of Processing Methods for High Strength High Conductivity Wires for High Field Magnet Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Han, K.; Embury, J.D.

    1998-10-01

    This paper will deal with the basic concepts of attaining combination of high strength and high conductivity in pure materials, in-situ composites and macrocomposites. It will survey current attainments, and outline where some future developments may lie in developing wire products that are close to the theoretical strength of future magnet applications.

  19. High-field functional magnetic resonance imaging of vocalization processing in marmosets

    PubMed Central

    Sadagopan, Srivatsun; Temiz-Karayol, Nesibe Z.; Voss, Henning U.

    2015-01-01

    Vocalizations are behaviorally critical sounds, and this behavioral importance is reflected in the ascending auditory system, where conspecific vocalizations are increasingly over-represented at higher processing stages. Recent evidence suggests that, in macaques, this increasing selectivity for vocalizations might culminate in a cortical region that is densely populated by vocalization-preferring neurons. Such a region might be a critical node in the representation of vocal communication sounds, underlying the recognition of vocalization type, caller and social context. These results raise the questions of whether cortical specializations for vocalization processing exist in other species, their cortical location, and their relationship to the auditory processing hierarchy. To explore cortical specializations for vocalizations in another species, we performed high-field fMRI of the auditory cortex of a vocal New World primate, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). Using a sparse imaging paradigm, we discovered a caudal-rostral gradient for the processing of conspecific vocalizations in marmoset auditory cortex, with regions of the anterior temporal lobe close to the temporal pole exhibiting the highest preference for vocalizations. These results demonstrate similar cortical specializations for vocalization processing in macaques and marmosets, suggesting that cortical specializations for vocal processing might have evolved before the lineages of these species diverged. PMID:26091254

  20. Helical dipole magnets for polarized protons in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.; Courant, E.; Fischer, W.

    1997-07-01

    Superconducting helical dipole magnets will be used in the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to maintain polarization of proton beams and to perform localized spin rotations at the two major experimental detector regions. Requirements for the helical dipole system are discussed, and magnet prototype work is reported.

  1. One-thousand-fold enhancement of high field liquid nuclear magnetic resonance signals at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoquan; Levien, Marcel; Karschin, Niels; Parigi, Giacomo; Luchinat, Claudio; Bennati, Marina

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a fundamental spectroscopic technique for the study of biological systems and materials, molecular imaging and the analysis of small molecules. It detects interactions at very low energies and is thus non-invasive and applicable to a variety of targets, including animals and humans. However, one of its most severe limitations is its low sensitivity, which stems from the small interaction energies involved. Here, we report that dynamic nuclear polarization in liquid solution and at room temperature can enhance the NMR signal of (13)C nuclei by up to three orders of magnitude at magnetic fields of ∼3 T. The experiment can be repeated within seconds for signal averaging, without interfering with the sample magnetic homogeneity. The method is therefore compatible with the conditions required for high-resolution NMR. Enhancement of (13)C signals on various organic compounds opens up new perspectives for dynamic nuclear polarization as a general tool to increase the sensitivity of liquid NMR.

  2. One-thousand-fold enhancement of high field liquid nuclear magnetic resonance signals at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guoquan; Levien, Marcel; Karschin, Niels; Parigi, Giacomo; Luchinat, Claudio; Bennati, Marina

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a fundamental spectroscopic technique for the study of biological systems and materials, molecular imaging and the analysis of small molecules. It detects interactions at very low energies and is thus non-invasive and applicable to a variety of targets, including animals and humans. However, one of its most severe limitations is its low sensitivity, which stems from the small interaction energies involved. Here, we report that dynamic nuclear polarization in liquid solution and at room temperature can enhance the NMR signal of 13C nuclei by up to three orders of magnitude at magnetic fields of ∼3 T. The experiment can be repeated within seconds for signal averaging, without interfering with the sample magnetic homogeneity. The method is therefore compatible with the conditions required for high-resolution NMR. Enhancement of 13C signals on various organic compounds opens up new perspectives for dynamic nuclear polarization as a general tool to increase the sensitivity of liquid NMR.

  3. A dual RF resonator system for high-field functional magnetic resonance imaging of small animals.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, R; Bodgdanov, G; King, J; Allard, A; Ferris, C F

    2004-01-30

    A new apparatus has been developed that integrates an animal restrainer arrangement for small animals with an actively tunable/detunable dual radio-frequency (RF) coil system for in vivo anatomical and functional magnetic resonance imaging of small animals at 4.7 T. The radio-frequency coil features an eight-element microstrip line configuration that, in conjunction with a segmented outer copper shield, forms a transversal electromagnetic (TEM) resonator structure. Matching and active tuning/detuning is achieved through fixed/variable capacitors and a PIN diode for each resonator element. These components along with radio-frequency chokes (RFCs) and blocking capacitors are placed on two printed circuit boards (PCBs) whose copper coated ground planes form the front and back of the volume coil and are therefore an integral part of the resonator structure. The magnetic resonance signal response is received with a dome-shaped single-loop surface coil that can be height-adjustable with respect to the animal's head. The conscious animal is immobilized through a mechanical arrangement that consists of a Plexiglas body tube and a head restrainer. This restrainer has a cylindrical holder with a mouthpiece and position screws to receive and restrain the head of the animal. The apparatus is intended to perform anatomical and functional magnetic resonance imaging in conscious animals such as mice, rats, hamsters, and marmosets. Cranial images acquired from fully conscious rats in a 4.7 T Bruker 40 cm bore animal scanner underscore the feasibility of this approach and bode well to extend this system to the imaging of other animals.

  4. Development of Rutherford-type cables for high field accelerator magnets at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Borissov, E.; Elementi, L.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lombardo, V.; Rusy, A.; Turrioni, D.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    Fermilab's cabling facility has been upgraded to a maximum capability of 42 strands. This facility is being used to study the effect of cabling on the performance of the various strands, and for the development and fabrication of cables in support of the ongoing magnet R&D programs. Rutherford cables of various geometries, packing factors, with and without a stainless steel core, were fabricated out of Cu alloys, NbTi, Nb{sub 3}Al, and various Nb{sub 3}Sn strands. The parameters of the upgraded cabling machine and results of cable R&D efforts at Fermilab are reported.

  5. NMR in pulsed high-field magnets and application to high-T(C) superconductors.

    PubMed

    Stork, H; Bontemps, P; Rikken, G L J A

    2013-09-01

    This article deals with the implementation of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments in pulsed magnetic fields at the pulsed-field facility of the Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses and its application to the high-T(C) superconductor YBa2Cu3O6.51. The experimental setup is described in detail, including a low-temperature probe head adapted for pulsed fields. An entire paragraph is dedicated to the discussion of NMR in pulsed field and the introduction of an advanced deconvolution technique making use of the induction voltage in an additional pick-up coil. The (63)Cu/(65)Cu NMR experiments on an YBa2Cu3O6.51 single crystal were performed at 2.5K during a field pulse of 46.8-T-amplitude. In the recorded spectrum the (63)Cu center line and high-frequency satellites as well as the (65)Cu center line are identified and are compared with results in literature.

  6. [Orbital vasculonervous network and orbital surgical compartments by high field magnetic resonance].

    PubMed

    Hernández González, L C; Suárez Suárez, E; Dos Santos Bernardo, V; Junceda Moreno, J; Recio Rodríguez, M; Martínez De Vega, V; Viaño López, J

    2003-10-01

    To elucidate the possibilities and indications of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the study of the orbit and its contents. Orbital anatomy was studied in sliced specimens of fifteen fresh frozen cadavers and the results were compared with those obtained in thirty asymptomatic subjects who underwent a magnetic resonance with 1.5 Tesla equipment. The information obtained was used to interpret the findings in twenty-two patients with various orbital diseases. High-resolution MRI allows visualization of structures difficult to assess previously, like the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) surrounding the optic nerve, the complete intraorbital route and the exit of the third cranial nerve, the ophthalmic artery and the intraorbital relationships of the sixth cranial nerve, which can be clearly differentiated from the lateral rectus muscle. High-resolution MRI is a very useful tool for the study of the orbit and its content. It provides accurate diagnoses through non-invasive procedures and facilitates the planning of the surgical approaches by improving the visualization of pathologic orbital structures. lcarlos@correo.uniovi.es

  7. NMR in pulsed high-field magnets and application to high-TC superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stork, H.; Bontemps, P.; Rikken, G. L. J. A.

    2013-09-01

    This article deals with the implementation of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments in pulsed magnetic fields at the pulsed-field facility of the Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses and its application to the high-TC superconductor YBa2Cu3O6.51. The experimental setup is described in detail, including a low-temperature probe head adapted for pulsed fields. An entire paragraph is dedicated to the discussion of NMR in pulsed field and the introduction of an advanced deconvolution technique making use of the induction voltage in an additional pick-up coil. The 63Cu/65Cu NMR experiments on an YBa2Cu3O6.51 single crystal were performed at 2.5 K during a field pulse of 46.8-T-amplitude. In the recorded spectrum the 63Cu center line and high-frequency satellites as well as the 65Cu center line are identified and are compared with results in literature.

  8. Quench absorption coils: a quench protection concept for high-field superconducting accelerator magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentink, M.; Salmi, T.

    2017-06-01

    A quench protection concept based on coupled secondary coils is studied for inductively transferring energy out of a quenching superconducting dipole and thus limiting the peak hotspot temperature. So-called ‘quench absorption coils’ are placed in close proximity to the superconducting coils and are connected in series with a diode for the purpose of preventing current transformation during regular operation. During a quench, current is then transformed into the quench absorption coils so that a significant fraction of the stored magnetic energy is dissipated in the these coils. Numerical calculations are performed to determine the impact of such a concept and to evaluate the dimensions of the quench absorption coils needed to obtain significant benefits. A previously constructed 15 T Nb3Sn block coil is taken as a reference layout. Finite-element calculations are used to determine the combined inductive and thermal response of this system and these calculations are validated with a numerical model using an adiabatic approximation. The calculation results indicate that during a quench the presence of the quench absorption coils reduces the energy dissipated in the superconducting coils by 45% and reduces the hotspot temperature by over 100 K. In addition, the peak resistive voltage over the superconducting coils is significantly reduced. This suggests that this concept may prove useful for magnet designs in which the hotspot temperature is a design driver.

  9. Magnetic resonance anatomy of the proximal metacarpal region of the horse described from images acquired from low- and high-field magnets.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Annamaria; Dyson, Sue

    2009-01-01

    While low-field magnetic resonance (MR) images can provide useful information in the investigation of proximal metacarpal region pain, an in-depth knowledge of anatomy and comparison with more detailed high-field images are essential to understand the meaning of different signal intensities within tissues. This anatomic description is based on low-field and high-field MR examination of 30 cadaver metacarpal regions of mature horses with no history of carpal or proximal metacarpal pain. Normal MR anatomy is described and is illustrated by high-field and low-field MR images in transverse, sagittal and dorsal planes. Normal anatomic variations of soft tissue and osseous structures are discussed. Differences between the signal intensity and definition of tissues on high-field and low-field MR images and in different pulse sequences are highlighted. Several structures could be evaluated in both high-field and low-field images that cannot easily be imaged using radiography and ultrasonography, including the abaxial margins of the suspensory ligament, the interosseous ligaments between the metacarpal bones and the carpometacarpal ligaments. Structures that have previously not been described in detail were also identified.

  10. Pion Production from Proton Synchrotron Radiation in Strong Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    We study pion production by proton synchrotron radiation in the presence of a strong magnetic field. In this study we find that the decay width satisfies a robust scaling relation. This scaling implies that one can infer the decay width in more realistic magnetic fields of 1015 G, where ni,f ˜ 1012-1013, from the results for ni,f ˜ 104-105. Then, we present the resultant pion intensity and angular distributions for realistic magnetic field strengths.

  11. Development of superconductors for applications in high-field, high-current-density magnets for fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, L.T.; Miller, J.R.

    1986-09-26

    The development of large-bore, high-field magnets for fusion energy applications requires a system approach to both magnet and conductor design. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the criteria used to choose superconductors include: strain tolerance, radiation tolerance, heat removal, stability, fabricability, and cost. We report on the performance of industrially produced, prototype, Ti-modified Nb/sub 3/Sn wires developed with LLNL support. Wire performance characteristics evaluated include critical current as a function of magnetic field, temperature, and applied strain. Tests were performed to determine how this performance translates to the performance of a cable-in-conduit conductor system using this wire. An alternative to Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductors is NbN, which is strain and radiation insensitive. We report preliminary efforts to produce multifilamentary NbN conductors by liquid-metal infiltration of NbN-coated, high-strength fibers. In addition, we discuss the fabrication of multifilamentary NbN conductors and their possible impact on magnet design.

  12. Characterization of a dielectric phantom for high-field magnetic resonance imaging applications

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Qi; Duyn, Jeff H.; Gudino, Natalia; de Zwart, Jacco A.; van Gelderen, Peter; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Brown, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this work, a generic recipe for an inexpensive and nontoxic phantom was developed within a range of biologically relevant dielectric properties from 150 MHz to 4.5 GHz. Methods: The recipe includes deionized water as the solvent, NaCl to primarily control conductivity, sucrose to primarily control permittivity, agar–agar to gel the solution and reduce heat diffusivity, and benzoic acid to preserve the gel. Two hundred and seventeen samples were prepared to cover the feasible range of NaCl and sucrose concentrations. Their dielectric properties were measured using a commercial dielectric probe and were fitted to a 3D polynomial to generate a recipe describing the properties as a function of NaCl concentration, sucrose concentration, and frequency. Results: Results indicated that the intuitive linear and independent relationships between NaCl and conductivity and between sucrose and permittivity are not valid. A generic polynomial recipe was developed to characterize the complex relationship between the solutes and the resulting dielectric values and has been made publicly available as a web application. In representative mixtures developed to mimic brain and muscle tissue, less than 2% difference was observed between the predicted and measured conductivity and permittivity values. Conclusions: It is expected that the recipe will be useful for generating dielectric phantoms for general magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) coil development at high magnetic field strength, including coil safety evaluation as well as pulse sequence evaluation (including B1+ mapping, B1+ shimming, and selective excitation pulse design), and other non-MRI applications which require biologically equivalent dielectric properties. PMID:25281973

  13. Characterization of a dielectric phantom for high-field magnetic resonance imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Duan, Qi; Duyn, Jeff H; Gudino, Natalia; de Zwart, Jacco A; van Gelderen, Peter; Sodickson, Daniel K; Brown, Ryan

    2014-10-01

    In this work, a generic recipe for an inexpensive and nontoxic phantom was developed within a range of biologically relevant dielectric properties from 150 MHz to 4.5 GHz. The recipe includes deionized water as the solvent, NaCl to primarily control conductivity, sucrose to primarily control permittivity, agar-agar to gel the solution and reduce heat diffusivity, and benzoic acid to preserve the gel. Two hundred and seventeen samples were prepared to cover the feasible range of NaCl and sucrose concentrations. Their dielectric properties were measured using a commercial dielectric probe and were fitted to a 3D polynomial to generate a recipe describing the properties as a function of NaCl concentration, sucrose concentration, and frequency. Results indicated that the intuitive linear and independent relationships between NaCl and conductivity and between sucrose and permittivity are not valid. A generic polynomial recipe was developed to characterize the complex relationship between the solutes and the resulting dielectric values and has been made publicly available as a web application. In representative mixtures developed to mimic brain and muscle tissue, less than 2% difference was observed between the predicted and measured conductivity and permittivity values. It is expected that the recipe will be useful for generating dielectric phantoms for general magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) coil development at high magnetic field strength, including coil safety evaluation as well as pulse sequence evaluation (including B₁(+) mapping, B₁(+) shimming, and selective excitation pulse design), and other non-MRI applications which require biologically equivalent dielectric properties.

  14. Characterization of a dielectric phantom for high-field magnetic resonance imaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Qi Duyn, Jeff H.; Gudino, Natalia; Zwart, Jacco A. de; Gelderen, Peter van; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Brown, Ryan

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: In this work, a generic recipe for an inexpensive and nontoxic phantom was developed within a range of biologically relevant dielectric properties from 150 MHz to 4.5 GHz. Methods: The recipe includes deionized water as the solvent, NaCl to primarily control conductivity, sucrose to primarily control permittivity, agar–agar to gel the solution and reduce heat diffusivity, and benzoic acid to preserve the gel. Two hundred and seventeen samples were prepared to cover the feasible range of NaCl and sucrose concentrations. Their dielectric properties were measured using a commercial dielectric probe and were fitted to a 3D polynomial to generate a recipe describing the properties as a function of NaCl concentration, sucrose concentration, and frequency. Results: Results indicated that the intuitive linear and independent relationships between NaCl and conductivity and between sucrose and permittivity are not valid. A generic polynomial recipe was developed to characterize the complex relationship between the solutes and the resulting dielectric values and has been made publicly available as a web application. In representative mixtures developed to mimic brain and muscle tissue, less than 2% difference was observed between the predicted and measured conductivity and permittivity values. Conclusions: It is expected that the recipe will be useful for generating dielectric phantoms for general magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) coil development at high magnetic field strength, including coil safety evaluation as well as pulse sequence evaluation (including B{sub 1}{sup +} mapping, B{sub 1}{sup +} shimming, and selective excitation pulse design), and other non-MRI applications which require biologically equivalent dielectric properties.

  15. Can Images Obtained With High Field Strength Magnetic Resonance Imaging Reduce Contouring Variability of the Prostate?

    SciTech Connect

    Usmani, Nawaid; Sloboda, Ron; Kamal, Wafa; Ghosh, Sunita; Pervez, Nadeem; Pedersen, John; Yee, Don; Danielson, Brita; Murtha, Albert; Amanie, John; Monajemi, Tara

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to determine whether there is less contouring variability of the prostate using higher-strength magnetic resonance images (MRI) compared with standard MRI and computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Forty patients treated with prostate brachytherapy were accrued to a prospective study that included the acquisition of 1.5-T MR and CT images at specified time points. A subset of 10 patients had additional 3.0-T MR images acquired at the same time as their 1.5-T MR scans. Images from each of these patients were contoured by 5 radiation oncologists, with a random subset of patients repeated to quantify intraobserver contouring variability. To minimize bias in contouring the prostate, the image sets were placed in folders in a random order with all identifiers removed from the images. Results: Although there was less interobserver contouring variability in the overall prostate volumes in 1.5-T MRI compared with 3.0-T MRI (p < 0.01), there was no significant differences in contouring variability in the different regions of the prostate between 1.5-T MRI and 3.0-T MRI. MRI demonstrated significantly less interobserver contouring variability in both 1.5-T and 3.0-T compared with CT in overall prostate volumes (p < 0.01, p = 0.01), with the greatest benefits being appreciated in the base of the prostate. Overall, there was less intraobserver contouring variability than interobserver contouring variability for all of the measurements analyzed. Conclusions: Use of 3.0-T MRI does not demonstrate a significant improvement in contouring variability compared with 1.5-T MRI, although both magnetic strengths demonstrated less contouring variability compared with CT.

  16. Comparison of High-field and Low-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Stifle Joint Disorders in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Przeworski, A; Adamiak, Z; Głodek, J

    2016-09-01

    The most common cause of hindlimb lameness in dogs is cranial cruciate ligament rupture. In 48-77.3% of the population this trauma leads to secondary damage of the meniscus. Depending on the magnetic strength of the used device, different diagnostic accuracy can be achieved. The examination sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging is affected by many factors which are independent of diagnostic strength, such as correct positioning of the patient, size of the stifle joint examined, or selection of the right protocol of sequences. Sensitivity of meniscus damage detection was 100% and 90%, respectively, in high- and low-field magnetic resonance. The best results were reported during examination of the stifle in dogs above 10 kg b.w. at a flexion angle of 145°, and in sagittal and dorsal planes. Regardless of the magnetic strength applied, imaging of the whole cranial cruciate ligament is difficult. Moreover, MRI allows the detection of the first signs of osteoarthritis, which were observed 4 and 6 weeks after rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament using high and low-field MRI. This also applies to lesions in the subchondral bone or a bone marrow which occurred in association with insufficiency of the stifle joint, and were mainly localized in the epiphysis of the femur and tibia. The present article provides a comparison of different examination protocols and images of damaged stifle structures, such as menisci, ligaments and bones of the stifle joint visualized with low-field and high-field magnetic resonance. Magnetic resonance arthrography is also discussed.

  17. Proton magnetic relaxation dispersion in aqueous biopolymer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, S.

    Investigation of the magnetic field dependence of proton spin-lattice relaxation in solutions of bovine fibrinogen has been performed for Larmor frequencies between 50 Hz and 60 MHz, and complemented with measurements of spin-spin relaxation rates at 2 kHz and 25 MHz. A thorough analysis of experimental data, including the effects of protein concentration, temperature, pH and isotopic dilution, leads to an overall relaxation scheme consistent with T1 and T2 values at both low and high magnetic fields. The scheme involves water molecules slightly anisotropically bound on proteins as well as slow exchanging protein protons magnetically coupled to solute nuclei. A coherent picture, reminiscent of the traditional hydration layer, can be obtained for bound water. A major conclusion is that transfer of single protons may contribute substantially to the chemical exchange between free and bound water.

  18. The Magnetic Moments of the Proton and the Antiproton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, Stefan; Smorra, Christian

    A comparison of the magnetic moments of the proton and the antiproton provides a sensitive test of matter-antimatter symmetry. While the magnetic moment of the proton is known with a relative precision of 10^{-8}, that of the antiproton is only known with moderate accuracy. Important progress towards a high-precision measurement of the particle's magnetic moment was reported in 2011 by a group at Mainz when spin transitions of a single proton stored in a cryogenic Penning trap were observed. To resolve the single-proton spin flips, the so-called 'continuous Stern-Gerlach effect' was utilized. Using this technique, the proton magnetic moment was measured by two groups at Mainz and Harvard with relative precisions of 8.9× 10^{-6} and 2.5× 10^{-6}, respectively. Currently, two collaborations at the CERN antiproton decelerator (AD)—a part of ATRAP and BASE—are pushing their efforts to apply the methods developed for the proton to measure the magnetic moment of the antiproton. Very recently, DiSciacca et al. reported on a measurement of the antiproton's magnetic moment with a relative precision of 4.4 ppm, which is a improvement of the formerly best value by about a factor of 680. Using the so-called double Penning trap technique, both collaborations aim for a precision measurement at the level of at least 10^{-9} in future experiments, which would provide a highly sensitive test of the CPT symmetry using baryons.

  19. Brain–heart interactions: challenges and opportunities with functional magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field

    PubMed Central

    Raven, Erika P.; Duyn, Jeff H.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at ultra-high field (UHF) strengths (7 T and above) offers unique opportunities for studying the human brain with increased spatial resolution, contrast and sensitivity. However, its reliability can be compromised by factors such as head motion, image distortion and non-neural fluctuations of the functional MRI signal. The objective of this review is to provide a critical discussion of the advantages and trade-offs associated with UHF imaging, focusing on the application to studying brain–heart interactions. We describe how UHF MRI may provide contrast and resolution benefits for measuring neural activity of regions involved in the control and mediation of autonomic processes, and in delineating such regions based on anatomical MRI contrast. Limitations arising from confounding signals are discussed, including challenges with distinguishing non-neural physiological effects from the neural signals of interest that reflect cardiorespiratory function. We also consider how recently developed data analysis techniques may be applied to high-field imaging data to uncover novel information about brain–heart interactions. PMID:27044994

  20. Manufacture and Testing of a High Field Gradient Magnetic Fractionation System for Quantitative Detection of Plasmodium falciparum Gametocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, Stephan; Woodward, Robert C.; Davis, Timothy M. E.; St. Pierre, Tim G.

    2010-12-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is the most dangerous of the human malaria parasite species and accounts for millions of clinical episodes of malaria each year in tropical countries. The pathogenicity of Plasmodium falciparum is a result of its ability to infect erythrocytes where it multiplies asexually over 48 h or develops into sexual forms known as gametocytes. If sufficient male and female gametocytes are taken up by a mosquito vector, it becomes infectious. Therefore, the presence and density of gametocytes in human blood is an important indicator of human-to-mosquito transmission of malaria. Recently, we have shown that high field gradient magnetic fractionation improves gametocyte detection in human blood samples. Here we present two important new developments. Firstly we introduce a quantitative approach to replace the previous qualitative method and, secondly, we describe a novel method that enables cost-effective production of the magnetic fractionation equipment required to carry out gametocyte quantification. We show that our custom-made magnetic fractionation equipment can deliver results with similar sensitivity and convenience but for a small fraction of the cost.

  1. Comparison Between Nb3Al and Nb3Sn Strands and Cables for High Field Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.; Kikuchi, A.; Barzi, E.; Chlachidze, G.; Rusy, A.; Takeuchi, T.; Tartaglia, M.; Turrioni, D.; Velev, V.; Wake, M.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The Nb{sub 3}Al small racetrack magnet, SR07, has been successfully built and tested to its short sample limit beyond 10 Tesla without any training. Thus the practical application of Nb{sub 3}Al strands for high field accelerator magnets is established. The characteristics of the representative F4 strand and cable, are compared with the typical Nb{sub 3}Sn strand and cable. It is represented by the OST high current RRP Nb{sub 3}Sn strand with 108/127 configuration. The effects of Rutherford cabling to both type strands are explained and the inherent problem of the Nb{sub 3}Sn strand is discussed. Also the test results of two representative small racetrack magnets are compared from the stand point of Ic values, and training. The maximum current density of the Nb{sub 3}Al strands is still smaller than that of the Nb{sub 3}Sn strands, but if we take into account of the stress-strain characteristics, Nb{sub 3}Al strands become somewhat favorable in some applications.

  2. Analysing radio-frequency coil arrays in high-field magnetic resonance imaging by the combined field integral equation method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shumin; Duyn, Jeff H

    2006-06-21

    We present the combined field integral equation (CFIE) method for analysing radio-frequency coil arrays in high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three-dimensional models of coils and the human body were used to take into account the electromagnetic coupling. In the method of moments formulation, we applied triangular patches and the Rao-Wilton-Glisson basis functions to model arbitrarily shaped geometries. We first examined a rectangular loop coil to verify the CFIE method and also demonstrate its efficiency and accuracy. We then studied several eight-channel receive-only head coil arrays for 7.0 T SENSE functional MRI. Numerical results show that the signal dropout and the average SNR are two major concerns in SENSE coil array design. A good design should be a balance of these two factors.

  3. Development of Ta-matrix Nb3Al Strand and Cable for High-Field Accelerator Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, K.; Ghosh, A.; Kikuchi, A.; Takeuchi, T.; Banno, N.; Iijima, Y.; Nimori, S.; Takigawa, H.; Terashima, A.; Nakamoto, T.; Kuroda, Y.; Maruyama, M.; Takao, T.; Tanaka, K.; Nakagawa, K.; Barzi, E.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A.

    2011-08-03

    Research and development of Nb{sub 3}Al strands and cables for a high field accelerator magnet is ongoing under the framework of the CERN-KEK collaboration. In this program, new Ta-matrix Nb{sub 3}Al strands were developed and their mechanical properties and superconducting properties were studied. The non-Cu J{sub c} values of these strands were 750 {approx} 800 A/mm{sup 2} at 15 T and 4.2 K. Using these strands, test fabrication of 27-strand Rutherford cable was carried out in collaboration with NIMS and Fermilab. The properties of the strands extracted from the cable were examined and it was found that there was no degradation of the superconducting properties of the strands. In this paper, we report the fabrication of the strands and the cable in brief and present some of the results obtained by studying their properties.

  4. Windows on the Human Body – in Vivo High-Field Magnetic Resonance Research and Applications in Medicine and Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Ewald; Meyerspeer, Martin; Fischmeister, Florian Ph. S.; Grabner, Günther; Bauer, Herbert; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2010-01-01

    Analogous to the evolution of biological sensor-systems, the progress in “medical sensor-systems”, i.e., diagnostic procedures, is paradigmatically described. Outstanding highlights of this progress are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS), which enable non-invasive, in vivo acquisition of morphological, functional, and metabolic information from the human body with unsurpassed quality. Recent achievements in high and ultra-high field MR (at 3 and 7 Tesla) are described, and representative research applications in Medicine and Psychology in Austria are discussed. Finally, an overview of current and prospective research in multi-modal imaging, potential clinical applications, as well as current limitations and challenges is given. PMID:22219684

  5. Transsphenoidal Resection of Sellar Tumors Using High-Field Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Szerlip, Nicholas J.; Zhang, Yi-Chen; Placantonakis, Dimitris G.; Goldman, Marc; Colevas, Kara B.; Rubin, David G.; Kobylarz, Eric J.; Karimi, Sasan; Girotra, Monica; Tabar, Viviane

    2011-01-01

    There has been increasing experience in the utilization of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) for intracranial surgery. Despite this trend, only a few U.S centers have examined the use of this technology for transsphenoidal resection of tumors of the sella. We present the largest series in North America examining the role of iMRI for pituitary adenoma resection. We retrospectively reviewed our institutional experience of 59-patients who underwent transsphenoidal procedures for sellar and suprasellar tumors with iMRI guidance. Of these, 52 patients had a histological diagnosis of pituitary adenoma. The technical results of this subgroup were examined. A 1.5-T iMRI was integrated with the BrainLAB (Feldkirchen, Germany) neuronavigation system. The majority (94%) of tumors in our series were macroadenomas. Seventeen percent of tumors were confined to the sella, 49% had suprasellar extensions without involvement of the cavernous sinus, 34% had frank cavernous sinus invasion. All patients underwent at least one iMRI, and 19% required one or more additional sets of intraoperative imaging. In 58% of patients, iMRI led to the surgeon attempting more resection. A gross total resection was obtained in 67% of the patients with planned total resections. There was one case of permanent postoperative diabetes insipidus and no other instances of new hormone replacement. In summary, iMRI was most useful for tumors of the sella with and without suprasellar extension where the information from the iMRI extended the complete resection rate from 40 to 72% and 55 to 88%, respectively. As one would expect, it did not substantially increase the rate of resection of tumors with cavernous sinus invasion. Overall, iMRI was particularly useful in guiding resection safely, aiding in clinical decision making, and allowing identification and preservation of the pituitary stalk and normal pituitary gland. Limitations of the iMRI include a need for additional personnel and training

  6. The high-field magnet endstation for X-ray magnetic dichroism experiments at ESRF soft X-ray beamline ID32

    PubMed Central

    Kummer, K.; Fondacaro, A.; Jimenez, E.; Velez-Fort, E.; Amorese, A.; Aspbury, M.; Yakhou-Harris, F.; van der Linden, P.; Brookes, N. B.

    2016-01-01

    A new high-field magnet endstation for X-ray magnetic dichroism experiments has been installed and commissioned at the ESRF soft X-ray beamline ID32. The magnet consists of two split-pairs of superconducting coils which can generate up to 9 T along the beam and up to 4 T orthogonal to the beam. It is connected to a cluster of ultra-high-vacuum chambers that offer a comprehensive set of surface preparation and characterization techniques. The endstation and the beam properties have been designed to provide optimum experimental conditions for X-ray magnetic linear and circular dichroism experiments in the soft X-ray range between 400 and 1600 eV photon energy. User operation started in November 2014. PMID:26917134

  7. Endometrium evaluation with high-field (3-Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging in patients submitted to uterine leiomyoma embolization

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Monica Amadio Piazza; Nasser, Felipe; Zlotnik, Eduardo; Messina, Marcos de Lorenzo; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the endometrial alterations related to embolization of uterine arteries for the treatment of symptomatic uterine leiomyomatosis (pelvic pain and/or uterine bleeding) by means of high-field (3-Tesla) magnetic resonance. Methods: This is a longitudinal and prospective study that included 94 patients with a clinical and imaging diagnosis of symptomatic uterine leiomyomatosis, all of them treated by embolization of the uterine arteries. The patients were submitted to evaluations by high-field magnetic resonance of the pelvis before and 6 months after the procedure. Specific evaluations were made of the endometrium on the T2-weighted sequences, and on the T1-weighted sequences before and after the intravenous dynamic infusion of the paramagnetic contrast. In face of these measures, statistical analyses were performed using Student's t test for comparison of the results obtained before and after the procedure. Results: An average increase of 20.9% was noted in the endometrial signal on T2-weighted images obtained after the uterine artery embolization procedure when compared to the pre-procedure evaluation (p=0.0004). In the images obtained with the intravenous infusion of paramagnetic contrast, an average increase of 18.7% was noted in the post-embolization intensity of the endometrial signal, compared to the pre-embolization measure (p<0.035). Conclusion: After embolization of the uterine arteries, there was a significant increase of the endometrial signal on the T2-weighted images and on the post-contrast images, inferring possible edema and increased endometrial flow. Future studies are needed to assess the clinical impact of these findings. PMID:23579745

  8. Evaluation of radio frequency microcoils as nuclear magnetic resonance detectors in low-homogeneity high-field superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, A. C.; Neideen, T. A.; Magin, R. L.; Norcross, J. A.

    1998-11-01

    We describe here experiments evaluating the performance of solenoidal radio frequency probes having submillimeter dimensions (microcoils) as detectors for liquid nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in very low-homogeneity (100 ppm/cm) magnetic fields. Performance is based on the measured H2O linewidth. A series of solenoidal microcoils having sample volumes 8, 53, and 593 nl were filled with distilled H2O and evaluated for smallest obtainable unshimmed NMR spectral linewidths in a vertical bore superconducting magnet, stabilized at 5.9 T (1H frequency=250 MHz). The smallest microcoil (472 μm diameter) gave a smallest H2O linewidth of 525 Hz, 25 times smaller than that from a standard 5.7 mm probe. Linewidth increased approximately as the square root of sample volume. For comparison, shimmed H2O linewidths using the same microcoils in a high-homogeneity (0.1 ppm/cm) NMR magnet were also measured. Shimmed linewidths in the high-homogeneity magnet were two orders of magnitude smaller and exhibited a similar dependence on volume. The results demonstrate that by using microcoils the volume over which the polarizing magnetic field must meet a specified homogeneity can be significantly reduced, which would be advantageous for smaller, less expensive NMR systems.

  9. Single-Plane Magnetically Focused Elongated Small Field Proton Beams.

    PubMed

    McAuley, Grant A; Slater, James M; Wroe, Andrew J

    2015-08-01

    We previously performed Monte Carlo simulations of magnetically focused proton beams shaped by a single quadrapole magnet and thereby created narrow elongated beams with superior dose delivery characteristics (compared to collimated beams) suitable for targets of similar geometry. The present study seeks to experimentally validate these simulations using a focusing magnet consisting of 24 segments of samarium cobalt permanent magnetic material adhered into a hollow cylinder. Proton beams with properties relevant to clinical radiosurgery applications were delivered through the magnet to a water tank containing a diode detector or radiochromic film. Dose profiles were analyzed and compared with analogous Monte Carlo simulations. The focused beams produced elongated beam spots with high elliptical symmetry, indicative of magnet quality. Experimental data showed good agreement with simulations, affirming the utility of Monte Carlo simulations as a tool to model the inherent complexity of a magnetic focusing system. Compared to target-matched unfocused simulations, focused beams showed larger peak to entrance ratios (26% to 38%) and focused simulations showed a two-fold increase in beam delivery efficiency. These advantages can be attributed to the magnetic acceleration of protons in the transverse plane that tends to counteract the particle outscatter that leads to degradation of peak to entrance performance in small field proton beams. Our results have important clinical implications and suggest rare earth focusing magnet assemblies are feasible and could reduce skin dose and beam number while delivering enhanced dose to narrow elongated targets (eg, in and around the spinal cord) in less time compared to collimated beams. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. On the Importance of Exchangeable NH Protons in Creatine for the Magnetic Coupling of Creatine Methyl Protons in Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruiskamp, M. J.; Nicolay, K.

    2001-03-01

    The methyl protons of creatine in skeletal muscle exhibit a strong off-resonance magnetization transfer effect. The mechanism of this process is unknown. We previously hypothesized that the exchangeable amide/amino protons of creatine might be involved. To test this the characteristics of the creatine magnetization transfer effect were investigated in excised rat hindleg skeletal muscle that was equilibrated in either H2O or D2O solutions containing creatine. The efficiency of off-resonance magnetization transfer to the protons of mobile creatine in excised muscle was similar to that previously reported in intact muscle in vivo. Equilibrating the isolated muscle in D2O solution had no effect on the magnetic coupling to the immobile protons. It is concluded that exchangeable protons play a negligible role in the magnetic coupling of creatine methyl protons in muscle.

  11. Proton magnetic relaxation and internal rotations in tetramethylammonium cadmium chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Utton, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and relaxation studies of the proton spin-lattice relaxation time (PSLRT) and proton second moment (PSM) are reported. Tetramethylammonium cadmium chloride (TMCC) was selected as a diamagnetic member of the isomorphic series, and hence proton data relate directly to the motion of the tetramethylammonium ion in the absence of paramagnetic ions. In the model adopted, the correlation time for hindered motion of one of the methyl groups differs from that of the other three groups in the low-temperature phase below 104 K. PSLRT and PSM values agree closely with experimental data with this model. Crystallographic phase transitions in TMCC occur at 104 K and 119 K according to the PSLRT measurements. Dipolar interactions between adjacent protons account for the PSLR rates below 104 K.

  12. Mercury's Surface Magnetic Field Determined from Proton-Reflection Magnetometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winslow, Reka M.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Anderson, Brian J.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Raines, Jim M.; Lillis, Robert J.; Korth, Haje; Slavin, James A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2014-01-01

    Solar wind protons observed by the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit about Mercury exhibit signatures of precipitation loss to Mercury's surface. We apply proton-reflection magnetometry to sense Mercury's surface magnetic field intensity in the planet's northern and southern hemispheres. The results are consistent with a dipole field offset to the north and show that the technique may be used to resolve regional-scale fields at the surface. The proton loss cones indicate persistent ion precipitation to the surface in the northern magnetospheric cusp region and in the southern hemisphere at low nightside latitudes. The latter observation implies that most of the surface in Mercury's southern hemisphere is continuously bombarded by plasma, in contrast with the premise that the global magnetic field largely protects the planetary surface from the solar wind.

  13. Impairment of chondrocyte biosynthetic activity by exposure to 3-tesla high-field magnetic resonance imaging is temporary.

    PubMed

    Sunk, Ilse-Gerlinde; Trattnig, Siegfried; Graninger, Winfried B; Amoyo, Love; Tuerk, Birgit; Steiner, Carl-Walter; Smolen, Josef S; Bobacz, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    The influence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices at high field strengths on living tissues is unknown. We investigated the effects of a 3-tesla electromagnetic field (EMF) on the biosynthetic activity of bovine articular cartilage. Bovine articular cartilage was obtained from juvenile and adult animals. Whole joints or cartilage explants were subjected to a pulsed 3-tesla EMF; controls were left unexposed. Synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs) was measured by using [35S]sulfate incorporation; mRNA encoding the cartilage markers aggrecan and type II collagen, as well as IL-1beta, were analyzed by RT-PCR. Furthermore, effects of the 3-tesla EMF were determined over the course of time directly after exposure (day 0) and at days 3 and 6. In addition, the influence of a 1.5-tesla EMF on cartilage sGAG synthesis was evaluated. Chondrocyte cell death was assessed by staining with Annexin V and TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). Exposure to the EMF resulted in a significant decrease in cartilage macromolecule synthesis. Gene expression of both aggrecan and IL-1beta, but not of collagen type II, was reduced in comparison with controls. Staining with Annexin V and TUNEL revealed no evidence of cell death. Interestingly, chondrocytes regained their biosynthetic activity within 3 days after exposure, as shown by proteoglycan synthesis rate and mRNA expression levels. Cartilage samples exposed to a 1.5-tesla EMF remained unaffected. Although MRI devices with a field strength of more than 1.5 T provide a better signal-to-noise ratio and thereby higher spatial resolution, their high field strength impairs the biosynthetic activity of articular chondrocytes in vitro. Although this decrease in biosynthetic activity seems to be transient, articular cartilage exposed to high-energy EMF may become vulnerable to damage.

  14. Impairment of chondrocyte biosynthetic activity by exposure to 3-tesla high-field magnetic resonance imaging is temporary

    PubMed Central

    Sunk, Ilse-Gerlinde; Trattnig, Siegfried; Graninger, Winfried B; Amoyo, Love; Tuerk, Birgit; Steiner, Carl-Walter; Smolen, Josef S; Bobacz, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    The influence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices at high field strengths on living tissues is unknown. We investigated the effects of a 3-tesla electromagnetic field (EMF) on the biosynthetic activity of bovine articular cartilage. Bovine articular cartilage was obtained from juvenile and adult animals. Whole joints or cartilage explants were subjected to a pulsed 3-tesla EMF; controls were left unexposed. Synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs) was measured by using [35S]sulfate incorporation; mRNA encoding the cartilage markers aggrecan and type II collagen, as well as IL-1β, were analyzed by RT–PCR. Furthermore, effects of the 3-tesla EMF were determined over the course of time directly after exposure (day 0) and at days 3 and 6. In addition, the influence of a 1.5-tesla EMF on cartilage sGAG synthesis was evaluated. Chondrocyte cell death was assessed by staining with Annexin V and TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). Exposure to the EMF resulted in a significant decrease in cartilage macromolecule synthesis. Gene expression of both aggrecan and IL-1β, but not of collagen type II, was reduced in comparison with controls. Staining with Annexin V and TUNEL revealed no evidence of cell death. Interestingly, chondrocytes regained their biosynthetic activity within 3 days after exposure, as shown by proteoglycan synthesis rate and mRNA expression levels. Cartilage samples exposed to a 1.5-tesla EMF remained unaffected. Although MRI devices with a field strength of more than 1.5 T provide a better signal-to-noise ratio and thereby higher spatial resolution, their high field strength impairs the biosynthetic activity of articular chondrocytes in vitro. Although this decrease in biosynthetic activity seems to be transient, articular cartilage exposed to high-energy EMF may become vulnerable to damage. PMID:16831232

  15. Recent progress towards developing a high field, high-T(sub c) superconducting magnet for magnetic suspension and balance systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derochemont, L. Pierre; Oakes, Carlton E.; Squillante, Michael R.; Duan, Hong-Min; Hermann, Allen M.; Andrews, Robert J.; Poeppel, Roger B.; Maroni, Victor A.; Carlberg, Ingrid A.; Kelliher, Warren C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews superconducting magnets and high T(sub c) superconducting oxide ceramic materials technology to identify areas of fundamental impasse to the fabrication of components and devices that tap what are believed to be the true potential of these new materials. High T(sub c) ceramics pose problems in fundamentally different areas which need to be solved unlike low T(sub c) materials. The authors map out an experimental plan designed to research process technologies which, if suitably implemented, should allow these deficiencies to be solved. Finally, assessments are made of where and on what regimes magnetic system designers should focus their attention to advance the practical development of systems based on these new materials.

  16. Recent progress towards developing a high field, high-T(sub c) superconducting magnet for magnetic suspension and balance systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derochemont, L. Pierre; Oakes, Carlton E.; Squillante, Michael R.; Duan, Hong-Min; Hermann, Allen M.; Andrews, Robert J.; Poeppel, Roger B.; Maroni, Victor A.; Carlberg, Ingrid A.; Kelliher, Warren C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews superconducting magnets and high T(sub c) superconducting oxide ceramic materials technology to identify areas of fundamental impasse to the fabrication of components and devices that tap what are believed to be the true potential of these new materials. High T(sub c) ceramics pose problems in fundamentally different areas which need to be solved unlike low T(sub c) materials. The authors map out an experimental plan designed to research process technologies which, if suitably implemented, should allow these deficiencies to be solved. Finally, assessments are made of where and on what regimes magnetic system designers should focus their attention to advance the practical development of systems based on these new materials.

  17. A Nested Phosphorus and Proton Coil Array for Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ryan; Lakshmanan, Karthik; Madelin, Guillaume; Parasoglou, Prodromos

    2015-01-01

    A dual-nuclei radiofrequency coil array was constructed for phosphorus and proton magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of the human brain at 7 Tesla. An eight-channel transceive degenerate birdcage phosphorus module was implemented to provide whole-brain coverage and significant sensitivity improvement over a standard dual-tuned loop coil. A nested eight-channel proton module provided adequate sensitivity for anatomical localization without substantially sacrificing performance on the phosphorus module. The developed array enabled phosphorus spectroscopy, a saturation transfer technique to calculate the global creatine kinase forward reaction rate, and single-metabolite whole-brain imaging with 1.4 cm nominal isotropic resolution in 15 min (2.3 cm actual resolution), while additionally enabling 1 mm isotropic proton imaging. This study demonstrates that a multi-channel array can be utilized for phosphorus and proton applications with improved coverage and/or sensitivity over traditional single-channel coils. The efficient multi-channel coil array, time-efficient pulse sequences, and the enhanced signal strength available at ultra-high fields can be combined to allow volumetric assessment of the brain and could provide new insights into the underlying energy metabolism impairment in several neurodegenerative conditions, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, as well as mental disorders such as schizophrenia. PMID:26375209

  18. The magnetic moments of the proton and the antiproton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, S.; Mooser, A.; Blaum, K.; Braeuninger, S.; Franke, K.; Kracke, H.; Leiteritz, C.; Matsuda, Y.; Nagahama, H.; Ospelkaus, C.; Rodegheri, C. C.; Quint, W.; Schneider, G.; Smorra, C.; Van Gorp, S.; Walz, J.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2014-04-01

    Recent exciting progress in the preparation and manipulation of the motional quantum states of a single trapped proton enabled the first direct detection of the particle's spin state. Based on this success the proton magnetic moment μp was measured with ppm precision in a Penning trap with a superimposed magnetic field inhomogeneity. An improvement by an additional factor of 1000 in precision is possible by application of the so-called double Penning trap technique. In a recent paper we reported the first demonstration of this method with a single trapped proton, which is a major step towards the first direct high-precision measurement of μp. The techniques required for the proton can be directly applied to measure the antiproton magnetic moment μp. An improvement in precision of μp by more than three orders of magnitude becomes possible, which will provide one of the most sensitive tests of CPT invariance. To achieve this research goal we are currently setting up the Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE) at the antiproton decelerator (AD) of CERN.

  19. High field (9.4 Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging of cortical grey matter lesions in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Schmierer, Klaus; Parkes, Harold G; So, Po-Wah; An, Shu F; Brandner, Sebastian; Ordidge, Roger J; Yousry, Tarek A; Miller, David H

    2010-03-01

    .9; SD = 5 versus 22.6 ms; SD = 4.7; P < 0.01). Associations were detected between phosphorylated neurofilament and myelin basic protein (r = 0.58, P < 0.01), myelin basic protein and T(2) (r = -0.59, P < 0.01), and neuronal density and T(1) (r = -0.57, P < 0.01). All indices correlated with duration of tissue fixation, however, including the latter in the analysis did not fundamentally affect the associations described. Our data show that T(2)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging at 9.4 T enables detection of cortical grey matter lesion in post-mortem multiple sclerosis brain. The quantitative associations suggest that in cortical grey matter T(1) may be a predictor of neuronal density, and T(2) of myelin content (and-secondarily-axons). Successful translation of these results into in vivo studies using high field magnetic resonance imaging (e.g. 3 T and 7 T) will improve the assessment of cortical pathology and thereby have an impact on the diagnosis and natural history studies of patients with multiple sclerosis, as well as clinical trial designs for putative treatments to prevent cortical demyelination and neuronal loss.

  20. Numerical modelling of thermal effects in rats due to high-field magnetic resonance imaging (0.5 1 GHz)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakic, Adnan; Crozier, Stuart; Liu, Feng

    2004-12-01

    A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) thermal model has been developed to compute the temperature elevation in the Sprague Dawley rat due to electromagnetic energy deposition in high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The field strengths examined ranged from 11.75-23.5 T (corresponding to 1H resonances of 0.5-1 GHz) and an N-stub birdcage resonator was used to both transmit radio-frequency energy and receive the MRI signals. With an in-plane resolution of 1.95 mm, the inhomogeneous rat phantom forms a segmented model of 12 different tissue types, each having its electrical and thermal parameters assigned. The steady-state temperature distribution was calculated using a Pennes 'bioheat' approach. The numerical algorithm used to calculate the induced temperature distribution has been successfully validated against analytical solutions in the form of simplified spherical models with electrical and thermal properties of rat muscle. As well as assisting with the design of MRI experiments and apparatus, the numerical procedures developed in this study could help in future research and design of tumour-treating hyperthermia applicators to be used on rats in vivo.

  1. Numerical modelling of thermal effects in rats due to high-field magnetic resonance imaging (0.5-1 GHZ).

    PubMed

    Trakic, Adnan; Crozier, Stuart; Liu, Feng

    2004-12-21

    A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) thermal model has been developed to compute the temperature elevation in the Sprague Dawley rat due to electromagnetic energy deposition in high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The field strengths examined ranged from 11.75-23.5 T (corresponding to 1H resonances of 0.5-1 GHz) and an N-stub birdcage resonator was used to both transmit radio-frequency energy and receive the MRI signals. With an in-plane resolution of 1.95 mm, the inhomogeneous rat phantom forms a segmented model of 12 different tissue types, each having its electrical and thermal parameters assigned. The steady-state temperature distribution was calculated using a Pennes 'bioheat' approach. The numerical algorithm used to calculate the induced temperature distribution has been successfully validated against analytical solutions in the form of simplified spherical models with electrical and thermal properties of rat muscle. As well as assisting with the design of MRI experiments and apparatus, the numerical procedures developed in this study could help in future research and design of tumour-treating hyperthermia applicators to be used on rats in vivo.

