Science.gov

Sample records for high-frequency gravitational waves

  1. Gravitational Wave Astronomy:The High Frequency Window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Nils; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    As several large scale interferometers are beginning to take data at sensitivities where astrophysical sources are predicted, the direct detection of gravitational waves may well be imminent. This would (finally) open the long anticipated gravitational-wave window to our Universe, and should lead to a much improved understanding of the most violent processes imaginable; the formation of black holes and neutron stars following core collapse supernovae and the merger of compact objects at the end of binary inspiral. Over the next decade we can hope to learn much about the extreme physics associated with, in particular, neutron stars. This contribution is divided in two parts. The first part provides a text-book level introduction to gravitational radiation. The key concepts required for a discussion of gravitational-wave physics are introduced. In particular, the quadrupole formula is applied to the anticipated bread-and-butter source for detectors like LIGO, GEO600, EGO and TAMA300: inspiralling compact binaries. The second part provides a brief review of high frequency gravitational waves. In the frequency range above (say) 100 Hz, gravitational collapse, rotational instabilities and oscillations of the remnant compact objects are potentially important sources of gravitational waves. Significant and unique information concerning the various stages of collapse, the evolution of protoneutron stars and the details of the supranuclear equation of state of such objects can be drawn from careful study of the gravitational-wave signal. As the amount of exciting physics one may be able to study via the detections of gravitational waves from these sources is truly inspiring, there is strong motivation for the development of future generations of ground based detectors sensitive in the range from hundreds of Hz to several kHz.

  2. The Influence of High-Frequency Gravitational Waves Upon Muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Moy, Lawrence S.; Baker, Robert M. L. Jr

    2007-01-30

    The objective of this paper is to present a theory for the possible influence of high-frequency gravitational waves or HFGWs and pulsed micro-current electromagnetic waves or EMs on biological matter specifically on muscle cells and myofibroblasts. The theory involves consideration of the natural frequency of contractions and relaxations of muscles, especially underlying facial skin, and the possible influence of HFGWs on that process. GWs pass without attenuation through all material thus conventional wisdom would dictate that GWs would have no influence on biological matter. On the other hand, GWs can temporarily modify a gravitational field in some locality if they are of high frequency and such a modification might have an influence in changing the skin muscles' natural frequency. Prior to the actual laboratory generation of HFGWs their influence can be emulated by micro-current EM pulses to the skin and some evidence presented here on that effect may predict the influence of HFGWs. We believe that the HFGW pulsations lead to increased muscle activity and may serve to reverse the aging process. A novel theoretical framework concerning these relaxation phenomena is one result of the paper. Another result is the analysis of the possible delivery system of the FBAR-generated HFGWs, the actual power of the generated HFGWs, and the system's application to nanostructural modification of the skin or muscle cells. It is concluded that a series of non-evasive experiments, which are identified, will have the potential to test theory by detecting and analyzing the possible HFGWs change in polarization, refraction, etc. after their interaction with the muscle cells.

  3. High-Frequency Gravitational Wave Induced Nuclear Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, Giorgio; Baker, Robert M. L. Jr.

    2007-01-30

    Nuclear fusion is a process in which nuclei, having a total initial mass, combine to produce a single nucleus, having a final mass less than the total initial mass. Below a given atomic number the process is exothermic; that is, since the final mass is less than the combined initial mass and the mass deficit is converted into energy by the nuclear fusion. On Earth nuclear fusion does not happen spontaneously because electrostatic barriers prevent the phenomenon. To induce controlled, industrial scale, nuclear fusion, only a few methods have been discovered that look promising, but net positive energy production is not yet possible because of low overall efficiency of the systems. In this paper we propose that an intense burst of High Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGWs) could be focused or beamed to a target mass composed of appropriate fuel or target material to efficiently rearrange the atomic or nuclear structure of the target material with consequent nuclear fusion. Provided that efficient generation of HFGW can be technically achieved, the proposed fusion reactor could become a viable solution for the energy needs of mankind and alternatively a process for beaming energy to produce a source of fusion energy remotely - even inside solid materials.

  4. The potential for very high-frequency gravitational wave detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruise, A. M.

    2012-05-01

    The science case for observing gravitational waves at frequencies in the millihertz-kilohertz range using LIGO, VIRGO, GEO600 or LISA is very strong and the first results are expected at these frequencies. However, as gravitational wave astronomy progresses beyond the first detections, other frequency bands may be worth exploring. Early predictions of gravitational wave emission from discrete sources at very much higher frequencies (megahertz and above) have been published and more recent studies of cosmological signals from inflation, Kaluza-Klein modes from gravitational interactions in brane worlds and plasma instabilities surrounding violent astrophysical events, are all possible sources. This communication examines current observational possibilities and the detector technology required to make meaningful observations at these frequencies.

  5. Signal photon flux generated by high-frequency relic gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Wang, Sai; Wen, Hao

    2016-08-01

    The power spectrum of primordial tensor perturbations increases rapidly in the high frequency region if the spectral index n t > 0. It is shown that the amplitude of relic gravitational waves h t(5 × 109 Hz) varies from 10-36 to 10-25 while n t varies from -6.25 × 10-3 to 0.87. A high frequency gravitational wave detector proposed by F.-Y. Li detects gravitational waves through observing the perturbed photon flux that is generated by interaction between relic gravitational waves and electromagnetic field. It is shown that the perturbative photon flux (5 × 109 Hz) varies from 1.40 × 10-4 s-1 to 2.85 × 107 s-1 while n t varies from -6.25 × 10-3 to 0.87. Correspondingly, the ratio of the transverse perturbative photon flux to the background photon flux varies from 10-28 to 10-16. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11305181,11322545,11335012) and Open Project Program of State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Y5KF181CJ1)

  6. Proposed Ultra-High Sensitivity High-Frequency Gravitational Wave Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Robert M. L.; Stephenson, Gary V.; Li, Fangyu

    2008-01-01

    The paper discusses the proposed improvement of a High-Frequency Relic Gravitational Wave (HFRGW) detector designed by Li, Baker, Fang, Stephenson and Chen in order to greatly improve its sensitivity. The improved detector is inspired by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Observatory or LIGO, but is sensitive to the high-frequency end of the gravitational-wave spectrum. As described in prior papers it utilizes the Gertsenshtein effect, which introduces the conversion of gravitational waves to electromagnetic (EM) waves in the presence of a static magnetic field. Such a conversion, if it leads to photons moving in a direction perpendicular to the plane of the EM waves and the magnetic field, will allow for ultra-high sensitivity HFRGW detection. The use of sensitive microwave, single photon detectors such as a circuit QED and/or the Rydberg Atom Cavity Detector, or off-the-shelf detectors, could lead to such detection. When the EM-detection photons are focused at the microwave detectors by fractal-membrane reflectors sensitivity is also improved. Noise sources external to the HFRGW detector will be eliminated by placing a tight mosaic of superconducting tiles (e.g., YBCO) and/or fractal membranes on the interior surface of the detector's cryogenic containment vessel in order to provide a perfect Faraday cage. Internal thermal noise will be eliminated by means of a microwave absorbing (or reflecting) interior enclosure shaped to conform to a high-intensity continuous microwave Gaussian beam (GB), will reduce any background photon flux (BPF) noise radiated normal to the GB's axis. Such BPF will be further attenuated by a series of microwave absorbing baffles forming tunnels to the sensitive microwave detectors on each side of the GB and at right angles to the static magnetic field. A HFGW detector of bandwidth of 1 KHz to 10 KHz or less in the GHz band has been selected. It is concluded that the utilization of the new ultra-high-sensitivity microwave detectors

  7. The Peoples Republic of China High-Frequency Gravitational Wave Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Robert M. L.

    2009-03-01

    For the past decade the Peoples Republic of China has been increasingly active in the pursuit of High-Frequency Gravitational Wave (HFGW) research. Much of their progress has been during 2008. An epochal achievement was the publication of the theoretical analysis of the Li-Baker HFGW detector in the European Physical Journal C (Li, et al., 2008), "Perturbative Photon Fluxes Generated by High-Frequency Gravitational Waves and Their Physical Effects"). Many Chinese scientists and graduate students have participated in these HFGW studies and their contributions are briefly discussed. Some of the key scientists and their institutions are as follows: first from Chongqing University: Zhenyun Fang, Director of the Institute of Theoretical Physics, Xing gang Wu, The Institute of Theoretical Physics, Nan Yang, The Institute of Gravitational Physics; Jun Luo, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Wuhan, China, the Head of Gravitational Laboratory, Yang Zhang, University of Science and Technology of China, Associate Dean of the College of Sciences, Biao Li, Institute of Electronic Engineering of China Academy of Engineering Physics (CAEP), Chief of Microwave Antenna Division, Chuan-Ming Zhou, Technology Committee of Institute of Electronic Engineering of the CAEP, Jie Zhou, Institute of Electronic Engineering of the CAEP, Chief of the Signal Processing Division; Weijia Wen, Department of Physics, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. This Chinese HFGW team includes two parts: (1) Theoretical study and (2) Experimental investigation. These two parts have closed relations, and many cross projects, including cooperation between the American GravWave and Chinese HFGW teams. Referring to financial support, The Institute of Electronic Engineering (i.e., Microwave Laboratory) has already (June 2008) provided support more than three million Yuan for the HFGW detection project and this activity is discussed.

  8. Piezoelectric-Crystal-Resonator High-Frequency Gravitational Wave Generation and Synchro-Resonance Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Robert M. L.; Woods, R. Clive; Li, Fangyu

    2006-01-01

    Here we show the generation of high-frequency-gravitational-waves (HFGWs) utilizing piezoelectric elements such as the ubiquitous Film-Bulk-Acoustic-Resonators (FBARs), found in cell phones, as energized by inexpensive magnetrons, found in microwave ovens, generating GWs having a frequency of about 4.9GHz and their detection by means of new synchro-resonance techniques developed in China. In the 1960s Weber suggested piezoelectric crystals for gravitational-wave (GW) generation. Since then researchers have proposed specific designs. The major obstacle has been the cost of procuring, installing, and energizing a sufficient number of such resonators to generate sufficiently powerful GWs to allow for detection. Recent mass-production techniques, spurred on by the production of cell phones, have driven the cost of resonators down. The new Chinese detector for detecting the 4.9×109Hz HFGW is a coupling-system of fractal membranes-beam-splitters and a narrow, 6.1 cm-radius, pulsed-Gaussian-laser or continuous-Gaussian detection beam passing through a static 15T-magnetic field. The detector is sensitive to GW amplitudes of ~10-30 to be generated with signal-to-noise ratios greater than one. It is concluded that a cost-effective HFGW generation and detection apparatus can now be fabricated and operated in the laboratory. If the two groups or clusters of magnetrons and FBARs were space borne and at lunar distance (e.g., at the Moon and at the lunar L3 libration point) and the quadrupole formalism approximately holds for GW radiators (the FBAR clusters) many GW wavelengths apart, then the HFGW power would be about 420 W and the flux about 2×105 Wm-2 (or more than one hundred times greater than the solar radiation flux at the Earth) focused at the focal spot, or remote-HFGW-emitter, anywhere in the Earth's environs - on or below the Earth's surface.

  9. Applications of High-Frequency Gravitational Waves to the Global War on Terror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Robert M. L.

    2010-01-01

    Applications of high-frequency gravitational waves or HFGWs to the global war on terror are now realistic because technology developed by GravWave® LLC and other institutions overseas can lead to devices, some already constructed, that can generate and detect HFGWs. In fact, three HFGW detectors have been built outside the United States and an ultra high-sensitive Li-Baker HFGW Detector has been proposed. HFGW generators have been proposed theoretically by the Russians, Germans, Italians and Chinese. Because of their unique characteristics, such as their ability to pass through all material without attenuation, HFGWs could be utilized for uninterruptible, very low-probability-of-intercept (LPI), high-bandwidth communications among and between anti-terrorist assets. One such communications system, which can be constructed from off-the-shelf elements, is discussed. The HFGW generation device or transmitter alternative selected is based upon bands of piezoelectric crystal, film-bulk acoustic resonators or FBARs energized by conventional Magnetrons. The system is theoretically capable of transmitting and detecting, through use of the Li-Baker HFGW detector, a signal generated on the opposite side of the Earth. Although HFGWs do not interact with and are not absorbed by ordinary matter, their presence can be detected by their distortion of spacetime as measured by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Observatory (LIGO), Virgo, GEO600, et al., by detection photons generated from electromagnetic beams having the same frequency, direction and phase as the HFGWs in a superimposed magnetic field (Li-Baker HFGW Detector), by the change in polarization HFGWs produce in a microwave guide (Birmingham University Detector) and by other such instruments. Potential theoretical applications, which may or may not be practical yet theoretically possible, are propulsion, including "moving" space objects such as missiles, anti-missiles and warheads in flight; surveillance through

  10. Upper Limits On High-Frequency Single-Source Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halmrast, Daniel; Beklen, Elif; Chatterjee, Shami; Cordes, James M.; Dolch, Timothy; Ellis, Justin; Lam, Michael T.; McLaughlin, Maura; Pennucci, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    In the coming years, pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are poised to detect gravitational waves (GWs) from supermassive black hole binary systems. In addition to measuring the GW stochastic background, PTAs can also detect single-source GWs. By analyzing data taken over many years, PTAs are typically sensitive to nanohertz-frequency GW sources. However, the microhertz to millihertz GW frequency regime is outside the typical range of PTA sensitivity, and is relatively unexplored. Through analysis of multiple-hour long observations of particular pulsars routinely measured by the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav), we searched for continuous wave (CW) sources at GW frequencies in the microhertz to millihertz regime. Using such single-pulsar measurements taken by the NRAO Green Bank Telescope, we applied CW detection algorithms to the datasets. While no CW sources were detected within the data, new upper limits on the strains of single-source GWs were found in the GW frequency range of 10 microhertz to 1 millihertz. By repeatedly simulating sources with known strains, we determined the minimum strains required for CW detection, and showed that these minimum strains place upper limits on the strengths of potential sources. Due to the positions of the pulsars analyzed, we also placed stronger directional limits on CW sources in the high GW frequency regime.

  11. Search for high frequency gravitational-wave bursts in the first calendar year of LIGO's fifth science run

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Aso, Y.; Ballmer, S.; Barton, M. A.; Betzwieser, J.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Cannon, K. C.; Cardenas, L.; Cepeda, C.; Chalermsongsak, T.

    2009-11-15

    We present an all-sky search for gravitational waves in the frequency range 1 to 6 kHz during the first calendar year of LIGO's fifth science run. This is the first untriggered LIGO burst analysis to be conducted above 3 kHz. We discuss the unique properties of interferometric data in this regime. 161.3 days of triple-coincident data were analyzed. No gravitational events above threshold were observed and a frequentist upper limit of 5.4 year{sup -1} on the rate of strong gravitational-wave bursts was placed at a 90% confidence level. Implications for specific theoretical models of gravitational-wave emission are also discussed.

  12. Results of an all-sky high-frequency Einstein@Home search for continuous gravitational waves in LIGO's fifth science run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Avneet; Papa, Maria Alessandra; Eggenstein, Heinz-Bernd; Zhu, Sylvia; Pletsch, Holger; Allen, Bruce; Bock, Oliver; Maschenchalk, Bernd; Prix, Reinhard; Siemens, Xavier

    2016-09-01

    We present results of a high-frequency all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from isolated compact objects in LIGO's fifth science run (S5) data, using the computing power of the Einstein@Home volunteer computing project. This is the only dedicated continuous gravitational wave search that probes this high-frequency range on S5 data. We find no significant candidate signal, so we set 90% confidence level upper limits on continuous gravitational wave strain amplitudes. At the lower end of the search frequency range, around 1250 Hz, the most constraining upper limit is 5.0 ×10-24, while at the higher end, around 1500 Hz, it is 6.2 ×10-24. Based on these upper limits, and assuming a fiducial value of the principal moment of inertia of 1038 kg m2 , we can exclude objects with ellipticities higher than roughly 2.8 ×10-7 within 100 pc of Earth with rotation periods between 1.3 and 1.6 milliseconds.

  13. The gravitational wave decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, John

    2016-03-01

    With the expected direct detection of gravitational waves by Advanced LIGO and pulsar timing arrays in the near future, and with the recent launch of LISA Pathfinder this can arguably be called the decade of gravitational waves. Low frequency gravitational waves in the mHz range, which can only be observed from space, provide the richest science and complement high frequency observatories on the ground. A space-based observatory will improve our understanding of the formation and growth of massive black holes, create a census of compact binary systems in the Milky Way, test general relativity in extreme conditions, and enable searches for new physics. LISA, by far the most mature concept for detecting gravitational waves from space, has consistently ranked among the nation's top priority large science missions. In 2013, ESA selected the science theme ``The Gravitational Universe'' for its third large mission, L3, under the Cosmic Visions Program, with a planned launch date of 2034. NASA has decided to join with ESA on the L3 mission as a junior partner and has recently assembled a study team to provide advice on how NASA might contribute to the European-led mission. This talk will describe these efforts and the activities of the Gravitational Wave Science Interest Group and the L3 Study Team, which will lead to the first space-based gravitational wave observatory.

  14. Gravitational lensing of gravitational wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kei Wong, Wang; Ng, Kwan Yeung

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational lensing phenomena are widespread in electromagnetic astrophysics, and in principle may also be uncovered with gravitational waves. We examine gravitational wave events lensed by elliptical galaxies in the limit of geometric optics, where we expect to see multiple signals from the same event with different arrival times and amplitudes. By using mass functions for compact binaries from population-synthesis simulations and a lensing probability calculated from Planck data, we estimate the rate of lensed signals for future gravitational wave missions.

  15. High-frequency Rayleigh-wave method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xu, Y.; Luo, Y.; Chen, C.; Liu, J.; Ivanov, J.; Zeng, C.

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency (???2 Hz) Rayleigh-wave data acquired with a multichannel recording system have been utilized to determine shear (S)-wave velocities in near-surface geophysics since the early 1980s. This overview article discusses the main research results of high-frequency surface-wave techniques achieved by research groups at the Kansas Geological Survey and China University of Geosciences in the last 15 years. The multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method is a non-invasive acoustic approach to estimate near-surface S-wave velocity. The differences between MASW results and direct borehole measurements are approximately 15% or less and random. Studies show that simultaneous inversion with higher modes and the fundamental mode can increase model resolution and an investigation depth. The other important seismic property, quality factor (Q), can also be estimated with the MASW method by inverting attenuation coefficients of Rayleigh waves. An inverted model (S-wave velocity or Q) obtained using a damped least-squares method can be assessed by an optimal damping vector in a vicinity of the inverted model determined by an objective function, which is the trace of a weighted sum of model-resolution and model-covariance matrices. Current developments include modeling high-frequency Rayleigh-waves in near-surface media, which builds a foundation for shallow seismic or Rayleigh-wave inversion in the time-offset domain; imaging dispersive energy with high resolution in the frequency-velocity domain and possibly with data in an arbitrary acquisition geometry, which opens a door for 3D surface-wave techniques; and successfully separating surface-wave modes, which provides a valuable tool to perform S-wave velocity profiling with high-horizontal resolution. ?? China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009.

  16. High Frequency Guided Wave Virtual Array SAFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, R.; Pardini, A.; Diaz, A.

    2003-03-01

    The principles of the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) are generalized for application to high frequency plate wave signals. It is shown that a flaw signal received in long-range plate wave propagation can be analyzed as if the signals were measured by an infinite array of transducers in an unbounded medium. It is shown that SAFT-based flaw sizing can be performed with as few as three or less actual measurement positions.

  17. Measurement of high frequency waves using a wave follower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, S.; Shemdin, O. H.

    1983-01-01

    High frequency waves were measured using a laser-optical sensor mounted on a wave follower. Measured down-wind wave slope spectra are shown to be wind speed dependent; the mean square wave-slopes are generally larger than those measured by Cox and Munk (1954) using the sun glitter method.

  18. Gravitational Wave Astrophysics: Opening the New Frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2011-01-01

    The gravitational wave window onto the universe is expected to open in approximately 5 years, when ground-based detectors make the first detections in the high-frequency regime. Gravitational waves are ripples in spacetime produced by the motions of massive objects such as black holes and neutron stars. Since the universe is nearly transparent to gravitational waves, these signals carry direct information about their sources - such as masses, spins, luminosity distances, and orbital parameters through dense, obscured regions across cosmic time. This talk will explore gravitational waves as cosmic messengers, highlighting key sources, detection methods, and the astrophysical payoffs across the gravitational wave spectrum.

  19. Gravitational Wave Astrophysics: Opening the New Frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2011-01-01

    The gravitational wave window onto the universe is expected to open in approx. 5 years, when ground-based detectors make the first detections in the high-frequency regime. Gravitational waves are ripples in spacetime produced by the motions of massive objects such as black holes and neutron stars. Since the universe is nearly transparent to gravitational waves, these signals carry direct information about their sources - such as masses, spins, luminosity distances, and orbital parameters, through dense, obscured regions across cosmic time. This article explores gravitational waves as cosmic messengers, highlighting key sources, detection methods, and the astrophysical payoffs across the gravitational wave spectrum.

  20. Gravitational Waves from Gravitational Collapse.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Chris L; New, Kimberly C B

    2003-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for more than three decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  1. Gravitational Waves from Gravitational Collapse.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Chris L; New, Kimberly C B

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational-wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion-induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  2. Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Christopher L; New, Kimberly C

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  3. Gravitational Wave Astrophysics: Opening the New Frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2011-01-01

    The gravitational wave window onto the universe is expected to open in 5 years, when ground-based detectors make the first detections in the high-frequency regime. Gravitational waves are ripples in spacetime produced by the motions of massive objects such as black holes and neutron stars. Since the universe is nearly transparent to gravitational waves, these signals carry direct information about their sources such as masses, spins, luminosity distances, and orbital parameters through dense, obscured regions across cosmic time. This article explores gravitational waves as cosmic messengers, highlighting key sources, detection methods, and the astrophysical payoffs across the gravitational wave spectrum. Keywords: Gravitational wave astrophysics; gravitational radiation; gravitational wave detectors; black holes.

  4. Gravitational Wave Astrophysics: Opening the New Frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2011-01-01

    A new era in astronomy will begin when the gravitational wave window onto the universe opens in approx. 5 years) as ground-based detectors make the first detections in the high-frequency regime. Since the universe is nearly transparent to gravitational waves) these signals carry direct information about their sources - such as masses) spins) luminosity distances) and orbital parameters - through dense) obscured regions across cosmic time. This talk will explore gravitational waves as cosmic messengers) highlighting key sources and opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy across the gravitational wave spectrum.

  5. Gravitational Wave Astrophysics: Opening the New Frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2011-01-01

    A new era in time-domain astronomy will begin when the gravitational wave window onto the universe opens in approx. 5 years, as ground-based detectors make the first detections in the high-frequency regime. Since the universe is nearly transparent to gravitational waves, these signals carry direct information about their sources - such as masses, spins, luminosity distances, and orbital parameters through dense, obscured regions across cosmic time. This talk will explore gravitational waves as cosmic messengers, highlighting key sources and opportunities for multimessenger astronomy across the gravitational wave spectrum.

  6. Gravitational Wave Astrophysics: Opening the New Frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2012-01-01

    A new era in astronomy will begin when the gravitational wave window onto the universe opens in approx. 5 years, as ground-based detectors make the first detections in the high-frequency regime. Since the universe is nearly transparent to gravitational waves, these signals carry direct information about their sources - such as masses, spins, luminosity distances, and orbital parameters - through dense, obscured regions across cosmic time. This talk will explore gravitational waves as cosmic messengers, highlighting key sources and opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy across the gravitational wave spectrum.

  7. Gravitational waves from inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzetti, M. C.; Bartolo, N.; Liguori, M.; Matarrese, S.

    2016-09-01

    The production of a stochastic background of gravitational waves is a fundamental prediction of any cosmological inflationary model. The features of such a signal encode unique information about the physics of the Early Universe and beyond, thus representing an exciting, powerful window on the origin and evolution of the Universe. We review the main mechanisms of gravitational-wave production, ranging from quantum fluctuations of the gravitational field to other mechanisms that can take place during or after inflation. These include e.g. gravitational waves generated as a consequence of extra particle production during inflation, or during the (p)reheating phase. Gravitational waves produced in inflation scenarios based on modified gravity theories and second-order gravitational waves are also considered. For each analyzed case, the expected power spectrum is given. We discuss the discriminating power among different models, associated with the validity/violation of the standard consistency relation between tensor-to-scalar ratio r and tensor spectral index nT. In light of the prospects for (directly/indirectly) detecting primordial gravitational waves, we give the expected present-day gravitational radiation spectral energy-density, highlighting the main characteristics imprinted by the cosmic thermal history, and we outline the signatures left by gravitational waves on the Cosmic Microwave Background and some imprints in the Large-Scale Structure of the Universe. Finally, current bounds and prospects of detection for inflationary gravitational waves are summarized.

  8. Gravitational wave-Gauge field oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, R. R.; Devulder, C.; Maksimova, N. A.

    2016-09-01

    Gravitational waves propagating through a stationary gauge field transform into gauge field waves and back again. When multiple families of flavor-space locked gauge fields are present, the gravitational and gauge field waves exhibit novel dynamics. At high frequencies, the system behaves like coupled oscillators in which the gravitational wave is the central pacemaker. Due to energy conservation and exchange among the oscillators, the wave amplitudes lie on a multidimensional sphere, reminiscent of neutrino flavor oscillations. This phenomenon has implications for cosmological scenarios based on flavor-space locked gauge fields.

  9. Those Elusive Gravitational Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The presence of gravitational waves was predicted by Einstein in his theory of General Relativity. Since then, scientists have been attempting to develop a detector sensitive enough to measure these cosmic signals. Once the presence of gravitational waves is confirmed, scientists can directly study star interiors, galaxy cores, or quasars. (MA)

  10. Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, D. G.; Howell, E. J.; Ju, L.; Zhao, C.

    2012-02-01

    Part I. An Introduction to Gravitational Wave Astronomy and Detectors: 1. Gravitational waves D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao and E. J. Howell; 2. Sources of gravitational waves D. G. Blair and E. J. Howell; 3. Gravitational wave detectors D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao, H. Miao, E. J. Howell, and P. Barriga; 4. Gravitational wave data analysis B. S. Sathyaprakash and B. F. Schutz; 5. Network analysis L. Wen and B. F. Schutz; Part II. Current Laser Interferometer Detectors: Three Case Studies: 6. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory P. Fritschel; 7. The VIRGO detector S. Braccini; 8. GEO 600 H. Lück and H. Grote; Part III. Technology for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors: 9. Lasers for high optical power interferometers B. Willke and M. Frede; 10. Thermal noise, suspensions and test masses L. Ju, G. Harry and B. Lee; 11. Vibration isolation: Part 1. Seismic isolation for advanced LIGO B. Lantz; Part 2. Passive isolation J-C. Dumas; 12. Interferometer sensing and control P. Barriga; 13. Stabilizing interferometers against high optical power effects C. Zhao, L. Ju, S. Gras and D. G. Blair; Part IV. Technology for Third Generation Gravitational Wave Detectors: 14. Cryogenic interferometers J. Degallaix; 15. Quantum theory of laser-interferometer GW detectors H. Miao and Y. Chen; 16. ET. A third generation observatory M. Punturo and H. Lück; Index.

  11. Search for Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubono, K.

    The current status of the experimental search for gravitational waves is reviewed here. The emphasis is on the Japanese TAMA project. We started operation of the TAMA300 laser interferometric detector in 1999, and are now collecting and analyzing observational data to search for gravitational wave signals.

  12. Towards Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losurdo, Giovanni

    This chapter is meant to introduce the reader to the forthcoming network of second-generation interferometric detectors of gravitational waves, at a time when their construction is close to completion and there is the ambition to detect gravitational waves for the first time in the next few years and open the way to gravitational wave astronomy. The legacy of first-generation detectors is discussed before giving an overview of the technology challenges that have been faced to make advanced detectors possible. The various aspects outlined here are then discussed in more detail in the subsequent chapters of the book.

  13. High-frequency matrix converter with square wave input

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Joseph Alexander; Balda, Juan Carlos

    2015-03-31

    A device for producing an alternating current output voltage from a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage comprising, high-frequency, square-wave input a matrix converter and a control system. The matrix converter comprises a plurality of electrical switches. The high-frequency input and the matrix converter are electrically connected to each other. The control system is connected to each switch of the matrix converter. The control system is electrically connected to the input of the matrix converter. The control system is configured to operate each electrical switch of the matrix converter converting a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage across the first input port of the matrix converter and the second input port of the matrix converter to an alternating current output voltage at the output of the matrix converter.

  14. Gravitational Waves and Time Domain Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan; Nissanke, Samaya; Williams, Roy

    2012-01-01

    The gravitational wave window onto the universe will open in roughly five years, when Advanced LIGO and Virgo achieve the first detections of high frequency gravitational waves, most likely coming from compact binary mergers. Electromagnetic follow-up of these triggers, using radio, optical, and high energy telescopes, promises exciting opportunities in multi-messenger time domain astronomy. In the decade, space-based observations of low frequency gravitational waves from massive black hole mergers, and their electromagnetic counterparts, will open up further vistas for discovery. This two-part workshop featured brief presentations and stimulating discussions on the challenges and opportunities presented by gravitational wave astronomy. Highlights from the workshop, with the emphasis on strategies for electromagnetic follow-up, are presented in this report.

  15. Gravitational-Wave Detection (ii). Current Gravitational Wave Detector Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Nobuyuki

    2005-11-01

    The workshop session C1ii was focused on the results of recent operating detectors. 10 speakers presented the latest results of each experiments: ALLEGRO, GEO, LIGO, TAMA and VIRGO experiments. There were reports about searches for gravitational waves in analysis of observation data. The results are of no detection of gravitational waves, but observational upper-limits of gravitational waves are improved.

  16. Gravitational Waves: The Evidence Mounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wick, Gerald L.

    1970-01-01

    Reviews the work of Weber and his colleagues in their attempts at detecting extraterrestial gravitational waves. Coincidence events recorded by special detectors provide the evidence for the existence of gravitational waves. Bibliography. (LC)

  17. Gravitational waves from technicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Jaervinen, Matti; Sannino, Francesco; Kouvaris, Chris

    2010-03-15

    We investigate the production and possible detection of gravitational waves stemming from the electroweak phase transition in the early universe in models of minimal walking technicolor. In particular we discuss the two possible scenarios in which one has only one electroweak phase transition and the case in which the technicolor dynamics allows for multiple phase transitions.

  18. The gravitational wave experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertotti, B.; Ambrosini, R.; Asmar, S. W.; Brenkle, J. P.; Comoretto, G.; Giampieri, G.; Less, L.; Messeri, A.; Wahlquist, H. D.

    1992-01-01

    Since the optimum size of a gravitational wave detector is the wave length, interplanetary dimensions are needed for the mHz band of interest. Doppler tracking of Ulysses will provide the most sensitive attempt to date at the detection of gravitational waves in the low frequency band. The driving noise source is the fluctuations in the refractive index of interplanetary plasma. This dictates the timing of the experiment to be near solar opposition and sets the target accuracy for the fractional frequency change at 3.0 x 10 exp -14 for integration times of the order of 1000 sec. The instrumentation utilized by the experiment is distributed between the radio systems on the spacecraft and the seven participating ground stations of the Deep Space Network and Medicina. Preliminary analysis is available of the measurements taken during the Ulysses first opposition test.

  19. Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Einstein's General Theory of Relativity is our best classical description of gravity, and informs modern astronomy and astrophysics at all scales: stellar, galactic, and cosmological. Among its surprising predictions is the existence of gravitational waves -- ripples in space-time that carry energy and momentum away from strongly interacting gravitating sources. In my talk, I will give an overview of the properties of this radiation, recent breakthroughs in computational physics allowing us to calculate the waveforms from galactic mergers, and the prospect of direct observation with interferometric detectors such as LIGO and LISA.

  20. Microscale capillary wave turbulence excited by high frequency vibration.

    PubMed

    Blamey, Jeremy; Yeo, Leslie Y; Friend, James R

    2013-03-19

    Low frequency (O(10 Hz-10 kHz)) vibration excitation of capillary waves has been extensively studied for nearly two centuries. Such waves appear at the excitation frequency or at rational multiples of the excitation frequency through nonlinear coupling as a result of the finite displacement of the wave, most often at one-half the excitation frequency in so-called Faraday waves and twice this frequency in superharmonic waves. Less understood, however, are the dynamics of capillary waves driven by high-frequency vibration (>O(100 kHz)) and small interface length scales, an arrangement ideal for a broad variety of applications, from nebulizers for pulmonary drug delivery to complex nanoparticle synthesis. In the few studies conducted to date, a marked departure from the predictions of classical Faraday wave theory has been shown, with the appearance of broadband capillary wave generation from 100 Hz to the excitation frequency and beyond, without a clear explanation. We show that weak wave turbulence is the dominant mechanism in the behavior of the system, as evident from wave height frequency spectra that closely follow the Rayleigh-Jeans spectral response η ≈ ω(-17/12) as a consequence of a period-halving, weakly turbulent cascade that appears within a 1 mm water drop whether driven by thickness-mode or surface acoustic Rayleigh wave excitation. However, such a cascade is one-way, from low to high frequencies. The mechanism of exciting the cascade with high-frequency acoustic waves is an acoustic streaming-driven turbulent jet in the fluid bulk, driving the fundamental capillary wave resonance through the well-known coupling between bulk flow and surface waves. Unlike capillary waves, turbulent acoustic streaming can exhibit subharmonic cascades from high to low frequencies; here it appears from the excitation frequency all the way to the fundamental modes of the capillary wave at some four orders of magnitude in frequency less than the excitation frequency

  1. High frequency atmospheric gravity wave damping in the mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, G. R.; Liu, A. Z.; Li, F.; Tang, J.

    2003-09-01

    Correlative measurements of temperature and winds by Na lidar and brightness in OH and O 2 Atmospheric band airglow have been made at Albuquerque, NM and Maui, HI for a study of high frequency (period less than 30 minutes) Atmospheric Gravity Waves. Wave studies from four nights have been made and the correlative information describes the intrinsic wave properties with altitude, their damping characteristics, and resulting accelerations to the large scale circulation in the 85-100 km altitude region. Generally, saturated to super-saturated conditions were observed below 95 km. Above this altitude, they were less saturated to freely propagating.

  2. Gravitational wave astronomy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, L. S.

    Astronomers rely on a multiplicity of observational perspectives in order to infer the nature of the Universe. Progress in astronomy has historically been associated with new or improved observational perspectives. Gravitational wave detectors now under construction will provide us with a perspective on the Universe fundamentally different from any we have come to know. With this new perspective comes the hope of new insights and understanding, not just of exotic astrophysical processes, but of "bread-and-butter" astrophysics: e.g., stars and stellar evolution, galaxy formation and evolution, neutron star structure, and cosmology. In this report the author discusses briefly a small subset of the areas of conventional, "bread-and-butter" astrophysics where we can reasonably hope that gravitational wave observations will provide us with valuable new insights and understandings.

  3. Physical response of light-time gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koop, Michael J.; Finn, Lee Samuel

    2014-09-01

    Gravitational wave detectors are typically described as responding to gravitational wave metric perturbations, which are gauge-dependent and—correspondingly—unphysical quantities. This is particularly true for ground-based interferometric detectors, like LIGO, space-based detectors, like LISA and its derivatives, spacecraft Doppler tracking detectors, and pulsar timing array detectors. The description of gravitational waves, and a gravitational wave detector's response, to the unphysical metric perturbation has lead to a proliferation of false analogies and descriptions regarding how these detectors function, and true misunderstandings of the physical character of gravitational waves. Here we provide a fully physical and gauge-invariant description of the response of a wide class of gravitational wave detectors in terms of the Riemann curvature, the physical quantity that describes gravitational phenomena in general relativity. In the limit of high frequency gravitational waves, the Riemann curvature separates into two independent gauge-invariant quantities: a "background" curvature contribution and a "wave" curvature contribution. In this limit the gravitational wave contribution to the detector response reduces to an integral of the gravitational wave contribution of the curvature along the unperturbed photon path between components of the detector. The description presented here provides an unambiguous physical description of what a gravitational wave detector measures and how it operates, a simple means of computing corrections to a detectors response owing to general detector motion, a straightforward way of connecting the results of numerical relativity simulations to gravitational wave detection, and a basis for a general and fully relativistic pulsar timing formula.

  4. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Branch, Darren W

    2013-05-07

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  5. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Branch, Darren W

    2014-03-11

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  6. Corrosion monitoring using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Corrosion develops due to adverse environmental conditions during the life cycle of a range of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the structural integrity. The nondestructive detection and monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. The wave propagation and interference of the different guided wave modes depends on the thickness of the structure. Laboratory experiments were conducted and the wall thickness reduced by consecutive milling of the steel structure. Further measurements were conducted using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath and the damage severity monitored. From the measured signal change due to the wave mode interference the wall thickness reduction was monitored. The high frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  7. Corrosion monitoring using high-frequency guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, P.

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion can develop due to adverse environmental conditions during the life cycle of a range of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the reduction of the strength and thus degradation of the structural integrity. The monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic wedge transducers with single sided access to the structure, guided wave modes were selectively generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. The wave propagation and interference of the different guided wave modes depends on the thickness of the structure. Laboratory experiments were conducted for wall thickness reduction due to milling of the steel structure. From the measured signal changes due to the wave mode interference the reduced wall thickness was monitored. Good agreement with theoretical predictions was achieved. The high frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  8. Sensitivity of high-frequency Rayleigh-wave data revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Ivanov, J.

    2007-01-01

    Rayleigh-wave phase velocity of a layered earth model is a function of frequency and four groups of earth properties: P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity (Vs), density, and thickness of layers. Analysis of the Jacobian matrix (or the difference method) provides a measure of dispersion curve sensitivity to earth properties. Vs is the dominant influence for the fundamental mode (Xia et al., 1999) and higher modes (Xia et al., 2003) of dispersion curves in a high frequency range (>2 Hz) followed by layer thickness. These characteristics are the foundation of determining S-wave velocities by inversion of Rayleigh-wave data. More applications of surface-wave techniques show an anomalous velocity layer such as a high-velocity layer (HVL) or a low-velocity layer (LVL) commonly exists in near-surface materials. Spatial location (depth) of an anomalous layer is usually the most important information that surface-wave techniques are asked to provide. Understanding and correctly defining the sensitivity of high-frequency Rayleigh-wave data due to depth of an anomalous velocity layer are crucial in applying surface-wave techniques to obtain a Vs profile and/or determine the depth of an anomalous layer. Because depth is not a direct earth property of a layered model, changes in depth will result in changes in other properties. Modeling results show that sensitivity at a given depth calculated by the difference method is dependent on the Vs difference (contrast) between an anomalous layer and surrounding layers. The larger the contrast is, the higher the sensitivity due to depth of the layer. Therefore, the Vs contrast is a dominant contributor to sensitivity of Rayleigh-wave data due to depth of an anomalous layer. Modeling results also suggest that the most sensitive depth for an HVL is at about the middle of the depth to the half-space, but for an LVL it is near the ground surface. ?? 2007 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  9. Gaussian beam decomposition of high frequency wave fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tanushev, Nicolay M. Engquist, Bjoern; Tsai, Richard

    2009-12-10

    In this paper, we present a method of decomposing a highly oscillatory wave field into a sparse superposition of Gaussian beams. The goal is to extract the necessary parameters for a Gaussian beam superposition from this wave field, so that further evolution of the high frequency waves can be computed by the method of Gaussian beams. The methodology is described for R{sup d} with numerical examples for d=2. In the first example, a field generated by an interface reflection of Gaussian beams is decomposed into a superposition of Gaussian beams. The beam parameters are reconstructed to a very high accuracy. The data in the second example is not a superposition of a finite number of Gaussian beams. The wave field to be approximated is generated by a finite difference method for a geometry with two slits. The accuracy in the decomposition increases monotonically with the number of beams.

  10. High-frequency wave normals in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, F.; Smith, L.D.; Sonett, C.P.

    1984-05-01

    High-frequency (0.01--0.04 Hz) magnetic fluctuations in 506 ten-minute intervals of contemporaneous Explorer 35 and Apollo 12 measurements made in the solar wind near the morning side of the Earth's bow shock show the presence of a large population of disturbances resembling Alfven waves. Each wavefront normal n is systematically aligned (median deviation = 35/sup 0/) with , the associated ten-minute average of the magnetic field. Because of variability in the direction of from one interval to another, the coupled distribution of n is nearly isotropic in solar ecliptic coordinates, in contrast with the results of other studies of waves at much lower frequency indicating outward propagation from the sun. Presumably the high frequency waves discussed here are stirred into isotropy (in solar ecliptic coordinates) by following the low frequency fluctuations. As these waves maintain their alignement of n with despite the great variation of , a strong physical alignment constraint is inferred.

  11. High-frequency homogenization for travelling waves in periodic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunyan, Davit; Milton, Graeme W.; Craster, Richard V.

    2016-07-01

    We consider high-frequency homogenization in periodic media for travelling waves of several different equations: the wave equation for scalar-valued waves such as acoustics; the wave equation for vector-valued waves such as electromagnetism and elasticity; and a system that encompasses the Schrödinger equation. This homogenization applies when the wavelength is of the order of the size of the medium periodicity cell. The travelling wave is assumed to be the sum of two waves: a modulated Bloch carrier wave having crystal wavevector k and frequency ω1 plus a modulated Bloch carrier wave having crystal wavevector m and frequency ω2. We derive effective equations for the modulating functions, and then prove that there is no coupling in the effective equations between the two different waves both in the scalar and the system cases. To be precise, we prove that there is no coupling unless ω1=ω2 and (k -m )⊙Λ ∈2 π Zd, where Λ=(λ1λ2…λd) is the periodicity cell of the medium and for any two vectors a =(a1,a2,…,ad),b =(b1,b2,…,bd)∈Rd, the product a⊙b is defined to be the vector (a1b1,a2b2,…,adbd). This last condition forces the carrier waves to be equivalent Bloch waves meaning that the coupling constants in the system of effective equations vanish. We use two-scale analysis and some new weak-convergence type lemmas. The analysis is not at the same level of rigour as that of Allaire and co-workers who use two-scale convergence theory to treat the problem, but has the advantage of simplicity which will allow it to be easily extended to the case where there is degeneracy of the Bloch eigenvalue.

  12. High-frequency homogenization for travelling waves in periodic media.

    PubMed

    Harutyunyan, Davit; Milton, Graeme W; Craster, Richard V

    2016-07-01

    We consider high-frequency homogenization in periodic media for travelling waves of several different equations: the wave equation for scalar-valued waves such as acoustics; the wave equation for vector-valued waves such as electromagnetism and elasticity; and a system that encompasses the Schrödinger equation. This homogenization applies when the wavelength is of the order of the size of the medium periodicity cell. The travelling wave is assumed to be the sum of two waves: a modulated Bloch carrier wave having crystal wavevector [Formula: see text] and frequency ω1 plus a modulated Bloch carrier wave having crystal wavevector [Formula: see text] and frequency ω2. We derive effective equations for the modulating functions, and then prove that there is no coupling in the effective equations between the two different waves both in the scalar and the system cases. To be precise, we prove that there is no coupling unless ω1=ω2 and [Formula: see text] where Λ=(λ1λ2…λ d ) is the periodicity cell of the medium and for any two vectors [Formula: see text] the product a⊙b is defined to be the vector (a1b1,a2b2,…,adbd ). This last condition forces the carrier waves to be equivalent Bloch waves meaning that the coupling constants in the system of effective equations vanish. We use two-scale analysis and some new weak-convergence type lemmas. The analysis is not at the same level of rigour as that of Allaire and co-workers who use two-scale convergence theory to treat the problem, but has the advantage of simplicity which will allow it to be easily extended to the case where there is degeneracy of the Bloch eigenvalue.

  13. Quantum Emulation of Gravitational Waves

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Cirio, Mauro; Büse, Alexander; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves, as predicted by Einstein’s general relativity theory, appear as ripples in the fabric of spacetime traveling at the speed of light. We prove that the propagation of small amplitude gravitational waves in a curved spacetime is equivalent to the propagation of a subspace of electromagnetic states. We use this result to propose the use of entangled photons to emulate the evolution of gravitational waves in curved spacetimes by means of experimental electromagnetic setups featuring metamaterials. PMID:26169801

  14. Mapping High-Frequency Waves in the Reconnection Diffusion Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viberg, H.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Vaivads, A.; Andre, M.

    2012-12-01

    We study the occurrence of high frequency waves, between the electron cyclotron and plasma frequency, in a reconnection diffusion region in the Earth's magnetotail at a distance of about 19 RE from the Earth. Most of the wave activity is concentrated in the separatrix regions, with no significant activity observed in the inflow and outflow regions. Different types of waves are observed at the outer part of the separatrix region depending on the plasma characteristics in the inflow region. For the cold ~100 eV lobe plasma in the inflow we observe Langmuir waves which are generated by the bump-on-tail instability of a several keV electron beam propagating in the cold background plasma. For the hotter ~1 keV inflow plasma, which is similar to the plasmasheet population, electron cyclotron waves are observed in this region, most probably generated by low energy (several tens of eV) electron beams. Deeper into the separatrix region (closer to the current sheet), we observe mostly electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) in association with two counter-streaming electron beams: low energy beam towards the X-line, and high energy beam away from the X-line. Observations of HF waves provide important information about electron dynamics in the diffusion region, and allow for precise mapping of kinetic boundaries.

  15. Ionospheric heating with oblique high-frequency waves

    SciTech Connect

    Field, E.C. Jr.; Bloom, R.M. ); Kossey, P.A. )

    1990-12-01

    This paper presents calculations of ionospheric electron temperature and density perturbations and ground-level signal changes produced by intense oblique high-frequency (HF) radio waves. The analysis takes into account focusing at caustics, the consequent Joule heating of the surrounding plasma, heat conduction, diffusion, and recombination processes, these being the effects of a powerful oblique modifying wave. It neglects whatever plasma instabilities might occur. The authors then seek effects on a secondary test wave that is propagated along the same path as the first. The calculations predict ground-level field strength reductions of several decibels in the test wave for modifying waves having effective radiated power (ERP) in the 85- to 90-dBW range. These field strength changes are similar in sign, magnitude, and location to ones measured in Soviet experiments. The location of the signal change is sensitive to the frequency and the model ionosphere assumed; so future experiments should employ the widest possible range of frequencies and propagation conditions. An ERP of 90 dBW seems to be a sort of threshold that, if exceeded, might result in substantial rather than small signal changes. The conclusions are based solely on Joule heating and subsequent refraction of waves passing through caustic regions.

  16. Accumulative coupling between magnetized tenuous plasma and gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan

    2017-01-01

    This talk presents solutions to the plasma waves induced by a plane gravitational wave (GW) train travelling through a region of strongly magnetized plasma. The computations constitute a very preliminary feasibility study for a possible ultra-high frequency gravitational wave detector, meant to take advantage of the observation that the plasma current is proportional to the GW amplitude, and not its square. This work is supported in part by NSFC Grant Number 11503003.

  17. Resent developments in high-frequency surface-wave techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, J.; Pan, Y.; Zeng, C.

    2012-12-01

    High-frequency Rayleigh-wave methods, such as Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW), are getting increasingly attention in the near-surface geophysics and geotechnique community in the last 20 years because of their non-invasive, non-destructive, efficient, and low-cost advantages and their success in environmental and engineering applications. They are viewed by near-surface geophysics community as the one of most promise techniques in the future. However, they face unique problems related to extremely irregular velocity variations in near-surface geology or man-made constructions, for example, highway, foundation, dam, levee, jetty, etc., which are not solvable by techniques or algorithms widely used in earthquake seismology or oil/gas seismic exploration. We present solutions to the problems associated with near-surface materials that possess velocity inverse and high Poisson's ratio. Calculation of dispersion curves by existing algorithms may fail for some special velocity models due to velocity inverse (a high-velocity layer on the top of a low-velocity layer). Two velocity models are most common in near-surface applications. One is a low-velocity half space model and the other a high-velocity topmost layer. The former model results in a complex matrix that no roots can be found in the real number domain, which implies that no phase velocities can be calculated in certain frequency ranges based on current exist algorithms. A solution is to use the real part of the root of the complex number. It is well-known that phase velocities approach about 91% of the shear (S)-wave velocity of the topmost layer when wavelengths are much shorter than the thickness of the topmost layer. The later model, however, results in that phase velocities in a high-frequency range calculated using the current algorithms approach a velocity associated with the S-wave velocity of the second layer NOT the topmost layer. A solution to this problem is to use a two-layer model to

  18. LISA in the gravitational wave decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, John; Cornish, Neil

    2015-04-01

    With the expected direct detection of gravitational waves in the second half of this decade by Advanced LIGO and pulsar timing arrays, and with the launch of LISA Pathfinder in the summer of this year, this can arguably be called the decade of gravitational waves. Low frequency gravitational waves in the mHz range, which can only be observed from space, provide the richest science and complement high frequency observatories on the ground. A space-based observatory will improve our understanding of the formation and growth of massive black holes, create a census of compact binary systems in the Milky Way, test general relativity in extreme conditions, and enable searches for new physics. LISA, by far the most mature concept for detecting gravitational waves from space, has consistently ranked among the nation's top priority large science missions. In 2013, ESA selected the science theme ``The Gravitational Universe'' for its third large mission, L3, under the Cosmic Visions Program, with a planned launch date of 2034. Recently, NASA has decided to join with ESA on the L3 mission as a junior partner. Both agencies formed a committee to advise them on the scientific and technological approaches for a space based gravitational wave observatory. The leading mission design, Evolved LISA or eLISA, is a slightly de-scoped version of the earlier LISA design. This talk will describe activities of the Gravitational Wave Science Interest Group (GWSIG) under the Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG), focusing on LISA technology development in both the U.S. and Europe, including the LISA Pathfinder mission.

  19. High-frequency electrostatic waves in the magnetosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, T. S. T.

    1973-01-01

    High-frequency electrostatic microinstabilities in magnetospheric plasmas are considered in detail. Rather special plasma parameters are found to be required to match the theoretical wave spectrum with satellite observations in the magnetosphere. In particular, it is necessary to have a cold and a warm species of electrons such that (1) the warm component has an anomalous velocity distribution function that is nonmonotonic in the perpendicular component of velocity and is the source of free energy driving the instabilities, (2) the density ratio of the cold component to the hot component is greater than about 0.01, and (3) the temperature ratio of the two components for cases of high particle density is no less than 0.1. These requirements and the corresponding instability criteria are satisfied only in the trapping region; this is also the region in which the waves are most frequently observed. The range of unstable wavelengths and an estimate of the diffusion coefficient are also obtained. The wave are found to induce strong diffusion in velocity space for low-energy electrons during periods of moderate wave amplitude.

  20. Phase velocity limit of high-frequency photon density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskell, Richard C.; Svaasand, Lars O.; Madsen, Sten; Rojas, Fabio E.; Feng, T.-C.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1995-05-01

    In frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM), two factors make high modulation frequencies desirable. First, with frequencies as high as a few GHz, the phase lag versus frequency plot has sufficient curvature to yield both the scattering and absorption coefficients of the tissue under examination. Second, because of increased attenuation, high frequency photon density waves probe smaller volumes, an asset in small volume in vivo or in vitro studies. This trend toward higher modulation frequencies has led us to re-examine the derivation of the standard diffusion equation (SDE) from the Boltzman transport equation. We find that a second-order time-derivative term, ordinarily neglected in the derivation, can be significant above 1 GHz for some biological tissue. The revised diffusion equation, including the second-order time-derivative, is often termed the P1 equation. We compare the dispersion relation of the P1 equation with that of the SDE. The P1 phase velocity is slower than that predicted by the SDE; in fact, the SDE phase velocity is unbounded with increasing modulation frequency, while the P1 phase velocity approaches c/sqrt(3) is attained only at modulation frequencies with periods shorter than the mean time between scatterings of a photon, a frequency regime that probes the medium beyond the applicability of diffusion theory. Finally we caution that values for optical properties deduced from FDPM data at high frequencies using the SDE can be in error by 30% or more.

  1. Microfluidic particle manipulation using high frequency surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Ye; Collins, David J.

    2016-11-01

    Precise manipulation of particles and biological cells remains a very active research area in microfluidics. Among various force fields applied for microfluidic manipulations, acoustic waves have superior propagating properties in solids and fluids, which can readily enable non-contact cell manipulation in long operating distances. Exploiting acoustic waves for fluid and cell manipulation in microfluidics has led to a newly emerging research area, acoustofluidics. In this work, I will present particle and cell manipulation in microfluidics using high frequency surface acoustic waves (SAW). In particular, I will discuss a unique design of a focused IDT (FIDT) structure, which is able to generate a highly localized SAW field on the order of 20 µm wide. This highly focused acoustic beam has an effective manipulation area size that is comparable to individual micron-sized particles. Here, I demonstrate the use of this highly localized SAW field for single particle level sorting with sub-millisecond pulses and selective capture of particles. Based on the presented studies on acoustic particle manipulation, I envision that the merging of acoustics and microfluidics could enable various particle and cell manipulations needed in microfluidic applications. We acknowledge the support received from Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD)-Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) International Design Center (IDG11300101) and SUTD Startup Research Grant (SREP13053) awarded to Y.A.

  2. Fault-zone attenuation of high-frequency seismic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakeslee, Sam; Malin, Peter; Alvarez, Marcos

    1989-11-01

    We have developed a technique to measure seismic attenuation within an active fault-zone at seismogenic depths. Utilizing a pair of stations and pairs of earthquakes, spectral ratios are performed to isolate attenuation produced by wave-propagation within the fault-zone. This empirical approach eliminates common source, propagation, instrument and near-surface site effects. The technique was applied to a cluster of 19 earthquakes recorded by a pair of downhole instruments located within the San Andreas fault-zone, at Parkfield California. Over the 1-40 Hz bandwidth used in this analysis, amplitudes are found to decrease exponentially with frequency. Furthermore, the fault-zone propagation distance correlates with the severity of attenuation. Assuming a constant Q attenuation operator, the S-wave quality factor within the fault-zone at a depth of 5-6 kilometers is 31 (+7,-5). If fault-zones are low-Q environments, then near-source attenuation of high-frequency seismic waves may help to explain phenomenon such as fmax. Fault-zone Q may prove to be a valuable indicator of the mechanical behavior and rheology of fault-zones. Specific asperities can be monitored for precursory changes associated with the evolving stress-field within the fault-zone. The spatial and temporal resolution of the technique is fundamentally limited by the uncertainty in earthquake location and the interval time between earthquakes.

  3. Helicity-rotation-gravity coupling for gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, Jairzinho; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2006-04-15

    The consequences of spin-rotation-gravity coupling are worked out for linear gravitational waves. The coupling of helicity of the wave with the rotation of a gravitational-wave antenna is investigated and the resulting modifications in the Doppler effect and aberration are pointed out for incident high-frequency gravitational radiation. Extending these results to the case of a gravitomagnetic field via the gravitational Larmor theorem, the rotation of linear polarization of gravitational radiation propagating in the field of a rotating mass is studied. It is shown that in this case the linear polarization state rotates by twice the Skrotskii angle as a consequence of the spin-2 character of linear gravitational waves.

  4. Gravitational Wave Experiments - Proceedings of the First Edoardo Amaldi Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coccia, E.; Pizzella, G.; Ronga, F.

    1995-07-01

    Production of Gravitational Radiation by Particle Accelerators and by High Power Lasers * NESTOR: An Underwater Cerenkov Detector for Neutrino Astronomy * A Cosmic-Ray Veto System for the Gravitational Wave Detector NAUTLUS * Interferometers * Development of a 20m Prototype Laser Interferometric Gravitational Wave Detector at NAO * Production of Higher-Order Light Modes by High Quality Optical Components * Vibration Isolation and Suspension Systems for Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Detectors * Quality Factors of Stainless Steel Pendulum Wires * Reduction of Suspension Thermal Noises in Laser Free Masses Gravitational Antenna by Correlation of the Output with Additional Optical Signal * Resonant Detectors * Regeneration Effects in a Resonant Gravitational Wave Detector * A Cryogenic Sapphire Transducer with Double Frequency Pumping for Resonant Mass GW Detectors * Effect of Parametric Instability of Gravitational Wave Antenna with Microwave Cavity Transducer * Resonators of Novel Geometry for Large Mass Resonant Transducers * Measurements on the Gravitational Wave Antenna ALTAIR Equipped with a BAE Transducer * The Rome BAE Transducer: Perspectives of its Application to Ultracryogenic Gravitational Wave Antennas * Behavior of a de SQUID Tightly Coupled to a High-Q Resonant Transducer * High Q-Factor LC Resonators for Optimal Coupling * Comparison Between Different Data Analysis Procedures for Gravitational Wave Pulse Detection * Supernova 1987A Rome Maryland Gravitational Radiation Antenna Observations * Analysis of the Data Recorded by the Maryland and Rome Gravitational-Wave Detectors and the Seismic Data from Moscow and Obninsk Station during SN1987A * Multitransducer Resonant Gravitational Antennas * Local Array of High Frequency Antennas * Interaction Cross-Sections for Spherical Resonant GW Antennae * Signal-To-Noise Analysis for a Spherical Gravitational Wave Antenna Instrumented with Multiple Transducers * On the Design of Ultralow Temperature Spherical

  5. Gravitational Waves From Supermassive Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Girolamo, Tristano

    2016-10-01

    In this talk, I will present the first direct detections of gravitational waves from binary stellar-mass black hole mergers during the first observing run of the two detectors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, which opened the field of gravitational-wave astronomy, and then discuss prospects for observing gravitational waves from supermassive black holes with future detectors.