  2. Functionality of veterinary identification microchips following low- (0.5 tesla) and high-field (3 tesla) magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Piesnack, Susann; Frame, Mairi E; Oechtering, Gerhard; Ludewig, Eberhard

    2013-01-01

    The ability to read patient identification microchips relies on the use of radiofrequency pulses. Since radiofrequency pulses also form an integral part of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) process, the possibility of loss of microchip function during MRI scanning is of concern. Previous clinical trials have shown microchip function to be unaffected by MR imaging using a field strength of 1 Tesla and 1.5. As veterinary MRI scanners range widely in field strength, this study was devised to determine whether exposure to lower or higher field strengths than 1 Tesla would affect the function of different types of microchip. In a phantom study, a total of 300 International Standards Organisation (ISO)-approved microchips (100 each of three different types: ISO FDX-B 1.4 × 9 mm, ISO FDX-B 2.12 × 12 mm, ISO HDX 3.8 × 23 mm) were tested in a low field (0.5) and a high field scanner (3.0 Tesla). A total of 50 microchips of each type were tested in each scanner. The phantom was composed of a fluid-filled freezer pack onto which a plastic pillow and a cardboard strip with affixed microchips were positioned. Following an MRI scan protocol simulating a head study, all of the microchips were accurately readable. Neither 0.5 nor 3 Tesla imaging affected microchip function in this study. © 2013 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  3. Slow Magnetic Relaxations in Cobalt(II) Tetranitrate Complexes. Studies of Magnetic Anisotropy by Inelastic Neutron Scattering and High-Frequency and High-Field EPR Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Lei; Cui, Hui-Hui; Stavretis, Shelby E.; ...

    2016-12-07

    We synthesized and studied three mononuclear cobalt(II) tetranitrate complexes (A)2[Co(NO3)4] with different countercations, Ph4P+ (1), MePh3P+ (2), and Ph4As+ (3), using X-ray single-crystal diffraction, magnetic measurements, inelastic neutron scattering (INS), high-frequency and high-field EPR (HF-EPR) spectroscopy, and theoretical calculations. Furthermore, the X-ray diffraction studies reveal that the structure of the tetranitrate cobalt anion varies with the countercation. 1 and 2 exhibit highly irregular seven-coordinate geometries, while the central Co(II) ion of 3 is in a distorted-dodecahedral configuration. The sole magnetic transition observed in the INS spectroscopy of 1–3 corresponds to the zero-field splitting (2(D2 + 3E2)1/2) from 22.5(2) cm–1 inmore » 1 to 26.6(3) cm–1 in 2 and 11.1(5) cm–1 in 3. The positive sign of the D value, and hence the easy-plane magnetic anisotropy, was demonstrated for 1 by INS studies under magnetic fields and HF-EPR spectroscopy. The combined analyses of INS and HF-EPR data yield the D values as +10.90(3), +12.74(3), and +4.50(3) cm–1 for 1–3, respectively. Frequency- and temperature-dependent alternating-current magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal the slow magnetization relaxation in 1 and 2 at an applied dc field of 600 Oe, which is a characteristic of field-induced single-molecule magnets (SMMs). Finally, the electronic structures and the origin of magnetic anisotropy of 1–3 were revealed by calculations at the CASPT2/NEVPT2 level.« less

  4. Mental rotation studied by functional magnetic resonance imaging at high field (4 tesla): performance and cortical activation.

    PubMed

    Tagaris, G A; Kim, S G; Strupp, J P; Andersen, P; Uğurbil, K; Georgopoulos, A P

    1997-07-01

    We studied the performance and cortical activation patterns during a mental rotation task (Shepard & Metzler, 1971) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMlU) at high field (4 Tesla). Twenty-four human subjects were imaged (fMRI group), whereas six additional subjects performed the task without being imaged (control group). All subjects were shown pairs of perspective drawings of 31, objects and asked to judge whether they were the same or mirror images. The measures of performance examined included (1) the percentage of errors, (2) the speed of performance, calculated as the inverse of the average response time, and (3) the rate of rotation for those object pairs correctly identified as "same." We found the following: (1) Subjects in the fMRI group performed well outside and inside the magnet, and, in the latter case, before and during data acquisition. Moreover, performance over time improved in the same manner as in the control group. These findings indicate that exposure to high magnetic fields does not impair performance in mental rotation. (2) Functional activation data were analyzed from 16 subjects of the fMRI goup. Several cortical areas were activated during task performance. The relations between the measures of performance above and the magnitude of activation of specific cortical areas were investigated by anatomically demarcating these areas of interest and calculating a normalized activation for each one of them. (3) We used the multivariate technique of hierarchical tree modeling to determine functional clustering among areas of interest and performance measures. Two main branches were distinguished: One comprised areas in the right hemisphere and the extrastriate and superior parietal lobules bilaterally, whereas the other comprised areas of the left hemisphere and the frontal pole bilaterally; all three performance measures above clustered with the former branch. Specifically, performance outcome ("percentage of errors") clustered with the

  5. Magnetic Moment of Proton Drip-Line Nucleus (9)C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuta, K.; Fukuda, M.; Tanigaki, M.; Minamisono, T.; Nojiri, Y.; Mihara, M.; Onishi, T.; Yamaguchi, T.; Harada, A.; Sasaki, M.

    1994-01-01

    The magnetic moment of the proton drip-line nucleus C-9(I(sup (pi)) = 3/2, T(sub 1/2) = 126 ms) has been measured for the first time, using the beta-NMR detection technique with polarized radioactive beams. The measure value for the magnetic moment is 1mu(C-9)! = 1.3914 +/- 0.0005 (mu)N. The deduced spin expectation value of 1.44 is unusually larger than any other ones of even-odd nuclei.

  6. High-field magnetization of heusler alloys Fe2 XY ( X = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni; Y = Al, Si)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourov, N. I.; Marchenkov, V. V.; Korolev, A. V.; Belozerova, K. A.; Weber, H. W.

    2015-10-01

    The magnetization curves of ferromagnetic Heusler alloys Fe2 XY (where X = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni are transition 3 d elements and Y = Al, Si are the s and p elements of the third period of the Periodic Table) have been measured at T = 4.2 K in the field range H ≤ 70 kOe. It has been shown that the high-field ( H ≥ 20 kOe) magnetization is described within the Stoner model.

  7. Magnetic properties of Zn doped Co{sub 2}Y hexaferrite by using high-field Mössbauer spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tae Lim, Jung; Sung Kim, Chul

    2014-05-07

    The polycrystalline samples of Ba{sub 2}Co{sub 2−x}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 22} (x = 0.5, 1.0, 1.5) were synthesized by using solid-state-reaction method. From the XRD patterns, analyzed by Rietveld refinement, the prepared samples are found to be single-phased with rhombohedral structure (R-3m). The magnetic properties of samples were investigated with vibrating sample magnetometer, and high-field Mössbauer spectrometer. From the zero-field-cooled curves under 100 Oe between 4.2 and 740 K, we observe that the samples show spin transition from helicalmagnetic to ferrimagnetic order. With increasing Zn ion concentration, the spin transition temperature (T{sub s}) and Curie temperature (T{sub C}) decrease linearly. We have obtained Zero-field Mössbauer spectra of all samples at various temperatures ranging from 4.2 to 650 K, and analyzed the spectra below T{sub C} as six-sextets for Fe sites. From the temperature dependence of hyperfine field (H{sub hf}), we have noticed an abrupt change in H{sub hf} at T{sub s}. In addition, Mössbauer spectra of all samples at 4.2 K were taken with applied field ranging from 0 to 50 kOe, indicating the canting angle between applied field and H{sub hf} decreased with increasing Zn concentration.

  8. High strength kiloampere Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox cables for high-field magnet applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tengming; Li, Pei; Jiang, Jianyi; Cooley, Lance; Tompkins, John; McRae, Dustin; Walsh, Robert

    2015-06-01

    INCONEL X750 for various high-field magnet applications.

  9. High strength kiloampere Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O x cables for high-field magnet applications

    DOE PAGES

    Shen, Tengming; Li, Pei; Jiang, Jianyi; ...

    2015-04-17

    -Cr-Al and high strength of INCONEL X750 for various high-field magnet applications.« less

  10. PEGylated NaHoF4 nanoparticles as contrast agents for both X-ray computed tomography and ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ni, Dalong; Zhang, Jiawen; Bu, Wenbo; Zhang, Chen; Yao, Zhenwei; Xing, Huaiyong; Wang, Jing; Duan, Fei; Liu, Yanyan; Fan, Wenpei; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Shi, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that multimodal imaging can integrate the advantages of different imaging modalities by overcoming their individual limitations. As ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be inevitably used in future MRI/X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner, it is highly expected to develop high-performance nano-contrast agents for ultra-high field MR and CT dual-modality imaging, which has not been reported yet. Moreover, specific behavior of nano-contrast agents for ultra-high field MRI is a challenging work and still remains unknown. Herein, a novel type of NaHoF4 nanoparticles (NPs) with varied particle sizes were synthesized and explored as high-performance dual-modality contrast agents for ultra-high field MR and CT imaging. The specific X-ray absorption and MR relaxivity enhancements with varied nanoparticle diameters (3 nm, 7 nm, 13 nm and 29 nm) under different magnetic field (1.5/3.0/7.0 T) are investigated. Based on experimental results and theoretical analysis, the Curie and dipolar relaxation mechanisms of NaHoF4 NPs are firstly separated. Our results will greatly promote the future medical translational development of the NaHoF4 nano-contrast agents for ultra-high field MR/CT dual-modality imaging applications.

  11. Assessment of female ballet dancers' ankles in the en pointe position using high field strength magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Russell, Jeffrey A; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    The en pointe position of the ankle in ballet is extreme. Previously, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of ballet dancers' ankles en pointe was confined to a low field, open MR device. To develop a reproducible ankle MRI protocol for ballet dancers en pointe and to assess the positions of the key structures in the dancers ankles. Six female ballet dancers participated; each was randomly assigned to stand en pointe while one of her feet and ankles was splinted with wooden rods affixed with straps or to begin with the ankle in neutral position. She lay in an MR scanner with the ankle inside a knee coil for en pointe imaging and inside an ankle/foot coil for neutral position imaging. Proton density weighted images with and without fat suppression and 3D water excitation gradient recalled echo images were obtained en pointe and in neutral position in sagittal, axial, and coronal planes. We compared the bones, cartilage, and soft tissues within and between positions. No difficulties using the protocol were encountered. En pointe the posterior articular surface of the tibial plafond was incongruent with the talar dome and rested on the posterior talus. The posterior edge of the plafond impinged Kager's fat pad. All participants exhibited one or more small ganglion cysts about the ankle and proximal foot, as well as fluid accumulation in the flexor and fibularis tendon sheaths. Our MRI protocol allows assessment of female ballet dancers' ankles in the extreme plantar flexion position in which the dancers perform. We consistently noted incongruence of the talocrural joint and convergence of the tibia, talus, and calcaneus posteriorly. This protocol may be useful for clinicians who evaluate dancers. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  12. In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of breast cancer: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    An emerging clinical modality called proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) enables the non-invasive in vivo assessment of tissue metabolism and is demonstrating applications in improving the specificity of MR breast lesion diagnosis and monitoring tumour responsiveness to neoadjuvant chemotherapies. Variations in the concentration of choline-based cellular metabolites, detectable with 1H-MRS, have shown an association with malignant transformation of tissue in in vivo and in vitro studies. 1H-MRS exists as an adjunct to the current routine clinical breast MR examination. This review serves as an introduction to the field of breast 1H-MRS, discusses modern high-field strength and quantitative approaches and technical considerations, and reviews the literature with respect to the application of 1H-MRS for breast cancer. PMID:22515594

  13. Determination of the intersublattice exchange interactions in GdCo12-xFexB6 (x = 0-3) intermetallic compounds by high field magnetization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diop, L. V. B.; Isnard, O.; Skourski, Y.; Ballon, G.

    2013-05-01

    High field magnetization measurements up to 60 T on free powder samples from GdCo12-xFexB6 (x = 0-3) compounds are reported. The data were used to evaluate the microscopic exchange interaction integral, JGd-3d, between Gd and 3d (Co,Fe) spins. The systems are ferrimagnets; they order magnetically between TC = 95 K for x = 3 and TC = 165 K for x = 0. The low temperature magnetization curves as well as the temperature dependence of intrinsic magnetic parameters are determined by magnetic measurements in pulsed magnetic field. The average magnetic moment ⟨μCo+Fe⟩ per mean transition metal atom (Co + Fe) is small and increases with increasing Fe concentration from 0.44 μΒ for x = 0 to 0.51 μΒ for x = 3 at T = 4 K. From high field magnetization curves, a value of JGd-3d/kB = -4.65 K is derived for x = 0, whereas mean field approximation yields a much larger 3d-3d exchange integral of JCo-Co/kB = 105 K. The obtained results reveal an increase of -JGd-3d/kB with Fe concentration. For x = 0.5, the intersublattice coefficient nGd-3d is found to keep an almost constant value of 5.87 ± 0.13 T*f.u.*μB-1 whatever the temperature in the 2 to 60 K range.

  14. New 30 kA power system at Fermilab and its use for measuring the effects of ripple current on the performance of superconducting high field magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Garvey, J.; Jaskierny, W.; Lamm, M.; Makulski, A.; Orris, D.F.; Pfeffer, H.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.; Wolff, D.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    A new 30 kA, 30 V dc Power System was designed, built, and commissioned at Fermilab for testing Superconducting High Field Magnets. This system has been successfully supporting operations at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility since April 2002. It is based on six commercial 150 kW Power Energy Industries power supply modules and the following in-house modules: six 720 Hz filters, two 15 kA/1kV dc solid-state dump switch, and a 3 MJ/30 kA/1 kV dc dump resistor. Additional inhouse electronic components were designed and built to provide precise current regulation and distribution of current and current rate of change. An industrial-type Programmable Logic Controller system was used to provide equipment interlocks and monitoring. This paper summarizes studies on the influence of characteristics of this new power system--such as ripple current--on the performance of High Field Superconducting magnets.

  15. Slow Magnetic Relaxations in Cobalt(II) Tetranitrate Complexes. Studies of Magnetic Anisotropy by Inelastic Neutron Scattering and High-Frequency and High-Field EPR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lei; Cui, Hui-Hui; Stavretis, Shelby E.; Hunter, Seth C.; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Chen, Xue-Tai; Sun, Yi-Chen; Wang, Zhenxing; Song, You; Podlesnyak, Andrey A.; Ouyang, Zhong-Wen; Xue, Zi-Ling

    2016-12-07

    We synthesized and studied three mononuclear cobalt(II) tetranitrate complexes (A)2[Co(NO3)4] with different countercations, Ph4P+ (1), MePh3P+ (2), and Ph4As+ (3), using X-ray single-crystal diffraction, magnetic measurements, inelastic neutron scattering (INS), high-frequency and high-field EPR (HF-EPR) spectroscopy, and theoretical calculations. Furthermore, the X-ray diffraction studies reveal that the structure of the tetranitrate cobalt anion varies with the countercation. 1 and 2 exhibit highly irregular seven-coordinate geometries, while the central Co(II) ion of 3 is in a distorted-dodecahedral configuration. The sole magnetic transition observed in the INS spectroscopy of 1–3 corresponds to the zero-field splitting (2(D2 + 3E2)1/2) from 22.5(2) cm–1 in 1 to 26.6(3) cm–1 in 2 and 11.1(5) cm–1 in 3. The positive sign of the D value, and hence the easy-plane magnetic anisotropy, was demonstrated for 1 by INS studies under magnetic fields and HF-EPR spectroscopy. The combined analyses of INS and HF-EPR data yield the D values as +10.90(3), +12.74(3), and +4.50(3) cm–1 for 1–3, respectively. Frequency- and temperature-dependent alternating-current magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal the slow magnetization relaxation in 1 and 2 at an applied dc field of 600 Oe, which is a characteristic of field-induced single-molecule magnets (SMMs). Finally, the electronic structures and the origin of magnetic anisotropy of 1–3 were revealed by calculations at the CASPT2/NEVPT2 level.

  16. An Analytical Technique to Elucidate Field Impurities From Manufacturing Uncertainties of an Double Pancake Type HTS Insert for High Field LTS/HTS NMR Magnets.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Seung-Yong; Ahn, Min Cheol; Bobrov, Emanuel Saul; Bascuñán, Juan; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2009-06-01

    This paper addresses adverse effects of dimensional uncertainties of an HTS insert assembled with double-pancake coils on spatial field homogeneity. Each DP coil was wound with Bi2223 tapes having dimensional tolerances larger than one order of magnitude of those accepted for LTS wires used in conventional NMR magnets. The paper presents: 1) dimensional variations measured in two LTS/HTS NMR magnets, 350 MHz (LH350) and 700 MHz (LH700), both built and operated at the Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory; and 2) an analytical technique and its application to elucidate the field impurities measured with the two LTS/HTS magnets. Field impurities computed with the analytical model and those measured with the two LTS/HTS magnets agree quite well, demonstrating that this analytical technique is applicable to design a DP-assembled HTS insert with an improved field homogeneity for a high-field LTS/HTS NMR magnet.

  17. An Analytical Technique to Elucidate Field Impurities From Manufacturing Uncertainties of an Double Pancake Type HTS Insert for High Field LTS/HTS NMR Magnets

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Seung-yong; Ahn, Min Cheol; Bobrov, Emanuel Saul; Bascuñán, Juan; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses adverse effects of dimensional uncertainties of an HTS insert assembled with double-pancake coils on spatial field homogeneity. Each DP coil was wound with Bi2223 tapes having dimensional tolerances larger than one order of magnitude of those accepted for LTS wires used in conventional NMR magnets. The paper presents: 1) dimensional variations measured in two LTS/HTS NMR magnets, 350 MHz (LH350) and 700 MHz (LH700), both built and operated at the Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory; and 2) an analytical technique and its application to elucidate the field impurities measured with the two LTS/HTS magnets. Field impurities computed with the analytical model and those measured with the two LTS/HTS magnets agree quite well, demonstrating that this analytical technique is applicable to design a DP-assembled HTS insert with an improved field homogeneity for a high-field LTS/HTS NMR magnet. PMID:20407595

  18. Immunochemical and proton magnetic resonance studies of toxic venom proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    Immunochemical responses of a number of pit viper venoms to antibodies derived separately from the acidic and basic subunits of Mojave toxin isolated from the venom of Crotalus scutulatus scutulatus were investigated by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Ouchterlony immunodiffusion. The three-dimensional solution structure of myotoxin a isolated from the venom of Crotalus viridis viridis was studied by proton nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. Assignment of many resonance lines to their corresponding protons enabled detection of several residue specific interactions implicating existence of a three-dimensional structural feature of the molecule which is probably important to toxic activity. Finally, a computer program is presented that calculates the three-dimensional structure of a protein from dihedral angles and allows viewing of projections of the calculated structures on a standard display. This program is unique in that it is designed to operate on the microcomputers of the IBM PC family.

  19. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of a gray matter heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Marsh, L; Lim, K O; Sullivan, E V; Lane, B; Spielman, D

    1996-12-01

    We used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to examine resonances representing metabolites containing N-acetyl (NA) groups (predominantly N-acetyl aspartate), choline, and creatine within a large left-hemispheric gray matter heterotopia (GMH) in a 35-year-old man with corpus callosum agenesis. In contrast to normal brain tissue, including gray matter regions, heterotopic gray matter was characterized by relatively increased choline and creatine resonances and a normal NA signal. These data suggest increased cellular activity or persistent immature neuronal tissue in GMH relative to unaffected tissue.

  20. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy: technique for the neuroradiologist.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Kim M

    2013-08-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides information on neuronal and axonal viability, energetics of cellular structures, and status of cellular membranes. Proton MRS appeals to clinicians and scientists because its application in the clinical setting can increase the specificity of MR imaging. The objective of this article is to provide descriptive concepts of the technique and its application in vivo for a variety of patient populations. When appropriately incorporating MRS into the neuroradiologic evaluation, this technique produces relevant information to radiologists and clinicians for their understanding of adult and pediatric neurologically based disease processes.

  1. The connective tissue and ligaments of the distal interphalangeal joint: a review and investigation using ultra-high field 16.4 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Slattery, D; Aland, C; Durbridge, G; Cowin, G

    2014-05-01

    This study reviews the literature on the anatomy of the connective tissues surrounding the distal interphalangeal joint and further characterizes the three-dimensional relationships of these structures with ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging. Ten cadaver fingers, fixed in a solution of 5% agar and 4% formalin, were imaged utilising an ultrashield 16.4 Tesla ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging, yielding a total of 4000 images. Images were analysed using Osirix™ (version 5.5.1 32 bit edition) for three-dimensional reconstruction. We found numerous conflicting descriptions of the connective tissue structures around the distal interphalangeal joint. Based upon our literature review and imaging studies we have defined precisely Cleland's ligaments, the oblique proximal septum, Grayson's ligaments, the dorsal plate, and the interosseous ligaments of the distal interphalangeal joint.

  2. ENERGETIC PROTONS, RADIONUCLIDES, AND MAGNETIC ACTIVITY IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, N. J.; Drake, J. F.

    2009-10-01

    We calculate the location of the magnetically inactive dead zone in the minimum-mass protosolar disk, under ionization scenarios including stellar X-rays, long- or short-lived radionuclide decay, and energetic protons arriving from the general interstellar medium, from a nearby supernova explosion, from the disk corona, or from the corona of the young star. The disk contains a dead zone in all scenarios except those with small dust grains removed and a fraction of the short-lived radionuclides remaining in the gas. All the cases without exception have an 'undead zone' where intermediate resistivities prevent magneto-rotational turbulence while allowing shear-generated large-scale magnetic fields. The mass column in the undead zone is typically greater than the column in the turbulent surface layers. The results support the idea that the dead and undead zones are robust consequences of cold, dusty gas with mass columns exceeding 1000 g cm{sup -2}.

  3. Energetic Protons, Radionuclides, and Magnetic Activity in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, N. J.; Drake, J. F.

    2009-10-01

    We calculate the location of the magnetically inactive dead zone in the minimum-mass protosolar disk, under ionization scenarios including stellar X-rays, long- or short-lived radionuclide decay, and energetic protons arriving from the general interstellar medium, from a nearby supernova explosion, from the disk corona, or from the corona of the young star. The disk contains a dead zone in all scenarios except those with small dust grains removed and a fraction of the short-lived radionuclides remaining in the gas. All the cases without exception have an "undead zone" where intermediate resistivities prevent magneto-rotational turbulence while allowing shear-generated large-scale magnetic fields. The mass column in the undead zone is typically greater than the column in the turbulent surface layers. The results support the idea that the dead and undead zones are robust consequences of cold, dusty gas with mass columns exceeding 1000 g cm-2.

  4. Transsphenoidal pituitary macroadenomas resection guided by PoleStar N20 low-field intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging: comparison with early postoperative high-field magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Song; Shou, Xue-Fei; Yao, Cheng-Jun; Wang, Yong-Fei; Zhuang, Dong-Xiao; Mao, Ying; Li, Shi-Qi; Zhou, Liang-Fu

    2009-07-01

    To evaluate the applicability of low-field intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) during transsphenoidal surgery of pituitary macroadenomas. Fifty-five transsphenoidal surgeries were performed for macroadenomas (modified Hardy's Grade II-IV) resections. All of the surgical processes were guided by real-time updated contrast T1-weighted coronal and sagittal images, which were acquired with 0.15 Tesla PoleStar N20 iMRI (Medtronic Navigation, Louisville, CO). The definitive benefits as well as major drawbacks of low-field iMRI in transsphenoidal surgery were assessed with respect to intraoperative imaging, tumor resection control, comparison with early postoperative high-field magnetic resonance imaging, and follow-up outcomes. Intraoperative imaging revealed residual tumor and guided extended tumor resection in 17 of 55 cases. As a result, the percentage of gross total removal of macroadenomas increased from 58.2% to 83.6%. The accuracy of imaging evaluation of low-field iMRI was 81.8%, compared with early postoperative high-field MRI (Correlation coefficient, 0.677; P < 0.001). A significantly lower accuracy was identified with low-field iMRI in 6 cases with cavernous sinus invasion (33.3%) in contrast to the 87.8% found with other sites (Fisher's exact test, P < 0.001). The PoleStar N20 low-field iMRI navigation system is a promising tool for safe, minimally invasive, endonasal, transsphenoidal pituitary macroadenomas resection. It enables neurosurgeons to control the extent of tumor resection, particularly for suprasellar tumors, ensuring surgical accuracy and safety, and leading to a decreased likelihood of repeat surgeries. However, this technology is still not satisfying in estimating the amount of the parasellar residual tumor invading into cavernous sinus, given the false or uncertain images generated by low-field iMRI in this region, which are difficult to discriminate between tumor remnant and blood within the venous sinus.

  5. Magnetic phase transition of high-pressure phase (VO)2P2O7 studied by high-field ESR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraka, K.; Nagasaka, Y.; Kunimoto, T.; Inagaki, Y.; Okubo, S.; Ohta, H.; Saito, T.; Azuma, M.; Takano, M.

    2004-05-01

    The high-pressure phase of (VO)2P2O7 (HP-VOPO) is a S=1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnetic alternating chain compound with one spin gap. The high-field ESR measurements of the HP-VOPO single crystal have been performed using the pulsed magnetic field up to 30T. Small anomaly is observed in ESR mode for both a- and b-axis. The linewidth became broad around Bc=20T when the field is applied along the a- and b-axis. The magnetic state of HP-VOPO above Bc will be discussed.

  6. Capture and Transport of Laser Accelerated Protons by Pulsed Magnetic Fields: Advancements Toward Laser-Based Proton Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burris-Mog, Trevor J.

    The interaction of intense laser light (I > 10 18 W/cm2) with a thin target foil leads to the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism (TNSA). TNSA is responsible for the generation of high current, ultra-low emittance proton beams, which may allow for the development of a compact and cost effective proton therapy system for the treatment of cancer. Before this application can be realized, control is needed over the large divergence and the 100% kinetic energy spread that are characteristic of TNSA proton beams. The work presented here demonstrates control over the divergence and energy spread using strong magnetic fields generated by a pulse power solenoid. The solenoidal field results in a parallel proton beam with a kinetic energy spread DeltaE/E = 10%. Assuming that next generation lasers will be able to operate at 10 Hz, the 10% spread in the kinetic energy along with the 23% capture efficiency of the solenoid yield enough protons per laser pulse to, for the first time, consider applications in Radiation Oncology. Current lasers can generate proton beams with kinetic energies up to 67.5 MeV, but for therapy applications, the proton kinetic energy must reach 250 MeV. Since the maximum kinetic energy Emax of the proton scales with laser light intensity as Emax ∝ I0.5, next generation lasers may very well accelerate 250 MeV protons. As the kinetic energy of the protons is increased, the magnetic field strength of the solenoid will need to increase. The scaling of the magnetic field B with the kinetic energy of the protons follows B ∝ E1/2. Therefor, the field strength of the solenoid presented in this work will need to be increased by a factor of 2.4 in order to accommodate 250 MeV protons. This scaling factor seems reasonable, even with present technology. This work not only demonstrates control over beam divergence and energy spread, it also allows for us to now perform feasibility studies to further research what a laser-based proton therapy system

  7. A carbon-13 and proton nuclear magnetic resonance study of some experimental referee broadened-specification /ERBS/ turbine fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalling, D. K.; Pugmire, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary results of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy study of alternative jet fuels are presented. A referee broadened-specification (ERBS) aviation turbine fuel, a mixture of 65 percent traditional kerosene with 35 percent hydrotreated catalytic gas oil (HCGO) containing 12.8 percent hydrogen, and fuels of lower hydrogen content created by blending the latter with a mixture of HCGO and xylene bottoms were studied. The various samples were examined by carbon-13 and proton NMR at high field strength, and the resulting spectra are shown. In the proton spectrum of the 12.8 percent hydrogen fuel, no prominent single species is seen while for the blending stock, many individual lines are apparent. The ERBS fuels were fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography and the resulting fractions analyzed by NMR. The species found are identified.

  8. Ultra-robust high-field magnetization plateau and supersolidity in bond-frustrated MnCr2S4.

    PubMed

    Tsurkan, Vladimir; Zherlitsyn, Sergei; Prodan, Lilian; Felea, Viorel; Cong, Pham Thanh; Skourski, Yurii; Wang, Zhe; Deisenhofer, Joachim; von Nidda, Hans-Albrecht Krug; Wosnitza, Joahim; Loidl, Alois

    2017-03-01

    Frustrated magnets provide a promising avenue for realizing exotic quantum states of matter, such as spin liquids and spin ice or complex spin molecules. Under an external magnetic field, frustrated magnets can exhibit fractional magnetization plateaus related to definite spin patterns stabilized by field-induced lattice distortions. Magnetization and ultrasound experiments in MnCr2S4 up to 60 T reveal two fascinating features: (i) an extremely robust magnetization plateau with an unusual spin structure and (ii) two intermediate phases, indicating possible realizations of supersolid phases. The magnetization plateau characterizes fully polarized chromium moments, without any contributions from manganese spins. At 40 T, the middle of the plateau, a regime evolves, where sound waves propagate almost without dissipation. The external magnetic field exactly compensates the Cr-Mn exchange field and decouples Mn and Cr sublattices. In analogy to predictions of quantum lattice-gas models, the changes of the spin order of the manganese ions at the phase boundaries of the magnetization plateau are interpreted as transitions to supersolid phases.

  9. Ultra-robust high-field magnetization plateau and supersolidity in bond-frustrated MnCr2S4

    PubMed Central

    Tsurkan, Vladimir; Zherlitsyn, Sergei; Prodan, Lilian; Felea, Viorel; Cong, Pham Thanh; Skourski, Yurii; Wang, Zhe; Deisenhofer, Joachim; von Nidda, Hans-Albrecht Krug; Wosnitza, Joahim; Loidl, Alois

    2017-01-01

    Frustrated magnets provide a promising avenue for realizing exotic quantum states of matter, such as spin liquids and spin ice or complex spin molecules. Under an external magnetic field, frustrated magnets can exhibit fractional magnetization plateaus related to definite spin patterns stabilized by field-induced lattice distortions. Magnetization and ultrasound experiments in MnCr2S4 up to 60 T reveal two fascinating features: (i) an extremely robust magnetization plateau with an unusual spin structure and (ii) two intermediate phases, indicating possible realizations of supersolid phases. The magnetization plateau characterizes fully polarized chromium moments, without any contributions from manganese spins. At 40 T, the middle of the plateau, a regime evolves, where sound waves propagate almost without dissipation. The external magnetic field exactly compensates the Cr–Mn exchange field and decouples Mn and Cr sublattices. In analogy to predictions of quantum lattice-gas models, the changes of the spin order of the manganese ions at the phase boundaries of the magnetization plateau are interpreted as transitions to supersolid phases. PMID:28345038

  10. Radiation effects of 200 MeV proton beams on Nd-Fe-B magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Y.; Yasuda, K.; Sasase, M.; Ishigami, R.; Hatori, S.; Ohashi, K.; Tanaka, S.

    2003-08-01

    Effects of 200 MeV proton irradiation on the re-magnetized Nd-Fe-B magnet (Shin-Etsu Chemical N48) were investigated. The dose dependence of the magnetic flux loss for the re-magnetized sample agreed well with that for the unirradiated one within the experimental accuracy. The N48 magnet, demagnetized by the radiation, had perfectly its magnetic properties of its unirradiated level by means of the re-magnetization.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance in sedimentary rocks: Effect of proton desorption rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, Kenneth S.

    1982-09-01

    In a discussion of nuclear magnetic resonance of protons in the pore fluid of sedimentary rocks, Cohen and Mendelson assumed that the desorption rate of protons from the rock surface is much faster than the relaxation rate of the magnetization for protons on the surface. In the present paper it is shown that this assumption is not necessary and conditions are established under which the analysis of Cohen and Mendelson is valid.

  12. An improved permanent magnet quadrupole design with larger good field region for high intensity proton linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Jose V.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2013-11-01

    The Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA), being developed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) will produce a 20 MeV, 30 mA, continuous wave (CW) proton beam. At these low velocities, space-charge forces dominate, and could lead to larger beam sizes and beam halos. Hence in the design of the focusing lattice of the LEHIPA drift tube linac (DTL) using permanent magnet quadrupoles (PMQs), a larger good field region is preferred. Here we study, using the two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) simulation codes PANDIRA and RADIA, four different types of cylindrical PMQ designs: 16-segment trapezoidal Halbach configuration, bullet-nosed geometry and 8- and 16-segment rectangular geometries. The trapezoidal Halbach geometry is used in a variety of accelerators since it provides very high field gradients in small bores, while the bullet-nosed geometry, which is a combination of the trapezoidal and rectangular designs, is used in some DTLs. This study shows that a larger good field region is possible in the 16-segment rectangular design as compared to the Halbach and bullet-nosed designs, making it more attractive for high-intensity proton linacs. An improvement in good-field region by ˜16% over the Halbach design is obtained in the optimized 16-segment rectangular design, although the field gradient is lower by ˜20%. Tolerance studies show that the rectangular segment PMQ design is substantially less sensitive to the easy axis orientation errors and hence will be a better choice for DTLs.

  13. High latitude proton precipitation and light-ion density profiles during the magnetic storm initial phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of precipitating protons and light ion densities by experiments on OGO-4 indicate that widespread proton precipitation occurs in predawn hours during the magnetic storm initial phase from the latitude of the high-latitude ion trough, or plasmapause , up to Lambda 75 deg. A softening of the proton spectrum is apparent as the plasmapause is approached. The separation of the low-latitude precipitation boundaries for 7.3 kev and 23.8 kev protons is approximately 1 deg, compared with a 3.6 deg separation which has been computed using the formulas of Gendrin and Eather and Carovillano. Consideration of probable proton drift morphology leads to the conclusion that protons ase injected in predawn hours, with widespread precipitation occurring in the region outside the plasmapause. Protons less energetic than approximately 7 kev drift eastward, while the more energetic protons drift westward, producing the observed dawn-dusk asymmetry for the lower-energy protons.

  14. Terahertz cyclotron resonance spectroscopy of an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure using a high-field pulsed magnet and an asynchronous optical sampling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, B. F.; Smith, W. F.; Hibberd, M. T.; Dawson, P.; Beck, M.; Bartels, A.; Guiney, I.; Humphreys, C. J.; Graham, D. M.

    2016-05-01

    The effective mass, sheet carrier concentration, and mobility of electrons within a two-dimensional electron gas in an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure were determined using a laboratory-based terahertz cyclotron resonance spectrometer. The ability to perform terahertz cyclotron resonance spectroscopy with magnetic fields of up to 31 T was enabled by combining a high-field pulsed magnet with a modified asynchronous optical sampling terahertz detection scheme. This scheme allowed around 100 transmitted terahertz waveforms to be recorded over the 14 ms magnetic field pulse duration. The sheet density and mobility were measured to be 8.0 × 1012 cm-2 and 9000 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 77 K. The in-plane electron effective mass at the band edge was determined to be 0.228 ± 0.002m0.

  15. Quantitative Proton Magnetic Resonance Techniques for Measuring Fat

    PubMed Central

    Harry, Houchun; Kan, Hermien E.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate, precise, and reliable techniques for quantifying body and organ fat distributions are important tools in physiology research. They are critically needed in studies of obesity and diseases involving excess fat accumulation. Proton magnetic resonance methods address this need by providing an array of relaxometry-based (T1, T2) and chemical-shift-based approaches. These techniques can generate informative visualizations of regional and whole-body fat distributions, yield measurements of fat volumes within specific body depots, and quantify fat accumulation in abdominal organs and muscles. MR methods are commonly used to investigate the role of fat in nutrition and metabolism, to measure the efficacy of short and long-term dietary and exercise interventions, to study the implications of fat in organ steatosis and muscular dystrophies, and to elucidate pathophysiological mechanisms in the context of obesity and its comorbidities. The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of mainstream MR strategies for fat quantification. The article will succinctly describe the principles that differentiate water and fat proton signals, summarize advantages and limitations of various techniques, and offer a few illustrative examples. The article will also highlight recent efforts in MR of brown adipose tissue and conclude by briefly discussing some future research directions. PMID:24123229

  16. A portable high-field pulsed-magnet system for single-crystal x-ray scattering studies.

    PubMed

    Islam, Zahirul; Ruff, Jacob P C; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Yasuhiro H; Ross, Kathryn A; Gaulin, Bruce D; Qu, Zhe; Lang, Jonathan C

    2009-11-01

    We present a portable pulsed-magnet system for x-ray studies of materials in high magnetic fields (up to 30 T). The apparatus consists of a split-pair of minicoils cooled on a closed-cycle cryostat, which is used for x-ray diffraction studies with applied field normal to the scattering plane. A second independent closed-cycle cryostat is used for cooling the sample to near liquid helium temperatures. Pulsed magnetic fields (approximately 1 ms in total duration) are generated by discharging a configurable capacitor bank into the magnet coils. Time-resolved scattering data are collected using a combination of a fast single-photon counting detector, a multichannel scaler, and a high-resolution digital storage oscilloscope. The capabilities of this instrument are used to study a geometrically frustrated system revealing strong magnetostrictive effects in the spin-liquid state.

  17. A portable high-field pulsed-magnet system for single-crystal x-ray scattering studies

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Zahirul; Lang, Jonathan C.; Ruff, Jacob P. C.; Ross, Kathryn A.; Gaulin, Bruce D.; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Yasuhiro H.; Qu Zhe

    2009-11-15

    We present a portable pulsed-magnet system for x-ray studies of materials in high magnetic fields (up to 30 T). The apparatus consists of a split-pair of minicoils cooled on a closed-cycle cryostat, which is used for x-ray diffraction studies with applied field normal to the scattering plane. A second independent closed-cycle cryostat is used for cooling the sample to near liquid helium temperatures. Pulsed magnetic fields ({approx}1 ms in total duration) are generated by discharging a configurable capacitor bank into the magnet coils. Time-resolved scattering data are collected using a combination of a fast single-photon counting detector, a multichannel scaler, and a high-resolution digital storage oscilloscope. The capabilities of this instrument are used to study a geometrically frustrated system revealing strong magnetostrictive effects in the spin-liquid state.

  18. Blood species discrimination using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zailer, Elina; Diehl, Bernd W K; Monakhova, Yulia B

    2017-05-01

    Blood species identification is an important challenge in forensic science. Conventional methods used for blood species analysis are destructive and associated with time-consuming sample preparation steps. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is known for its nondestructive properties and fast results. This research study presents a proton ((1)H) NMR method to discriminate blood species including human, cat, dog, elephant, and bison. Characteristic signals acting as markers are observed for each species. Moreover, the data are evaluated by principle component analysis (PCA) and support vector machines (SVM). A 100% correct species recognition between human and nonhuman species is achieved using radial basis kernel function (RBF) and standardized data. The research study shows that (1)H NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for differentiating human and nonhuman blood showing a great significance to forensic science.

  19. Brain proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for hepatic encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Chin-Sing; McConnell, James R.; Chu, Wei-Kom

    1993-08-01

    Liver failure can induce gradations of encephalopathy from mild to stupor to deep coma. The objective of this study is to investigate and quantify the variation of biochemical compounds in the brain in patients with liver failure and encephalopathy, through the use of water- suppressed, localized in-vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (HMRS). The spectral parameters of the compounds quantitated are: N-Acetyl Aspartate (NAA) to Creatine (Cr) ratio, Choline (Cho) to Creatine ratio, Inositol (Ins) to Creatine ratio and Glutamine-Glutamate Amino Acid (AA) to Creatine ratio. The study group consisted of twelve patients with proven advanced chronic liver failure and symptoms of encephalopathy. Comparison has been done with results obtained from five normal subjects without any evidence of encephalopathy or liver diseases.

  20. Calibration of a compact magnetic proton recoil neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianfu; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xianpeng; Ruan, Jinlu; Zhang, Guoguang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Qiu, Suizheng; Chen, Liang; Liu, Jinliang; Song, Jiwen; Liu, Linyue; Yang, Shaohua

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic proton recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer is considered as a powerful instrument to measure deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron spectrum, as it is currently used in inertial confinement fusion facilities and large Tokamak devices. The energy resolution (ER) and neutron detection efficiency (NDE) are the two most important parameters to characterize a neutron spectrometer. In this work, the ER calibration for the MPR spectrometer was performed by using the HI-13 tandem accelerator at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), and the NDE calibration was performed by using the neutron generator at CIAE. The specific calibration techniques used in this work and the associated accuracies were discussed in details in this paper. The calibration results were presented along with Monte Carlo simulation results.

  1. Magnetic resonance anatomy of the carpus of the horse described from images acquired from low-field and high-field magnets.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Annamaria; Dyson, Sue

    2011-01-01

    Cadaver carpi of 30 mature horses with no history of carpal or proximal metacarpal pain were examined using low-field (0.27 T) and high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Normal MRI anatomy in transverse, sagittal, and dorsal plane images was determined by comparison with anatomical specimens and standard texts. Subchondral bone and cortical bone thickness measurements were obtained from standardised sites. There was variable subchondral bone thickness in the radius and carpal bones; subchondral bone thickness was consistently larger at dorsal compared with palmar sites in the proximal row of carpal bones. The endosteal surface of the subchondral bone was smooth. The shape of the ulnar carpal bone was variable and one or more small osseous fragments were identified palmar to the bone in 5/30 limbs. There was no evidence to suggest that these were pathological fractures or avulsions of the lateral palmar intercarpal ligament. The amount of muscle tissue in the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons in the proximal aspect of the carpus varied, but none was present at the level of the middle carpal joint and distally. Several structures could be evaluated that cannot be imaged using radiography, ultrasonography, or arthroscopy, including the transverse intercarpal ligaments, the radiocarpal ligament, the short palmar carpal ligaments, and the carpometacarpal ligaments. Anatomical variations not previously described were identified, including the layers of the medial aspect of the carpal fascia. Knowledge of the variation in MRI appearance of the carpus of nonlame horses is helpful for interpretation of MR images of lame horses. © 2011 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  2. Fe Substitution Effect on the High-Field Magnetization in the Kondo Semiconductor CeRu2Al10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Akihiro; Kindo, Koichi; Nohara, Hiroki; Nakamura, Michio; Tanida, Hiroshi; Sera, Masafumi; Nishioka, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    The magnetization of the Fe substitution system in the Kondo semiconductor CeRu2Al10 was measured in high magnetic fields of up to 72 T with the magnetic field (H) along the a-axis. The magnetization curve indicates that the critical field from the antiferromagnetic (AFM) phase to the paramagnetic one (Hcp) shows an increase from ˜51 (x = 0) to ˜60 T (x = 0.7) owing to the Fe substitution. The Fe concentration dependence of Hcp is similar to that of the magnitude of the energy of the spin gap. The degree of the concave H dependence of the magnetization curve, which is the characteristic feature for H ∥ a in CeT2Al10 (T = Ru, Os), is not strongly enhanced by the Fe substitution. This may be due to the suppression of the strong anisotropy of the hybridization between the conduction band and the localized 4f shell along the a-axis. These results reveal that the spin gap of the present system consists of at least two components, the gap due to the spin (Kondo) singlet formation and the anisotropy gap of the AF magnon.

  3. Rabi, the proton magnetic moment, and the ‘2-wire' magnet, 1931-34

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, Paul

    2001-04-01

    With the assistance of Gregory Breit, I.I. Rabi, at Columbia University, worked out in 1931 a method to determine the spin (not the magnetic moment) of atomic nuclei by deflecting an atomic beam of the isotope in question in a weak, but long, inhomogeneous magnetic field. Crucial to this method was that it required no exact knowledge of that field. When the sensational result -- µp = 2.5µ_Bohr(m_e/m_p) -- from Otto Stern's deflection of a beam of hydrogen molecules in a strong magnetic field became known late in 1932, its confirmation by another laboratory, preferably by another method, seemed urgent. No one else had the refined technique to reproduce Stern's experiment. But because the hydrogen electronic wave function was known, the Breit-Rabi technique was susceptible of extension in this case to the measurement of the magnetic moment of the proton - - but only with accurate knowledge of the magnetic field and field gradient traversed by the atomic hydrogen beam. To this end Rabi introduced the '2-wire' magnet, producing a weak field and uniform gradient that could be calculated rather than measured. This field configuration quickly came to be used in all magnetic deflection experiments in Rabi's laboratory, first as produced directly by electric currents, and subsequently as emulated in iron electromagnets in order to achieve the higher magnetic fields required by molecular beam magnetic resonance experiments from 1937 onward.

  4. Rabi, the proton magnetic moment, and the ¡2-wire¢ magnet, 1931-34

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, Paul

    2001-04-01

    With the assistance of Gregory Breit, I.I. Rabi, at Columbia University, worked out in 1931 a method to determine the spin (not the magnetic moment) of atomic nuclei by deflecting an atomic beam of the isotope in question in a weak, but long, inhomogeneous magnetic field. Crucial to this method was that it required no exact knowledge of that field. When the sensational result: p = 2.5:_Bohr(m_e/m_p) from Otto Stern's deflection of a beam of hydrogen molecules in a strong magnetic field became known late in 1932, its confirmation by another laboratory, preferably by another method, seemed urgent. No one else had the refined technique to reproduce Stern's experiment. But because the hydrogen electronic wave function was known, the Breit Rabi technique was susceptible of extension in this case to the measurement of the magnetic moment of the proton but only with accurate knowledge of the magnetic field and field gradient traversed by the atomic hydrogen beam. To this end Rabi introduced the '2 wire' magnet, producing a weak field and uniform gradient that could be calculated rather than measured. This field configuration quickly came to be used in all magnetic deflection experiments in Rabi's laboratory, first as produced directly by electric currents, and subsequently as emulated in iron electromagnets in order to achieve the higher magnetic fields required by molecular beam magnetic resonance experiments from 1937 onward.

  5. Skyrme model study of proton and neutron properties in a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bing-Ran

    2017-02-01

    The proton and neutron properties in a uniform magnetic field are investigated. The Gell-Mann-Nishijima formula is shown to be satisfied for baryon states. It is found that with increasing magnetic field strength, the proton mass first decreases and then increases, while the neutron mass always increases. The ratio between magnetic moment of proton and neutron increases with the increase of the magnetic field strength. With increasing magnetic field strength, the size of proton first increases and then decreases, while the size of neutron always decreases. The present analysis implies that in the core part of the magnetar, the equation of state depend on the magnetic field, which modifies the mass limit of the magnetar.

  6. [Orthodontic brackets in high field MR imaging: experimental evaluation of magnetic field interactions at 3.0 Tesla].

    PubMed

    Kemper, J; Klocke, A; Kahl-Nieke, B; Adam, G

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate static magnetic field interactions for 32 commonly used orthodontic brackets in a 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. 32 orthodontic brackets consisting of a steel alloy (n = 27), a cobalt-chromium alloy (n = 2), ceramic (n = 1), ceramic with a steel slot (n = 1), and titanium (n = 1) from 13 different manufacturers were tested for magnetic field interactions in a static magnetic field at 3.0 T (Gyroscan Intera 3.0 T, Philips Medical Systems, Best, Netherlands). The magnetic deflection force F (z) [mN] was evaluated by determining the deflection angle beta [ degrees ] using the established deflection angle test according to the ASTM guidelines. The magnetic-field-induced rotational force F (rot) or torque was qualitatively determined using a 5-point grading scale (0: no torque; + 4: very strong torque). In 18 of the 32 brackets, the deflection angle beta was found to be > 45 degrees and the translational force exceeded the gravitational force F (G) on the particular bracket (F (z): 1.2 - 45.7 mN). The translational force F (z) was found to be up to 68.5 times greater than the gravitational force F (G) (F (z)/F (G): 1.4 - 68.5). The rotational force F (rot) was correspondingly high (+ 3/+ 4) for those brackets. For the remaining 14 objects, the deflection angles were < 45 degrees and the torque measurements ranged from 0 to + 2. The static magnetic field did not affect the titanium bracket and the ceramic bracket. No measurable translational and rotational forces were found. Of the 32 brackets investigated for magnetic field interactions at 3.0 T, 18 (56.25 %) were unsafe in the MR environment according to the ASTM guidelines. However, the forces measured were minimal compared to the forces generally necessary for dislodging these bonded orthodontic brackets from tooth surfaces. The implications of these results for orthodontic patients undergoing MR examinations at 3 Tesla are discussed.

  7. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in childhood brainstem lesions.

    PubMed

    Porto, L; Hattingen, E; Pilatus, U; Kieslich, M; Yan, B; Schwabe, D; Zanella, F E; Lanfermann, H

    2007-03-01

    Diagnosis of brainstem lesions in children based on magnetic resonance imaging alone is a challenging problem. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a noninvasive technique for spatial characterization of biochemical markers in tissues and gives information regarding cell membrane proliferation, neuronal damage, and energy metabolism. We measured the concentrations of biochemical markers in five children with brainstem lesions and evaluated their potential diagnostic significance. Images and spectra were acquired on a 1.5-T imager. The concentrations of N-acetylaspartate, tetramethylamines (e.g., choline), creatine, phosphocreatine, lactate, and lipids were measured within lesions located at the brainstem using Point-resolved spectroscopy sequences. Diagnosis based on localized proton spectroscopy included brainstem glioma, brainstem encephalitis, demyelination, dysmyelination secondary to neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF 1), and possible infection or radiation necrosis. In all but one patient, diagnosis was confirmed by biopsy or by clinical follow-up. This small sample of patients suggests that MRS is important in the differential diagnosis between proliferative and nonproliferative lesions in patients without neurofibromatosis. Unfortunately, in cases of NF 1, MRS can have a rather misdiagnosis role.

  8. First observation of amino acid side chain dynamics in membrane proteins using high field deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsey, R.A.; Kintanar, A.; Tsai, M.D.; Smith, R.L.; Janes, N.; Oldfield, E.