  6. Misidentification caused by leaky surface wave in high-frequency surface wave method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lingli; Xia, Jianghai; Pan, Yudi

    2014-12-01

    Multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method analyses high-frequency surface waves to determine shear (S)-wave velocities of near-surface materials, which are usually unconsolidated and possess higher Poisson's ratios. One of key steps using the MASW method to obtain the near-surface S-wave velocities is to pick correct phase velocities in dispersive images. A high-frequency seismic survey conducted over near-surface materials with a higher Poisson's ratio will often result in data that contains non-geometric wave, which will raise an additional energy in the dispersion image. Failure to identify it may result in misidentification. In this paper, we have presented a description about leaky surface wave and the influence caused by the existence of leaky waves in a high-frequency seismic record. We first introduce leaky wave and non-geometric wave. Next, we use two synthetic tests to demonstrate that non-geometric wave is leaky wave and show the properties about leaky surface wave by eigenfunctions using Chen's algorithm. We show that misidentification may occur in picking the dispersion curves of normal Rayleigh wave modes because the leaky-wave energy normally connects energy of fundamental and/or higher modes. Meanwhile, we use a real-world example to demonstrate the influence of leaky wave. We also propose that muting and filtering should been applied to raw seismic records prior to generating dispersive images to prevent misidentifying leaky surface waves as modal surface waves by a real-world example. Finally, we use a three-layer model with a low-velocity half-space to illustrate that leaky surface waves appear on condition that the phase velocities are higher than maximum S-wave velocity of the earth model when solving the Rayleigh equation.

  7. High frequency acoustic wave scattering from turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narra, Venkateswarlu

    This thesis describes an experimental investigation of high frequency acoustic wave scattering from turbulent premixed flames. The objective of this work was to characterize the scattered incoherent acoustic field and determine its parametric dependence on frequency, flame brush thickness, incident and measurement angles, mean velocity and flame speed. The experimental facility consists of a slot burner with a flat flame sheet that is approximately 15 cm wide and 12 cm tall. The baseline cold flow characteristics and flame sheet statistics were extensively characterized. Studies were performed over a wide range of frequencies (1-24 kHz) in order to characterize the role of the incident acoustic wave length. The spectrum of the scattered acoustic field showed distinct incoherent spectral sidebands on either side of the driving frequency. The scattered incoherent field was characterized in terms of the incoherent field strength and spectral bandwidth and related to the theoretical predictions. The role of the flame front wrinkling scale, i.e., flame brush thickness, was also studied. Flame brush thickness was varied independent of the mean velocity and flame speed by using a variable turbulence generator. Results are reported for five flame brush thickness cases, ranging from 1.2 mm to 5.2 mm. Some dependence of scattered field characteristics on flame brush thickness was observed, but the magnitude of the effect was much smaller than expected from theoretical considerations. The spatial dependence of the scattered field was investigated by measuring the scattered field at four measurement angles and exciting the flame at four incident angles. Theory predicts that these variations influence the spatial scale of the acoustic wave normal to the flame, a result confirmed by the measurements. Measurements were performed for multiple combinations of mean velocities and flame speeds. The scattered field was observed to depend strongly on the flame speed. Further analysis

  8. Basis of Ionospheric Modification by High-Frequency Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    for conducting ionospheric heating experiments in Gakona, Alaska, as part of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ) [5], is being...upgraded. The upgraded HAARP HF transmitting system will be a phased-array antenna of 180 elements. Each element is a cross dipole, which radiates a...supported by the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ), the Air Force Research Laboratory at Hanscom Air Force Base, MA, and by the Office

  9. First test of high frequency Gravity Waves from inflation using Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Alejandro; Freese, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Inflation models ending in a first order phase transition produce gravitational waves (GW) via bubble collisions of the true vacuum phase. We demonstrate that these bubble collisions can leave an observable signature in Advanced LIGO, an upcoming ground-based GW experiment. These GW are dependent on two parameters of the inflationary model: ɛ represents the energy difference between the false vacuum and the true vacuum of the inflaton potential, and χ measures how fast the phase transition ends (χ ~ the number of e-folds during the actual phase transition). Advanced LIGO will be able to test the validity of single-phase transition models within the parameter space 107 GeVlesssim ɛ1/4 lesssim 1010 GeV and 0.19 lesssim χ lesssim 1. If inflation occurred through a first order phase transition, then Advanced LIGO could be the first to discover high frequency GW from inflation.

  10. Primordial gravitational waves in running vacuum cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamayo, D. A.; Lima, J. A. S.; Alves, M. E. S.; de Araujo, J. C. N.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the cosmological production of gravitational waves in a nonsingular flat cosmology powered by a "running vacuum" energy density described by ρΛ ≡ ρΛ(H), a phenomenological expression potentially linked with the renormalization group approach in quantum field theory in curved spacetimes. The model can be interpreted as a particular case of the class recently discussed by Perico et al. (2013) [25] which is termed complete in the sense that the cosmic evolution occurs between two extreme de Sitter stages (early and late time de Sitter phases). The gravitational wave equation is derived and its time-dependent part numerically integrated since the primordial de Sitter stage. The generated spectrum of gravitons is also compared with the standard calculations where an abrupt transition, from the early de Sitter to the radiation phase, is usually assumed. It is found that the stochastic background of gravitons is very similar to the one predicted by the cosmic concordance model plus inflation except at higher frequencies (ν ≳ 100 kHz). This remarkable signature of a "running vacuum" cosmology combined with the proposed high frequency gravitational wave detectors and measurements of the CMB polarization (B-modes) may provide a new window to confront more conventional models of inflation.

  11. GRAVITATIONAL WAVES FROM STELLAR COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. FRYER

    2001-01-01

    Stellar core-collapse plays an important role in nearly all facets of astronomy: cosmology (as standard candles), formation of compact objects, nucleosynthesis and energy deposition in galaxies. In addition, they release energy in powerful explosions of light over a range of energies, neutrinos, and the subject of this meeting, gravitational waves. Because of this broad range of importance, astronomers have discovered a number of constraints which can be used to help them understand the importance of stellar core-collapse as gravitational wave sources.

  12. Gravitational Waves from Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkotas, Konstantinos

    2016-03-01

    Neutron stars are the densest objects in the present Universe, attaining physical conditions of matter that cannot be replicated on Earth. These unique and irreproducible laboratories allow us to study physics in some of its most extreme regimes. More importantly, however, neutron stars allow us to formulate a number of fundamental questions that explore, in an intricate manner, the boundaries of our understanding of physics and of the Universe. The multifaceted nature of neutron stars involves a delicate interplay among astrophysics, gravitational physics, and nuclear physics. The research in the physics and astrophysics of neutron stars is expected to flourish and thrive in the next decade. The imminent direct detection of gravitational waves will turn gravitational physics into an observational science, and will provide us with a unique opportunity to make major breakthroughs in gravitational physics, in particle and high-energy astrophysics. These waves, which represent a basic prediction of Einstein's theory of general relativity but have yet to be detected directly, are produced in copious amounts, for instance, by tight binary neutron star and black hole systems, supernovae explosions, non-axisymmetric or unstable spinning neutron stars. The focus of the talk will be on the neutron star instabilities induced by rotation and the magnetic field. The conditions for the onset of these instabilities and their efficiency in gravitational waves will be presented. Finally, the dependence of the results and their impact on astrophysics and especially nuclear physics will be discussed.

  13. Comparing the Robustness of High-Frequency Traveling-Wave Tube Slow-Wave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, Christine T.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Kory, Carol L.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional electromagnetic field simulation software package was used to compute the cold-test parameters, phase velocity, on-axis interaction impedance, and attenuation, for several high-frequency traveling-wave tube slow-wave circuit geometries. This research effort determined the effects of variations in circuit dimensions on cold-test performance. The parameter variations were based on the tolerances of conventional micromachining techniques.

  14. Gravitational waves and multimessenger astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Fulvio

    2016-07-01

    It is widely expected that in the coming quinquennium the first gravitational wave signal will be directly detected. The ground-based advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors are being upgraded to a sensitivity level such that we expect to be measure a significant binary merger rate. Gravitational waves events are likely to be accompanied by electromagnetic counterparts and neutrino emission carrying complementary information to those associated to the gravitational signals. If it becomes possible to measure all these forms of radiation in concert, we will end up an impressive increase in the comprehension of the whole phenomenon. In the following we summarize the scientific outcome of the interferometric detectors in the past configuration. Then we focus on some of the potentialities of the advanced detectors once used in the new context of the multimessenger astronomy.

  15. Merging Black Holes and Gravitational Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2009-01-01

    This talk will focus on simulations of binary black hole mergers and the gravitational wave signals they produce. Applications to gravitational wave detection with LISA, and electronagnetic counterparts, will be highlighted.

  16. Utilization of high-frequency Rayleigh waves in near-surface geophysics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.; Ivanov, J.; Tian, G.; Chen, C.

    2004-01-01

    Shear-wave velocities can be derived from inverting the dispersive phase velocity of the surface. The multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) is one technique for inverting high-frequency Rayleigh waves. The process includes acquisition of high-frequency broad-band Rayleigh waves, efficient and accurate algorithms designed to extract Rayleigh-wave dispersion curves from Rayleigh waves, and stable and efficient inversion algorithms to obtain near-surface S-wave velocity profiles. MASW estimates S-wave velocity from multichannel vertical compoent data and consists of data acquisition, dispersion-curve picking, and inversion.

  17. High Frequency Resonant Electromagnetic Generation and Detection of Ultrasonic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Katsuhiro; Wright, Oliver; Hyoguchi, Takao

    1994-05-01

    High frequency resonant mode electromagnetic ultrasonic generation and detection in metals is demonstrated at frequencies up to ˜150 MHz with various metal sheet samples. Using a unified theory of the generation and detection process, it is shown how various physical quantities can be measured. The sound velocity or thickness of the sheets can be derived from the resonant frequencies. At resonance the detected amplitude is inversely proportional to the ultrasonic attenuation of the sample, whereas the resonance half-width is proportional to this attenuation. We derive the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient from the half-width, and show how the grain size of the material can be probed. In addition we present results for thin bonded sheets, and show how a measure of the bonding or delamination can be obtained. This high frequency resonant method shows great promise for the non-destructive evaluation of thin sheets and coatings in the sub- 10-µm to 1-mm thickness range.

  18. High Frequency Plasma Waves Associated With Solar Wind Reconnection Exhausts: WIND/WAVES Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huttunen, K. E.; Bale, S. D.; Phan, T. D.; Davis, M.; Gosling, J. T.

    2006-12-01

    Observations of strong plasma wave activity near reconnection X-line regions in THE laboratory and in the Earth's magnetosphere have suggested that plasma waves may play AN important role in the reconnection process by providing anomalous resistivity through wave-particle interactions and by accelerating electrons. Recent observations of quasi-steady magnetic reconnection in the solar wind introduces an important new environment to study the role of plasma waves in a collisionless plasma associated with the reconnection process. We have used observations by the WIND spacecraft to study high frequency plasma waves associated with 28 solar wind reconnection exhausts. The TNR (Thermal Noise Receiver) experiment included in the WAVES instrument on WIND measures electric spectral density from 4 to 256 kHz and the TDS (Time Domain Sampler) experiment also included in WAVES samples electric field waveforms at rates up to 120,000 samples/s. A large fraction (79%) of the investigated events showed significant enhancements in the wave power around ~ 4 kHz, while only about one third (39%) of the exhausts were associated with intensifications around THE local electron plasma frequency (few tens of kHz). TDS waveform samples revealed three different wave modes: electron solitary waves, ion acoustic waves and Langmuir waves. The intense plasma waves were most frequently observed close to the X-line and near the exhaust boundaries, although wave emissions were commonly observed elsewhere within the exhausts as well

  19. High-frequency acoustic waves are not sufficient to heat the solar chromosphere.

    PubMed

    Fossum, Astrid; Carlsson, Mats

    2005-06-16

    One of the main unanswered questions in solar physics is why the Sun's outer atmosphere is hotter than its surface. Theory predicts abundant production of high-frequency (10-50 mHz) acoustic waves in subsurface layers of the Sun, and such waves are believed by many to constitute the dominant heating mechanism of the chromosphere (the lower part of the outer solar atmosphere) in non-magnetic regions. Such high-frequency waves are difficult to detect because of high-frequency disturbances in Earth's atmosphere (seeing) and other factors. Here we report the detection of high-frequency waves, and we use numerical simulations to show that the acoustic energy flux of these waves is too low, by a factor of at least ten, to balance the radiative losses in the solar chromosphere. Acoustic waves therefore cannot constitute the dominant heating mechanism of the solar chromosphere.

  20. Listening to the low-frequency gravitational-wave band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Scott

    2016-03-01

    Ground-based gravitational-wave detectors are beginning to explore the high-frequency band of roughly 10 to 1000 Hz. These three decades in frequency represent one of several astrophysically important wavebands. In this talk, I will focus on the astrophysics of the low-frequency band, from roughly 30 microhertz to 0.1 Hz. This band is expected to be particularly rich with very loud sources. I will survey what we expect to be important sources of low-frequency gravitational waves, and review the scientific payoff that would come from measuring them.

  1. MHz gravitational waves from short-term anisotropic inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Asuka; Soda, Jiro

    2016-04-18

    We reveal the universality of short-term anisotropic inflation. As a demonstration, we study inflation with an exponential type gauge kinetic function which is ubiquitous in models obtained by dimensional reduction from higher dimensional fundamental theory. It turns out that an anisotropic inflation universally takes place in the later stage of conventional inflation. Remarkably, we find that primordial gravitational waves with a peak amplitude around 10{sup −26}∼10{sup −27} are copiously produced in high-frequency bands 10 MHz∼100 MHz. If we could detect such gravitational waves in future, we would be able to probe higher dimensional fundamental theory.

  2. MHz gravitational waves from short-term anisotropic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Asuka; Soda, Jiro

    2016-04-01

    We reveal the universality of short-term anisotropic inflation. As a demonstration, we study inflation with an exponential type gauge kinetic function which is ubiquitous in models obtained by dimensional reduction from higher dimensional fundamental theory. It turns out that an anisotropic inflation universally takes place in the later stage of conventional inflation. Remarkably, we find that primordial gravitational waves with a peak amplitude around 10-26~ 10-27 are copiously produced in high-frequency bands 10 MHz~100 MHz. If we could detect such gravitational waves in future, we would be able to probe higher dimensional fundamental theory.

  3. Gravitational wave science from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gair, Jonathan R.

    2016-05-01

    The rich millihertz gravitational wave band can only be accessed with a space- based detector. The technology for such a detector will be demonstrated by the LISA Pathfinder satellite that is due to launch this year and ESA has selected gravitational wave detection from space as the science theme to be addressed by the L3 large mission to be launched around 2034. In this article we will discuss the sources that such an instrument will observe, and how the numbers of events and precision of parameter determination are affected by modifications to the, as yet not finalised, mission design. We will also describe some of the exciting scientific applications of these observations, to astrophysics, fundamental physics and cosmology.

  4. Electromagnetic Counterparts to Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, Mansi M.; GROWTH Collaboration; iPTF/ZTF Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The direct detection of gravitational waves from merging black holes marks the dawn of a new era. I will present ongoing efforts and prospectsto identify and characterize the electromagnetic counterpart. Among the various models for electromagnetic emission from binary neutronstar mergers, free neutron decay gives the most luminous and fast-evolving optical counterpart. I will describe a co-ordinated global effort, the GROWTH (Global Relay of Observatories Watching Transients Happen) network working in tandem with the Zwicky Transient Facility.

  5. Primordial gravitational waves and cosmology.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Lawrence M; Dodelson, Scott; Meyer, Stephan

    2010-05-21

    The observation of primordial gravitational waves could provide a new and unique window on the earliest moments in the history of the universe and on possible new physics at energies many orders of magnitude beyond those accessible at particle accelerators. Such waves might be detectable soon, in current or planned satellite experiments that will probe for characteristic imprints in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background, or later with direct space-based interferometers. A positive detection could provide definitive evidence for inflation in the early universe and would constrain new physics from the grand unification scale to the Planck scale.

  6. On the role of high frequency waves in ocean altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandemark, Douglas C.

    This work mines a coastal and open ocean air-sea interaction field experiment data set where the goals are to refine satellite retrieval of wind, wind stress, and sea level using a microwave radar altimeter. The data were collected from a low-flying aircraft using a sensor suite designed to measure the surface waves, radar backscatter, the atmospheric flow, and turbulent fluxes within the marine boundary layer. This uncommon ensemble provides the means to address several specific altimeter-related topics. First, we examine and document the impact that non wind-driven gravity wave variability, e.g. swell, has upon the commonly-invoked direct relationship between altimeter backscatter and near surface wind speed. The demonstrated impact is larger in magnitude and more direct than previously suggested. The study also isolates the wind-dependence of short-scale slope variance and suggests its magnitude is somewhat lower than shown elsewhere while a second-order dependence on long waves is also evident. A second study assesses the hypothesis that wind-aligned swell interacts with the atmospheric boundary flow leading to a depressed level of turbulence. Cases of reduced drag coefficient at moderate wind speeds were in evidence within the data set, and buoy observations indicate that swell was present and a likely control during these events. Coincidentally, short-scale wave roughness was also depressed suggesting decreased wind stress. Attempts to confirm the theory failed, however, due to numerous limitations in the quantity and quality of the data in hand. A lesson learned is that decoupling atmospheric stability and wave impacts in field campaigns requires both a very large amount of data as well as vertical resolution of fluxes within the first 10--20 m of the surface.

  7. Low frequency gravitational wave astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Shane

    The field of low-frequency gravitational wave astronomy is evolving as the design of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is in flux. Changing mission architectures naturally has an impact on the science goals and science capabilities in gravitational wave astronomy, requiring astrophysicists to pursue a deeper understanding on three fronts. (1) What astrophysical knowledge can be extracted from populations of sources based on their relative strengths in the data streams? (2) How are the science returns maximized as detector capabilities evolve? (3) How do evolving detector performance expectations alter the science that is possible with space- based gravitational wave detectors? This work proposes a series of investigations that address these questions along two broad avenues of inquiry. The first thrust of this effort is designed to examine how the population of ultra-compact galactic binaries can be better characterized by multi-messenger observations and statistical population analyses. While these investigations are astrophysical interesting in and of themselves, they are particularly relevant as detector designs evolve because the binaries are a limiting source of astrophysical noise that must be mitigated in order to maximize the science return for other sources, such as massive binary black hole inspirals and extreme mass ratio inspirals. The second thrust of this effort is geared toward characterization of the detector itself, since this ultimately fixes our ability to answer astrophysical questions. While many high-fidelity simulators exist for the original LISA mission architecture, the work proposed here will develop a new, flexible suite of prototyping tools analogous to the "Online Sensitivity Curve Generator" (which the PI authored). These tools will allow astrophysicists and data analysts alike to rapidly assess whether new proposed architectures for a space-based gravitational wave observatory will enhance or adversely impact the science

  8. Theory of high-frequency waves in a coaxial plasma wave guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraghechi, B.; Farrokhi, B.; Willett, J. E.

    1999-10-01

    An analysis of the high-frequency eigenmodes of a coaxial wave guide containing a magnetized annular plasma column is presented. A transcendental equation is derived from the boundary conditions in the form of an eighth-order determinant equated to zero. Simultaneous solution of this determinantal equation and a polynomial equation derived from the wave equation yields the dispersion relations for the eigenmodes. By reduction of the order of the determinant the appropriate transcendental equation is easily obtained for some special cases, e.g., partially filled coaxial wave guide. The electrostatic treatment of a coaxial cylindrical wave guide is also presented. The corresponding transcendental equation is reduced to some special cases, e.g., conventional wave guide containing an annular plasma column under electrostatic approximation. Numerical solutions are obtained for some azimuthally symmetric EH (perturbed TM) and HE (perturbed TE) wave guide modes, cyclotron modes, and space-charge modes. A strong dependence of the frequencies of these electromagnetic-electrostatic waves on the radii of the coaxial wave guide and the plasma column is revealed.

  9. Unprecedentedly Strong and Narrow Electromagnetic Emissions Stimulated by High-Frequency Radio Waves in the Ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Norin, L.; Leyser, T. B.; Nordblad, E.; Thide, B.; McCarrick, M.

    2009-02-13

    Experimental results of secondary electromagnetic radiation, stimulated by high-frequency radio waves irradiating the ionosphere, are reported. We have observed emission peaks, shifted in frequency up to a few tens of Hertz from radio waves transmitted at several megahertz. These emission peaks are by far the strongest spectral features of secondary radiation that have been reported. The emissions are attributed to stimulated Brillouin scattering, long predicted but hitherto never unambiguously identified in high-frequency ionospheric interaction experiments. The experiments were performed at the High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP), Alaska, USA.

  10. Unprecedentedly strong and narrow electromagnetic emissions stimulated by high-frequency radio waves in the ionosphere.

    PubMed

    Norin, L; Leyser, T B; Nordblad, E; Thidé, B; McCarrick, M

    2009-02-13

    Experimental results of secondary electromagnetic radiation, stimulated by high-frequency radio waves irradiating the ionosphere, are reported. We have observed emission peaks, shifted in frequency up to a few tens of Hertz from radio waves transmitted at several megahertz. These emission peaks are by far the strongest spectral features of secondary radiation that have been reported. The emissions are attributed to stimulated Brillouin scattering, long predicted but hitherto never unambiguously identified in high-frequency ionospheric interaction experiments. The experiments were performed at the High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP), Alaska, USA.

  11. Extragalactic sources of gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, M. J.

    The prospects of detecting gravitational waves from galactic nuclei are shown to be bleak: although some 'scenarios', such as those involving black hole coalescence, would emit a pulse with about 0.1 efficiency, the predicted event rate is discouragingly low. If most of the 'unseen' mass in the universe were in the remnants of massive 'Population III' stars, then the overlapping bursts from the collapse of such objects in early epochs would yield a stochastic background that could amount to about 0.001 (or even more) of the critical cosmological density. Such a background may be above the detectability threshold for future experiments, and can be probed by studying the timing noise of pulsars, and the secular behavior of the binary pulsar. General constraints on stochastic backgrounds, including 'primordial' gravitational radiation, are summarized.

  12. Attenuation of High-Frequency Seismic Waves in Eastern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahood, M.

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the frequency-dependent attenuation of the crust in Eastern Iran by analysis data from 132 local earthquakes having focal depths in the range of 5-25 km. We estimated the quality factor of coda waves ( Q c) and body waves ( Q p and Q s) in the frequency band of 1.5-24 Hz by applying the single backscattering theory of S-coda envelopes and the extended coda-normalization method, respectively. Considering records from recent earthquakes (Rigan M w 6.5, 2010/12/20, Goharan M w 6.2, 2013/5/11 and Sirch M w 5.5, 2013/1/21), the estimated values of Q c, Q p and Q s vary from 151 ± 49, 63 ± 6, and 93 ± 14 at 1.5 Hz to 1,994 ± 124, 945 ± 84 and 1,520 ± 123 at 24 Hz, respectively. The average frequency-dependent relationships ( Q = Q o f n ) estimated for the region are Q c = (108 ± 10) f (0.96±0.01), Q p = (50 ± 5) f (1.01±0.04), and Q s = (75 ± 6) f (1.03±0.06). These results evidenced a frequency dependence of the quality factors Q c, Q p, and Q s, as commonly observed in tectonically active zones characterized by a high degree of heterogeneity, and the low value of Q indicated an attenuative crust beneath the entire region.

  13. Electromagnetic Counterparts of Gravitational Wave Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branchesi, Marica

    2015-03-01

    In the near future the ground-based gravitational wave detectors will reach sensitivities that should make it possible for the first time to directly observe gravitational waves. The simultaneous availability of gravitational wave detectors observing together with space and ground-based electromagnetic telescopes will offer a great opportunity to explore the Universe in a new multi-messenger perspective. Promising sources of gravitational waves are the most energetic astrophysical events such as the merger of neutron stars and/or stellar-mass black holes and the core collapse of massive stars. These events are believed to produce electromagnetic transients in the sky, like gamma-ray bursts and supernovae. An overview of the expected electromagnetic counterparts of the gravitational wave sources is presented, focusing on the challenges, opportunities and strategies for starting transient gravitational wave astronomy.

  14. Singularities from colliding plane gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipler, Frank J.

    1980-12-01

    A simple geometrical argument is given which shows that a collision between two plane gravitational waves must result in singularities. The argument suggests that these singularities are a peculiar feature of plane waves, because singularities are also a consequence of a collision between self-gravitating plane waves of other fields with arbitrarily small energy density.

  15. First test of high frequency Gravity Waves from inflation using Advanced LIGO

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Alejandro; Freese, Katherine E-mail: ktfreese@umich.edu

    2015-01-01

    Inflation models ending in a first order phase transition produce gravitational waves (GW) via bubble collisions of the true vacuum phase. We demonstrate that these bubble collisions can leave an observable signature in Advanced LIGO, an upcoming ground-based GW experiment. These GW are dependent on two parameters of the inflationary model: ε represents the energy difference between the false vacuum and the true vacuum of the inflaton potential, and χ measures how fast the phase transition ends (χ ∼ the number of e-folds during the actual phase transition). Advanced LIGO will be able to test the validity of single-phase transition models within the parameter space 10{sup 7} GeV∼< ε{sup 1/4} ∼< 10{sup 10} GeV and 0.19 ∼< χ ∼< 1. If inflation occurred through a first order phase transition, then Advanced LIGO could be the first to discover high frequency GW from inflation.

  16. Gravitational Waves: Elusive Cosmic Messengers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest g ravitational wave source for ground-based interferometers such as LIG O, VIRGO, and GE0600, as well as the space-based interferometer LISA. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires t hat we know the radiation waveforms they emit. Since these mergers ta ke place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate t hese waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to comp ute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could comple te even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situ ation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthro ughs. This talk will focus on new simulations that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applic ations in gravitational wave detection, data analysis, and astrophysi cs.

  17. Generation of Gravitational Waves with Nuclear Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, Giorgio; Baker, Robert M. L. Jr.

    2006-01-20

    The problem of efficient generation of High Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGWs) and pulses of Gravitational Radiation might find a reasonably simple solution by employing nuclear matter, especially isomers. A fissioning isomer not only rotates at extremely high frequency ({approx} 3.03x1024 s-1), but is also highly deformed in the first stages of fission (the nucleus is rotating and made asymmetric 'before' fission). Thus one achieves significant impulsive forces (e.g., 3.67x108 N) acting over extremely short time spans (e.g., 3.3x10-22 s). Alternatively, a pulsed particle beam, which could include antimatter, could trigger nuclear reactions and build up a coherent GW as the particles move through a target mass. The usual difficulty with HFGWs generated by nuclear reactions is the small dimensions of their nuclear-reaction volumes, that is, the small moment of inertia and submicroscopic radii of gyration (e.g., 10-16 m) of the nuclear-mass system. Such a difficulty is overcome by utilizing clusters of nuclear material, whose nuclear reactions are in synchronization (through the use of a computer controlled logic system) and are at a large distance apart, e.g., meters, kilometers, etc. The effective radius of gyration of the overall nuclear mass system is enormous and if the quadrupole formalism holds even approximately, then significant HFGW is generated, for example up to 8.5x1010 W to 1.64x1025 W bursts for the transient asymmetrical spinning nucleus case. In this preliminary analysis, possible conceptual designs of reactors suitable for the generation of HFGWs are discussed as well as applications to space technology. In an optimized dual-beam design, GW amplitudes on the order of A {approx} 0.005 are theoretically achieved in the laboratory, which might have interesting general-relativity and nuclear-physics consequences.

  18. Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology with Gravitational Waves.

    PubMed

    Sathyaprakash, B S; Schutz, Bernard F

    2009-01-01

    Gravitational wave detectors are already operating at interesting sensitivity levels, and they have an upgrade path that should result in secure detections by 2014. We review the physics of gravitational waves, how they interact with detectors (bars and interferometers), and how these detectors operate. We study the most likely sources of gravitational waves and review the data analysis methods that are used to extract their signals from detector noise. Then we consider the consequences of gravitational wave detections and observations for physics, astrophysics, and cosmology.

  19. Gravitational waves from axion monodromy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebecker, Arthur; Jaeckel, Joerg; Rompineve, Fabrizio; Witkowski, Lukas T.

    2016-11-01

    Large field inflation is arguably the simplest and most natural variant of slow-roll inflation. Axion monodromy may be the most promising framework for realising this scenario. As one of its defining features, the long-range polynomial potential possesses short-range, instantonic modulations. These can give rise to a series of local minima in the post-inflationary region of the potential. We show that for certain parameter choices the inflaton populates more than one of these vacua inside a single Hubble patch. This corresponds to a dynamical phase decomposition, analogously to what happens in the course of thermal first-order phase transitions. In the subsequent process of bubble wall collisions, the lowest-lying axionic minimum eventually takes over all space. Our main result is that this violent process sources gravitational waves, very much like in the case of a first-order phase transition. We compute the energy density and peak frequency of the signal, which can lie anywhere in the mHz-GHz range, possibly within reach of next-generation interferometers. We also note that this ``dynamical phase decomposition" phenomenon and its gravitational wave signal are more general and may apply to other inflationary or reheating scenarios with axions and modulated potentials.

  20. Gravitational waves in bimetric MOND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2014-01-01

    I consider the weak-field limit (WFL) of the bimetric, relativistic formulation of the modified Newtonian dynamics (BIMOND)—the lowest order in the small departures hμν=gμν-ημν, h stretchy="false">^μν=g stretchy="false">^μν-ημν from double Minkowski space-time. In particular, I look at propagating solutions, for a favorite subclass of BIMOND. The WFL splits into two sectors for two linear combinations, hμν±, of hμν and h stretchy="false">^μν. The hμν+ sector is equivalent to the WFL of general relativity (GR), with its gauge freedom, and has the same vacuum gravitational waves. The hμν- sector is fully nonlinear even for the weakest hμν-, and inherits none of the coordinate gauge freedom. The equations of motion are scale invariant in the deep-MOND limit of purely gravitational systems. In these last two regards, the BIMOND WFL is greatly different from that of other bimetric theories studied to date. Despite the strong nonlinearity, an arbitrary pair of harmonic GR wave packets of hμν and h stretchy="false">^μν moving in the same direction, is a solution of the (vacuum) BIMOND WFL.

  1. Gravitational waves from axion monodromy

    SciTech Connect

    Hebecker, Arthur; Jaeckel, Joerg; Rompineve, Fabrizio; Witkowski, Lukas T.

    2016-11-02

    Large field inflation is arguably the simplest and most natural variant of slow-roll inflation. Axion monodromy may be the most promising framework for realising this scenario. As one of its defining features, the long-range polynomial potential possesses short-range, instantonic modulations. These can give rise to a series of local minima in the post-inflationary region of the potential. We show that for certain parameter choices the inflaton populates more than one of these vacua inside a single Hubble patch. This corresponds to a dynamical phase decomposition, analogously to what happens in the course of thermal first-order phase transitions. In the subsequent process of bubble wall collisions, the lowest-lying axionic minimum eventually takes over all space. Our main result is that this violent process sources gravitational waves, very much like in the case of a first-order phase transition. We compute the energy density and peak frequency of the signal, which can lie anywhere in the mHz-GHz range, possibly within reach of next-generation interferometers. We also note that this “dynamical phase decomposition' phenomenon and its gravitational wave signal are more general and may apply to other inflationary or reheating scenarios with axions and modulated potentials.

  2. Atomic gravitational wave interferometric sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Savas; Hogan, Jason M.; Kasevich, Mark A.; Graham, Peter W.; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2008-12-15

    We propose two distinct atom interferometer gravitational wave detectors, one terrestrial and another satellite based, utilizing the core technology of the Stanford 10 m atom interferometer presently under construction. Each configuration compares two widely separated atom interferometers run using common lasers. The signal scales with the distance between the interferometers, which can be large since only the light travels over this distance, not the atoms. The terrestrial experiment with two {approx}10 m atom interferometers separated by a {approx}1 km baseline can operate with strain sensitivity {approx}(10{sup -19}/{radical}(Hz)) in the 1 Hz-10 Hz band, inaccessible to LIGO, and can detect gravitational waves from solar mass binaries out to megaparsec distances. The satellite experiment with two atom interferometers separated by a {approx}1000 km baseline can probe the same frequency spectrum as LISA with comparable strain sensitivity {approx}(10{sup -20}/{radical}(Hz)). The use of ballistic atoms (instead of mirrors) as inertial test masses improves systematics coming from vibrations and acceleration noise, and significantly reduces spacecraft control requirements. We analyze the backgrounds in this configuration and discuss methods for controlling them to the required levels.

  3. Self-adaptive method for high frequency multi-channel analysis of surface wave method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When the high frequency multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method is conducted to explore soil properties in the vadose zone, existing rules for selecting the near offset and spread lengths cannot satisfy the requirements of planar dominant Rayleigh waves for all frequencies of interest ...

  4. High-frequency Plasma Waves Associated with Magnetic Reconnection in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Activities of high-frequency plasma waves associated with magnetic reconnection in the solar wind observed by Time Domain Sampler (TDS) experiments on STEREO/WAVES are preliminarily analyzed. The TDS instrument can provide burst mode electric fields data with as long as 16384 sample points at 250 kHz sampling rate. In all 1120 suspected reconnection events, it is found that the most commonly occurred waves are neither ion acoustic waves, electrostatic solitary waves, nor Langmuir/upper hybrid waves, but Bernstein-like waves with harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency. In addition, to each type of waves, Langmuir/upper hybrid waves reveal the largest occurrence rate in the reconnection region than in the ambient solar wind. These results indicate that Bernstein-like waves and Langmuir/upper hybrid waves might play important roles in the reconnection associated particle heating processes and they might also influence the dissipation of magnetic reconnection.

  5. High-frequency internal waves near the Luzon Strait observed by underwater gliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnick, Daniel L.; Johnston, T. M. Shaun; Sherman, Jeffrey T.

    2013-02-01

    flow through the Luzon Strait produces large internal waves that propagate westward into the South China Sea and eastward into the Pacific. Underwater gliders gathered sustained observations of internal waves during seven overlapping missions from April 2007 through July 2008. A particular focus is the high-frequency internal waves, where the operational definition of high involves periods shorter than a glider profile taking 3-6 h. Internal wave vertical velocity is estimated from measurements of pressure and glider orientation through two methods: (1) use of a model of glider flight balancing buoyancy and drag along the glider path and (2) high-pass filtering of the observed glider vertical velocity. By combining high-frequency vertical velocities from glider flight with low-frequency estimates from isopycnal depth variations between dives, a spectrum covering five decades of frequency is constructed. A map of the standard deviation of vertical velocity over the survey area shows a decay from the Luzon Strait into the Pacific. The growth of high-frequency vertical velocity with propagation into the South China Sea is observed through two 2-week time series stations. The largest observed vertical velocities are greater than 0.2 m s-1 and are associated with displacements approaching 200 m. The high-frequency waves are observed at regular intervals of 1 day as they ride on diurnal tidal internal waves generated in the Strait.

  6. Gravitational-wave Mission Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnamara, Paul; Jennrich, Oliver; Stebbins, Robin T.

    2014-01-01

    In November 2013, ESA selected the science theme, the "Gravitational Universe," for its third large mission opportunity, known as L3, under its Cosmic Vision Programme. The planned launch date is 2034. ESA is considering a 20% participation by an international partner, and NASA's Astrophysics Division has indicated an interest in participating. We have studied the design consequences of a NASA contribution, evaluated the science benefits and identified the technology requirements for hardware that could be delivered by NASA. The European community proposed a strawman mission concept, called eLISA, having two measurement arms, derived from the well studied LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) concept. The US community is promoting a mission concept known as SGO Mid (Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatory Mid-sized), a three arm LISA-like concept. If NASA were to partner with ESA, the eLISA concept could be transformed to SGO Mid by the addition of a third arm, augmenting science, reducing risk and reducing non-recurring engineering costs. The characteristics of the mission concepts and the relative science performance of eLISA, SGO Mid and LISA are described. Note that all results are based on models, methods and assumptions used in NASA studies

  7. Folding gravitational-wave interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, J. R.; Ballmer, Stefan W.

    2017-01-01

    The sensitivity of kilometer-scale terrestrial gravitational wave interferometers is limited by mirror coating thermal noise. Alternative interferometer topologies can mitigate the impact of thermal noise on interferometer noise curves. In this work, we explore the impact of introducing a single folding mirror into the arm cavities of dual-recycled Fabry–Perot interferometers. While simple folding alone does not reduce the mirror coating thermal noise, it makes the folding mirror the critical mirror, opening up a variety of design and upgrade options. Improvements to the folding mirror thermal noise through crystalline coatings or cryogenic cooling can increase interferometer range by as much as a factor of two over the Advanced LIGO reference design.

  8. High-frequency programmable acoustic wave device realized through ferroelectric domain engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivry, Yachin; Wang, Nan; Durkan, Colm

    2014-03-01

    Surface acoustic wave devices are extensively used in contemporary wireless communication devices. We used atomic force microscopy to form periodic macroscopic ferroelectric domains in sol-gel deposited lead zirconate titanate, where each ferroelectric domain is composed of many crystallites, each of which contains many microscopic ferroelastic domains. We examined the electro-acoustic characteristics of the apparatus and found a resonator behavior similar to that of an equivalent surface or bulk acoustic wave device. We show that the operational frequency of the device can be tailored by altering the periodicity of the engineered domains and demonstrate high-frequency filter behavior (>8 GHz), allowing low-cost programmable high-frequency resonators.

  9. On the Importance of High Frequency Gravity Waves for Ice Nucleation in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent investigations of the influence of atmospheric waves on ice nucleation in cirrus have identified a number of key processes and sensitivities: (1) ice concentrations produced by homogeneous freezing are strongly dependent on cooling rates, with gravity waves dominating upper tropospheric cooling rates; (2) rapid cooling driven by high-frequency waves are likely responsible for the rare occurrences of very high ice concentrations in cirrus; (3) sedimentation and entrainment tend to decrease ice concentrations as cirrus age; and (4) in some situations, changes in temperature tendency driven by high-frequency waves can quench ice nucleation events and limit ice concentrations. Here we use parcel-model simulations of ice nucleation driven by long-duration, constant-pressure balloon temperature time series, along with an extensive dataset of cold cirrus microphysical properties from the recent ATTREX high-altitude aircraft campaign, to statistically examine the importance of high-frequency waves as well as the consistency between our theoretical understanding of ice nucleation and observed ice concentrations. The parcel-model simulations indicate common occurrence of peak ice concentrations exceeding several hundred per liter. Sedimentation and entrainment would reduce ice concentrations as clouds age, but 1-D simulations using a wave parameterization (which underestimates rapid cooling events) still produce ice concentrations higher than indicated by observations. We find that quenching of nucleation events by high-frequency waves occurs infrequently and does not prevent occurrences of large ice concentrations in parcel simulations of homogeneous freezing. In fact, the high-frequency variability in the balloon temperature data is entirely responsible for production of these high ice concentrations in the simulations.

  10. The Bright Future of Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Gabriela

    2008-04-01

    These are exciting times in the search for gravitational waves. Gravitational waves are expected from many different astrophysical sources: brief transients from violent events like supernova explosions and collisions of neutron stars and black holes, coalescence of compact binary systems, continuous waves from rotating systems, and stochastic signals from cosmological origin or unresolved transients. The LIGO gravitational wave detectors have achieved unprecedented sensitivity to gravitational waves, and other detectors around the world are expected to reach similar sensitivities. The LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC) has recently completed their most sensitive observation run to date with LIGO and GEO detectors, including several months of joint observations with the European VIRGO detector. The LIGO Laboratory and the LSC, as well as the Virgo Collaboration, are actively preparing for operating enhanced detectors in the very near future. The next decade will see the construction and commissioning of Advanced LIGO and VIRGO, and quite possibly the launch of the space-based LISA mission, starting for sure then, if not earlier, a new era for gravitational wave astronomy. Plans for a world-wide network of ground based detectors involving more detectors in Europe, Japan and Australia are becoming more concrete. The future of gravitational wave astronomy is bright indeed! In this talk, will briefly describe the present status of the ground and space based detector projects and discuss the science we may expect to do with the detectors (and detections!) we will have in the upcoming era of gravitational wave astronomy.

  11. Gravitational wave emission from oscillating millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Mark G.; Schwenzer, Kai

    2015-02-01

    Neutron stars undergoing r-mode oscillation emit gravitational radiation that might be detected on the Earth. For known millisecond pulsars the observed spin-down rate imposes an upper limit on the possible gravitational wave signal of these sources. Taking into account the physics of r-mode evolution, we show that only sources spinning at frequencies above a few hundred Hertz can be unstable to r-modes, and we derive a more stringent universal r-mode spin-down limit on their gravitational wave signal. We find that this refined bound limits the gravitational wave strain from millisecond pulsars to values below the detection sensitivity of next generation detectors. Young sources are therefore a more promising option for the detection of gravitational waves emitted by r-modes and to probe the interior composition of compact stars in the near future.

  12. High-frequency guided ultrasonic waves for hidden defect detection in multi-layer aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masserey, B.; Raemy, C.; Fromme, P.

    2012-05-01

    Aerospace structures contain multi-layer components subjected to cyclic loading conditions; fatigue cracks and disbonds can develop, often at fastener holes. High-frequency guided waves have the potential for non-destructive damage detection at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance. Using commercially available ultrasonic transducers, high frequency guided waves were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of a model structure, consisting of two adhesively bonded aluminum plates. The wave propagation along the specimen was measured and quantified using a laser interferometer. The wave propagation and scattering at internal defects was simulated using Finite Element (FE) models and good agreement with the measurement results found. The detection sensitivity using standard pulse-echo measurements was verified and the influence of the stand-off distance predicted from the FE simulation results.

  13. Direct Measurement of Basilar Membrane Motion Using Pulsed-Wave Doppler High-Frequency Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbatian, Z.; Garland, P.; Adamson, R. B. A.; Bance, M.; Brown, J. A.

    2011-11-01

    We present a preliminary report on the use of a new technique for measuring the motion of the basilar membrane, high-frequency ultrasound Doppler vibrometry. Using a custom-built, 1 mm diameter probe, we collected ultrasonic reflections from intracochlear structures and applied pulsed-wave Doppler vibrometry to measure the basilar membrane response to pressure applied in the ear canal.

  14. Shallow Water Sediment Properties Derived from High-Frequency Shear and Interface Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-10

    FREQUENCY SHEAR ONR N00014-88-C-1238 AND INTERFACE WAVES 6. AUTHOR(S) JOHN EWING, JERRY A. CARTER, GEORGE H. SUTTON AND NOEL BARSTOW 7. PERFORMING...B4. PAGES 4739--4762. APRIL 10. 1992 Shallow Water Sediment Properties Derived From High-Frequency Shear and Interface Waves JOHN EWING Woods Hole...calculating thickness. The amplitude falloff with range establishes a Q velocity gradients and penetration depths [ Nettleton . 19401 estimate of 40 in

  15. Binary Black Holes and Gravitational Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy, more than the combined light from all the stars in the visible universe. This energy is emitted in the form of gravitational waves, and observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO and LISA requires that we know the pattern or fingerprint of the radiation emitted. Since black hole mergers take place in regions of extreme gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these wave patterns.

  16. Gravitational waves from neutron star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Hwan

    With H. A. Bethe, G. E. Brown worked on the merger rate of neutron star binaries for the gravitational wave detection. Their prediction has to be modified significantly due to the observations of 2M⊙ neutron stars and the detection of gravitational waves. There still, however, remains a possibility that neutron star-low mass black hole binaries are significant sources of gravitational waves for the ground-based detectors. In this paper, I review the evolution of neutron star binaries with super-Eddington accretion and discuss the future prospect.

  17. High-frequency guided ultrasonic waves to monitor corrosion thickness loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, Paul; Bernhard, Fabian; Masserey, Bernard

    2017-02-01

    Corrosion due to adverse environmental conditions can occur for a range of industrial structures, e.g., ships and offshore oil platforms. Pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion can lead to the reduction of the strength and thus degradation of the structural integrity. The nondestructive detection and monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can be achieved using high frequency guided ultrasonic waves propagating along the structure. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, the two fundamental Lamb wave modes were selectively generated simultaneously, penetrating through the complete thickness of the structure. The wave propagation and interference of the guided wave modes depends on the thickness of the structure. Numerical simulations were performed using a 2D Finite Difference Method (FDM) algorithm in order to visualize the guided wave propagation and energy transfer across the plate thickness. Laboratory experiments were conducted and the wall thickness reduced initially uniformly by milling of the steel structure. Further measurements were conducted using accelerated corrosion in salt water. From the measured signal change due to the wave mode interference, the wall thickness reduction was monitored and good agreement with theoretical predictions was achieved. Corrosion can lead to non-uniform thickness reduction and the influence of this on the propagation of the high frequency guided ultrasonic waves was investigated. The wave propagation in a steel specimen with varying thickness was measured experimentally and the influence on the wave propagation characteristics quantified.

  18. Inversion of high frequency surface waves with fundamental and higher modes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.; Tian, G.

    2003-01-01

    The phase velocity of Rayleigh-waves of a layered earth model is a function of frequency and four groups of earth parameters: compressional (P)-wave velocity, shear (S)-wave velocity, density, and thickness of layers. For the fundamental mode of Rayleigh waves, analysis of the Jacobian matrix for high frequencies (2-40 Hz) provides a measure of dispersion curve sensitivity to earth model parameters. S-wave velocities are the dominant influence of the four earth model parameters. This thesis is true for higher modes of high frequency Rayleigh waves as well. Our numerical modeling by analysis of the Jacobian matrix supports at least two quite exciting higher mode properties. First, for fundamental and higher mode Rayleigh wave data with the same wavelength, higher modes can "see" deeper than the fundamental mode. Second, higher mode data can increase the resolution of the inverted S-wave velocities. Real world examples show that the inversion process can be stabilized and resolution of the S-wave velocity model can be improved when simultaneously inverting the fundamental and higher mode data. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Defect Detection in Multi-Layered Structures Using High Frequency Guided Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masserey, B.; Kostson, E.; Fromme, P.

    2011-06-01

    Aircraft structures contain multi-layered components connected by fasteners, where fatigue cracks and disbonds can develop due to cyclic loading conditions and stress concentration. High frequency guided waves propagating along the structure allow for the efficient non-destructive testing of components, such as aircraft wings. However, the sensitivity for the detection of small defects has to be ascertained. The type of multi-layered model structure investigated consists of two adhesively bonded aluminium plate-strips. High frequency ultrasonic wave propagation along the structure and the sensitivity to disbonds and small defects in the metallic layers was investigated and verified experimentally. Preliminary fatigue experiments were carried out and the sensitivity of the guided waves to monitor fatigue crack growth at a fastener hole during cyclic loading was investigated. The measurement setup has the potential for fatigue crack growth monitoring at critical and difficult to access fastener locations from a stand-off distance.

  20. Low and high frequency instabilities in an explosion-generated-plasma and possibility of wave triplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, O. P.; Singh, Sukhmander; Malik, Hitendra K.; Kumar, A.

    2015-01-01

    An explosion-generated-plasma is explored for low and high frequency instabilities by taking into account the drift of all the plasma species together with the dust particles which are charged. The possibility of wave triplet is also discussed based on the solution of dispersion equation and synchronism conditions. High frequency instability (HFI) and low frequency instability (LFI) are found to occur in this system. LFI grows faster with the higher concentration of dust particles, whereas its growth rate goes down if the mass of the dust is higher. The ion and electron temperatures affect its growth in opposite manner and the electron temperature causes this instability to grow. In addition to the instabilities, a simple wave is also observed to propagate, whose velocity is larger for larger wave number, smaller mass of the dust and higher ion temperature.

  1. The Millikan shaking experiments and high-frequency seismic wave propagation in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Toshiro; Okamoto, Taro

    2014-08-01

    In order to study high-frequency seismic wave propagation, seismic wavefields generated by resonant-shaking experiments of the Millikan Library, on the campus of California Institute Technology (Pasadena, California, USA), were analysed. Because the resonant shaking frequencies are 1.12 Hz (the east-west direction) and 1.64 Hz (the north-south direction), this active-source experiment can provide opportunities for studying high-frequency seismic wave propagation in Southern California. Because they are very narrow frequency band data, the analyses must be quite different from ordinary time-domain analyses. We show, theoretically, that the signals must be dominated by surface waves. Adopting this surface wave assumption, we proceed to make two separate analyses, one on spectral amplitude and the other on phase. We present a new method to derive group velocity from phase based on the cross correlations between the station in the Millikan Library (MIK) and stations in the regional network. Our results support that an active-source experiment by resonant shaking of a building is a feasible approach for high-frequency seismic wave studies.

  2. Noncontact monitoring of fatigue crack growth using high frequency guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masserey, B.; Fromme, P.

    2014-03-01

    The development of fatigue cracks at fastener holes due to stress concentration is a common problem in aircraft maintenance. This contribution investigates the use of high frequency guided waves for the non-contact monitoring of fatigue crack growth in tensile, aluminium specimens. High frequency guided ultrasonic waves have a good sensitivity for defect detection and can propagate along the structure, thus having the potential for the inspection of difficult to access parts by means of non-contact measurements. Experimentally the required guided wave modes are excited using standard wedge transducers and measured using a laser interferometer. The growth of fatigue cracks during cyclic loading was monitored optically and the resulting changes in the signal caused by crack growth are quantified. Full three-dimensional simulation of the scattering of the high frequency guided ultrasonic waves at the fastener hole and crack has been implemented using the Finite Difference (FD) method. The comparison of the results shows a good agreement of the measured and predicted scattered field of the guided wave at quarter-elliptical and through-thickness fatigue cracks. The measurements show a good sensitivity for the early detection of fatigue damage and for the monitoring of fatigue crack growth at a fastener hole. The sensitivity and repeatability are ascertained, and the robustness of the methodology for practical in-situ ultrasonic monitoring of fatigue crack growth is discussed.

  3. Monitoring of corrosion damage using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, D.; Fromme, P.

    2014-03-01

    Due to adverse environmental conditions corrosion can develop during the life cycle of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the integrity and load bearing capacity of the structure. Structural health monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can in principle be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, high frequency guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. Wall thickness reduction was induced using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath. The corrosion damage was monitored based on the effect on the wave propagation and interference of the different modes. The change in the wave interference was quantified based on an analysis in the frequency domain (Fourier transform) and was found to match well with theoretical predictions for the wall thickness loss. High frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  4. Monitoring of corrosion damage using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, D.; Fromme, P.

    2015-03-01

    Due to adverse environmental conditions corrosion can develop during the life cycle of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the integrity and load bearing capacity of the structure. Structural health monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can in principle be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, high frequency guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. Wall thickness reduction was induced using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath. The corrosion damage was monitored based on the effect on the wave propagation and interference of the different modes. The change in the wave interference was quantified based on an analysis in the frequency domain (Fourier transform) and was found to match well with theoretical predictions for the wall thickness loss. High frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  5. Gravitational wave detection in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Wei-Tou

    Gravitational Wave (GW) detection in space is aimed at low frequency band (100nHz-100mHz) and middle frequency band (100mHz-10Hz). The science goals are the detection of GWs from (i) Supermassive Black Holes; (ii) Extreme-Mass-Ratio Black Hole Inspirals; (iii) Intermediate-Mass Black Holes; (iv) Galactic Compact Binaries and (v) Relic GW Background. In this paper, we present an overview on the sensitivity, orbit design, basic orbit configuration, angular resolution, orbit optimization, deployment, time-delay interferometry (TDI) and payload concept of the current proposed GW detectors in space under study. The detector proposals under study have arm length ranging from 1000km to 1.3 × 109km (8.6AU) including (a) Solar orbiting detectors — (ASTROD Astrodynamical Space Test of Relativity using Optical Devices (ASTROD-GW) optimized for GW detection), Big Bang Observer (BBO), DECi-hertz Interferometer GW Observatory (DECIGO), evolved LISA (e-LISA), Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), other LISA-type detectors such as ALIA, TAIJI etc. (in Earthlike solar orbits), and Super-ASTROD (in Jupiterlike solar orbits); and (b) Earth orbiting detectors — ASTROD-EM/LAGRANGE, GADFLI/GEOGRAWI/g-LISA, OMEGA and TIANQIN.

  6. Heating of ions by high frequency electromagnetic waves in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zestanakis, P. A.; Kominis, Y.; Hizanidis, K.; Ram, A. K.

    2013-07-15

    The heating of ions by high frequency electrostatic waves in magnetically confined plasmas has been a paradigm for studying nonlinear wave-particle interactions. The frequency of the waves is assumed to be much higher than the ion cyclotron frequency and the waves are taken to propagate across the magnetic field. In fusion type plasmas, electrostatic waves, like the lower hybrid wave, cannot access the core of the plasma. That is a domain for high harmonic fast waves or electron cyclotron waves—these are primarily electromagnetic waves. Previous studies on heating of ions by two or more electrostatic waves are extended to two electromagnetic waves that propagate directly across the confining magnetic field. While the ratio of the frequency of each wave to the ion cyclotron frequency is large, the frequency difference is assumed to be near the ion cyclotron frequency. The nonlinear wave-particle interaction is studied analytically using a two time-scale canonical perturbation theory. The theory elucidates the effects of various parameters on the gain in energy by the ions—parameters such as the amplitudes and polarizations of the waves, the ratio of the wave frequencies to the cyclotron frequency, the difference in the frequency of the two waves, and the wave numbers associated with the waves. For example, the ratio of the phase velocity of the envelope formed by the two waves to the phase velocity of the carrier wave is important for energization of ions. For a positive ratio, the energy range is much larger than for a negative ratio. So waves like the lower hybrid waves will impart very little energy to ions. The theoretical results are found to be in good agreement with numerical simulations of the exact dynamical equations. The analytical results are used to construct mapping equations, simplifying the derivation of the motion of ions, which are, subsequently, used to follow the evolution of an ion distribution function. The heating of ions can then be

  7. Hunting for dark particles with gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Giudice, Gian F.; McCullough, Matthew; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-10-03

    The LIGO observation of gravitational waves from a binary black hole merger has begun a new era in fundamental physics. If new dark sector particles, be they bosons or fermions, can coalesce into exotic compact objects (ECOs) of astronomical size, then the first evidence for such objects, and their underlying microphysical description, may arise in gravitational wave observations. In this work we study how the macroscopic properties of ECOs are related to their microscopic properties, such as dark particle mass and couplings. We then demonstrate the smoking gun exotic signatures that would provide observational evidence for ECOs, and hence new particles, in terrestrial gravitational wave observatories. Finally, we discuss how gravitational waves can test a core concept in general relativity: Hawking’s area theorem.

  8. Gravitational Waves from Oscillons after Inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antusch, Stefan; Cefalà, Francesco; Orani, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the production of gravitational waves during preheating after inflation in the common case of field potentials that are asymmetric around the minimum. In particular, we study the impact of oscillons, comparatively long lived and spatially localized regions where a scalar field (e.g., the inflaton) oscillates with large amplitude. Contrary to a previous study, which considered a symmetric potential, we find that oscillons in asymmetric potentials associated with a phase transition can generate a pronounced peak in the spectrum of gravitational waves that largely exceeds the linear preheating spectrum. We discuss the possible implications of this enhanced amplitude of gravitational waves. For instance, for low scale inflation models, the contribution from the oscillons can strongly enhance the observation prospects at current and future gravitational wave detectors.

  9. Building a Galactic Scale Gravitational Wave Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Maura

    2016-03-01

    Pulsars are rapidly rotating neutron stars with phenomenal rotational stability that can be used as celestial clocks in a variety of fundamental physics experiences. One of these experiments involves using a pulsar timing array of precisely timed millisecond pulsars to detect perturbations due to gravitational waves. The low frequency gravitational waves detectable through pulsar timing will most likely result from an ensemble of supermassive black hole binaries. I will introduce the efforts of the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav), a collaboration that monitors over 50 millisecond pulsars with the Green Bank Telescope and the Arecibo Observatory, with a focus on our observation and data analysis methods. I will also describe how NANOGrav has joined international partners through the International Pulsar Timing Array to form a low-frequency gravitational wave detector of unprecedented sensitivity.

  10. Gravitational Waves: A New Observational Window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camp, Jordan B.

    2010-01-01

    The era of gravitational wave astronomy is rapidly approaching, with a likely start date around the middle of this decade ' Gravitational waves, emitted by accelerated motions of very massive objects, provide detailed information about strong-field gravity and its sources, including black holes and neutron stars, that electromagnetic probes cannot access. In this talk I will discuss the anticipated sources and the status of the extremely sensitive detectors (both ground and space based) that will make gravitational wave detections possible. As ground based detectors are now taking data, I will show some initial science results related to measured upper limits on gravitational wave signals. Finally Z will describe new directions including advanced detectors and joint efforts with other fields of astronomy.

  11. Hunting for dark particles with gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudice, Gian F.; McCullough, Matthew; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-10-01

    The LIGO observation of gravitational waves from a binary black hole merger has begun a new era in fundamental physics. If new dark sector particles, be they bosons or fermions, can coalesce into exotic compact objects (ECOs) of astronomical size, then the first evidence for such objects, and their underlying microphysical description, may arise in gravitational wave observations. In this work we study how the macroscopic properties of ECOs are related to their microscopic properties, such as dark particle mass and couplings. We then demonstrate the smoking gun exotic signatures that would provide observational evidence for ECOs, and hence new particles, in terrestrial gravitational wave observatories. Finally, we discuss how gravitational waves can test a core concept in general relativity: Hawking's area theorem.

  12. Gravitational Wave Detection with Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Savas; Graham, Peter W.; Hogan, Jason M.; Kasevich, Mark A.; Rajendran, Surjeet; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2008-01-23

    We propose two distinct atom interferometer gravitational wave detectors, one terrestrial and another satellite-based, utilizing the core technology of the Stanford 10m atom interferometer presently under construction. The terrestrial experiment can operate with strain sensitivity {approx} 10{sup -19}/{radical}Hz in the 1 Hz-10 Hz band, inaccessible to LIGO, and can detect gravitational waves from solar mass binaries out to megaparsec distances. The satellite experiment probes the same frequency spectrum as LISA with better strain sensitivity {approx} 10{sup -20}/{radical}Hz. Each configuration compares two widely separated atom interferometers run using common lasers. The effect of the gravitational waves on the propagating laser field produces the main effect in this configuration and enables a large enhancement in the gravitational wave signal while significantly suppressing many backgrounds. The use of ballistic atoms (instead of mirrors) as inertial test masses improves systematics coming from vibrations and acceleration noise, and reduces spacecraft control requirements.

  13. LISA: Detecting Gravitational Waves from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    The laser interferometer space antenna (LISA), a joint NASA/ESA mission, will be the first dedicated gravitational wave detector in space. This presentation will provide a tutorial of the LISA measurement concept.

  14. Particle production in a gravitational wave background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Preston; McDougall, Patrick; Singleton, Douglas

    2017-03-01

    We study the possibility that massless particles, such as photons, are produced by a gravitational wave. That such a process should occur is implied by tree-level Feynman diagrams such as two gravitons turning into two photons, i.e., g +g →γ +γ . Here we calculate the rate at which a gravitational wave creates a massless scalar field. This is done by placing the scalar field in the background of a plane gravitational wave and calculating the 4-current of the scalar field. Even in the vacuum limit of the scalar field it has a nonzero vacuum expectation value (similar to what occurs in the Higgs mechanism) and a nonzero current. We associate this with the production of scalar field quanta by the gravitational field. This effect has potential consequences for the attenuation of gravitational waves since the massless field is being produced at the expense of the gravitational field. This is related to the time-dependent Schwinger effect, but with the electric field replaced by the gravitational wave background and the electron/positron field quanta replaced by massless scalar "photons." Since the produced scalar quanta are massless there is no exponential suppression, as occurs in the Schwinger effect due to the electron mass.

  15. High-frequency wave diffraction by an impedance segment at oblique incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korol'kov, A. I.; Shanin, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    The plane problem of high-frequency acoustic wave diffraction by a segment with impedance boundary conditions is considered. The angle of incidence of waves is assumed to be small (oblique). The paper generalizes the method previously developed by the authors for an ideal segment (with Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions). An expression for the directional pattern of the scattered field is derived. The optical theorem is proved for the case of the parabolic equation. The surface wave amplitude is calculated, and the results are numerically verified by the integral equation method.

  16. The Path to Gravitational Wave Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barish, Barry

    2017-01-01

    Experimental efforts toward gravitational wave detection began with the innovative resonant bar experiments of Joseph Weber in the 1960s. This technique evolved, but was eventually replaced by the potentially more sensitive suspended mass interferometers. Large scale interferometers, GEO, LIGO and Virgo were funded in 1994. The 22 year history since that time will be discussed, tracing the key technical challenges and solutions that have enabled LIGO to reach the incredible sensitivities where gravitational waves from binary black hole mergers have been observed.

  17. Gravitational waves and the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Latham A.

    Can we detect primordial gravitational waves ( i.e. tensor perturbations)? If so, what will they teach us about the early universe? These two questions are central to this two part thesis. First, in chapters 2 and 3, we compute the gravitational wave spectrum produced by inflation. We argue that if inflation is correct, then the scalar spectral index n s should satisfy n s [Special characters omitted.] 0.98; and if n s satisfies 0.95 [Special characters omitted.] n s [Special characters omitted.] 0.98, then the tensor-to-scalar ratio r should satisfy r [Special characters omitted.] 0.01. This means that, if inflation is correct, then primordial gravitational waves are likely to be detectable. We compute in detail the "tensor transfer function" T t ( k, t) which relates the tensor power spectrum at two different times t 1 and t 2 , and the "tensor extrapolation function" E t ( k, k [low *] ) which relates the primordial tensor power spectrum at two different wavenumbers k and k [low *] . By analyzing these two expressions, we show that inflationary gravitational waves should yield crucial clues about inflation itself, and about the "primordial dark age" between the end of inflation and the start of big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Second, in chapters 4 and 5, we compute the gravitational wave spectrum produced by the cyclic model. We examine a surprising duality relating expanding and contracting cosmological models that generate the same spectrum of gauge-invariant Newtonian potential fluctuations. This means that, if the cyclic model is correct, then it cannot be distinguished from inflation by observing primordial scalar perturbations alone. Fortunately, gravitational waves may be used to cleanly discriminate between the inflationary and cyclic scenarios: we show that BBN constrains the gravitational wave spectrum generated by the cyclic model to be so suppressed that it cannot be detected by any known experiment. Thus, the detection of a primordial gravitational

  18. The pregalactic cosmic gravitational wave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matzner, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    An outline is given that estimates the expected gravitational wave background, based on plausible pregalactic sources. Some cosmologically significant limits can be put on incoherent gravitational wave background arising from pregalactic cosmic evolution. The spectral region of cosmically generated and cosmically limited radiation is, at long periods, P greater than 1 year, in contrast to more recent cosmological sources, which have P approx. 10 to 10(exp -3).

  19. High-Frequency Electrostatic Wave Generation and Transverse Ion Acceleration by Low Alfvenic Wave Components of BBELF Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Khazanov, George; Mukhter, Ali

    2006-01-01

    Satellite observations in the auroral plasma have revealed that extremely low frequency (ELF) waves play a dominant role in the acceleration of electrons and ions in the auroral plasma. The electromagnetic components of the ELF (EMELF) waves are the electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves below the cyclotron frequency of the lightest ion species in a multi-ion plasma. Shear Alfv6n waves (SAWS) constitute the lowest frequency components of the ELF waves below the ion cyclotron frequency of the heaviest ion. The -2 mechanism for the transfer of energy from such EMELF waves to ions affecting transverse ion heating still remains a matter of debate. A very ubiquitous fe8ture of ELF waves now observed in several rocket and satellite experiments is that they occur in conjunction with high-frequency electrostatic waves. The frequency spectrum of the composite wave turbulence extends from the low frequency of the Alfvenic waves to the high frequency of proton plasma frequency and/or the lower hybrid frequency. The spectrum does not show any feature organized by the ion cyclotron frequencies and their harmonics. Such broadband waves consisting of both the EM and ES waves are now popularly referred as BBELF waves. We present results here from 2.5-D particle-in-cell simulations showing that the ES components are directly generated by cross- field plasma instabilities driven by the drifts of the ions and electrons in the EM component of the BBELF waves.

  20. Time Evolution of Pure Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyama, S. M.

    1981-03-01

    Numerical solutions to the Einstein equations in the case of pure gravitational waves are given. The system is assumed to be axially symmetric and non-rotating. The time symmetric initial data and the conformally flat initial data are obtained by solving the constraint equations at t=0. The time evolution of these initial data depends strongly on the initial amplitude of the gravitational waves. In the case of the low initial amplitude, waves only disperse to null infinity. By comparing the initial gravitational energy with the total energy loss through an r=constant surface, it is concluded that the Newman-Penrose method and the Gibbon-Hawking method are the most desirable for measuring the energy flux of gravitational radiation numerically. In the case that the initial ratio of the spatial extent of the gravitational waves to the Schwarzschild radius (M/2) is smaller than about 300, the waves collapse by themselves, leading to formation of a black hole. The analytic solutions of the linearized Einstein equations for the pure gravitational waves are also shown.

  1. Monitoring of hidden damage in multi-layered aerospace structures using high-frequency guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semoroz, A.; Masserey, B.; Fromme, P.

    2011-04-01

    Aerospace structures contain multi-layered components connected by fasteners, where fatigue cracks and disbonds or localized lack of sealant can develop due to cyclic loading conditions and stress concentration. High frequency guided waves propagating along such a structure allow for the efficient non-destructive testing of large components, such as aircraft wings. The type of multi-layered model structure investigated in this contribution consists of two aluminium plates adhesively bonded with an epoxy based sealant layer. Using commercially available transducer equipment, specific high frequency guided ultrasonic wave modes that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure were excited. The wave propagation along the structure was measured experimentally using a laser interferometer. Two types of hidden damage were considered: a localized lack of sealant and small surface defects in the metallic layer facing the sealant. The detection sensitivity using standard pulse-echo measurement equipment has been quantified and the detection of small hidden defects from significant stand-off distances has been shown. Fatigue experiments were carried out and the potential of high frequency guided waves for the monitoring of fatigue crack growth at a fastener hole during cyclic loading was discussed.

  2. High-frequency gravity waves and homogeneous ice nucleation in tropical tropopause layer cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Ueyama, Rei; Pfister, Leonhard; Bui, Theopaul V.; Alexander, M. Joan; Podglajen, Aurélien; Hertzog, Albert; Woods, Sarah; Lawson, R. Paul; Kim, Ji-Eun; Schoeberl, Mark R.

    2016-06-01

    The impact of high-frequency gravity waves on homogeneous-freezing ice nucleation in cold cirrus clouds is examined using parcel model simulations driven by superpressure balloon measurements of temperature variability experienced by air parcels in the tropical tropopause region. We find that the primary influence of high-frequency waves is to generate rapid cooling events that drive production of numerous ice crystals. Quenching of ice nucleation events by temperature tendency reversal in the highest-frequency waves does occasionally produce low ice concentrations, but the overall impact of high-frequency waves is to increase the occurrence of high ice concentrations. The simulated ice concentrations are considerably higher than indicated by in situ measurements of cirrus in the tropical tropopause region. One-dimensional simulations suggest that although sedimentation reduces mean ice concentrations, a discrepancy of about a factor of 3 with observed ice concentrations remains. Reconciliation of numerical simulations with the observed ice concentrations will require inclusion of physical processes such as heterogeneous nucleation and entrainment.

  3. Gravitational Waves from a Dark Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we show that a large class of models with a composite dark sector undergo a strong first order phase transition in the early Universe, which could lead to a detectable gravitational wave signal. We summarize the basic conditions for a strong first order phase transition for SU (N ) dark sectors with nf flavors, calculate the gravitational wave spectrum and show that, depending on the dark confinement scale, it can be detected at eLISA or in pulsar timing array experiments. The gravitational wave signal provides a unique test of the gravitational interactions of a dark sector, and we discuss the complementarity with conventional searches for new dark sectors. The discussion includes the twin Higgs and strongly interacting massive particle models as well as symmetric and asymmetric composite dark matter scenarios.

  4. High frequency guided waves for hidden fatigue crack growth monitoring in multi-layer aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Henry; Fromme, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Varying loading conditions of aircraft structures result in stress concentration at fastener holes, where multi-layered components are connected, possibly leading to the development of fatigue cracks. High frequency guided waves propagating along the structure allow for the non-destructive testing of such components, e.g., aircraft wings. However, the sensitivity for the detection of small, potentially hidden, fatigue cracks has to be ascertained. The type of multi-layered model structure investigated consists of two adhesively bonded aluminium plate-strips. Fatigue experiments were carried out. The sensitivity of the high frequency guided wave modes to monitor fatigue crack growth at a fastener hole during cyclic loading was investigated, using both standard pulse-echo equipment and laser interferometry. The sensitivity and repeatability of the measurements were ascertained, having the potential for fatigue crack growth monitoring at critical and difficult to access fastener locations from a stand-off distance.

  5. High-frequency programmable acoustic wave device realized through ferroelectric domain engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Ivry, Yachin E-mail: cd229@eng.cam.ac.uk; Wang, Nan; Durkan, Colm E-mail: cd229@eng.cam.ac.uk

    2014-03-31

    Surface acoustic wave devices are extensively used in contemporary wireless communication devices. We used atomic force microscopy to form periodic macroscopic ferroelectric domains in sol-gel deposited lead zirconate titanate, where each ferroelectric domain is composed of many crystallites, each of which contains many microscopic ferroelastic domains. We examined the electro-acoustic characteristics of the apparatus and found a resonator behavior similar to that of an equivalent surface or bulk acoustic wave device. We show that the operational frequency of the device can be tailored by altering the periodicity of the engineered domains and demonstrate high-frequency filter behavior (>8 GHz), allowing low-cost programmable high-frequency resonators.

  6. Probing cosmic superstrings with gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, L.; Avelino, P. P.

    2016-09-01

    We compute the stochastic gravitational wave background generated by cosmic superstrings using a semianalytical velocity-dependent model to describe their dynamics. We show that heavier string types may leave distinctive signatures on the stochastic gravitational wave background spectrum within the reach of present and upcoming gravitational wave detectors. We examine the physically motivated scenario in which the physical size of loops is determined by the gravitational backreaction scale and use NANOGrav data to derive a conservative constraint of G μF<3.2 ×10-9 on the tension of fundamental strings. We demonstrate that approximating the gravitational wave spectrum generated by cosmic superstring networks using the spectrum generated by ordinary cosmic strings with reduced intercommuting probability (which is often done in the literature) leads, in general, to weaker observational constraints on G μF. We show that the inclusion of heavier string types is required for a more accurate characterization of the region of the (gs,G μF) parameter space that may be probed using direct gravitational wave detectors. In particular, we consider the observational constraints that result from NANOGrav data and show that heavier strings generate a secondary exclusion region of parameter space.

  7. Experimental observation of standing wave effect in low-pressure very-high-frequency capacitive discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yong-Xin; Gao, Fei; Liu, Jia; Wang, You-Nian

    2014-07-28

    Radial uniformity measurements of plasma density were carried out by using a floating double probe in a cylindrical (21 cm in electrode diameter) capacitive discharge reactor driven over a wide range of frequencies (27–220 MHz). At low rf power, a multiple-node structure of standing wave effect was observed at 130 MHz. The secondary density peak caused by the standing wave effect became pronounced and shifts toward the axis as the driving frequency further to increase, indicative of a much more shortened standing-wave wavelength. With increasing rf power, the secondary density peak shift toward the radial edge, namely, the standing-wave wavelength was increased, in good qualitative agreement with the previous theory and simulation results. At higher pressures and high frequencies, the rf power was primarily deposited at the periphery of the electrode, due to the fact that the waves were strongly damped as they propagated from the discharge edge into the center.

  8. Investigations of propagating wave types in railway tracks at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryue, J.; Thompson, D. J.; White, P. R.; Thompson, D. R.

    2008-08-01

    At low frequencies waves propagate in a rail as bending, extensional or torsional waves. At higher frequencies, above about 1.5 kHz, the rail cross-section deforms and many higher order wave types exist. This cross-section deformation has to be taken into account for an accurate evaluation of the dispersion properties at high frequencies. Simulation results in the literature show that a multiplicity of wave modes is possible within this high-frequency range. In this work, wave types that propagate primarily through separate regions of the rail cross-section are investigated for frequencies up to 80 kHz. Two numerical methods are applied to obtain the dispersion properties for a railway track model including rail pads as a continuous foundation. These are a conventional finite element (FE) method and a wavenumber finite element (WFE) method, each of which can include the effects of cross-sectional deformation. In order to validate the predicted results, experiments were performed on a short test track using an impact hammer and accelerometers. Additional measurements used piezoceramic transducers to excite the rail at higher frequencies. The results are compared with simulations in terms of the group velocity and they present very good agreement. From this comparison, it is identified which wave types predominantly propagate on various regions of the rail cross-section.

  9. How to test gravitation theories by means of gravitational-wave measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, K. S.

    1974-01-01

    Gravitational-wave experiments are a potentially powerful tool for testing gravitation theories. Most theories in the literature predict rather different polarization properties for gravitational waves than are predicted by general relativity; and many theories predict anomalies in the propagation speeds of gravitational waves.

  10. Nearby Stars as Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Ilídio; Silk, Joseph

    2015-07-01

    Sun-like stellar oscillations are excited by turbulent convection and have been discovered in some 500 main-sequence and sub-giant stars and in more than 12,000 red giant stars. When such stars are near gravitational wave sources, low-order quadrupole acoustic modes are also excited above the experimental threshold of detectability, and they can be observed, in principle, in the acoustic spectra of these stars. Such stars form a set of natural detectors to search for gravitational waves over a large spectral frequency range, from {10}-7 to {10}-2 Hz. In particular, these stars can probe the {10}-6-{10}-4 Hz spectral window which cannot be probed by current conventional gravitational wave detectors, such as the Square Kilometre Array and Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna. The Planetary Transits and Oscillations of State (PLATO) stellar seismic mission will achieve photospheric velocity amplitude accuracy of {cm} {{{s}}}-1. For a gravitational wave search, we will need to achieve accuracies of the order of {10}-2 {cm} {{{s}}}-1, i.e., at least one generation beyond PLATO. However, we have found that multi-body stellar systems have the ideal setup for this type of gravitational wave search. This is the case for triple stellar systems formed by a compact binary and an oscillating star. Continuous monitoring of the oscillation spectra of these stars to a distance of up to a kpc could lead to the discovery of gravitational waves originating in our galaxy or even elsewhere in the universe. Moreover, unlike experimental detectors, this observational network of stars will allow us to study the progression of gravitational waves throughout space.

  11. High-frequency sound wave propagation in binary gas mixtures flowing through microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, M.; Lorenzani, S.

    2016-05-01

    The propagation of high-frequency sound waves in binary gas mixtures flowing through microchannels is investigated by using the linearized Boltzmann equation based on a Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK)-type approach and diffuse reflection boundary conditions. The results presented refer to mixtures whose constituents have comparable molecular mass (like Ne-Ar) as well as to disparate-mass gas mixtures (composed of very heavy plus very light molecules, like He-Xe). The sound wave propagation model considered in the present paper allows to analyze the precise nature of the forced-sound modes excited in different gas mixtures.

  12. Relations among low ionosphere parameters and high frequency radio wave absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cipriano, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Charged particle conductivities measured in the very low ionosphere at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, and Wallops Island, Virginia, are compared with atmospheric parameters and high frequency radio wave absorption measurements. Charged particle densities are derived from the conductivity data. Between 33 and 58 km, positive conductivity correlated well with neutral atmospheric temperature, with temperature coefficients as large as 4.6%/deg K. Good correlations were also found between HF radio wave absorption and negative conductivity at altitudes as low as 53 km, indicating that the day-to-day absorption variations were principally due to variations in electron loss rate.

  13. Orientational atom interferometers sensitive to gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lorek, Dennis; Laemmerzahl, Claus; Wicht, Andreas

    2010-02-15

    We present an atom interferometer that differs from common atom interferometers as it is not based on the spatial splitting of electronic wave functions, but on orienting atoms in space. As an example we present how an orientational atom interferometer based on highly charged hydrogen-like atoms is affected by gravitational waves. We show that a monochromatic gravitational wave will cause a frequency shift that scales with the binding energy of the system rather than with its physical dimension. For a gravitational wave amplitude of h=10{sup -23} the frequency shift is of the order of 110 {mu}Hz for an atom interferometer based on a 91-fold charged uranium ion. A frequency difference of this size can be resolved by current atom interferometers in 1 s.

  14. Binary Black Holes and Gravitational Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy, more than the combined light from all the stars in the visible universe. This energy is emitted in the form of gravitational waves, and observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO and LISA requires that we know the pattern or fingerprint of the radiation emitted. Since black hole mergers take place in regions of extreme gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these wave patterns. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute these wave patterns. However, their computer codes have been plagued by problems that caused them to crash. This situation has changed dramatically in the past 2 years, with a series of amazing breakthroughs. This discussion examines these gravitational patterns, showing how a spacetime is constructed on a computer to build a simulation laboratory for binary black hole mergers. The focus is on recent advances that are revealing these waveforms, and the dramatic new potential for discoveries that arises when these sources will be observed by the space-based gravitational wave detector LISA.

  15. Space-borne gravitational wave observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    The paper describes the progress toward a space-borne gravitational wave observatory and its foreseeable science potential. In particular the paper describes the status of the LISA-like mission called eLISA, the reference mission for the Gravitational Universe theme adopted by ESA for its Large mission L3, and the status of its precursor LISA Pathfinder, due to launch in 2015.

  16. High-frequency waves following PKP-CDIFF at distances greater than 155°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Ichiro

    1990-04-01

    Using a seismic network in Hokkaido-Tohoku region, Japan we observe PKP waves in the distance range 152 to 157°from a deep earthquake in Argentina. The seismic network consists of 26 stations and provides us with a data set of dense distance sampling. The examination of amplitude variation of PKP-BC and PKP-Cdiff with distance locates the C-cusp at about 155.5° for a surface source for the path from Argentina to Japan. This C-cusp position suggests a P velocity of 10.27 km/s at the bottom of the outer core. The bandpass filtering of the data shows that high-frequency waves are observed following PKP-Cdiff at distances beyond the C-cusp. The waves are characterized by a dominant frequency of about 2 to 3 Hz, a long duration of oscillation until the arrival of PKP-AB, and an apparent onset slowness of about 4 s/deg, which is approximately equal to that of PKP-AB in the distance range. The onset time of the high-frequency waves seems to be consistent with the least time of the scattering of PKP-BC on the receiver side near the bottom of the upper mantle.

  17. Low Frequency Turbulence as the Source of High Frequency Waves in Multi-Component Space Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Krivorutsky, Emmanuel N.; Uritsky, Vadim M.

    2011-01-01

    Space plasmas support a wide variety of waves, and wave-particle interactions as well as wavewave interactions are of crucial importance to magnetospheric and ionospheric plasma behavior. High frequency wave turbulence generation by the low frequency (LF) turbulence is restricted by two interconnected requirements: the turbulence should be strong enough and/or the coherent wave trains should have the appropriate length. These requirements are strongly relaxed in the multi-component plasmas, due to the heavy ions large drift velocity in the field of LF wave. The excitation of lower hybrid waves (LHWs), in particular, is a widely discussed mechanism of interaction between plasma species in space and is one of the unresolved questions of magnetospheric multi-ion plasmas. It is demonstrated that large-amplitude Alfven waves, in particular those associated with LF turbulence, may generate LHW s in the auroral zone and ring current region and in some cases (particularly in the inner magnetosphere) this serves as the Alfven wave saturation mechanism. We also argue that the described scenario can playa vital role in various parts of the outer magnetosphere featuring strong LF turbulence accompanied by LHW activity. Using the data from THEMIS spacecraft, we validate the conditions for such cross-scale coupling in the near-Earth "flow-braking" magnetotail region during the passage of sharp injection/dipolarization fronts, as well as in the turbulent outflow region of the midtail reconnection site.

  18. Joint inversion of high-frequency surface waves with fundamental and higher modes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Liu, J.; Liu, Q.; Xu, S.

    2007-01-01

    Joint inversion of multimode surface waves for estimating the shear (S)-wave velocity has received much attention in recent years. In this paper, we first analyze sensitivity of phase velocities of multimodes of surface waves for a six-layer earth model, and then we invert surface-wave dispersion curves of the theoretical model and a real-world example. Sensitivity analysis shows that fundamental mode data are more sensitive to the S-wave velocities of shallow layers and are concentrated on a very narrow frequency band, while higher mode data are more sensitive to the parameters of relatively deeper layers and are distributed over a wider frequency band. These properties provide a foundation of using a multimode joint inversion to define S-wave velocities. Inversion results of both synthetic data and a real-world example demonstrate that joint inversion with the damped least-square method and the singular-value decomposition technique to invert high-frequency surface waves with fundamental and higher mode data simultaneously can effectively reduce the ambiguity and improve the accuracy of S-wave velocities. ?? 2007.

  19. Calculation of high frequency ultrasonic signals for shear wave insonification in solid material.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, V; Langenberg, K J; Chakhlov, S

    2004-04-01

    The goal of the theoretical part is to simulate an automatic ultrasonic inspection with contact technique shear wave probes, where the high frequency signals are captured and used to perform a reconstruction based on the synthetic aperture focusing method "SAFT". Therefore the ultrasonic probe, the scanning path and the defects are parameters in a CAD model. The scattering behavior of the defect is calculated by the Kirchhoff approximation in its elastodynamic version. The result of the simulation--the high frequency data--and the result of the SAFT-reconstructions are compared with experimental results on a steel test block with side drilled and flat bottom holes. The model is validated by the experiment. One of the applications of the model is to identify multiple reflections.

  20. Embedding nonrelativistic physics inside a gravitational wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekaert, Xavier; Morand, Kevin

    2013-09-01

    Gravitational waves with parallel rays are known to have remarkable properties: their orbit space of null rays possesses the structure of a nonrelativistic spacetime of codimension-1. Their geodesics are in one-to-one correspondence with dynamical trajectories of a nonrelativistic system. Similarly, the null dimensional reduction of Klein-Gordon’s equation on this class of gravitational waves leads to a Schrödinger equation on curved space. These properties are generalized to the class of gravitational waves with a null Killing vector field, of which we propose a new geometric definition, as conformally equivalent to the previous class and such that the Killing vector field is preserved. This definition is instrumental for performing this generalization, as well as various applications. In particular, results on geodesic completeness are extended in a similar way. Moreover, the classification of the subclass with constant scalar invariants is investigated.

  1. Exploring Gravitational Waves in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cominsky, Lynn R.; McLin, Kevin M.; Peruta, Carolyn; Simonnet, Aurore

    2016-04-01

    On September 14, 2015, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) received the first confirmed gravitational wave signals. Now known as GW150914 (for the date on which the signals were received), the event represents the coalescence of two black holes that were previously in mutual orbit. LIGO’s exciting discovery provides direct evidence of what is arguably the last major unconfirmed prediction of Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity. The Education and Public Outreach group at Sonoma State University has created an educator's guide that provides a brief introduction to LIGO and to gravitational waves, along with two simple demonstration activities that can be done in the classroom to engage students in understanding LIGO’s discovery. Additional resources have also been provided to extend student explorations of Einstein’s Universe.

  2. General-relativistic astrophysics. [gravitational wave astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, K. S.

    1978-01-01

    The overall relevance of general relativity to astrophysics is considered, and some of the knowledge about the ways in which general relativity should influence astrophysical systems is reviewed. Attention is focused primarily on finite-sized astrophysical systems, such as stars, globular clusters, galactic nuclei, and primordial black holes. Stages in the evolution of such systems and tools for studying the effects of relativistic gravity in these systems are examined. Gravitational-wave astronomy is discussed in detail, with emphasis placed on estimates of the strongest gravitational waves that bathe earth, present obstacles and future prospects for detection of the predicted waves, the theory of small perturbations of relativistic stars and black holes, and the gravitational waves such objects generate. Characteristics of waves produced by black-hole events in general, pregalactic black-hole events, black-hole events in galactic nuclei and quasars, black-hole events in globular clusters, the collapse of normal stars to form black holes or neutron stars, and corequakes in neutron stars are analyzed. The state of the art in gravitational-wave detection and characteristics of various types of detector are described.

  3. Gravitational wave background from Standard Model physics: qualitative features

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiglieri, J.; Laine, M. E-mail: laine@itp.unibe.ch

    2015-07-01

    Because of physical processes ranging from microscopic particle collisions to macroscopic hydrodynamic fluctuations, any plasma in thermal equilibrium emits gravitational waves. For the largest wavelengths the emission rate is proportional to the shear viscosity of the plasma. In the Standard Model at 0T > 16 GeV, the shear viscosity is dominated by the most weakly interacting particles, right-handed leptons, and is relatively large. We estimate the order of magnitude of the corresponding spectrum of gravitational waves. Even though at small frequencies (corresponding to the sub-Hz range relevant for planned observatories such as eLISA) this background is tiny compared with that from non-equilibrium sources, the total energy carried by the high-frequency part of the spectrum is non-negligible if the production continues for a long time. We suggest that this may constrain (weakly) the highest temperature of the radiation epoch. Observing the high-frequency part directly sets a very ambitious goal for future generations of GHz-range detectors.

  4. Gravitational wave background from Standard Model physics: qualitative features

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiglieri, J.; Laine, M.

    2015-07-16

    Because of physical processes ranging from microscopic particle collisions to macroscopic hydrodynamic fluctuations, any plasma in thermal equilibrium emits gravitational waves. For the largest wavelengths the emission rate is proportional to the shear viscosity of the plasma. In the Standard Model at T>160 GeV, the shear viscosity is dominated by the most weakly interacting particles, right-handed leptons, and is relatively large. We estimate the order of magnitude of the corresponding spectrum of gravitational waves. Even though at small frequencies (corresponding to the sub-Hz range relevant for planned observatories such as eLISA) this background is tiny compared with that from non-equilibrium sources, the total energy carried by the high-frequency part of the spectrum is non-negligible if the production continues for a long time. We suggest that this may constrain (weakly) the highest temperature of the radiation epoch. Observing the high-frequency part directly sets a very ambitious goal for future generations of GHz-range detectors.

  5. Gravitational Wave Detection: A Historical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulson, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The search for gravitational waves began at the Chapel Hill Conference in January 1957, and will reach a successful conclusion at a set of observatories around the globe about sixty years later. This talk will review the history of the early thought experiments, the program of resonant mass detectors (``Weber bars''), and the development of the large interferometric detectors like Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo that are, it is hoped, about to make the first detections of gravitational wave signals. I am pleased to acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation for my research, most recently under NSF Grant PHY-1205835.

  6. Gravitational Waves and Multi-Messenger Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan M.

    2010-01-01

    Gravitational waves are produced by a wide variety of sources throughout the cosmos, including the mergers of black hole and neutron star binaries/compact objects spiraling into central black holes in galactic nuclei, close compact binaries/and phase transitions and quantum fluctuations in the early universe. Observing these signals can bring new, and often very precise, information about their sources across vast stretches of cosmic time. In this talk we will focus on thee opening of this gravitational-wave window on the universe, highlighting new opportunities for discovery and multi-messenger astronomy.

  7. Gravitational waves induced by spinor fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Kaixi; Piao, Yun-Song

    2015-07-01

    In realistic model building, spinor fields with various masses are present. During inflation, a spinor field may induce gravitational waves as a second order effect. In this paper, we calculate the contribution of a single massive spinor field to the power spectrum of primordial gravitational wave by using a retarded Green propagator. We find that the correction is scale invariant and of order H4/MP4 for arbitrary spinor mass mψ. Additionally, we also observe that when mψ≳H , the dependence of correction on mψ/H is nontrivial.

  8. Gravitational waves in a de Sitter universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Nigel T.

    2016-02-01

    The construction of exact linearized solutions to the Einstein equations within the Bondi-Sachs formalism is extended to the case of linearization about de Sitter spacetime. The gravitational wave field measured by distant observers is constructed, leading to a determination of the energy measured by such observers. It is found that gravitational wave energy conservation does not normally apply to inertial observers but that it can be formulated for a class of accelerated observers, i.e., with worldlines that are timelike but not geodesic.

  9. Toward loop quantization of plane gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinterleitner, Franz; Major, Seth

    2012-03-01

    The polarized Gowdy model in terms of Ashtekar-Barbero variables is reduced with an additional constraint derived from the Killing equations for plane gravitational waves with parallel rays. The new constraint is formulated in a diffeomorphism invariant manner and, when it is included in the model, the resulting constraint algebra is first class, in contrast to the prior work done in special coordinates. Using an earlier work by Banerjee and Date, the constraints are expressed in terms of classical quantities that have an operator equivalent in loop quantum gravity, making these plane gravitational wave spacetimes accessible to loop quantization techniques.

  10. External control of ion waves in a plasma by high frequency fields

    DOEpatents

    Kaw, P.K.; Dawson, J.M.

    1973-12-18

    An apparatus and method are described for stabilizing plasma instabilities, in a magnetically confined plasma column by transmitting into the plasma high frequency electromagnetic waves at a frequency close to the electron plasma frequency. The said frequencies, e.g., are between the plasma frequency and 1.5 times the plasma frequency at a power level below the level for producing parametric instabilities in a plasma having temperatures from below 10 eV to about 10 keV or more, at densities from below 10/sup 13/ to above 10/sup 18/ particles/cm/sup 3/. (Official Gazette)

  11. Gravitational waves from compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Freitas Pacheco, José Antonio

    2010-11-01

    Large ground-based laser beam interferometers are presently in operation both in the USA (LIGO) and in Europe (VIRGO) and potential sources that might be detected by these instruments are revisited. The present generation of detectors does not have a sensitivity high enough to probe a significant volume of the universe and, consequently, predicted event rates are very low. The planned advanced generation of interferometers will probably be able to detect, for the first time, a gravitational signal. Advanced LIGO and EGO instruments are expected to detect few (some): binary coalescences consisting of either two neutron stars, two black holes or a neutron star and a black hole. In space, the sensitivity of the planned LISA spacecraft constellation will allow the detection of the gravitational signals, even within a “pessimistic" range of possible signals, produced during the capture of compact objects by supermassive black holes, at a rate of a few tens per year.

  12. Outlook for Detecting Gravitational Waves with Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Though the recent discovery of GW150914 is a thrilling success in the field of gravitational-wave astronomy, LIGO is only one tool the scientific community is using to hunt for these elusive signals. After 10 years of unsuccessful searching, how likely is it that pulsar-timing-array projects will make their own first detection soon?Frequency ranges for gravitational waves produced by different astrophysical sources. Pulsar timing arrays such as the EPTA and IPTA are used to detect low-frequency gravitational waves generated by the stochastic background and supermassive black hole binaries. [Christopher Moore, Robert Cole and Christopher Berry]Supermassive BackgroundGround-based laser interferometers like LIGO are ideal for probing ripples in space-time caused by the merger of stellar-mass black holes; these mergers cause chirps in the frequency range of tens to thousands of hertz. But how do we pick up the extremely low-frequency, nanohertz background signal caused by the orbits of pairs of supermassive black holes? For that, we need pulsar timing arrays.Pulsar timing arrays are sets of pulsars whose signals are analyzed to look for correlations in the pulse arrival time. As the space-time between us and a pulsar is stretched and then compressed by a passing gravitational wave, the pulsars pulses should arrive a little late and then a little early. Comparing these timing residuals in an array of pulsars could theoretically allow for the detection of the gravitational waves causing them.Globally, there are currently four pulsar timing array projects actively searching for this signal, with a fifth planned for the future. Now a team of scientists led by Stephen Taylor (NASA-JPL/Caltech) has estimated the likelihood that these projects will successfully detect gravitational waves in the future.Probability for SuccessExpected detection probability of the gravitational-wave background as a function of observing time, for five different pulsar timing arrays. Optimistic

  13. Space Detection of Gravitational Waves (lisa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araujo, J. C. Neves; Buchman, S.; Cavalleri, A.; Danzmann, K.; Doles, R.; Fontana, G.; Hanso, J.; Hueller, M.; Sigurdsso, S.; Turneaure, J.; Ungarell, C.; Vecchi, A.; Vital, S.; Webe, W.

    2002-12-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission is designed to observe gravitational waves from galactic and extra-galactic binary systems, including gravitational waves generated in the vicinity of the very massive black holes found in the centers of many galaxies. Acting as a giant Michelson interferometer the three spacecraft flying 5 million km apart will open the era of astronomy in the gravitational spectrum. We give an introduction to the mission and describe the status of selected experimental, theoretical, and planning LISA work, as reported at the Ninth Marcel Grossman Meeting in 2000 in Rome. We discuss the three areas of technology challenges facing the mission inertial sensors, micronewton thrusters, and picometer interferometry. We report on the progress in the development of free falling moving test-masses for LISA and for the related technology demonstration mission. We present simple formulas to evaluate the performance of the device as a function of the various design parameters, and we compare them with preliminary experimental results from a test prototype we are developing. Quantitative agreement is found. The gravitational radiation emitted during the final stages of coalescence of stellar mass compact objects with low massive black holes is a signal detectable by LISA. It will also provide the opportunity of measuring relativistic strong field effects. A brief discussion addresses the detection by LISA of gravitational waves generated by cataclysmic binary variables at frequencies below 1 mHz. Finally the prospects for cosmology work with LISA type antennas are being analyzed.

  14. Space Based Gravitational Wave Observatories (SGOs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatories (SGOs) will enable the systematic study of the frequency band from 0.0001 - 1 Hz of gravitational waves, where a rich array of astrophysical sources is expected. ESA has selected The Gravitational Universe as the science theme for the L3 mission opportunity with a nominal launch date in 2034. This will be at a minimum 15 years after ground-based detectors and pulsar timing arrays announce their first detections and at least 18 years after the LISA Pathfinder Mission will have demonstrated key technologies in a dedicated space mission. It is therefore important to develop mission concepts that can take advantage of the momentum in the field and the investment in both technology development and a precision measurement community on a more near-term timescale than the L3 opportunity. This talk will discuss a mission concept based on the LISA baseline that resulted from a recent mission architecture study.

  15. Bayesian analysis on gravitational waves and exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xihao

    Attempts to detect gravitational waves using a pulsar timing array (PTA), i.e., a collection of pulsars in our Galaxy, have become more organized over the last several years. PTAs act to detect gravitational waves generated from very distant sources by observing the small and correlated effect the waves have on pulse arrival times at the Earth. In this thesis, I present advanced Bayesian analysis methods that can be used to search for gravitational waves in pulsar timing data. These methods were also applied to analyze a set of radial velocity (RV) data collected by the Hobby- Eberly Telescope on observing a K0 giant star. They confirmed the presence of two Jupiter mass planets around a K0 giant star and also characterized the stellar p-mode oscillation. The first part of the thesis investigates the effect of wavefront curvature on a pulsar's response to a gravitational wave. In it we show that we can assume the gravitational wave phasefront is planar across the array only if the source luminosity distance " 2piL2/lambda, where L is the pulsar distance to the Earth (˜ kpc) and lambda is the radiation wavelength (˜ pc) in the PTA waveband. Correspondingly, for a point gravitational wave source closer than ˜ 100 Mpc, we should take into account the effect of wavefront curvature across the pulsar-Earth line of sight, which depends on the luminosity distance to the source, when evaluating the pulsar timing response. As a consequence, if a PTA can detect a gravitational wave from a source closer than ˜ 100 Mpc, the effects of wavefront curvature on the response allows us to determine the source luminosity distance. The second and third parts of the thesis propose a new analysis method based on Bayesian nonparametric regression to search for gravitational wave bursts and a gravitational wave background in PTA data. Unlike the conventional Bayesian analysis that introduces a signal model with a fixed number of parameters, Bayesian nonparametric regression sets

  16. Numerical Modeling of High Frequency Electromagnetic Wave Propagation through Ionospheric Plasma with Randomly Distributed Flute Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplinger, J.; Sotnikov, V. I.; Wallerstein, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    A three dimensional numerical ray-tracing algorithm based on a Hamilton-Jacobi geometric optics approximation is used to analyze propagation of high frequency (HF) electromagnetic waves through a plasma with randomly distributed vortex structures having a spatial dependence in the plane perpendicular to earth's magnetic field. This spatial dependence in density is elongated and uniform along the magnetic field lines. Similar vortex structures may appear in the equatorial spread F region and in the Auroral zone of the ionosphere. The diffusion coefficient associated with wave vector deflection from a propagation path can be approximated by measuring the average deflection angle of the beam of rays. Then, the beam broadening can be described statistically using the Fokker-Planck equation. Visualizations of the ray propagation through generated density structures along with estimated and analytically calculated diffusion coefficients will be presented.

  17. Quantum nondemolition measurements. [by gravitational wave antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braginskii, V. B.; Vorontsov, Iu. I.; Thorne, K. S.

    1980-01-01

    The article describes new electronic techniques required for quantum nondemolition measurements and the theory underlying them. Consideration is given to resonant-bar gravitational-wave antennas. Position measurements are discussed along with energy measurements and back-action-evading measurements. Thermal noise in oscillators and amplifiers is outlined. Prospects for stroboscopic measurements are emphasized.

  18. Insights into the gravitational wave memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieri, Lydia

    2017-01-01

    A major breakthrough of General Relativity (GR) happened in 2015 with LIGO's first detection of gravitational waves. Typical sources for gravitational radiation are mergers of binary black holes, binary neutron stars and core-collapse supernovae. In these processes mass and momenta are radiated away in form of gravitational waves. GR predicts that these waves leave a footprint in the spacetime, that is they change the spacetime permanently, which results in a permanent displacement of test masses. This effect is called the memory. In this talk, I will explore the gravitational wave memory. We will see that there are two types of memory, one going back to Ya. B. Zel'dovich and A. G. Polnarev and one to D. Christodoulou. Then I will discuss recent work including my collaboration with D. Garfinkle, S.-T. Yau, P. Chen, focusing on how neutrinos or electromagnetic fields contribute to the memory effect, and work with D. Garfinkle and N. Yunes on cosmological memory. The author thanks NSF for support by grant DMS-1253149 to The University of Michigan.

  19. Ground-based gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Kazuaki

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational wave is predicted by Einstein’s general relativity, which conveys the information of source objects in the universe. The detection of the gravitational wave is the direct test of the theory and will be used as new tool to investigate dynamical nature of the universe. However, the effect of the gravitational wave is too tiny to be easily detected. From the first attempt utilizing resonant antenna in the 1960s, efforts of improving antenna sensitivity were continued by applying cryogenic techniques until approaching the quantum limit of sensitivity. However, by the year 2000, resonant antenna had given the way to interferometers. Large projects involving interferometers started in the 1990s, and achieved successful operations by 2010 with an accumulated extensive number of technical inventions and improvements. In this memorial year 2015, we enter the new phase of gravitational-wave detection by the forthcoming operation of the second-generation interferometers. The main focus in this paper is on how advanced techniques have been developed step by step according to scaling the arm length of the interferometer up and the history of fighting against technical noise, thermal noise, and quantum noise is presented along with the current projects, LIGO, Virgo, GEO-HF and KAGRA.

  20. High-frequency torsional Alfvén waves as an energy source for coronal heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Abhishek Kumar; Shetye, Juie; Murawski, Krzysztof; Doyle, John Gerard; Stangalini, Marco; Scullion, Eamon; Ray, Tom; Wójcik, Dariusz Patryk; Dwivedi, Bhola N.

    2017-03-01

    The existence of the Sun’s hot atmosphere and the solar wind acceleration continues to be an outstanding problem in solar-astrophysics. Although magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes and dissipation of magnetic energy contribute to heating and the mass cycle of the solar atmosphere, yet direct evidence of such processes often generates debate. Ground-based 1-m Swedish Solar Telescope (SST)/CRISP, Hα 6562.8 Å observations reveal, for the first time, the ubiquitous presence of high frequency (~12–42 mHz) torsional motions in thin spicular-type structures in the chromosphere. We detect numerous oscillating flux tubes on 10 June 2014 between 07:17 UT to 08:08 UT in a quiet-Sun field-of-view of 60” × 60” (1” = 725 km). Stringent numerical model shows that these observations resemble torsional Alfvén waves associated with high frequency drivers which contain a huge amount of energy (~105 W m‑2) in the chromosphere. Even after partial reflection from the transition region, a significant amount of energy (~103 W m‑2) is transferred onto the overlying corona. We find that oscillating tubes serve as substantial sources of Alfvén wave generation that provide sufficient Poynting flux not only to heat the corona but also to originate the supersonic solar wind.

  1. High-frequency torsional Alfvén waves as an energy source for coronal heating.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Abhishek Kumar; Shetye, Juie; Murawski, Krzysztof; Doyle, John Gerard; Stangalini, Marco; Scullion, Eamon; Ray, Tom; Wójcik, Dariusz Patryk; Dwivedi, Bhola N

    2017-03-03

    The existence of the Sun's hot atmosphere and the solar wind acceleration continues to be an outstanding problem in solar-astrophysics. Although magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes and dissipation of magnetic energy contribute to heating and the mass cycle of the solar atmosphere, yet direct evidence of such processes often generates debate. Ground-based 1-m Swedish Solar Telescope (SST)/CRISP, Hα 6562.8 Å observations reveal, for the first time, the ubiquitous presence of high frequency (~12-42 mHz) torsional motions in thin spicular-type structures in the chromosphere. We detect numerous oscillating flux tubes on 10 June 2014 between 07:17 UT to 08:08 UT in a quiet-Sun field-of-view of 60" × 60" (1" = 725 km). Stringent numerical model shows that these observations resemble torsional Alfvén waves associated with high frequency drivers which contain a huge amount of energy (~10(5) W m(-2)) in the chromosphere. Even after partial reflection from the transition region, a significant amount of energy (~10(3) W m(-2)) is transferred onto the overlying corona. We find that oscillating tubes serve as substantial sources of Alfvén wave generation that provide sufficient Poynting flux not only to heat the corona but also to originate the supersonic solar wind.

  2. High-frequency torsional Alfvén waves as an energy source for coronal heating

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Abhishek Kumar; Shetye, Juie; Murawski, Krzysztof; Doyle, John Gerard; Stangalini, Marco; Scullion, Eamon; Ray, Tom; Wójcik, Dariusz Patryk; Dwivedi, Bhola N.

    2017-01-01

    The existence of the Sun’s hot atmosphere and the solar wind acceleration continues to be an outstanding problem in solar-astrophysics. Although magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes and dissipation of magnetic energy contribute to heating and the mass cycle of the solar atmosphere, yet direct evidence of such processes often generates debate. Ground-based 1-m Swedish Solar Telescope (SST)/CRISP, Hα 6562.8 Å observations reveal, for the first time, the ubiquitous presence of high frequency (~12–42 mHz) torsional motions in thin spicular-type structures in the chromosphere. We detect numerous oscillating flux tubes on 10 June 2014 between 07:17 UT to 08:08 UT in a quiet-Sun field-of-view of 60” × 60” (1” = 725 km). Stringent numerical model shows that these observations resemble torsional Alfvén waves associated with high frequency drivers which contain a huge amount of energy (~105 W m−2) in the chromosphere. Even after partial reflection from the transition region, a significant amount of energy (~103 W m−2) is transferred onto the overlying corona. We find that oscillating tubes serve as substantial sources of Alfvén wave generation that provide sufficient Poynting flux not only to heat the corona but also to originate the supersonic solar wind. PMID:28256538

  3. High frequency computation in wave equations and optimal design for a cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Jun

    Two types of problems are studied in this thesis. One part of the thesis is devoted to high frequency computation. Motivated by fast multiscale Gaussian wavepacket transforms and multiscale Gaussian beam methods which were originally designed for initial value problems of wave equations in the high frequency regime, we develop fast multiscale Gaussian beam methods for wave equations in bounded convex domains in the high frequency regime. To compute the wave propagation in bounded convex domains, we have to take into account reflecting multiscale Gaussian beams, which are accomplished by enforcing reflecting boundary conditions during beam propagation and carrying out suitable reflecting beam summation. To propagate multiscale beams efficiently, we prove that the ratio of the squared magnitude of beam amplitude and the beam width is roughly conserved, and accordingly we propose an effective indicator to identify significant beams. We also prove that the resulting multiscale Gaussian beam methods converge asymptotically. Numerical examples demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method. The second part of the thesis studies the reduction of backscatter radar cross section (RCS) for a cavity embedded in the ground plane. One approach for RCS reduction is through the coating material. Assume the bottom of the cavity is coated by a thin, multilayered radar absorbing material (RAM) with possibly different permittivities. The objective is to minimize the backscatter RCS by the incidence of a plane wave over a single or a set of incident angles and frequencies. By formulating the scattering problem as a Helmholtz equation with artificial boundary condition, the gradient with respect to the material permittivities is determined efficiently by the adjoint state method, which is integrated into a nonlinear optimization scheme. Numerical example shows the RCS may be significantly reduced. Another approach is through shape optimization. By introducing a transparent

  4. Simple equations guide high-frequency surface-wave investigation techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Chen, C.; Kaufmann, R.D.; Luo, Y.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss five useful equations related to high-frequency surface-wave techniques and their implications in practice. These equations are theoretical results from published literature regarding source selection, data-acquisition parameters, resolution of a dispersion curve image in the frequency-velocity domain, and the cut-off frequency of high modes. The first equation suggests Rayleigh waves appear in the shortest offset when a source is located on the ground surface, which supports our observations that surface impact sources are the best source for surface-wave techniques. The second and third equations, based on the layered earth model, reveal a relationship between the optimal nearest offset in Rayleigh-wave data acquisition and seismic setting - the observed maximum and minimum phase velocities, and the maximum wavelength. Comparison among data acquired with different offsets at one test site confirms the better data were acquired with the suggested optimal nearest offset. The fourth equation illustrates that resolution of a dispersion curve image at a given frequency is directly proportional to the product of a length of a geophone array and the frequency. We used real-world data to verify the fourth equation. The last equation shows that the cut-off frequency of high modes of Love waves for a two-layer model is determined by shear-wave velocities and the thickness of the top layer. We applied this equation to Rayleigh waves and multi-layer models with the average velocity and obtained encouraging results. This equation not only endows with a criterion to distinguish high modes from numerical artifacts but also provides a straightforward means to resolve the depth to the half space of a layered earth model. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. New window into stochastic gravitational wave background.

    PubMed

    Rotti, Aditya; Souradeep, Tarun

    2012-11-30

    A stochastic gravitational wave background (SGWB) would gravitationally lens the cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons. We correct the results provided in existing literature for modifications to the CMB polarization power spectra due to lensing by gravitational waves. Weak lensing by gravitational waves distorts all four CMB power spectra; however, its effect is most striking in the mixing of power between the E mode and B mode of CMB polarization. This suggests the possibility of using measurements of the CMB angular power spectra to constrain the energy density (Ω(GW)) of the SGWB. Using current data sets (QUAD, WMAP, and ACT), we find that the most stringent constraints on the present Ω(GW) come from measurements of the angular power spectra of CMB temperature anisotropies. In the near future, more stringent bounds on Ω(GW) can be expected with improved upper limits on the B modes of CMB polarization. Any detection of B modes of CMB polarization above the expected signal from large scale structure lensing could be a signal for a SGWB.

  6. Gravitational waves from an early matter era

    SciTech Connect

    Assadullahi, Hooshyar; Wands, David

    2009-04-15

    We investigate the generation of gravitational waves due to the gravitational instability of primordial density perturbations in an early matter-dominated era which could be detectable by experiments such as laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory (LIGO) and laser interferometer space antenna (LISA). We use relativistic perturbation theory to give analytic estimates of the tensor perturbations generated at second order by linear density perturbations. We find that large enhancement factors with respect to the naive second-order estimate are possible due to the growth of density perturbations on sub-Hubble scales. However very large enhancement factors coincide with a breakdown of linear theory for density perturbations on small scales. To produce a primordial gravitational-wave background that would be detectable with LIGO or LISA from density perturbations in the linear regime requires primordial comoving curvature perturbations on small scales of order 0.02 for advanced LIGO or 0.005 for LISA; otherwise numerical calculations of the nonlinear evolution on sub-Hubble scales are required.

  7. Inversion to estimate ocean wave directional spectrum from high-frequency radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisaki, Yukiharu

    2015-04-01

    An high-frequency (HF) radar observes ocean surface currents and waves by radiating HF radio waves to the sea surface and analyzing the backscattered signals. Ocean wave spectrum is estimated from the first- and the second-order scattering of Doppler spectra by the inversion. The estimation of ocean surface currents is robust, because the surface currents can be derived from the peak Doppler frequency of the first-order scattering in the Doppler spectrum. The method to estimate ocean wave spectra is complicated and the second-order scattering in the Doppler spectrum is fragile, which is affected by the noise in the Doppler spectrum. A new method to estimate ocean wave spectra from HF radar is developed. This method is the extension of Hisaki (1996, 2005, 2006, 2009, 2014). The new method can be applied to both the single radar and dual radar array case, while the previous methods can be applied only the single radar case (Hisaki, 2005, 2006, 2009, 2014) or dual radar case (Hisaki, 1996). Ocean wave spectra are estimated in the regular grid cells, while wave spectra are estimated on the polar grids points with the origin of the radar position in the previous method for single radar case. The governing equations for wave estimation are the integral equations which relate the wave spectrum to the Doppler spectrum, and the energy balance equation under the assumption of stationarity. The regularization constraints in the horizontal space and the wave frequency-direction space are also used for the estimation. The unknowns, which are spectral values, surface wind speeds and directions, are estimated by seeking the minimum of the objective function, which is defined as the sum of weighted squares of the equations. The signal to noise ratio in the Doppler spectrum for wave estimation must be high. We selected the Doppler spectra using the SOM (Self organization map ) analysis method. The method will be demonstrated by comparing with in-situ observed data, in which only

  8. Superconducting Antenna Concept for Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulian, A.; Foreman, J.; Nikoghosyan, V.; Nussinov, S.; Sica, L.; Tollaksen, J.

    The most advanced contemporary efforts and concepts for registering gravitational waves are focused on measuring tiny deviations in large arm (kilometers in case of LIGO and thousands of kilometers in case of LISA) interferometers via photons. In this report we discuss a concept for the detection of gravitational waves using an antenna comprised of superconducting electrons (Cooper pairs) moving in an ionic lattice. The major challenge in this approach is that the tidal action of the gravitational waves is extremely weak compared with electromagnetic forces. Any motion caused by gravitational waves, which violates charge neutrality, will be impeded by Coulomb forces acting on the charge carriers (Coulomb blockade) in metals, as well as in superconductors. We discuss a design, which avoids the effects of Coulomb blockade. It exploits two different superconducting materials used in a form of thin wires -"spaghetti." The spaghetti will have a diameter comparable to the London penetration depth, and length of about 1-10 meters. To achieve competitive sensitivity, the antenna would require billions of spaghettis, which calls for a challenging manufacturing technology. If successfully materialized, the response of the antenna to the known highly periodic sources of gravitational radiation, such as the Pulsar in Crab Nebula will result in an output current, detectable by superconducting electronics. The antenna will require deep (0.3K) cryogenic cooling and magnetic shielding. This design may be a viable successor to LISA and LIGO concepts, having the prospect of higher sensitivity, much smaller size and directional selectivity. This concept of compact antenna may benefit also terrestrial gradiometry.

  9. Michelson geostationary gravitational wave observatory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, A. J.

    Studies made during the previous year are outlined. These studies have indicated that a Michelson mm wave interferometer observatory (MGO) operating in geostationary orbit is the best configuration satisfying both current operational and design constraints. It is proposed to study the design of this space laboratory interferometer and to study the inclusion of an inertial transponder in this design.

  10. Parameterizing the High Frequency Evolution of Nearshore Waves in a Nonlinear Wave Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-07

    shallow water. Ocean Engineering, 20, 359-388. Mase, H., & Kirby, J. T. (1992). Hybrid frequency-domain KdV equation for random wave transformation. In B...version of a nonlinear mild slope equation gives a very good representation of the propagation of waves through the shoaling and surf zones. However...such models are computationally expensive. In order to reduce the computational cost of the nonlinear mild slope equation model, it is combined with the

  11. Microfluidic pumping through miniaturized channels driven by ultra-high frequency surface acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Shilton, Richie J.; Travagliati, Marco; Beltram, Fabio; Cecchini, Marco

    2014-08-18

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are an effective means to pump fluids through microchannel arrays within fully portable systems. The SAW-driven acoustic counterflow pumping process relies on a cascade phenomenon consisting of SAW transmission through the microchannel, SAW-driven fluid atomization, and subsequent coalescence. Here, we investigate miniaturization of device design, and study both SAW transmission through microchannels and the onset of SAW-driven atomization up to the ultra-high-frequency regime. Within the frequency range from 47.8 MHz to 754 MHz, we show that the acoustic power required to initiate SAW atomization remains constant, while transmission through microchannels is most effective when the channel widths w ≳ 10 λ, where λ is the SAW wavelength. By exploiting the enhanced SAW transmission through narrower channels at ultra-high frequencies, we discuss the relevant frequency-dependent length scales and demonstrate the scaling down of internal flow patterns and discuss their impact on device miniaturization strategies.

  12. Highly focused high-frequency travelling surface acoustic waves (SAW) for rapid single-particle sorting.

    PubMed

    Collins, David J; Neild, Adrian; Ai, Ye

    2016-02-07

    High-speed sorting is an essential process in a number of clinical and research applications, where single cells, droplets and particles are segregated based on their properties in a continuous flow. With recent developments in the field of microscale actuation, there is increasing interest in replicating the functions available to conventional fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) flow cytometry in integrated on-chip systems, which have substantial advantages in cost and portability. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices are ideal for many acoustofluidic applications, and have been used to perform such sorting at rates on the order of kHz. Essential to the accuracy of this sorting, however, is the dimensions of the region over which sorting occurs, where a smaller sorting region can largely avoid inaccurate sorting across a range of sample concentrations. Here we demonstrate the use of flow focusing and a highly focused SAW generated by a high-frequency (386 MHz), 10 μm wavelength set of focused interdigital transducers (FIDTs) on a piezoelectric lithium niobate substrate, yielding an effective sorting region only ~25 μm wide, with sub-millisecond pulses generated at up to kHz rates. Furthermore, because of the use of high frequencies, actuation of particles as small as 2 μm can be realized. Such devices represent a substantial step forward in the evolution of highly localized forces for lab-on-a-chip microfluidic applications.

  13. Dynamics of laser interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhmanov, Malik

    2000-11-01

    Dynamics of fields and mirrors in the new laser interferometric gravitational wave detectors is described. The dynamics of fields is formulated in terms of difference equations, which take into account the large delay due to the light transit time in the interferometer arm cavities. Solutions of these field equations are found in both transient and steady-state regimes. The solutions for fields in the transient regime can be used for the measurement of the parameters of Fabry-Perot cavities. The solutions for fields in the steady-state regime can be used for the analysis of noise performance of Fabry-Perot cavities. The dynamics of the mirrors is described in terms of two normal coordinates: the cavity length and its center of mass. Such dynamics is strongly affected by the radiation pressure of light circulating in the cavity. The forces of radiation pressure are nonlinear and nonconservative. These two effects introduce instabilities and give rise to a violation of conservation of energy for the motion of the suspended mirrors. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations of the dynamics are done with applications to the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). The dynamics of signal recycling and power recycling interferometers is analyzed using the field equations. The response of the interferometers to the input laser field and motion of its mirrors is calculated. Several basic transfer functions are found. These correspond to either a single or a nested cavity. A nested cavity appears either in the dynamics of the differential mode in signal recycling interferometers or in the dynamics of the common mode of power recycling interferometers. The poles of transfer functions of these nested cavities are found. The response of the interferometers to gravitational waves is described: the analysis is done in the rest frame of a local observer which is a natural coordinate system of the detector. This response is given by the interferometer

  14. Response of interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, Lee Samuel

    2009-01-15

    The derivation of the response function of an interferometric gravitational wave detector is a paradigmatic calculation in the field of gravitational wave detection. Surprisingly, the standard derivation of the response wave detectors makes several unjustifiable assumptions, both conceptual and quantitative, regarding the coordinate trajectory and coordinate velocity of the null geodesic the light travels along. These errors, which appear to have remained unrecognized for at least 35 years, render the standard derivation inadequate and misleading as an archetype calculation. Here we identify the flaws in the existing derivation and provide, in full detail, a correct derivation of the response of a single-bounce Michelson interferometer to gravitational waves, following a procedure that will always yield correct results; compare it to the standard, but incorrect, derivation; show where the earlier mistakes were made; and identify the general conditions under which the standard derivation will yield correct results. By a fortuitous set of circumstances, not generally so, the final result is the same in the case of Minkowski background spacetime, synchronous coordinates, transverse-traceless gauge metric perturbations, and arm mirrors at coordinate rest.