    1981-05-10

    The first deuterium NMR spectra of an individual membrane protein, bacteriohodopsin in the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium R1 has been obtained. Biosynthetic isotopic enrichment with (gamma-2H6) valine and high field Fourier transform operation permitted rapid data acquisition on intact membranes, including measurement of relaxation times. At some temperatures high quality spectra could be obtained in less than 1 s. (U-14C)Valine tracer studies indicate that less than or equal to 2% of valine added to the growth medium is broken down and incorporated into other membrane constituents. The NMR results indicate that the valine side chain is a rather rigid structure. Motion about C alpha-C beta is slow (less than 10(5) s-1) at growth temperature, while motion about C beta-C gamma is as expected fast (much greater than 10(5) s-1) at all accessible temperatures. The activation energy for methyl group rotation from spin-lattice relaxation data between -75 and 53 degrees C is approximately 2.4 kcal/mol, in good agreement with previous 1H NMR studies on solid alkanes. Preliminary data on (gamma-2H6)valine-labeled Acholeplasma laidlawii B (PG9) cell membranes are also presented. Results strongly suggest that it should now be possible to observe in great detail the motions of any type of amino acid side chain in membrane proteins, including the effects of lipid composition on protein dynamics.

  9. High field magnetic transitions in the mixed holmium-yttrium iron garnet Ho(0.43)Y(2.57)Fe(5)O(12).

    PubMed

    Bouguerra, A; Khène, S; de Brion, S; Chouteau, G; Fillion, G

    2005-01-12

    High static magnetic field magnetization measurements have been performed up to 23 T on Ho(0.43)Y(2.57)Fe(5)O(12) single crystals at helium temperature (T = 4.2 K) with fields applied along the three main cubic axes: [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. The change from the spontaneous ferrimagnetic structure in zero magnetic field to the fully ferromagnetic one in high field takes place through several intermediate phases separated by transitions with step-like magnetization behaviour, but without any observed hysteresis. Using the effective spin Hamiltonian approximation, we show that the general features of these transitions can be accounted for by a large magnetocristalline anisotropy of the Ho(3+) moments of the uniaxial type along the local z axis of each rare-earth site. The model is in better agreement with the experiments than its Ising limit, widely used before, but is still unsuccessful in predicting the 'umbrella' magnetic structures found by previous neutron and NMR experiments.

  10. Limits of NbTi and Nb3Sn, and Development of W&R Bi-2212 HighField Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Godeke, A.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D.R.; Ferracin, P.; Prestemon,S.O.; Sabbi, G.; Scanlan, R.M.

    2006-12-01

    NbTi accelerator dipoles are limited to magnetic fields (H)of about 10 T, due to an intrinsic upper critical field(Hc2) limitationof 14 T. To surpass this restriction, prototype Nb3Sn magnets are beingdeveloped which have reached 16 T. We show that Nb3Sn dipole technologyis practically limited to 17 to 18 T due to insufficient high fieldpinning, and intrinsically to 20 to 22 T due to Hc2 limitations.Therefore, to obtain magnetic fields approaching 20 T and higher, amaterial is required with a higher Hc2 and sufficient high field pinningcapacity. A realistic candidate for this purpose is Bi-2212, which isavailable in roundwires and sufficient lengths for the fabrication ofcoils based on Rutherford-type cables. We initiated a program to developthe required technology to construct accelerator magnets from'windand-react' (W&R) Bi-2212 coils. We outline the complicationsthat arise through the use of Bi-2212, describe the development paths toaddress these issues, and conclude with the design of W&R Bi-2212sub-scale magnets.

  11. The design of the inelastic neutron scattering mode for the Extreme Environment Diffractometer with the 26 T High Field Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkowiak, Maciej; Stüßer, Norbert; Prokhnenko, Oleksandr

    2015-10-01

    The Extreme Environment Diffractometer is a neutron time-of-flight instrument, designed to work with a constant-field hybrid magnet capable of reaching fields over 26 T, unprecedented in neutron science; however, the presence of the magnet imposes both spatial and technical limitations on the surrounding instrument components. In addition to the existing diffraction and small-angle neutron scattering modes, the instrument will operate also in an inelastic scattering mode, as a direct time-of-flight spectrometer. In this paper we present the Monte Carlo ray-tracing simulations, the results of which illustrate the performance of the instrument in the inelastic-scattering mode. We describe the focussing neutron guide and the chopper system of the existing instrument and the planned design for the instrument upgrade. The neutron flux, neutron spatial distribution, divergence distribution and energy resolution are calculated for standard instrument configurations.

  12. Preliminary Observations on Sensitivity and Specificity of Magnetization Transfer Asymmetry for Imaging Myelin of Rat Brain at High Field

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Woong; Choi, Jiye; Cho, Janggeun; Lee, Chulhyun; Jeon, Daejong; Park, Sung-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) has been often used for imaging myelination. Despite its high sensitivity, the specificity of MTR to myelination is not high because tissues with no myelin such as muscle can also show high MTR. In this study, we propose a new magnetization transfer (MT) indicator, MT asymmetry (MTA), as a new method of myelin imaging. The experiments were performed on rat brain at 9.4 T. MTA revealed high signals in white matter and significantly low signals in gray matter and muscle, indicating that MTA has higher specificity than MTR. Demyelination and remyelination studies demonstrated that the sensitivity of MTA to myelination was as high as that of MTR. These experimental results indicate that MTA can be a good biomarker for imaging myelination. In addition, MTA images can be efficiently acquired with an interslice MTA method, which may accelerate clinical application of myelin imaging. PMID:26413534

  13. Preliminary Observations on Sensitivity and Specificity of Magnetization Transfer Asymmetry for Imaging Myelin of Rat Brain at High Field.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Woong; Choi, Jiye; Cho, Janggeun; Lee, Chulhyun; Jeon, Daejong; Park, Sung-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) has been often used for imaging myelination. Despite its high sensitivity, the specificity of MTR to myelination is not high because tissues with no myelin such as muscle can also show high MTR. In this study, we propose a new magnetization transfer (MT) indicator, MT asymmetry (MTA), as a new method of myelin imaging. The experiments were performed on rat brain at 9.4 T. MTA revealed high signals in white matter and significantly low signals in gray matter and muscle, indicating that MTA has higher specificity than MTR. Demyelination and remyelination studies demonstrated that the sensitivity of MTA to myelination was as high as that of MTR. These experimental results indicate that MTA can be a good biomarker for imaging myelination. In addition, MTA images can be efficiently acquired with an interslice MTA method, which may accelerate clinical application of myelin imaging.

  14. Design of a triple resonance magic angle sample spinning probe for high field solid state nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Rachel W.; Paulson, Eric K.; Zilm, Kurt W.

    2003-06-01

    Standard design and construction practices used in building nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probes for the study of solid state samples become difficult if not entirely impractical to implement as the 1H resonance frequency approaches the self resonance frequency of commercial capacitors. We describe an approach that utilizes short variable transmission line segments as tunable reactances. Such an approach effectively controls stray reactances and provides a higher Q alternative to ceramic chip capacitors. The particular probe described is built to accommodate a 2.5 mm magic angle spinning rotor system, and is triply tuned to 13C, 15N, and 1H frequencies for use at 18.8 T (200, 80, and 800 MHz, respectively). Isolation of the three radio frequency (rf) channels is achieved using both a rejection trap and a transmission line notch filter. The compact geometry of this design allows three channels with high power handling capability to fit in a medium bore (63 mm) magnet. Extended time variable temperature operation is integral to the mechanical design, enabling the temperature control necessary for investigation of biological macromolecules. Accurate measurement of the air temperature near the sample rotor is achieved using a fiber optic thermometer, which does not interfere with the rf electronics. We also demonstrate that acceptable line shapes are only readily achieved using zero magnetic susceptibility wire in construction of the sample coil. Computer simulation of the circuit aided in the physical design of the probe. Representative data illustrating the efficiency, rf homogeneity, and signal to noise factor of the probe are presented.

  15. Characterization of Alloys with Potential for Application in Cable-in-Conduit Conductors for High-Field Superconducting Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, R.P.; Miller, J.R.; Toplosky, V.J.

    2004-06-28

    Since the introduction of the cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) concept, a variety of alloys have been proposed for fabricating the jacket. The jacket provides primary containment of the supercritical helium coolant and is typically also the primary structural component for the magnet. These functions create requirements for strength, toughness, weldability, and fabricability in tubular form. When the CICC uses Nb3Sn, there are additional requirements to accommodate the manufacturing and heat-treatment processes for the superconductor as well as its strain-sensitive performance during operation. Both of the present favorite jacket alloys, Incoloy 908 and modified (ultra-low carbon) 316LN, have both demonstrated acceptable functionality as well as a few undesirable features. In this paper, we present data from cryogenic mechanical tests on a group of heat-resistant, high-strength superalloys that appear to offer equal or better mechanical performance (e.g. strength, toughness, and modulus) while mitigating the undesirable aspects (e.g. SAGBO in the case of I908 and thermal-expansion mismatch with Nb3Sn in the case of 316LN). Data are presented for each alloy in the as-received and aged conditions. These alloys are presently being considered as candidates for use in the next-generation hybrid magnet for the NHMFL but may also be of interest to the fusion and energy storage communities.

  16. Beyond blood brain barrier breakdown - in vivo detection of occult neuroinflammatory foci by magnetic nanoparticles in high field MRI.

    PubMed

    Tysiak, Eva; Asbach, Patrick; Aktas, Orhan; Waiczies, Helmar; Smyth, Maureen; Schnorr, Joerg; Taupitz, Matthias; Wuerfel, Jens

    2009-08-06

    Gadopentate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely applied for the visualization of blood brain barrier (BBB) breakdown in multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Recently, the potential of magnetic nanoparticles to detect macrophage infiltration by MRI was demonstrated. We here investigated a new class of very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOP) as novel contrast medium in murine adoptive-transfer EAE. EAE was induced in 17 mice via transfer of proteolipid protein specific T cells. MR images were obtained before and after application of Gd-DTPA and VSOP on a 7 Tesla rodent MR scanner. The enhancement pattern of the two contrast agents was compared, and correlated to histology, including Prussian Blue staining for VSOP detection and immunofluorescent staining against IBA-1 to identify macrophages/microglia. Both contrast media depicted BBB breakdown in 42 lesions, although differing in plaques appearances and shapes. Furthermore, 13 lesions could be exclusively visualized by VSOP. In the subsequent histological analysis, VSOP was localized to microglia/macrophages, and also diffusely dispersed within the extracellular matrix. VSOP showed a higher sensitivity in detecting BBB alterations compared to Gd-DTPA enhanced MRI, providing complementary information of macrophage/microglia activity in inflammatory plaques that has not been visualized by conventional means.

  17. Beyond blood brain barrier breakdown – in vivo detection of occult neuroinflammatory foci by magnetic nanoparticles in high field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Tysiak, Eva; Asbach, Patrick; Aktas, Orhan; Waiczies, Helmar; Smyth, Maureen; Schnorr, Joerg; Taupitz, Matthias; Wuerfel, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Background Gadopentate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely applied for the visualization of blood brain barrier (BBB) breakdown in multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Recently, the potential of magnetic nanoparticles to detect macrophage infiltration by MRI was demonstrated. We here investigated a new class of very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOP) as novel contrast medium in murine adoptive-transfer EAE. Methods EAE was induced in 17 mice via transfer of proteolipid protein specific T cells. MR images were obtained before and after application of Gd-DTPA and VSOP on a 7 Tesla rodent MR scanner. The enhancement pattern of the two contrast agents was compared, and correlated to histology, including Prussian Blue staining for VSOP detection and immunofluorescent staining against IBA-1 to identify macrophages/microglia. Results Both contrast media depicted BBB breakdown in 42 lesions, although differing in plaques appearances and shapes. Furthermore, 13 lesions could be exclusively visualized by VSOP. In the subsequent histological analysis, VSOP was localized to microglia/macrophages, and also diffusely dispersed within the extracellular matrix. Conclusion VSOP showed a higher sensitivity in detecting BBB alterations compared to Gd-DTPA enhanced MRI, providing complementary information of macrophage/microglia activity in inflammatory plaques that has not been visualized by conventional means. PMID:19660125

  18. Observation of high field DHVA-effect and induced magnetism in single crystal TiBe/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    van Deursen, A.P.J.; van Ruitenbeek, J.M.; Verhoef, W.A.; de Vroomen, A.R.; Smith, J.L.; de Groot, R.A.; Koelling, D.D.; Mueller, F.M.

    1981-01-01

    Recently much interest has been given to itinerant magnetism in cubic Laves phase or C15 materials. Primarily this stems from the discussion of the relationship of p-state pairing and ferromagnetism in ZrZn/sub 2/ by Enz and Matthias, and the possibility of triplet superconductivity. The most recent work in this field has focused on the isoelectronic, isostructural material TiBe/sub 2/, and the possibility that this material is metamagnetic. That TiBe/sub 2/ is close to some form of magnetic instability can be infered indirectly from the peaked nature of its density of states near the fermi level, but also from the observation of ferromagnetism in TiBe/sub 2-x/Cu/sub x/, when x is greater than about 0.15. In this paper a single crystal of pure TiBe/sub 2/ is considered in fields larger than 15 Tesla (T) and at a temperature of 1.3/sup 0/K.

  19. Beneficial impact of high-field intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging on the efficacy of pediatric low-grade glioma surgery.

    PubMed

    Roder, Constantin; Breitkopf, Martin; Ms; Bisdas, Sotirios; Freitas, Rousinelle da Silva; Dimostheni, Artemisia; Ebinger, Martin; Wolff, Markus; Tatagiba, Marcos; Schuhmann, Martin U

    2016-03-01

    significance. Moreover, PFS was highly significantly better in patients with CRs than in those with incomplete resections (p < 0.001). Significantly better surgical results (CR) and PFS were achieved after using iMRI in patients in whom total resections were intended. Therefore, the use of high-field iMRI is strongly recommended for electively planned LGG resections in pediatric patients.

  20. Development of high field SQUID magnetometer for magnetization studies up to 7 T and temperatures in the range from 4.2 to 300 K

    SciTech Connect

    Nagendran, R.; Thirumurugan, N.; Chinnasamy, N.; Janawadkar, M. P.; Sundar, C. S.

    2011-01-15

    We present the design, fabrication, integration, testing, and calibration of a high field superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. The system is based on dc SQUID sensor with flux locked loop readout electronics. The design is modular and all the subsystems have been fabricated in the form of separate modules in order to simplify the assembly and for ease of maintenance. A novel feature of the system is that the current induced in the pickup loop is distributed as inputs to two different SQUID sensors with different strengths of coupling in order to improve the dynamic range of the system. The SQUID magnetometer has been calibrated with yttrium iron garnet (YIG) sphere as a standard reference material. The calibration factor was determined by fitting the measured flux profile of the YIG sphere to that expected for a point dipole. Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} was also used as another reference material for the calibration and the effective magnetic moment of the Gd{sup 3+} could be evaluated from the temperature dependent magnetization measurements. The sensitivity of the system has been estimated to be about 10{sup -7} emu at low magnetic fields and about 10{sup -5} emu at high magnetic fields {approx}7 T.

  1. Limits of NbTi and Nb3Sn, and Development of W&R Bi-2212 HighField Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Godeke, A.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D.R.; Ferracin, P.; Prestemon,S.O.; Sa bbi, G.; Scanlan, R.M.

    2006-09-01

    NbTi accelerator dipoles are limited to magneticfields (H)of about 10 T, due to an intrinsic upper critical field (Hc2) limitationof 14 T. To surpass this restriction, prototype Nb3Sn magnets are beingdeveloped which have reached 16 T. We show that Nb3Sn dipole technologyis practically limited to 17 to 18 T due to insufficient high fieldpinning, and intrinsically to 20 to 22 T due to Hc2 limitations.Therefore, to obtain magnetic fields approaching 20 T and higher, amaterial is required with a higher Hc2 and sufficient high field pinningcapacity. A realistic candidate for this purpose is Bi-2212, which isavailable in roundwires and sufficient lengths for the fabrication ofcoils based on Rutherford-type cables. We initiated a program to developthe required technology to construct accelerator magnets from'windand-react' (W&R) Bi-2212 coils. We outline the complicationsthat arise through the use of Bi-2212, describe the development paths toaddress these issues, and conclude with the design of W&R Bi-2212sub-scale magnets.

  2. An equation for the quench propagation velocity valid for high field magnet use of REBCO coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonura, M.; Senatore, C.

    2016-06-01

    Based on a study of the thermophysical properties, we derived a practical formula for the normal zone propagation velocity appropriate for REBa2Cu3O7-x coated conductors in high magnetic fields. An analytical expression to evaluate the current sharing temperature as a function of the operating conditions is also proposed. The presented study has allowed us to account for experimental results not fully understood in the framework of the models widely used in the literature. In particular, we provided a fundamental understanding of the experimental evidence that the normal zone propagation velocity in REBa2Cu3O7-x coated conductors can be mainly determined by the operating current, regardless of the applied field and temperature.

  3. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in ecstasy (MDMA) users.

    PubMed

    Daumann, Jörg; Fischermann, Thomas; Pilatus, Ulrich; Thron, Armin; Moeller-Hartmann, Walter; Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, Euphrosyne

    2004-05-20

    The popular recreational drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) has well-recognized neurotoxic effects upon central serotonergic systems in animal studies. In humans, the use of MDMA has been linked to cognitive problems, particularly to deficits in long-term memory and learning. Recent studies with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) have reported relatively low levels of the neuronal marker N-acetylaspartate (NAA) in MDMA users, however, these results have been ambiguous. Moreover, the only available 1H MRS study of the hippocampus reported normal findings in a small sample of five MDMA users. In the present study, we compared 13 polyvalent ecstasy users with 13 matched controls. We found no differences between the NAA/creatine/phosphocreatine (Cr) ratios of users and controls in neocortical regions, and only a tendency towards lower NAA/Cr ratios in the left hippocampus of MDMA users. Thus, compared with cognitive deficits, 1H MRS appears to be a less sensitive marker of potential neurotoxic damage in ecstasy users. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on brain edema

    SciTech Connect

    Naruse, S.; Horikawa, Y.; Tanaka, C.; Hirakawa, K.; Nishikawa, H.; Yoshizaki, K.

    1982-06-01

    The water in normal and edematous brain tissues of rats was studied by the pulse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, measuring the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and the transverse relaxation time (T2). In the normal brain, T1 and T2 were single components, both shorter than in pure water. Prolongation and separation of T2 into two components, one fast and one slow, were the characteristic findings in brain edema induced by both cold injury and triethyl tin (TET), although some differences between the two types of edema existed in the content of the lesion and in the degree of changes in T1 and T2 values. Quantitative analysis of T1 and T2 values in their time course relating to water content demonstrated that prolongation of T1 referred to the volume of increased water in tissues examined, and that two phases of T2 reflected the distribution and the content of the edema fluid. From the analysis of the slow component of T2 versus water content during edema formation, it was demonstrated that the increase in edema fluid was steady, and its content was constant during formation of TET-induced edema. On the contrary, during the formation of cold-injury edema, water-rich edema fluid increased during the initial few hours, and protein-rich edema fluid increased thereafter. It was concluded that proton NMR relaxation time measurements may provide new understanding in the field of brain edema research.

  5. Measurement of the ratio of the proton's electric to magnetic form factors by recoil polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Mark K. Jones; Hall A Collaboration

    1999-03-01

    The longitudinal and transverse polarizations of the outgoing proton were measured for the reaction {sup 1}H(e,e' p) at four-momentum transfer squared of 0.5 to 3.5 GeV{sup 2}. The ratio of the electric to magnetic form factors of the proton is proportional to the ratio of the transverse to longitudinal polarizations.

  6. ARTEMIS observations of the solar wind proton scattering function from lunar crustal magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, A. R.; Halekas, J. S.; Lue, C.; Fatemi, S.

    2017-04-01

    Despite their small scales, lunar crustal magnetic fields are routinely associated with observations of reflected and/or backstreaming populations of solar wind protons. Solar wind proton reflection locally reduces the rate of space weathering of the lunar regolith, depresses local sputtering rates of neutrals into the lunar exosphere, and can trigger electromagnetic waves and small-scale collisionless shocks in the near-lunar space plasma environment. Thus, knowledge of both the magnitude and scattering function of solar wind protons from magnetic anomalies is crucial in understanding a wide variety of planetary phenomena at the Moon. We have compiled 5.5 years of ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun) observations of reflected protons at the Moon and used a Liouville tracing method to ascertain each proton's reflection location and scattering angles. We find that solar wind proton reflection is largely correlated with crustal magnetic field strength, with anomalies such as South Pole/Aitken Basin (SPA), Mare Marginis, and Gerasimovich reflecting on average 5-12% of the solar wind flux while the unmagnetized surface reflects between 0.1 and 1% in charged form. We present the scattering function of solar wind protons off of the SPA anomaly, showing that the scattering transitions from isotropic at low solar zenith angles to strongly forward scattering at solar zenith angles near 90°. Such scattering is consistent with simulations that have suggested electrostatic fields as the primary mechanism for solar wind proton reflection from crustal magnetic anomalies.

  7. Tracking of systemically administered mononuclear cells in the ischemic brain by high-field magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Stroh, Albrecht; Zimmer, Claus; Werner, Nikos; Gertz, Karen; Weir, Kathrine; Kronenberg, Golo; Steinbrink, Jens; Mueller, Susanne; Sieland, Katharina; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Nickenig, Georg; Endres, Matthias

    2006-11-15

    This study was designed to track systemically administered mononuclear cells (MNCs) in the ischemic mouse brain using 7 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Splenectomized wild-type mice were subjected to brain ischemia by 30 or 60 min filamentous occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAo) and reperfusion. Spleen-derived MNCs were labeled with very small superparamagnetic iron-oxide particles (VSOP) and transfused into recipient mice 30 min, 8 h, or 24 h after MCAo via the tail vein. High-resolution MRI sequences were designed to monitor the dynamics of brain ischemia and to observe the migration and engraftment of transfused cells into the ischemic brain. T2*-weighted (gradient-echo) hypointense signal changes became apparent at 24-48 h after transfusion, were typically associated with the ischemic lesion border, and could be followed up to 5 weeks after the insult. Such presumed MNC-associated signal changes in MRI were confirmed by histochemical detection of iron (Prussian blue staining) and detection of constitutively expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a subset of animals transfused with MNCs derived from GFP transgenic mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate that brain engraftment of systemically administered mononuclear cells can be visualized non-invasively over time and space using high-resolution MRI.

  8. Clinical indications for high-field 1.5 T intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and neuro-navigation for neurosurgical procedures. Review of initial 100 cases.

    PubMed

    Maesawa, Satoshi; Fujii, Masazumi; Nakahara, Norimoto; Watanabe, Tadashi; Saito, Kiyoshi; Kajita, Yasukazu; Nagatani, Tetsuya; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Jun

    2009-08-01

    Initial experiences are reviewed in an integrated operation theater equipped with an intraoperative high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance (MR) imager and neuro-navigation (BrainSUITE), to evaluate the indications and limitations. One hundred consecutive cases were treated, consisting of 38 gliomas, 49 other tumors, 11 cerebrovascular diseases, and 2 functional diseases. The feasibility and usefulness of the integrated theater were evaluated for individual diseases, focusing on whether intraoperative images (including diffusion tensor imaging) affected the surgical strategy. The extent of resection and outcomes in each histological category of brain tumors were examined. Intraoperative high-field MR imaging frequently affected or modified the surgical strategy in the glioma group (27/38 cases, 71.1%), but less in the other tumor group (13/49 cases, 26.5%). The surgical strategy was not modified in cerebrovascular or functional diseases, but the success of procedures and the absence of complications could be confirmed. In glioma surgery, subtotal or greater resection was achieved in 22 of the 31 patients (71%) excluding biopsies, and intraoperative images revealed tumor remnants resulting in the extension of resection in 21 of the 22 patients (95.4%), the highest rate of extension among all types of pathologies. The integrated neuro-navigation improved workflow. The best indication for intraoperative high-field MR imaging and integrated neuro-navigation is brain tumors, especially gliomas, and is supplementary in assuring quality in surgery for cerebrovascular or functional diseases. Immediate quality assurance is provided in several types of neurosurgical procedures.

  9. Randomized trial for superiority of high field strength intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging guided resection in pituitary surgery.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Vivek; Raheja, Amol; Suri, Ashish; Chandra, P Sarat; Kale, Shashank S; Kumar, Rajinder; Garg, Ajay; Kalaivani, Mani; Pandey, Ravindra M; Sharma, Bhawani S

    2017-03-01

    Till date there are no randomized trials to suggest the superiority of intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging (IOMRI) guided trans-sphenoidal pituitary resection over two dimensional fluoroscopic (2D-F) guided resections. We conducted this trial to establish the superiority of IOMRI in pituitary surgery. Primary objective was to compare extent of tumor resection between the two study arms. It was a prospective, randomized, outcome assessor and statistician blinded, two arm (A: IOMRI, n=25 and B: 2D-F, n=25), parallel group clinical trial. 4 patients from IOMRI group cross-over to 2D-F group and were consequently analyzed in latter group, based on modified intent to treat method. A total of 50 patients were enrolled till completion of trial (n=25 in each study arm). Demographic profile and baseline parameters were comparable among the two arms (p>0.05) except for higher number of endoscopic procedures and experienced neurosurgeons (>10years) in arm B (p=0.02, 0.002 respectively). Extent of resection was similar in both study arms (A, 94.9% vs B, 93.6%; p=0.78), despite adjusting for experience of operating surgeon and use of microscope/endoscope for surgical resection. We observed that use of IOMRI helped optimize the extent of resection in 5/20 patients (25%) for pituitary tumor resection in-group A. Present study failed to observe superiorty of IOMRI over conventional 2D-F guided resection in pituitary macroadenoma surgery. By use of this technology, younger surgeons could validate their results intra-operatively and hence could increase EOR without causing any increase in complications.

  10. Analysis of 137 Patients Who Underwent Endoscopic Transsphenoidal Pituitary Adenoma Resection Under High-Field Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Navigation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaping; Wang, Fuyu; Zhou, Tao; Wang, Peng; Chen, Xiaolei; Zhang, Jiashu; Zhou, Dingbiao

    2017-08-01

    Pure endoscopic resection has become the most popular surgical approach for pituitary adenoma. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) systems have been in use for endoscopic resection of pituitary adenomas. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of iMRI and neuroimaging navigation techniques during endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery of pituitary adenomas. Data from 137 patients who underwent resection of endoscopic pituitary adenoma under 1.5T iMRI navigation were collected and analyzed. Of patients, 92 underwent complete resection and 45 had residual tumor on real-time iMRI. Twenty-three patients underwent further surgery, and total resection was achieved in 19. Extent of total resection increased from 67.15% to 81.02%. iMRI revealed 3 patients with bleeding in the surgical area, which was successfully treated during the surgery. Review images obtained 3 months after surgery showed 26 patients with residual tumor; 14 patients had the same volume as intraoperatively, and 12 patients had a volume less than that observed intraoperatively. Residual tumor volume in the suprasellar region was less than that seen intraoperatively in 11 of 15 (73.3%) patients. The use of iMRI and neuronavigation not only leads to a higher rate of tumor resection but also helps in detecting and removing hematomas in the surgical area. Follow-up examinations of extent of residual tumor at 3 months postoperatively were consistent with intraoperative results. Residual tumor volume in the suprasellar region was usually less than that observed intraoperatively. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. An Ultra-High Field Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study of Post Exercise Lactate, Glutamate and Glutamine Change in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Andrea; Thomas, Adam G.; Rawlings, Nancy B.; Near, Jamie; Nichols, Thomas E.; Clare, Stuart; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Stagg, Charlotte J.

    2015-01-01

    During strenuous exercise there is a progressive increase in lactate uptake and metabolism into the brain as workload and plasma lactate levels increase. Although it is now widely accepted that the brain can metabolize lactate, few studies have directly measured brain lactate following vigorous exercise. Here, we used ultra-high field magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain to obtain static measures of brain lactate, as well as brain glutamate and glutamine after vigorous exercise. The aims of our experiment were to (a) track the changes in brain lactate following recovery from exercise, and (b) to simultaneously measure the signals from brain glutamate and glutamine. The results of our experiment showed that vigorous exercise resulted in a significant increase in brain lactate. Furthermore, both glutamate and glutamine were successfully resolved, and as expected, although contrary to some previous reports, we did not observe any significant change in either amino acid after exercise. We did however observe a negative correlation between glutamate and a measure of fitness. These results support the hypothesis that peripherally derived lactate is taken up by the brain when available. Our data additionally highlight the potential of ultra-high field MRS as a non-invasive way of measuring multiple brain metabolite changes with exercise. PMID:26732236

  12. Terahertz cyclotron resonance spectroscopy of an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure using a high-field pulsed magnet and an asynchronous optical sampling technique

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B. F. Smith, W. F.; Hibberd, M. T.; Dawson, P.; Graham, D. M.; Beck, M.; Bartels, A.; Guiney, I.; Humphreys, C. J.

    2016-05-23

    The effective mass, sheet carrier concentration, and mobility of electrons within a two-dimensional electron gas in an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure were determined using a laboratory-based terahertz cyclotron resonance spectrometer. The ability to perform terahertz cyclotron resonance spectroscopy with magnetic fields of up to 31 T was enabled by combining a high-field pulsed magnet with a modified asynchronous optical sampling terahertz detection scheme. This scheme allowed around 100 transmitted terahertz waveforms to be recorded over the 14 ms magnetic field pulse duration. The sheet density and mobility were measured to be 8.0 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2} and 9000 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} at 77 K. The in-plane electron effective mass at the band edge was determined to be 0.228 ± 0.002m{sub 0}.

  13. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance study of the proton-irradiated KTiOPO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se-Hun; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2013-08-01

    31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was employed to study the effects of proton irradiation on KTiOPO4 (KTP) in view of the previously studied paramagnetic impurity doping effects. High-resolution 31P NMR measurements showed significant increase in the isotropic chemical shifts of the two inequivalent phosphorus sites in the proton-irradiated KTP system, indicating decrease in the electron density around the phosphorous nuclei. The 31P NMR linewidths of the KTP system manifested anomalies associated with the superionic transition and with the polaron formation, which became much weaker after proton irradiation. Besides, the activation energy of the charge carriers increased significantly after proton irradiation.

  14. Proton flare and magnetic storm effect in the vicinity of the Earth.

    PubMed

    Nealy, J E; Wilson, J W; Shea, M A; Smart, D F

    1994-10-01

    We have developed a model and associated computational procedure for estimating energetic proton exposures during a major solar proton event that occur in combination with a large magnetic storm. Transmission functions for solar protons are computed using geomagnetic vertical cutoff data for quiescent and disturbed conditions. Predicted exposures in low altitude polar orbit are found to be orders of magnitude greater for severe magnetic storm conditions than are corresponding exposures in the absence of major disturbances. We examine the response scenario for the events of November 1960 as an example.

  15. Proton flare and magnetic storm effect in the vicinity of the earth

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, M.A.; Smart, D.F.; Nealy, J.E.; Wilson, J.W.

    1994-12-31

    The authors have developed a model and associated computational procedure for estimating energetic proton exposures during a major solar proton event that occur in combination with a large magnetic storm. Transmission functions for solar protons are computed using geomagnetic vertical cutoff data for quiescent and disturbed conditions. Predicated exposures in low altitude polar orbit are found to be orders of magnitude greater for severe magnetic storm conditions than are corresponding exposures in the absence of major disturbances. The authors examine the response scenario for the events of November 1960 as an example.

  16. High-Field Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Density Functional Theory Study of Stable Organic Radicals in Lignin: Influence of the Extraction Process, Botanical Origin, and Protonation Reactions on the Radical g Tensor.

    PubMed

    Bährle, Christian; Nick, Thomas U; Bennati, Marina; Jeschke, Gunnar; Vogel, Frédéric

    2015-06-18

    The radical concentrations and g factors of stable organic radicals in different lignin preparations were determined by X-band EPR at 9 GHz. We observed that the g factors of these radicals are largely determined by the extraction process and not by the botanical origin of the lignin. The parameter mostly influencing the g factor is the pH value during lignin extraction. This effect was studied in depth using high-field EPR spectroscopy at 263 GHz. We were able to determine the gxx, gyy, and gzz components of the g tensor of the stable organic radicals in lignin. With the enhanced resolution of high-field EPR, distinct radical species could be found in this complex polymer. The radical species are assigned to substituted o-semiquinone radicals and can exist in different protonation states SH3+, SH2, SH1-, and S2-. The proposed model structures are supported by DFT calculations. The g principal values of the proposed structure were all in reasonable agreement with the experiments.

  17. Direct high-precision measurement of the magnetic moment of the proton.

    PubMed

    Mooser, A; Ulmer, S; Blaum, K; Franke, K; Kracke, H; Leiteritz, C; Quint, W; Rodegheri, C C; Smorra, C; Walz, J

    2014-05-29

    One of the fundamental properties of the proton is its magnetic moment, µp. So far µp has been measured only indirectly, by analysing the spectrum of an atomic hydrogen maser in a magnetic field. Here we report the direct high-precision measurement of the magnetic moment of a single proton using the double Penning-trap technique. We drive proton-spin quantum jumps by a magnetic radio-frequency field in a Penning trap with a homogeneous magnetic field. The induced spin transitions are detected in a second trap with a strong superimposed magnetic inhomogeneity. This enables the measurement of the spin-flip probability as a function of the drive frequency. In each measurement the proton's cyclotron frequency is used to determine the magnetic field of the trap. From the normalized resonance curve, we extract the particle's magnetic moment in terms of the nuclear magneton: μp = 2.792847350(9)μN. This measurement outperforms previous Penning-trap measurements in terms of precision by a factor of about 760. It improves the precision of the forty-year-old indirect measurement, in which significant theoretical bound state corrections were required to obtain µp, by a factor of 3. By application of this method to the antiproton magnetic moment, the fractional precision of the recently reported value can be improved by a factor of at least 1,000. Combined with the present result, this will provide a stringent test of matter/antimatter symmetry with baryons.

  18. Direct high-precision measurement of the magnetic moment of the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooser, A.; Ulmer, S.; Blaum, K.; Franke, K.; Kracke, H.; Leiteritz, C.; Quint, W.; Rodegheri, C. C.; Smorra, C.; Walz, J.

    2014-05-01

    One of the fundamental properties of the proton is its magnetic moment, µp. So far µp has been measured only indirectly, by analysing the spectrum of an atomic hydrogen maser in a magnetic field. Here we report the direct high-precision measurement of the magnetic moment of a single proton using the double Penning-trap technique. We drive proton-spin quantum jumps by a magnetic radio-frequency field in a Penning trap with a homogeneous magnetic field. The induced spin transitions are detected in a second trap with a strong superimposed magnetic inhomogeneity. This enables the measurement of the spin-flip probability as a function of the drive frequency. In each measurement the proton's cyclotron frequency is used to determine the magnetic field of the trap. From the normalized resonance curve, we extract the particle's magnetic moment in terms of the nuclear magneton: μp = 2.792847350(9)μN. This measurement outperforms previous Penning-trap measurements in terms of precision by a factor of about 760. It improves the precision of the forty-year-old indirect measurement, in which significant theoretical bound state corrections were required to obtain µp, by a factor of 3. By application of this method to the antiproton magnetic moment, the fractional precision of the recently reported value can be improved by a factor of at least 1,000. Combined with the present result, this will provide a stringent test of matter/antimatter symmetry with baryons.

  19. High resolution NMR study of T{sub 1} magnetic relaxation dispersion. IV. Proton relaxation in amino acids and Met-enkephalin pentapeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2014-10-21

    Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) of protons was studied in the pentapeptide Met-enkephalin and the amino acids, which constitute it. Experiments were run by using high-resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) in combination with fast field-cycling, thus enabling measuring NMRD curves for all individual protons. As in earlier works, Papers I–III, pronounced effects of intramolecular scalar spin-spin interactions, J-couplings, on spin relaxation were found. Notably, at low fields J-couplings tend to equalize the apparent relaxation rates within networks of coupled protons. In Met-enkephalin, in contrast to the free amino acids, there is a sharp increase in the proton T{sub 1}-relaxation times at high fields due to the changes in the regime of molecular motion. The experimental data are in good agreement with theory. From modelling the relaxation experiments we were able to determine motional correlation times of different residues in Met-enkephalin with atomic resolution. This allows us to draw conclusions about preferential conformation of the pentapeptide in solution, which is also in agreement with data from two-dimensional NMR experiments (rotating frame Overhauser effect spectroscopy). Altogether, our study demonstrates that high-resolution NMR studies of magnetic field-dependent relaxation allow one to probe molecular mobility in biomolecules with atomic resolution.

  20. High-Field Open versus Short-Bore Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Spine: A Randomized Controlled Comparison of Image Quality

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Elke; Asbach, Patrick; Diederichs, Gerd; Wetz, Christoph; Siebert, Eberhard; Wagner, Moritz; Hamm, Bernd; Dewey, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to compare the image quality of spinal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performed on a high-field horizontal open versus a short-bore MR scanner in a randomized controlled study setup. Methods Altogether, 93 (80% women, mean age 53) consecutive patients underwent spine imaging after random assignement to a 1-T horizontal open MR scanner with a vertical magnetic field or a 1.5-T short-bore MR scanner. This patient subset was part of a larger cohort. Image quality was assessed by determining qualitative parameters, signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR), and quantitative contour sharpness. Results The image quality parameters were higher for short-bore MR imaging. Regarding all sequences, the relative differences were 39% for the mean overall qualitative image quality, 53% for the mean SNR values, and 34–37% for the quantitative contour sharpness (P<0.0001). The CNR values were also higher for images obtained with the short-bore MR scanner. No sequence was of very poor (nondiagnostic) image quality. Scanning times were significantly longer for examinations performed on the open MR scanner (mean: 32±22 min versus 20±9 min; P<0.0001). Conclusions In this randomized controlled comparison of spinal MR imaging with an open versus a short-bore scanner, short-bore MR imaging revealed considerably higher image quality with shorter scanning times. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00715806 PMID:24391767

  1. Dysprosium-Modified Tobacco Mosaic Virus Nanoparticles for Ultra-High-Field Magnetic Resonance and Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, He; Zhang, Yifan; Shukla, Sourabh; Gu, Yuning; Yu, Xin; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2017-09-26

    The increasing prevalence of ultra-high-field magnetic resonance imaging (UHFMRI) in biomedical research and clinical settings will improve the resolution and diagnostic accuracy of MRI scans. However, better contrast agents are needed to achieve a satisfactory signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we report the synthesis of a bimodal contrast agent prepared by loading the internal cavity of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) nanoparticles with a dysprosium (Dy(3+)) complex and the near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) dye Cy7.5. The external surface of TMV was conjugated with an Asp-Gly-Glu-Ala (DGEA) peptide via a polyethylene glycol linker to target integrin α2β1. The resulting nanoparticle (Dy-Cy7.5-TMV-DGEA) was stable and achieved a high transverse relaxivity in ultra-high-strength magnetic fields (326 and 399 mM(-1) s(-1) at 7 and 9.4 T, respectively). The contrast agent was also biocompatible (low cytotoxicity) and targeted PC-3 prostate cancer cells and tumors in vitro and in vivo as confirmed by bimodal NIRF imaging and T2-mapping UHFMRI. Our results show that Dy-Cy7.5-TMV-DGEA is suitable for multiscale MRI scanning from the cellular level to the whole body, particularly in the context of UHFMRI applications.

  2. Carbon-13 and proton magnetic resonance of mouse muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Fung, B M

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that roughly 4 mmol carbon atoms/g mouse muscle can give rise to a "high resolution" 13C NMR spectrum. From the 13C spectrum, it is estimated that the protons from mobile organic molecules or molecular segments amount to 6-8%of total nonrigid protons (organic plus water) in muscle. Their spin-spin relaxation times (T2) are of the order of 0.4-2 ms. At 37 degrees C, the proton spin-echo decay of mouse muscle changes rapidly with time after death, while that of mouse brain does not. PMID:890043

  3. [To Test Glutamate Hypothesis for Schizophrenia Utilizing Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Tsugawa, Sachiko; Nakajima, Shin-Ichiro Luke

    2017-09-01

    Recent advancement in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has elucidated the pathophysiology of mental illness, including schizophrenia. MRS is a neuroimaging technique that non-invasively measures chemicals, using nuclear magnetic resonance. This narrative review explains proton MRS (1H-MRS) and introduces pivotal studies to examine a glutamate hypothesis for schizophrenia, employing 1H-MRS.

  4. Magnetic Shielding for High Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    nonlinear and eminently non-dispersive switching networks (such as banks of fast diodes ) have large bandwidths. Because of this simulation we believe...function of the form f z c t( )+ 0 . Here c0 and η0 correspond to speed of light and impedance in free space. In view of this, Taylor expansion of the...for space applications, added weight rarely has a high cost penalty and a light material with very good SE must meet these cost constraints. The

  5. Effective heating of nonadiabatic protons in magnetic reconnection with a guide field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usami, Shunsuke; Horiuchi, Ritoku; Ohtani, Hiroaki

    2017-09-01

    The mechanism of plasma heating through magnetic reconnection with a guide magnetic field is investigated by means of two-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulations. These simulations mimic the dynamics of two torus plasmas merging through magnetic reconnection in a spherical tokamak (ST) device. It is found that a large part of protons, which behave as nonadiabatic, are effectively heated in the downstream because a ring-like structure of proton velocity distribution is observed at a local point in the downstream. The characteristic features of the velocity distribution can be explained as the following proton motion. Upon entering the downstream across the separatrix, nonadiabatic protons suddenly feel the strong electromagnetic field in the downstream and move in the outflow direction while rotating mainly around the guide magnetic field. The protons gain kinetic energy not only on the separatrix but also in the downstream. This effective heating process can be interpreted as the "pickup," which, however, was thought to be responsible for only heavy ions. In this work, it is demonstrated that the pickup of protons is compatible with the known pickup theory in the cases in which the plasma beta is much less than 1, which is satisfied in STs.

  6. A high-field 3He metastability exchange optical pumping polarizer operating in a 1.5 T medical scanner for lung magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, G.; Pałasz, T.; Wojna, A.; Głowacz, B.; Suchanek, M.; Olejniczak, Z.; Dohnalik, T.

    2013-05-01

    After being hyperpolarized using the technique of Metastability Exchange Optical Pumping (MEOP), 3He can be used as a contrast agent for lung magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MEOP is usually performed at low magnetic field (˜1 mT) and low pressure (˜1 mbar), which results in a low magnetization production rate. Polarization preserving compression with a compression ratio of order 1000 is also required. It was demonstrated in sealed cells that high nuclear polarization values can be obtained at higher pressures with MEOP, if performed at high magnetic field (non-standard conditions). In this work, the feasibility of building a high-field polarizer that operates within a commercial 1.5 T scanner was evaluated. Preliminary measurements of nuclear polarization with sealed cells filled at different 3He gas pressures (1.33 to 267 mbar) were performed. The use of an annular shape for the laser beam increased by 25% the achievable nuclear polarization equilibrium value (Meq) at 32 and 67 mbar as compared to a Gaussian beam shape. Meq values of 66.4% and 31% were obtained at 32 and 267 mbar, respectively, and the magnetization production rate was increased by a factor of 10 compared to the best results obtained under standard conditions. To study the reproducibility of the method in a polarizing system, the same experiments were performed with small cells connected to a gas handling system. Despite careful cleaning procedure, the purity of the 3He gas could not be matched to that of the sealed cells. Consequently, the polarization build-up times were approximately 3 times longer in the 20-30 mbar range of pressure than those obtained for the 32 mbar sealed cell. However, reasonable Meq values of 40%-60% were achieved in a 90 ml open cell. Based on these findings, a novel compact polarizing system was designed and built. Its typical output is a 3He gas flow rate of 15 sccm with a polarization of 33%. In-vivo lung MRI ventilation images (Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of

  7. Noninvasive amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating the grading and cellularity of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yan; Lin, Yusong; Zhang, Wei; Kong, Lingfei; Wang, Lifu; Zuo, Panli; Vallines, Ignacio; Schmitt, Benjamin; Tian, Jie; Song, Xiaolei; Zhou, Jinyuan; Wang, Meiyun

    2017-01-24

    Using noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging techniques to accurately evaluate the grading and cellularity of gliomas is beneficial for improving the patient outcomes. Amide proton transfer imaging is a noninvasive molecular magnetic resonance imaging technique based on chemical exchange saturation transfer mechanism that detects endogenous mobile proteins and peptides in biological tissues. Between August 2012 and November 2015, a total number of 44 patients with pathologically proven gliomas were included in this study. We compared the capability of amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging with that of noninvasive diffusion-weighted imaging and noninvasive 3-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin imaging in evaluating the grading and cellularity of gliomas. Our results reveal that amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging is a superior imaging technique to diffusion-weighted imaging and 3-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin imaging in the grading of gliomas. In addition, our results showed that the Ki-67 index correlated better with the amide proton transfer-weighted signal intensity than with the apparent diffusion coefficient value or the cerebral blood flow value in the gliomas. Amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging is a promising method for predicting the grading and cellularity of gliomas.

  8. Noninvasive amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating the grading and cellularity of gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Kong, Lingfei; Wang, Lifu; Zuo, Panli; Vallines, Ignacio; Schmitt, Benjamin; Tian, Jie; Song, Xiaolei; Zhou, Jinyuan; Wang, Meiyun

    2017-01-01

    Using noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging techniques to accurately evaluate the grading and cellularity of gliomas is beneficial for improving the patient outcomes. Amide proton transfer imaging is a noninvasive molecular magnetic resonance imaging technique based on chemical exchange saturation transfer mechanism that detects endogenous mobile proteins and peptides in biological tissues. Between August 2012 and November 2015, a total number of 44 patients with pathologically proven gliomas were included in this study. We compared the capability of amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging with that of noninvasive diffusion-weighted imaging and noninvasive 3-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin imaging in evaluating the grading and cellularity of gliomas. Our results reveal that amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging is a superior imaging technique to diffusion-weighted imaging and 3-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin imaging in the grading of gliomas. In addition, our results showed that the Ki-67 index correlated better with the amide proton transfer-weighted signal intensity than with the apparent diffusion coefficient value or the cerebral blood flow value in the gliomas. Amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging is a promising method for predicting the grading and cellularity of gliomas. PMID:27992380

  9. High-field magnetization study of [Cu(pyz){sub 2} (HF{sub 2})]PF{sub 6} : an s = 1/2 quasi-two-dimensional Heisenberg magnet.

    SciTech Connect

    Cizmar, E.; Ozerov, M.; Skourski, Y.; Zvyagin, S. A.; Schlueter, J. A.; Manson, J. L.; Wosnitza, J.; Materials Science Division; Dresden High Magnetic Field Lab.; Safarik Univ.; Eastern Washington Univ.

    2010-04-01

    We report on pulsed-field magnetization studies of the quasi-two-dimensional spin system [Cu(pyz){sub 2}(HF{sub 2})]PF{sub 6}. The magnetization saturates at B{sub C}{sup ab} = 37.5 T and B{sub C}{sup c} = 33.8 T for in-plane and out-of-plane orientations of the applied magnetic field, respectively. In addition, the angular dependence of the g-factor studied by electron-spin resonance reveals orbital overlap in the ab plane suggesting a quasi-two-dimensional square-lattice network of Cu spins. It is argued that the high-field behavior is governed by the two-dimensional nature of the spin correlations due to the large anisotropy of the exchange couplings.

  10. Binding of calcium to phosphatidylcholines as determined by proton magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yabusaki, K K; Wells, M A

    1975-01-14

    The interactions of calcium, magnesium, and the rare earth cations, cerium, neodymium, and praseodymium, with phosphatidylcholines were studied by proton magnetic resonance and infared spectroscopy. The calcium-induced chemical shifts for the various protons of phosphatidylcholine were C alpha choline greater than C beta choline greater than N(CH3)3 greater than C3 glycerol. No significant chemical shifts were observed for the C1 and C2 glycerol protons. None of the acyl chain protons were affected by the presence of calcium. Analysis of the salt-induced chemical shifts yielded binding curves with an excellent fit with the theoretical. The vicinal coupling constants for the various protons of phosphatidylcholine did not appear to change in the presence of calcium. The lanthanide-induced isotropic shifts for the protons of phosphatidylcholines followed the order Cbeta choline greater than C3 glycerol greater than Calpha choline greater than N(CH3)3. Examination of the P=O stretching band (1150-1300 cm-1) of phosphatidylcholines by differential infrared spectroscopy showed that this band shifted to shorter wavelengths in the presence of calcium. The site of calcium binding to phosphatidylcholines as deduced from the proton magnetic resonance and infrared data is discussed in light of the high specificity for calcium in enhancing the amino-catalyzed methanolysis of phosphatidylcholines.