  15. Simulating Responses of Gravitational-Wave Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, John; Edlund, Jeffrey; Vallisneri. Michele

    2006-01-01

    Synthetic LISA is a computer program for simulating the responses of the instrumentation of the NASA/ESA Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission, the purpose of which is to detect and study gravitational waves. Synthetic LISA generates synthetic time series of the LISA fundamental noises, as filtered through all the time-delay-interferometry (TDI) observables. (TDI is a method of canceling phase noise in temporally varying unequal-arm interferometers.) Synthetic LISA provides a streamlined module to compute the TDI responses to gravitational waves, according to a full model of TDI (including the motion of the LISA array and the temporal and directional dependence of the arm lengths). Synthetic LISA is written in the C++ programming language as a modular package that accommodates the addition of code for specific gravitational wave sources or for new noise models. In addition, time series for waves and noises can be easily loaded from disk storage or electronic memory. The package includes a Python-language interface for easy, interactive steering and scripting. Through Python, Synthetic LISA can read and write data files in Flexible Image Transport System (FITS), which is a commonly used astronomical data format.

  16. Pseudospectral method for gravitational wave collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilditch, David; Weyhausen, Andreas; Brügmann, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    We present a new pseudospectral code, bamps, for numerical relativity written with the evolution of collapsing gravitational waves in mind. We employ the first-order generalized harmonic gauge formulation. The relevant theory is reviewed, and the numerical method is critically examined and specialized for the task at hand. In particular, we investigate formulation parameters—gauge- and constraint-preserving boundary conditions well suited to nonvanishing gauge source functions. Different types of axisymmetric twist-free moment-of-time-symmetry gravitational wave initial data are discussed. A treatment of the axisymmetric apparent horizon condition is presented with careful attention to regularity on axis. Our apparent horizon finder is then evaluated in a number of test cases. Moving on to evolutions, we investigate modifications to the generalized harmonic gauge constraint damping scheme to improve conservation in the strong-field regime. We demonstrate strong-scaling of our pseudospectral penalty code. We employ the Cartoon method to efficiently evolve axisymmetric data in our 3 +1 -dimensional code. We perform test evolutions of the Schwarzschild spacetime perturbed by gravitational waves and by gauge pulses, both to demonstrate the use of our black-hole excision scheme and for comparison with earlier results. Finally, numerical evolutions of supercritical Brill waves are presented to demonstrate durability of the excision scheme for the dynamical formation of a black hole.

  17. Breaking a dark degeneracy with gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lombriser, Lucas; Taylor, Andy E-mail: ant@roe.ac.uk

    2016-03-01

    We identify a scalar-tensor model embedded in the Horndeski action whose cosmological background and linear scalar fluctuations are degenerate with the concordance cosmology. The model admits a self-accelerated background expansion at late times that is stable against perturbations with a sound speed attributed to the new field that is equal to the speed of light. While degenerate in scalar fluctuations, self-acceleration of the model implies a present cosmological tensor mode propagation at ∼<95 % of the speed of light with a damping of the wave amplitude that is ∼>5 % less efficient than in general relativity. We show that these discrepancies are endemic to self-accelerated Horndeski theories with degenerate large-scale structure and are tested with measurements of gravitational waves emitted by events at cosmological distances. Hence, gravitational-wave cosmology breaks the dark degeneracy in observations of the large-scale structure between two fundamentally different explanations of cosmic acceleration—a cosmological constant and a scalar-tensor modification of gravity. The gravitational wave event GW150914 recently detected with the aLIGO instruments and its potential association with a weak short gamma-ray burst observed with the Fermi GBM experiment may have provided this crucial measurement.

  18. Instability of high-frequency acoustic waves in accretion disks with turbulent viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoperskov, A. V.; Khrapov, S. S.

    1999-05-01

    The dynamics of linear perturbations in a differentially rotating accretion disk with a non-homogeneous vertical structure is investigated. We find that turbulent viscosity results in instability of both pinching oscillations, and bending modes. Not only the low-frequency fundamental modes, but also the high-frequency reflective harmonics appear to be unstable. The question of the limits of applicability of the thin disk model (MTD) is also investigated. Some differences in the dispersion properties of the MTD and of the three-dimensional model appear for wave numbers k <~ (1-3)/h (h is the half-thickness of a disk). In the long-wavelength limit, the relative difference between the eigenfrequencies of the unstable acoustic mode in the 3D-model and the MTD is smaller than 5%. In the short wavelength case (kh > 1) these differences are increased.

  19. Data analysis of the high frequency surface wave radar during typhoon Chan-hom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Wang, Hui; Gao, Jia; Li, Huan; Wang, Guosong; Pan, Song; Fan, Wenjing; Liu, Kexiu; Zhao, Chen; Qi, Anxiang

    2017-01-01

    Multi-frequency high frequency radar with small circular array was deployed in Zhujiajian and Shengshan to detect the winds, waves, and currents in the overlapping area operationally in 2007. No. 1509 typhoon Chan-hom landed in the coastal areas of Jujiajian, and then moved north by east, passing the radar detection area. This paper compared the radar observed data to anchored-buoy observed data and ASCAT satellite remote sensing large area wind data respectively. The results of comparison indicated that radar basically reflected the real distribution of wind and current of Zhoushan area during typhoon Chan-hom, showing the radar is qualified to detect the winds and currents under complex marine conditions.

  20. Hard magnetic ferrite with a gigantic coercivity and high frequency millimetre wave rotation

    PubMed Central

    Namai, Asuka; Yoshikiyo, Marie; Yamada, Kana; Sakurai, Shunsuke; Goto, Takashi; Yoshida, Takayuki; Miyazaki, Tatsuro; Nakajima, Makoto; Suemoto, Tohru; Tokoro, Hiroko; Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic ferrites such as Fe3O4 and Fe2O3 are extensively used in a range of applications because they are inexpensive and chemically stable. Here we show that rhodium-substituted ε-Fe2O3, ε-RhxFe2−xO3 nanomagnets prepared by a nanoscale chemical synthesis using mesoporous silica as a template, exhibit a huge coercive field (Hc) of 27 kOe at room temperature. Furthermore, a crystallographically oriented sample recorded an Hc value of 31 kOe, which is the largest value among metal-oxide-based magnets and is comparable to those of rare-earth magnets. In addition, ε-RhxFe2−xO3 shows high frequency millimetre wave absorption up to 209 GHz. ε-Rh0.14Fe1.86O3 exhibits a rotation of the polarization plane of the propagated millimetre wave at 220 GHz, which is one of the promising carrier frequencies (the window of air) for millimetre wave wireless communications. PMID:22948817

  1. Interaction of High Frequency Acoustic Waves and Optical Waves Propagating in Single Mode Fibers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paula, Ramon Perez

    This paper develops a frequency dependent model for the acousto-optic interaction with a single mode fiber of acoustic waves having wavelengths comparable to the fiber diameter. This paper also presents optical techniques for experimental observation and measurement of such effects. The acoustic waves are both normally and obliquelly incident on the fiber. The solutions to the elastic problem studied here are constructed using scalar and vector potentials. The principal strains induced by a plane wave propagating in a fluid is calculated through the solution of the wave equation and the associated boundary condition. The optical beam propagation is analyzed starting with Maxwell's, equations and the required solution for single mode (degenerate double mode) propagation is presented. For the perturbed fiber the anisotropic solution is discussed. The optical indicatrix is derived from the electric energy density, with the major axis parallel to the induced principal strains obtained from the solution of the elastic problem. The solution of the optical indicatrix equation (index ellipsoid) yields two independent propagation modes that are linear polarized plane waves with two different propagation velocities. The induced phase shift and birefringence are calculated from the index ellipsoid. The birefringence and phase shift are also measured experimentally using a fiber optic interferometer and a fiber optic polariscope. The experimental apparatus is discussed in detail and the techniques used to make the measurements are presented. The results are separated into two parts: first, the results for ultrasonic waves of normal incidence are presented, theoretical and experimental results are discussed, and the two compared; second, the results for angular incidence are presented in the same format as above, and compared with the results for perpendicular incidence.

  2. Horizontal variability of high-frequency nonlinear internal waves in Massachusetts Bay detected by an array of seafloor pressure sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, J. A.; Lerczak, J. A.; Moum, J. N.

    2016-08-01

    A two-dimensional array of 14 seafloor pressure sensors was deployed to measure properties of tidally generated, nonlinear, high-frequency internal waves over a 14 km by 12 km area west of Stellwagen Bank in Massachusetts Bay during summer 2009. Thirteen high-frequency internal wave packets propagated through the region over 6.5 days (one packet every semidiurnal cycle). Propagation speed and direction of wave packets were determined by triangulation, using arrival times and distances between triads of sensor locations. Wavefront curvature ranged from straight to radially spreading, with wave speeds generally faster to the south. Waves propagated to the southwest, rotating to more westward with shoreward propagation. Linear theory predicts a relationship between kinetic energy and bottom pressure variance of internal waves that is sensitive to sheared background currents, water depth, and stratification. By comparison to seafloor acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements, observations nonetheless show a strong relationship between kinetic energy and bottom pressure variance. This is presumably due to phase-locking of the wave packets to the internal tide that dominates background currents and to horizontally uniform and relatively constant stratification throughout the study. This relationship was used to qualitatively describe variations in kinetic energy of the high-frequency wave packets. In general, high-frequency internal wave kinetic energy was greater near the southern extent of wavefronts and greatly decreased upon propagating shoreward of the 40 m isobath.

  3. Detecting Triple Systems with Gravitational Wave Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiron, Yohai; Kocsis, Bence; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) has recently discovered gravitational waves (GWs) emitted by merging black hole binaries. We examine whether future GW detections may identify triple companions of merging binaries. Such a triple companion causes variations in the GW signal due to: (1) the varying path length along the line of sight during the orbit around the center of mass; (2) relativistic beaming, Doppler, and gravitational redshift; (3) the variation of the “light”-travel time in the gravitational field of the triple companion; and (4) secular variations of the orbital elements. We find that the prospects for detecting a triple companion are the highest for low-mass compact object binaries which spend the longest time in the LIGO frequency band. In particular, for merging neutron star binaries, LIGO may detect a white dwarf or M-dwarf perturber at a signal-to-noise ratio of 8, if it is within 0.4 {R}ȯ distance from the binary and the system is within a distance of 100 Mpc. Stellar mass (supermassive) black hole perturbers may be detected at a factor 5 × (103×) larger separations. Such pertubers in orbit around a merging binary emit GWs at frequencies above 1 mHz detectable by the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna in coincidence.

  4. Reheating and primordial gravitational waves in generalized Galilean genesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nishi, Sakine; Kobayashi, Tsutomu E-mail: tsutomu@rikkyo.ac.jp

    2016-04-01

    Galilean genesis is an alternative to inflation, in which the universe starts expanding from Minkowski with the stable violation of the null energy condition. In this paper, we discuss how the early universe is reheated through the gravitational particle production at the transition from the genesis phase to the subsequent phase where the kinetic energy of the scalar field is dominant. We then study the consequences of gravitational reheating after Galilean genesis on the spectrum of primordial gravitational waves. The resultant spectrum is strongly blue, and at high frequencies Ω{sub gw}∝ f{sup 3} in terms of the energy density per unit logarithmic frequency. Though this cannot be detected in existing detectors, the amplitude can be as large as Ω{sub gw}∼ 10{sup −12} at f∼ 100 MHz, providing a future test of the genesis scenario. The analysis is performed within the framework of generalized Galilean genesis based on the Horndeski theory, which enables us to derive generic formulas.

  5. Interferometer Techniques for Gravitational-Wave Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freise, Andreas; Strain, Kenneth

    2010-12-01

    Several km-scale gravitational-wave detectors have been constructed world wide. These instruments combine a number of advanced technologies to push the limits of precision length measurement. The core devices are laser interferometers of a new kind; developed from the classical Michelson topology these interferometers integrate additional optical elements, which significantly change the properties of the optical system. Much of the design and analysis of these laser interferometers can be performed using well-known classical optical techniques, however, the complex optical layouts provide a new challenge. In this review we give a textbook-style introduction to the optical science required for the understanding of modern gravitational wave detectors, as well as other high-precision laser interferometers. In addition, we provide a number of examples for a freely available interferometer simulation software and encourage the reader to use these examples to gain hands-on experience with the discussed optical methods.

  6. Listening to the Universe with gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2016-07-01

    The discovery of gravitational waves by the twin LIGO detectors in September 2015 has opened a new window for observational astronomy. The coming years will witness the emergence of other detectors such as Advanced Virgo, KAGRA and LIGO-India. The worldwide network of these detectors will not only observe binary black holes, which we now know will be the dominant sources, but other sources such as binary neutron stars, neutron star-black hole binaries, supernovae, stochastic backgrounds and unknown sources that we do not know yet. In my talk I will describe how gravitational wave observations will help us gain deeper insights into fundamental physics, astrophysics and cosmology in the coming years and decades.

  7. Silicon mirror suspensions for gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumming, A. V.; Cunningham, L.; Hammond, G. D.; Haughian, K.; Hough, J.; Kroker, S.; Martin, I. W.; Nawrodt, R.; Rowan, S.; Schwarz, C.; van Veggel, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most significant limits to the sensitivity of current, and future, long-baseline interferometric gravitational wave detectors is thermal displacement noise of the test masses and their suspensions. This paper reports results of analytical and experimental studies of the limits to thermal noise performance of cryogenic silicon test mass suspensions set by two constraints on suspension fibre dimensions: the minimum dimensions required to allow conductive cooling for extracting incident laser beam heat deposited in the mirrors; and the minimum dimensions of fibres (set by their tensile strength) which can support test masses of the size envisaged for use in future detectors. We report experimental studies of breaking strength of silicon ribbons, and resulting design implications for the feasibility of suspension designs for future gravitational wave detectors using silicon suspension fibres. We analyse the implication of this study for thermal noise performance of cryogenically cooled silicon suspensions.

  8. Interferometer techniques for gravitational-wave detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Charlotte; Brown, Daniel; Freise, Andreas; Strain, Kenneth A.

    2016-12-01

    Several km-scale gravitational-wave detectors have been constructed worldwide. These instruments combine a number of advanced technologies to push the limits of precision length measurement. The core devices are laser interferometers of a new kind; developed from the classical Michelson topology these interferometers integrate additional optical elements, which significantly change the properties of the optical system. Much of the design and analysis of these laser interferometers can be performed using well-known classical optical techniques; however, the complex optical layouts provide a new challenge. In this review, we give a textbook-style introduction to the optical science required for the understanding of modern gravitational wave detectors, as well as other high-precision laser interferometers. In addition, we provide a number of examples for a freely available interferometer simulation software and encourage the reader to use these examples to gain hands-on experience with the discussed optical methods.

  9. Gravitational waves from the first stars

    SciTech Connect

    Sandick, Pearl; Olive, Keith A.; Daigne, Frederic; Vangioni, Elisabeth

    2006-05-15

    We consider the stochastic background of gravitational waves produced by an early generation of Population III stars coupled with a normal mode of star formation at lower redshift. The computation is performed in the framework of hierarchical structure formation and is based on cosmic star formation histories constrained to reproduce the observed star formation rate at redshift z < or approx. 6, the observed chemical abundances in damped Lyman alpha absorbers and in the intergalactic medium, and to allow for an early reionization of the Universe at z{approx}11 as indicated by the third year results released by WMAP. We find that the normal mode of star formation produces a gravitational wave background which peaks at 300-500 Hz and is within LIGO III sensitivity. The Population III component peaks at lower frequencies (30-100 Hz depending on the model), and could be detected by LIGO III as well as the planned BBO and DECIGO interferometers.

  10. Interferometer techniques for gravitational-wave detection.

    PubMed

    Bond, Charlotte; Brown, Daniel; Freise, Andreas; Strain, Kenneth A

    2016-01-01

    Several km-scale gravitational-wave detectors have been constructed worldwide. These instruments combine a number of advanced technologies to push the limits of precision length measurement. The core devices are laser interferometers of a new kind; developed from the classical Michelson topology these interferometers integrate additional optical elements, which significantly change the properties of the optical system. Much of the design and analysis of these laser interferometers can be performed using well-known classical optical techniques; however, the complex optical layouts provide a new challenge. In this review, we give a textbook-style introduction to the optical science required for the understanding of modern gravitational wave detectors, as well as other high-precision laser interferometers. In addition, we provide a number of examples for a freely available interferometer simulation software and encourage the reader to use these examples to gain hands-on experience with the discussed optical methods.

  11. Testing Gravitational Physics with Space-based Gravitational-wave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational wave observations provide exceptional and unique opportunities for precision tests of gravitational physics, as predicted by general relativity (GR). Space-based gravitational wave measurements, with high signal-to-noise ratios and large numbers of observed events may provide the best-suited gravitational-wave observations for testing GR with unprecedented precision. These observations will be especially useful in testing the properties of gravitational waves and strong-field aspects of the theory which are less relevant in other observations. We review the proposed GR test based on observations of massive black hole mergers, extreme mass ratio inspirals, and galactic binary systems.

  12. Gravitational-wave detection using multivariate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Thomas S.; Meacher, Duncan; Clark, James; Sutton, Patrick J.; Jones, Gareth; Minot, Ariana

    2013-09-01

    Searches for gravitational-wave bursts (transient signals, typically of unknown waveform) require identification of weak signals in background detector noise. The sensitivity of such searches is often critically limited by non-Gaussian noise fluctuations that are difficult to distinguish from real signals, posing a key problem for transient gravitational-wave astronomy. Current noise rejection tests are based on the analysis of a relatively small number of measured properties of the candidate signal, typically correlations between detectors. Multivariate analysis (MVA) techniques probe the full space of measured properties of events in an attempt to maximize the power to accurately classify events as signal or background. This is done by taking samples of known background events and (simulated) signal events to train the MVA classifier, which can then be applied to classify events of unknown type. We apply the boosted decision tree (BDT) MVA technique to the problem of detecting gravitational-wave bursts associated with gamma-ray bursts. We find that BDTs are able to increase the sensitive distance reach of the search by as much as 50%, corresponding to a factor of ˜3 increase in sensitive volume. This improvement is robust against trigger sky position, large sky localization error, poor data quality, and the simulated signal waveforms that are used. Critically, we find that the BDT analysis is able to detect signals that have different morphologies from those used in the classifier training and that this improvement extends to false alarm probabilities beyond the 3σ significance level. These findings indicate that MVA techniques may be used for the robust detection of gravitational-wave bursts with a priori unknown waveform.

  13. Kinks, extra dimensions, and gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    O'Callaghan, Eimear; Gregory, Ruth

    2011-03-01

    We investigate in detail the gravitational wave signal from kinks on cosmic (super)strings, including the kinematical effects from the internal extra dimensions. We find that the signal is suppressed, however, the effect is less significant that that for cusps. Combined with the greater incidence of kinks on (super)strings, it is likely that the kink signal offers the better chance for detection of cosmic (super)strings.

  14. Separating Gravitational Wave Signals from Instrument Artifacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littenberg, Tyson B.; Cornish, Neil J.

    2010-01-01

    Central to the gravitational wave detection problem is the challenge of separating features in the data produced by astrophysical sources from features produced by the detector. Matched filtering provides an optimal solution for Gaussian noise, but in practice, transient noise excursions or "glitches" complicate the analysis. Detector diagnostics and coincidence tests can be used to veto many glitches which may otherwise be misinterpreted as gravitational wave signals. The glitches that remain can lead to long tails in the matched filter search statistics and drive up the detection threshold. Here we describe a Bayesian approach that incorporates a more realistic model for the instrument noise allowing for fluctuating noise levels that vary independently across frequency bands, and deterministic "glitch fitting" using wavelets as "glitch templates", the number of which is determined by a trans-dimensional Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. We demonstrate the method's effectiveness on simulated data containing low amplitude gravitational wave signals from inspiraling binary black hole systems, and simulated non-stationary and non-Gaussian noise comprised of a Gaussian component with the standard LIGO/Virgo spectrum, and injected glitches of various amplitude, prevalence, and variety. Glitch fitting allows us to detect significantly weaker signals than standard techniques.

  15. Spacetime Symphony: APOD and Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cominsky, Lynn R.; Simonnet, Aurore; LIGO-Virgo Scientific Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In 1915, Albert Einstein published his General Theory of Relativity. In this theory, gravity is not a force, but a property of space and time in the presence of massive objects. A century later, on September 14, 2015, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) received the first confirmed gravitational wave signals. Now known as GW150914, the event represents the coalescence of two distant black holes that were previously in mutual orbit. The LIGO-Virgo Scientific Collaboration planned a detailed social media strategy to publicize the February 11, 2016 press conference that announced this discovery. Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD) was a major factor in disseminating the now iconic imagery that was developed, and the LVC worked closely with APOD to ensure that the secrecy would be maintained throughout the press embargo period. Due to the success of our efforts, we repeated the process for the AAS press conference that announced GW151226, the second confirmed gravitational wave event. We have also repurposed the APOD imagery for an online course for community college instructors, as well as in a poster that will be available through CPEPphysics.org (Contemporary Physics Education Project).

  16. Astrophysical calibration of gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitkin, M.; Messenger, C.; Wright, L.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate a method to assess the validity of gravitational-wave detector calibration through the use of gamma-ray bursts as standard sirens. Such signals, as measured via gravitational-wave observations, provide an estimated luminosity distance that is subject to uncertainties in the calibration of the data. If a host galaxy is identified for a given source then its redshift can be combined with current knowledge of the cosmological parameters yielding the true luminosity distance. This will then allow a direct comparison with the estimated value and can validate the accuracy of the original calibration. We use simulations of individual detectable gravitational-wave signals from binary neutron star (BNS) or neutron star-black hole systems, which we assume to be found in coincidence with short gamma-ray bursts, to estimate any discrepancy in the overall scaling of the calibration for detectors in the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo network. We find that the amplitude scaling of the calibration for the LIGO instruments could on average be confirmed to within ˜10 % for a BNS source within 100 Mpc. This result is largely independent of the current detector calibration method and gives an uncertainty that is competitive with that expected in the current calibration procedure. Confirmation of the calibration accuracy to within ˜20 % can be found with BNS sources out to ˜500 Mpc .

  17. Ground-based gravitational-wave observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaime, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    After decades of development and recent upgrades, a network of ground-based interferometric gravitational-wave detectors has begun regular operation. Last year LIGO's two detectors ran for ca. 4 months, observing waves emitted during the inspiral and coalescence of pairs of black holes hundreds of megaparsec from Earth. The results from LIGO's first observational run will be described, as will plans and expectations for a larger network to include Virgo in Europe and other ground-based detectors in the coming years.

  18. The Quest for B Modes from Inflationary Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Kovetz, Ely D.

    2016-09-01

    The search for the curl component (B mode) in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization induced by inflationary gravitational waves is described. The canonical single-field slow-roll model of inflation is presented, and we explain the quantum production of primordial density perturbations and gravitational waves. It is shown how these gravitational waves then give rise to polarization in the CMB. We then describe the geometric decomposition of the CMB polarization pattern into a curl-free component (E mode) and curl component (B mode) and show explicitly that gravitational waves induce B modes. We discuss the B modes induced by gravitational lensing and by Galactic foregrounds and show how both are distinguished from those induced by inflationary gravitational waves. Issues involved in the experimental pursuit of these B modes are described, and we summarize some of the strategies being pursued. We close with a brief discussion of some other avenues toward detecting/characterizing the inflationary gravitational-wave background.

  19. Relic gravitational waves and extended inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Michael S.; Wilczek, Frank

    1990-01-01

    In extended inflation, a new version of inflation where the transition from the false-vacuum phase to a radiation-dominated Universe is accomplished by bubble nucleation and percolation, bubble collisions supply a potent-and potentially detectable-source of gravitational waves. The present energy density in relic gravity waves from bubble collisions is expected to be about 10(exp -5) of closure density-many orders of magnitude greater than that of the gravity waves produced by quantum fluctuations. Their characteristic wavelength depends upon the reheating temperature T(sub RH): lambda is approximately 10(exp 4) cm (10(exp 14) GeV/T(sub RH)). If large numbers of black holes are produced, a not implausible outcome, they will evaporate producing comparable amounts of shorter wavelength waves, lambda is approximately 10(exp -6) cm (T(sub RH)/10(exp 14) GeV).

  20. MHz gravitational wave constraints with decameter Michelson interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Aaron S.; Gustafson, Richard; Hogan, Craig; Kamai, Brittany; Kwon, Ohkyung; Lanza, Robert; Larson, Shane L.; McCuller, Lee; Meyer, Stephan S.; Richardson, Jonathan; Stoughton, Chris; Tomlin, Raymond; Weiss, Rainer; Holometer Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    A new detector, the Fermilab Holometer, consists of separate yet identical 39-meter Michelson interferometers. Strain sensitivity achieved is better than 10-21/√{Hz } between 1 to 13 MHz from a 130-h data set. This measurement exceeds the sensitivity and frequency range made from previous high frequency gravitational wave experiments by many orders of magnitude. Constraints are placed on a stochastic background at 382 Hz resolution. The 3 σ upper limit on ΩGW, the gravitational wave energy density normalized to the closure density, ranges from 5.6 ×1 012 at 1 MHz to 8.4 ×1 015 at 13 MHz. Another result from the same data set is a search for nearby primordial black hole binaries (PBHB). There are no detectable monochromatic PBHBs in the mass range 0.83 - 3.5 ×1 021 g between the Earth and the Moon. Projections for a chirp search with the same data set increase the mass range to 0.59 -2.5 ×1 025 g and distances out to Jupiter. This result presents a new method for placing limits on a poorly constrained mass range of primordial black holes. Additionally, solar system searches for PBHBs place limits on their contribution to the total dark matter fraction.

  1. Gravitational waves from bubble collisions: An analytic derivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinno, Ryusuke; Takimoto, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    We consider gravitational wave production by bubble collisions during a cosmological first-order phase transition. In the literature, such spectra have been estimated by simulating the bubble dynamics, under so-called thin-wall and envelope approximations in a flat background metric. However, we show that, within these assumptions, the gravitational wave spectrum can be estimated in an analytic way. Our estimation is based on the observation that the two-point correlator of the energy-momentum tensor ⟨T (x )T (y )⟩ can be expressed analytically under these assumptions. Though the final expressions for the spectrum contain a few integrations that cannot be calculated explicitly, we can easily estimate it numerically. As a result, it is found that the most of the contributions to the spectrum come from single-bubble contribution to the correlator, and in addition the fall-off of the spectrum at high frequencies is found to be proportional to f-1 . We also provide fitting formulas for the spectrum.

  2. Gravitational wave detection with the solar probe: I. Motivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, K. S.

    1978-01-01

    Questions are posed and answered through discussion of gravitational wave detection with the Solar Probe. Discussed are: (1) what a gravitational wave is; (2) why wave detection is important; (3) what astrophysical information might be learned from these waves; (4) status of attempts to detect these waves; (5) why the Solar Probe is a special mission for detecting these waves; (6) how the Solar Probe's expected sensitivity compares with the strength of predicted gravitational waves; and (7) what gravity wave searchers will do after the Solar Probe.

  3. Multimessenger time delays from lensed gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Tessa; Trodden, Mark

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the potential of high-energy astrophysical events, from which both massless and massive signals are detected, to probe fundamental physics. In particular, we consider how strong gravitational lensing can induce time delays in multimessenger signals from the same source. Obvious messenger examples are massless photons and gravitational waves, and massive neutrinos, although more exotic applications can also be imagined, such as to massive gravitons or axions. The different propagation times of the massive and massless particles can, in principle, place bounds on the total neutrino mass and probe cosmological parameters. Whilst measuring such an effect may pose a significant experimental challenge, we believe that the "massive time delay" represents an unexplored fundamental physics phenomenon.

  4. Extraction of gravitational waves in numerical relativity.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Nigel T; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    A numerical-relativity calculation yields in general a solution of the Einstein equations including also a radiative part, which is in practice computed in a region of finite extent. Since gravitational radiation is properly defined only at null infinity and in an appropriate coordinate system, the accurate estimation of the emitted gravitational waves represents an old and non-trivial problem in numerical relativity. A number of methods have been developed over the years to "extract" the radiative part of the solution from a numerical simulation and these include: quadrupole formulas, gauge-invariant metric perturbations, Weyl scalars, and characteristic extraction. We review and discuss each method, in terms of both its theoretical background as well as its implementation. Finally, we provide a brief comparison of the various methods in terms of their inherent advantages and disadvantages.

  5. Extraction of gravitational waves in numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Nigel T.; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2016-12-01

    A numerical-relativity calculation yields in general a solution of the Einstein equations including also a radiative part, which is in practice computed in a region of finite extent. Since gravitational radiation is properly defined only at null infinity and in an appropriate coordinate system, the accurate estimation of the emitted gravitational waves represents an old and non-trivial problem in numerical relativity. A number of methods have been developed over the years to "extract" the radiative part of the solution from a numerical simulation and these include: quadrupole formulas, gauge-invariant metric perturbations, Weyl scalars, and characteristic extraction. We review and discuss each method, in terms of both its theoretical background as well as its implementation. Finally, we provide a brief comparison of the various methods in terms of their inherent advantages and disadvantages.

  6. Doppler-cancelled response to VLF gravitational waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caporali, A.

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of long periodic gravitational waves with a three link microwave system known as the Doppler Cancelling System is discussed. This system, which was developed for a gravitational redshift experiment, uses one-way and two-way Doppler informatin to construct the beat signal of two reference oscillators moving with respect to each other. The geometric optics approximation is used to derive the frequency shift produced on a light signal propagating in a gravitational wave space-time. The signature left on the Doppler-cancelled beat by burst and continuous gravitational waves is analyzed. A comparison is made between the response to gravitational waves of the Doppler Cancelling System and that of a Doppler tracking system which employs two-way, round-trip radio waves. A three-fold repetition of the gravitational wave form is found to be a common feature of the response functions of both systems. These two functions otherwise exhibit interesting differences.

  7. Development of data communication system with ultra high frequency radio wave for implantable artificial hearts.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Shinichi; Yamagishi, Hiroto; Sankai, Yoshiyuki

    2009-01-01

    In order to minimize infection risks of patients with artificial hearts, wireless data transmission methods with electromagnetic induction or light have been developed. However, these methods tend to become difficult to transmit data if the external data transmission unit moves from its proper position. To resolve this serious problem, the purpose of this study is to develop a prototype wireless data communication system with ultra high frequency radio wave and confirm its performance. Due to its high-speed communication rate, low power consumption, high tolerance to electromagnetic disturbances, and secure wireless communication, we adopted Bluetooth radio wave technology for our system. The system consists of an internal data transmission unit and an external data transmission unit (53 by 64 by 16 mm, each), and each has a Bluetooth module (radio field intensity: 4 dBm, receiver sensitivity: -80 dBm). The internal unit also has a micro controller with an 8-channel 10-bit A/D converter, and the external unit also has a RS-232C converter. We experimented with the internal unit implanted into pig meat, and carried out data transmission tests to evaluate the performance of this system in tissue thickness of up to 3 mm. As a result, data transfer speeds of about 20 kbps were achieved within the communication distance of 10 m. In conclusion, we confirmed that the system can wirelessly transmit the data from the inside of the body to the outside, and it promises to resolve unstable data transmission due to accidental movements of an external data transmission unit.

  8. Electrojet-independent ionospheric extremely low frequency/very low frequency wave generation by powerful high frequency waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer; Snyder, Arnold; Chang, Chia-Lie

    2010-08-15

    Results of extremely low frequency/very low frequency (ELF/VLF) wave generation by intensity-modulated high frequency (HF) heaters of 3.2 MHz in Gakona, Alaska, near local solar noon during a geomagnetic quiet time, are presented to support an electrojet-independent ELF/VLF wave generation mechanism. The modulation was set by splitting the HF transmitter array into two subarrays; one was run at cw full power and the other run alternatively at 50% and 100% power modulation by rectangular waves of 2.02, 5, 8, and 13 kHz. The most effective generation was from the X-mode heater with 100% modulation. While the 8 kHz radiation has the largest wave amplitude, the spectral intensity of the radiation increases with the modulation frequency, i.e., 13 kHz line is the strongest. Ionograms recorded significant virtual height spread of the O-mode sounding echoes. The patterns of the spreads and the changes of the second and third hop virtual height traces caused by the O/X-mode heaters are distinctively different, evidencing that it is due to differently polarized density irregularities generated by the filamentation instability of the O/X-mode HF heaters.

  9. Astrophysical meaning of the discovery of gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipunov, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    The discovery of gravitational waves by the international collaboration LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory)/Virgo on the one hand is a triumphant confirmation of the general theory of relativity, and on the other confirms the general fundamental ideas on the nuclear evolution of baryon matter in the Universe concentrated in binary stars. LIGO/Virgo may turn out to be the first experiment in the history of physics to detect two physical entities, gravitational waves and black holes.

  10. An heuristic introduction to gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, Vernon D.

    1983-03-01

    We describe in physical terms the phenomenon of gravitational waves. The philosophy of William Gilbert is used.1 ``Since in the discovery of secret things and in the investigation of hidden causes, stronger reasons are obtained from sure experiments and demonstrated arguments than from probable conjectures and the opinions of philosophical speculators of the common sort; therefore to the end that the noble substance of that great loadstone, our common mother (the earth), still quite unknown, and also the forces extraordinary and exalted of this globe may the better be understood...''

  11. Sharing the Wonder of Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, Joey Shapiro; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    To share as widely as possible the excitement of the new discovery of gravitational waves, scientists in the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC) and Virgo Collaboration prepared communication tools for a worldwide and diverse audience. This work included resources for traditional and social media outlets, preparing to engage at a wide range of levels and interests. The response to the LIGO discovery announcement indicated that the public is eager to engage with frontier physics. The LSC and Virgo outreach efforts hold lessons for broad STEM outreach including examples of citizen science initiatives and art +science collaboration as a way to inspire and engage a wide range of audiences.

  12. (abstract) OMEGA: A Gravitational Wave MIDEX Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellings, Ronald W.

    1996-01-01

    Among the low frequency (LF) gravitational wave sources that are of astronomical interest are white dwarf binaries, neutron star binaries, massive black hole binaries, and compact stars spiralling into massive black holes. A mission to detect these sources has been proposed to NASA as a possible member of its low-cost, near-term MIDEX mission series. This mission utilizes six tiny miniprobes in high Earth orbit to produce a sensitive Michelson interferometer with million kilometer arms, yielding a strain sensitivity below 10^{-21} at periods longer than a hundred seconds. At this sensitivity, known binary stars will be seen and plausible unknown massive black hole events will be searched for.

  13. Analysis of internal wave reflection within a magnetostrictive patch transducer for high-frequency guided torsional waves.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoe Woong; Cho, Seung Hyun; Kim, Yoon Young

    2011-08-01

    Recently, megahertz-range torsional waves have been successfully generated and measured by a magnetostrictive patch transducer employing a meander coil. But the waveform of a high-frequency torsional wave generated by magnetostrictive patch transducers becomes greatly distorted with multiple trailing pulses. The hypothesis explaining the cause of the waveform distortion is that the distortion results mainly from the internal wave reflection within the magnetostrictive patch, which is in turn caused by the impedance mismatch between the bare and patch-bonded parts of the pipe. Based on the hypothesis, we developed an analytic model for internal reflection simulation and conducted several experiments using a patch transducer to verify the hypothesis. The comparison of the analytical and experimental results showed that the internal reflection at the edge of the patch was responsible for the distortion of the measured waveform. The present study also confirmed that the standard acoustic impedance matching to avoid sudden discontinuities at the patch edges can effectively reduce the internal reflection and alleviate the waveform distortion problem.

  14. The Data Analysis in Gravitational Wave Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-ge, Wang; Lebigot, Eric; Zhi-hui, Du; Jun-wei, Cao; Yun-yong, Wang; Fan, Zhang; Yong-zhi, Cai; Mu-zi, Li; Zong-hong, Zhu; Jin, Qian; Cong, Yin; Jian-bo, Wang; Wen, Zhao; Yang, Zhang; Blair, David; Li, Ju; Chun-nong, Zhao; Lin-qing, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational wave (GW) astronomy based on the GW detection is a rising interdisciplinary field, and a new window for humanity to observe the universe, followed after the traditional astronomy with the electromagnetic waves as the detection means, it has a quite important significance for studying the origin and evolution of the universe, and for extending the astronomical research field. The appearance of laser interferometer GW detector has opened a new era of GW detection, and the data processing and analysis of GWs have already been developed quickly around the world, to provide a sharp weapon for the GW astronomy. This paper introduces systematically the tool software that commonly used for the data analysis of GWs, and discusses in detail the basic methods used in the data analysis of GWs, such as the time-frequency analysis, composite analysis, pulsar timing analysis, matched filter, template, χ2 test, and Monte-Carlo simulation, etc.

  15. Gravitational wave background from rotating neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosado, Pablo A.

    2012-11-01

    The background of gravitational waves produced by the ensemble of rotating neutron stars (which includes pulsars, magnetars, and gravitars) is investigated. A formula for Ω(f) (a function that is commonly used to quantify the background, and is directly related to its energy density) is derived, without making the usual assumption that each radiating system evolves on a short time scale compared to the Hubble time; the time evolution of the systems since their formation until the present day is properly taken into account. Moreover, the formula allows one to distinguish the different parts of the background: the unresolvable (which forms a stochastic background or confusion noise, since the waveforms composing it cannot be either individually observed or subtracted out of the data of a detector) and the resolvable. Several estimations of the background are obtained, for different assumptions on the parameters that characterize neutron stars and their population. In particular, different initial spin period distributions lead to very different results. For one of the models, with slow initial spins, the detection of the background by present or planned detectors can be rejected. However, other models do predict the detection of the background, that would be unresolvable, by the future ground-based gravitational wave detector ET. A robust upper limit for the background of rotating neutron stars is obtained; it does not exceed the detection threshold of two cross-correlated Advanced LIGO interferometers. If gravitars exist and constitute more than a few percent of the neutron star population, then they produce an unresolvable background that could be detected by ET. Under the most reasonable assumptions on the parameters characterizing a neutron star, the background is too faint to be detected. Previous papers have suggested neutron star models in which large magnetic fields (like the ones that characterize magnetars) induce big deformations in the star, which

  16. The next detectors for gravitational wave astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, David; Ju, Li; Zhao, ChunNong; Wen, LinQing; Miao, HaiXing; Cai, RongGen; Gao, JiangRui; Lin, XueChun; Liu, Dong; Wu, Ling-An; Zhu, ZongHong; Hammond, Giles; Paik, Ho Jung; Fafone, Viviana; Rocchi, Alessio; Blair, Carl; Ma, YiQiu; Qin, JiaYi; Page, Michael

    2015-12-01

    This paper focuses on the next detectors for gravitational wave astronomy which will be required after the current ground based detectors have completed their initial observations, and probably achieved the first direct detection of gravitational waves. The next detectors will need to have greater sensitivity, while also enabling the world array of detectors to have improved angular resolution to allow localisation of signal sources. Sect. 1 of this paper begins by reviewing proposals for the next ground based detectors, and presents an analysis of the sensitivity of an 8 km armlength detector, which is proposed as a safe and cost-effective means to attain a 4-fold improvement in sensitivity. The scientific benefits of creating a pair of such detectors in China and Australia is emphasised. Sect. 2 of this paper discusses the high performance suspension systems for test masses that will be an essential component for future detectors, while sect. 3 discusses solutions to the problem of Newtonian noise which arise from fluctuations in gravity gradient forces acting on test masses. Such gravitational perturbations cannot be shielded, and set limits to low frequency sensitivity unless measured and suppressed. Sects. 4 and 5 address critical operational technologies that will be ongoing issues in future detectors. Sect. 4 addresses the design of thermal compensation systems needed in all high optical power interferometers operating at room temperature. Parametric instability control is addressed in sect. 5. Only recently proven to occur in Advanced LIGO, parametric instability phenomenon brings both risks and opportunities for future detectors. The path to future enhancements of detectors will come from quantum measurement technologies. Sect. 6 focuses on the use of optomechanical devices for obtaining enhanced sensitivity, while sect. 7 reviews a range of quantum measurement options.

  17. Gravitational wave astronomy: needle in a haystack.

    PubMed

    Cornish, Neil J

    2013-02-13

    A worldwide array of highly sensitive ground-based interferometers stands poised to usher in a new era in astronomy with the first direct detection of gravitational waves. The data from these instruments will provide a unique perspective on extreme astrophysical objects, such as neutron stars and black holes, and will allow us to test Einstein's theory of gravity in the strong field, dynamical regime. To fully realize these goals, we need to solve some challenging problems in signal processing and inference, such as finding rare and weak signals that are buried in non-stationary and non-Gaussian instrument noise, dealing with high-dimensional model spaces, and locating what are often extremely tight concentrations of posterior mass within the prior volume. Gravitational wave detection using space-based detectors and pulsar timing arrays bring with them the additional challenge of having to isolate individual signals that overlap one another in both time and frequency. Promising solutions to these problems will be discussed, along with some of the challenges that remain.

  18. Gravitational Wave Detection in the Introductory Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burko, Lior M.

    2017-01-01

    Great physics breakthroughs are rarely included in the introductory physics course. General relativity and binary black hole coalescence are no different, and can be included in the introductory course only in a very limited sense. However, we can design activities that directly involve the detection of GW150914, the designation of the Gravitation Wave signal detected on September 14, 2015, thereby engage the students in this exciting discovery directly. The activities naturally do not include the construction of a detector or the detection of gravitational waves. Instead, we design it to include analysis of the data from GW150914, which includes some interesting analysis activities for students of the introductory course. The same activities can be assigned either as a laboratory exercise or as a computational project for the same population of students. The analysis tools used here are simple and available to the intended student population. It does not include the sophisticated analysis tools, which were used by LIGO to carefully analyze the detected signal. However, these simple tools are sufficient to allow the student to get important results. We have successfully assigned this lab project for students of the introductory course with calculus at Georgia Gwinnett College.

  19. Astrophysical Model Selection in Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Matthew R.; Cornish, Neil J.; Littenberg, Tyson B.

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical studies in gravitational wave astronomy have mostly focused on the information that can be extracted from individual detections, such as the mass of a binary system and its location in space. Here we consider how the information from multiple detections can be used to constrain astrophysical population models. This seemingly simple problem is made challenging by the high dimensionality and high degree of correlation in the parameter spaces that describe the signals, and by the complexity of the astrophysical models, which can also depend on a large number of parameters, some of which might not be directly constrained by the observations. We present a method for constraining population models using a hierarchical Bayesian modeling approach which simultaneously infers the source parameters and population model and provides the joint probability distributions for both. We illustrate this approach by considering the constraints that can be placed on population models for galactic white dwarf binaries using a future space-based gravitational wave detector. We find that a mission that is able to resolve approximately 5000 of the shortest period binaries will be able to constrain the population model parameters, including the chirp mass distribution and a characteristic galaxy disk radius to within a few percent. This compares favorably to existing bounds, where electromagnetic observations of stars in the galaxy constrain disk radii to within 20%.

  20. An Atomic Gravitational Wave Interferometric Sensor (AGIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Savas; Graham, Peter W.; Hogan, Jason M.; Kasevich, Mark A.; Rajendran, Surjeet; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2008-08-01

    We propose two distinct atom interferometer gravitational wave detectors, one terrestrial and another satellite-based, utilizing the core technology of the Stanford 10m atom interferometer presently under construction. Each configuration compares two widely separated atom interferometers run using common lasers. The signal scales with the distance between the interferometers, which can be large since only the light travels over this distance, not the atoms. The terrestrial experiment with baseline {approx} 1 km can operate with strain sensitivity {approx} 10{sup -19}/{radical}Hz in the 1 Hz-10 Hz band, inaccessible to LIGO, and can detect gravitational waves from solar mass binaries out to megaparsec distances. The satellite experiment with baseline {approx} 1000 km can probe the same frequency spectrum as LISA with comparable strain sensitivity {approx} 10{sup -20}/{radical}Hz. The use of ballistic atoms (instead of mirrors) as inertial test masses improves systematics coming from vibrations, acceleration noise, and significantly reduces spacecraft control requirements. We analyze the backgrounds in this configuration and discuss methods for controlling them to the required levels.

  1. Transformations of asymptotic gravitational-wave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Gravitational-wave data is gauge dependent. While we can restrict the class of gauges in which such data may be expressed, there will still be an infinite-dimensional group of transformations allowed while remaining in this class, and almost as many different—though physically equivalent—waveforms as there are transformations. This paper presents a method for calculating the effects of the most important transformation group, the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) group, consisting of rotations, boosts, and supertranslations (which include time and space translations as special cases). To a reasonable approximation, these transformations result in simple coupling between the modes in a spin-weighted spherical-harmonic decomposition of the waveform. It is shown that waveforms from simulated compact binaries in the publicly available SXS waveform catalog contain unmodeled effects due to displacement and drift of the center of mass, accounting for mode mixing at typical levels of 1%. However, these effects can be mitigated by measuring the average motion of the system's center of mass for a portion of the inspiral, and applying the opposite transformation to the waveform data. More generally, controlling the BMS transformations will be necessary to eliminate the gauge ambiguity inherent in gravitational-wave data for both numerical and analytical waveforms. Open-source code implementing BMS transformations of waveforms is supplied along with this paper in the supplemental materials.

  2. Atomization off thin water films generated by high-frequency substrate wave vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, David J.; Manor, Ofer; Winkler, Andreas; Schmidt, Hagen; Friend, James R.; Yeo, Leslie Y.

    2012-11-01

    Generating aerosol droplets via the atomization of thin aqueous films with high frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) offers several advantages over existing nebulization methods, particularly for pulmonary drug delivery, offering droplet sizes in the 1-5-μm range ideal for effective pulmonary therapy. Nevertheless, the physics underlying SAW atomization is not well understood, especially in the context of thin liquid film formation and spreading and how this affects the aerosol production. Here, we demonstrate that the film geometry, governed primarily by the applied power and frequency of the SAW, indeed plays a crucial role in the atomization process and, in particular, the size of the atomized droplets. In contrast to the continuous spreading of low surface energy liquids atop similar platforms, high surface energy liquids such as water, in the present case, are found to undergo transient spreading due to the SAW to form a quasisteady film whose height is determined by self-selection of the energy minimum state associated with the acoustic resonance in the film and whose length arises from a competition between acoustic streaming and capillary effects. This is elucidated from a fundamental model for the thin film spreading behavior under SAW excitation, from which we show good agreement between the experimentally measured and theoretically predicted droplet dimension, both of which consistently indicate a linear relationship between the droplet diameter and the mechanical power coupled into the liquid by the SAW (the latter captured by an acoustic Weber number to the two thirds power, and the reciprocal of the SAW frequency).

  3. Atomization off thin water films generated by high-frequency substrate wave vibrations.

    PubMed

    Collins, David J; Manor, Ofer; Winkler, Andreas; Schmidt, Hagen; Friend, James R; Yeo, Leslie Y

    2012-11-01

    Generating aerosol droplets via the atomization of thin aqueous films with high frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) offers several advantages over existing nebulization methods, particularly for pulmonary drug delivery, offering droplet sizes in the 1-5-μm range ideal for effective pulmonary therapy. Nevertheless, the physics underlying SAW atomization is not well understood, especially in the context of thin liquid film formation and spreading and how this affects the aerosol production. Here, we demonstrate that the film geometry, governed primarily by the applied power and frequency of the SAW, indeed plays a crucial role in the atomization process and, in particular, the size of the atomized droplets. In contrast to the continuous spreading of low surface energy liquids atop similar platforms, high surface energy liquids such as water, in the present case, are found to undergo transient spreading due to the SAW to form a quasisteady film whose height is determined by self-selection of the energy minimum state associated with the acoustic resonance in the film and whose length arises from a competition between acoustic streaming and capillary effects. This is elucidated from a fundamental model for the thin film spreading behavior under SAW excitation, from which we show good agreement between the experimentally measured and theoretically predicted droplet dimension, both of which consistently indicate a linear relationship between the droplet diameter and the mechanical power coupled into the liquid by the SAW (the latter captured by an acoustic Weber number to the two thirds power, and the reciprocal of the SAW frequency).

  4. Variation in high-frequency wave radiation from small repeating earthquakes as revealed by cross-spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyama, Norishige; Uchida, Naoki; Matsuzawa, Toru; Okada, Tomomi; Nakajima, Junichi; Matsushima, Takeshi; Kono, Toshio; Hirahara, Satoshi; Nakayama, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    We examined the variation in the high-frequency wave radiation for three repeating earthquake sequences (M = 3.1-4.1) in the northeastern Japan subduction zone by waveform analyses. Earthquakes in each repeating sequence are located at almost the same place and show low-angle thrust type focal mechanisms, indicating that they represent repeated ruptures of a seismic patch on the plate boundary. We calculated cross-spectra of the waveforms and obtained the phases and coherences for pairs of events in the respective repeating sequences in order to investigate the waveform differences. We used waveform data sampled at 1 kHz that were obtained from temporary seismic observations we conducted immediately after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake near the source area. For two repeating sequences, we found that the interevent delay times for the two waveforms in a frequency band higher than the corner frequencies are different from those in a lower frequency band for particular event pairs. The phases and coherences show that there are coherent high-frequency waves for almost all the repeaters regardless of the high-frequency delays. These results indicate that high-frequency waves are always radiated from the same vicinity (subpatch) for these events but the time intervals between the ruptures of the subpatch and the centroid times can vary. We classified events in the sequence into two subgroups according to the high-frequency band interevent delays relative to the low-frequency band. For one sequence, we found that all the events that occurred just after (within 11 days) larger nearby earthquakes belong to one subgroup while other events belong to the other subgroup. This suggests that the high-frequency wave differences were caused by stress perturbations due to the nearby earthquakes. In summary, our observations suggest that high-frequency waves from the repeating sequence are radiated not from everywhere but from a long-duration subpatch within the seismic slip area. The

  5. Broadband magnetoelastic coupling in magnonic-phononic crystals for high-frequency nanoscale spin-wave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graczyk, Piotr; Kłos, Jarosław; Krawczyk, Maciej

    2017-03-01

    Spin waves are promising candidates for information carriers in advanced technology. The interactions between spin waves and acoustic waves in magnetic nanostructures are of much interest because of their potential application for spin-wave generation, amplification, and transduction. We investigate numerically the dynamics of magnetoelastic excitations in a one-dimensional magnonic-phononic crystal consisting of alternating layers of permalloy and cobalt. We use the plane-wave method and the finite-element method for frequency- and time-domain simulations, respectively. The studied structure is optimized for hybridization of specific spin-wave and acoustic dispersion branches in the entire Brillouin zone in a broad frequency range. We show that this type of periodic structure can be used for efficient generation of high-frequency spin waves.

  6. Phase Measurement System for Gravitational Wave Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipstein, William

    We propose to advance the maturity of the LISA Phasemeter based on our recent experience developing a flight Phasemeter for the Laser Ranging Interferometer (LRI) on NASA's GRACE Follow-On mission. Our three main objectives are to: 1) incorporate the flight GRACE Follow-on LRI phasemeter developments into the TRL4 LISA design used extensively in our interferometer testbed; 2) evaluate the LRI Phasemeter against LISA's more stringent requirements in order to identify required design changes; 3) advance the design maturity of the LISA phasemeter through an architecture study to maintain the viability of the Phasemeter as a contribution to ESA's L3 gravitational wave mission. NASA intends to partner in the European Space Agency's (ESA) Gravitational-Wave detection mission, selected for the L3 mission to launch in 2034. This is expected to be a LISA-like mission with the two enabling LISA technologies: 1. a drag-free system to mitigate or measure non-gravitational forces on the spacecraft, 2. an interferometric measure¬ment system with precision phasemeters to measure picometer variations over the million kilometer separation between the spacecraft. To validate the key technologies of the drag-free system, the ESA LISA Pathfinder (LPF) mission is currently demonstrating a gravitational reference sensor (GRS) and microNewton thrusters in space. While LPF has an on-board interferometer to measure proof- mass motion with respect to the spacecraft, the LPF interferometer does not test the interspacecraft laser interferometry needed for a LISA-like mission. To validate the key technologies of the LISA interferometric measurement, the JPL LISA Phase Measurement Team has studied and developed a prototype LISA phase measurement system. This phase measurement system has also been adapted for a demonstration mission, albeit in a different arena. GRACE Follow-Ons Laser Ranging Interferometer (LRI), due to launch in late 2017, will make LISA-like inter-spacecraft interferometric

  7. BOOK REVIEW Analysis of Gravitational-Wave Data Analysis of Gravitational-Wave Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairhurst, Stephen

    2010-12-01

    The field of gravitational-wave data analysis has expanded greatly over the past decade and significant developments have been made in methods of analyzing the data taken by resonant bar and interferometric detectors, as well as analysis of mock LISA data. This book introduces much of the required theoretical background in gravitational physics, statistics and time series analysis before moving on to a discussion of gravitational-wave data analysis techniques themselves. The book opens with an overview of the theory of gravitational radiation, providing a comprehensive discussion of various introductory topics: linearized gravity, transverse traceless gauge, the effects of gravitational waves (via geodesic deviation), energy and momentum carried by the waves, and generation of gravitational waves. The second chapter provides an introduction to the various sources of gravitational waves, followed by more detailed expositions on some of the primary sources. For example, the description of compact binary coalescence is thorough and includes a brief exposition of the post-Newtonian formalism and the effective one body method. There also follows extended derivations of gravitational waves from distorted neutron stars, supernovae and a stochastic background. Chapter three provides an introduction to the statistical theory of signal detection, including a discussion of parameter estimation via the Fisher matrix formalism. This is presented from a very mathematical, postulate based, standpoint and I expect that even established gravitational-wave data analysts will find the derivations here more formal than they are used to. The discussion of likelihood ratio tests and the importance of prior probabilities are presented particularly clearly. The fourth chapter covers time series analysis, with power spectrum estimation, extraction of periodic signals and goodness of fit tests. Chapter five switches topics and gives the details of the response of gravitational-wave

  8. Nonlinear evolution of high frequency R-mode waves excited by water group ions near comets - Computer experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, H.; Matsumoto, H.; Omura, Y.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1989-01-01

    An ion beam resonates with R-mode waves at a high-frequency RH mode and a low-frequency RL mode. The nonlinear evolution of ion beam-generated RH waves is studied here by one-dimensional hybrid computer experiments. Both wave-particle and subsequent wave-wave interactions are examined. The competing process among coexisting RH and RL mode beam instabilities and repeated decay instabilities triggered by the beam-excited RH mode waves is clarified. It is found that the quenching of the RH instability is not caused by a thermal spreading of the ion beam, but by the nonlinear wave-wave coupling process. The growing RH waves become unstable against the decay instability. This instability involves a backward-traveling RH electromagnetic wave and a forward-traveling longitudinal sound wave. The inverse cascading process is found to occur faster than the growth of the RL mode. Wave spectra decaying from the RH waves weaken as time elapses and the RL mode waves become dominant at the end of the computer experiment.

  9. Gravitational wave astronomy— astronomy of the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhurandhar, S. V.

    2011-12-01

    An enigmatic prediction of Einstein's general theory of relativity is gravitational waves. With the observed decay in the orbit of the Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar agreeing within a fraction of a percent with the theoretically computed decay from Einstein's theory, the existence of gravitational waves was firmly established. Currently there is a worldwide effort to detect gravitational waves with inteferometric gravitational wave observatories or detectors and several such detectors have been built or are being built. The initial detectors have reached their design sensitivities and now the effort is on to construct advanced detectors which are expected to detect gravitational waves from astrophysical sources. The era of gravitational wave astronomy has arrived. This article describes the worldwide effort which includes the effort on the Indian front— the IndIGO project —, the principle underlying interferometric detectors both on ground and in space, the principal noise sources that plague such detectors, the astrophysical sources of gravitational waves that one expects to detect by these detectors and some glimpse of the data analysis methods involved in extracting the very weak gravitational wave signals from detector noise.

  10. Gravitational wave astronomy - astronomy of the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhurandhar, S. V.

    2011-03-01

    An enigmatic prediction of Einstein's general theory of relativity is gravitational waves. With the observed decay in the orbit of the Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar agreeing within a fraction of a percent with the theoretically computed decay from Einstein's theory, the existence of gravitational waves was firmly established. Currently there is a worldwide effort to detect gravitational waves with inteferometric gravitational wave observatories or detectors and several such detectors have been built or being built. The initial detectors have reached their design sensitivities and now the effort is on to construct advanced detectors which are expected to detect gravitational waves from astrophysical sources. The era of gravitational wave astronomy has arrived. This article describes the worldwide effort which includes the effort on the Indian front - the IndIGO project -, the principle underlying interferometric detectors both on ground and in space, the principal noise sources that plague such detectors, the astrophysical sources of gravitational waves that one expects to detect by these detectors and some glimpse of the data analysis methods involved in extracting the very weak gravitational wave signals from detector noise.

  11. Optimizing Vetoes for Gravitational-wave Transient Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Essick, R.; Blackburn, Lindy L.; Katsavounidis, E.

    2014-01-01

    Interferometric gravitational-wave detectors like LIGO, GEO600 and Virgo record a surplus of information above and beyond possible gravitational-wave events. These auxiliary channels capture information about the state of the detector and its surroundings which can be used to infer potential terrestrial noise sources of some gravitational-wave-like events. We present an algorithm addressing the ordering (or equivalently optimizing) of such information from auxiliary systems in gravitational-wave detectors to establish veto conditions in searches for gravitational-wave transients. The procedure was used to identify vetoes for searches for unmodelled transients by the LIGO and Virgo collaborations during their science runs from 2005 through 2007. In this work we present the details of the algorithm; we also use a limited amount of data from LIGO's past runs in order to examine the method, compare it with other methods, and identify its potential to characterize the instruments themselves. We examine the dependence of Receiver Operating Characteristic curves on the various parameters of the veto method and the implementation on real data. We find that the method robustly determines important auxiliary channels, ordering them by the apparent strength of their correlations to the gravitational-wave channel. This list can substantially reduce the background of noise events in the gravitational-wave data. In this way it can identify the source of glitches in the detector as well as assist in establishing confidence in the detection of gravitational-wave transients.

  12. Parameter estimation of gravitational wave compact binary coalescences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haster, Carl-Johan; LIGO Scientific Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The first detections of gravitational waves from coalescing binary black holes have allowed unprecedented inference on the astrophysical parameters of such binaries. Given recent updates in detector capabilities, gravitational wave model templates and data analysis techniques, in this talk I will describe the prospects of parameter estimation of compact binary coalescences during the second observation run of the LIGO-Virgo collaboration.

  13. Gravitational wave production at the end of inflation.

    PubMed

    Easther, Richard; Giblin, John T; Lim, Eugene A

    2007-11-30

    We consider gravitational wave production due to parametric resonance at the end of inflation, or "preheating." This leads to large inhomogeneities that source a stochastic background of gravitational waves at scales inside the comoving Hubble horizon at the end of inflation. We confirm that the present amplitude of these gravitational waves need not depend on the inflationary energy scale. We analyze an explicit model where the inflationary energy scale is approximately 10{9} GeV, yielding a signal close to the sensitivity of Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory and Big Bang Observer. This signal highlights the possibility of a new observational "window" into inflationary physics and provides significant motivation for searches for stochastic backgrounds of gravitational waves in the Hz to GHz range, with an amplitude on the order of Omega_{gw}(k)h{2} approximately 10{-11}.

  14. Directed search for continuous gravitational waves from the Galactic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, R. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Austin, L.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S. H.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Bergmann, G.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Bessis, D.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbhade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bowers, J.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brannen, C. A.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castiglia, A.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Deleeuw, E.; Deléglise, S.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Dmitry, K.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, E.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hall, B.; Hall, E.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Horrom, T.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Hua, Z.; Huang, V.; Huerta, E. A.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Iafrate, J.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, H.; Jang, Y. J.; Jaranowski, P.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasprzack, M.; Kasturi, R.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufman, K.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Kremin, A.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kucharczyk, C.; Kudla, S.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kurdyumov, R.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Le Roux, A.; Leaci, P.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.-H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, J.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J. B.; Lhuillier, V.; Li, T. G. F.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Litvine, V.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lloyd, D.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Lodhia, D.; Loew, K.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Luan, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macarthur, J.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Manca, G. M.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martinelli, L.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; May, G.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Mokler, F.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Mori, T.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nagy, M. F.; Nanda Kumar, D.; Nardecchia, I.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R.; Necula, V.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nishida, E.; Nishizawa, A.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega Larcher, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Ou, J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoletti, R.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Pedraza, M.; Peiris, P.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pinard, L.; Pindor, B.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Poeld, J.; Poggiani, R.; Poole, V.; Poux, C.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, C.; Rodruck, M.; Roever, C.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Saracco, E.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G. R.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Soden, K.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Sperandio, L.; Staley, A.; Steinert, E.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stevens, D.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szeifert, G.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tang, L.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, R.; ter Braack, A. P. M.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Verma, S.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vlcek, B.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vrinceanu, D.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Waldman, S. J.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Wan, Y.; Wang, J.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wibowo, S.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williams, T.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yum, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, X. J.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2013-11-01

    We present the results of a directed search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown, isolated neutron stars in the Galactic center region, performed on two years of data from LIGO’s fifth science run from two LIGO detectors. The search uses a semicoherent approach, analyzing coherently 630 segments, each spanning 11.5 hours, and then incoherently combining the results of the single segments. It covers gravitational wave frequencies in a range from 78 to 496 Hz and a frequency-dependent range of first-order spindown values down to -7.86×10-8Hz/s at the highest frequency. No gravitational waves were detected. The 90% confidence upper limits on the gravitational wave amplitude of sources at the Galactic center are ˜3.35×10-25 for frequencies near 150 Hz. These upper limits are the most constraining to date for a large-parameter-space search for continuous gravitational wave signals.

  15. Gravitational waves from the cosmological QCD transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourão Roque, V. R. C.; Roque, G. Lugones o.; Lugones, G.

    2014-09-01

    We determine the minimum fluctuations in the cosmological QCD phase transition that could be detectable by the eLISA/NGO gravitational wave observatory. To this end, we performed several hydrodynamical simulations using a state-of-the-art equation of state derived from lattice QCD simulations. Based on the fact that the viscosity per entropy density of the quark gluon plasma obtained from heavy-ion collision experiments at the RHIC and the LHC is extremely small, we considered a non-viscous fluid in our simulations. Several previous works about this transition considered a first order transition that generates turbulence which follows a Kolmogorov power law. We show that for the QCD crossover transition the turbulent spectrum must be very different because there is no viscosity and no source of continuous energy injection. As a consequence, a large amount of kinetic energy accumulates at the smallest scales. From the hydrodynamic simulations, we have obtained the spectrum of the gravitational radiation emitted by the motion of the fluid, finding that, if typical velocity and temperature fluctuations have an amplitude Δ v /c ≳ 10-2 and/or Δ T/T_c ≳ 10-3, they would be detected by eLISA/NGO at frequencies larger than ˜ 10-4 Hz.

  16. On the direct detection of gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustovoit, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    Different types of gravitational wave (GW) detectors are considered. It is noted that interferometric techniques offer the greatest prospects for GW registration due to their high sensitivity and extremely wide frequency band. Using laser interferometers, proposed as far back as 1962 in the work by M E Gertsenshtein and V I Pustovoit published in Russian (Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz., vol. 43, p. 605, 1962) and in English translation (Sov. Phys. JETP, vol. 16, p. 433, 1963), it proved possible for the first time to directly detect GW emission from a merger of two black holes. It is noted that the assertion that Gertsen-shtein-Pustovoit's work was unknown to some of those experts involved in direct GW detection is inconsistent with reality. The problems of high-power laser radiation affecting the electrostatic polarization of free-mass mirrors are discussed. It is shown that mirror polarization can lead to additional links with electrically conducting elements of the design resulting in the interferometer's reduced sensitivity. Some new prospects for developing high reflection structures are discussed and heat extraction problems are considered. This article is the revised and extended version of the report “On the first direct detection of gravitational waves” delivered by V I Pustovoit at the Scientific Session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (March 2, 2016). All other reports presented at the session were published in the preceding issue of Physics-Uspekhi (September 2016) (see Refs [108, 111-113]). (Editorial note)

  17. DETECTING GRAVITATIONAL WAVE MEMORY WITH PULSAR TIMING

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, J. M.; Jenet, F. A. E-mail: merlyn@phys.utb.edu

    2012-06-10

    We compare the detectability of gravitational bursts passing through the solar system with those passing near each millisecond pulsar in an N-pulsar timing array. The sensitivity to Earth-passing bursts can exploit the correlation expected in pulse arrival times while pulsar-passing bursts, though uncorrelated between objects, provide an N-fold increase in overall time baseline that can compensate for the lower sensitivity. Bursts with memory from mergers of supermassive black holes produce step functions in apparent spin frequency that are the easiest to detect in pulsar timing. We show that the burst rate and amplitude distribution, while strongly dependent on inadequately known cosmological evolution, may favor detection in the pulsar terms rather than the Earth timing perturbations. Any contamination of timing data by red spin noise makes burst detection more difficult because both signals grow with the length of the time data span T. Furthermore, the different bursts that could appear in one or more data sets of length T Almost-Equal-To 10 yr also affect the detectability of the gravitational wave stochastic background that, like spin noise, has a red power spectrum. A burst with memory is a worthwhile target in the timing of multiple pulsars in a globular cluster because it should produce a correlated signal with a time delay of less than about 10 years in some cases.

  18. Using Gravitational-Wave Standard Sirens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holz, Daniel E.; Hughes, Scott A.

    2005-08-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) from supermassive binary black hole (BBH) in-spirals are potentially powerful standard sirens (the GW analog to standard candles; see work of B. Schutz). Because these systems are well modeled, the space-based GW observatory LISA will be able to measure the luminosity distance (but not the redshift) to some distant massive BBH systems with 1%-10% accuracy. This accuracy is largely limited by pointing error: GW sources are generally poorly localized on the sky. Localizing the binary independently (e.g., through association with an electromagnetic counterpart) greatly reduces this positional error. An electromagnetic counterpart may also allow determination of the event's redshift. In this case, BBH coalescence would constitute an extremely precise (better than 1%) standard candle visible to high redshift. In practice, gravitational lensing degrades this precision, although the candle remains precise enough to provide useful information about the distance-redshift relation. Even if very rare, these GW standard sirens would complement, and increase confidence in, other standard candles.

  19. Black Holes, Gravitational Waves, and LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John

    2009-01-01

    Binary black hole mergers are central to many key science objectives of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). For many systems the strongest part of the signal is only understood by numerical simulations. Gravitational wave emissions are understood by simulations of vacuum General Relativity (GR). I discuss numerical simulation results from the perspective of LISA's needs, with indications of work that remains to be done. Some exciting scientific opportunities associated with LISA observations would be greatly enhanced if prompt electromagnetic signature could be associated. I discuss simulations to explore this possibility. Numerical simulations are important now for clarifying LISA's science potential and planning the mission. We also consider how numerical simulations might be applied at the time of LISA's operation.

  20. On a nonlinear gravitational wave. Geodesics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culetu, Hristu

    2016-12-01

    An exact, plane-wave solution of the gravitational field equations is investigated. The source stress tensor is represented by an anisotropic null fluid with energy flux to which the energy density ρ and all pressures are finite throughout the spacetime. They depend on a constant length (taken of the order of the Planck length) and acquire Planck values close to the null surface t-z=0, the z-axis being the direction of propagation. However, ρ and p become positive when a cross-polarization term is introduced in the line element. The timelike geodesics of a test particle are contained in a plane whose normal has constant direction and the null trajectories are comoving with a plane of fixed direction.

  1. Constraining the Braneworld with Gravitational Wave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWilliams, Sean T.

    2011-01-01

    Some braneworld models may have observable consequences that, if detected, would validate a requisite element of string theory. In the infinite Randall-Sundrum model (RS2), the AdS radius of curvature, L, of the extra dimension supports a single bound state of the massless graviton on the brane, thereby reproducing Newtonian gravity in the weak-field limit. However, using the AdS/CFT correspondence, it has been suggested that one possible consequence of RS2 is an enormous increase in Hawking radiation emitted by black holes. We utilize this possibility to derive two novel methods for constraining L via gravitational wave measurements. We show that the EMRI event rate detected by LISA can constrain L at the approximately 1 micron level for optimal cases, while the observation of a single galactic black hole binary with LISA results in an optimal constraint of L less than or equal to 5 microns.

  2. The Mario Schenberg Gravitational Wave Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Nei F.; Aguiar, Odylio D.

    2016-10-01

    This article is an account of the work done in the Mario Schenberg gravitational wave antenna up to date, focusing mainly in the participation of the Laboratório de Estado Sólido e Baixas Temperaturas (LESBT) do Instituto de Física da Universidade de S. Paulo. The text starts with an introduction describing the problem, the Brazilian project, and the participant institutions. This is followed by a description of the construction of the infrastructure, initial tests, and final basic assembly at the LESBT. Results are presented for the thermal and mechanical behaviors of the cryogenic system and for the development of active transducers in its various stages, culminating with the last version in which the project sensitivity of ˜4 × 10-20 Hz-1/2 was attained.

  3. Ultrahigh precision cosmology from gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, Curt; Holz, Daniel E.

    2009-11-15

    We show that the Big Bang Observer (BBO), a proposed space-based gravitational-wave (GW) detector, would provide ultraprecise measurements of cosmological parameters. By detecting {approx}3x10{sup 5} compact-star binaries, and utilizing them as standard sirens, BBO would determine the Hubble constant to {approx}0.1%, and the dark-energy parameters w{sub 0} and w{sub a} to {approx}0.01 and {approx}0.1, respectively. BBO's dark-energy figure-of-merit would be approximately an order of magnitude better than all other proposed, dedicated dark-energy missions. To date, BBO has been designed with the primary goal of searching for gravitational waves from inflation, down to the level {omega}{sub GW}{approx}10{sup -17}; this requirement determines BBO's frequency band (deci-Hz) and its sensitivity requirement (strain measured to {approx}10{sup -24}). To observe an inflationary GW background, BBO would first have to detect and subtract out {approx}3x10{sup 5} merging compact-star binaries, out to a redshift z{approx}5. It is precisely this carefully measured foreground which would enable high-precision cosmology. BBO would determine the luminosity distance to each binary to {approx} percent accuracy. In addition, BBO's angular resolution would be sufficient to uniquely identify the host galaxy for the majority of binaries; a coordinated optical/infrared observing campaign could obtain the redshifts. Combining the GW-derived distances and the electromagnetically-derived redshifts for such a large sample of objects, out to such high redshift, naturally leads to extraordinarily tight constraints on cosmological parameters. We emphasize that such 'standard siren' measurements of cosmology avoid many of the systematic errors associated with other techniques: GWs offer a physics-based, absolute measurement of distance. In addition, we show that BBO would also serve as an exceptionally powerful gravitational-lensing mission, and we briefly discuss other astronomical uses of BBO

  4. Ultrahigh precision cosmology from gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, Curt; Holz, Daniel E.

    2009-11-01

    We show that the Big Bang Observer (BBO), a proposed space-based gravitational-wave (GW) detector, would provide ultraprecise measurements of cosmological parameters. By detecting ˜3×105 compact-star binaries, and utilizing them as standard sirens, BBO would determine the Hubble constant to ˜0.1%, and the dark-energy parameters w0 and wa to ˜0.01 and ˜0.1, respectively. BBO’s dark-energy figure-of-merit would be approximately an order of magnitude better than all other proposed, dedicated dark-energy missions. To date, BBO has been designed with the primary goal of searching for gravitational waves from inflation, down to the level ΩGW˜10-17; this requirement determines BBO’s frequency band (deci-Hz) and its sensitivity requirement (strain measured to ˜10-24). To observe an inflationary GW background, BBO would first have to detect and subtract out ˜3×105 merging compact-star binaries, out to a redshift z˜5. It is precisely this carefully measured foreground which would enable high-precision cosmology. BBO would determine the luminosity distance to each binary to ˜ percent accuracy. In addition, BBO’s angular resolution would be sufficient to uniquely identify the host galaxy for the majority of binaries; a coordinated optical/infrared observing campaign could obtain the redshifts. Combining the GW-derived distances and the electromagnetically-derived redshifts for such a large sample of objects, out to such high redshift, naturally leads to extraordinarily tight constraints on cosmological parameters. We emphasize that such “standard siren” measurements of cosmology avoid many of the systematic errors associated with other techniques: GWs offer a physics-based, absolute measurement of distance. In addition, we show that BBO would also serve as an exceptionally powerful gravitational-lensing mission, and we briefly discuss other astronomical uses of BBO, including providing an early warning system for all short/hard gamma-ray bursts.

  5. LIMITS ON THE STOCHASTIC GRAVITATIONAL WAVE BACKGROUND FROM THE NORTH AMERICAN NANOHERTZ OBSERVATORY FOR GRAVITATIONAL WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Demorest, P. B.; Ransom, S.; Ferdman, R. D.; Kaspi, V. M.; Gonzalez, M. E.; Stairs, I. H.; Nice, D.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Brazier, A.; Cordes, J. M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Lazio, J.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Ellis, J.; Giampanis, S.; Finn, L. S.; Freire, P.; Jenet, F.; Lommen, A. N.; McLaughlin, M.; and others

    2013-01-10

    We present an analysis of high-precision pulsar timing data taken as part of the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) project. We have observed 17 pulsars for a span of roughly five years using the Green Bank and Arecibo radio telescopes. We analyze these data using standard pulsar timing models, with the addition of time-variable dispersion measure and frequency-variable pulse shape terms. Sub-microsecond timing residuals are obtained in nearly all cases, and the best rms timing residuals in this set are {approx}30-50 ns. We present methods for analyzing post-fit timing residuals for the presence of a gravitational wave signal with a specified spectral shape. These optimally take into account the timing fluctuation power removed by the model fit, and can be applied to either data from a single pulsar, or to a set of pulsars to detect a correlated signal. We apply these methods to our data set to set an upper limit on the strength of the nHz-frequency stochastic supermassive black hole gravitational wave background of h{sub c} (1 yr{sup -1}) < 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} (95%). This result is dominated by the timing of the two best pulsars in the set, PSRs J1713+0747 and J1909-3744.

  6. Searching for gravitational waves from neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrisy, Ashikuzzaman

    In this dissertation we discuss gravitational waves (GWs) and their neutron star (NS) sources. We begin with a general discussion of the motivation for searching for GWs and the indirect experimental evidence of their existence. Then we discuss the various mechanisms through which NS can emit GWs, paying special attention the r-mode oscillations. Finally we end with discussion of GW detection. In Chapter 2 we describe research into the frequencies of r-mode oscillations. Knowing these frequencies can be useful for guiding and interpreting gravitational wave and electromagnetic observations. The frequencies of slowly rotating, barotropic, and non-magnetic Newtonian stars are well known, but subject to various corrections. After making simple estimates of the relative strengths of these corrections we conclude that relativistic corrections are the most important. For this reason we extend the formalism of K. H. Lockitch, J. L. Friedman, and N. Andersson [Phys. Rev. D 68, 124010 (2003)], who consider relativistic polytropes, to the case of realistic equations of state. This formulation results in perturbation equations which are solved using a spectral method. We find that for realistic equations of state the r-mode frequency ranges from 1.39--1.57 times the spin frequency of the star when the relativistic compactness parameter (M/R) is varied over the astrophysically motivated interval 0.110--0.310. Following a successful r-mode detection our results can help constrain the high density equation of state. In Chapter 3 we present a technical introduction to the data analysis tools used in GW searches. Starting from the plane-wave solutions derived in Chapter 1 we develop the F-statistic used in the matched filtering technique. This technique relies on coherently integrating the GW detector's data stream with a theoretically modeled wave signal. The statistic is used to test the null hypothesis that the data contains no signal. In this chapter we also discuss how to

  7. Dynamic Tensile Cracking in Slopes and the Possible Existence of Seismic Rayleigh Waves in a High Frequency Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uenishi, K.

    2011-12-01

    In the previous investigations (Earthq. Eng. Struct. Dyn. 2000, Int. J. Geomech. 2010, Rock Mech. Rock Eng. 2010) we have shown the possibility of evaluating the mechanical characteristics of relevant seismic waves from earthquake-induced dynamic structural failure patterns. Slopes are one of the typical structures that may experience mechanical destabilization by seismic waves and thus can be used as "sensors" to detect specific properties of the waves, some of which, especially those related to high frequencies, might be difficult to be identified by using ordinary seismological recordings. One notable example is the fill slopes in the Midorigaoka area in Sendai City, Japan, where the dynamic loading associated with the 1978 Miyagi-ken-oki earthquake (Japan Meteorological Agency Magnitude Mj = 7.4) generated crack openings in the top surface along the upper edge (crest). Although the slopes were reinforced by steel pipe piles after this 1978 event, tensile cracking was induced again along the upper edge by the off the Pacific coast of Tohoku earthquake in March, 2011 (moment magnitude Mw = 9.0). Similar tensile cracks were found not only in California after the 1906 and 1957 San Francisco and the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes but also in the South Island along the cliff edge at Redcliffs, Sumner and Sumner Head on the occasion of the February 2011 Christchurch, New Zealand, earthquake (Mw = 6.1). In this study, using the moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method, we perform two-dimensional numerical simulations for body or Rayleigh surface wave interaction with an archetypal linear elastic slope. The results suggest, at least from the stress point of view, that in order to systematically explain the generation mechanism of the tensile cracking, it may be more reasonable to assume the existence of Rayleigh waves in a high frequency range. That is, body waves and low-frequency Rayleigh waves may not be able to generate such failure patterns. Further analysis shows

  8. LISA Pathfinder: First steps to observing gravitational waves from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Paul; LISA Pathfinder Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    With the first direct detection of gravitational waves a little over a year ago, the gravitational window to the Universe has been opened. The gravitational wave spectrum spans many orders of magnitude in frequency, with several of the most interesting astronomical sources emitting gravitational waves at frequencies only observable from space The European Space Agency (ESA) has been active in the field of space-borne gravitational wave detection for many years, and in 2013 selected the Gravitational Universe as the science theme for the third large class mission in the Cosmic Vision science programme. In addition, ESA took the step of developing the LISA Pathfinder mission to demonstrate the critical technologies required for a future mission. The goal of the LISA Pathfinder mission is to place a test body in free fall such that any external forces (acceleration) are reduced to levels lower than those expected from the passage of a gravitational wave LISA Pathfinder was launched on the 3rd December 2015 from the European Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. After a series of 6 apogee raising manoeuvres, the satellite left earth orbit, and travelled to its final science orbit around the first Sun-Earth Lagrange point (L1). Following a relatively short commissioning phase, science operations began on 1st March 2016. In the following 3 months over 100 experiments and over 1500hours of noise measurements have been performed, demonstrating that the observation of gravitational waves from space can be realised.

  9. Transmission of high frequency sound waves through a slug flow jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.; Vijayaraghavan, A.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis has been performed of sound waves which propagate in a pipe with gas flow. At the pipe exit these waves are partially reflected and the remainder are diffracted. The analysis is carried out by resolving the sound at the exit into its Fourier components and then continuing the solution, which is a combination of elementary plane waves, beyond the exit. These waves are of two types: homogeneous waves which propagate to infinity, and inhomogeneous waves with complex wave numbers which decay. The reflected waves are evaluated from the inhomogeneous waves. At the boundary of the jet, refraction of the elementary plane waves is accounted for and the far field sound is evaluated by the method of stationary phase. Comparisons of the theoretical calculations are made with experimental results and with calculations of other theories.

  10. Stochastic gravitational wave background from light cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    DePies, Matthew R.; Hogan, Craig J.

    2007-06-15

    Spectra of the stochastic gravitational wave backgrounds from cosmic strings are calculated and compared with present and future experimental limits. Motivated by theoretical expectations of light cosmic strings in superstring cosmology, improvements in experimental sensitivity, and recent demonstrations of large, stable loop formation from a primordial network, this study explores a new range of string parameters with masses lighter than previously investigated. A standard 'one-scale' model for string loop formation is assumed. Background spectra are calculated numerically for dimensionless string tensions G{mu}/c{sup 2} between 10{sup -7} and 10{sup -18}, and initial loop sizes as a fraction of the Hubble radius {alpha} from 0.1 to 10{sup -6}. The spectra show a low frequency power-law tail, a broad spectral peak due to loops decaying at the present epoch (including frequencies higher than their fundamental mode, and radiation associated with cusps), and a flat (constant energy density) spectrum at high frequencies due to radiation from loops that decayed during the radiation-dominated era. The string spectrum is distinctive and unlike any other known source. The peak of the spectrum for light strings appears at high frequencies, significantly affecting predicted signals. The spectra of the cosmic string backgrounds are compared with current millisecond pulsar limits and Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) sensitivity curves. For models with large stable loops ({alpha}=0.1), current pulsar-timing limits exclude G{mu}/c{sup 2}>10{sup -9}, a much tighter limit on string tension than achievable with other techniques, and within the range of current models based on brane inflation. LISA may detect a background from strings as light as G{mu}/c{sup 2}{approx_equal}10{sup -16}, corresponding to field theory strings formed at roughly 10{sup 11} GeV.

  11. Comparative analysis on penetrating depth of high-frequency Rayleigh and Love waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaofei; Xia, Jianghai; Shen, Chao; Xu, Hongrui

    2014-12-01

    A particular mode of surface waves possesses a unique phase velocity for each wavelength. Different wavelengths primarily reflect geological information at different depths. In practice, knowledge on penetrating depth of surface wave data is extremely important to define an earth model for inverting their phase velocities. For a layered model, we use the Jacobian matrix to investigate the relationship between wavelength and penetrating depth. The results show that a different mode of surface waves is sensitive to a different depth range. No matter for Rayleigh or Love waves, higher mode waves can penetrate deeper than fundamental mode waves do. For a normal model (S-wave velocity increases with depth) and given the same wavelength, the fundamental mode Rayleigh-wave data can 'see' 1.3-1.4 times deeper than that of Love waves. In addition, the higher-mode components of the two waves can penetrate the same depth. Our numerical studies based on sensitivity analysis of fundamental mode waves of two kinds of irregular models, HVL (high-velocity-layer model) and LVL (low-velocity-layer model), suggest that both Rayleigh and Love waves are insensitive to the layers beneath an HVL or LVL and the HVL itself. Therefore, wavelengths required for estimating S-wave velocity of these layers are much longer than the normal model.

  12. Speed of Gravitational Waves from Strongly Lensed Gravitational Waves and Electromagnetic Signals.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xi-Long; Liao, Kai; Biesiada, Marek; Piórkowska-Kurpas, Aleksandra; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2017-03-03

    We propose a new model-independent measurement strategy for the propagation speed of gravitational waves (GWs) based on strongly lensed GWs and their electromagnetic (EM) counterparts. This can be done in two ways: by comparing arrival times of GWs and their EM counterparts and by comparing the time delays between images seen in GWs and their EM counterparts. The lensed GW-EM event is perhaps the best way to identify an EM counterpart. Conceptually, this method does not rely on any specific theory of massive gravitons or modified gravity. Its differential setting (i.e., measuring the difference between time delays in GW and EM domains) makes it robust against lens modeling details (photons and GWs travel in the same lensing potential) and against internal time delays between GW and EM emission acts. It requires, however, that the theory of gravity is metric and predicts gravitational lensing similar to general relativity. We expect that such a test will become possible in the era of third-generation gravitational-wave detectors, when about 10 lensed GW events would be observed each year. The power of this method is mainly limited by the timing accuracy of the EM counterpart, which for kilonovae is around 10^{4}  s. This uncertainty can be suppressed by a factor of ∼10^{10}, if strongly lensed transients of much shorter duration associated with the GW event can be identified. Candidates for such short transients include short γ-ray bursts and fast radio bursts.

  13. Speed of Gravitational Waves from Strongly Lensed Gravitational Waves and Electromagnetic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xi-Long; Liao, Kai; Biesiada, Marek; Piórkowska-Kurpas, Aleksandra; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2017-03-01

    We propose a new model-independent measurement strategy for the propagation speed of gravitational waves (GWs) based on strongly lensed GWs and their electromagnetic (EM) counterparts. This can be done in two ways: by comparing arrival times of GWs and their EM counterparts and by comparing the time delays between images seen in GWs and their EM counterparts. The lensed GW-EM event is perhaps the best way to identify an EM counterpart. Conceptually, this method does not rely on any specific theory of massive gravitons or modified gravity. Its differential setting (i.e., measuring the difference between time delays in GW and EM domains) makes it robust against lens modeling details (photons and GWs travel in the same lensing potential) and against internal time delays between GW and EM emission acts. It requires, however, that the theory of gravity is metric and predicts gravitational lensing similar to general relativity. We expect that such a test will become possible in the era of third-generation gravitational-wave detectors, when about 10 lensed GW events would be observed each year. The power of this method is mainly limited by the timing accuracy of the EM counterpart, which for kilonovae is around 1 04 s . This uncertainty can be suppressed by a factor of ˜1 010, if strongly lensed transients of much shorter duration associated with the GW event can be identified. Candidates for such short transients include short γ -ray bursts and fast radio bursts.

  14. Generation of uniform large-area very high frequency plasmas by launching two specific standing waves simultaneously

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsin-Liang; Tu, Yen-Cheng; Hsieh, Cheng-Chang; Lin, Deng-Lain; Leou, Keh-Chyang

    2014-09-01

    With the characteristics of higher electron density and lower ion bombardment energy, large-area VHF (very high frequency) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition has become an essential manufacturing equipment to improve the production throughput and efficiency of thin film silicon solar cell. However, the combination of high frequency and large electrodes leads to the so-called standing wave effect causing a serious problem for the deposition uniformity of silicon thin film. In order to address this issue, a technique based on the idea of simultaneously launching two standing waves that possess similar amplitudes and are out of phase by 90° in time and space is proposed in this study. A linear plasma reactor with discharge length of 54 cm is tested with two different frequencies including 60 and 80 MHz. The experimental results show that the proposed technique could effectively improve the non-uniformity of VHF plasmas from >±60% when only one standing wave is applied to <±10% once two specific standing waves are launched at the same time. Moreover, in terms of the reactor configuration adopted in this study, in which the standing wave effect along the much shorter dimension can be ignored, the proposed technique is applicable to different frequencies without the need to alter the number and arrangement of power feeding points.

  15. Generation of uniform large-area very high frequency plasmas by launching two specific standing waves simultaneously

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hsin-Liang Tu, Yen-Cheng; Hsieh, Cheng-Chang; Lin, Deng-Lain; Leou, Keh-Chyang

    2014-09-14

    With the characteristics of higher electron density and lower ion bombardment energy, large-area VHF (very high frequency) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition has become an essential manufacturing equipment to improve the production throughput and efficiency of thin film silicon solar cell. However, the combination of high frequency and large electrodes leads to the so-called standing wave effect causing a serious problem for the deposition uniformity of silicon thin film. In order to address this issue, a technique based on the idea of simultaneously launching two standing waves that possess similar amplitudes and are out of phase by 90° in time and space is proposed in this study. A linear plasma reactor with discharge length of 54 cm is tested with two different frequencies including 60 and 80 MHz. The experimental results show that the proposed technique could effectively improve the non-uniformity of VHF plasmas from >±60% when only one standing wave is applied to <±10% once two specific standing waves are launched at the same time. Moreover, in terms of the reactor configuration adopted in this study, in which the standing wave effect along the much shorter dimension can be ignored, the proposed technique is applicable to different frequencies without the need to alter the number and arrangement of power feeding points.

  16. Earth-orbiting resonant-mass gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Ho Jung

    1989-01-01

    Earth-based gravitational wave detectors suffer from the need to support the large antenna masses against the earth's gravity without transmitting a significant amount of seismic noise. Passive vibration isolation is difficult to achieve below 1 Hz on the earth. Vibration-free space environment thus gives an opportunity to extend the frequency window of gravitational wave detection to ultralow frequencies. The weightless condition of a space laboratory also enables construction of a highly symmetric multimode antenna which is capable of resolving the direction of the source and the polarization of the incoming wave without resorting to multiantenna coincidence. Two types of earth-orbiting resonant-mass gravitational wave detectors are considered. One is a skyhook gravitational wave detector, proposed by Braginsky and Thorne (1985). The other is a spherical detector, proposed by Forward (1971) and analyzed by Wagoner and Paik (1976).

  17. Squeezed light for advanced gravitational wave detectors and beyond.

    PubMed

    Oelker, E; Barsotti, L; Dwyer, S; Sigg, D; Mavalvala, N

    2014-08-25

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that squeezed vacuum states can be injected into gravitational wave detectors to improve their sensitivity at detection frequencies where they are quantum noise limited. Squeezed states could be employed in the next generation of more sensitive advanced detectors currently under construction, such as Advanced LIGO, to further push the limits of the observable gravitational wave Universe. To maximize the benefit from squeezing, environmentally induced disturbances such as back scattering and angular jitter need to be mitigated. We discuss the limitations of current squeezed vacuum sources in relation to the requirements imposed by future gravitational wave detectors, and show a design for squeezed light injection which overcomes these limitations.

  18. Twin mirrors for laser interferometric gravitational-wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Sassolas, Benoît; Benoît, Quentin; Flaminio, Raffaele; Forest, Danièle; Franc, Janyce; Galimberti, Massimo; Lacoudre, Aline; Michel, Christophe; Montorio, Jean-Luc; Morgado, Nazario; Pinard, Laurent

    2011-05-01

    Gravitational-wave detectors such as Virgo and the laser interferometric gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO) use a long-baseline Michelson interferometer with Fabry-Perot cavities in the arms to search for gravitational waves. The symmetry between the two Fabry-Perot cavities is crucial to reduce the interferometer's sensitivity to the laser amplitude and frequency noise. To this purpose, the transmittance of the mirrors in both cavities should be as close as possible. This paper describes the realization and the characterization of the first twin large low-loss mirrors with transmissions differing by less than 0.01%.

  19. Gravitational waves from Affleck-Dine condensate fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Shuang-Yong

    2015-06-01

    We compute the stochastic gravitational wave production from Affleck-Dine condensate fragmentation in the early universe, focusing on an effective potential with a logarithmic mass correction that typically arises in gravity mediated supersymmetry breaking scenarios. We find that a significant gravitational wave background can be generated when Q-balls are being formed out of the condensate fragmentation. This gravitational wave background has a distinct multi-peak power spectrum where the trough is closely linked to the supersymmetry breaking scale and whose frequencies are peaked around kHz for TeV supersymmetry breaking.

  20. Nonlinear low frequency water waves in a cylindrical shell subjected to high frequency excitations - Part I: Experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dajun, Wang; Chunyan, Zhou; Li, Junbao; Shen, Song; Li, Min; Liu, Xijun

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on nonlinear low frequency gravity water waves in a partially filled cylindrical shell subjected to high frequency horizontal excitations. The characteristics of natural frequencies and mode shapes of the water-shell coupled system are discussed. The boundaries for onset of gravity waves are measured and plotted by curves of critical excitation force magnitude with respect to excitation frequency. For nonlinear water waves, the time history signals and their spectrums of motion on both water surface and shell are recorded. The shapes of water surface are also measured using scanning laser vibrometer. In particular, the phenomenon of transitions between different gravity wave patterns is observed and expressed by the waterfall graphs. These results exhibit pronounced nonlinear properties of shell-fluid coupled system.

  1. High frequency seismic noise generated from breaking swallow water ocean waves and the link to time-variable sea states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppeliers, C.; Mallinson, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Breaking waves in the near-shore are known to generate a significant amount of high frequency (f>5 Hz) energy. We investigate the correlation between the spectrum of seismic energy and the local sea states. We deployed a single three-component broadband seismometer approximately 50 m from the sea shore and recorded continuously for approximately 10 days. Our observations show that during elevated sea states, and presumably larger breaking waves in the surf zone, the power spectral density of the wave-generated seismic energy shifts to lower frequencies and higher spectral amplitudes. The correlation of the seismic spectral power to the height and period of ocean waves suggests that seismic observations can be used as a proxy for local sea states, which may have implications for sea shore sediment transport.

  2. Experimental and numerical modeling of the high frequency resonant motion of a vertical cylinder in irregular waves

    SciTech Connect

    Scolan, Y.M.; Deleuil, G.; Martigny, D.

    1996-12-31

    The ringing phenomenon does not seem to be completely solved yet. After the first stage of the French CLAROM project: High Frequency Resonances of Offshore Structures, it is shown the necessity to provide not only better models of hydrodynamics forces but also better models of wave crest kinematics. Here the so-called Madsen-Rainey-Manners and Faltinsen-Newman-Vinje formulations are used. Numerical results are compared to experimental ones. The test set-up consists of a vibrating vertical cylinder resting on the bottom of a tank; its natural mode is excited by a wave train. It clearly appears that, owing to the nonlinearities of the force formulation and/or to the wave crest extrapolated kinematics the resonant motion can be reproduced. However, uncertainties still remain concerning the choice of the adequate stretching model in the wave crest.

  3. Impact of high-frequency waves on the ocean altimeter range bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandemark, D.; Chapron, B.; Elfouhaily, T.; Campbell, J. W.

    2005-11-01

    New aircraft observations are presented on the range determination error in satellite altimetry associated with ocean waves. Laser-based measurements of the cross correlation between the gravity wave slope and elevation are reported for the first time. These observations provide direct access to a long, O(10 m), gravity wave statistic central to nonlinear wave theory prediction of the altimeter sea state bias. Coincident Ka-band radar scattering data are used to estimate an electromagnetic (EM) range bias analogous to that in satellite altimetry. These data, along with ancillary wind and wave slope variance estimates, are used alongside existing theory to evaluate the extent of long- versus short-wave, O(cm), control of the bias. The longer wave bias contribution to the total EM bias is shown to range from 25 to as much as 100%. Moreover, on average the term is linearly related to wind speed and to the gravity wave slope variance, consistent with WNL theory. The EM bias associated with interactions between long and short waves is obtained assuming the effect is additive to the independently observed long-wave factor. This second component is also a substantial contributor, is observed to be quadratic in wind speed or wave slope, and dominates at moderate wind speeds. The behavior is shown to be consistent with EM bias prediction based in hydrodynamic modulation theory. Study implications for improved correction of the on-orbit satellite sea state bias are discussed.

  4. Numerical Relativity, Black Hole Mergers, and Gravitational Waves: Part III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This series of 3 lectures will present recent developments in numerical relativity, and their applications to simulating black hole mergers and computing the resulting gravitational waveforms. In this third and final lecture, we present applications of the results of numerical relativity simulations to gravitational wave detection and astrophysics.

  5. Numerical Relativity, Black Hole Mergers, and Gravitational Waves: Part I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This series of 3 lectures will present recent developments in numerical relativity, and their applications to simulating black hole mergers and computing the resulting gravitational waveforms. In this first lecture, we introduce the basic ideas of numerical relativity, highlighting the challenges that arise in simulating gravitational wave sources on a computer.

  6. Neutrinos from supernovae as a trigger for gravitational wave search.

    PubMed

    Pagliaroli, G; Vissani, F; Coccia, E; Fulgione, W

    2009-07-17

    Exploiting an improved analysis of the nue signal from the explosion of a galactic core collapse supernova, we show that it is possible to identify within about 10 ms the time of the bounce, which is strongly correlated to the time of the maximum amplitude of the gravitational signal. This allows us to precisely identify the gravitational wave burst timing.

  7. Analysis of high frequency guided wave scattering at a fastener hole with a view to fatigue crack detection.

    PubMed

    Masserey, Bernard; Fromme, Paul

    2017-04-01

    The scattering of high frequency guided ultrasonic waves by a fatigue crack at the side of a fastener hole has been studied. The guided wave pulse consists of the superposition of the two fundamental Lamb modes A0 and S0 above the cut-off frequencies of the higher modes. The scattered field was simulated using a three-dimensional finite difference algorithm with a staggered, Cartesian grid for the limited area of interest around the hole and an analytical phase angle correction for the additional, variable propagation distance. Experimentally, the modes were selectively excited using a standard ultrasonic wedge transducer and measured using a laser interferometer, resulting in good spatial resolution. The scattered field was measured and simulated for an undamaged hole, a small, part-thickness quarter-elliptical fatigue crack, and a through-thickness fatigue crack. Good agreement was found and a significant influence of the fatigue cracks on the scattered field was observed. The complex difference of the scattered field due to additional scattered waves at the fatigue cracks of variable depth and length was evaluated. This allows for the prediction of high frequency guided wave sensitivity for fatigue crack detection at fastener holes, a significant maintenance problem for ageing aircraft.

  8. Monitoring of hidden fatigue crack growth in multi-layer aircraft structures using high frequency guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, H.; Masserey, B.; Fromme, P.

    2015-03-01

    Varying loading conditions of aircraft structures result in stress concentration at fastener holes, where multi-layered components are connected, potentially leading to the development of hidden fatigue cracks in inaccessible layers. High frequency guided waves propagating along the structure allow for the structural health monitoring (SHM) of such components, e.g., aircraft wings. Experimentally the required guided wave modes can be easily excited using standard ultrasonic wedge transducers. However, the sensitivity for the detection of small, potentially hidden, fatigue cracks has to be ascertained. The type of multi-layered model structure investigated consists of two adhesively bonded aluminum plate-strips with a sealant layer. Fatigue experiments were carried out and the growth of fatigue cracks at the fastener hole in one of the metallic layers was monitored optically during cyclic loading. The influence of the fatigue cracks of increasing size on the scattered guided wave field was evaluated. The sensitivity and repeatability of the high frequency guided wave modes to detect and monitor the fatigue crack growth was investigated, using both standard pulse-echo equipment and a laser interferometer. The potential for hidden fatigue crack growth monitoring at critical and difficult to access fastener locations from a stand-off distance was ascertained. The robustness of the methodology for practical in situ ultrasonic monitoring of fatigue crack growth is discussed.

  9. Gravitational wave background from reheating after hybrid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Figueroa, Daniel G.; Sastre, Alfonso

    2008-02-15

    The reheating of the Universe after hybrid inflation proceeds through the nucleation and subsequent collision of large concentrations of energy density in the form of bubblelike structures moving at relativistic speeds. This generates a significant fraction of energy in the form of a stochastic background of gravitational waves, whose time evolution is determined by the successive stages of reheating: First, tachyonic preheating makes the amplitude of gravity waves grow exponentially fast. Second, bubble collisions add a new burst of gravitational radiation. Third, turbulent motions finally sets the end of gravitational waves production. From then on, these waves propagate unimpeded to us. We find that the fraction of energy density today in these primordial gravitational waves could be significant for grand unified theory (GUT)-scale models of inflation, although well beyond the frequency range sensitivity of gravitational wave observatories like LIGO, LISA, or BBO. However, low-scale models could still produce a detectable signal at frequencies accessible to BBO or DECIGO. For comparison, we have also computed the analogous gravitational wave background from some chaotic inflation models and obtained results similar to those found by other groups. The discovery of such a background would open a new observational window into the very early universe, where the details of the process of reheating, i.e. the big bang, could be explored. Moreover, it could also serve in the future as a new experimental tool for testing the inflationary paradigm.

  10. NASA's Gravitational - Wave Mission Concept Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, Robin; Jennrich, Oliver; McNamara, Paul

    2012-01-01

    With the conclusion of the NASA/ESA partnership on the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) Project, NASA initiated a study to explore mission concepts that will accomplish some or all of the LISA science objectives at lower cost. The Gravitational-Wave Mission Concept Study consisted of a public Request for Information (RFI), a Core Team of NASA engineers and scientists, a Community Science Team, a Science Task Force, and an open workshop. The RFI yielded were 12 mission concepts, 3 instrument concepts and 2 technologies. The responses ranged from concepts that eliminated the drag-free test mass of LISA to concepts that replace the test mass with an atom interferometer. The Core Team reviewed the noise budgets and sensitivity curves, the payload and spacecraft designs and requirements, orbits and trajectories and technical readiness and risk. The Science Task Force assessed the science performance by calculating the horizons. the detection rates and the accuracy of astrophysical parameter estimation for massive black hole mergers, stellar-mass compact objects inspiraling into central engines. and close compact binary systems. Three mission concepts have been studied by Team-X, JPL's concurrent design facility. to define a conceptual design evaluate kt,y performance parameters. assess risk and estimate cost and schedule. The Study results are summarized.

  11. Studies for Improved Gravitational Wave Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, Peter L.

    2003-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the possible accuracy of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) for studying gravitational waves at frequencies below the usually quoted frequency range of 100 microHz to 1 Hz. The extended frequency range of most interest is from 3 to 100 microHz. During this work, a new source of spurious accelerations of the test masses for LISA that had been overlooked previously was identified. It is one of the main noise contributors at 100 microHz, and rises as the inverse of the frequency to become probably the largest error source at 3 microHz. The new error source is fluctuations in the charge on the test mass due to cosmic ray charging interacting with the electric fields inside the housing that carries the capacitive electrodes for sensing relative motion of the test mass with respect to the housing. Even for zero charge on the test mass, there will be electrical fields acting on each face due to work function differences between the capacitive electrodes and the test mass.

  12. Gravitational Wave Emulation Using Gaussian Process Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doctor, Zoheyr; Farr, Ben; Holz, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Parameter estimation (PE) for gravitational wave signals from compact binary coalescences (CBCs) requires reliable template waveforms which span the parameter space. Waveforms from numerical relativity are accurate but computationally expensive, so approximate templates are typically used for PE. These `approximants', while quick to compute, can introduce systematic errors and bias PE results. We describe a machine learning method for generating CBC waveforms and uncertainties using existing accurate waveforms as a training set. Coefficients of a reduced order waveform model are computed and each treated as arising from a Gaussian process. These coefficients and their uncertainties are then interpolated using Gaussian process regression (GPR). As a proof of concept, we construct a training set of approximant waveforms (rather than NR waveforms) in the two-dimensional space of chirp mass and mass ratio and interpolate new waveforms with GPR. We demonstrate that the mismatch between interpolated waveforms and approximants is below the 1% level for an appropriate choice of training set and GPR kernel hyperparameters.

  13. Theoretical implications of detecting gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Geshnizjani, Ghazal; Kinney, William H. E-mail: whkinney@buffalo.edu

    2015-08-01

    This paper is the third in a series of theorems which state how cosmological observations can provide evidence for an early phase of acceleration in the universe. It was demonstrated in [1,2], that the observed power spectrum for scalar perturbations forces all possible alternative theories of inflation to theories other than General Relativity. It was shown that generically, without a phase of accelerated expansion, these alternatives have to break at least one of the following tenets of classical general relativity: the Null Energy Condition (NEC), subluminal signal propagation, or sub-Planckian energy densities. In this paper we prove how detection of primordial gravitational waves at large scales can provide independent evidence to support a phase of accelerated expansion. This proof does not rely on the spectral index for tensor modes but relies on validity of quantum field theory in curved space time and tensor modes being sourced from adiabatic vacuum fluctuations. Our approach, like in the case of scalars, is proof by contradiction: we investigate the possibility of a detectable tensor signal sourced by vacuum fluctuations in a non-accelerating, sub-Planckian universe using cosmological perturbation theory and derive contradictory limits on cosmological dynamics. The contradiction implies that one or more of our axioms for early universe must have been broken. The bound from tensor perturbations is not only independent of, but also stronger than the one obtained from scalar power spectrum.

  14. Black Hole Kicks as New Gravitational Wave Observables.

    PubMed

    Gerosa, Davide; Moore, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    Generic black hole binaries radiate gravitational waves anisotropically, imparting a recoil, or kick, velocity to the merger remnant. If a component of the kick along the line of sight is present, gravitational waves emitted during the final orbits and merger will be gradually Doppler shifted as the kick builds up. We develop a simple prescription to capture this effect in existing waveform models, showing that future gravitational wave experiments will be able to perform direct measurements, not only of the black hole kick velocity, but also of its accumulation profile. In particular, the eLISA space mission will measure supermassive black hole kick velocities as low as ∼500  km s^{-1}, which are expected to be a common outcome of black hole binary coalescence following galaxy mergers. Black hole kicks thus constitute a promising new observable in the growing field of gravitational wave astronomy.

  15. Visualization of Merging Black Holes and Gravitational Waves

    NASA Video Gallery

    This visualization shows gravitational waves emitted by two black holes of nearly equal mass as they spiral together and merge. Orange ripples represent distortions of space-time caused by the rapi...

  16. Two Timescale Approximation Applied to Gravitational Waves from Eccentric EMRIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moxon, Jordan; Flanagan, Eanna; Hinderer, Tanja; Pound, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Gravitational-wave driven inspirals of compact objects into massive black holes (Extreme Mass Ratio Inspirals - EMRIs) form an interesting, long-lived signal for future space-based gravitational wave detectors. Accurate signal predictions will be necessary to take full advantage of matched filtering techniques, motivating the development of a calculational technique for deriving the gravitational wave signal to good approximation throughout the inspiral. We report on recent work on developing the two-timescale technique with the goal of predicting waveforms from eccentric equatorial systems to subleading (post-adiabatic) order in the phase, building on recent work by Pound in the scalar case. The computation requires us to understand the dissipative component of the second-order self force. It also demands careful consideration of how the two timescale (near-zone) approximation should match with the post-Minkowski approximation of the gravitational waves at great distances.

  17. Pulsar timing arrays: closing in on low- frequency gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampson, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Just like electromagnetic radiation, gravitational waves come in a wide spectrum of frequencies. Different frequencies give us access to different physical information about our universe. By taking advantage of the phenomenal stability of the spin rate of millisecond pulsars, pulsar timing arrays will allow us to detect gravitational waves in the nanohertz band. The most likely source in this band is supermassive black hole binaries, formed when galaxies merge, and so the detection of these gravitational waves gives us a new tool to learn about the merger history of galaxies and the environment in galactic cores. I will discuss the exciting astrophysics we can learn using pulsar timing arrays, as well as the prospects and expected timeline for gravitational wave detection in this new frequency regime.

  18. Multiple Signal Classification for Gravitational Wave Burst Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Junwei; He, Zhengqi

    2013-01-01

    This work is mainly focused on the application of the multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm for gravitational wave burst search. This algorithm extracts important gravitational wave characteristics from signals coming from detectors with arbitrary position, orientation and noise covariance. In this paper, the MUSIC algorithm is described in detail along with the necessary adjustments required for gravitational wave burst search. The algorithm's performance is measured using simulated signals and noise. MUSIC is compared with the Q-transform for signal triggering and with Bayesian analysis for direction of arrival (DOA) estimation, using the Ω-pipeline. Experimental results show that MUSIC has a lower resolution but is faster. MUSIC is a promising tool for real-time gravitational wave search for multi-messenger astronomy.

  19. The Science of Gravitational Waves with Space Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, James Ira

    2013-01-01

    After decades of effort, direct detection of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources is on the horizon. Aside from teaching us about gravity itself, gravitational waves hold immense promise as a tool for general astrophysics. In this talk I will provide an overview of the science enabled by a space-based gravitational wave observatory sensitive in the milli-Hertz frequency band including the nature and evolution of massive black holes and their host galaxies, the demographics of stellar remnant compact objects in the Milky Way, and the behavior of gravity in the strong-field regime. I will also summarize the current status of efforts in the US and Europe to implement a space-based gravitational wave observatory.

  20. Gravitational-Wave Detectors: First, Second, and Third Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Mandic, Vuk

    2011-11-02

    Gravitational waves are predicted by the general theory of relativity to be produced by accelerating mass systems with quadrupole (or higher) moment. The amplitude of gravitational waves is expected to be very small, so the best chance of their direct detection lies with some of the most energetic events in the universe, such as mergers of two neutron stars or black holes, supernova explosions, or the Big Bang itself. Over the past decade several detectors have been built to search for such gravitational-wave sources. This talk will review the current status of these detectors, as well as some of their most recent results, and will cover plans and expectations for the future generations of gravitational wave detectors.

  1. Generation of High-Frequency P and S Wave Radiation from Underground Explosions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-30

    tectonic shear stress or anisotropy in the initial fracture distribution. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Shear waves, Seismic sources, Model seismology, P and S wave...12 7. Damage in a Glass Plate Produced by a Hypervelocity Impact...and tectonic environments. The two obvious sources of uncertainty in Pn/Lg are source effects and path effects. Our work has focused on understanding

  2. Electromagnetic waves and Stokes parameters in the wake of a gravitational wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacyan, Shahen

    2012-11-01

    A theoretical description of electromagnetic waves in the background of a (weak) gravitational wave is presented. Explicit expressions are obtained for the Stokes parameters during the passage of a plane-fronted gravitational wave described by the Ehlers-Kundt metric. In particular, it is shown that the axis of the polarization ellipse oscillates, its ellipticity remaining constant.

  3. Perturbative and gauge invariant treatment of gravitational wave memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieri, Lydia; Garfinkle, David

    2014-04-01

    We present a perturbative treatment of gravitational wave memory. The coordinate invariance of Einstein's equations leads to a type of gauge invariance in perturbation theory. As with any gauge invariant theory, results are more clear when expressed in terms of manifestly gauge invariant quantities. Therefore we derive all our results from the perturbed Weyl tensor rather than the perturbed metric. We derive gravitational wave memory for the Einstein equations coupled to a general energy-momentum tensor that reaches null infinity.

  4. Exploring the sensitivity of next generation gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arun, K. G.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Biwer, C.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bock, O.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, C.; Bork, R.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brinkmann, M.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Buonanno, A.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cepeda, C. B.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dave, I.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Palma, I.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferreira, E. C.; Fisher, R. P.; Fletcher, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Geng, P.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Green, A. C.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heintze, M. C.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leong, J. R.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lormand, M.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magaña Zertuche, L.; Magee, R. M.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nitz, A.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O’Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O’Reilly, B.; O’Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Phelps, M.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Raymond, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tse, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Weaver, B.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Zanolin, M.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; (LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Harms, J.

    2017-02-01

    The second-generation of gravitational-wave detectors are just starting operation, and have already yielding their first detections. Research is now concentrated on how to maximize the scientific potential of gravitational-wave astronomy. To support this effort, we present here design targets for a new generation of detectors, which will be capable of observing compact binary sources with high signal-to-noise ratio throughout the Universe.

  5. Numerical Relativity for Space-Based Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2011-01-01

    In the next decade, gravitational wave instruments in space may provide high-precision measurements of gravitational-wave signals from strong sources, such as black holes. Currently variations on the original Laser Interferometer Space Antenna mission concepts are under study in the hope of reducing costs. Even the observations of a reduced instrument may place strong demands on numerical relativity capabilities. Possible advances in the coming years may fuel a new generation of codes ready to confront these challenges.

  6. Effect of Extra Dimensions on Gravitational Waves from Cosmic Strings

    SciTech Connect

    O'Callaghan, Eimear; Chadburn, Sarah; Geshnizjani, Ghazal; Gregory, Ruth; Zavala, Ivonne

    2010-08-20

    We show how the motion of cosmic superstrings in extra dimensions can modify the gravitational wave signal from cusps. Additional dimensions both round off cusps, as well as reducing the probability of their formation, and thus give a significant dimension dependent damping of the gravitational waves. We look at the implication of this effect for LIGO and LISA, as well as commenting on more general frequency bands.

  7. Gravitational waves from surface inhomogeneities of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, Sushan; Mukherjee, Dipanjan; Bhattacharya, Dipankar; Sarkar, Prakash

    2016-11-01

    Surface asymmetries of accreting neutron stars are investigated for their mass quadrupole moment content. Though the amplitude of the gravitational waves from such asymmetries seems to be beyond the limit of detectability of the present generation of detectors, it appears that rapidly rotating neutron stars with strong magnetic fields residing in high-mass x-ray binaries would be worth considering for a targeted search for continuous gravitational waves with the next generation of instruments.

  8. Exploring the cosmos with gravitational-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stephen R.; Gair, Jonathan R.; Mandel, Ilya; Lentati, Lindley; Ellis, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy will open up a new frontier in astrophysical studies of neutron stars (NSs) and black-holes (BHs). Near-future detections will shed light on the coalescence rate of compact-object binaries, present an independent means of constraining cosmological parameters, and offer a host of other exciting opportunities. My doctoral research has followed two threads, linked by the common goal of mining rich information from near-future GW observations. In the first thread of my dissertation, I developed a technique to probe cosmological parameters with GWs in the absence of any electromagnetic counterparts. This exploits the potential for a network of GW interferometers to extract the distance of each system from the measured gravitational waveform. I use the observed intrinsic narrowness of the NS-NS mass-distribution, along with GW-measured redshifted-masses, to deduce candidate redshift distributions for each system, thereby allowing a probe of the distance-redshift relation. I find that an advanced LIGO-Virgo network can place independent, complementary constraints on the Hubble constant, whilst a third-generation network will be capable of probing the dark energy equation-of-state and the star-formation rate of the NS-NS progenitor population. In the second thread, I studied the potential for high-precision timing of millisecond pulsars to infer the perturbing influence of passing GWs. I developed a robust data-analysis pipeline to constrain the levels of anisotropy in a stochastic nanoHertz GW background using an ensemble of these pulsars. This technique cross-correlates pulse time-of-arrival deviations from many pulsars, leveraging the common influence of a stochastic background against noise sources, and mines the cross-correlation signature for information on the angular distribution of GW-power. Additionally, I developed several rapid inference techniques applicable to pulsar-timing searches for individual supermassive BH binary

  9. Analysis of group-velocity dispersion of high-frequency Rayleigh waves for near-surface applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Zeng, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method is an efficient tool to obtain the vertical shear (S)-wave velocity profile using the dispersive characteristic of Rayleigh waves. Most MASW researchers mainly apply Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity dispersion for S-wave velocity estimation with a few exceptions applying Rayleigh-wave group-velocity dispersion. Herein, we first compare sensitivities of fundamental surface-wave phase velocities with group velocities with three four-layer models including a low-velocity layer or a high-velocity layer. Then synthetic data are simulated by a finite difference method. Images of group-velocity dispersive energy of the synthetic data are generated using the Multiple Filter Analysis (MFA) method. Finally we invert a high-frequency surface-wave group-velocity dispersion curve of a real-world example. Results demonstrate that (1) the sensitivities of group velocities are higher than those of phase velocities and usable frequency ranges are wider than that of phase velocities, which is very helpful in improving inversion stability because for a stable inversion system, small changes in phase velocities do not result in a large fluctuation in inverted S-wave velocities; (2) group-velocity dispersive energy can be measured using single-trace data if Rayleigh-wave fundamental-mode energy is dominant, which suggests that the number of shots required in data acquisition can be dramatically reduced and the horizontal resolution can be greatly improved using analysis of group-velocity dispersion; and (3) the suspension logging results of the real-world example demonstrate that inversion of group velocities generated by the MFA method can successfully estimate near-surface S-wave velocities. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Experimental Limits on Gravitational Waves in the MHz frequency Range

    SciTech Connect

    Lanza, Robert Jr.