  11. The Travelling-Wave Primate System: A New Solution for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Macaque Monkeys at 7 Tesla Ultra-High Field

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Tim; Mallow, Johannes; Plaumann, Markus; Luchtmann, Michael; Stadler, Jörg; Mylius, Judith; Brosch, Michael; Bernarding, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Neuroimaging of macaques at ultra-high field (UHF) is usually conducted by combining a volume coil for transmit (Tx) and a phased array coil for receive (Rx) tightly enclosing the monkey’s head. Good results have been achieved using vertical or horizontal magnets with implanted or near-surface coils. An alternative and less costly approach, the travelling-wave (TW) excitation concept, may offer more flexible experimental setups on human whole-body UHF magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, which are now more widely available. Goal of the study was developing and validating the TW concept for in vivo primate MRI. Methods The TW Primate System (TWPS) uses the radio frequency shield of the gradient system of a human whole-body 7 T MRI system as a waveguide to propagate a circularly polarized B1 field represented by the TE11 mode. This mode is excited by a specifically designed 2-port patch antenna. For receive, a customized neuroimaging monkey head receive-only coil was designed. Field simulation was used for development and evaluation. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was compared with data acquired with a conventional monkey volume head coil consisting of a homogeneous transmit coil and a 12-element receive coil. Results The TWPS offered good image homogeneity in the volume-of-interest Turbo spin echo images exhibited a high contrast, allowing a clear depiction of the cerebral anatomy. As a prerequisite for functional MRI, whole brain ultrafast echo planar images were successfully acquired. Conclusion The TWPS presents a promising new approach to fMRI of macaques for research groups with access to a horizontal UHF MRI system. PMID:26066653

  12. The Travelling-Wave Primate System: A New Solution for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Macaque Monkeys at 7 Tesla Ultra-High Field.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Tim; Mallow, Johannes; Plaumann, Markus; Luchtmann, Michael; Stadler, Jörg; Mylius, Judith; Brosch, Michael; Bernarding, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging of macaques at ultra-high field (UHF) is usually conducted by combining a volume coil for transmit (Tx) and a phased array coil for receive (Rx) tightly enclosing the monkey's head. Good results have been achieved using vertical or horizontal magnets with implanted or near-surface coils. An alternative and less costly approach, the travelling-wave (TW) excitation concept, may offer more flexible experimental setups on human whole-body UHF magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, which are now more widely available. Goal of the study was developing and validating the TW concept for in vivo primate MRI. The TW Primate System (TWPS) uses the radio frequency shield of the gradient system of a human whole-body 7 T MRI system as a waveguide to propagate a circularly polarized B1 field represented by the TE11 mode. This mode is excited by a specifically designed 2-port patch antenna. For receive, a customized neuroimaging monkey head receive-only coil was designed. Field simulation was used for development and evaluation. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was compared with data acquired with a conventional monkey volume head coil consisting of a homogeneous transmit coil and a 12-element receive coil. The TWPS offered good image homogeneity in the volume-of-interest Turbo spin echo images exhibited a high contrast, allowing a clear depiction of the cerebral anatomy. As a prerequisite for functional MRI, whole brain ultrafast echo planar images were successfully acquired. The TWPS presents a promising new approach to fMRI of macaques for research groups with access to a horizontal UHF MRI system.

  13. Assessment of Age-Related Morphometric Changes of Subcortical Structures in Healthy People Using Ultra-High Field 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue-Yuan; Zhao, Lei; Yu, Tao; Qiao, Liang; Ni, Duan-Yu; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Li, Yong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the age-related morphometric changes of subcortical structures in healthy people. Materials and Methods: Ultra-high field 7 tesla magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in humans was used to visualize the subcortical structures of healthy young, middle-aged and elderly participants. Using the magnetization-prepared two rapid acquisition gradient echo (MP2RAGE) sequence, we assessed the visibility of the margins of the thalamus and white matter in the thalamus, as well as the anterior commissure (AC) and posterior commissure (PC) length, the maximal height of the thalamus, the half width of the third ventricle and the distance between the AC and the center of the mammillothalamic tract (MTT) at the level of the AC-PC plane. All quantitative data were statistically evaluated. Results: The AC-PC length did not differ significantly among the three groups. The maximal height of the thalamus decreased with age (rs(53) = −0.719, p < 0.001). The half width of the third ventricle (rs(53) = 0.705, p < 0.001) and the distance between the AC and the center of the MTT (rs(53) = 0.485, p < 0.001) increased with age. The distance between the AC and the center of the MTT of the young and the elderly participants differed significantly (p = 0.007). Conclusion: The AC-PC length is not a good candidate for proportional correction during atlas-to-patient registration. The maximal height of the thalamus and the half width of the third ventricle correlated strongly with age, and the MTT position in relation to the AC shifted posteriorly as age increased. These age-related morphometric changes of subcortical structures should be considered in targeting for functional neurosurgery. PMID:27725800

  14. Chemical spray pyrolysis of Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O high-T(sub c) superconductors for high-field bitter magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derochemont, L. Pierre; Zhang, John G.; Squillante, Michael R.; Hermann, A. M.; Duan, H. M.; Andrews, Robert J.; Kelliher, Warren C.

    1991-01-01

    The deposition of Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O thick films by spray pyrolyzing a Ba-Ca-Cu-O precursor film and diffusing thallium into the film to form the superconducting phase is examined. This approach was taken to reduce exposure to thallium and its health and safety hazards. The Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O system was selected because it has very attractive features which make it appealing to device and manufacturing engineering. Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O will accommodate a number of superconducting phases. This attribute makes it very forgiving to stoichiometric fluctuations in the bulk and film. It has excellent thermal and chemical stability, and appears to be relatively insensitive to chemical impurities. Oxygen is tightly bound into the systems, consequently there is no orthorhombic (conductor) to tetragonal (insulator) transition which would affect a component's lifetime. More significantly, the thallium based superconductors appear to have harder magnetic properties than the other high-Tc oxide ceramics. Estimates using magnetoresistance measurements indicate that at 77 K Tl2Ba2CaCu2O10 will have an upper critical field, H(sub c2) fo 26 Tesla for applied fields parallel to the c-axis and approximately 1000 Tesla for fields oriented in the a-b plane. Results to date have shown that superconducting films can be reproducibly deposited on 100 oriented MgO substrates. One film had a zero resistance temperature of 111.5 K. Furthermore, x ray diffraction analysis of the films showed preferential c-axis orientation parallel to the plane of the substrate. These results have now made it possible to consider the manufacture of a superconducting tape wire which can be configured into a topology useful for high-field magnet designs. The research which leads to the preparation of these films and plans for further development are reviewed.

  15. Studying cyto and myeloarchitecture of the human cortex at ultra-high field with quantitative imaging: R1, R2(*) and magnetic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Marques, José P; Khabipova, Diana; Gruetter, Rolf

    2017-02-15

    In this manuscript, the use of quantitative imaging at ultra-high field is evaluated as a mean to study cyto and myelo-architecture of the cortex. The quantitative contrasts used are the longitudinal relaxation rate (R1), apparent transverse relaxation rate (R2(*)) and quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM). The quantitative contrasts were computed using high resolution in-vivo (0.65mm isotropic) brain data acquired at 7T. The performance of the different quantitative approaches was evaluated by visualizing the contrast between known highly myelinated primary sensory cortex regions and the neighbouring cortex. The transition from the inner layers to the outer layers (from white matter to the pial surface) of the human cortex, which is known to have varying cyto- and myelo architecture, was evaluated. The across cortex and through depth behaviour observed for the different quantitative maps was in good agreement between the different subjects, clearly allowing the differentiation between different Brodmann regions, suggesting these features could be used for individual cortical brain parcellation. While both R1 and R2(*) maps decrease monotonically from the white matter to the pial surface due to the decrease of myelin and iron between these regions, magnetic susceptibility maps have a more complex behaviour reflecting its opposing sensitivity to myelin and iron concentration.

  16. Low-field and high-field magnetic resonance contrast imaging of magnetoferritin as a pathological model system of iron accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strbak, Oliver; Balejcikova, Lucia; Baciak, Ladislav; Kovac, Jozef; Masarova-Kozelova, Marta; Krafcik, Andrej; Dobrota, Dusan; Kopcansky, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Various pathological processes including neurodegenerative disorders are associated with the accumulation of iron, while it is believed that a precursor of iron accumulation is ferritin. Physiological ferritin is due to low relaxivity, which results in only weak detection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. On the other hand, pathological ferritin is associated with disrupted iron homeostasis and structural changes in the mineral core, and should increase the hypointensive artefacts in MRI. On the basis of recent findings in respect to the pathological ferritin structure, we prepared the magnetoferritin particles as a possible pathological ferritin model system. The particles were characterised with dynamic light scattering, as well as with superconducting quantum interference device measurements. With the help of low-field (0.2 T) and high-field (4.7 T) MRI standard T 2-weighted protocols we found that it is possible to clearly distinguish between native ferritin as a physiological model system, and magnetoferritin as a pathological model system. Surprisingly, the T 2-weighted short TI inversion recovery protocol at low-field system showed the optimum contrast differentiation. Such findings are highly promising for exploiting the use of iron accumulation as a noninvasive diagnostics tool of pathological processes, where the magnetoferritin particles could be utilised as MRI iron quantification calibration samples.

  17. Role of high-field intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging on a multi-image fusion-guided stereotactic biopsy of the basal ganglia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang; Chen, Zhijuan; Yang, Shuyuan; Zhang, Jianning; Yue, Shuyuan; Wang, Zengguang; Yang, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present case study was to investigate the advantages of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) on the real-time guidance and monitoring of a stereotactic biopsy. The study describes a patient with intracranial lesions, which were examined by conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging using a 1.5T intraoperative MRI system. The digital and pre-operative positron emission/computed tomography image data were transferred to a BrainLAB planning workstation, and a variety of images were automatically fused. The BrainLAB software was then used to reconstruct the corticospinal tract (CST) and create a three-dimensional display of the anatomical association between the CST and the brain lesions. A Leksell surgical planning workstation was used to identify the ideal target site and a reasonable needle track for the biopsy. The 1.5T iMRI was used to effectively monitor the intracranial condition during the brain biopsy procedure. Post-operatively, the original symptoms of the patient were not aggravated and no further neurological deficits were apparent. The histopathological diagnosis of non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma was made. Using high-field iMRI, the multi-image fusion-guided stereotactic brain biopsy allows for a higher positive rate of biopsy and a lower incidence of complications. The approach of combining multi-image fusion images with the frame-based stereotactic biopsy may be clinically useful for intracranial lesions of deep functional areas.

  18. A high-field magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer using an oven-controlled crystal oscillator as the local oscillator of its radio frequency transceiver.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao; Tang, Xin; Tang, Weinan; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2014-09-01

    A home-made high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) spectrometer with multiple receiving channels is described. The radio frequency (RF) transceiver of the spectrometer consists of digital intermediate frequency (IF) circuits and corresponding mixing circuits. A direct digital synthesis device is employed to generate the IF pulse; the IF signal from a down-conversion circuit is sampled and followed by digital quadrature detection. Both the IF generation and the IF sampling use a 50 MHz clock. An oven-controlled crystal oscillator, which has outstanding spectral purity and a compact circuit, is used as the local oscillator of the RF transceiver. A digital signal processor works as the pulse programmer of the spectrometer, as a result, 32 control lines can be generated simultaneously while an event is triggered. Field programmable gate array devices are utilized as the auxiliary controllers of the IF generation, IF receiving, and gradient control. High performance, including 1 μs time resolution of the soft pulse, 1 MHz receiving bandwidth, and 1 μs time resolution of the gradient waveform, is achieved. High-quality images on a 1.5 T MRI system using the spectrometer are obtained.

  19. WE-D-17A-04: Magnetically Focused Proton Irradiation of Small Volume Targets

    SciTech Connect

    McAuley, G; Slater, J; Wroe, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the advantages of magnetic focusing for small volume proton irradiations and the potential clinical benefits for radiosurgery targets. The primary goal is to create narrow elongated proton beams of elliptical cross section with superior dose delivery characteristics compared to current delivery modalities (eg, collimated beams). In addition, more general beam shapes are also under investigation. Methods: Two prototype magnets consisting of 24 segments of samarium-cobalt (Sm2Co17) permanent magnetic material adhered into hollow cylinders were manufactured for testing. A single focusing magnet was placed on a positioning track on our Gantry 1 treatment table and 15 mm diameter proton beams with energies and modulation relevant to clinical radiosurgery applications (127 to 186 MeV, and 0 to 30 mm modulation) were delivered to a terminal water tank. Beam dose distributions were measured using a PTW diode detector and Gafchromic EBT2 film. Longitudinal and transverse dose profiles were analyzed and compared to data from Monte Carlo simulations analogous to the experimental setup. Results: The narrow elongated focused beam spots showed high elliptical symmetry indicating high magnet quality. In addition, when compared to unfocused beams, peak-to-entrance depth dose ratios were 11 to 14% larger (depending on presence or extent of modulation), and minor axis penumbras were 11 to 20% smaller (again depending on modulation) for focused beams. These results suggest that the use of rare earth magnet assemblies is practical and could improve dose-sparing of normal tissue and organs at risk while delivering enhanced dose to small proton radiosurgery targets. Conclusion: Quadrapole rare earth magnetic assemblies are a promising and inexpensive method to counteract particle out scatter that tends to degrade the peak to entrance performance of small field proton beams. Knowledge gained from current experiments will inform the design of a prototype treatment

  20. Direct high-precision measurement of the magnetic moment of the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quint, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    The challenge to measure the properties of the proton with great precision inspires very different branches of physics. The magnetic moment of the proton is a fundamental property of this particle. So far it has only been measured indirectly, by analyzing the spectrum of an atomic hydrogen maser in a magnetic field. Here we report the direct high-precision measurement of the magnetic moment of a single proton using the double Penning-trap technique. We drive proton-spin quantum jumps by a radio-frequency field in a Penning trap with a homogeneous magnetic field. The induced spin transitions are detected in a second trap with a strong superimposed magnetic inhomogeneity. This enables the measurement of the spin-flip probability as a function of the drive frequency. In each measurement the proton's cyclotron frequency is used to determine the magnetic field of the trap. From the normalized resonance curve, we extract the particle's magnetic moment in terms of the nuclear magneton: μp = 2.792 847 350 (9) μN. This measurement outperforms previous Penning-trap measurements in terms of precision by a factor of about 760. It improves the precision of the forty year-old indirect measurement by D. Kleppner et al., in which significant theoretical bound-state corrections were required to obtain μp, by a factor of 3. By application of this method to the antiproton magnetic moment, the fractional precision of the recently reported value can be improved by a factor of at least 1,000. Combined with the present result, this will provide a stringent test of matter/antimatter symmetry with baryons. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, grant QU122/3.

  1. An analytical solution to proton Bragg peak deflection in a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Russell; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2012-09-07

    The role of MR imaging for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is becoming more and more important thanks to the excellent soft tissue contrast offered by MRI. Hybrid therapy devices with integrated MRI scanners are under active development for x-ray therapy. The combination of proton therapy with MRI imaging has only been investigated at the theoretical or conceptual level. Of concern is the deflection of the proton beam in the homogeneous magnetic field. A previous publication has come to the conclusion that the impact of a 0.5 T magnetic field on the dose distribution for proton therapy is very small and lateral deflections stay well below 2 mm. The purpose of this study is to provide new insights into the effects of magnetic fields on a proton beam coming to rest in a patient. We performed an analytical calculation of the lateral deflection of protons with initial energies between 50 MeV and 250 MeV, perpendicular to the beam direction and the magnetic field. We used a power-law range-energy relationship and the Lorentz force in both relativistic and non-relativistic conditions. Calculations were done for protons coming to rest in water or soft tissue, and generalized to other uniform and non-uniform media. Results were verified by comparisons with numerical calculations and Monte Carlo simulations. A key result of our calculations is that the maximum lateral deflection at the end of range is proportional to the third power of the initial energy. Accordingly, due to the strong dependence on the energy, even a relatively small magnetic field of 0.5 T will cause a deflection of the proton beam by 1 cm at the end of range of a 200 MeV beam. The maximum deflection at 200 MeV is more than 10 times larger than that of a 90 MeV beam. Relativistic corrections of the deflection are generally small but they can become non-negligible at higher energies around 200 MeV and above. Contrary to previous findings, the lateral deflection of a proton beam can be significant (1

  2. Processing and characterization of superconducting solenoids made of Bi-2212/Ag-alloy multifilament round wire for high field magnet applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng

    As the only high temperature superconductor with round wire (RW) geometry, Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x (Bi-2212) superconducting wire has the advantages of being multi-filamentary, macroscopically isotropic and twistable. With overpressure (OP) processing techniques recently developed by our group at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), the engineering current density (Je) of Bi-2212 RW can be dramatically increased. For example, Je of more than 600 A/mm 2 (4.2 K and 20 T) is achieved after 100 bar OP processing. With these intrinsically beneficial properties and recent processing progress, Bi-2212 RW has become very attractive for high field magnet applications, especially for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) magnets and accelerator magnets etc. This thesis summarizes my graduate study on Bi-2212 solenoids for high field and high homogeneity NMR magnet applications, which mainly includes performance study of Bi-2212 RW insulations, 1 bar and OP processing study of Bi-2212 solenoids, and development of superconducting joints between Bi-2212 RW conductors. Electrical insulation is one of the key components of Bi-2212 coils to provide sufficient electrical standoff within coil winding pack. A TiO 2/polymer insulation offered by nGimat LLC was systematically investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dielectric property measurements, and transport critical current (Ic) property measurements. About 29% of the insulation by weight is polymer. When the Bi-2212 wire is fully heat treated, this decomposes with slow heating to 400 °C in flowing O2. After the full reaction, we found that the TiO2 did not degrade the critical current properties, adhered well to the conductor, and provided a breakdown voltage of more than 100 V. A Bi-2212 RW wound solenoid coil was built using this insulation being offered by nGimat LLC. The coil resistance was constant through coil winding, polymer burn

  3. Dynamics of the penetration boundaries of solar protons during a strong magnetic storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glukhov, G. A.; Kratenko, Y. P.; Mineev, Y. V.

    1985-01-01

    The variations in the equatorial penetration boundary of solar protons with E sub p = 0.9 to 8.0 MeV during a strong magnetic storm of April 3 to 5, were analyzed. The dynamics of this boundary is compared with the dynamics of the outer trapping boundary of electrons with E sub e = - 0.3 to 0.6 MeV. The solar-proton penetration and the structure of the real magnetic field are studied. The unique data on the thin structure of development of a magnetospheric substorm were obtained for the first time.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Proton Loss from Carotenoid Radical Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Kispert, Lowell D; Focsan, A Ligia; Konovalova, Tatyana A; Lawrence, Jesse; Bowman, Michael K; Dixon, David A; Molnar, Peter; Deli, Jozsef

    2007-06-11

    Carotenoids, intrinsic components of reaction centers and pigment-protein complexes in photosynthetic membranes, play a photoprotective role and serve as a secondary electron donor. Before optimum use of carotenoids can be made in artificial photosynthetic systems, their robust nature in living materials requires extensive characterization of their electron transfer, radical trapping ability, stability, structure in and on various hosts, and photochemical behavior. Pulsed ENDOR and 2D-HYSCORE studies combined with DFT calculations reveal that photo-oxidation of natural zeaxanthin (I) and violaxanthin (II) on silica-alumina produces not only the carotenoid radical cations (Car•+) but also neutral radicals (#Car•) by proton loss from the methyl groups at positions 5 or 5', and possibly 9 or 9' and 13 or 13'. Notably, the proton loss favored in I at the 5 position by DFT calculations, is unfavorable in II due to the epoxide at the 5, 6 position. DFT calculations predict the isotropic methyl proton couplings of 8-10 MHz for Car•+ which agree with the ENDOR for carotenoid α-conjugated radical cations. Large α-proton hyperfine coupling constants (>10 MHz) determined from HYSCORE are assigned from the DFT calculations to neutral carotenoid radicals. Proton loss upon photolysis was also examined as a function of carotenoid polarity [Lycopene (III) versus 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al (IV)]; hydrogen bonding [Lutein (V) versus III]; host [silica-alumina versus MCM-41 molecular sieve]; and substituted metal in MCM-41. Loss of H+ from the 5(5'), 9(9') or 13(13') methyl positions has importance in photoprotection. Photoprotection involves nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) in which 1Ch1* decays via energy transfer to the carotenoid which returns to the ground state by thermal dissipation; or via electron transfer to form a charge transfer state (I •+…Chl•-), lower in energy than 1Chl*. Formation of I •+ results in bond lengthening, a mechanism for nonradiative energy

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of proton transverse relaxation times in suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Panczyk, Tomasz; Konczak, Lukasz; Zapotoczny, Szczepan; Szabelski, Pawel; Nowakowska, Maria

    2015-01-01

    In this work we have analyzed the influence of various factors on the transverse relaxation times T2 of water protons in suspension of magnetic nanoparticles. For that purpose we developed a full molecular dynamics force field which includes the effects of dispersion interactions between magnetic nanoparticles and water molecules, electrostatic interactions between charged nanoparticles and magnetic dipole-dipole and dipole-external field interactions. We also accounted for the magnetization reversal within the nanoparticles body frames due to finite magnetic anisotropy barriers. The force field together with the Langevin dynamics imposed on water molecules and the nanoparticles allowed us to monitor the dephasing of water protons in real time. Thus, we were able to determine the T2 relaxation times including the effects of the adsorption of water on the nanoparticles' surfaces, thermal fluctuations of the orientation of nanoparticles' magnetizations as well as the effects of the core-shell architecture of nanoparticles and their agglomeration into clusters. We found that there exists an optimal cluster size for which T2 is minimized and that the retardation of water molecules motion, due to adsorption on the nanoparticles surfaces, has some effect in the measured T2 times. The typical strengths of the external magnetic fields in MRI are enough to keep the magnetizations fixed along the field direction, however, in the case of low magnetic fields, we observed significant enhancement of T2 due to thermal fluctuations of the orientations of magnetizations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. First application of proton reflection magnetometry with MESSENGER to estimate Mercury's surface magnetic field strength (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, R. M.; Johnson, C. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Gershman, D. J.; Raines, J. M.; Lillis, R. J.; Korth, H.; Slavin, J. A.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first use of proton reflection magnetometry, a novel adaptation of electron reflectometry, to estimate Mercury's surface field strength. We use measurements of protons by MESSENGER's Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) in 8-s integration times. Because of the limited field of view of FIPS, we average pitch-angle distributions by accumulating proton data from multiple integration periods and orbits over selected geographical regions. Proton loss cones are evident in both the northern hemisphere cusp region as well as on the nightside at low latitudes in the southern hemisphere. The existence of the loss cones provides confirmation of proton precipitation to the surface in these regions. The loss cone pitch-angle cut-offs are gradual rather than sharp, which we attribute in part to wave-particle scattering causing pitch-angle diffusion. Fitting diffusion curves to the pitch-angle distributions yields estimates of both the cut-off pitch angle, αc, and an average Dαt, where Dα is the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient and t is the diffusion time. The in-situ magnetic field together with αc provide an estimate of the surface magnetic field strength. The results are within 10% of a magnetospheric model for the surface field at the mapped surface locations, but are systematically lower than the model predictions. This discrepancy is consistent with the presence of near-surface plasma, which locally lowers the actual total magnetic field at the surface but is not included in the vacuum-field magnetospheric model. As consistency checks, we have confirmed that the loss cone size decreases with increasing altitude and that the surface magnetic field strength increases with increasing latitude. Our results confirm the offset dipole structure at the surface and demonstrate that proton reflection magnetometry is a practical method for inferring the surface magnetic field strength at Mercury. Further observations may resolve regional-scale structure in the

  7. Proton-nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times in brain edema

    SciTech Connect

    Kamman, R.L.; Go, K.G.; Berendsen, H.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Proton relaxation times of protein solutions, bovine brain, and edematous feline brain tissue were studied as a function of water concentration, protein concentration, and temperature. In accordance with the fast proton exchange model for relaxation, a linear relation could be established between R1 and the inverse of the weight fraction of tissue water. This relation also applied to R2 of gray matter and of protein solutions. No straightforward relation with water content was found for R2 of white matter. Temperature-dependent studies indicated that in this case, the slow exchange model for relaxation had to be applied. The effect of macromolecules in physiological relevant concentrations on the total relaxation behavior of edematous tissue was weak. Total water content changes predominantly affected the relaxation rates. The linear relation may have high clinical potential for assessment of the status of cerebral edema on the basis of T1 and T2 readings from MR images.

  8. Correlation between proton anisotropy and magnetic field direction in the distant geotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klecker, B.; Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1984-01-01

    A statistical analysis has been conducted of the anisotropy of suprathermal protons and the polarity of the magnetic field during April 10-16, 1983. At this time, ISEE-3 was at lunar distances in the geomagnetic tail of the earth, and well within the nominal magnetopause. The first-order anisotropy is presently correlated with the latitude angle and the z-component of the magnetic field. The anisotropy direction's frequency distribution is strongly peaked in the earthward and tailward direction, indicating fast earthward and tailward flows. For large anisotropies, and within 5 earth radii of the nominal neutral sheet position, a strong correlation is found between the earthward-streaming suprathermal protons and the northward polarity of the magnetic field; large tailward anisotropies are generally correlated with southward magnetic field polarity. This correlation is most simply interpreted in terms of a neutral line or reconnection model.

  9. Energetic protons, alpha particles, and electrons in magnetic flux transfer events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1982-01-01

    Energetic proton, alpha particle, and electron data are presented for two magnetopause crossings, which show magnetic field signatures characteristic of flux transfer events (FTEs). Energetic proton and alpha particles are observed streaming along the magnetic field within the magnetosheath in all events showing magnetic signatures characteristic of the FTEs. Flux ratios as high as about 180 parallel and antiparallel to the magnetic field are observed, which means that ions of about 30 keV per charge are at times streaming almost scatter-free from the magnetopause into the magnetosheath. Energetic ion bursts with signatures equal to those observed in FTEs are reduced by more than an order of magnitude as compared to the trapped particle flux.

  10. COMPARISON OF NONCONTRAST COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY AND HIGH-FIELD MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING IN THE EVALUATION OF GREAT DANES WITH CERVICAL SPONDYLOMYELOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Vaquero, Paula; Da Costa, Ronaldo C.; Drost, Wm Tod

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) provides excellent bony detail, whereas magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is superior in evaluating the neural structures. The purpose of this prospective study was to assess interobserver and intermethod agreement in the evaluation of cervical vertebral column morphology and lesion severity in Great Danes with cervical spondylomyelopathy by use of noncontrast CT and high-field MR imaging. Fifteen client-owned affected Great Danes were enrolled. All dogs underwent noncontrast CT under sedation and MR imaging under general anesthesia of the cervical vertebral column. Three observers independently evaluated the images to determine the main site of spinal cord compression, direction and cause of the compression, articular process joint characteristics, and presence of foraminal stenosis. Overall intermethod agreement, intermethod agreement for each observer, overall interobserver agreement, and interobserver agreement between pairs of observers were calculated by use of kappa (κ) statistics. The highest overall intermethod agreements were obtained for the main site of compression and direction of compression with substantial agreements (κ = 0.65 and 0.62, respectively), whereas the lowest was obtained for right-sided foraminal stenosis (κ = 0.39, fair agreement). For both imaging techniques, the highest and lowest interobserver agreements were recorded for the main site of compression and degree of articular joint proliferation, respectively. While different observers frequently agree on the main site of compression using both imaging techniques, there is considerable variation between modalities and among observers when assessing articular process characteristics and foraminal stenosis. Caution should be exerted when comparing image interpretations from multiple observers. PMID:24547789

  11. [Detection and evaluation of cartilage defects in the canine stifle joint - an ex vivo study using high-field magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Flatz, K M; Glaser, C; Flatz, W H; Reiser, M F; Matis, U

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to implement and test an imaging protocol for the detection and evaluation of standardised cartilage defects using high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to determine its limitations. A total of 84 cartilage defects were created in the femoral condyles of euthanized dogs with a minimum body mass of 25 kg. The cartilage defects had a depth of 0.3 to 1.0 mm and a diameter of 1 to 5 mm. T1-FLASH-3D-WE-sequences with an isotropic voxel size of 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 mm and an anisotropic voxel size of 0.3 x 0.3 x 0.8 mm were used. In addition to quantitative evaluation of the cartilage defects, the sig- nal intensities, signal-to-noise ratios and contrast-to-noise ratios of the cartilage were determined. Of special interest were the limita- tions in identifying and delineating the standardised cartilage defects. With the anisotropic voxel size, more cartilage defects were detectable. Our results demonstrated that cartilage defects as small as 3.0 mm in diameter and 0.4 mm in depth were reliably detected using anisotropic settings. Cartilage defects below this size were not reliably detected. We found that for optimal delineation of the joint cartilage and associated defects, a higher in-plane resolution with a larger slice thickness should be used, corresponding to the anisotropic settings employed in this study. For the delineation of larger cartilage defects, both the anisotropic and isotropic imaging methods can be used.

  12. Variations in proton scanned beam dose delivery due to uncertainties in magnetic beam steering.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Stephen; Polf, Jerimy; Ciangaru, George; Frank, Steven J; Bues, Martin; Smith, Al

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a method to calculate and study the impact of fluctuations in the magnetic field strengths within the steering magnets in a proton scanning beam treatment nozzle on the dose delivered to the patient during a proton therapy treatment. First, an analytical relationship between magnetic field uncertainties in the steering magnets and the resulting lateral displacements in the position of the delivered scanned beam "dose spot" was established. Next, using a simple 3D dose calculation code and data from a validated Monte Carlo model of the proton scanning beam treatment nozzle, the uniform dose delivery to a 3D treatment volume was calculated. The dose distribution was then recalculated using the calculated lateral displacements due to magnetic field fluctuations to the proton pencil beam position. Using these two calculated dose distributions, the clinical effects of the magnetic field fluctuations were determined. A deliberate displacement of four adjacent spots either toward or away from each other was used to determine the "maximum" dose impact, while a random displacement of all spots was used to establish a more realistic clinical dose impact. Changes in the dose volume histogram (DVH) and the presence of hot and cold spots in the treatment volume were used to quantify the impact of dose-spot displacement. A general analytical relationship between magnetic field uncertainty and final dose-spot position is presented. This analytical relationship was developed such that it can be applied to study magnetic beam steering for any scanned beam nozzle design. Using this relationship the authors found for the example beam steering nozzle used in this study that deliberate lateral displacements of 0.5 mm or random lateral displacements of up to 1.0 mm produced a noticeable dose impact (5% hot spot) in the treatment volume. A noticeable impact (3% decrease in treatment volume coverage) on the DVH was observed for random displacements

  13. High strength kiloampere Bi$$_2$$Sr$$_2$$CaCu$$_2$$O$$_x$$ cables for high-field magnet applications

    DOE PAGES

    Shen, Tengming; Li, Pei; Jiang, Jianyi; ...

    2015-04-17

    strength of INCONEL X750 for various high-field magnet applications.« less

  14. Interpretation of Magnetization Transfer and Proton Cross-Relaxation Spectra of Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessier, J. J.; Dillon, N.; Carpenter, T. A.; Hall, L. D.

    1995-05-01

    Magnetization-tfansfer (MT) experiments have been performed at 300 MHz on agar gels, solutions of sodium alginate, bovine nasal cartilage, and postmortem porcine muscle, The experimental results elucidate MT mechanisms between mobile macromolecules (correlation time τC On the order of 10-8 s) and water, and demonstrate the need to incorporate their effects in the characterization of biological samples. In addition, the results obtained confirm a recently published three-spin-bath theoretical treatment for proton magnetization transfer.

  15. Proton spin-echo magnetometer: a novel approach for magnetic field measurement in residual field gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Seong-Joo; Hwang, Seong-min; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Kim, Kiwoong

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate a proton spin echo magnetometer, in which the interrogation time is not limited by T2* and can be prolonged to T2. Therefore, even under a severe field gradient, the precision of the measurement does not degrade. We devised a phase linearization method that enables accurate estimation of the precession frequency from a spin-echo train. With proton spins in deoxygenated tetramethylsilane and a superconducting quantum interference device-detected NMR system at KRISS, an average field of around 5 μT was measured with an uncertainty of 0.42 nT in the presence of a field gradient of 12.8 μT m-1. This implies that our system tolerated a 25% variation in magnetic field over the sample area. The proton spin-echo magnetometer will be useful in measuring magnetic fields without compensating for residual field gradients.

  16. Fundamental investigations of supported monometallic and bimetallic catalysts by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xi.

    1990-09-21

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of hydrogen, has been applied to investigate silica-supported Group VIII monometallic and Group VIII-Group IB bimetallic catalysts and alumina- and silica-supported platinum-rhenium bimetallic catalysts. Two adsorbed states of hydrogen, i.e., irreversible and reversible hydrogen, on the surfaces of monometallic Ru, Pt, and Cu particles and bimetallic Ru-Group Ib, Pt-Group Ib, and Pt-Re particles were observed directly via proton NMR. The same amounts of the irreversible hydrogen adsorbed on pure Ru catalysts were measured by both proton NMR and the volumetric technique. The electronic environments on surfaces of monometallic catalysts are sensitive to changes in metal dispersion, state of adsorbed hydrogen, and residual chlorine. Surface compositions for the Ru--Cu and Pt--Cu bimetallic catalysts were determined by NMR of adsorbed hydrogen. 297 refs., 96 figs., 19 tabs.

  17. Invited Article: Relation between electric and magnetic field structures and their proton-beam images

    SciTech Connect

    Kugland, N. L.; Ryutov, D. D.; Plechaty, C.; Ross, J. S.; Park, H.-S.

    2012-10-15

    Proton imaging is commonly used to reveal the electric and magnetic fields that are found in high energy density plasmas. Presented here is an analysis of this technique that is directed towards developing additional insight into the underlying physics. This approach considers: formation of images in the limits of weak and strong intensity variations; caustic formation and structure; image inversion to obtain line-integrated field characteristics; direct relations between images and electric or magnetic field structures in a plasma; imaging of sharp features such as Debye sheaths and shocks. Limitations on spatial and temporal resolution are assessed, and similarities with optical shadowgraphy are noted. Synthetic proton images are presented to illustrate the analysis. These results will be useful for quantitatively analyzing experimental proton imaging data and verifying numerical codes.

  18. Invited article: Relation between electric and magnetic field structures and their proton-beam images.

    PubMed

    Kugland, N L; Ryutov, D D; Plechaty, C; Ross, J S; Park, H-S

    2012-10-01

    Proton imaging is commonly used to reveal the electric and magnetic fields that are found in high energy density plasmas. Presented here is an analysis of this technique that is directed towards developing additional insight into the underlying physics. This approach considers: formation of images in the limits of weak and strong intensity variations; caustic formation and structure; image inversion to obtain line-integrated field characteristics; direct relations between images and electric or magnetic field structures in a plasma; imaging of sharp features such as Debye sheaths and shocks. Limitations on spatial and temporal resolution are assessed, and similarities with optical shadowgraphy are noted. Synthetic proton images are presented to illustrate the analysis. These results will be useful for quantitatively analyzing experimental proton imaging data and verifying numerical codes.

  19. Development of a compact proton scanning system in Uppsala with a moveable second magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorin, Stefan; Grusell, Erik; Tilly, Nina; Medin, Joakim; Blom, Mikael; Ziemann, Volker; Reistad, Dag; Glimelius, Bengt

    2000-05-01

    A scanned proton beam yields dose distributions that in most cases are superior to passively scattered proton beams and to other external radiation treatment modalities. The present paper gives a description of the scanning system that has been developed at the Svedberg Laboratory (TSL) in Uppsala. The scanning technique and the technical design are described. The solution with a small pole gap of the magnets and a moveable second magnet results in a very compact scanning head, which can therefore be incorporated in a gantry of relatively limited size. A prototype was constructed that has been used to realize various dose distributions with a scanned beam of 180 MeV protons at TSL.

  20. Glutamatergic Effects of Divalproex in Adolescents with Mania: A Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawn, Jeffrey R.; Patel, Nick C.; Chu, Wen-Jang; Lee, Jing-Huei; Adler, Caleb M.; Kim, Mi Jung; Bryan, Holly S.; Alfieri, David C.; Welge, Jeffrey A.; Blom, Thomas J.; Nandagopal, Jayasree J.; Strakowski, Stephen M.; DelBello, Melissa P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([superscript 1]H MRS) to evaluate the in vivo effects of extended-release divalproex sodium on the glutamatergic system in adolescents with bipolar disorder, and to identify baseline neurochemical predictors of clinical remission. Method: Adolescents with bipolar disorder who were…

  1. Glutamatergic Effects of Divalproex in Adolescents with Mania: A Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawn, Jeffrey R.; Patel, Nick C.; Chu, Wen-Jang; Lee, Jing-Huei; Adler, Caleb M.; Kim, Mi Jung; Bryan, Holly S.; Alfieri, David C.; Welge, Jeffrey A.; Blom, Thomas J.; Nandagopal, Jayasree J.; Strakowski, Stephen M.; DelBello, Melissa P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([superscript 1]H MRS) to evaluate the in vivo effects of extended-release divalproex sodium on the glutamatergic system in adolescents with bipolar disorder, and to identify baseline neurochemical predictors of clinical remission. Method: Adolescents with bipolar disorder who were…

  2. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies of boronated nucleosides

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, B.N.

    1992-01-01

    Modified nucleosides are an emerging class of potentially therapeutic agents. Recently, a number of 2[prime]-deoxynucleosides with boronated bases have been synthesized in this laboratory, including: 2[prime]-deoxy-N7-cyanoborano guanosine (bGua), 2[prime]-deoxy-N3-cyanoborano cytidine (bCyt), and 2[prime]-deoxy-N1-cyanoborano adenosine (bAde). The author has utilized proton NMR spectroscopy to determine the molecular recognition of these boronated nucleosides with their complementary base pairing partners. The self-association as well as heteroassociation were studied by varying the temperature, concentration, and mole fraction of each component. Proton NMR techniques include normal proton studies to measure the chemical shifts and homonuclear 1-D NOE difference to measure through space interactions, all of which help to determine the exact pairing behaviour of these nucleosides. Similar studies have been performed on unboronated nucleosides in order to determine if the boronated nucleosides can form stable Watson-Crick type base pairs; similar to unboronated nucleosides. From the results, the author concludes that bGua forms a stable Watson-Crick type base pair with Cyt. Both bGua and Cyt are able to self associate although the homodimers are less stable than the bGua:Cyt heterodimers. The other two boronated nucleosides because the cyanoborane group blocks the normal base pairing sites. The results are consistent with Hoogsteen pairing. Continuous variation studies suggest the existence of trimers of bCyt with Gua[sub 2] as well as other possible pairing schemes. The ability of bGua to complex with Cyt in a Watson-Crick type base pair suggests that it might be able to be incorporated like normal Gua into DNA.

  3. Evaluation of brain edema using magnetic resonance proton relaxation times

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Nishimura, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Experimental and clinical studies on the evaluation of water content in cases of brain edema were performed in vivo, using MR proton relaxation times (longitudinal relaxation time, T1; transverse relaxation time, T2). Brain edema was produced in the white matter of cats by the direct infusion method. The correlations between proton relaxation times obtained from MR images and the water content of white matter were studied both in autoserum-infused cats and in saline-infused cats. The correlations between T1 as well as T2 and the water content in human vasogenic brain edema were also examined and compared with the data obtained from the serum group. T1 and T2 showed good correlations with the water content of white matter not only in the experimental animals but also in the clinical cases. The quality of the edema fluid did not influence relaxation time and T1 seemed to represent almost solely the water content of the tissue. T2, however, was affected by the nature of existence of water and was more sensitive than T1 in detecting extravasated edema fluid. It seems feasible therefore to evaluate the water content of brain edema on the basis of T1 values.

  4. Double resonance experiments in low magnetic field: dynamic polarization of protons by (14)N and measurement of low NQR frequencies.

    PubMed

    Seliger, J; Zagar, V

    2009-08-01

    The possibilities of dynamically polarizing proton spin system via the quadrupole (14)N spin system in low magnetic field are analyzed. The increase of the proton magnetization is calculated. The polarization rate of the proton spin system is related to the transition probabilities per unit time between the (14)N quadrupole energy levels and proton energy levels. The experiments performed in 1,3,5-triazine confirm the results of the theoretical analysis. A new double resonance technique is proposed for the measurement of nuclear quadrupole resonance frequencies nu(Q) of the order of 100kHz and lower. The technique is based on magnetic field cycling between a high and a low static magnetic field and observation of the proton NMR signal in the high magnetic field. In the low magnetic field the quadrupole nuclei and protons resonantly interact at the proton Larmor frequency nu(H)=nu(Q)/2. The quadrupole nuclei are simultaneously excited by a resonant rf magnetic field oriented along the direction of the low static magnetic field. The experimental procedure is described and the sensitivity of the new technique is estimated. Some examples of the measurement of low (14)N and (2)H nuclear quadrupole resonance frequencies are presented.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Water Proton Relaxation in Protein Solutions and Tissue: T1ρ Dispersion Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Enn-Ling; Kim, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Image contrast in clinical MRI is often determined by differences in tissue water proton relaxation behavior. However, many aspects of water proton relaxation in complex biological media, such as protein solutions and tissue are not well understood, perhaps due to the limited empirical data. Principal Findings Water proton T1, T2, and T1ρ of protein solutions and tissue were measured systematically under multiple conditions. Crosslinking or aggregation of protein decreased T2 and T1ρ, but did not change high-field T1. T1ρ dispersion profiles were similar for crosslinked protein solutions, myocardial tissue, and cartilage, and exhibited power law behavior with T1ρ(0) values that closely approximated T2. The T1ρ dispersion of mobile protein solutions was flat above 5 kHz, but showed a steep curve below 5 kHz that was sensitive to changes in pH. The T1ρ dispersion of crosslinked BSA and cartilage in DMSO solvent closely resembled that of water solvent above 5 kHz but showed decreased dispersion below 5 kHz. Conclusions Proton exchange is a minor pathway for tissue T1 and T1ρ relaxation above 5 kHz. Potential models for relaxation are discussed, however the same molecular mechanism appears to be responsible across 5 decades of frequencies from T1ρ to T1. PMID:20052404

  6. Eddy current analysis and optimization of fast scanning magnet for a proton therapy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xu; Qin, Bin; Liu, Kaifeng; Chen, Wei; Liang, Zhikai; Chen, Qushan; Chen, Dezhi; Fan, Mingwu

    2017-08-01

    Proton therapy is now recognized as one of the most effective radiation therapy methods for cancers. A proton therapy facility with multiple gantry treatment rooms is under development in HUST (Huazhong University of Science and Technology), which is based on isochronous superconducting cyclotron scheme. In the beam line, the scanning system spreads out the proton beam on the target according to the complex tumour shape by two scanning magnets for horizontal and vertical scanning independently. Since these two magnets are excited by alternating currents and the maximum repetition frequency is up to 100 Hz, eddy currents and losses are expected to be significant. Slits are proven to be an effective way to reduce the eddy currents. To evaluate the heat distribution due to eddy losses in the pole end of the scanning magnet, the transient electromagnetic analysis and steady-state thermal analysis are performed. This paper describes design considerations of the scanning system and mainly analyses the eddy current effect of the scanning magnets. Different coil shapes and slit arrangements are simulated and compared to obtain the optimal configuration. The maximum temperatures of two magnets are optimized below 70 °C. In addition, the lag effect due to eddy currents is also discussed.

  7. Magnetic fluctuation power near proton temperature anisotropy instability thresholds in the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Bale, S D; Kasper, J C; Howes, G G; Quataert, E; Salem, C; Sundkvist, D

    2009-11-20

    The proton temperature anisotropy in the solar wind is known to be constrained by the theoretical thresholds for pressure-anisotropy-driven instabilities. Here, we use approximately 1x10;{6} independent measurements of gyroscale magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind to show for the first time that these fluctuations are enhanced along the temperature anisotropy thresholds of the mirror, proton oblique firehose, and ion cyclotron instabilities. In addition, the measured magnetic compressibility is enhanced at high plasma beta (beta_{ parallel} greater, similar1) along the mirror instability threshold but small elsewhere, consistent with expectations of the mirror mode. We also show that the short wavelength magnetic fluctuation power is a strong function of collisionality, which relaxes the temperature anisotropy away from the instability conditions and reduces correspondingly the fluctuation power.

  8. Ultrafast proton radiography of the magnetic fields generated by a laser-driven coil current

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Lan; Ji, Hantao; Fiksel, Gennady; Fox, William; Evans, Michelle; Alfonso, Noel

    2016-04-15

    Magnetic fields generated by a current flowing through a U-shaped coil connecting two copper foils were measured using ultrafast proton radiography. Two ~ 1.25 kJ, 1-ns laser pulses propagated through laser entrance holes in the front foil and were focused to the back foil with an intensity of ~ 3 x 1016 W/cm2. The intense laser-solid interaction induced a high voltage between the copper foils and generated a large current in the connecting coil. The proton data show ~ 40-50 T magnetic fields at the center of the coil ~ 3-4 ns after laser irradiation. In conclusion, the experiments provide significant insight for future target designs that aim to develop a powerful source of external magnetic fields for various applications in high-energy-density science.

  9. Ultrafast proton radiography of the magnetic fields generated by a laser-driven coil current

    DOE PAGES

    Gao, Lan; Ji, Hantao; Fiksel, Gennady; ...

    2016-04-15

    Magnetic fields generated by a current flowing through a U-shaped coil connecting two copper foils were measured using ultrafast proton radiography. Two ~ 1.25 kJ, 1-ns laser pulses propagated through laser entrance holes in the front foil and were focused to the back foil with an intensity of ~ 3 x 1016 W/cm2. The intense laser-solid interaction induced a high voltage between the copper foils and generated a large current in the connecting coil. The proton data show ~ 40-50 T magnetic fields at the center of the coil ~ 3-4 ns after laser irradiation. In conclusion, the experiments providemore » significant insight for future target designs that aim to develop a powerful source of external magnetic fields for various applications in high-energy-density science.« less

  10. Development of a compact magnetic proton recoil spectrometer for measurement of deuterium-tritium neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jianfu Ouyang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xianpeng; Qiu, Suizheng; Zhang, Guoguang; Ruan, Jinlu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yang, Shaohua; Song, Jiwen; Liu, Linyue; Li, Hongyun

    2015-12-15

    A new compact magnetic proton recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer has been designed for precise measurement of deuterium-tritium (DT) neutrons. This design is presented emphasizing the magnetic analyzing system, which is based on a compact quadrupole-dipole (QD) electromagnet. The focal plane detector (FPD) is also discussed with respect to application for the next step. The characteristics of the MPR spectrometer were calculated by using Monte Carlo simulation. A preliminary experiment was performed to test the magnetic analyzing system and the proton images of the FPD. Since the QD electromagnet design allows for a larger foil thickness and solid angle to be utilized, the MPR spectrometer defined in this paper can achieve neutron detection efficiency more than 5 × 10{sup −7} at an energy resolution of 1.5% for measuring DT neutrons.

  11. Ultrafast proton radiography of the magnetic fields generated by a laser-driven coil current

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Lan; Ji, Hantao; Fiksel, Gennady; Fox, William; Evans, Michelle; Alfonso, Noel

    2016-04-15

    Magnetic fields generated by a current flowing through a U-shaped coil connecting two copper foils were measured using ultrafast proton radiography. Two ∼1.25 kJ, 1-ns laser pulses propagated through laser entrance holes in the front foil and were focused to the back foil with an intensity of ∼3 × 10{sup 16 }W/cm{sup 2}. The intense laser-solid interaction induced a high voltage between the copper foils and generated a large current in the connecting coil. The proton data show ∼40–50 T magnetic fields at the center of the coil ∼3–4 ns after laser irradiation. The experiments provide significant insight for future target designs that aim to develop a powerful source of external magnetic fields for various applications in high-energy-density science.

  12. Development of a compact magnetic proton recoil spectrometer for measurement of deuterium-tritium neutrons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianfu; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Qiu, Suizheng; Zhang, Guoguang; Ruan, Jinlu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xianpeng; Yang, Shaohua; Song, Jiwen; Liu, Linyue; Li, Hongyun

    2015-12-01

    A new compact magnetic proton recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer has been designed for precise measurement of deuterium-tritium (DT) neutrons. This design is presented emphasizing the magnetic analyzing system, which is based on a compact quadrupole-dipole (QD) electromagnet. The focal plane detector (FPD) is also discussed with respect to application for the next step. The characteristics of the MPR spectrometer were calculated by using Monte Carlo simulation. A preliminary experiment was performed to test the magnetic analyzing system and the proton images of the FPD. Since the QD electromagnet design allows for a larger foil thickness and solid angle to be utilized, the MPR spectrometer defined in this paper can achieve neutron detection efficiency more than 5 × 10(-7) at an energy resolution of 1.5% for measuring DT neutrons.

  13. Magnetic Fluctuation Power Near Proton Temperature Anisotropy Instability Thresholds in the Solar Wind

    SciTech Connect

    Bale, S. D.; Kasper, J. C.; Howes, G. G.; Quataert, E.; Salem, C.; Sundkvist, D.

    2009-11-20

    The proton temperature anisotropy in the solar wind is known to be constrained by the theoretical thresholds for pressure-anisotropy-driven instabilities. Here, we use approximately 1x10{sup 6} independent measurements of gyroscale magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind to show for the first time that these fluctuations are enhanced along the temperature anisotropy thresholds of the mirror, proton oblique firehose, and ion cyclotron instabilities. In addition, the measured magnetic compressibility is enhanced at high plasma beta (beta{sub ||} > or approx. 1) along the mirror instability threshold but small elsewhere, consistent with expectations of the mirror mode. We also show that the short wavelength magnetic fluctuation power is a strong function of collisionality, which relaxes the temperature anisotropy away from the instability conditions and reduces correspondingly the fluctuation power.

  14. Magnetism in MoS{sub 2} induced by proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, S.; Gopinadhan, K.; Dhar, S.; Venkatesan, T.; Chan, T. K.; Yu, X. J.; Zhan, D.; Shen, Z. X.; Cao, L.; Rusydi, A.; Breese, M. B. H.; Thong, John T. L.