    2015-03-01

    This thesis presents the results of a search for gravitational waves in the 1-11MHz frequency range using dual power-recycled Michelson laser interferometers at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. An unprecedented level of sensitivity to gravitational waves in this frequency range has been achieved by cross-correlating the output fluctuations of two identical and colocated 40m long interferometers. This technique produces sensitivities better than two orders of magnitude below the quantum shot-noise limit, within integration times of less than 1 hour. 95% confidence level upper limits are placed on the strain amplitude of MHz frequency gravitational waves at the 10-21 Hz-1/2 level, constituting the best direct limits to date at these frequencies. For gravitational wave power distributed over this frequency range, a broadband upper limit of 2.4 x 10-21Hz-1/2 at 95% confidence level is also obtained. This thesis covers the detector technology, the commissioning and calibration of the instrument, the statistical data analysis, and the gravitational wave limit results. Particular attention is paid to the end-to-end calibration of the instrument’s sensitivity to differential arm length motion, and so to gravitational wave strain. A detailed statistical analysis of the data is presented as well.

  11. Response of a Doppler canceling system to plane gravitational waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caporali, A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper discusses the interaction of long periodic gravitational waves with a three-link microwave system known as the Doppler canceling system. This system, which was developed for a gravitational red-shift experiment, uses one-way and two-way Doppler information to construct the beat signal of two reference oscillators moving with respect to each other. The geometric-optics approximation is used to derive the frequency shift produced on a light signal propagating in a gravitational-wave space-time. The signature left on the Doppler-cancelled beat by bursts and continuous gravitational waves is analyzed. A comparison is made between the response to gravitational waves of the Doppler canceling system and that of a (NASA) Doppler tracking system which employs two-way, round-trip radio waves. A threefold repetition of the gravitational wave form is found to be a common feature of the response functions of both systems. These two functions otherwise exhibit interesting differences.

  12. Mechanisms of interaction between very high-frequency photoacoustic waves and the skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sá, Gonçalo F. F.; Serpa, Carlos; Arnaut, Luis G.

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this work is to improve the understanding of the interaction between photoacoustic waves and skin. We employ photoacoustic waves with 1 MPa amplitude and center frequencies of 100 MHz to transiently perturb model lipid membranes and the stratum corneum of mini pigs. The lipid structure transient perturbation observed is tentatively attributed to a temperature rise mechanism. We also try to show that the dynamic acoustic radiation force mechanism can explain the perturbation induced by photoacoustic waves in skin. Indeed, 15 bar pressure gradients across 5 corneocytes (approx. 5 μm wide) are shown to transiently perturb the skin structure.

  13. High-frequency sound waves to eliminate a horizon in the mixmaster universe.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chitre, D. M.

    1972-01-01

    From the linear wave equation for small-amplitude sound waves in a curved space-time, there is derived a geodesiclike differential equation for sound rays to describe the motion of wave packets. These equations are applied in the generic, nonrotating, homogeneous closed-model universe (the 'mixmaster universe,' Bianchi type IX). As for light rays described by Doroshkevich and Novikov (DN), these sound rays can circumnavigate the universe near the singularity to remove particle horizons only for a small class of these models and in special directions. Although these results parallel those of DN, different Hamiltonian methods are used for treating the Einstein equations.

  14. Sensors in the Stream: The High-Frequency Wave of the Present.

    PubMed

    Rode, Michael; Wade, Andrew J; Cohen, Matthew J; Hensley, Robert T; Bowes, Michael J; Kirchner, James W; Arhonditsis, George B; Jordan, Phil; Kronvang, Brian; Halliday, Sarah J; Skeffington, Richard A; Rozemeijer, Joachim C; Aubert, Alice H; Rinke, Karsten; Jomaa, Seifeddine

    2016-10-04

    New scientific understanding is catalyzed by novel technologies that enhance measurement precision, resolution or type, and that provide new tools to test and develop theory. Over the last 50 years, technology has transformed the hydrologic sciences by enabling direct measurements of watershed fluxes (evapotranspiration, streamflow) at time scales and spatial extents aligned with variation in physical drivers. High frequency water quality measurements, increasingly obtained by in situ water quality sensors, are extending that transformation. Widely available sensors for some physical (temperature) and chemical (conductivity, dissolved oxygen) attributes have become integral to aquatic science, and emerging sensors for nutrients, dissolved CO2, turbidity, algal pigments, and dissolved organic matter are now enabling observations of watersheds and streams at time scales commensurate with their fundamental hydrological, energetic, elemental, and biological drivers. Here we synthesize insights from emerging technologies across a suite of applications, and envision future advances, enabled by sensors, in our ability to understand, predict, and restore watershed and stream systems.

  15. Lepton asymmetry in the primordial gravitational wave spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide; Yokoyama, Jun'Ichi

    2007-04-15

    Effects of neutrino free streaming are evaluated on the primordial spectrum of gravitational radiation taking both neutrino chemical potential and masses into account. The former or the lepton asymmetry induces two competitive effects, namely, to increase anisotropic stress, which damps the gravitational wave more, and to delay the matter-radiation equality time, which reduces the damping. The latter effect is more prominent and a large lepton asymmetry would reduce the damping. We may thereby be able to measure the magnitude of lepton asymmetry from the primordial gravitational wave spectrum.

  16. Attenuation of high-frequency body waves in the crust of the Central External Dinarides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasović, Iva; Ruščić, Marija; Herak, Davorka; Herak, Marijan

    2015-10-01

    The Central External Dinarides are known as a tectonically complex region of moderate seismicity where several strong earthquakes occurred in the last century. In order to gain insight into the attenuation of seismic waves in the area, the extended coda normalization method was applied to band-pass-filtered seismograms of local earthquakes recorded at seven seismological broadband stations. Obtained results indicate strong attenuation of direct body waves: Q 0,P = Q P(1 Hz) is found between 21 and 120 and Q 0,S = Q S(1 Hz) is between 46 and 113, whereas the exponent n in the power law of frequency dependence of the quality factor is found in the range of 0.63-1.52 and 0.65-0.97 for n P and n S, respectively. P-waves are, on the average, attenuated more than S-waves. The three island stations (Dugi Otok (DUGI), Žirje (ZIRJ), Hvar (HVAR)) are distinguished by the strong low-frequency P-wave attenuation and more pronounced frequency dependence of the Q P factor ( Q 0,S/ Q 0,P > 1.7, Q 0,P < 60, n P > n S). The remaining four inland stations (Udbina (UDBI), Morići (MORI), Kijevo (KIJV), Čačvina (CACV)) all exhibit similar qualitative attenuation properties for P- and S-waves ( n P ≈ n S ≈ 1 and Q 0,S ≈ Q 0,P), although individual values of the Q-factors vary notably within this group. Low-frequency attenuation of direct S-waves in the crust is stronger than mean attenuation of scattered coda waves in the lithosphere, especially for long coda lapse times. The results are also qualitatively in agreement with the thermal regime in the area.

  17. Estimating gravity wave parameters from oblique high-frequency backscatter: Modeling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bristow, W.A.; Greenwald, R.A.

    1995-03-01

    A new technique for estimating electron density perturbation amplitudes of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs), using HF radar data, is presented. TIDs are observed in HF radar data as enhancements of the ground-scattered power which propagate through the radar`s field of view. These TIDs are the ionospheric manifestation of atmospheric acoustic-gravity waves. TID electron density perturbation amplitudes were estimated by simulating the radar returns, using HF ray tracing through a model ionosphere perturbed by a model gravity wave. The simulation determined the return power in the ground-scattered portion of the signal as a function of range, and this was compared to HF radar data from the Goose Bay HF radar at a time when evidence of gravity waves was present in the data. By varying the amplitude of the electron density perturbation in the model it was possible to estimate the perturbation of the actual wave. It was found that the perturbations that are observed by the Goose Bay HF radar are of the order of 20% to 35%. It was also found that the number of observable power enhancements, and the relative amplitudes of these enhancements, depended on the vertical thickness of the gravity wave`s source region. From the simulations and observations it was estimated that the source region for the case presented here was approximately 20 km thick. In addition, the energy in the wave packet was calculated and compared to an estimate of the available energy in the source region. It was found that the wave energy was about 0.2% of the estimated available source region energy. 20 refs., 12 figs.

  18. Generation of High-Frequency P and S Wave Energy by Rock Fracture During a Buried Explosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-20

    MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) Air Force Research Laboratory Space Vehicles Directorate 3550 Aberdeen Avenue SE Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 AFRL /RVBYE 11...DISTRIBUTION LIST DTIC/OCP 8725 John J. Kingman Rd, Suite 0944 Ft Belvoir, VA 22060-6218 1 cy AFRL /RVIL Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 2 cys Official... AFRL -RV -PS- TR-2015-0145 AFRL -RV -PS- TR-2015-0145 GENERATION OF HIGH-FREQUENCY P AND S WAVE ENERGY BY ROCK FRACTURE DURING A BURIED EXPLOSION

  19. High-frequency solitons in media with induced scattering from damped low-frequency waves with nonuniform dispersion and nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Aseeva, N. V. Gromov, E. M.; Tyutin, V. V.

    2015-12-15

    The dynamics of high-frequency field solitons is considered using the extended nonhomogeneous nonlinear Schrödinger equation with induced scattering from damped low-frequency waves (pseudoinduced scattering). This scattering is a 3D analog of the stimulated Raman scattering from temporal spatially homogeneous damped low-frequency modes, which is well known in optics. Spatial inhomogeneities of secondorder linear dispersion and cubic nonlinearity are also taken into account. It is shown that the shift in the 3D spectrum of soliton wavenumbers toward the short-wavelength region is due to nonlinearity increasing in coordinate and to decreasing dispersion. Analytic results are confirmed by numerical calculations.

  20. Estimating gravity wave parameters from oblique high-frequency backscatter: Modeling and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, W. A.; Greenwald, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    A new technique for estimating electron density perturbation amplitudes of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs), using HF radar data, is presented. TIDs are observed in HF radar data as enhancements of the ground-scattered power which propagate through the radar's field of view. These TIDs are the ionospheric manifestation of atmospheric acoustic-gravity waves. TID electron density perturbation amplitudes were estimated by simulating the radar returns, using HF ray tracing through a model ionosphere perturbed by a model gravity wave. The simulation determined the return power in the ground-scattered portion of the signal as a function of range, and this was compared to HF radar data from the Goose Bay HF radar at a time when evidence of gravity waves was present in the data. By varying the amplitude of the electron density perturbation in the model it was possible to estimate the perturbation of the actual wave. It was found that the perturbations that are observed by the Goose Bay HF radar are of the order of 20% to 35%. It was also found that the number of observable power enhancements, and the relative amplitudes of these enhancements, depended on the vertical thickness of the gravity wave's source region. From the simulations and observations it was estimated that the source region for the case presented here was approximately 20 km thick. In addition, the energy in the wave packet was calculated and compared to an estimate of the available energy in the source region. It was found that the wave energy was about 0.2% of the estimated available source region energy.

  1. Gravitational wave background from binary systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rosado, Pablo A.

    2011-10-15

    Basic aspects of the background of gravitational waves and its mathematical characterization are reviewed. The spectral energy density parameter {Omega}(f), commonly used as a quantifier of the background, is derived for an ensemble of many identical sources emitting at different times and locations. For such an ensemble, {Omega}(f) is generalized to account for the duration of the signals and of the observation, so that one can distinguish the resolvable and unresolvable parts of the background. The unresolvable part, often called confusion noise or stochastic background, is made by signals that cannot be either individually identified or subtracted out of the data. To account for the resolvability of the background, the overlap function is introduced. This function is a generalization of the duty cycle, which has been commonly used in the literature, in some cases leading to incorrect results. The spectra produced by binary systems (stellar binaries and massive black hole binaries) are presented over the frequencies of all existing and planned detectors. A semi-analytical formula for {Omega}(f) is derived in the case of stellar binaries (containing white dwarfs, neutron stars or stellar-mass black holes). Besides a realistic expectation of the level of background, upper and lower limits are given, to account for the uncertainties in some astrophysical parameters such as binary coalescence rates. One interesting result concerns all current and planned ground-based detectors (including the Einstein Telescope). In their frequency range, the background of binaries is resolvable and only sporadically present. In other words, there is no stochastic background of binaries for ground-based detectors.

  2. Coupled solitons of intense high-frequency and low-frequency waves in Zakharov-type systems.

    PubMed

    Gromov, Evgeny; Malomed, Boris

    2016-12-01

    One-parameter families of exact two-component solitary-wave solutions for interacting high-frequency (HF) and low-frequency (LF) waves are found in the framework of Zakharov-type models, which couple the nonlinear Schrödinger equation for intense HF waves to the Boussinesq (Bq) or Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for the LF component through quadratic terms. The systems apply, in particular, to the interaction of surface (HF) and internal (LF) waves in stratified fluids. These solutions are two-component generalizations of the single-component Bq and KdV solitons. Perturbed dynamics and stability of the solitary waves are studied in detail by means of analytical and numerical methods. Essentially, they are stable against separation of the HF and LF components if the latter one is shaped as a potential well acting on the HF field, and unstable, against splitting of the two components, with a barrier-shaped LF one. Collisions between the solitary waves are studied by means of direct simulations, demonstrating a trend to merger of in-phase solitons, and elastic interactions of out-of-phase ones.

  3. Coupled solitons of intense high-frequency and low-frequency waves in Zakharov-type systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, Evgeny; Malomed, Boris

    2016-12-01

    One-parameter families of exact two-component solitary-wave solutions for interacting high-frequency (HF) and low-frequency (LF) waves are found in the framework of Zakharov-type models, which couple the nonlinear Schrödinger equation for intense HF waves to the Boussinesq (Bq) or Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for the LF component through quadratic terms. The systems apply, in particular, to the interaction of surface (HF) and internal (LF) waves in stratified fluids. These solutions are two-component generalizations of the single-component Bq and KdV solitons. Perturbed dynamics and stability of the solitary waves are studied in detail by means of analytical and numerical methods. Essentially, they are stable against separation of the HF and LF components if the latter one is shaped as a potential well acting on the HF field, and unstable, against splitting of the two components, with a barrier-shaped LF one. Collisions between the solitary waves are studied by means of direct simulations, demonstrating a trend to merger of in-phase solitons, and elastic interactions of out-of-phase ones.

  4. High frequency guided ultrasonic waves for hidden fatigue crack growth monitoring in multi-layer model aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Henry; Masserey, Bernard; Fromme, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Especially for ageing aircraft the development of fatigue cracks at fastener holes due to stress concentration and varying loading conditions constitutes a significant maintenance problem. High frequency guided waves offer a potential compromise between the capabilities of local bulk ultrasonic measurements with proven defect detection sensitivity and the large area coverage of lower frequency guided ultrasonic waves. High frequency guided waves have energy distributed through all layers of the specimen thickness, allowing in principle hidden (2nd layer) fatigue damage monitoring. For the integration into structural health monitoring systems the sensitivity for the detection of hidden fatigue damage in inaccessible locations of the multi-layered components from a stand-off distance has to be ascertained. The multi-layered model structure investigated consists of two aluminium plate-strips with an epoxy sealant layer. During cyclic loading fatigue crack growth at a fastener hole was monitored. Specific guided wave modes (combination of fundamental A0 and S0 Lamb modes) were selectively excited above the cut-off frequencies of higher modes using a standard ultrasonic wedge transducer. Non-contact laser measurements close to the defect were performed to qualify the influence of a fatigue crack in one aluminium layer on the guided wave scattering. Fatigue crack growth monitoring using laser interferometry showed good sensitivity and repeatability for the reliable detection of small, quarter-elliptical cracks. Standard ultrasonic pulse-echo equipment was employed to monitor hidden fatigue damage from a stand-off distance without access to the damaged specimen layer. Sufficient sensitivity for the detection of fatigue cracks located in the inaccessible aluminium layer was verified, allowing in principle practical in situ ultrasonic monitoring of fatigue crack growth.

  5. Intensity statistics of very high frequency sound scattered from wind-driven waves.

    PubMed

    Walstead, Sean P; Deane, Grant B

    2016-05-01

    The interaction of vhf 100-1000 kHz underwater sound with the ocean surface is explored. The bistatic forward scatter of 300 kHz sound is measured in a wind driven wave channel. Fluctuations in arrival amplitude are described by the scintillation index (SI) which is a measure of arrival intensity variance. SI initially increases with wind speed but eventually saturates to a value of 0.5 when the root-mean-square (rms) roughness is 0.5 mm. An adjusted scintillation index (SI*) is suggested that accounts for the multiple arrivals and properly saturates to a value of 1. Fluctuations in arrival time do not saturate and increase proportionately to the dominant surface wave component. Forward scattering is modeled at frequencies ranging from 50 to 2000 kHz using the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral with surface wave realizations derived from wave gauge data. The amplitude and temporal statistics of the simulated scattering agree well with measured data. Intensity saturation occurs at lower wind speeds for higher frequency sound. Both measured and modeled vhf sound is characterized by many surface arrivals at saturation. Doppler shifts associated with wave motion are expected to vary rapidly for vhf sound however further analysis is required.

  6. Alfvén waves and current relaxation: attenuation at high frequencies and large resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, F. E. M.

    2012-06-01

    The dispersion relations of Alfvén waves propagating in a resistive plasma are explored by assuming a finite relaxation time for the current density. It is shown that the proposed approach is consistent with the hydromagnetic approximation. An extension for the equation governing the space and time evolution of Alfvén waves is provided. New results are found at high values of the wave frequency ω: for a small resistivity, the wavelength increases as the cube of the equilibrium magnetic field but decreases with the cube of ω for a large resistivity, the wave attenuation does not depend on ω, saturating to a finite value which is fully determined by the relaxation time of the current density. A transition frequency, ωt, between two sharply distinct regimes of the perturbation is identified: for ω < ωt, the disturbance propagates in the resistive plasma as an attenuated oscillation; for ω > ωt the wave ceases very rapidly to oscillate (in space), its amplitude saturating to a finite value. The results presented here may be relevant for investigations of some transient phenomena in plasma physics such as the reconnection of magnetic field lines.

  7. Pulsar timing arrays: the promise of gravitational wave detection.

    PubMed

    Lommen, Andrea N

    2015-12-01

    We describe the history, methods, tools, and challenges of using pulsars to detect gravitational waves. Pulsars act as celestial clocks detecting gravitational perturbations in space-time at wavelengths of light-years. The field is poised to make its first detection of nanohertz gravitational waves in the next 10 years. Controversies remain over how far we can reduce the noise in the pulsars, how many pulsars should be in the array, what kind of source we will detect first, and how we can best accommodate our large bandwidth systems. We conclude by considering the important question of how to plan for a post-detection era, beyond the first detection of gravitational waves.

  8. LISA: Science and Prospects for Gravitational Wave Detection in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Shane L.

    2017-01-01

    Spaceborne gravitational wave observatories with million kilometer armlengths will probe gravitational waves with kilosecond periods. This part of the spectrum is populated by a diverse menagerie of high energy astrophysical systems that will give new insights into stellar evolution, the formation and evolution of super-massive black holes, and the growth of structure in the Universe. LISA is a laser interferometric observatory that will be sensitive to gravitational wave frequencies from about 10 microHertz to about 1 Hertz, providing gravitational wave observations of these phenomena that will enable population studies, detailed characterization of the structure and bulk motion of matter in these systems, as well as enabling new, detailed tests of physics in strong gravitational fields. The core LISA measurement has been demonstrated by the successful flight of LISA Pathfinder, paving the way for the start of LISA mission design and planning. In this talk, we will discuss the science that low-frequency gravitational wave observations will reveal and enable, as well as the current technology status and progress forward toward an eventual LISA flight.

  9. Low-loss unidirectional transducer for high frequency surface acoustic wave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryukov, S. V.; Martin, G.; Schmidt, H.; Wall, B.

    2011-10-01

    A multi-track unidirectional transducer for surface acoustic wave devices is presented. This transducer consists of periodic cells containing in each of the multiple tracks, only two electrodes and two gaps with quarter period width. So the structure has maximal possible dimensions of its elements for a cell period equal to one wavelength. In spite of current technological limitations this permits to implement unidirectional transducers in GHz range. In contrast to known structures with active tracks only, the structure contains alternating both active transducer tracks and passive reflector tracks with different apertures comparable to surface acoustic wave (SAW) wavelength. The tracks strongly interact due to diffraction of waves excited by such electrode structure on a piezoelectric substrate. A structure analysis by means of finite element method shows that complete unidirectionality can be reached. First experimental results are given.

  10. Wave parameters comparisons between High Frequency (HF) radar system and an in situ buoy: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Maria; Alonso-Martirena, Andrés; Agostinho, Pedro; Sanchez, Jorge; Ferrer, Macu; Fernandes, Carlos

    2015-04-01

    The coastal zone is an important area for the development of maritime countries, either in terms of recreation, energy exploitation, weather forecasting or national security. Field measurements are in the basis of understanding how coastal and oceanic processes occur. Most processes occur over long timescales and over large spatial ranges, like the variation of mean sea level. These processes also involve a variety of factors such as waves, winds, tides, storm surges, currents, etc., that cause huge interference on such phenomena. Measurement of waves have been carried out using different techniques. The instruments used to measure wave parameters can be very different, i.e. buoys, ship base equipment like sonar and satellites. Each equipment has its own advantage and disadvantage depending on the study subject. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the behaviour of a different technology available and presently adopted in wave measurement. In the past few years the measurement of waves using High Frequency (HF) Radars has had several developments. Such a method is already established as a powerful tool for measuring the pattern of surface current, but its use in wave measurements, especially in the dual arrangement is recent. Measurement of the backscatter of HF radar wave provides the raw dataset which is analyzed to give directional data of surface elevation at each range cell. Buoys and radars have advantages, disadvantages and its accuracy is discussed in this presentation. A major advantage with HF radar systems is that they are unaffected by weather, clouds or changing ocean conditions. The HF radar system is a very useful tool for the measurement of waves over a wide area with real-time observation, but it still lacks a method to check its accuracy. The primary goal of this study was to show how the HF radar system responds to high energetic variations when compared to wave buoy data. The bulk wave parameters used (significant wave height, period and

  11. Self-focusing of intense high frequency electromagnetic waves in a collisional magnetoactive plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Niknam, A. R.; Hashemzadeh, M.; Aliakbari, A.; Majedi, S.; Haji Mirzaei, F.

    2011-11-15

    The self-focusing of an intense electromagnetic beam in a collisional magnetoactive plasma has been investigated by the perturbation method. Considering the relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities and the first three terms of perturbation expansion for the electron density and velocity, the nonlinear wave equation is obtained. This wave equation is solved by applying the source dependent expansion method and the evolution of electromagnetic beam spot-size is discussed. It is shown that the laser spot-size decreases with increasing the collision frequency and external magnetic field strength.

  12. Design and Implementation of High Frequency Ultrasound Pulsed-Wave Doppler Using FPGA

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chang-hong; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk

    2009-01-01

    The development of a field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based pulsed-wave Doppler processing approach in pure digital domain is reported in this paper. After the ultrasound signals are digitized, directional Doppler frequency shifts are obtained with a digital-down converter followed by a low-pass filter. A Doppler spectrum is then calculated using the complex fast Fourier transform core inside the FPGA. In this approach, a pulsed-wave Doppler implementation core with reconfigurable and real-time processing capability is achieved. PMID:18986909

  13. Finite-Difference Modeling and Dispersion Analysis of High-Frequency Love Waves for Near-Surface Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yinhe; Xia, Jianghai; Xu, Yixian; Zeng, Chong; Liu, Jiangping

    2010-12-01

    Love-wave propagation has been a topic of interest to crustal, earthquake, and engineering seismologists for many years because it is independent of Poisson's ratio and more sensitive to shear (S)-wave velocity changes and layer thickness changes than are Rayleigh waves. It is well known that Love-wave generation requires the existence of a low S-wave velocity layer in a multilayered earth model. In order to study numerically the propagation of Love waves in a layered earth model and dispersion characteristics for near-surface applications, we simulate high-frequency (>5 Hz) Love waves by the staggered-grid finite-difference (FD) method. The air-earth boundary (the shear stress above the free surface) is treated using the stress-imaging technique. We use a two-layer model to demonstrate the accuracy of the staggered-grid modeling scheme. We also simulate four-layer models including a low-velocity layer (LVL) or a high-velocity layer (HVL) to analyze dispersive energy characteristics for near-surface applications. Results demonstrate that: (1) the staggered-grid FD code and stress-imaging technique are suitable for treating the free-surface boundary conditions for Love-wave modeling, (2) Love-wave inversion should be treated with extra care when a LVL exists because of a lack of LVL information in dispersions aggravating uncertainties in the inversion procedure, and (3) energy of high modes in a low-frequency range is very weak, so that it is difficult to estimate the cutoff frequency accurately, and "mode-crossing" occurs between the second higher and third higher modes when a HVL exists.

  14. Finite-difference modeling and dispersion analysis of high-frequency love waves for near-surface applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Zeng, C.; Liu, J.

    2010-01-01

    Love-wave propagation has been a topic of interest to crustal, earthquake, and engineering seismologists for many years because it is independent of Poisson's ratio and more sensitive to shear (S)-wave velocity changes and layer thickness changes than are Rayleigh waves. It is well known that Love-wave generation requires the existence of a low S-wave velocity layer in a multilayered earth model. In order to study numerically the propagation of Love waves in a layered earth model and dispersion characteristics for near-surface applications, we simulate high-frequency (>5 Hz) Love waves by the staggered-grid finite-difference (FD) method. The air-earth boundary (the shear stress above the free surface) is treated using the stress-imaging technique. We use a two-layer model to demonstrate the accuracy of the staggered-grid modeling scheme. We also simulate four-layer models including a low-velocity layer (LVL) or a high-velocity layer (HVL) to analyze dispersive energy characteristics for near-surface applications. Results demonstrate that: (1) the staggered-grid FD code and stress-imaging technique are suitable for treating the free-surface boundary conditions for Love-wave modeling, (2) Love-wave inversion should be treated with extra care when a LVL exists because of a lack of LVL information in dispersions aggravating uncertainties in the inversion procedure, and (3) energy of high modes in a low-frequency range is very weak, so that it is difficult to estimate the cutoff frequency accurately, and "mode-crossing" occurs between the second higher and third higher modes when a HVL exists. ?? 2010 Birkh??user / Springer Basel AG.

  15. Nanoliter-droplet acoustic streaming via ultra high frequency surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Shilton, Richie J; Travagliati, Marco; Beltram, Fabio; Cecchini, Marco

    2014-08-06

    The relevant length scales in sub-nanometer amplitude surface acoustic wave-driven acoustic streaming are demonstrated. We demonstrate the absence of any physical limitations preventing the downscaling of SAW-driven internal streaming to nanoliter microreactors and beyond by extending SAW microfluidics up to operating frequencies in the GHz range. This method is applied to nanoliter scale fluid mixing.

  16. Surface Wave Effects on High-Frequency Currents Over a Shelf Edge Bank

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    VA 22203-1995 ONR Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited. Several acoustic Doppler current profilers and vertical strings of...processes, wind stress , topographic effects Unclassified Unclassified Unclassified UU 20 Hemantha Wijesekera (228) 688-4845 Reset Surface Wave...Oregon (Manuscript received 5 October 2012, in final form 9 April 2013) ABSTRACT Several acoustic Doppler current profilers and vertical strings of

  17. Quantifying Source Excitation and Path Effects for High Frequency Regional Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    and Ruud , 1996; Jih, 1996; Nolte et al., 1996; Jones et al., 1997; McLaughlin and Wilkins, 1997; Bradley and Jones, 1998, 1999) and pseudo-spectral...Mathematical methods in geophysical imaging IV, SPIE, 2822, 40-51. Husebye, E.S. and Ruud , B.O., 1996, Wave propagation in complex crust- CTBT implications

  18. Shallow water sediment properties derived from high-frequency shear and interface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, John; Carter, Jerry A.; Sutton, George H.; Barstow, Noel

    1992-04-01

    Low-frequency sound propagation in shallow water environments is not restricted to the water column but also involves the subbottom. Thus, as well as being important for geophysical description of the seabed, subbottom velocity/attenuation structure is essential input for predictive propagation models. To estimate this structure, bottom-mounted sources and receivers were used to make measurements of shear and compressional wave propagation in shallow water sediments of the continental shelf, usually where boreholes and high-resolution reflection profiles give substantial supporting geologic information about the subsurface. This colocation provides an opportunity to compare seismically determined estimates of physical properties of the seabed with the "ground truth" properties. Measurements were made in 1986 with source/detector offsets up to 200 m producing shear wave velocity versus depth profiles of the upper 30-50 m of the seabed (and P wave profiles to lesser depths). Measurements in 1988 were made with smaller source devices designed to emphasize higher frequencies and recorded by an array of 30 sensors spaced at 1-m intervals to improve spatial sampling and resolution of shallow structure. These investigations with shear waves have shown that significant lateral and vertical variations in the physical properties of the shallow seabed are common and are principally created by erosional and depositional processes associated with glacial cycles and sea level oscillations during the Quaternary. When the seabed structure is relatively uniform over the length of the profiles, the shear wave fields are well ordered, and the matching of the data with full waveform synthetics has been successful, producing velocity/attenuation models consistent with the subsurface lithology indicated by coring results. Both body waves and interface waves have been modeled for velocity/attenuation as a function of depth with the aid of synthetic seismograms and other analytical

  19. Interaction of High Frequency Electromagnetic Waves with Vortex Density Structures: Comparison of Analytical and LSP Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Lundberg, J.; Paraschiv, I.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2014-10-01

    Interchange or flute type density irregularities in magnetized plasma are associated with Rayleigh-Taylor type instability. In particular, we are interested in the generation of low frequency plasma density irregularities in the form of flute type vortex density structures and interaction of high frequency electromagnetic waves used for surveillance and communication with such structures. These types of density irregularities play an important role in refraction and scattering of high frequency electromagnetic signals propagating in the earth ionosphere, in high energy density physics (HEDP), and in many other applications. We will present PIC simulation results of EM scattering on vortex type density structures using the LSP code and compare them with analytical results. Two cases will be analyzed. In the first case electromagnetic wave scattering will take place in the ionospheric plasma. In the second case laser probing in a high-beta Z-pinch plasma will be presented. This work was supported by the Air Force Research laboratory, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the Naval Research Laboratory and NNSA/DOE Grant No. DE-FC52-06NA27616 at the University of Nevada at Reno.

  20. Learning about Black-Hole Formation from Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesden, Michael H.

    2017-01-01

    The first observing run of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) discovered gravitational waves from two binary black-hole mergers. Although astrophysical black holes are simple objects fully characterized by their masses and spins, key features of binary black-hole formation such as mass transfer, natal kicks, and common-envelope evolution can misalign black-hole spins with the orbital angular momentum of the binary. These misaligned spins will precess as gravitational-wave emission causes the black holes to inspiral to separations at which the waves are detectable by observatories like LIGO. Spin precession modulates the amplitude and frequency of the gravitational waves observed by LIGO, allowing it to not only test general relativity but also reveal the secrets of black-hole formation. This talk will briefly describe those elements of binary black-hole formation responsible for initial spin misalignments, how spin precession and radiation reaction in general relativity determine how spins evolve from formation until the black holes enter LIGO’s sensitivity band, and how spin-induced gravitational-wave modulation in band can be used as a diagnostic of black-hole formation.

  1. Towards robust detection of gravitational waves by pulsar timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornish, Neil J.; Sampson, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Precision timing of highly stable milli-second pulsars is a promising technique for detecting very low frequency sources of gravitational waves. In any one pulsar, the gravitational wave signal appears as an additional source of timing noise, and it is only by considering the coherent response across a network of pulsars that the signal can be distinguished from other sources of noise. In the limit where there are many gravitational wave sources, or in the limit where there are many pulsars in the array, the waves produce a unique tensor correlation pattern that depends only on the angular separation of each pulsar pair. It is this distinct fingerprint that is used to search for gravitational waves using pulsar timing arrays. Here we consider how the prospects for detection are diminished when there are a finite number of signals and pulsars, which breaks the statistical isotropy of the timing array and of the gravitational wave sky. We also study the use of "sky-scrambles'' to break the signal correlations in the data as a way to increase confidence in a detection.

  2. Potential damage to DC superconducting magnets due to the high frequency electromagnetic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental data are presented in support of the hypothesis that a dc superconducting magnet coil does not behave strictly as an inductor, but as a complicated electrodynamic device capable of supporting electromagnetic waves. Travel times of nanosecond pulses and evidence of sinusoidal standing waves were observed on a prototype four-layer solenoidal coil at room temperature. Ringing observed during switching transients appears as a sequence of multiple reflected square pulses whose durations are related to the layer lengths. With sinusoidal excitation of the coil, the voltage amplitude between a pair of points on the coil exhibits maxima at those frequencies such that the distance between these points is an odd multiple of half wavelength in free space. Evidence indicates that any disturbance, such as that resulting from switching or sudden fault, initiates multiple reflections between layers, thus raising the possibility for sufficiently high voltages to cause breakdown.

  3. Graphene-mediated microfluidic transport and nebulization via high frequency Rayleigh wave substrate excitation.

    PubMed

    Ang, Kar M; Yeo, Leslie Y; Hung, Yew M; Tan, Ming K

    2016-09-21

    The deposition of a thin graphene film atop a chip scale piezoelectric substrate on which surface acoustic waves are excited is observed to enhance its performance for fluid transport and manipulation considerably, which can be exploited to achieve further efficiency gains in these devices. Such gains can then enable complete integration and miniaturization for true portability for a variety of microfluidic applications across drug delivery, biosensing and point-of-care diagnostics, among others, where field-use, point-of-collection or point-of-care functionality is desired. In addition to a first demonstration of vibration-induced molecular transport in graphene films, we show that the coupling of the surface acoustic wave gives rise to antisymmetric Lamb waves in the film which enhance molecular diffusion and hence the flow through the interstitial layers that make up the film. Above a critical input power, the strong substrate vibration displacement can also force the molecules out of the graphene film to form a thin fluid layer, which subsequently destabilizes and breaks up to form a mist of micron dimension aerosol droplets. We provide physical insight into this coupling through a simple numerical model, verified through experiments, and show several-fold improvement in the rate of fluid transport through the film, and up to 55% enhancement in the rate of fluid atomization from the film using this simple method.

  4. High efficiency off-axis current drive by high frequency fast waves

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Pinsker, R. I.; Moeller, C. P.; Porkolab, M.; Vdovin, V.

    2014-02-12

    Modeling work shows that current drive can be done off-axis with high efficiency, as required for FNSF and DEMO, by using very high harmonic fast waves (“helicons” or “whistlers”). The modeling indicates that plasmas with high electron beta are needed in order for the current drive to take place off-axis, making DIII-D a highly suitable test vehicle for this process. The calculations show that the driven current is not very sensitive to the launched value of n{sub ∥}, a result that can be understood from examination of the evolution of n{sub ∥} as the waves propagate in the plasma. Because of this insensitivity, relatively large values (∼3) of n{sub ∥} can be launched, thereby avoiding some of the problems with mode conversion in the boundary found in some previous experiments. Use of a traveling wave antenna provides a very narrow n{sub ∥} spectrum, which also helps avoid mode conversion.

  5. Resonant mode for gravitational wave detectors based on atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Peter W.; Hogan, Jason M.; Kasevich, Mark A.; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2016-11-01

    We describe an atom interferometric gravitational wave detector design that can operate in a resonant mode for increased sensitivity. By oscillating the positions of the atomic wave packets, this resonant detection mode allows for coherently enhanced, narrow-band sensitivity at target frequencies. The proposed detector is flexible and can be rapidly switched between broadband and narrow-band detection modes. For instance, a binary discovered in broadband mode can subsequently be studied further as the inspiral evolves by using a tailored narrow-band detector response. In addition to functioning like a lock-in amplifier for astrophysical events, the enhanced sensitivity of the resonant approach also opens up the possibility of searching for important cosmological signals, including the stochastic gravitational wave background produced by inflation. We give an example of detector parameters which would allow detection of inflationary gravitational waves down to ΩGW˜10-14 for a two-satellite space-based detector.

  6. Gravitational wave extraction in simulations of rotating stellar core collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Reisswig, C.; Ott, C. D.; Sperhake, U.; Schnetter, E.

    2011-03-15

    We perform simulations of general relativistic rotating stellar core collapse and compute the gravitational waves (GWs) emitted in the core-bounce phase of three representative models via multiple techniques. The simplest technique, the quadrupole formula (QF), estimates the GW content in the spacetime from the mass-quadrupole tensor only. It is strictly valid only in the weak-field and slow-motion approximation. For the first time, we apply GW extraction methods in core collapse that are fully curvature based and valid for strongly radiating and highly relativistic sources. These techniques are not restricted to weak-field and slow-motion assumptions. We employ three extraction methods computing (i) the Newman-Penrose (NP) scalar {Psi}{sub 4}, (ii) Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli-Moncrief master functions, and (iii) Cauchy-characteristic extraction (CCE) allowing for the extraction of GWs at future null infinity, where the spacetime is asymptotically flat and the GW content is unambiguously defined. The latter technique is the only one not suffering from residual gauge and finite-radius effects. All curvature-based methods suffer from strong nonlinear drifts. We employ the fixed-frequency integration technique as a high-pass waveform filter. Using the CCE results as a benchmark, we find that finite-radius NP extraction yields results that agree nearly perfectly in phase, but differ in amplitude by {approx}1%-7% at core bounce, depending on the model. Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli-Moncrief waveforms, while, in general, agreeing in phase, contain spurious high-frequency noise of comparable amplitudes to those of the relatively weak GWs emitted in core collapse. We also find remarkably good agreement of the waveforms obtained from the QF with those obtained from CCE. The results from QF agree very well in phase and systematically underpredict peak amplitudes by {approx}5%-11%, which is comparable to the NP results and is certainly within the uncertainties associated with core collapse

  7. Projected constraints on Lorentz-violating gravity with gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Devin; Yunes, Nicolás; Yagi, Kent

    2015-04-01

    Gravitational waves are excellent tools to probe the foundations of general relativity in the strongly dynamical and nonlinear regime. One such foundation is Lorentz symmetry, which can be broken in the gravitational sector by the existence of a preferred time direction and, thus, a preferred frame at each spacetime point. This leads to a modification in the orbital decay rate of binary systems, and also in the generation and chirping of their associated gravitational waves. Here we study whether waves emitted in the late, quasicircular inspiral of nonspinning, neutron star binaries can place competitive constraints on two proxies of gravitational Lorentz violation: Einstein-Æther theory and khronometric gravity. We model the waves in the small-coupling (or decoupling) limit and in the post-Newtonian approximation, by perturbatively solving the field equations in small deformations from general relativity and in the small-velocity or weak-gravity approximation. We assume that a gravitational wave consistent with general relativity has been detected with second- and third-generation, ground-based detectors, and with the proposed space-based mission DECIGO, with and without coincident electromagnetic counterparts. Without a counterpart, a detection consistent with general relativity can only place competitive constraints on gravitational Lorentz violation when using future, third-generation or space-based instruments. On the other hand, a single counterpart is enough to place constraints that are 10 orders of magnitude more stringent than current binary pulsar bounds, even when using second-generation detectors. This is because Lorentz violation forces the group velocity of gravitational waves to be different from that of light, and this difference can be very accurately constrained with coincident observations.

  8. Babich's expansion and the fast Huygens sweeping method for the Helmholtz wave equation at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wangtao; Qian, Jianliang; Burridge, Robert

    2016-05-01

    In some applications, it is reasonable to assume that geodesics (rays) have a consistent orientation so that the Helmholtz equation can be viewed as an evolution equation in one of the spatial directions. With such applications in mind, starting from Babich's expansion, we develop a new high-order asymptotic method, which we dub the fast Huygens sweeping method, for solving point-source Helmholtz equations in inhomogeneous media in the high-frequency regime and in the presence of caustics. The first novelty of this method is that we develop a new Eulerian approach to compute the asymptotics, i.e. the traveltime function and amplitude coefficients that arise in Babich's expansion, yielding a locally valid solution, which is accurate close enough to the source. The second novelty is that we utilize the Huygens-Kirchhoff integral to integrate many locally valid wavefields to construct globally valid wavefields. This automatically treats caustics and yields uniformly accurate solutions both near the source and remote from it. The third novelty is that the butterfly algorithm is adapted to accelerate the Huygens-Kirchhoff summation, achieving nearly optimal complexity O (Nlog ⁡ N), where N is the number of mesh points; the complexity prefactor depends on the desired accuracy and is independent of the frequency. To reduce the storage of the resulting tables of asymptotics in Babich's expansion, we use the multivariable Chebyshev series expansion to compress each table by encoding the information into a small number of coefficients. The new method enjoys the following desired features. First, it precomputes the asymptotics in Babich's expansion, such as traveltime and amplitudes. Second, it takes care of caustics automatically. Third, it can compute the point-source Helmholtz solution for many different sources at many frequencies simultaneously. Fourth, for a specified number of points per wavelength, it can construct the wavefield in nearly optimal complexity in terms

  9. Gravitational-wave probe of effective quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Stephon; Finn, Lee Samuel; Yunes, Nicolas

    2008-09-15

    All modern routes leading to a quantum theory of gravity - i.e., perturbative quantum gravitational one-loop exact correction to the global chiral current in the standard model, string theory, and loop quantum gravity - require modification of the classical Einstein-Hilbert action for the spacetime metric by the addition of a parity-violating Chern-Simons term. The introduction of such a term leads to spacetimes that manifest an amplitude birefringence in the propagation of gravitational waves. While the degree of birefringence may be intrinsically small, its effects on a gravitational wave accumulate as the wave propagates. Observation of gravitational waves that have propagated over cosmological distances may allow the measurement of even a small birefringence, providing evidence of quantum gravitational effects. The proposed Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) will be sensitive enough to observe the gravitational waves from sources at cosmological distances great enough that interesting bounds on the Chern-Simons coupling may be found. Here we evaluate the effect of a Chern-Simons induced spacetime birefringence to the propagation of gravitational waves from such systems. Focusing attention on the gravitational waves from coalescing binary black holes systems, which LISA will be capable of observing at redshifts approaching 30, we find that the signature of Chern-Simons gravity is a time-dependent change in the apparent orientation of the binary's orbital angular momentum with respect to the observer line-of-sight, with the magnitude of change reflecting the integrated history of the Chern-Simons coupling over the worldline of the radiation wave front. While spin-orbit coupling in the binary system will also lead to an evolution of the system's orbital angular momentum, the time dependence and other details of this real effect are different than the apparent effect produced by Chern-Simons birefringence, allowing the two effects to be separately identified

  10. A model for high frequency guided wave inspection of curved shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, R.; Pardini, A.; Diaz, A.

    2002-05-01

    Modeling work is reported in support of the development of an ultrasonic measurement to detect stress corrosion cracking in the shell of a nuclear waste storage tank, where transducer access is restricted to distances of several feet from the suspected flaw location. The measurement uses a 3.5 MHz 70 degree shear wave that propagates from the transducer to flaw site through a series of multiple reflections between the outer and inner walls of the shell. Results are shown which explain experimentally observed complexities in the received signals.

  11. Stable Determination of a Scattered Wave from its Far-Field Pattern: The High Frequency Asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondi, Luca; Sini, Mourad

    2015-10-01

    We deal with the stability issue for the determination of outgoing time-harmonic acoustic waves from their far-field patterns. We are especially interested in keeping as explicit as possible the dependence of our stability estimates on the wavenumber of the corresponding Helmholtz equation and in understanding the high wavenumber, that is frequency, asymptotics. Applications include stability results for the determination from far-field data of solutions of direct scattering problems with sound-soft obstacles and an instability analysis for the corresponding inverse obstacle problem. The key tool consists of establishing precise estimates on the behavior of Hankel functions with large argument or order.

  12. Modified High Frequency Radial Spin Wave Mode Spectrum in a Chirality-Controlled Nanopillar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolthammer, J. E.; Rudge, J.; Choi, B. C.; Hong, Y. K.

    2016-09-01

    Circular magnetic spin valve nanopillars in a dual vortex configuration have dynamic characteristics strongly dependent on the interlayer dipole coupling. We report here on frequency domain properties of such nanopillars obtained by micromagnetic simulations. After the free layer is chirality switched with spin transfer torque, a radial spin wave eigenmode spectrum forms in the free layer with unusually large edge amplitude. The structure of these modes indicate a departure from the magnetostatic processes typically observed experimentally and treated analytically in low aspect ratio isolated disks. Our findings give new details of dynamic chirality control and relxation in nanopillars and raise potential signatures for experiments.

  13. Gravitational wave hotspots: Ranking potential locations of single-source gravitational wave emission

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Joseph; Polin, Abigail; Lommen, Andrea; Christy, B; Stappers, Ben; Finn, Lee Samuel; Jenet, F. A.

    2014-03-20

    The steadily improving sensitivity of pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) suggests that gravitational waves (GWs) from supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) systems in the nearby universe will be detectable sometime during the next decade. Currently, PTAs assume an equal probability of detection from every sky position, but as evidence grows for a non-isotropic distribution of sources, is there a most likely sky position for a detectable single source of GWs? In this paper, a collection of Galactic catalogs is used to calculate various metrics related to the detectability of a single GW source resolvable above a GW background, assuming that every galaxy has the same probability of containing an SMBHB. Our analyses of these data reveal small probabilities that one of these sources is currently in the PTA band, but as sensitivity is improved regions of consistent probability density are found in predictable locations, specifically around local galaxy clusters.

  14. Role of the P-wave high frequency energy and duration as noninvasive cardiovascular predictors of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, Raúl; Martínez, Arturo; Rieta, José J

    2015-04-01

    A normal cardiac activation starts in the sinoatrial node and then spreads throughout the atrial myocardium, thus defining the P-wave of the electrocardiogram. However, when the onset of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) approximates, a highly disturbed electrical activity occurs within the atria, thus provoking fragmented and eventually longer P-waves. Although this altered atrial conduction has been successfully quantified just before PAF onset from the signal-averaged P-wave spectral analysis, its evolution during the hours preceding the arrhythmia has not been assessed yet. This work focuses on quantifying the P-wave spectral content variability over the 2h preceding PAF onset with the aim of anticipating as much as possible the arrhythmic episode envision. For that purpose, the time course of several metrics estimating absolute energy and ratios of high- to low-frequency power in different bands between 20 and 200Hz has been computed from the P-wave autoregressive spectral estimation. All the analyzed metrics showed an increasing variability trend as PAF onset approximated, providing the P-wave high-frequency energy (between 80 and 150Hz) a diagnostic accuracy around 80% to discern between healthy subjects, patients far from PAF and patients less than 1h close to a PAF episode. This discriminant power was similar to that provided by the most classical time-domain approach, i.e., the P-wave duration. Furthermore, the linear combination of both metrics improved the diagnostic accuracy up to 88.07%, thus constituting a reliable noninvasive harbinger of PAF onset with a reasonable anticipation. The information provided by this methodology could be very useful in clinical practice either to optimize the antiarrhythmic treatment in patients at high-risk of PAF onset and to limit drug administration in low risk patients.

  15. The Gravitational-Wave Universe seen by Pulsar Timing Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingarelli, Chiara M. F.; International Pulsar Timing Array

    2017-01-01

    Galaxy mergers are a standard aspect of galaxy formation and evolution, and most (likely all) large galaxies contain supermassive black holes. As part of the merging process, the supermassive black holes should in-spiral together and eventually merge, generating a background of gravitational radiation in the nanohertz to microhertz regime. Processes in the early Universe such as relic gravitational waves and cosmic strings may also generate gravitational radiation in the same frequency band. An array of precisely timed pulsars spread across the sky can form a galactic-scale gravitational wave detector in the nanohertz band. I describe the current efforts to develop and extend the pulsar timing array concept, together with recent limits which have emerged from North American and international efforts to constrain astrophysical phenomena at the heart of supermassive black hole mergers.

  16. Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Merger.

    PubMed

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Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Waldman, S J; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, H; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, L; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; 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    2016-02-12

    On September 14, 2015 at 09:50:45 UTC the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory simultaneously observed a transient gravitational-wave signal. The signal sweeps upwards in frequency from 35 to 250 Hz with a peak gravitational-wave strain of 1.0×10(-21). It matches the waveform predicted by general relativity for the inspiral and merger of a pair of black holes and the ringdown of the resulting single black hole. The signal was observed with a matched-filter signal-to-noise ratio of 24 and a false alarm rate estimated to be less than 1 event per 203,000 years, equivalent to a significance greater than 5.1σ. The source lies at a luminosity distance of 410(-180)(+160)  Mpc corresponding to a redshift z=0.09(-0.04)(+0.03). In the source frame, the initial black hole masses are 36(-4)(+5)M⊙ and 29(-4)(+4)M⊙, and the final black hole mass is 62(-4)(+4)M⊙, with 3.0(-0.5)(+0.5)M⊙c(2) radiated in gravitational waves. All uncertainties define 90% credible intervals. These observations demonstrate the existence of binary stellar-mass black hole systems. This is the first direct detection of gravitational waves and the first observation of a binary black hole merger.

  17. Hearing the signal of dark sectors with gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeckel, Joerg; Khoze, Valentin V.; Spannowsky, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by advanced LIGO (aLIGO)'s recent discovery of gravitational waves, we discuss signatures of new physics that could be seen at ground- and space-based interferometers. We show that a first-order phase transition in a dark sector would lead to a detectable gravitational wave signal at future experiments, if the phase transition has occurred at temperatures few orders of magnitude higher than the electroweak scale. The source of gravitational waves in this case is associated with the dynamics of expanding and colliding bubbles in the early universe. At the same time we point out that topological defects, such as dark sector domain walls, may generate a detectable signal already at aLIGO. Both bubble and domain-wall scenarios are sourced by semiclassical configurations of a dark new physics sector. In the first case, the gravitational wave signal originates from bubble wall collisions and subsequent turbulence in hot plasma in the early universe, while the second case corresponds to domain walls passing through the interferometer at present and is not related to gravitational waves. We find that aLIGO at its current sensitivity can detect smoking-gun signatures from domain-wall interactions, while future proposed experiments including the fifth phase of aLIGO at design sensitivity can probe dark sector phase transitions.

  18. Low-Frequency Gravitational Wave Searches Using Spacecraft Doppler Tracking.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, J W

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses spacecraft Doppler tracking, the current-generation detector technology used in the low-frequency (∼millihertz) gravitational wave band. In the Doppler method the earth and a distant spacecraft act as free test masses with a ground-based precision Doppler tracking system continuously monitoring the earth-spacecraft relative dimensionless velocity 2Δv/c = Δν/ν0, where Δν is the Doppler shift and ν0 is the radio link carrier frequency. A gravitational wave having strain amplitude h incident on the earth-spacecraft system causes perturbations of order h in the time series of Δν/ν0. Unlike other detectors, the ∼ 1-10 AU earth-spacecraft separation makes the detector large compared with millihertz-band gravitational wavelengths, and thus times-of-flight of signals and radio waves through the apparatus are important. A burst signal, for example, is time-resolved into a characteristic signature: three discrete events in the Doppler time series. I discuss here the principles of operation of this detector (emphasizing transfer functions of gravitational wave signals and the principal noises to the Doppler time series), some data analysis techniques, experiments to date, and illustrations of sensitivity and current detector performance. I conclude with a discussion of how gravitational wave sensitivity can be improved in the low-frequency band.

  19. Effects of finite-time singularities on gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleidis, K.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-10-01

    We analyze the impact of finite-time singularities on gravitational waves, in the context of F(R) gravity. We investigate which singularities are allowed to occur during the inflationary era, when gravitational waves are considered, and we discuss the quantitative implications of each allowed singularity. As we show, only a pressure singularity, the so-called Type II and also a Type IV singularity are allowed to occur during the inflationary era. In the case of a Type II, the resulting amplitude of the gravitational wave is zero or almost zero, hence this pressure singularity has a significant impact on the primordial gravitational waves. The case of a Type IV singularity is more interesting since as we show, the singularity has no effect on the amplitude of the gravitational waves. Therefore, this result combined with the fact that the Type IV singularity affects only the dynamics of inflation, leads to the conclusion that the Universe passes smoothly through a Type IV singularity.

  20. Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

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J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J. H.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C. R.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, G. H.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Waldman, S. J.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, H.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    On September 14, 2015 at 09:50:45 UTC the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory simultaneously observed a transient gravitational-wave signal. The signal sweeps upwards in frequency from 35 to 250 Hz with a peak gravitational-wave strain of 1.0 ×10-21. It matches the waveform predicted by general relativity for the inspiral and merger of a pair of black holes and the ringdown of the resulting single black hole. The signal was observed with a matched-filter signal-to-noise ratio of 24 and a false alarm rate estimated to be less than 1 event per 203 000 years, equivalent to a significance greater than 5.1 σ . The source lies at a luminosity distance of 41 0-180+160 Mpc corresponding to a redshift z =0.0 9-0.04+0.03 . In the source frame, the initial black hole masses are 3 6-4+5M⊙ and 2 9-4+4M⊙ , and the final black hole mass is 6 2-4+4M⊙ , with 3. 0-0.5+0.5M⊙ c2 radiated in gravitational waves. All uncertainties define 90% credible intervals. These observations demonstrate the existence of binary stellar-mass black hole systems. This is the first direct detection of gravitational waves and the first observation of a binary black hole merger.

  1. Excitation of Single-Mode Lamb Waves at High-Frequency-Thickness Products.

    PubMed

    Khalili, Pouyan; Cawley, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Guided wave inspection is used extensively in petrochemical plants to check for defects such as corrosion. Long-range low-frequency inspection can be used to detect relatively large defects, while higher frequency inspection provides improved sensitivity to small defects, but the presence of multiple dispersive modes makes it difficult to implement. This paper investigates the possibility of exciting a single-mode Lamb wave with low dispersion at a frequency thickness of around 20 MHz-mm. It is shown by finite element (FE) analysis backed up by experiments that a signal dominated by the A1 mode can be generated, even in a region where many modes have similar phase velocities. The A1 mode has relatively little motion at the plate surface which means that only a small reflection is generated at features such as T-joints; this is verified numerically. It is also expected that it will be relatively unaffected by surface roughness or attenuative coatings. These features are very similar to those of the higher order mode cluster (HOMC) reported by other authors, and it is shown that the A1 mode shape is very similar to the deflected shape reported in HOMC.

  2. Location of high-frequency P wave microseismic noise in the Pacific Ocean using multiple small aperture arrays

    DOE PAGES

    Pyle, Moira L.; Koper, Keith D.; Euler, Garrett G.; ...

    2015-04-20

    We investigate source locations of P-wave microseisms within a narrow frequency band (0.67–1.33 Hz) that is significantly higher than the classic microseism band (~0.05–0.3 Hz). Employing a backprojection method, we analyze data recorded during January 2010 from five International Monitoring System arrays that border the Pacific Ocean. We develop a ranking scheme that allows us to combine beam power from multiple arrays to obtain robust locations of the microseisms. Some individual arrays exhibit a strong regional component, but results from the combination of all arrays show high-frequency P wave energy emanating from the North Pacific basin, in general agreement withmore » previous observations in the double-frequency (DF) microseism band (~0.1–0.3 Hz). This suggests that the North Pacific source of ambient P noise covers a broad range of frequencies and that the wave-wave interaction model is likely valid at shorter periods.« less

  3. Testing the Speed of Gravitational Waves over Cosmological Distances with Strong Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, Thomas E.; Bacon, David

    2017-03-01

    Probing the relative speeds of gravitational waves and light acts as an important test of general relativity and alternative theories of gravity. Measuring the arrival time of gravitational waves (GWs) and electromagnetic (EM) counterparts can be used to measure the relative speeds, but only if the intrinsic time lag between emission of the photons and gravitational waves is well understood. Here we suggest a method that does not make such an assumption, using future strongly lensed GW events and EM counterparts; Biesiada et al. [J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys.10 (2014) 080, 10.1088/1475-7516/2014/10/080] forecast that 50-100 strongly lensed GW events will be observed each year with the Einstein Telescope. A single strongly lensed GW event would produce robust constraints on cGW/cγ at the 10-7 level, if a high-energy EM counterpart is observed within the field of view of an observing γ -ray burst monitor.

  4. Upper limits on a stochastic background of gravitational waves.

    PubMed

    Abbott, B; Abbott, R; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, J; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Belczynski, K; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Bland, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Buonanno, A; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chen, Y; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; DeBra, D; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandar, S; Díaz, M; Di Credico, A; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Ehrens, P; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Finn, L S; Franzen, K Y; Frey, R E; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Goda, K; Goggin, L; González, G; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guenther, M; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harry, G; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Hewitson, M; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hua, W; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, L; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Khan, A; Kim, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Koranda, S; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Lück, H; Luna, M; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, K; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNabb, J W C; Melissinos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nash, T; Nocera, F; Noel, J S; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Parameswariah, C; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Regimbau, T; Reitze, D H; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Roddy, S; Rodriguez, A; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sandberg, V; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Seader, S E; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Smith, J; Smith, M R; Spjeld, O; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Tanner, D B; Taylor, R; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D; Ungarelli, C; Vallisneri, M; van Putten, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Ward, H; Ward, R; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Wen, S; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wiley, S; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Woods, D; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zanolin, M; Zhang, L; Zotov, N; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J

    2005-11-25

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory has performed a third science run with much improved sensitivities of all three interferometers. We present an analysis of approximately 200 hours of data acquired during this run, used to search for a stochastic background of gravitational radiation. We place upper bounds on the energy density stored as gravitational radiation for three different spectral power laws. For the flat spectrum, our limit of omega0 < 8.4 x 10(-4) in the 69-156 Hz band is approximately 10(5) times lower than the previous result in this frequency range.

  5. High-frequency surface acoustic wave device based on thin-film piezoelectric interdigital transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin Kumar, A.K.; Paruch, P.; Triscone, J.-M.; Daniau, W.; Ballandras, S.; Pellegrino, L.; Marre, D.; Tybell, T.

    2004-09-06

    Using high-quality epitaxial c-axis Pb(Zr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8})O{sub 3} films grown by off-axis magnetron sputtering onto metallic (001) Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3} substrates, a nonconventional thin-film surface acoustic wave device based on periodic piezoelectric transducers was realized. The piezoelectric transducers consist of a series of ferroelectric domains with alternating polarization states. The artificial modification of the ferroelectric domain structure is performed by using an atomic force microscope tip as a source of electric field, allowing local switching of the polarization. Devices with 1.2 and 0.8 {mu}m wavelength, defined by the modulation period of the polarization, and corresponding to central frequencies in the range 1.50-3.50 GHz have been realized and tested.

  6. PMN-PT single crystal, high-frequency ultrasonic needle transducers for pulsed-wave Doppler application.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qifa; Xu, Xiaochen; Gottlieb, Emanuel J; Sun, Lei; Cannata, Jonathan M; Ameri, Hossein; Humayun, Mark S; Han, Pengdi; Shung, K Kirk

    2007-03-01

    High-frequency needle ultrasound transducers with an aperture size of 0.4 mm were fabricated using lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-33% PT) as the active piezoelectric material. The active element was bonded to a conductive silver particle matching layer and a conductive epoxy backing through direct contact curing. An outer matching layer of parylene was formed by vapor deposition. The active element was housed within a polyimide tube and a 20-gauge needle housing. The magnitude and phase of the electrical impedance of the transducer were 47 omega and -38 degrees, respectively. The measured center frequency and -6 dB fractional bandwidth of the PMN-PT needle transducer were 44 MHz and 45%, respectively. The two-way insertion loss was approximately 15 dB. In vivo high-frequency, pulsed-wave Doppler patterns of blood flow in the posterior portion and in vitro ultrasonic backscatter microscope (UBM) images of the rabbit eye were obtained with the 44-MHz needle transducer.

  7. Spatiotemporal interference of photoelectron wave packets and the time scale of nonadiabatic transitions in the high-frequency regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, Koudai

    2016-10-01

    The method of the envelope Hamiltonian [K. Toyota, U. Saalmann, and J. M. Rost, New J. Phys. 17, 073005 (2015), 10.1088/1367-2630/17/7/073005] is applied to further study a detachment dynamics of a model negative ion in one dimension in the high-frequency regime. This method is based on the Floquet approach, but the time dependency of an envelope function is explicitly kept for arbitrary pulse durations. Therefore, it is capable of describing not only a photon absorption or emission, but also a nonadiabatic transition which is induced by the time-varying envelope of the pulse. It was shown that the envelope Hamiltonian accurately retrieves the results obtained by the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, and the underlying physics were well understood by the adiabatic approximation based on the envelope Hamiltonian. In this paper, we explore two more aspects of the detachment dynamics, which were not considered in our previous work. First, we determine the features of both a spatial and temporal interference of photoelectron wave packets in a photon-absorption process. We conclude that both of the interference mechanisms are universal in ionization dynamics in the high-frequency regime. Second, we extract a pulse duration which maximizes a yield of the nonadiabatic transition as a function of a pulse duration. It is shown that it becomes maximum when the pulse duration is comparable to a time scale of an electron.

  8. Millimeter waves or extremely high frequency electromagnetic fields in the environment: what are their effects on bacteria?

    PubMed

    Soghomonyan, Diana; Trchounian, Karen; Trchounian, Armen

    2016-06-01

    Millimeter waves (MMW) or electromagnetic fields of extremely high frequencies at low intensity is a new environmental factor, the level of which is increased as technology advance. It is of interest that bacteria and other cells might communicate with each other by electromagnetic field of sub-extremely high frequency range. These MMW affected Escherichia coli and many other bacteria, mainly depressing their growth and changing properties and activity. These effects were non-thermal and depended on different factors. The significant cellular targets for MMW effects could be water, cell plasma membrane, and genome. The model for the MMW interaction with bacteria is suggested; a role of the membrane-associated proton FOF1-ATPase, key enzyme of bioenergetic relevance, is proposed. The consequences of MMW interaction with bacteria are the changes in their sensitivity to different biologically active chemicals, including antibiotics. Novel data on MMW effects on bacteria and their sensitivity to different antibiotics are presented and discussed; the combined action of MMW and antibiotics resulted with more strong effects. These effects are of significance for understanding changed metabolic pathways and distinguish role of bacteria in environment; they might be leading to antibiotic resistance in bacteria. The effects might have applications in the development of technique, therapeutic practices, and food protection technology.

  9. Wave scattering from encapsulated microbubbles subject to high-frequency ultrasound: contribution of higher-order scattering modes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiusheng; Hunter, Kendall S; Shandas, Robin

    2009-10-01

    The theoretical understanding of encapsulated microbubble response to high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) excitation is still limited although some novel experimental HFUS contrast imaging techniques have been well developed. In this paper, the higher-order modal (HOM) contributions to the scattered field are studied for such microbubbles driven by 1-100 MHz ultrasound. An exact solution of all small-amplitude vibrational modes of a single encapsulated microbubble in water is given by the wave scattering theory (WST) method and compared to results obtained from Church's Rayleigh-Plesset-like model for the small-amplitude radial oscillation of a microbubble in an incompressible fluid. From numerical results, we show that the HOM field contribution is significant for scattering properties from individual Nycomed microbubbles with normalized frequency > or = 0.2. It is also shown that the multiple scattering is strengthened for monodispersed Definity microbubbles of 3 microm radius at frequencies >40 MHz. However, comparisons between the authors' analyses and known experimental data for polydispersed Definity microbubbles indicate that the HOM contributions are insignificant in attenuation estimation at frequencies <50 MHz. In conclusion, the WST model analysis suggests that HOM scattering is an important consideration for single bubbles but may be less critical in the modeling of polydispersed Definity bubbles at high frequencies.

  10. Detectability of Gravitational Waves from High-Redshift Binaries.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Pablo A; Lasky, Paul D; Thrane, Eric; Zhu, Xingjiang; Mandel, Ilya; Sesana, Alberto

    2016-03-11

    Recent nondetection of gravitational-wave backgrounds from pulsar timing arrays casts further uncertainty on the evolution of supermassive black hole binaries. We study the capabilities of current gravitational-wave observatories to detect individual binaries and demonstrate that, contrary to conventional wisdom, some are, in principle, detectable throughout the Universe. In particular, a binary with rest-frame mass ≳10^{10}M_{⊙} can be detected by current timing arrays at arbitrarily high redshifts. The same claim will apply for less massive binaries with more sensitive future arrays. As a consequence, future searches for nanohertz gravitational waves could be expanded to target evolving high-redshift binaries. We calculate the maximum distance at which binaries can be observed with pulsar timing arrays and other detectors, properly accounting for redshift and using realistic binary waveforms.

  11. Stochastic gravitational wave background from cold dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, Carmelita; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Matarrese, Sabino

    2006-03-15

    The current knowledge of cosmological structure formation suggests that Cold Dark Matter (CDM) halos possess a nonspherical density profile, implying that cosmic structures can be potential sources of gravitational waves via power transfer from scalar perturbations to tensor metric modes in the nonlinear regime. By means of a previously developed mathematical formalism and a triaxial collapse model, we numerically estimate the stochastic gravitational-wave background generated by CDM halos during the fully nonlinear stage of their evolution. Our results suggest that the energy density associated with this background is comparable to that produced by primordial tensor modes at frequencies {nu}{approx_equal}10{sup -18}-10{sup -17} Hz if the energy scale of inflation is V{sup 1/4}{approx_equal}1-2x10{sup 15} GeV, and that these gravitational waves could give rise to several cosmological effects, including secondary CMB anisotropy and polarization.

  12. Detectability of Gravitational Waves from High-Redshift Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosado, Pablo A.; Lasky, Paul D.; Thrane, Eric; Zhu, Xingjiang; Mandel, Ilya; Sesana, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Recent nondetection of gravitational-wave backgrounds from pulsar timing arrays casts further uncertainty on the evolution of supermassive black hole binaries. We study the capabilities of current gravitational-wave observatories to detect individual binaries and demonstrate that, contrary to conventional wisdom, some are, in principle, detectable throughout the Universe. In particular, a binary with rest-frame mass ≳1010M⊙ can be detected by current timing arrays at arbitrarily high redshifts. The same claim will apply for less massive binaries with more sensitive future arrays. As a consequence, future searches for nanohertz gravitational waves could be expanded to target evolving high-redshift binaries. We calculate the maximum distance at which binaries can be observed with pulsar timing arrays and other detectors, properly accounting for redshift and using realistic binary waveforms.

  13. LIGO: The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory.

    PubMed

    Abramovici, A; Althouse, W E; Drever, R W; Gürsel, Y; Kawamura, S; Raab, F J; Shoemaker, D; Sievers, L; Spero, R E; Thorne, K S; Vogt, R E; Weiss, R; Whitcomb, S E; Zucker, M E

    1992-04-17

    The goal of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) Project is to detect and study astrophysical gravitational waves and use data from them for research in physics and astronomy. LIGO will support studies concerning the nature and nonlinear dynamics of gravity, the structures of black holes, and the equation of state of nuclear matter. It will also measure the masses, birth rates, collisions, and distributions of black holes and neutron stars in the universe and probe the cores of supernovae and the very early universe. The technology for LIGO has been developed during the past 20 years. Construction will begin in 1992, and under the present schedule, LIGO's gravitational-wave searches will begin in 1998.

  14. Massive gravitons as dark matter and gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Katsuki; Mukohyama, Shinji

    2016-07-01

    We consider the possibility that the massive graviton is a viable candidate for dark matter in the context of bimetric gravity. We first derive the energy-momentum tensor of the massive graviton and show that it indeed behaves as that of dark matter fluid. We then discuss a production mechanism and the present abundance of massive gravitons as dark matter. Since the metric to which ordinary matter fields couple is a linear combination of the two mass eigenstates of bigravity, production of massive gravitons, i.e., the dark matter particles, is inevitably accompanied by generation of massless gravitons, i.e., the gravitational waves. Therefore, in this scenario some information about dark matter in our Universe is encoded in gravitational waves. For instance, if LIGO detects gravitational waves generated by the preheating after inflation, then the massive graviton with the mass of ˜0.01 GeV is a candidate for dark matter.

  15. Stochastic simulation for the propagation of high-frequency acoustic waves through a random velocity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, B.; Darmon, M.; Leymarie, N.; Chatillon, S.; Potel, C.

    2012-05-01

    In-service inspection of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) requires the development of non-destructive techniques adapted to the harsh environment conditions and the examination complexity. From past experiences, ultrasonic techniques are considered as suitable candidates. The ultrasonic telemetry is a technique used to constantly insure the safe functioning of reactor inner components by determining their exact position: it consists in measuring the time of flight of the ultrasonic response obtained after propagation of a pulse emitted by a transducer and its interaction with the targets. While in-service the sodium flow creates turbulences that lead to temperature inhomogeneities, which translates into ultrasonic velocity inhomogeneities. These velocity variations could directly impact the accuracy of the target locating by introducing time of flight variations. A stochastic simulation model has been developed to calculate the propagation of ultrasonic waves in such an inhomogeneous medium. Using this approach, the travel time is randomly generated by a stochastic process whose inputs are the statistical moments of travel times known analytically. The stochastic model predicts beam deviations due to velocity inhomogeneities, which are similar to those provided by a determinist method, such as the ray method.

  16. Progress Toward a Space-Based Gravitational Wave Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.; Stebbins, Robin T.

    The discovery of binary pulsar PSR 1913+16 by Hulse & Taylor in 1974 established the existence of gravitational waves, for which the 1983 Nobel Prize was awarded. However, the measurement of astrophysical parameters from gravitational waves will open an entirely new spectrum for discovery and understanding of the Universe, not simply a new window in the electromagnetic spectrum like gamma ray telescopes in the 1970s. Two types of ground-based detectors, Advanced LIGO/Virgo and Pulsar Timing Arrays, are expected to directly detect gravitational waves in their respective frequency bands before the end of the decade. However, many of the most exciting sources are in the band from 0.1-100 mHz, accessible only from space due to seismic and gravity gradient noise on Earth. The European Space Agency (ESA) has chosen the 'Gravitational Universe' as the science theme for its L3 Cosmic Visions opportunity, planned for launch in 2034. NASA is planning to participate as a junior partner. Here we summarize progress toward realizing a gravitational wave observatory in space.

  17. Cylindrical gravitational waves in expanding universes: Models for waves from compact sources

    SciTech Connect

    Gowdy, Robert H.; Edmonds, B. Douglas

    2007-04-15

    New boundary conditions are imposed on the familiar cylindrical gravitational wave vacuum spacetimes. The new spacetime family represents cylindrical waves in a flat expanding (Kasner) universe. Space sections are flat and nonconical where the waves have not reached and wave amplitudes fall off more rapidly than they do in Einstein-Rosen solutions, permitting a more regular null inifinity.

  18. Cylindrical gravitational waves in expanding universes: Models for waves from compact sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowdy, Robert H.; Edmonds, B. Douglas

    2007-04-01

    New boundary conditions are imposed on the familiar cylindrical gravitational wave vacuum spacetimes. The new spacetime family represents cylindrical waves in a flat expanding (Kasner) universe. Space sections are flat and nonconical where the waves have not reached and wave amplitudes fall off more rapidly than they do in Einstein-Rosen solutions, permitting a more regular null inifinity.

  19. Bayesian reconstruction of gravitational wave bursts using chirplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millhouse, Margaret; Cornish, Neil; Littenberg, Tyson

    2017-01-01

    The BayesWave algorithm has been shown to accurately reconstruct unmodeled short duration gravitational wave bursts and to distinguish between astrophysical signals and transient noise events. BayesWave does this by using a variable number of sine-Gaussian (Morlet) wavelets to reconstruct data in multiple interferometers. While the Morlet wavelets can be summed together to produce any possible waveform, there could be other wavelet functions that improve the performance. Because we expect most astrophysical gravitational wave signals to evolve in frequency, modified Morlet wavelets with linear frequency evolution - called chirplets - may better reconstruct signals with fewer wavelets. We compare the performance of BayesWave using Morlet wavelets and chirplets on a variety of simulated signals.

  20. Nonlinear wave breaking in self-gravitating viscoelastic quantum fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Aniruddha; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar; Bhar, Radhaballav; Khan, Manoranjan

    2017-02-01

    The stability of a viscoelastic self-gravitating quantum fluid has been studied. Symmetry breaking instability of solitary wave has been observed through 'viscosity modified Ostrovsky equation' in weak gravity limit. In presence of strong gravitational field, the solitary wave breaks into shock waves. Response to a Gaussian perturbation, the system produces quasi-periodic short waves, which in terns predicts the existence of gravito-acoustic quasi-periodic short waves in lower solar corona region. Stability analysis of this dynamical system predicts gravity has the most prominent effect on the phase portraits, therefore, on the stability of the system. The non-existence of chaotic solution has also been observed at long wavelength perturbation through index value theorem.

  1. The Effects of High Frequency ULF Wave Activity on the Spectral Characteristics of Coherent HF Radar Returns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, D. M.; Yeoman, T. K.; Woodfield, E. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is now a common practice to employ ground-based radars in order to distinguish between those regions of the Earth's upper atmosphere which are magnetically conjugate to open and closed field lines. Radar returns from ionospheric irregularities inside the polar cap and cusp regions generally exhibit large spectral widths in contrast to those which exist on closed field lines at lower latitudes. It has been suggested that the so-called Spectral Width Boundary (SWB) might act as a proxy for the open-closed field line boundary (OCFLB), which would then be an invaluable tool for investigating reconnection rates in the magnetosphere. The exact cause of the increased spectral widths observed at very high latitudes is still subject to considerable debate. Several mechanisms have been proposed. This paper compares a dusk-sector interval of coherent HF radar data with measurements made by an induction coil magnetometer located at Tromso, Norway (66° N geomagnetic). On this occasion, a series of transient regions of radar backscatter exhibiting large spectral widths are accompanied by increases in spectral power of ULF waves in the Pc1-2 frequency band. These observations would then, seem to support the possibility that high frequency magnetospheric wave activity at least contribute to the observed spectral characteristics and that such wave activity might play a significant role in the cusp and polar cap ionospheres.

  2. Space-Based Gravitational-wave Mission Concept Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    The LISA Mission Concept has been under study for over two decades as a spacebased gravitational-wave detector capable of observing astrophysical sources in the 0.0001 to 1 Hz band. The concept has consistently received strong recommendations from various review panels based on the expected science, most recently from the US Astr02010 Decadal Review. Budget constraints have led both the US and European Space agencies to search for lower cost options. We report results from the US effort to explore the tradeoffs between mission cost and science return, and in particular a family of mission concepts referred to as SGO (Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatory).

  3. Dynamics and gravitational wave signature of collapsar formation.

    PubMed

    Ott, C D; Reisswig, C; Schnetter, E; O'Connor, E; Sperhake, U; Löffler, F; Diener, P; Abdikamalov, E; Hawke, I; Burrows, A

    2011-04-22

    We perform 3+1 general relativistic simulations of rotating core collapse in the context of the collapsar model for long gamma-ray bursts. We employ a realistic progenitor, rotation based on results of stellar evolution calculations, and a simplified equation of state. Our simulations track self-consistently collapse, bounce, the postbounce phase, black hole formation, and the subsequent early hyperaccretion phase. We extract gravitational waves from the spacetime curvature and identify a unique gravitational wave signature associated with the early phase of collapsar formation.

  4. What can we learn about cosmic structure from gravitational waves?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan M.

    2003-01-01

    Observations of low frequency gravitational waves by the space-based LISA mission will open a new observational window on the early universe and the emergence of structure. LISA will observe the dynamical coalescence of massive black hole binaries at high redshifts, giving an unprecedented look at the merger history of galaxies and the reionization epoch. LISA will also observe gravitational waves from the collapse of supermassive stars to form black holes, and will map the spacetime in the central regions of galaxy cusps at high precision.

  5. GRB as a counterpart for Gravitational Wave detection in LCGT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Nobuyuki

    2010-10-01

    Short Gamma-ray burst (GRB) progenitors are considered as merger of compact star binaries which consist of neutron stars or blackholes. These compact star binaries will radiate a strong gravitational wave in their coalescence, and gravitational wave detectors aim to detect them. We studied the chance probability of coincidence between GRB and GW detection in LCGT detector. Due to omni-directional acceptance of GW detectors, about 75% of GRB events which closer than cosmological redshift z<0.1 are expected to confirm by GW detection.

  6. The generation of gravitational waves. II - The postlinear formalism revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, R. J.; Thorne, K. S.

    1977-01-01

    Two different versions of the Green's function for the scalar wave equation in weakly curved spacetime (one due to DeWitt and DeWitt, the other to Thorne and Kovacs) are compared and contrasted; and their mathematical equivalence is demonstrated. Then the DeWitt-DeWitt Green's function is used to construct several alternative versions of the Thorne-Kovacs postlinear formalism for gravitational-wave generation. Finally it is shown that, in calculations of gravitational bremsstrahlung radiation, some of our versions of the postlinear formalism allow one to treat the interacting bodies as point masses, while others do not.

  7. Spherical gravitational wave detectors: MiniGRAIL and Mario Schenberg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Aguiar, O. D.

    2014-03-01

    Spherical gravitational wave detectors allow the analysis of multiple independent channels and, therefore, are able to determine gravitational wave directions and polarizations. There are two spherical detectors being developed now: MiniGRAIL (Netherlands) and Mario Schenberg (Brazil). Both share the same principle of detection and main features. They have done commissioning runs and shown progress in their development. We have presented here the status of Mario Schenberg. Its transducers have been redesigned for sensitivity improvements. While an offline analysis was already developed for MiniGRAIL, we have investigated a low latency data analysis technique for Mario Schenberg. Both analysis are based on directional detection.

  8. Dynamics and Gravitational Wave Signature of Collapsar Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, C. D.; Reisswig, C.; Schnetter, E.; O'Connor, E.; Sperhake, U.; Löffler, F.; Diener, P.; Abdikamalov, E.; Hawke, I.; Burrows, A.

    2011-04-01

    We perform 3+1 general relativistic simulations of rotating core collapse in the context of the collapsar model for long gamma-ray bursts. We employ a realistic progenitor, rotation based on results of stellar evolution calculations, and a simplified equation of state. Our simulations track self-consistently collapse, bounce, the postbounce phase, black hole formation, and the subsequent early hyperaccretion phase. We extract gravitational waves from the spacetime curvature and identify a unique gravitational wave signature associated with the early phase of collapsar formation.

  9. Gravitational wave bursts from cosmic superstrings with Y-junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Binetruy, P.; Bohe, A.; Hertog, T.; Steer, D. A.

    2009-12-15

    Cosmic superstring loops generically contain strings of different tensions that meet at Y-junctions. These loops evolve nonperiodically in time, and have cusps and kinks that interact with the junctions. We study the effect of junctions on the gravitational wave signal emanating from cosmic string cusps and kinks. We find that earlier results on the strength of individual bursts from cusps and kinks on strings without junctions remain largely unchanged, but junctions give rise to additional contributions to the gravitational wave signal coming from strings expanding at the speed of light at a junction and kinks passing through a junction.

  10. Relationship between high-frequency sediment-level oscillations in the swash zone and inner surf zone wave characteristics under calm wave conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Swash zone topography rapidly responds to the surf zone waves. Understanding how sandy beaches respond to wave action is critical for beach erosion research, and plays a critical role in the design and maintenance of shore protection structures. The main objectives of this study were to detect the relationship between high-frequency beachface oscillations and surf zone wave characteristics under plunging breakers by using Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA). The study site is located in Houjiangwan Bay, eastern Guangdong. Topography data were sampled at 6 min intervals. The wave characteristic parameters were calculated by spectrum method. During the field work, the beach showed a reflective state and plunging breakers controlled the surf zone. The beach cusp topography was destructed gradually. The analysis provides 4 canonical correlation processes between the beachface variations and surf zone waves, which explained 95.28% of the overall variation in the data. The result shows wave steepness, the irregularity factor and spectral broadness factor had strong impacts on the topography. The wave steepness was the most important factor for beach profile variations. The results of the present study indicate that data-driven statistical analysis, such as CCA, is useful for analyzing profile response to waves if there is strong correlation between the two variables (beach profiles and wave).

  11. Cosmic Messengers: Binary Black Holes and Gravitational Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy, more than the combined light from all the stars in the visible universe. This energy is emitted in the form of gravitational waves, and observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors such as LISA requires that we know the pattern or fingerprint of the radiation emitted. Since black hole mergers take place in regions of extreme gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein s equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these wave patterns. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute these wave patterns. However, their computer codes have been plagued by problems that caused them to crash. . This situation has changed dramatically in the past 2 years, with a series of amazing breakthroughs. This talk will take you on this quest for these gravitational wave patterns, showing how a spacetime is constructed on a computer to build a simulation laboratory for binary black hole mergers. We will focus on the recent advances that are revealing these waveforms, and the dramatic new potential for discoveries that arises when these sources will. be observed by LISA.

  12. Binary Black Holes, Numerical Relativity, and Gravitational Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy, more than the combined light from all the stars in the visible universe. This energy is emitted in the form of gravitational waves, and observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors such as LISA requires that we know the pattern or fingerprint of the radiation emitted. Since black hole mergers take place in regions of extreme gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these wave patterns. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute these wave patterns. However, their computer codes have been plagued by problems that caused them to crash. This situation has changed dramatically in the past 2 years, with a series of amazing breakthroughs. This talk will take you on this quest for these gravitational wave patterns, showing how a spacetime is constructed on a computer to build a simulation laboratory for binary black hole mergers. We will focus on the recent advances that are revealing these waveforms, and the dramatic new potential for discoveries that arises when these sources will be observed by LISA

  13. The Suitability of Hybrid Waveforms for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Ilana; Pfeiffer, H.; Nissanke, S.; Mroue, A.

    2013-01-01

    General relativity predicts that the coalescence of two compact objects, such as black holes, will produce gravitational radiation; i.e., ripples in the curvature of space-time. Detectors like Advanced LIGO (the Laser Interferometry Gravitational-wave Observatory) are expected to measure such events within the next few years. In order to be able to characterize the gravitational waves they measure, these detectors require accurate waveform models, which can be constructed by fusing an analytical post-Newtonian inspiral waveform with a numerical relativity late-inspiral-merger-ringdown waveform. Numerical relativity, though the most accurate model, is computationally expensive: the longest simulations to date taking several months to run. Post-Newtonian theory, an analytic approximation to General Relativity, is easy to compute but becomes increasingly inaccurate near merger. Because of this trade-off, it is important to determine the optimal length of the numerical waveform, while maintaining the necessary accuracy for gravitational wave detectors. We present a study of the sufficient accuracy of post-Newtonian and numerical relativity waveforms for the most demanding usage case: parameter estimation of strong sources in advanced gravitational wave detectors. We perform a comprehensive analysis of errors that enter such “hybrid waveforms” in the case of equal-mass and unequal mass non-spinning binaries. We also explore the possibility of using these hybrid waveforms as a detection template bank for Advanced LIGO. Accurate hybrids play an important role in investigating the efficiency of gravitational wave search pipelines, as with NINJA (Numerical INJection Analysis); and also in constructing analytical models that span the entire parameter space of binary black hole mass ratios and spins, as with NRAR (Numerical Relativity and Analytic Relativity).

  14. The Suitability of Hybrid Waveforms for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Ilana; Pfeiffer, H.; Nissanke, S.

    2012-01-01

    General relativity predicts that the coalescence of two compact objects, such as black holes, will produce gravitational radiation; i.e., ripples in the curvature of space-time. Detectors like Advanced LIGO (the Laser Interferometry Gravitational-wave Observatory) are expected to measure such events within the next few years. In order to be able to characterize the gravitational waves they measure, these detectors require accurate waveform models, which can be constructed by fusing an analytical post-Newtonian inspiral waveform with a numerical relativity late-inspiral-merger-ringdown waveform. Numerical relativity, though the most accurate model, is computationally expensive: the longest simulations to date taking several months to run. Post-Newtonian theory, an analytic approximation to General Relativity, is easy to compute but becomes increasingly inaccurate near merger. Because of this trade-off, it is important to determine the optimal length of the numerical waveform, while maintaining the necessary accuracy for gravitational wave detectors. We present a study of the sufficient accuracy of post-Newtonian and numerical relativity waveforms for the most demanding usage case: parameter estimation of strong sources in advanced gravitational wave detectors. We perform a comprehensive analysis of errors that enter such "hybrid waveforms” in the case of equal-mass non-spinning binaries. Preliminary research has also been done in the case of unequal-mass non-spinning binaries. Accurate hybrids play an important role in investigating the efficiency of gravitational wave search pipelines, as with NINJA (Numerical INJection Analysis); and also in constructing analytical models that span the entire parameter space of binary black hole mass ratios and spins, as with NRAR (Numerical Relativity and Analytic Relativity).

  15. Searching for Stochastic Gravitational Waves Using Data from the Two Co-Located LIGO Hanford Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, R. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Camp, Jordan B; Gehrels, N.; Kanner, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Searches for a stochastic gravitational-wave background (SGWB) using terrestrial detectors typically involve cross-correlating data from pairs of detectors. The sensitivity of such cross-correlation analyses depends, among other things, on the separation between the two detectors: the smaller the separation, the better the sensitivity. Hence, a co-located detector pair is more sensitive to a gravitational-wave background than a nonco- located detector pair. However, co-located detectors are also expected to suffer from correlated noise from instrumental and environmental effects that could contaminate the measurement of the background. Hence, methods to identify and mitigate the effects of correlated noise are necessary to achieve the potential increase in sensitivity of co-located detectors. Here we report on the first SGWB analysis using the two LIGO Hanford detectors and address the complications arising from correlated environmental noise. We apply correlated noise identification and mitigation techniques to data taken by the two LIGO Hanford detectors, H1 and H2, during LIGO's fifth science run. At low frequencies, 40-460Hz, we are unable to sufficiently mitigate the correlated noise to a level where we may confidently measure or bound the stochastic gravitational-wave signal. However, at high frequencies, 460 - 1000Hz, these techniques are sufficient to set a 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limit on the gravitational-wave energy density of Omega(f) < 7.7 × 10(exp -4)(f/900Hz)(sup 3), which improves on the previous upper limit by a factor of approx. 180. In doing so, we demonstrate techniques that will be useful for future searches using advanced detectors, where correlated noise (e.g., from global magnetic fields) may affect even widely separated detectors.

  16. Searching for stochastic gravitational waves using data from the two colocated LIGO Hanford detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, R. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Austin, L.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S. H.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Bergmann, G.; Berliner, J. M.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Bessis, D.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbhade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bowers, J.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brannen, C. A.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castiglia, A.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Deleeuw, E.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dmitry, K.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, E.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hall, B.; Hall, E.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Horrom, T.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Hua, Z.; Huang, V.; Huerta, E. A.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Iafrate, J.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, H.; Jang, Y. J.; Jaranowski, P.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasprzack, M.; Kasturi, R.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufman, K.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Kremin, A.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kucharczyk, C.; Kudla, S.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, D. Nanda; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kurdyumov, R.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.-H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, J. J.; Lee, J.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Le Roux, A.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J. B.; Lhuillier, V.; Li, T. G. F.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Litvine, V.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lloyd, D.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Lodhia, D.; Loew, K.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Luan, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macarthur, J.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Manca, G. M.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martini, G.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; May, G.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Mikhailov, E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Mokler, F.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Mori, T.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nagy, M. F.; Nardecchia, I.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R.; Necula, V.; Neri, I.; Neri, M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nishida, E.; Nishizawa, A.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega Larcher, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Ou, J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoletti, R.; Paris, H.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Pedraza, M.; Peiris, P.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pinard, L.; Pindor, B.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Poggiani, R.; Poole, V.; Postiglione, F.; Poux, C.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, C.; Rodruck, M.; Roever, C.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Saracco, E.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G. R.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Soden, K.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Sperandio, L.; Staley, A.; Steinert, E.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stevens, D.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szeifert, G.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tang, L.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, R.; ter Braack, A. P. M.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, P. J.; Veitch, J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Verma, S.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vitale, S.; Vlcek, B.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vrinceanu, D.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Waldman, S. J.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Wan, Y.; Wang, J.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wibowo, S.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williams, T.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yum, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, X. J.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Searches for a stochastic gravitational-wave background (SGWB) using terrestrial detectors typically involve cross-correlating data from pairs of detectors. The sensitivity of such cross-correlation analyses depends, among other things, on the separation between the two detectors: the smaller the separation, the better the sensitivity. Hence, a colocated detector pair is more sensitive to a gravitational-wave background than a noncolocated detector pair. However, colocated detectors are also expected to suffer from correlated noise from instrumental and environmental effects that could contaminate the measurement of the background. Hence, methods to identify and mitigate the effects of correlated noise are necessary to achieve the potential increase in sensitivity of colocated detectors. Here we report on the first SGWB analysis using the two LIGO Hanford detectors and address the complications arising from correlated environmental noise. We apply correlated noise identification and mitigation techniques to data taken by the two LIGO Hanford detectors, H1 and H2, during LIGO's fifth science run. At low frequencies, 40-460 Hz, we are unable to sufficiently mitigate the correlated noise to a level where we may confidently measure or bound the stochastic gravitational-wave signal. However, at high frequencies, 460-1000 Hz, these techniques are sufficient to set a 95% confidence level upper limit on the gravitational-wave energy density of Ω (f )<7.7 ×1 0-4(f /900 Hz )3 , which improves on the previous upper limit by a factor of ˜180 . In doing so, we demonstrate techniques that will be useful for future searches using advanced detectors, where correlated noise (e.g., from global magnetic fields) may affect even widely separated detectors.

  17. BOOK REVIEW: Gravitational Waves, Volume 1: Theory and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, Eric

    2008-10-01

    A superficial introduction to gravitational waves can be found in most textbooks on general relativity, but typically, the treatment hardly does justice to a field that has grown tremendously, both in its theoretical and experimental aspects, in the course of the last twenty years. Other than the technical literature, few other sources have been available to the interested reader; exceptions include edited volumes such as [1] and [2], Weber's little book [3] which happily is still in print, and Peter Saulson's text [4] which appears, unfortunately, to be out of print. In addition to these technical references, the story of gravitational waves was famously told by a sociologist of scientific knowledge [5] (focusing mostly on the experimental aspects) and a historian of science [6] (focusing mostly on the theoretical aspects). The book Gravitational Waves, Volume 1, by Michele Maggiore, is a welcome point of departure. This is, as far as I know, the first comprehensive textbook on gravitational waves. It describes the theoretical foundations of the subject, the known (and anticipated) sources, and the principles of detection by resonant masses and laser interferometers. This book is a major accomplishment, and with the promised volume 2 on astrophysical and cosmological aspects of gravitational waves, the community of all scientists interested in this topic will be well served. Part I of the book is devoted to the theoretical aspects of gravitational waves. In chapter 1 the waves are introduced in usual relativist's fashion, in the context of an approximation to general relativity in which they are treated as a small perturbation of the Minkowski metric of flat spacetime. This is an adequate foundation to study how the waves propagate, and how they interact with freely moving masses making up a detector. The waves are presented in the usual traceless-transverse gauge, but the detection aspects are also worked out in the detector's proper rest frame; this dual

  18. Lunar LIGO: A new concept in gravitational wave astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafave, Norman; Wilson, Thomas L.

    1993-01-01

    For three decades, physicists have been in search of an elusive phenomenon predicted by Einstein's general theory of relativity; gravitational radiation. These weak vibrations of spacetime have, thus far, eluded conclusive Earth-based detection due in part to insufficient detector sensitivity and noise isolation. The detection of gravitational waves is crucial for two reasons. It would provide further evidence for the validity of Einstein's theory of relativity, the presently accepted theory of gravitation. Furthermore, the ability to identify the location of a source of a detected gravitational wave event would yield a radical new type of astronomy based on non-electromagnetic emissions. We continue our study of a lunar-based system which can provide an important complement to Earth-based analysis because it is completely independent of the geophysical sources of noise on Earth, while providing an Earth-Moon baseline for pin-pointing burst sources in the Universe. We also propose for the first time that a simplified version of the LIGO beam detector optical system, which we will call LLIGO (Lunar LIGO), could be emplaced on the Moon as part of NASA's robotic lander program now under study (Artemis). The Earth-based investigation has two major programs underway. Both involve large interferometer-type gravitational wave antennas.

  19. Gravitational-Wave Cosmology across 29 Decades in Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasky, Paul D.; Mingarelli, Chiara M. F.; Smith, Tristan L.; Giblin, John T.; Thrane, Eric; Reardon, Daniel J.; Caldwell, Robert; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, N. D. Ramesh; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Dai, Shi; Dempsey, James; Hobbs, George; Kerr, Matthew; Levin, Yuri; Manchester, Richard N.; Osłowski, Stefan; Ravi, Vikram; Rosado, Pablo A.; Shannon, Ryan M.; Spiewak, Renée; van Straten, Willem; Toomey, Lawrence; Wang, Jingbo; Wen, Linqing; You, Xiaopeng; Zhu, Xingjiang

    2016-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations of the gravitational field in the early Universe, amplified by inflation, produce a primordial gravitational-wave background across a broad frequency band. We derive constraints on the spectrum of this gravitational radiation, and hence on theories of the early Universe, by combining experiments that cover 29 orders of magnitude in frequency. These include Planck observations of cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization power spectra and lensing, together with baryon acoustic oscillations and big bang nucleosynthesis measurements, as well as new pulsar timing array and ground-based interferometer limits. While individual experiments constrain the gravitational-wave energy density in specific frequency bands, the combination of experiments allows us to constrain cosmological parameters, including the inflationary spectral index nt and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r . Results from individual experiments include the most stringent nanohertz limit of the primordial background to date from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, ΩGW(f )<2.3 ×10-10 . Observations of the cosmic microwave background alone limit the gravitational-wave spectral index at 95% confidence to nt≲5 for a tensor-to-scalar ratio of r =0.11 . However, the combination of all the above experiments limits nt<0.36 . Future Advanced LIGO observations are expected to further constrain nt<0.34 by 2020. When cosmic microwave background experiments detect a nonzero r , our results will imply even more stringent constraints on nt and, hence, theories of the early Universe.

  20. Gravitating toward Science: Parent-Child Interactions at a Gravitational-Wave Observatory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szechter, Lisa E.; Carey, Elizabeth J.

    2009-01-01

    This research examined the nature of parent-child conversations at an informal science education center housed in an active gravitational-wave observatory. Each of 20 parent-child dyads explored an interactive exhibit hall privately, without the distraction of other visitors. Parents employed a variety of strategies to support their children's…

  1. Gravitational scattering of zero-rest-mass plane waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Logi, W. K.; Kovacs, S. J., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The Feyman-diagram technique is used to calculate the differential cross sections for the scattering of zero-rest-mass plane waves of spin 0, 1, and 2 by linearized Schwarzschild and Kerr geometries in the long-wavelength weak-field limit. It is found that the polarization of right (or left) circularly polarized electromagnetic waves is unaffected by the scattering process (i.e., helicity is conserved) and that the two helicity (polarization) states of the photon are scattered differently by the Kerr geometry. This coupling between the photon helicity and the angular momentum of the scatterer also leads to a partial polarization of unpolarized incident light. For gravitational waves, on the other hand, there is neither helicity conservation nor helicity-dependent scattering; the angular momentum of the scatterer has no polarizing effect on incident unpolarized gravitational waves.

  2. Black Hole Mergers and Gravitational Waves: Opening the New Frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2012-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes produces a powerful burst of gravitational waves, emitting more energy than all the stars in the observable universe combined. Since these mergers take place in the regime of strong dynamical gravity, computing the gravitational waveforms requires solving the full Einstein equations of general relativity on a computer. For more than 30 years, scientists tried to simulate these mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes were plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. In the past several years, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will highlight these breakthroughs and the resulting 'gold rush' of new results that is revealing the dynamics of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics.

  3. Black Hole Mergers, Gravitational Waves, and Multi-Messenger Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan M.

    2010-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest source of gravitational waves for both ground-based detectors such as LIGO and VIRGO, as well as the space-based LISA. Since the merger takes place in the regime of strong dynamical gravity, computing the resulting gravitational waveforms requires solving the full Einstein equations of general relativity on a computer. Although numerical codes designed to simulate black hole mergers were plagued for many years by a host of instabilities, recent breakthroughs have conquered these problems and opened up this field dramatically. This talk will focus on the resulting gold rush of new results that is revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, astrophysics, and testing general relativity.

  4. Nanohertz gravitational wave searches with interferometric pulsar timing experiments.

    PubMed

    Tinto, Massimo

    2011-05-13

    We estimate the sensitivity to nano-Hertz gravitational waves of pulsar timing experiments in which two highly stable millisecond pulsars are tracked simultaneously with two neighboring radio telescopes that are referenced to the same timekeeping subsystem (i.e., "the clock"). By taking the difference of the two time-of-arrival residual data streams we can exactly cancel the clock noise in the combined data set, thereby enhancing the sensitivity to gravitational waves. We estimate that, in the band (10(-9)-10(-8))  Hz, this "interferometric" pulsar timing technique can potentially improve the sensitivity to gravitational radiation by almost 2 orders of magnitude over that of single-telescopes. Interferometric pulsar timing experiments could be performed with neighboring pairs of antennas of the NASA's Deep Space Network and the forthcoming large arraying projects.

  5. Gravitational Wave Signals from Core-Collapse Supernova Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakunin, Konstantin; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Frere, Noah; Marronetti, Pedro; Bruenn, Stephen; Hix, W. Raphael; Lentz, Eric J.; Harris, J. Austin; Endeve, Eirik; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Blondin, John

    2017-01-01

    We present gravitational wave signals produced in two- and three-dimensional simulations of core-collapse supernova explosions. We perform our first-principles simulations with the neutrino hydrodynamics code CHIMERA. The code is based on Newtonian hydrodynamics and MGFLD neutrino transport with realistic neutrino interactions. It includes a nuclear equation of state, general relativistic corrections to the gravitational potential and neutrino transport, and a nuclear reaction network. Our simulations cover a wide range of progenitors from light (9.6M⊙) to heavy (30M⊙) mass. We compute the complete gravitational wave signals for all of these models. In this talk, we present the results and analyze the similarities and differences between the signals.

  6. Gravitational Wave Tests of General Relativity with Future Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Katie; Yunes, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational Wave detections with aLIGO have given us unrivalled insight into the extreme gravity regime, in which the gravitational field is strong and dynamical, but where will these types of detections be in 20 years? In this talk, we will explore how the construction of future generations of gravitational wave detectors influences our ability to test General Relativity in extreme gravity. In particular, using the noise spectra for aLIGO, A+, Voyager, CE, and ET-B, as well as the eLISA configurations N2A1, N2A2, and N2A5, we will compare the constraints that eLISA will provide to those that future generations of aLIGO will provide. These studies should produce useful information about instrument design to help guide design of future detectors for tests of gravity. Supported by the Montana Space Grant Consortium.

  7. Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.

    2014-08-01

    Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatories (SGOs) will enable the systematic study of the frequency band from 0.0001 - 1 Hz of gravitational waves, where a rich array of astrophysical sources is expected. ESA has selected “The Gravitational Universe” as the science theme for the L3 mission opportunity with a nominal launch date in 2034. This will be at a minimum 15 years after ground-based detectors and pulsar timing arrays announce their first detections and at least 18 years after the LISA Pathfinder Mission will have demonstrated key technologies in a dedicated space mission. It is therefore important to develop mission concepts that can take advantage of the momentum in the field and the investment in both technology development and a precision measurement community on a more near-term timescale than the L3 opportunity. This talk will discuss a mission concept based on the LISA baseline that resulted from a recent mission architecture study.

  8. [Design of High Frequency Signal Detecting Circuit of Human Body Impedance Used for Ultrashort Wave Diathermy Apparatus].

    PubMed

    Fan, Xu; Wang, Yunguang; Cheng, Haiping; Chong, Xiaochen

    2016-02-01

    The present circuit was designed to apply to human tissue impedance tuning and matching device in ultra-short wave treatment equipment. In order to judge if the optimum status of circuit parameter between energy emitter circuit and accepter circuit is in well syntony, we designed a high frequency envelope detect circuit to coordinate with automatic adjust device of accepter circuit, which would achieve the function of human tissue impedance matching and tuning. Using the sampling coil to receive the signal of amplitude-modulated wave, we compared the voltage signal of envelope detect circuit with electric current of energy emitter circuit. The result of experimental study was that the signal, which was transformed by the envelope detect circuit, was stable and could be recognized by low speed Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) and was proportional to the electric current signal of energy emitter circuit. It could be concluded that the voltage, transformed by envelope detect circuit can mirror the real circuit state of syntony and realize the function of human tissue impedance collecting.

  9. Laser Development for Gravitational-Wave Interferometry in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Camp, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    We are reporting on our development work on laser (master oscillator) and optical amplifier systems for gravitational-wave interferometry in space. Our system is based on the mature, wave-guided optics technologies, which have advantages over bulk, crystal-based, free-space optics. We are investing in a new type of compact, low-noise master oscillator, called the planar-waveguide external cavity diode laser. We made measurements, including those of noise, and performed space-qualification tests.

  10. Accelerated Searches of Gravitational Waves Using Graphics Processing Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Shin Kee; Wen, Linqing; Blair, David; Cannon, Kipp

    2010-06-01

    The existence of gravitational waves was predicted by Albert Einstein. Black hole and neutron star binary systems will product strong gravitational waves through their inspiral and eventual merger. The analysis of the gravitational wave data is computationally intensive, requiring matched filtering of terabytes of data with a bank of at least 3000 numerical templates that represent predicted waveforms. We need to complete the analysis in real-time (within the duration of the signal) in order to enable follow-up observations with some conventional optical or radio telescopes. We report a novel application of a graphics processing units (GPUs) for the purpose of accelerating the search pipelines for gravitational waves from coalescing binary systems of compact objects. A speed-up of 16 fold in total has been achieved with an NVIDIA GeForce 8800 Ultra GPU card compared with a standard central processing unit (CPU). We show that further improvements are possible and discuss the reduction in CPU number required for the detection of inspiral sources afforded by the use of GPUs.

  11. The gravitational wave spectrum from cosmological B-L breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Buchmüller, W.; Domcke, V.; Kamada, K.; Schmitz, K. E-mail: valerie.domcke@desy.de E-mail: kai.schmitz@ipmu.jp

    2013-10-01

    Cosmological B-L breaking is a natural and testable mechanism to generate the initial conditions of the hot early universe. If B-L is broken at the grand unification scale, the false vacuum phase drives hybrid inflation, ending in tachyonic preheating. The decays of heavy B-L Higgs bosons and heavy neutrinos generate entropy, baryon asymmetry and dark matter and also control the reheating temperature. The different phases in the transition from inflation to the radiation dominated phase produce a characteristic spectrum of gravitational waves. We calculate the complete gravitational wave spectrum due to inflation, preheating and cosmic strings, which turns out to have several features. The production of gravitational waves from cosmic strings has large uncertainties, with lower and upper bounds provided by Abelian Higgs strings and Nambu-Goto strings, implying Ω{sub GW}h{sup 2} ∼ 10{sup −13}–10{sup −8}, much larger than the spectral amplitude predicted by inflation. Forthcoming gravitational wave detectors such as eLISA, advanced LIGO, ET, BBO and DECIGO will reach the sensitivity needed to test the predictions from cosmological B-L breaking.

  12. The gravitational wave spectrum from cosmological B-L breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchmüller, W.; Domcke, V.; Kamada, K.; Schmitz, K.

    2013-10-01

    Cosmological B-L breaking is a natural and testable mechanism to generate the initial conditions of the hot early universe. If B-L is broken at the grand unification scale, the false vacuum phase drives hybrid inflation, ending in tachyonic preheating. The decays of heavy B-L Higgs bosons and heavy neutrinos generate entropy, baryon asymmetry and dark matter and also control the reheating temperature. The different phases in the transition from inflation to the radiation dominated phase produce a characteristic spectrum of gravitational waves. We calculate the complete gravitational wave spectrum due to inflation, preheating and cosmic strings, which turns out to have several features. The production of gravitational waves from cosmic strings has large uncertainties, with lower and upper bounds provided by Abelian Higgs strings and Nambu-Goto strings, implying ΩGWh2 ~ 10-13-10-8, much larger than the spectral amplitude predicted by inflation. Forthcoming gravitational wave detectors such as eLISA, advanced LIGO, ET, BBO and DECIGO will reach the sensitivity needed to test the predictions from cosmological B-L breaking.

  13. Detection of gravitational waves: a hundred year journey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavalvala, Nergis

    2016-05-01

    In February 2016, scientists announced the first ever detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes, launching a new era of gravitational wave astronomy and unprecedented tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity. I will describe the science and technology, and also the human story, behind the long quest that led to this discovery. Bio: Nergis Mavalvala is Professor of Physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Her research links the world of quantum mechanics, usually apparent only at the atomic scale, with gravitational waves, arising from some of the most powerful, yet elusive, forces in the cosmos. In 2016, she was part of the team that announced the first detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes. She received a B.A. from Wellesley College in 1990 and a Ph.D. from MIT in 1997. She was a postdoctoral fellow and research scientist at the California Institute of Technology between 1997 and 2002. Since 2002, she has been on the Physics faculty at MIT, and was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2010. She is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the Optical Society of America.

  14. Formation of black hole and emission of gravitational waves.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi

    2006-12-01

    Numerical simulations were performed for the formation process of rotating black holes. It is suggested that Kerr black holes are formed for wide ranges of initial parameters. The nature of gravitational waves from a test particle falling into a Kerr black hole as well as the development of 3D numerical relativity for the coalescing binary neutron stars are discussed.

  15. PREFACE: 8th Edoardo Amaldi Conference on Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marka, Zsuzsa; Marka, Szabolcs

    2010-04-01

    (The attached PDF contains select pictures from the Amaldi8 Conference) At Amaldi7 in Sydney in 2007 the Gravitational Wave International Committee (GWIC), which oversees the Amaldi meetings, decided to hold the 8th Edoardo Amaldi Conference on Gravitational Waves at Columbia University in the City of New York. With this decision, Amaldi returned to North America after a decade. The previous two years have seen many advances in the field of gravitational wave detection. By the summer of 2009 the km-scale ground based interferometric detectors in the US and Europe were preparing for a second long-term scientific run as a worldwide detector network. The advanced or second generation detectors had well-developed plans and were ready for the production phase or started construction. The European-American space mission, LISA Pathfinder, was progressing towards deployment in the foreseeable future and it is expected to pave the ground towards gravitational wave detection in the milliHertz regime with LISA. Plans were developed for an additional gravitational wave detector in Australia and in Japan (in this case underground) to extend the worldwide network of detectors for the advanced detector era. Japanese colleagues also presented plans for a space mission, DECIGO, that would bridge the gap between the LISA and ground-based interferometer frequency range. Compared to previous Amaldi meetings, Amaldi8 had new elements representing emerging trends in the field. For example, with the inclusion of pulsar timing collaborations to the GWIC, gravitational wave detection using pulsar timing arrays was recognized as one of the prominent directions in the field and was represented at Amaldi8 as a separate session. By 2009, searches for gravitational waves based on external triggers received from electromagnetic observations were already producing significant scientific results and plans existed for pointing telescopes by utilizing gravitational wave trigger events. Such

  16. Gravitational Wave Detection by Interferometry (Ground and Space).

    PubMed

    Pitkin, Matthew; Reid, Stuart; Rowan, Sheila; Hough, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in recent years on the development of gravitational-wave detectors. Sources such as coalescing compact binary systems, neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries, stellar collapses and pulsars are all possible candidates for detection. The most promising design of gravitational-wave detector uses test masses a long distance apart and freely suspended as pendulums on Earth or in drag-free spacecraft. The main theme of this review is a discussion of the mechanical and optical principles used in the various long baseline systems in operation around the world - LIGO (USA), Virgo (Italy/France), TAMA300 and LCGT (Japan), and GEO600 (Germany/U.K.) - and in LISA, a proposed space-borne interferometer. A review of recent science runs from the current generation of ground-based detectors will be discussed, in addition to highlighting the astrophysical results gained thus far. Looking to the future, the major upgrades to LIGO (Advanced LIGO), Virgo (Advanced Virgo), LCGT and GEO600 (GEO-HF) will be completed over the coming years, which will create a network of detectors with the significantly improved sensitivity required to detect gravitational waves. Beyond this, the concept and design of possible future "third generation" gravitational-wave detectors, such as the Einstein Telescope (ET), will be discussed.

  17. Denoising of gravitational wave signals via dictionary learning algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Forné, Alejandro; Marquina, Antonio; Font, José A.; Ibáñez, José M.

    2016-12-01

    Gravitational wave astronomy has become a reality after the historical detections accomplished during the first observing run of the two advanced LIGO detectors. In the following years, the number of detections is expected to increase significantly with the full commissioning of the advanced LIGO, advanced Virgo and KAGRA detectors. The development of sophisticated data analysis techniques to improve the opportunities of detection for low signal-to-noise-ratio events is, hence, a most crucial effort. In this paper, we present one such technique, dictionary-learning algorithms, which have been extensively developed in the last few years and successfully applied mostly in the context of image processing. However, to the best of our knowledge, such algorithms have not yet been employed to denoise gravitational wave signals. By building dictionaries from numerical relativity templates of both binary black holes mergers and bursts of rotational core collapse, we show how machine-learning algorithms based on dictionaries can also be successfully applied for gravitational wave denoising. We use a subset of signals from both catalogs, embedded in nonwhite Gaussian noise, to assess our techniques with a large sample of tests and to find the best model parameters. The application of our method to the actual signal GW150914 shows promising results. Dictionary-learning algorithms could be a complementary addition to the gravitational wave data analysis toolkit. They may be used to extract signals from noise and to infer physical parameters if the data are in good enough agreement with the morphology of the dictionary atoms.

  18. Josh Goldberg and the physical reality of gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulson, Peter R.

    2011-12-01

    In this article, I pay tribute to the contributions made by Josh Goldberg toward our understanding that gravitational waves are genuine physical predictions of general relativity. Josh played a central role in developing our understanding of how a binary star system generates gravitational waves. Another key contribution came through his patronage of the 1957 Chapel Hill Conference, in his role as funding officer for the Air Force's support of research in gravitation. I examine in detail the discussion at the Chapel Hill Conference, and show how the question of the reality of gravitational waves was resolved by a recognition that one could, in principle, construct a detector for such waves. I trace the implications of this resolution in the work of Joseph Weber, who attended the Chapel Hill Conference, and of Rainer Weiss, who did not attend but who carefully studied the key paper that Felix Pirani presented there. I conclude with a brief discussion of how a few minor remaining puzzles were resolved some years later.

  19. Formation of black hole and emission of gravitational waves

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulations were performed for the formation process of rotating black holes. It is suggested that Kerr black holes are formed for wide ranges of initial parameters. The nature of gravitational waves from a test particle falling into a Kerr black hole as well as the development of 3D numerical relativity for the coalescing binary neutron stars are discussed. PMID:25792793

  20. Gravitational damping of Alfven waves in stellar atmospheres and winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khabibrakhmanov, I. K.; Mullan, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    We consider how gravity affects the propagation of Alfven waves in a stellar atmosphere. We show that when the ion gyrofrequency exceeds the collision rate, the waves are absorbed at a rate proportional to the gravitational acceleration g. Estimates show that this mechanism can readily account for the observed energy losses in the solar chromosphere. The mechanism predicts that the pressure at the top of the chromosphere P(sub Tc) should scale with g as P(sub Tc) proportional to g(exp delta), where delta approximately equals 2/3; this is close to empirical results which suggest delta approximately equals 0.6. Gravitational damping leads to deposition of energy at a rate proportional to the mass of the particles. Hence, heavier ion are heated more effectively than protons. This is consistent with the observed proportionality between ion temperature and mass in the solar wind. Gravitational damping causes the local g to be effectively decreased by an amount proportional to the wave energy. This feature affects the acceleration of the solar wind. Gravitational damping may also lead to self-regulation of the damping of Alfven waves in stellar winds: this is relevant in the context of slow massive winds in cool giants.

  1. Chiral primordial gravitational waves from dilaton induced delayed chromonatural inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Ippei; Soda, Jiro; CLEO Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We study inflation driven by a dilaton and an axion, both of which are coupled to a SU(2) gauge field. We find that the inflation driven by the dilaton occurs in the early stage of inflation during which the gauge field grows due to the gauge-kinetic function. When the energy density of magnetic fields catches up with that of electric fields, chromonatural inflation takes over in the late stage of inflation, which we call delayed chromonatural inflation. Thus, the delayed chromonatural inflation driven by the axion and the gauge field is induced by the dilaton. The interesting outcome of the model is the generation of chiral primordial gravitational waves on small scales. Since the gauge field is inert in the early stage of inflation, it is viable in contrast to the conventional chromonatural inflation. We find the parameter region where chiral gravitational waves are generated in a frequency range higher than nHz, which are potentially detectable in future gravitational wave interferometers and pulsar-timing arrays such as DECi-hertz Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (DECIGO), evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA), and Square Kilometer Array (SKA).

  2. Towards robust gravitational wave detection with pulsar timing arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornish, Neil J.; Sampson, Laura

    2016-05-01

    Precision timing of highly stable millisecond pulsars is a promising technique for the detection of very low frequency sources of gravitational waves. In any single pulsar, a stochastic gravitational wave signal appears as an additional source of timing noise that can be absorbed by the noise model, and so it is only by considering the coherent response across a network of pulsars that the signal can be distinguished from other sources of noise. In the limit where there are many gravitational wave sources in the sky, or many pulsars in the array, the signals produce a unique tensor correlation pattern that depends only on the angular separation between each pulsar pair. It is this distinct fingerprint that is used to search for gravitational waves using pulsar timing arrays. Here we consider how the prospects for detection are diminished when the statistical isotropy of the timing array or the gravitational wave signal is broken by having a finite number of pulsars and a finite number of sources. We find the standard tensor-correlation analysis to be remarkably robust, with a mild impact on detectability compared to the isotropic limit. Only when there are very few sources and very few pulsars does the standard analysis begin to fail. Having established that the tensor correlations are a robust signature for detection, we study the use of "sky scrambles" to break the correlations as a way to increase confidence in a detection. This approach is analogous to the use of "time slides" in the analysis of data from ground-based interferometric detectors.

  3. Gamma-ray-burst beaming and gravitational-wave observations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Holz, Daniel E

    2013-11-01

    Using the observed rate of short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) it is possible to make predictions for the detectable rate of compact binary coalescences in gravitational-wave detectors. We show that the nondetection of mergers in the existing LIGO/Virgo data constrains the beaming angles and progenitor masses of gamma-ray bursts, although these limits are fully consistent with existing expectations. We make predictions for the rate of events in future networks of gravitational-wave observatories, finding that the first detection of a neutron-star-neutron-star binary coalescence associated with the progenitors of short GRBs is likely to happen within the first 16 months of observation, even in the case of only two observatories (e.g., LIGO-Hanford and LIGO-Livingston) operating at intermediate sensitivities (e.g., advanced LIGO design sensitivity, but without signal recycling mirrors), and assuming a conservative distribution of beaming angles (e.g., all GRBs beamed within θ(j) = 30°). Less conservative assumptions reduce the waiting time until first detection to a period of weeks to months, with an event detection rate of >/~10/yr. Alternatively, the compact binary coalescence model of short GRBs can be ruled out if a binary is not seen within the first two years of operation of a LIGO-Hanford, LIGO-Livingston, and Virgo network at advanced design sensitivity. We also demonstrate that the gravitational wave detection rate of GRB triggered sources (i.e., those seen first in gamma rays) is lower than the rate of untriggered events (i.e., those seen only in gravitational waves) if θ(j)≲30°, independent of the noise curve, network configuration, and observed GRB rate. The first detection in gravitational waves of a binary GRB progenitor is therefore unlikely to be associated with the observation of a GRB.