    2012-09-03

    Molybdenum disulphide, a diamagnetic layered dichalcogenide solid, is found to show magnetic ordering at room temperature when exposed to a 2 MeV proton beam. The temperature dependence of magnetization displays ferrimagnetic behavior with a Curie temperature of 895 K. A disorder mode corresponding to a zone-edge phonon and a Mo valence higher than +4 has been detected in the irradiated samples using Raman and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The possible origins of long-range magnetic ordering in irradiated MoS{sub 2} samples are discussed.

  15. The effects of the use of piezoelectric motors in a 1.5-Tesla high-field magnetic resonance imaging system (MRI).

    PubMed

    Wendt, O; Oellinger, J; Lüth, T C; Felix, R; Boenick, U

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation with two different rotatory piezomotors in a closed 1.5 Tesla high-field MRI. The focus of the investigation was on testing the functionality of these motors within the MRI and to determining the image interference they caused. To obtain a differentiated estimate of the interference the motors were tested in both the passive (turned off, i.e. without current flow) and active (turned on, i.e. with current flow) state during MRI scanning. Three different types of sequences were used for the test: Spin-Echo (SE), Gradient-Echo (GE) and Echo-Planar Imaging (EPI). A plastic container filled with a gadolinium-manganese solution was used for representation of the artefacts. The motors investigated were placed parallel to the container at predetermined distances during the experiment. The results show that the motors investigated suffered no functional limitations in the magnetic field of the MRI but, depending on the type of motor, the measurement distance and the state of the motor, the motors had different effects on the sequence images. A motor in the off-state placed immediately next to the object to be measured mainly causes artefacts because of its material properties. If, on the other hand, the piezomotor is in the on-state images with strong noise result when the motor is immediately next to the object being measured. The images regain their normal quality when the motor is approximately at a distance of 1 m from the object being investigated. Driving the motor inside the MRI, therefore, is only to be recommended during the pauses in scanning: this delivers artefact-free images if minimal, motor-specific distances are kept to. With regard to the three different types of sequences it was determined that the SE sequence was the least sensitive and the EPI sequence the most sensitive to disturbance. The GE sequence showed only minimal differences to the SE sequence with regard to signal-to-noise ratios

  16. [Intraoperative high-field magnetic resonance imaging combined with functional neuronavigation in resection of low-grade temporal lobe tumors involving optic radiation].

    PubMed

    Bai, Shaocong; Chen, Xiaolei; Geng, Jiefeng; Wu, Dongdong; Yu, Xinguang; Xu, Bainan

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the clinical value of high-field-strength intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) combined with optic radiation neuro-navigation for the resection of temporal lobe low-grade gliomas. From April 2009 to September 2013, 65 patients with temporal lobe low-grade gliomas (WHO grade II) involving optic radiation were operated with iMRI and functional neuro-navigation. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) based fiber tracking was used to delineate optic radiation. The reconstructed optic radiations were integrated into a navigation system, in order to achieve intraoperative microscopic-based functional neuro-navigation. iMRI was used to update the images for both optic radiations and residual tumors. Volumetric analyses were performed using 3D Slicer for pre- and intra-operative tumor volumes in all cases. All patients were evaluated for visual field deficits preoperatively and postoperatively. The Student t test was used to evaluate the average rate of extent of resection between groups. Spearman rank correlation analysis was used to assess correlations between predictors and epilepsy prognosis. Preoperative tumor volumes were (78±40) cm3. In 29 cases, iMRI scan detected residual tumor that could be further resected, and extent of resection were increased from 76.2% to 92.7% (t=7.314, P<0.01). In 19 cases (29.2%), gross total resection was accomplished, and iMRI contributed directly to 8 of these cases. Postsurgical follow-up period varied from 13 months to 59 months, mean (33±13) months. Tumor progression were observed in 3 patients, newly developed or deteriorated visual field defects occurred in 4 patients (6.2%). For patients with pre-operative seizures, Engel Class I were achieved for 89.7% of them. Spearman rank correlation analysis revealed that seizure outcome (Engel Class) was related to increased excision of ratio (r=-0.452, P=0.004, 95% CI: -0.636--0.261) and larger tumors (r=0.391, P=0.014, 95% CI: 0.178-0.484). With iMRI and functional

  17. The effect of magnetically induced linear aggregates on proton transverse relaxation rates of aqueous suspensions of polymer coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Saville, Steven L; Woodward, Robert C; House, Michael J; Tokarev, Alexander; Hammers, Jacob; Qi, Bin; Shaw, Jeremy; Saunders, Martin; Varsani, Rahi R; St Pierre, Tim G; Mefford, O Thompson

    2013-03-07

    It has been recently reported that for some suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles the transverse proton relaxation rate, R(2), is dependent on the time that the sample is exposed to an applied magnetic field. This time dependence has been linked to the formation of linear aggregates or chains in an applied magnetic field via numerical modeling. It is widely known that chain formation occurs in more concentrated ferrofluids systems and that this has an affect on the ferrofluid properties. In this work we examine the relationships between colloidal stability, the formation of these linear structures, and changes observed in the proton transverse relaxation rate of aqueous suspensions of magnetic particles. A series of iron oxide nanoparticles with varying stabilizing ligand brush lengths were synthesized. These systems were characterized with dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, dark-field optical microscopy, and proton transverse relaxation rate measurements. The dark field optical microscopy and R(2) measurements were made in similar magnetic fields over the same time scale so as to correlate the reduction of the transverse relaxivity with the formation of linear aggregates. Our results indicate that varying the ligand length has a direct effect on the colloidal arrangement of the system in a magnetic field, producing differences in the rate and size of chain formation, and hence systematic changes in transverse relaxation rates over time. With increasing ligand brush length, attractive inter-particle interactions are reduced, which results in slower aggregate formation and shorter linear aggregate length. These results have implications for the stabilization, characterization and potentially the toxicity of magnetic nanoparticle systems used in biomedical applications.

  18. Proton Exchange Rates Measured by Saturation Transfer Using Delayed Randomization of the Solvent Magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leijon, Mikael

    1996-08-01

    The spin-lock saturation transfer experiment introduced by B. Adams and L. Lerner (J. Magn. Reson.96, 604-607, 1992) is analyzed in terms of the Bloch equations. It is shown that theT1ρrelaxation of the solvent is introduced in the decay of the exchangeable protons under conditions of relatively rapid exchange. An alternative experiment is suggested that randomizes the solvent magnetization with a pulsed field gradient before the observe pulse. This gives a single exponential intensity decay for the exchanging protons at all exchange rates. In addition, efficient water suppression and an even excitation profile are obtained.

  19. Ion cooling in the plasmasphere during magnetic storm initial phase: modeling the proton temperature dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, Galina; Verigin, Mikhail; Bezrukikh, Vladilen

    The effect of ion temperature decreasing at L ¡ 3 during geomagnetic storm development was recently revealed by INTERBALL 2 and MAGION 5 thermal plasma data. A model of proton drift outward from the Earth caused by magnetic field decreasing in the inner plasmasphere is considered. Conservation of the first adiabatic invariant results in proton cooling during their outward motion. It is shown that model temperatures well agree with experimental data. The work is partially supported by the RAS programs P16 and OFN 15.

  20. The effects of 8 Helios observed solar proton events of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ValdezGalicia, J. F.; Alexander, P.; Otaola, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    There have been recent suggestions that large fluxes during solar energetic particle events may produce their own turbulence. To verify this argument it becomes essential to find out whether these flows cause an enhancement of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations. In the present work, power and helicity spectra of the IMF before, during and after 8 Helios-observed solar proton events in the range 0.3 - 1 AU are analyzed. In order to detect proton self generated waves, the time evolution of spectra are followed.

  1. New method to determine proton trajectories in the equatorial plane of a dipole magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Ioanoviciu, Damaschin

    2015-01-01

    A parametric description of proton trajectories in the equatorial plane of Earth's dipole magnetic field has been derived. The exact expression of the angular coordinate contains an integral to be performed numerically. The radial coordinate results from the initial conditions by basic mathematical operations and by using trigonometric functions. With the approximate angular coordinate formula, applicable for a wide variety of cases of protons trapped in Earth's radiation belts, no numerical integration is needed. The results of exact and approximate expressions were compared for a specific case and small differences were found.

  2. The effects of 8 Helios observed solar proton events of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ValdezGalicia, J. F.; Alexander, P.; Otaola, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    There have been recent suggestions that large fluxes during solar energetic particle events may produce their own turbulence. To verify this argument it becomes essential to find out whether these flows cause an enhancement of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations. In the present work, power and helicity spectra of the IMF before, during and after 8 Helios-observed solar proton events in the range 0.3 - 1 AU are analyzed. In order to detect proton self generated waves, the time evolution of spectra are followed.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of hindfoot involvement in patients with spondyloarthritides: comparison of low-field and high-field strength units.

    PubMed

    Eshed, Iris; Althoff, Christian E; Feist, Eugen; Minden, Kirsten; Schink, Tania; Hamm, Bernd; Hermann, Kay-Geert A

    2008-01-01

    To compare MRI evaluation of a painful hindfoot of patients with spondyloarthritides (SpA) on low-field (0.2 T) versus high-field (1.5 T) MRI. Patients with SpA and hindfoot pain were randomly referred to either high-field or low-field MRI. Twenty-seven patients were evaluated (male/female: 17:10; mean age: 39+/-1.4 years). Fifteen patients were examined by low-field and 12 by high-field MRI. Two patients (evaluated by high-field MRI) were excluded. Images were separately read by two radiologists who later reached a consensus. In each patient the prevalence of erosions, fluid, synovitis or bone marrow edema of the hindfoot joints, tendinosis or tenosynovitis of tendons, enthesitis of the plantar fascia and Achilles tendon and retrocalcaneal bursitis were recorded. Clinical and demographic parameters were comparable between both groups. MRI evaluation of joints and tendons of the hindfoot revealed no significant differences in patients with SpA groups for all parameters. Analyzing all joints or tendons together, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. Low-field and high-field MRI provide comparable information for evaluation of inflammatory hindfoot involvement. Thus, low-field MRI can be considered as a reliable diagnostic tool for the detection of hindfoot abnormalities in SpA patients.

  4. Alternating-gradient canted cosine theta superconducting magnets for future compact proton gantries

    DOE PAGES

    Wan, Weishi; Brouwer, Lucas; Caspi, Shlomo; ...

    2015-10-23

    We present a design of superconducting magnets, optimized for application in a gantry for proton therapy. We have introduced a new magnet design concept, called an alternating-gradient canted cosine theta (AG-CCT) concept, which is compatible with an achromatic layout. This layout allows a large momentum acceptance. The 15 cm radius of the bore aperture enables the application of pencil beam scanning in front of the SC-magnet. The optical and dynamic performance of a gantry based on these magnets has been analyzed using the fields derived (via Biot-Savart law) from the actual windings of the AG-CCT combined with the full equationsmore » of motion. The results show that with appropriate higher order correction, a large 3D volume can be rapidly scanned with little beam shape distortion. A very big advantage is that all this can be done while keeping the AG-CCT fields fixed. This reduces the need for fast field ramping of the superconducting magnets between the successive beam energies used for the scanning in depth and it is important for medical application since this reduces the technical risk (e.g., a quench) associated with fast field changes in superconducting magnets. For proton gantries the corresponding superconducting magnet system holds promise of dramatic reduction in weight. For heavier ion gantries there may furthermore be a significant reduction in size.« less

  5. Alternating-gradient canted cosine theta superconducting magnets for future compact proton gantries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Weishi; Brouwer, Lucas; Caspi, Shlomo; Prestemon, Soren; Gerbershagen, Alexander; Schippers, Jacobus Maarten; Robin, David

    2015-10-01

    We present a design of superconducting magnets, optimized for application in a gantry for proton therapy. We have introduced a new magnet design concept, called an alternating-gradient canted cosine theta (AG-CCT) concept, which is compatible with an achromatic layout. This layout allows a large momentum acceptance. The 15 cm radius of the bore aperture enables the application of pencil beam scanning in front of the SC-magnet. The optical and dynamic performance of a gantry based on these magnets has been analyzed using the fields derived (via Biot-Savart law) from the actual windings of the AG-CCT combined with the full equations of motion. The results show that with appropriate higher order correction, a large 3D volume can be rapidly scanned with little beam shape distortion. A very big advantage is that all this can be done while keeping the AG-CCT fields fixed. This reduces the need for fast field ramping of the superconducting magnets between the successive beam energies used for the scanning in depth and it is important for medical application since this reduces the technical risk (e.g., a quench) associated with fast field changes in superconducting magnets. For proton gantries the corresponding superconducting magnet system holds promise of dramatic reduction in weight. For heavier ion gantries there may furthermore be a significant reduction in size.

  6. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, John A.; Greenwald, Shlomo

    1989-01-01

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  7. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  8. Measurement of lateral diffusion rates in membranes by pulsed magnetic field gradient, magic angle spinning-proton nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Gawrisch, Klaus; Gaede, Holly C

    2007-01-01

    Membrane organization, including the presence of domains, can be characterized by measuring lateral diffusion rates of lipids and membrane-bound substances. Magic angle spinning (MAS) yields well-resolved proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of lipids in biomembranes. When combined with pulsed-field gradient NMR (rendering what is called "pulsed magnetic field gradients-MAS-NMR"), it permits precise diffusion measurements on the micrometer lengths scale for any substance with reasonably well-resolved proton MAS-NMR resonances, without the need of preparing oriented samples. Sample preparation procedures, the technical requirements for the NMR equipment, and spectrometer settings are described. Additionally, equations for analysis of diffusion data obtained from unoriented samples, and a method for correcting the data for liposome curvature are provided.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance multiwindow analysis of proton local fields and magnetization distribution in natural and deuterated mouse muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Peemoeller, H; Pintar, M M

    1979-01-01

    The proton free-induction decays, spin-spin relaxation times, local fields in the rotating frame, and spin-lattice relaxation times in the laboratory and rotating frames, in natural and fully deuterated mouse muscle, are reported. Measurements were taken above and below freezing temperature and at two time windows on the free-induction decay. A comparative analysis show that the magnetization fractions deduced from the different experiments are in good agreement. The main conclusion is that the resolution of the (heterogeneous) muscle nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) response is improved by the multiwindow analysis. PMID:262554

  10. SU-D-304-02: Magnetically Focused Proton Irradiation of Small Field Targets

    SciTech Connect

    McAuley, GA; Slater, JM; Slater, JD; Wroe, AJ

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the use of magnetic focusing for small field proton irradiations. It is hypothesized that magnetic focusing will provide significant dose distribution benefits over standard collimated beams for fields less than 10 mm diameter. Methods: Magnets consisting of 24 segments of radiation hard samarium-cobalt adhered into hollow cylinders were designed and manufactured. Two focusing magnets were placed on a positioning track on our Gantry 1 treatment table. Proton beams with energies of 127 and 157 MeV, 15 and 30 mm modulation, and 8 mm initial diameters were delivered to a water tank using single-stage scattering. Depth dose distributions were measured using a PTW PR60020 diode detector and transverse profiles were measured with Gafchromic EBT3 film. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed - both for comparison with experimental data and to further explore the potential of magnetic focusing in silica. For example, beam spot areas (based on the 90% dose contour) were matched at Bragg depth between simulated 100 MeV collimated beams and simulated beams focused by two 400 T/m gradient magnets. Results: Preliminary experimental results show 23% higher peak to entrance dose ratios and flatter spread out Bragg peak plateaus for 8 mm focused beams compared with uncollimated beams. Monte Carlo simulations showed 21% larger peak to entrance ratios and a ∼9 fold more efficient dose to target delivery compared to spot-sized matched collimated beams. Our latest results will be presented. Conclusion: Our results suggest that rare earth focusing magnet assemblies could reduce skin dose and beam number while delivering dose to nominally spherical radiosurgery targets over a much shorter time compared to unfocused beams. Immediate clinical applications include those associated with proton radiosurgery and functional radiosurgery of the brain and spine, however expanded treatment sites can be also envisaged.

  11. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for the diagnosis and management of cerebral disorders.

    PubMed

    Rudkin, T M; Arnold, D L

    1999-08-01

    The use of magnetism in medicine has a long and colorful history since its legendary discovery in the Western world by the shepherd Magnes. More recent use of magnetism has centered on nuclear magnetic resonance. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides chemical information on tissue metabolites. Both hydrogen 1 (1H) and phosphorus 31 resonances have been used to study brain tissue, but the magnetic resonance sensitivity for protons is far greater than it is for phosphorus. One of the most important contributions of 1H-MRS to clinical neurology is its ability to quantify neuronal loss and to demonstrate reversible neuronal damage. 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been found to be a useful research tool in elucidating the pathophysiology underlying certain diseases. This review focuses on the use of proton MRS to study various neurologic diseases, including epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, brain tumors, human immunodeficiency virus 1-associated neurologic disorders, as well as cerebrovascular, neurodegenerative, and metabolic diseases. It highlights the contributions of 1H-MRS to the diagnosis and the monitoring of these neurologic diseases that make it a useful adjunct in patient management.

  12. Amplification of Collective Magnetic Fluctuations in Magnetized Bi-Maxwellian Plasmas for Parallel Wave Vectors. I. Electron-Proton Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafin, S.; Schlickeiser, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2016-09-01

    The general electromagnetic fluctuation theory is a powerful tool to analyze the magnetic fluctuation spectrum of a plasma. Recent works utilizing this theory for a magnetized non-relativistic isotropic Maxwellian electron-proton plasma have demonstrated that the equilibrium ratio of | δ B| /{B}0 can be as high as 10-12. This value results from the balance between spontaneous emission of fluctuations and their damping, and it is considerably smaller than the observed value | δ B| /{B}0 in the solar wind at 1 au, where {10}-3≲ | δ B| /{B}0≲ {10}-1. In the present manuscript, we consider an anisotropic bi-Maxwellian distribution function to investigate the effect of plasma instabilities on the magnetic field fluctuations. We demonstrate that these instabilities strongly amplify the magnetic field fluctuations and provide a sufficient mechanism to explain the observed value of | δ B| /{B}0 in the solar wind at 1 au.

  13. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance identification and discrimination of side chain isomers of phytosterols using a lanthanide shift reagent.

    PubMed

    Iida, T; Tamura, T; Matsumoto, T

    1980-03-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectra at 90 MHz were measured for a number of side chain isomers of phytosterols (sterols with a C8H17 side chain, and delta 24-, 24-methylene, delta 22-, 24-ethylidene, 24-methly, 24-ethyl, 24-methyl-delta 22-, 24-ethyl delta 22-, and 24-ethyl-delta 22,25(27)-sterols) with or without a lanthanide shift reagent, tris[1,1,1,2,2,3,3 - heptafluoro - 7,7 - dimethyloctane - 4,6 - dionato]ytterbium, Yb(fod)3, and the effect of Yb(fod)3 on the side chain methyl protons is discussed. The change of the chemical shifts induced Yb(fod)3 for the side chain methyls was expressed in terms of the induced shift ratios (ISR values), i.e., the ratios of the induced chemical shifts of the respective side chain methyls to that of the fastest moving side chain methyl. The ISR values were sentitive to minor structural and stereochemical differences, but almost independent of ring structures and of substrate concentrations, thus providing confirmatory evidence for the side chain structures. Also, the Yb(fod)3-induced spectral patterns observed in the high-field methyl region bore the fingerprints of the side chain structures. Several isomeric pairs of sterols, which differ only in the geometry of double bonds or the absolute configuration at C-24 in the side chain, i.e., cis- and trans-isomers of delta 22-and 24-ethylidene sterols, 24R/alpha- and 24S/beta-methyl sterols, 24R/alpha- and 24S/beta-ethyl sterols, and 24S/alpha- and 24R/beta-ethyl-delta 22-sterols, could be differentiated from each other under the influence of Yb(fod)3, even though they were measured at 90 MHz.

  14. Magnetic properties of proton irradiated BiFeO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seungkyu; Jin Kim, Sam; Sung Kim, Chul

    2013-05-07

    The crystal structure and magnetic properties of BiFeO{sub 3} samples, proton-irradiated with 0, 10, and 20 pC/{mu}m{sup 2}, were investigated with x-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer, and Moessbauer spectroscopy measurements. From the Rietveld refinement analysis of the XRD patterns, the crystal structure of BiFeO{sub 3} is determined to be rhombohedral with the space group of R3c. We have observed the decrease in the lattice constant and oxygen occupancy with proton irradiation. The magnetization hysteresis (M-H) curves show the appearance of the weak ferromagnetic behavior in the proton irradiated BiFeO{sub 3} samples. The Moessbauer spectra of proton irradiated BiFeO{sub 3} samples at 295 K were analyzed with two-sextets (B{sub 1} and B{sub 2}) and doublet. From the isomer shift ({delta}) values, ionic states were determined to be Fe{sup 3+}. Compared to non-irradiated sample, having the antiferromagnetic area ratio (two-sextets) of 45.47, 54.53% the antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic area ratios (doublet) of 10 and 20 pC/{mu}m{sup 2} proton irradiated BiFeO{sub 3} samples are 41.36, 51.26, and 7.38% and 41.03, 50.90, and 8.07%, respectively. Our experimental observation suggests that the increase in the paramagnetic area ratio is due to the disappearance of superexchange interaction, resulted from the removal of the oxygen with proton irradiation. Also, the appearance of the weak ferromagnetic behavior is caused by the breaking of the antiferromagnetic coupling.

  15. [Experiment and analyse on the effect of magnetic nanoparticles upon relaxation time of proton in molecular recognition by MRI].

    PubMed

    Hu, Lili; Song, Tao; Yang, Wenhui; Wang, Ming; Zhang, Fang; Tao, Chunjing

    2007-06-01

    To research on the effect of three different magnetic nanoparticles upon relaxation time of proton. The detection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicates that there is the effect of marked difference to right control experiment and to analyze the difference from theory. The result discloses that will be able to perform the experiment of molecular recognition using magnetic nanoparticles later.

  16. Proton acceleration by 3D magnetic reconnection in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, P. K.; Dalla, S.

    2007-05-01

    High energy charged particles are an important feature of solar activity such as flares, and indeed non thermal particles play a significant role in flare energy balance. Magnetic reconnection is the primary energy release mechanism in flares, and the strong DC electric fields associated with this reconnection may well be the origin of the high energy charged particles. Whilst particle acceleration has been widely studied for 2D configurations, little is known about 3D configurations. We investigate particle acceleration using a test particle approach, in the simplest 3D reconnection configuration, a 3D magnetic null point. Two modes of reconnection are possible: with a strong current filament along the "spine" field line connecting to the null, or with a sheet current at the "fan" plane of field lines emerging from the null. Using simple model fields, incorporating intiially only thee ideal reconnection region outside the current sheet (or filament), particle trajectories are investigated and the energy spectra and spatial distribution of accelerated particles are determined. We consider and compare fan and spine reconnection, and determine how the properties of the accelerated particles depend on the parameters of the reonnecting field. We also present preliminary results using more realistic, self consistent model fields.

  17. Development of a patch antenna array RF coil for ultra-high field MRI.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Manabu; Nakajima, Iwao; Obayashi, Shigeru; Nagai, Yuji; Obata, Takayuki; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Ikehira, Hiroo

    2007-01-01

    In radiofrequency (RF) coil design for ultra-high-field magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, short RF wavelengths present various challenges to creating a big volume coil. When imaging a human body using an ultra-high magnetic field MR imaging system (magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla or more), short wavelength may induce artifacts from dielectric effect and other factors. To overcome these problems, we developed a patch antenna array coil (PAAC), which is a coil configured as a combination of patch antennas. We prototyped this type of coil for 7T proton MR imaging, imaged a monkey brain, and confirmed the coil's utility as an RF coil for ultra-high-field MR imaging.

  18. In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of the healthy human brain at 9.4 T: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Chadzynski, Grzegorz L; Pohmann, Rolf; Shajan, Gunamony; Kolb, Rupert; Bisdas, Sotirios; Klose, Uwe; Scheffler, Klaus

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the feasibility of in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ((1)H MRSI) of the healthy human brain at a field strength of 9.4 T, using conventional acquisition techniques, is examined and the initial experience is summarized. MRSI measurements were performed on a 9.4 T MR scanner (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) equipped with head-only gradient insert (AC84, Siemens) and custom-developed, 8-channel transmit/24-channel receive, and 16-channel transmit/31-channel receive coils. Spectra were acquired from the superior part of the human brain with a modified STEAM sequence. Spectral quantification was done with LCModel software. Reasonable quality and signal-to-noise ratio of the acquired spectra allowed reliable quantification of 12 metabolites (Cramer-Rao lower bounds < 20 %), some of which may be difficult to quantify at field strengths below 7 T due to overlapping resonances or low concentrations. While further developments are necessary to minimize chemical shift displacement and homogeneity of the transmit field, it is demonstrated that in vivo (1)H MRSI at a field strength of 9.4 T is possible. However, further studies applying up-to-date techniques to overcome high-field specific problems are needed in order to assess the potential gain in sensitivity that may be offered by MRSI at 9.4 T.

  19. High-field magnetic behavior and forced-ferromagnetic state in an ErF e11TiH single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyuchenko, N. V.; Zvezdin, A. K.; Tereshina, E. A.; Skourski, Y.; Doerr, M.; Drulis, H.; Pelevin, I. A.; Tereshina, I. S.

    2015-09-01

    The crystal-field and exchange parameters are determined for the single-crystalline hydride ErF e11TiH compound by analyzing the experimental magnetization curves obtained in magnetic fields of up to 60 T. By using the calculated parameters we succeeded in modeling theoretical magnetization curves for ErF e11TiH up to 200 S and to study in detail the transition from ferrimagnetic to a ferromagnetic state in the applied magnetic field.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of single-plane magnetically focused narrow proton beams.

    PubMed

    McAuley, G A; Barnes, S R S; Slater, J M; Wroe, A J

    2013-02-07

    We present Monte Carlo simulations of magnetically focused proton beams shaped by a single quadrapole magnet. Such beams are narrowly focused in one longitudinal plane but fan out in the perpendicular plane producing elongated elliptical beam spots (a 'screwdriver' shape). The focused beams were compared to passively collimated beams (the current standard of delivery for small radiosurgery beams). Beam energies considered were relevant to functional radiosurgery and standard radiosurgery clinical applications. Three monoenergetic beams (100, 125, and 150 MeV) and a modulated beam were simulated. Monoenergetic magnetically focused beams demonstrated 28 to 32% lower entrance doses, 31 to 47% larger central peak to entrance depth dose ratios, 26 to 35% smaller integral dose, 25 to 32% smaller estimated therapeutic ratios, 19 to 37% smaller penumbra volumes, and 38 to 65% smaller vertical profile lateral penumbras at Bragg depth, compared to the collimated beams. Focused modulated beams showed 31% larger central peak to entrance dose ratio, and 62 to 65% smaller vertical lateral penumbras over the plateau of the spread out Bragg peak. These advantages can be attributed to the directional acceleration of protons in the transverse plane due to the magnetic field. Such beams can be produced using commercially available assemblies of permanent rare earth magnets that do not require electric power or cryrogenic cooling. Our simulations suggest that these magnets can be inexpensively incorporated into the beam line to deliver reduced dose to normal tissue, and enhanced dose to elongated elliptical targets with major and minor axes on the order of a few centimeters and millimeters, respectively. Such beams may find application in novel proton functional and standard radiosurgery treatments in and around critical structures.

  1. Design summary of the magnet support structures for the proton storage ring injection line upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardin, J.D.; Ledford, J.E.; Smith, B.G.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the technical engineering and design issues associated with the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) Injection Line upgrade of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The main focus is on the engineering design calculations of several magnet support structures. The general procedure based upon a set number of design criteria is outlined, followed by a case-by-case summary of the engineering design analyses, reutilization or fabrication callouts and design safety factors.

  2. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance of intact friend leukemia cells: phosphorylcholine increase during differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Agris, P.F.; Campbell, I.D.

    1982-06-18

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance of intact Friend leukemia cells was used to analyze their erythroid-like differentiation. The technique, which requires only 10/sup 8/ to 10/sup 9/ cells and approximately 2 minutes for acquisition of each spectrum, demonstrated the occurrence of many signal changes during differentiation. With cell extracts, 64 signals were assigned to 12 amino acids and 19 other intermediary metabolites, and a dramatic signal change was attributed to a fourfrease in cytoplasmic phosphorylcholines.

  3. Magnetism in C{sub 60} films induced by proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, S.; Satpati, B.; Joseph, B.; Dev, B. N.; Nirmala, R.; Malik, S. K.; Kesavamoorthy, R.

    2007-02-15

    It is shown that polycrystalline fullerene thin films on hydrogen-passivated Si(111) substrates irradiated by 2 MeV protons display ferromagneticlike behavior at 5 K. At 300 K, both the pristine and the irradiated film show diamagnetic behavior. Magnetization data in the temperature range of 2-300 K in 1 T applied field, for the irradiated film show much stronger temperature dependence compared to the pristine film. Possible origins of ferromagneticlike signals in the irradiated films are discussed.

  4. Studies of ${\\rm Nb}_{3}{\\rm Sn}$ Strands Based on the Restacked-Rod Process for High Field Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Barzi, E.; Bossert, M.; Gallo, G.; Lombardo, V.; Turrioni, D.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2011-12-21

    A major thrust in Fermilab's accelerator magnet R&D program is the development of Nb3Sn wires which meet target requirements for high field magnets, such as high critical current density, low effective filament size, and the capability to withstand the cabling process. The performance of a number of strands with 150/169 restack design produced by Oxford Superconducting Technology was studied for round and deformed wires. To optimize the maximum plastic strain, finite element modeling was also used as an aid in the design. Results of mechanical, transport and metallographic analyses are presented for round and deformed wires.

  5. High-resolution three-dimensional macromolecular proton fraction mapping for quantitative neuroanatomical imaging of the rodent brain in ultra-high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Naumova, Anna V; Akulov, Andrey E; Khodanovich, Marina Yu; Yarnykh, Vasily L

    2017-02-15

    A well-known problem in ultra-high-field MRI is generation of high-resolution three-dimensional images for detailed characterization of white and gray matter anatomical structures. T1-weighted imaging traditionally used for this purpose suffers from the loss of contrast between white and gray matter with an increase of magnetic field strength. Macromolecular proton fraction (MPF) mapping is a new method potentially capable to mitigate this problem due to strong myelin-based contrast and independence of this parameter of field strength. MPF is a key parameter determining the magnetization transfer effect in tissues and defined within the two-pool model as a relative amount of macromolecular protons involved into magnetization exchange with water protons. The objectives of this study were to characterize the two-pool model parameters in brain tissues in ultra-high magnetic fields and introduce fast high-field 3D MPF mapping as both anatomical and quantitative neuroimaging modality for small animal applications. In vivo imaging data were obtained from four adult male rats using an 11.7T animal MRI scanner. Comprehensive comparison of brain tissue contrast was performed for standard R1 and T2 maps and reconstructed from Z-spectroscopic images two-pool model parameter maps including MPF, cross-relaxation rate constant, and T2 of pools. Additionally, high-resolution whole-brain 3D MPF maps were obtained with isotropic 170µm voxel size using the single-point synthetic-reference method. MPF maps showed 3-6-fold increase in contrast between white and gray matter compared to other parameters. MPF measurements by the single-point synthetic reference method were in excellent agreement with the Z-spectroscopic method. MPF values in rat brain structures at 11.7T were similar to those at lower field strengths, thus confirming field independence of MPF. 3D MPF mapping provides a useful tool for neuroimaging in ultra-high magnetic fields enabling both quantitative tissue

  6. Self-assembled arrays of polyoxometalate-based metal-organic nanotubes for proton conduction and magnetism.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yan-Qing; Zang, Hong-Ying; Wang, Xin-Long; Zhou, En-Long; Song, Bai-Qiao; Wang, Chun-Gang; Shao, Kui-Zhan; Su, Zhong-Min

    2015-06-30

    The first polyoxometalate-based metal-organic nanotube constructed via covalent bonds has been synthesized. POM anions stick the metal-organic nanotubes to build 3D nanotubular arrays. The stability, magnetic and proton conducting properties are investigated.

  7. Magnetic moment of proton drip-line nucleus {sup 9}C

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuta, K.; Fukuda, M.; Tanigaki, M.; Minamisono, T.; Nojiri, Y.; Mihara, M.; Onishi, T.; Yamaguchi, T.; Harada, A.; Sasaki, M.

    1994-10-01

    The magnetic moment of the proton drip-line nucleus {sup 9}C(I{sup {pi}}=3/2{sup -}, T{sub {1/2}}=126 ms) has been measured for the first time, using the {beta}-NMR detection technique with polarized radioactive beams. The measured value for the magnetic moment is {vert_bar} {mu}({sup 9}C) {vert_bar} = 1.3914{+-}0.0005 {mu}{sub N}. The deduced spin expectation value<{sigma}> of 1.44 is unusually larger than an other ones of even-odd nuclei.

  8. Measurement of pulsed-power-driven magnetic fields via proton deflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mariscal, D.; McGuffey, C.; Valenzuela, J.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Chittenden, J. P.; Niasse, N.; Presura, R.; Haque, S.; Wallace, M.; Arias, A.; Covington, A.; Sawada, H.; Wiewior, P.

    2014-12-01

    Measuring magnetic field and current distribution in Z-pinch plasma systems is crucial to the validation of Z-pinch theory. In this letter, the demonstration of proton deflectometry to pulsed-power-driven loads at the mega-amp scale is presented, which is capable of making more detailed field maps in high-density regions of plasmas. In this method, a laser-driven, broad-spectrum, MeV-energy proton beam is directed through a pulsed-power-driven plasma system, and the resulting deflections are measured to examine configuration of magnetic fields and to infer the currents that support them. The technique was first demonstrated on simple short-circuit loads, and the results are in excellent agreement with numerical simulations providing reliable estimates of the field and current configurations. It was then applied to a more complex—radial foil—plasma load. The measurements show unexpected proton deflections that exhibit the complexity of the plasma load and that with further analysis will reveal details about the current and magnetic field topology in this complex configuration.

  9. Ulysses observations of electron and proton components in a magnetic cloud and related wave activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osherovich, V. A.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Phillips, J. L.; Balogh, A.

    1995-01-01

    In addition to a smooth rotation of the magnetic field vector, magnetic clouds have a low proton temperature T(sub p). Their expansion in the solar wind leads to depletion and therefore the ion component cools down. It has been shown recently that the electron component in magnetic clouds behaves differently: when the cloud expands, electron temperature Te anti correlates with density and therefore Te increases in the cloud, creating favorable conditions for the rise of ion-acoustic waves. For the magnetic cloud observed by Ulysses on June 10 - 12, 1993 at 4.64 AU at S 32.5 deg, we present observations for both electron and proton components and related plasma wave activity. Our results confirm the anti correlation between T(sub e) and electron density and also exhibit a high ratio of T(sub e)/T(sub P) in the cloud. Since Landau damping is not effective for T(sub e)/T(sub p) much greater than 1, Doppler shifted ion acoustic waves are expected in the cloud. Calculation of ion acoustic wave frequencies in the cloud and comparison with observed wave activity confirm this expectation. As in our previous work, we show that the electron component in the cloud obeys a polytropic law with gamma is less than 1 (gamma approximately equals 0.3-0.4). The dynamics of the magnetic cloud are determined to a large degree by the dominating electron pressure.

  10. Persistence of singlet fluctuations in the coupled spin tetrahedra system Cu2Te2O5Br2 revealed by high-field magnetization, 79Br NQR, and 125Te NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, S.-H.; Choi, K.-Y.; Berger, H.; Büchner, B.; Grafe, H.-J.

    2012-11-01

    We present high-field magnetization and 79Br nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) and 125Te nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies in the weakly coupled Cu2+ (S=1/2) tetrahedral system Cu2Te2O5Br2. The field-induced level crossing effects were observed by the magnetization measurements in a long-ranged magnetically ordered state which was confirmed by a strong divergence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate T1-1 at T0=13.5 K. In the paramagnetic state, T1-1 reveals an effective singlet-triplet spin gap much larger than that observed by static bulk measurements. Our results imply that the inter- and the intratetrahedral interactions compete, but at the same time they cooperate strengthening effectively the local intratetrahedral exchange couplings. We discuss that the unusual feature originates from the frustrated intertetrahedral interactions.

  11. Investigation of Mechanical Activation on Li-N-H Systems Using 6Li Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance at Ultra-High Field

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Kwak, Ja Hun; Yang, Zhenguo; Osborn, William; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Shaw, Leonard D.

    2008-07-15

    Abstract The significantly enhanced spectral resolution in the 6Li MAS NMR spectra of Li-N-H systems at ultra-high field of 21.1 tesla is exploited, for the first time, to study the detailed electronic and chemical environmental changes associated with mechanical activation of Li-N-H system using high energy balling milling. Complementary to ultra-high field studies, the hydrogen discharge dynamics are investigated using variable temperature in situ 1H MAS NMR at 7.05 tesla field. The significantly enhanced spectral resolution using ultra-high filed of 21.1 tesla was demonstrated along with several major findings related to mechanical activation, including the upfield shift of the resonances in 6Li MAS spectra induced by ball milling, more efficient mechanical activation with ball milling at liquid nitrogen temperature than with ball milling at room temperature, and greatly enhanced hydrogen discharge exhibited by the liquid nitrogen ball milled samples.

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance proton imaging of bone pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Atlan, H.; Sigal, R.; Hadar, H.; Chisin, R.; Cohen, I.; Lanir, A.; Soudry, M.; Machtey, Y.; Schreiber, R.; Benmair, J.

    1986-02-01

    Thirty-two patients with diversified pathology were examined with a supraconductive NMR imager using spin echo with different TR and TE to obtain T1 and T2 weighted images. They included 20 tumors (12 primary, eight metastasis), six osteomyelitis, three fractures, two osteonecrosis, and one diffuse metabolic (Gaucher) disease. In all cases except for the stress fractures, the bone pathology was clearly visualized in spite of the normal lack of signal from the compact cortical bone. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging proved to be at least as sensitive as radionuclide scintigraphy but much more accurate than all other imaging procedures including computed tomography (CT) and angiography to assess the extension of the lesions, especially in tumors extended to soft tissue. This is due both to easy acquisition of sagittal and coronal sections and to different patterns of pathologic modifications of T1 and T2 which are beginning to be defined. It is hoped that more experience in clinical use of these patterns will help to discriminate between tumor extension and soft-tissue edema. We conclude that while radionuclide scintigraphy will probably remain the most sensitive and easy to perform screening test for bone pathology, NMR imaging, among noninvasive diagnostic procedures, appears to be at least as specific as CT. In addition, where the extension of the lesions is concerned, NMR imaging is much more informative than CT. In pathology of the spine, the easy visualization of the spinal cord should decrease the need for myelography.

  13. Proton magnetic resonance imaging using a nitrogen-vacancy spin sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugar, D.; Mamin, H. J.; Sherwood, M. H.; Kim, M.; Rettner, C. T.; Ohno, K.; Awschalom, D. D.

    2015-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging, with its ability to provide three-dimensional, elementally selective imaging without radiation damage, has had a revolutionary impact in many fields, especially medicine and the neurosciences. Although challenging, its extension to the nanometre scale could provide a powerful new tool for the nanosciences, especially if it can provide a means for non-destructively visualizing the full three-dimensional morphology of complex nanostructures, including biomolecules. To achieve this potential, innovative new detection strategies are required to overcome the severe sensitivity limitations of conventional inductive detection techniques. One successful example is magnetic resonance force microscopy, which has demonstrated three-dimensional imaging of proton NMR with resolution on the order of 10 nm, but with the requirement of operating at cryogenic temperatures. Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres in diamond offer an alternative detection strategy for nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging that is operable at room temperature. Here, we demonstrate two-dimensional imaging of 1H NMR from a polymer test sample using a single NV centre in diamond as the sensor. The NV centre detects the oscillating magnetic field from precessing protons as the sample is scanned past the NV centre. A spatial resolution of ˜12 nm is shown, limited primarily by the scan resolution.

  14. Irradiation effects on magnetic properties in neutron and proton irradiated reactor pressure vessel steel

    SciTech Connect

    Park, D.G.; Hong, J.H.; Kim, I.S.; Kim, H.C.

    1999-09-01

    The effects of neutron and proton dose on the magnetic properties of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel were investigated. The coercivity and maximum induction increased in two stages with respect to neutron dose, being nearly constant up to a dose of 1.5 x 10{sup {minus}7} dpa, followed by a rapid increase up to a dose of 1.5 x 10{sup {minus}5} dpa. The coercivity and maximum induction in the proton irradiated specimens also showed a two stage variation with respect to proton dose, namely a rapid increase up to a dose of 0.2 x 10{sup {minus}2} dpa, then a decrease up to 1.2 x 10{sup {minus}2} dpa. The Barkhausen noise (BN) amplitude in neutron irradiated specimens also varied in two stages in a reverse manner, the transition at the same dose of 1.5 x 10{sup {minus}7} dpa. The BN amplitude in proton irradiated specimens decreased by 60% up to 0.2 x 10{sup {minus}2} dpa followed by an increase up to 1.2 x 10{sup {minus}2} dpa. The results were in good accord with the one dimensional domain wall model considering the density of defects and wall energy.

  15. Modeling the inner plasma sheet protons and magnetic field under enhanced convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Ping; Lyons, Larry R.; Chen, Margaret W.; Wolf, Richard A.; Toffoletto, Frank R.

    2003-02-01

    In order to understand the evolution of the protons and magnetic field in the inner plasma sheet from quiet to disturbed conditions, we incorporate a modified version of the Magnetospheric Specification Model (MSM) with a modified version of the Tsyganenko 96 (T96) magnetic field model to simulate the protons and magnetic field under an increasing convection electric field with two-dimensional (2-D) force balance maintained along the midnight meridian. The local time dependent proton differential fluxes assigned to the model boundary are a mixture of hot plasma from the mantle and cooler plasma from the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL). We previously used this model to simulate the inner plasma sheet under weak convection corresponding to a cross polar cap potential drop (ΔΦPC) equal to 26 kV and obtained 2-D quiet time equilibrium for proton and magnetic field that agrees well with observations. We start our simulation for enhanced convection with this quiet time equilibrium and time-independent boundary particle sources and increase ΔΦPC steadily from 26 to 146 kV in 5 hours. Simulations are also run separately to steady states by keeping ΔΦPC constant after it is increased to 98 and 146 kV. The magnitudes of proton pressure, number density, and temperature and their increase from quiet to moderate activity (ΔΦPC = 98 kV) are consistent with most observations. Our simulation at high activity (ΔΦPC = 146 kV) underestimates the observed pressure and temperature. This disagreement indicates possible dependence of the boundary particle sources on activity and possible effects of solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements that have not yet been included in our simulation. The simulated equatorial pressures and temperatures show stronger enhancement on the dusk side than on the dawn side as convection is increased, while density profiles show an increase on the dawn side and a decrease on the dusk side. The simulated proton flow speed at the equatorial plane

  16. High-field magnetization studies of spin-dimer behaviors on low-dimensional spin systems, LiCu2-xZnxO2 and FeTe3O7X (X = Cl, Br)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Her, J. L.; Hsu, H. C.; Matsuda, Y. H.; Kindo, K.; Chou, C. C.; Yang, H. D.; Berger, H.; Chou, F. C.

    2013-03-01

    High-field magnetization of two kinds of low-dimensional spin system was studied in pulsed magnets. Several anomalies were clearly observed in dm/dH curves of doped LiCu2-xZnxO2 (x = 0.07) at low temperatures (1.3 K < T < 20 K). When temperature decreases, the anomalies sharper / splits at certain critical temperatures which are related to the formation of isolated spin-dimer and spin freezing state. A field-induced spin density wave state was suggested to exist at high magnetic fields. The doping of Zn2+ ions breaks the spin-chain of Cu2+ ions, leading to the formation of isolated spin-dimers and lowering the critical field of formation of spin density state. The magnetization process measurements were preformed on another series of samples, FeTe3O7X (X = Cl, Br), which has spin-dimer, formed by Fe3+ ions, at low temperatures and magnetic fields up to 100 T. At low temperatures, the magnetization processes show four step-like structures, which have nearly equal spaces of 25 T. Both samples show similar behavior. These steps are considered to be the magnetic excitation of the antiferromagnetic spin-dimers.

  17. Low energy proton bidirectional anisotropies and their relation to transient interplanetary magnetic structures: ISEE-3 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsden, R. G.; Sanderson, T. R.; Wenzel, K. P.; Smith, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    It is known that the interplanetary medium in the period approaching solar maximum is characterized by an enhancement in the occurrence of transient solar wind streams and shocks and that such systems are often associated with looplike magnetic structures or clouds. There is observational evidence that bidirectional, field aligned flows of low energy particles could be a signature of such looplike structures, although detailed models for the magnetic field configuration and injection mechanisms do not exist at the current time. Preliminary results of a survey of low energy proton bidirectional anisotropies measured on ISEE-3 in the interplanetary medium between August 1978 and May 1982, together with magnetic field data from the same spacecraft are presented.

  18. Accelerated mapping of magnetic susceptibility using 3D planes-on-a-paddlewheel (POP) EPI at ultra-high field strength.

    PubMed

    Stäb, Daniel; Bollmann, Steffen; Langkammer, Christian; Bredies, Kristian; Barth, Markus

    2017-04-01

    With the advent of ultra-high field MRI scanners in clinical research, susceptibility based MRI has recently gained increasing interest because of its potential to assess subtle tissue changes underlying neurological pathologies/disorders. Conventional, but rather slow, three-dimensional (3D) spoiled gradient-echo (GRE) sequences are typically employed to assess the susceptibility of tissue. 3D echo-planar imaging (EPI) represents a fast alternative but generally comes with echo-time restrictions, geometrical distortions and signal dropouts that can become severe at ultra-high fields. In this work we assess quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) at 7 T using non-Cartesian 3D EPI with a planes-on-a-paddlewheel (POP) trajectory, which is created by rotating a standard EPI readout train around its own phase encoding axis. We show that the threefold accelerated non-Cartesian 3D POP EPI sequence enables very fast, whole brain susceptibility mapping at an isotropic resolution of 1 mm and that the high image quality has sufficient signal-to-noise ratio in the phase data for reliable QSM processing. The susceptibility maps obtained were comparable with regard to QSM values and geometric distortions to those calculated from a conventional 4 min 3D GRE scan using the same QSM processing pipeline. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Exchange and crystal field in Sm-based magnets. I. Inelastic neutron scattering and high-field magnetization study of Sm2Fe17 and Sm2Fe17N3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippel, A.; Jahn, L.; Loewenhaupt, M.; Eckert, D.; Kerschl, P.; Handstein, A.; Müller, K.-H.; Wolf, M.; Kuz'Min, M. D.; Steinbeck, L.; Richter, M.; Teresiak, A.; Bewley, R.

    2002-02-01

    A peak is detected in the high-energy inelastic neutron scattering spectra of Sm2Fe17 and Sm2Fe17N3, which is associated with the intermultiplet transition in the 4f shell of samarium. The peak in the nitride Sm2Fe17N3 is situated at a lower energy (163 meV) as compared with the parent compound Sm2Fe17 (177 meV). The peak position provides direct information on the strength of the exchange field on Sm in both compounds: Bex=380 and 270 T in Sm2Fe17 and Sm2Fe17N3, respectively. The 30% reduction in Bex as a result of nitrogenating Sm2Fe17 is consistent with the earlier discovered similar effect in Gd2Fe17. High-field (B<=50 T) magnetization curves have been measured on an oriented powder sample of Sm2Fe17N3 and analyzed using the newly determined Bex. The leading crystal field parameter is thus found to be A02=-28 meV.

  20. [High field MR imaging: magnetic field interactions of aneurysm clips, coronary artery stents and iliac artery stents with a 3.0 Tesla MR system].

    PubMed

    Sommer, T; Maintz, D; Schmiedel, A; Hackenbroch, M; Hofer, U; Urbach, H; Pavlidis, C; Träber, F; Schild, H; Höher, M

    2004-05-01

    To evaluate magnetic field interactions of commonly used biomedical implants at 3.0 Tesla. Fourteen aneurysm clips designed for permanent placement in intracranial aneurysms, 19 coronary artery stents and 20 iliac artery stents were evaluated in an actively shielded compact 3.0 T MR system (Intera, Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands, length of magnet 1.57 m). The magnetic deflection forces (translational movement) were evaluated as follows: The implants were suspended by a fine string and placed in the magnet bore at the location of the maximum magnetic field gradient. The translational forces F (z) were calculated from the measured angle of deflection from the vertical axis. The magnetic field-induced torque (rotational forces) was evaluated as follows: Each implant was placed in the center of the magnetic bore parallel to the static magnetic field B0 (position 0 degrees ). Any possible displacement of the implant was noted on a millimeter scale and any torque qualitatively evaluated using a 5 point grading scale (0: no torque; + 4: very strong torque). The implant was turned in steps of 45 degrees, and the procedure was repeated to encompass a full 360 degrees rotation. In 52 of the 53 devices tested, the deflection force (deflection angle: range 0-21 degrees, translational force: range 0-3.8 mN) was less than the gravitational force (i.e., the implant's weight). These devices (n = 52/53) did not show any alignment to or rotation in the magnetic field at any of the various 45 degrees -increment positions corresponding to a qualitative torque evaluation of grade 0/4. One device (n = 1/53), an iliac artery stent made of stainless steel (Zenith, Cook, Mönchengladbach, BRD), was found to have deflection forces (deflection angle 88 degrees translational force 299 mN) greatly exceeding the gravitational force as well as a pronounced torque (grade 4/4). Out of 53 biomedical implants evaluated for magnetic field interactions at 3.0 T, one iliac artery stent

  1. A superconducting magnet mandrel with minimum symmetry laminations for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, S.; Arbelaez, D.; Brouwer, L.; Dietderich, D. R.; Felice, H.; Hafalia, R.; Prestemon, S.; Robin, D.; Sun, C.; Wan, W.

    2013-08-01

    The size and weight of ion-beam cancer therapy gantries are frequently determined by a large aperture, curved, ninety degree, dipole magnet. The higher fields achievable with superconducting technology promise to greatly reduce the size and weight of this magnet and therefore also the gantry as a whole. This paper reports advances in the design of winding mandrels for curved, canted cosine-theta (CCT) magnets in the context of a preliminary magnet design for a proton gantry. The winding mandrel is integral to the CCT design and significantly affects the construction cost, stress management, winding feasibility, eddy current power losses, and field quality of the magnet. A laminated mandrel design using a minimum symmetry in the winding path is introduced and its feasibility demonstrated by a rapid prototype model. Piecewise construction of the mandrel using this laminated approach allows for increased manufacturing techniques and material choices. Sectioning the mandrel also reduces eddy currents produced during field changes accommodating the scan of beam energies during treatment. This symmetry concept can also greatly reduce the computational resources needed for 3D finite element calculations. It is shown that the small region of symmetry forming the laminations combined with periodic boundary conditions can model the entire magnet geometry disregarding the ends.

  2. Initial test results of the Los Alamos proton-storage-ring bump-magnet system

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, C.R.; Barlow, D.B.; Redd, D.B.

    1997-09-01

    An upgrade program for increasing the stored beam current in the LANSCE Proton Storage is presently under way. Part of the upgrade effort has been to design, specify, and add four bump-magnet/modulator systems to the ring. This paper describes the initial test results of the first bump-magnet/modulator system. The paper begins with an overview of the pulsed-power system including important specifications of the modulator, magnet, cabling, and control system. In the main portion of the paper, waveforms and test data are included showing the accuracy, repeatability, and stability of the magnet-current pulses. These magnet pulses are programmable both in rise and fall time as well as in amplitude. The amplitude can be set between 50 and 300 A, the rise-time is fixed at 1 ms, and the linear fall-time can be varied between 500 {mu}s and 1500 {mu}s. Other issues such as loading effects and power dissipation in the magnet-bore beamtube are examined and reported.

  3. Strange magnetic form factor of the proton at $Q^2 = 0.23$ GeV$^2$

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ping; Leinweber, Derek; Thomas, Anthony; Young, Ross

    2009-06-01

    We determine the $u$ and $d$ quark contributions to the proton magnetic form factor at finite momentum transfer by applying chiral corrections to quenched lattice data. Heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory is applied at next to leading order in the quenched, and full QCD cases for the valence sector using finite range regularization. Under the assumption of charge symmetry these values can be combined with the experimental values of the proton and neutron magnetic form factors to deduce a relatively accurate value for the strange magnetic form factor at $Q^2=0.23$ GeV$^2$, namely $G_M^s=-0.034 \\pm 0.021$ $\\mu_N$.

  4. Internal field of homogeneously magnetized toroid sensor for proton free precession magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primdahl, F.; Merayo, J. M. G.; Brauer, P.; Laursen, I.; Risbo, T.

    2005-02-01

    The shift of the NMR spectral line frequency in a proton free precession absolute scalar magnetometer using the omni-directional toroid container for a proton-rich liquid depends on the magnetic susceptibility of the liquid and on the direction of the external field relative to the axis of the toroid. The theoretical shift is estimated for water by computing the additional magnetic field from the magnetization of the liquid and comparing it to the theoretical field in a spherical container. Along the axis the estimated average shift is -0.08 nT and perpendicular to the axis the shift is +0.08 nT relative to that of a spherical sensor. The field inhomogeneity introduced by the toroid shape amounts to 0.32 nT over the volume of the sensor and is not expected to significantly affect the signal decay time, when considering the typical water line width of about 2.5 nT.

  5. Analyzing power in pion-proton bremsstrahlung, and the. Delta. sup ++ (1232) magnetic moment

    SciTech Connect

    Bosshard, A.; Amsler, C.; Doebeli, M.; Doser, M.; Schaad, M.; Riedlberger, J.; Truoel, P. ); Bistirlich, J.A.; Crowe, K.M.; Ljungfelt, S.; Meyer, C.A. ); van den Brandt, B.; Konter, J.A.; Mango, S.; Renker, D. ); Loude, J.F.; Perroud, J.P. ); Haddock, R.P. ); Sober, D.I. )

    1991-10-01

    We report on a first measurement of the polarized-target asymmetry of the pion-proton bremsstrahlung cross section ({pi}{sup +}{ital p}{r arrow}{pi}{sup {minus}}{ital p}{gamma}). As in previous cross section measurements the pion energy (298 MeV) and the detector geometry for this experiment was chosen to optimize the sensitivity to the radiation from the magnetic dipole moment of the {Delta}{sup ++}(1232) resonance {mu}{sub {Delta}}. Comparison to a recent isobar model for pion-nucleon bremsstrahlung yields {mu}{sub {Delta}}=(1.62{plus minus}0.18){mu}{sub {ital p}}, where {mu}{sub {ital p}} is the proton magnetic moment. Since the asymmetry depends less than the cross section on the choice of the other input parameters for the model, their uncertainties affect this analysis by less than the experimental error. However the theory fails to represent both the cross section and the asymmetry data at the highest photon energies. Hence further improvements in the calculations are needed before the model dependence of the magnetic moment analysis can be fully assessed. The present result agrees with bag-model corrections to the SU(6) prediction {mu}{sub {Delta}}=2{mu}{sub {ital p}}. As a by-product, the analyzing power for elastic {pi}{sup +}{ital p} scattering at 415 MeV/{ital c} was also measured. This second result is in good agreement with phase shift calculations.

  6. Magnetic dipole moment of the doubly-closed-shell plus one proton nucleus 49Sc.

    PubMed

    Ohtsubo, T; Stone, N J; Stone, J R; Towner, I S; Bingham, C R; Gaulard, C; Köster, U; Muto, S; Nikolov, J; Nishimura, K; Simpson, G S; Soti, G; Veskovic, M; Walters, W B; Wauters, F

    2012-07-20

    The nucleus 49Sc, having a single f(7/2) proton outside doubly magic 48Ca (Z=20, N=28), is one of the very few isotopes which makes possible testing of the fundamental theory of nuclear magnetism. The magnetic moment has been measured by online β NMR of nuclei oriented at milli-Kelvin temperatures to be (+)5.616(25)  μ(N). The result is discussed in terms of a detailed theory of the structure of the magnetic moment operator, showing excellent agreement with calculated departure from the f(7/2) Schmidt limit extreme single-particle value. The measurement completes the sequence of moments of Sc isotopes with even numbers of f(7/2) neutrons: the first such isotopic chain between two major shells for which a full set of moment measurements exists. The result further completes the isotonic sequence of ground-state moments of nuclei with an odd number of f(7/2) protons coupled to a closed subshell of f(7/2) neutrons. Comparison with a recent shell-model calculation of the latter sequence is made.

  7. Metabolite profile of cerebrospinal fluid in patients with spina bifida: a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Pal, Kamalesh; Sharma, Uma; Gupta, D K; Pratap, Akshay; Jagannathan, N R

    2005-02-01

    The present study was carried out to assess the metabolic differences between cerebrospinal fluid samples of patients with spina bifida and age-matched control individuals. To study the metabolite profile of cerebrospinal fluid of patients with spina bifida using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, compare the levels of metabolites with controls, establish correlation of underlying neuronal dysfunction with metabolic changes in patients with spina bifida, and evaluate the potential use of this technique as an additional tool for diagnostic assessment. Combination of embryopathy, stretching, ischemia, compression, and trauma is responsible for cord dysfunction in spina bifida. Changes in neuronal metabolism leads to changes in the local milieu of cerebrospinal fluid in the cord. Change in metabolite profile of cerebrospinal fluid in spina bifida in terms of increase in products of anaerobic metabolism, nerve membrane integrity, and nerve ischemia has not yet been studied. Cerebrospinal fluid obtained from patients and control individuals were characterized using various one- and two-dimensional proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques. Concentration of various metabolites was calculated using the area under the nuclear magnetic resonance peak. Statistically significantly higher levels of lactate, choline, glycerophosphocholine, acetate, and alanine in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with spina bifida was observed compared with control individuals. Significantly higher levels of metabolites were observed in patients with spina bifida, representing a state of nerve ischemia, anaerobic metabolism, and disruption of neuronal membrane.

  8. Phosphorus and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy demonstrates mitochondrial dysfunction in early and advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hattingen, Elke; Magerkurth, Jörg; Pilatus, Ulrich; Mozer, Anne; Seifried, Carola; Steinmetz, Helmuth; Zanella, Friedhelm; Hilker, Rüdiger

    2009-12-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction hypothetically contributes to neuronal degeneration in patients with Parkinson's disease. While several in vitro data exist, the measurement of cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction in living patients with Parkinson's disease is challenging. Anatomical magnetic resonance imaging combined with phosphorus and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging provides information about the functional integrity of mitochondria in specific brain areas. We measured partial volume corrected concentrations of low-energy metabolites and high-energy phosphates with sufficient resolution to focus on pathology related target areas in Parkinson's disease. Combined phosphorus and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in the mesostriatal region was performed in 16 early and 13 advanced patients with Parkinson's disease and compared to 19 age-matched controls at 3 Tesla. In the putamen and midbrain of both Parkinson's disease groups, we found a bilateral reduction of high-energy phosphates such as adenosine triphophosphate and phosphocreatine as final acceptors of energy from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. In contrast, low-energy metabolites such as adenosine diphophosphate and inorganic phosphate were within normal ranges. These results provide strong in vivo evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction of mesostriatal neurons is a central and persistent phenomenon in the pathogenesis cascade of Parkinson's disease which occurs early in the course of the disease.

  9. The effect of polymer coatings on proton transverse relaxivities of aqueous suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Matthew R J; Huffstetler, Phillip P; Miles, William C; Goff, Jonathon D; Davis, Richey M; Riffle, Judy S; House, Michael J; Woodward, Robert C; St Pierre, Timothy G

    2011-08-12

    Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles are good candidates for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents due to their high magnetic susceptibilities. Here we investigate 19 polyether-coated magnetite nanoparticle systems comprising three series. All systems were synthesized from the same batch of magnetite nanoparticles. A different polyether was used for each series. Each series comprised systems with systematically varied polyether loadings per particle. A highly significant (p < 0.0001) linear correlation (r = 0.956) was found between the proton relaxivity and the intensity-weighted average diameter measured by dynamic light scattering in the 19 particle systems studied. The intensity-weighted average diameter measured by dynamic light scattering is sensitive to small number fractions of larger particles/aggregates. We conclude that the primary effect leading to differences in proton relaxivity between systems arises from the small degree of aggregation within the samples, which appears to be determined by the nature of the polymer and, for one system, the degree of polymer loading of the particles. For the polyether coatings used in this study, any changes in relaxivity from differences in water exclusion or diffusion rates caused by the polymer are minor in comparison with the changes in relaxivity resulting from variations in the degree of aggregation.

  10. Temperature dependence of proton NMR relaxation times at earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedbalski, Peter; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Parish, Christopher; Ferguson, Sarah; Cervantes, Eduardo; Oomen, Anisha; Krishnan, Anagha; Goyal, Aayush; Lumata, Lloyd

    The theoretical description of relaxation processes for protons, well established and experimentally verified at conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) fields, has remained untested at low fields despite significant advances in low field NMR technology. In this study, proton spin-lattice relaxation (T1) times in pure water and water doped with varying concentrations of the paramagnetic agent copper chloride have been measured from 6 to 92oC at earth's magnetic field (1700 Hz). Results show a linear increase of T1 with temperature for each of the samples studied. Increasing the concentration of the copper chloride greatly reduced T1 and reduced dependence on temperature. The consistency of the results with theory is an important confirmation of past results, while the ability of an ultra-low field NMR system to do contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is promising for future applicability to low-cost medical imaging and chemical identification. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  11. Characterization of the ELIMED Permanent Magnets Quadrupole system prototype with laser-driven proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillaci, F.; Pommarel, L.; Romano, F.; Cuttone, G.; Costa, M.; Giove, D.; Maggiore, M.; Russo, A. D.; Scuderi, V.; Malka, V.; Vauzour, B.; Flacco, A.; Cirrone, G. A. P.

    2016-07-01

    Laser-based accelerators are gaining interest in recent years as an alternative to conventional machines [1]. In the actual ion acceleration scheme, energy and angular spread of the laser-driven beams are the main limiting factors for beam applications and different solutions for dedicated beam-transport lines have been proposed [2,3]. In this context a system of Permanent Magnet Quadrupoles (PMQs) has been realized [2] by INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud of the Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) researchers, in collaboration with SIGMAPHI company in France, to be used as a collection and pre-selection system for laser driven proton beams. This system is meant to be a prototype to a more performing one [3] to be installed at ELI-Beamlines for the collection of ions. The final system is designed for protons and carbons up to 60 MeV/u. In order to validate the design and the performances of this large bore, compact, high gradient magnetic system prototype an experimental campaign have been carried out, in collaboration with the group of the SAPHIR experimental facility at LOA (Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée) in Paris using a 200 TW Ti:Sapphire laser system. During this campaign a deep study of the quadrupole system optics has been performed, comparing the results with the simulation codes used to determine the setup of the PMQ system and to track protons with realistic TNSA-like divergence and spectrum. Experimental and simulation results are good agreement, demonstrating the possibility to have a good control on the magnet optics. The procedure used during the experimental campaign and the most relevant results are reported here.

  12. [Conventional and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and proton spectroscopy in MELAS].

    PubMed

    Casimiro, Carlos; Martins, Joana; Nunes, César; Parreira, Tiago; Batista, Sónia; Cordeiro, Miguel; Matias, Fernando; Rebelo, Olinda; Freitas, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes) is a mitochondrial hereditary dysfunction in which the physiopathological mechanism of cerebral lesions is not totally understood as yet. Typically, these lesions are described as having normal to increased apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and this has been used to distinguish stroke-like lesions from ischemic lesions. Notwithstanding this, within the last few years, there have been reports of diffusion restriction in stroke-like episodes. Analysis of the diffusion characteristics on serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over a 16 month period, on a patient with MELAS and stroke-like lesions, to investigate the controversial changes of the ADC, reported in the last years. Evaluation of the proton spectroscopy changes in stroke-like lesions and apparently spared brain. We performed four serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including two stroke-like episodes, in a 28-year-old man with MELAS (mitochondrial DNA mutation A3243G). Qualitative analysis of the magnetic resonance images, including the single voxel spectroscopy and ADC maps, with analysis of evolution patterns of the last ones. Both MRI that were performed during those episodes of stroke-like lesion revealed areas of diffusion restriction, coexisting areas of high ADC. During the chronic phase, there was a regression of those changes. Proton spectroscopy showed the presence of lactate and reduction of N-acetyl aspartate peak in stroke-like lesion and the presence of lactate in apparently spared brain. All alterations that were recorded strengthen the view that cytotoxic oedema can occur in stroke-like lesions. Thus, their presence should not weaken the possibility of MELAS, especially if those lesions affect the temporal, parietal and/or occipital lobes, or if they predominantly involve the cortical gray matter, spanning vascular borders and if proton spectroscopy reveals lactate peak in the apparently spared brain.

  13. High field pulsed microwiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, R.W.

    1990-12-31

    This paper describes a microwiggler assembly which produces large magnetic fields for oscillating charged particle beams, particularly electron beams for free electron laser (FEL) application. A tube of electrically conductive material is formed with radial slots axially spaced at the period of the electron beam. The slots have alternate 180{degrees} relationships and are formed to a maximum depth of 0.6 to 0.7 times the tube circumference. An optimum slot depth is selected eliminate magnetic quadrupole fields within the microwiggler as determined from a conventional pulsed wire technique. Suitable slot configurations include single slits, double slits, triple slits, and elliptical slots. An axial electron beam direction is maintained by experimentally placing end slits adjacent entrance and exit portions of the assembly, where the end slit depth is determined by use of the pulsed wire technique outside the tube.

  14. High field pulsed microwiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a microwiggler assembly which produces large magnetic fields for oscillating charged particle beams, particularly electron beams for free electron laser (FEL) application. A tube of electrically conductive material is formed with radial slots axially spaced at the period of the electron beam. The slots have alternate 180{degrees} relationships and are formed to a maximum depth of 0.6 to 0.7 times the tube circumference. An optimum slot depth is selected eliminate magnetic quadrupole fields within the microwiggler as determined from a conventional pulsed wire technique. Suitable slot configurations include single slits, double slits, triple slits, and elliptical slots. An axial electron beam direction is maintained by experimentally placing end slits adjacent entrance and exit portions of the assembly, where the end slit depth is determined by use of the pulsed wire technique outside the tube.

  15. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance study of hirudin: resonance assignment and secondary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumaran, D.K.; Clore, G.M.; Preuss, A.; Zarbock, J.; Gronenbron, A.M.

    1987-01-27

    The /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of the 65-residue protein hirudin is assigned in a sequential manner by using a combination of two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques to demonstrate through-bond and through space (<5-A) connectives. The secondary structure of hirudin is deduced from a qualitative interpretation of the nuclear Overhauser effects involving the backbone NH, C/sup ..cap alpha../H, and C/sup ..beta../H protons. It is shown that hirudin has two ..beta..-sheets and no ..cap alpha..-helices.

  16. Isotropic proton-detected local-field nuclear magnetic resonancein solids

    SciTech Connect

    Havlin, Robert H.; Walls, Jamie D.; Pines, Alexander

    2004-08-04

    A new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method is presented which produces linear, isotropic proton-detected local-field spectra for InS spin systems in powdered samples. The method, HETeronuclear Isotropic Evolution (HETIE), refocuses the anisotropic portion of the heteronuclear dipolar coupling frequencies by evolving the system under a series of specially designed Hamiltonians and evolution pathways. The theory behind HETIE is represented along with experimental studies conducted on a powdered sample of ferrocene, demonstrating the methodology outlined in this paper. Applications of HETIE for structural determination in solid-state NMR are discussed.

  17. High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of seminolipid from bovine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, J G; Storey, B T; Hemling, M L; Grob, R L

    1990-06-01

    The high-resolution one- and two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) characterization of seminolipid from bovine spermatozoa is presented. The 1H-NMR data was confirmed by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of the partially methylated alditol acetates of the sugar unit, mild alkaline methanolysis of the glyceryl ester, mobility on normal phase and diphasic thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS). The structure of the molecule corresponds to 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-hexadecanoyl-3-O-beta-D-(3'-sulfo)-galactopyranosyl- sn-glycerol.

  18. Ion hydration effects in aqueous solutions of strong electrolytes, according to proton magnetic relaxation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnichenko, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    The concentration dependences of proton magnetic relaxation (PMR) rates measured at different temperatures in aqueous electrolyte solutions and concentrated seawater (SW) in a wide range of salt concentrations and for different seawater salinities are presented, along with the concentration dependences of PMR rates determined in salts dissolved directly in seawater. The coordination numbers of the basic ions in seawater were determined from the complete solvation limits and compared with those measured in single-component water-salt solutions. The attaining of complete solvation limits was determined using the PMR data for ions of different hydration signs.

  19. Magnetic fabric results from DSDP Holes 380A (Black Sea) and 524 (South Atlantic) sediment cores: A case study for the comparison between low and high field torque magnetometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folami, S. L.; Hailwood, E. A.

    1991-08-01

    Magnetic fabric (anisotropy) measurements have been made on samples of Quaternary sediments from DSDP Hole 380A (Black Sea) and Tertiary and Cretaceous nannofossil oozes, marls and volcanoclastic sandstones from the Southeast flank of the Walvis Ridge at Hole 524, recovered during Legs 42B and 73 of the International Program of Ocean Drilling (IPOD). The fabric was determined by means of both a low field and a high field torque magnetometer. The overall results from the low field measurements are similar to those from the high field measurements. The results from both sets of measurements indicate the existence of a NE-SW lineation at Hole 380A and a NW-SE lineation at Hole 524. For Hole 380A some of the individual parameters show slight differences in values for the low field and high field torque measurements while for Hole 524 these individual parameters compare favourably and indicate an approximately one-to-one correspondence. In general the fabric is better defined at Hole 524 than at Hole 380A. Anisotropy measurements sometimes were found to be greatly affected by the shape of the sample. This apparent ‘shape-effect’ appears to be more prevalent in the high field than in the low field measurements. In addition, for Holes 380A and 524 some samples show deformational-style fabric characteristics on one instrument and depositional-style characteristics on the other. The reasons for these differences and how the effects on the anisotropy data can be removed or minimised are described in this paper.

  20. Application of Metabolic 13C Labeling in Conjunction with High-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Comparative Conformational Analysis of High Mannose-Type Oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Yukiko; Yanagi, Kotaro; Kitajima, Toshihiko; Yamaguchi, Takumi; Chiba, Yasunori; Kato, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    High mannose-type oligosaccharides are enzymatically trimmed in the endoplasmic reticulum, resulting in various processing intermediates with exposed glycotopes that are recognized by a series of lectins involved in glycoprotein fate determination in cells. Although recent crystallographic data have provided the structural basis for the carbohydrate recognition of intracellular lectins, atomic information of dynamic oligosaccharide conformations is essential for a quantitative understanding of the energetics of carbohydrate–lectin interactions. Carbohydrate NMR spectroscopy is useful for characterizing such conformational dynamics, but often hampered by poor spectral resolution and lack of recombinant techniques required to produce homogeneous glycoforms. To overcome these difficulties, we have recently developed a methodology for the preparation of a homogeneous high mannose-type oligosaccharide with 13C labeling using a genetically engineered yeast strain. We herein successfully extended this method to result in the overexpression of 13C-labeled Man9GlcNAc2 (M9) with a newly engineered yeast strain with the deletion of four genes involved in N-glycan processing. This enabled high-field NMR analyses of 13C-labeled M9 in comparison with its processing product lacking the terminal mannose residue ManD2. Long-range NOE data indicated that the outer branches interact with the core in both glycoforms, and such foldback conformations are enhanced upon the removal of ManD2. The observed conformational variabilities might be significantly associated with lectins and glycan-trimming enzymes. PMID:24970159

  1. [Quantitative determination of bosentan by proton nuclear magnetic resonance with internal standard method].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cai-Yu; Zhang, Na; He, Lan

    2014-02-01

    The study aims to establish a quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (QNMR) method for the determination of the absolute content of bosentan. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy [1H NMR] spectra were obtained in CDCl3 with the internal standard dimethyl terephthalate and zg30 pulse sequence by using a Bruker AVANCE II 400 spectrometer. The content of bosentan is determined with QNMR in comparison with the result obtained by mass balance method. The result is 96.25% by QNMR and 96.54% by mass balance method. A rapid and accurate QNMR method has been established for the quantitative determination of the absolute content of bosentan. The study provides a new way for the quality control and calibration of a new reference standard material, it could be the complementary with the mass balance method for the assay of standard reference.

  2. Quantified T1 as an adjunct to apparent diffusion coefficient for early infarct detection: a high-field magnetic resonance study in a rat stroke model.

    PubMed

    Kaur, J; Tuor, U I; Zhao, Z; Petersen, J; Jin, A Y; Barber, P A

    2009-06-01

    Thrombolytic treatment for acute stroke has focused attention on accurate identification of injured vs. salvageable brain tissue, particularly if reperfusion occurs. However, our knowledge of differences in acute magnetic resonance imaging changes between transient and permanent ischemia and how they reflect permanently damaged tissue remain incomplete. Magnetic resonance imaging characteristics vary widely following ischemia and, at acute times, T1, T2 or apparent diffusion coefficient quantification may differentiate viable tissue from that destined to infarct. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 9.4 T following permanent or transient (90 min) middle cerebral artery occlusion in spontaneously hypertensive male rats or Wistar rats. Within 30 min, quantified maps of the apparent diffusion coefficient, T1, and T2 were performed and measures determined for sequences in the infarct and compared with that in the contralateral region. Lesion area for each magnetic resonance imaging sequence (T1, T2, apparent diffusion coefficient, and perfusion maps) was delineated for different time points using quantitative threshold measures and compared with final histological damage. Early extensive changes in T1 following both transient and permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion provided a sensitive early indicator of the final infarct area. Following reperfusion, small but measurable early T2 changes indicative of early development of vasogenic edema occurred in the transient but not permanent groups. In transient middle cerebral artery occlusion, at 70 min apparent diffusion coefficient decreased (P<0.001) and then pseudonormalized at 150 min. In permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion, apparent diffusion coefficient declined over time. Lesion area detected using T1 maps exceeded that with T2 and apparent diffusion coefficient at 70 and 150 min in both groups (P<0.001). The results indicate that, independent of reperfusion, quantified T1 is

  3. Non-destructive ripeness sensing by using proton NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance)

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Seong In; Krutz, G.W.; Stroshine, R.L. . Dept. of Agricultural Engineering); Bellon, V. , 34 - Montpellier )

    1990-01-01

    More than 80 kinds of fruits and vegetables are available in the United States. But only about 6 of them have their quality standards (Dull, 1986). In the 1990 Fresh Trends survey (Zind, 1990), consumers were asked to rate 16 characteristics important to their decision to purchase fresh produce. The four top ranking factors were ripeness/freshness, taste/flavor, appearance/condition and nutritional value. Of these surveyed, 96% rated ripeness/freshness as extremely important or very important. Therefore, the development of reliable grading or sorting techniques for fresh commodities is essential. Determination of fruit quality often involves cutting and tasting. Non-destructive quality control in fruit and vegetables is a goal of growers and distributors, as well as the food processing industry. Many nondestructive techniques have been evaluated including soft x-ray, optical transmission, near infrared radiation, and machine vision. However, there are few reports of successful non-destructive measurement of sugar content directly in fruit. Higher quality fruit could be harvested and available to consumers if a nondestructive sensor that detects ripeness level directly by measuring sugar content were available. Using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) principle is the possibility. A nondestructive ripeness (or sweetness) sensor for fruit quality control can be developed with the proton NMR principle (Cho, 1989). Several feasibility studies were necessary for the ripeness sensor development. Main objectives in this paper was to investigate the feasibilities (1) to detect ripeness (or sweetness level) of raw fruit tissue with an high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (200 MHz) and (2) to measure sugar content of intact fruit with a low resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (10 MHz). 7 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Non-destructive Ripeness Sensing by Using Proton NMR [Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cho, Seong In; Krutz, G. W.; Stroshine, R. L.; Bellon, V.

    1990-01-01

    More than 80 kinds of fruits and vegetables are available in the United States. But only about 6 of them have their quality standards (Dull, 1986). In the 1990 Fresh Trends survey (Zind, 1990), consumers were asked to rate 16 characteristics important to their decision to purchase fresh produce. The four top ranking factors were ripeness/freshness, taste/flavor, appearance/condition and nutritional value. Of these surveyed, 96% rated ripeness/freshness as extremely important or very important. Therefore, the development of reliable grading or sorting techniques for fresh commodities is essential. Determination of fruit quality often involves cutting and tasting. Non-destructive quality control in fruit and vegetables is a goal of growers and distributors, as well as the food processing industry. Many nondestructive techniques have been evaluated including soft x-ray, optical transmission, near infrared radiation, and machine vision. However, there are few reports of successful non-destructive measurement of sugar content directly in fruit. Higher quality fruit could be harvested and available to consumers if a nondestructive sensor that detects ripeness level directly by measuring sugar content were available. Using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) principle is the possibility. A nondestructive ripeness (or sweetness) sensor for fruit quality control can be developed with the proton NMR principle (Cho, 1989). Several feasibility studies were necessary for the ripeness sensor development. Main objectives in this paper was to investigate the feasibilities (1) to detect ripeness (or sweetness level) of raw fruit tissue with an high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (200 MHz) and (2) to measure sugar content of intact fruit with a low resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (10 MHz).

  5. Quantifying solid-fluid interfacial phenomena in porous rocks with proton nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Ehud J.; Velasco, Katherine K.; Nur, Amos M.

    1986-04-01

    The three order-of-magnitude variation in the proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) longitudinal relaxation time T1 of water adsorbed on silica surfaces versus that of bulk water makes proton NMR studies of porous materials powerful tools to study the effects of adsorption. Recent theory permits the utilization of this different response to obtain pore space surface-to-volume (S/V) distribution functions by inverting the decay of the z component of magnetization of fully saturated porous rocks; information can likewise be obtained on the fluid distribution at partially saturated conditions. A computer program has been developed to invert the NMR relaxation curves for the S/V distribution function, assuming an isolated pore regime, the ramifications of which are examined. The program has been applied to experimental results from water, porous sandstones, and tight gas sands at various pore fluid saturations and varying electrolyte content. For the fully saturated case, the results show promise in the application of NMR to describing pore space geometries in rock samples with widely varying surface-to-volume ratios. For partially saturated rocks, the results reflect the preferential early draining of the large pores at high water saturations, connectivity percolation phenomena at intermediate saturations, and the dominating role of adsorbed water films at low water saturations. Experiments on rocks saturated with saline solutions disclose the importance of the effects of alteration of the active sites on the rock surfaces as well as the role of electrolytes in modifying the structural properties of bulk solution.

  6. Proton and deuteron nuclear magnetic resonance studies of amorphous hydrogenated silicon, carbon, and carbon alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kernan, Mary Jane Wurth

    Despite the profound influence of semiconductors and the changes they have produced, many fundamental questions remain unanswered. We have used proton and deuteron nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to explore the role of hydrogens in amorphous silicon and amorphous carbon and carbon alloy films. In the carbon films, dipolar filtering techniques reveal a two-component shifted lineshape in the proton NMR spectra and deuteron magnetic resonance (DMR) data demonstrate a feedstock gas dependence in the film deposition process. In these measurements, DMR is used to examine the effect of hydrogen on the photovoltaic properties of amorphous silicon thin films. We have measured the effects of photoillumination on amorphous silicon, particularly with respect to the process of metastable defect formation (the Staebler-Wronski effect). The creation and passivation of dangling silicon bonds is observed and quantified. We report large-scale light-induced atomic rearrangements which produce shifts and broadenings of the DMR lineshapes. The deuterium NMR lineshape component most affected by atomic rearrangements is a broad central feature which is shown to be molecular in origin. This spectral feature includes hydrogens trapped and immobile on surfaces created by strains and dislocations in the material. Narrowing of the lineshape at elevated temperatures indicates motion with a small activation energy. The substantial population represented by this feature is shown to account for at least 15% of the total hydrogens in high-quality amorphous silicon samples.

  7. Proton Magnetic Form Factor from Existing Elastic e-p Cross Section Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Longwu; Christy, Eric; Gilad, Shalev; Keppel, Cynthia; Schmookler, Barak; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2015-04-01

    The proton magnetic form factor GMp, in addition to being an important benchmark for all cross section measurements in hadron physics, provides critical information on proton structure. Extraction of GMp from e-p cross section data is complicated by two-photon exchange (TPE) effects, where available calculations still have large theoretical uncertainties. Studies of TPE contributions to e-p scattering have observed no nonlinear effects in Rosenbluth separations. Recent theoretical investigations show that the TPE correction goes to 0 when ɛ approaches 1, where ɛ is the virtual photon polarization parameter. In this talk, existing e-p elastic cross section data are reanalyzed by extrapolating the reduced cross section for ɛ approaching 1. Existing polarization transfer data, which is supposed to be relatively immune to TPE effects, are used to produce a ratio of electric and magnetic form factors. The extrapolated reduced cross section and polarization transfer ratio are then used to calculate GEp and GMp at different Q2 values.

  8. Double-proton beams and magnetic switchbacks in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, Marcia; Goldstein, Bruce E.

    2013-06-01

    Previous work has led to suggestions that core-beam distributions of ions in the fast polar solar wind could be caused either by wave-particle interactions in interplanetary space or by ejections of faster material into pre-existing flows. It has also been suggested that the many-hour-long high-speed structures, or microstreams, in the polar wind could be the interplanetary manifestation of solar X-ray jets observed in supergranule boundaries. Proton distribution functions both in the microstreams and in the ambient fast polar wind are examined to test the conjecture that solar ejections may play an important role in creating double proton beams. Double-peaked distributions in the microstreams that have the peak containing most of the particles (the core) being faster than the less-dense beam are suggestive of ejection of material that may have come from a jet. It is concluded, however, that those "backwards" distributions were caused by magnetic reversals, or switchbacks, rather than by the inclusion of faster material. Other than in the switchbacks, there is no qualitative difference between the double-proton streaming in the microstreams peaks and in the ambient wind. Evidence is provided that essentially all departures of the magnetic field from the dominant polarity of the polar wind are due to such switchbacks rather than to solar fields with non-dominant polarities. It is also shown that, in the fast polar solar wind, there are more short-duration switchbacks than longer ones and that the incidence of reversed fields increases with solar distance.

  9. Medical treatment of horses with deep digital flexor tendon injuries diagnosed with high-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging: 118 cases (2000-2010).

    PubMed

    Lutter, John D; Schneider, Robert K; Sampson, Sarah N; Cary, Julie A; Roberts, Greg D; Vahl, Christopher I

    2015-12-01

    To describe the location and severity of deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) lesions diagnosed by means of high-field-strength MRI in horses and to identify variables associated with return to activity following medical treatment. Retrospective case series. 118 horses. Medical records of horses with DDFT injury diagnosed with MRI over a 10-year period (2000-2010) and treated medically (intrasynovial administration of corticosteroids and sodium hyaluronan, rest and rehabilitation, or both) were reviewed. History, signalment, use, results of lameness examination and diagnostic local anesthesia, MRI findings, and treatment details were recorded. Outcome was obtained by telephone interview or follow-up examination. Horses were grouped by predictor variables and analyzed with logistic regression to identify significant effects. Overall, of 97 horses available for follow-up (median time to follow-up, 5 years; range, 1 to 12 years), 59 (61%) returned to activity for a mean duration of 22.6 months (median, 18 months; range, 3 to 72 months), with 25 (26%) still sound at follow-up. Of horses with mild, moderate, and severe injury, 21 of 29 (72%), 20 of 36 (56%), and 18 of 32 (56%), respectively, returned to use. Horses treated with intrasynovial corticosteroid injection and 6 months of rest and rehabilitation returned to use for a significantly longer duration than did horses treated without rest. Western performance horses returned to use for a significantly longer duration than did English performance horses. Results of the present study suggested that outcome for horses with DDFT injuries treated medically depended on injury severity, presence of concurrent injury to other structures in the foot, type of activity, and owner compliance with specific treatment recommendations. Although some horses successfully returned to prior activity, additional treatment options are needed to improve outcome in horses with severe injuries and to improve long-term prognosis.

  10. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNET SYSTEM AT THE 50 GEV PROTON BEAM LINE FOR THE J-PARC NEUTRINO EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    WANDERER,P.; ET AL.

    2003-06-15

    A neutrino oscillation experiment using the J-PARC SO GeV 0.75 MW proton beam is planned as a successor to the K2K project currently being operated at KEK. A superconducting magnet system is required for the arc section of the primary proton beam line to be within the space available at the site. A system with 28 combined function magnets is proposed to simplify the system and optimize the cost. The required fields for the magnets are 2.6 T dipole and 19 T/m quadrupole. The magnets are also required to have a large aperture, 173.4 mm diameter, to accommodate the large beam emittance. The magnets will be protected by cold diodes and cooled by forced flow supercritical helium produced by a 4.5 K, 2 {approx} 2.5 kW refrigerator. This paper reports the system overview and the design status.

  11. Magnetic interactions between a [4Fe-4S]1+ cluster and a flavin mononucleotide radical in the enzyme trimethylamine dehydrogenase: A high-field electron paramagnetic resonance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournel, Andre; Gambarelli, Serge; Guigliarelli, Bruno; More, Claude; Asso, Marcel; Chouteau, Gerard; Hille, Russ; Bertrand, Patrick

    1998-12-01

    Trimethylamine dehydrogenase is a bacterial enzyme which contains two redox centers: a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) group which constitutes the active site and a [4Fe-4S]1+,2+ cluster which transfers the electrons provided by the FMN to an electron-transferring flavoprotein. According to the x-ray crystal structure, the center-to-center distance is equal to 12 Å and the nearest atoms of the two centers are separated by a 4 Å gap. Although this arrangement does not appear especially favorable for mediating strong magnetic interactions, a triplet state electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum arising from the intercenter magnetic coupling is observed at X band (9 GHz) when the enzyme is reduced by its substrate. In earlier work, the temperature dependence of this spectrum and its analysis based on a triplet state spin Hamiltonian were used to propose the range (0.8-100 cm-1) for the parameter J0 of the isotropic interaction J0SA.SB, but neither the magnitude of J0 nor its sign could be further specified [R. C. Stevenson, W. R. Dunham, R. H. Sands, T. P. Singer, and H. Beinert, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 869, 81 (1986)]. In the present work, we have studied the interaction EPR spectrum in the range 9-340 GHz. Numerical simulations based on a spin Hamiltonian describing a system of two S=1/2 interacting spins allowed us to determine the full set of parameters describing the magnetic interactions between the FMN radical and the [4Fe-4S]1+ cluster. In particular, our study demonstrates that the coupling is antiferromagnetic with J0=+0.72 cm-1. Although this value corresponds to the lower limit of the range proposed previously, it still appears markedly larger than those measured in biological systems in which a similar arrangement of two paramagnetic centers is found.

  12. Multifilamentary Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductors on the base of high-tin alloyed bronzes for high-field magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Sverdlov, V.Y.; Tikhonovsky, M.A.; Tikhinsky, G.F.; Kondratov, A.A.; Rudycheva, T.Y.; Klimenko, E.Y.; Novikov, S.I.

    1996-07-01

    Multifilamentary Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductors have been fabricated due to the worked out technology of deformed bronze with increased content of tin (16...18wt%) production. Studies have been made of the effects of bronze composition and thermal treatment conditions on the overall critical current density of multifilamentary Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductors. It is shown, that the use of the bronze with increased content of tin as well as bronze alloying with titanium improves the superconducting properties of composites, especially in high magnetic fields.

  13. Magnetic Field Distribution and Signal Decay in Functional MRI in Very High Fields (up to 9.4 T) Using Monte Carlo Diffusion Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Mueller-Bierl, Bernd Michael; Uludag, Kamil; Pereira, Philippe L.; Schick, Fritz

    2007-01-01

    Extravascular signal decay rate R2 or R2∗ as a function of blood oxygenation, geometry, and field strength was calculated using a Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm for a wider parameter range than hitherto by others. The relaxation rates of gradient-recalled-echo (GRE) and Hahn-spin-echo (HSE) imaging in the presence of blood vessels (ranging from capillaries to veins) have been computed for a wide range of field strengths up to 9.4T and 50% blood deoxygenation. The maximum HSE decay was found to be shifted to lower radii in higher compared to lower field strengths. For GRE, however, the relaxation rate was greatest for large vessels at any field strength. In addition, assessments of computational reliability have been carried out by investigating the influence of the time step, the Monte Carlo step procedure, boundary conditions, the number of angles between the vessel and the exterior field B0, the influence of neighboring vessels having the same orientation as the central vessel, and the number of proton spins. The results were compared with those obtained from a field distribution of the vessel computed by an analytic formula describing the field distribution of an ideal object (an infinitely long cylinder). It was found that the time step is not critical for values equal to or lower than 200 microseconds. The choice of the MC step procedure (three-dimensional Gaussian diffusion, constant one- or three-dimensional diffusion step) also failed to influence the results significantly; in contrast, the free boundary conditions, as well as taking too few angles into account, did introduce errors. Next neighbor vessels with the same orientation as the main vessel did not contribute significantly to signal decay. The total number of particles simulated was also found to play a minor role in computing R2/ R2∗. PMID:18273394

  14. High-field magnetic resonance imaging of structural alterations in first-episode, drug-naive patients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z; Peng, W; Sun, H; Kuang, W; Li, W; Jia, Z; Gong, Q

    2016-01-01

    Previous structural imaging studies have found evidence of brain morphometric changes in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), but these studies rarely excluded compounding effects of certain important factors, such as medications and long duration of illnesses. Furthermore, the neurobiological mechanism of the macroscopic findings of structural alterations in MDD patients remains unclear. In this study, we utilized magnetization transfer imaging, a quantitative measure of the macromolecular structural integrity of brain tissue, to identify biophysical alterations, which are represented by a magnetization transfer ratio (MTR), in MDD patients. To ascertain whether MTR changes occur independent of volume loss, we also conduct voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis. The participants included 27 first-episode, drug-naive MDD patients and 28 healthy controls matched for age and gender. Whole-brain voxel-based analysis was used to compare MTR and gray matter volume across groups and to analyse correlations between MTR and age, symptom severity, and illness duration. The patients exhibited significantly lower MTR in the left superior parietal lobule and left middle occipital gyrus compared with healthy controls, which may be related to the attentional and cognitive dysfunction in MDD patients. The VBM analysis revealed significantly increased gray matter volume in right postcentral gyrus in MDD patients. These findings in first-episode, drug-naive MDD patients may reflect microstructural gray matter changes in the parietal and occipital cortices close to illness onset that existed before volume loss, and thus potentially provide important new insight into the early neurobiology of depression. PMID:27824357

  15. High-field magnetic resonance imaging of structural alterations in first-episode, drug-naive patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Peng, W; Sun, H; Kuang, W; Li, W; Jia, Z; Gong, Q

    2016-11-08

    Previous structural imaging studies have found evidence of brain morphometric changes in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), but these studies rarely excluded compounding effects of certain important factors, such as medications and long duration of illnesses. Furthermore, the neurobiological mechanism of the macroscopic findings of structural alterations in MDD patients remains unclear. In this study, we utilized magnetization transfer imaging, a quantitative measure of the macromolecular structural integrity of brain tissue, to identify biophysical alterations, which are represented by a magnetization transfer ratio (MTR), in MDD patients. To ascertain whether MTR changes occur independent of volume loss, we also conduct voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis. The participants included 27 first-episode, drug-naive MDD patients and 28 healthy controls matched for age and gender. Whole-brain voxel-based analysis was used to compare MTR and gray matter volume across groups and to analyse correlations between MTR and age, symptom severity, and illness duration. The patients exhibited significantly lower MTR in the left superior parietal lobule and left middle occipital gyrus compared with healthy controls, which may be related to the attentional and cognitive dysfunction in MDD patients. The VBM analysis revealed significantly increased gray matter volume in right postcentral gyrus in MDD patients. These findings in first-episode, drug-naive MDD patients may reflect microstructural gray matter changes in the parietal and occipital cortices close to illness onset that existed before volume loss, and thus potentially provide important new insight into the early neurobiology of depression.

  16. Dosimetric Impact of Using a Virtual Couch Shift for Online Correction of Setup Errors for Brain Patients on an Integrated High-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging Linear Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Ruschin, Mark; Sahgal, Arjun; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Sonier, Marcus; Keller, Brian; Lee, Young

    2017-07-01

    To quantify the dosimetric impact of using virtual couch shift (VCS) for correcting setup errors in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated on a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-linac. Six GBM patients treated with 60 Gy (30 fractions) were selected for this simulation study. For each case, 2 reference plans were generated in the MRL treatment planning system: With (WIB) and with no (NOB) MRI B field present. Subsequently, 2-mm, 4-mm, and 6-mm translational errors were simulated and corrected for using a VCS method based on shift-only, warm start segment weight (SWO), and segment weight and shape (SSO) optimization. The resulting distributions were compared with the reference plan using planning target volume (PTV) homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), organs at risk (OAR) maximum dose (D0.01cc), and OAR median dose (D50). A simulated 30-fraction treatment was constructed to evaluate the cumulative effect of daily corrections. Feasibility and workflow for correcting rotations were also assessed. All reference plans were deemed clinically acceptable with respect to PTV and OAR objectives. The difference in HI (ΔHI) between corrected and reference was not statistically significant between WIB and NOB (P=.89). The average ΔHI was +0.8%, -0.1%, and -1.0% for shift-only, SWO, and SSO, respectively, with a statistically significant difference (P<.001) for shift-only versus SWO and SSO. The CI remained unchanged (mean ΔCI = -0.01) between the corrected and reference plans, with no statistically significant dependence on magnetic field presence, correction method, or shift magnitude or orientation. The brainstem D50 on average decreased with SWO and SSO; however, D0.01cc increased by a median value of 1.2%, 1.9%, and 2.0% for shift-only, SWO, and SSO, respectively. For other OARs, D0.01cc decreased using SWO or SSO. For the simulated treatment and rotational corrections, similar trends were measured. For translational errors in brain MRI

  17. Motor and premotor cortices in subcortical stroke: proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy measures and arm motor impairment.

    PubMed

    Craciunas, Sorin C; Brooks, William M; Nudo, Randolph J; Popescu, Elena A; Choi, In-Young; Lee, Phil; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Savage, Cary R; Cirstea, Carmen M

    2013-06-01

    Although functional imaging and neurophysiological approaches reveal alterations in motor and premotor areas after stroke, insights into neurobiological events underlying these alterations are limited in human studies. We tested whether cerebral metabolites related to neuronal and glial compartments are altered in the hand representation in bilateral motor and premotor areas and correlated with distal and proximal arm motor impairment in hemiparetic persons. In 20 participants at >6 months postonset of a subcortical ischemic stroke and 16 age- and sex-matched healthy controls, the concentrations of N-acetylaspartate and myo-inositol were quantified by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Regions of interest identified by functional magnetic resonance imaging included primary (M1), dorsal premotor (PMd), and supplementary (SMA) motor areas. Relationships between metabolite concentrations and distal (hand) and proximal (shoulder/elbow) motor impairment using Fugl-Meyer Upper Extremity (FMUE) subscores were explored. N-Acetylaspartate was lower in M1 (P = .04) and SMA (P = .004) and myo-inositol was higher in M1 (P = .003) and PMd (P = .03) in the injured (ipsilesional) hemisphere after stroke compared with the left hemisphere in controls. N-Acetylaspartate in ipsilesional M1 was positively correlated with hand FMUE subscores (P = .04). Significant positive correlations were also found between N-acetylaspartate in ipsilesional M1, PMd, and SMA and in contralesional M1 and shoulder/elbow FMUE subscores (P = .02, .01, .02, and .02, respectively). Our preliminary results demonstrated that proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a sensitive method to quantify relevant neuronal changes in spared motor cortex after stroke and consequently increase our knowledge of the factors leading from these changes to arm motor impairment.

  18. A volume birdcage coil with an adjustable sliding tuner ring for neuroimaging in high field vertical magnets: ex and in vivo applications at 21.1 T

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Chunqi; Masad, Ihssan S.; Rosenberg, Jens T.; Elumalai, Malathy; Brey, William W.; Grant, Samuel C.; Gor’kov, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    A tunable 900 MHz transmit/receive volume coil was constructed for 1H MR imaging of biological samples in a 21.1 T vertical bore magnet. To accommodate a diverse range of specimen and RF loads at such a high frequency, a sliding-ring adaptation of a low-pass birdcage was implemented through simultaneous alteration of distributed capacitance. To make efficient use of the constrained space inside the vertical bore, a modular probe design was implemented with a bottom-adjustable tuning and matching apparatus. The sliding ring coil displays good homogeneity and sufficient tuning range for different samples of various dimensions representing large span of RF loads. High resolution in vivo and ex vivo images of large rats (up to 350 g), mice and human postmortem tissues were obtained to demonstrate coil functionality and to provide examples of potential applications at 21.1 T. PMID:22750638

  19. {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance study of proton-irradiated KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Se-Hun; Lee, Kyu Won; Oh, B. H.; Lee, Cheol Eui; Hong, K. S.

    2007-11-01

    We have studied the microscopic structure and dynamics in a proton-irradiated KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} single crystal. Our {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance measurements indicate that proton irradiation gives rise to a decrease in the local dipolar order of the rigid lattice protons and an increase in interstitial protons as well as structural distortion of the PO{sub 4} tetrahedra.

  20. Atomic scale structure of amorphous aluminum oxyhydroxide, oxide and oxycarbide films probed by very high field (27)Al nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Baggetto, L; Sarou-Kanian, V; Florian, P; Gleizes, A N; Massiot, D; Vahlas, C

    2017-03-15

    The atomic scale structure of aluminum in amorphous alumina films processed by direct liquid injection chemical vapor deposition from aluminum tri-isopropoxide (ATI) and dimethyl isopropoxide (DMAI) is investigated by solid-state (27)Al nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) using a very high magnetic field of 20.0 T. This study is performed as a function of the deposition temperature in the range 300-560 °C, 150-450 °C, and 500-700 °C, for the films processed from ATI, DMAI (+H2O), and DMAI (+O2), respectively. While the majority of the films are composed of stoichiometric aluminum oxide, other samples are partially or fully hydroxylated at low temperature, or contain carbidic carbon when processed from DMAI above 500 °C. The quantitative analysis of the SSNMR experiments reveals that the local structure of these films is built from AlO4, AlO5, AlO6 and Al(O,C)4 units with minor proportions of the 6-fold aluminum coordination and significant amounts of oxycarbides in the films processed from DMAI (+O2). The aluminum coordination distribution as well as the chemical shift distribution indicate that the films processed from DMAI present a higher degree of structural disorder compared to the films processed from ATI. Hydroxylation leads to an increase of the 6-fold coordination resulting from the trend of OH groups to integrate into AlO6 units. The evidence of an additional environment in films processed from DMAI (+O2) by (27)Al SSNMR and first-principle NMR calculations on Al4C3 and Al4O4C crystal structures supports that carbon is located in Al(O,C)4 units. The concentration of this coordination environment strongly increases with increasing process temperature from 600 to 700 °C favoring a highly disordered structure and preventing from crystallizing into γ-alumina. The obtained results are a valuable guide to the selection of process conditions for the CVD of amorphous alumina films with regard to targeted applications.

  1. High field solenoids for muon cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Eyssa, Y.; Kenny, S.; Miller, J.R.; Prestemon, S.

    1999-09-08

    The proposed cooling system for the muon collider will consist of a 200 meter long line of alternating field straight solenoids interspersed with bent solenoids. The muons are cooled in all directions using a 400 mm long section liquid hydrogen at high field. The muons are accelerated in the forward direction by about 900 mm long, 805 MHz RF cavities in a gradient field that goes from 6 T to -6 T in about 300 mm. The high field section in the channel starts out at an induction of about 2 T in the hydrogen. As the muons proceed down the cooling channel, the induction in the liquid hydrogen section increases to inductions as high as 30 T. The diameter of the liquid hydrogen section starts at 750 mm when the induction is 2 T. As the induction in the cooling section goes up, the diameter of the liquid hydrogen section decreases. When the high field induction is 30 T, the diameter of the liquid hydrogen section is about 80 mm. When the high field solenoid induction is below 8.5 T or 9T, niobium titanium coils are proposed for generating .the magnetic field. Above 8.5 T or 9 T to about 20 T, graded niobium tin and niobium titanium coils would be used at temperatures down to 1.8 K. Above 20 T, a graded bybrid magnet system is proposed, where the high field magnet section (above 20 T) is either a conventional water cooled coil section or a water cooled Bitter type coil. Two types of superconducting coils have been studied. They include; epoxy impregnated intrinsically stable coils, and cable in conduit conductor (CICC) coils with helium in the conduit.

  2. Utility of cerebral proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in differential diagnosis of HIV-related dementia.

    PubMed

    Swindells, S; McConnell, J R; McComb, R D; Gendelman, H E

    1995-09-01

    Opportunistic infections often coexist with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in brain. Making the correct diagnosis is often difficult despite recent advances in neuroimaging techniques. 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) is an emerging non-invasive examination for diagnosis and monitoring of brain disorders. 1H MRS measures a variety of organic compounds using magnetism and radio waves. Biochemical aberrations in brain, not shown by conventional tests, may be demonstrated by 1H MRS testing. A patient coinfected with HIV and hepatitis B (HBV) presented with progressive dementia. Clinical, neuroradiological and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examinations failed to provide a diagnosis in support of either HIV-1-associated cognitive/motor complex or HBV-induced hepatic encephalopathy (HE), 1H MRS was used in an attempt to discriminate between these diagnoses. Spectroscopy demonstrated increased glutamine and normal N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) levels, metabolic changes consistent with HE. These findings were later confirmed pathologically. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a non-invasive test with utility for the differential diagnosis of HIV-associated dementia.

  3. Localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the cerebellum in detoxifying alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Seitz, D; Widmann, U; Seeger, U; Nägele, T; Klose, U; Mann, K; Grodd, W

    1999-01-01

    An increased daily alcohol consumption results in neurological symptoms and morphological central nervous system changes, e.g. shrinkage of the frontal lobes and the cerebellar vermis. Brain shrinkage can be due to neuronal loss, gliosis, or alterations of (cell) membrane constitutes/myelin. Neuronal, glial, and metabolic changes can be measured in vivo with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A total of 11 alcoholics and 10 age-matched volunteers were examined by magnetic resonance imaging and localized magnetic resonance spectroscopy at an echo time of 135 and 5 msec. Peak integral values were calculated for N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), myo-inositol (ml), glutamate/glutamine (Glx), and normalized to phosphocreatine/creatine (Cr). Patients had a significant shrinkage of the cerebellar vermis. NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr ratios were reduced in both sequences, but the NAA/Cr reduction was only significant in long echo time, although the Cho/Cr reduction was significant in short echo time. The ml/Cr and Glx/Cr ratios did not show any significant difference between volunteers and patients. The decrease of NAA/Cr in alcohol dependent patients is consistent with neuronal loss. The Cho/Cr decrease and an unchanged ml/Cr may reflect cell membrane modification or myelin alterations in alcohol-dependent patients. These changes lead to brain shrinkage, although hydration effects and gliosis are less likely.

  4. High order magnetic optics for high dynamic range proton radiography at a kinetic energy of 800 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sjue, S. K. L. Mariam, F. G.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Saunders, A.

    2016-01-15

    Flash radiography with 800 MeV kinetic energy protons at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an important experimental tool for investigations of dynamic material behavior driven by high explosives or pulsed power. The extraction of quantitative information about density fields in a dynamic experiment from proton generated images requires a high fidelity model of the proton imaging process. It is shown that accurate calculations of the transmission through the magnetic lens system require terms beyond second order for protons far from the tune energy. The approach used integrates the correlated multiple Coulomb scattering distribution simultaneously over the collimator and the image plane. Comparison with a series of static calibration images demonstrates the model’s accurate reproduction of both the transmission and blur over a wide range of tune energies in an inverse identity lens that consists of four quadrupole electromagnets.

  5. High order magnetic optics for high dynamic range proton radiography at a kinetic energy of 800 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjue, S. K. L.; Mariam, F. G.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Saunders, A.

    2016-01-01

    Flash radiography with 800 MeV kinetic energy protons at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an important experimental tool for investigations of dynamic material behavior driven by high explosives or pulsed power. The extraction of quantitative information about density fields in a dynamic experiment from proton generated images requires a high fidelity model of the proton imaging process. It is shown that accurate calculations of the transmission through the magnetic lens system require terms beyond second order for protons far from the tune energy. The approach used integrates the correlated multiple Coulomb scattering distribution simultaneously over the collimator and the image plane. Comparison with a series of static calibration images demonstrates the model's accurate reproduction of both the transmission and blur over a wide range of tune energies in an inverse identity lens that consists of four quadrupole electromagnets.

  6. High order magnetic optics for high dynamic range proton radiography at a kinetic energy of 800 MeV.

    PubMed

    Sjue, S K L; Mariam, F G; Merrill, F E; Morris, C L; Saunders, A

    2016-01-01

    Flash radiography with 800 MeV kinetic energy protons at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an important experimental tool for investigations of dynamic material behavior driven by high explosives or pulsed power. The extraction of quantitative information about density fields in a dynamic experiment from proton generated images requires a high fidelity model of the proton imaging process. It is shown that accurate calculations of the transmission through the magnetic lens system require terms beyond second order for protons far from the tune energy. The approach used integrates the correlated multiple Coulomb scattering distribution simultaneously over the collimator and the image plane. Comparison with a series of static calibration images demonstrates the model's accurate reproduction of both the transmission and blur over a wide range of tune energies in an inverse identity lens that consists of four quadrupole electromagnets.

  7. Combined high-field intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopy increase extent of resection and progression-free survival for pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Peter T; Evans, John A; Zipfel, Gregory J; Chole, Richard A; Uppaluri, Ravindra; Haughey, Bruce H; Getz, Anne E; Silverstein, Julie; Rich, Keith M; Kim, Albert H; Dacey, Ralph G; Chicoine, Michael R

    2015-02-01

    The clinical benefit of combined intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) and endoscopy for transsphenoidal pituitary adenoma resection has not been completely characterized. This study assessed the impact of microscopy, endoscopy, and/or iMRI on progression-free survival, extent of resection status (gross-, near-, and sub-total resection), and operative complications. Retrospective analyses were performed on 446 transsphenoidal pituitary adenoma surgeries at a single institution between 1998 and 2012. Multivariate analyses were used to control for baseline characteristics, differences during extent of resection status, and progression-free survival analysis. Additional surgery was performed after iMRI in 56/156 cases (35.9%), which led to increased extent of resection status in 15/156 cases (9.6%). Multivariate ordinal logistic regression revealed no increase in extent of resection status following iMRI or endoscopy alone; however, combining these modalities increased extent of resection status (odds ratio 2.05, 95% CI 1.21-3.46) compared to conventional transsphenoidal microsurgery. Multivariate Cox regression revealed that reduced extent of resection status shortened progression-free survival for near- versus gross-total resection [hazard ratio (HR) 2.87, 95% CI 1.24-6.65] and sub- versus near-total resection (HR 2.10; 95% CI 1.00-4.40). Complication comparisons between microscopy, endoscopy, and iMRI revealed increased perioperative deaths for endoscopy versus microscopy (4/209 and 0/237, respectively), but this difference was non-significant considering multiple post hoc comparisons (Fisher exact, p = 0.24). Combined use of endoscopy and iMRI increased pituitary adenoma extent of resection status compared to conventional transsphenoidal microsurgery, and increased extent of resection status was associated with longer progression-free survival. Treatment modality combination did not significantly impact complication rate.

  8. Combined high-field intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopy increase extent of resection and progression-free survival for pituitary adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Sylvester, Peter T.; Evans, John A.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Chole, Richard A.; Uppaluri, Ravindra; Haughey, Bruce H.; Getz, Anne E.; Silverstein, Julie; Rich, Keith M.; Kim, Albert H.; Dacey, Ralph G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The clinical benefit of combined intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) and endoscopy for transsphenoidal pituitary adenoma resection has not been completely characterized. This study assessed the impact of microscopy, endoscopy, and/or iMRI on progression-free survival, extent of resection status (gross-, near-, and subtotal resection), and operative complications. Methods Retrospective analyses were performed on 446 transsphenoidal pituitary adenoma surgeries at a single institution between 1998 and 2012. Multivariate analyses were used to control for baseline characteristics, differences during extent of resection status, and progression-free survival analysis. Results Additional surgery was performed after iMRI in 56/156 cases (35.9 %), which led to increased extent of resection status in 15/156 cases (9.6 %). Multivariate ordinal logistic regression revealed no increase in extent of resection status following iMRI or endoscopy alone; however, combining these modalities increased extent of resection status (odds ratio 2.05, 95 % CI 1.21–3.46) compared to conventional transsphenoidal microsurgery. Multivariate Cox regression revealed that reduced extent of resection status shortened progression-free survival for near- versus gross-total resection [hazard ratio (HR) 2.87, 95 % CI 1.24–6.65] and sub- versus near-total resection (HR 2.10; 95 % CI 1.00–4.40). Complication comparisons between microscopy, endoscopy, and iMRI revealed increased perioperative deaths for endoscopy versus microscopy (4/209 and 0/237, respectively), but this difference was non-significant considering multiple post hoc comparisons (Fisher exact, p = 0.24). Conclusions Combined use of endoscopy and iMRI increased pituitary adenoma extent of resection status compared to conventional transsphenoidal microsurgery, and increased extent of resection status was associated with longer progression-free survival. Treatment modality combination did not significantly impact

  9. Absolute quantification for benzoic acid in processed foods using quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Takashi; Sato, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Naoki; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko

    2012-09-15

    The absolute quantification method of benzoic acid (BA) in processed foods using solvent extraction and quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was developed and validated. BA levels were determined using proton signals (δ(H) 7.53 and 7.98) referenced to 2-dimethyl-2-silapentane-5-sulfonate-d(6) sodium salt (DSS-d(6)) after simple solvent extraction from processed foods. All recoveries from several kinds of processed foods, spiked at their specified maximum Japanese usage levels (0.6-2.5 g kg(-1)) and at 0.13 g kg(-1) and 0.063 g kg(-1), were greater than 80%. The limit of quantification was confirmed as 0.063 g kg(-1) in processed foods, which was sufficiently low for the purposes of monitoring BA. The accuracy of the proposed method is equivalent to the conventional method using steam-distillation extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography. The proposed method was both rapid and simple. Moreover, it provided International System of Units traceability without the need for authentic analyte standards. Therefore, the proposed method is a useful and practical tool for determining BA levels in processed foods.

  10. Metabolic assessment of the human pons by in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Guan, Ji-Tian; Xu, Xiao-Hu; Geng, Yi-Qun; Yu, Xiao-Jun; Wu, Ren-Hua

    2008-08-28

    To determine the normal mean reference normal value for metabolic ratios in the pons of healthy adult Chinese subjects by using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1HMRS). Eighty healthy Chinese subjects, ranging in age from 21 to 60 years, were divided into four groups, each containing 20 subjects per decade. The pons of every subject was scanned on single-voxel 1HMRS by using the point-resolved proton spectroscopy sequence (PRESS) with echo time (TE)=144 ms and repetition time (TR)=1500 ms. The total mean ratios of N-acetylasparate/creatine-phosphocreatine (NAA/Cr), NAA/choline-containing compounds (Cho) and Cho/Cr in subjects ranging from 21 to 60 years were 2.13+/-0.07, 1.22+/-0.11 and 1.81+/-0.09 respectively. The highest metabolite ratios were seen in the 41-50 year group. There was no significant difference with respect to age or gender. The ratios of NAA/Cr, NAA/Cho or Cho/Cr in the pons did not correlate with the age or gender of healthy subjects.

  11. A proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic study in autism spectrum disorders: amygdala and orbito-frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kenji; Toda, Yoshihiro; Ito, Hiromichi; Mori, Tatsuo; Goji, Aya; Fujii, Emiko; Miyazaki, Masahito; Harada, Masafumi; Kagami, Shoji

    2013-02-01

    We previously reported neural dysfunction in the anterior cingulate cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in autistic patients using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS). In this investigation, we measured chemical metabolites in the left amygdala and the bilateral orbito-frontal cortex (OFC), which are the main components of the social brain. We also examined the association between these metabolic findings and social abilities in subjects with autism. The study group included 77 autistic patients (3-6years old; mean age 4.1; 57 boys and 20 girls). The control subjects were 31 children (3-6years old; mean age 4.0; 23 boys and 8 girls). Conventional proton MR spectra were obtained using the STEAM sequence with parameters of TR=5 sec and TE=15 msec by a 1.5-tesla clinical MRI system. We analyzed the concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), creatine/phosphocreatine (Cr), and choline-containing compounds (Cho) using LCModel (Ver. 6.1). The concentrations of NAA in the left amygdala and the bilateral OFC in autistic patients were significantly decreased compared to those in the control group. In the autistic patients, the NAA concentrations in these regions correlated with their social quotient. These findings suggest the presence of neuronal dysfunction in the amygdala and OFC in autism. Dysfunction in the amygdala and OFC may contribute to the pathogenesis of autism.

  12. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Relevance of Glutamate and GABA to Neuropsychology.

    PubMed

    Ende, Gabriele

    2015-09-01

    Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) has been widely used to study the healthy and diseased brain in vivo. The availability of whole body MR scanners with a field strength of 3 Tesla and above permit the quantification of many metabolites including the neurotransmitters glutamate (Glu) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The potential link between neurometabolites identified by MRS and cognition and behavior has been explored in numerous studies both in healthy subjects and in patient populations. Preliminary findings suggest direct or opposite associations between GABA or Glu with impulsivity, anxiety, and dexterity. This chapter is intended to provide an overview of basic principles of MRS and the literature reporting correlations between GABA or Glu and results of neuropsychological assessments.

  13. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of resins from the family pinaceae.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Joseph B; Kozminski, Michael A; Fahlstrom, Carl A; Santiago-Blay, Jorge A

    2007-02-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectra were recorded for solutions of resinous materials harvested from 82 species in seven genera of the gymnospermous plant family Pinaceae. Data were recorded in both one and two (COSY) dimensions. Approximately 11 peaks in the 1D spectra and 10 cross-peaks in the 2D spectra were present in almost all pinacean spectra, providing a familial diagnostic. Some 40 1D peaks or peak clusters and 60 2D cross-peaks or clusters were considered significant and are reported, when present, for all species. Whereas previous solid-state 13C data were diagnostic primarily at the family level, the patterns of 1D and 2D peaks may provide diagnostic information at the genus and species levels. These spectra constitute the first broad use of 1H NMR to study plant exudates in general and to provide taxonomic characterization in particular.

  14. [A new method of distinguishing weak and overlapping signals of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Gang; Quan, Hong; Wang, Cheng; Gong, Qiyong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a new method of combining translation invariant (TI) and wavelet-threshold (WT) algorithm to distinguish weak and overlapping signals of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) is presented. First, the 1H-MRS spectrum signal is transformed into wavelet domain and then its wavelet coefficients are obtained. Then, the TI method and WT method are applied to detect the weak signals overlapped by the strong ones. Through the analysis of the simulation data, we can see that both frequency and amplitude information of small-signals can be obtained accurately by the algorithm, and through the combination with the method of signal fitting, quantitative calculation of the area under weak signals peaks can be realized.

  15. Correction of Proton Resonance Frequency Shift Temperature Maps for Magnetic Field Disturbances Caused by Breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmatukha, Andriy V.; Bakker, Chris J. G.

    2006-05-01

    Respiratory Induced Resonance Offset (RIRO) is a periodic disturbance of the magnetic field due to breathing. Such disturbances handicap the accuracy of the Proton Resonance Frequency Shift (PRFS) method of MRI temperature mapping in anatomies situated nearby the lungs and chest wall. In this work, we propose a method capable of minimizing errors caused by RIRO in PRFS temperature maps. In this method, a set of baseline images characterizing RIRO at a variety of respiratory cycle instants is acquired before the thermal treatment starts. During the treatment, the temperature evolution is found from two successive images. Then, the calculated temperature changes are corrected for the additional contribution caused by RIRO using the pre-treatment baseline images acquired at the identical instances of the respiratory cycle. Our method is shown to improve the accuracy and stability of PRFS temperature maps in the presence of RIRO and motion in phantom and volunteer experiments.

  16. Sickle cell disease painful crisis and steady state differentiation by proton magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Adolfo A; Cabal, Carlos A; Lores, Manuel A; Losada, Jorge; Pérez, Enrique R

    2009-01-01

    The delay time of the Hb S polymerization process was investigated in 63 patients with sickle cell disease during steady state and 10 during painful crisis starting from spin-spin proton magnetic resonance (PMR) time behavior measured at 36 degrees C and during spontaneous deoxygenation. We found a significant decrease of delay time as a result of the crisis (36 +/- 10%) and two well-differentiated ranges of values for each state: 273-354 min for steady state and 166-229 min for crisis with an uncertainty region of 15%. It is possible to use PMR as an objective and quantitative method in order to differentiate both clinical conditions of the sickle cell patient, but a more clear differentiation can be established comparing the delay time (td) value of one patient during crisis with his own td value during steady state.

  17. Use of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the treatment of psychiatric disorders: a critical update.

    PubMed

    Bustillo, Juan R

    2013-09-01

    Because of the wide availability of hardware as well as of standardized analytic quantification tools, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) has become widely used to study psychiatric disorders. (1)H-MRS allows measurement of brain concentrations of more traditional singlet neurometabolites like N-acetylaspartate, choline, and creatine. More recently, quantification of the more complex multiplet spectra for glutamate, glutamine, inositol, and γ-aminobutyric acid have also been implemented. Here we review applications of (1)H-MRS in terms of informing treatment options in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorders. We first discuss recent meta-analytic studies reporting the most reliable findings. Then we evaluate the more sparse literature focused on 1H-MRS-detected neurometabolic effects of various treatment approaches in psychiatric populations. Finally we speculate on future developments that may result in translation of these tools to improve the treatment of psychiatric disorders.

  18. High field magnetotransport and point contact Andreev reflection measurements on CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 4} and CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 3}Br—Degenerate magnetic semiconductor single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, K. Coey, J. M. D.; Stamenov, P.; Alaria, J.

    2014-05-07

    Single crystals of the metallically degenerate fully magnetic semiconductors CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 4} and CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 3}Br have been prepared by the Chemical Vapour Transport method, using either Se or Br as transport agents. The high-quality, millimetre-sized, octahedrally faceted, needle- and platelet-shaped crystals are characterised by means of high field magnetotransport (μ{sub 0}H≤ 14 T) and Point Contact Andreev Reflection. The relatively high spin polarisation observed |P|>0.56, together with the relatively low minority carrier effective mass of 0.25 m{sub e}, and long scattering time  10{sup −13} s, could poise these materials for integration in low- and close-to-room temperature minority injection bipolar heterojunction transistor demonstrations.

  19. Accurate classification of brain gliomas by discriminate dictionary learning based on projective dictionary pair learning of proton magnetic resonance spectra.

    PubMed

    Adebileje, Sikiru Afolabi; Ghasemi, Keyvan; Aiyelabegan, Hammed Tanimowo; Saligheh Rad, Hamidreza

    2017-04-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful noninvasive technique that complements the structural images of cMRI, which aids biomedical and clinical researches, by identifying and visualizing the compositions of various metabolites within the tissues of interest. However, accurate classification of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy is still a challenging issue in clinics due to low signal-to-noise ratio, overlapping peaks of metabolites, and the presence of background macromolecules. This paper evaluates the performance of a discriminate dictionary learning classifiers based on projective dictionary pair learning method for brain gliomas proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy spectra classification task, and the result were compared with the sub-dictionary learning methods. The proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy data contain a total of 150 spectra (74 healthy, 23 grade II, 23 grade III, and 30 grade IV) from two databases. The datasets from both databases were first coupled together, followed by column normalization. The Kennard-Stone algorithm was used to split the datasets into its training and test sets. Performance comparison based on the overall accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and precision was conducted. Based on the overall accuracy of our classification scheme, the dictionary pair learning method was found to outperform the sub-dictionary learning methods 97.78% compared with 68.89%, respectively. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and MRI Reveal No Evidence for Brain Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corrigan, Neva M.; Shaw, Dennis. W. W.; Richards, Todd L.; Estes, Annette M.; Friedman, Seth D.; Petropoulos, Helen; Artru, Alan A.; Dager, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Brain mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed as an etiologic factor in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ([superscript 1]HMRS) and MRI were used to assess for evidence of brain mitochondrial dysfunction in longitudinal samples of children with ASD or developmental delay (DD), and cross-sectionally…

  1. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and MRI Reveal No Evidence for Brain Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corrigan, Neva M.; Shaw, Dennis. W. W.; Richards, Todd L.; Estes, Annette M.; Friedman, Seth D.; Petropoulos, Helen; Artru, Alan A.; Dager, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Brain mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed as an etiologic factor in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ([superscript 1]HMRS) and MRI were used to assess for evidence of brain mitochondrial dysfunction in longitudinal samples of children with ASD or developmental delay (DD), and cross-sectionally…

  2. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance and spectrophotometric studies of nickel(II)-iron(II) hybrid hemoglobins

    SciTech Connect

    Shibayama, N.; Inubushi, T.; Morimoto, H.; Yonetani, T.

    1987-04-21

    Ni(II)-Fe(II) hybrid hemoglobins, ..cap alpha..(Fe)/sub 2/..beta..(Ni)/sub 2/ and ..cap alpha..(Ni)/sub 2/..beta..(Fe)/sub 2/, have been characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance with Ni(II) protoporphyrin IX (Ni-PP) incorporated in apoprotein, which serves as a permanent deoxyheme. ..cap alpha..(Fe)/sub 2/..beta..(Ni)/sub 2/, ..cap alpha..(Ni)/sub 2/..beta..(Fe)/sub 2/, and NiHb commonly show exchangeable proton resonances at 11 and 14 ppm, due to hydrogen-bonded protons in a deoxy-like structure. Upon binding of carbon monoxide (CO) to ..cap alpha..(Fe)/sub 2/..beta..(Ni)/sub 2/, these resonances disappear at pH 6.5 to pH 8.5. On the other hand, the complementary hybrid ..cap alpha..(Ni)/sub 2/..beta..(Fe-CO)/sub 2/ showed the 11 and 14 ppm resonances at low pH. Upon raising pH, the intensities of both resonances are reduced, although these changes are not synchronized. Electronic absorption spectra and hyperfine-shifted proton resonances indicate that the ligation of CO in the ..beta..(Fe) subunits induced changes in the coordination and spin states of Ni-PP in the ..cap alpha.. subunits. In a deoxy-like structure, the coordination of Ni-PP in the ..cap alpha.. subunits is predominantly in a low-spin (S = 0) four-coordination state, whereas in an oxy-like structure the contribution of a high-spin (S = 1) five-coordination state markedly increased. Ni-PP in the ..beta.. subunits always takes a high-spin five-coordination state regardless of solution conditions and the state of ligation in the partner ..cap alpha..(Fe) subunits. In the ..beta..(Ni) subunits, a significant downfield shift of the proximal histidyl N/sub delta/H resonance and a change in the absorption spectrum of Ni-PP were detected, upon changing the quaternary structure of the hybrid. The chemical shifts were analyzed in terms of the E11-Val methyls vs. the porphyrin rings in hybrid Hbs.

  3. Design of a compact, permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source for proton and H2(+) beam production.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xianlu; Zhang, Tianjue; Luo, Shan; Wang, Chuan; Zheng, Xia; Yin, Zhiguo; Zhong, Junqing; Wu, Longcheng; Qin, Jiuchang

    2010-02-01

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source was developed at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) for proton beam production of over 60 mA [B.-Q. Cui, Y.-W. Bao, L.-Q. Li, W.-S. Jiang, and R.-W. Wang, Proceedings of the High Current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) Ion Source for Proton Accelerator, APAC-2001, 2001 (unpublished)]. For various proton beam applications, another 2.45 GHz microwave ion source with a compact structure is designed and will be built at CIAE as well for high current proton beam production. It is also considered to be used for the test of H(2)(+) beam, which could be injected into the central region model cyclotron at CIAE, and accelerated to 5 MeV before extraction by stripping. The required ECR magnetic field is supplied by all the permanent magnets rather than electrical solenoids and six poles. The magnetic field distribution provided by this permanent magnets configuration is a large and uniformly volume of ECR zone, with central magnetic field of a magnitude of approximately 875 Gs [T. Taylor and J. S. C. Wills, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 309, 37 (1991)]. The field adjustment at the extraction end can be implemented by moving the position of the magnet blocks. The results of plasma, coupling with 2.45 GHz microwave in the ECR zone inside the ion source are simulated by particle-in-cell code to optimize the density by adjusting the magnetic field distribution. The design configuration of the ion source will be summarized in the paper.

  4. Search for Magnetic Monopoles with the MoEDAL Forward Trapping Detector in 13 TeV Proton-Proton Collisions at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Acharya, B; Alexandre, J; Baines, S; Benes, P; Bergmann, B; Bernabéu, J; Branzas, H; Campbell, M; Caramete, L; Cecchini, S; de Montigny, M; De Roeck, A; Ellis, J R; Fairbairn, M; Felea, D; Flores, J; Frank, M; Frekers, D; Garcia, C; Hirt, A M; Janecek, J; Kalliokoski, M; Katre, A; Kim, D-W; Kinoshita, K; Korzenev, A; Lacarrère, D H; Lee, S C; Leroy, C; Lionti, A; Mamuzic, J; Margiotta, A; Mauri, N; Mavromatos, N E; Mermod, P; Mitsou, V A; Orava, R; Parker, B; Pasqualini, L; Patrizii, L; Păvălaş, G E; Pinfold, J L; Popa, V; Pozzato, M; Pospisil, S; Rajantie, A; Ruiz de Austri, R; Sahnoun, Z; Sakellariadou, M; Sarkar, S; Semenoff, G; Shaa, A; Sirri, G; Sliwa, K; Soluk, R; Spurio, M; Srivastava, Y N; Suk, M; Swain, J; Tenti, M; Togo, V; Tuszyński, J A; Vento, V; Vives, O; Vykydal, Z; Whyntie, T; Widom, A; Willems, G; Yoon, J H; Zgura, I S

    2017-02-10

    MoEDAL is designed to identify new physics in the form of long-lived highly ionizing particles produced in high-energy LHC collisions. Its arrays of plastic nuclear-track detectors and aluminium trapping volumes provide two independent passive detection techniques. We present here the results of a first search for magnetic monopole production in 13 TeV proton-proton collisions using the trapping technique, extending a previous publication with 8 TeV data during LHC Run 1. A total of 222 kg of MoEDAL trapping detector samples was exposed in the forward region and analyzed by searching for induced persistent currents after passage through a superconducting magnetometer. Magnetic charges exceeding half the Dirac charge are excluded in all samples and limits are placed for the first time on the production of magnetic monopoles in 13 TeV pp collisions. The search probes mass ranges previously inaccessible to collider experiments for up to five times the Dirac charge.

  5. Search for Magnetic Monopoles with the MoEDAL Forward Trapping Detector in 13 TeV Proton-Proton Collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, B.; Alexandre, J.; Baines, S.; Benes, P.; Bergmann, B.; Bernabéu, J.; Branzas, H.; Campbell, M.; Caramete, L.; Cecchini, S.; de Montigny, M.; De Roeck, A.; Ellis, J. R.; Fairbairn, M.; Felea, D.; Flores, J.; Frank, M.; Frekers, D.; Garcia, C.; Hirt, A. M.; Janecek, J.; Kalliokoski, M.; Katre, A.; Kim, D.-W.; Kinoshita, K.; Korzenev, A.; Lacarrère, D. H.; Lee, S. C.; Leroy, C.; Lionti, A.; Mamuzic, J.; Margiotta, A.; Mauri, N.; Mavromatos, N. E.; Mermod, P.; Mitsou, V. A.; Orava, R.; Parker, B.; Pasqualini, L.; Patrizii, L.; Pǎvǎlaş, G. E.; Pinfold, J. L.; Popa, V.; Pozzato, M.; Pospisil, S.; Rajantie, A.; Ruiz de Austri, R.; Sahnoun, Z.; Sakellariadou, M.; Sarkar, S.; Semenoff, G.; Shaa, A.; Sirri, G.; Sliwa, K.; Soluk, R.; Spurio, M.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Suk, M.; Swain, J.; Tenti, M.; Togo, V.; Tuszyński, J. A.; Vento, V.; Vives, O.; Vykydal, Z.; Whyntie, T.; Widom, A.; Willems, G.; Yoon, J. H.; Zgura, I. S.; MoEDAL Collaboration

    2017-02-01

    MoEDAL is designed to identify new physics in the form of long-lived highly ionizing particles produced in high-energy LHC collisions. Its arrays of plastic nuclear-track detectors and aluminium trapping volumes provide two independent passive detection techniques. We present here the results of a first search for magnetic monopole production in 13 TeV proton-proton collisions using the trapping technique, extending a previous publication with 8 TeV data during LHC Run 1. A total of 222 kg of MoEDAL trapping detector samples was exposed in the forward region and analyzed by searching for induced persistent currents after passage through a superconducting magnetometer. Magnetic charges exceeding half the Dirac charge are excluded in all samples and limits are placed for the first time on the production of magnetic monopoles in 13 TeV p p collisions. The search probes mass ranges previously inaccessible to collider experiments for up to five times the Dirac charge.

  6. Molecular Dynamics of Hexamethylbenzene at Low Temperatures: Evidence of Unconventional Magnetism Based on Rotational Motion of Protons.

    PubMed

    Yen, Fei; Zhao, Zhenzheng; Hu, Sixia; Chen, Lang

    2017-08-17

    The types of magnetism known to date are all mainly based on contributions from electron motion. We show how rotational motion of protons (H(+) ) within the methyl groups in hexamethylbenzene (C6 (CH3 )6 ) also contribute significantly to the magnetic susceptibility. Starting from below 118 K, as the rotational motion of the methyl groups set in, an associated magnetic moment positive in nature due to charge of the protons renders the susceptibility to become anomalously dependent on temperature. Starting from 20 K, the susceptibility diverges with decreasing temperature indicative of spin-spin interactions between methyl groups aligned in a previously unclassified type of anti-ferromagnetic configuration. Complementary dielectric constant measurements also show the existence of magneto-dielectric coupling. Our findings allow for the study of strongly correlated systems that are based on a species that possesses much slower dynamics. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Electron Cloud Generation and Trapping in a Quadrupole Magnet at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, Robert J.; Browman, Andrew A.; Ledford, John E.; Borden, Michael J.; O'Hara, James F.; McCrady, Rodney C.; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; Spickermann, Thomas; Zaugg, Thomas J.; Pivi, Mauro T.F.; /SLAC

    2008-03-17

    Recent beam physics studies on the two-stream e-p instability at the LANL proton storage ring (PSR) have focused on the role of the electron cloud generated in quadrupole magnets where primary electrons, which seed beam-induced multipacting, are expected to be largest due to grazing angle losses from the beam halo. A new diagnostic to measure electron cloud formation and trapping in a quadrupole magnet has been developed, installed, and successfully tested at PSR. Beam studies using this diagnostic show that the 'prompt' electron flux striking the wall in a quadrupole is comparable to the prompt signal in the adjacent drift space. In addition, the 'swept' electron signal, obtained using the sweeping feature of the diagnostic after the beam was extracted from the ring, was larger than expected and decayed slowly with an exponential time constant of 50 to 100 {micro}s. Other measurements include the cumulative energy spectra of prompt electrons and the variation of both prompt and swept electron signals with beam intensity. Experimental results were also obtained which suggest that a good fraction of the electrons observed in the adjacent drift space for the typical beam conditions in the 2006 run cycle were seeded by electrons ejected from the quadrupole.

  8. NMR spin locking of proton magnetization under a frequency-switched Lee-Goldburg pulse sequence.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Tian, Changlin; Cross, Timothy A

    2002-01-01

    The spin dynamics of NMR spin locking of proton magnetization under a frequency-switched Lee-Goldburg (FSLG) pulse sequence is investigated for a better understanding of the line-narrowing mechanism in PISEMA experiments. For the sample of oriented 15N(1,3,5,7)-labeled gramicidin A in hydrated DMPC bilayers, it is found that the spin-lattice relaxation time T(1rho)(H) in the tilted rotating frame is about five times shorter when the 1H magnetization is spin locked at the magic angle by the FSLG sequence compared to the simple Lee-Goldburg sequence. It is believed that the rapid phase alternation of the effective fields during the FSLG cycles results in averaging of the spin lock field so that the spin lock becomes less efficient. A FSLG supercycle has been suggested here to slow the phase alternation. It has been demonstrated experimentally that a modified PISEMA pulse sequence with such supercycles gives rise to about 30% line narrowing in the dipolar dimension in the PISEMA spectra compared to a standard PISEMA pulse sequence.

  9. Brain metabolite alterations in children with primary nocturnal enuresis using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Lei, Du; Ma, Jun; Wang, Mengxing; Shen, Guohua; Wang, Hui; Yang, Guang; Du, Xiaoxia

    2014-07-01

    Nocturnal enuresis is a common developmental disorder in children; primary monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (PMNE) is the dominant subtype. Previous literature has suggested that the prefrontal cortex and the pons are both involved in micturition control. This study aimed to investigate the metabolic levels of the left prefrontal cortex and the pons in children with PMNE by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). Twenty-five children with PMNE and 25 healthy children took part in our experiments. Magnetic resonance examinations were performed on a Siemens 3T Trio Tim scanner. For each subject, localized 1H-MRS was acquired from the left prefrontal cortex (mainly in brodmann area 9) and the pons with a point-resolved spectroscopy sequence with repetition time 2,000 ms, echo time 30 ms and 64 averages. The LCModel software package was used to analyze the MRS raw data, and two-sample t tests were used to determine significant differences between the two groups. The results revealed a significant reduction in metabolite to total creatine ratios of N-acetylaspartate (NAA/tCr) in the left prefrontal cortex and the pons for children with PMNE compared to healthy children. Our study suggests that metabolism is disturbed in the prefrontal cortex and the pons in children with PMNE, which may be associated with the symptoms of enuresis.

  10. Neurochemistry of drug action: insights from proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging and their relevance to addiction.

    PubMed

    Licata, Stephanie C; Renshaw, Perry F

    2010-02-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) is a noninvasive imaging technique that permits measurement of particular compounds or metabolites within the tissue of interest. In the brain, (1)H MRS provides a snapshot of the neurochemical environment within a defined volume of interest. A search of the literature demonstrates the widespread utility of this technique for characterizing tumors, tracking the progress of neurodegenerative disease, and for understanding the neurobiological basis of psychiatric disorders. As of relatively recently, (1)H MRS has found its way into substance abuse research, and it is beginning to become recognized as a valuable complement in the brain imaging toolbox that also contains positron emission tomography, single-photon-emission computed tomography, and functional magnetic resonance imaging. Drug abuse studies using (1)H MRS have identified several biochemical changes in the brain. The most consistent alterations across drug class were reductions in N-acetylaspartate and elevations in myo-inositol, whereas changes in choline, creatine, and amino acid transmitters also were abundant. Together, the studies discussed herein provide evidence that drugs of abuse may have a profound effect on neuronal health, energy metabolism and maintenance, inflammatory processes, cell membrane turnover, and neurotransmission, and these biochemical changes may underlie the neuropathology within brain tissue that subsequently gives rise to the cognitive and behavioral impairments associated with drug addiction.

  11. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: longitudinal study before and after treatment.

    PubMed

    Lázaro, Luisa; Bargalló, Núria; Andrés, Susana; Falcón, Carles; Morer, Astrid; Junqué, Carme; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina

    2012-01-30

    Abnormalities in neurochemical compounds in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) may help increase our knowledge of neurobiological abnormalities in the fronto-subcortical circuits. The aims of this exploratory study were to identify with in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) the possible alterations in neurometabolites in a group of drug naïve children and adolescents with OCD in comparison with a control group and to determine whether there was any effect of treatment on the metabolite levels. Eleven OCD children and adolescents (age range 9-17 years; 6 male, 5 female) and twelve healthy subjects with similar age, sex and estimated intellectual quotient were studied. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 1.5 T was used. We placed 3 voxels, one bilaterally located involving anterior cingulate-medial frontal regions, and one in each striatal region involving the caudate and putaminal regions. Concentrations of creatine (Cr), myo-inositol (mI), total Cho (glycerophosphocholine+phosphocholine), total NAA (N-acetyl aspartate+N-acetyl aspartylglutamate), and total Glx (glutamate+glutamine) were calculated. We found significantly lower concentrations of total Cho in left striatum in OCD patients compared with healthy subjects. The difference in Cho concentrations in left striatum between the two groups did not change over time and persisted at follow-up assessment. Like the control subjects, OCD patients undergoing pharmacological treatment and clinical recovery showed no significant changes in neurometabolic activity between the first and second evaluations.

  12. Neurochemistry of Drug Action: Insights from Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging And Their Relevance to Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Licata, Stephanie C.; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2011-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) is a non-invasive imaging technique that permits measurement of particular compounds or metabolites within the tissue of interest. In the brain, 1H MRS provides a snapshot of the neurochemical environment within a defined volume of interest. A search of the literature demonstrates the widespread utility of this technique for characterizing tumors, tracking the progress of neurodegenerative disease, and for understanding the neurobiological basis of psychiatric disorders. As of relatively recently, 1H MRS has found its way into substance abuse research, and it is beginning to become recognized as a valuable complement in the brain imaging toolbox that also contains positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Drug abuse studies employing 1H MRS have identified a number biochemical changes in the brain. The most consistent alterations across drug class were reductions in N-acetylaspartate and elevations in myo-inositol, while changes in choline, creatine, and amino acid transmitters also were abundant. Together, the studies discussed herein provide evidence that drugs of abuse may have a profound impact on neuronal health, energy metabolism and maintenance, inflammatory processes, cell membrane turnover, and neurotransmission, and these biochemical changes may underlie the neuropathology within brain tissue that subsequently gives rise to the cognitive and behavioral impairments associated with drug addiction. PMID:20201852

  13. Search for magnetic monopoles with the MoEDAL prototype trapping detector in 8 TeV proton-proton collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, B.; Alexandre, J.; Bendtz, K.; Benes, P.; Bernabéu, J.; Campbell, M.; Cecchini, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Chatterjee, A.; de Montigny, M.; Derendarz, D.; De Roeck, A.; Ellis, J. R.; Fairbairn, M.; Felea, D.; Frank, M.; Frekers, D.; Garcia, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Hasegan, D.; Kalliokoski, M.; Katre, A.; Kim, D.-W.; King, M. G. L.; Kinoshita, K.; Lacarrère, D. H.; Lee, S. C.; Leroy, C.; Lionti, A.; Margiotta, A.; Mauri, N.; Mavromatos, N. E.; Mermod, P.; Milstead, D.; Mitsou, V. A.; Orava, R.; Parker, B.; Pasqualini, L.; Patrizii, L.; Păvălas, G. E.; Pinfold, J. L.; Platkevič, M.; Popa, V.; Pozzato, M.; Pospisil, S.; Rajantie, A.; Sahnoun, Z.; Sakellariadou, M.; Sarkar, S.; Semenoff, G.; Sirri, G.; Sliwa, K.; Soluk, R.; Spurio, M.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Staszewski, R.; Suk, M.; Swain, J.; Tenti, M.; Togo, V.; Trzebinski, M.; Tuszynski, J. A.; Vento, V.; Vives, O.; Vykydal, Z.; Whyntie, T.; Widom, A.; Willems, G.; Yoon, J. H.

    2016-08-01

    The MoEDAL experiment is designed to search for magnetic monopoles and other highly-ionising particles produced in high-energy collisions at the LHC. The largely passive MoEDAL detector, deployed at Interaction Point 8 on the LHC ring, relies on two dedicated direct detection techniques. The first technique is based on stacks of nucleartrack detectors with surface area ~18m2, sensitive to particle ionisation exceeding a high threshold. These detectors are analysed offline by optical scanning microscopes. The second technique is based on the trapping of charged particles in an array of roughly 800 kg of aluminium samples. These samples are monitored offline for the presence of trapped magnetic charge at a remote superconducting magnetometer facility. We present here the results of a search for magnetic monopoles using a 160 kg prototype MoEDAL trapping detector exposed to 8TeV proton-proton collisions at the LHC, for an integrated luminosity of 0.75 fb-1. No magnetic charge exceeding 0:5 g D (where g D is the Dirac magnetic charge) is measured in any of the exposed samples, allowing limits to be placed on monopole production in the mass range 100 GeV≤ m ≤ 3500 GeV. Model-independent cross-section limits are presented in fiducial regions of monopole energy and direction for 1 g D ≤ | g| ≤ 6 g D, and model-dependent cross-section limits are obtained for Drell-Yan pair production of spin-1/2 and spin-0 monopoles for 1 g D ≤ | g| ≤ 4 g D. Under the assumption of Drell-Yan cross sections, mass limits are derived for | g| = 2 g D and | g| = 3 g D for the first time at the LHC, surpassing the results from previous collider experiments.

  14. DESIGN OF SUPERCONDUCTING COMBINED FUNCTION MAGNETS FOR THE 50 GEV PROTON BEAM LINE FOR THE J-PARC NEUTRINO EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    WANDERER,P.; ET AL.

    2003-06-15

    Superconducting combined function magnets will be utilized for the 50GeV-750kW proton beam line for the J-PARC neutrino experiment and an R and D program has been launched at KEK. The magnet is designed to provide a combined function with a dipole field of 2.59 T and a quadrupole field of 18.7 T/m in a coil aperture of 173.4 mm. A single layer coil is proposed to reduce the fabrication cost and the coil arrangement in the 2-D cross-section results in left-right asymmetry. This paper reports the design study of the magnet.

  15. Complete 1H assignments of the non-exchangeable protons of the non self-complementary heptadeoxyribonucleotide d[(GTCGTCA).(TGACGAC)] and its component strands by high field NMR.

    PubMed

    Lown, J W; Hanstock, C C; Lobe, C G; Bleackley, C

    1985-06-01

    The non self complementary heptadeoxyribonucleotides d(GTCGTCA) and d(TGACGAC) were synthesized by the phosphotriester method. While complete 1H-NMR assignments of the former were obtained by a combination of one and two-dimensional techniques at room temperature, extensive stacking of the latter under these conditions dictated analysis at 50 degrees C when the lines were sharply resolved. The duplex form of the annealed strands under the conditions of the 1H-NMR experiment was established independently of the NMR evidence by 32P end labeling with T4 polynucleotide kinase followed by butt end joining using the absolute specificity of T4 ligase for double strand DNA. Analysis of the resulting ladder of polymers was performed using gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Complete 1H-NMR assignments of the non-exchangeable protons in the self complementary heptamer was achieved. The assignments were confirmed using NOE differences, and two-dimensional COSY, and HH-INADEQUATE experiments at 400 and 500 MHz. The assignments are in accord with a conformation for the heptamer belonging to the B family of structures.

  16. Detection of necrosis in human tumour xenografts by proton magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, I.; Kaalhus, O.; Lyng, H.; Rofstad, E. K.

    1995-01-01

    Tumours with necrotic regions have an inadequate blood supply and are expected to differ from well-vascularised tumours in response to treatment. The purpose of the present work was to investigate whether proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) might be used to detect necrotic regions in tumours. MR images and histological sections from individual tumours of three different amelanotic human melanoma xenograft lines (BEX-t, HUX-t, SAX-t) were analysed in pairs. MRI was performed at 1.5 T using two spin-echo pulse sequences, one with a repetition time (TR) of 600 ms and echo times (TEs) of 20, 40, 60 and 80 ms and the other with a TR of 2000 ms and TEs of 20, 40, 60 and 80 ms. Spin-lattice relaxation time (T1), spin-spin relaxation time (T2) and proton density (N0) were calculated for each volume element corresponding to a pixel. Synthetic MR images, pure T1, T2 and N0 images and spin-echo images with chosen values for TR and TE were generated from these data. T1, T2 and N0 distributions of tumour subregions, corresponding to necrotic regions and regions of viable tissue as defined by histological criteria, were also generated. T1 and T2 were significantly shorter in the necrotic regions than in the regions of viable tissue in all tumours. These differences were sufficiently large to allow the generation of synthetic spin-echo images showing clear contrast between necrosis and viable tissue. Maximum contrast was achieved with TRs within the range 2800-4000 ms and TEs within the range 160-200 ms. Necrotic tissue could also be distinguished from viable tissue in pure T1 and T2 images. Consequently, the possibility exists that MRI might be used for detection of necrotic regions in tumours and hence for prediction of tumour treatment response. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7880724

  17. Automatic segmentation of cartilage in high-field magnetic resonance images of the knee joint with an improved voxel-classification-driven region-growing algorithm using vicinity-correlated subsampling.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Ceyda Nur; Albayrak, Songül

    2016-05-01

    Anatomical structures that can deteriorate over time, such as cartilage, can be successfully delineated with voxel-classification approaches in magnetic resonance (MR) images. However, segmentation via voxel-classification is a computationally demanding process for high-field MR images with high spatial resolutions. In this study, the whole femoral, tibial, and patellar cartilage compartments in the knee joint were automatically segmented in high-field MR images obtained from Osteoarthritis Initiative using a voxel-classification-driven region-growing algorithm with sample-expand method. Computational complexity of the classification was alleviated via subsampling of the background voxels in the training MR images and selecting a small subset of significant features by taking into consideration systems with limited memory and processing power. Although subsampling of the voxels may lead to a loss of generality of the training models and a decrease in segmentation accuracies, effective subsampling strategies can overcome these problems. Therefore, different subsampling techniques, which involve uniform, Gaussian, vicinity-correlated (VC) sparse, and VC dense subsampling, were used to generate four training models. The segmentation system was experimented using 10 training and 23 testing MR images, and the effects of different training models on segmentation accuracies were investigated. Experimental results showed that the highest mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) values for all compartments were obtained when the training models of VC sparse subsampling technique were used. Mean DSC values optimized with this technique were 82.6%, 83.1%, and 72.6% for femoral, tibial, and patellar cartilage compartments, respectively, when mean sensitivities were 79.9%, 84.0%, and 71.5%, and mean specificities were 99.8%, 99.9%, and 99.9%.

  18. Magnetic resonance safety and compatibility of tantalum markers used in proton beam therapy for intraocular tumors: A 7.0 Tesla study.

    PubMed

    Oberacker, Eva; Paul, Katharina; Huelnhagen, Till; Oezerdem, Celal; Winter, Lukas; Pohlmann, Andreas; Boehmert, Laura; Stachs, Oliver; Heufelder, Jens; Weber, Andreas; Rehak, Matus; Seibel, Ira; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2017-10-01

    Proton radiation therapy (PRT) is a standard treatment of uveal melanoma. PRT patients undergo implantation of ocular tantalum markers (OTMs) for treatment planning. Ultra-high-field MRI is a promising technique for 3D tumor visualization and PRT planning. This work examines MR safety and compatibility of OTMs at 7.0 Tesla. MR safety assessment included deflection angle measurements (DAMs), electromagnetic field (EMF) simulations for specific absorption rate (SAR) estimation, and temperature simulations for examining radiofrequency heating using a bow-tie dipole antenna for transmission. MR compatibility was assessed by susceptibility artifacts in agarose, ex vivo pig eyes, and in an ex vivo tumor eye using gradient echo and fast spin-echo imaging. DAM (α < 1 °) demonstrated no risk attributed to magnetically induced OTM deflection. EMF simulations showed that an OTM can be approximated by a disk, demonstrated the need for averaging masses of mave  = 0.01 g to accommodate the OTM, and provided SAR0.01g,maximum  = 2.64 W/kg (Pin  = 1W) in OTM presence. A transfer function was derived, enabling SAR0.01g estimation for individual patient scenarios without the OTM being integrated. Thermal simulations revealed minor OTM-related temperature increase (δT < 15 mK). Susceptibility artifact size (<8 mm) and location suggest no restrictions for MRI of the nervus opticus. OTMs are not a per se contraindication for MRI. Magn Reson Med 78:1533-1546, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. High order magnetic optics for high dynamic range proton radiography at a kinetic energy 800 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sjue, Sky K. L.; Morris, Christopher L.; Merrill, Frank Edward; Mariam, Fesseha Gebre; Saunders, Alexander

    2016-01-14

    Flash radiography with 800 MeV kinetic energy protons at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an important experimental tool for investigations of dynamic material behavior driven by high explosives or pulsed power. The extraction of quantitative information about density fields in a dynamic experiment from proton generated images requires a high fidelity model of the protonimaging process. It is shown that accurate calculations of the transmission through the magnetic lens system require terms beyond second order for protons far from the tune energy. The approach used integrates the correlated multiple Coulomb scattering distribution simultaneously over the collimator and the image plane. Furthermore, comparison with a series of static calibrationimages demonstrates the model’s accurate reproduction of both the transmission and blur over a wide range of tune energies in an inverse identity lens that consists of four quadrupole electromagnets.

  20. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic detection and determination of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as a contaminant of methyl methacrylate raw material.

    PubMed

    Hanna, G M; Lau-Cam, C A

    1995-01-01

    A simple, specific, and accurate proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopic method is presented for detection and assay of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate dimer as a contaminant of methyl methacrylate monomer. In addition to minimizing exposure of the analyst to the irritant and toxic methacrylic acid esters, the proposed method requires no sample preparation. Quantitations are based on integrals for signals of methylene protons of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate at 4.37 ppm and methyl protons of methyl methacrylate at 3.70 ppm. Analysis of 10 synthetic mixtures of the monomer with 1-11% of dimer yielded a dimer recovery of 100.5 +/- 2.05% (mean +/- standard deviation). Correspondence (correlation coefficient, r = 0.9999) between the amount of dimer added and the amount found was excellent. The proposed method measures as little as 1% of dimer.

  1. Status of intense permanent magnet proton source for China-accelerator driven sub-critical system Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q. Ma, H. Y.; Yang, Y.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhang, Z. M.; Zhao, H. Y.; He, Y.; Zhao, H. W.

    2016-02-15

    Two compact intense 2.45 GHz permanent magnet proton sources and their corresponding low energy beam transport (LEBT) system were developed successfully for China accelerator driven sub-critical system in 2014. Both the proton sources operate at 35 kV potential. The beams extracted from the ion source are transported by the LEBT, which is composed of two identical solenoids, to the 2.1 MeV Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). In order to ensure the safety of the superconducting cavities during commissioning, an electrostatic-chopper has been designed and installed in the LEBT line that can chop the continuous wave beam into a pulsed one. The minimum width of the pulse is less than 10 μs and the fall/rise time of the chopper is about 20 ns. The performance of the proton source and the LEBT, such as beam current, beam profile, emittance and the impact to RFQ injection will be presented.

  2. High order magnetic optics for high dynamic range proton radiography at a kinetic energy 800 MeV

    DOE PAGES

    Sjue, Sky K. L.; Morris, Christopher L.; Merrill, Frank Edward; ...

    2016-01-14

    Flash radiography with 800 MeV kinetic energy protons at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an important experimental tool for investigations of dynamic material behavior driven by high explosives or pulsed power. The extraction of quantitative information about density fields in a dynamic experiment from proton generated images requires a high fidelity model of the protonimaging process. It is shown that accurate calculations of the transmission through the magnetic lens system require terms beyond second order for protons far from the tune energy. The approach used integrates the correlated multiple Coulomb scattering distribution simultaneously over the collimator and the image plane.more » Furthermore, comparison with a series of static calibrationimages demonstrates the model’s accurate reproduction of both the transmission and blur over a wide range of tune energies in an inverse identity lens that consists of four quadrupole electromagnets.« less

  3. A systematic review of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings in sport-related concussion.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Andrew; Iverson, Grant L; Stanwell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Traditional structural neuroimaging techniques are normal in athletes who sustain sport-related concussions and are only considered to be clinically helpful in ruling out a more serious brain injury. There is a clinical need for more sophisticated, non-invasive imaging techniques capable of detecting changes in neurophysiology after injury. Concussion is associated with neurometabolic changes including neuronal depolarization, release of excitatory neurotransmitters, ionic shifts, changes in glucose metabolism, altered cerebral blood flow, and impaired axonal function. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS, or simply MRS) is capable of measuring brain biochemistry and has the potential to identify and quantify physiologic changes after concussion. The focus of the current review is to provide an overview of research findings using MRS in sport-related concussion. A systematic review of articles published in the English language, up to February 2013, was conducted. Articles were retrieved via the databases: PsychINFO, Medline, Embase, SportDiscus, Scopus, Web of Science, and Informit using key terms: magnetic resonance spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, neurospectroscopy, spectroscopy, two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, correlation spectroscopy, J-spectroscopy, exchange spectroscopy, nuclear overhauser effect spectroscopy, NMR, MRS, COSY, EXSY, NOESY, 2D NMR, craniocerebral trauma, mild traumatic brain injury, mTBI, traumatic brain injury, brain concussion, concussion, brain damage, sport, athletic, and athlete. Observational, cohort, correlational, cross-sectional, and longitudinal studies were all included in the current review. The review identified 11 publications that met criteria for inclusion, comprised of data on 200 athletes and 116 controls. Nine of 11 studies reported a MRS abnormality consistent with an alteration in neurochemistry. The results support the use of MRS as a research tool for identifying

  4. Evaluation of Water Exchange Kinetics on [Ln(AAZTAPh-NO2)(H2O)q](x) Complexes Using Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Shima; Tei, Lorenzo; Botta, Mauro; Helm, Lothar

    2016-06-20

    Water exchange kinetics on [Ln(AAZTAPh-NO2)(H2O)q](-) (Ln = Gd(3+), Dy(3+), or Tm(3+)) were determined by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. The number of inner-sphere water molecules was found to change from two to one when going from Dy(3+) to Tm(3+). The calculated water exchange rate constants obtained by variable-temperature proton transverse relaxation rates are 3.9 × 10(6), 0.46 × 10(6), and 0.014 × 10(6) s(-1) at 298 K for Gd(3+), Dy(3+), and Tm(3+), respectively. Variable-pressure measurements were used to assess the water exchange mechanism. The results indicate an associative and dissociative interchange mechanism for Gd(3+) and Dy(3+) complexes with ΔV(⧧) values of -1.4 and 1.9 cm(3) mol(-1), respectively. An associative activation mode (Ia or A mechanism) was obtained for the Tm(3+) complex (ΔV(⧧) = -5.6 cm(3) mol(-1)). Moreover, [Dy(AAZTAPh-NO2)(H2O)2](-) with a very high transverse relaxivity value was found as a potential candidate for negative contrast agents for high-field imaging applications.

  5. High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of ovarian cyst fluid.

    PubMed

    Boss, E A; Moolenaar, S H; Massuger, L F; Boonstra, H; Engelke, U F; de Jong, J G; Wevers, R A

    2000-08-01

    Most ovarian tumors are cystic structures containing variable amounts of fluid. Several studies of ovarian cyst fluid focus on one specific metabolite using conventional assay systems. We examined the potential of (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in evaluation of the overall metabolic composition of cyst fluid from different ovarian tumors. Ovarian cyst fluid samples obtained from 40 patients with a primary ovarian tumor (12 malignant and 28 benign) were examined. After deproteinization and pD standardization, we performed (1)H-NMR spectroscopy on a 600 MHz instrument. With (1)H-NMR spectroscopy we found detectable concentrations of 36 metabolites with high intersample variation. A number of unassigned resonances as well as unexpected metabolites were found. We introduce an overall inventory of the low-molecular-weight metabolites in ovarian cyst fluid with corresponding resonances. Significant differences in concentration (p < 0.01) were found for several metabolites (including an unknown metabolite) between malignant and benign ovarian cysts. Furthermore, higher concentrations in malignant- and lower in benign fluids were found compared to normal serum values, indicating local cyst wall metabolic processes in case of malignant transformation. We conclude that (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can give an overview of low-molecular-weight proton-containing metabolities present in ovarian cyst fluid samples. The metabolic composition of cyst fluid differs significantly between benign and malignant ovarian tumors. Furthermore, differences between benign subgroups possibly related to histopathological behaviour can be detected. The presence of N-acetyl aspartic acid and 5-oxoproline exclusively in serous cystadenoma samples is remarkable. Future studies will concentrate on these findings and explore the possibilities of extrapolating information from the in vitro studies to in vivo practice, in which metabolic differences between malignant and

  6. Response of engineered cartilage tissue to biochemical agents as studied by proton magnetic resonance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Potter, K; Butler, J J; Horton, W E; Spencer, R G

    2000-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results correlate with the biochemical composition of cartilage matrix and can therefore be used to evaluate natural tissue development and the effects of biologic interventions. Chondrocytes harvested from day-16 chick embryo sterna were inoculated into an MRI-compatible hollow-fiber bioreactor. The tissue that formed over a period of 2-4 weeks was studied biochemically, histologically, and with MRI. Besides natural development, the response of the tissue to administration of retinoic acid, interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), and daily dosing with ascorbic acid was studied. Tissue wet and dry weight, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content, and collagen content all increased with development time, while tissue hydration decreased. The administration of retinoic acid resulted in a significant reduction in tissue wet weight, proteoglycan content, and cell number and an increase in hydration as compared with controls. Daily dosing with ascorbic acid increased tissue collagen content significantly compared with controls, while the administration of IL-1beta resulted in increased proteoglycan content. The water proton longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates correlated well with GAG and collagen concentrations of the matrix as well as with tissue hydration. In contrast, the magnetization transfer value for the tissue correlated only with total collagen. Finally, the self-diffusion coefficient of water correlated with tissue hydration. Parameters derived from MR images obtained noninvasively can be used to quantitatively assess the composition of cartilage tissue generated in a bioreactor. We conclude that MRI is a promising modality for the assessment of certain biochemical properties of cartilage in a wide variety of settings.

  7. Intra-abdominal fat burden discriminated in vivo using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Walling, Brent E; Munasinghe, Jeeva; Berrigan, David; Bailey, Michael Q; Simpson, R Mark

    2007-01-01

    To assess proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) as a means to distinguish among mice with disparate intra-abdominal body fat compositions, and to measure changes in intra-abdominal fat burden during weight loss and regain. Intra-abdominal fat burden was analyzed as a ratio of integrated areas under the curves of fat to water (1)H-MRS signals collected from a region of interest standardized across B6.V-Lep(ob), C57BL/6, and A-ZIP/F mice that exhibited various genotypically related body fat compositions, ranging from obese (B6.V-Lep(ob)) to minimal body fat (A-ZIP/F). 1H-MRS analysis of fat burden was compared with intra-abdominal fat volume and with a single cross-sectional intra-abdominal fat area calculated from segmented magnetic resonance images. Similar measurements were made from obese B6.V-Lep(ob) mice before, during, and after they were induced to lose weight by leptin administration. Relative amounts of intra-abdominal fat analyzed by 1H-MRS differed significantly according to body composition and genotype of the three strains of mice (p < 0.05). Intra-abdominal fat assessed by 1H-MRS correlated with both intra-abdominal fat volume (r = 0.88, p < 0.001) and body weight (r = 0.82, p < 0.001) among, but not within, all three genotypes. During weight loss and regain, there was a significant overall pattern of changes in intra-abdominal fat quantity that occurred, which was reflected by 1H-MRS (p = 0.006). Results support the use of localized 1H-MRS for assessing differences in intra-abdominal fat. Refinements in 1H-MRS voxel region of interest size and location as well as instrument precision may result in improved correlations within certain body compositions.

  8. Changes in the distribution of low-energy trapped protons associated with the April 17, 1965, magnetic storm.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, A. L.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    The absolute intensity of geomagnetically trapped protons in the energy ranges from 0.52 to 4.0 MeV and from 0.90 to 1.8 MeV has been measured with the solid-state proton detector on the satellite Injun 4 for the period from Mar. 1 to May 31, 1965. A study of the temporal variations of these fluxes associated with the Apr. 17, 1965, magnetic storm shows a general redistribution of these protons for L greater than 2.5. The effect of the sudden commencement was a general depression in the intensities and a hardening of the energy spectra, although the intensities recovered to their prestorm level during the initial phase. The major redistribution was apparently initiated by the polar substorm. During the recovery phase, a secondary peak developed in the intensity profile at L of about 3.5 for 0.52-MeV protons that had no counterpart at this energy at the equator. No such peak was observed for 0.9-MeV protons.

  9. Probing astrocyte metabolism in vivo: proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the injured and aging brain

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Janna L.; Choi, In-Young; Brooks, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Following a brain injury, the mobilization of reactive astrocytes is part of a complex neuroinflammatory response that may have both harmful and beneficial effects. There is also evidence that astrocytes progressively accumulate in the normal aging brain, increasing in both number and size. These astrocyte changes in normal brain aging may, in the event of an injury, contribute to the exacerbated injury response and poorer outcomes observed in older traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors. Here we present our view that proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS), a neuroimaging approach that probes brain metabolism within a defined region of interest, is a promising technique that may provide insight into astrocyte metabolic changes in the injured and aging brain in vivo. Although 1H-MRS does not specifically differentiate between cell types, it quantifies certain metabolites that are highly enriched in astrocytes (e.g., Myo-inositol, mlns), or that are involved in metabolic shuttling between astrocytes and neurons (e.g., glutamate and glutamine). Here we focus on metabolites detectable by 1H-MRS that may serve as markers of astrocyte metabolic status. We review the physiological roles of these metabolites, discuss recent 1H-MRS findings in the injured and aging brain, and describe how an astrocyte metabolite profile approach might be useful in clinical medicine and clinical trials. PMID:26578948

  10. Magnetization Transfer and Amide Proton Transfer MRI of Neonatal Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yang; Wang, Xiaoming; Zhao, Xuna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study aims to evaluate the process of brain development in neonates using combined amide proton transfer (APT) imaging and conventional magnetization transfer (MT) imaging. Materials and Methods. Case data were reviewed for all patients hospitalized in our institution's neonatal ward. Patients underwent APT and MT imaging (a single protocol) immediately following the routine MR examination. Single-slice APT/MT axial imaging was performed at the level of the basal ganglia. APT and MT ratio (MTR) measurements were performed in multiple brain regions of interest (ROIs). Data was statistically analyzed in order to assess for significant differences between the different regions of the brain or correlation with patient gestational age. Results. A total of 38 neonates were included in the study, with ages ranging from 27 to 41 weeks' corrected gestational age. There were statistically significant differences in both APT and MTR measurements between the frontal lobes, basal ganglia, and occipital lobes (APT: frontal lobe versus occipital lobe P = 0.031 and other groups P = 0.00; MTR: frontal lobe versus occipital lobe P = 0.034 and other groups P = 0.00). Furthermore, APT and MTR in above brain regions exhibited positive linear correlations with patient gestational age. Conclusions. APT/MT imaging can provide valuable information about the process of the neonatal brain development at the molecular level.

  11. Reliability of glutamate and GABA quantification using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yasen, Alia L; Smith, Jolinda; Christie, Anita D

    2017-03-16

    The consistency and reliability of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) assessments of neurotransmitter concentration has not been widely examined over multiple days. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of glutamate and GABA measures using a single-voxel (1)H-MRS protocol in healthy men and women. Glutamate and GABA quantitations were obtained from the primary motor cortex (M1) and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in 13 healthy individuals across 3 data collection sessions, including a baseline (Visit 1), 2-week (Visit 2), and 2-month time point (Visit 3). Glutamate concentrations were similar across visits in M1 (p=0.72) and the DLPFC (p=0.52). Reliability across days was excellent in M1 (R=0.93), and in the DLPFC (R=0.99). GABA concentrations were similar across visits in M1 (p=0.44) and in the DLPFC (p=0.59). Reliability of GABA concentration across days was excellent in M1 (R=0.93), and in the DLPFC (R=0.97). (1)H-MRS is a reliable method for quantifying glutamate and GABA concentration in M1 and the DLPFC in humans.

  12. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) of the cerebellum in men with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Tibbo, P; Hanstock, CC; Asghar, S; Silverstone, P; Allen, PS

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether there are cerebellar vermis abnormalities in schizophrenia. DESIGN: Prospective imaging study with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). SETTING: Schizophrenia clinic at a large urban hospital. PATIENTS AND CONTROLS: Twelve right-handed male patients with schizophrenia, and 12 control subjects with no psychiatric history. INTERVENTIONS: MRS data were acquired from a 2.0 x 2.0 x 2.0 cm volume of interest that included the entire cerebellar vermis. OUTCOME MEASURES: Spectral peak arising from N-acetylaspartate (NAA), phosphocreatine/creatine (Cr) and choline (Cho). RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the patients with schizophrenia and the controls in cerebellar vermis ratios of NAA to Cr (p = 0.71) or Cho to Cr (p = 0.50). CONCLUSIONS: This study does not support earlier structural studies that found abnormalities of the cerebellar vermis in schizophrenia, although it does support reported neurochemical studies. It does not rule out cerebellar involvement in schizophrenia through mechanisms such as aberrant circuitry. Larger in vivo structural/neurochemical and functional imaging studies in other parts of the cerebellum are needed. PMID:11109301

  13. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance of regenerating rat liver after partial hepatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    de Certaines, J.D.; Moulinoux, J.P.; Benoist, L.; Benard, A.; Rivet, P.

    1982-08-09

    Spin-lattice (T/sub 1/) and spin-spin (T/sub 2/) proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times were measured over a 48-hours period of experimental liver regeneration in Wistar rats, T/sub 2/ showed an early significant increase reaching a plateau 30% above baseline from the 10th hrs onwards. Laparotomized control animals showed no change in T/sub 2/ values. The increase in T/sub 1/ occurred at a later stage but was no different from that in laparotomized controls. T/sub 1/ reached a peak, 20% above baseline, around the 30th hr. The changes observed were far less marked than those previously described for cancer tissue, which showed about a 60% increase in T/sub 1/ fluctuations followed a circadian pattern, with a minimum at night's end and a maximum around mid-day. No circadian rhythm was seen for T/sub 2/. The observed T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ changes are discussed with respect to mitotic and metabolic events known to occur during regeneration of the liver.

  14. Brain metabolism in Alzheimer disease and vascular dementia assessed by in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Herminghaus, Sebastian; Frölich, Lutz; Gorriz, Corrina; Pilatus, Ullrich; Dierks, Thomas; Wittsack, Hans-Jörg; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Maurer, Konrad; Zanella, Friedhelm E

    2003-07-30

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) allows the assessment of various cerebral metabolites non-invasively in vivo. Among 1H MRS-detectable metabolites, N-acetyl-aspartate and N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (tNAA), trimethylamines (TMA), creatine and creatine phosphate (tCr), inositol (Ins) and glutamate (Gla) are of particular interest, since these moieties can be assigned to specific neuronal and glial metabolic pathways, membrane constituents, and energy metabolism. In this study on 94 subjects from a memory clinic population, 1H MRS results (single voxel STEAM: TE 20 ms, TR 1500 ms) on the above metabolites were assessed for five different brain regions in probable vascular dementia (VD), probable Alzheimer's disease (AD), and age-matched healthy controls. In both VD and AD, ratios of tNAA/tCr were decreased, which may be attributed to neuronal atrophy and loss, and Ins/tCr-ratios were increased indicating either enhanced gliosis or alteration of the cerebral inositol metabolism. However, the topographical distribution of the metabolic alterations in both diseases differed, revealing a temporoparietal pattern for AD and a global, subcortically pronounced pattern for VD. Furthermore, patients suffering from vascular dementia (VD) had remarkably enhanced TMA/tCr ratios, potentially due to ongoing degradation of myelin. Thus, the metabolic alterations obtained by 1H MRS in vivo allow insights into the pathophysiology of the different dementias and may be useful for diagnostic classification.

  15. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in pediatric low-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Porto, Luciana; Kieslich, Matthias; Franz, Kea; Lehrbecher, Thomas; Pilatus, Ulrich; Hattingen, Elke

    2010-10-01

    Our purpose was to investigate whether in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging, using normalized concentrations of total choline (tCho) and total creatine (tCr), can differentiate between WHO grade I pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) and diffuse, fibrillary WHO grade II astrocytoma (DA) in children. Data from 16 children with astrocytomas (11 children with PA and 5 children with DA) were evaluated retrospectively. MRS was performed before treatment in all patients with histologically proven low-grade astrocytomas. Metabolite concentrations of tCho and tCr were normalized to the respective concentration in contralateral brain tissue. The Mann-Whitney U test was performed to evaluate differences between these two groups. Normalized tCho did not show any statistically significant difference between the two groups. There was a strong trend (P = 0.07) toward higher values of normalized tCr in the DA group. For 3 of 5 children with DA, lactate was detectable, but only 1 of 11 children with PA showed lactate. We concluded that choline as a single parameter is not reliable in the differential diagnosis of low-grade astrocytomas in children. Our results suggest that tCr concentrations combined with lactate will be helpful in the differential diagnosis of PA and DA in children.

  16. Magnetization Transfer and Amide Proton Transfer MRI of Neonatal Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study aims to evaluate the process of brain development in neonates using combined amide proton transfer (APT) imaging and conventional magnetization transfer (MT) imaging. Materials and Methods. Case data were reviewed for all patients hospitalized in our institution's neonatal ward. Patients underwent APT and MT imaging (a single protocol) immediately following the routine MR examination. Single-slice APT/MT axial imaging was performed at the level of the basal ganglia. APT and MT ratio (MTR) measurements were performed in multiple brain regions of interest (ROIs). Data was statistically analyzed in order to assess for significant differences between the different regions of the brain or correlation with patient gestational age. Results. A total of 38 neonates were included in the study, with ages ranging from 27 to 41 weeks' corrected gestational age. There were statistically significant differences in both APT and MTR measurements between the frontal lobes, basal ganglia, and occipital lobes (APT: frontal lobe versus occipital lobe P = 0.031 and other groups P = 0.00; MTR: frontal lobe versus occipital lobe P = 0.034 and other groups P = 0.00). Furthermore, APT and MTR in above brain regions exhibited positive linear correlations with patient gestational age. Conclusions. APT/MT imaging can provide valuable information about the process of the neonatal brain development at the molecular level. PMID:27885356

  17. Measuring relative acetylcholine receptor agonist binding by selective proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Behling, R W; Yamane, T; Navon, G; Sammon, M J; Jelinski, L W

    1988-01-01

    A method is presented that uses selective proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation measurements of nicotine in the presence of the acetylcholine receptor to obtain relative binding constants for acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, and muscarine. For receptors from Torpedo californica the results show that (a) the binding constants are in the order acetylcholine greater than nicotine greater than carbamylcholine greater than muscarine; (b) selective NMR measurements provide a rapid and direct method for monitoring both the specific and nonspecific binding of agonists to these receptors and to the lipid; (c) alpha-bungarotoxin can be used to distinguish between specific and nonspecific binding to the receptor; (d) the receptor--substrate interaction causes a large change in the selective relaxation time of the agonists even at concentrations 100x greater than that of the receptor. This last observation means that these measurements provide a rapid method to monitor drug binding when only small amounts of receptor are available. Furthermore, the binding strategies presented here may be useful for the NMR determination of the conformation of the ligand in its bound state. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:3395661

  18. [Effects of echo time on the liver fat quantification using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zaiyi; Liu, Xiaoying; Xu, Li; Li, Yan; Wang, Qiushi; Zheng, Junhui; Liang, Changhong

    2010-08-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effects of different echo time (TE) on the liver fat quantification using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). Liver 1H-MRS was performed on 24 adult male wistar rats on a 1.5 T superconductor MR scanner. Spectrums were collected with a TR of 1500 ms and different TE of 35, 45, 55, 65, 75, 85, 95, 105, 144 ms, respectively. The water and lipid peaks, baseline of the spectrum and lipid to water ratio were evaluated. With the increment of TE, the amplitude and integrated area of the water and lipid peaks decreased, and the baseline of the spectrum and the lipid to water ratio became unstable. The lipid to water ratio determined by 1H-MRS was highly correlated with the liver fat content determined by pathological analysis at TE between 35 and 55 ms (r > 0.9) and poorly to moderately correlated at TE > or =65 ms (r < 0.9). The results indicated that long TE would compromise the liver fat quantification using 1H-MRS, and therefore short TE was strongly recommended for liver fat quantification.

  19. Characterization of urban aerosol using aerosol mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, M. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Lefer, B.; Rappenglück, B.

    2012-07-01

    Particulate matter was measured during August and September of 2006 in Houston as part of the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project. Aerosol size and composition were determined using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer. Aerosol was dominated by sulfate (4.1 ± 2.6 μg m-3) and organic material (5.5 ± 4.0 μg m-3), with contributions of organic material from both primary (˜32%) and secondary (˜68%) sources. Secondary organic aerosol appears to be formed locally. In addition, 29 aerosol filter samples were analyzed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy to determine relative concentrations of organic functional groups. Houston aerosols are less oxidized than those observed elsewhere, with smaller relative contributions of carbon-oxygen double bonds. These particles do not fit 1H NMR source apportionment fingerprints for identification of secondary, marine, and biomass burning organic aerosol, suggesting that a new fingerprint for highly urbanized and industrially influenced locations be established.

  20. Differentiation of SCA2 from MSA-C using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Boesch, Sylvia M; Wolf, Christian; Seppi, Klaus; Felber, Stephan; Wenning, Gregor K; Schocke, Michael

    2007-03-01

    To assess and compare biochemical and volumetric features of the cerebellum in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) and patients with the cerebellar variant of multiple system atrophy (MSA-C). Nine genetically assigned SCA2 patients and six MSA-C patients who met the clinical criteria of MSA-C underwent a clinical and neuroradiological workup with respect to cerebellar features. The MR protocol consisted of a sagittal T1-weighted three-dimensional fast low-angle shot (3D FLASH) sequence and a transversal T2- and spin-density-weighted turbo spin-echo sequence. The proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ((1)H-MRSI) protocol consisted of two chemical shift imaging (CSI) sequences (echo time (TE) = 20 and 135 msec). Both short- and long-TE MR spectroscopy (MRS) images showed significant decreases in values for N-acetylaspartate to creatine (NAA/Cr), and choline to creatine (Cho/Cr) ratios in MSA-C and SCA2 compared to normal controls, though there was no difference between the two patient groups. In contrast, distinct cerebellar lactate (Lac) peaks were detected in seven SCA2 patients, and small peaks were detected in two. However, we did not detect any definite Lac peak in MSA-C or control subjects. MRSI revealed Lac pathology in SCA2 but not in MSA-C. Whether this indicates distinct pathogenetic mechanisms of cerebellar degeneration remains to be established.

  1. Brain energy metabolism in early MSA-P: A phosphorus and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Stamelou, M; Pilatus, U; Reuss, A; Respondek, G; Knake, S; Oertel, W H; Höglinger, G U

    2015-05-01

    Recently, mutations in the COQ2 gene, encoding for an enzyme involved in coenzyme Q10 biosynthesis, have been suggested to confer susceptibility risk for multiple system atrophy (MSA). Thus, the possible role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of MSA has emerged. Here, we studied brain energy metabolism in vivo in early MSA-parkinsonism (MSA-P) patients and compared to healthy controls. We have used combined phosphorus and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure high- and low-energy phosphates in the basal ganglia of early (Hoehn and Yahr stage I-III), probable MSA-P patients (N = 9) compared to healthy controls (N = 9). No significant changes in the high energy phosphates and other parameters reflecting the energy status of the cells were found in the basal ganglia of MSA-P patients compared to healthy controls. N-acetylaspartate was significantly reduced in MSA-P compared to healthy controls and correlated with the Unified Multiple System Atrophy Rating Scale. Brain energy metabolism in early MSA-P is not impaired, despite the presence of impaired neuronal integrity. This may imply that mitochondrial dysfunction may not play a primary role in the pathophysiology of MSA, at least in European populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance and proton relaxation times in experimental heterotopic heart transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Eugene, M.; Lechat, P.; Hadjiisky, P.; Teillac, A.; Grosgogeat, Y.; Cabrol, C.

    1986-01-01

    It should be possible to detect heart transplant rejection by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging if it induces myocardial T1 and T2 proton relaxation time alterations or both. We studied 20 Lewis rats after a heterotopic heart transplantation. In vitro measurement of T1 and T2 was performed on a Minispec PC20 (Bruker) 3 to 9 days after transplantation. Histologic analysis allowed the quantification of rejection process based on cellular infiltration and myocardiolysis. Water content, a major determinant of relaxation time, was also studied. T1 and T2 were significantly prolonged in heterotopic vs orthotopic hearts (638 +/- 41 msec vs 606 +/- 22 msec for T1, p less than 0.01 and 58.2 +/- 8.4 msec vs 47.4 +/- 1.9 msec for T2, p less than 0.001). Water content was also increased in heterotopic hearts (76.4 +/- 2.3 vs 73.8 +/- 1.0, p less than 0.01). Most importantly, we found close correlations between T1 and especially T2 vs water content, cellular infiltration, and myocardiolysis. We conclude that rejection reaction should be noninvasively detected by NMR imaging, particularly with pulse sequences emphasizing T2.

  3. Anterior insula GABA levels correlate with emotional aspects of empathy: a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianfeng; Zhang, Zhuwei; Dong, Fang; Chen, Luguang; Zheng, Li; Guo, Xiuyan; Li, Jianqi

    2014-01-01

    Empathy is a multidimensional construct referring to the capacity to understand and share the emotional and affective states of another person. Cerebral γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic levels are associated with a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, the role of the GABA system in different dimensions of empathy has not been investigated. Thirty-two right-handed healthy volunteers took part in this study. We used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine GABA concentrations in the anterior insula (AI) and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and to examine the relationship between the GABA concentrations and the subcomponents of empathy evaluated by the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI). Pearson correlation analyses (two-tailed) showed that AI GABA was significantly associated with the empathy concern score (r = 0.584, p<0.05) and the personal distress score (r = 0.538, p<0.05) but not significantly associated with other empathy subscales. No significant correlation was found between ACC GABA and empathy subscores. Left AI GABA was positively correlated with the emotional aspects of empathy. These preliminary findings call into question whether AI GABA alterations might predict empathy dysfunction in major psychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia, which have been described as deficits in emotional empathic abilities.

  4. Correction of proton resonance frequency shift temperature maps for magnetic field disturbances caused by breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmatukha, Andriy V.; Bakker, Chris J. G.

    2006-09-01

    Respiratory induced resonance offset (RIRO) is a periodic disturbance of a magnetic field due to breathing. Such disturbance handicaps the accuracy of the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) method of MRI temperature mapping in anatomies situated nearby the lungs and chest wall. In this work, we propose a method capable of minimizing errors caused by RIRO in PRFS temperature maps. In this method, a set of baseline images characterizing RIRO at a variety of respiratory cycle instants is acquired before the thermal treatment starts. During the treatment, the temperature evolution is found from two successive images. Then, the calculated temperature changes are corrected for the additional contribution caused by RIRO using the pre-treatment baseline images acquired at the identical instances of the respiratory cycle. Our method is shown to improve the accuracy and stability of PRFS temperature maps in the presence of RIRO and inter-scan motion in phantom and volunteers' breathing experiments. Our method is also shown to be applicable to anatomies moving during breathing if a proper registration procedure is applied.

  5. Absolute quantification of carnosine in human calf muscle by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, Mahir S.; Reyngoudt, Harmen; DeDeene, Yves; Sazak, Hakan S.; Fieremans, Els; Delputte, Steven; D'Asseler, Yves; Derave, Wim; Lemahieu, Ignace; Achten, Eric

    2007-12-01

    Carnosine has been shown to be present in the skeletal muscle and in the brain of a variety of animals and humans. Despite the various physiological functions assigned to this metabolite, its exact role remains unclear. It has been suggested that carnosine plays a role in buffering in the intracellular physiological pHi range in skeletal muscle as a result of accepting hydrogen ions released in the development of fatigue during intensive exercise. It is thus postulated that the concentration of carnosine is an indicator for the extent of the buffering capacity. However, the determination of the concentration of this metabolite has only been performed by means of muscle biopsy, which is an invasive procedure. In this paper, we utilized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) in order to perform absolute quantification of carnosine in vivo non-invasively. The method was verified by phantom experiments and in vivo measurements in the calf muscles of athletes and untrained volunteers. The measured mean concentrations in the soleus and the gastrocnemius muscles were found to be 2.81 ± 0.57/4.8 ± 1.59 mM (mean ± SD) for athletes and 2.58 ± 0.65/3.3 ± 0.32 mM for untrained volunteers, respectively. These values are in agreement with previously reported biopsy-based results. Our results suggest that 1H MRS can provide an alternative method for non-invasively determining carnosine concentration in human calf muscle in vivo.

  6. Antenna development for high field plasma imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, X.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.

    2010-10-15

    Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) and microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) are two microwave nonperturbing plasma visualization techniques that employ millimeter-wave imaging arrays with lens-coupled planar antennas, yielding time-resolved images of temperature (via ECEI) and electron density (via MIR) fluctuations within high temperature magnetic fusion plasmas. A series of new planar antennas have been developed that extend this technology to frequencies as high as 220 GHz for use on high field plasma devices with toroidal fields in excess of 3 T. Antenna designs are presented together with theoretical calculations, simulations, and experimental measurements.

  7. Antenna development for high field plasma imaginga)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2010-10-01

    Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) and microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) are two microwave nonperturbing plasma visualization techniques that employ millimeter-wave imaging arrays with lens-coupled planar antennas, yielding time-resolved images of temperature (via ECEI) and electron density (via MIR) fluctuations within high temperature magnetic fusion plasmas. A series of new planar antennas have been developed that extend this technology to frequencies as high as 220 GHz for use on high field plasma devices with toroidal fields in excess of 3 T. Antenna designs are presented together with theoretical calculations, simulations, and experimental measurements.

  8. Antenna development for high field plasma imaging.

    PubMed

    Kong, X; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C

    2010-10-01

    Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) and microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) are two microwave nonperturbing plasma visualization techniques that employ millimeter-wave imaging arrays with lens-coupled planar antennas, yielding time-resolved images of temperature (via ECEI) and electron density (via MIR) fluctuations within high temperature magnetic fusion plasmas. A series of new planar antennas have been developed that extend this technology to frequencies as high as 220 GHz for use on high field plasma devices with toroidal fields in excess of 3 T. Antenna designs are presented together with theoretical calculations, simulations, and experimental measurements.

  9. ISEE 3 observations of low-energy proton bidirectional events and their relation to isolated interplanetary magnetic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsden, R. G.; Sanderson, T. R.; Tranquille, C.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Smith, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    The paper represents the results of a comprehensive survey of low-energy proton bidirectional anisotropies and associated transient magnetic structures as observed in the 35-1600 keV energy range on ISEE-3 during the last solar maximum. The majority of observed bidirectional flow (BDF) events (more than 70 percent) are associated with isolated magnetic structures which are postulated to be an interplanetary manifestation of coronal mass ejection (CME) events. The observed BDF events can be qualitatively grouped into five classes depending on the field signature of the related magnetic structure and the association (or lack of association) with an interplanetary shock. Concerning the topology of the CME-related magnetic structures, the observations are interpreted as being consistent with a detached bubble, comprising closed loops or tightly wound helices.

  10. Development of an all-permanent-magnet microwave ion source equipped with multicusp magnetic fields for high current proton beam production.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Hara, S; Seki, T; Iga, T

    2008-02-01

    An all-permanent-magnet (APM) microwave hydrogen ion source was developed to reduce the size and to simplify structure of a conventional solenoid coil microwave ion source developed for reliability improvement of high current proton linac application systems. The difficulty in developing the APM source was sensitive dependence of the source performance on axial magnetic field in the microwave discharge chamber. It was difficult to produce high current proton beam stably without precise tuning of the magnetic field using solenoid coils. We lowered the sensitivity using multicusp magnetic fields for plasma confinement at the discharge chamber sidewall of the source. This enabled stable high current proton beam production with the APM microwave ion source with no tuning coil. The water cooling and the power supply for the coils are not necessary for the APM source, which leads to better reliability and system simplification. The outer diameter of the APM source was around 300 mm, which was 20% lower than the coil source. The APM source produced a maximum hydrogen ion beam current of 65 mA (high current density of 330 mA/cm(2), proton ratio of 87%, and beam energy of 30 keV) with a 5 mm diameter extraction aperture, pulse width of 400 micros, and 20 Hz repetition rate at 1.3 kW microwave power. This performance is almost the same as the best performances of the conventional coil sources. The extracted ion beams were focused with electrostatic five-grid lens to match beam to acceptance of radio-frequency quadrupole linacs. The maximum focused beam current through the orifice (5 mm radius) and the lens was 36 mA and the 90% focused beam half-width was 1-2 mm.

  11. Development of an all-permanent-magnet microwave ion source equipped with multicusp magnetic fields for high current proton beam productiona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, M.; Hara, S.; Seki, T.; Iga, T.

    2008-02-01

    An all-permanent-magnet (APM) microwave hydrogen ion source was developed to reduce the size and to simplify structure of a conventional solenoid coil microwave ion source developed for reliability improvement of high current proton linac application systems. The difficulty in developing the APM source was sensitive dependence of the source performance on axial magnetic field in the microwave discharge chamber. It was difficult to produce high current proton beam stably without precise tuning of the magnetic field using solenoid coils. We lowered the sensitivity using multicusp magnetic fields for plasma confinement at the discharge chamber sidewall of the source. This enabled stable high current proton beam production with the APM microwave ion source with no tuning coil. The water cooling and the power supply for the coils are not necessary for the APM source, which leads to better reliability and system simplification. The outer diameter of the APM source was around 300mm, which was 20% lower than the coil source. The APM source produced a maximum hydrogen ion beam current of 65mA (high current density of 330mA/cm2, proton ratio of 87%, and beam energy of 30keV) with a 5mm diameter extraction aperture, pulse width of 400μs, and 20Hz repetition rate at 1.3kW microwave power. This performance is almost the same as the best performances of the conventional coil sources. The extracted ion beams were focused with electrostatic five-grid lens to match beam to acceptance of radio-frequency quadrupole linacs. The maximum focused beam current through the orifice (5mm radius) and the lens was 36mA and the 90% focused beam half-width was 1-2mm.

  12. The effects of the RHIC E-lenses magnetic structure layout on the proton beam trajectory

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Pikin, A.; Luo, Y.; Okamura, M.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Raparia, D.

    2011-03-28

    We are designing two electron lenses (E-lens) to compensate for the large beam-beam tune spread from proton-proton interactions at IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). They will be installed in RHIC IR10. First, the layout of these two E-lenses is introduced. Then the effects of e-lenses on proton beam are discussed. For example, the transverse fields of the e-lens bending solenoids and the fringe field of the main solenoids will shift the proton beam. For the effects of the e-lens on proton beam trajectory, we calculate the transverse kicks that the proton beam receives in the electron lens via Opera at first. Then, after incorporating the simplified E-lens lattice in the RHIC lattice, we obtain the closed orbit effect with the Simtrack Code.

  13. Investigation of Ag-sheathed multi-filamentary Bi2Sr 2CaCu2O8-x superconducting round wires processed with overpressure, for high field magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matras, Maxime

    The need for electromagnets that generate fields >20 T has grown in numerous applications,, especially in high energy physics and NMR research. Conventional resistive magnets require a tremendous amount of power to generate these fields. In contrast superconducting magnets require significantly smaller amounts of power. The low temperature superconductors are limited to fields below 25 T, whereas high temperature superconductors (HTS) show large critical current density above 25 T. Ag-sheathed Bi2Sr2CaCu2O x (2212) multifilamentary round wire is the only HTS that can be made as a round wire with isotropic electrical behavior in magnetic field, and it has a high irreversibility field at 4.2 K. These properties make 2212 an ideal candidate for high-field magnets. Only recently has the critical current density (Jc) in 2212 been increased to a value that makes it a viable magnet material. In the past, the gas-filled porosity in the as-drawn 2212 filaments agglomerated into filament-size bubbles during the heat treatment of the wire at 1 atm. These bubbles severely limited the supercurrent flow in the wire and the gases in the bubbles could also expand at high temperature generating 2212 leakage. The bubbles and leakage were eliminated using overpressure (OP) processing, which was recently developed for 2212 at the Applied Superconductivity Center. OP processing uses a gas that isostatically compresses the Ag wire during the entire heat treatment of the wire, which eliminates the bubbles and prevents leakage. My studies showed that using OP at 100 atm increases Jc by 800 % compared to the conventional processing at 1 atm. This makes 2212 round wire a very competitive candidate for high-field magnets. The wire compression with OP is the key to reach high J c and it was studied as a function of time and temperature to optimize the densification process. We found that the wire diameter decreases by 3.8 +/- 0.3% after the full OP heat treatment (OP-HT) at 50 atm and by 3

  14. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the evaluation of children with congenital heart disease and acute central nervous system injury.

    PubMed

    Ashwal, S; Holshouser, B A; Hinshaw, D B; Schell, R M; Bailey, L

    1996-08-01

    We studied nine infants and children, aged 1 week to 42 months, with severe acute central nervous system injuries associated with cardiac disease or corrective operations by means of single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine whether this technique would be useful in predicting neurologic outcome. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic data were acquired from the occipital gray and parietal white matter (8 cm3 volume, stimulated echo-acquisition mode sequence with echo time of 20 msec and repetition time of 3.0 seconds) a median of 9 days after operation (range 3 to 42 days). Data were expressed as ratios of areas under metabolite peaks, including N-acetyl compounds, choline-containing compounds, creatine and phosphocreatine, and lactate. Four patients had cerebral insults before operation, one had both a preoperative and a perioperative insult, three had perioperative insults, and one had a prolonged cardiac arrest 2 days after operation. Outcomes (Glasgow Outcome Scale scores) were assigned at discharge and 6 to 12 months after injury. Six patients were in a vegetative state or had severe impairment at discharge, and two still had severe impairment at 6- to 12-month follow-up. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed lactate in these two patients, along with markedly reduced ratios of N-acetyl compounds to creatine compounds. The other four patients with severe impairment recovered to a level of mild disability at follow-up. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed no lactate in these four patients; however, one patient showed moderately reduced ratio of N-acetyl compounds to creatine compounds. The three patients who had mild or moderate impairment at discharge showed no lactate and mild or no changes in metabolite ratios; follow-up revealed normal or mild outcomes. Overall, we found that the presence of lactate and markedly reduced ratios of N-acetyl compounds to creatine compounds were predictive of severe outcomes at discharge

  15. About possibility of primary cosmic rays proton acceleration up to super-high relativistic energies in the Neutral Layer of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaradze, Nodar; Vanishvili, George; Bakradze, Themur; Kordzadze, Lia; Elizbarashvili, Misha; Bazerashvili, Eka

    2013-02-01

    Theoretical considerations concerning of the charged particles acceleration in general, and in particular, the peculiarities of protons acceleration in the Neutral Layer of Cosmic Space, in the frame of Maxwell Electro-Magnetic Field Theory have been reviewed on the article. A brief historical review of events is given, indicating that protons can be speeding up to ultra-relativistic energies in the Neutral Layer of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field, which is affirmed by anomalously high number of cosmic μ-mesons, generated by protons, through the decay of π- and -mesons, have been discovered in lower layers of the Earth's Atmosphere, as well as in a great depths of underground

  16. Complete Proton and Carbon Assignment of Triclosan via One- and Two- Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Students from an upper-division undergraduate spectroscopy class analyzed one- and two-dimensional 400 MHz NMR spectroscopic data from triclosan in CDCl3. Guided assignment of all proton and carbon signals was completed via 1D proton and carbon, nuclear Overhauser effect (nOe), distortionless enhanc...

  17. Individual variation in macronutrient regulation measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of human plasma.

    PubMed

    Park, Youngja; Kim, Seoung Bum; Wang, Bing; Blanco, Roberto A; Le, Ngoc-Anh; Wu, Shaoxiong; Accardi, Carolyn J; Alexander, R Wayne; Ziegler, Thomas R; Jones, Dean P

    2009-07-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) spectroscopy of plasma provides a global metabolic profiling method that shows promise for clinical diagnostics. However, cross-sectional studies are complicated by a lack of understanding of intraindividual variation, and this limits experimental design and interpretation of data. The present study determined the diurnal variation detected by (1)H NMR spectroscopy of human plasma. Data reduction methods revealed three time-of-day metabolic patterns, which were associated with morning, afternoon, and night. Major discriminatory regions for these time-of-day patterns included the various kinds of lipid signals (-CH(2)- and -CH(2)OCOR), and the region between 3 and 4 ppm heavily overlapped with amino acids that had alpha-CH and alpha-CH(2). The phasing and duration of time-of-day patterns were variable among individuals, apparently because of individual difference in food processing/digestion and absorption and clearance of macronutrient energy sources (fat, protein, carbohydrate). The times of day that were most consistent among individuals, and therefore most useful for cross-sectional studies, were fasting morning (0830-0930), postprandial afternoon (1430-1630), and nighttime samples (0430-0530). Importantly, the integrated picture of metabolism provided by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy of plasma suggests that this approach is suitable to study complex regulatory processes, including eating patterns/eating disorders, upper gastrointestinal functions (gastric emptying, pancreatic, biliary functions), and absorption/clearance of macronutrients. Hence, (1)H-NMR spectroscopy of plasma could provide a global metabolic tolerance test to assess complex processes involved in disease, including eating disorders and the range of physiological processes causing dysregulation of energy homeostasis.

  18. APOE genotype modulates proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy metabolites in the aging brain.

    PubMed

    Gomar, Jesus J; Gordon, Marc L; Dickinson, Dwight; Kingsley, Peter B; Uluğ, Aziz M; Keehlisen, Lynda; Huet, Sarah; Buthorn, Justin J; Koppel, Jeremy; Christen, Erica; Conejero-Goldberg, Concepcion; Davies, Peter; Goldberg, Terry E

    2014-05-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) studies on healthy aging have reported inconsistent findings and have not systematically taken into account the possible modulatory effect of APOE genotype. We aimed to quantify brain metabolite changes in healthy subjects in relation to age and the presence of the APOE E4 genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Additionally, we examined these measures in relation to cognition. We studied a cohort of 112 normal adults between 50 and 86 years old who were genotyped for APOE genetic polymorphism. Measurements of (1)H-MRS metabolites were obtained in the posterior cingulate and precuneus region. Measures of general cognitive functioning, memory, executive function, semantic fluency, and speed of processing were also obtained. General linear model analysis demonstrated that older APOE E4 carriers had significantly higher choline/creatine and myo-inositol/creatine ratios than APOE E3 homozygotes. Structural equation modeling resulted in a model with an excellent goodness of fit and in which the APOE × age interaction and APOE status each had a significant effect on (1)H-MRS metabolites (choline/creatine and myo-inositol/creatine). Furthermore, the APOE × age variable modulation of cognition was mediated by (1)H-MRS metabolites. In a healthy aging normal population, choline/creatine and myo-inositol/creatine ratios were significantly increased in APOE E4 carriers, suggesting the presence of neuroinflammatory processes and greater membrane turnover in older carriers. Structural equation modeling analysis confirmed these possible neurodegenerative markers and also indicated the mediator role of these metabolites on cognitive performance among older APOE E4 carriers. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. All rights reserved.

  19. A longitudinal proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study of mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Ronald A; Gasparovic, Charles; Merideth, Flannery; Ruhl, David; Doezema, David; Mayer, Andrew R

    2011-01-01

    Despite the prevalence and impact of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), common clinical assessment methods for mTBI have insufficient sensitivity and specificity. Moreover, few researchers have attempted to document underlying changes in physiology as a function of recovery from mTBI. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (¹H-MRS) was used to assess neurometabolite concentrations in a supraventricular tissue slab in 30 individuals with semi-acute mTBI, and 30 sex-, age-, and education-matched controls. No significant group differences were evident on traditional measures of attention, memory, working memory, processing speed, and executive skills, though the mTBI group reported significantly more somatic, cognitive, and emotional symptoms. At a mean of 13 days post-injury, white matter concentrations of creatine (Cre) and phosphocreatine (PCre) and the combined glutamate-glutamine signal (Glx) were elevated in the mTBI group, while gray matter concentrations of Glx were reduced. Partial normalization of these three neurometabolites and N-acetyl aspartate occurred in the early days post-injury, during the semi-acute period of recovery. In addition, 17 mTBI patients (57%) returned for a follow-up evaluation (mean = 120 days post-injury). A significant group × time interaction indicated recovery in the mTBI group for gray matter Glx, and trends toward recovery in white matter Cre and Glx. An estimate of premorbid intelligence predicted the magnitude of neurometabolite normalization over the follow-up interval for the mTBI group, indicating that biological factors underlying intelligence may also be associated with more rapid recovery.

  20. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the motor cortex in cervical myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Izabela; Duggal, Neil; Bartha, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Alterations in motor function in cervical myelopathy secondary to degenerative disease may be due to local effects of spinal compression or distal effects related to cortical reorganization. This prospective study characterizes differences in metabolite levels in the motor cortex, specifically N-acetylaspartate, creatine, choline, myo-inositol and glutamate plus glutamine, due to alterations in cortical function in patients with reversible spinal cord compression compared with healthy controls. We hypothesized that N-acetylaspartate/creatine levels would be decreased in the motor cortex of patients with cervical myelopathy due to reduced neuronal integrity/function and myo-inositol/creatine levels would be increased due to reactive gliosis. Twenty-four patients with cervical myelopathy and 11 healthy controls underwent proton-magnetic resonance spectroscopy on a 3.0 Tesla Siemens Magnetom Tim Trio MRI. Areas of activation from functional magnetic resonance imaging scans of a finger-tapping paradigm were used to localize a voxel on the side of greater motor deficit in the myelopathy group (n = 10 on right side and n = 14 on left side of the brain) and on each side of the motor cortex in controls. Neurological function was measured with the Neck Disability Index, modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association and American Spinal Injury Association questionnaires. Metabolite levels were measured relative to total creatine within the voxel of interest. No metabolite differences were detected between the right side and left side of the motor cortex in controls. The myelopathy group had significantly decreased neurological function compared with the control group (Neck Disability Index: P < 0.001 and modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association: P < 0.001). There was a significant decrease in the N-acetylaspartate/creatine metabolite ratio in the motor cortex of the myelopathy group (1.21 ± 0.07) compared with the right (1.37 ± 0.03; P = 0.01) and