  4. LIGO GW150914 and GW151226 gravitational wave detection and generalized gravitation theory (MOG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, J. W.

    2016-12-01

    The nature of gravitational waves in a generalized gravitation theory is investigated. The linearized field equations and the metric tensor quadrupole moment power and the decrease in radius of an inspiralling binary system of two compact objects are derived. The generalized Kerr metric describing a spinning black hole is determined by its mass M and the spin parameter a = cS / GM2. The LIGO-Virgo collaboration data is fitted with smaller binary black hole masses in agreement with the current electromagnetic, observed X-ray binary upper bound for a black hole mass, M ≲ 10M⊙.

  5. Gravitational collapse of dissipative fluid as a source of gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Sanjukta Chakraborty, Subenoy

    2016-01-15

    Gravitational collapse of cylindrical anisotropic fluid has been considered in analogy with the work of Misner and Sharp. Using Darmois matching conditions, the interior cylindrical dissipative fluid (in the form of shear viscosity and heat flux) is matched to an exterior vacuum Einstein–Rosen space–time. It is found that on the bounding 3-surface the radial pressure of the anisotropic perfect fluid is linearly related to the shear viscosity and the heat flux of the dissipative fluid on the boundary. This non-zero radial pressure on the bounding surface may be considered as the source of gravitational waves outside the collapsing matter distribution.

  6. Broadband searches for continuous gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dergachev, Vladimir; LIGO/Virgo Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Isolated rotating neutron stars are expected to emit gravitational radiation of nearly constant frequency and amplitude. Searches for such radiation from unknown stars are computationally limited, with all-sky searches of initial LIGO and Virgo data achieving sensitivity to strains smaller than 10-24. Because CW amplitudes are thought to be extremely weak, long time integrations must be carried out to detect a signal. Integration is complicated by the motion of the Earth (daily rotation and orbital motion) which induces substantial modulations of detected frequency and amplitude that are highly dependent on source location. Large volumes of acquired data make this search computationally difficult. We will present recently published results and discuss algorithms used to analyze large volumes of data.

  7. Massive gravitational waves in Chern-Simons modified gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Myung, Yun Soo; Moon, Taeyoon E-mail: tymoon@inje.ac.kr

    2014-10-01

    We consider the nondynamical Chern-Simons (nCS) modified gravity, which is regarded as a parity-odd theory of massive gravity in four dimensions. We first find polarization modes of gravitational waves for θ=x/μ in nCS modified gravity by using the Newman-Penrose formalism where the null complex tetrad is necessary to specify gravitational waves. We show that in the Newman–Penrose formalism, the number of polarization modes is one in addition to an unspecified Ψ{sub 4}, implying three degrees of freedom for θ=x/μ. This compares with two for a canonical embedding of θ=t/μ. Also, if one introduces the Ricci tensor formalism to describe a massive graviton arising from the nCS modified gravity, one finds one massive mode after making second-order wave equations, which is compared to five found from the parity-even Einstein–Weyl gravity.

  8. Gravitational wave memory: A new approach to study modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Song Ming; Nishizawa, Atsushi

    2016-11-01

    It is well known that two types of gravitational wave memory exist in general relativity (GR): the linear memory and the nonlinear, or Christodoulou, memory. These effects, especially the latter, depend on the specific form of the Einstein equation. It can then be speculated that, in modified theories of gravity, the memory can differ from the GR prediction and provides novel phenomena to study these theories. We support this speculation by considering scalar-tensor theories, for which we find two new types of memory: the T memory and the S memory, which contribute to the tensor and scalar components of a gravitational wave, respectively. Specifically, the former is caused by the burst of energy carried away by scalar radiation, while the latter is intimately related to the no scalar hair property of black holes in scalar-tensor gravity. We estimate the size of these two types of memory in gravitational collapses and formulate a detection strategy for the S memory, which can be singled out from tensor gravitational waves. We show that (i) the S memory exists even in spherical symmetry and is observable under current model constraints, and (ii) while the T memory is usually much weaker than the S memory, it can become comparable in the case of spontaneous scalarization.

  9. Quantum Measurement Theory in Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilishin, Stefan L.; Khalili, Farid Ya.

    2012-12-01

    The fast progress in improving the sensitivity of the gravitational-wave detectors, we all have witnessed in the recent years, has propelled the scientific community to the point at which quantum behavior of such immense measurement devices as kilometer-long interferometers starts to matter. The time when their sensitivity will be mainly limited by the quantum noise of light is around the corner, and finding ways to reduce it will become a necessity. Therefore, the primary goal we pursued in this review was to familiarize a broad spectrum of readers with the theory of quantum measurements in the very form it finds application in the area of gravitational-wave detection. We focus on how quantum noise arises in gravitational-wave interferometers and what limitations it imposes on the achievable sensitivity. We start from the very basic concepts and gradually advance to the general linear quantum measurement theory and its application to the calculation of quantum noise in the contemporary and planned interferometric detectors of gravitational radiation of the first and second generation. Special attention is paid to the concept of the Standard Quantum Limit and the methods of its surmounting.

  10. Rapid Radio Followups of LIGO Gravitational Wave Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenet, Rick; Stevens, Jamie; Wieringa, Mark; Creighton, Teviet

    2010-10-01

    We propose real time follow-up observations with the ATCA to search for radio counterparts to candidate gravitational-wave events detected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors. Electromagnetic and gravitational radiation provide complementary views of the Universe: the former being generated by the microphysical processes of charged particles, the latter by coherent bulk motion of masses. A complete picture of the most violent events in nature, such as supernovae and mergers of stellar remnants, will require both types of observation: Gravitational waves (GWs) to uncover the mechanics of the underlying (gravitational) energy source, and electromagnetic waves to reveal how that energy is then dissipated in matter. The search for GWs is entering an exciting phase with kilometer-scale interferometric detectors LIGO and Virgo achieving sensitivities for which detection of GWs is plausible. Since the sensitivity of these instruments improves incrementally, it is likely that the first verifiable detections of GWs will have signal-to-noise ratios that are just barely statistically significant. Observations in the electromagnetic spectrum will help confirm the first GW detections.

  11. Binary Black Holes, Gravitational Waves, and Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the massive black hole (MBH) binaries that are found at the center of most galaxies, "astronomical messenger", gravitational waves (GW), and the use of numerical relativity understand the features of these phenomena. The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy and is one of the brightest sources in the gravitational wave sky. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. Since these mergers take place in regions of very strong gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute these waveforms using the methods of numerical relativity.. This talk will take you on this quest for the holy grail of numerical relativity, showing how a spacetime is constructed on a computer to build a simulation laboratory for binary black hole mergers. We will focus on the recent advances that are revealing these waveforms, and the dramatic new potential for discoveries that arises when these sources will be observed by LIGO and LISA.

  12. Quantum Measurement Theory in Gravitational-Wave Detectors.

    PubMed

    Danilishin, Stefan L; Khalili, Farid Ya

    2012-01-01

    The fast progress in improving the sensitivity of the gravitational-wave detectors, we all have witnessed in the recent years, has propelled the scientific community to the point at which quantum behavior of such immense measurement devices as kilometer-long interferometers starts to matter. The time when their sensitivity will be mainly limited by the quantum noise of light is around the corner, and finding ways to reduce it will become a necessity. Therefore, the primary goal we pursued in this review was to familiarize a broad spectrum of readers with the theory of quantum measurements in the very form it finds application in the area of gravitational-wave detection. We focus on how quantum noise arises in gravitational-wave interferometers and what limitations it imposes on the achievable sensitivity. We start from the very basic concepts and gradually advance to the general linear quantum measurement theory and its application to the calculation of quantum noise in the contemporary and planned interferometric detectors of gravitational radiation of the first and second generation. Special attention is paid to the concept of the Standard Quantum Limit and the methods of its surmounting.

  13. NANOGrav Constraints on Gravitational Wave Bursts with Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Brazier, A.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Christy, B.; Cordes, J. M.; Cornish, N. J.; Demorest, P. B.; Deng, X.; Dolch, T.; Ellis, J. A.; Ferdman, R. D.; Fonseca, E.; Garver-Daniels, N.; Jenet, F.; Jones, G.; Kaspi, V. M.; Koop, M.; Lam, M. T.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Levin, L.; Lommen, A. N.; Lorimer, D. R.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R. S.; Madison, D. R.; McLaughlin, M. A.; McWilliams, S. T.; Nice, D. J.; Palliyaguru, N.; Pennucci, T. T.; Ransom, S. M.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I. H.; Stinebring, D. R.; Stovall, K.; Swiggum, J.; Vallisneri, M.; van Haasteren, R.; Wang, Y.; Zhu, W. W.; NANOGrav Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Among efforts to detect gravitational radiation, pulsar timing arrays are uniquely poised to detect “memory” signatures, permanent perturbations in spacetime from highly energetic astrophysical events such as mergers of supermassive black hole binaries. The North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) observes dozens of the most stable millisecond pulsars using the Arecibo and Green Bank radio telescopes in an effort to study, among other things, gravitational wave memory. We herein present the results of a search for gravitational wave bursts with memory (BWMs) using the first five years of NANOGrav observations. We develop original methods for dramatically speeding up searches for BWM signals. In the directions of the sky where our sensitivity to BWMs is best, we would detect mergers of binaries with reduced masses of {10}9 {M}⊙ out to distances of 30 Mpc; such massive mergers in the Virgo cluster would be marginally detectable. We find no evidence for BWMs. However, with our non-detection, we set upper limits on the rate at which BWMs of various amplitudes could have occurred during the time spanned by our data—e.g., BWMs with amplitudes greater than 10-13 must encounter the Earth at a rate less than 1.5 yr-1.

  14. Chirality oscillation of primordial gravitational waves during inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yong; Wang, Yu-Tong; Piao, Yun-Song

    2017-03-01

    We show that if the gravitational Chern-Simons term couples to a massive scalar field ( m > H), the primordial gravitational waves (GWs) will show itself the chirality oscillation, i.e., the amplitudes of the left- and right-handed GWs modes will convert into each other and oscillate in their propagations. This oscillation will eventually develop a permanent difference of the amplitudes of both modes, which leads to nearly opposite oscillating shapes in the power spectra of the left- and right-handed primordial GWs. We discuss its implication to the CMB B-mode polarization.

  15. NASA's Preparations for ESA's L3 Gravitational Wave Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, Robin T.

    2016-01-01

    In November 2013, the European Space Agency (ESA) selected the science theme, the "Gravitational Universe," for its third large mission opportunity, known as 'L3,' under its Cosmic Vision Programme. The planned launch date is 2034. NASA is seeking a role as an international partner in L3. NASA is supporting: (1) US participation in early mission studies, (2) US technology development, (3) pre-decadal preparations, (4) ESA's LISA Pathfinder mission and (5) the ST7 Disturbance Reduction System project. This talk summarizes NASA's preparations for a future gravitational-wave mission.

  16. Precision Laser Development for Gravitational Wave Space Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Camp, Jordan

    2011-01-01

    Optical fiber and semiconductor laser technologies have evolved dramatically over the last decade due to the increased demands from optical communications. We are developing a laser (master oscillator) and optical amplifier based on those technologies for interferometric space missions, such as the gravitational-wave mission LISA, and GRACE follow-on, by fully utilizing the mature wave-guided optics technologies. In space, where a simple and reliable system is preferred, the wave-guided components are advantageous over bulk, crystal-based, free-space laser, such as NPRO (Non-planar Ring Oscillator) and bulk-crystal amplifier, which are widely used for sensitive laser applications on the ground.

  17. Observation of high-frequency electrostatic waves in the vicinity of the reconnection ion diffusion region by the spacecraft of the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, M.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Berchem, J.; Walker, R. J.; Liang, H.; El-Alaoui, M.; Goldstein, M. L.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Marklund, G.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Ergun, R. E.; Wilder, F. D.; Russell, C. T.; Strangewway, R. J.; Zhao, C.; Paterson, W. R.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C. J.; Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.; Dorelli, J. C.; Gershman, D. J.; Avanov, L. A.; Lavraud, B.; Chandler, M. O.

    2016-05-01

    We report Magnetospheric Multiscale observations of high-frequency electrostatic waves in the vicinity of the reconnection ion diffusion region on the dayside magnetopause. The ion diffusion region is identified during two magnetopause crossings by the Hall electromagnetic fields, the slippage of ions with respect to the magnetic field, and magnetic energy dissipation. In addition to electron beam modes that have been previously detected at the separatrix on the magnetospheric side of the magnetopause, we report, for the first time, the existence of electron cyclotron harmonic waves at the magnetosheath separatrix. Broadband waves between the electron cyclotron and electron plasma frequencies, which were probably generated by electron beams, were found within the magnetopause current sheet. Contributions by these high-frequency waves to the magnetic energy dissipation were negligible in the diffusion regions as compared to those of lower-frequency waves.

  18. Modeling the high-frequency complex modulus of silicone rubber using standing Lamb waves and an inverse finite element method.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Ulf; Lindahl, Olof; Andersson, Britt

    2014-12-01

    To gain an understanding of the high-frequency elastic properties of silicone rubber, a finite element model of a cylindrical piezoelectric element, in contact with a silicone rubber disk, was constructed. The frequency-dependent elastic modulus of the silicone rubber was modeled by a fourparameter fractional derivative viscoelastic model in the 100 to 250 kHz frequency range. The calculations were carried out in the range of the first radial resonance frequency of the sensor. At the resonance, the hyperelastic effect of the silicone rubber was modeled by a hyperelastic compensating function. The calculated response was matched to the measured response by using the transitional peaks in the impedance spectrum that originates from the switching of standing Lamb wave modes in the silicone rubber. To validate the results, the impedance responses of three 5-mm-thick silicone rubber disks, with different radial lengths, were measured. The calculated and measured transitional frequencies have been compared in detail. The comparison showed very good agreement, with average relative differences of 0.7%, 0.6%, and 0.7% for the silicone rubber samples with radial lengths of 38.0, 21.4, and 11.0 mm, respectively. The average complex elastic moduli of the samples were (0.97 + 0.009i) GPa at 100 kHz and (0.97 + 0.005i) GPa at 250 kHz.

  19. Astronomers Get New Tools for Gravitational-Wave Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    Teamwork between gamma-ray and radio astronomers has produced a breakthrough in finding natural cosmic tools needed to make the first direct detections of the long-elusive gravitational waves predicted by Albert Einstein nearly a century ago. An orbiting gamma-ray telescope has pointed radio astronomers to specific locations in the sky where they can discover new millisecond pulsars. Millisecond pulsars, rapidly-spinning superdense neutron stars, can serve as extremely precise and stable natural clocks. Astronomers hope to detect gravitational waves by measuring tiny changes in the pulsars' rotation caused by the passage of the gravitational waves. To do this, they need a multitude of millisecond pulsars dispersed widely throughout the sky. However, nearly three decades after the discovery of the first millisecond pulsar, only about 150 of them had been found, some 90 of those clumped tightly in globular star clusters and thus unusable for detecting gravitational waves. The problem was that millisecond pulsars could only be discovered through arduous, computing-intensive searches of small portions of sky. "We've probably found far less than one percent of the millisecond pulsars in the Milky Way Galaxy," said Scott Ransom of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). The breakthrough came when an instrument aboard NASA's Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope began surveying the sky in 2008. This instrument located hundreds of gamma-ray-emitting objects throughout our Galaxy, and astronomers suspected many of these could be millisecond pulsars. Paul Ray of the Naval Research Laboratory initiated an international collaboration to use radio telescopes to confirm the identity of these objects as millisecond pulsars. "The data from Fermi were like a buried-treasure map," Ransom said. "Using our radio telescopes to study the objects located by Fermi, we found 17 millisecond pulsars in three months. Large-scale searches had taken 10-15 years to find that many," Ransom

  20. Scale-dependent gravitational waves from a rolling axion

    SciTech Connect

    Namba, Ryo; Shiraishi, Maresuke; Peloso, Marco; Unal, Caner; Sorbo, Lorenzo E-mail: peloso@physics.umn.edu E-mail: sorbo@physics.umass.edu

    2016-01-01

    We consider a model in which a pseudo-scalar field σ rolls for some e-folds during inflation, sourcing one helicity of a gauge field. These fields are only gravitationally coupled to the inflaton, and therefore produce scalar and tensor primordial perturbations only through gravitational interactions. These sourced signals are localized on modes that exit the horizon while the roll of σ is significant. We focus our study on cases in which the model can simultaneously produce (i) a large gravitational wave signal, resulting in observable B-modes of the CMB polarizations, and (ii) sufficiently small scalar perturbations, so to be in agreement with the current limits from temperature anisotropies. Different choices of parameters can instead lead to a localized and visible departure from gaussianity in the scalar sector, either at CMB or LSS scales.

  1. Binary black holes, gravitational waves, and numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centrella, Joan M.; Baker, John G.; Boggs, William D.; Kelly, Bernard J.; McWilliams, Sean T.; van Meter, James R.

    2007-07-01

    The final merger of comparable mass binary black holes produces an intense burst of gravitational radiation and is one of the strongest sources for both ground-based and space-based gravitational wave detectors. Since the merger occurs in the strong-field dynamical regime of general relativity, numerical relativity simulations of the full Einstein equations in 3-D are required to calculate the resulting gravitational dynamics and waveforms. While this problem has been pursued for more than 30 years, the numerical codes have long been plagued by various instabilities and, overall, progress was incremental. Recently, however, dramatic breakthrough have occurred, resulting in robust simulations of merging black holes. In this paper, we examine these developments and the exciting new results that are emerging.

  2. Gravitational waves in the spectral action of noncommutative geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, William; Ochoa, Joseph; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2010-10-15

    The spectral triple approach to noncommutative geometry allows one to develop the entire standard model (and supersymmetric extensions) of particle physics from a purely geometry standpoint and thus treats both gravity and particle physics on the same footing. The bosonic sector of the theory contains a modification to Einstein-Hilbert gravity, involving a nonconformal coupling of curvature to the Higgs field and conformal Weyl term (in addition to a nondynamical topological term). In this paper we derive the weak-field limit of this gravitational theory and show that the production and dynamics of gravitational waves are significantly altered. In particular, we show that the graviton contains a massive mode that alters the energy lost to gravitational radiation, in systems with evolving quadrupole moment. We explicitly calculate the general solution and apply it to systems with periodically varying quadrupole moments, focusing, in particular, on the well-known energy loss formula for circular binaries.

  3. Probing the internal composition of neutron stars with gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatziioannou, Katerina; Yagi, Kent; Klein, Antoine; Cornish, Neil; Yunes, Nicolás

    2015-11-01

    Gravitational waves from neutron star binary inspirals contain information about the as yet unknown equation of state of supranuclear matter. In the absence of definitive experimental evidence that determines the correct equation of state, a number of diverse models that give the pressure inside a neutron star as function of its density have been constructed by nuclear physicists. These models differ not only in the approximations and techniques they employ to solve the many-body Schrödinger equation, but also in the internal neutron star composition they assume. We study whether gravitational wave observations of neutron star binaries in quasicircular inspirals up to contact will allow us to distinguish between equations of state of differing internal composition, thereby providing important information about the properties and behavior of extremely high density matter. We carry out a Bayesian model selection analysis, and find that second generation gravitational wave detectors can heavily constrain equations of state that contain only quark matter, but hybrid stars containing both normal and quark matter are typically harder to distinguish from normal matter stars. A gravitational wave detection with a signal-to-noise ratio of 20 and masses around 1.4 M⊙ would provide indications of the existence or absence of strange quark stars, while a signal-to-noise ratio 30 detection could either detect or rule out strange quark stars with a 20 to 1 confidence. The presence of kaon condensates or hyperons in neutron star inner cores cannot be easily confirmed. For example, for the equations of state studied in this paper, even a gravitational wave signal with a signal-to-noise ratio as high as 60 would not allow us to claim a detection of kaon condensates or hyperons with confidence greater than 5 to 1. On the other hand, if kaon condensates and hyperons do not form in neutron stars, a gravitational wave signal with similar signal-to-noise ratio would be able to

  4. On propagation of electromagnetic and gravitational waves in the expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladyshev, V. O.

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain an equation for the propagation time of electromagnetic and gravitational waves in the expanding Universe. The velocity of electromagnetic waves propagation depends on the velocity of the interstellar medium in the observer's frame of reference. Gravitational radiation interacts weakly with the substance, so electromagnetic and gravitational waves propagate from a remote astrophysical object to the terrestrial observer at different time. Gravitational waves registration enables the inverse problem solution - by the difference in arrival time of electromagnetic and gravitational-wave signal, we can determine the characteristics of the emitting area of the astrophysical object.

  5. Gravitational Wave Signatures in Black Hole Forming Core Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdá-Durán, Pablo; DeBrye, Nicolas; Aloy, Miguel A.; Font, José A.; Obergaulinger, Martin

    2013-12-01

    We present general relativistic numerical simulations of collapsing stellar cores. Our initial model consists of a low metallicity rapidly-rotating progenitor which is evolved in axisymmetry with the latest version of our general relativistic code CoCoNuT, which allows for black hole formation and includes the effects of a microphysical equation of state (LS220) and a neutrino leakage scheme to account for radiative losses. The motivation of our study is to analyze in detail the emission of gravitational waves in the collapsar scenario of long gamma-ray bursts. Our simulations show that the phase during which the proto-neutron star (PNS) survives before ultimately collapsing to a black hole is particularly optimal for gravitational wave emission. The high-amplitude waves last for several seconds and show a remarkable quasi-periodicity associated with the violent PNS dynamics, namely during the episodes of convection and the subsequent nonlinear development of the standing-accretion shock instability (SASI). By analyzing the spectrogram of our simulations we are able to identify the frequencies associated with the presence of g-modes and with the SASI motions at the PNS surface. We note that the gravitational waves emitted reach large enough amplitudes to be detected with third-generation detectors such as the Einstein Telescope within a Virgo Cluster volume at rates <~ 0.1 yr-1.

  6. GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SIGNATURES IN BLACK HOLE FORMING CORE COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    Cerdá-Durán, Pablo; DeBrye, Nicolas; Aloy, Miguel A.; Font, José A.; Obergaulinger, Martin

    2013-12-20

    We present general relativistic numerical simulations of collapsing stellar cores. Our initial model consists of a low metallicity rapidly-rotating progenitor which is evolved in axisymmetry with the latest version of our general relativistic code CoCoNuT, which allows for black hole formation and includes the effects of a microphysical equation of state (LS220) and a neutrino leakage scheme to account for radiative losses. The motivation of our study is to analyze in detail the emission of gravitational waves in the collapsar scenario of long gamma-ray bursts. Our simulations show that the phase during which the proto-neutron star (PNS) survives before ultimately collapsing to a black hole is particularly optimal for gravitational wave emission. The high-amplitude waves last for several seconds and show a remarkable quasi-periodicity associated with the violent PNS dynamics, namely during the episodes of convection and the subsequent nonlinear development of the standing-accretion shock instability (SASI). By analyzing the spectrogram of our simulations we are able to identify the frequencies associated with the presence of g-modes and with the SASI motions at the PNS surface. We note that the gravitational waves emitted reach large enough amplitudes to be detected with third-generation detectors such as the Einstein Telescope within a Virgo Cluster volume at rates ≲ 0.1 yr{sup –1}.

  7. Can JWST Follow Up on Gravitational-Wave Detections?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Bitten by the gravitational-wave bug? While we await Thursdays press conference, heres some food for thought: if LIGO were able to detect gravitational waves from compact-object mergers, how could we follow up on the detections? A new study investigates whether the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to observe electromagnetic signatures of some compact-object mergers.Hunting for MergersStudying compact-object mergers (mergers of black holes and neutron stars) can help us understand a wealth of subjects, like high-energy physics, how matter behaves at nuclear densities, how stars evolve, and how heavy elements in the universe were created.The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is searching for the signature ripples in spacetime identifying these mergers, but gravitational waves are squirrelly: LIGO will only be able to localize wave sources to tens of square degrees. If we want to find out more about any mergers LIGO discovers in gravitational waves, well need a follow-up search for electromagnetic counterparts with other observatories.The Kilonova KeyOne possible electromagnetic counterpart is kilonovae, explosions that can be produced during a merger of a binary neutron star or a neutron starblack hole system. If the neutron star is disrupted during the merger, some of the hot mass is flung outward and shines brightly by radioactive decay.Kilonovae are especially promising as electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves for three reasons:They emit isotropically, so the number of observable mergers isnt limited by relativistic beaming.They shine for a week, giving follow-up observatories time to search for them.The source location can beeasily recovered.The only problem? We dont currently have any sensitive survey instruments in the near-infrared band (where kilonova emission peaks) that can provide coverage over tens of square degrees. Luckily, we will soon have just the thing: JWST, launching in 2018!JWSTs

  8. Predicting Electromagnetic Signatures of Gravitational Wave Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Orazio, Daniel John

    This dissertation investigates the signatures of electromagnetic radiation that may accompany two specific sources of gravitational radiation: the inspiral and merger of massive black hole binaries (MBHBs) in galactic nuclei, and the coalescence of black hole neutron star (BHNS) pairs. Part I considers the interaction of MBHBs, at sub-pc separations, with a circumbinary gas disk. Accretion rates onto the MBHB are calculated from two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations as a function of the relative masses of the black holes. The results are applied to interpretation of the recent, sub-pc separation MBHB candidate in the nucleus of the periodically variable Quasar PG 1302-102. We advance an interpretation of the variability observed in PG 1302-102 as being caused by Doppler-boosted emission sourced by the orbital velocity of the smaller black hole in a MBHB with disparate relative masses. Part II considers BHNS binaries in which the black hole is large enough to swallow the neutron star whole before it is disrupted. As the pair nears merger, orbital motion of the black hole through the magnetosphere of the neutron star generates an electromotive force, a black-hole-battery, which, for the strongest neutron star magnetic field strengths, could power luminosities large enough to make the merging pair observable out to cosmic distances. Relativistic solutions for vacuum fields of a magnetic dipole near a horizon are given, and a mechanism for harnessing the power of the black-hole-battery is put forth in the form of a fireball emitting in hard X-rays to gamma-rays.

  9. LISA and LISA Pathfinder: Gravitational Wave Observation in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzman, Felipe

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a planned NASA-ESA gravitational wave observatory in the frequency range of 0.1 mHz--100 mHz. This observation band is inaccessible to ground-based detectors due to fluctuations in the Earth gravitational field. Gravitational wave sources for LISA include galactic binaries, mergers of supermassive black-hole binaries, extreme-mass-ratio inspirals, and cosmology backgrounds and bursts. LISA is a constellation of three spacecraft separated by 5 million km in an equilateral triangle, whose center follows the Earth in a heliocentric orbit with an orbital phase offset of 20 degrees. Challenging technology is required to ensure pure geodetic trajectories of the six onboard test masses, whose distance fluctuations will be measured by interspacecraft laser interferometers with picometer accuracy. LISA Pathfinder is an ESA-launched technology demonstration mission of key LISA subsystems such as spacecraft control with micronewton thrusters, test mass drag-free control, and precision laser interferometry between free-flying test masses. Ground testing of hardware of the Gravitational Reference Sensor and Optical Metrology subsystems of LISA Pathfinder is currently ongoing. A detailed description of the two missions and an overview of current investigations conducted by the community will be discussed. The current status in development and implementation of LISA Pathfinder pre-flight systems and latest results of the ongoing ground testing efforts will also be presented.

  10. Sonic search for monopoles, gravitational waves and newtorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, C.; de Rújula, A.; Lautrup, B.

    1984-08-01

    Hopes for the detection of gravitational waves and of very massive magnetic monopoles rely on cosmological sources - the big bang itself in the monopole's case. Some gravitational wave antennas are ``acoustic'' resonant detectors, that have reached a sensitivity not far from the ``quantum limit''. We investigate in detail the response of these sensitive detectors to the passage of ``relic'' monopoles. We compute signal to noise ratios for a variety of target materials, and we find them to be favourable for the very cold, high quality resonators that are presently contemplated. A monopole traversing a metal produces a ``thermo-acoustic'' pulse, whose amplitude is linear in the monopole's velocity, β. If the metal is superconducting, there is a novel additional ``magneto-acoustic'' source, whose amplitude is β-independent. Monopole detectors that rely on ionization have a sensitivity threshold in β, and may conceivably be blind to relic monopoles. The response of superconducting loop detectors is β-independent, but their collection areas are limited by the requirement of a sophisticated magnetic shielding. Neither of the above limitations would be shared by an acoustic monopole detector. We sketch a ``sonic antenna'' that would respond directionally to coventional cosmic rays, gravitational radiation, monopoles, and even to more exotic signals, like newtorites (elementary or composite ``meteorites'' that interact with ordinary matter only gravitationally). Permanent address: Niels Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark.

  11. Searching for gamma-ray counterpart of gravitational wave transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sol, H.

    2016-12-01

    With the recent direct detection of gravitational waves (GW), the search for electromagnetic counterpart of gravitational transients appears as a new challenge for astronomers. Information provided by electromagnetic data is complementary to the one deduced from the gravitational signal. Detecting the same event through the two messengers would be highly interesting to better identify the sources and refine their parameters. The scarcity of cosmic sources detected at very high energy (VHE) suggests that the gamma-ray domain could be useful to catch first electromagnetic signatures and reduce error boxes. Present IACT (Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes) like the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) operating in Namibia, the Major Atmospheric Gamma Imaging Cherenkov Telescopes (MAGIC) in the Canary Islands and the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) in the USA are already participating in the electromagnetic follow up of LIGO-Virgo gravitational wave event candidates. In the next decade the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), operating with a larger field of view, a higher sensitivity in the VHE gamma-ray range between 20 GeV and 300 TeV, and a fast re-positionning, will be perfectly adapted to this observational program.

  12. Testing the Speed of Gravitational Waves over Cosmological Distances with Strong Gravitational Lensing.

    PubMed

    Collett, Thomas E; Bacon, David

    2017-03-03

    Probing the relative speeds of gravitational waves and light acts as an important test of general relativity and alternative theories of gravity. Measuring the arrival time of gravitational waves (GWs) and electromagnetic (EM) counterparts can be used to measure the relative speeds, but only if the intrinsic time lag between emission of the photons and gravitational waves is well understood. Here we suggest a method that does not make such an assumption, using future strongly lensed GW events and EM counterparts; Biesiada et al. [J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys.10 (2014) 080JCAPBP1475-751610.1088/1475-7516/2014/10/080] forecast that 50-100 strongly lensed GW events will be observed each year with the Einstein Telescope. A single strongly lensed GW event would produce robust constraints on c_{GW}/c_{γ} at the 10^{-7} level, if a high-energy EM counterpart is observed within the field of view of an observing γ-ray burst monitor.

  13. High-order boundary integral equation solution of high frequency wave scattering from obstacles in an unbounded linearly stratified medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Alex H.; Nelson, Bradley J.; Mahoney, J. Matthew

    2015-09-01

    We apply boundary integral equations for the first time to the two-dimensional scattering of time-harmonic waves from a smooth obstacle embedded in a continuously-graded unbounded medium. In the case we solve, the square of the wavenumber (refractive index) varies linearly in one coordinate, i.e. (Δ + E +x2) u (x1 ,x2) = 0 where E is a constant; this models quantum particles of fixed energy in a uniform gravitational field, and has broader applications to stratified media in acoustics, optics and seismology. We evaluate the fundamental solution efficiently with exponential accuracy via numerical saddle-point integration, using the truncated trapezoid rule with typically 102 nodes, with an effort that is independent of the frequency parameter E. By combining with a high-order Nyström quadrature, we are able to solve the scattering from obstacles 50 wavelengths across to 11 digits of accuracy in under a minute on a desktop or laptop.

  14. TianQin: a space-borne gravitational wave detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jun; Chen, Li-Sheng; Duan, Hui-Zong; Gong, Yun-Gui; Hu, Shoucun; Ji, Jianghui; Liu, Qi; Mei, Jianwei; Milyukov, Vadim; Sazhin, Mikhail; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Toth, Viktor T.; Tu, Hai-Bo; Wang, Yamin; Wang, Yan; Yeh, Hsien-Chi; Zhan, Ming-Sheng; Zhang, Yonghe; Zharov, Vladimir; Zhou, Ze-Bing

    2016-02-01

    TianQin is a proposal for a space-borne detector of gravitational waves in the millihertz frequencies. The experiment relies on a constellation of three drag-free spacecraft orbiting the Earth. Inter-spacecraft laser interferometry is used to monitor the distances between the test masses. The experiment is designed to be capable of detecting a signal with high confidence from a single source of gravitational waves within a few months of observing time. We describe the preliminary mission concept for TianQin, including the candidate source and experimental designs. We present estimates for the major constituents of the experiment’s error budget and discuss the project’s overall feasibility. Given the current level of technological readiness, we expect TianQin to be flown in the second half of the next decade.

  15. Searches for Continuous Gravitational Waves in LIGO and Virgo Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riles, Keith; LIGO Scientific Collaboration Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration have carried out searches for periodic continuous gravitational waves. These analyses range from targeted searches for gravitational-wave signals from known pulsars, for which precise ephemerides from radio or X-ray observations are available, to all-sky searches for unknown neutron stars, including stars in unknown binary systems. Between these extremes lie directed searches for known stars of unknown spin frequency or for new unknown sources at specific locations. These different types of searches will be presented, including final results from the Initial LIGO and Virgo data runs and, where available, new results from searches of early Advanced LIGO data. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation grant PHY-1505932.

  16. An antenna for laser gravitational-wave observations in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faller, J. E.; Bender, P. L.; Hall, J. L.; Hils, D.; Stebbins, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    Progress during the past two years on a proposed Laser Gravitational-Wave Observatory in Space (LAGOS) is discussed. Calculated performance for a 10 to the 6th km sized antenna over the frequency range of 10 to the -5th to 1 Hz is given. The sensitivity from 0.001 to 0.1 Hz is expected to be 1 x 10 to the -21st/Hz exp 0.5. Noise sources such as accelerations of the drag-free test masses by random molecular impacts and by fluctuations in the net thermal radiation pressure will limit the sensitivity at lower frequencies. The scientific objectives are the observation of CW gravitational waves from large numbers of binary systems and the detection of pulses which may have been emitted during the period of galaxy formation.

  17. Leveraging waveform complexity for confident detection of gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanner, Jonah B.; Littenberg, Tyson B.; Cornish, Neil; Millhouse, Meg; Xhakaj, Enia; Salemi, Francesco; Drago, Marco; Vedovato, Gabriele; Klimenko, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    The recent completion of Advanced LIGO suggests that gravitational waves may soon be directly observed. Past searches for gravitational-wave transients have been impacted by transient noise artifacts, known as glitches, introduced into LIGO data due to instrumental and environmental effects. In this work, we explore how waveform complexity, instead of signal-to-noise ratio, can be used to rank event candidates and distinguish short duration astrophysical signals from glitches. We test this framework using a new hierarchical pipeline that directly compares the Bayesian evidence of explicit signal and glitch models. The hierarchical pipeline is shown to perform well and, in particular, to allow high-confidence detections of a range of waveforms at a realistic signal-to-noise ratio with a two-detector network.

  18. New method for gravitational wave detection with atomic sensors.

    PubMed

    Graham, Peter W; Hogan, Jason M; Kasevich, Mark A; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2013-04-26

    Laser frequency noise is a dominant noise background for the detection of gravitational waves using long-baseline optical interferometry. Amelioration of this noise requires near simultaneous strain measurements on more than one interferometer baseline, necessitating, for example, more than two satellites for a space-based detector or two interferometer arms for a ground-based detector. We describe a new detection strategy based on recent advances in optical atomic clocks and atom interferometry which can operate at long baselines and which is immune to laser frequency noise. Laser frequency noise is suppressed because the signal arises strictly from the light propagation time between two ensembles of atoms. This new class of sensor allows sensitive gravitational wave detection with only a single baseline. This approach also has practical applications in, for example, the development of ultrasensitive gravimeters and gravity gradiometers.

  19. Modeling Gravitational Waves to Test GR Dispersion and Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tso, Rhondale; Chen, Yanbei; Isi, Maximilliano

    2017-01-01

    Given continued observation runs from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory Scientific Collaboration, further gravitational wave (GW) events will provide added constraints on beyond-general relativity (b-GR) theories. One approach, independent of the GW generation mechanism at the source, is to look at modification to the GW dispersion and propagation, which can accumulate over vast distances. Generic modification of GW propagation can also, in certain b-GR theories, impact the polarization content of GWs. To this end, a comprehensive approach to testing the dispersion and polarization content is developed by modeling anisotropic deformations to the waveforms' phase, along with birefringence effects and corollary consequences for b-GR polarizations, i.e., breathing, vector, and longitudinal modes. Such an approach can be mapped to specific theories like Lorentz violation, amplitude birefringence in Chern-Simons, and provide hints at additional theories to be included. An overview of data analysis routines to be implemented will also be discussed.

  20. Balanced homodyne readout for quantum limited gravitational wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Fritschel, Peter; Evans, Matthew; Frolov, Valery

    2014-02-24

    Balanced homodyne detection is typically used to measure quantum-noise-limited optical beams, including squeezed states of light, at audio-band frequencies. Current designs of advanced gravitational wave interferometers use some type of homodyne readout for signal detection, in part because of its compatibility with the use of squeezed light. The readout scheme used in Advanced LIGO, called DC readout, is however not a balanced detection scheme. Instead, the local oscillator field, generated from a dark fringe offset, co-propagates with the signal field at the anti-symmetric output of the beam splitter. This article examines the alternative of a true balanced homodyne detection for the readout of gravitational wave detectors such as Advanced LIGO. Several practical advantages of the balanced detection scheme are described.

  1. Domain walls and gravitational waves in the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajewski, Tomasz; Lalak, Zygmunt; Lewicki, Marek; Olszewski, Paweł

    2016-12-01

    We study domain walls which can be created in the Standard Model under the assumption that it is valid up to very high energy scales. We focus on domain walls interpolating between the physical electroweak vacuum and the global minimum appearing at very high field strengths. The creation of the network which ends up in the electroweak vacuum percolating through the Universe is not as difficult to obtain as one may expect, although it requires certain tuning of initial conditions. Our numerical simulations confirm that such domain walls would swiftly decay and thus cannot dominate the Universe. We discuss the possibility of detection of gravitational waves produced in this scenario. We have found that for the standard cosmology the energy density of these gravitational waves is too small to be observed in present and planned detectors.

  2. Intensity of gravitational wave emitted by an oscillating Keplerian binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, M. N.; Bhuiyan, M. T. H.; Bhuyan, M. D. I.; Faruque, S. B.

    2017-02-01

    This paper attempts to formulate a way for calculating the intensity of gravitational wave from two point masses in Keplerian circular and elliptic orbits. The intensity is calculated with the assumption that the orbital plane of the binary undergoes small oscillation about the equilibrium x-y plane. This problem is simplification of a physically possible orbit where one of the point masses is spinning whereby the spin-orbit force drives the orbital plane to wobble in a complicated manner. It is shown that the total energy of gravitational wave emitted by the binary in this case is dominated by the parameters which take into account the oscillation of the plane. The results presented are in fact a generalization of the classic results of Landau and Lifshitz.

  3. Prospects for primordial gravitational waves in string inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parameswaran, Susha L.; Zavala, Ivonne

    2016-08-01

    Assuming that the early universe had (i) a description using perturbative string theory and its field theory limit, (ii) an epoch of slow-roll inflation within a four-dimensional effective field theory and a hierarchy of scales Minf < mkk < ms ≲ MPl that keeps the latter under control, we derive an upper bound on the amplitude of primordial gravitational waves. The bound is very sensitive to mild changes in numerical coefficients and the expansion parameters. For example, allowing couplings and mass-squared hierarchies ≲ 0.2 implies r ≲ 0.05, but asking more safely for hierarchies ≲ 0.1, the bound becomes r ≲ 10-6. Moreover, large volumes — typically used in string models to keep backreaction and moduli stabilization under control — drive r down. Consequently, any detection of inflationary gravitational waves would present an interesting but difficult challenge for string theory.

  4. Charge management for gravitational-wave observatories using UV LEDs

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, S. E.; Turner, M. D.; Schlamminger, S.; Hagedorn, C. A.; Gundlach, J. H.

    2010-01-15

    Accumulation of electrical charge on the end mirrors of gravitational-wave observatories can become a source of noise limiting the sensitivity of such detectors through electronic couplings to nearby surfaces. Torsion balances provide an ideal means for testing gravitational-wave technologies due to their high sensitivity to small forces. Our torsion pendulum apparatus consists of a movable plate brought near a plate pendulum suspended from a nonconducting quartz fiber. A UV LED located near the pendulum photoejects electrons from the surface, and a UV LED driven electron gun directs photoelectrons towards the pendulum surface. We have demonstrated both charging and discharging of the pendulum with equivalent charging rates of {approx}10{sup 5}e/s, as well as spectral measurements of the pendulum charge resulting in a white noise level equivalent to 3x10{sup 5}e/{radical}(Hz).

  5. Double optical spring enhancement for gravitational-wave detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehbein, Henning; Mueller-Ebhardt, Helge; Schnabel, Roman; Danzmann, Karsten; Somiya, Kentaro; Chen Yanbei; Danilishin, Stefan L.

    2008-09-15

    Currently planned second-generation gravitational-wave laser interferometers such as Advanced LIGO exploit the extensively investigated signal-recycling technique. Candidate Advanced LIGO configurations are usually designed to have two resonances within the detection band, around which the sensitivity is enhanced: a stable optical resonance and an unstable optomechanical resonance--which is upshifted from the pendulum frequency due to the so-called optical-spring effect. As an alternative to a feedback control system, we propose an all-optical stabilization scheme, in which a second optical spring is employed, and the test mass is trapped by a stable ponderomotive potential well induced by two carrier light fields whose detunings have opposite signs. The double optical spring also brings additional flexibility in reshaping the noise spectral density and optimizing toward specific gravitational-wave sources. The presented scheme can be extended easily to a multi-optical-spring system that allows further optimization.

  6. First upper limits from LIGO on gravitational wave bursts

    SciTech Connect

    B. Abbott et al.

    2004-03-09

    We report on a search for gravitational wave bursts using data from the first science run of the LIGO detectors. Our search focuses on bursts with durations ranging from 4 ms to 100 ms, and with significant power in the LIGO sensitivity band of 150 to 3000 Hz. We bound the rate for such detected bursts at less than 1.6 events per day at 90% confidence level. This result is interpreted in terms of the detection efficiency for ad hoc waveforms (Gaussians and sine-Gaussians) as a function of their root-sum-square strain h{sub rss}; typical sensitivities lie in the range h{sub rss} {approx} 10{sup -19} - 10{sup -17} strain/{radical}Hz, depending on waveform. We discuss improvements in the search method that will be applied to future science data from LIGO and other gravitational wave detectors.

  7. Strong lensing of gravitational waves as seen by LISA.

    PubMed

    Sereno, M; Sesana, A; Bleuler, A; Jetzer, Ph; Volonteri, M; Begelman, M C

    2010-12-17

    We discuss strong gravitational lensing of gravitational waves from the merging of massive black hole binaries in the context of the LISA mission. Detection of multiple events would provide invaluable information on competing theories of gravity, evolution and formation of structures and, possibly, constraints on H0 and other cosmological parameters. Most of the optical depth for lensing is provided by intervening massive galactic halos, for which wave optics effects are negligible. Probabilities to observe multiple events are sizable for a broad range of formation histories. For the most optimistic models, up to ≲ 4 multiple events with a signal to noise ratio ≳ 8 are expected in a 5-year mission. Chances are significant even for conservative models with either light (≲ 60%) or heavy (≲ 40%) seeds. Because of lensing amplification, some intrinsically too faint signals are brought over threshold (≲ 2 per year).

  8. Limits of Astrophysics with Gravitational-Wave Backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callister, Thomas; Sammut, Letizia; Qiu, Shi; Mandel, Ilya; Thrane, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The recent Advanced LIGO detection of gravitational waves from the binary black hole GW150914 suggests there exists a large population of merging binary black holes in the Universe. Although most are too distant to be individually resolved by advanced detectors, the superposition of gravitational waves from many unresolvable binaries is expected to create an astrophysical stochastic background. Recent results from the LIGO and Virgo Collaborations show that this astrophysical background is within reach of Advanced LIGO. In principle, the binary black hole background encodes interesting astrophysical properties, such as the mass distribution and redshift distribution of distant binaries. However, we show that this information will be difficult to extract with the current configuration of advanced detectors (and using current data analysis tools). Additionally, the binary black hole background also constitutes a foreground that limits the ability of advanced detectors to observe other interesting stochastic background signals, for example, from cosmic strings or phase transitions in the early Universe. We quantify this effect.

  9. Impact of cosmic neutrinos on the gravitational-wave background

    SciTech Connect

    Mangilli, Anna; Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino; Riotto, Antonio

    2008-10-15

    We obtain the equation governing the evolution of the cosmological gravitational-wave background, accounting for the presence of cosmic neutrinos, up to second order in perturbation theory. In particular, we focus on the epoch during radiation dominance, after neutrino decoupling, when neutrinos yield a relevant contribution to the total energy density and behave as collisionless ultrarelativistic particles. Besides recovering the standard damping effect due to neutrinos, a new source term for gravitational waves is shown to arise from the neutrino anisotropic stress tensor. The importance of such a source term, so far completely disregarded in the literature, is related to the high velocity dispersion of neutrinos in the considered epoch; its computation requires solving the full second-order Boltzmann equation for collisionless neutrinos.

  10. FIFTH SEMINAR IN MEMORY OF D.N. KLYSHKO: Dynamics of a Fabry-Perot cavity in the field of a plane gravitational wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarabrin, S. P.

    2007-12-01

    The interaction of a weak gravitational wave with a Fabry-Perot cavity is analysed beyond the long-wavelength approximation in the input-mirror locally Lorentzian frame of reference taking the light pressure into account. The generalised expressions are obtained for the coefficient of pondermotive optical rigidity, the motion law of the moving mirror of the cavity and the response function of the cavity. It is shown that the latter is a sum of two phase shifts of a circulating light wave: the phase incursion after reflection from the moving mirror and the phase incursion due to the direct interaction of gravitational and light waves in the cavity. The possibility of the resonance detection of high-frequency gravitational waves by using the optical rigidity effect is considered.

  11. Extracting Physics from Gravitational Waves from Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepanczyk, Marek; LIGO Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Core-Collapse Supernovae (CCSN) are the spectacular and violent deaths of massive stars. In my presentation I will give an overview of searches targeting supernova signals in LIGO and Virgo data. In particular I will present results of a search for gravitational waves from CCSN, performed in initial LIGO and Virgo data including the methodology, upper limits and model exclusion statements. I will also describe the current efforts towards parameter estimation and waveform reconstruction.

  12. Einstein's Symphony: A Gravitational Wave Voyage Through Space and Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro Key, Joey; Yunes, Nico; Grimberg, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Einstein's Symphony: A Gravitational Wave Voyage Through Space and Time is a gravitational wave astronomy planetarium show in production by a collaboration of scientists, filmmakers, and artisits from the Center for Gravitational Wave Astonomy (CGWA) at the University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB) and Montana State University (MSU). The project builds on the success of the interdisciplinary Celebrating Einstein collaboration. The artists and scientists who created the A Shout Across Time original film and the Black (W)hole immersive art installation for Celebrating Einstein are teaming with the Museum of the Rockies Taylor Planetarium staff and students to create a new full dome Digistar planetarium show that will be freely and widely distributed to planetaria in the US and abroad. The show uses images and animations filmed and collected for A Shout Across Time and for Black (W)hole as well as new images and animations and a new soundtrack composed and produced by the MSU School of Music to use the full capability of planetarium sound systems. The planetarium show will be narrated with ideas drawn from the Celebrating Einstein danced lecture on gravitational waves that the collaboration produced. The combination of products, resources, and team members assembled for this project allows us to create an original planetarium show for a fraction of the cost of a typical show. In addition, STEM education materials for G6-12 students and teachers will be provided to complement and support the show. This project is supported by the Texas Space Grant Consortium (TSGC), Montana Space Grant Consortium (MSGC), and the American Physical Society (APS).

  13. Gravitational wave emission and spin-down of young pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, Mark G.; Schwenzer, Kai

    2014-01-20

    The rotation frequencies of young pulsars are systematically below their theoretical Kepler limit. r-modes have been suggested as a possible explanation for this observation. With the help of semi-analytic expressions that make it possible to assess the uncertainties of the r-mode scenario due to the impact of uncertainties in underlying microphysics, we perform a quantitative analysis of the spin-down and the emitted gravitational waves of young pulsars. We find that the frequency to which r-modes spin-down a young neutron star (NS) is surprisingly insensitive to both the microscopic details and the saturation amplitude. Comparing our result to astrophysical data, we show that for a range of sufficiently large saturation amplitudes r-modes provide a viable spin-down scenario and that all observed young pulsars are very likely already outside the r-mode instability region. Therefore, the most promising sources for gravitational wave detection are unobserved NSs associated with recent supernovae, and we find that advanced LIGO should be able to see several of them. Our analysis shows that despite the coupling of the spin-down and thermal evolution, a power-law spin-down with an effective braking index n {sub rm} ≤ 7 is realized. Because of this, the gravitational wave strain amplitude is completely independent of both the r-mode saturation amplitude and the microphysics and depends on the saturation mechanism only within some tens of percent. However, the gravitational wave frequency depends on the amplitude, and we provide the required expected timing parameter ranges to look for promising sources in future searches.

  14. NASA's Preparations for ESA's L3 Gravitational Wave Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, Robin

    2016-03-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) selected gravitational-wave astrophysics as the science theme for its third large mission opportunity, known as `L3,' under its Cosmic Vision Programme. NASA is seeking a role as an international partner in L3. NASA is: (1) participating in ESA's early mission activities, (2) developing potential US technology contributions, (3) participating in ESA's LISA Pathfinder mission, (4) and conducting a study of how NASA might participate. This talk will survey the status of these activities.

  15. Limiting the effects of earthquakes on gravitational-wave interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Michael; Earle, Paul; Harms, Jan; Biscans, Sebastien; Buchanan, Christopher; Coughlin, Eric; Donovan, Fred; Fee, Jeremy; Gabbard, Hunter; Guy, Michelle; Mukund, Nikhil; Perry, Matthew

    2017-02-01

    Ground-based gravitational wave interferometers such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) are susceptible to ground shaking from high-magnitude teleseismic events, which can interrupt their operation in science mode and significantly reduce their duty cycle. It can take several hours for a detector to stabilize enough to return to its nominal state for scientific observations. The down time can be reduced if advance warning of impending shaking is received and the impact is suppressed in the isolation system with the goal of maintaining stable operation even at the expense of increased instrumental noise. Here, we describe an early warning system for modern gravitational-wave observatories. The system relies on near real-time earthquake alerts provided by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Preliminary low latency hypocenter and magnitude information is generally available in 5 to 20 min of a significant earthquake depending on its magnitude and location. The alerts are used to estimate arrival times and ground velocities at the gravitational-wave detectors. In general, 90% of the predictions for ground-motion amplitude are within a factor of 5 of measured values. The error in both arrival time and ground-motion prediction introduced by using preliminary, rather than final, hypocenter and magnitude information is minimal. By using a machine learning algorithm, we develop a prediction model that calculates the probability that a given earthquake will prevent a detector from taking data. Our initial results indicate that by using detector control configuration changes, we could prevent interruption of operation from 40 to 100 earthquake events in a 6-month time-period.

  16. Constraints on primordial density perturbations from induced gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Assadullahi, Hooshyar; Wands, David

    2010-01-15

    We consider the stochastic background of gravitational waves produced during the radiation-dominated hot big bang as a constraint on the primordial density perturbation on comoving length scales much smaller than those directly probed by the cosmic microwave background or large-scale structure. We place weak upper bounds on the primordial density perturbation from current data. Future detectors such as BBO and DECIGO will place much stronger constraints on the primordial density perturbation on small scales.

  17. Low-frequency gravitational-wave science frontiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Scott

    2017-01-01

    With LIGO detecting stellar mass black holes and (soon) other stellar mass compact objects, and with LISA Pathfinder demonstrating important elements of the technology needed to fly a gravitational-wave antenna in space, the case for a low-frequency, space-based gravitational-wave detector - LISA - is stronger than ever. In this talk, I will survey the landscape of low-frequency gravitational-wave astronomy. The LISA frequency band from afew ×10-5 Hz to about 1 Hz is one which is rich with known sources whose measurement will enable new astronomical and physical measurements of important systems. It is also a band with great potential discovery space. In this talk, I will survey the known knowns and known unknowns in the LISA band, describing the frontiers that we can study in advance of the mission, and the frontiers that LISA measurements will unveil. I will also talk about the possible unknown unknowns where surprising discoveries may lurk.

  18. Accelerated gravitational wave parameter estimation with reduced order modeling.

    PubMed

    Canizares, Priscilla; Field, Scott E; Gair, Jonathan; Raymond, Vivien; Smith, Rory; Tiglio, Manuel

    2015-02-20

    Inferring the astrophysical parameters of coalescing compact binaries is a key science goal of the upcoming advanced LIGO-Virgo gravitational-wave detector network and, more generally, gravitational-wave astronomy. However, current approaches to parameter estimation for these detectors require computationally expensive algorithms. Therefore, there is a pressing need for new, fast, and accurate Bayesian inference techniques. In this Letter, we demonstrate that a reduced order modeling approach enables rapid parameter estimation to be performed. By implementing a reduced order quadrature scheme within the LIGO Algorithm Library, we show that Bayesian inference on the 9-dimensional parameter space of nonspinning binary neutron star inspirals can be sped up by a factor of ∼30 for the early advanced detectors' configurations (with sensitivities down to around 40 Hz) and ∼70 for sensitivities down to around 20 Hz. This speedup will increase to about 150 as the detectors improve their low-frequency limit to 10 Hz, reducing to hours analyses which could otherwise take months to complete. Although these results focus on interferometric gravitational wave detectors, the techniques are broadly applicable to any experiment where fast Bayesian analysis is desirable.

  19. Primordial gravitational waves from axion-gauge fields dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimastrogiovanni, Emanuela; Fasiello, Matteo; Fujita, Tomohiro

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by the chromo-natural inflation model of Adshead&Wyman, we reshape its scalar content to relax the tension with current observational bounds. Besides an inflaton, the setup includes a spectator sector in which an axion and SU(2) gauge fields are coupled via a Chern-Simons-type term. The result is a viable theory endowed with an alternative production mechanism for gravitational waves during inflation. The gravitational wave signal sourced by the spectator fields can be much larger than the contribution from standard vacuum fluctuations, it is distinguishable from the latter on the basis of its chirality and, depending on the theory parameters values, also its tilt. This production process breaks the well-known relation between the tensor-to-scalar ratio and the energy scale of inflation. As a result, even if the Hubble rate is itself too small for the vacuum to generate a tensor amplitude detectable by upcoming experiments, this model still supports observable gravitational waves.

  20. Tuning up for Gravitational Wave Detection in Accreting Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, Duncan; Steeghs, Danny; Ransom, Scott

    Rapidly-rotating neutron stars are the only candidates for persistent gravitational wave emis-sion, for which a targeted search can be performed based on the spin period measured from electromagnetic (e.g. radio and X-ray) observations. Apart from the expected weakness of the emission, the principal difficulty for such searches is the lack of precision in measurements of the spin as well as the other physical parameters of the system. I present a pilot program of optical and infra-red observations of the stellar counterparts to X-ray bright accreting neutron stars, in order to measure (or improve the precision of) the binary parameters. These measurements will allow optimisation of future gravitational wave searches, and will also facilitate searches of the extensive X-ray timing data from NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, to measure the spin frequency (for those systems where it is not precisely known). Observations such as these will provide the best possible chance for detecting the gravitational wave emission from these systems.

  1. Possible Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of gravitational waves was established by the discovery of the Binary Pulsar PSR 1913+16 by Hulse and Taylor in 1974, for which they were awarded the 1983 Nobel Prize. However, it is the exploitation of these gravitational waves for the extraction of the astrophysical parameters of the sources that will open the first new astronomical window since the development of gamma ray telescopes in the 1970's and enable a new era of discovery and understanding of the Universe. Direct detection is expected in at least two frequency bands from the ground before the end of the decade with Advanced LIGO and Pulsar Timing Arrays. However, many of the most exciting sources will be continuously observable in the band from 0.1-100 mHz, accessible only from space due to seismic noise and gravity gradients in that band that disturb ground-based observatories. This poster will discuss a possible mission concept, Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatory (SGO-Mid) developed from the original Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) reference mission but updated to reduce risk and cost.

  2. Binary Black Holes, Gravitational Waves, and Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, John

    2007-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest gravitational wave source for ground-based interferometers such as LIGO, VIRGO, and GE0600, as well as the space-based interferometer LISA. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. Since these mergers take place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will focus on new simulations that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, data analysis, and astrophysics.

  3. Merging Black Holes, Gravitational Waves, and Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan M.

    2009-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes will emit more energy than all the stars in the observable universe combined. This energy will come in the form of gravitational waves, which are a key prediction of Einstein's general relativity and a new tool for exploring the universe. Observing these mergers with gravitational wave detectors, such as the ground-based LIGO and the space-based LISA, requires knowledge of the radiation waveforms. Since these mergers take place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes were long plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will focus on new simulations that are revealing the dynamics and w aefo rms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics.

  4. Observing gravitational-wave transient GW150914 with minimal assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chatterji, S.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Clark, M.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Haas, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hinder, I.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani,