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Sample records for high-frequency induction heating

  1. ZCS High Frequency Inverter for Aluminum Vessel Induction Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiwara, Hiroyuki; Nakaoka, Mutsuo

    Recent induction cooking apparatus are utilized for induction heating of ferromagnetic materials at 20-50kHz with a high efficiency. They can not, however, be applied for non-magnetic materials such as aluminum vessels. Here, we present a voltage-clamp reverse conducting ZCS high frequency inverter of half bridge type for induction heating of an aluminum vessel. The switching devices utilized for this inverter are SITs and its operating frequency is determined as 200kHz. This paper describes its circuit constitution and the obtained experimental results from a practical point of view.

  2. Deformation behavior of SS400 Thick plate by high-frequency-induction-heating-based line heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kwang Seok; Eom, Deuk Ha; Lee, Jung-Hwan

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the line heating-induced permanent deformation behavior of an SS400 thick plate was investigated through both numerical analysis and experimental testing by applying high-frequency induction heating after generating dual-curvature by secondary line heating. First, an approach based on electromagnetic-thermal-structural coupling numerical analysis was adopted for predicting the temperature distribution and subsequent permanent deformation over the SS400 carbon steel plate. Experimental line heating was also carried out to validate the feasibility of the numerical analysis by applying newly designed laboratory-scale high-frequency (HF) induction-heating (IH) equipment. It was found that the shape of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) generated by HF IH and the subsequent microstructure of the SS400 carbon steel plate within the HAZ were strongly dependent on the input power. Permanent vertical deformation increased with an increase in the input power, regardless of the shape of the doubly curved plates (concave- or saddle-type plates). Transverse curvature determined in both the simulation and the experiment were investigated and compared.

  3. CFAVC scheme for high frequency series resonant inverter-fed domestic induction heating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Booma; Reddy Sathi, Rama

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the investigations on the constant frequency asymmetric voltage cancellation control in the AC-AC resonant converter-fed domestic induction heating system. Conventional fixed frequency control techniques used in the high frequency converters lead to non-zero voltage switching operation and reduced output power. The proposed control technique produces higher output power than the conventional fixed-frequency control strategies. In this control technique, zero-voltage-switching operation is maintained during different duty cycle operation for reduction in the switching losses. Complete analysis of the induction heating power supply system with asymmetric voltage cancellation control is discussed in this article. Simulation and experimental study on constant frequency asymmetric voltage cancellation (CFAVC)-controlled full bridge series resonant inverter is performed. Time domain simulation results for the open and closed loop of the system are obtained using MATLAB simulation tool. The simulation results prove the control of voltage and power in a wide range. PID controller-based closed loop control system achieves the voltage regulation of the proposed system for the step change in load. Hardware implementation of the system under CFAVC control is done using the embedded controller. The simulation and experimental results validate the performance of the CFAVC control technique for series resonant-based induction cooking system.

  4. High-frequency induction heated sintering of ball milled Fe-WC nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakeri, M.; Zanganeh, T.; Najafi, A.

    2013-07-01

    Fe-WC nanocomposites were successfully fabricated by high-frequency induction heated sintering of ball milled nanostructure powders. The ball milled powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction. Density measurements by the Archimedes method show that all sintered samples have the relative density higher than 95%. Studies on the effects of WC content, milling speed, and milling time indicate that a higher milling speed and a more WC content lead to the improvement of mechanical properties. There is a very good distribution of WC particles in the Fe matrix at the milling speed of 650 r/min. For the sintered sample 20-5-650 (20wt% WC, milling time of 5 h, and milled speed of 650 r/min), the maximum Brinell hardness and yield stress are obtained to be 3.25 GPa and 858 MPa, respectively. All sintered samples have brittle fracture during compression test except the sample 20-5-650.

  5. Development of ti-coated ferromagnetic needle, adaptable for ablation cancer therapy by high-frequency induction heating.

    PubMed

    Naohara, Takashi; Aono, Hiromichi; Maehara, Tsunehiro; Hirazawa, Hideyuki; Matsutomo, Shinya; Watanabe, Yuji

    2012-03-06

    To develop a novel ablation therapy for human solid cancer, the heating properties of a ferromagnetic carbon steel rod and a prototype Ti-coated needle using this carbon steel rod, were investigated in several high-frequency outputs at 300 kHz. In the former, the heating property was drastically different among the three inclination angles (θ = 0°, 45° and 90°) relative to the magnetic flux direction as a result of the shape magnetic anisotropy. However, the effect of the inclination angles was completely eliminated in the latter. It is considered that the complete non-oriented heating property relative to the magnetic flux direction allows the precise control of the ablation temperature during minimally invasive thermotherapy without a lead-wire connected to a fiber-optic thermometer. This newly designed Ti-coated device will be suitable for clinical use combined with its superior biocompatibility for ablation treatments using high-frequency induction heating.

  6. Heat-power working regimes of a high-frequency (0.44 MHz) 1000-kW induction plasmatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbanenko, V. M.; Farnasov, G. A.; Lisafin, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    The energy working regimes of a superpower high-frequency induction (HFI) plasmatron with a high-frequency (HF) generator are studied. The HFI plasmatron with a power of 1000 kVA and a working frequency of 440 kHz, in which air is used as a plasma-forming gas, can be used for treatment of various oxide powder materials. The energy regimes substantially influence finish products and their costs. Various working regimes of the HFI plasma unit and the following characteristics are studied: the dependence of the vibration power on the anode power, the dependence of the power losses on the anode power at various of plasma-forming gas flow rates, and the coefficients of efficiency of the plasmatron and the HFI-plasma unit at various powers. The effect of the plasma-forming gas flow rate on the bulk temperature is determined.

  7. High frequency-heated air turbojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miron, J. H. D.

    1986-01-01

    A description is given of a method to heat air coming from a turbojet compressor to a temperature necessary to produce required expansion without requiring fuel. This is done by high frequency heating, which heats the walls corresponding to the combustion chamber in existing jets, by mounting high frequency coils in them. The current transformer and high frequency generator to be used are discussed.

  8. Additive Manufacturing/Diagnostics via the High Frequency Induction Heating of Metal Powders: The Determination of the Power Transfer Factor for Fine Metallic Spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, Orlando; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Caravias, George; Holcomb, Matthew

    2015-03-11

    Grid Logic Inc. is developing a method for sintering and melting fine metallic powders for additive manufacturing using spatially-compact, high-frequency magnetic fields called Micro-Induction Sintering (MIS). One of the challenges in advancing MIS technology for additive manufacturing is in understanding the power transfer to the particles in a powder bed. This knowledge is important to achieving efficient power transfer, control, and selective particle heating during the MIS process needed for commercialization of the technology. The project s work provided a rigorous physics-based model for induction heating of fine spherical particles as a function of frequency and particle size. This simulation improved upon Grid Logic s earlier models and provides guidance that will make the MIS technology more effective. The project model will be incorporated into Grid Logic s power control circuit of the MIS 3D printer product and its diagnostics technology to optimize the sintering process for part quality and energy efficiency.

  9. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Dymond, Jr., Lauren E.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Grimm, William G.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Ola, Samuel A.; Simpson, James E.; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter; Turner, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and I or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to adjust the driving frequency of the oscillator.

  10. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Dolan, James T.; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang

    2000-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  11. Separation behavior of impurities and selenium reduction by the reactive zone refining process using high-frequency induction heating to purify Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Moonsoo; Kim, Young-Min; Lee, Huk-Hee; Hong, Soon-Jik; Lee, Jong-Hyeon

    2016-12-01

    A zone refining processing was utilized to purify tellurium (Te) metal using a locally melted zone caused by high-frequency induction heating. The travel rate of the molten zone was set as a parameter. The purification efficiency for each impurity (Bi, Sb, Sn, and Se) in the tellurium sample was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), and the experimental results were compared with the theoretical results furnished by the proposed model to validate its predictions. The experimental results indicated that a lower travel rate of the molten zone and repetition of passes were more efficient for purification. The effective distribution coefficient keff and the keff values of bismuth, antimony, tin, and selenium were 0.5, 0.35, 0.22, and 0.58, respectively. These elements were effective for the purification of Te by zone refining. The obtained distribution coefficient keff values of impurities can be used as standards for the purification of Te by zone refining. The Vickers hardness was measured, and a correlation between hardness and concentration was observed, with an average Vickers hardness was 62 Hv.

  12. Ionospheric modifications in high frequency heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-01-15

    Featured observations in high-frequency (HF) heating experiments conducted at Arecibo, EISCAT, and high frequency active auroral research program are discussed. These phenomena appearing in the F region of the ionosphere include high-frequency heater enhanced plasma lines, airglow enhancement, energetic electron flux, artificial ionization layers, artificial spread-F, ionization enhancement, artificial cusp, wideband absorption, short-scale (meters) density irregularities, and stimulated electromagnetic emissions, which were observed when the O-mode HF heater waves with frequencies below foF2 were applied. The implication and associated physical mechanism of each observation are discussed and explained. It is shown that these phenomena caused by the HF heating are all ascribed directly or indirectly to the excitation of parametric instabilities which instigate anomalous heating. Formulation and analysis of parametric instabilities are presented. The results show that oscillating two stream instability and parametric decay instability can be excited by the O-mode HF heater waves, transmitted from all three heating facilities, in the regions near the HF reflection height and near the upper hybrid resonance layer. The excited Langmuir waves, upper hybrid waves, ion acoustic waves, lower hybrid waves, and field-aligned density irregularities set off subsequent wave-wave and wave-electron interactions, giving rise to the observed phenomena.

  13. Self-integrating inductive loop for measuring high frequency pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas-Moreno, Mónica V.; Robles, Guillermo; Martínez-Tarifa, Juan M.; Sanz-Feito, Javier

    2011-08-01

    High frequency pulses can be measured by means of inductive sensors. The main advantage of these sensors consists of non-contact measurements that isolate and protect measuring equipment. The objective of this paper is to present the implementation of an inductive sensor for measuring rapidly varying currents. It consists of a rectangular loop with a resistor at its terminals. The inductive loop gives the derivative of the current according to Faraday's law and the resistor connected to the loop modifies the sensor's frequency response to obtain an output proportional to the current pulse. The self-integrating inductive sensor was validated with two sensors, a non-inductive resistor and a commercial high frequency current transformer. The results were compared to determine the advantages and drawbacks of the probe as an adequate inductive transducer.

  14. High-frequency phenomena in magnetic recording and inductive devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jury, Jason Charles

    At high frequencies (>1 GHz), ferromagnetic materials and associated electronic circuitry show interesting and sometimes undesirable behavior. In this dissertation, we examine high-frequency effects in magnetic recording and magnetic inductive devices. We analyze "impedance profiling" of the disk drive interconnect, as a way of shaping the write current waveform. This proves to be useful under somewhat limited conditions (for write head with low impedance, characteristic time of the shaped waveform less than the one-way interconnect propagation delay). We then analyze a buffer amplifier (consisting of a single transistor in an emitter-follower configuration) as a means of improving the electronic signal to noise ratio (SNR) associated with high-resistance read sensors. We develop and utilize a "matched filter bound" SNR for assessing the performance of the disk drive read-path. For a hypothetical recording system at an areal density of 1 terabit/in2, the buffer amplifier improves SNR anywhere from 0.5 dB for 670 Mb/s up to 1 dB for 4.17 Gb/s. We then present measurements and quantitative analysis for magnetic fluctuation noise in read sensors. The analysis is enabled by rigorous calibration of the noise measurement setup. We are able to explain the behavior of the mag-noise (primary) resonance frequency versus bias current and externally-applied field, by using a micromagnetic model (NIST-OOMMF) where we also account for sensor heating and associated reduction in free-layer and biasing magnet saturation moment. We then analyze the behavior of multi-domain magnetic materials and the associated inductive device behaviors. First we utilize micromagnetic modeling to calculate the spin-resonance modes associated with multi-domain films. We find agreement in trend between the modeling results and experimentally-observed sub-FMR permeability resonances, particularly that both model and experiment predict a power-law dependence of frequency on the ratio of thickness to

  15. High-frequency plasma-heating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brambilla, Marco; Lallia, Pascal

    1978-01-01

    An array of adjacent wave guides feed high-frequency energy into a vacuum chamber in which a toroidal plasma is confined by a magnetic field, the wave guide array being located between two toroidal current windings. Waves are excited in the wave guide at a frequency substantially equal to the lower frequency hybrid wave of the plasma and a substantially equal phase shift is provided from one guide to the next between the waves therein. For plasmas of low peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TE.sub.01 mode and the output electric field is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. For exciting waves in plasmas of high peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TM.sub.01 mode and the magnetic field at the wave guide outlets is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. The wave excited at the outlet of the wave guide array is a progressive wave propagating in the direction opposite to that of the toroidal current and is, therefore, not absorbed by so-called "runaway" electrons.

  16. High frequency alternating current chip nano calorimeter with laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    Shoifet, E.; Schick, C.; Chua, Y. Z.; Huth, H.

    2013-07-15

    Heat capacity spectroscopy at frequencies up to 100 kHz is commonly performed by thermal effusivity measurements applying the 3ω-technique. Here we show that AC-calorimetry using a thin film chip sensor allows for the measurement of frequency dependent heat capacity in the thin film limit up to about 1 MHz. Using films thinner than the thermal length of the thermal wave (∼1 μm) at such frequencies is advantageous because it provides heat capacity alone and not in combination with other quantities like thermal conductivity, at least on a qualitative basis. The used calorimetric sensor and the sample are each less than 1 μm thick. For high frequency AC-calorimetry, high cooling rates at very small temperature differences are required. This is realized by minimizing the heated spot to the size of the on chip thermocouple (3 × 6 μm{sup 2}). A modulated laser beam shaped and positioned by a glass fiber is used as the heat source. The device was used to measure the complex heat capacity in the vicinity of the dynamic glass transition (structural relaxation) of poly(methyl methacrylate). Combining different calorimeters finally provides data between 10{sup −3} Hz and 10{sup 6} Hz. In this frequency range the dynamic glass transition shifts about 120 K.

  17. High frequency alternating current chip nano calorimeter with laser heating.

    PubMed

    Shoifet, E; Chua, Y Z; Huth, H; Schick, C

    2013-07-01

    Heat capacity spectroscopy at frequencies up to 100 kHz is commonly performed by thermal effusivity measurements applying the 3ω-technique. Here we show that AC-calorimetry using a thin film chip sensor allows for the measurement of frequency dependent heat capacity in the thin film limit up to about 1 MHz. Using films thinner than the thermal length of the thermal wave (~1 μm) at such frequencies is advantageous because it provides heat capacity alone and not in combination with other quantities like thermal conductivity, at least on a qualitative basis. The used calorimetric sensor and the sample are each less than 1 μm thick. For high frequency AC-calorimetry, high cooling rates at very small temperature differences are required. This is realized by minimizing the heated spot to the size of the on chip thermocouple (3 × 6 μm(2)). A modulated laser beam shaped and positioned by a glass fiber is used as the heat source. The device was used to measure the complex heat capacity in the vicinity of the dynamic glass transition (structural relaxation) of poly(methyl methacrylate). Combining different calorimeters finally provides data between 10(-3) Hz and 10(6) Hz. In this frequency range the dynamic glass transition shifts about 120 K.

  18. High frequency alternating current chip nano calorimeter with laser heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoifet, E.; Chua, Y. Z.; Huth, H.; Schick, C.

    2013-07-01

    Heat capacity spectroscopy at frequencies up to 100 kHz is commonly performed by thermal effusivity measurements applying the 3ω-technique. Here we show that AC-calorimetry using a thin film chip sensor allows for the measurement of frequency dependent heat capacity in the thin film limit up to about 1 MHz. Using films thinner than the thermal length of the thermal wave (˜1 μm) at such frequencies is advantageous because it provides heat capacity alone and not in combination with other quantities like thermal conductivity, at least on a qualitative basis. The used calorimetric sensor and the sample are each less than 1 μm thick. For high frequency AC-calorimetry, high cooling rates at very small temperature differences are required. This is realized by minimizing the heated spot to the size of the on chip thermocouple (3 × 6 μm2). A modulated laser beam shaped and positioned by a glass fiber is used as the heat source. The device was used to measure the complex heat capacity in the vicinity of the dynamic glass transition (structural relaxation) of poly(methyl methacrylate). Combining different calorimeters finally provides data between 10-3 Hz and 106 Hz. In this frequency range the dynamic glass transition shifts about 120 K.

  19. Ionospheric heating with oblique high-frequency waves

    SciTech Connect

    Field, E.C. Jr.; Bloom, R.M. ); Kossey, P.A. )

    1990-12-01

    This paper presents calculations of ionospheric electron temperature and density perturbations and ground-level signal changes produced by intense oblique high-frequency (HF) radio waves. The analysis takes into account focusing at caustics, the consequent Joule heating of the surrounding plasma, heat conduction, diffusion, and recombination processes, these being the effects of a powerful oblique modifying wave. It neglects whatever plasma instabilities might occur. The authors then seek effects on a secondary test wave that is propagated along the same path as the first. The calculations predict ground-level field strength reductions of several decibels in the test wave for modifying waves having effective radiated power (ERP) in the 85- to 90-dBW range. These field strength changes are similar in sign, magnitude, and location to ones measured in Soviet experiments. The location of the signal change is sensitive to the frequency and the model ionosphere assumed; so future experiments should employ the widest possible range of frequencies and propagation conditions. An ERP of 90 dBW seems to be a sort of threshold that, if exceeded, might result in substantial rather than small signal changes. The conclusions are based solely on Joule heating and subsequent refraction of waves passing through caustic regions.

  20. An MRI-Compatible High Frequency AC Resistive Heating System for Homeothermic Maintenance in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ana L.; Kinchesh, Paul; Kersemans, Veerle; Allen, Philip D.; Smart, Sean C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop an MRI-compatible resistive heater, using high frequency alternating current (AC), for temperature maintenance of anaesthetised animals. Materials and Methods An MRI-compatible resistive electrical heater was formed from narrow gauge wire connected to a high frequency (10–100 kHz) AC power source. Multiple gradient echo images covering a range of echo times, and pulse-acquire spectra were acquired with the wire heater powered using high frequency AC or DC power sources and without any current flowing in order to assess the sensitivity of the MRI acquisitions to the presence of current flow through the heater wire. The efficacy of temperature maintenance using the AC heater was assessed by measuring rectal temperature immediately following induction of general anaesthesia for a period of 30 minutes in three different mice. Results Images and spectra acquired in the presence and absence of 50–100 kHz AC through the wire heater were indistinguishable, whereas DC power created field shifts and lineshape distortions. Temperature lost during induction of anaesthesia was recovered within approximately 20 minutes and a stable temperature was reached as the mouse’s temperature approached the set target. Conclusion The AC-powered wire heater maintains adequate heat input to the animal to maintain body temperature, and does not compromise image quality. PMID:27806062

  1. Induction Heating Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Induction heating technology, a magnetic non-deforming process, was developed by Langley researchers to join plastic and composite components in space. Under NASA license, Inductron Corporation uses the process to produce induction heating systems and equipment for numerous applications. The Torobonder, a portable system, comes with a number of interchangeable heads for aircraft repair. Other developments are the E Heating Head, the Toroid Joining Gun, and the Torobrazer. These products perform bonding applications more quickly, safely and efficiently than previous methods.

  2. Ultra-high frequency induction energy effects on refractory oxides as applied to processing and immobilization of radioactive waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, Jay A.

    The application of ultra-high frequency induction melting of refractory oxides (i.e. borosilicate glass [BSG]) has been extensively investigated to determine the feasibility of developing and implementing an innovative inductively heated draining technique that is reliable and predictable. The primary purpose is for immobilizing highly radioactive waste streams resulting from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. This work has included development and validation of a numerical model, using ANSYS MultiPhysics software, as well as numerous proof-of-concept and pilot-scale experimental tests. The model is a steady state axially-symmetric geometry for a cylindrical water-cooled crucible that includes two separate induction energy sources operating at different frequencies. It accounts for the induction energy interactions, thermal conduction, convection, and radiation effects, as well as hydrodynamic phenomenon due to buoyancy effects. The material property models incorporated into the numerical model include temperature dependence up to 2,000°C of key parameters including density, specific heat, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity, which can vary by several orders of magnitude within the temperature variations seen. The model has been experimentally validated, and shown to provide excellent representation of steady state temperature distributions, convection cell configurations, and flow field velocities for molten low conductivity materials. Thus, it provides the capability to conduct parametric studies to understand operational sensitivities and geometry effects that determine the performance of the inductively heated draining device, including scale-up effects. Complementary experimental work has also been conducted to test the model predictions, and iteratively used to improve the model accuracy. However, the primary focus of the experimental efforts was to demonstrate the feasibility of the inductively heated draining technique for application to

  3. Field oriented control of an induction machine in a high frequency link power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sul, Seung K.; Lipo, Thomas A.

    1988-01-01

    A field-oriented controlled induction machine drive operating with a high-frequency single-phase sinusoidal voltage link is presented. System performance is investigated by computer simulation and is verified by a test on a prototype system. A novel control loop to minimize the link voltage fluctuation is proposed. The capability of rapid demagnetization of the induction machine by current regulation is investigated. A current-modulation technique termed mode control is proposed, and its performance is compared with that of the conventional delta-modulation technique.

  4. Induction heating coupler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Copeland, Carl E. (Inventor); Swaim, Robert J. (Inventor); Coultrip, Robert H. (Inventor); Johnston, David F. (Inventor); Phillips, W. Morris (Inventor); Johnson, Samuel D. (Inventor); Dinkins, James R. (Inventor); Buckley, John D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An induction heating device includes a handle having a hollow interior and two opposite ends, a wrist connected to one end of the handle, a U-shaped pole piece having two spaced apart ends, a tank circuit including an induction coil wrapped around the pole piece and a capacitor connected to the induction coil, a head connected to the wrist and including a housing for receiving the U-shaped pole piece, the two spaced apart ends of the pole piece extending outwardely beyond the housing, and a power source connected to the tank circuit. When the tank circuit is energized and a susceptor is placed in juxtaposition to the ends of the U-shaped pole piece, the susceptor is heated by induction heating due to magnetic flux passing between the two ends of the pole piece.

  5. Coil design considerations for a high-frequency electromagnetic induction sensing instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigman, John B.; Barrowes, Benjamin E.; Wang, Yinlin; Bennett, Hollis J.; Simms, Janet E.; Yule, Donald E.; O'Neill, Kevin; Shubitidze, Fridon

    2016-05-01

    Intermediate electrical conductivity (IEC) materials (101S/m < σ < 104S/m), such as carbon fiber (CF), have recently been used to make smart bombs. In addition, homemade improvised explosive devices (IED) can be produced with low conducting materials (10-4S/m < σ < 1S/m), such as Ammonium Nitrate (AN). To collect unexploded ordnance (UXO) from military training ranges and thwart deadly IEDs, the US military has urgent need for technology capable of detection and identification of subsurface IEC objects. Recent analytical and numerical studies have showed that these targets exhibit characteristic quadrature response peaks at high induction frequencies (100kHz - 15MHz, the High Frequency Electromagnetic Induction (HFEMI) band), and they are not detectable with traditional ultra wideband (UWB) electromagnetic induction (EMI) metal detectors operating between 100Hz - 100kHz. Using the HFEMI band for induction sensing is not so simple as driving existing instruments at higher frequencies, though. At low frequency, EMI systems use more wire turns in transmit and receive coils to boost signal-to-noise ratios (SNR), but at higher frequencies, the transmitter current has non-uniform distribution along the coil length. These non-uniform currents change the spatial distribution of the primary magnetic field and disturb axial symmetry and thwart established approaches for inferring subsurface metallic object properties. This paper discusses engineering tradeoffs for sensing with a broader band of frequencies ever used for EMI sensing, with particular focus on coil geometries.

  6. High-frequency acoustic waves are not sufficient to heat the solar chromosphere.

    PubMed

    Fossum, Astrid; Carlsson, Mats

    2005-06-16

    One of the main unanswered questions in solar physics is why the Sun's outer atmosphere is hotter than its surface. Theory predicts abundant production of high-frequency (10-50 mHz) acoustic waves in subsurface layers of the Sun, and such waves are believed by many to constitute the dominant heating mechanism of the chromosphere (the lower part of the outer solar atmosphere) in non-magnetic regions. Such high-frequency waves are difficult to detect because of high-frequency disturbances in Earth's atmosphere (seeing) and other factors. Here we report the detection of high-frequency waves, and we use numerical simulations to show that the acoustic energy flux of these waves is too low, by a factor of at least ten, to balance the radiative losses in the solar chromosphere. Acoustic waves therefore cannot constitute the dominant heating mechanism of the solar chromosphere.

  7. Flexible heating head for induction heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Johnson, Samuel D. (Inventor); Coultrip, Robert H. (Inventor); Phillips, W. Morris (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An induction heating head includes a length of wire having first and second opposite ends and being wound in a flat spiral shape to form an induction coil, a capacitor connected to the first and second ends of the wire, the induction coil and capacitor defining a tank circuit, and a flexible, elastomeric body molded to encase the induction coil. When a susceptor is placed in juxtaposition to the body, and the tank circuit is powered, the susceptor is inductively heated.

  8. The resistance of high frequency inductive welded pipe to grooving corrosion in salt water

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, C.; Triess, E.; Herbsleb, G.

    1986-09-01

    When exposed to neutral, salt-containing waters, electric resistant welded pipe in carbon and low alloy steels with increased sulfur contents may suffer preferential corrosion attack in the weld area. Because of its appearance, this type of corrosion is called grooving corrosion. The susceptibility to grooving corrosion may be determined and quantitatively described by means of an accelerated potentiostatic exposure test. The importance of type, concentration, and temperature of the electrolytic solution; potential; test duration; and the sulfur content of the steel in the accelerated corrosion test and the susceptibility of steels to grooving corrosion are described. Line pipe in high frequency inductive (HFI) welded carbon and low alloy steels are resistant to grooving corrosion particularly because of their low sulfur content.

  9. Analysis the electrical parameters of a high-frequency coreless induction furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iagăr, A.; Popa, G. N.; Diniş, C. M.

    2015-06-01

    The paper analyzes the most important electrical parameters of a coreless induction furnace, having a capacity of 7 kg molten iron (i.e. 2.5 kg aluminum). The furnace is supplied by a high-frequency (HF) static converter ITS2 12K20, with the output frequency 5...12 kHz, 600...1200 Vac rated HF voltage, and 20 kW rated HF power. Monitoring of electrical parameters was done for an aluminum charge, using a power quality analyser CA8334. The measurement results showed that induction furnace operation causes unbalance and harmonics in three-phase currents absorbed from the distribution network. Harmonics in the line currents are caused mainly by static converter, and to a lesser extent by furnace load and interaction of eddy currents induced in the charge and the magnetic field of the inductor. To reduce the negative impact of the current harmonics on the distribution network is necessary the design and achievement of electrical filters for odd-order harmonics (5th, 7th, 11th, 13th, 17th, 19th, 23th, 25th).

  10. [Influence of infra-red and super high frequency heating on food value of the beef meat].

    PubMed

    Beliaeva, M A

    2005-01-01

    In clause results of research of influence infrared and super high frequency heating on amino acid, fatty fabric and mineral; substances fresh beef are shown meat, after infra-red and the super high frequency of processing, also are shown influence of various modes infra-red heating of processing on amino acid of meat. Advantage of an infra-red way of processing is shown in comparison with super high frequency heating.

  11. Adjustable Induction-Heating Coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Rod; Bartolotta, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Improved design for induction-heating work coil facilitates optimization of heating in different metal specimens. Three segments adjusted independently to obtain desired distribution of temperature. Reduces time needed to achieve required temperature profiles.

  12. Influence of low- and high-frequency heating on biodegrading microorganisms in soil: microbial degradation.

    PubMed

    Roland, Ulf; Holzer, Frank; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter

    2013-01-01

    The influence of low-frequency (50 Hz) resistive and high-frequency (13.56 MHz, radio-frequency) dielectric heating in comparison to conventional heating on the microbial degradation of pollutants in soil was studied. The investigation of the biodegradation of model substances (benzoic acid, acetic acid, glucose, sodium acetate) added to a standard soil showed no significant influence of the electrical heating methods when compared with samples heated to the same temperature in a water bath. Therefore, a hindrance of the microbial degradation could be excluded as it was done for soil respiration in a previous study. This finding is especially relevant for the application of these electrical heating methods for thermally enhanced soil bioremediation as an option for making in situ or ex situ clean-up processes more efficient.

  13. Design of spherical electron gun for ultra high frequency, CW power inductive output tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Meenu; Joshi, L. M.

    2016-03-01

    Inductive Output Tube (IOT) is an amplifier that usually operates in UHF range. It is an electron tube whose basic structure is similar to conventional vacuum devices. This device is widely used in broadcast applications but is now being explored for scientific applications also specifically, particle accelerators and fusion plasma heating purposes. The paper describes the design approach of a spherical gridded electron gun of a 500 MHz, 100 kW CW power IOT. The electron gun structure has been simulated and optimized for operating voltage and current of 40kV and 3.5 A respectively. The electromagnetic analysis of this spherical electron gun has been carried out in CST and TRAK codes.

  14. Optimum Construction of Heating Coil for Domestic Induction Cooker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Dola; Bandyopadhyay, Atanu; Sadhu, Pradip Kumar; Pal, Nitai

    2010-10-01

    The design and optimization of the parameters of heating coil is very important for the analytical analysis of high frequency inverter fed induction cooker. Moreover, accurate prediction of high frequency winding loss (i.e., losses due to skin and proximity effects) is necessary as the induction cooker used in power electronics applications. At high frequency current penetration in the induction coil circuit is very difficult for conducting wire due to skin-effect. To eradicate the skin effect heating coil is made up of bundle conductor i.e., litz wire. In this paper inductances and AC resistances of a litz-wire are calculated and optimized by considering the input parameters like wire type, shape, number of strand, number of spiral turn, number of twist per feet of heating coil and operating frequency. A high frequency half bridge series resonant mirror inverter circuit is used in this paper and taking the optimum values of inductance and ac resistance the circuit is simulated through PSPICE simulations. It has been noticed that the results are feasible enough for real implementation.

  15. Induction heating coupler and annealer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Johnson, Samuel D. (Inventor); Copeland, Carl E. (Inventor); Coultrip, Robert H. (Inventor); Phillips, W. Morris (Inventor); Johnston, David F. (Inventor); Swaim, Robert J. (Inventor); Dinkins, James R. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An induction heating device includes a handle having a hollow interior and two opposite ends, a wrist connected to one end of the handle, a U-shaped pole piece having- two spaced apart ends, a tank circuit including an induction coil wrapped around the pole piece and a capacitor connected to the induction coil, a head connected to the wrist and including a housing for receiving the U-shaped pole piece, the two spaced apart ends of the pole piece extending outwardly beyond the housing, and a power source connected to the tank circuit. When the tank circuit is energized and a susceptor is placed in juxtaposition to the ends of the U-shaped pole piece, the susceptor is heated by induction heating due to a magnetic flux passing between the two ends of the pole piece.

  16. High-frequency torsional Alfvén waves as an energy source for coronal heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Abhishek Kumar; Shetye, Juie; Murawski, Krzysztof; Doyle, John Gerard; Stangalini, Marco; Scullion, Eamon; Ray, Tom; Wójcik, Dariusz Patryk; Dwivedi, Bhola N.

    2017-03-01

    The existence of the Sun’s hot atmosphere and the solar wind acceleration continues to be an outstanding problem in solar-astrophysics. Although magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes and dissipation of magnetic energy contribute to heating and the mass cycle of the solar atmosphere, yet direct evidence of such processes often generates debate. Ground-based 1-m Swedish Solar Telescope (SST)/CRISP, Hα 6562.8 Å observations reveal, for the first time, the ubiquitous presence of high frequency (~12–42 mHz) torsional motions in thin spicular-type structures in the chromosphere. We detect numerous oscillating flux tubes on 10 June 2014 between 07:17 UT to 08:08 UT in a quiet-Sun field-of-view of 60” × 60” (1” = 725 km). Stringent numerical model shows that these observations resemble torsional Alfvén waves associated with high frequency drivers which contain a huge amount of energy (~105 W m‑2) in the chromosphere. Even after partial reflection from the transition region, a significant amount of energy (~103 W m‑2) is transferred onto the overlying corona. We find that oscillating tubes serve as substantial sources of Alfvén wave generation that provide sufficient Poynting flux not only to heat the corona but also to originate the supersonic solar wind.

  17. High-frequency torsional Alfvén waves as an energy source for coronal heating.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Abhishek Kumar; Shetye, Juie; Murawski, Krzysztof; Doyle, John Gerard; Stangalini, Marco; Scullion, Eamon; Ray, Tom; Wójcik, Dariusz Patryk; Dwivedi, Bhola N

    2017-03-03

    The existence of the Sun's hot atmosphere and the solar wind acceleration continues to be an outstanding problem in solar-astrophysics. Although magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes and dissipation of magnetic energy contribute to heating and the mass cycle of the solar atmosphere, yet direct evidence of such processes often generates debate. Ground-based 1-m Swedish Solar Telescope (SST)/CRISP, Hα 6562.8 Å observations reveal, for the first time, the ubiquitous presence of high frequency (~12-42 mHz) torsional motions in thin spicular-type structures in the chromosphere. We detect numerous oscillating flux tubes on 10 June 2014 between 07:17 UT to 08:08 UT in a quiet-Sun field-of-view of 60" × 60" (1" = 725 km). Stringent numerical model shows that these observations resemble torsional Alfvén waves associated with high frequency drivers which contain a huge amount of energy (~10(5) W m(-2)) in the chromosphere. Even after partial reflection from the transition region, a significant amount of energy (~10(3) W m(-2)) is transferred onto the overlying corona. We find that oscillating tubes serve as substantial sources of Alfvén wave generation that provide sufficient Poynting flux not only to heat the corona but also to originate the supersonic solar wind.

  18. High-frequency torsional Alfvén waves as an energy source for coronal heating

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Abhishek Kumar; Shetye, Juie; Murawski, Krzysztof; Doyle, John Gerard; Stangalini, Marco; Scullion, Eamon; Ray, Tom; Wójcik, Dariusz Patryk; Dwivedi, Bhola N.

    2017-01-01

    The existence of the Sun’s hot atmosphere and the solar wind acceleration continues to be an outstanding problem in solar-astrophysics. Although magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes and dissipation of magnetic energy contribute to heating and the mass cycle of the solar atmosphere, yet direct evidence of such processes often generates debate. Ground-based 1-m Swedish Solar Telescope (SST)/CRISP, Hα 6562.8 Å observations reveal, for the first time, the ubiquitous presence of high frequency (~12–42 mHz) torsional motions in thin spicular-type structures in the chromosphere. We detect numerous oscillating flux tubes on 10 June 2014 between 07:17 UT to 08:08 UT in a quiet-Sun field-of-view of 60” × 60” (1” = 725 km). Stringent numerical model shows that these observations resemble torsional Alfvén waves associated with high frequency drivers which contain a huge amount of energy (~105 W m−2) in the chromosphere. Even after partial reflection from the transition region, a significant amount of energy (~103 W m−2) is transferred onto the overlying corona. We find that oscillating tubes serve as substantial sources of Alfvén wave generation that provide sufficient Poynting flux not only to heat the corona but also to originate the supersonic solar wind. PMID:28256538

  19. Comparative Study of Magnetic Properties of Nanoparticles by High-Frequency Heat Dissipation and Conventional Magnetometry

    DOE PAGES

    Malik, V.; Goodwill, J.; Mallapragada, S.; ...

    2014-11-13

    The rate of heating of a water-based colloid of uniformly sized 15 nm magnetic nanoparticles by high-amplitude and high-frequency ac magnetic field induced by the resonating LC circuit (nanoTherics Magnetherm) was measured. The results are analyzed in terms of specific energy absorption rate (SAR). Fitting field amplitude and frequency dependences of SAR to the linear response theory, magnetic moment per particles was extracted. The value of magnetic moment was independently evaluated from dc magnetization measurements (Quantum Design MPMS) of a frozen colloid by fitting field-dependent magnetization to Langevin function. The two methods produced similar results, which are compared to themore » theoretical expectation for this particle size. Additionally, analysis of SAR curves yielded effective relaxation time.« less

  20. Comparative Study of Magnetic Properties of Nanoparticles by High-Frequency Heat Dissipation and Conventional Magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, V.; Goodwill, J.; Mallapragada, S.; Prozorov, T.; Prozorov, R.

    2014-11-13

    The rate of heating of a water-based colloid of uniformly sized 15 nm magnetic nanoparticles by high-amplitude and high-frequency ac magnetic field induced by the resonating LC circuit (nanoTherics Magnetherm) was measured. The results are analyzed in terms of specific energy absorption rate (SAR). Fitting field amplitude and frequency dependences of SAR to the linear response theory, magnetic moment per particles was extracted. The value of magnetic moment was independently evaluated from dc magnetization measurements (Quantum Design MPMS) of a frozen colloid by fitting field-dependent magnetization to Langevin function. The two methods produced similar results, which are compared to the theoretical expectation for this particle size. Additionally, analysis of SAR curves yielded effective relaxation time.

  1. Heating of ions by high frequency electromagnetic waves in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zestanakis, P. A.; Kominis, Y.; Hizanidis, K.; Ram, A. K.

    2013-07-15

    The heating of ions by high frequency electrostatic waves in magnetically confined plasmas has been a paradigm for studying nonlinear wave-particle interactions. The frequency of the waves is assumed to be much higher than the ion cyclotron frequency and the waves are taken to propagate across the magnetic field. In fusion type plasmas, electrostatic waves, like the lower hybrid wave, cannot access the core of the plasma. That is a domain for high harmonic fast waves or electron cyclotron waves—these are primarily electromagnetic waves. Previous studies on heating of ions by two or more electrostatic waves are extended to two electromagnetic waves that propagate directly across the confining magnetic field. While the ratio of the frequency of each wave to the ion cyclotron frequency is large, the frequency difference is assumed to be near the ion cyclotron frequency. The nonlinear wave-particle interaction is studied analytically using a two time-scale canonical perturbation theory. The theory elucidates the effects of various parameters on the gain in energy by the ions—parameters such as the amplitudes and polarizations of the waves, the ratio of the wave frequencies to the cyclotron frequency, the difference in the frequency of the two waves, and the wave numbers associated with the waves. For example, the ratio of the phase velocity of the envelope formed by the two waves to the phase velocity of the carrier wave is important for energization of ions. For a positive ratio, the energy range is much larger than for a negative ratio. So waves like the lower hybrid waves will impart very little energy to ions. The theoretical results are found to be in good agreement with numerical simulations of the exact dynamical equations. The analytical results are used to construct mapping equations, simplifying the derivation of the motion of ions, which are, subsequently, used to follow the evolution of an ion distribution function. The heating of ions can then be

  2. Plasma-heating by induction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, K.; Thorpe, M. L.

    1969-01-01

    Induction-heated plasma torch operates with an input of 1 Mw of direct current of which 71 percent is transferred to the plasma and the remainder is consumed by electrical losses in the system. Continuous operation of the torch should be possible for as long as 5,000 hours.

  3. High frequency electromagnetism, heat transfer and fluid flow coupling in ANSYS multiphysics.

    PubMed

    Sabliov, Cristina M; Salvi, Deepti A; Boldor, Dorin

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to numerically predict the temperature of a liquid product heated in a continuous-flow focused microwave system by coupling high frequency electromagnetism, heat transfer, and fluid flow in ANSYS Multiphysics. The developed model was used to determine the temperature change in water processed in a 915 MHz microwave unit, under steady-state conditions. The influence of the flow rates on the temperature distribution in the liquid was assessed. Results showed that the average temperature of water increased from 25 degrees C to 34 degrees C at 2 l/min, and to 42 degrees C at 1 l/min. The highest temperature regions were found in the liquid near the center of the tube, followed by progressively lower temperature regions as the radial distance from the center increased, and finally followed by a slightly higher temperature region near the tube's wall corresponding to the energy distribution given by the Mathieu function. The energy distribution resulted in a similar temperature pattern, with the highest temperatures close to the center of the tube and lower at the walls. The presented ANSYS Multiphysics model can be easily improved to account for complex boundary conditions, phase change, temperature dependent properties, and non-Newtonian flows, which makes for an objective of future studies.

  4. Electron cyclotron harmonic resonances in high-frequency heating of the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2013-09-15

    Electron acceleration by upper hybrid waves under cyclotron harmonic resonance interaction is studied. Theory is formulated; the analytical solutions in the second and fourth harmonic cyclotron resonance cases are obtained, and in the third harmonic case, a first order differential equation governing the evolution of the electron energy is derived. The theory is applied for explaining the generation of artificial ionization layers observed in high-frequency (HF) ionospheric heating experiments. The upper hybrid waves are assumed to be excited parametrically by the O-mode HF heating wave. As the decay mode is the lower hybrid wave, the excited upper hybrid waves have wavelengths ranging from 0.25 to 0.5 m, which are short enough to effectively incorporate the finite Larmour radius effect for the harmonic cyclotron resonance interactions as well as have a frequency bandwidth of about 20 kHz, which provides an altitude region of about 10 km for continuous harmonic cyclotron resonance interaction between electrons and descending waves in the slightly inhomogeneous geomagnetic field. The numerical results on electron acceleration show that electron fluxes with energies larger than 14 eV are generated in the three harmonic cases. These energetic electrons cause impact ionizations, which are descending to form artificial ionization layers at the bottom of the ionospheric F region.

  5. The features of steel surface hardening with high energy heating by high frequency currents and shower cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancivsky, V. V.; Skeeba, V. Yu; Bataev, I. A.; Lobanov, D. V.; Martyushev, N. V.; Sakha, O. V.; Khlebova, I. V.

    2016-11-01

    The paper examines the process of surface hardening of steel 45 with the help of high energy heating by high frequency currents with simultaneous shower water cooling. We theoretically justified and experimentally proved a possibility of liquid phase forming in the course of heating not on the surface, but in the depth of the surface layer.

  6. Thermoacoustic Contrast of Prostate Cancer due to Heating by Very High Frequency Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Hull, D; Thomas, M; Griep, SK; Jacobsohn, K; See, WA

    2015-01-01

    Applying the thermoacoustic (TA) effect to diagnostic imaging was first proposed in the 1980s. The object under test is irradiated by high-power pulses of electromagnetic energy, which heat tissue and cause thermal expansion. Outgoing TA pressure pulses are detected by ultrasound transducers and reconstructed to provide images of the object. The TA contrast mechanism is strongly dependent upon the frequency of the irradiating electromagnetic pulse. When very high frequency (VHF) electromagnetic irradiation is utilized, TA signal production is driven by ionic content. Prostatic fluids contain high levels of ionic metabolites, including citrate, zinc, calcium, and magnesium. Healthy prostate glands produce more ionic metabolites than diseased glands. VHF pulses are therefore expected to generate stronger TA signal in healthy prostate glands than in diseased glands. A benchtop system for performing ex vivo thermoacoustic computed tomography with VHF energy is described and images are presented. The system utilizes irradiation pulses of 700 ns duration exceeding 20 kW power. Reconstructions frequently visualize anatomic landmarks such as the urethra and verumontanum. TA reconstructions from three freshly excised human prostate glands with little, moderate, and severe cancerous involvement are compared with histology. TA signal strength is negatively correlated with percent cancerous involvement in this small sample size. For the 45 regions of interest analyzed, a reconstruction value of 0.4 mV provides 100% sensitivity but only 29% specificity. This sample size is far too small to draw sweeping conclusions, but the results warrant a larger volume study including comparison of TA images to the gold standard, histology. PMID:25554968

  7. Thermoacoustic contrast of prostate cancer due to heating by very high frequency irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patch, S. K.; Hull, D.; Thomas, M.; Griep, SK; Jacobsohn, K.; See, WA

    2015-01-01

    Applying the thermoacoustic (TA) effect to diagnostic imaging was first proposed in the 1980s. The object under test is irradiated by high-power pulses of electromagnetic energy, which heat tissue and cause thermal expansion. Outgoing TA pressure pulses are detected by ultrasound transducers and reconstructed to provide images of the object. The TA contrast mechanism is strongly dependent upon the frequency of the irradiating electromagnetic pulse. When very high frequency (VHF) electromagnetic irradiation is utilized, TA signal production is driven by ionic content. Prostatic fluids contain high levels of ionic metabolites, including citrate, zinc, calcium, and magnesium. Healthy prostate glands produce more ionic metabolites than diseased glands. VHF pulses are therefore expected to generate stronger TA signal in healthy prostate glands than in diseased glands. A benchtop system for performing ex vivo TA computed tomography with VHF energy is described and images are presented. The system utilizes irradiation pulses of 700 ns duration exceeding 20 kW power. Reconstructions frequently visualize anatomic landmarks such as the urethra and verumontanum. TA reconstructions from three freshly excised human prostate glands with little, moderate, and severe cancerous involvement are compared with histology. TA signal strength is negatively correlated with percent cancerous involvement in this small sample size. For the 45 regions of interest analyzed, a reconstruction value of 0.4 mV provides 100% sensitivity but only 29% specificity. This sample size is far too small to draw sweeping conclusions, but the results warrant a larger volume study including comparison of TA images to the gold standard, histology.

  8. Thermoacoustic contrast of prostate cancer due to heating by very high frequency irradiation.

    PubMed

    Patch, S K; Hull, D; Thomas, M; Griep, S K; Jacobsohn, K; See, W A

    2015-01-21

    Applying the thermoacoustic (TA) effect to diagnostic imaging was first proposed in the 1980s. The object under test is irradiated by high-power pulses of electromagnetic energy, which heat tissue and cause thermal expansion. Outgoing TA pressure pulses are detected by ultrasound transducers and reconstructed to provide images of the object. The TA contrast mechanism is strongly dependent upon the frequency of the irradiating electromagnetic pulse. When very high frequency (VHF) electromagnetic irradiation is utilized, TA signal production is driven by ionic content. Prostatic fluids contain high levels of ionic metabolites, including citrate, zinc, calcium, and magnesium. Healthy prostate glands produce more ionic metabolites than diseased glands. VHF pulses are therefore expected to generate stronger TA signal in healthy prostate glands than in diseased glands. A benchtop system for performing ex vivo TA computed tomography with VHF energy is described and images are presented. The system utilizes irradiation pulses of 700 ns duration exceeding 20 kW power. Reconstructions frequently visualize anatomic landmarks such as the urethra and verumontanum. TA reconstructions from three freshly excised human prostate glands with little, moderate, and severe cancerous involvement are compared with histology. TA signal strength is negatively correlated with percent cancerous involvement in this small sample size. For the 45 regions of interest analyzed, a reconstruction value of 0.4 mV provides 100% sensitivity but only 29% specificity. This sample size is far too small to draw sweeping conclusions, but the results warrant a larger volume study including comparison of TA images to the gold standard, histology.

  9. A high frequency active voltage doubler in standard CMOS using offset-controlled comparators for inductive power transmission.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung-Min; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a fully integrated active voltage doubler in CMOS technology using offset-controlled high speed comparators for extending the range of inductive power transmission to implantable microelectronic devices (IMD) and radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags. This active voltage doubler provides considerably higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) and lower dropout voltage compared to its passive counterpart and requires lower input voltage than active rectifiers, leading to reliable and efficient operation with weakly coupled inductive links. The offset-controlled functions in the comparators compensate for turn-on and turn-off delays to not only maximize the forward charging current to the load but also minimize the back current, optimizing PCE in the high frequency (HF) band. We fabricated the active voltage doubler in a 0.5-μm 3M2P std . CMOS process, occupying 0.144 mm(2) of chip area. With 1.46 V peak AC input at 13.56 MHz, the active voltage doubler provides 2.4 V DC output across a 1 kΩ load, achieving the highest PCE = 79% ever reported at this frequency. In addition, the built-in start-up circuit ensures a reliable operation at lower voltages.

  10. A High Frequency Active Voltage Doubler in Standard CMOS Using Offset-Controlled Comparators for Inductive Power Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung-Min; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully integrated active voltage doubler in CMOS technology using offset-controlled high speed comparators for extending the range of inductive power transmission to implantable microelectronic devices (IMD) and radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags. This active voltage doubler provides considerably higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) and lower dropout voltage compared to its passive counterpart and requires lower input voltage than active rectifiers, leading to reliable and efficient operation with weakly coupled inductive links. The offset-controlled functions in the comparators compensate for turn-on and turn-off delays to not only maximize the forward charging current to the load but also minimize the back current, optimizing PCE in the high frequency (HF) band. We fabricated the active voltage doubler in a 0.5-μm 3M2P std. CMOS process, occupying 0.144 mm2 of chip area. With 1.46 V peak AC input at 13.56 MHz, the active voltage doubler provides 2.4 V DC output across a 1 kΩ load, achieving the highest PCE = 79% ever reported at this frequency. In addition, the built-in start-up circuit ensures a reliable operation at lower voltages. PMID:23853321

  11. Method for Accurate Surface Temperature Measurements During Fast Induction Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larregain, Benjamin; Vanderesse, Nicolas; Bridier, Florent; Bocher, Philippe; Arkinson, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    A robust method is proposed for the measurement of surface temperature fields during induction heating. It is based on the original coupling of temperature-indicating lacquers and a high-speed camera system. Image analysis tools have been implemented to automatically extract the temporal evolution of isotherms. This method was applied to the fast induction treatment of a 4340 steel spur gear, allowing the full history of surface isotherms to be accurately documented for a sequential heating, i.e., a medium frequency preheating followed by a high frequency final heating. Three isotherms, i.e., 704, 816, and 927°C, were acquired every 0.3 ms with a spatial resolution of 0.04 mm per pixel. The information provided by the method is described and discussed. Finally, the transformation temperature Ac1 is linked to the temperature on specific locations of the gear tooth.

  12. Influence of low- and high-frequency electrical heating on biodegrading microorganisms in soil: soil respiration.

    PubMed

    Roland, Ulf; Holzer, Frank; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter

    2013-01-01

    The influence of electrical heating on microbiological processes in soil has been studied to evaluate the potential for enhancing biodegradation of pollutants by controlling the temperature. A frequency of 50 Hz (power line frequency) was applied for resistive heating. Dielectric heating was realized using a frequency of 13.56 MHz (radio frequency). Both techniques were compared with conventional heating in a water bath. For experiments in laboratory and full scale, a model soil and a contaminated original soil were used. It was shown that under conditions capable for heating soil to 35 degrees C or even 60 degrees C, soil respiration as a measure for microbial activity was not hindered by electrical heating when temperature and moisture content were comparable with conventional heating. The variations of soil respiration were reversible upon temperature changes. Under certain conditions, periodical fluctuations of microbiological activity were observed. Several possible explanations including chronobiology are discussed without being able to provide an unambiguous interpretation for this effect.

  13. Formation of high-carbon abrasion-resistant surface layers when high-energy heating by high-frequency currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikova, N. V.; Skeeba, V. Yu; Martyushev, N. V.; Miller, R. A.; Rubtsova, N. S.

    2016-11-01

    The paper shows the possibility of carburization of low-carbon steel surface layers using high-frequency currents. The mathematical modeling of carburization using high-energy heating by high-frequency currents (HEH HFC) has been carried out, the temperature fields formed during the given processing have been calculated, as well as the structural changes in the surface layers have been simulated. The features of the structure formation in the surface layers of low-carbon steel after carburizing via HEH HFC have been determined by optical and scanning microscopy, which is confirmed by the computational models. The rational mode of fusion via HEH HFC has also been determined (power density of the source qs = (1.5 ... 4.0) • 108 W m-2, (the relative travel speed of parts Vp = 5 ... 100 mm / sec), with forming the compressive retained stresses in the surface layer (σRS ≈ -300 ... -400 MPa).

  14. High frequency core localized modes in neutral beam heated plasmas on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Nazikian, R.; Chang, Z.; Fredrickson, E.D.

    1995-11-01

    A band of high frequency modes in the range 50--150 kHz with intermediate toroidal mode numbers 4 < n < 10 are commonly observed in the core of supershot plasmas on TFTR. Two distinct varieties of MHD modes are identified corresponding to a flute-like mode predominantly appearing around the q = 1 surface and an outward ballooning mode for q > 1. The flute-like modes have nearly equal amplitude on the high field and low field side of the magnetic axis and are mostly observed in moderate performance supershot plasmas with {tau}{sub E} < 2{tau}{sub L} while the ballooning-like modes have enhanced amplitude on the low field side of the magnetic axis and tend to appear in higher performance supershot plasmas with {tau}{sub E} > 2{tau}{sub L}, where {tau}{sub L} is the equivalent L-mode confinement time. The modes propagate in the ion diamagnetic drift direction and are highly localized with radial widths {Delta}r {approximately} 5--10 cm, fluctuation levels {tilde n}/n, {tilde T}{sub e}/T{sub e} < 0.01, and radial displacements {zeta}{sub r} {approximately} 0.1 cm. Unlike the toroidally localized high-n activity observed just prior to major and minor disruptions on TFTR, these modes are typically much weaker, more benign, and may be indicative of kinetic ballooning modes destabilized by resonant circulating neutral beam ions.

  15. Ion plating with an induction heating source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.; Brainard, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    Induction heating is introduced as an evaporation heat source in ion plating. A bare induction coil without shielding can be directly used in the glow discharge region with no arcing. The only requirement is to utilize an rf inductive generator with low operating frequency of 75 kHz. Mechanical simplicity of the ion plating apparatus and ease of operation is a great asset for industrial applications; practically any metal such as nickel, iron, and the high temperature refractories can be evaporated and ion plated.

  16. An Induction Heating Method with Traveling Magnetic Field for Long Structure Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Takamitsu; Tomita, Hideo; Obata, Shuji; Saito, Yukio

    A novel dismantlable adhesion method for recycling operation of interior materials is proposed. This method is applied a high frequency induction heating and a thermoplastic adhesive. For an adhesion of interior material to long steel stud, a conventional spiral coil as like IH cooking heater gives inadequateness for uniform heating to the stud. Therefore, we have proposed an induction heating method with traveling magnetic field for perfect long structures bonding. In this paper, we describe on the new adhesion method using the 20kHz, three-phase 200V inverter and linear induction coil. From induction heating characteristics to thin steel plates and long studs, the method is cleared the usefulness for uniform heating to long structures.

  17. A H2 very high frequency capacitively coupled plasma inactivates glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase(GapDH) more efficiently than UV photons and heat combined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapelmann, Katharina; Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Buerger, Ines; Bandow, Julia Elisabeth; Awakowicz, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Plasma sterilization is a promising alternative to commonly used sterilization techniques, because the conventional methods suffer from certain limitations, e.g. incompatibility with heat-sensitive materials, or use of toxic agents. However, plasma-based sterilization mechanisms are not fully understood yet. A low-pressure very high frequency capacitively coupled plasma is used to investigate the impact of a hydrogen discharge on the protein glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapDH). GapDH is an enzyme of glycolysis. As a part of the central metabolism, it occurs in nearly all organisms from bacteria to humans. The plasma is investigated with absolutely calibrated optical emission spectroscopy in order to identify and to quantify plasma components that can contribute to enzyme inactivation. The contribution of UV photons and heat to GapDH inactivation is investigated separately, and neither seems to be a major factor. In order to investigate the mechanisms of GapDH inactivation by the hydrogen discharge, samples are investigated for etching, induction of amino acid backbone breaks, and chemical modifications. While neither etching nor strand breaks are observed, chemical modifications occur at different amino acid residues of GapDH. Deamidations of asparagines as well as methionine and cysteine oxidations are detected after VHF-CCP treatment. In particular, oxidation of the cysteine in the active centre is known to lead to GapDH inactivation.

  18. Study of the generator/motor operation of induction machines in a high frequency link space power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipo, Thomas A.; Sood, Pradeep K.

    1987-01-01

    Static power conversion systems have traditionally utilized dc current or voltage source links for converting power from one ac or dc form to another since it readily achieves the temporary energy storage required to decouple the input from the output. Such links, however, result in bulky dc capacitors and/or inductors and lead to relatively high losses in the converters due to stresses on the semiconductor switches. The feasibility of utilizing a high frequency sinusoidal voltage link to accomplish the energy storage and decoupling function is examined. In particular, a type of resonant six pulse bridge interface converter is proposed which utilizes zero voltage switching principles to minimize switching losses and uses an easy to implement technique for pulse density modulation to control the amplitude, frequency, and the waveshape of the synthesized low frequency voltage or current. Adaptation of the proposed topology for power conversion to single-phase ac and dc voltage or current outputs is shown to be straight forward. The feasibility of the proposed power circuit and control technique for both active and passive loads are verified by means of simulation and experiment.

  19. Modeling a Cold Crucible Induction Heated Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Grant L. Hawkes

    2003-06-01

    FIDAP has been used to simulate melting of radioactive waste glass in a cold crucible induction heated melter. A model has been created that couples the magnetic vector potential (real and imaginary) to a transient startup of the melting process. This magnetic field is coupled to the mass, momentum, and energy equations that vary with time and position as the melt grows. The coupling occurs with the electrical conductivity of the glass as it rises above the melt temperature of the glass and heat is generated. Natural convection within the molten glass helps determine the shape of the melt as it progresses in time. An electromagnetic force is also implemented that is dependent on the electrical properties and frequency of the coil. This study shows the progression of the melt shape with time along with temperatures, power input, velocities, and magnetic vector potential. A power controller is implemented that controls the primary coil current and power.

  20. Verification and validation for induction heating

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Kin; Tippetts, Trevor B; Allen, David W

    2008-01-01

    Truchas is a software package being developed at LANL within the Telluride project for predicting the complex physical processes in metal alloy casting. The software was designed to be massively parallel, multi-material, multi-physics, and to run on 3D, fully unstructured meshes. This work describes a Verification and Validation assessment of Truchas for simulating the induction heating phase of a casting process. We used existing data from a simple experiment involving the induction heating of a graphite cylinder, as graphite is a common material used for mold assemblies. Because we do not have complete knowledge of all the conditions and properties in this experiment (as is the case in many other experiments), we performed a parameter sensitivity study, modeled the uncertainties of the most sensitive parameters, and quantified how these uncertainties propagate to the Truchas output response. A verification analysis produced estimates of the numerical error of the Truchas solution to our computational model. The outputs from Truchas runs with randomly sampled parameter values were used for the validation study.

  1. High-frequency sarcomeric auto-oscillations induced by heating in living neonatal cardiomyocytes of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Shintani, Seine A.; Oyama, Kotaro; Fukuda, Norio; Ishiwata, Shin’ichi

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • We tested the effects of infra-red laser irradiation on cardiac sarcomere dynamics. • A rise in temperature (>∼38 °C) induced high-frequency sarcomeric auto-oscillations. • These oscillations occurred with and without blockade of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} stores. • Cardiac sarcomeres can play a role as a temperature-dependent rhythm generator. - Abstract: In the present study, we investigated the effects of infra-red laser irradiation on sarcomere dynamics in living neonatal cardiomyocytes of the rat. A rapid increase in temperature to >∼38 °C induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}-independent high-frequency (∼5–10 Hz) sarcomeric auto-oscillations (Hyperthermal Sarcomeric Oscillations; HSOs). In myocytes with the intact sarcoplasmic reticular functions, HSOs coexisted with [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}-dependent spontaneous beating in the same sarcomeres, with markedly varying frequencies (∼10 and ∼1 Hz for the former and latter, respectively). HSOs likewise occurred following blockade of the sarcoplasmic reticular functions, with the amplitude becoming larger and the frequency lower in a time-dependent manner. The present findings suggest that in the mammalian heart, sarcomeres spontaneously oscillate at higher frequencies than the sinus rhythm at temperatures slightly above the physiologically relevant levels.

  2. Simulation of the processes that occur in a high-frequency VChI 11-60/1,76 induction plant for melting of metals and the conservation of radioactive wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'vov, E. I.

    2016-06-01

    High-frequency induction plants are widely used to melt high-purity refractory metals and to conserve radioactive wastes in a glassy mass. The regimes of operation of such a plant are simulated, and the optimum conditions of stable energy transfer to a melting crucible are revealed.

  3. X-ray and optical crystallographic parameters investigations of high frequency induction melted Al-(alpha-Al(2)O(3)) alloys.

    PubMed

    Bourbia, A; Draissia, M; Bedboudi, H; Boulkhessaim, S; Debili, M Y

    2010-01-01

    This article deals with the microstructural strengthening mechanisms of aluminium by means of hard alpha-Al(2)O(3) alumina fine particles. A broad of understanding views covering materials preparations, elaboration process, characterization techniques and associated microstructural characteristic parameters measurements is given. In order to investigate the microstructural characteristic parameters and the mechanical strengthening mechanisms of pure aluminium by hard fine particles, a set of Al-(alpha-Al(2)O(3)) alloys samples were made under vacuum by high fusion temperature melting, the high frequency (HF) process, and rapidly solidified under ambient temperature from a mixture of cold-compacted high-pure fine Al and alpha-Al(2)O(3) powders. The as-solidified Al-(alpha-Al(2)O(3)) alloys were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, optical microscopy observations and Vickers microhardness tests in both brut and heat-treated states. It was found that the as-solidified HF Al-(alpha-Al(2)O(3)) alloys with compositions below 4 wt.% (alpha-Al(2)O(3)) are single-phase microstructures of the solid solution FCC Al phase and over two-phase microstructures of the solid solution FCC Al and the Rhombohedral alpha-Al(2)O(3) phases. The optical micrographs reveal the presence of a grain size refinement in these alloys. Vickers microhardness of the as-solidified Al-(alpha-Al(2)O(3)) is increased by means of pure fine alpha-Al(2)O(3) alumina particles. These combined effects of strengthening and grain size refinement observed in the as-solidified Al-(alpha-Al(2)O(3)) alloys are essentially due to a strengthening of Al by the alpha-Al(2)O(3) alumina particles insertion in the (HF) melted and rapidly solidified alloys.

  4. Inductively heated particulate matter filter regeneration control system

    SciTech Connect

    Gonze, Eugene V; Paratore Jr., Michael J; Kirby, Kevin W; Phelps, Amanda; Gregoire, Daniel J

    2012-10-23

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter with an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas, a downstream end and zones. The system also includes a heating element. A control module selectively activates the heating element to inductively heat one of the zones.

  5. Exploring HF-induced ionospheric turbulence by Doppler sounding and stimulated electromagnetic emissions at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program heating facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Evgeny N.; Shindin, Alexey V.; Grach, Savely M.; Milikh, Gennady M.; Mishin, Evgeny V.; Bernhardt, Paul A.; Siefring, Carl L.; Briczinski, Stanley J.; McCarrick, Michael J.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the features of the F region plasma perturbations during HF heating experiments at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program facility in March-April 2011 and May-June 2014. The diagnostics included multifrequency Doppler (phase) sounding (MDS) and stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE). The results concern modification of the electron density profile near the reflection and upper hybrid heights, as well as correlation of the density modification with temporal behavior of narrow continuum, downshifted maximum, and broad continuum SEE spectral features. We reveal also a new SEE spectral feature which appears in the SEE spectra for the pump frequency f0 near the third and fourth electron gyroharmonics. It is located in the SEE spectrum well below the pump wave frequency, f - f0 -(40-220) kHz, occupies a wide frequency range till 100-150 kHz, and is termed the broad downshifted emission.

  6. REEXAMINATION OF INDUCTION HEATING OF PRIMITIVE BODIES IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, Raymond L.; Roberge, Wayne G. E-mail: roberw@rpi.edu

    2013-10-20

    We reexamine the unipolar induction mechanism for heating asteroids originally proposed in a classic series of papers by Sonett and collaborators. As originally conceived, induction heating is caused by the 'motional electric field' that appears in the frame of an asteroid immersed in a fully ionized, magnetized solar wind and drives currents through its interior. However, we point out that classical induction heating contains a subtle conceptual error, in consequence of which the electric field inside the asteroid was calculated incorrectly. The problem is that the motional electric field used by Sonett et al. is the electric field in the freely streaming plasma far from the asteroid; in fact, the motional field vanishes at the asteroid surface for realistic assumptions about the plasma density. In this paper we revisit and improve the induction heating scenario by (1) correcting the conceptual error by self-consistently calculating the electric field in and around the boundary layer at the asteroid-plasma interface; (2) considering weakly ionized plasmas consistent with current ideas about protoplanetary disks; and (3) considering more realistic scenarios that do not require a fully ionized, powerful T Tauri wind in the disk midplane. We present exemplary solutions for two highly idealized flows that show that the interior electric field can either vanish or be comparable to the fields predicted by classical induction depending on the flow geometry. We term the heating driven by these flows 'electrodynamic heating', calculate its upper limits, and compare them to heating produced by short-lived radionuclides.

  7. Unique Computer Modeling Approaches for Simulation of Induction Heating and Heat-Treating Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnev, Valery

    2013-07-01

    In the last decade, when discussing subjects related to a computer modeling of induction heating and heat treating, the word "usefulness" has been replaced by the word "necessity." Modern computer simulation is capable of effectively simulating electromagnetic and thermal phenomena for many processes, including those that involve electromagnetic induction. This article discusses the state-of-the-art computer simulation of induction heating and heat treating providing answers to following questions: Why finite element analysis is not always the best tool for computer modeling of some induction heating applications? What are the limitations of generalized all-purpose commercial programs? What are the crucial tips that executives must know regarding computer modeling of induction heating? Several case studies will be reviewed in this article as well.

  8. Approximating ambient D-region electron densities using dual-beam HF heating experiments at the high-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Divya

    Dual-beam ELF/VLF wave generation experiments performed at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) HF transmitter in Gakona, Alaska are critically compared with the predictions of a newly developed ionospheric high frequency (HF) heating model that accounts for the simultaneous propagation and absorption of multiple HF beams. The dual-beam HF heating experiments presented herein consist of two HF beams transmitting simultaneously: one amplitude modulated (AM) HF beam modulates the conductivity of the lower ionosphere in the extremely low frequency (ELF, 30 Hz to 3 kHz) and/or very low frequency (VLF, 3 kHz to 30 kHz) band while a second HF beam broadcasts a continuous waveform (CW) signal, modifying the efficiency of ELF/VLF conductivity modulation and thereby the efficiency of ELF/VLF wave generation. Ground-based experimental observations are used together with the predictions of the theoretical model to identify the property of the received ELF/VLF wave that is most sensitive to the effects of multi-beam HF heating, and that property is determined to be the ELF/VLF signal magnitude. The dependence of the generated ELF/VLF wave magnitude on several HF transmission parameters (HF power, HF frequency, and modulation waveform) is then experimentally measured and analyzed within the context of the multi-beam HF heating model. For all cases studied, the received ELF/VLF wave magnitude as a function of transmission parameter is analyzed to identify the dependence on the ambient D-region electron density (Ne) and/or electron temperature ( Te), in turn identifying the HF transmission parameters that provide significant independent information regarding the ambient conditions of the D-region ionosphere. A theoretical analysis is performed to determine the conditions under which the effects of Ne and Te can be decoupled, and the results of this analysis are applied to identify an electron density profile that can reproduce the unusually high level of ELF

  9. Computer simulation and optimal designing of energy-saving technologies of the induction heating of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidovich, V. B.

    2012-12-01

    Advanced energy-saving technologies of induction heating of metals are discussed. The importance of the joint simulation of electromagnetic and temperature fields on induction heating is demonstrated. The package of specialized programs for simulating not only induction heating devices, but also technologies that employ industrial heating has been developed. An intimate connection between optimal design and control of induction heaters is shown.

  10. Synthesis of Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes by Inductive Heating CCVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biris, A. R.; Biris, A. S.; Lupu, D.; Trigwell, S.; Rahman, Z. U.; Aldea, N.; Marginean, P.

    2005-01-01

    The CCVD syntheses of MWCNTs from acetylene on Fe:Co:CaCO 3 and Fe:Co:CaO were performed using two different methods of heating: outer furnace and inductive heating. The comparative analysis of the MWCNTs obtained by the two methods show that the tubes grown in inductive heating have smaller diameters (5-25 nm), with fewer walls and aspect ratio of the order of hundreds. The ratio of outer to inner diameter (od/id) is ranging between 2 and 2.5. Inductively assisted CCVD is a very attractive method because of the major advantages that it presents, like low energetic consumption, thinner, well crystallized and more uniform tubes.

  11. Induction heaters used to heat subsurface formations

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh [Houston, TX; Bass, Ronald M [Houston, TX

    2012-04-24

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes an elongated electrical conductor located in the subsurface formation. The electrical conductor extends between at least a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact. A ferromagnetic conductor at least partially surrounds and at least partially extends lengthwise around the electrical conductor. The electrical conductor, when energized with time-varying electrical current, induces sufficient electrical current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor such that the ferromagnetic conductor resistively heats to a temperature of at least about 300.degree. C.

  12. Wireless induction heating in a microfluidic device for cell lysis.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung-ki; Min, Junghong; Park, Jung-Hwan

    2010-04-07

    A wireless induction heating system in a microfluidic device was devised for cell lysis to extract DNA and RNA from Escherichia coli. The thermal responses of nickel, iron and copper heating units were studied by applying an alternating magnetic field as a function of geometry of unit, strength of magnetic field, and kind of metal. Heating units were prepared by cutting metal film using a fiber laser, and the units were integrated into a microchannel system using a soft lithographic process. Variation and distribution of temperature on the surface of the heating units was observed using a thermographic camera and temperature labels. The amount of protein released from E. coli by thermal lysis was determined by protein concentration measurement. Hemoglobin released from red blood cells was observed using colorimetric intensity measurement. Extracted DNA was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and the profile was compared with that of a positive control of ultrasonically disrupted E. coli. The stability of RNA extracted by induction heating was quantified by the measurement of 23S/16S rRNA ratio and comparison with that by normal RNA extraction kit as a gold standard. A solid-shaped nickel structure was selected as the induction heating element in the microfluidic device because of the relatively small influence of geometries and faster thermal response.The amount of protein extracted from E. coli and hemoglobin released from red blood cells by induction heating of the nickel unit in the microfluidic device was proportional to the strength of the applied magnetic field. The lysis of E. coli by induction heating was as effective as lysis of DNA by the ultrasonication method because the threshold cycle values of the sample were compatible with those of the positive control as measured by ultrasonication. Thermal lysis of E. coli by induction heating represents a reasonable alternative to a commercial RNA extraction method as shown by the comparative

  13. Numerical model of induction heating of steel-tube ends

    SciTech Connect

    Garbulsky, G.D.; Marino, P.; Pignotti, A.

    1997-01-01

    A two-dimensional model of induction heating of steel-tube ends, that takes into account magnetic induction saturation and temperature dependence of material properties, is developed as an aid to process design and optimization. The model is solved by the finite difference method, and is validated by comparison with thermocouple measurements at an industrial facility at which three tubes are heated concurrently prior to an upsetting process. An example of the dependence of the final temperature distribution on geometrical parameters is discussed in detail.

  14. Joule heating of Io's ionosphere by unipolar induction currents

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, F.; Lichtenstein, B.R.

    1980-01-01

    Electrical induction in Io's ionosphere, due to the corotating plasma bound to the Jovian magnetosphere, is one possible source for the attainment of the high temperatures suggested by the large scale height of Io's ionosphere. Unipolar induction models are constructed to calculate ionospheric joule heating numerically, whose heating rates lie between 10 to the -9th and 10 to the -8th W/cu m. The binding and coupling of the ionosphere is due to the dense, and possibly ionized, neutral SO2 atmosphere, and there appears to be no need to postulate the existence of an intrinsic Ionian magnetic field in order to retain the observed ionnosphere.

  15. Consideration of different heating lengths of needles with induction heating and resistance system: A novel design of needle module for thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Bui, Huy-Tien; Hwang, Sheng-Jye; Lee, Huei-Huang; Huang, Durn-Yuan

    2017-04-01

    Thermal ablation using alternating electromagnetic fields is a promising method to treat tissues including tumors. With this approach, an electromagnetic field is generated around an induction coil, which is supplied with high frequency current from a power source. Any electrically conducting object, which is placed in the electromagnetic field, is then heated due to eddy currents. Basic principles underlying this novel thermotherapy needle system are internal induction and resistance heating. This presents a new design of a standard gauge 18 percutaneous trans-hepatic cholangiography needle module combined with a compact power source. Three needle modules containing coils of different lengths were used to locally heat up different volumes of tissues in in vitro experiments on pig livers. Temperature on the inside surface of the needle was controlled and monitored through a K-type thermocouple. By using this needle module system, no two-section or ferromagnetic nanoparticle-coated needles were required; the system worked well with the SUS-304 stainless-steel needle. Successful results were demonstrated in the in vitro experiments on pig livers with different heating lengths of 10, 20, and 30 mm needles. With low power sources, needles could be heated up to a high temperature. The novel design of the needle module incorporated with a high frequency power source was thus shown to be a promising technology for tissue ablation. Bioelectromagnetics.38:220-226, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Graphene synthesis via magnetic inductive heating of copper substrates.

    PubMed

    Piner, Richard; Li, Huifeng; Kong, Xianghua; Tao, Li; Kholmanov, Iskandar N; Ji, Hengxing; Lee, Wi Hyoung; Suk, Ji Won; Ye, Jongpil; Hao, Yufeng; Chen, Shanshan; Magnuson, Carl W; Ismach, Ariel F; Akinwande, Deji; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2013-09-24

    Scaling graphene growth using an oven to heat large substrates becomes less energy efficient as system size is increased. We report a route to graphene synthesis in which radio frequency (RF) magnetic fields inductively heat metal foils, yielding graphene of quality comparable to or higher than that of current chemical vapor deposition techniques. RF induction heating allows for rapid temperature ramp up/down, with great potential for large scale and rapid manufacturing of graphene with much better energy efficiency. Back-gated field effect transistors on a SiO2/Si substrate showed carrier mobility up to ∼14 000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) measured under ambient conditions. Many advantages of RF heating are outlined, and some fundamental aspects of this approach are discussed.

  17. High Frequency Plasma Generators for Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divergilio, W. F.; Goede, H.; Fosnight, V. V.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a one year program to experimentally adapt two new types of high frequency plasma generators to Argon ion thrusters and to analytically study a third high frequency source concept are presented. Conventional 30 cm two grid ion extraction was utilized or proposed for all three sources. The two plasma generating methods selected for experimental study were a radio frequency induction (RFI) source, operating at about 1 MHz, and an electron cyclotron heated (ECH) plasma source operating at about 5 GHz. Both sources utilize multi-linecusp permanent magnet configurations for plasma confinement. The plasma characteristics, plasma loading of the rf antenna, and the rf frequency dependence of source efficiency and antenna circuit efficiency are described for the RFI Multi-cusp source. In a series of tests of this source at Lewis Research Center, minimum discharge losses of 220+/-10 eV/ion were obtained with propellant utilization of .45 at a beam current of 3 amperes. Possible improvement modifications are discussed.

  18. High frequency power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Mikund R.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this project was to provide the technology of high frequency, high power transmission lines to the 100 kW power range at 20 kHz frequency. In addition to the necessary design studies, a 150 m long, 600 V, 60 A transmission line was built, tested and delivered for full vacuum tests. The configuration analysis on five alternative configurations resulted in the final selection of the three parallel Litz straps configuration, which gave a virtually concentric design in the electromagnetic sense. Low inductance, low EMI and flexibility in handling are the key features of this configuration. The final design was made after a parametric study to minimize the losses, weight and inductance. The construction of the cable was completed with no major difficulties. The R,L,C parameters measured on the cable agreed well with the calculated values. The corona tests on insulation samples showed a safety factor of 3.

  19. Induction heating apparatus and methods of operation thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, John G.

    2006-08-01

    Methods of operation of an induction melter include providing material within a cooled crucible proximate an inductor. A desired electromagnetic flux skin depth for heating the material within the crucible may be selected, and a frequency of an alternating current for energizing the inductor and for producing the desired skin depth may be selected. The alternating current frequency may be adjusted after energizing the inductor to maintain the desired electromagnetic flux skin depth. The desired skin depth may be substantially maintained as the temperature of the material varies. An induction heating apparatus includes a sensor configured to detect changes in at least one physical characteristic of a material to be heated in a crucible, and a controller configured for selectively varying a frequency of an alternating current for energizing an inductor at least partially in response to changes in the physical characteristic to be detected by the sensor.

  20. Multicharged iron ions produced by using induction heating vapor source.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yushi; Kubo, Takashi; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Tanaka, Kiyokatsu; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Yoshida, Yoshikazu; Asaji, Toyohisa; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2008-02-01

    Multiply charged Fe ions are produced from solid pure material in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. We develop an evaporator by using induction heating with an induction coil which is made of bare molybdenum wire partially covered by ceramic beads in vacuum and surrounding and heating directly the pure Fe rod. Heated material has no contact with insulators, so that outgas is minimized. The evaporator is installed around the mirror end plate outside of the ECR plasma with its hole grazing the ECR zone. Helium or argon gas is usually chosen for supporting gas. The multicharged Fe ions up to Fe(13+) are extracted from the opposite side of mirror and against the evaporator, and then multicharged Fe ion beam is formed. We compare production of multicharged iron ions by using this new source with our previous methods.

  1. Magnetoencephalography study of different relationships among low- and high-frequency-band neural activities during the induction of peaceful and fearful audiovisual modalities among males and females.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chia-Yen; Lin, Ching-Po

    2017-01-02

    Our previous study estimated the bias from the match attributes of the auditory and visual modalities related to a peaceful mood in the male brain. However, the interactions among the four main frequency bands of neural activity remain unknown. Therefore, this study uses magnetoencephalography to explore gender differences in the perceptions of auditory and visual modalities related to peaceful and fearful moods. Instead of analyzing single frequencies, this study analyzes interactions between low-frequency phase and high-frequency amplitude to reflect neural communication. The top four values in each of the 10 brain regions were averaged to give a representative value for further analysis with repeated-measures ANOVA. The results from the cross-frequency analyses suggest that delta-theta, delta-alpha, delta-beta, and delta-gamma couplings are associated with interactions between emotion and modality; theta-alpha, theta-beta, and theta-gamma couplings are associated with interactions between gender and emotion/time; alpha-beta and alpha-gamma couplings are associated with time; and beta-gamma coupling is associated with interactions between gender and modality. Although no obvious hemispheric lateralization of emotion in the macroscopic neural activity was found, these results reveal that males have stronger couplings (e.g., beta-gamma coupling) in the visual modality related to peaceful mood, whereas females have stronger couplings (e.g., beta-gamma coupling) in the audiovisual modality related to fearful mood. Gender differences become much more apparent when analysis is based on cross-frequency coupling. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Induction Heating Process: 3D Modeling and Optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naar, R.; Bay, F.

    2011-05-01

    An increasing number of problems in mechanics and physics involves multiphysics coupled problems. Among these problems, we can often find electromagnetic coupled problems. Electromagnetic couplings may be involved through the use of direct or induced currents for thermal purposes—in order to generate heat inside a work piece in order to get either a prescribed temperature field or some given mechanical or metallurgical properties through an accurate control of temperature evolution with respect to time-, or for solid or fluid mechanics purposes—in order to create magnetic forces such as in fluid mechanics (electromagnetic stirring,…) or solid mechanics (magnetoforming,…). Induction heat treatment processes is therefore quite difficult to control; trying for instance to minimize distortions generated by such a process is not easy. In order to achieve these objectives, we have developed a computational tool which includes an optimsation stage. A 3D finite element modeling tool for local quenching after induction heating processes has already been developed in our laboratory. The modeling of such a multiphysics coupled process needs taking into account electromagnetic, thermal, mechanical and metallurgical phenomenon—as well as their mutual interactions during the whole process: heating and quenching. The model developed is based on Maxwell equations, heat transfer equation, mechanical equilibrium computations, Johnson-Mehl-Avrami and Koistinen-Marburger laws. All these equations and laws may be coupled but some coupling may be neglected. In our study, we will also focus on induction heating process aiming at optimising the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ). Thus problem is formalized as an optimization problem—minimizing a cost function which measures the difference between computed and optimal temperatures—along with some constraints on process parameters. The optimization algorithms may be of two kinds—either zero-order or first-order algorithms. First

  3. High-frequency regeneration via multiple shoot induction of an elite recalcitrant cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. cv Narashima) by using embryo apex.

    PubMed

    Pathi, Krishna Mohan; Tuteja, Narendra

    2013-01-01

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is one of the most commercially important fiber crops in the world. Compared with other crops, cotton represents a recalcitrant species for regeneration protocols. The development of efficient and rapid regeneration protocol for elite Indian cotton variety could help improve the quality characteristics and biotic or abiotic stress tolerance. Here we report a novel regeneration protocol in Indian cotton cultivar Narashima. The maximum number of multiple shoots obtained was 16 per explants, performance which has never been achieved in any prior reports. The embryo apex explants were isolated from 2 d old in vitro growing seedlings. Explants were cultured on MS medium containing different plant growth regulator combinations in order to induce multiple shoots. Among the tested combinations, the 2 mg/l of 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) and 2 mg/l kinetin (KIN) proved to be most suited for achieving the maximum number of multiple shoots. The elongation of multiple shoots was obtained in media supplemented with gibberellic acid (GA3). The regenerated plants were successfully hardened in earthen pots after adequate acclimatization. This method avoids callus tissue, the stage of regeneration which may lead to somaclonal variation. The important feature of the presented method is shortening of regeneration time, as well as the induction of a high number of multiple shoots per explants. The present protocol may provide an efficient and rapid regeneration tool for obtaining more stable transformants from embryo apex explants of Indian cotton cultivar Narashima.

  4. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or "halo" at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

  5. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

  6. [High frequency ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sattler, E

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has become a standard procedure in clinical dermatology. Devices with intermediate high frequencies of 7.5-15 MHz are used in dermato-oncology for the staging and postoperative care of skin tumor patients and in angiology for improved vessel diagnostics. In contrast, the high frequency ultrasound systems with 20-100 MHz probes offer a much higher resolution, yet with a lower penetration depth of about 1 cm. The main indications are the preoperative measurements of tumor thickness in malignant melanoma and other skin tumors and the assessment of inflammatory and soft tissue diseases, offering information on the course of these dermatoses and allowing therapy monitoring. This article gives an overview on technical principles, devices, mode of examination, influencing factors, interpretation of the images, indications but also limitations of this technique.

  7. High frequency plasma generators for ion thruster applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divergilio, W. F.; Goede, H.; Komatsu, G. K.; Christensen, T.

    1981-01-01

    Two concepts for high frequency discharge ion thrusters are described. Both sources are designed for use with 30 cm grid sets and argon propellant and utilize multi-cusp permanent magnet geometries for plasma confinement. The RF induction source is a conventional design representing a synthesis of the RIT and multi-cusp concepts. The preliminary data (without system optimization) indicate a discharge efficiency comparable to that obtained in 30 cm hollow cathode multi-cusp argon thrusters. The electron cyclotron heating source is electrodeless and exhibits plasma characteristics which should lead to greatly reduced discharge chamber and screen sputter rates with the optimization of the magnetic fields, microwave frequency, and feed configuration.

  8. Extraordinary induction heating effect near the first order Curie transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barati, M. R.; Selomulya, C.; Sandeman, K. G.; Suzuki, K.

    2014-10-01

    While materials with a 1st order Curie transition (TC) are known for the magnetic cooling effect due to the reversibility of their large entropy change, they also have a great potential as a candidate material for induction heating where a large loss power is required under a limited alternating magnetic field. We have carried out a proof-of-concept study on the induction heating effect in 1st order ferromagnetic materials where the temperature is self-regulated at TC. LaFe11.57Si1.43H1.75, a well-known magnetocaloric material, was employed in this study because TC of this compound (319 K) resides in the ideal temperature range for hyperthermia treatment of cancerous cells. It is found that the hysteresis loss of LaFe11.57Si1.43H1.75 increases dramatically near TC due to the magnetic phase coexistence associated with the 1st order magnetic transition. The spontaneous magnetization (Ms) shows a very abrupt decrease from 110 Am2kg-1 at 316 K to zero at 319 K. This large Ms immediately below TC along with the enhanced irreversibility of the hysteresis curve result in a specific absorption rate as large as 0.5 kWg-1 under a field of 8.8 kAm-1 at 279 kHz. This value is nearly an order of magnitude larger than that observed under the same condition for conventional iron oxide-based materials. Moreover, the large heating effect is self-regulated at the 1st order TC (319 K). This proof-of-concept study shows that the extraordinary heating effect near the 1st order Curie point opens up a novel alloy design strategy for large, self-regulated induction heating.

  9. Induction Heating Model of Cermet Fuel Element Environmental Test (CFEET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, C. F.; Bradley, D. E.; Cavender, D. P.; Mireles, O. R.; Hickman, R. R.

    2013-01-01

    Deep space missions with large payloads require high specific impulse and relatively high thrust to achieve mission goals in reasonable time frames. Nuclear Thermal Rockets (NTR) are capable of producing a high specific impulse by employing heat produced by a fission reactor to heat and therefore accelerate hydrogen through a rocket nozzle providing thrust. Fuel element temperatures are very high (up to 3000 K) and hydrogen is highly reactive with most materials at high temperatures. Data covering the effects of high-temperature hydrogen exposure on fuel elements are limited. The primary concern is the mechanical failure of fuel elements due to large thermal gradients; therefore, high-melting-point ceramics-metallic matrix composites (cermets) are one of the fuels under consideration as part of the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) Advance Exploration System (AES) technology project at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The purpose of testing and analytical modeling is to determine their ability to survive and maintain thermal performance in a prototypical NTR reactor environment of exposure to hydrogen at very high temperatures and obtain data to assess the properties of the non-nuclear support materials. The fission process and the resulting heating performance are well known and do not require that active fissile material to be integrated in this testing. A small-scale test bed; Compact Fuel Element Environmental Tester (CFEET), designed to heat fuel element samples via induction heating and expose samples to hydrogen is being developed at MSFC to assist in optimal material and manufacturing process selection without utilizing fissile material. This paper details the analytical approach to help design and optimize the test bed using COMSOL Multiphysics for predicting thermal gradients induced by electromagnetic heating (Induction heating) and Thermal Desktop for radiation calculations.

  10. Study of Variable Frequency Induction Heating in Steel Making Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukutani, Kazuhiko; Umetsu, Kenji; Itou, Takeo; Isobe, Takanori; Kitahara, Tadayuki; Shimada, Ryuichi

    Induction heating technologies have been the standard technologies employed in steel making processes because they are clean, they have a high energy density, they are highly the controllable, etc. However, there is a problem in using them; in general, frequencies of the electric circuits have to be kept fixed to improve their power factors, and this constraint makes the processes inflexible. In order to overcome this problem, we have developed a new heating technique-variable frequency power supply with magnetic energy recovery switching. This technique helps us in improving the quality of steel products as well as the productivity. We have also performed numerical calculations and experiments to evaluate its effect on temperature distributions on heated steel plates. The obtained results indicate that the application of the technique in steel making processes would be advantageous.

  11. Impact of Gas Heating in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, D. B.; Bose, D.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Cruden, B. A.; Meyyappan, M.; Sharma, S. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recently it has been recognized that the neutral gas in inductively coupled plasma reactors heats up significantly during processing. The resulting gas density variations across the reactor affect reaction rates, radical densities, plasma characteristics, and uniformity within the reactor. A self-consistent model that couples the plasma generation and transport to the gas flow and heating has been developed and used to study CF4 discharges. A Langmuir probe has been used to measure radial profiles of electron density and temperature. The model predictions agree well with the experimental results. As a result of these comparisons along with the poorer performance of the model without the gas-plasma coupling, the importance of gas heating in plasma processing has been verified.

  12. Promoted-Combustion Chamber with Induction Heating Coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Erin; Hagood, Richard; Lowery, Freida; Herald, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    An improved promoted-combustion system has been developed for studying the effects of elevated temperatures on the flammability of metals in pure oxygen. In prior promoted-combustion chambers, initial temperatures of metal specimens in experiments have been limited to the temperatures of gas supplies, usually near room temperature. Although limited elevated temperature promoted-combustion chambers have been developed using water-cooled induction coils for preheating specimens, these designs have been limited to low-pressure operation due to the hollow induction coil. In contrast, the improved promoted-combustion chamber can sustain a pressure up to 10 kpsi (69 MPa) and, through utilization of a solid induction coil, is capable of preheating a metal specimen up to its melting point [potentially in excess of 2,000 F (approximately equal to 1,100 C)]. Hence, the improved promoted combustion chamber makes a greater range of physical conditions and material properties accessible for experimentation. The chamber consists of a vertical cylindrical housing with an inner diameter of 8 in. (20.32 cm) and an inner height of 20.4 in. (51.81 cm). A threaded, sealing cover at one end of the housing can be unscrewed to gain access for installing a specimen. Inlet and outlet ports for gases are provided. Six openings arranged in a helical pattern in the chamber wall contain sealed sapphire windows for viewing an experiment in progress. The base of the chamber contains pressure-sealed electrical connectors for supplying power to the induction coil. The connectors feature a unique design that prevents induction heating of the housing and the pressure sealing surfaces; this is important because if such spurious induction heating were allowed to occur, chamber pressure could be lost. The induction coil is 10 in. (25.4 cm) long and is fitted with a specimen holder at its upper end. At its lower end, the induction coil is mounted on a ceramic base, which affords thermal insulation to

  13. Investigation of iron cobalt nanocomposites for high frequency applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kelsy J.

    FeCo-based nanocomposite soft magnetic materials were developed in collaboration with Magnetics, Division of Spang and Co., for high frequency and high temperature application. Excellent soft magnetic properties include: low coercivity, high permeability, low energy losses, etc. These and large saturation inductions make these alloys attractive for fundamental studies and industrial applications. In this thesis, nanocrystalline composites will be developed from amorphous precursors for applications in two frequency regimes: 1) High frequency (0.01-30 MHz) such as high temperature power inductors, pulsed power transformers, and radio frequency (rf) magnetic heating; and 2) Ultra high frequency (30 MHz - 30 GHz) for radio frequency materials and electromagnetic interference (EMI) or radio frequency interference (RFI) absorption. New nanocomposites with higher saturation induction and high-temperature stability were developed with reduced glass forming elements such as Zr, Nb, Si and B. The amounts of the magnetic transition metals and early transition metal growth inhibitors were varied to determine trade-offs between higher inductions and fine microstructures and consequently low magnetic losses. Alloys having (Fe1-xCox)80+y+zNb4-y B13-zSi2Cu1 (25 ≤ x ≤ 50 and y = 0-4 and z = 0-3) nominal compositions were cast using planar flow casting (PFC) at Magnetics. Technical magnetic properties: permeability, maximum induction, remanence ratio, coercive field and high frequency magnetic losses as a function of composition and annealing temperature are reported after primary crystallization for 1 hr in a transverse magnetic field (TMF). Of note is the development of inductor cores with maximum inductions in excess of 1.76 T and 1.67 T in cores that exhibit power losses comparable with state of the art commercial soft magnetic alloys. For application in EMI/RFI absorption, FeCo-based alloys have the largest saturation induction and a tunable magnetic anisotropy which may

  14. Induction-heated cooking appliance using new quasi-resonant ZVS-PWM with power factor correction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Nakaoka, Mutsuo; Izaki, Kiyoshi; Hirota, Izuo; Yamashita, Hidekazu; Omori, Hideki

    1998-07-01

    This paper presents a new prototype of a voltage-fed quasi-load resonant inverter with a constant-frequency variable-power (CFVP) regulation scheme, which is developed for the next-generation high-frequency high-power induction-heated (IH) cooking appliances in household applications. This application-specific high-frequency single-ended push-pull inverter using new-generation specially designed insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBT`s) can efficiently operate under a principle of zero-voltage switching pulsewidth modulation (ZVS-PWM) strategy. This low-cost soft-switching inverter using reverse-conducting and reverse-blocking IGBT`s is more suitable for multiple-burner-type induction-heating cooking appliances. The operating principle and unique features of a new resonant ZVS-PWM inverter circuit topology is originally described, together with its steady-state power regulation characteristics, which are illustrated on the basis of its computer-aided simulation and experimental results. The ZVS operation condition on power regulation, loss analysis of new IGBT`s incorporated into this inverter, and its active filtering performance are discussed herein for IH cooking appliances.

  15. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr

    2005-09-27

    An oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, a feedback network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, the feedback network being configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and a tuning circuit connected to the input of the amplifier, wherein the tuning circuit is continuously variable and consists of solid state electrical components with no mechanically adjustable devices including a pair of diodes connected to each other at their respective cathodes with a control voltage connected at the junction of the diodes. Another oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, a feedback network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, the feedback network being configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and transmission lines connected to the input of the amplifier with an input pad and a perpendicular transmission line extending from the input pad and forming a leg of a resonant "T", and wherein the feedback network is coupled to the leg of the resonant "T".

  16. A New Approach in Optimizing the Induction Heating Process Using Flux Concentrators: Application to 4340 Steel Spur Gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barka, Noureddine; Chebak, Ahmed; El Ouafi, Abderrazak; Jahazi, Mohammad; Menou, Abdellah

    2014-09-01

    The beneficial effects of using flux concentrators during induction heat treatment process of spur gears made of 4340 high strength steel is demonstrated using 3D finite element model. The model is developed by coupling electromagnetic field and heat transfer equations and simulated by using Comsol software. Based on an adequate formulation and taking into account material properties and process parameters, the model allows calculating temperature distribution in the gear tooth. A new approach is proposed to reduce the electromagnetic edge effect in the gear teeth which allows achieving optimum hardness profile after induction heat treatment. In the proposed method, the principal gear is positioned in sandwich between two other gears having the same geometry that act as flux concentrators. The gap between the gear and the flux concentrators was optimized by studying temperature variation between the tip and root regions of gear teeth. Using the proposed model, it was possible identifying processing conditions that allow for quasi-uniform final temperature profile in the medium and high frequency conditions during induction hardening of spur gears.

  17. Experimental Observations and Numerical Prediction of Induction Heating in a Graphite Test Article

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, Todd A; Johnson, Debra P; Jurney, James D; Freer, Jerry E; Dougherty, Lisa M; Stout, Stephen A

    2009-01-01

    The induction heating coils used in the plutonium casting furnaces at the Los Alamos National Laboratory are studied here. A cylindrical graphite test article has been built, instrumented with thermocouples, and heated in the induction coil that is normally used to preheat the molds during casting operations. Preliminary results of experiments aimed at understanding the induction heating process in the mold portion of the furnaces are reported. The experiments have been modeled in COMSOL Multiphysics and the numerical and experimental results are compared to one another. These comparisons provide insight into the heating process and provide a benchmark for COMSOL calculations of induction heating in the mold portion of the plutonium casting furnaces.

  18. Ice melting properties of steel fiber modified asphalt mixtures with induction heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hao; Sun, Yihan; Liu, Quantao; Li, Bin; Wu, Shaopeng; Tang, Jin

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the ice melting performance of asphalt concrete with steel fibers was studied. Steel fiber modified asphalt mixtures were prepared, five different fiber amount of steel fiber modified asphalt mixtures were mixed to study their induction heating rate. The samples covered with different thickness of ice were heated with induction heating to study their ice melting efficency. It was proved that the induction heating of steel fiber modified asphalt mixtures could significantly improve their ice melting efficency compared with the natural condition. And it was found that the thickness of the ice had little influence on the induction heating rate of the asphalt concrete.

  19. SIGNAL MEDIATORS AT INDUCTION OF HEAT RESISTANCE OF WHEAT PLANTLETS BY SHORT-TERM HEATING.

    PubMed

    Karpets, Yu V; Kolupaev, Yu E; Yastreb, T O

    2015-01-01

    The effects of functional interplay of calcium ions, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) in the cells of wheat plantlets roots (Triticum aestivum L.) at the induction of their heat resistance by a short-term influence of hyperthermia (heating at the temperature of 42 degrees C during 1 minute) have been investigated. The transitional increase of NO and H2O2 content, invoked by heating, was suppressed by the treatment of plantlets with the antagonists of calcium EGTA (chelator of exocellular calcium), lanthanum chloride (blocker of calcium channels of various types) and neomycin (inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-dependent phospholipase C). The rise of hydrogen peroxide content, caused by hardening, was partially suppressed by the action of inhibitors of nitrate reductase (sodium wolframate) and NO-synthase (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester--L-NAME), and the increasing of nitric oxide content was suppressed by the treatment of plants with the antioxidant ionol and with the scavenger of hydrogen peroxide (dimethylthiourea). These compounds and antagonists of calcium also partially removed the effect of the rise of plantlets' heat resistance, invoked by hardening heating. The conclusion on calcium's role in the activation of enzymatic systems, generating reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide, and on the functional interplay of these signal mediators at the induction of heat resistance of plantlets by hardening heating is made.

  20. Induction Heating of Hypervelocity Impact Samples to 2500 Degrees Centigrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Joshua; Pardo, Art; Henderson, Don; Rodriguez, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The Remote Hypervelocity Test Laboratory (RHTL) at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was asked to heat samples up to 2500 degrees Centigrade (4532 degrees Fahrenheit) to simulate reentry scenarios of crafts where heated shields are impacted with single small particles ranging from 0.2 to 1.0 millimeters (.008 to.039 inches) of various materials. The team decided an electromagnetic induction (induction heater) was the best method to achieve and control the temperatures in a rapid manner. The samples consisted of three-dimensional carbon-carbon and two-dimensional carbon-phenolic, which are both electrically conductive. After several attempts the team was able to achieve over 2500 degrees Centigrade (4532 degrees Fahrenheit) in ambient atmosphere. When the system was moved to the target chamber and the vacuum system evacuated down to 250 millitorr, arcing occurred between the bus bars and tank, the feedthrough fittings that carried the coolant and current, and between the target sample and coil. To overcome this arcing, conformal coatings, room temperature vulcanization (RTV) silicone, and other non-conductive materials were used to isolate the electromagnetic fields.

  1. Hysteresis heating based induction bonding of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwanwatana, Witchuda

    The viability of using magnetic particulate susceptor materials for induction heating during bonding of polymer matrix composites is well established in this work. The unique ability to offer localized heating, geometric flexibility, and self-controlled temperature is the major advantage of this technique. Hysteresis heating is tailored through careful design of the microstructure of nickel particulate polymer films (Ni/PSU). An excellent heating rate can be attained in the frequency range of 1 to 10 MHz for particle volume fraction below percolation of 0.26. The diameter of nickel particle should be kept between 65 nm to 10 mum to ensure multi-domain heating, Curie temperature control, negligible shielding effect, minimum eddy current, and slight particle oxidation. The hysteresis heating behavior of the Ni/PSU films is found to be volumetric in nature and proportional to the cube of applied magnetic field. On the other hand, heat generation is inversely proportional to the size of the multi-domain particles. The frequency effect; however, provide maximum heat generation at the domain wall resonance frequency. Curie temperature control is observed when sufficiently high magnetic fields (˜138 Oe) are applied. The master curves of AC heat generation in Ni/PSU films are established and show a strong particle size effect. Hysteresis fusion bonding of glass/polyphenylene sulfide thermoplastic composites using a magnetic film as the thermoplastic adhesive shows that the bond strength of hysteresis-welded materials is comparable to that of autoclave-welded materials while offering an order of magnitude reduction in cycle time. The relative contribution of the intimate contact and healing mechanisms to the fusion bonding process indicates that hysteresis bonding is controlled by intimate contact. The macroscopic failure modes vary from mostly adhesive composite/film (low bond strength) to a combination of adhesive composite/film, cohesive film, cohesive composite and

  2. Finite element residual stress analysis of induction heating bended ferritic steel piping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kima, Jong Sung; Kim, Kyoung-Soo; Oh, Young-Jin; Chang, Hyung-Young; Park, Heung-Bae

    2014-10-01

    Recently, there is a trend to apply the piping bended by induction heating process to nuclear power plants. Residual stress can be generated due to thermo-mechanical mechanism during the induction heating bending process. It is well-known that the residual stress has important effect on crack initiation and growth. The previous studies have focused on the thickness variation. In part, some studies were performed for residual stress evaluation of the austenitic stainless steel piping bended by induction heating. It is difficult to find the residual stresses of the ferritic steel piping bended by the induction heating. The study assessed the residual stresses of induction heating bended ferriticsteel piping via finite element analysis. As a result, it was identified that high residual stresses are generated on local outersurface region of the induction heating bended ferritic piping.

  3. Finite element residual stress analysis of induction heating bended ferritic steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Kima, Jong Sung; Kim, Kyoung-Soo; Oh, Young-Jin; Chang, Hyung-Young; Park, Heung-Bae

    2014-10-06

    Recently, there is a trend to apply the piping bended by induction heating process to nuclear power plants. Residual stress can be generated due to thermo-mechanical mechanism during the induction heating bending process. It is well-known that the residual stress has important effect on crack initiation and growth. The previous studies have focused on the thickness variation. In part, some studies were performed for residual stress evaluation of the austenitic stainless steel piping bended by induction heating. It is difficult to find the residual stresses of the ferritic steel piping bended by the induction heating. The study assessed the residual stresses of induction heating bended ferriticsteel piping via finite element analysis. As a result, it was identified that high residual stresses are generated on local outersurface region of the induction heating bended ferritic piping.

  4. High-frequency ECG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tragardh, Elin; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2006-01-01

    The standard ECG is by convention limited to 0.05-150 Hz, but higher frequencies are also present in the ECG signal. With high-resolution technology, it is possible to record and analyze these higher frequencies. The highest amplitudes of the high-frequency components are found within the QRS complex. In past years, the term "high frequency", "high fidelity", and "wideband electrocardiography" have been used by several investigators to refer to the process of recording ECGs with an extended bandwidth of up to 1000 Hz. Several investigators have tried to analyze HF-QRS with the hope that additional features seen in the QRS complex would provide information enhancing the diagnostic value of the ECG. The development of computerized ECG-recording devices that made it possible to record ECG signals with high resolution in both time and amplitude, as well as better possibilities to store and process the signals digitally, offered new methods for analysis. Different techniques to extract the HF-QRS have been described. Several bandwidths and filter types have been applied for the extraction as well as different signal-averaging techniques for noise reduction. There is no standard method for acquiring and quantifying HF-QRS. The physiological mechanisms underlying HF-QRS are still not fully understood. One theory is that HF-QRS are related to the conduction velocity and the fragmentation of the depolarization wave in the myocardium. In a three-dimensional model of the ventricles with a fractal conduction system it was shown that high numbers of splitting branches are associated with HF-QRS. In this experiment, it was also shown that the changes seen in HF-QRS in patients with myocardial ischemia might be due to the slowing of the conduction velocity in the region of ischemia. This mechanism has been tested by Watanabe et al by infusing sodium channel blockers into the left anterior descending artery in dogs. In their study, 60 unipolar ECGs were recorded from the entire

  5. Design and construction of a hyperthermia system with improved interaction of magnetic induction-heating.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Fang; Lin, Xi-Zhang; Lo, Wei-Hung

    2010-01-01

    For the applications of localized hyperthermia, an improved magnetic induction-heating system is described. The associated components of this system, for example, coils for generating magnetic field, magnetic circuit for flux path, and ferrite needles for generating heat by magnetic induction, all have been explained. An animal experiment of induction-heating hyperthermia for rat's liver is also carried out, and the consequent pathology of Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stain and NADPH oxidase activity assay are also conducted for evaluation.

  6. Characterization of the Inductively Heated Plasma Source IPG6-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dropmann, Michael; Laufer, Rene; Herdrich, Georg; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2014-10-01

    In close collaboration between the Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics and Engineering Research (CASPER) at Baylor University, Texas, and the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, two plasma facilities have been established using the Inductively heated Plasma Generator 6 (IPG6). The facility at Baylor University (IPG6-B) works at a frequency of 13.56 MHz and a maximum power of 15 kW. A vacuum pump of 160 m3/h in combination with a butterfly valve allows pressure control over a wide range. Intended fields of research include basic investigation into thermo-chemistry and plasma radiation, space plasma environments and high heat fluxes e.g. those found in fusion devices or during atmospheric re-entry of spacecraft. After moving the IPG6-B facility to the Baylor Research and Innovation Collaborative (BRIC) it was placed back into operation during the summer of 2014. Initial characterization in the new lab, using a heat flux probe, Pitot probe and cavity calorimeter, has been conducted for Air, Argon and Helium. The results of this characterization are presented.

  7. Examination of Coil Arrangement for Higher Quality Heating of the Induction Heating Cooker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonetsu, Daigo; Kawata, Kohei; Hara, Takehisa; Ujiie, Satoshi; Joto, Takaya; Masuda, Tadashi

    This paper proposes effective and practical design method of higher quality heating for induction-heating cooker. The IH cooker which has the simple pancake-shaped coil arrangement produces slightly nonuniform temperature distribution along the heating plate. The object of this research is to achieve the better heating performance by adjusting the arrangement of the coil. Easiness of coil winding is added to the evaluation basis. Eddy current analysis is made by the finite element method for calculating the heat distribution of the heating plate. After this, heat transfer analysis is made by the finite element method for calculating the temperature distribution of the heating plate. Multi-objective genetic algorithm is employed for obtaining the optimum arrangement of the coil. The two objectives that mean the uniformity of temperature distribution and the easiness of coil winding are both evaluated. By using the proposed method, we could obtain the expected coil arrangement easily. The temperature distribution approaches closer to uniform distribution by using the obtained coil arrangement which is not difficult to wind.

  8. Toroid Joining Gun. [thermoplastic welding system using induction heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, J. D.; Fox, R. L.; Swaim, R J.

    1985-01-01

    The Toroid Joining Gun is a low cost, self-contained, portable low powered (100-400 watts) thermoplastic welding system developed at Langley Research Center for joining plastic and composite parts using an induction heating technique. The device developed for use in the fabrication of large space sructures (LSST Program) can be used in any atmosphere or in a vacuum. Components can be joined in situ, whether on earth or on a space platform. The expanded application of this welding gun is in the joining of thermoplastic composites, thermosetting composites, metals, and combinations of these materials. Its low-power requirements, light weight, rapid response, low cost, portability, and effective joining make it a candidate for solving many varied and unique bonding tasks.

  9. Ion heating, burnout of the high-frequency field, and ion sound generation under the development of a modulation instability of an intense Langmuir wave in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kirichok, A. V. Kuklin, V. M.; Pryimak, A. V.; Zagorodny, A. G.

    2015-09-15

    The development of one-dimensional parametric instabilities of intense long plasma waves is considered in terms of the so-called hybrid models, with electrons being treated as a fluid and ions being regarded as particles. The analysis is performed for both cases when the average plasma field energy is lower (Zakharov's hybrid model—ZHM) or greater (Silin's hybrid model—SHM) than the plasma thermal energy. The efficiency of energy transfer to ions and to ion perturbations under the development of the instability is considered for various values of electron-to-ion mass ratios. The energy of low-frequency oscillations (ion-sound waves) is found to be much lower than the final ion kinetic energy. We also discuss the influence of the changes in the damping rate of the high-frequency (HF) field on the instability development. The decrease of the absorption of the HF field inhibits the HF field burnout within plasma density cavities and gives rise to the broadening of the HF spectrum. At the same time, the ion velocity distribution tends to the normal distribution in both ZHM and SHM.

  10. Ion heating, burnout of the high-frequency field, and ion sound generation under the development of a modulation instability of an intense Langmuir wave in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichok, A. V.; Kuklin, V. M.; Pryimak, A. V.; Zagorodny, A. G.

    2015-09-01

    The development of one-dimensional parametric instabilities of intense long plasma waves is considered in terms of the so-called hybrid models, with electrons being treated as a fluid and ions being regarded as particles. The analysis is performed for both cases when the average plasma field energy is lower (Zakharov's hybrid model—ZHM) or greater (Silin's hybrid model—SHM) than the plasma thermal energy. The efficiency of energy transfer to ions and to ion perturbations under the development of the instability is considered for various values of electron-to-ion mass ratios. The energy of low-frequency oscillations (ion-sound waves) is found to be much lower than the final ion kinetic energy. We also discuss the influence of the changes in the damping rate of the high-frequency (HF) field on the instability development. The decrease of the absorption of the HF field inhibits the HF field burnout within plasma density cavities and gives rise to the broadening of the HF spectrum. At the same time, the ion velocity distribution tends to the normal distribution in both ZHM and SHM.

  11. Quantitative thermal diffusivity imaging of disbonds in thermal protective coatings using inductive heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. M.; Winfree, William P.

    1990-01-01

    An inductive heating technique for making thermal diffusivity images of disbonds between thermal protective coatings and their substrates is presented. Any flaw in the bonding of the coating and the substrate shows as an area of lowered values in the diffusivity image. The benefits of the inductive heating approach lie in its ability to heat the conductive substrate without directly heating the dielectric coating. Results are provided for a series of samples with fabricated disbonds, for a range of coating thicknesses.

  12. Mitigation of divertor heat flux by high-frequency ELM pacing with non-fuel pellet injection in DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Bortolon, A.; Maingi, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; ...

    2017-03-23

    Experiments have been conducted on DIII-D investigating high repetition rate injection of non-fuel pellets as a tool for pacing Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) and mitigating their transient divertor heat loads. Effective ELM pacing was obtained with injection of Li granules in different H-mode scenarios, at frequencies 3–5 times larger than the natural ELM frequency, with subsequent reduction of strike-point heat flux. However, in scenarios with high pedestal density (~6 × 1019 m–3), the magnitude of granule triggered ELMs shows a broad distribution, in terms of stored energy loss and peak heat flux, challenging the effectiveness of ELM mitigation. Furthermore, transientmore » heat-flux deposition correlated with granule injections was observed far from the strike-points. As a result, field line tracing suggest this phenomenon to be consistent with particle loss into the mid-plane far scrape-off layer, at toroidal location of the granule injection.« less

  13. Method and device for determining bond separation strength using induction heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coultrip, Robert H. (Inventor); Johnson, Samuel D. (Inventor); Copeland, Carl E. (Inventor); Phillips, W. Morris (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An induction heating device includes an induction heating gun which includes a housing, a U-shaped pole piece having two spaced apart opposite ends defining a gap there between, the U-shaped pole piece being mounted in one end of the housing, and a tank circuit including an induction coil wrapped around the pole piece and a capacitor connected to the induction coil. A power source is connected to the tank circuit. A pull test machine is provided having a stationary chuck and a movable chuck, the two chucks holding two test pieces bonded together at a bond region. The heating gun is mounted on the pull test machine in close proximity to the bond region of the two test pieces, whereby when the tank circuit is energized, the two test pieces are heated by induction heating while a tension load is applied to the two test pieces by the pull test machine to determine separation strength of the bond region.

  14. Comparative decomposition kinetics of neutral monosaccharides by microwave and induction heating treatments.

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Shuntaro; Oono, Kiriyo; Onda, Ayumu; Yanagisawa, Kazumichi; Azuma, Jun-ichi

    2013-06-28

    The stabilities of five neutral monosaccharides (glucose, galactose, mannose, arabinose, and xylose) were kinetically compared after the molecules were submitted to microwave heating (internal heating) and induction heating (external heating) under completely identical thermal histories by employing PID (proportional, integral, and derivative) temperature controlled ovens and homogeneous mixing. By heating in water at 200°C, the rate constants for the decomposition reactions varied from 2.13×10(-4) to 3.87×10(-4)s(-1) for microwave heating; however, the values increased by 1.1- to 1.5-fold for induction heating. Similarly, in a dilute (0.8%) sulfuric acid solution, the decomposition rate constants varied from 0.61×10(-3) to 2.00×10(-3)s(-1) for microwave heating; however, the values increased by 1.5- to 2.2-fold for induction heating. The results show that microwave heating imparts greater stability to neutral monosaccharides than does induction heating. The undesirable decomposition of monosaccharides at the surface boundary of reactor walls may have increased the probability of monosaccharide decomposition during induction heating.

  15. An inductively heated hot cavity catcher laser ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reponen, M.; Moore, I. D.; Pohjalainen, I.; Rothe, S.; Savonen, M.; Sonnenschein, V.; Voss, A.

    2015-12-01

    An inductively heated hot cavity catcher has been constructed for the production of low-energy ion beams of exotic, neutron-deficient Ag isotopes. A proof-of-principle experiment has been realized by implanting primary 107Ag21+ ions from a heavy-ion cyclotron into a graphite catcher. A variable-thickness nickel foil was used to degrade the energy of the primary beam in order to mimic the implantation depth expected from the heavy-ion fusion-evaporation recoils of N = Z 94Ag. Following implantation, the silver atoms diffused out of the graphite and effused into the catcher cavity and transfer tube, where they were resonantly laser ionized using a three-step excitation and ionization scheme. Following mass separation, the ions were identified by scanning the frequency of the first resonant excitation step while recording the ion count rate. Ion release time profiles were measured for different implantation depths and cavity temperatures with the mean delay time varying from 10 to 600 ms. In addition, the diffusion coefficients for silver in graphite were measured for temperatures of 1470 K, 1630 K, and 1720 K, from which an activation energy of 3.2 ± 0.3 eV could be determined.

  16. Design of a superconducting 20 MJ induction heating coil

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.K.; Ibrahim, E.A.; Gaberson, P.C.; Eckels, P.W.; Jarabak, A.J.; Rogers, J.D.; Thullen, P.; Walker, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    A pancake-wound, low-loss, superconducting, induction-heating coil has been designed to demonstrate the feasibility of superconducting polaidal system for the Tokamak reactors, to provide confidence in application of superconductivity to actual reactors, and to provide the opportunity to solve specific engineering problems to support the fusion pulsed coil program. the coil is designed to store 20 MJ at 50 kA. The superconductor material is NbTi for a 7.5 tesla maximum field. The coil is designed to survive at least 100,000 cycles of full bipolar half cycle sinusoidal operation from +7.5 tesla to -7.5 telsa fields in one second. The coil is natural convection immersion-cooled at 4.5/sup 0/K in liquid helium bath. The design demonstrates confidence in an advanced design, low-loss, cryostable conductor, along with safety, reliability and the operating life of the coil of more than 100,000 cycles.

  17. An inductively heated hot cavity catcher laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Reponen, M.; Moore, I. D. Pohjalainen, I.; Savonen, M.; Voss, A.; Rothe, S.; Sonnenschein, V.

    2015-12-15

    An inductively heated hot cavity catcher has been constructed for the production of low-energy ion beams of exotic, neutron-deficient Ag isotopes. A proof-of-principle experiment has been realized by implanting primary {sup 107}Ag{sup 21+} ions from a heavy-ion cyclotron into a graphite catcher. A variable-thickness nickel foil was used to degrade the energy of the primary beam in order to mimic the implantation depth expected from the heavy-ion fusion-evaporation recoils of N = Z {sup 94}Ag. Following implantation, the silver atoms diffused out of the graphite and effused into the catcher cavity and transfer tube, where they were resonantly laser ionized using a three-step excitation and ionization scheme. Following mass separation, the ions were identified by scanning the frequency of the first resonant excitation step while recording the ion count rate. Ion release time profiles were measured for different implantation depths and cavity temperatures with the mean delay time varying from 10 to 600 ms. In addition, the diffusion coefficients for silver in graphite were measured for temperatures of 1470 K, 1630 K, and 1720 K, from which an activation energy of 3.2 ± 0.3 eV could be determined.

  18. Collisionless electron heating by radio frequency bias in low gas pressure inductive discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2012-12-10

    We show experimental observations of collisionless electron heating by the combinations of the capacitive radio frequency (RF) bias power and the inductive power in low argon gas pressure RF biased inductively coupled plasma (ICP). With small RF bias powers in the ICP, the electron energy distribution (EED) evolved from bi-Maxwellian distribution to Maxwellian distribution by enhanced plasma bulk heating and the collisionless sheath heating was weak. In the capacitive RF bias dominant regime, however, high energy electrons by the RF bias were heated on the EEDs in the presence of the ICP. The collisionless heating mechanism of the high energy electrons transited from collisionless inductive heating to capacitive coupled collisionless heating by the electron bounce resonance in the RF biased ICP.

  19. Inductive heating kills cells that contribute to plaque: a proof-of-concept.

    PubMed

    Gaitas, Angelo; Kim, Gwangseong

    2015-01-01

    Inducing cell death by heating targeted particles shows promise in cancer treatment. Here, we aim to demonstrate the feasibility of extending the use of this technique to treat and remove vascular deposits and thrombosis. We used induction heating of macrophages, which are key contributors to atherosclerosis and have demonstrated clear feasibility for heating and destroying these cells using ferromagnetic and pure iron particles. Specifically, iron particles achieved maximum temperatures of 51 ± 0.5 °C and spherical particles achieved a maximum temperature of 43.9 ± 0.2 °C (N = 6) after 30 min of inductive heating. Two days of subsequent observation demonstrated that inductive heating led to a significant reduction in cell number. Prior to induction heating, cell density was 105,000 ± 20,820 cells/ml (N = 3). This number was reduced to 6,666 ± 4,410 cells/ml for the spherical particles and 16,666 ± 9,280 cells/ml for the iron particles 24 h after inductive heating. Though cell density increased on the second day following inductive heating, the growth was minimal. Cells grew to 26,667 ± 6,670 cells/ml and 30,000 ± 15,280 cells/ml respectively. Compared to cell cultures with iron and spherical particles that were not subjected to induction heating, we observed a 97% reduction in cell count for the spherical particles and a 91% reduction for the iron particles after the first 24 h. After 48 h we observed a 95% reduction in cell growth for both spherical and iron particles. Induction heating of microparticles was thus highly effective in reducing the macrophage population and preventing their growth. These results demonstrate the feasibility of targeting cells involved in atherosclerosis and warrant further research into potential clinical applications.

  20. Control of power to an inductively heated part

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, D.R.; Frost, C.A.; Kahle, P.M.; Kelley, J.B.; Stanton, S.L.

    1997-05-20

    A process for induction hardening a part to a desired depth with an AC signal applied to the part from a closely coupled induction coil includes measuring the voltage of the AC signal at the coil and the current passing through the coil; and controlling the depth of hardening of the part from the measured voltage and current. The control system determines parameters of the part that are functions of applied voltage and current to the induction coil, and uses a neural network to control the application of the AC signal based on the detected functions for each part. 6 figs.

  1. Control of power to an inductively heated part

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, Douglas R.; Frost, Charles A.; Kahle, Philip M.; Kelley, J. Bruce; Stanton, Suzanne L.

    1997-01-01

    A process for induction hardening a part to a desired depth with an AC signal applied to the part from a closely coupled induction coil includes measuring the voltage of the AC signal at the coil and the current passing through the coil; and controlling the depth of hardening of the part from the measured voltage and current. The control system determines parameters of the part that are functions of applied voltage and current to the induction coil, and uses a neural network to control the application of the AC signal based on the detected functions for each part.

  2. Binaural beats at high frequencies.

    PubMed

    McFadden, D; Pasanen, E G

    1975-10-24

    Binaural beats have long been believed to be audible only at low frequencies, but an interaction reminiscent of a binaural beat can sometimes be heard when different two-tone complexes of high frequency are presented to the two ears. The primary requirement is that the frequency separation in the complex at one ear be slightly different from that in the other--that is, that there be a small interaural difference in the envelope periodicities. This finding is in accord with other recent demonstrations that the auditory system is not deaf to interaural time differences at high frequencies.

  3. Improvement of Mechanical Properties of Spheroidized 1045 Steel by Induction Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minwook; Shin, Jung-Ho; Choi, Young; Lee, Seok-Jae

    2016-04-01

    The effects of induction heat treatment on the formation of carbide particles and mechanical properties of spheroidized 1045 steel were investigated by means of microstructural analysis and tensile testing. The induction spheroidization accelerated the formation of spherical cementite particles and effectively softened the steel. The volume fraction of cementite was found to be a key factor that affected the mechanical properties of spheroidized steels. Further tests showed that sequential spheroidization by induction and furnace heat treatments enhanced elongation within a short spheroidization time, resulting in better mechanical properties. This was due to the higher volume fraction of spherical cementite particles that had less diffusion time for particle coarsening.

  4. High-frequency broadband transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    London, S. E.; Tomashevich, S. V.

    1981-05-01

    A systematic review of the theory and design principles of high-frequency broadband transformers is presented. It is shown that the transformers of highest performance are those whose coils consist of strips of double-wire and multiwire transmission lines. Such devices are characterized by a wide operating frequency range, and make possible operation at microwave frequencies at high levels of transmitted power.

  5. Electromagnetic induction heating for single crystal graphene growth: morphology control by rapid heating and quenching.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chaoxing; Li, Fushan; Chen, Wei; Veeramalai, Chandrasekar Perumal; Ooi, Poh Choon; Guo, Tailiang

    2015-03-12

    The direct observation of single crystal graphene growth and its shape evolution is of fundamental importance to the understanding of graphene growth physicochemical mechanisms and the achievement of wafer-scale single crystalline graphene. Here we demonstrate the controlled formation of single crystal graphene with varying shapes, and directly observe the shape evolution of single crystal graphene by developing a localized-heating and rapid-quenching chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system based on electromagnetic induction heating. Importantly, rational control of circular, hexagonal, and dendritic single crystalline graphene domains can be readily obtained for the first time by changing the growth condition. Systematic studies suggest that the graphene nucleation only occurs during the initial stage, while the domain density is independent of the growth temperatures due to the surface-limiting effect. In addition, the direct observation of graphene domain shape evolution is employed for the identification of competing growth mechanisms including diffusion-limited, attachment-limited, and detachment-limited processes. Our study not only provides a novel method for morphology-controlled graphene synthesis, but also offers fundamental insights into the kinetics of single crystal graphene growth.

  6. Induction of heat-shock protein synthesis in chondrocytes at physiological temperatures.

    PubMed

    Madreperla, S A; Louwerenburg, B; Mann, R W; Towle, C A; Mankin, H J; Treadwell, B V

    1985-01-01

    Induction of heat-shock protein (HSP) synthesis is demonstrated in cultured calf-chondrocytes at temperatures shown to occur in normal human cartilage during experiments subjecting intact cadaverous hip joints to the parameters of level walking. A 70,000 MW heat-shock protein (HSP-70) is synthesized by chondrocytes at temperatures above 39 degrees C, while induction of synthesis of a 110,000 MW HSP only occurs at temperatures of 45 degrees C or greater. These differences in critical temperatures for induction, and data showing differences in kinetics of induction and repression of synthesis, suggest that there are differences in the mechanism of induction of the two HSPs. The duration of HSP synthesis and inhibition of synthesis of normal cellular proteins is directly proportional to the duration and magnitude of the temperature rise. Possible relationships between these new findings and the initiation and progression of degenerative joint disease are discussed.

  7. System and method of adjusting the equilibrium temperature of an inductively-heated susceptor

    DOEpatents

    Matsen, Marc R; Negley, Mark A; Geren, William Preston

    2015-02-24

    A system for inductively heating a workpiece may include an induction coil, at least one susceptor face sheet, and a current controller coupled. The induction coil may be configured to conduct an alternating current and generate a magnetic field in response to the alternating current. The susceptor face sheet may be configured to have a workpiece positioned therewith. The susceptor face sheet may be formed of a ferromagnetic alloy having a Curie temperature and being inductively heatable to an equilibrium temperature approaching the Curie temperature in response to the magnetic field. The current controller may be coupled to the induction coil and may be configured to adjust the alternating current in a manner causing a change in at least one heating parameter of the susceptor face sheet.

  8. Complex of automated equipment and technologies for waveguides soldering using induction heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murygin, A. V.; Tynchenko, V. S.; Laptenok, V. D.; Emilova, O. A.; Bocharov, A. N.

    2017-02-01

    The article deals with the problem of designing complex automated equipment for soldering waveguides based on induction heating technology. A theoretical analysis of the problem, allowing to form a model of the «inductor-waveguide» system and to carry out studies to determine the form of inducing wire, creating a narrow and concentrated heat zone in the area of the solder joint. Also solves the problem of the choice of the temperature control means, the information from which is used later to generate the effective management of induction soldering process. Designed hardware complex in conjunction with the developed software system is a system of automatic control, allowing to manage the process of induction heating, to prevent overheating and destruction of the soldered products, improve the stability of induction soldering process, to improve the quality of products, thereby reducing time and material costs for the production.

  9. Induction Tempering vs Conventional Tempering of a Heat-Treatable Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackl, Stephanie; Zuber, Michael; Clemens, Helmut; Primig, Sophie

    2016-07-01

    An induction heat treatment is favorable compared to a conventional one mainly due to significant time and cost savings. Therefore, in this study, the microstructure property relationships during induction and conventional heat treatment of a heat treatable steel 42CrMo4 is investigated. The yield strength and hardness is slightly higher for the conventionally heat-treated steel, whereas the induction heat-treated condition exhibits a roughly 30 J/cm2 higher impact energy. In a previous investigation of the authors, it has been proved that the difference in yield strength originates from the smaller block size of the conventionally heat-treated steel, which was already present after hardening. In the present work, it can be shown that during tempering the martensitic blocks become equi-axed ferrite grains due to recrystallization as revealed by electron back scatter diffraction. Nevertheless, a larger grain size usually is less favorable for the impact toughness of steels. Therefore, another mechanism is responsible for the higher impact energy of the induction hardened and tempered steel. With the aid of transmission electron microscopy a finer distribution of cementite was observed in the induction heat-treated samples. The delay of recovery is the reason for the presence of finer cementite in case of the induction heat-treated steel. Here, the higher heating rates and shorter process times reduce the annihilation of dislocation and as a consequence provide more nucleation sites for precipitation of cementite during tempering. From the obtained experimental results, it is believed that the finer distribution of carbides causes the observed higher impact toughness.

  10. Application of induction heating in food processing and cooking: A Review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Induction heating is an electromagnetic heating technology that has several advantages such as high safety, scalability, and high energy efficiency. It has been applied for a long time in metal processing, medical applications, and cooking. However, the application of this technology in the food pro...

  11. Acoustic sensor for real-time control for the inductive heating process

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, John Bruce; Lu, Wei-Yang; Zutavern, Fred J.

    2003-09-30

    Disclosed is a system and method for providing closed-loop control of the heating of a workpiece by an induction heating machine, including generating an acoustic wave in the workpiece with a pulsed laser; optically measuring displacements of the surface of the workpiece in response to the acoustic wave; calculating a sub-surface material property by analyzing the measured surface displacements; creating an error signal by comparing an attribute of the calculated sub-surface material properties with a desired attribute; and reducing the error signal below an acceptable limit by adjusting, in real-time, as often as necessary, the operation of the inductive heating machine.

  12. Vacuum-Induction, Vacuum-Arc, and Air-Induction Melting of a Complex Heat-Resistant Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R. F.; Rowe, John P.; Freeman, J. W.

    1959-01-01

    The relative hot-workability and creep-rupture properties at 1600 F of a complex 55Ni-20Cr-15Co-4Mo-3Ti-3Al alloy were evaluated for vacuum-induction, vacuum-arc, and air-induction melting. A limited study of the role of oxygen and nitrogen and the structural effects in the alloy associated with the melting process was carried out. The results showed that the level of boron and/or zirconium was far more influential on properties than the melting method. Vacuum melting did reduce corner cracking and improve surface during hot-rolling. It also resulted in more uniform properties within heats. The creep-rupture properties were slightly superior in vacuum heats at low boron plus zirconium or in heats with zirconium. There was little advantage at high boron levels and air heats were superior at high levels of boron plus zirconium. Vacuum heats also had fewer oxide and carbonitride inclusions although this was a function of the opportunity for separation of the inclusions from high oxygen plus nitrogen heats. The removal of phosphorous by vacuum melting was not found to be related to properties. Oxygen plus nitrogen appeared to increase ductility in creep-rupture tests suggesting that vacuum melting removes unidentified elements detrimental to ductility. Oxides and carbonitrides in themselves did not initiate microcracks. Carbonitrides in the grain boundaries of air heats did initiate microcracks. The role of microcracking from this source and as a function of oxygen and nitrogen content was not clear. Oxygen and nitrogen did intensify corner cracking during hot-rolling but were not responsible for poor surface which resulted from rolling heats melted in air.

  13. Noninvasive induction implant heating: an approach for contactless altering of mechanical properties of shape memory implants.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Ronny; Hustedt, Michael; Wesling, Volker; Hurschler, Christoph; Olender, Gavin; Mach, Martin; Gösling, Thomas; Müller, Christian W

    2013-01-01

    This article shows an approach to change the properties of an orthopaedic shape memory implant within biological tissue, using contactless induction heating. Due to inducing the one way-memory effect, triggered by the rise of temperature within the implant, the geometry and hence the mechanical properties of the implant itself, are altered. The power uptake of the implant, depending on the induction parameters as well as on its position within the induction coil, is shown. Thermographic measurements are carried out in order to determine the surface temperature distribution of the implant. In order to simulate biological tissue, the implant was embedded in agarose gel. Suitable heating parameters, in terms of a short heating process in combination with a reduced heat impact on the surrounding environment, were determined.

  14. Wireless Metal Detection and Surface Coverage Sensing for All-Surface Induction Heating

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Veli Tayfun; Unal, Emre; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2016-01-01

    All-surface induction heating systems, typically comprising small-area coils, face a major challenge in detecting the presence of a metallic vessel and identifying its partial surface coverage over the coils to determine which of the coils to power up. The difficulty arises due to the fact that the user can heat vessels made of a wide variety of metals (and their alloys). To address this problem, we propose and demonstrate a new wireless detection methodology that allows for detecting the presence of metallic vessels together with uniquely sensing their surface coverages while also identifying their effective material type in all-surface induction heating systems. The proposed method is based on telemetrically measuring simultaneously inductance and resistance of the induction coil coupled with the vessel in the heating system. Here, variations in the inductance and resistance values for an all-surface heating coil loaded by vessels (made of stainless steel and aluminum) at different positions were systematically investigated at different frequencies. Results show that, independent of the metal material type, unique identification of the surface coverage is possible at all freqeuncies. Additionally, using the magnitude and phase information extracted from the coupled coil impedance, unique identification of the vessel effective material is also achievable, this time independent of its surface coverage. PMID:26978367

  15. An induction heating diamond anvil cell for high pressure and temperature micro-Raman spectroscopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Keiji; Noguchi, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    A new external heating configuration is presented for high-temperature diamond anvil cell instruments. The supporting rockers are thermally excited by induction from an externally mounted copper coil passing a 30 kHz alternating current. The inductive heating configuration therefore avoids the use of breakable wires, yet is capable of cell temperatures of 1100 K or higher. The diamond anvil cell has no resistive heaters, but uses a single-turn induction coil for elevating the temperature. The induction coil is placed near the diamonds and directly heats the tungsten carbide rockers that support the diamond. The temperature in the cell is determined from a temperature-power curve calibrated by the ratio between the intensities of the Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman lines of silicon. The high-pressure transformation of quartz to coesite is successfully observed by micro-Raman spectroscopy using this apparatus. The induction heating diamond anvil cell is thus a useful alternative to resistively heated diamond anvil cells.

  16. Wireless Metal Detection and Surface Coverage Sensing for All-Surface Induction Heating.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Veli Tayfun; Unal, Emre; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2016-03-11

    All-surface induction heating systems, typically comprising small-area coils, face a major challenge in detecting the presence of a metallic vessel and identifying its partial surface coverage over the coils to determine which of the coils to power up. The difficulty arises due to the fact that the user can heat vessels made of a wide variety of metals (and their alloys). To address this problem, we propose and demonstrate a new wireless detection methodology that allows for detecting the presence of metallic vessels together with uniquely sensing their surface coverages while also identifying their effective material type in all-surface induction heating systems. The proposed method is based on telemetrically measuring simultaneously inductance and resistance of the induction coil coupled with the vessel in the heating system. Here, variations in the inductance and resistance values for an all-surface heating coil loaded by vessels (made of stainless steel and aluminum) at different positions were systematically investigated at different frequencies. Results show that, independent of the metal material type, unique identification of the surface coverage is possible at all freqeuncies. Additionally, using the magnitude and phase information extracted from the coupled coil impedance, unique identification of the vessel effective material is also achievable, this time independent of its surface coverage.

  17. Eddy Current Analysis of Thin Metal Container in Induction Heating by Line Integral Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Hagino; Ishibashi, Kazuhisa

    In recent years, induction-heating cookers have been disseminated explosively. It is wished to commercialize flexible and disposable food containers that are available for induction heating. In order to develop a good quality food container that is heated moderately, it is necessary to analyze accurately eddy currents induced in a thin metal plate. The integral equation method is widely used for solving induction-heating problems. If the plate thickness approaches zero, the surface integral equations on the upper and lower plate surfaces tend to become the same and the equations become ill conditioned. In this paper, firstly, we derive line integral equations from the boundary integral equations on the assumption that the electromagnetic fields in metal are attenuated rapidly compared with those along the metal surface. Next, so as to test validity of the line integral equations, we solve the eddy current induced in a thin metal container in induction heating and obtain power density given to the container and impedance characteristics of the heating coil. We compare computed results with those by FEM.

  18. Numerical simulations of inductive-heated float-zone growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Y. T.; Choi, S. K.

    1992-01-01

    The present work provides an improved fluid flow and heat-transfer modeling of float-zone growth by introducing a RF heating model so that an ad hoc heating temperature profile is not necessary. Numerical simulations were carried out to study the high-temperature float-zone growth of titanium carbide single crystal. The numerical results showed that the thermocapillary convection occurring inside the molten zone tends to increase the convexity of the melt-crystal interface and decrease the maximum temperature of the molten zone, while the natural convection tends to reduce the stability of the molten zone by increasing its height. It was found that the increase of induced heating due to the increase of applied RF voltage is reduced by the decrease of zone diameter. Surface tension plays an important role in controlling the amount of induced heating. Finally, a comparison of the computed shape of the free surface with a digital image obtained during a growth run showed adequate agreement.

  19. Immediate induction of heat shock proteins is not protective against cryopreservation in normal human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Park, S J; Choi, H R; Nam, K M; Na, J I; Huh, C H; Park, K C

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) were first identified as proteins whose synthesis was enhanced by stresses, such as increased temperature. HSPs can protect cells from various cytotoxic factors by stabilizing proteins. Thus, it could be hypothesized that heat induced HSPs can provide protective effects against cryopreservation-induced cell death. The aim of this study was to determine whether induction of HSPs can increase the cell viability of normal human fibroblasts after cryopreservation. Cytotoxic effects of heat treatment were tested and the induction of HSPs was assessed by examining time-dependent HSP expression. A cell counting method using fluorescence microscopy was used to determine the viability of cells. In addition, the effects of geranylgeranylacetone were evaluated in terms of HSP expression and cytoskeleton changes. The results of this study showed that immediate induction of HSPs does not protect normal human fibroblasts against cryopreservation-induced cell death possibly by inducing cytoskeleton changes.

  20. Solid fossil-fuel recovery by electrical induction heating in situ - A proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, S.

    1980-04-01

    A technique, termed electrical induction heating, is proposed for in situ processes of energy production from solid fossil fuels, such as bitumen production from underground distillation of oil sand; oil by underground distillation of oil shale; petroleum from heavy oil by underground mobilization of heavy oil, from either residues of conventional liquid petroleum deposits or new deposits of viscous oil; methane and coal tar from lignite and coal deposits by underground distillation of coal; and generation of electricity by surface combustion of low calorific-value gas from underground coke gasification by combustion of the organic residue left from the underground distillation of coal by induction heating. A method of surface distillation of mined coking coal by induction heating to produce coke, methane, and coal tar is also proposed.

  1. Temperature analysis of induction motors using a hybrid thermal model with distributed heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, S. C.; Pal, S. K.

    1998-06-01

    The article presents a hybrid thermal model for the accurate estimation of temperature distribution of induction motors. The developed model is a combination of lumped and distributed thermal parameters which are obtained from motor dimensions and other constants such as material density, specific heats, thermal conductivity, etc. The model is especially suited for the derating of induction motors operating under distorted and unbalanced supply condition. The model have been applied to a small (2hp, 415 V, 3-phase) cage rotor induction motor. The performance of the model is confirmed by experimental temperature data from the body and the conductor inside the slots of the motor.

  2. Magnetic induction-induced resistive heating of optical fibers and gratings.

    PubMed

    Canning, John; Naqshbandi, Masood; Cook, Kevin; Huyang, George

    2013-03-15

    Magnetic induction heating of optical fibers packaged with a steel plate is studied using a fiber Bragg grating. The dependence on the induced wavelength shift with magnetic field is obtained for a commercially available induction heater. More than a 300°C temperature rise is observed within seconds. The potential of magnetic induction as an efficient and rapid means of modulating devices and as a novel approach to potential optical based magnetic field and current sensing is proposed and discussed. The extension of the ideas into micro and nanophotonics is described.

  3. Basis of Ionospheric Modification by High-Frequency Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    for conducting ionospheric heating experiments in Gakona, Alaska, as part of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ) [5], is being...upgraded. The upgraded HAARP HF transmitting system will be a phased-array antenna of 180 elements. Each element is a cross dipole, which radiates a...supported by the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ), the Air Force Research Laboratory at Hanscom Air Force Base, MA, and by the Office

  4. Surface modification of graphite and ceramics with metals using induction heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeshoji, Toshi-Taka; Imoto, Akiko; Suzumura, Akio; Katori, Mana; Yamazaki, Takahisa; Sakamoto, Masahiro; Sakimichi, Satoshi

    2014-08-01

    In order to join metals to graphite or ceramics by soldering or brazing, a new surface modification method using induction heating was developed for graphite and ceramics. Such source metals as Cu, Ni, Cr, etc. were induction-heated in vacuum atmosphere and making deposited films on the deposition substrate, or the target substrate; graphite, AlN, Si3N4. The applicability of this method was investigated and the deposited layer was analysed by SEM observation, Auger electron spectrum analysis, X-ray diffractometry, and EPMA. By comparison of ambient vacuum pressure during deposition and the saturated vaopr pressure of source metals, this method was considered to utilize the sublimation phenomenon.

  5. Demonstration of a non-contact x-ray source using an inductively heated pyroelectric accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klopfer, Michael; Satchouk, Vladimir; Cao, Anh; Wolowiec, Thomas; Alivov, Yahya; Molloi, Sabee

    2015-04-01

    X-ray emission from pyroelectric sources can be produced through non-contact thermal cycling using induction heating. In this study, we demonstrated a proof of concept non-contact x-ray source powered via induction heating. An induction heater operating at 62.5 kHz provided a total of 6.5 W of delivered peak thermal power with 140 V DC of driving voltage. The heat was applied to a ferrous substrate mechanically coupled to a cubic 1 cm3 Lithium Niobate (LiNbO3) pyroelectric crystal maintained in a 3-12 mTorr vacuum. The maximum temperature reached was 175 °C in 86 s of heating. The cooling cycle began immediately after heating and was provided by passive radiative cooling. The total combined cycle time was 250 s. x-ray photons were produced and analyzed in both heating and cooling phases. Maximum photon energies of 59 keV and 55 keV were observed during heating and cooling, respectively. Non-contact devices such as this, may find applications in cancer therapy (brachytherapy), non-destructive testing, medical imaging, and physics education fields.

  6. Evaluation of inductively heated ferromagnetic alloy implants for therapeutic interstitial hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Paulus, J A; Richardson, J S; Tucker, R D; Park, J B

    1996-04-01

    Ferromagnetic alloys heated by magnetic induction have been investigated as interstitial hyperthermia delivery implants for over a decade, utilizing low Curie temperatures to provide thermal self-regulation. The minimally invasive method is attractive for fractionated thermal treatment of tumors which are not easily heated by focused microwave or ultrasound techniques. Past analyses of ferromagnetic seeds by other authors depict poor experimental correlation with theoretical heating predictions. Improvements in computer hardware and commercially available finite element analysis software have simplified the analysis of inductively heated thermal seeds considerably. This manuscript examines end effects of finite length implants and nonlinear magnetic material properties to account for previous inconsistencies. Two alloys, Ni-28 wt% Cu (NiCu) and Pd-6.15 wt% Co (PdCo), were used for comparison of theoretical and experimental calorimetric results. Length to diameter (L/d) ratios of over 20 for cylindrical seeds are necessary for minimization of end effects. Magnetic properties tested for alloys of NiCu and PdCo illustrate considerable nonlinearity of these materials in field strength ranges used for induction heating. Field strength dependent magnetic permeabilities and calorimetric data illustrate that more detailed material information must be included to accurately estimate induction power loss for these implants.

  7. A validated model for induction heating of shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Robert N.; Boyd, James G.; Hartl, Darren J.; Brown, Jonathan K.; Calkins, Frederick T.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2016-04-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators deliver high forces while being compact and reliable, making them ideal for consideration in aerospace applications. One disadvantage of these thermally driven actuators is their slow cyclic time response compared to conventional actuators. Induction heating has recently been proposed to quickly heat SMA components. However efforts to date have been purely empirical. The present work approachs this problem in a computational manner by developing a finite element model of induction heating in which the time-harmonic electromagnetic equations are solved for the Joule heat power field, the energy equation is solved for the temperature field, and the linear momentum equations are solved to find the stress, displacement, and internal state variable fields. The combined model was implemented in Abaqus using a Python script approach and applied to SMA torque tube and beam actuators. The model has also been used to examine magnetic flux concentrators to improve the induction systems performance. Induction heating experiments were performed using the SMA torque tube, and the model agreed well with the experiments.

  8. Comparative effects of ohmic, induction cooker, and electric stove heating on soymilk trypsin inhibitor inactivation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Zhao, Luping; Zhang, Caimeng; Kong, Xiangzhen; Hua, Yufei; Chen, Yeming

    2015-03-01

    During thermal treatment of soymilk, a rapid incorporation of Kunitz trypsin inhibitor (KTI) into protein aggregates by covalent (disulfide bond, SS) and/or noncovalent interactions with other proteins is responsible for its fast inactivation of trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA). In contrast, the slow cleavage of a single Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI) peptide bond is responsible for its slow inactivation of TIA and chymotrypsin inhibitor activity (CIA). In this study, the effects of Ohmic heating (220 V, 50 Hz) on soymilk TIA and CIA inactivation were examined and compared to induction cooker and electric stove heating with similar thermal histories. It was found that: (1) TIA and CIA inactivation was slower from 0 to 3 min, and faster after 3 min as compared to induction cooker and electric stove. (2) The thiol (SH) loss rate was slower from 0 to 3 min, and similar to induction cooker and electric stove after 3 min. (3) Ohmic heating slightly increased protein aggregate formation. (4) In addition to the cleavage of one BBI peptide bond, an additional reaction might occur to enhance BBI inactivation. (5) Ohmic heating was more energy-efficient for TIA and CIA inactivation. (6) TIA and CIA inactivation was accelerated with increasing electric voltage (110, 165, and 220 V) of Ohmic heating. It is likely that the enhanced inactivation of TIA by Ohmic heating is due to its combined electrochemical and thermal effects.

  9. Fluid Modeling of a Very High Frequency Capacitively Coupled Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Rochan; Raja, Laxminarayan; Ventzek, Peter; Iwao, Toshihiko; Ishibashi, Kiyotaka; Esgee Technologies Inc. Collaboration; University of Texas at Austin Collaboration; Tokyo Electron Ltd. Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Very High Frequency Capacitively Coupled Plasma (VHF-CCP) discharges have been studied extensively for semiconductor manufacturing applications for well over a decade. Modeling of these discharges however poses significant challenges owing to complexity associated with simulation of multiple coupled phenomena (electro-static/magnetic fields and plasma physics) over different scales and the representation of these phenomena in a computational framework. We present 2D simulations of a self-consistent plasma with the electromagnetic field represented using vector and scalar potentials. For a range of operating conditions, the ratio of capacitive and inductive power, calculated using empirical correlations available in the literature, are matched by adjusting both the electrostatic and electromagnetic fields in a decoupled manner. We present results using this model that demonstrate most of the important VHF-CCP discharge phenomena reported in the literature, such as electromagnetic wave versus electrostatic heating and its impact on plasma non-uniformity, wave resonances, etc. while realizing a practically feasible computational model.

  10. Electron heating in the inductive discharge array (IDA): theoretical concept and first measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahr, Philipp; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2016-09-01

    Besides the common stochastic heating effect in inductively coupled plasmas, recently a novel heating mechanism was identified theoretically by Czarnetzki and Tarnev. It considers the movement of electrons in a plane parallel to the induced electric field lines, in contrast to the well-known case, when the considered electrons move perpendicular. To enable the possibility of non-local energy gain for electron in this parallel plane, a periodically structured electric field was proposed. To experimentally verify this hypothesis a new plasma source was designed and assembled. This source is named Inductive Discharge Array (IDA). The special spatial field structure is realized by a large electrode with an array of 6 x 6 small plane inductive coils. Due to the use of two separate electric circuits, both electric field structures mentioned in can be achieved. Here the theoretical background and the relevant design considerations are presented. In addition first experimental results are shown.

  11. Acceleration of solar wind in polar coronal holes by induction heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chertkov, A. D.; Shkrebets, A. E.; Arkhipov, Yu. V.; Soldatov, V. A.

    1995-01-01

    The universal induction heating mechanism supplying with the energy all the processes of coronal heating and the solar wind acceleration is developed. The observed relative 'trembling' of photospheric super-large scale magnetic fields with quasi-periods of 1-4 days amounts 30-40 percent in amplitude. The inductive electric field appears in the corona. The electric currents cause the Joule dissipation. The uneven heating leads to the solar wind acceleration. A model is suggested in which high-speed streams in space are caused by the combination of the enhanced inductive energy flux from the solar coronal active regions; the work against the regular magnetic field; losses from coronal emission. The consideration is made in terms of the dissipative solar wind theory with the finite electrical conductivity of plasma. The leakage of plasma and the energy flux across the magnetic field, caused by the induction heating processes, are taken into account. The polar coronal holes (and the mid-latitude ones) are indicators of energy transfer balance but not direct sources of high-speed streams in the solar wind.

  12. Inhibition of Heat Shock Induction of Heat Shock Protein 70 and Enhancement of Heat Shock Protein 27 Phosphorylation by Quercetin Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rongsheng E.; Kao, Jeffrey L.-F.; Hilliard, Carolyn A.; Pandita, Raj K.; Roti, Joseph L. Roti; Hunt, Clayton R.; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of heat-induced heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)a expression have the potential to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of heat induced radiosensitization of tumors. Among known small molecule inhibitors, quercetin has the advantage of being easily modified for structure-activity studies. Herein, we report the ability of five mono-methyl and five carbomethoxymethyl derivatives of quercetin to inhibit heat-induced HSP70 expression and enhance HSP27 phosphorylation in human cells. While quercetin and several derivatives inhibit HSP70 induction and enhance HSP27 phosphorylation at Ser78, other analogs selectively inhibit HSP70 induction without enhancing HSP27 phosphorylation that would otherwise aid in cell survival. We also show that good inhibitors of HSP70 induction are also good inhibitors of both CK2 and CamKII, kinases that are known to activate HSP70 expression by phosphorylation of heat shock transcription factor 1. Derivatives that show poor inhibition of either or both kinases are not good inhibitors of HSP70 induction, suggesting that quercetin’s effectiveness is due to its ability to inhibit both kinases. PMID:19296652

  13. Induced electric fields in workers near low-frequency induction heating machines.

    PubMed

    Kos, Bor; Valič, Blaž; Kotnik, Tadej; Gajšek, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Published data on occupational exposure to induction heating equipment are scarce, particularly in terms of induced quantities in the human body. This article provides some additional information by investigating exposure to two such machines-an induction furnace and an induction hardening machine. Additionally, a spatial averaging algorithm for measured fields we developed in a previous publication is tested on new data. The human model was positioned at distances where measured values of magnetic flux density were above the reference levels. All human exposure was below the basic restriction-the lower bound of the 0.1 top percentile induced electric field in the body of a worker was 0.193 V/m at 30 cm from the induction furnace.

  14. Parametric nanomechanical amplification at very high frequency.

    PubMed

    Karabalin, R B; Feng, X L; Roukes, M L

    2009-09-01

    Parametric resonance and amplification are important in both fundamental physics and technological applications. Here we report very high frequency (VHF) parametric resonators and mechanical-domain amplifiers based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Compound mechanical nanostructures patterned by multilayer, top-down nanofabrication are read out by a novel scheme that parametrically modulates longitudinal stress in doubly clamped beam NEMS resonators. Parametric pumping and signal amplification are demonstrated for VHF resonators up to approximately 130 MHz and provide useful enhancement of both resonance signal amplitude and quality factor. We find that Joule heating and reduced thermal conductance in these nanostructures ultimately impose an upper limit to device performance. We develop a theoretical model to account for both the parametric response and nonequilibrium thermal transport in these composite nanostructures. The results closely conform to our experimental observations, elucidate the frequency and threshold-voltage scaling in parametric VHF NEMS resonators and sensors, and establish the ultimate sensitivity limits of this approach.

  15. Induction heating to trigger the nickel surface modification by in situ generated 4-carboxybenzene diazonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrotin, Bastien; Jacques, Amory; Devillers, Sébastien; Delhalle, Joseph; Mekhalif, Zineb

    2016-05-01

    Nickel is commonly used in numerous applications and is one of the few materials that present strong ferromagnetic properties. These make it a suitable material for induction heating which can be used to activate the grafting of organic species such as diazonium salts onto the material. Diazonium compounds are often used for the modification of metals and alloys thanks to their easy chemical reduction onto the substrates and the possibility to apply a one-step in situ generation process of the diazonium species. This work focuses on the grafting of 4-aminocarboxybenzene on nickel substrates in the context of a spontaneous grafting conducted either at room temperature or by thermal assistance through conventional heating and induction heating. These modifications are also carried out with the goal of maintaining the oxides layer as much as possible unaffected. The benefits of using induction heating with respect to conventional heating are an increase of the grafting rate, a better control of the reaction and a slighter impact on the oxides layer.

  16. Use of miniature magnetic sensors for real-time control of the induction heating process

    DOEpatents

    Bentley, Anthony E.; Kelley, John Bruce; Zutavern, Fred J.

    2002-01-01

    A method of monitoring the process of induction heating a workpiece. A miniature magnetic sensor located near the outer surface of the workpiece measures changes in the surface magnetic field caused by changes in the magnetic properties of the workpiece as it heats up during induction heating (or cools down during quenching). A passive miniature magnetic sensor detects a distinct magnetic spike that appears when the saturation field, B.sub.sat, of the workpiece has been exceeded. This distinct magnetic spike disappears when the workpiece's surface temperature exceeds its Curie temperature, due to the sudden decrease in its magnetic permeability. Alternatively, an active magnetic sensor can also be used to measure changes in the resonance response of the monitor coil when the excitation coil is linearly swept over 0-10 MHz, due to changes in the magnetic permeability and electrical resistivity of the workpiece as its temperature increases (or decreases).

  17. High Frequency Linacs for Hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaldi, Ugo; Braccini, Saverio; Puggioni, Paolo

    The use of radiofrequency linacs for hadrontherapy was proposed about 20 years ago, but only recently has it been understood that the high repetition rate together with the possibility of very rapid energy variations offers an optimal solution to the present challenge of hadrontherapy: "paint" a moving tumor target in three dimensions with a pencil beam. Moreover, the fact that the energy, and thus the particle range, can be electronically adjusted implies that no absorber-based energy selection system is needed, which, in the case of cyclotron-based centers, is the cause of material activation. On the other side, a linac consumes less power than a synchrotron. The first part of this article describes the main advantages of high frequency linacs in hadrontherapy, the early design studies, and the construction and test of the first high-gradient prototype which accelerated protons. The second part illustrates some technical issues relevant to the design of copper standing wave accelerators, the present developments, and two designs of linac-based proton and carbon ion facilities. Superconductive linacs are not discussed, since nanoampere currents are sufficient for therapy. In the last two sections, a comparison with circular accelerators and an overview of future projects are presented.

  18. Pharmacological induction of heat shock protein 68 synthesis in cultured rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, R N; Dwyer, B E

    1995-12-15

    The induction of the highly inducible 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP 70) is associated with thermotolerance and survival from many other types of stress. This investigation studied the pharmacological induction of HSP 68 (HSP 68 is the rat homolog of human HSP 70) by 1,10-phenanthroline in cultured rat astrocytes under conditions that activated heat shock transcription factor-1 without inducing HSP 68 synthesis. Two conditions that activate heat shock transcription factor-1 and promote its binding to the heat shock element without subsequent transcription of HSP 68 mRNA, intracellular acidosis and exposure to salicylate, showed synthesis of HSP 68 when 1,10-phenanthroline was added to culture medium after the activation of heat shock transcription factor-1. 1,10-phenanthroline mimicked heat shock by inducing HSP 68 mRNA and protein under both conditions. 1,10-phenanthroline added alone to culture medium did not induce the synthesis of HSP 68 or activate heat shock transcription factor-1. These findings strongly suggest a multistep activation for HSP 68 synthesis and also demonstrate that the synthesis of HSP 68 can be pharmacologically regulated.

  19. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Rigby, Wayne; Wallace, John; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2012-06-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low (˜120 °C) and high (˜800 °C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 °C with a maximum pressure of ˜1 × 10-5 Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 °C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 °C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of ˜2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  20. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Rigby, Wayne; Wallace, John; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2012-06-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low (∼120 °C) and high (∼800 °C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 °C with a maximum pressure of ∼1 × 10(-5) Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 °C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 °C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of ∼2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  1. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Rigby, Wayne; Wallace, John

    2012-06-15

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low ({approx}120 Degree-Sign C) and high ({approx}800 Degree-Sign C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 Degree-Sign C with a maximum pressure of {approx}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 Degree-Sign C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 Degree-Sign C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of {approx}2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  2. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Pashupati Dhakal, Gianluigi Ciovati, Wayne Rigby, John Wallace, Ganapati Rao Myneni

    2012-06-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low ({approx}120 deg C) and high ({approx}800 deg C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 deg C with a maximum pressure of {approx}1 x 10{sup -5} Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 deg C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 deg C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of {approx}2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  3. Heated Allergens and Induction of Tolerance in Food Allergic Children

    PubMed Central

    Netting, Merryn; Makrides, Maria; Gold, Michael; Quinn, Patrick; Penttila, Irmeli

    2013-01-01

    Food allergies are one of the first manifestations of allergic disease and have been shown to significantly impact on general health perception, parental emotional distress and family activities. It is estimated that in the Western world, almost one in ten children have an IgE-mediated allergy. Cow’s milk and egg allergy are common childhood allergies. Until recently, children with food allergy were advised to avoid all dietary exposure to the allergen to which they were sensitive, in the thought that consumption would exacerbate their allergy. However, recent publications indicate that up to 70% of children with egg allergy can tolerate egg baked in a cake or muffin without apparent reaction. Likewise, up to 75% of children can tolerate baked goods containing cow’s milk, and these children demonstrate IgE and IgG4 profiles indicative of tolerance development. This article will review the current literature regarding the use of heated food allergens as immunotherapy for children with cow’s milk and egg allergy. PMID:23739144

  4. Grafting of bifunctional phosphonic and carboxylic acids on Phynox: Impact of induction heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devillers, S.; Lanners, L.; Delhalle, J.; Mekhalif, Z.

    2011-05-01

    Phynox, a cobalt-chromium alloy, exhibits interesting mechanical properties making it a valuable material for a number of applications. However, its applications (especially biomedical ones) often require specific surface properties that can be imparted via suitable surface functionalizations. Based on Faraday's law of induction, induction heating is a widely used method to heat metallic substrates directly and contactless. The aim of this work is to compare the influence of induction heating and a conventional heating method on the functionalization of Phynox surfaces with bifunctional (6-phosphonohexanoic and 11-phosphoundecanoic acids) monolayers in order to create a platform for a large variety of post-grafting chemical reactions, e.g. with alcohols and amines, to modify and control the surface properties. In a first part, we assess the influence of the heating method on the interaction between the two terminal moieties of the 6-phosphonohexanoic and 11-phosphoundecanoic acids and the Phynox surface by studying the grafting of n-dodecylphosphonic acid and n-dodecanoic acid separately. The suitability of such bifunctional molecules for post-grafting chemical reactions has then been assessed by studying the post-grafting of a fluorinated alcohol by the Steglich esterification reaction between the carboxylic end of the grafted bifunctional molecules and the alcohol function of the post-grafted molecule. It has been shown that induction heating can lead to a much more selective adsorption of bifunctional molecules on the surface of Phynox, leaving a higher amount of free carboxylic acid functions to react during the second modification step.

  5. Heat shock protein induction in rat pancreatic islets by recombinant human interleukin 1 beta.

    PubMed

    Helqvist, S; Polla, B S; Johannesen, J; Nerup, J

    1991-03-01

    Interleukin 1 beta, potentiated by tumour necrosis factor alpha, is cytotoxic to pancreatic Beta cells in vitro. We have hypothesized that interleukin 1 beta induces oxygen free radicals in Beta cells. Since cytotoxicity induced by free radicals and by heat may activate the same cellular repair mechanism (the heat shock response), the aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of protein synthesis in isolated islets after exposure to interleukin 1 beta (150 pg/ml, 24 h), tumour necrosis factor alpha (50 ng/ml, 24 h) heat shock (43 degrees C, 30 min) and H2O2 (0.1 mmol/l, 20 min). By polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, autoradiography, Western-blot analysis and partial peptide mapping of 35S-methionine labelled islets, interleukin 1 beta was found to induce a 73 kilodalton protein belonging to the heat shock protein family heat shock protein 70, a heat shock protein 90, and haem oxygenase. A minor induction of heat shock protein 73 and haem oxygenase was seen after H2O2. Interleukin 1 beta did not induce heat shock proteins in rat thyroid cells, rat mesangial cells or in human monocytes. Tumour necrosis factor alpha did not induce selective protein synthesis. Pre-exposure of islets to heat, tumour necrosis factor alpha, or H2O2 did not prevent the impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin release seen after 24 h of interleukin 1 beta exposure. The data are compatible with free radical induction by interleukin 1 beta. However, the heat shock response is not specific for oxidative injury, and previous studies have shown discrepant effects as to a protective effect of free radical scavengers against interleukin 1 beta-mediated beta-cytotoxicity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Surface engineering glass-metal coatings designed for induction heating of ceramic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Amir Azam; Labbe, Jean Claude

    2014-06-01

    The term Surface Engineering is of relatively recent origin and use, however, the use of coatings and treatments to render surfaces of materials more suitable for certain application or environment is not new. With the advent of Vacuum Technology, Surface Engineering has gained a whole new impetus, whereby expensive materials with adequate mechanical, chemical and thermal properties are being coated or treated on their surfaces in order to achieve what is called as Surface Engineered materials. The present paper presents an overview of recent achievements in Surface Engineering and gives a detailed view of a specific application where glass-metal composite coatings were deposited on ceramic components in order to render them sensitive to induction heating. Sintered glaze coatings containing silver particles in appropriate concentration can be used for the induction heating of porcelain. Mixtures of glass ceramic powders with silver are used to prepare self-transfer patterns, which are deposited over porcelain. Several configurations of these coatings, which are aesthetic to start with, are employed and heating patterns are recorded. The microstructure of these coatings is discussed in relation to the heating ability by a classical household induction system. The results show that this technique is practical and commercially viable.

  7. Induction heating for surface triggering styrene polymerization on titanium modified with ATRP initiator.

    PubMed

    Barthélémy, Bastien; Devillers, Sébastien; Minet, Isabelle; Delhalle, Joseph; Mekhalif, Zineb

    2011-02-15

    Titanium and its alloys present high interests for technological applications due to their high corrosion resistance, mechanical properties and biocompatibility. In combination with these remarkable characteristics, some Ti applications require specific surface properties that can be imparted with suitable surface functionalizations of the TiO(2) oxide layer. The present work aims to study the surface-initiated ATR polymerization of styrene on titanium substrates, using grafted 11-(2-bromoisobutyrate)-undecyl-1-phosphonic acid as initiator and to compare the impact of two different heating ways on the efficiency of this polymerization: induction vs. conventional heating. The ability of the initiator to bind titanium substrates and act as an initiator for ATRP of styrene is investigated: both heating conditions led to the polymerization of styrene on modified titanium substrates. However, induction heating appeared to be much more efficient than conventional heating, leading to the formation of a thicker, much denser polystyrene layer than conventional heating after only 1h of polymerization.

  8. Lightweight, high-frequency transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    The 25-kVA space transformer was developed under contract by Thermal Technology Laboratory, Buffalo, N. Y. The NASA Lewis transformer technology program attempted to develop the baseline technology. For the 25-kVA transformer the input voltage was chosen as 200 V, the output voltage as 1500 V, the input voltage waveform as square wave, the duty cycle as continuous, the frequency range (within certain constraints) as 10 to 40 kHz, the operating temperatures as 85 deg. and 130 C, the baseplate temperature as 50 C, the equivalent leakage inductance as less than 10 micro-h, the operating environment as space, and the life expectancy as 10 years. Such a transformer can also be used for aircraft, ship and terrestrial applications.

  9. High Frequency Chandler Wobble Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, F.; Stuck, J.; Thomas, M.

    2003-04-01

    and OMCT forcing fields give no hint for increased excitation power in the Chandler band. Thus it is assumed, that continuous high frequency excitation due to stochastic weather phenomena is responsible for the perpetuation of the Chandler wobble.

  10. A high frequency electromagnetic impedance imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Hung-Wen; Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex

    2003-01-15

    Non-invasive, high resolution geophysical mapping of the shallow subsurface is necessary for delineation of buried hazardous wastes, detecting unexploded ordinance, verifying and monitoring of containment or moisture contents, and other environmental applications. Electromagnetic (EM) techniques can be used for this purpose since electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity are representative of the subsurface media. Measurements in the EM frequency band between 1 and 100 MHz are very important for such applications, because the induction number of many targets is small and the ability to determine the subsurface distribution of both electrical properties is required. Earlier workers were successful in developing systems for detecting anomalous areas, but quantitative interpretation of the data was difficult. Accurate measurements are necessary, but difficult to achieve for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface. We are developing a broadband non-invasive method for accurately mapping the electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of the shallow subsurface using an EM impedance approach similar to the MT exploration technique. Electric and magnetic sensors were tested to ensure that stray EM scattering is minimized and the quality of the data collected with the high-frequency impedance (HFI) system is good enough to allow high-resolution, multi-dimensional imaging of hidden targets. Additional efforts are being made to modify and further develop existing sensors and transmitters to improve the imaging capability and data acquisition efficiency.

  11. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-03-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  12. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-01-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  13. Closed loop control of the induction heating process using miniature magnetic sensors

    DOEpatents

    Bentley, Anthony E.; Kelley, John Bruce; Zutavern, Fred J.

    2003-05-20

    A method and system for providing real-time, closed-loop control of the induction hardening process. A miniature magnetic sensor located near the outer surface of the workpiece measures changes in the surface magnetic field caused by changes in the magnetic properties of the workpiece as it heats up during induction heating (or cools down during quenching). A passive miniature magnetic sensor detects a distinct magnetic spike that appears when the saturation field, B.sub.sat, of the workpiece has been exceeded. This distinct magnetic spike disappears when the workpiece's surface temperature exceeds its Curie temperature, due to the sudden decrease in its magnetic permeability. Alternatively, an active magnetic sensor can measure changes in the resonance response of the monitor coil when the excitation coil is linearly swept over 0-10 MHz, due to changes in the magnetic permeability and electrical resistivity of the workpiece as its temperature increases (or decreases).

  14. Induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifiers for plasma heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jong, R. A.

    1988-08-01

    We describe an induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifier that is presently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It is designed to produce up to 2 MW of average power at a frequency of 250 GHz for plasma heating experiments in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment. In addition, we shall describe a FEL amplifier design for plasma heating of advanced tokamak fusion devices. This system is designed to produce average power levels of about 10 MW at frequencies ranging from 280 to 560 GHz.

  15. Induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifiers for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, R.A.

    1988-08-22

    We describe an induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifier that is presently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It is designed to produce up to 2 MW of average power at a frequency of 250 GHz for plasma heating experiments in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment. In addition, we shall describe a FEL amplifier design for plasma heating of advanced tokamak fusion devices. This system is designed to produce average power levels of about 10 MW at frequencies ranging form 280 to 560 GHz. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  16. Inductively Heated Shape Memory Polymer for the Magnetic Actuation of Medical Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, P; Mckinley, G; Wilson, T; Small, W; Benett, W; Bearinger, J; McElfresh, M; Maitland, D

    2005-09-06

    Presently there is interest in making medical devices such as expandable stents and intravascular microactuators from shape memory polymer (SMP). One of the key challenges in realizing SMP medical devices is the implementation of a safe and effective method of thermally actuating various device geometries in vivo. A novel scheme of actuation by Curie-thermoregulated inductive heating is presented. Prototype medical devices made from SMP loaded with Nickel Zinc ferrite ferromagnetic particles were actuated in air by applying an alternating magnetic field to induce heating. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis was performed on both the particle-loaded and neat SMP materials to assess the impact of the ferrite particles on the mechanical properties of the samples. Calorimetry was used to quantify the rate of heat generation as a function of particle size and volumetric loading of ferrite particles in the SMP. These tests demonstrated the feasibility of SMP actuation by inductive heating. Rapid and uniform heating was achieved in complex device geometries and particle loading up to 10% volume content did not interfere with the shape recovery of the SMP.

  17. Inductively heated shape memory polymer for the magnetic actuation of medical devices.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Patrick R; McKinley, Gareth H; Wilson, Thomas S; Small, Ward; Benett, William J; Bearinger, Jane P; McElfresh, Michael W; Maitland, Duncan J

    2006-10-01

    Presently, there is interest in making medical devices such as expandable stents and intravascular microactuators from shape memory polymer (SMP). One of the key challenges in realizing SMP medical devices is the implementation of a safe and effective method of thermally actuating various device geometries in vivo. A novel scheme of actuation by Curie-thermoregulated inductive heating is presented. Prototype medical devices made from SMP loaded with nickel zinc ferrite ferromagnetic particles were actuated in air by applying an alternating magnetic field to induce heating. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis was performed on both the particle-loaded and neat SMP materials to assess the impact of the ferrite particles on the mechanical properties of the samples. Calorimetry was used to quantify the rate of heat generation as a function of particle size and volumetric loading of ferrite particles in the SMP. These tests demonstrated the feasibility of SMP actuation by inductive heating. Rapid and uniform heating was achieved in complex device geometries and particle loading up to 10% volume content did not interfere with the shape recovery of the SMP.

  18. Viscous effects on motion and heating of electrons in inductively coupled plasma reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.H.; Bose, D.

    1999-10-01

    A transport model is developed for nonlocal effects on motion and heating of electrons in inductively coupled plasma reactors. The model is based on the electron momentum equation derived from the Boltzmann equation, retaining anisotropic stress components which in fact are viscous stresses. The resulting model consists of transport equations for the magnitude of electron velocity oscillation and terms representing energy dissipation due to viscous stresses in the electron energy equation. In this model, electrical current is obtained in a nonlocal manner due to viscous effects, instead of Ohm's law or the electron momentum equation without viscous effects, while nonlocal heating of electrons is represented by the viscous dissipation. Computational results obtained by two-dimensional numerical simulations show that nonlocal determination of electrical current indeed is important, and viscous dissipation becomes an important electron heating mechanism at low pressures. It is suspected that viscous dissipation in inductively coupled plasma reactors in fact represents stochastic heating of electrons, and this possibility is exploited by discussing physical similarities between stochastic heating and energy dissipation due to the stress tensor.

  19. Induction heat treatment and technique of bioceramic coatings production on medical titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Aleksandr A.; Rodionov, Igor V.; Fomina, Marina A.; Poshivalova, Elena Y.; Krasnikov, Aleksandr V.; Petrova, Natalia N.; Zakharevich, Andrey M.; Skaptsov, Alexander A.; Gribov, Andrey N.; Atkin, Vsevolod S.

    2015-03-01

    Prospective composite bioceramic titania coatings were obtained on intraosseous implants fabricated from medical titanium alloy VT16 (Ti-2.5Al-5Mo-5V). Consistency changes of morphological characteristics, physico-mechanical properties and biocompatibility of experimental titanium implant coatings obtained by oxidation during induction heat treatment are defined. Technological recommendations for obtaining bioceramic coatings with extremely high strength on titanium items surface are given.

  20. Controlled nucleation and growth of thin hydroxyapatite layers on titanium implants by using induction heating technique.

    PubMed

    Gómez Morales, J; Rodríguez Clemente, R; Armas, B; Combescure, C; Berjoan, R; Cubo, J; Martínez, E; García Carmona, J; Garelik, S; Murtra, J; Muraviev, D N

    2004-06-22

    This paper reports the results obtained by the development of a new wet method of hydroxyapatite (HA) thin layer deposition. The method is based on the localized precipitation of HA on metallic substrates activated by induction heating. The technique developed has been shown to allow for the complete coating of substrates with micrometric thin films of HA within a low processing time. The method has been successfully applied to coat Ti plaques and Ti-6A1-4V cylinders.

  1. On the optimal chamber length and electron heating mechanism in low pressure inductive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Lee, Ho-Won; Park, Il-Seo; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2016-09-01

    Plasma resistance with the chamber length was measured at different plasma densities in low pressure inductively coupled plasmas. It was found that the plasma resistance has a maximum at specific chamber length, Lopt, and the Lopt is changed with the plasma density. It is related to the maximum collisionless electron heating, which simultaneously satisfies the conditions of both the bounce resonance and the transit time resonance. Therefore, Lopt is an optimal chamber size for the power transfer to the plasma.

  2. High Frequency Stable Oscillate boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Gonzalez-Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Ohl, Claus Dieter

    2015-11-01

    We present an unexpected regime of resonant bubble oscillations on a thin metal film submerged in water, which is continuously heated with a focused CW laser. The oscillatory bubble dynamics reveals a remarkably stable frequency of several 100 kHz and is resolved from the side using video recordings at 1 million frames per second. The emitted sound is measured simultaneously and shows higher harmonics. Once the laser is switched on the water in contact with the metal layer is superheated and an explosively expanding cavitation bubble is generated. However, after the collapse a microbubble is nucleated from the bubble remains which displays long lasting oscillations. Generally, pinch-off from of the upper part of the microbubble is observed generating a continuous stream of small gas bubbles rising upwards. The cavitation expansion, collapse, and the jetting of gas bubbles are detected by the hydrophone and are correlated to the high speed video. We find the bubble oscillation frequency is dependent on the bubble size and surface tension. A preliminary model based on Marangoni flow and heat transfer can explain the high flow velocities observed, yet the origin of bubble oscillation is currently not well understood.

  3. Electromagnetic induction heating of an orthopaedic nickel--titanium shape memory device.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christian W; Pfeifer, Ronny; El-Kashef, Tarek; Hurschler, Christof; Herzog, Dirk; Oszwald, Markus; Haasper, Carl; Krettek, Christian; Gösling, Thomas

    2010-12-01

    Shape memory orthopaedic implants made from nickel-titanium (NiTi) might allow the modulation of fracture healing, changing their cross-sectional shape by employing the shape memory effect. We aimed to show the feasibility and safety of contact-free electromagnetic induction heating of NiTi implants in a rat model. A water-cooled generator-oscillator combination was used. Induction characteristics were determined by measuring the temperature increase of a test sample in correlation to generator power and time. In 53 rats, NiTi implants were introduced into the right hind leg. The animals were transferred to the inductor, and the implant was electromagnetically heated to temperatures between 40 and 60°C. Blood samples were drawn before and 4 h after the procedure. IL-1, IL-4, IL-10, TNF-α, and IFN-γ were measured. Animals were euthanized at 3 weeks. Histological specimens from the hind leg and liver were retrieved and examined for inflammatory changes, necrosis, and corrosion pits. Cytokine measurements and histological specimens showed no significant differences among the groups. We concluded that electromagnetic induction heating of orthopedic NiTi implants is feasible and safe in a rat model. This is the first step in the development of new orthopedic implants in which stiffness or rigidity can be modified after implantation to optimize bone-healing.

  4. High temperature setup for measurements of Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity of thin films using inductive heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnane, L.; Williams, N.; Silva, H.; Gokirmak, A.

    2015-10-01

    We have developed an automated setup for simultaneous measurement of Seebeck coefficient S(T) and electrical resistivity ρ(T) of thin film samples from room temperature to ˜650 °C. S and ρ are extracted from current-voltage (I-V) measurements obtained using a semiconductor parameter analyzer and temperature measurements obtained using commercial thermocouples. The slope and the x-axis intercept of the I-V characteristics represent the sample conductance G and the Seebeck voltage, respectively. The measured G(T) can be scaled to ρ(T) by the geometry factor obtained from the room temperature resistivity measurement of the film. The setup uses resistive or inductive heating to control the temperature and temperature gradient on the sample. Inductive heating is achieved with steel plates that surround the test area and a water cooled copper pipe coil underneath that generates an AC magnetic field. The measurements can be performed using resistive heating only or inductive heating only, or a combination of both depending on the desired heating ranges. Inductive heating provides a more uniform heating of the test area, does not require contacts to the sample holder, can be used up to the Curie temperature of the particular magnetic material, and the temperature gradients can be adjusted by the relative positions of the coil and sample. Example results obtained for low doped single-crystal silicon with inductive heating only and with resistive heating only are presented.

  5. Heating or freezing bone. Effects on angiogenesis induction and growth potential in mice.

    PubMed

    Leunig, M; Yuan, F; Berk, D A; Gerweck, L E; Jain, R K

    1996-08-01

    We have characterized the effect of bone graft treatment by heating or freezing (with or without dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)). Tissue culture and dorsal skin-fold chambers in mice were used as sites to quantify the effect on angiogenesis, growth and calcification of neonatal femora. Fresh femora increased in both length and cartilage diameter (calcification in vivo only), but cryopreservation or heating abolished the increase in femoral dimensions. In vivo, femora of all experimental groups elicited an angiogenic response from the host tissue, which was most pronounced for fresh femora, weaker for DMSO-preserved frozen bone and poor for unprotected frozen bone and boiled femora. Freezing in the presence of a cryopreservative (DMSO) was found to preserve the angiogenic potential of frozen bone, whereas unprotected heating or freezing significantly impaired angiogenesis induction and growth potential.

  6. Molecular responses of Escherichia coli caused by heat stress and recombinant protein production during temperature induction.

    PubMed

    Valdez-Cruz, Norma A; Ramírez, Octavio T; Trujillo-Roldán, Mauricio A

    2011-01-01

    In a recent review, we discussed the extensively used temperature-inducible expression system, based on the pL and/or pR phage lambda promoters that are finely regulated by the thermo-labile cI857 repressor. In this system, an increase in temperature induces the heterologous protein production and activates the heat shock response, as well as the stringent and SOS responses. The same responses are activated just by the overproduction of recombinant protein. All such responses result in a metabolic burden to the cells, a decrease in the specific growth rate, and alterations in the central carbon metabolism. Altogether, these effects can alter the quantity and quality of the produced foreign protein. Here, we compare and discuss the transcription of selected genes, and the concomitant synthesis of heat-shock proteins (hsp) soon after thermal induction, in relation to the responses that occur in other expression systems that also trigger the heat-shock response.

  7. Induction of heat shock proteins in response to primary alcohols in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed

    Benndorf, D; Loffhagen, N; Babel, W

    1999-01-01

    Cells of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus 69-V, a species able to metabolize a range of aliphatic hydrocarbons and alcohols, were confronted with ethanol, butanol, hexanol or heat shock during growth on acetate as sole source of carbon and energy. The primary alcohols and the heat shock led to the synthesis of new proteins or amplified expression of specific, common and general proteins, which were detected by silver staining after two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Some of the alcohol-inducible proteins were identified as heat shock proteins by comparing protein patterns of alcohol-shocked cells with those of heat-shocked cells, and by N-terminal amino acid sequencing. DnaK was found to be amplified after all treatments, but GroEI only after heat shock and ethanol treatment. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the protein, which was considerably amplified after alcohol treatment and heat shock, shows homology to HtpG (high temperature protein G). Some of the heat shock proteins induced by ethanol differ from those induced by butanol and hexanol, suggesting there are at least two different signals for the induction of some heat shock proteins by primary alcohols. This could be due to the different localization of ethanol, butanol and hexanol in the membrane, or because higher cytoplasmic concentrations of ethanol than of butanol or hexanol were applied in these tests in order to keep concentrations of the alcohols in the membrane roughly similar. Besides heat shock proteins, a group of proteins were observed which were only induced by butanol and hexanol, possibly indicating the existence of a further defense mechanism against high concentrations of hydrophobic substrates preventing protein denaturation and membrane damage.

  8. Fuzzy and conventional control of high-frequency ventilation.

    PubMed

    Noshiro, M; Matsunami, T; Takakuda, K; Ryumae, S; Kagawa, T; Shimizu, M; Fujino, T

    1994-07-01

    A high-frequency ventilator was developed, consisting of a single-phase induction motor, an unbalanced mass and a mechanical vibration system. Intermittent positive pressure respiration was combined with high-frequency ventilation to measure end-tidal pCO2. Hysteresis was observed between the rotational frequency of the high-frequency ventilator and end-tidal pCO2. A fuzzy proportional plus integral control system, designed on the basis of the static characteristics of the controlled system and a knowledge of respiratory physiology, successfully regulated end-tidal pCO2. The characteristics of gas exchange under high-frequency ventilation was approximated by a first-order linear model. A conventional PI control system, designed on the basis of the approximated model, regulated end-tidal pCO2 with a performance similar to that of the fuzzy PI control system. The design of the fuzzy control system required less knowledge about the controlled system than that of the conventional control system.

  9. A magnetic induction heating system with multi-cascaded coils and adjustable magnetic circuit for hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Fang; Chao, Hsuan-Yi; Chang, Hsun-Hao; Lin, Xi-Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of cancer cells that cannot survive in an environment with temperature over 42 °C, a magnetic induction heating system for cancer treatment is developed in this work. First, the methods and analyses for designing the multi-cascaded coils magnetic induction hyperthermia system are proposed, such as internal impedance measurement of power generator, impedance matching of coils, and analysis of the system. Besides, characteristics of the system are simulated by a full-wave package for engineering optimization. Furthermore, by considering the safety factor of patients, a two-sectional needle is designed for hyperthermia. Finally, this system is employed to test the liver of swine in ex-vivo experiments, and through Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stain and NADPH oxidase activity assay, the feasibility of this system is verified.

  10. Role of TRP channels in the induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) by heating skin

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wen-Li; Yoshioka, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in skin are crucial for achieving temperature sensitivity to maintain internal temperature balance and thermal homeostasis, as well as to protect skin cells from environmental stresses such as infrared (IR) or near-infrared (NIR) radiation via heat shock protein (Hsp) production. However, the mechanisms by which IR and NIR activate TRP channels and produce Hsps intracellularly have been independently reported. In this review, we discuss the relationship between TRP channel activation and Hsp production, and introduce the roles of several skin TRP channels in the regulation of HSP production by IR and NIR exposure. PMID:27493511

  11. Role of TRP channels in the induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) by heating skin.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wen-Li; Yoshioka, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in skin are crucial for achieving temperature sensitivity to maintain internal temperature balance and thermal homeostasis, as well as to protect skin cells from environmental stresses such as infrared (IR) or near-infrared (NIR) radiation via heat shock protein (Hsp) production. However, the mechanisms by which IR and NIR activate TRP channels and produce Hsps intracellularly have been independently reported. In this review, we discuss the relationship between TRP channel activation and Hsp production, and introduce the roles of several skin TRP channels in the regulation of HSP production by IR and NIR exposure.

  12. Evaluation of heat shock protein (HSP-60) induction on accumulation of carbohydrate in Isochrysis galbana

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, H.; Wolfe, M.; Tell, J.; Tjeerdema, R.

    1995-12-31

    Primary levels of the marine food chain may play an important role in the fate of petroleum hydrocarbons in both chemically dispersed and un-dispersed oil spills. HSP-60 proteins, members of the chaperonin family of stress proteins, are induced in response to a wide variety of environmental agents, including UV light, heavy metals, and xenobiotics. Increased production and storage of carbohydrate in I. galbana has been associated with aging and stress. Thus, HSP-60 and carbohydrate storage were selected as sublethal endpoints of exposure to the primary producer, I. galbana, a golden brown, unicellular algae, and a significant component of the marine phytoplankton community. The authors have found that I. galbana cultures exposed to water-accommodated fractions (WAF) of Prudhoe Bay Crude Oil (PBCO), and PBCO/dispersant preparations efficiently induce HSP-60. Studies indicated that WAF produced a dose-related response in I. galbana, which increased as a function of time. Dispersant alone showed the greatest induction, while combined WAF-dispersant showed less induction, suggesting a possible competition between crude oil and algae for dispersant interaction. In addition, they have demonstrated that I. galbana accumulates carbohydrates in response to exposure to WAF and PBCO/dispersant preparations and therefore represents another index of stress in this organism. They were interested in determining if induction of stress proteins and HSP60 in particular represented an adaptive-mechanism, allowing this algae to better cope with exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons released in the marine environment during an oil spill. In an effort to determine if stress protein induction serves as a protective adaptive response to exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons they examined the effect of heat shock induction on the accumulation of carbohydrates by these organisms in response to exposure to WAF and dispersed oil preparations.

  13. Application of Annular Linear Induction Pumps Technology for Waste Heat Rejection and Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, Harold E.

    2005-03-16

    The U.S.-sponsored Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) program will require a light weight, efficient, and reliable power generation system capable of a 20+ year lifespan. This requirement has renewed interest in orbiter technological development. Sub-components of the orbiter system are the primary and secondary power conversion/heat rejection systems for both the proposed nuclear reactors and Brayton cycle heat engines. Brayton-cycle conversion technology has been identified as an excellent candidate for nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) power conversion systems. The conversion/rejection systems for these components typically utilize pumped molten metal as the heat transfer medium. Electromagnetic (EM) Annular Linear Induction Pumps (ALIPs) are ideal for this purpose as they can operate at moderate to high efficiency, at elevated temperature, do not involve moving parts (solid-state; long life), and require no bearings or seals. A parametric study was performed to develop a suite of ALIP preliminary designs capable of providing specified pressure and mass flow rate ranges for the proposed NaK(78) Brayton-cycle heat rejection loop. A limited study was also performed for the proposed lithium-cooled nuclear reactor heat transport loops; however, the design of these units is still in its infancy. Both studies were conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with the MHD Systems’ ALIP Design Code. The studies focused on designing ALIPs that displayed reasonably high efficiency and low source voltages as well as low mass and smallest geometric envelope.

  14. Electromagnetic interference with a bipolar pacemaker by an induction heating (IH) rice cooker.

    PubMed

    Nagatomo, Toshihisa; Abe, Haruhiko; Kohno, Ritsuko; Toyoshima, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Hiroshi; Kondo, Shoichi; Kabashima, Narutoshi; Takeuchi, Masaaki; Tamura, Masahito; Okazaki, Masahiro; Otsuji, Yutaka

    2009-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields may interfere with normal pacemaker function. Despite new device designs and bipolar leads, electromagnetic interference (EMI) remains a concern when pacemaker recipients are exposed to various household appliances. We report the observation of EMI by an induction heating (IH) rice cooker in a patient with sick sinus syndrome who was the recipient of a bipolar dual chamber-pacing system. Stored electrograms revealed episodes of inappropriate ventricular pacing, all coinciding with the opening of an IH rice cooker. Recipients of implantable medical devices must be warned to handle IH rice cookers with caution.

  15. Historical Review of Electric Household Appliances using Induction-Heating and Future Challenging Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Izuo; Yamashita, Hidekazu; Omori, Hideki; Nakaoka, Mutsuo

    This paper presents historical progress on technology evolution of the electric and electronic household appliances using the inverter, especially for Induction-Heating applications, which have been put in practical use as the desk-top cooker for the first time at home in 1974 until being applied to the rice cooker and the multi-burner cooking heater. It also describes the future innovative evolution of the power semiconductor switching devices and the inverter circuit topologies supporting its progressive developments. Looking back its progress, the future trends on consumer power electronics is discussed on the practical problem in the future.

  16. Magneto-inductive heating of water-based iron oxide ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselova, Iu. P.; Safronov, A. P.; Samatov, O. M.; Kurlyandskaya, G. V.

    2016-09-01

    Spherical magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) of iron oxide were fabricated by laser target evaporation technique. Water-based ferrofluids were prepared on the basis of obtained MNPs. Their structure and magnetic properties were studied by a number of methods including transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, SQUID-magnetometry and magnetic relaxation losses measurements. Magneto-inductive heating experiment showed the specific power loss value of 2 W/g for 1.8 kA/m alternating magnetic field of 214 kHz frequency. These parameters indicate that LTE MNPs are perspective materials for biomedical applications such as hyperthermia.

  17. Induction temperature of human heat shock factor is reprogrammed in a Drosophila cell environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clos, Joachim; Rabindran, Sridhar; Wisniewski, Jan; Wu, Carl

    1993-07-01

    HEAT shock factor (HSF)1,2, the transcriptional activator of eukaryotic heat shock genes, is induced to bind DNA by a monomer to trimer transition involving leucine zipper interactions3,4. Although this mode of regulation is shared among many eukaryotic species, there is variation in the temperature at which HSF binding activity is induced. We investigated the basis of this variation by analysing the response of a human HSF expressed in Drosophila cells and Drosophila HSF expressed in human cells. We report here that the temperature that induces DNA binding and trimerization of human HSF in Drosophila was decreased by ~10 °C to the induction temperature for the host cell, whereas Drosophila HSF expressed in human cells was constitutively active. The results indicate that the activity of HSF in vivo is not a simple function of the absolute environmental temperature.

  18. [Possible pathways of heat resistance induction in plant cells by exogenous nitrogen oxide].

    PubMed

    Karpets, Iu V; Kolupaev, Iu E; Iastreb, T O; Dmitriev, A P

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms of influence of exogenous nitrogen oxide (NO) on heat resistance of wheat coleoptiles have been studied. The treatment of plant cells with nitrogen oxide donor (sodium nitroprusside) resulted in the increase of superoxide anion-radical (O2*-) generation already after 10 minutes. The inhibitor of protein biosynthesis cycloheximide did not inhibit the O2*- generation by coleoptiles caused with the NO donor whereas the inhibitor of phosphatidic acid formation (butanol-1) partially inhibited it. The treatment of coleoptiles with the calcium ionophore (A23187) or activator of inositol cycle (inositol) compensated the suppression of butanol-1 effect on NO-dependent O2*- formation. Butanol-1 has also leveled the induction of coleoptiles heat resistance caused by the NO donor, whereas calcium ionophore and inositol almost completely removed the butanol-1 effect. The possible mechanisms of participation of reactive oxygen species, phosphatidic acid and calcium ions in the realization of NO physiological effects are discussed.

  19. Prototyping Energy Efficient Thermo-Magnetic & Induction Hardening for Heat Treat & Net Shape Forming Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Aquil Ahmad

    2012-08-03

    Within this project, Eaton undertook the task of bringing about significant impact with respect to sustainability. One of the major goals for the Department of Energy is to achieve energy savings with a corresponding reduction in carbon foot print. The use of a coupled induction heat treatment with high magnetic field heat treatment makes possible not only improved performance alloys, but with faster processing times and lower processing energy, as well. With this technology, substitution of lower cost alloys for more exotic alloys became a possibility; microstructure could be tailored for improved magnetic properties or wear resistance or mechanical performance, as needed. A prototype commercial unit has been developed to conduct processing of materials. Testing of this equipment has been conducted and results demonstrate the feasibility for industrial commercialization.

  20. Numerical simulation of thermal disposition with induction heating used for oncological hyperthermic treatment.

    PubMed

    Dughiero, F; Corazza, S

    2005-01-01

    Hyperthermia plays an important role in oncological therapies, most often being used in combination with radiotherapy, chemotherapy and immunotherapy. The success of this therapy is strongly dependent on the precision and control of thermal deposition. Hyperthermia based on induction heating, with thermally self-regulating thermoseeds inserted into the tumorous mass, is used for interstitial treatment. The technique was the subject of the numerical study presented in the paper. The analysis was carried out using coupled electromagnetic heating and thermo-fluid dynamic FEM simulations. During thermal deposition by induction heating of inserted seeds, the simulations estimated the thermal field inside and outside the tumour, as well as the sensitivity of the thermal field to variations regarding seed temperature, configuration and proximity to vessels. The method, for which accurate anatomical patient's information is essential, is suitable for providing useful qualitative and quantitative information about thermal transients and power density distribution for hyperthermic treatment. Several grid steps were analysed and compared. A 1 cm seed grid was resulted in good homogeneity and effectiveness of the thermal deposition. The cold spot effect caused by large vessels was demonstrated and quantified. Simulations of the heating of a tumorous mass in the liver showed that an indcutor generator operating at 200 kHz frequency and 500 A current, producing a pulsating magnetic field of H = 60 A cm(-1), was adequate for the treatment. The seeds that perform best among those tested (Nicu (28% Cu), PdNi (27.2% Ni), PdCo (6.15% Co) and ferrite core) were the PdNi (1 mm radius, 10 mm length), as they have a low Curie temperature (52 degrees C), which is the closest to the desired treatment temperature and thus reduces the risk of hot spots.

  1. An introduction to high frequency radioteletype systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnau, Roger R.

    1989-10-01

    A basic introductory guide is provided to modern High Frequency (HF) data communications systems. Described are modern commercial radioteletype systems, data communication protocols, and various secrets of the trade.

  2. Real-time, high frequency QRS electrocardiograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T. (Inventor); DePalma, Jude L. (Inventor); Moradi, Saeed (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Real time cardiac electrical data are received from a patient, manipulated to determine various useful aspects of the ECG signal, and displayed in real time in a useful form on a computer screen or monitor. The monitor displays the high frequency data from the QRS complex in units of microvolts, juxtaposed with a display of conventional ECG data in units of millivolts or microvolts. The high frequency data are analyzed for their root mean square (RMS) voltage values and the discrete RMS values and related parameters are displayed in real time. The high frequency data from the QRS complex are analyzed with imbedded algorithms to determine the presence or absence of reduced amplitude zones, referred to herein as RAZs. RAZs are displayed as go, no-go signals on the computer monitor. The RMS and related values of the high frequency components are displayed as time varying signals, and the presence or absence of RAZs may be similarly displayed over time.

  3. High power, high frequency component test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen; Krawczonek, Walter

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has available a high frequency, high power laboratory facility for testing various components of aerospace and/or terrestrial power systems. This facility is described here. All of its capabilities and potential applications are detailed.

  4. High frequency testing of rubber mounts.

    PubMed

    Vahdati, Nader; Saunders, L Ken Lauderbaugh

    2002-04-01

    Rubber and fluid-filled rubber engine mounts are commonly used in automotive and aerospace applications to provide reduced cabin noise and vibration, and/or motion accommodations. In certain applications, the rubber mount may operate at frequencies as high as 5000 Hz. Therefore, dynamic stiffness of the mount needs to be known in this frequency range. Commercial high frequency test machines are practically nonexistent, and the best high frequency test machine on the market is only capable of frequencies as high as 1000 Hz. In this paper, a high frequency test machine is described that allows test engineers to study the high frequency performance of rubber mounts at frequencies up to 5000 Hz.

  5. Overview of the Advanced High Frequency Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the competencies, selected areas of research and technology development activities, and current external collaborative efforts of the NASA Glenn Research Center's Advanced High Frequency Branch.

  6. Neural coding of high-frequency tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    Available evidence was presented indicating that neural discharges in the auditory nerve display characteristic periodicities in response to any tonal stimulus including high-frequency stimuli, and that this periodicity corresponds to the subjective pitch.

  7. Induction of a chicken small heat shock (stress) protein: evidence of multilevel posttranscriptional regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Edington, B V; Hightower, L E

    1990-01-01

    A novel form of regulation of expression of a vertebrate heat shock gene is described. A cDNA clone encoding human Hsp27 was shown to specifically recognize chicken Hsp23 RNA by Northern (RNA) blot analysis and hybrid-select translation. This probe was then used to measure chicken hsp23 gene activity in control and heat-stressed cells. The hsp23 gene(s) was transcriptionally active in non-heat-stressed cells, and its rate of transcription did not increase significantly upon heat shock. Cytoplasmic Hsp23 mRNA, which was metabolically very stable in nonstressed cells, underwent a fourfold increase in amount after a 1-h heat shock, resulting in a twofold increase in Hsp23 mRNA in polysomes. Hsp23 mRNA was relatively abundant and translationally active even in non-heat-shocked cells. Taken together, these data implicated posttranscriptional nuclear events as an important control point for induction of Hsp23 RNA transcripts. The protein half-life of Hsp23 increased from approximately 2 h in control cultures to 13 h in heat-shocked cells, revealing a second major control point. Hsp23 which was synthesized prior to heat shock also increased in stability and contributed to the overall accumulation of Hsp23 in heat-shocked cells. Cycloheximide had no effect on this change in Hsp23 half-life, while dactinomycin blocked the stabilization of Hsp23, suggesting a need for newly synthesized RNA. These data indicated that stabilization of Hsp23 protein and posttranscriptional nuclear events resulting in increased production of Hsp23 mRNA were primarily responsible for a 13-fold increase in the accumulation of newly synthesized Hsp23 after 1 h of heat shock. The regulation of the hsp23 gene is discussed in comparison with several other posttranscriptionally regulated genes, including the proto-oncogene c-fos, the developmentally regulated chicken delta-crystallin gene, and regulation of cellular gene expression by the proto-oncogene c-myc. Images PMID:2388629

  8. Purinergic Receptor Antagonists Inhibit Odorant-Induced Heat Shock Protein 25 Induction in Mouse Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hegg, Colleen C.; Lucero, Mary T.

    2010-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) accumulate in cells exposed to a variety of physiological and environmental factors, such as heat shock, oxidative stress, toxicants, and odorants. Ischemic, stressed, and injured cells release ATP in large amounts. Our hypothesis is that noxious stimulation (in this case, strong odorant) evokes the release of ATP in the olfactory epithelium (OE). Extracellular ATP, a signal of cellular stress, induces the expression of HSPs via purinergic receptors. In the present study, in vivo odorant exposure (heptanal or r-carvone) led to a selective induction of HSP25 in glia-like sustentacular cells in the Swiss Webster mouse OE, as previously shown in rats (Carr et al., 2001). Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo administration of purinergic receptor antagonists suramin and pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulfonic acid (PPADS) blocked the expression of HSP25 immunoreactivity in sustentacular cells. ATP released by acutely injured cells could act as an early signal of cell and tissue damage, causing HSP expression and initiating a stress signaling cascade to protect against further damage. Sustentacular cells have a high capacity to detoxify xenobiotics and thereby protect the olfactory epithelium from airborne pollutants. Thus, the robust, rapid induction of HSPs in sustentacular cells may help maintain the integrity of the OE during exposure to toxicants. PMID:16206165

  9. Electron heating during E-H transition in inductively coupled RF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, Th; Küllig, C.; Meichsner, J.

    2015-08-01

    A planar inductively coupled RF discharge (13.56 MHz) in argon and oxygen was exemplarily studied using space and phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The characteristic excitation rate pattern due to the electron heating during the sheath expansion was found for both gases in the E-mode. Furthermore, an intensive pattern in oxygen appears during the sheath collapse. This is associated with the electron heating caused by electric field reversal due to the strong electronegativity. The transition from the E- to the H-mode may be stepwise or continuous, depending on the gas type and total gas pressure. In the H-mode, significant differences in the excitation rate patterns exist. A broad and weakly modulated pattern is found over the RF cycle in argon, whereas in oxygen two separated patterns appear representing the electron heating for each half cycle. The reason may be the different excitation processes of the investigated resonant states and the influence of metastable argon atoms as well as attachment/detachment processes and dissociative recombination in oxygen. The E-H transition in oxygen at 5 Pa develops continuously and was studied in detail through the excitation rate. During the transition, the E- and H-mode are present and a hybrid mode was observed.

  10. Induction heating studies of dextran coated MgFe2O4 nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Khot, V M; Salunkhe, A B; Thorat, N D; Ningthoujam, R S; Pawar, S H

    2013-01-28

    MgFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles with sizes around 20 nm have been prepared by a combustion method and functionalized with dextran for their possible applications in magnetic particle hyperthermia. The induction heating study of these nanoparticles at different magnetic field amplitudes, from 6.7 kA m(-1) to 26.7 kA m(-1), showed self-heating temperature rise up to 50.25 °C and 73.32 °C (at 5 mg mL(-1) and 10 mg mL(-1) concentrations in water respectively) which was primarily thought to be due to hysteresis losses activated by an AC magnetic field. The dextran coated nanoparticles showed a maximum specific absorption rate (SAR) of about 85.57 W g(-1) at 26.7 kA m(-1) (265 kHz). Dextran coated nanoparticles at concentrations below 1.8 mg mL(-1) exhibit good viability above 86% on mice fibroblast L929 cells. The results suggest that combustion synthesized MgFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles coated with dextran can be used as potential heating agents in magnetic particle hyperthermia. Uncoated and dextran coated samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) and zeta potential-DLS studies.

  11. Production of pyrolytic liquids from industrial sewage sludges in an induction-heating reactor.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Tien; Chang, Jeng-Hung; Hsien, Kuo-Jung; Chang, Yuan-Ming

    2009-01-01

    With the application of induction-heating, the pyrolytic experiments have been carried out for three sewage sludges from the food processing factories in an externally heated fixed-bed reactor. The thermochemical characteristics of sludge samples were first analyzed. The results indicated that the calorific value had about 15 MJ/kg on an average, suggesting that it had a potential for biomass energy source. However, its nitrogen concentration was relatively high. From the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) curves, it showed that the pyrolysis reaction can be almost finished in the temperature range of 450-750 degrees C. The yields of resulting liquid and char products from the pyrolysis of sewage sludge were discussed for examining the effects of pyrolysis temperature (500-800 degrees C), heating rate (200-500 degrees C/min), and holding time (1-8 min). Overall, the variation of yield was not so significant in the experimental conditions for three sewage sludges. All results of the resulting liquid products analyzed by elemental analyzer, pH meter, Karl-Fischer moisture titrator and bomb calorimeter were in consistence with those analyses by FTIR spectroscopy. Furthermore, the pyrolysis liquid products contained large amounts of water (>73% by weight) mostly derived from the bound water in the biosludge feedstocks and the condensation reactions during the pyrolysis reaction, and fewer contents of oxygenated hydrocarbons composing of carbonyl and nitrogen-containing groups, resulting in low pH and low calorific values.

  12. Eutectic Bonding Utilizing Radio Frequency Induction Heating for Fabricating Vertical Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunmi; Kim, Areum; Cui, Yinhua; Chae, Su Jin; Nam, Minwoo; Kwon, Soon Hyeong; Cha, Yong Won; Pyo, Sung Gyu

    2015-11-01

    Vertical light-emitting diodes (VLEDs) have attracted considerable attention owing to their improved thermal, electrical, and optical performance compared to conventional LEDs. To fabricate VLEDs, a bonding technique is required following laser lift-off. Eutectic bonding techniques are preferred owing to their low-heat mechanism and production safety. However, the conventional resistance heating method for eutectic bonding process, the extremely longer process time becomes a problem such as cost rise, wapage. In this study, the thermal efficiency was measured according to the diameter of the coil in order to optimize the eutectic bonding of the RF induction heating method in order to solve this problem. We confirmed that successful eutectic bonding is possible with less than 30 min processing using Sn-Glass. In addition, Au (20 wt%)/Sn (80 wt%) alloy, a mainly used the eutectic bonding interlayer material for VLEDs, can also be used as an interlayer to provide void-free eutectic bonding in less than 30 min.

  13. A high frequency silicon pressure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahng, S. K.; Gross, C.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical and design considerations as well as fabrication and experimental work involved in the development of high-frequency silicon pressure sensors with an ultra-small diaphragm are discussed. A sensor is presented with a rectangular diaphragm of 0.0127 cm x 0.0254 cm x 1.06 micron; the sensor has a natural frequency of 625 kHz and a sensitivity of 0.82 mv/v-psi. High-frequency results from shock tube testing and low-frequency (less than 50 kHz) comparison with microphones are given.

  14. Metrology For High-Frequency Nanoelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Wallis, T. Mitch; Imtiaz, Atif; Nembach, Hans T.; Rice, Paul; Kabos, Pavel

    2007-09-26

    Two metrological tools for high-frequency measurements of nanoscale systems are described: (i) two/N-port analysis of nanoscale devices as well as (ii) near-field scanning microwave microscopy (NSMM) for materials characterization. Calibrated two/N-port measurements were made on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) welded to a coplanar waveguide. Significant changes in the extracted high-frequency electrical response of the welded MWNT were measured when the contacts to the MWNT were modified. Additionally, NSMM was used to characterize films of nanotube soot deposited on copper and sapphire substrates. The material properties of the films showed a strong dependence on the substrate material.

  15. High frequency plasma generator for ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goede, H.; Divergilio, W. F.; Fosnight, V. V.; Komatsu, G.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a program to experimentally develop two new types of plasma generators for 30 cm electrostatic argon ion thrusters are presented. The two plasma generating methods selected for this study were by radio frequency induction (RFI), operating at an input power frequency of 1 MHz, and by electron cyclotron heating (ECH) at an operating frequency of 5.0 GHz. Both of these generators utilize multiline cusp permanent magnet configurations for plasma confinement and beam profile optimization. The program goals were to develop a plasma generator possessing the characteristics of high electrical efficiency (low eV/ion) and simplicity of operation while maintaining the reliability and durability of the conventional hollow cathode plasma sources. The RFI plasma generator has achieved minimum discharge losses of 120 eV/ion while the ECH generator has obtained 145 eV/ion, assuming a 90% ion optical transparency of the electrostatic acceleration system. Details of experimental tests with a variety of magnet configurations are presented.

  16. New alloys and multilayer configuration of them to get self-regulated temperature cookware (SRTC) in induction heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waeckerlé, Thierry; Fraissé, Herve; Boulogne, Bruno; Spire, Sjean Luc

    2006-09-01

    It is pointed out in this paper that the concept of self-regulating temperature cookware is valid for cooking by induction heating. This provides no overheating, improved heating rate, self-adjusted cooking temperature and further improved energy efficiency. To succeed in this, a 3-ply cladded metallic structure made of an inner stainless steel layer, a thick aluminium layer in the centre part, and an outer dedicated low-Curie-point layer made of a new FeNiCr alloy is used. The magnetic coupling between induction heater and the new structure is discussed.

  17. Accelerated carbide spheroidisation of 1.2343 tool steel by induction heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlouhý, J.; Kövér, M.

    2015-12-01

    Tool steels undergo spheroidisation or soft annealing to enhance machinability and cold formability. Conventional soft annealing takes several hours. The final microstructure is composed of globular carbides in a ferritic matrix. We present an alternative process of carbide spheroidisation and steel softening. Accelerated carbide spheroidisation and refinement (ASR) was achieved by induction heating at temperatures close to the A1 temperature. The spheroidised structure was obtained in less than 5 minutes. The carbide particles that formed during the ASR were significantly finer than for the conventional soft annealing. The hardness after ASR was higher than the hardness after soft annealing because of the dispersion strengthening by finer and more densely distributed carbide particles. On the other hand, the fine structure is favourable for hardening. It enables smaller austenite grains and martensite laths to be obtained.

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in bio-crudes from induction-heating pyrolysis of biomass wastes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Tien; Mi, Hsiao-Hsuan; Chang, Yuan-Ming; Yang, Shyh-Yu; Chang, Jeng-Hung

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare the bio-crudes from agricultural wastes (i.e., rice straw, rice husk, sugarcane bagasse and coconut shell) by using induction-heating pyrolysis at specified conditions. The quantitative analysis of 21 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in bio-crudes examined using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) revealed that the PAHs in bio-crudes were primarily dominant in the low molecular weight (LMW) PAHs, including naphthalene (1.10-2.45 mg/L) and acenaphthene (0.72-7.61 mg/L). However, by considering carcinogenic potency, the bio-crudes from rice husk and sugarcane bagasse contained higher contents of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) (0.52 and 0.92 mg/L, respectively) as compared to those from rice straw and coconut shell.

  19. Numerical design of induction heating in the PVT growth of SiC crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Juan; Chen, Xuejiang; Li, Yuan

    2014-09-01

    A 2-D numerical global model was applied to study effects of induction heating system on silicon carbide single crystal growth by a finite element method. Models with different coil radii and different electrical frequencies were carried out to investigate the relationship between coil design and SiC crystal growth process while the temperature of the monitoring point was fixed at about 2300 K. The predicted growth rate along the substrate surface was also compared and discussed. The results showed that the temperature distribution inside the furnace and the growth rate were affected by coil radius and electrical frequency. Finally, based on the analysis of simulation results, one reasonable range of coil radius and electrical frequency compromising a balance between higher growth rate, lower electrical power consumption, lower thermal stress in grown crystals and more stable operation of SiC powder was obtained.

  20. Magnetically driven three-dimensional manipulation and inductive heating of magnetic-dispersion containing metal alloys

    PubMed Central

    Calabro, Joshua D.; Huang, Xu; Lewis, Brian G.; Ramirez, Ainissa G.

    2010-01-01

    Fundamental to the development of three-dimensional microelectronic fabrication is a material that enables vertical geometries. Here we show low-melting-point metal alloys containing iron dispersions that can be remotely manipulated by magnetic fields to create vertical geometries and thus enable novel three-dimensional assemblies. These iron dispersions enhance the mechanical properties needed for strong, reliable interconnects without significantly altering the electrical properties of the alloys. Additionally, these iron dispersions act as susceptors for magnetic induction heating, allowing the rapid melting of these novel alloys at temperatures lower than those usually reported for conventional metal alloys. By localizing high temperatures and by reducing temperature excursions, the materials and methods described have potential in a variety of device fabrication applications. PMID:20194786

  1. Induction of Rhizopus oryzae germination under starvation using host metabolites increases spore susceptibility to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Turgeman, Tidhar; Kakongi, Nathan; Schneider, Avishai; Vinokur, Yakov; Teper-Bamnolker, Paula; Carmeli, Shmuel; Levy, Maggie; Skory, Christopher D; Lichter, Amnon; Eshel, Dani

    2014-03-01

    Sweetpotato is a nutritional source worldwide. Soft rot caused by Rhizopus spp. is a major limiting factor in the storage of produce, rendering it potentially unsafe for human consumption. In this study, Rhizopus oryzae was used to develop a concept of postharvest disease control by weakening the pathogen through induction of spore germination under starvation conditions. We isolated the sweetpotato active fractions (SPAFs) that induce spore germination and used them at a low dose to enhance spore weakening caused by starvation. Germination in SPAF at 1 mg/ml weakened the pathogen spores by delaying their ability to form colonies on rich media and by increasing their sensitivity to heat stress. The weakening effect was also supported by reduced metabolic activity, as detected by Alarmar Blue fluorescent dye assays. Spores incubated with SPAF at 1 mg/ml showed DNA fragmentation in some of their nuclei, as observed by TUNEL assay. In addition, these spores exhibited changes in ultrastructural morphology (i.e., shrinkage of germ tubes, nucleus deformation, and vacuole formation) which are hallmarks of programmed cell death. We suggest that induction of spore germination under starvation conditions increases their susceptibility to stress and, therefore, might be considered a new strategy for pathogen control.

  2. Advanced Extremely High Frequency Satellite (AEHF)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-261 Advanced Extremely High Frequency Satellite (AEHF) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget...Office Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To Be

  3. Psychophysical tuning curves at very high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Ifat; Plack, Christopher J.

    2005-10-01

    For most normal-hearing listeners, absolute thresholds increase rapidly above about 16 kHz. One hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of the hearing-threshold curve is imposed by the transmission characteristics of the middle ear, which attenuates the sound input [Masterton et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 45, 966-985 (1969)]. An alternative hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of hearing is imposed by the tonotopicity of the cochlea [Ruggero and Temchin, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 13206-13210 (2002)]. The aim of this study was to test these hypotheses. Forward-masked psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) were derived for signal frequencies of 12-17.5 kHz. For the highest signal frequencies, the high-frequency slopes of some PTCs were steeper than the slope of the hearing-threshold curve. The results also show that the human auditory system displays frequency selectivity for characteristic frequencies (CFs) as high as 17 kHz, above the frequency at which absolute thresholds begin to increase rapidly. The findings suggest that, for CFs up to 17 kHz, the high-frequency limitation in humans is imposed in part by the middle-ear attenuation, and not by the tonotopicity of the cochlea.

  4. Landau damping with high frequency impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz,M.

    2009-05-04

    Coupled bunch longitudinal stability in the presence of high frequency impedances is considered. A frequency domain technique is developed and compared with simulations. The frequency domain technique allows for absolute stability tests and is applied to the problem of longitudinal stability in RHIC with the new 56 MHz RF system.

  5. A bipartite operator interacts with a heat shock element to mediate early meiotic induction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae HSP82

    SciTech Connect

    Szent-Gyorgyi, C.

    1995-12-01

    This report seeks to characterize the activation of meiotic gene in terms of cis-acting DNA elements and their associated factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It was found that vegetative repression and meiotic induction depend on interactions of the promoter-proximal heat shock element with a nearby bipartite repression element. The experiments described explore how two different regulatory pathways induce transcription by stimulating a single classical activation element, a nonspecific heat shock element. 81 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Brazed Diamond Micropowder Bur Fabricated by Supersonic Frequency Induction Heating for Precision Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Bojiang; Lou, Jianpeng; Pang, Qian

    2014-04-01

    The common brazed diamond micropowder bur fabricated in a vacuum furnace produces an even brazing alloy surface. The small brazed diamond grits show low outcropping from the brazing alloy surface, and the chip space between them is small. The bur shows a low grinding efficiency and poor heat dissipation. In this study, a brazed diamond micropowder bur was fabricated by supersonic frequency induction heating. The method afforded a fluctuant surface on the brazing alloy. The brazed diamond grits with an outcropping height distributed uniformly on the fluctuant surface. The fluctuant surface showed a certain chip space. These characteristics of the tool increased the grinding efficiency and decreased the temperature of the grinding arc area. The roughness R a of the ceramic tile surface trimmed by the tool cylinder was between 0.09 and 0.12 μm. In the first 90 min, the decrease in the weight of the ceramic tile ground by the tool cylinder was higher than that ground by the tool fabricated in a vacuum furnace. When the ceramic tile was cylindrically ground, the temperature of the grinding arc area measured using a thermocouple remained below 70 °C.

  7. A power-efficient thermocycler based on induction heating for DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Debjani; Venkataraman, V.; Mohan, K. Naga; Chandra, H. Sharat; Natarajan, Vasant

    2004-09-01

    We have built a thermocycler based on the principles of induction heating for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of target sequences in DNA samples of interest. The cycler has an average heating rate of ˜0.8 °C/s and a cooling rate of ˜0.5 °C/s, and typically takes ˜4 h to complete a 40-cycle PCR protocol. It is power-efficient (˜6 W per reaction tube), micro-processor controlled, and can be adapted for battery operation. Using this instrument, we have successfully amplified a 350 bp segment from a plasmid and SRY, the human sex determining gene, which occurs as a single-copy sequence in genomic DNA of human males. The PCR products from this thermocycler are comparable to those obtained by the use of commercially available machines. Its easy front-end operation, low-power design, portability and low cost makes it suitable for diagnostic field applications of PCR.

  8. Initial Operation of the Miniaturized Inductively Heated Plasma Generator IPG6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dropmann, Michael; Herdrich, Georg; Laufer, Rene; Koch, Helmut; Gomringer, Chris; Cook, Mike; Schmoke, Jimmy; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2012-10-01

    In close collaboration between the Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics and Engineering Research (CASPER) at Baylor University, Texas, and the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, two plasma wind tunnel facilities of similar type have been established using the inductively heated plasma source IPG6 which is based on proven IRS designs. The facility at Baylor University (IPG6-B) works at a frequency of 13.56 MHz and a maximum power of 15 kW. A vacuum pump of 160m^3/h in combination with a butterfly valve allows pressure control in a wide range. First experiments have been conducted with Air, O2 and N2 as working gases and volumetric flow rates of up to 14 L/min at pressures of a few 100 Pa, although pressures below 1 Pa are achievable at lower flow rates. The maximum tested electric power so far was 8 kW. Plasma powers and total pressures in the plasma jet have been obtained. In the near future the set up of additional diagnostics, the use of other gases (i.e. H2, He), and the integration of a dust particle accelerator are planned. The intended fields of research are basic investigation in thermo-chemistry and plasma radiation, space plasma environments and high heat fluxes e.g. in fusion devices or during atmospheric entry of spacecraft.

  9. Simulation of Induction Heat Treatment of Steel Articles with the Help of ELTA 6.0 and 2DELTA Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukanin, V. A.; Zenkov, A. E.; Ivanov, A. N.; Nemkov, V. S.

    2016-11-01

    Processes of induction heat treatment of steel articles are studied with the help of ELTA and 2DELTA software for electrothermal analysis. A novel process of combined hardening of extra heavy balanced drill pipes is studied as an example. The results of the computations are confirmed by experimental data.

  10. Vitrification of high level nuclear waste inside ambient temperature disposal containers using inductive heating: The SMILE system

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.; Reich, M.; Barletta, R.

    1996-03-01

    A new approach, termed SMILE (Small Module Inductively Loaded Energy), for the vitrification of high level nuclear wastes (HLW) is described. Present vitrification systems liquefy the HLW solids and associated frit material in large high temperature melters. The molten mix is then poured into small ({approximately}1 m{sup 3}) disposal canisters, where it solidifies and cools. SMILE eliminates the separate, large high temperature melter. Instead, the BLW solids and frit melt inside the final disposal containers, using inductive heating. The contents then solidify and cool in place. The SMILE modules and the inductive heating process are designed so that the outer stainless can of the module remains at near ambient temperature during the process cycle. Module dimensions are similar to those of present disposal containers. The can is thermally insulated from the high temperature inner container by a thin layer of refractory alumina firebricks. The inner container is a graphite crucible lined with a dense alumina refractory that holds the HLW and fiit materials. After the SMILE module is loaded with a slurry of HLW and frit solids, an external multi-turn coil is energized with 30-cycle AC current. The enclosing external coil is the primary of a power transformer, with the graphite crucible acting as a single turn ``secondary.`` The induced current in the ``secondary`` heats the graphite, which in turn heats the HLW and frit materials. The first stage of the heating process is carried out at an intermediate temperature to drive off remnant liquid water and water of hydration, which takes about 1 day. The small fill/vent tube to the module is then sealed off and the interior temperature raised to the vitrification range, i.e., {approximately}1200C. Liquefaction is complete after approximately 1 day. The inductive heating then ceases and the module slowly loses heat to the environment, allowing the molten material to solidify and cool down to ambient temperature.

  11. Turbulence in unsteady flow at high frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Gary D.

    1990-01-01

    Turbulent flows subjected to oscillations of the mean flow were simulated using a large-eddy simulation computer code for flow in a channel. The objective of the simulations was to provide better understanding of the effects of time-dependent disturbances on the turbulence of a boundary layer and of the underlying physical phenomena regarding the basic interaction between the turbulence and external disturbances. The results confirmed that turbulence is sensitive to certain ranges of frequencies of disturbances. However, no direct connection was found between the frequency of imposed disturbances and the characteristic 'burst' frequency of turbulence. New insight into the nature of turbulence at high frequencies was found. Viscous phenomena near solid walls were found to be the dominant influence for high-frequency perturbations.

  12. High-current, high-frequency capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1983-06-01

    The NASA Lewis high-current, high-frequency capacitor development program was conducted under a contract with Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., San Diego, California. The program was started to develop power components for space power systems. One of the components lacking was a high-power, high-frequency capacitor. Some of the technology developed in this program may be directly usable in an all-electric airplane. The materials used in the capacitor included the following: the film is polypropylene, the impregnant is monoisopropyl biphenyl, the conductive epoxy is Emerson and Cuming Stycast 2850 KT, the foil is aluminum, the case is stainless steel (304), and the electrode is a modified copper-ceramic.

  13. High-current, high-frequency capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The NASA Lewis high-current, high-frequency capacitor development program was conducted under a contract with Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., San Diego, California. The program was started to develop power components for space power systems. One of the components lacking was a high-power, high-frequency capacitor. Some of the technology developed in this program may be directly usable in an all-electric airplane. The materials used in the capacitor included the following: the film is polypropylene, the impregnant is monoisopropyl biphenyl, the conductive epoxy is Emerson and Cuming Stycast 2850 KT, the foil is aluminum, the case is stainless steel (304), and the electrode is a modified copper-ceramic.

  14. High Frequency Guided Wave Virtual Array SAFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, R.; Pardini, A.; Diaz, A.

    2003-03-01

    The principles of the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) are generalized for application to high frequency plate wave signals. It is shown that a flaw signal received in long-range plate wave propagation can be analyzed as if the signals were measured by an infinite array of transducers in an unbounded medium. It is shown that SAFT-based flaw sizing can be performed with as few as three or less actual measurement positions.

  15. Apparatus for measuring high frequency currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagmann, Mark J. (Inventor); Sutton, John F. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring high frequency currents includes a non-ferrous core current probe that is coupled to a wide-band transimpedance amplifier. The current probe has a secondary winding with a winding resistance that is substantially smaller than the reactance of the winding. The sensitivity of the current probe is substantially flat over a wide band of frequencies. The apparatus is particularly useful for measuring exposure of humans to radio frequency currents.

  16. [High-frequency oscillatory ventilation in neonates].

    PubMed

    2002-09-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) may be considered as an alternative in the management of severe neonatal respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. In patients with diffuse pulmonary disease, HFOV can applied as a rescue therapy with a high lung volume strategy to obtain adequate alveolar recruitment. We review the mechanisms of gas exchange, as well as the indications, monitoring and special features of the use HVOF in the neonatal period.

  17. Extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics.

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Vigliano, David; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Williams, Jeffery Thomas; Wouters, Gregg A.; Bacon, Larry Donald; Mar, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to understand the fundamental physics of extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics. To accomplish this objective, we produced models, conducted simulations, and performed measurements to identify the mechanisms of effects as frequency increases into the millimeter-wave regime. Our purpose was to answer the questions, 'What are the tradeoffs between coupling, transmission losses, and device responses as frequency increases?', and, 'How high in frequency do effects on electronic systems continue to occur?' Using full wave electromagnetics codes and a transmission-line/circuit code, we investigated how extremely high-frequency RF propagates on wires and printed circuit board traces. We investigated both field-to-wire coupling and direct illumination of printed circuit boards to determine the significant mechanisms for inducing currents at device terminals. We measured coupling to wires and attenuation along wires for comparison to the simulations, looking at plane-wave coupling as it launches modes onto single and multiconductor structures. We simulated the response of discrete and integrated circuit semiconductor devices to those high-frequency currents and voltages, using SGFramework, the open-source General-purpose Semiconductor Simulator (gss), and Sandia's Charon semiconductor device physics codes. This report documents our findings.

  18. Online induction heating for determination of isotope composition of woody stem water with laser spectrometry: A methods assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lazarus, Brynne E.; Germino, Matthew; Vander Veen, Jessica L.

    2016-01-01

    Application of stable isotopes of water to studies of plant–soil interactions often requires a substantial preparatory step of extracting water from samples without fractionating isotopes. Online heating is an emerging approach for this need, but is relatively untested and major questions of how to best deliver standards and assess interference by organics have not been evaluated. We examined these issues in our application of measuring woody stem xylem of sagebrush using a Picarro laser spectrometer with online induction heating. We determined (1) effects of cryogenic compared to induction-heating extraction, (2) effects of delivery of standards on filter media compared to on woody stem sections, and (3) spectral interference from organic compounds for these approaches (and developed a technique to do so). Our results suggest that matching sample and standard media improves accuracy, but that isotopic values differ with the extraction method in ways that are not due to spectral interference from organics.

  19. Online induction heating for determination of isotope composition of woody stem water with laser spectrometry: a methods assessment.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Brynne E; Germino, Matthew J; Vander Veen, Jessica L

    2016-06-01

    Application of stable isotopes of water to studies of plant-soil interactions often requires a substantial preparatory step of extracting water from samples without fractionating isotopes. Online heating is an emerging approach for this need, but is relatively untested and major questions of how to best deliver standards and assess interference by organics have not been evaluated. We examined these issues in our application of measuring woody stem xylem of sagebrush using a Picarro laser spectrometer with online induction heating. We determined (1) effects of cryogenic compared to induction-heating extraction, (2) effects of delivery of standards on filter media compared to on woody stem sections, and (3) spectral interference from organic compounds for these approaches (and developed a technique to do so). Our results suggest that matching sample and standard media improves accuracy, but that isotopic values differ with the extraction method in ways that are not due to spectral interference from organics.

  20. Two-Stage Soft-Switching High-Frequency Inverter with Simple PFC Function for Consumer IH Cooking Appliances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Yuki; Hiraki, Eiji; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Sadakata, Hideki; Fujita, Atsushi; Omori, Hideki; Nakaoka, Mutsuo

    In recent years, consumer induction-heating (IH) cooking appliances have grown increasingly popular because of their easy cleaning, high efficiency, safety, and controllability. IH food cooking system for consumer home use are indispensable to heat various metallic pans, such as aluminum, copper, stainless steel, and iron cast for further diffusing. Furthermore, these appliances have to satisfy the utility AC grid harmonics regulations of IEC61000-3-2. To meet these requirements, this paper proposes a two-stage soft-switching high-frequency inverter with simple PFC function that is suitable for consumer IH cooking appliances. The proposed system comprises a soft-switching chopper based boost PFC converter with passive snubber and phase-shifted PWM controlled ZVZCS high-frequency inverter. In order to satisfy the utility AC grid current harmonic regulations, a simple PFC control technique with discontinuous current mode is introduced. This technique as well as the fundamental operating performances of the proposed IH system is tested. The effectiveness of proposed IH system is substantially proved from a practical point of view on the basis of the experimental results.

  1. Rapid localized heating of graphene coating on a silicon mold by induction for precision molding of polymer optics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Zhou, Wenchen; Yi, Allen Y

    2017-04-01

    In compression molding of polymer optical components with micro/nanoscale surface features, rapid heating of the mold surface is critical for the implementation of this technology for large-scale applications. In this Letter, a novel method of a localized rapid heating process is reported. This process is based on induction heating of a thin conductive coating deposited on a silicon mold. Since the graphene coating is very thin (∼45  nm), a high heating rate of 10∼20°C/s can be achieved by employing a 1200 W 30 kHz electrical power unit. Under this condition, the graphene-coated surface and the polymer substrate can be heated above the polymer's glass transition temperature within 30 s and subsequently cooled down to room temperature within several tens of seconds after molding, resulting in an overall thermal cycle of about 3 min or shorter. The feasibility of this process was validated by fabrication of optical gratings, micropillar matrices, and microlens arrays on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrates with very high precision. The uniformity and surface geometries of the replicated optical elements are evaluated using an optical profilometer, a diffraction test setup, and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor built with a molded PMMA microlens array. Compared with the conventional bulk heating molding process, this novel rapid localized induction heating process could improve replication efficiency with better geometrical fidelity.

  2. Possible involvement of phosphorylated heat-shock factor-1 in changes in heat shock protein 72 induction in the failing rat heart following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Marunouchi, Tetsuro; Murata, Mao; Takagi, Norio; Tanonaka, Kouichi

    2013-01-01

    It is supposed that an increase in the level of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) in the failing heart would be beneficial for reducing the myocardial damage. However, the induction of HSP72 after an exposure to heat shock is blunted in the failing rat heart following myocardial infarction. In this study, to clarify the possible mechanisms underlying this reduction in the ability for HSP72 induction in the failing heart, the possible involvement of heat-shock factor-1 (HSF1), an HSP transcription factor, in this reduction was examined. When hemodynamic parameters of rats with myocardial infarction 8 weeks after coronary artery ligation were measured, the animals showed the signs of chronic heart failure. The HSF1 content was increased in the viable myocardium in the failing heart. The ability to induce cardiac HSP72 was reduced after an exposure to hyperthermia. The level of HSF1 in the cytosolic fraction from the failing heart with or without exposure to hyperthermia was increased, whereas that of HSF1 in the nuclear fraction was reduced. In the failing heart, the level of HSF1 on its serine 303 (Ser303) residue, which phosphorylation represses HSF1, was increased. These findings suggest that HSF1 translocation from the cytosol into the nucleus was attenuated after an exposure to hyperthermia and that an increase in the phosphorylation of HSF1 Ser303 was involved in the impairment of heat shock-induced HSP72 induction in the failing heart following myocardial infarction.

  3. Examination of Buoyancy-Reduction Effect in Induction-Heating Cookers by Using 3D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonetsu, Daigo; Tanaka, Kazufumi; Hara, Takehisa

    In recent years, induction-heating (IH) cookers that can be used to heat nonmagnetic metals such as aluminum have been produced. Occasionally, a light pan moves on a glass plate due to buoyancy when heated by an IH cooker. In some IH cookers, an aluminum plate is mounted between the glass plate and the coil in order to reduce the buoyancy effect. The objective of this research is to evaluate the buoyancy-reduction effect and the heating effect of buoyancy-reduction plates. Eddy current analysis is carried out by 3D finite element method, and the electromagnetic force and the heat distribution on the heating plate are calculated. After this calculation is performed, the temperature distribution of the heating plate is calculated by heat transfer analysis. It is found that the shape, area, and the position of the buoyancy reduction plate strongly affect the buoyancy and the heat distribution. The impact of the shape, area, and position of the buoyancy reduction plate was quantified. The phenomena in the heating were elucidated qualitatively.

  4. Induction heating pure vapor source of high temperature melting point materials on electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Kutsumi, Osamu; Kato, Yushi; Matsui, Yuuki; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Uchida, Takashi; Yoshida, Yoshikazu; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2010-02-01

    Multicharged ions that are needed are produced from solid pure material with high melting point in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source. We develop an evaporator by using induction heating (IH) with multilayer induction coil, which is made from bare molybdenum or tungsten wire without water cooling and surrounding the pure vaporized material. We optimize the shapes of induction coil and vaporized materials and operation of rf power supply. We conduct experiment to investigate the reproducibility and stability in the operation and heating efficiency. IH evaporator produces pure material vapor because materials directly heated by eddy currents have no contact with insulated materials, which are usually impurity gas sources. The power and the frequency of the induction currents range from 100 to 900 W and from 48 to 23 kHz, respectively. The working pressure is about 10(-4)-10(-3) Pa. We measure the temperature of the vaporized materials with different shapes, and compare them with the result of modeling. We estimate the efficiency of the IH vapor source. We are aiming at the evaporator's higher melting point material than that of iron.

  5. Ultra-high vacuum compatible induction-heated rod casting furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, A.; Neubauer, A.; Münzer, W.; Regnat, A.; Benka, G.; Meven, M.; Pedersen, B.; Pfleiderer, C.

    2016-06-01

    We report the design of a radio-frequency induction-heated rod casting furnace that permits the preparation of polycrystalline ingots of intermetallic compounds under ultra-high vacuum compatible conditions. The central part of the system is a bespoke water-cooled Hukin crucible supporting a casting mold. Depending on the choice of the mold, typical rods have a diameter between 6 mm and 10 mm and a length up to 90 mm, suitable for single-crystal growth by means of float-zoning. The setup is all-metal sealed and may be baked out. We find that the resulting ultra-high vacuum represents an important precondition for processing compounds with high vapor pressures under a high-purity argon atmosphere up to 3 bars. Using the rod casting furnace, we succeeded to prepare large high-quality single crystals of two half-Heusler compounds, namely, the itinerant antiferromagnet CuMnSb and the half-metallic ferromagnet NiMnSb.

  6. Ultra-high vacuum compatible induction-heated rod casting furnace.

    PubMed

    Bauer, A; Neubauer, A; Münzer, W; Regnat, A; Benka, G; Meven, M; Pedersen, B; Pfleiderer, C

    2016-06-01

    We report the design of a radio-frequency induction-heated rod casting furnace that permits the preparation of polycrystalline ingots of intermetallic compounds under ultra-high vacuum compatible conditions. The central part of the system is a bespoke water-cooled Hukin crucible supporting a casting mold. Depending on the choice of the mold, typical rods have a diameter between 6 mm and 10 mm and a length up to 90 mm, suitable for single-crystal growth by means of float-zoning. The setup is all-metal sealed and may be baked out. We find that the resulting ultra-high vacuum represents an important precondition for processing compounds with high vapor pressures under a high-purity argon atmosphere up to 3 bars. Using the rod casting furnace, we succeeded to prepare large high-quality single crystals of two half-Heusler compounds, namely, the itinerant antiferromagnet CuMnSb and the half-metallic ferromagnet NiMnSb.

  7. DNA in nanopores: negative capacitance and delta-relaxation at high frequency.

    PubMed

    Mandal, S K

    2006-05-01

    We measured the high frequency dielectric relaxation behavior of DNA molecules confined in nanopores of polycarbonate membrane. The data revealed the existence of a critical frequency omega(c) approximately GHz at which the ac conductivity showed delta-relaxation. Interestingly, the DNA molecules also exhibited a crossover from positive to negative capacitance corresponding to omega(c). The negative capacitance at the critical frequency suggested a strong inductive behavior of DNA molecules in the high frequency regime. The results are interpreted in terms of the confined geometry of the DNA molecules in the nanopores. The interfacial water H-bonded to DNA played a crucial role in determining the high frequency relaxation of DNA molecules. The results indicated that the DNA in nanopores could be designed for application in high frequency bandpass/notch filters.

  8. Influence on cell death of high frequency motion of magnetic nanoparticles during magnetic hyperthermia experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallali, N.; Clerc, P.; Fourmy, D.; Gigoux, V.; Carrey, J.

    2016-07-01

    Studies with transplanted tumors in animals and clinical trials have provided the proof-of-concept of magnetic hyperthermia (MH) therapy of cancers using iron oxide nanoparticles. Interestingly, in several studies, the application of an alternating magnetic field (AMF) to tumor cells having internalized and accumulated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into their lysosomes can induce cell death without detectable temperature increase. To explain these results, among other hypotheses, it was proposed that cell death could be due to the high-frequency translational motion of MNPs under the influence of the AMF gradient generated involuntarily by most inductors. Such mechanical actions of MNPs might cause cellular damages and participate in the induction of cell death under MH conditions. To test this hypothesis, we developed a setup maximizing this effect. It is composed of an anti-Helmholtz coil and two permanent magnets, which produce an AMF gradient and a superimposed static MF. We have measured the MNP heating power and treated tumor cells by a standard AMF and by an AMF gradient, on which was added or not a static magnetic field. We showed that the presence of a static magnetic field prevents MNP heating and cell death in standard MH conditions. The heating power of MNPs in an AMF gradient is weak, position-dependent, and related to the presence of a non-zero AMF. Under an AMF gradient and a static field, no MNP heating and cell death were measured. Consequently, the hypothesis that translational motions could be involved in cell death during MH experiments is ruled out by our experiments.

  9. High-frequency Rayleigh-wave method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xu, Y.; Luo, Y.; Chen, C.; Liu, J.; Ivanov, J.; Zeng, C.

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency (???2 Hz) Rayleigh-wave data acquired with a multichannel recording system have been utilized to determine shear (S)-wave velocities in near-surface geophysics since the early 1980s. This overview article discusses the main research results of high-frequency surface-wave techniques achieved by research groups at the Kansas Geological Survey and China University of Geosciences in the last 15 years. The multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method is a non-invasive acoustic approach to estimate near-surface S-wave velocity. The differences between MASW results and direct borehole measurements are approximately 15% or less and random. Studies show that simultaneous inversion with higher modes and the fundamental mode can increase model resolution and an investigation depth. The other important seismic property, quality factor (Q), can also be estimated with the MASW method by inverting attenuation coefficients of Rayleigh waves. An inverted model (S-wave velocity or Q) obtained using a damped least-squares method can be assessed by an optimal damping vector in a vicinity of the inverted model determined by an objective function, which is the trace of a weighted sum of model-resolution and model-covariance matrices. Current developments include modeling high-frequency Rayleigh-waves in near-surface media, which builds a foundation for shallow seismic or Rayleigh-wave inversion in the time-offset domain; imaging dispersive energy with high resolution in the frequency-velocity domain and possibly with data in an arbitrary acquisition geometry, which opens a door for 3D surface-wave techniques; and successfully separating surface-wave modes, which provides a valuable tool to perform S-wave velocity profiling with high-horizontal resolution. ?? China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009.

  10. The LASI high-frequency ellipticity system

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    A high-frequency, high-resolution, electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (5) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (6) visualization of complex structures during the survey.

  11. Inverter design for high frequency power distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A class of simple resonantly commutated inverters are investigated for use in a high power (100 KW - 1000 KW) high frequency (10 KHz - 20 KHz) AC power distribution system. The Mapham inverter is found to provide a unique combination of large thyristor turn-off angle and good utilization factor, much better than an alternate 'current-fed' inverter. The effects of loading the Mapham inverter entirely with rectifier loads are investigated by simulation and with an experimental 3 KW 20 KHz inverter. This inverter is found to be well suited to a power system with heavy rectifier loading.

  12. The LASI high-frequency ellipticity system

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    A high-frequency, high-resolution, electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (5) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (6) visualization of complex structures during the survey.

  13. High frequency dynamic pressure calibration technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, P. A.; Zasimowich, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    A high frequency dynamic calibration technique for pressure transducers has been developed using a siren pressure generator (SPG). The SPG is an inlet-area-modulated device generating oscillating waveforms with dynamic pressure amplitudes up to 58.6 kPa (8.5 psi) in a frequency range of 1 to 10 kHz. A description of the generator, its operating characteristics and instrumentation used for pressure amplitude and frequency measurements is given. Waveform oscillographs and spectral analysis of the pressure transducers' output signals are presented.

  14. High frequency dynamic pressure calibration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, P. A.; Zasimowich, R. F.

    A high frequency dynamic calibration technique for pressure transducers has been developed using a siren pressure generator (SPG). The SPG is an inlet-area-modulated device generating oscillating waveforms with dynamic pressure amplitudes up to 58.6 kPa (8.5 psi) in a frequency range of 1 to 10 kHz. A description of the generator, its operating characteristics and instrumentation used for pressure amplitude and frequency measurements is given. Waveform oscillographs and spectral analysis of the pressure transducers' output signals are presented.

  15. RF Breakdown in High Frequency Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Doebert, S

    2004-05-27

    RF breakdown in high-frequency accelerators appears to limit the maximum achievable gradient as well as the reliability of such devices. Experimental results from high power tests, obtained mostly in the framework of the NLC/GLC project at 11 GHz and from the CLIC study at 30 GHz, will be used to illustrate the important issues. The dependence of the breakdown phenomena on rf pulse length, operating frequency and fabrication material will be described. Since reliability is extremely important for large scale accelerators such as a linear collider, the measurements of breakdown rate as a function of the operating gradient will be highlighted.

  16. Noise temperature in graphene at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengel, Raúl; Iglesias, José M.; Pascual, Elena; Martín, María J.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical method for obtaining the frequency-dependent noise temperature in monolayer graphene is presented. From the mobility and diffusion coefficient values provided by Monte Carlo simulation, the noise temperature in graphene is studied up to the THz range, considering also the influence of different substrate types. The influence of the applied electric field is investigated: the noise temperature is found to increase with the applied field, dropping down at high frequencies (in the sub-THz range). The results show that the low-frequency value of the noise temperature in graphene on a substrate tends to be reduced as compared to the case of suspended graphene due to the important effect of remote polar phonon interactions, thus indicating a reduced emitted noise power; however, at very high frequencies the influence of the substrate tends to be significantly reduced, and the differences between the suspended and on-substrate cases tend to be minimized. The values obtained are comparable to those observed in GaAs and semiconductor nitrides.

  17. High-Frequency Fluctuations During Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jara-Almonte, J.; Ji, H.; Daughton, W. S.; Roytershteyn, V.; Yamada, M.; Yoo, J.; Fox, W. R., II

    2014-12-01

    During collisionless reconnection, the decoupling of the field from the plasma is known to occur only within the localized ion and electron diffusion regions, however predictions from fully kinetic simulations do not agree with experimental observations on the size of the electron diffusion region, implying differing reconnection mechanisms. Previous experiments, along with 2D and 3D simulations, have conclusively shown that this discrepancy cannot be explained by either classical collisions or Lower-Hybrid Drift Instability (Roytershtyn 2010, 2013). Due to computational limitations, however, previous simulations were constrained to have minimal scale separation between the electron skin depth and the Debye length (de/λD ~ 10), much smaller than in experiments (de/λD ~ 300). This lack of scale-separation can drastically modify the electrostatic microphysics within the diffusion layer. Using 3D, fully explicit kinetic simulations with a realistic and unprecedentedly large separation between the Debye length and the electron skin depth, de/λD = 64, we show that high frequency electrostatic waves (ω >> ωLH) can exist within the electron diffusion region. These waves generate small-scale turbulence within the electron diffusion region which acts to broaden the layer. Anomalous resistivity is also generated by the turbulence and significantly modifies the force balance. In addition to simulation results, initial experimental measurements of high frequency fluctuations (electrostatic and electromagnetic, f ≤ 1 GHz) in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) will be presented.

  18. Improvement of efficiency and temperature control of induction heating vapor source on electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, T; Kiriyama, R; Muramatsu, M; Kitagawa, A; Uchida, T; Kurisu, Y; Nozaki, D; Yano, K; Yoshida, Y; Sato, F; Kato, Y; Iida, T

    2012-02-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) is used to generate multicharged ions for many kinds of the fields. We have developed an evaporator by using induction heating method that can generate pure vapor from solid state materials in ECRIS. We develop the new matching and protecting circuit by which we can precisely control the temperature of the induction heating evaporator. We can control the temperature within ±15 °C around 1400 °C under the operation pressure about 10(-4) Pa. We are able to use this evaporator for experiment of synthesizing process to need pure vapor under enough low pressure, e.g., experiment of generation of endohedral Fe-fullerene at the ECRIS.

  19. Excitation and Ionisation dynamics in high-frequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, D.

    2008-07-01

    excitation and sustainment of the discharge. As the pressure decreases the discharge operates in so-called 'alpha-mode' where the sheath expansion is responsible for discharge sustainment. Decreasing the pressure towards the limit of operation (below 1 Pa) the discharge operates in a regime where kinetic effects dominate plasma sustainment. Wave particle interactions resulting from the flux of highly energetic electrons interacting with thermal bulk electrons give rise to a series of oscillations in the electron excitation phase space at the sheath edge. This instability is responsible for a significant energy deposit in the plasma when so-called 'ohmic heating' is no longer efficient. In addition to this an interesting electron acceleration mechanism occurs during the sheath collapse. The large sheath width, due to low plasma densities at the lower pressure, and electron inertia allows the build up of a local electric field accelerating electrons towards the electrode. Multi-frequency plasmas, provide additional process control for technological applications, and through investigating the excitation dynamics in such discharges the limitations of functional separation is observed. Non-linear frequency coupling is observed in plasma boundary sheaths governed by two frequencies simultaneously. In an alpha-operated discharge the sheath edge velocity governs the excitation and ionisation within the plasma, and it will be shown that this is determined by the time varying sheath width. The nature of the coupling effects strongly depends on the ratio of the applied voltages. Under technologically relevant conditions (low frequency voltage >> high frequency voltage) interesting phenomena depending on the phase relation of the voltages are also observed and will be discussed.

  20. Measuring Inductive-Heating Coupling Coefficients and Thermal Loss Characteristics as a Function of Crucible Geometry and Material Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Jay

    A power measurement system has been designed for an ultra-high temperature inductively heated molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) reactor. The work presented in this research contributes to three different aspects of the induction heated MOE reactor facility: mathematical modeling of coil-to-workpiece power transfer, numerical modeling of heat transfer within the reactor, and experiments to measure the total hemispherical emittance of potential crucible materials. Facility-specific coupling coefficients for various samples have been experimentally determined for the MOE reactor facility. An analytical model coupling the predicted power input with heat transfer software was developed using COMSOL Multiphysics, and validated with experimental measurements of the steady state temperature gradient inside the reactor. These models were used to support the design of an experiment to measure the total hemispherical emissivity (epsilon) of conductive samples using a transient calorimetric technique. Results of epsilon are presented over a wide range of temperatures for copper, nickel, graphite and molybdenum. Furthermore, an investigation into optimizing the reactor system for heating will be discussed.

  1. Oxide-bioceramic coatings obtained on titanium items by the induction heat treatment and modified with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Aleksandr A.; Fomina, Marina A.; Rodionov, Igor V.; Koshuro, Vladimir A.; Petrova, Natalia V.; Skaptsov, Aleksandr A.; Atkin, Vsevolod S.

    2015-06-01

    Prospective composite bioceramic titania coatings were obtained on intraosseous implants fabricated from cp-titanium and medical titanium alloy VT16 (Ti-2.5Al-5Mo-5V). Consistency changes of morphological characteristics, mechanical properties and biocompatibility of experimental titanium implant coatings obtained by oxidation during induction heat treatment are defined. Technological recommendations for obtaining bioceramic coatings with extremely high strength on titanium items surface are given.

  2. High-Frequency Mechanostimulation of Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kadem, Laith F; Suana, K Grace; Holz, Michelle; Wang, Wei; Westerhaus, Hannes; Herges, Rainer; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2017-01-02

    Cell adhesion is regulated by molecularly defined protein interactions and by mechanical forces, which can activate a dynamic restructuring of adhesion sites. Previous attempts to explore the response of cell adhesion to forces have been limited to applying mechanical stimuli that involve the cytoskeleton. In contrast, we here apply a new, oscillatory type of stimulus through push-pull azobenzenes. Push-pull azobenzenes perform a high-frequency, molecular oscillation upon irradiation with visible light that has frequently been applied in polymer surface relief grating. We here use these oscillations to address single adhesion receptors. The effect of molecular oscillatory forces on cell adhesion has been analyzed using single-cell force spectroscopy and gene expression studies. Our experiments demonstrate a reinforcement of cell adhesion as well as upregulated expression levels of adhesion-associated genes as a result of the nanoscale "tickling" of integrins. This novel type of mechanical stimulus provides a previously unprecedented molecular control of cellular mechanosensing.

  3. Computer modeling of tactical high frequency antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Bobby G., Jr.

    1992-06-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to compare the performance of three tactical high frequency antennas to be used as possible replacement for the Tactical Data Communications Central (TDCC) antennas. The antennas were modeled using the Numerical Electromagnetics Code, Version 3 (NEC3), and the Eyring Low Profile and Buried Antenna Modeling Program (PAT7) for several different frequencies and ground conditions. The performance was evaluated by comparing gain at the desired takeoff angles, the voltage standing wave ratio of each antenna, and its omni-directional capability. The buried antenna models, the ELPA-302 and horizontal dipole, were most effective when employed over poor ground conditions. The best performance under all conditions tested was demonstrated by the HT-20T. Each of these antennas have tactical advantages and disadvantages and can optimize communications under certain conditions. The selection of the best antenna is situation dependent. An experimental test of these models is recommended to verify the modeling results.

  4. Degradation of PAHs by high frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Manariotis, Ioannis D; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V

    2011-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are persistent organic compounds, which have been reported in the literature to efficiently degrade at low (e.g. 20 kHz) and moderate (e.g. 506 kHz) ultrasound frequencies. The present study focuses on degradation of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene by ultrasound at three different relatively high frequencies (i.e. 582, 862, and 1142 kHz). The experimental results indicate that for all three frequencies and power inputs ≥ 133 W phenanthrene degrades to concentrations lower than our experimental detection limit (<1 μg/L). Phenanthrene degrades significantly faster at 582 kHz than at 862 and 1142 kHz. For all three frequencies, the degradation rates per unit mass are similar for naphthalene and phenanthrene and lower for pyrene. Furthermore, naphthalene degradation requires less energy than phenanthrene, which requires less energy than pyrene under the same conditions. No hexane-extractable metabolites were identified in the solutions.

  5. Fundamentals of bipolar high-frequency surgery.

    PubMed

    Reidenbach, H D

    1993-04-01

    In endoscopic surgery a very precise surgical dissection technique and an efficient hemostasis are of decisive importance. The bipolar technique may be regarded as a method which satisfies both requirements, especially regarding a high safety standard in application. In this context the biophysical and technical fundamentals of this method, which have been known in principle for a long time, are described with regard to the special demands of a newly developed field of modern surgery. After classification of this method into a general and a quasi-bipolar mode, various technological solutions of specific bipolar probes, in a strict and in a generalized sense, are characterized in terms of indication. Experimental results obtained with different bipolar instruments and probes are given. The application of modern microprocessor-controlled high-frequency surgery equipment and, wherever necessary, the integration of additional ancillary technology into the specialized bipolar instruments may result in most useful and efficient tools of a key technology in endoscopic surgery.

  6. High-frequency ultrasonic wire bonding systems

    PubMed

    Tsujino; Yoshihara; Sano; Ihara

    2000-03-01

    The vibration characteristics of longitudinal-complex transverse vibration systems with multiple resonance frequencies of 350-980 kHz for ultrasonic wire bonding of IC, LSI or electronic devices were studied. The complex vibration systems can be applied for direct welding of semiconductor tips (face-down bonding, flip-chip bonding) and packaging of electronic devices. A longitudinal-complex transverse vibration bonding system consists of a complex transverse vibration rod, two driving longitudinal transducers 7.0 mm in diameter and a transverse vibration welding tip. The vibration distributions along ceramic and stainless-steel welding tips were measured at up to 980 kHz. A high-frequency vibration system with a height of 20.7 mm and a weight of less than 15 g was obtained.

  7. Magnetic liposomes for colorectal cancer cells therapy by high-frequency magnetic field treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardiansyah, Andri; Huang, Li-Ying; Yang, Ming-Chien; Liu, Ting-Yu; Tsai, Sung-Chen; Yang, Chih-Yung; Kuo, Chih-Yu; Chan, Tzu-Yi; Zou, Hui-Ming; Lian, Wei-Nan; Lin, Chi-Hung

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we developed the cancer treatment through the combination of chemotherapy and thermotherapy using doxorubicin-loaded magnetic liposomes. The citric acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles (CAMNP, ca. 10 nm) and doxorubicin were encapsulated into the liposome (HSPC/DSPE/cholesterol = 12.5:1:8.25) by rotary evaporation and ultrasonication process. The resultant magnetic liposomes ( ca. 90 to 130 nm) were subject to characterization including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometer, and fluorescence microscope. In vitro cytotoxicity of the drug carrier platform was investigated through 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay using L-929 cells, as the mammalian cell model. In vitro cytotoxicity and hyperthermia (inductive heating) studies were evaluated against colorectal cancer (CT-26 cells) with high-frequency magnetic field (HFMF) exposure. MTT assay revealed that these drug carriers exhibited no cytotoxicity against L-929 cells, suggesting excellent biocompatibility. When the magnetic liposomes with 1 μM doxorubicin was used to treat CT-26 cells in combination with HFMF exposure, approximately 56% cells were killed and found to be more effective than either hyperthermia or chemotherapy treatment individually. Therefore, these results show that the synergistic effects between chemotherapy (drug-controlled release) and hyperthermia increase the capability to kill cancer cells.

  8. High frequency properties of resonant tunneling diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, H. Y.; Sinkkonen, J.

    The small signal analysis for the resonant tunneling diode (RTD) is carried out by using a semiclassical transport theory. Multiple scattering effects are accounted for in an optical approximation by using a complex mean free path. An analytical expression for the conduction current is given. The results show that the negative differential conductance prevails up to the frequency f0 limited by the quantum well transit time. The imaginary part of the admittance can be presented by a series inductance as has been recently found experimentally. In addition, the equivalent circuit has a capacitor in parallel with the conductance-inductance branch. Above f0 the admittance shows an oscillatory behaviour. The oscillations are associated with the quantum well transit time resonances.

  9. High frequency model of stacked film capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbert, T.; Joubert, C.; Daude, N.; Glaize, C.

    2001-11-01

    Polypropylene metallized capacitors are of general use in power electronics because of their reliability, their self-healing capabilities, and their low price. Though the behavior of metallized coiled capacitors has been discussed, no work has been carried out on stacked and flattened metallized capacitors. The purpose of this article is to suggest an analytical model of resonance frequency, stray inductance and impedance of stacked capacitors. We first solve the equation of propagation of the magnetic potential vector (A) in the dielectric of an homogeneous material. Then, we suggest an original method of resolution, like the one used for resonant cavities, in order to present an analytical solution of the problem. Finally, we give some experimental results proving that the physical knowledge of the parameters of the capacitor (dimension of the component, and material constants), enables us to calculate an analytical model of resonance frequency, stray inductance and impedance of stacked capacitors.

  10. Diffusion coefficient in hydrogel under high-frequency ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, Akira; Tanaka, Kei; Kumata, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Miyata, Shogo; Furukawa, Katsuko; Ushida, Takashi

    2007-03-01

    Modulating hydrogel properties by external stimuli can be applied for drug delivery system. For example, ultrasound can enhance drug release from hydrogel by the mechanism which is not fully understood. We measured diffusion coefficient in hydrogel under high-frequency ultrasound to understand mass transport property. To estimate diffusion coefficient, FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching) technique was applied with time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and we analyzed fluorescence recovery after photobleaching of FITC-dextran (4˜40 kDa) which was fully fused in agarose gel (1˜3 %). As a result, diffusion coefficient was altered when agarose gel was sonicated by 1MHz ultrasound with 400kPa (peak-peak). We discussed several possible underlying mechanisms such as cavitation, heat and phase transition with extended experimental data.

  11. Fast wave direct electron heating in advanced inductive and ITER baseline scenario discharges in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsker, R. I.; Austin, M. E.; Diem, S. J.; Doyle, E. J.; Grierson, B. A.; Hosea, J. C.; Jackson, G. L.; Kaufman, M. C.; Luce, T. C.; Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D.; Nagy, A.; Perkins, R.; Politzer, P. A.; Porkolab, M.; Ryan, P. M.; Solomon, W. M.; Taylor, G.; Turco, F.; Zeng, L.

    2014-02-01

    Fast Wave (FW) heating and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) are used in the DIII-D tokamak to study plasmas with low applied torque and dominant electron heating characteristic of burning plasmas. FW heating via direct electron damping has reached the 2.5 MW level in high performance ELMy H-mode plasmas. In Advanced Inductive (AI) plasmas, core FW heating was found to be comparable to that of ECH, consistent with the excellent first-pass absorption of FWs predicted by ray-tracing models at high electron beta. FW heating at the ˜2 MW level to ELMy H-mode discharges in the ITER Baseline Scenario (IBS) showed unexpectedly strong absorption of FW power by injected neutral beam (NB) ions, indicated by significant enhancement of the D-D neutron rate, while the intended absorption on core electrons appeared rather weak. The AI and IBS discharges are compared in an effort to identify the causes of the different response to FWs.

  12. Fast wave direct electron heating in advanced inductive and ITER baseline scenario discharges in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R. I.; Jackson, G. L.; Luce, T. C.; Politzer, P. A.; Austin, M. E.; Diem, S. J.; Kaufman, M. C.; Ryan, P. M.; Doyle, E. J.; Zeng, L.; Grierson, B. A.; Hosea, J. C.; Nagy, A.; Perkins, R.; Solomon, W. M.; Taylor, G.; Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D.; Porkolab, M.; Turco, F.

    2014-02-12

    Fast Wave (FW) heating and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) are used in the DIII-D tokamak to study plasmas with low applied torque and dominant electron heating characteristic of burning plasmas. FW heating via direct electron damping has reached the 2.5 MW level in high performance ELMy H-mode plasmas. In Advanced Inductive (AI) plasmas, core FW heating was found to be comparable to that of ECH, consistent with the excellent first-pass absorption of FWs predicted by ray-tracing models at high electron beta. FW heating at the ∼2 MW level to ELMy H-mode discharges in the ITER Baseline Scenario (IBS) showed unexpectedly strong absorption of FW power by injected neutral beam (NB) ions, indicated by significant enhancement of the D-D neutron rate, while the intended absorption on core electrons appeared rather weak. The AI and IBS discharges are compared in an effort to identify the causes of the different response to FWs.

  13. Aerodynamics of high frequency flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zheng; Roll, Jesse; Cheng, Bo; Deng, Xinyan

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic performance of high frequency flapping wings using a 2.5 gram robotic insect mechanism developed in our lab. The mechanism flaps up to 65Hz with a pair of man-made wing mounted with 10cm wingtip-to-wingtip span. The mean aerodynamic lift force was measured by a lever platform, and the flow velocity and vorticity were measured using a stereo DPIV system in the frontal, parasagittal, and horizontal planes. Both near field (leading edge vortex) and far field flow (induced flow) were measured with instantaneous and phase-averaged results. Systematic experiments were performed on the man-made wings, cicada and hawk moth wings due to their similar size, frequency and Reynolds number. For insect wings, we used both dry and freshly-cut wings. The aerodynamic force increase with flapping frequency and the man-made wing generates more than 4 grams of lift at 35Hz with 3 volt input. Here we present the experimental results and the major differences in their aerodynamic performances.

  14. High-Frequency Observations of Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Marchenko-Jorstad, S. G.; Mattox, J. R.; Wehrle, A. E.; Aller, M. F.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the results of high-frequency VLBA observations of 42 gamma-ray bright blazars monitored at 22 and 43 GHz between 1993.9 and 1997.6. In 1997 the observations included polarization-sensitive imaging. The cores of gamma-ray blazars are only weakly polarized, with EVPAs (electric-vector position angles) usually within 40 deg of the local direction of the jet. The EVPAs of the jet components are usually within 20 deg of the local jet direction. The apparent speeds of the gamma-ray bright blazars are considerably faster than in the general population of bright compact radio sources. Two X-ray flares (observed with RXTE) of the quasar PKS 1510-089 appear to be related to radio flares, but with the radio leading the X-ray variations by about 2 weeks. This can be explained either by synchrotron self-Compton emission in a component whose variations are limited by light travel time or by the Mirror Compton model.

  15. High-Frequency Observations of Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Marchenko-Jorstad, S. G.; Mattox, J. R.; Wehrle, A. E.; Aller, M. F.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the results of high-frequency VLBA observations of 42 gamma ray bright blazars monitored at 22 and 43 GHz between 1993.9 and 1997-6. In 1997 the observations included polarization-sensitive imaging. The cores of gamma ray blazars are only weakly polarized, with EVPAs (electric-vector position angles) usually within 40 degrees of the local direction of the jet. The EVPAs of the jet components are usually within 20 degrees of the local jet direction. The apparent speeds of the gamma ray bright blazars are considerably faster than in the general population of bright compact radio sources. Two X-ray flares (observed with RXTE) of the quasar PKS 1510-089 appear to be related to radio flares, but with the radio leading the X-ray variations by about 2 weeks. This can be explained either by synchrotron self-Compton emission in a component whose variations are limited by light travel time or by the Mirror Compton model.

  16. A High Frequency Model of Cascade Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    1998-01-01

    Closed form asymptotic expressions for computing high frequency noise generated by an annular cascade in an infinite duct containing a uniform flow are presented. There are two new elements in this work. First, the annular duct mode representation does not rely on the often-used Bessel function expansion resulting in simpler expressions for both the radial eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the duct. In particular, the new representation provides an explicit approximate formula for the radial eigenvalues obviating the need for solutions of the transcendental annular duct eigenvalue equation. Also, the radial eigenfunctions are represented in terms of exponentials eliminating the numerical problems associated with generating the Bessel functions on a computer. The second new element is the construction of an unsteady response model for an annular cascade. The new construction satisfies the boundary conditions on both the cascade and duct walls simultaneously adding a new level of realism to the noise calculations. Preliminary results which demonstrate the effectiveness of the new elements are presented. A discussion of the utility of the asymptotic formulas for calculating cascade discrete tone as well as broadband noise is also included.

  17. Plant Responses to High Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Vian, Alain; Davies, Eric; Gendraud, Michel; Bonnet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    High frequency nonionizing electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF) that are increasingly present in the environment constitute a genuine environmental stimulus able to evoke specific responses in plants that share many similarities with those observed after a stressful treatment. Plants constitute an outstanding model to study such interactions since their architecture (high surface area to volume ratio) optimizes their interaction with the environment. In the present review, after identifying the main exposure devices (transverse and gigahertz electromagnetic cells, wave guide, and mode stirred reverberating chamber) and general physics laws that govern EMF interactions with plants, we illustrate some of the observed responses after exposure to HF-EMF at the cellular, molecular, and whole plant scale. Indeed, numerous metabolic activities (reactive oxygen species metabolism, α- and β-amylase, Krebs cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, chlorophyll content, terpene emission, etc.) are modified, gene expression altered (calmodulin, calcium-dependent protein kinase, and proteinase inhibitor), and growth reduced (stem elongation and dry weight) after low power (i.e., nonthermal) HF-EMF exposure. These changes occur not only in the tissues directly exposed but also systemically in distant tissues. While the long-term impact of these metabolic changes remains largely unknown, we propose to consider nonionizing HF-EMF radiation as a noninjurious, genuine environmental factor that readily evokes changes in plant metabolism. PMID:26981524

  18. Automated calculation of surface energy fluxes with high-frequency lake buoy data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woolway, R Iestyn; Jones, Ian D; Hamilton, David P.; Maberly, Stephen C; Muroaka, Kohji; Read, Jordan S.; Smyth, Robyn L; Winslow, Luke A.

    2015-01-01

    Lake Heat Flux Analyzer is a program used for calculating the surface energy fluxes in lakes according to established literature methodologies. The program was developed in MATLAB for the rapid analysis of high-frequency data from instrumented lake buoys in support of the emerging field of aquatic sensor network science. To calculate the surface energy fluxes, the program requires a number of input variables, such as air and water temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and short-wave radiation. Available outputs for Lake Heat Flux Analyzer include the surface fluxes of momentum, sensible heat and latent heat and their corresponding transfer coefficients, incoming and outgoing long-wave radiation. Lake Heat Flux Analyzer is open source and can be used to process data from multiple lakes rapidly. It provides a means of calculating the surface fluxes using a consistent method, thereby facilitating global comparisons of high-frequency data from lake buoys.

  19. In situ post-weld heat treatment on martensitic stainless steel turbine runners using a robotic induction heating process to control temperature distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreault, E.; Hazel, B.; Côté, J.; Godin, S.

    2014-03-01

    A new robotic heat treatment process is developed. Using this solution it is now possible to perform local heat treatment on large steel components. Crack, cavitation and erosion repairs on turbine blades and Pelton buckets are among the applications of this technique. The proof of concept is made on a 13Cr-4Ni stainless steel designated "CA6NM". This alloy is widely used in the power industry for modern system components. Given the very tight temperature tolerance (600 to 630 °C) for post-weld heat treatment on this alloy, 13Cr-4Ni stainless steel is very well suited for demonstrating the possibilities of this process. To achieve heat treatment requirements, an induction heating system is mounted on a compact manipulator named "Scompi". This robot moves a pancake coil in order to control the temperature distribution. A simulator using thermal finite element analysis is first used for path planning. A feedback loop adjusts parameters in function of environmental conditions.

  20. Utilization of Induction Bonding for Automated Fabrication of TIGR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Johnston, Norman J.; Hulcher, A. Bruce; Marchello, Joseph M.; Messier, Bernadette C.

    1999-01-01

    A laboratory study of magnetic induction heat bonding of titanium foil and graphite fiber reinforced polymer prepreg tape, TiGr, demonstrated that the process is a viable candidate for low cost fabrication of aircraft structure made of this new material form. Data were obtained on weld bonding of PIXA and PETI-5 prepreg to titanium. Both the foil and honeycomb forms of titanium were investigated. The process relies on magnetic susceptor heating of titanium, not on high frequency heating of graphite fiber. The experiments showed that with a toroid magnet configuration, good weld bonds might be obtained with heating times of a few seconds. These results suggest the potential is good for the induction heating process to achieve acceptable commercial production rates.

  1. Curing of a bisphenol E based cyanate ester using magnetic nanoparticles as an internal heat source through induction heating.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Jeremiah W; Orange, François; Guinel, Maxime J-F; Guenthner, Andrew J; Mabry, Joseph M; Sahagun, Christopher M; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2013-11-13

    We report on the control of cyclotrimerization forming a polycyanurate polymer using magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in an alternating-current (ac) field as an internal heat source, starting from a commercially available monomer. Magnetic nanoparticles were dispersed in the monomer and catalytic system using sonication, and the mixture was subjected to an alternating magnetic field, causing the magnetic nanoparticles to dissipate the energy of the magnetic field in the form of heat. Internal heating of the particle/monomer/catalyst system was sufficient to start and sustain the polymerization reaction, producing a cyanate ester network with conversion that compared favorably to polymerization through heating in a conventional laboratory oven. The two heating methods gave similar differential scanning calorimetry temperature profiles, conversion rates, and glass transition temperatures when using the same temperature profile. The ability of magnetic nanoparticles in an ac field to drive the curing reaction should allow for other reactions forming high-temperature thermosetting polymers and for innovative ways to process such polymers.

  2. Synthesis of Peptide-Based Hybrid Nanobelts with Enhanced Color Emission by Heat Treatment or Water Induction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingcen; Zhu, Pengli; Fei, Jinbo; Zhao, Jie; Yan, Xuehai; Li, Junbai

    2015-06-22

    We demonstrate that an inorganic lanthanide ion (Tb(3+)) or organic dye molecules were encapsulated in situ into diphenylalanine (FF) organogels by a general, simple, and efficient co-assembly process, which generated peptide-based hybrid nanobelts with a range of colored emissions. In the presence of a photosensitizer (salicylic acid), the organogel can serve as an excellent molecular-donor scaffold to investigate FRET to Tb(3+). More importantly, heat treatment or water induction instigated a morphology transition from nanofibers to nanobelts, after which the participation of guest molecules in the FF assembly was promoted and the stability and photoluminescence emission of the composite organogels were enhanced.

  3. Influence of heating and cyclic tension on the induction of heat shock proteins and bone-related proteins by MC3T3-E1 cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Eunna; Sampson, Alana Cherrell; Rylander, Marissa Nichole

    2014-01-01

    Stress conditioning (e.g., thermal, shear, and tensile stress) of bone cells has been shown to enhance healing. However, prior studies have not investigated whether combined stress could synergistically promote bone regeneration. This study explored the impact of combined thermal and tensile stress on the induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs) and bone-related proteins by a murine preosteoblast cell line (MC3T3-E1). Cells were exposed to thermal stress using a water bath (44°C for 4 or 8 minutes) with postheating incubation (37°C for 4 hours) followed by exposure to cyclic strain (equibiaxial 3%, 0.2 Hz, cycle of 10-second tensile stress followed by 10-second rest). Combined thermal stress and tensile stress induced mRNA expression of HSP27 (1.41 relative fold induction (RFI) compared to sham-treated control), HSP70 (5.55 RFI), and osteopontin (1.44 RFI) but suppressed matrix metalloproteinase-9 (0.6 RFI) compared to the control. Combined thermal and tensile stress increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion into the culture supernatant (1.54-fold increase compared to the control). Therefore, combined thermal and mechanical stress preconditioning can enhance HSP induction and influence protein expression important for bone tissue healing.

  4. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  5. High temperature pressurized high frequency testing rig and test method

    DOEpatents

    De La Cruz, Jose; Lacey, Paul

    2003-04-15

    An apparatus is described which permits the lubricity of fuel compositions at or near temperatures and pressures experienced by compression ignition fuel injector components during operation in a running engine. The apparatus consists of means to apply a measured force between two surfaces and oscillate them at high frequency while wetted with a sample of the fuel composition heated to an operator selected temperature. Provision is made to permit operation at or near the flash point of the fuel compositions. Additionally a method of using the subject apparatus to simulate ASTM Testing Method D6079 is disclosed, said method involving using the disclosed apparatus to contact the faces of prepared workpieces under a measured load, sealing the workface contact point into the disclosed apparatus while immersing said contact point between said workfaces in a lubricating media to be tested, pressurizing and heating the chamber and thereby the fluid and workfaces therewithin, using the disclosed apparatus to impart a differential linear motion between the workpieces at their contact point until a measurable scar is imparted to at least one workpiece workface, and then evaluating the workface scar.

  6. Experimental investigations on monitoring and control of induction heating process for semi-solid alloys using the heating coil as sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Yuu; Zheng, Cheng-Qing; Hamel, François G.; Charron, Rémi; Ang Loong, Chee

    2002-08-01

    A method of monitoring the state of metal alloys during induction heating and control of the heating process utilizing the heating coil itself as a sensor is proposed, and its usefulness and effectiveness were experimentally investigated using aluminium A357 billets for the semi-solid metal (SSM) casting processes. The impedance of the coil containing the billet was continuously measured by the proposed method in the temperature range between room temperature and 700 °C. It was found that the reactance component of the impedance varied distinctively according to the billet state and could clearly monitor the deformation of the billet, while the resistance component increased with temperature, reflecting the variation of the resistivity of the billet which has strong correlation to the solid/liquid fraction of the billets. The measured impedance is very sensitive to the billet states such as temperature, deformation and solid/liquid fraction and could be used as a parameter to monitor and control the heating process for SSMs.

  7. Virus Induction of Heat Shock Protein 70 Reflects a General Response to Protein Accumulation in the Plant Cytosol1

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, Frederic; Thomas, Carole L.; Lederer, Carsten; Niu, Yan; Wang, Daowen; Maule, Andrew J.

    2005-01-01

    Different cytoplasmically replicating RNA viruses were shown to induce a specific subset of heat-inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). To identify the inducing principle, a promoter∷reporter system was developed for the facile analysis of differentially responding Arabidopsis HSP70 genes, by infiltration into Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Through transient expression of individual viral cistrons or through deletion analysis of a viral replicon, we were unable to identify a unique inducer of HSP70. However, there was a positive correlation between the translatability of the test construct and the differential induction of HSP70. Since these data implied a lack of specificity in the induction process, we also expressed a random series of cytosolically targeted Arabidopsis genes and showed that these also differentially induced HSP70. Through a comparison of different promoter∷reporter constructs and through measurements of the steady-state levels of the individual proteins, it appeared that the HSP70 response reflected the ability of the cytosol to sense individual properties of particular proteins when expressed at high levels. This phenomenon is reminiscent of the unfolded protein response observed when the induced accumulation of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum also induces a specific suite of chaperones. PMID:15805473

  8. The induction levels of heat shock protein 70 differentiate the vulnerabilities to mutant huntingtin among neuronal subtypes.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Marubuchi, Shigeki; Qi, Mei-Ling; Enokido, Yasushi; Tamura, Takuya; Inagaki, Reina; Murata, Miho; Kanazawa, Ichiro; Wanker, Erich E; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2007-01-24

    The reason why vulnerabilities to mutant polyglutamine (polyQ) proteins are different among neuronal subtypes is mostly unknown. In this study, we compared the gene expression profiles of three types of primary neurons expressing huntingtin (htt) or ataxin-1. We found that heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), a well known chaperone molecule protecting neurons in the polyQ pathology, was dramatically upregulated only by mutant htt and selectively in the granule cells of the cerebellum. Granule cells, which are insensitive to degeneration in the human Huntington's disease (HD) pathology, lost their resistance by suppressing hsp70 with siRNA, whereas cortical neurons, affected in human HD, gained resistance by overexpressing hsp70. This indicates that induction levels of hsp70 are a critical factor for determining vulnerabilities to mutant htt among neuronal subtypes. CAT (chloramphenicol acetyltransferase) assays showed that CBF (CCAAT box binding factor, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein zeta) activated, but p53 repressed transcription of the hsp70 gene in granule cells. Basal and mutant htt-induced expression levels of p53 were remarkably lower in granule cells than in cortical neurons, suggesting that different magnitudes of p53 are linked to distinct induction levels of hsp70. Surprisingly, however, heat shock factor 1 was not activated in granule cells by mutant htt. Collectively, different levels of hsp70 among neuronal subtypes might be involved in selective neuronal death in the HD pathology.

  9. Assessment of heat shock protein 70 induction by heat in alfalfa varieties and constitutive overexpression in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Ferradini, Nicoletta; Iannacone, Rina; Capomaccio, Stefano; Metelli, Alessandra; Armentano, Nadia; Semeraro, Lucia; Cellini, Francesco; Veronesi, Fabio; Rosellini, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones involved in many cellular functions. It has been shown that mammalian cytosolic HSP70 binds antigenic peptides mediating the activation of the immune system, and that it plays a determining role in tumour immunogenicity. This suggests that HSP70 may be used for the production of conjugated vaccines. Human and plant HSPs share high sequence similarity and some important biological functions in vitro. In addition, plant HSPs have no endotoxic side effects. Extraction of HSP70 from plants for use as vaccine adjuvant requires enhancing its concentration in plant tissues. In this work, we explored the possibility to produce HSP70 in both transgenic and non-transgenic plants, using alfalfa as a model species. First, a transcriptional analysis of a constitutive and an inducible HSP70 genes was conducted in Arabidopsis thaliana. Then the coding sequence of the inducible form was cloned and introduced into alfalfa by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, and the accumulation of the protein in leaf tissue of transgenic plants was demonstrated. We also tested diverse alfalfa varieties for heat-inducible expression of endogenous HSP70, revealing variety-specific responses to heat shock.

  10. On-clip high frequency reliability and failure test structures

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Eric S.; Campbell, David V.

    1997-01-01

    Self-stressing test structures for realistic high frequency reliability characterizations. An on-chip high frequency oscillator, controlled by DC signals from off-chip, provides a range of high frequency pulses to test structures. The test structures provide information with regard to a variety of reliability failure mechanisms, including hot-carriers, electromigration, and oxide breakdown. The system is normally integrated at the wafer level to predict the failure mechanisms of the production integrated circuits on the same wafer.

  11. On-clip high frequency reliability and failure test structures

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, E.S.; Campbell, D.V.

    1997-04-29

    Self-stressing test structures for realistic high frequency reliability characterizations. An on-chip high frequency oscillator, controlled by DC signals from off-chip, provides a range of high frequency pulses to test structures. The test structures provide information with regard to a variety of reliability failure mechanisms, including hot-carriers, electromigration, and oxide breakdown. The system is normally integrated at the wafer level to predict the failure mechanisms of the production integrated circuits on the same wafer. 22 figs.

  12. High Frequency Acoustic Propagation using Level Set Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    solution of the high frequency approximation to the wave equation. Traditional solutions to the Eikonal equation in high frequency acoustics are...curvature can be extracted at any point of the front from the level set function (provided the normal and curvature are well-defined at that point ), and... points per wavelength to resolve the wave). Ray tracing is therefore the current standard for high frequency propagation modeling. LSM may provide

  13. High-frequency Probing Diagnostic for Hall Current Plasma Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    A.A. Litvak; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2001-10-25

    High-frequency oscillations (1-100 MHz) in Hall thrusters have apparently eluded significant experimental scrutiny. A diagnostic setup, consisting of a single Langmuir probe, a special shielded probe connector-positioner, and an electronic impedance-matching circuit, was successfully built and calibrated. Through simultaneous high-frequency probing of the Hall thruster plasma at multiple locations, high-frequency plasma waves have been identified and characterized for various thruster operating conditions.

  14. Calorimetric measurement of heat load in full non-inductive LHCD plasmas on TRIAM-1M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, K.; Shinoda, N.; Sugata, T.; Sasaki, K.; Zushi, H.; Nakamura, K.; Sato, K. N.; Sakamoto, M.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Triam Group

    2007-06-01

    Calorimetric measurements using the temperature increment of cooling-water were carried out to estimate the heat load distribution on the plasma facing components (PFCs) in the limiter discharges on TRIAM-1M. Line averaged electron density, ne, and LH power, PLH, dependences of the heat load on PFCs were measured. The heat load on the limiters was proportional to ne1.5 in the range of ne = 0.2-1.0 × 1019 m-3 and PLH1 in the range of PLH = 0.005-0.09 MW. For PLH > 0.1 MW, the plasma transition to an enhanced current drive (ECD) mode appeared and the ne dependences on the heat load on the limiter moderated. This indicates that the heat flux to scrape-off layer (SOL) region was reduced due to the improvement of the plasma confinement. The up-down asymmetry of the heat load on the vacuum vessel was enhanced in the ECD mode, which may be caused by the increasing of the direct loss of energetic electrons.

  15. Induction of Heat-Shock Protein 70 Expression by Geranylgeranylacetone Shows Cytoprotective Effects in Cardiomyocytes of Mice under Humid Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaowu; Yuan, Binbin; Dong, Wenpeng; Yang, Bo; Yang, Yongchao; Lin, Xi; Gong, Gu

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence has revealed that humid heat stress (HHS) causes considerable damage to human health. The cardiovascular system has been suggested to be the primary target of heat stress, which results in serious cardiovascular diseases. However, there is still a lack of effective approaches for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases induced by HHS. Objective Heat-shock proteins (Hsps), especially Hsp70, are reported to provide effective cytoprotection under various stress stimuli. In the present study, we evaluated the cytoprotective effect of geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), which was previously been reported to induce Hsp70 expression in cardiomyocytes under HHS. Methods and Principal Findings Using a mouse model of HHS, we showed that the pretreatment of GGA enhanced Hsp70 expression under HHS, as examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot. We then examined the effect of GGA pretreatment on the cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by HHS using terminal-deoxynucleoitidyl transferase mediated nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, and found that GGA pretreatment inhibited mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. GGA pretreatment could reverse the effect of HHS on cell apoptosis by increasing expression of Bcl-2, decreasing cytochrome c in cytosol, and increasing cytochrome c in mitochondria. However, GGA pretreatment had no effect on the oxidative stress induced by HHS as determined by levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH). Conclusion We have demonstrated that GGA pretreatment suppressed HHS-induced apoptosis of cardiomyocytes through the induction of Hsp70 overexpression. PMID:24695789

  16. Dynamic properties of ionospheric plasma turbulence driven by high-power high-frequency radiowaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grach, S. M.; Sergeev, E. N.; Mishin, E. V.; Shindin, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    A review is given of the current state-of-the-art of experimental studies and the theoretical understanding of nonlinear phenomena that occur in the ionospheric F-layer irradiated by high-power high-frequency ground-based transmitters. The main focus is on the dynamic features of high-frequency turbulence (plasma waves) and low-frequency turbulence (density irregularities of various scales) that have been studied in experiments at the Sura and HAARP heating facilities operated in temporal and frequency regimes specially designed with consideration of the characteristic properties of nonlinear processes in the perturbed ionosphere using modern radio receivers and optical instruments. Experimental results are compared with theoretical turbulence models for a magnetized collisional plasma in a high-frequency electromagnetic field, allowing the identification of the processes responsible for the observed features of artificial ionospheric turbulence.

  17. Dynamic properties of ionospheric plasma turbulence driven by high-power high-frequency radiowaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grach, S. M.; Sergeev, E. N.; Mishin, E. V.; Shindin, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    A review is given of the current state-of-the-art of experimental studies and the theoretical understanding of nonlinear phenomena that occur in the ionospheric F-layer irradiated by high-power high-frequency ground-based transmitters. The main focus is on the dynamic features of high-frequency turbulence (plasma waves) and low-frequency turbulence (density irregularities of various scales) that have been studied in experiments at the Sura and HAARP heating facilities operated in temporal and frequency regimes specially designed with consideration of the characteristic properties of nonlinear processes in the perturbed ionosphere using modern radio receivers and optical instruments. Experimental results are compared with theoretical turbulence models for a magnetized collisional plasma in a high-frequency electromagnetic field, allowing the identification of the processes responsible for the observed features of artificial ionospheric turbulence.

  18. Induction of HSP70 is associated with vincristine resistance in heat-shocked 9L rat brain tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, W. C.; Lin, K. Y.; Chen, K. D.; Lai, Y. K.

    1992-01-01

    The most prominent cellular changes in heat-shock response are induction of HSPs synthesis and reorganisation of cytoskeleton. Vincristine was used as a tool to evaluate the integrity of microtubules in 9L rat brain tumour cells recovering from heat-shock treatment. Cells treated at 45 degrees C for 15 min and recovered under normal growing condition became resistant to vincristine-inflicted cytotoxicity and microtubule destruction. Among all HSPs, the level of HSP70 and the degree of vincristine resistance are best correlated. HSP70 and tubulin were found to be associated with each other as they were co-immunoprecipitated by either anti-HSP70 or anti-beta-tubulin monoclonal antibody. The current studies establish for the first time that HSP70 can complex with tubulin in cells and this association may stabilise the organisation of microtubules thus protect the heat-treated cells from vincristine damage. These findings are noteworthy in combining hyperthermia and chemotherapy in the management of malignant diseases. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1419602

  19. Induction of Hsp70 by desiccation, ionising radiation and heat-shock in the eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, K Ingemar; Schill, Ralph O

    2007-04-01

    The physiology and biochemistry behind the extreme tolerance to desiccation shown by the so-called anhydrobiotic animals represents an exciting challenge to biology. The current knowledge suggests that both carbohydrates and proteins are often involved in protecting the dry cell from damage, or in the repair of induced damage. Tardigrades belong to the most desiccation-tolerant multicellular organisms, but very little research has been reported on the biochemistry behind desiccation tolerance in this group. We quantified the induction of the heat-shock protein Hsp70, a very wide-spread stress protein, in response to desiccation, ionising radiation, and heating, in the anhydrobiotic tardigrade Richtersius coronifer using an immuno-westernblot method. Elevated levels of Hsp70 were recorded after treatment of both heat and ionising radiation, and also in rehydrated tardigrades after a period of desiccation. In contrast, tardigrades in the desiccated (dry) state had reduced Hsp70 levels compared to the non-treated control group. Our results suggest that Hsp70 may be involved in the physiological and biochemical system underlying desiccation (and radiation) tolerance in tardigrades, and that its role may be connected to repair processes after desiccation rather than to biochemical stabilization in the dry state.

  20. Why high-frequency pulse tubes can be tipped

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, Gregory W092710; Backhaus, Scott N

    2010-01-01

    The typical low-frequency pulse-tube refrigerator loses significant cooling power when it is tipped with the pulse tube's cold end above its hot end, because natural convection in the pulse tube loads the cold heat exchanger. Yet most high-frequency pulse-tube refrigerators work well in any orientation with respect to gravity. In such a refrigerator, natural convection is suppressed by sufficiently fast velocity oscil1ations, via a nonlinear hydrodynamic effect that tends to align the density gradients in the pulse tube parallel to the oscillation direction. Since gravity's tendency to cause convection is only linear in the pulse tube's end-to-end temperature difference while the oscillation's tendency to align density gradients with oscillating velocity is nonlinear, it is easiest to suppress convection when the end-to-end temperature difference is largest. Simple experiments demonstrate this temperature dependence, the strong dependence on the oscillating velocity, and little dependence on the magnitude or phase of the oscillating pressure. In some circumstances in this apparatus, the suppression of convection is a hysteretic function of oscillating velocity. In some other circumstances, a time-dependent convective state seems more difficult to suppress.

  1. An experiment on induction of triploidy in Eriocheir japonicus hepuensis Dai by heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Renhou; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Xiangyu; Yu, Hongjun

    1993-03-01

    Temperature treatment to inhibit extrusion of the polar body of the egg was first used on a lower crustacean, Artemia salina (Gross, 1932), and then was used for inducing triploids of amphibian (Frankhauser and Griffiths, 1939), fish (Svardson, 1945), and mammal (Beatly and Fishchberg, 1949). So far, induction of triploidy has been extensively used to obtain sterile or quick-growth individuals in fish (Swarup, 1956; Lincoln, and Scott, 1983 and Thorgaard, 1986) and mollusk (Stanley et al., 1984), but similar work has not been reported on crab, a higher crustancean.

  2. Recent Improvements in High-Frequency Eddy Current Conductivity Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Nabah, Bassam A.; Nagy, Peter B.

    2008-02-01

    Due to its frequency-dependent penetration depth, eddy current measurements are capable of mapping near-surface residual stress profiles based on the so-called piezoresistivity effect, i.e., the stress-dependence of electric conductivity. To capture the peak compressive residual stress in moderately shot-peened (Almen 4-8A) nickel-base superalloys, the eddy current inspection frequency has to go as high as 50-80 MHz. Recently, we have reported the development of a new high-frequency eddy current conductivity measuring system that offers an extended inspection frequency range up to 80 MHz. Unfortunately, spurious self- and stray-capacitance effects render the complex coil impedance variation with lift-off more nonlinear as the frequency increases, which makes it difficult to achieve accurate apparent eddy current conductivity (AECC) measurements with the standard four-point linear interpolation method beyond 25 MHz. In this paper, we will demonstrate that reducing the coil size reduces its sensitivity to capacitive lift-off variations, which is just the opposite of the better known inductive lift-off effect. Although reducing the coil size also reduces its absolute electric impedance and relative sensitivity to conductivity variations, a smaller coil still yields better overall performance for residual stress assessment. In addition, we will demonstrate the benefits of a semi-quadratic interpolation scheme that, together with the reduced lift-off sensitivity of the smaller probe coil, minimizes and in some cases completely eliminates the sensitivity of AECC measurements to lift-off uncertainties. These modifications allow us to do much more robust measurements up to as high as 80-100 MHz with the required high relative accuracy of +/-0.1%.

  3. E-H heating mode transition in inductive discharges with different antenna sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyo-Chang Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-05-15

    The spatial distribution of plasma density and the transition power for capacitive (E) to inductive (H) mode transition are studied in planar type inductively coupled plasmas with different antenna sizes. The spatial plasma distribution has a relatively flat profile at a low gas pressure, while the plasma profile is affected by the antenna size at higher gas pressure. The transition power for the E to H mode transition is shown to be critically affected by the antenna size. When the discharge is sustained by a small one-turn antenna coil, the transition power has a minimum value at Ar gas of 20 mTorr. However, the minimum transition power is shown at a relatively high gas pressure (40–60 mTorr) in the case of a large one-turn antenna coil. This change in the transition power can be understood by the thermal transport of the energetic electrons with non-local kinetics to the chamber wall. This non-local kinetic effect indicates that the transition power can also increase even for a small antenna if the antenna is placed near the wall.

  4. Heat Shock Protein Induction in Human Cells by CO2 Laser Irradiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-14

    Boorstein W. A review of the role of 70 kD heat shock proteins in protein translocation across membranes. Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek 1990:58:137-46. 32...1991;65:363-366. 55. Young DB. Stress proteins and the immune response. Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek 1990;58:203-208. 56. Craig EA, Kramer J, Kosic-Smithers

  5. Poly(4-vinylphenol) gate insulator with cross-linking using a rapid low-power microwave induction heating scheme for organic thin-film-transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Ching-Lin; Shang, Ming-Chi; Hsia, Mao-Yuan; Wang, Shea-Jue; Huang, Bohr-Ran; Lee, Win-Der

    2016-03-01

    A Microwave-Induction Heating (MIH) scheme is proposed for the poly(4-vinylphenol) (PVP) gate insulator cross-linking process to replace the traditional oven heating cross-linking process. The cross-linking time is significantly decreased from 1 h to 5 min by heating the metal below the PVP layer using microwave irradiation. The necessary microwave power was substantially reduced to about 50 W by decreasing the chamber pressure. The MIH scheme is a good candidate to replace traditional thermal heating for cross-linking of PVP as the gate insulator for organic thin-film-transistors.

  6. Monitoring method and apparatus using high-frequency carrier

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, H.D.

    1996-04-30

    A method and apparatus for monitoring an electrical-motor-driven device by injecting a high frequency carrier signal onto the power line current. The method is accomplished by injecting a high frequency carrier signal onto an AC power line current. The AC power line current supplies the electrical-motor-driven device with electrical energy. As a result, electrical and mechanical characteristics of the electrical-motor-driven device modulate the high frequency carrier signal and the AC power line current. The high frequency carrier signal is then monitored, conditioned and demodulated. Finally, the modulated high frequency carrier signal is analyzed to ascertain the operating condition of the electrical-motor-driven device. 6 figs.

  7. Monitoring method and apparatus using high-frequency carrier

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Howard D.

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring an electrical-motor-driven device by injecting a high frequency carrier signal onto the power line current. The method is accomplished by injecting a high frequency carrier signal onto an AC power line current. The AC power line current supplies the electrical-motor-driven device with electrical energy. As a result, electrical and mechanical characteristics of the electrical-motor-driven device modulate the high frequency carrier signal and the AC power line current. The high frequency carrier signal is then monitored, conditioned and demodulated. Finally, the modulated high frequency carrier signal is analyzed to ascertain the operating condition of the electrical-motor-driven device.

  8. Early 72-kDa heat shock protein induction in microglial cells following focal ischemia in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Soriano, M A; Planas, A M; Rodríguez-Farré, E; Ferrer, I

    1994-12-05

    Focal cerebral ischemia in the adult rat produces induction of 72-kDa heat shock protein (HSP-72) in neurons, glia and endothelial cells. Double antigen immunocytochemistry was carried out to find out whether microglial cells express HSP-72 following 1-h middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion. A monoclonal antibody against the CR3 complement receptor (OX-42) specific for microglia was used followed by a monoclonal antibody against HSP-72. Co-localization of these antibodies was seen in cells of the ipsilateral corpus callosum and striatum at 3 h following 1-h MCA occlusion, and in the ipsilateral striatal penumbra, corpus callosum and cortex at 8 h. Results demonstrate that stellate microglial cells show an early response to 1-h MCA occlusion by expressing inducible HSP-72, thus suggesting that microglial cells are sensitive to the ischemic insult.

  9. NMDA receptors mediate heat shock protein induction in the mouse brain following administration of the ibotenic acid analogue AMAA.

    PubMed

    Planas, A M; Ferrer, I; Rodríguez-Farré, E

    1995-11-27

    Expression of inducible heat shock protein-70 (HSP-70) and hsp-70 mRNA were studied in the adult mouse brain following systemic administration of the ibotenic acid analogue (+/-)-2-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoleacetic acid (AMAA), which is a potent N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) agonist. At the dose of 20 mg/kg, AMAA produced excitatory behaviours in adult mice but overt convulsions were not seen. This treatment did not result in any detectable morphological brain damage at 4 days following administration. At 2.5 h and 5 h following treatment induction of hsp-70 mRNA expression was found in the pyramidal cell layers of CA1 and, to a lesser extent, CA3 fields of hippocampal Ammon's horn, amygdala, olfactory lobes, tenia tecta, hypothalamic nuclei and a superficial layer of cingulate, frontal and retrosplenial cortices. The presence of HSP-70 was detected by immunochemistry at 24 h following drug administration in those regions previously showing hsp-70 mRNA induction. AMAA-induced hsp-70 mRNA expression was prevented by pre-treatment with the non-competitive NMDA antagonist MK-801. These results suggest that NMDA receptors are involved in the stress response induced by AMAA.

  10. Occupational exposure assessment of magnetic fields generated by induction heating equipment—the role of spatial averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, Bor; Valič, Blaž; Kotnik, Tadej; Gajšek, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Induction heating equipment is a source of strong and nonhomogeneous magnetic fields, which can exceed occupational reference levels. We investigated a case of an induction tempering tunnel furnace. Measurements of the emitted magnetic flux density (B) were performed during its operation and used to validate a numerical model of the furnace. This model was used to compute the values of B and the induced in situ electric field (E) for 15 different body positions relative to the source. For each body position, the computed B values were used to determine their maximum and average values, using six spatial averaging schemes (9-285 averaging points) and two averaging algorithms (arithmetic mean and quadratic mean). Maximum and average B values were compared to the ICNIRP reference level, and E values to the ICNIRP basic restriction. Our results show that in nonhomogeneous fields, the maximum B is an overly conservative predictor of overexposure, as it yields many false positives. The average B yielded fewer false positives, but as the number of averaging points increased, false negatives emerged. The most reliable averaging schemes were obtained for averaging over the torso with quadratic averaging, with no false negatives even for the maximum number of averaging points investigated.

  11. Occupational exposure assessment of magnetic fields generated by induction heating equipment-the role of spatial averaging.

    PubMed

    Kos, Bor; Valič, Blaž; Kotnik, Tadej; Gajšek, Peter

    2012-10-07

    Induction heating equipment is a source of strong and nonhomogeneous magnetic fields, which can exceed occupational reference levels. We investigated a case of an induction tempering tunnel furnace. Measurements of the emitted magnetic flux density (B) were performed during its operation and used to validate a numerical model of the furnace. This model was used to compute the values of B and the induced in situ electric field (E) for 15 different body positions relative to the source. For each body position, the computed B values were used to determine their maximum and average values, using six spatial averaging schemes (9-285 averaging points) and two averaging algorithms (arithmetic mean and quadratic mean). Maximum and average B values were compared to the ICNIRP reference level, and E values to the ICNIRP basic restriction. Our results show that in nonhomogeneous fields, the maximum B is an overly conservative predictor of overexposure, as it yields many false positives. The average B yielded fewer false positives, but as the number of averaging points increased, false negatives emerged. The most reliable averaging schemes were obtained for averaging over the torso with quadratic averaging, with no false negatives even for the maximum number of averaging points investigated.

  12. Diagnostics and two-dimensional simulation of low-frequency inductively coupled plasmas with neutral gas heating and electron heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrikov, K. N.; Denysenko, I. B.; Tsakadze, E. L.; Xu, S.; Storer, R. G.

    2002-11-01

    This article presents the results on the diagnostics and numerical modeling of low-frequency (approx460 KHz) inductively coupled plasmas generated in a cylindrical metal chamber by an external flat spiral coil. Experimental data on the electron number densities and temperatures, electron energy distribution functions, and optical emission intensities of the abundant plasma species in low/intermediate pressure argon discharges are included. The spatial profiles of the plasma density, electron temperature, and excited argon species are computed, for different rf powers and working gas pressures, using the two-dimensional fluid approach. The model allows one to achieve a reasonable agreement between the computed and experimental data. The effect of the neutral gas temperature on the plasma parameters is also investigated. It is shown that neutral gas heating (at rf powers[greater-than-or-equal, slanted]0.55 kW) is one of the key factors that control the electron number density and temperature. The dependence of the average rf power loss, per electron-ion pair created, on the working gas pressure shows that the electron heat flux to the walls appears to be a critical factor in the total power loss in the discharge.

  13. Suppressing high-frequency temperature oscillations in microchannels with surface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yangying; Antao, Dion S.; Bian, David W.; Rao, Sameer R.; Sircar, Jay D.; Zhang, Tiejun; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2017-01-01

    Two-phase microchannel heat sinks are attractive for thermal management of high heat flux electronic devices, yet flow instability which can lead to thermal and mechanical fatigue remains a significant challenge. Much work has focused on long-timescale (˜seconds) flow oscillations which are usually related to the compressible volume in the loop. The rapid growth of vapor bubbles which can also cause flow reversal, however, occurs on a much shorter timescale (˜tens of milliseconds). While this high-frequency oscillation has often been visualized with high-speed imaging, its effect on the instantaneous temperature has not been fully investigated due to the typical low sampling rates of the sensors. Here, we investigate the temperature response as a result of the high-frequency flow oscillation in microchannels and the effect of surface microstructures on this temperature oscillation with a measurement data acquisition rate of 1000 Hz. For smooth surface microchannels, fluid flow oscillated between complete dry-out and rewetting annular flow due to the short-timescale flow instability, which caused high-frequency and large amplitude temperature oscillations (10 °C in 25 ms). In comparison, hydrophilic surface structures on the microchannel promoted capillary flow which delayed and suppressed dry-out in each oscillation cycle, and thus significantly reduced the temperature oscillation at high heat fluxes. This work suggests that promoting capillary wicking via surface structures is a promising technique to reduce thermal fatigue in high heat flux two-phase microchannel thermal management devices.

  14. Heat induction of hsp18 gene expression in Streptomyces albus G: transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Servant, P; Mazodier, P

    1996-01-01

    In Streptomyces albus G, HSP18, a protein belonging to the small heat shock protein family, could be detected only at high temperature. The nucleotide sequence of the DNA region upstream from hsp18 contains an open reading frame (orfY) which is in the opposite orientation and 150 bp upstream. This open reading frame encodes a basic protein of 225 amino acids showing no significant similarity to any proteins found in data banks. Disruption of this gene in the S. albus chromosome generated mutants that synthesized hsp18 RNA at 30 degrees C, suggesting that orfY plays either a direct or indirect role in the transcriptional regulation of the hsp18 gene. In addition, thermally induced expression of the hsp18 gene is subject to posttranscriptional regulation. In the orfY mutant, although hsp18 RNA was synthesized at a high level at 30 degrees C, the HSP18 protein could not be detected except after heat shock. Synthesis of the HSP18 protein in the orfY mutant was also heat inducible when transcription was inhibited by rifampin. Furthermore, when wild-type cultures of S. albus were shifted from high temperature to 30 degrees C, synthesis of the gene product could no longer be detected, even though large amounts of hsp18 RNA were present. PMID:8955381

  15. Induction of apoptosis by phenylisocyanate derivative of quercetin: involvement of heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Ye, Bin; Yang, Jin-Liang; Chen, Li-Juan; Wu, Xian-Xue; Yang, Han-Shuo; Zhao, Ju-Mei; Yuan, Zhi-Ping; Li, Jiong; Wen, Yan-Jun; Mao, Yong-Qiu; Lei, Song; Kan, Bing; Fan, Lin-Yu; Yao, Wen-Xiu; Wang, Rui; Wang, Guo-Qing; Du, Xiao-Bo; Liu, Huan-Yi; Wu, Hong-Bing; Xu, Jian-Rong; Li, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Xia; Wei, Yu-Quan; Cheng, Li

    2007-11-01

    Quercetin, a widely distributed bioflavonoid, inhibits the growth of various tumor cells. The present study was designed to investigate whether a novel quercetin derivative [phenylisocyanate of quercetin (PHICNQ)] exerts antitumor activity against K562 and CT26 tumor cell lines by inducing apoptosis, and to examine the possible mechanism in the phenomenon. The cell proliferation assay of K562 and CT26 tumor cells was determined by the trypan blue dye exclusion test. Apoptosis of PHICNQ-treated cells was determined by morphological analysis, agarose gel DNA electrophoresis and quantitated by flow cytometry after staining with propidium iodide. Cell cycle was evaluated by flow cytometry. The expression of heat shock protein 70 was checked by Western blot analysis. Our results showed that PHICNQ inhibited the proliferation of K562 and CT26 cells in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. PHICNQ was 308- and 73-fold more active on CT26 and K562 cells than quercetin, respectively. In addition to this cytostatic effect, treatment of K562 and CT26 tumor cells with PHICNQ induced apoptosis. PHICNQ treatment downregulated the expression of heat shock protein 70 more dramatically than quercetin treatment. These results suggest that PHICNQ is a more powerful antiproliferative derivative than quercetin, with cytostatic and apoptotic effects on K562 and CT26 tumor cells. PHICNQ may trigger apoptosis in tumor cells through inhibition of heat shock protein 70 synthesis and expression.

  16. Parametric analysis of hollow conductor parallel and coaxial transmission lines for high frequency space power distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffries, K. S.; Renz, D. D.

    1984-01-01

    A parametric analysis was performed of transmission cables for transmitting electrical power at high voltage (up to 1000 V) and high frequency (10 to 30 kHz) for high power (100 kW or more) space missions. Large diameter (5 to 30 mm) hollow conductors were considered in closely spaced coaxial configurations and in parallel lines. Formulas were derived to calculate inductance and resistance for these conductors. Curves of cable conductance, mass, inductance, capacitance, resistance, power loss, and temperature were plotted for various conductor diameters, conductor thickness, and alternating current frequencies. An example 5 mm diameter coaxial cable with 0.5 mm conductor thickness was calculated to transmit 100 kW at 1000 Vac, 50 m with a power loss of 1900 W, an inductance of 1.45 micron and a capacitance of 0.07 micron-F. The computer programs written for this analysis are listed in the appendix.

  17. Performance testing of a high frequency link converter for Space Station power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sul, S. K.; Alan, I.; Lipo, T. A.

    1989-01-01

    The testing of a brassboard version of a 20-kHz high-frequency ac voltage link prototype converter dynamics for Space Station application is presented. The converter is based on a three-phase six-pulse bridge concept. The testing includes details of the operation of the converter when it is driving an induction machine source/load. By adapting a field orientation controller (FOC) to the converter, four-quadrant operation of the induction machine from the converter has been achieved. Circuit modifications carried out to improve the performance of the converter are described. The performance of two 400-Hz induction machines powered by the converter with simple V/f regulation mode is reported. The testing and performance results for the converter utilizing the FOC, which provides the capability for rapid torque changes, speed reversal, and four-quadrant operation, are reported.

  18. [Experiences in high frequency audiometry and possible applications (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Dieroff, H G

    1976-09-01

    Observations on the ultrasonic perception of noise-impaired persons gave rise to use the high frequency audiometry described by Fletcher for the early recognition of noise-induced damages. Using commercial equipment we found that the earpiece was not adapted to high frequency conditions. The adaptation problem and ways of modification are described in detail. After having improved the coupling features reproducible hearing curves were obtained. Examinations were carried out on workers, whose noise exposure exceeded the critical intensity by only a few dB. The following 3 categories of impairment were found: 1. Normal hearing between 125 and 8,000 Hz as well as in the high frequency region. 2. Unsignificant noise-induced impairments between 125 and 8,000 Hz; no high frequency hearing. 3. Acoustic hearing; no high frequency hearing. The results are discussed. It is supposed that high frequency hearing losses due to noise and chemical noxious exposure (streptomycin) are valuable in diagnostics and prognostics. Accordingly persons are to be assessed as noise sensitive, when there is no more high frequency hearing before practising noise work.

  19. High-frequency energy in singing and speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monson, Brian Bruce

    While human speech and the human voice generate acoustical energy up to (and beyond) 20 kHz, the energy above approximately 5 kHz has been largely neglected. Evidence is accruing that this high-frequency energy contains perceptual information relevant to speech and voice, including percepts of quality, localization, and intelligibility. The present research was an initial step in the long-range goal of characterizing high-frequency energy in singing voice and speech, with particular regard for its perceptual role and its potential for modification during voice and speech production. In this study, a database of high-fidelity recordings of talkers was created and used for a broad acoustical analysis and general characterization of high-frequency energy, as well as specific characterization of phoneme category, voice and speech intensity level, and mode of production (speech versus singing) by high-frequency energy content. Directionality of radiation of high-frequency energy from the mouth was also examined. The recordings were used for perceptual experiments wherein listeners were asked to discriminate between speech and voice samples that differed only in high-frequency energy content. Listeners were also subjected to gender discrimination tasks, mode-of-production discrimination tasks, and transcription tasks with samples of speech and singing that contained only high-frequency content. The combination of these experiments has revealed that (1) human listeners are able to detect very subtle level changes in high-frequency energy, and (2) human listeners are able to extract significant perceptual information from high-frequency energy.

  20. Characterization of bio-oil from induction-heating pyrolysis of food-processing sewage sludges using chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Tien; Lee, Mei-Kuei; Chang, Jeng-Hung; Su, Ting-Yi; Chang, Yuan-Ming

    2009-05-01

    In this study, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to analyze the pyrolytic bio-oils and gas fractions derived from the pyrolysis of industrial sewage sludges using induction-heating technique. The liquid products were obtained from the cryogenic condensation of the devolatilization fraction in a nitrogen atmosphere using a heating rate of 300 degrees C/min ranging from 25 to 500 degrees C. The analytical results showed that the pyrolysis bio-oils were very complex mixtures of organic compounds and contained a lot of nitrogenated and/or oxygenated compounds such as aliphatic hydrocarbons, phenols, pyridines, pyrroles, amines, ketones, and so on. These organic hydrocarbons containing nitrogen and/or oxygen should originate from the protein and nucleic acid textures of the microbial organisms present in the sewage sludge. The non-condensable devolatilization fractions were also composed of nitrogenated and oxygenated compounds, but contained small fractions of phenols, 1H-indoles, and fatty carboxylic acids. On the other hand, the compositions in the non-condensable gas products were principally carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and methane analyzed by gas chromatography-thermal conductivity detector (GC-TCD).

  1. Comparative studies on temperature threshold for heat shock protein 70 induction in young and adult Murrah buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Haque, N; Ludri, A; Hossain, S A; Ashutosh, M

    2012-10-01

    To know the temperature threshold for heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) induction in lymphocytes and to assess physiological changes, if any, in relation to HSP70 induction in young and adult Murrah buffaloes, this study was divided into two parts: I. In vivo study: where assay of HSP70 was performed in blood samples collected from acutely exposed young and adult Murrah buffaloes (n = 6) inside a climatic chamber at 40, 42 and 45 °C for 4 h and thermoneutral temperature (22 °C). Physiological parameters viz., rectal temperature, respiratory rate, pulse rate and skin temperature of different body parts were monitored to assess magnitude of stress in the animals owing to thermal exposure II. For in vitro study, equal numbers of lymphocyte cells were separated from blood collected from young and adult buffaloes and were subjected to four temperature treatments (38, 40, 42 and 45 °C) for 4 h. A significant increase (p < 0.05) in all the physiological parameters in both young and adult buffaloes was observed after exposure to 40, 42 and 45 °C for 4 h as compared to 38 °C. The average plasma HSP70 concentrations (ng/ml) were significantly higher (p < 0.05) at 40, 42 and 45 °C as compared to 38 °C in both young and adult and were higher in young than adult buffaloes at 38 and 45 °C. Heat shock protein 70 level in lymphocyte lysate showed highest concentration after 3-h exposure to all temperatures (40, 42 and 45 °C) in both young and adult buffaloes. The intensity of changes of all physiological parameters was more in young animals than in the adults indicating the greater susceptibility of younger animals to heat stress and was found to be changed at around 40 °C when animals were exposed to different temperatures, indicating the possibility that HSP70 production may be initiated at this temperature which is 2 or 3 °C higher than core body temperature.

  2. A reactor for high-temperature pyrolysis and oxygen isotopic analysis of cellulose via induction heating.

    PubMed

    Evans, Michael N

    2008-07-01

    A reactor for converting cellulose into carbon monoxide for subsequent oxygen isotopic analysis via continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry is described. The system employs an induction heater to produce temperatures >or=1500 degrees C within a molybdenum foil crucible positioned by boron nitride (BN) spacers within a quartz outer sleeve. For samples of a homogeneous working standard cellulose between 300 and 400 microg in size, the blank/signal ratio is <5%, and the long-term precision is 0.30 per thousand (N = 232). For samples of 30 to 100 microg in size, a gas pressure sintered silicon nitride (Si(3)N(4)) outer sleeve replaces the quartz sleeve, the BN spacers are not used, and 6.0-grade carrier He must be used to minimize the blank signal. With these modifications a blank/sample ratio of <5% and long-term precision of 0.30 per thousand (N = 144) are obtained. These results are similar to those achieved using standard high-temperature furnaces, but the reactor is simpler to pack, the system is more economical to run, and samples as small as 30 microg cellulose may be measured. For both reactors memory is significant in the subsequent sample and is believed to be due to exchange with reactor oxygen at temperatures above 1000 degrees C. Further applications might include online preparation of other materials requiring temperatures of 1500-2600 degrees C.

  3. Magnetic fields generated by an induction heating (IH) cook top do not cause genotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Miyakoshi, Junji; Horiuchi, Emi; Nakahara, Takehisa; Sakurai, Tomonori

    2007-10-01

    The use of induction heater (IH) cook tops in homes has become widespread, especially in Japan, but there are concerns about the safety of intermediate frequency (IF) electromagnetic fields associated with these cooking appliances. Since the cellular genotoxicity of IF magnetic fields has not been examined in cultured cells, we examined the effects of these fields at a magnetic flux density of 532 +/- 20 microT at 23 kHz, using an exposure unit with a built-in CO2 incubator. Exposure to the IF magnetic field at 532 microT for 2 h did not affect the growth of CHO-K1 cells and caused no mutagenic effects in bacterial mutation assays. Exposure to the IF magnetic field for 2 h induced neither single nor double DNA strand breaks in comet assays, and caused no significant change in the mutation frequency at the HPRT locus compared to sham exposure. The magnetic field used in this study is more than 80 times higher than the level recommended as safe in the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. From these results, we suggest that exposure to an IF magnetic field for 2 h does not cause cellular genotoxicity in bacteria and in Chinese hamster cells. However, the possibility of effects on other cellular functions remains, and further studies on the cellular effects of IF magnetic fields are required.

  4. On the heating of inductively coupled resonators (stents) during MRI examinations.

    PubMed

    Busch, Martin; Vollmann, Wolfgang; Bertsch, Thomas; Wetzler, Rainer; Bornstedt, Axel; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Schnorr, Jörg; Kivelitz, Dietmar; Taupitz, Matthias; Grönemeyer, Dietrich

    2005-10-01

    Stents that have been implanted to preserve the results of vascular dilatation are frequently affected by in-stent restenosis, which ideally should be followed up by a noninvasive diagnostic modality. Active MRI stents can enable this kind of follow-up, while normal metallic stents can not. The prototype stents investigated in this study were designed as electric resonating circuits without a direct connection to the MR imager, and function as inductively coupled transmit coils. The model of a long solenoid coil is used to describe the additional power loss caused by such resonators. The theoretically estimated temperature increase is verified by measurements for different resonators and discussed for worst-case conditions. The RF power absorption of an active resonator is negligible compared to the total power absorbed during MRI. The local temperature increase observed for prototypes embedded in phantoms is in a range that excludes direct tissue damage. However, ruptures in the conducting structure of a resonator can cause hot spots, which may establish a high local temperature. This hazard can be reduced by designing resonators with a low quality (Q) factor or by setting the circuit slightly off resonance; however, this would lower the nominal amplification for which the resonator was designed.

  5. Research Initiatives for Materials State Sensing (RIMSS) Task Order 0020: High Frequency Eddy Current NDE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Approved for public release; distribution unlimited.  Between single sweep measurements Eddy Current excitation will not run, to prevent heating the...AFRL-RX-WP-TR-2015-0004 RESEARCH INITIATIVES FOR MATERIALS STATE SENSING (RIMSS) Task Order 0020: High Frequency Eddy Current NDE...Frequency Eddy Current NDE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-10-D-5210-0020 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F 6. AUTHOR(S) See

  6. Piezoelectric Shaker Development for High Frequency Calibration of Accelerometers

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Bev; Harper, Kari K.; Vogl, Gregory W.

    2010-05-28

    Calibration of vibration transducers requires sinusoidal motion over a wide frequency range with low distortion and low cross-axial motion. Piezoelectric shakers are well suited to generate such motion and are suitable for use with laser interferometric methods at frequencies of 3 kHz and above. An advantage of piezoelectric shakers is the higher achievable accelerations and displacement amplitudes as compared to electro-dynamic (ED) shakers. Typical commercial ED calibration shakers produce maximum accelerations from 100 m/s{sup 2} to 500 m/s{sup 2}. Very large ED shakers may produce somewhat higher accelerations but require large amplifiers and expensive cooling systems to dissipate heat. Due to the limitations in maximum accelerations by ED shakers at frequencies above 5 kHz, the amplitudes of the generated sinusoidal displacement are frequently below the resolution of laser interferometers used in primary calibration methods. This limits the usefulness of ED shakers in interferometric based calibrations at higher frequencies.Small piezoelectric shakers provide much higher acceleration and displacement amplitudes for frequencies above 5 kHz, making these shakers very useful for accelerometer calibrations employing laser interferometric measurements, as will be shown in this paper. These piezoelectric shakers have been developed and used at NIST for many years for high frequency calibration of accelerometers. This paper documents the construction and performance of a new version of these shakers developed at NIST for the calibration of accelerometers over the range of 3 kHz to 30 kHz and possibly higher. Examples of typical calibration results are also given.

  7. Effect of Permissive Dehydration on Induction and Decay of Heat Acclimation, and Temperate Exercise Performance

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Rebecca A.; Massey, Heather C.; Tipton, Michael J.; Young, John S.; Corbett, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: It has been suggested that dehydration is an independent stimulus for heat acclimation (HA), possibly through influencing fluid-regulation mechanisms and increasing plasma volume (PV) expansion. There is also some evidence that HA may be ergogenic in temperate conditions and that this may be linked to PV expansion. We investigated: (i) the influence of dehydration on the time-course of acquisition and decay of HA; (ii) whether dehydration augmented any ergogenic benefits in temperate conditions, particularly those related to PV expansion. Methods: Eight males [VO2max: 56.9(7.2) mL·kg−1·min−1] undertook two HA programmes (balanced cross-over design), once drinking to maintain euhydration (HAEu) and once with restricted fluid-intake (HADe). Days 1, 6, 11, and 18 were 60 min exercise-heat stress tests [HST (40°C; 50% RH)], days 2–5 and 7–10 were 90 min, isothermal-strain (Tre ~ 38.5°C), exercise-heat sessions. Performance parameters [VO2max, lactate threshold, efficiency, peak power output (PPO)] were determined pre and post HA by graded exercise test (22°C; 55%RH). Results: During isothermal-strain sessions hypohydration was achieved in HADe and euhydration maintained in HAEu [average body mass loss −2.71(0.82)% vs. −0.56(0.73)%, P < 0.001], but aldosterone concentration, power output, and cardiovascular strain were unaffected by dehydration. HA was evident on day 6 {reduced end-exercise Tre [−0.30(0.27)°C] and exercise heart rate [−12(15) beats.min−1], increased PV [+7.2(6.4)%] and sweat-loss [+0.25(0.22) L.h−1], P < 0.05} with some further adaptations on day 11 {further reduced end-exercise Tre [−0.25(0.19)°C] and exercise heart rate [−3(9) beats.min−1], P < 0.05}. These adaptations were not notably affected by dehydration and were generally maintained 7-days post HA. Performance parameters were unchanged, apart from increased PPO (+16(20) W, irrespective of condition). Conclusions: When thermal-strain is matched

  8. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kye-Si; Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-01

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  9. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Kye-Si Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-15

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  10. High-frequency matrix converter with square wave input

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Joseph Alexander; Balda, Juan Carlos

    2015-03-31

    A device for producing an alternating current output voltage from a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage comprising, high-frequency, square-wave input a matrix converter and a control system. The matrix converter comprises a plurality of electrical switches. The high-frequency input and the matrix converter are electrically connected to each other. The control system is connected to each switch of the matrix converter. The control system is electrically connected to the input of the matrix converter. The control system is configured to operate each electrical switch of the matrix converter converting a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage across the first input port of the matrix converter and the second input port of the matrix converter to an alternating current output voltage at the output of the matrix converter.

  11. High frequency ultrasound with color Doppler in dermatology*

    PubMed Central

    Barcaui, Elisa de Oliveira; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Lopes, Flavia Paiva Proença Lobo; Piñeiro-Maceira, Juan; Barcaui, Carlos Baptista

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography is a method of imaging that classically is used in dermatology to study changes in the hypoderma, as nodules and infectious and inflammatory processes. The introduction of high frequency and resolution equipments enabled the observation of superficial structures, allowing differentiation between skin layers and providing details for the analysis of the skin and its appendages. This paper aims to review the basic principles of high frequency ultrasound and its applications in different areas of dermatology. PMID:27438191

  12. High frequency, small signal MH loops of ferromagnetic thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, C. A.; Ong, K. G.

    2000-01-01

    A method is presented for transforming the high frequency bias susceptibility measurements of ferromagnetic thin films into the form of a MH loop with, depending upon the measurement geometry, the y-axis zero crossing giving a measure of the coercive force or anisotropy field. The loops provide a measure of the quantitative and qualitative high frequency switching properties of ferromagnetic thin films. c2000 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Characterizing Earthquake Rupture Properties Using Peak High-Frequency Offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, L.; Meng, L.

    2014-12-01

    Teleseismic array back-projection (BP) of high frequency (~1Hz) seismic waves has been recently applied to image the aftershock sequence of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake. The BP method proves to be effective in capturing early aftershocks that are difficult to be detected due to the contamination of the mainshock coda wave. Furthermore, since the event detection is based on the identification of the local peaks in time series of the BP power, the resulting event location corresponds to the peak high-frequency energy rather than the hypocenter. In this work, we show that the comparison between the BP-determined catalog and conventional phase-picking catalog provides estimates of the spatial and temporal offset between the hypocenter and the peak high-frequency radiation. We propose to measure this peak high-frequency shift of global earthquakes between M4.0 to M7.0. We average the BP locations calibrated by multiple reference events to minimize the uncertainty due to the variation of 3D path effects. In our initial effort focusing on the foreshock and aftershock sequence of the 2014 Iquique earthquake, we find systematic shifts of the peak high-frequency energy towards the down-dip direction. We find that the amount of the shift is a good indication of rupture length, which scales with the earthquake magnitude. Further investigations of the peak high frequency offset may provide constraints on earthquake source properties such as rupture directivity, rupture duration, rupture speed, and stress drop.

  14. Ischemic postconditioning prevents renal ischemia reperfusion injury through the induction of heat shock proteins in rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiongmei; Du, Xuefang; Zhao, Yanli; Zhang, Dong; Yue, Lihui; Wang, Zhenxian

    2014-12-01

    Ischemic postconditioning (IPo) attenuates ischemia‑reperfusion injuries (IRI) in various organs, of both animals and humans. This study tested the hypothesis that IPo attenuates renal IRI through the upregulation of heat shock protein (HSP)70, HSP27 and heme oxygenase‑1 (HO‑1, also known as HSP 32) expression. Adult Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to bilateral renal ischemia for 45 min followed by reperfusion for up to 48 h. One group of rats received IPo prior to restoring full perfusion. Another group was administered 100 mg/kg HSP inhibitor quercetin, injected intraperitoneally 1 h prior to ischemia. Control rats received sham operations. Renal IR resulted in severe morphological and pathological changes, with increased serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen concentrations. IR resulted in increased inflammation by inducing plasma tumor necrosis factor‑α and renal nuclear factor kappa‑light‑chain‑enhancer of activated B cells expression. IR also increased lipid peroxidation, as indicated by elevated malondialdehyde content, reduced superoxide dismutase activity and increased renal apoptosis. Renal HSP70, HSP27 and HO‑1 mRNA and protein levels were increased by IR and further elevated by IPo. IPo attenuated these changes observed in pathology, lipid peroxidation, apoptosis and inflammation. Quercetin treatment abolished all the protective effects of IPo. In conclusion, this study showed that IPo can attenuate lipid peroxidation, apoptosis and inflammation as well as renal IRI by upregulating the expression of HSP70, HSP27 and HO‑1.

  15. Improved efficiency and precise temperature control of low-frequency induction-heating pure iron vapor source on ECR ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Y.; Takenaka, T.; Yano, K.; Kiriyama, R.; Kurisu, Y.; Nozaki, D.; Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Uchida, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Sato, F.; Iida, T.

    2012-11-01

    Multiply charged ions to be used prospectively are produced from solid pure material in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). Recently a pure iron source is also required for the production of caged iron ions in the fullerene in order to control cells in vivo in bio-nano science and technology. We adopt directly heating iron rod by induction heating (IH) because it has non-contact with insulated materials which are impurity gas sources. We choose molybdenum wire for the IH coils because it doesn't need water cooling. To improve power efficiency and temperature control, we propose to the new circuit without previously using the serial and parallel dummy coils (SPD) for matching and safety. We made the circuit consisted of inductively coupled coils which are thin-flat and helix shape, and which insulates the IH power source from the evaporator. This coupling coils circuit, i.e. insulated induction heating coil transformer (IHCT), can be move mechanically. The secondary current can be adjusted precisely and continuously. Heating efficiency by using the IHCT is much higher than those of previous experiments by using the SPD, because leakage flux is decreased and matching is improved simultaneously. We are able to adjust the temperature in heating the vapor source around melting point. And then the vapor pressure can be controlled precisely by using the IHCT. We can control ±10K around 1500°C by this method, and also recognize to controlling iron vapor flux experimentally in the extreme low pressures. Now we come into next stage of developing induction heating vapor source for materials with furthermore high temperature melting points above 2000K with the IHCT, and then apply it in our ECRIS.

  16. Designing high frequency ac inductors using ferrite and Molypermalloy Powder Cores (MPP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.; Wagner, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    The major considerations in the design of high frequency ac inductors are reviewed. Two methods for designing the inductor: the area product method and the core geometry method, are presented. The two major effects of the inductor air gap, fringing flux power loss and increase of inductance, are discussed. Equations for the inductor design and a step-by-step design procedure are given. The use of a lumped air gap or a distributed air gap are discussed and a comparison of the losses resulting from these gaps, together with experimental results are presented.

  17. The dimethylthiourea-induced attenuation of cisplatin nephrotoxicity is associated with the augmented induction of heat shock proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, Takayuki Kato, Akihiko; Yasuda, Hideo; Miyaji, Takehiko; Luo, Jinghui; Sakao, Yukitoshi; Ito, Hideaki; Fujigaki, Yoshihide; Hishida, Akira

    2009-01-15

    Dimethylthiourea (DMTU), a potent hydroxyl radical scavenger, affords protection against cisplatin (CDDP)-induced acute renal failure (ARF). Since the suppression of oxidative stress and the enhancement of heat shock proteins (HSPs) are both reported to protect against CDDP-induced renal damage, we tested whether increased HSP expression is involved in the underlying mechanisms of the DMTU-induced renal protection. We examined the effect of DMTU treatment on the expression of HSPs in the kidney until day 5 following a single injection of CDDP (5 mg/kg BW). DMTU significantly inhibited the CDDP-induced increments of serum creatinine, the number of 8-hydroxyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG)- and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive tubular cells, and tubular damage score (p < 0.05). CDDP significantly increased renal abundances of HO-1, HSP60, HSP72 and HSP90 at days 1, 3, and 5. DMTU significantly augmented only the expression of HSP60 expression mainly in the cytoplasm of the proximal tubular cells at days 1 and 3 in CDDP-induced ARF. DMTU also inhibited the CDDP-induced increment of Bax, a pro-apoptotic protein, in the fraction of organelles/membranes at day 3. The findings suggest that DMTU may afford protection against CDDP-induced ARF, partially through the early induction of cytoplasmic HSP60, thereby preventing the Bax-mediated apoptosis in renal tubular c0010el.

  18. Neutral gas density depletion due to neutral gas heating and pressure balance in an inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Tynan, George R.; Cattolica, Robert

    2007-02-01

    The spatial distribution of neutral gas temperature and total pressure have been measured for pure N2, He/5%N2 and Ar/5%N2 in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor, and a significant rise in the neutral gas temperature has been observed. When thermal transpiration is used to correct total pressure measurements, the total pressure remains constant regardless of the plasma condition. Neutral pressure is depleted due to the pressure balance when the plasma pressure (mainly electron pressure) becomes comparable to the neutral pressure in high density plasma. Since the neutral gas follows the ideal gas law, the neutral gas density profile was obtained from the neutral gas temperature and the corrected neutral pressure measurements. The results show that the neutral gas density at the centre of the plasma chamber (factor of 2-4 ×) decreases significantly in the presence of a plasma discharge. Significant spatial variation in neutral gas uniformity occurs in such plasmas due to neutral gas heating and pressure balance.

  19. Zinc Supplementation with Polaprezinc Protects Mouse Hepatocytes against Acetaminophen-Induced Toxicity via Induction of Heat Shock Protein 70

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Tadashi; Ohata, Shuzo; Kusumoto, Chiaki; Mochida, Shinsuke; Nakada, Junya; Inagaki, Yoshimi; Ohta, Yoshiji; Matsura, Tatsuya

    2010-01-01

    Polaprezinc, a chelate compound consisting of zinc and l-carnosine, is clinically used as a medicine for gastric ulcers. It has been shown that induction of heat shock protein (HSP) is involved in protective effects of polaprezinc against gastric mucosal injury. In the present study, we investigated whether polaprezinc and its components could induce HSP70 and prevent acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in mouse primary cultured hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were treated with polaprezinc, zinc sulfate or l-carnosine at the concentration of 100 µM for 9 h, and then exposed to 10 mM APAP. Polaprezinc or zinc sulfate increased cellular HSP70 expression. However, l-carnosine had no influence on it. Pretreatment of the cells with polaprezinc or zinc sulfate significantly suppressed cell death as well as cellular lipid peroxidation after APAP treatment. In contrast, pretreatment with polaprezinc did not affect decrease in intracellular glutathione after APAP. Furthermore, treatment with KNK437, an HSP inhibitor, attenuated increase in HSP70 expression induced by polaprezinc, and abolished protective effect of polaprezinc on cell death after APAP. These results suggested that polaprezinc, in particular its zinc component, induces HSP70 expression in mouse primary cultured hepatocytes, and inhibits lipid peroxidation after APAP treatment, resulting in protection against APAP toxicity. PMID:20104264

  20. Extreme thermotolerance and behavioral induction of 70-kDa heat shock proteins and their encoding genes in honey bees

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Foraging honey bees frequently leave the hive to gather pollen and nectar for the colony. This period of their lives is marked by periodic extremes of body temperature, metabolic expenditure, and flight muscle activity. Following ecologically relevant episodes of hyperthermia between 33°C and 50°C, heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) expression and hsp70/hsc70-4 activity in brains of nonflying laboratory-held bees increased by only two to three times baseline at temperatures 46–50°C. Induction was undetectable in thoracic–flight muscles. Yet, thorax hsp70 mRNA (but not hsc70-4 mRNA) levels were up to ten times higher in flight-capable hive bees and foraging bees compared to 1-day-old, flight-incapable bees, while brain hsp70/hsc70-4 mRNA levels were low and varied little among behavioral groups. These data suggest honey bee tissues, especially flight muscles, are extremely thermotolerant. Furthermore, Hsp70 expression in the thoraces of flight-capable bees is probably flight-induced by oxidative and mechanical damage to flight muscle proteins rather than temperature. PMID:18696260

  1. Induction heating apparatus and methods for selectively energizing an inductor in response to a measured electrical characteristic that is at least partially a function of a temperature of a material being heated

    DOEpatents

    Richardson, John G.; Morrison, John L.; Hawkes, Grant L.

    2006-07-04

    An induction heating apparatus includes a measurement device for indicating an electrical resistance of a material to be heated. A controller is configured for energizing an inductor in response to the indicated resistance. An inductor may be energized with an alternating current, a characteristic of which may be selected in response to an indicated electrical resistance. Alternatively, a temperature of the material may be indicated via measuring the electrical resistance thereof and a characteristic of an alternating current for energizing the inductor may be selected in response to the temperature. Energizing the inductor may minimize the difference between a desired and indicated resistance or the difference between a desired and indicated temperature. A method of determining a temperature of at least one region of at least one material to be induction heated includes correlating a measured electrical resistance thereof to an average temperature thereof.

  2. Induction of the heat shock regulon of Escherichia coli markedly increases production of bacterial viruses at high temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Wiberg, J S; Mowrey-McKee, M F; Stevens, E J

    1988-01-01

    Production of bacteriophages T2, T4, and T6 at 42.8 to 44 degrees C was increased from 8- to 260-fold by adapting the Escherichia coli host (grown at 30 degrees C) to growth at the high temperature for 8 min before infection; this increase was abolished if the host htpR (rpoH) gene was inactive. Others have shown that the htpR protein increases or activates the synthesis of at least 17 E. coli heat shock proteins upon raising the growth temperature above a certain level. At 43.8 to 44 degrees C in T4-infected, unadapted cells, the rates of RNA, DNA, and protein synthesis were about 100, 70, and 70%, respectively, of those in T4-infected, adapted cells. Production of the major processed capsid protein, gp23, was reduced significantly more than that of most other T4 proteins in unadapted cells relative to adapted cells. Only 4.6% of the T4 DNA made in unadapted cells was resistant to micrococcal nuclease, versus 50% in adapted cells. Thus, defective maturation of T4 heads appears to explain the failure of phage production in unadapted cells. Overproduction of the heat shock protein GroEL from plasmids restored T4 production in unadapted cells to about 50% of that seen in adapted cells. T4-infected, adapted E. coli B at around 44 degrees C exhibited a partial tryptophan deficiency; this correlated with reduced uptake of uracil that is probably caused by partial induction of stringency. Production of bacteriophage T7 at 44 degrees C was increased two- to fourfold by adapting the host to 44 degrees C before infection; evidence against involvement of the htpR (rpoH) gene is presented. This work and recent work with bacteriophage lambda (C. Waghorne and C.R. Fuerst, Virology 141:51-64, 1985) appear to represent the first demonstrations for any virus that expression of the heat shock regulon of a host is necessary for virus production at high temperature. Images PMID:2446014

  3. Permeability measurement of soft magnetic films at high frequency and multilayering effect

    SciTech Connect

    Senda, M.

    1993-03-01

    This paper reports a new method for the measurement of permeability at high frequencies (1 MHz to 1 GHz). An inductance line with a magnetic/conductive/magnetic layer structure was used to estimate the permeability. The inductance line made it possible to measure frequency characteristics of the permeability up to the GHz range because of a low stray capacitance and high resonance frequency. The magnetic film pattern was designed so as to eliminate demagnetizing field effects, and the permeability was estimated based on analysis of the magnetic circuit. Using this method, NiFe/SiO[sub 2] and (Fe/SiO[sub 2])/SiO[sub 2] multilayer films were confirmed to show superior frequency characteristics by a factor of 20 over those of NiFe single-layer film. Also, ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) was observed in these multilayer films at 650 and 750 MHz.

  4. The effect of metal-contacts on carbon nanotube for high frequency interconnects and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Chimowa, George; Bhattacharyya, Somnath

    2014-08-15

    High frequency characterisation of platinum and tungsten contacts on individual multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) is performed from 10 MHz to 50 GHz. By measuring the scattering parameters of aligned individual MWNTs, we show that metal contacts enhance an inductive response due to the improved MWNT-electrode coupling reducing the capacitive effect. This behaviour is pronounced in the frequency below 10 GHz and strong for tungsten contacts. We explain the inductive response as a result of the interaction of stimulus current with the localized (or defects) states present at the contact region resulting in the current lagging behind the voltage. The results are further supported by direct current measurements that show tungsten to significantly increase carbon nanotube-electrode coupling. The immediate consequence is the reduction of the contact resistance, implying a reduction of electron tunnelling barrier from the electrode to the carbon nanotube.

  5. Interface Strategy To Achieve Tunable High Frequency Attenuation.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hualiang; Zhang, Haiqian; Ji, Guangbin; Xu, Zhichuan J

    2016-03-01

    Among all polarizations, the interface polarization effect is the most effective, especially at high frequency. The design of various ferrite/iron interfaces can significantly enhance the materials' dielectric loss ability at high frequency. This paper presents a simple method to generate ferrite/iron interfaces to enhance the microwave attenuation at high frequency. The ferrites were coated onto carbonyl iron and could be varied to ZnFe2O4, CoFe2O4, Fe3O4, and NiFe2O4. Due to the ferrite/iron interface inducing a stronger dielectric loss effect, all of these materials achieved broad effective frequency width at a coating layer as thin as 1.5 mm. In particular, an effective frequency width of 6.2 GHz could be gained from the Fe@NiFe2O4 composite.

  6. Switch over to the high frequency rf systems near transition

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.; Wei, J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to point out that since bunch narrowing naturally occurs in the acceleration process in the vicinity of transition, it should be possible to switch over to the high frequency system close to transition when the bunch has narrowed enough to fit directly into the high frequency bucket. The advantage of this approach is the simplicity, no extra components or gymnastics are required of the low frequency system. The disadvantage, of course, is for protons which do not go through transition. But on the other hand, there is no shortage of intensity for protons and so it should be possible to keep the phase space area low for protons, and then matching to the high frequency bucket should be easily accomplished by adiabatic compression. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Casimir force between δ -δ' mirrors transparent at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Alessandra N.; Silva, Jeferson Danilo L.; Alves, Danilo T.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate, in the context of a real massless scalar field in 1 +1 dimensions, models of partially reflecting mirrors simulated by Dirac δ -δ' point interactions. In the literature, these models do not exhibit full transparency at high frequencies. In order to provide a more realistic feature for these models, we propose a modified δ -δ' point interaction that enables full transparency in the limit of high frequencies. Taking this modified δ -δ' model into account, we investigate the Casimir force, comparing our results with those found in the literature.

  8. High-frequency generation in two coupled semiconductor superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matharu, Satpal; Kusmartsev, Feodor V.; Balanov, Alexander G.

    2013-10-01

    We theoretically show that two semiconductor superlattices arranged on the same substrate and coupled with the same resistive load can be used for a generation of high-frequency periodic and quasiperiodic signals. Each superlattice involved is capable to generate current oscillations associated with drift of domains of high charge concentration. However, the coupling with the common load can eventually lead to synchronization of the current oscillations in the interacting superlattices. We reveal how synchronization depends on detuning between devices and the resistance of the common load, and discuss the effects of coupling and detuning on the high-frequency power output from the system.

  9. A MEMS-based high frequency x-ray chopper.

    PubMed

    Siria, A; Dhez, O; Schwartz, W; Torricelli, G; Comin, F; Chevrier, J

    2009-04-29

    Time-resolved x-ray experiments require intensity modulation at high frequencies (advanced rotating choppers have nowadays reached the kHz range). We here demonstrate that a silicon microlever oscillating at 13 kHz with nanometric amplitude can be used as a high frequency x-ray chopper. We claim that using micro-and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS), it will be possible to achieve higher frequencies in excess of hundreds of megahertz. Working at such a frequency can open a wealth of possibilities in chemistry, biology and physics time-resolved experiments.

  10. Condenser Microphone Protective Grid Correction for High Frequency Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Erik; Bennett, Reginald

    2010-01-01

    Use of a protective grid on small diameter microphones can prolong the lifetime of the unit, but the high frequency effects can complicate data interpretation. Analytical methods have been developed to correct for the grid effect at high frequencies. Specifically, the analysis pertains to quantifying the microphone protective grid response characteristics in the acoustic near field of a rocket plume noise source. A frequency response function computation using two microphones will be explained. Experimental and instrumentation setup details will be provided. The resulting frequency response function for a B&K 4944 condenser microphone protective grid will be presented, along with associated uncertainties

  11. Real-Time, High-Frequency QRS Electrocardiograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; DePalma, Jude L.; Moradi, Saeed

    2003-01-01

    An electronic system that performs real-time analysis of the low-amplitude, high-frequency, ordinarily invisible components of the QRS portion of an electrocardiographic signal in real time has been developed. Whereas the signals readily visible on a conventional electrocardiogram (ECG) have amplitudes of the order of a millivolt and are characterized by frequencies <100 Hz, the ordinarily invisible components have amplitudes in the microvolt range and are characterized by frequencies from about 150 to about 250 Hz. Deviations of these high-frequency components from a normal pattern can be indicative of myocardial ischemia or myocardial infarction

  12. Thermo-Mechanical Stress in High-Frequency Vacuum Electron Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamzina, Diana; Luhmann, Neville C.; Ravani, Bahram

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of the thermo-mechanical performance of high-frequency vacuum electron devices is essential to the advancement of RF sources towards high-power generation. Operation in an ultra-high vacuum environment, space restricting magnetic focusing, and limited material options are just some of the constraints that complicate thermal management in a high-power VED. An analytical method for evaluating temperature, stress, and deformation distribution in thin vacuum-to-cooling walls is presented, accounting for anisotropic material properties. Thin plate geometry is used and analytical expressions are developed for thermo-mechanical analysis that includes the microstructure effects of grain orientations. The method presented evaluates the maximum allowable heat flux that can be used to establish the power-handling limitation of high-frequency VEDs prior to full-scale design, accelerating time-to-manufacture.

  13. Adjusting the thermostat: the threshold induction temperature for the heat-shock response in intertidal mussels (genus Mytilus) changes as a function of thermal history.

    PubMed

    Buckley, B A; Owen, M E; Hofmann, G E

    2001-10-01

    Spatio-temporal variation in heat-shock gene expression gives organisms the ability to respond to changing thermal environments. The temperature at which heat-shock genes are induced, the threshold induction temperature, varies as a function of the recent thermal history of an organism. To elucidate the mechanism by which this plasticity in gene expression is achieved, we determined heat-shock protein (Hsp) induction threshold temperatures in the intertidal mussel Mytilus trossulus collected from the field in February and again in August. In a separate experiment, threshold induction temperatures, endogenous levels of both the constitutive and inducible isoforms of Hsps from the 70 kDa family and the quantity of ubiquitinated proteins (a measure of cellular protein denaturation) were measured in M. trossulus after either 6 weeks of cold acclimation in the laboratory or acclimatization to warm, summer temperatures in the field over the same period. In addition, we quantified levels of activated heat-shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) in both groups of mussels (HSF1 inducibly transactivates all classes of Hsp genes). Lastly, we compared the temperature of HSF1 activation with the induction threshold temperature in the congeneric M. californianus. It was found that the threshold induction temperature in M. trossulus was 23 degrees C in February and 28 degrees C in August. This agreed with the acclimation/acclimatization experiment, in which mussels acclimated in seawater tables to a constant temperature of 10-11 degrees C for 6 weeks displayed a threshold induction temperature of 20-23 degrees C compared with 26-29 degrees C for individuals that were experiencing considerably warmer body temperatures in the intertidal zone over the same period. This coincided with a significant increase in the inducible isoform of Hsp70 in warm-acclimatized individuals but no increase in the constitutive isoform or in HSF1. Levels of ubiquitin-conjugated protein were significantly

  14. The role of inorganic metals and metalloporphyrins in the induction of haem oxygenase and heat-shock protein 70 in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mitani, K; Fujita, H; Fukuda, Y; Kappas, A; Sassa, S

    1993-01-01

    The role of inorganic metals and metalloporphyrins in the induction of mRNAs for haem oxygenase and heat-shock protein 70 (hsp70), the two heat-shock proteins, was examined in human HepG2 and Hep3B hepatoma cells. SnCl2, but not Sn-protoporphyrin, was found to be a potent inducer of both haem oxygenase and hsp70 mRNAs. In contrast, CoCl2, ZnCl2 and FeCl2 caused little induction of haem oxygenase and hsp70 mRNAs, whereas the porphyrin complexes of these metals strongly induced haem oxygenase mRNA, without influencing the level of hsp70 mRNA. The induction process was largely transcriptional, as judged by the inhibition of induction by actinomycin D, but not by cycloheximide, and by increased transcription demonstrated by nuclear run-off analysis. Since CoCl2 is a potent inducer of haem oxygenase in vivo in animals, the possibility of the biosynthesis of Co-protoporphyrin was examined in human hepatoma cells by incubating them with CoCl2 and protoporphyrin, or delta-aminolaevulinate (ALA), the precursor of protoporphyrin. Both types of treatment led to a potent induction of haem oxygenase mRNA. Co-protoporphyrin formation was also spectrally demonstrated in cells incubated with the metal and ALA. The results of this study indicate that certain metals, e.g. SnCl2, may directly induce haem oxygenase mRNA, whereas with other elements, incorporation of the metal into the porphyrin macrocycle is necessary for induction. Therefore CoCl2, like haemin, may activate the haem oxygenase gene via a haem-responsive transcription factor, whereas SnCl2 may exert its effect via a metal-responsive transcription factor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8384446

  15. Superparamagnetic MFe2O 4 (M = Ni, Co, Zn, Mn) nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, induction heating and cell viability studies for cancer hyperthermia applications.

    PubMed

    Sabale, Sandip; Jadhav, Vidhya; Khot, Vishwajeet; Zhu, Xiaoli; Xin, Meiling; Chen, Hongxia

    2015-03-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoferrites are prepared by simple and one step refluxing in polyol synthesis. The ferrite nanoparticles prepared by this method exhibit particle sizes below 10 nm and high degree of crystallinity. These ferrite nanoparticles are compared by means of their magnetic properties, induction heating and cell viability studies for its application in magnetic fluid hyperthermia. Out of all studied nanoparticles in present work, only ZnFe2O4 and CoFe2O4 MNPs are able to produce threshold hyperthermia temperature. This rise in temperature is discussed in detail in view of their magneto-structural properties. Therefore ZnFe2O4 and CoFe2O4 MNPs with improved stability, magnetic induction heating and cell viability are suitable candidates for magnetic hyperthermia.

  16. Effect of neutral gas heating on the wave magnetic fields of a low pressure 13.56 MHz planar coil inductively coupled argon discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Jayapalan, Kanesh K. Chin, Oi-Hoong

    2014-04-15

    The axial and radial magnetic field profiles in a 13.56 MHz (radio frequency) laboratory 6 turn planar coil inductively coupled plasma reactor are simulated with the consideration of the effect of neutral gas heating. Spatially resolved electron densities, electron temperatures, and neutral gas temperatures were obtained for simulation using empirically fitted electron density and electron temperature and heuristically determined neutral gas temperature. Comparison between simulated results and measured fields indicates that neutral gas heating plays an important role in determining the skin depth of the magnetic fields.

  17. Induction of heat shock proteins DnaK, GroEL, and GroES by salt stress in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Kilstrup, M; Jacobsen, S; Hammer, K; Vogensen, F K

    1997-01-01

    The bacterium Lactococcus lactis has become a model organism in studies of growth physiology and membrane transport, as a result of its simple fermentative metabolism. It is also used as a model for studying the importance of specific genes and functions during life in excess nutrients, by comparison of prototrophic wild-type strains and auxotrophic domesticated (dairy) strains. In a study of the capacity of domesticated strains to perform directed responses toward various stress conditions, we have analyzed the heat and salt stress response in the established L. lactis subsp. cremoris laboratory strain MG1363, which was originally derived from a dairy strain. After two-dimensional separation of proteins, the DnaK, GroEL, and GroES heat shock proteins, the HrcA (Orf1) heat shock repressor, and the glycolytic enzymes pyruvate kinase, glyceral-dehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and phosphoglycerate kinase were identified by a combination of Western blotting and direct N-terminal amino acid sequencing of proteins from the gels. Of 400 to 500 visible proteins, 17 were induced more than twofold during heat stress. Two classes of heat stress proteins were identified from their temporal induction pattern. The fast-induced proteins (including DnaK) showed an abruptly increased rate of synthesis during the first 10 min, declining to intermediate levels after 15 min. GroEL and GroES, which also belong to this group, maintained a high rate of synthesis after 15 min. The class of slowly induced proteins exhibited a gradual increase in the rate of synthesis after the onset of stress. Unlike other organisms, all salt stress-induced proteins in L. lactis were also subjected to heat stress induction. DnaK, GroEL, and GroES showed similar temporal patterns of induction during salt stress, resembling the timing during heat stress although at a lower induction level. These data indicate an overlap between the heat shock and salt stress responses in L. lactis. PMID:9143115

  18. Effect of neutral gas heating on the wave magnetic fields of a low pressure 13.56 MHz planar coil inductively coupled argon discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayapalan, Kanesh K.; Chin, Oi-Hoong

    2014-04-01

    The axial and radial magnetic field profiles in a 13.56 MHz (radio frequency) laboratory 6 turn planar coil inductively coupled plasma reactor are simulated with the consideration of the effect of neutral gas heating. Spatially resolved electron densities, electron temperatures, and neutral gas temperatures were obtained for simulation using empirically fitted electron density and electron temperature and heuristically determined neutral gas temperature. Comparison between simulated results and measured fields indicates that neutral gas heating plays an important role in determining the skin depth of the magnetic fields.

  19. Nanocrystalline structure of the surface layer of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings obtained upon preliminary induction heat treatment of metal base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, A. A.; Steinhauer, A. B.; Lyasnikov, V. N.; Wenig, S. B.; Zakharevich, A. M.

    2012-05-01

    Biocompatible nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings for intrabone titanium implants have been obtained by plasma spraying. The HA coatings have an average grain size within 10-30 nm and are characterized by improved characteristics of morphological heterogeneity that is acquired due to the induction heat treatment (IHT) of substrates prior to plasma spray deposition. Based on the data of scanning electron microscopy with computer-aided processing of images, it is established that the average grain size depends on the IHT temperature.

  20. High-frequency hearing in seals and sea lions.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Kane A; Reichmuth, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Existing evidence suggests that some pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, and walruses) can detect underwater sound at frequencies well above the traditional high-frequency hearing limits for their species. This phenomenon, however, is not well studied: Sensitivity patterns at frequencies beyond traditional high-frequency limits are poorly resolved, and the nature of the auditory mechanism mediating hearing at these frequencies is unknown. In the first portion of this study, auditory sensitivity patterns in the 50-180 kHz range were measured for one California sea lion (Zalophus californianus), one harbor seal (Phoca vitulina), and one spotted seal (Phoca largha). Results show the presence of two distinct slope-regions at the high-frequency ends of the audiograms of all three subjects. The first region is characterized by a rapid decrease in sensitivity with increasing frequency-i.e. a steep slope-followed by a region of much less rapid sensitivity decrease-i.e. a shallower slope. In the second portion of this study, a masking experiment was conducted to investigate how the basilar membrane of a harbor seal subject responded to acoustic energy from a narrowband masking noise centered at 140 kHz. The measured masking pattern suggests that the initial, rapid decrease in sensitivity on the high-frequency end of the subject's audiogram is not due to cochlear constraints, as has been previously hypothesized, but rather to constraints on the conductive mechanism.

  1. Collocations of High Frequency Noun Keywords in Prescribed Science Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menon, Sujatha; Mukundan, Jayakaran

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses the discourse of science through the study of collocational patterns of high frequency noun keywords in science textbooks used by upper secondary students in Malaysia. Research has shown that one of the areas of difficulty in science discourse concerns lexis, especially that of collocations. This paper describes a corpus-based…

  2. Piezoelectric films for high frequency ultrasonic transducers in biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qifa; Lau, Sienting; Wu, Dawei; Shung, K. Kirk

    2011-01-01

    Piezoelectric films have recently attracted considerable attention in the development of various sensor and actuator devices such as nonvolatile memories, tunable microwave circuits and ultrasound transducers. In this paper, an overview of the state of art in piezoelectric films for high frequency transducer applications is presented. Firstly, the basic principles of piezoelectric materials and design considerations for ultrasound transducers will be introduced. Following the review, the current status of the piezoelectric films and recent progress in the development of high frequency ultrasonic transducers will be discussed. Then details for preparation and structure of the materials derived from piezoelectric thick film technologies will be described. Both chemical and physical methods are included in the discussion, namely, the sol–gel approach, aerosol technology and hydrothermal method. The electric and piezoelectric properties of the piezoelectric films, which are very important for transducer applications, such as permittivity and electromechanical coupling factor, are also addressed. Finally, the recent developments in the high frequency transducers and arrays with piezoelectric ZnO and PZT thick film using MEMS technology are presented. In addition, current problems and further direction of the piezoelectric films for very high frequency ultrasound application (up to GHz) are also discussed. PMID:21720451

  3. Factors Affecting the Benefits of High-Frequency Amplification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwitz, Amy R.; Ahlstrom, Jayne B.; Dubno, Judy R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to determine the extent to which high-frequency amplification helped or hindered speech recognition as a function of hearing loss, gain-frequency response, and background noise. Method: Speech recognition was measured monaurally under headphones for nonsense syllables low-pass filtered in one-third-octave steps…

  4. Piezoelectric films for high frequency ultrasonic transducers in biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qifa; Lau, Sienting; Wu, Dawei; Shung, K Kirk

    2011-02-01

    Piezoelectric films have recently attracted considerable attention in the development of various sensor and actuator devices such as nonvolatile memories, tunable microwave circuits and ultrasound transducers. In this paper, an overview of the state of art in piezoelectric films for high frequency transducer applications is presented. Firstly, the basic principles of piezoelectric materials and design considerations for ultrasound transducers will be introduced. Following the review, the current status of the piezoelectric films and recent progress in the development of high frequency ultrasonic transducers will be discussed. Then details for preparation and structure of the materials derived from piezoelectric thick film technologies will be described. Both chemical and physical methods are included in the discussion, namely, the sol-gel approach, aerosol technology and hydrothermal method. The electric and piezoelectric properties of the piezoelectric films, which are very important for transducer applications, such as permittivity and electromechanical coupling factor, are also addressed. Finally, the recent developments in the high frequency transducers and arrays with piezoelectric ZnO and PZT thick film using MEMS technology are presented. In addition, current problems and further direction of the piezoelectric films for very high frequency ultrasound application (up to GHz) are also discussed.

  5. High Frequency Acoustic Channel Characterization for Propagation and Ambient Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-30

    with Michael Porter and the ONR High Frequency Initiative and the ONR PLUSNet program. REFERENCES M. B. Porter and H. P. Bucker, “Gaussian...Harrison and Michael Porter , “A passive fathometer for determining bottom depth and imaging seabed layering using ambient noise”, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 120

  6. Measurement of high frequency waves using a wave follower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, S.; Shemdin, O. H.

    1983-01-01

    High frequency waves were measured using a laser-optical sensor mounted on a wave follower. Measured down-wind wave slope spectra are shown to be wind speed dependent; the mean square wave-slopes are generally larger than those measured by Cox and Munk (1954) using the sun glitter method.

  7. High-Frequency Oscillations and Seizure Generation in Neocortical Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worrell, Greg A.; Parish, Landi; Cranstoun, Stephen D.; Jonas, Rachel; Baltuch, Gordon; Litt, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Neocortical seizures are often poorly localized, explosive and widespread at onset, making them poorly amenable to epilepsy surgery in the absence of associated focal brain lesions. We describe, for the first time in an unselected group of patients with neocortical epilepsy, the finding that high-frequency (60--100 Hz) epileptiform oscillations…

  8. Iron Phosphate Glass for Vitrifying Hanford AZ102 LAW in Joule Heated and Cold Crucible Induction Melters

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Delbert E.; Brow, R. K.; Ray, C. S.; Kim, Cheol-Woon; Reis, Signo T.; Vienna, John D.; Peeler, David K.; Johnson, Fabienne; Hansen, E. K.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Soelberg, Nicolas R.; Pegg, Ian L.; Gan, Hao

    2012-01-05

    An iron phosphate composition for vitrifying a high sulfate (~17 wt%) and high alkali (~80 wt%) low activity Hanford waste, known as AZ102 LAW, has been developed for processing in a Joule Heated Melter (JHM) or a Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). This composition produced a glass waste form, designated as MS26AZ102F-2, with a waste loading of 26 wt% of the AZ102 which corresponded to a total alkali and sulfate (SO3) content of 21 and 4.2 wt%, respectively. A slurry (7M Na) of MS26AZ102F-2 simulant was melted continuously at temperatures between 1030 and 1090°C for 10 days in a small JHM at PNNL and for 7 days in a CCIM at INL. The as-cast glasses produced in both melters and in trial laboratory experiments along with their CCC-treated counterparts met the DOE LAW requirements for the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and the Vapor Hydration Test (VHT). These glass waste forms retained up to 77 % of the SO3 (3.3 wt%), 100% of the Cesium, and 33 to 44% of the rhenium, surrogate for Tc-99, all of which either exceeded or were comparable to the retention limit for these species in borosilicate glass nuclear waste form. Analyses of commercial K-3 refractory lining and the Inconel 693 metal electrodes used in JHM indicated only minimum corrosion of these components by the iron phosphate glass. This is the first time that an iron phosphate composition (slurry feed) was melted continuously in the JHM and CCIM, thereby, demonstrating that iron phosphate glasses can be used as alternative hosts for vitrifying nuclear waste.

  9. Generation of Non-Inductive H-Mode Plasmas with 30 MHz Fast Wave Heating in NSTX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G.; Bertelli, N.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Hosea, J. C.; Mueller, D.; Perkins, R. J.; Poli, F. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Raman, R.

    2016-10-01

    A Fusion Nuclear Science Facility based on a spherical tokamak must generate the plasma current (Ip) with little or no central solenoid field. The NSTX-U non-inductive (NI) plasma research program is addressing this goal by developing NI start-up, ramp-up and sustainment scenarios separately. 4 MW of 30 MHz fast wave power is predicted to ramp Ip to 400 kA, a level sufficient to avoid significant shine-through of 90 keV ions from neutral beam injection. In 2010, experiments in NSTX demonstrated that 1.4 MW of 30 MHz high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) power could generate an Ip = 300 kA H-mode discharge with a NI Ip fraction, fNI, around 0.7 at the maximum axial toroidal field (BT(0)) in NSTX of 0.55 T. NSTX-U is a major upgrade of NSTX that will eventually allow the generation of plasmas with BT(0) up to 1 T. Full wave simulations of 30 MHz HHFW heating in NSTX-U predict reduced FW power loss in the plasma edge as BT(0) is increased. HHFW experiments this year aim to couple 3 - 4 MW of 30 MHz HHFW power into an Ip = 250 - 350 kA plasma with BT(0) up to 0.75 T to generate a fNI = 1 H-mode plasma. These experiments should benefit from the improved fast wave coupling predicted at higher BT(0) in NSTX-U. Work supported by USDOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  10. Heat shock protein 90 and calcineurin pathway inhibitors enhance the efficacy of triazoles against Scedosporium prolificans via induction of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Fazal; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2014-01-01

    Scedosporium prolificans is a pathogenic mold resistant to current antifungals, and infection results in high mortality. Simultaneous targeting of both ergosterol biosynthesis and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) or the calcineurin pathway in S. prolificans may be an important strategy for enhancing the potency of antifungal agents. We hypothesized that the inactive triazoles posaconazole (PCZ) and itraconazole (ICZ) acquire fungicidal activity when combined with the calcineurin inhibitor tacrolimus (TCR) or Hsp90 inhibitor 17-demethoxy-17-(2-propenylamino) geldanamycin (17AAG). PCZ, ICZ, TCR and 17AAG alone were inactive in vitro against S. prolificans spores (MICs > 128 μg/ml). In contrast, MICs for PCZ or ICZ in combination with TCR or 17AAG (0.125-0.50 μg/ml) were much lower compared with drug alone. In addition PCZ and ICZ in combination with TCR or 17AAG became fungicidal. Because apoptosis is regulated by the calcineurin pathway in fungi and is under the control of Hsp90, we hypothesized that this synergistic fungicidal effect is mediated via apoptosis. This observed fungicidal activity was mediated by increased apoptosis of S. prolificans germlings, as evidenced by reactive oxygen species accumulation, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, phosphatidylserine externalization, and DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, induction of caspase-like activity was correlated with TCR or 17AAG + PCZ/ICZ-induced cell death. In conclusion, we report for the first time that PCZ or ICZ in combination with TCR or 17AAG renders S. prolificans exquisitely sensitive to PCZ or ICZ via apoptosis. This finding may stimulate the development of new therapeutic strategies for patients infected with this recalcitrant fungus. PMID:28357242

  11. [Participation of the active oxygen forms in the induction of ascorbate peroxidase and guaiacol peroxidase under heat hardening of wheat seedlings].

    PubMed

    Kolupaev, Iu E; Oboznyĭ, A I

    2012-01-01

    The influence of one-minute hardening heating at 42 degrees C on the dynamics of hydrogen peroxide generation and activity of antioxidant enzymes in roots of winter wheat seedlings has been investigated. It was shown that the content of hydrogen peroxide increased within the first 30 minutes after heat influence, whereupon it approached the level of control variant. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) increased significantly within 10 min after heating and was maintained at a high level during 24 hours of observation. The activity of ascorbate peroxidase and guaiacol peroxidase increased after 3-6 hours after the hardening and reached its maximum after 24 hours, when there was the most significant increase in heat resistance of seedlings. The short-term increase in hydrogen peroxide content caused by hardening heating was suppressed by treatment of seedlings with H2O2 scavenger dimethylthiourea, inhibitors of NADPH-oxidase (imidazole) and SOD (sodium diethyldithiocarbamate). All these effectors levelled the increase of activity of ascorbate peroxidase and guaiacol peroxidase and significantly inhibited the development of heat resistance of seedlings. The conclusion was made about the role of hydrogen peroxide produced with the participation of NADPH-oxidase and SOD in the induction of antioxidant system by heat hardening of wheat seedlings.

  12. Induction of heat shock protein HSPA6 (HSP70B') upon HSP90 inhibition in cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kuballa, Petric; Baumann, Anna-Lena; Mayer, Klaus; Bär, Ute; Burtscher, Helmut; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2015-06-04

    Genome-wide transcript profiling to elucidate responses to HSP90 inhibition revealed strong induction of HSPA6 in MCF-7 cells treated with 17-AAG. Time- and dose dependent induction of HSPA6 (confirmed by qPCR and Western Blots) occurred also upon treatment with Radicicol, another HSP90 inhibitor. HSPA6 was not detectable in untreated cells or cells treated with toxins that do not inhibit HSP90, or upon applying oxidative stress. Thus, HSPA6 induction is not a general response to cytotoxic insults. Modulation of HSPA6 levels by siRNA-mediated inhibition or recombinant expression did not influence 17-AAG mediated cell death. HSPA6 induction as a consequence of HSP90 inhibition occurs in various (but not all) cell lines and may be a more specific marker for HSP90 inhibition than induction of other HSP70 proteins.

  13. Shunted Josephson tunnel junctions: High-frequency, self-pumped low noise amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calander, N.; Claeson, T.; Rudner, S.

    1982-07-01

    The high-frequency amplification properties of transformer coupled, resistively shunted Josephson tunnel junctions have been investigated. The importance of the shunt loop inductance is stressed. It allows a high cutoff frequency, of significance for good high-frequency performance. The self-pumped parametric amplifier showed none of the excessive noise rise, which has hitherto plagued the development of externally pumped Josephson junction amplifiers. Around 10 GHz, we estimated a noise temperature less than 30 K for an amplifier pumped by a Josephson oscillation with a frequency well above twice the signal frequency. The corresponding gain of 5 dB may be increased in a better impedance matched circuit. The gain was very stable against variations in the bias conditions. A gain-bandwidth product as high as 0.3 was registered. The experimental results agreed well with the established theory for self-pumped parametric Josephson amplifiers. It should be possible to extend the low noise amplification by this device to mm wave frequencies. A relaxation oscillation occurred at a subharmonic of the Josephson frequency when the shunt loop inductance became large. The amplification in this mode followed closely the predictions of a simple model, where the signal modulated the switching of the sawtooth-like (relatively low frequency) relaxation current. Gains of about 15 dB were measured around 10 GHz, but the amplification was sensitive to bias conditions and noisy in this case where the relaxation frequency fell well below the signal frequency. Much improved properties were registered when the inductance was decreased so that the relaxation frequency approached the Josephson frequency and exceeded twice the signal frequency. The behavior then resembled that of a Josephson mode parametric amplifier, but the high content of harmonics of a relaxation oscillation meant that the amplifier became noisier due to converted noise from the many idler frequencies.

  14. [High-frequency ventilation. I. Distribution of alveolar pressure amplitudes during high frequency oscillation in the lung model].

    PubMed

    Theissen, J; Lunkenheimer, P P; Niederer, P; Bush, E; Frieling, G; Lawin, P

    1987-09-01

    The pattern of intrapulmonary pressure distribution was studied during high-frequency ventilation in order to explain the inconsistent results reported in the literature. Methods. Pressure and flow velocity (hot-wire anemometry) were measured in different lung compartments: 1. In transalveolar chambers sealed to the perforated pleural surfaces of dried pig lungs; 2. In emphysema-simulating airbags sealed to the isolated bronchial trees of dried pig lungs; and 3. In transalveolar chambers sealed to the perforated pleural surfaces of freshly excised pig lungs. Results. 1. The pressure amplitudes change from one area to another and depending on the exciting frequency. 2. High-frequency oscillation is associated with an increase in pressure amplitude when the exciting frequency rises, whereas with conventional high-frequency jet ventilation the pressure amplitude is more likely to decrease with frequency. 3. During high-frequency jet ventilation the local pressure amplitude changes with the position of the tube in the trachea rather than with the exciting frequency. 4. When the volume of the measuring chamber is doubled the resulting pressure amplitude falls to half the control value. 5. The pressure amplitude and mean pressure measured in the transalveolar chamber vary more or less independently from the peak flow velocity. High-frequency ventilation is thus seen to be a frequency-dependant, inhomogeneous mode of ventilation that can essentially be homogenized by systematically changing the exciting frequency. The frequency-dependant response to different lung areas to excitation is likely to result from an intrabronchially-localized aerodynamic effect rather than the mechanical properties of the lung parenchyma.

  15. Multiscale Thermo-Mechanical Design and Analysis of High Frequency and High Power Vacuum Electron Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamzina, Diana

    Diana Gamzina March 2016 Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Multiscale Thermo-Mechanical Design and Analysis of High Frequency and High Power Vacuum Electron Devices Abstract A methodology for performing thermo-mechanical design and analysis of high frequency and high average power vacuum electron devices is presented. This methodology results in a "first-pass" engineering design directly ready for manufacturing. The methodology includes establishment of thermal and mechanical boundary conditions, evaluation of convective film heat transfer coefficients, identification of material options, evaluation of temperature and stress field distributions, assessment of microscale effects on the stress state of the material, and fatigue analysis. The feature size of vacuum electron devices operating in the high frequency regime of 100 GHz to 1 THz is comparable to the microstructure of the materials employed for their fabrication. As a result, the thermo-mechanical performance of a device is affected by the local material microstructure. Such multiscale effects on the stress state are considered in the range of scales from about 10 microns up to a few millimeters. The design and analysis methodology is demonstrated on three separate microwave devices: a 95 GHz 10 kW cw sheet beam klystron, a 263 GHz 50 W long pulse wide-bandwidth sheet beam travelling wave tube, and a 346 GHz 1 W cw backward wave oscillator.

  16. The effects of neutral gas heating on H mode transition and maintenance currents in a 13.56 MHz planar coil inductively coupled plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jayapalan, Kanesh K.; Chin, Oi-Hoong

    2012-09-15

    The H mode transition and maintenance currents in a 13.56 MHz laboratory 6 turn planar coil inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor are simulated for low pressure argon discharge range of 0.02-0.3 mbar with neutral gas heating and at ambient temperature. An experimentally fitted 3D power evolution plot for 0.02 mbar argon pressure is also shown to visualize the effects of hysteresis in the system. Comparisons between simulation and experimental measurements show good agreement in the pressure range of 0.02-0.3 mbar for transition currents and 0.02-0.1 mbar for maintenance currents only when neutral gas heating is considered. This suggests that neutral gas heating plays a non-negligible role in determining the mode transition points of a rf ICP system.

  17. High-frequency Broadband Modulations of Electroencephalographic Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Onton, Julie; Makeig, Scott

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency cortical potentials in electroencephalographic (EEG) scalp recordings have low amplitudes and may be confounded with scalp muscle activities. EEG data from an eyes-closed emotion imagination task were linearly decomposed using independent component analysis (ICA) into maximally independent component (IC) processes. Joint decomposition of IC log spectrograms into source- and frequency-independent modulator (IM) processes revealed three distinct classes of IMs that separately modulated broadband high-frequency (∼15–200 Hz) power of brain, scalp muscle, and likely ocular motor IC processes. Multi-dimensional scaling revealed significant but spatially complex relationships between mean broadband brain IM effects and the valence of the imagined emotions. Thus, contrary to prevalent assumption, unitary modes of spectral modulation of frequencies encompassing the beta, gamma, and high gamma frequency ranges can be isolated from scalp-recorded EEG data and may be differentially associated with brain sources and cognitive activities. PMID:20076775

  18. High-Frequency Power Gain in the Mammalian Cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid Ó.; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2011-11-01

    Amplification in the mammalian inner ear is thought to result from a nonlinear active process known as the cochlear amplifier. Although there is much evidence that outer hair cells (OHCs) play a central role in the cochlear amplifier, the mechanism of amplification remains uncertain. In non-mammalian ears hair bundles can perform mechanical work and account for the active process in vitro, yet in the mammalian cochlea membrane-based electromotility is required for amplification in vivo. A key issue is how OHCs conduct mechanical power amplification at high frequencies. We present a physical model of a segment of the mammalian cochlea that can amplify the power of external signals. In this representation both electromotility and active hair-bundle motility are required for mechanical power gain at high frequencies. We demonstrate how the endocochlear potential, the OHC resting potential, Ca2+ gradients, and ATP-fueled myosin motors serve as the energy sources underlying mechanical power gain in the cochlear amplifier.

  19. Parametric Study of High Frequency Pulse Detonation Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Anderw D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes development of high frequency pulse detonation tubes similar to a small pulse detonation engine (PDE). A high-speed valve injects a charge of a mixture of fuel and air at rates of up to 1000 Hz into a constant area tube closed at one end. The reactants detonate in the tube and the products exit as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers are used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device and thrust is measured with a balance. The effects of injection frequency, fuel and air flow rates, tube length, and injection location are considered. Both H2 and C2H4 fuels are considered. Optimum (maximum specific thrust) fuel-air compositions and resonant frequencies are identified. Results are compared to PDE calculations. Design rules are postulated and applications to aerodynamic flow control and propulsion are discussed.

  20. Extracting cardiac myofiber orientations from high frequency ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Cong, Zhibin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Ming; Wagner, Mary B.; Kirshbom, Paul; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-01

    Cardiac myofiber plays an important role in stress mechanism during heart beating periods. The orientation of myofibers decides the effects of the stress distribution and the whole heart deformation. It is important to image and quantitatively extract these orientations for understanding the cardiac physiological and pathological mechanism and for diagnosis of chronic diseases. Ultrasound has been wildly used in cardiac diagnosis because of its ability of performing dynamic and noninvasive imaging and because of its low cost. An extraction method is proposed to automatically detect the cardiac myofiber orientations from high frequency ultrasound images. First, heart walls containing myofibers are imaged by B-mode high frequency (<20 MHz) ultrasound imaging. Second, myofiber orientations are extracted from ultrasound images using the proposed method that combines a nonlinear anisotropic diffusion filter, Canny edge detector, Hough transform, and K-means clustering. This method is validated by the results of ultrasound data from phantoms and pig hearts.

  1. High Frequency Resonant Electromagnetic Generation and Detection of Ultrasonic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Katsuhiro; Wright, Oliver; Hyoguchi, Takao

    1994-05-01

    High frequency resonant mode electromagnetic ultrasonic generation and detection in metals is demonstrated at frequencies up to ˜150 MHz with various metal sheet samples. Using a unified theory of the generation and detection process, it is shown how various physical quantities can be measured. The sound velocity or thickness of the sheets can be derived from the resonant frequencies. At resonance the detected amplitude is inversely proportional to the ultrasonic attenuation of the sample, whereas the resonance half-width is proportional to this attenuation. We derive the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient from the half-width, and show how the grain size of the material can be probed. In addition we present results for thin bonded sheets, and show how a measure of the bonding or delamination can be obtained. This high frequency resonant method shows great promise for the non-destructive evaluation of thin sheets and coatings in the sub- 10-µm to 1-mm thickness range.

  2. How High Frequency Trading Affects a Market Index

    PubMed Central

    Kenett, Dror Y.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Stanley, H. Eugene; gur-Gershgoren, Gitit

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between a market index and its constituent stocks is complicated. While an index is a weighted average of its constituent stocks, when the investigated time scale is one day or longer the index has been found to have a stronger effect on the stocks than vice versa. We explore how this interaction changes in short time scales using high frequency data. Using a correlation-based analysis approach, we find that in short time scales stocks have a stronger influence on the index. These findings have implications for high frequency trading and suggest that the price of an index should be published on shorter time scales, as close as possible to those of the actual transaction time scale. PMID:23817553

  3. High-frequency oscillations and the neurobiology of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Uhlhaas, Peter J; Singer, Wolf

    2013-09-01

    Neural oscillations at low- and high-frequency ranges are a fundamental feature of large-scale networks. Recent evidence has indicated that schizophrenia is associated with abnormal amplitude and synchrony of oscillatory activity, in particular, at high (beta/gamma) frequencies. These abnormalities are observed during task-related and spontaneous neuronal activity which may be important for understanding the pathophysiology of the syndrome. In this paper, we shall review the current evidence for impaired beta/gamma-band oscillations and their involvement in cognitive functions and certain symptoms of the disorder. In the first part, we will provide an update on neural oscillations during normal brain functions and discuss underlying mechanisms. This will be followed by a review of studies that have examined high-frequency oscillatory activity in schizophrenia and discuss evidence that relates abnormalities of oscillatory activity to disturbed excitatory/inhibitory (E/I) balance. Finally, we shall identify critical issues for future research in this area.

  4. High Frequency Acoustic Reflection and Transmission in Ocean Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    scattering in ocean environments with special emphasis on propagation in shallow water waveguides and scattering from ocean sediments. 3 ) Development of...TYPE 3 . DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High Frequency Acoustic Reflection and Transmission in Ocean Sediments...REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 3

  5. Microstrip antenna modeling and measurement at high frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Bevensee, R.M.

    1986-04-30

    This report addresses the task C(i) of the Proposal for Microstrip Antenna Modeling and Measurement at High Frequencies by the writer, July 1985. The task is: Assess the advantages and disadvantages of the three computational approaches outlined in the Proposal, including any difficulties to be resolved and an estimate of the time required to implement each approach. The three approaches are (1) Finite Difference, (2) Sommerfeld-GTD-MOM, and (3) Surface Intergral Equations - MOM. These are discussed in turn.

  6. Automated composite ellipsoid modelling for high frequency GTD analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sze, K. Y.; Rojas, R. G.; Klevenow, F. T.; Scheick, J. T.

    1991-01-01

    The preliminary results of a scheme currently being developed to fit a composite ellipsoid to the fuselage of a helicopter in the vicinity of the antenna location are discussed under the assumption that the antenna is mounted on the fuselage. The parameters of the close-fit composite ellipsoid would then be utilized as inputs into NEWAIR3, a code programmed in FORTRAN 77 for high frequency Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) Analysis of the radiation of airborne antennas.

  7. High frequency fishbones excited by near perpendicular neutral beam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Deng

    2006-07-15

    The high frequency fishbone instability observed in experiments with near perpendicular neutral beam injection is interpreted as the ideal internal kink mode destabilized by circulating energetic ions. The mode frequency is close to the transit frequency of circulating ions. The beta value of the circulating ions is required to peak on the magnetic axis and the average value within the q=1 magnetic surface must exceed a critical value for the mode to grow up.

  8. Modeling high-frequency capacitance in SOI MOS capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łukasiak, Lidia; Jasiński, Jakub; Beck, Romuald B.; Ikraiam, Fawzi A.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a model of high frequency capacitance of a SOI MOSCAP. The capacitance in strong inversion is described with minority carrier redistribution in the inversion layer taken into account. The efficiency of the computational process is significantly improved. Moreover, it is suitable for the simulation of thin-film SOI structures. It may also be applied to the characterization of non-standard SOI MOSCAPS e.g. with nanocrystalline body.

  9. High-frequency audiometry: test reliability and procedural considerations.

    PubMed

    Stelmachowicz, P G; Beauchaine, K A; Kalberer, A; Kelly, W J; Jesteadt, W

    1989-02-01

    This study compared the reliability of a recently developed high-frequency audiometer (HFA) [Stevens et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 81, 470-484 (1987)] with a less complicated system that uses supraaural earphones (Koss system). The new approach permits calibration on an individual basis, making it possible to express thresholds at high frequencies in dB SPL. Data obtained from 50 normal-hearing subjects, ranging in age from 10-60 years, were used to evaluate the effects on reliability of threshold variance, earpiece/earphone fitting variance, and the variance associated with the HFA calibration process. Without earpiece/earphone replacement, the reliability of thresholds for the two systems is similar. With replacement, the HFA showed poorer reliability than the Koss system above 11 kHz, largely due to errors in estimating the calibration function. HFA reliability is greater for subjects with valid calibration functions over the entire frequency range. When average correction factors are applied to the Koss data in an effort to convert threshold estimates to dB SPL, individual transfer functions are not represented accurately. Thus the benefit of being able to express thresholds at high frequencies in dB SPL must be weighed against the additional source of variability introduced by the HFA calibration process.

  10. Design of matching layers for high-frequency ultrasonic transducers

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Chunlong; Ma, Jianguo; Chiu, Chi Tat; Williams, Jay A.; Fong, Wayne; Chen, Zeyu; Zhu, BenPeng; Xiong, Rui; Shi, Jing; Hsiai, Tzung K.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa

    2015-01-01

    Matching the acoustic impedance of high-frequency (≥100 MHz) ultrasound transducers to an aqueous loading medium remains a challenge for fabricating high-frequency transducers. The traditional matching layer design has been problematic to establish high matching performance given requirements on both specific acoustic impedance and precise thickness. Based on both mass-spring scheme and microwave matching network analysis, we interfaced metal-polymer layers for the matching effects. Both methods hold promises for guiding the metal-polymer matching layer design. A 100 MHz LiNbO3 transducer was fabricated to validate the performance of the both matching layer designs. In the pulse-echo experiment, the transducer echo amplitude increased by 84.4% and its −6dB bandwidth increased from 30.2% to 58.3% comparing to the non-matched condition, demonstrating that the matching layer design method is effective for developing high-frequency ultrasonic transducers. PMID:26445518

  11. High frequency resolution terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangala, Bagvanth Reddy

    2013-12-01

    A new method for the high frequency resolution terahertz time-domain spectroscopy is developed based on the characteristic matrix method. This method is useful for studying planar samples or stack of planar samples. The terahertz radiation was generated by optical rectification in a ZnTe crystal and detected by another ZnTe crystal via electro-optic sampling method. In this new characteristic matrix based method, the spectra of the sample and reference waveforms will be modeled by using characteristic matrices. We applied this new method to measure the optical constants of air. The terahertz transmission through the layered systems air-Teflon-air-Quartz-air and Nitrogen gas-Teflon-Nitrogen gas-Quartz-Nitrogen gas was modeled by the characteristic matrix method. A transmission coefficient is derived from these models which was optimized to fit the experimental transmission coefficient to extract the optical constants of air. The optimization of an error function involving the experimental complex transmission coefficient and the theoretical transmission coefficient was performed using patternsearch algorithm of MATLAB. Since this method takes account of the echo waveforms due to reflections in the layered samples, this method allows analysis of longer time-domain waveforms giving rise to very high frequency resolution in the frequency-domain. We have presented the high frequency resolution terahertz time-domain spectroscopy of air and compared the results with the literature values. We have also fitted the complex susceptibility of air to the Lorentzian and Gaussian functions to extract the linewidths.

  12. Neuronal morphology generates high-frequency firing resonance.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Srdjan; Szapiro, Germán; Schwartz, Eric; Barbour, Boris; Brunel, Nicolas; Hakim, Vincent

    2015-05-06

    The attenuation of neuronal voltage responses to high-frequency current inputs by the membrane capacitance is believed to limit single-cell bandwidth. However, neuronal populations subject to stochastic fluctuations can follow inputs beyond this limit. We investigated this apparent paradox theoretically and experimentally using Purkinje cells in the cerebellum, a motor structure that benefits from rapid information transfer. We analyzed the modulation of firing in response to the somatic injection of sinusoidal currents. Computational modeling suggested that, instead of decreasing with frequency, modulation amplitude can increase up to high frequencies because of cellular morphology. Electrophysiological measurements in adult rat slices confirmed this prediction and displayed a marked resonance at 200 Hz. We elucidated the underlying mechanism, showing that the two-compartment morphology of the Purkinje cell, interacting with a simple spiking mechanism and dendritic fluctuations, is sufficient to create high-frequency signal amplification. This mechanism, which we term morphology-induced resonance, is selective for somatic inputs, which in the Purkinje cell are exclusively inhibitory. The resonance sensitizes Purkinje cells in the frequency range of population oscillations observed in vivo.

  13. Induction of heat-shock response and alterations of protein phosphorylation by a novel topoisomerase II inhibitor, withangulatin A, in 9L rat brain tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, W C; Lin, K Y; Chen, C M; Chen, Z T; Liu, H J; Lai, Y K

    1991-10-01

    Withangulatin A is a newly identified in vitro topoisomerase II inhibitor isolated from the Chinese antitumor herb Physalis angulata. In vivo, it was found to be cytotoxic, capable of suppressing general protein synthesis and of inducing the synthesis of a small set of proteins including those generated by heat-shock treatment. The 70 kDa protein generated by withangulatin A was unequivocally identified as the heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) since both proteins migrated to the same position on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels, could be recognized by a monoclonal antibody to human HSP70, and exhibited identical peptide maps. The induction of protein synthesis by withangulatin A was regulated at the transcriptional level since it was aborted in cells pre-treated with actinomycin D. However, the initiation of this process did not require de novo protein synthesis since it was not affected by cycloheximide. Other cellular effect of withangulatin A was alterations of protein phosphorylation including an enhancement of phosphorylation of a 65 kDa protein which was also detected in the heat-shocked cells. Moreover, this process was observed within 7.5 min after the initial heat treatment which is much faster than the onset of HSP synthesis. Therefore, increased phosphorylation of the 65 kDa protein may represent one of the earliest signals generated by both heat-shock and withangluatin A and may be involved in the upstream regulation of heat-shock response in cells.

  14. Phosphorus geochemical cycling inferences from high frequency lake monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockford, Lucy; Jordan, Philip; Taylor, David

    2013-04-01

    Freshwater bodies in Europe are required to return to good water quality status under the Water Framework Directive by 2015. A small inter-drumlin lake in the northeast of Ireland has been susceptible to eutrophic episodes and the presence of algal blooms during summer since annual monitoring began in 2002. While agricultural practice has been controlled by the implementation of the Nitrates Directive in 2006, the lake is failing to recover to good water quality status to meet with the Water Framework Directive objectives. Freshwaters in Ireland are regarded, in the main, as phosphorus (P) limited so identifying the sources of P possibly fuelling the algal blooms may provide an insight into how to improve water quality conditions. In a lake, these sources are divided between external catchment driven loads, as a result of farming and point sources, and P released from sediments made available to photic waters through internal lake mechanisms. High frequency sensors on data-sondes, installed on the lake in three locations, have provided chlorophyll a, redox potential, dissolved oxygen, temperature, pH, conductivity and turbidity data since March 2010. A data-sonde was installed in the hypolimnion to observe the change in lake conditions as P is released from lake sediments as a result of geochemical cycling with iron during anoxic periods. As compact high frequency sampling equipment for P analysis is still in its infancy for freshwaters, a proxy measurement of geochemical cycling in lakes would be useful to determine fully the extent of P contribution from sediments to the overall P load. Phosphorus was analysed once per month along with a number of other parameters and initial analysis of the high frequency data has shown changes in readings when known P release from lake sediments has occurred. Importantly, these data have shown when these P enriched hypolimnetic waters may be re-introduced to shallower waters in the photic zone, by changes in dissolved oxygen

  15. Modeling of power control schemes in induction cooking devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beato, Alessio; Conti, Massimo; Turchetti, Claudio; Orcioni, Simone

    2005-06-01

    In recent years, with remarkable advancements of power semiconductor devices and electronic control systems, it becomes possible to apply the induction heating technique for domestic use. In order to achieve the supply power required by these devices, high-frequency resonant inverters are used: the force commutated, half-bridge series resonant converter is well suited for induction cooking since it offers an appropriate balance between complexity and performances. Power control is a key issue to attain efficient and reliable products. This paper describes and compares four power control schemes applied to the half-bridge series resonant inverter. The pulse frequency modulation is the most common control scheme: according to this strategy, the output power is regulated by varying the switching frequency of the inverter circuit. Other considered methods, originally developed for induction heating industrial applications, are: pulse amplitude modulation, asymmetrical duty cycle and pulse density modulation which are respectively based on variation of the amplitude of the input supply voltage, on variation of the duty cycle of the switching signals and on variation of the number of switching pulses. Each description is provided with a detailed mathematical analysis; an analytical model, built to simulate the circuit topology, is implemented in the Matlab environment in order to obtain the steady-state values and waveforms of currents and voltages. For purposes of this study, switches and all reactive components are modelled as ideal and the "heating-coil/pan" system is represented by an equivalent circuit made up of a series connected resistance and inductance.

  16. High-frequency induction of chromosomal rearrangements in mouse germ cells by the chemotherapeutic agent chlorambucil.

    PubMed

    Rinchik, E M; Flaherty, L; Russell, L B

    1993-12-01

    Recent mutagenesis studies have demonstrated that the chemotherapeutic agent, chlorambucil (CHL), is highly mutagenic in male germ cells of the mouse. Post-meiotic germ cells, and especially early spermatids, are the most sensitive to the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of this agent. Genetic, cytogenetic and molecular analyses of many induced mutations have shown that, in these germ-cell stages, CHL induces predominantly chromosomal rearrangements (deletions and translocations), and mutation-rate studies show that, in terms of tolerated doses, CHL is perhaps five to ten times more efficient in inducing rearrangements than is radiation exposure. Appropriate breeding protocols, along with knowledge of the advantages and limitations associated with the use of CHL, can be used to expand the current resource of chromosomal rearrangements in the mouse and to provide new phenotype-associated mutations amenable to positional-cloning techniques. The analysis of CHL-induced mutations has also contributed to understanding the factors that affect the yield and nature of chemically induced germline mutations in mammals.

  17. Operator Independent Focused High Frequency ISM Band for Fat Reduction: Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Robert; Weiss, Margaret; Beasley, Karen; Vrba, Jan; Bernardy, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Background Selective fat reduction has been clearly shown for various methods and energy modalities including cryolipolysis and high intensity focused thermal ultrasound. Mathematical modeling of focused high frequency of the EM spectrum has indicated that selective heating of fat is possible using wavelengths not previous explored. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate in the porcine model that selective heating of fat is possible with a non-contact, operator independent device. Methods High frequencies of the Industrial, Scientific and Medical (ISM) RF band were utilized to reduce abdominal fat in a porcine model. Practical application of mathematical modeling allowed an auto-feedback loop to be developed to allow operator independent adjustment of energy to maintain subcutaneous fat at 45–46°C while overlying skin remained at 40–41°C. Results Treatments of three Vietnamese pigs were performed under anesthesia in a certified veterinary facility. Gross and microscopic histologic results demonstrated a marked reduction in adipocytes of the treated area after 4 treatments of a total of 30 minutes each, with incremental fat diminution after each treatment. A final 70% reduction of the abdominal fat layer was seen in the treated areas. Duplex ultrasound revealed a reduction of fat layer from 7.6 to 2.9 mm. Histologic evaluation revealed that epidermis, dermis, and adnexal structures such as hair follicles were unaffected by the treatment, while adipocytes were significantly affected. Conclusion A new model of fat reduction using high frequency RF has been successfully achieved in a porcine model. This has very positive implications in the development of an operator independent, contact free device for reduction of fat in clinical practice. Lasers Surg. Med. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23619902

  18. Measurement of high-frequency density fluctuations in improved confinement RFP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, J. R.; Chapman, B. E.; Anderson, J. K.; Sarff, J. S.; Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2013-10-01

    In standard RFP plasmas, transport is dominated by global magnetic tearing modes. For improved-confinement plasmas using inductive current profile control (PPCD), smaller-scale fluctuations at higher frequencies (>50 kHz) may become more important as the global tearing modes are significantly reduced. In particular, drift-wave-like instabilities are theoretically unstable to the higher temperature and density gradients achieved during PPCD discharges. On the MST, an eleven chord Far-Infrared (FIR) laser-based diagnostic system with ~ 8 cm spacing is used to measure electron density fluctuations by interferometry and far-forward collective scattering. The existing diagnostic measures line-integrated density fluctuations within the divergence of the probe beam covering a wavenumber range k-< 1.3 cm-1, corresponding to k-ρs < 1.3 (ρs is the ion-sound Larmor radius). Experimentally, in PPCD plasmas, global tearing modes are reduced while high frequency coherent modes (50 < f < 140 kHz) emerge among broadband fluctuations. Correlations of these modes with sources of free energy, such as temperature and density gradients, will be investigated. Additionally, effects of increased plasma flow from a 1MW tangential NBI on high frequency density fluctuations will also be explored. Work Supported by U.S.D.O.E.

  19. An impedance bridge measuring the capacitance ratio in the high frequency range up to 1 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bee Kim, Dan; Kew Lee, Hyung; Kim, Wan-Seop

    2017-02-01

    This paper describes a 2-terminal-pair impedance bridge, measuring the capacitance ratio in the high frequency range up to 1 MHz. The bridge was configured with two voltage sources and a phase control unit which enabled the bridge balance by synchronizing the voltage sources with an enhanced phase resolution. Without employing the transformers such as inductive voltage divider, injection and detection transformers, etc, the bridge system is quite simple to set up, and the balance procedure is quick and easy. Using this dual-source coaxial bridge, the 1:1 and 10:1 capacitance ratios were measured with 1 pF-1 nF capacitors in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 1 MHz. The measurement values obtained by the dual-source bridge were then compared with reference values measured using a commercial precision capacitance bridge of AH2700A, the Z-matrix method developed by ourselves, and the 4-terminal-pair coaxial bridge by the Czech Metrological Institute. All the measurements agreed within the reference uncertainty range of an order of 10-6-10-5, proving the bridge ability as a trustworthy tool for measuring the capacitance ratio in the high frequency range.

  20. Temperature-variable high-frequency dynamic modeling of PIN diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangbin, Ye; Jiajia, Zhang; Yicheng, Zhang; Yongtao, Yao

    2016-04-01

    The PIN diode model for high frequency dynamic transient characteristic simulation is important in conducted EMI analysis. The model should take junction temperature into consideration since equipment usually works at a wide range of temperature. In this paper, a temperature-variable high frequency dynamic model for the PIN diode is built, which is based on the Laplace-transform analytical model at constant temperature. The relationship between model parameters and temperature is expressed as temperature functions by analyzing the physical principle of these parameters. A fast recovery power diode MUR1560 is chosen as the test sample and its dynamic performance is tested under inductive load by a temperature chamber experiment, which is used for model parameter extraction and model verification. Results show that the model proposed in this paper is accurate for reverse recovery simulation with relatively small errors at the temperature range from 25 to 120 °C. Project supported by the National High Technology and Development Program of China (No. 2011AA11A265).

  1. In vitro cytotoxicity of Fe-Cr-Nb-B magnetic nanoparticles under high frequency electromagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiriac, Horia; Petreus, Tudor; Carasevici, Eugen; Labusca, Luminita; Herea, Dumitru-Daniel; Danceanu, Camelia; Lupu, Nicoleta

    2015-04-01

    The heating potential, cytotoxicity, and efficiency of Fe68.2Cr11.5Nb0.3B20 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), as such or coated with a chitosan layer, to decrease the cell viability in a cancer cell culture model by using high frequency alternating magnetic fields (AMF) have been studied. The specific absorption rate varied from 215 W/g for chitosan-free MNPs to about 190 W/g for chitosan-coated ones, and an equilibrium temperature of 46 °C was reached when chitosan-coated MNPs were subjected to AMF. The chitosan-free Fe68.2Cr11.5Nb0.3B20 MNPs proved a good biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity in all testing conditions, while the chitosan-coated ones induced strong tumoricidal effects when a cell-particle simultaneous co-incubation approach was used. In high frequency AMF, the particle-mediated heat treatment has proved to be a critical cause for decreasing in vitro the viability of a cancer cell line.

  2. Design of High Frequency Pulse Tube Cryocooler for Onboard Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srikanth, Thota; Padmanabhan; Gurudath, C. S.; Amrit, A.; Basavaraj, S.; Dinesh, K.

    2017-02-01

    To meet the growing demands of on-board applications such as cooling meteorological payloads and the satellite operational constraints like power, lower mass, reduced size and redundancy; a Pulse Tube Cryocooler (PTC) is designed by arriving at an operating frequency of 100 Hz and Helium gas pressure of 35 bar based on insights obtained from combination of phasor diagram, pulse tube and regenerator geometries with overall system mass of ≤ 2.0 kg. High frequency operation would allow reducing the size and mass of pressure wave modulator for a given input power. High Frequency also helps in reducing the volume of regenerator for a given cooling power, which increases the power density and leads to faster cool down. A component level modelling of the regenerator for optimising length and diameter for maximum Coefficient of Performance (COP) is carried out using REGEN3.3. The overall system level modelling of PTC is carried out using 1-D software SAGE. The cold end mass flow rate of the optimised regenerator is taken as reference for the system modelling. The performance achieved in REGEN3.3 is 2.15 W of net heat lift against the performance of 1.02 W of net heat lift at 80 K in SAGE.

  3. Calculation of the high-frequency conductivity and the Hall constant of a thin semiconductor film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenko, O. V.; Romanov, D. N.; Kuznetsova, I. A.

    2016-12-01

    The task about calculation of high-frequency conductivity and Hall constant of a thin semiconductor film is solved by the kinetic method. This film is placed in transverse stationary magnetic field and longitudinal alternative electric field. The ratio between film thickness and mean free path of charge carriers is assumed to be arbitrary. Skin effect is negligible. The diffuse-specular mechanism of charge carriers scattering from film surfaces is considered in the view of equal mirrority coefficients of the upper and lower film surfaces. The dependences of non-dimensional conductivity and Hall constant on non-dimensional parameters: electric field frequency, magnetic field induction and film thickness are investigated. The comparative analysis of obtained results with the calculations for the case of a metal film are made.

  4. High-frequency microwave anti-/de-icing system for carbon-reinforced airfoil structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feher, Lambert; Thumm, Manfred

    2001-08-01

    An aircraft may be subjected to icing for a variety of meteorological reasons during the flight. Ice formation on the plane and in particular on the aerodynamically carrying structures adversely affects the flight behaviour. Conventional de-icing methods for aluminum wings are characterised by a high energy consumption during the flight and slow ice melting due to thermal diffusion of the heat in the wing material. In addition to advanced turbines, novel materials and composites have to be used in order to reduce the weight and, hence, the fuel consumption. These composite materials have a far worse thermal conductivity than metals and undergo delamination when hot air systems, resistance or ohmic heating mats are used. In the paper, the unique advantages of a novel High Frequency Microwave Anti-/De-icing System for large future aircraft with carbon reinforced leading edge structures are presented.

  5. MS2 and ΦX174 inactivation by high frequency ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manariotis, I. D.; Syngouna, V.; Chrysikopoulos, C. V.

    2012-04-01

    Biocolloid inactivation in water with the use of ultrasound can be quite effective, because the implosion of cavitation bubbles can generate high temperatures and pressures at the heart of collapsed bubbles. Biocolloid inactivation by cavitation takes place due to a combination of simultaneously acting processes involving mechanical effects (caused by turbulence generation, microstreaming, liquid circulation currents, and shear stresses), chemical effects of cavitation (generation of active free radicals), and heat effects (generation of local hot spots). Generally, the mechanical effects are more responsible for biocolloid disinfection, whereas the chemical and heat effects play only a supporting role. The present study focuses on inactivation of MS2 and ΦΧ174 at three different relatively high frequencies (i.e. 582, 862, and 1142 kHz). The experimental results indicate that, for all three frequencies and power input of 133 W, both phages were at least 90% inactivated after 60 min of sonication.

  6. Engineering Graphene Conductivity for Flexible and High-Frequency Applications.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Alexander J; Carey, J David

    2015-10-14

    Advances in lightweight, flexible, and conformal electronic devices depend on materials that exhibit high electrical conductivity coupled with high mechanical strength. Defect-free graphene is one such material that satisfies both these requirements and which offers a range of attractive and tunable electrical, optoelectronic, and plasmonic characteristics for devices that operate at microwave, terahertz, infrared, or optical frequencies. Essential to the future success of such devices is therefore the ability to control the frequency-dependent conductivity of graphene. Looking to accelerate the development of high-frequency applications of graphene, here we demonstrate how readily accessible and processable organic and organometallic molecules can efficiently dope graphene to carrier densities in excess of 10(13) cm(-2) with conductivities at gigahertz frequencies in excess of 60 mS. In using the molecule 3,6-difluoro-2,5,7,7,8,8-hexacyanoquinodimethane (F2-HCNQ), a high charge transfer (CT) of 0.5 electrons per adsorbed molecule is calculated, resulting in p-type doping of graphene. n-Type doping is achieved using cobaltocene and the sulfur-containing molecule tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) with a CT of 0.41 and 0.24 electrons donated per adsorbed molecule, respectively. Efficient CT is associated with the interaction between the π electrons present in the molecule and in graphene. Calculation of the high-frequency conductivity shows dispersion-less behavior of the real component of the conductivity over a wide range of gigahertz frequencies. Potential high-frequency applications in graphene antennas and communications that can exploit these properties and the broader impacts of using molecular doping to modify functional materials that possess a low-energy Dirac cone are also discussed.

  7. Cholinergic mechanisms of high-frequency stimulation in entopeduncular nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Chronic, high-frequency (>100 Hz) electrical stimulation, known as deep brain stimulation (DBS), of the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi) is a highly effective therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD) and dystonia. Despite some understanding of how it works acutely in PD models, there remain questions about its mechanisms of action. Several hypotheses have been proposed, such as depolarization blockade, activation of inhibitory synapses, depletion of neurotransmitters, and/or disruption/alteration of network oscillations. In this study we investigated the cellular mechanisms of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) in entopeduncular nucleus (EP; rat equivalent of GPi) neurons using whole cell patch-clamp recordings. We found that HFS applied inside the EP nucleus induced a prolonged afterdepolarization that was dependent on stimulation frequency, pulse duration, and current amplitude. The high frequencies (>100 Hz) and pulse widths (>0.15 ms) used clinically for dystonia DBS could reliably induce these afterdepolarizations, which persisted under blockade of ionotropic glutamate (kynurenic acid, 2 mM), GABAA (picrotoxin, 50 μM), GABAB (CGP 55845, 1 μM), and acetylcholine nicotinic receptors (DHβE, 2 μM). However, this effect was blocked by atropine (2 μM; nonselective muscarinic antagonist) or tetrodotoxin (0.5 μM). Finally, the muscarinic-dependent afterdepolarizations were sensitive to Ca2+-sensitive nonspecific cationic (CAN) channel blockade. Hence, these data suggest that muscarinic receptor activation during HFS can lead to feedforward excitation through the opening of CAN channels. This study for the first time describes a cholinergic mechanism of HFS in EP neurons and provides new insight into the underlying mechanisms of DBS. PMID:26334006

  8. High Frequency Ground Motion from Finite Fault Rupture Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crempien, Jorge G. F.

    There are many tectonically active regions on earth with little or no recorded ground motions. The Eastern United States is a typical example of regions with active faults, but with low to medium seismicity that has prevented sufficient ground motion recordings. Because of this, it is necessary to use synthetic ground motion methods in order to estimate the earthquake hazard a region might have. Ground motion prediction equations for spectral acceleration typically have geometric attenuation proportional to the inverse of distance away from the fault. Earthquakes simulated with one-dimensional layered earth models have larger geometric attenuation than the observed ground motion recordings. We show that as incident angles of rays increase at welded boundaries between homogeneous flat layers, the transmitted rays decrease in amplitude dramatically. As the receiver distance increases away from the source, the angle of incidence of up-going rays increases, producing negligible transmitted ray amplitude, thus increasing the geometrical attenuation. To work around this problem we propose a model in which we separate wave propagation for low and high frequencies at a crossover frequency, typically 1Hz. The high-frequency portion of strong ground motion is computed with a homogeneous half-space and amplified with the available and more complex one- or three-dimensional crustal models using the quarter wavelength method. We also make use of seismic coda energy density observations as scattering impulse response functions. We incorporate scattering impulse response functions into our Green's functions by convolving the high-frequency homogeneous half-space Green's functions with normalized synthetic scatterograms to reproduce scattering physical effects in recorded seismograms. This method was validated against ground motion for earthquakes recorded in California and Japan, yielding results that capture the duration and spectral response of strong ground motion.

  9. Study of switching transients in high frequency converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinger, Donald S.; Elbuluk, Malik E.; Lee, Tony

    1993-01-01

    As the semiconductor technologies progress rapidly, the power densities and switching frequencies of many power devices are improved. With the existing technology, high frequency power systems become possible. Use of such a system is advantageous in many aspects. A high frequency ac source is used as the direct input to an ac/ac pulse-density-modulation (PDM) converter. This converter is a new concept which employs zero voltage switching techniques. However, the development of this converter is still in its infancy stage. There are problems associated with this converter such as a high on-voltage drop, switching transients, and zero-crossing detecting. Considering these problems, the switching speed and power handling capabilities of the MOS-Controlled Thyristor (MCT) makes the device the most promising candidate for this application. A complete insight of component considerations for building an ac/ac PDM converter for a high frequency power system is addressed. A power device review is first presented. The ac/ac PDM converter requires switches that can conduct bi-directional current and block bi-directional voltage. These bi-directional switches can be constructed using existing power devices. Different bi-directional switches for the converter are investigated. Detailed experimental studies of the characteristics of the MCT under hard switching and zero-voltage switching are also presented. One disadvantage of an ac/ac converter is that turn-on and turn-off of the switches has to be completed instantaneously when the ac source is at zero voltage. Otherwise shoot-through current or voltage spikes can occur which can be hazardous to the devices. In order for the devices to switch softly in the safe operating area even under non-ideal cases, a unique snubber circuit is used in each bi-directional switch. Detailed theory and experimental results for circuits using these snubbers are presented. A current regulated ac/ac PDM converter built using MCT's and IGBT's is

  10. Induction motor control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    Electromechanical actuators developed to date have commonly ultilized permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motors. More recently switched reluctance (SR) motors have been advocated due to their robust characteristics. Implications of work which utilized induction motors and advanced control techniques are discussed. When induction motors are operated from an energy source capable of controlling voltages and frequencies independently, drive characteristics are obtained which are superior to either PM or SR motors. By synthesizing the machine frequency from a high-frequency carrier (nominally 20 kHz), high efficiencies, low distortion, and rapid torque response are available. At this time multiple horsepower machine drives were demonstrated, and work is on-going to develop a 20 hp average, 40 hp peak class of aerospace actuators. This effort is based upon high-frequency power distribution and management techniques developed by NASA for Space Station Freedom.

  11. Induction motor control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    1990-01-01

    Electromechanical actuators developed to date have commonly utilized permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motors. More recently switched reluctance (SR) motors have been advocated due to their robust characteristics. Implications of work which utilizes induction motors and advanced control techniques are discussed. When induction motors are operated from an energy source capable of controlling voltages and frequencies independently, drive characteristics are obtained which are superior to either PM or SR motors. By synthesizing the machine frequency from a high frequency carrier (nominally 20 kHz), high efficiencies, low distortion, and rapid torque response are available. At this time multiple horsepower machine drives were demonstrated, and work is on-going to develop a 20 hp average, 40 hp peak class of aerospace actuators. This effort is based upon high frequency power distribution and management techniques developed by NASA for Space Station Freedom.

  12. Induction motor control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    1990-01-01

    Electromechanical actuators developed to date have commonly ultilized permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motors. More recently switched reluctance (SR) motors have been advocated due to their robust characteristics. Implications of work which utilized induction motors and advanced control techniques are discussed. When induction motors are operated from an energy source capable of controlling voltages and frequencies independently, drive characteristics are obtained which are superior to either PM or SR motors. By synthesizing the machine frequency from a high-frequency carrier (nominally 20 kHz), high efficiencies, low distortion, and rapid torque response are available. At this time multiple horsepower machine drives were demonstrated, and work is on-going to develop a 20 hp average, 40 hp peak class of aerospace actuators. This effort is based upon high-frequency power distribution and management techniques developed by NASA for Space Station Freedom.

  13. Acoustic trapping with a high frequency linear phased array.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fan; Li, Ying; Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Liu, Changgeng; Tat Chiu, Chi; Lee, Changyang; Ham Kim, Hyung; Shung, K Kirk

    2012-11-19

    A high frequency ultrasonic phased array is shown to be capable of trapping and translating microparticles precisely and efficiently, made possible due to the fact that the acoustic beam produced by a phased array can be both focused and steered. Acoustic manipulation of microparticles by a phased array is advantageous over a single element transducer since there is no mechanical movement required for the array. Experimental results show that 45 μm diameter polystyrene microspheres can be easily and accurately trapped and moved to desired positions by a 64-element 26 MHz phased array.

  14. A fast directional algorithm for high-frequency electromagnetic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, Paul; Ying Lexing

    2011-06-20

    This paper is concerned with the fast solution of high-frequency electromagnetic scattering problems using the boundary integral formulation. We extend the O(N log N) directional multilevel algorithm previously proposed for the acoustic scattering case to the vector electromagnetic case. We also detail how to incorporate the curl operator of the magnetic field integral equation into the algorithm. When combined with a standard iterative method, this results in an almost linear complexity solver for the combined field integral equations. In addition, the butterfly algorithm is utilized to compute the far field pattern and radar cross section with O(N log N) complexity.

  15. High frequency columnar silicon microresonators for mass detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kehrbusch, J.; Ilin, E. A.; Hullin, M.; Oesterschulze, E.

    2008-07-14

    A simple but effective technological scheme for the fabrication of high frequency silicon columnar microresonators is presented. With the proposed technique the dimensions of the microresonators are controlled on a scale of at least 1 {mu}m. Characterization of the mechanical properties of silicon columns gave resonant frequencies of the lowest flexural mode of 3-7 MHz with quality factors of up to 2500 in air and {approx}8800 under vacuum condition. Columnar microresonators were operated as mass balance with a sensitivity of 1 Hz/fg. A mass detection limit of 25 fg was deduced from experiments.

  16. High frequency atmospheric gravity wave damping in the mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, G. R.; Liu, A. Z.; Li, F.; Tang, J.

    2003-09-01

    Correlative measurements of temperature and winds by Na lidar and brightness in OH and O 2 Atmospheric band airglow have been made at Albuquerque, NM and Maui, HI for a study of high frequency (period less than 30 minutes) Atmospheric Gravity Waves. Wave studies from four nights have been made and the correlative information describes the intrinsic wave properties with altitude, their damping characteristics, and resulting accelerations to the large scale circulation in the 85-100 km altitude region. Generally, saturated to super-saturated conditions were observed below 95 km. Above this altitude, they were less saturated to freely propagating.

  17. High frequency SAW devices based on third harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Le Brizoual, L; Elmazria, O; Sarry, F; El Hakiki, M; Talbi, A; Alnot, P

    2006-12-01

    We demonstrate the third harmonic generation in a ZnO/Si layered structure to obtain high frequency SAW devices. This configuration eliminates the need of high lithography resolution and allows easy integration of such devices and electronics on the same wafer. A theoretical study was carried out for the determination of the phase velocity and the electromechanical coupling coefficient (K(2)) dispersion curves of the surface acoustic waves. These results are also in agreement with those measured on a SAW filter designed for the third harmonic generation and the operating frequency is up to 2468 MHz.

  18. Acoustic trapping with a high frequency linear phased array

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fan; Li, Ying; Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Liu, Changgeng; Tat Chiu, Chi; Lee, Changyang; Ham Kim, Hyung; Shung, K. Kirk

    2012-01-01

    A high frequency ultrasonic phased array is shown to be capable of trapping and translating microparticles precisely and efficiently, made possible due to the fact that the acoustic beam produced by a phased array can be both focused and steered. Acoustic manipulation of microparticles by a phased array is advantageous over a single element transducer since there is no mechanical movement required for the array. Experimental results show that 45 μm diameter polystyrene microspheres can be easily and accurately trapped and moved to desired positions by a 64-element 26 MHz phased array. PMID:23258939

  19. Fluctuation patterns in high-frequency financial asset returns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preis, T.; Paul, W.; Schneider, J. J.

    2008-06-01

    We introduce a new method for quantifying pattern-based complex short-time correlations of a time series. Our correlation measure is 1 for a perfectly correlated and 0 for a random walk time series. When we apply this method to high-frequency time series data of the German DAX future, we find clear correlations on short time scales. In order to subtract trivial autocorrelation parts from the pattern conformity, we introduce a simple model for reproducing the antipersistent regime and use alternatively level 1 quotes. When we remove the pattern conformity of this stochastic process from the original data, remaining pattern-based correlations can be observed.

  20. High-frequency nonreciprocal reflection from magnetic films with overlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ying; Nie, Yan; Camley, R. E.

    2013-11-14

    We perform a theoretical study of the nonreciprocal reflection of high-frequency microwave radiation from ferromagnetic films with thin overlayers. Reflection from metallic ferromagnetic films is always near unity and shows no nonreciprocity. In contrast, reflection from a structure which has a dielectric overlayer on top of a film composed of insulated ferromagnetic nanoparticles or nanostructures can show significant nonreciprocity in the 75–80 GHz frequency range, a very high value. This can be important for devices such as isolators or circulators.

  1. Observations and modeling of dynamically triggered high frequency burst events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Adam David

    2008-10-01

    A series of high-frequency (>20Hz) bursts of energy are observed on strong motion records during the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan Earthquake Mw7.6. We hypothesized that these bursts originated near the individual stations as small, shallow events that were dynamically triggered by the P- and S-waves generated by the Chi-Chi mainshock. These bursts were originally interpreted as a mainshock source signal by Chen et al., [2006] but our observations of events on strong motion records recorded at stations up to 170 km from the mainshock epicenter is consistent with the local triggering hypothesis. If the bursts originated on the Chi-Chi fault plane, as hypothesized by Chen et al. [2006] based on their analysis of recordings within 20Km from the Chelungpu fault, then they should not be observable at this distance assuming any reasonable value of crustal attenuation. The bursts on all strong motion stations in the Taiwan Central Weather Bureau network (TWCB) were identified using a numerical algorithm approach. This data set was analyzed in the context of local dynamic triggering which resulted in a stress threshold for triggering in the range 0.03 to 0.05 MPa for S-wave triggering and 0.0013 to 0.0033 MPa for P-wave triggering, consistent with prior observations of surface wave triggering. In an attempt to better characterize the nature of high frequency bursts, similar analysis of strong motion records was performed on the records of the 2004 Parkfield, CA earthquake (Mw6) at the USGS UPSAR array. The average array spacing was relatively small compared to the instruments in Taiwan so that further constraint of the location of bursts was possible. Bursts were found to be incoherent even for stations spaced 40m apart, suggesting that they occur in a region approximately 20m from the stations. The triggering threshold was found to be ~0.02Mpa, consistent with the observations from Taiwan. To test the possibility of nucleating unstable slip events in the very shallow crust we

  2. Explanation of persistent high frequency density structure in coalesced bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Gerald P.

    1988-07-01

    It has been observed that after the Main Ring rf manipulation of coalescing (where 5 to 13 primary bunches are transferred into a single rf bucket) the new secondary bunch displays evidence of high frequency density structure superimposed on the approximately Gaussian longitudinal bunch length distribution. This structure is persistent over a period of many seconds (hundreds of synchrotron oscillation periods). With the help of multiparticle simulation programs, an explanation of this phenomenon is given in terms of single particle longitudinal phase space dynamics. No coherent effects need be taken into account. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Material considerations for high frequency, high power capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W.; Galperin, I.

    1983-01-01

    Dielectric materials chosen for use in this high frequency, high power capacitor must endure hard vacuum conditions, high currents (up to 125 A rms), and frequencies up to 40 kHz. Temperature requirements for this type of capacitor are that capacitor operation must be efficient up to 125 C. A more stringent requirement for the sold dielectric is that the temperature coefficient of dissipation factor should indicate self stabilization well below 125 C. In addition, the dielectric temperature coefficient of capacitance should be negative.

  4. Motor monitoring method and apparatus using high frequency current components

    DOEpatents

    Casada, D.A.

    1996-05-21

    A motor current analysis method and apparatus for monitoring electrical-motor-driven devices are disclosed. The method and apparatus utilize high frequency portions of the motor current spectra to evaluate the condition of the electric motor and the device driven by the electric motor. The motor current signal produced as a result of an electric motor is monitored and the low frequency components of the signal are removed by a high-pass filter. The signal is then analyzed to determine the condition of the electrical motor and the driven device. 16 figs.

  5. Motor monitoring method and apparatus using high frequency current components

    DOEpatents

    Casada, Donald A.

    1996-01-01

    A motor current analysis method and apparatus for monitoring electrical-motor-driven devices. The method and apparatus utilize high frequency portions of the motor current spectra to evaluate the condition of the electric motor and the device driven by the electric motor. The motor current signal produced as a result of an electric motor is monitored and the low frequency components of the signal are removed by a high-pass filter. The signal is then analyzed to determine the condition of the electrical motor and the driven device.

  6. Material considerations for high frequency, high power capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, W.; Galperin, I.

    1983-10-01

    Dielectric materials chosen for use in this high frequency, high power capacitor must endure hard vacuum conditions, high currents (up to 125 A rms), and frequencies up to 40 kHz. Temperature requirements for this type of capacitor are that capacitor operation must be efficient up to 125 C. A more stringent requirement for the sold dielectric is that the temperature coefficient of dissipation factor should indicate self stabilization well below 125 C. In addition, the dielectric temperature coefficient of capacitance should be negative.

  7. Corrosion monitoring using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Corrosion develops due to adverse environmental conditions during the life cycle of a range of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the structural integrity. The nondestructive detection and monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. The wave propagation and interference of the different guided wave modes depends on the thickness of the structure. Laboratory experiments were conducted and the wall thickness reduced by consecutive milling of the steel structure. Further measurements were conducted using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath and the damage severity monitored. From the measured signal change due to the wave mode interference the wall thickness reduction was monitored. The high frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  8. 10 K high frequency pulse tube cryocooler with precooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sixue; Chen, Liubiao; Wu, Xianlin; Zhou, Yuan; Wang, Junjie

    2016-07-01

    A high frequency pulse tube cryocooler with precooling (HPTCP) has been developed and tested to meet the requirement of weak magnetic signals measurement, and the performance characteristics are presented in this article. The HPTCP is a two-stage pulse tube cryocooler with the precooling-stage replaced by liquid nitrogen. Two regenerators completely filled with stainless steel (SS) meshes are used in the cooler. Together with cold inertance tubes and cold gas reservoir, a cold double-inlet configuration is used to control the phase relationship of the HPTCP. The experimental result shows that the cold double-inlet configuration has improved the performance of the cooler obviously. The effects of operation parameters on the performance of the cooler are also studied. With a precooling temperature of 78.5 K, the maximum refrigeration capacity is 0.26 W at 15 K and 0.92 W at 20 K when the input electric power are 174 W and 248 W respectively, and the minimum no-load temperature obtained is 10.3 K, which is a new record on refrigeration temperature for high frequency pulse tube cryocooler reported with SS completely used as regenerative matrix.

  9. High-frequency ultrasound imaging for breast cancer biopsy guidance

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Thomas; Yoon, Changhan; Choi, Hojong; Eliahoo, Payam; Kim, Hyung Ham; Yamashita, Mary W.; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda J.; Lang, Julie E.; Sener, Stephen F.; Vallone, John; Martin, Sue E.; Kirk Shung, K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Image-guided core needle biopsy is the current gold standard for breast cancer diagnosis. Microcalcifications, an important radiographic finding on mammography suggestive of early breast cancer such as ductal carcinoma in situ, are usually biopsied under stereotactic guidance. This procedure, however, is uncomfortable for patients and requires the use of ionizing radiation. It would be preferable to biopsy microcalcifications under ultrasound guidance since it is a faster procedure, more comfortable for the patient, and requires no radiation. However, microcalcifications cannot reliably be detected with the current standard ultrasound imaging systems. This study is motivated by the clinical need for real-time high-resolution ultrasound imaging of microcalcifications, so that biopsies can be accurately performed under ultrasound guidance. We have investigated how high-frequency ultrasound imaging can enable visualization of microstructures in ex vivo breast tissue biopsy samples. We generated B-mode images of breast tissue and applied the Nakagami filtering technique to help refine image output so that microcalcifications could be better assessed during ultrasound-guided core biopsies. We describe the preliminary clinical results of high-frequency ultrasound imaging of ex vivo breast biopsy tissue with microcalcifications and without Nakagami filtering and the correlation of these images with the pathology examination by hematoxylin and eosin stain and whole slide digital scanning. PMID:26693167

  10. Phase velocity limit of high-frequency photon density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskell, Richard C.; Svaasand, Lars O.; Madsen, Sten; Rojas, Fabio E.; Feng, T.-C.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1995-05-01

    In frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM), two factors make high modulation frequencies desirable. First, with frequencies as high as a few GHz, the phase lag versus frequency plot has sufficient curvature to yield both the scattering and absorption coefficients of the tissue under examination. Second, because of increased attenuation, high frequency photon density waves probe smaller volumes, an asset in small volume in vivo or in vitro studies. This trend toward higher modulation frequencies has led us to re-examine the derivation of the standard diffusion equation (SDE) from the Boltzman transport equation. We find that a second-order time-derivative term, ordinarily neglected in the derivation, can be significant above 1 GHz for some biological tissue. The revised diffusion equation, including the second-order time-derivative, is often termed the P1 equation. We compare the dispersion relation of the P1 equation with that of the SDE. The P1 phase velocity is slower than that predicted by the SDE; in fact, the SDE phase velocity is unbounded with increasing modulation frequency, while the P1 phase velocity approaches c/sqrt(3) is attained only at modulation frequencies with periods shorter than the mean time between scatterings of a photon, a frequency regime that probes the medium beyond the applicability of diffusion theory. Finally we caution that values for optical properties deduced from FDPM data at high frequencies using the SDE can be in error by 30% or more.

  11. Advances in high frequency ultrasound separation of particulates from biomass.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Pablo; Augustin, Mary Ann; Xu, Xin-Qing; Mawson, Raymond; Knoerzer, Kai

    2017-03-01

    In recent years the use of high frequency ultrasound standing waves (megasonics) for droplet or cell separation from biomass has emerged beyond the microfluidics scale into the litre to industrial scale applications. The principle for this separation technology relies on the differential positioning of individual droplets or particles across an ultrasonic standing wave field within the reactor and subsequent biomass material predisposition for separation via rapid droplet agglomeration or coalescence into larger entities. Large scale transducers have been characterised with sonochemiluminescence and hydrophones to enable better reactor designs. High frequency enhanced separation technology has been demonstrated at industrial scale for oil recovery in the palm oil industry and at litre scale to assist olive oil, coconut oil and milk fat separation. Other applications include algal cell dewatering and milk fat globule fractionation. Frequency selection depends on the material properties and structure in the biomass mixture. Higher frequencies (1 and 2MHz) have proven preferable for better separation of materials with smaller sized droplets such as milk fat globules. For palm oil and olive oil, separation has been demonstrated within the 400-600kHz region, which has high radical production, without detectable impact on product quality.

  12. A perspective on high-frequency ultrasound for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamou, Jonathan; Aristizába, Orlando; Silverman, Ronald H.; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    High-frequency ultrasound (HFU, >15 MHz) is a rapidly developing field. HFU is currently used and investigated for ophthalmologic, dermatologic, intravascular, and small-animal imaging. HFU offers a non-invasive means to investigate tissue at the microscopic level with resolutions often better than 100 μm. However, fine resolution is only obtained over the limited depth-of-field (˜1 mm) of single-element spherically-focused transducers typically used for HFU applications. Another limitation is penetration depth because most biological tissues have large attenuation at high frequencies. In this study, two 5-element annular arrays with center frequencies of 17 and 34 MHz were fabricated and methods were developed to obtain images with increased penetration depth and depth-of-field. These methods were used in ophthalmologic and small-animal imaging studies. Improved blood sensitivity was obtained when a phantom mimicking a vitreous hemorrhage was imaged. Central-nervous systems of 12.5-day-old mouse embryos were imaged in utero and in three dimensions for the first time.

  13. High-frequency filtering of strong-motion records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Douglas, J.; Boore, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of noise in strong-motion records is most problematic at low and high frequencies where the signal to noise ratio is commonly low compared to that in the mid-spectrum. The impact of low-frequency noise (5 Hz) on computed pseudo-absolute response spectral accelerations (PSAs). In contrast to the case of low-frequency noise our analysis shows that filtering to remove high-frequency noise is only necessary in certain situations and that PSAs can often be used up to 100 Hz even if much lower high-cut corner frequencies are required to remove the noise. This apparent contradiction can be explained by the fact that PSAs are often controlled by ground accelerations associated with much lower frequencies than the natural frequency of the oscillator because path and site attenuation (often modelled by Q and κ, respectively) have removed the highest frequencies. We demonstrate that if high-cut filters are to be used, then their corner frequencies should be selected on an individual basis, as has been done in a few recent studies.

  14. Saltating Snow Mechanics: High Frequency Particle Response to Mountain Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksamit, N. O.; Pomeroy, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Blowing snow transport theory is currently limited by its dependency on the coupling of time-averaged measurements of particle saltation and suspension and wind speed. Details of the stochastic process of particle transport and complex bed interactions in the saltation layer, along with the influence of boundary-layer turbulence are unobservable with classic measurement techniques. In contrast, recent advances in two-phase sand transport understanding have been spurred by development of high-frequency wind and particle velocity measurement techniques. To advance the understanding of blowing snow, laser illuminated high-speed videography and ultrasonic anemometry were deployed in a mountain environment to examine saltation of snow over a natural snowpack in detail. A saltating snow measurement site was established at the Fortress Mountain Snow Laboratory, Alberta, Canada and instrumented with two Campbell CSAT3 ultrasonic anemometers, four Campbell SR50 ultrasonic snow depth sounders and a two dimensional Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) system. Measurements were collected during nighttime blowing snow events, quantifying snow particle response to high frequency wind gusts. This novel approach permits PTV to step beyond mean statistics of snow transport by identifying sub-species of saltation motion in the first 20 mm above the surface, as well as previously overlooked initiation processes, such as tumbling aggregate snow crystals ejecting smaller grains, then eventually disintegrating and bouncing into entrainment. Spectral characteristics of snow particle ejection and saltation dynamics were also investigated. These unique observations are starting to inform novel conceptualizations of saltating snow transport mechanisms.

  15. High Frequency PIN-Diode Switches for Radiometer Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montes, Oliver; Dawson, Douglas E.; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Reising, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    Internally calibrated radiometers are needed for ocean topography and other missions. Typically internal calibration is achieved with Dicke switching as one of the techniques. We have developed high frequency single-pole double-throw (SPDT) switches in the form of monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC) that can be easily integrated into Dicke switched radiometers that utilize microstrip technology. In particular, the switches we developed can be used for a radiometer such as the one proposed for the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Satellite Mission whose three channels at 92, 130, and 166 GHz would allow for wet-tropospheric path delay correction near coastal zones and over land. This feat is not possible with the current Jason-class radiometers due to their lower frequency signal measurement and thus lower resolution. The MMIC chips were fabricated at NGST using their InP PIN diode process and measured at JPL using high frequency test equipment. Measurement and simulation results will be presented.

  16. Optoacoustics for high-frequency ultrasonic imaging and manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, Matthew; Buma, Takashi

    2004-05-01

    Pulsed lasers can generate ultrasound through thermoelastic expansion of a thin optical absorber. By carefully designing the optical absorbing structure, efficient transduction is possible for a number of biomedical applications including high-frequency imaging, microfluidics, and sensing. The major key for efficient optoacoustic transduction in biomedical applications is to engineer a nearly perfect optical absorber possessing a large coefficient of thermal expansion with acoustic properties well matched to a water medium. We have obtained an optoacoustic efficiency increase of over 20 dB compared to conventional approaches using a thin, optically absorbing layer consisting of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and carbon black spin coated onto a clear PDMS substrate. This structure has been extensively analyzed both experimentally and analytically and seems to provide opportunities for a wide range of optoacoustic devices. In this talk we show how PDMS-based optoacoustic transduction can be used for high-frequency imaging using longitudinal waves and acoustic tweezing using Lamb waves. The basic mechanism of optoacoustic transduction will be described, and specific devices will be presented.

  17. Planck 2013 results. VI. High Frequency Instrument data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bowyer, J. W.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Girard, D.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herent, O.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hou, Z.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melot, F.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Mottet, S.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Orieux, F.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rusholme, B.; Sanselme, L.; Santos, D.; Sauvé, A.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Techene, S.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    Wedescribe the processing of the 531 billion raw data samples from the High Frequency Instrument (HFI), which we performed to produce six temperature maps from the first 473 days of Planck-HFI survey data. These maps provide an accurate rendition of the sky emission at 100, 143, 217, 353, 545, and 857GHz with an angular resolution ranging from 9.´7 to 4.´6. The detector noise per (effective) beam solid angle is respectively, 10, 6 , 12, and 39 μK in the four lowest HFI frequency channels (100-353GHz) and 13 and 14 kJy sr-1 in the 545 and 857 GHz channels. Relative to the 143 GHz channel, these two high frequency channels are calibrated to within 5% and the 353 GHz channel to the percent level. The 100 and 217 GHz channels, which together with the 143 GHz channel determine the high-multipole part of the CMB power spectrum (50 <ℓ < 2500), are calibrated relative to 143 GHz to better than 0.2%.

  18. [High-frequency transistor tract for UHF therapy device].

    PubMed

    Tamarchak, D Ia

    1998-01-01

    The paper deals with the specific features of construction of a common circuit and individual units of high-frequency transistor tracts for physiotherapeutic UHF apparatuses whose design is a possible way of conversion of radioelectron equipment. The design of UHF tracts gives rise to some radio engineering problems due to the low output resistance of bipolar transistors and to the operational characteristics of physiotherapeutic equipment and, as a result, the load of the tract is a two-conductor long line loaded with complex resistance whose active part changes slightly and the reactive one varies very greatly. The structure of a high-frequency, which transfers power from the generator with external excitement to the active part of complex load by changing its reactive part in the wide range, was analyzed. It is shown that for reliable operation of the UHF apparatus, its tract should have a multichannel structure with subsequent summation of the power and automatic compensation of the reactive component of alternating load. This provides a measuring mode for the power connected to the patient. The tract structure in question may serve the basis for the designing transistor physiotherapy apparatuses of average and high power (Poutput = 50-400 W).

  19. High-frequency wave normals in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, F.; Smith, L.D.; Sonett, C.P.

    1984-05-01

    High-frequency (0.01--0.04 Hz) magnetic fluctuations in 506 ten-minute intervals of contemporaneous Explorer 35 and Apollo 12 measurements made in the solar wind near the morning side of the Earth's bow shock show the presence of a large population of disturbances resembling Alfven waves. Each wavefront normal n is systematically aligned (median deviation = 35/sup 0/) with , the associated ten-minute average of the magnetic field. Because of variability in the direction of from one interval to another, the coupled distribution of n is nearly isotropic in solar ecliptic coordinates, in contrast with the results of other studies of waves at much lower frequency indicating outward propagation from the sun. Presumably the high frequency waves discussed here are stirred into isotropy (in solar ecliptic coordinates) by following the low frequency fluctuations. As these waves maintain their alignement of n with despite the great variation of , a strong physical alignment constraint is inferred.

  20. High-Frequency Normal Mode Propagation in Aluminum Cylinders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.; Waite, William F.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic measurements made using compressional-wave (P-wave) and shear-wave (S-wave) transducers in aluminum cylinders reveal waveform features with high amplitudes and with velocities that depend on the feature's dominant frequency. In a given waveform, high-frequency features generally arrive earlier than low-frequency features, typical for normal mode propagation. To analyze these waveforms, the elastic equation is solved in a cylindrical coordinate system for the high-frequency case in which the acoustic wavelength is small compared to the cylinder geometry, and the surrounding medium is air. Dispersive P- and S-wave normal mode propagations are predicted to exist, but owing to complex interference patterns inside a cylinder, the phase and group velocities are not smooth functions of frequency. To assess the normal mode group velocities and relative amplitudes, approximate dispersion relations are derived using Bessel functions. The utility of the normal mode theory and approximations from a theoretical and experimental standpoint are demonstrated by showing how the sequence of P- and S-wave normal mode arrivals can vary between samples of different size, and how fundamental normal modes can be mistaken for the faster, but significantly smaller amplitude, P- and S-body waves from which P- and S-wave speeds are calculated.

  1. Carbon nanotube transistor based high-frequency electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroter, Michael

    At the nanoscale carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have higher carrier mobility and carrier velocity than most incumbent semiconductors. Thus CNT based field-effect transistors (FETs) are being considered as strong candidates for replacing existing MOSFETs in digital applications. In addition, the predicted high intrinsic transit frequency and the more recent finding of ways to achieve highly linear transfer characteristics have inspired investigations on analog high-frequency (HF) applications. High linearity is extremely valuable for an energy efficient usage of the frequency spectrum, particularly in mobile communications. Compared to digital applications, the much more relaxed constraints for CNT placement and lithography combined with already achieved operating frequencies of at least 10 GHz for fabricated devices make an early entry in the low GHz HF market more feasible than in large-scale digital circuits. Such a market entry would be extremely beneficial for funding the development of production CNTFET based process technology. This talk will provide an overview on the present status and feasibility of HF CNTFET technology will be given from an engineering point of view, including device modeling, experimental results, and existing roadblocks. Carbon nanotube transistor based high-frequency electronics.

  2. High-frequency BiCMOS transconductance integrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beards, R. Douglas

    1990-10-01

    The capabilities of a fine-line bipolar complementary metal oxide semiconductor (BiCMOS) process in the design of wideband transconductance integrators for precision monolithic continuous time filtering are explored. The design considerations of such an integrator are examined in detail, with an emphasis on tunability and phase compensation as a means for realizing a precision wideband design. The concept of open-loop transconductance filtering is described and possible circuit topologies are investigated. Detailed small-signal and large-signal analysis of one proposed circuit which has both tunable bandwidth and tunable phase compensation is presented. Application of such an integrator to open-loop transconductance filtering in the 10-50 MHz frequency range is studied. Simulation results show specific performance expectations of the proposed circuit. The tunable compensation circuit was seen to restrict the amplitude of signals which the integrator can pass without severe distortion or even instability occurring. A potential solution to this problem is deemed to be unsuitable for high frequency applications. The general design philosophy of applying low-frequency techniques to realize a high frequency circuit was seen to result in several fundamental problems.

  3. A high-frequency electrospray driven by gas volume charges

    SciTech Connect

    Lastochkin, Dmitri; Chang, H.-C.

    2005-06-15

    High-frequency (>10 kHz) ac electrospray is shown to eject volatile dielectric liquid drops by an entirely different mechanism from dc sprays. The steady dc Taylor conic tip is absent and continuous spraying of submicron drops is replaced by individual dynamic pinchoff events involving the entire drop. We attribute this spraying mechanism to a normal Maxwell force produced by an undispersed plasma cloud in front of the meniscus that produces a visible glow at the spherical tip. The volume charge within the cloud is formed by electron-induced gas ionization of the evaporated liquid and produces a large normal field that is much higher than the nominal applied field such that drop ejection occurs at a voltage (at high frequencies) that is as much as ten times lower than that for dc sprays. The ejection force is sensitive to the liquid properties (but not its electrolyte composition), the ac frequency and trace amounts of inert gases, which are believed to catalyze the ionization reactions. As electroneutral drops are ejected, due to the large (>100) ratio between individual drop ejection time and the ac frequency, this mechanism can produce large (microns) electroneutral drops at relatively low voltages.

  4. Corrosion monitoring using high-frequency guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, P.

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion can develop due to adverse environmental conditions during the life cycle of a range of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the reduction of the strength and thus degradation of the structural integrity. The monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic wedge transducers with single sided access to the structure, guided wave modes were selectively generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. The wave propagation and interference of the different guided wave modes depends on the thickness of the structure. Laboratory experiments were conducted for wall thickness reduction due to milling of the steel structure. From the measured signal changes due to the wave mode interference the reduced wall thickness was monitored. Good agreement with theoretical predictions was achieved. The high frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  5. High-frequency-link based power electronics in power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sree, Hari

    Power quality has become a serious concern to many utility customers in recent times. Among the many power quality problems, voltage sags are one of the most common and most mischievous, affecting industrial and commercial customers. They are primarily caused by power system faults at the transmission and distribution level, and thus, are mostly unavoidable. Their effect depends on the equipment sensitivities to the magnitude and duration of these sags and each can cost an industry up to few million dollars. To counter these limitations, many solutions at the customer end have been proposed which include Constant Voltage Transformers (CVT's), UPS and line frequency transformer based Dynamic Voltage Restorer (DVR). These approaches have their respective limitations with regard to capabilities, size and cost. This research proposes a new approach to mitigating these voltage sags involving the use of high frequency transformer link. Suitable switching logic and control strategies have been implemented. The proposed approach in a one-phase application is verified with computer simulations and by a hardware proof-of-concept prototype. Application to three-phase system is verified through simulations. Application of high frequency transformers in other utility applications such as active filters and static compensators is also looked at.

  6. Very High Frequency (Beyond 100 MHz) PZT Kerfless Linear Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Da-Wei; Zhou, Qifa; Geng, Xuecang; Liu, Chang-Geng; Djuth, Frank; Shung, K. Kirk

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, and measurements of very high frequency kerfless linear arrays prepared from PZT film and PZT bulk material. A 12-µm PZT thick film fabricated from PZT-5H powder/solution composite and a piece of 15-µm PZT-5H sheet were used to fabricate 32-element kerfless high-frequency linear arrays with photolithography. The PZT thick film was prepared by spin-coating of PZT sol-gel composite solution. The thin PZT-5H sheet sample was prepared by lapping a PZT-5H ceramic with a precision lapping machine. The measured results of the 2 arrays were compared. The PZT film array had a center frequency of 120 MHz, a bandwidth of 60% with a parylene matching layer, and an insertion loss of 41 dB. The PZT ceramic sheet array was found to have a center frequency of 128 MHz with a poorer bandwidth (40% with a parylene matching layer) but a better sensitivity (28 dB insertion loss). PMID:19942516

  7. Resent developments in high-frequency surface-wave techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, J.; Pan, Y.; Zeng, C.

    2012-12-01

    High-frequency Rayleigh-wave methods, such as Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW), are getting increasingly attention in the near-surface geophysics and geotechnique community in the last 20 years because of their non-invasive, non-destructive, efficient, and low-cost advantages and their success in environmental and engineering applications. They are viewed by near-surface geophysics community as the one of most promise techniques in the future. However, they face unique problems related to extremely irregular velocity variations in near-surface geology or man-made constructions, for example, highway, foundation, dam, levee, jetty, etc., which are not solvable by techniques or algorithms widely used in earthquake seismology or oil/gas seismic exploration. We present solutions to the problems associated with near-surface materials that possess velocity inverse and high Poisson's ratio. Calculation of dispersion curves by existing algorithms may fail for some special velocity models due to velocity inverse (a high-velocity layer on the top of a low-velocity layer). Two velocity models are most common in near-surface applications. One is a low-velocity half space model and the other a high-velocity topmost layer. The former model results in a complex matrix that no roots can be found in the real number domain, which implies that no phase velocities can be calculated in certain frequency ranges based on current exist algorithms. A solution is to use the real part of the root of the complex number. It is well-known that phase velocities approach about 91% of the shear (S)-wave velocity of the topmost layer when wavelengths are much shorter than the thickness of the topmost layer. The later model, however, results in that phase velocities in a high-frequency range calculated using the current algorithms approach a velocity associated with the S-wave velocity of the second layer NOT the topmost layer. A solution to this problem is to use a two-layer model to

  8. Synergistic induction of apoptosis and caspase-independent autophagic cell death by a combination of nitroxide Tempo and heat shock in human leukemia U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qing-Li; Fujiwara, Yoshisada; Kondo, Takashi

    2010-10-01

    We have shown that heat stress or a superoxide dismutase mimic nitroxide, Tempo, induces apoptosis, while their combination causes nonapoptotic cell death; however, the underlying mechanism for this switch remains unclear. Here we identified for the first time that 10 mM Tempo present during heating at 44°C for 30 min rapidly induced autophagy in U937 leukemic cells in spite of Bax activation and mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) permeabilization. This co-treatment inhibited the processing of heat-activated procaspases-2, -8, -9 and -3 into active small subunits, leading to the inhibition of caspase-dependent apoptosis, and instead caused the induction of autophagy. The inactivation of caspases, a key event, could result from oxidation of active-site-CysSH of all caspases by a prooxidant oxo-ammonium cation, an intermediate derived Tempo during dismutation of heat-induced superoxide anion. In addition, the co-treatment caused mitochondrial calcium overloads, the mitochondrial inner membrane permeabilization, profound mitochondrial dysfunction, and liberation of Beclin 1 from the Bcl-2/Beclin 1 complex, all of which contributed to induction of autophagy. These autophagic cells underwent propidium iodide-positive necrosis in a delayed fashion, leading to the complete proliferative inhibition. Remarkably, ruthenium red and BAPTA, which interfere with mitochondrial calcium uptake, facilitated autophagic necrotic death. Cyclosporin A, which binds to cyclophilin D, had a similar necrotic effect. 3-Methyladenine facilitated the necrosis of autophagic cells. In contrast, 5 mM Tempo-44°C/10 min or 44°C/30 min induced Bax-mediated MOM permeabilization and caspase-dependent apoptosis more potently than Tempo alone. Thus, Tempo is a unique thermosensitizer to synergistically induce apoptosis and autophagic cell death.

  9. Induction heating vs conventional heating for the hydrothermal treatment of nitinol and its subsequent 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl 2-(trimethylammonio)ethyl phosphate coating by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Devillers, S; Barthélémy, B; Delhalle, J; Mekhalif, Z

    2011-10-01

    Nitinol is an alloy of great interest in general and especially in the biomedical field where many researches are aimed to improve both its corrosion resistance and its biocompatibility. In this work, we report on the advantage of an induction heating treatment in pure water compared to a conventional hydrothermal procedure. Both treatments lead to a hydroxylation of the surface, a decrease of the nickel amount in the outer part of the oxide layer, and a drastically decreased corrosion current density. However, the amount of surface hydroxyl groups is higher in the case of the induction heating treatment, which in turn leads to a denser grafting of atom transfer radical polymerization initiators and ultimately to a thicker 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl 2-(trimethylammonio)ethyl phosphate (MPC) polymer layer than in the case of conventional heating treatments. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), static contact angle, and polarization curves measurements as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been used to characterize the obtained modified surfaces.

  10. Inhibitory effects of sesquiterpenes from bay leaf on nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages: structure requirement and role of heat shock protein induction.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, H; Kagerura, T; Toguchida, I; Ueda, H; Morikawa, T; Yoshikawa, M

    2000-04-21

    The methanolic extract from the leaves of Laurus nobilis (bay leaf, laurel) was found to inhibit nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated mouse peritoneal macrophages. Through bioassay-guided separation, fourteen known sesquiterpenes were isolated from the active fraction and were examined for ability to inhibit the NO production. Seven sesquiterpene lactones (costunolide, dehydrocostus lactone, eremanthine, zaluzanin C, magnolialide, santamarine and spirafolide) potently inhibited LPS-induced NO production (IC50 = 1.2 approximately 3.8 microM). Other sesquiterpene constituents also showed the inhibitory activity (IC50 > or = 21 microM), but their inhibitory activities were less than those of sesquiterpene lactones. Alpha-methylene-gamma-butyrolactone also showed inhibitory activity (IC50 = 9.6 microM), while mokko lactone and watsonol A etc., reductants of the alpha-methylene-gamma-butyrolactone moiety by NaBH4 or DIBAL, and a 2-mercaptoethanol adduct of dehydrocostus lactone showed little activity (IC50 > or = 18 microM). These results indicated that the alpha-methylene-gamma-butyrolactone moiety is important for the activity. Furthermore, costunolide and dehydrocostus lactone inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) induction in accordance with induction of heat shock protein 72 (HSP 72). These results suggested that, as one of their mechanisms of action, sesquiterpene lactones induce HSP 72 thereby preventing nuclear factor-kappaB activation followed by iNOS induction.

  11. Microscale capillary wave turbulence excited by high frequency vibration.

    PubMed

    Blamey, Jeremy; Yeo, Leslie Y; Friend, James R

    2013-03-19

    Low frequency (O(10 Hz-10 kHz)) vibration excitation of capillary waves has been extensively studied for nearly two centuries. Such waves appear at the excitation frequency or at rational multiples of the excitation frequency through nonlinear coupling as a result of the finite displacement of the wave, most often at one-half the excitation frequency in so-called Faraday waves and twice this frequency in superharmonic waves. Less understood, however, are the dynamics of capillary waves driven by high-frequency vibration (>O(100 kHz)) and small interface length scales, an arrangement ideal for a broad variety of applications, from nebulizers for pulmonary drug delivery to complex nanoparticle synthesis. In the few studies conducted to date, a marked departure from the predictions of classical Faraday wave theory has been shown, with the appearance of broadband capillary wave generation from 100 Hz to the excitation frequency and beyond, without a clear explanation. We show that weak wave turbulence is the dominant mechanism in the behavior of the system, as evident from wave height frequency spectra that closely follow the Rayleigh-Jeans spectral response η ≈ ω(-17/12) as a consequence of a period-halving, weakly turbulent cascade that appears within a 1 mm water drop whether driven by thickness-mode or surface acoustic Rayleigh wave excitation. However, such a cascade is one-way, from low to high frequencies. The mechanism of exciting the cascade with high-frequency acoustic waves is an acoustic streaming-driven turbulent jet in the fluid bulk, driving the fundamental capillary wave resonance through the well-known coupling between bulk flow and surface waves. Unlike capillary waves, turbulent acoustic streaming can exhibit subharmonic cascades from high to low frequencies; here it appears from the excitation frequency all the way to the fundamental modes of the capillary wave at some four orders of magnitude in frequency less than the excitation frequency

  12. A NARX damper model for virtual tuning of automotive suspension systems with high-frequency loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alghafir, M. N.; Dunne, J. F.

    2012-02-01

    A computationally efficient NARX-type neural network model is developed to characterise highly nonlinear frequency-dependent thermally sensitive hydraulic dampers for use in the virtual tuning of passive suspension systems with high-frequency loading. Three input variables are chosen to account for high-frequency kinematics and temperature variations arising from continuous vehicle operation over non-smooth surfaces such as stone-covered streets, rough or off-road conditions. Two additional input variables are chosen to represent tuneable valve parameters. To assist in the development of the NARX model, a highly accurate but computationally excessive physical damper model [originally proposed by S. Duym and K. Reybrouck, Physical characterization of non-linear shock absorber dynamics, Eur. J. Mech. Eng. M 43(4) (1998), pp. 181-188] is extended to allow for high-frequency input kinematics. Experimental verification of this extended version uses measured damper data obtained from an industrial damper test machine under near-isothermal conditions for fixed valve settings, with input kinematics corresponding to harmonic and random road profiles. The extended model is then used only for simulating data for training and testing the NARX model with specified temperature profiles and different valve parameters, both in isolation and within quarter-car vehicle simulations. A heat generation and dissipation model is also developed and experimentally verified for use within the simulations. Virtual tuning using the quarter-car simulation model then exploits the NARX damper to achieve a compromise between ride and handling under transient thermal conditions with harmonic and random road profiles. For quarter-car simulations, the paper shows that a single tuneable NARX damper makes virtual tuning computationally very attractive.

  13. Population-specificity of heat stress gene induction in northern and southern eelgrass Zostera marina populations under simulated global warming.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Nina; Winters, Gidon; Rauch, Gisep; Eizaguirre, Christophe; Gu, Jenny; Nelle, Peter; Fricke, Birgit; Reusch, Thorsten B H

    2010-07-01

    Summer heat waves have already resulted in mortality of coastal communities, including ecologically important seagrass meadows. Gene expression studies from controlled experiments can provide important insight as to how species/genotypes react to extreme events that will increase under global warming. In a common stress garden, we exposed three populations of eelgrass, Zostera marina, to extreme sea surface temperatures, simulating the 2003-European heat wave. Populations came from locations widely differing in their thermal regime, two northern European locations [Ebeltoft (Kattegat), Doverodde (Limfjord, Baltic Sea)], and one southern population from Gabicce Mare (Adriatic Sea), allowing to test for population specificity in the response to a realistic heat stress event. Eelgrass survival and growth as well as the expression of 12 stress associated candidate genes were assessed during and after the heat wave. Contrary to expectations, all populations suffered equally from 3 weeks of heat stress in terms of shoot loss. In contrast, populations markedly differed in multivariate measures of gene expression. While the gene expression profiles converged to pre-stress values directly after the heat wave, stress correlated genes were upregulated again 4 weeks later, in line with the observed delay in shoot loss. Target genes had to be selected based on functional knowledge in terrestrial plants, nevertheless, 10/12 genes were induced relative to the control treatment at least once during the heat wave in the fully marine plant Z. marina. This study underlines the importance of realistic stress and recovery scenarios in studying the impact of predicted climate change.

  14. Development of high frequency and wide bandwidth Johnson noise thermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Crossno, Jesse; Liu, Xiaomeng; Kim, Philip; Ohki, Thomas A.; Fong, Kin Chung

    2015-01-12

    We develop a high frequency, wide bandwidth radiometer operating at room temperature, which augments the traditional technique of Johnson noise thermometry for nanoscale thermal transport studies. Employing low noise amplifiers and an analog multiplier operating at 2 GHz, auto- and cross-correlated Johnson noise measurements are performed in the temperature range of 3 to 300 K, achieving a sensitivity of 5.5 mK (110 ppm) in 1 s of integration time. This setup allows us to measure the thermal conductance of a boron nitride encapsulated monolayer graphene device over a wide temperature range. Our data show a high power law (T ∼ 4) deviation from the Wiedemann-Franz law above T ∼ 100 K.

  15. Development oF High Frequency Electromagnetic Mapping (HFEM) technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesch, R. L.

    1982-04-01

    High frequency electromagnetic mapping (HFEM) techniques were developed for evaluating rubblized oil shale in the cold retort state in the modified in situ process. This technology development is also applicable for using HFEM techniques for diagnosing, monitoring, controlling and evaluating modified in situ retorts after they are ignited. The baseline data work required to design a high temperature sample holder and experiments for determining the EM properties of oil shale samples at elevated temperatures (200 to 500 C) are described. A theoretical approach is given for modeling oil shale retorts for electromagnetic sensing techniques by a spheroid with an average dielectric constant along with numerical results. Finally, the measurement results are given for the spent and raw shale samples that were obtained from portions of the ten half score samples plus the results of the electromagnetic transmission measurements taken on oil shale samples.

  16. Reduced length fibre Bragg gratings for high frequency acoustic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Claire; Robertson, David; Brooks, Chris; Norman, Patrick; Rosalie, Cedric; Rajic, Nik

    2014-12-01

    In-fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) are now well established for applications in acoustic sensing. The upper frequency response limit of the Bragg grating is determined by its gauge length, which has typically been limited to about 1 mm for commercially available Type 1 gratings. This paper investigates the effect of FBG gauge length on frequency response for sensing of acoustic waves. The investigation shows that the ratio of wavelength to FBG length must be at least 8.8 in order to reliably resolve the strain response without significant gain roll-off. Bragg gratings with a gauge length of 200 µm have been fabricated and their capacity to measure low amplitude high frequency acoustic strain fields in excess of 2 MHz is experimentally demonstrated. The ultimate goal of this work is to enhance the sensitivity of acoustic damage detection techniques by extending the frequency range over which acoustic waves may be reliably measured using FBGs.

  17. Influence of pore roughness on high-frequency permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortis, Andrea; Smeulders, David M. J.; Guermond, Jean Luc; Lafarge, Denis

    2003-06-01

    The high-frequency behavior of the fluid velocity patterns for smooth and corrugated pore channels is studied. The classical approach of Johnson et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 176, 379 (1987)] for smooth geometries is obtained in different manners, thus clarifying differences with Sheng and Zhou [Phys. Rev. Lett. 61, 1591 (1988)] and Avellaneda and Torquato [Phys. Fluids A 3, 2529 (1991)]. For wedge-shaped pore geometries, the classical approach is modified by a nonanalytic extension proposed by Achdou and Avellaneda [Phys. Fluids A 4, 2561 (1992)]. The dependency of the nonanalytic extension on the apex angle of the wedge was derived. Precise numerical computations for various apex angles in two-dimensional channels confirmed this theoretical dependency, which is somewhat different from the original Achdou and Avellaneda predictions. Moreover, it was found that the contribution of the singularities does not alter the parameters of the classical theory by Johnson et al..

  18. Recording and analysis techniques for high-frequency oscillations.

    PubMed

    Worrell, G A; Jerbi, K; Kobayashi, K; Lina, J M; Zelmann, R; Le Van Quyen, M

    2012-09-01

    In recent years, new recording technologies have advanced such that, at high temporal and spatial resolutions, high-frequency oscillations (HFO) can be recorded in human partial epilepsy. However, because of the deluge of multichannel data generated by these experiments, achieving the full potential of parallel neuronal recordings depends on the development of new data mining techniques to extract meaningful information relating to time, frequency and space. Here, we aim to bridge this gap by focusing on up-to-date recording techniques for measurement of HFO and new analysis tools for their quantitative assessment. In particular, we emphasize how these methods can be applied, what property might be inferred from neuronal signals, and potentially productive future directions.

  19. High frequency conductivity of hot electrons in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amekpewu, M.; Mensah, S. Y.; Musah, R.; Mensah, N. G.; Abukari, S. S.; Dompreh, K. A.

    2016-05-01

    High frequency conductivity of hot electrons in undoped single walled achiral Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) under the influence of ac-dc driven fields was considered. We investigated semi-classically Boltzmann's transport equation with and without the presence of the hot electrons' source by deriving the current densities in CNTs. Plots of the normalized current density versus frequency of ac-field revealed an increase in both the minimum and maximum peaks of normalized current density at lower frequencies as a result of a strong injection of hot electrons. The applied ac-field plays a twofold role of suppressing the space-charge instability in CNTs and simultaneously pumping an energy for lower frequency generation and amplification of THz radiations. These have enormous promising applications in very different areas of science and technology.

  20. Design and development of mode launcher for high frequency Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaria, Mukesh Kumar; Sinha, A. K.; Khatun, H.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and development of helical cut smooth wall mode launcher for high frequency and high power Gyrotron. A Vlasov-type helical cut mode launcher for converting TE22,6 mode to a Gaussian mode has been designed for 120 GHz, 1 MW Gyrotron. The initial design of mode launcher has been optimized using LOT/SURF-3D software. The mode launcher diameter and length are optimized considering the minimum return loss and the minimum insertion loss by using CST microwave studio. The return loss (S11) and insertion loss (S21) performance of helical cut smooth wall mode launcher have been obtained using CST-Microwave Studio. The fabrication of Vlasov-type helical cut mode launcher for 120 GHz Gyrotron has also been carried out.

  1. Recording and analysis techniques for high-frequency oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Worrell, G.A.; Jerbi, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Lina, J.M.; Zelmann, R.; Le Van Quyen, M.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, new recording technologies have advanced such that, at high temporal and spatial resolutions, high-frequency oscillations (HFO) can be recorded in human partial epilepsy. However, because of the deluge of multichannel data generated by these experiments, achieving the full potential of parallel neuronal recordings depends on the development of new data mining techniques to extract meaningful information relating to time, frequency and space. Here, we aim to bridge this gap by focusing on up-to-date recording techniques for measurement of HFO and new analysis tools for their quantitative assessment. In particular, we emphasize how these methods can be applied, what property might be inferred from neuronal signals, and potentially productive future directions. PMID:22420981

  2. Effect of high-frequency modes on singlet fission dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Chen, Lipeng; Ishizaki, Akihito; Wang, Junling; Zhao, Yang

    2017-01-28

    Singlet fission is a spin-allowed energy conversion process whereby a singlet excitation splits into two spin-correlated triplet excitations residing on adjacent molecules and has a potential to dramatically increase the efficiency of organic photovoltaics. Recent time-resolved nonlinear spectra of pentacene derivatives have shown the importance of high frequency vibrational modes in efficient fission. In this work, we explore impacts of vibration-induced fluctuations on fission dynamics through quantum dynamics calculations with parameters from fitting measured linear and nonlinear spectra. We demonstrate that fission dynamics strongly depends on the frequency of the intramolecular vibrational mode. Furthermore, we examine the effect of two vibrational modes on fission dynamics. Inclusion of a second vibrational mode creates an additional fission channel even when its Huang-Rhys factor is relatively small. Addition of more vibrational modes may not enhance the fission per se, but can dramatically affect the interplay between fission dynamics and the dominant vibrational mode.

  3. Active Control of High-Frequency Combustor Instability Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2003-01-01

    To reduce the environmental impact of aerospace propulsion systems, extensive research is being done in the development of lean-burning (low fuel-to-air ratio) combustors that can reduce emissions throughout the mission cycle. However, these lean-burning combustors have an increased susceptibility to thermoacoustic instabilities-high-pressure oscillations much like sound waves that can cause severe high-frequency vibrations in the combustor. These pressure waves can fatigue the combustor components and even the downstream turbine blades. This can significantly decrease the combustor and turbine safe operating life. Thus, suppression of the thermoacoustic combustor instabilities is an enabling technology for lean, low-emissions combustors. Under the Propulsion and Power Program, the NASA Glenn Research Center in partnership with Pratt & Whitney, United Technologies Research Center, and Georgia Institute of Technology is developing technologies for the active control of combustion instabilities.

  4. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Branch, Darren W

    2013-05-07

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  5. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Branch, Darren W

    2014-03-11

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  6. Toward a High-Frequency Pulsed-Detonation Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Drummond, J. Philip

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the continued development of an actuator, energized by pulsed detonations, that provides a pulsed jet suitable for flow control in high-speed applications. A high-speed valve, capable of delivering a pulsed stream of reactants a mixture of H2 and air at rates of up to 1500 pulses per second, has been constructed. The reactants burn in a resonant tube and the products exit the tube as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers have been used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device at various reactant injection frequencies, including both resonant and off-resonant conditions. Pulsed detonations have been demonstrated in the lambda/4 mode of an 8 inch long tube at approx. 600 Hz. The pulsed jet at the exit of the device has been observed using shadowgraph and an infrared camera.

  7. Toward a High-Frequency Pulsed-Detonation Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Drummond, J. Philip

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the continued development of an actuator, energized by pulsed detonations, that provides a pulsed jet suitable for flow control in high-speed applications. A high-speed valve, capable of delivering a pulsed stream of reactants a mixture of H2 and air at rates of up to 1500 pulses per second, has been constructed. The reactants burn in a resonant tube and the products exit the tube as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers have been used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device at various reactant injection frequencies, including both resonant and off-resonant conditions. Pulsed detonations have been demonstrated in the lambda/4 mode of an 8 inch long tube at approximately 600 Hz. The pulsed jet at the exit of the device has been observed using shadowgraph and an infrared camera.

  8. Spectroscopic measurements of high frequency plasma in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Maehara, T.; Mukasa, S.; Takemori, T.; Watanabe, T.; Kurokawa, K.; Toyota, H.; Nomura, S.; Kawashima, A.; Iwamae, A.

    2009-03-15

    Spectroscopic measurements of high frequency (hf) plasma were performed under high pressure conditions (5 and 7 MPa) and supercritical (sc) CO{sub 2} conditions (8-20 MPa). Temperature evaluated from C{sub 2} Swan bands (d {sup 3}{pi}{sub g}{yields}a {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}) increased from 3600 to 4600 K with an increase in pressure. The first observation of broadening and shifting of the O I line profile (3p {sup 5} P{sub 3,2,1}{yields}3s {sup 5} S{sub 2}{sup 0}) of hf plasma under sc CO{sub 2} conditions was carried out. However, the origin of broadening and the shifting cannot be understood because the present theory explaining them is not valid for such high pressure conditions.

  9. Aftershock Prediction for High-Frequency Financial Markets' Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldovin, Fulvio; Camana, Francesco; Caraglio, Michele; Stella, Attilio L.; Zamparo, Marco

    The occurrence of aftershocks following a major financial crash manifests the critical dynamical response of financial markets. Aftershocks put additional stress on markets, with conceivable dramatic consequences. Such a phenomenon has been shown to be common to most financial assets, both at high and low frequency. Its present-day description relies on an empirical characterization proposed by Omori at the end of 1800 for seismic earthquakes. We point out the limited predictive power in this phenomenological approach and present a stochastic model, based on the scaling symmetry of financial assets, which is potentially capable to predict aftershocks occurrence, given the main shock magnitude. Comparisons with S&P high-frequency data confirm this predictive potential.

  10. High-frequency health data and spline functions.

    PubMed

    Martín-Rodríguez, Gloria; Murillo-Fort, Carlos

    2005-03-30

    Seasonal variations are highly relevant for health service organization. In general, short run movements of medical magnitudes are important features for managers in this field to make adequate decisions. Thus, the analysis of the seasonal pattern in high-frequency health data is an appealing task. The aim of this paper is to propose procedures that allow the analysis of the seasonal component in this kind of data by means of spline functions embedded into a structural model. In the proposed method, useful adaptions of the traditional spline formulation are developed, and the resulting procedures are capable of capturing periodic variations, whether deterministic or stochastic, in a parsimonious way. Finally, these methodological tools are applied to a series of daily emergency service demand in order to capture simultaneous seasonal variations in which periods are different.

  11. High-Frequency, High-Temperature Fretting Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matlik, J. F.; Farris, T. N.; Haake, F. K.; Swanson, G. R.; Duke, G. C.

    2005-01-01

    Fretting is a structural damage mechanism observed when two nominally clamped surfaces are subjected to an oscillatory loading. A critical location for fretting induced damage has been identified at the blade/disk and blade/damper interfaces of gas turbine engine turbomachinery and space propulsion components. The high-temperature, high-frequency loading environment seen by these components lead to severe stress gradients at the edge-of-contact. These contact stresses drive crack nucleation and propagation in fretting and are very sensitive to the geometry of the contacting bodies, the contact loads, materials, temperature, and contact surface tribology (friction). To diagnose the threat that small and relatively undetectable fretting cracks pose to damage tolerance and structural integrity of in-service components, the objective of this work is to develop a well-characterized experimental fretting rig capable of investigating fretting behavior of advanced aerospace alloys subjected to load and temperature conditions representative of such turbomachinery components.

  12. Gaussian beam decomposition of high frequency wave fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tanushev, Nicolay M. Engquist, Bjoern; Tsai, Richard

    2009-12-10

    In this paper, we present a method of decomposing a highly oscillatory wave field into a sparse superposition of Gaussian beams. The goal is to extract the necessary parameters for a Gaussian beam superposition from this wave field, so that further evolution of the high frequency waves can be computed by the method of Gaussian beams. The methodology is described for R{sup d} with numerical examples for d=2. In the first example, a field generated by an interface reflection of Gaussian beams is decomposed into a superposition of Gaussian beams. The beam parameters are reconstructed to a very high accuracy. The data in the second example is not a superposition of a finite number of Gaussian beams. The wave field to be approximated is generated by a finite difference method for a geometry with two slits. The accuracy in the decomposition increases monotonically with the number of beams.

  13. High-Frequency Cutoff in Type III Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislavsky, A. A.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Volvach, Ya. S.; Koval, A. A.

    In this article we report about a group of solar bursts with high-frequency cutoff, observed on 19 August of 2012 near 8:23 UT, simultaneously by three different radio telescopes: the Ukrainian decameter radio telescope (8-33 MHz), the French Nancay Decametric Array (10-70 MHz) and the Italian San Vito Solar Observatory of RSTN (25-180 MHz). Morphologically the bursts are very similar to the type III bursts. The solar activity is connected with the emergency of a new group of solar spots on the far side of the Sun with respect to observers on Earth. The solar bursts accompany many moderate flares over eastern limb. The refraction of the behind-limb radio bursts towards the Earth is favorable, if CMEs generate low-density cavities in solar corona.

  14. High-frequency electric field measurement using a toroidal antenna

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha

    2002-01-01

    A simple and compact method and apparatus for detecting high frequency electric fields, particularly in the frequency range of 1 MHz to 100 MHz, uses a compact toroidal antenna. For typical geophysical applications the sensor will be used to detect electric fields for a wide range of spectrum starting from about 1 MHz, in particular in the frequency range between 1 to 100 MHz, to detect small objects in the upper few meters of the ground. Time-varying magnetic fields associated with time-varying electric fields induce an emf (voltage) in a toroidal coil. The electric field at the center of (and perpendicular to the plane of) the toroid is shown to be linearly related to this induced voltage. By measuring the voltage across a toroidal coil one can easily and accurately determine the electric field.

  15. Status asthmaticus treated by high-frequency oscillatory ventilation.

    PubMed

    Duval, E L; van Vught, A J

    2000-10-01

    We present a 2.5-year-old girl in severe asthma crisis who clinically deteriorated on conventional mechanical ventilation, but was successfully ventilated with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV). Although HFOV is accepted as a technique for managing pediatric respiratory failure, its use in obstructive airway disease is generally thought to be contraindicated because of the risk of dynamic air-trapping. However, we suggest that obstructive airway disease can safely be managed with HFOV, provided certain conditions are met. These include the application of sufficiently high mean airway pressures to open and stent the airways ("an open airway strategy"), lower frequencies to overcome the greater attenuation of the oscillatory waves in the narrowed airways, permissive hypercapnia to enable reducing pressure swings as much as possible, longer expiratory times, and muscle paralysis to avoid spontaneous breathing.

  16. Effect of high-frequency modes on singlet fission dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Chen, Lipeng; Ishizaki, Akihito; Wang, Junling; Zhao, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Singlet fission is a spin-allowed energy conversion process whereby a singlet excitation splits into two spin-correlated triplet excitations residing on adjacent molecules and has a potential to dramatically increase the efficiency of organic photovoltaics. Recent time-resolved nonlinear spectra of pentacene derivatives have shown the importance of high frequency vibrational modes in efficient fission. In this work, we explore impacts of vibration-induced fluctuations on fission dynamics through quantum dynamics calculations with parameters from fitting measured linear and nonlinear spectra. We demonstrate that fission dynamics strongly depends on the frequency of the intramolecular vibrational mode. Furthermore, we examine the effect of two vibrational modes on fission dynamics. Inclusion of a second vibrational mode creates an additional fission channel even when its Huang-Rhys factor is relatively small. Addition of more vibrational modes may not enhance the fission per se, but can dramatically affect the interplay between fission dynamics and the dominant vibrational mode.

  17. High frequency sound propagation in a network of interconnecting streets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewett, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    We propose a new model for the propagation of acoustic energy from a time-harmonic point source through a network of interconnecting streets in the high frequency regime, in which the wavelength is small compared to typical macro-lengthscales such as street widths/lengths and building heights. Our model, which is based on geometrical acoustics (ray theory), represents the acoustic power flow from the source along any pathway through the network as the integral of a power density over the launch angle of a ray emanating from the source, and takes into account the key phenomena involved in the propagation, namely energy loss by wall absorption, energy redistribution at junctions, and, in 3D, energy loss to the atmosphere. The model predicts strongly anisotropic decay away from the source, with the power flow decaying exponentially in the number of junctions from the source, except along the axial directions of the network, where the decay is algebraic.

  18. High-frequency radar observations of ocean surface currents.

    PubMed

    Paduan, Jeffrey D; Washburn, Libe

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the discovery, development, and use of high-frequency (HF) radio wave backscatter in oceanography. HF radars, as the instruments are commonly called, remotely measure ocean surface currents by exploiting a Bragg resonant backscatter phenomenon. Electromagnetic waves in the HF band (3-30 MHz) have wavelengths that are commensurate with wind-driven gravity waves on the ocean surface; the ocean waves whose wavelengths are exactly half as long as those of the broadcast radio waves are responsible for the resonant backscatter. Networks of HF radar systems are capable of mapping surface currents hourly out to ranges approaching 200 km with a horizontal resolution of a few kilometers. Such information has many uses, including search and rescue support and oil-spill mitigation in real time and larval population connectivity assessment when viewed over many years. Today, HF radar networks form the backbone of many ocean observing systems, and the data are assimilated into ocean circulation models.

  19. Graphene Quantum Capacitors for High Frequency Tunable Analog Applications.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Clara F; Vitale, Wolfgang A; Sharma, Pankaj; Tamagnone, Michele; Mosig, Juan R; Ionescu, Adrian M

    2016-08-10

    Graphene quantum capacitors (GQC) are demonstrated to be enablers of radio-frequency (RF) functions through voltage-tuning of their capacitance. We show that GQC complements MEMS and MOSFETs in terms of performance for high frequency analog applications and tunability. We propose a CMOS compatible fabrication process and report the first experimental assessment of their performance at microwaves frequencies (up to 10 GHz), demonstrating experimental GQCs in the pF range with a tuning ratio of 1.34:1 within 1.25 V, and Q-factors up to 12 at 1 GHz. The figures of merit of graphene variable capacitors are studied in detail from 150 to 350 K. Furthermore, we describe a systematic, graphene specific approach to optimize their performance and predict the figures of merit achieved if such a methodology is applied.

  20. High-frequency EPR study of crude oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volodin, M. A.; Mamin, G. V.; Izotov, V. V.; Orlinskii, S. B.

    2013-12-01

    Four different samples of crude oil were studied by means of high-frequency W-band (94 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy with the aim to develop new methods of crude oil quality control. High spectral resolution of W-band allowed to avoid an overlap of spectra contributors. The ratio K between the integral intensity of the low-field EPR component of the vanadyl complexes to that of free radical line was chosen as an attribute of each sample. Using the K-parameters and EPR spectra simulations the crude oil leaking between adjacent horizons is shown. Pulsed EPR experiments allowed detecting free radicals signals only. It is demonstrated that the extracted transverse relaxation time could be used as an additional parameter which characterizes the origin of the crude oil and nature of the oil paramagnetic centers.

  1. High Frequency Resolution TOA Analysis for ELF/VLFWave Generation Experiments at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddle, J. D.; Moore, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Modulated HF heating of the ionosphere in the presence of natural ionospheric current sources has been used as a method to generate electromagnetic ELF/VLF waves since the 1970's. In the ~1-5 kHz band, the amplitude and phase of the received ELF/VLF signal depends on the amplitude and phase of the conductivity modulation generated throughout the HF-heated ionospheric body, as well as on the signal propagation parameters (i.e., the attenuation and phase constants) between each of the current sources and the receiver. Recent signal processing advances have produced an accurate ELF/VLF time-of-arrival (TOA) analysis technique that differentiates line-of-sight and ionospherically-reflected signal components, determining the amplitude and phase of each component observed at the receiver. This TOA method requires a wide bandwidth (> 2.5 kHz) and therefore is relatively insensitive to the frequency-dependent nature of ELF/VLF wave propagation. In this paper, we present an improved ELF/VLF TOA method that is capable of providing high frequency resolution. The new analysis technique is applied to experimental observations of ELF/VLF signals generated by modulated heating at HAARP. We present measurements of the amplitude and phase of the received ELF/VLF signal as a function of frequency and compare the results with the predictions of an HF heating model.

  2. High Frequency Monitoring System of Groundwater Level in Sheliao

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Chia, Y.; Chuang, P.

    2012-12-01

    Long-term groundwater monitoring had been executed since 1950s in Taiwan. In 1980s, with improving technology, various types of automatic reorders of groundwater level had become the most widely used equipment in groundwater monitoring. Among these devices, submersible pressure transducer is frequently selected to monitor groundwater level for its high frequency and high resolution. In this study, it is chosen to monitor groundwater level change in Sheliao well. On the other hand, factors which might influence the performance of recorded data were excluded in the early stage of establishment as well. And the final approach is to achieve a comprehensive understanding of the minor groundwater level change of Sheliao well, and specify its connection between precipitation, atmosphere, earth tide and earthquake. The Shelia well is located in central Taiwan, constructed in an unconfined aquifer, recorded hourly groundwater level change since 1997. We tried to establish a 1 Hz sampling rate pressure-sensing system in 2011 June. The groundwater level was monitored in a resolution of 2-mm. According to the records, several small-scale of fluctuations were observed and were all correlate well to the earthquakes. However, during the time that no earthquake occurred, some short-term fluctuations were still occurred, performed in a different pattern to those induced by earthquakes. After further investigation, those anomalous fluctuations of groundwater level were found corresponded to precipitation quite well. The fluctuations were observed under some specific condition, which involving different range of accumulated precipitation, rainfall intensity, and rainfall duration. The result implied groundwater level in Sheliao well changes with loading effect result from runoff on the ground surface and infiltration. And the earth tide lead to regularly change was also observed. We conclude that Sheliao can be characterized as a partial-confined aquifer with high frequency and high

  3. Electrokinetic particle-electrode interactions at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yariv, Ehud; Schnitzer, Ory

    2013-01-01

    We provide a macroscale description of electrokinetic particle-electrode interactions at high frequencies, where chemical reactions at the electrodes are negligible. Using a thin-double-layer approximation, our starting point is the set of macroscale equations governing the “bounded” configuration comprising of a particle suspended between two electrodes, wherein the electrodes are governed by a capacitive charging condition and the imposed voltage is expressed as an integral constraint. In the large-cell limit the bounded model is transformed into an effectively equivalent “unbounded” model describing the interaction between the particle and a single electrode, where the imposed-voltage condition is manifested in a uniform field at infinity together with a Robin-type condition applying at the electrode. This condition, together with the standard no-flux condition applying at the particle surface, leads to a linear problem governing the electric potential in the fluid domain in which the dimensionless frequency ω of the applied voltage appears as a governing parameter. In the high-frequency limit ω≫1 the flow is dominated by electro-osmotic slip at the particle surface, the contribution of electrode electro-osmosis being O(ω-2) small. That simplification allows for a convenient analytical investigation of the prevailing case where the clearance between the particle and the adjacent electrode is small. Use of tangent-sphere coordinates allows to calculate the electric and flows fields as integral Hankel transforms. At large distances from the particle, along the electrode, both fields decay with the fourth power of distance.

  4. Development of a Multi-Channel, High Frequency QRS Electrocardiograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DePalma, Jude L.

    2003-01-01

    With the advent of the ISS era and the potential requirement for increased cardiovascular monitoring of crewmembers during extended EVAs, NASA flight surgeons would stand to benefit from an evolving technology that allows for a more rapid diagnosis of myocardial ischemia compared to standard electrocardiography. Similarly, during the astronaut selection process, NASA flight surgeons and other physicians would also stand to benefit from a completely noninvasive technology that, either at rest or during maximal exercise tests, is more sensitive than standard ECG in identifying the presence of ischemia. Perhaps most importantly, practicing cardiologists and emergency medicine physicians could greatly benefit from such a device as it could augment (or even replace) standard electrocardiography in settings where the rapid diagnosis of myocardial ischemia (or the lack thereof) is required for proper clinical decision-making. A multi-channel, high-frequency QRS electrocardiograph is currently under development in the Life Sciences Research Laboratories at JSC. Specifically the project consisted of writing software code, some of which contained specially-designed digital filters, which will be incorporated into an existing commercial software program that is already designed to collect, plot and analyze conventional 12-lead ECG signals on a desktop, portable or palm PC. The software will derive the high-frequency QRS signals, which will be analyzed (in numerous ways) and plotted alongside of the conventional ECG signals, giving the PC-viewing clinician advanced diagnostic information that has never been available previously in all 12 ECG leads simultaneously. After the hardware and software for the advanced digital ECG monitor have been fully integrated, plans are to use the monitor to begin clinical studies both on healthy subjects and on patients with known coronary artery disease in both the outpatient and hospital settings. The ultimate goal is to get the technology

  5. Sensitivity of high-frequency Rayleigh-wave data revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Ivanov, J.

    2007-01-01

    Rayleigh-wave phase velocity of a layered earth model is a function of frequency and four groups of earth properties: P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity (Vs), density, and thickness of layers. Analysis of the Jacobian matrix (or the difference method) provides a measure of dispersion curve sensitivity to earth properties. Vs is the dominant influence for the fundamental mode (Xia et al., 1999) and higher modes (Xia et al., 2003) of dispersion curves in a high frequency range (>2 Hz) followed by layer thickness. These characteristics are the foundation of determining S-wave velocities by inversion of Rayleigh-wave data. More applications of surface-wave techniques show an anomalous velocity layer such as a high-velocity layer (HVL) or a low-velocity layer (LVL) commonly exists in near-surface materials. Spatial location (depth) of an anomalous layer is usually the most important information that surface-wave techniques are asked to provide. Understanding and correctly defining the sensitivity of high-frequency Rayleigh-wave data due to depth of an anomalous velocity layer are crucial in applying surface-wave techniques to obtain a Vs profile and/or determine the depth of an anomalous layer. Because depth is not a direct earth property of a layered model, changes in depth will result in changes in other properties. Modeling results show that sensitivity at a given depth calculated by the difference method is dependent on the Vs difference (contrast) between an anomalous layer and surrounding layers. The larger the contrast is, the higher the sensitivity due to depth of the layer. Therefore, the Vs contrast is a dominant contributor to sensitivity of Rayleigh-wave data due to depth of an anomalous layer. Modeling results also suggest that the most sensitive depth for an HVL is at about the middle of the depth to the half-space, but for an LVL it is near the ground surface. ?? 2007 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  6. High-frequency underwater plasma discharge application in antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. W.; Choi, S.; Lyakhov, K.; Shaislamov, U.; Mongre, R. K.; Jeong, D. K.; Suresh, R.; Lee, H. J.

    2017-03-01

    Plasma discharge is a novel disinfection and effectual inactivation approach to treat microorganisms in aqueous systems. Inactivation of Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) by generating high-frequency, high-voltage, oxygen (O2) injected and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) added discharge in water was achieved. The effect of H2O2 dose and oxygen injection rate on electrical characteristics of discharge and E. coli disinfection has been reported. Microbial log reduction dependent on H2O2 addition with O2 injection was observed. The time variation of the inactivation efficiency quantified by the log reduction of the initial E. coli population on the basis of optical density measurement was reported. The analysis of emission spectrum recorded after discharge occurrence illustrated the formation of oxidant species (OH•, H, and O). Interestingly, the results demonstrated that O2 injected and H2O2 added, underwater plasma discharge had fabulous impact on the E. coli sterilization. The oxygen injection notably reduced the voltage needed for generating breakdown in flowing water and escalated the power of discharge pulses. No impact of hydrogen peroxide addition on breakdown voltage was observed. A significant role of oxidant species in bacterial inactivation also has been identified. Furthermore the E. coli survivability in plasma treated water with oxygen injection and hydrogen peroxide addition drastically reduced to zero. The time course study also showed that the retardant effect on E. coli colony multiplication in plasma treated water was favorable, observed after long time. High-frequency underwater plasma discharge based biological applications is technically relevant and would act as baseline data for the development of novel antibacterial processing strategies.

  7. The Influence of High-Frequency Gravitational Waves Upon Muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Moy, Lawrence S.; Baker, Robert M. L. Jr

    2007-01-30

    The objective of this paper is to present a theory for the possible influence of high-frequency gravitational waves or HFGWs and pulsed micro-current electromagnetic waves or EMs on biological matter specifically on muscle cells and myofibroblasts. The theory involves consideration of the natural frequency of contractions and relaxations of muscles, especially underlying facial skin, and the possible influence of HFGWs on that process. GWs pass without attenuation through all material thus conventional wisdom would dictate that GWs would have no influence on biological matter. On the other hand, GWs can temporarily modify a gravitational field in some locality if they are of high frequency and such a modification might have an influence in changing the skin muscles' natural frequency. Prior to the actual laboratory generation of HFGWs their influence can be emulated by micro-current EM pulses to the skin and some evidence presented here on that effect may predict the influence of HFGWs. We believe that the HFGW pulsations lead to increased muscle activity and may serve to reverse the aging process. A novel theoretical framework concerning these relaxation phenomena is one result of the paper. Another result is the analysis of the possible delivery system of the FBAR-generated HFGWs, the actual power of the generated HFGWs, and the system's application to nanostructural modification of the skin or muscle cells. It is concluded that a series of non-evasive experiments, which are identified, will have the potential to test theory by detecting and analyzing the possible HFGWs change in polarization, refraction, etc. after their interaction with the muscle cells.

  8. A new high-frequency magnetic stimulator with an oil-cooled coil.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, J F; Klemar, B; Kiilerich, H

    1995-09-01

    A new high frequency magnetic stimulator, Labmag, is described which may be used in clinical neurophysiology and for the treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis. In order to avoid heating of the coil during repetitive stimulation, an oil/air cooling system was employed. The magnetic stimulus waveform is a half cosine with a rise time of 200 microseconds and a pulse width of 400 microseconds induced by alternating capacitor voltage. The Labmag product was compared with a commercially available high frequency stimulator, MagPro. The electric fields induced by Labmag were half the size of those induced by MagPro at identical stimulus intensities. Using a leaky integrator to simulate the effects on neurons, only minor differences in integrated electric fields were observed. There were no changes of the electric fields in relation to coil geometry. A minor difference in electric fields (1.0 +/- 0.8%) was observed when the polarity of the capacitor voltage alternated. Compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation were recorded from the first dorsal interosseous muscle (FDI) in eight subjects. Threshold intensities of CMAPs evoked by Labmag (58 +/- 7%) were significantly smaller (p < 0.05) than threshold intensities obtained with MagPro (63 +/- 8%). Peak-to-peak amplitudes, P-Pamps, of CMAPs were significantly smaller after single stimulations with Labmag at stimulation intensities of 130 and 140% of threshold intensity.

  9. Iron Phosphate Glass for Vitrifying Hanford AZ102 LAW in Joule Heated and Cold Crucible Induction Melters - 12240

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Delbert E.; Brow, Richard K.; Ray, Chandra S.; Reis, Signo T.; Kim, Cheol-Woon; Vienna, John D.; Sevigny, Gary; Peeler, David; Johnson, Fabienne C.; Hansen, Eric K.; Soelberg, Nick; Pegg, Ian L.; Gan, Hao

    2012-07-01

    An iron phosphate composition for vitrifying a high sulfate (∼17 wt%) and high alkali (∼80 wt%) Hanford low activity waste (LAW), known as AZ-102 LAW, has been developed for processing in a Joule Heated Melter (JHM) or a Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). This composition produced a glass waste form, designated as MS26AZ102F-2, with a waste loading of 26 wt% of the AZ-102 which corresponded to a total alkali and sulfate (represented as SO{sub 3}) content of 21 and 4.4 wt%, respectively. A slurry (7 M Na{sup +}) of MS26AZ102F-2 simulant was melted continuously at temperatures between 1030 and 1090 deg. C for 10 days in a small JHM at PNNL and for 70 hours in a CCIM at INL. The as-cast glasses produced in both melters and in trial laboratory experiments along with their canister centerline cooled (CCC) counterparts met the requirements for the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and the Vapor Hydration Test (VHT) responses in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract. These glass waste forms retained up to 77 % of the SO{sub 3} (3.3 wt%), 100% of the Cesium, and 33 to 44% of the rhenium (used as a surrogate for Tc) all of which either exceeded or were comparable to the retention limit for these species in borosilicate glass nuclear waste form. Analyses of commercial K-3 refractory lining and the Inconel 693 metal electrodes used in JHM indicated only minimum corrosion of these components by the iron phosphate glass. This is the first time that an iron phosphate composition was melted continuously in a slurry fed JHM and in the US, thereby, demonstrating that iron phosphate glasses can be used as alternative hosts for vitrifying nuclear waste. The following conclusions are drawn from the results of the present work. (1) An iron phosphate composition, designated as MS26AZ102F-2, containing 26 wt% of the simulated high sulfate (17 wt%), high alkali (80 wt%) Hanford AZ-102 LAW meets all the criteria for processing in a JHM and CCIM. This

  10. The role of intracellular oxidation in death induction (apoptosis and necrosis) in human promonocytic cells treated with stress inducers (cadmium, heat, X-rays).

    PubMed

    Galán, A; García-Bermejo, L; Troyano, A; Vilaboa, N E; Fernández, C; de Blas, E; Aller, P

    2001-04-01

    Treatment of U-937 human promonocytic cells with the stress inducers cadmium chloride (2 h at 200 microM), heat (2 h at 42.5 C) or X-rays (20 Gy), followed by recovery, caused death by apoptosis and stimulated caspase-3 activity. In addition, all stress agents caused intracellular oxidation, as measured by peroxide and/or anion superoxide accumulation. However, while pre-incubation with antioxidants (N-acetyl-L-cysteine or butylated hydroxyanisole) inhibited the induction of apoptosis by cadmium and X-rays, it did not affect the induction by heat-shock. Pre-incubation for 24 h with the GSH-depleting agent L-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine (BSO) switched the mode of death from apoptosis to necrosis in cadmium-treated cells. By contrast, BSO only caused minor modifacions in the rate of apoptosis without affecting the mode of death in heat- and X-rays-treated cells. BSO potentiated peroxide accumulation in cells treated with both cadmium and X-rays. However, while the accumulation of peroxides was stable in the case of cadmium, it was transient in the case of X-rays. Moreover, the administration of antioxidants during the recovery period sufficed to prevent necrosis and restore apoptosis in BSO plus cadmium-treated cells. Cadmium and X-rays caused a decrease in intracellular ATP levels, but the decrease was similar in both apoptotic and necrotic cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that (i) stress inducers cause intracellular oxidation, but oxidation is not a general requirement for apoptosis; and (ii) the duration of the oxidant state seems to be critical in determining the mode of death.

  11. [The first experience with using high frequency thermo-destruction in patients with metastatic cancer of the liver].

    PubMed

    Iarema, I V; Kolobov, S V; Trandofilov, M M

    2003-01-01

    Thermodestruction of the metastatic cancer of the liver was used in 18 patients. A high frequency induction thermodestructor ELECTROTOM HITT ("Berhtold" Germany) with the working frequency 343 kHz and power 0-60 Wt was used. After the ablation of the main focus the thermodestruction of metastases was performed in the liver. The effects of thermodestruction were estimated by the intraoperative biopsy before and after thermodestruction. The procedure was considered effective if biopsy revealed necrobiotic tissues. A connective tissue scar was formed at the place of thermodestruction. After operation the patients were given polychemotherapy.

  12. Induction of heat shock protein 72 in C6 glioma cells by methyl jasmonate through ROS-dependent heat shock factor 1 activation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Su Young; Kim, Ji Hye; Park, Min Jung; Kim, Sun Mi; Yoon, Chang Shin; Joo, Young Mi; Park, Jang Su; Han, Song Iy; Park, Hye Gyeong; Kang, Ho Sung

    2005-11-01

    Salicylate and jasmonates are two different types of plant hormone that play critical roles in plant defense responses against insect herbivores and microbial pathogens, through activating defense genes. These two natural products have been shown to have similar activities in animal cells: the compounds are able to induce cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in a variety of human cancer cells including those of colon, prostate, breast, and leukemia, suggesting the chemicals may potentially be a novel class of anti-cancer drugs. Since sodium salicylate can induce the heat shock response in animals, we examined the effects of jasmonates on the heat shock response in C6 glioma cells. Here, we show that brief exposure to methyl jasmonate (MeJA), but not to jasmonic acid, induces heat shock protein 72 (HSP72), but not HSP73 and HSP90, via heat shock factor I (HSF1) activation in C6 glioma cells without affecting cell viability. Intracellular H2O2 and O2-, and mitochondrial ROS were prominently increased in response to 5 mM MeJA in C6 cells. MeJA-induced HSP72 expression, HSF1 DNA binding, and human HSP70 promoter-driven CAT activity were prevented by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (a general antioxidant), catalase (a specific antioxidant for H2O2), and sodium formate (an inhibitor of OH.), but not by Rac1 dominant negative mutant Rac1N17 and diphenyleneiodonium (a NADPH oxidase inhibitor), indicating that MeJA induces HSP72 expression though HSF1 that is activated via Rac1-NADPH oxidase-independent ROS production pathway. These results suggest that the plant stress hormones share the ability to induce heat shock response in animal cells.

  13. An Investigation of High-frequency Combustion Oscillations in Liquid-propellant Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantler, Raymond L; Tischler, Adelbert O; Massa, Rudolph V

    1953-01-01

    An experimental investigation of high-frequency combustion oscillations (screaming) was conducted with a 100-pound-thrust acid-hydrocarbon rocket engine and a 500-pound-thrust oxygen-fuel rocket engine. The oscillation frequencies could be correlated as a linear function of the parameter C/L, where C is the experimentally measured characteristic velocity and L is the combustion-chamber length. The tendency of the engines to scream increased as chamber length was increased. With engine configurations that normally had a low efficiency, screaming resulted in increased performance; at the same time, a five to tenfold increase in heat-transfer rate occurred. It was possible, however, to achieve good performance without screaming.

  14. Fast-Ion Losses due to High-Frequency MHD Perturbations in the ASDEX Upgrade Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Guenter, S.; Igochine, V.; Maraschek, M.; Zohm, H.; Mantsinen, M. J.; Martin, P.; Piovesan, P.; Sassenberg, K.

    2008-02-08

    Time-resolved energy and pitch angle measurements of fast-ion losses correlated in frequency and phase with high-frequency magnetohydrodynamic perturbations have been obtained for the first time in a magnetic fusion device and are presented here. A detailed analysis of fast-ion losses due to toroidal Alfven eigenmodes has revealed the existence of a new core-localized magnetohydrodynamic perturbation, the sierpes mode. The sierpes mode is a non-Alfvenic instability which dominates the losses of fast ions in ion cyclotron resonance heated discharges, and it is named for its footprint in the spectrograms ('sierpes' means 'snake' in Spanish). The sierpes mode has been reconstructed by means of highly resolved multichord soft-x-ray measurements.

  15. Bolometric detectors for the high frequency instrument on the Planck surveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, T. C.; Paine, C.; Husted, L.; Yun, M.; Lange, A.; Bock, J.; Jones, B.; Ade, P.; Sudiwala, R.

    2002-01-01

    The High Frequency Instrument (HFI) on Planck will obtain all-sky images of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and other astrophysical sources of emission with resolution of 9 arcniin at 100 GHz, 7 arcmin at 143 GHz and 5 arcniin at 217, 353, 545 and 857 GHz. The HFI focal plane will contain 48 silicon nitride micromesh bolometric detectors operating from a 100 mK heat sink. Four detectors in each of the 6 bands will detect the sum of the power in both linear polarizations. An additional 4 pair of detectors will provide sensitivity to linear polarization of emission at 143, 217 and 353 GHz. We report on the development of these detectors, which are being produced at the JPL Micro Devices Laboratory, packaged at JPL Electronics Packaging, characterized at 100 mK before delivery to our HFI consortium partners at the UWCC, UK.

  16. Advantages of high-frequency Pulse-tube technology and its applications in infrared sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arts, R.; Willems, D.; Mullié, J.; Benschop, T.

    2016-05-01

    The low-frequency pulse-tube cryocooler has been a workhorse for large heat lift applications. However, the highfrequency pulse tube has to date not seen the widespread use in tactical infrared applications that Stirling cryocoolers have had, despite significant advantages in terms of exported vibrations and lifetime. Thales Cryogenics has produced large series of high-frequency pulse-tube cryocoolers for non-infrared applications since 2005. However, the use of Thales pulse-tube cryocoolers for infrared sensing has to date largely been limited to high-end space applications. In this paper, the performances of existing available off-the-shelf pulse-tube cryocoolers are examined versus typical tactical infrared requirements. A comparison is made on efficiency, power density, reliability, and cost. An outlook is given on future developments that could bring the pulse-tube into the mainstream for tactical infrared applications.

  17. Stimulation of high-frequency breakdown of gas in Uragan-3M torsatron by runaway electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, I. K.; Tarasov, M. I.; Sitnikov, D. A.; Pashnev, V. K.; Lytova, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    In experiments on confinement and heating of plasma in the Uragan-3M torsatron, the method of high-frequency breakdown of the working gas is used. In these experiments, in conditions of a relatively stable magnetic field, the rf power supplied to the setup chamber has a frequency close to the ion-cyclotron frequency. Such a method of gas breakdown is not always sufficiently reliable. In our experiments, preliminary ionization of the working gas by the run-away electron beam is used for stabilizing the breakdown. This work contains the results of experiments on enhancement of the runaway electron beam and on the interaction of the runaway electron beam in the Uragan-3M torsatron with the HF electromagnetic pump field. This enables us to formulate a number of recommendations for using spontaneously formed beams of accelerated particles for stimulating the rf breakdown. Our results confirm the possibility of gas breakdown by runaway electrons.

  18. High-frequency Plasma Waves Associated with Magnetic Reconnection in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Activities of high-frequency plasma waves associated with magnetic reconnection in the solar wind observed by Time Domain Sampler (TDS) experiments on STEREO/WAVES are preliminarily analyzed. The TDS instrument can provide burst mode electric fields data with as long as 16384 sample points at 250 kHz sampling rate. In all 1120 suspected reconnection events, it is found that the most commonly occurred waves are neither ion acoustic waves, electrostatic solitary waves, nor Langmuir/upper hybrid waves, but Bernstein-like waves with harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency. In addition, to each type of waves, Langmuir/upper hybrid waves reveal the largest occurrence rate in the reconnection region than in the ambient solar wind. These results indicate that Bernstein-like waves and Langmuir/upper hybrid waves might play important roles in the reconnection associated particle heating processes and they might also influence the dissipation of magnetic reconnection.

  19. The induction of heme oxygenase-1 suppresses heat shock protein 90 and the proliferation of human breast cancer cells through its byproduct carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wen-Ying; Chen, Yen-Chou; Shih, Chwen-Ming; Lin, Chun-Mao; Cheng, Chia-Hsiung; Chen, Ku-Chung; Lin, Cheng-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 is an oxidative stress-response enzyme which catalyzes the degradation of heme into bilirubin, ferric ion, and carbon monoxide (CO). Induction of HO-1 was reported to have antitumor activity; the inhibitory mechanism, however, is still unclear. In the present study, we found that treatment with [Ru(CO){sub 3}Cl{sub 2}]{sub 2} (RuCO), a CO-releasing compound, reduced the growth of human MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Analysis of growth-related proteins showed that treatment with RuCO down-regulated cyclinD1, CDK4, and hTERT protein expressions. Interestingly, RuCO treatment resulted in opposite effects on wild-type and mutant p53 proteins. These results were similar to those of cells treated with geldanamycin (a heat shock protein (HSP)90 inhibitor), suggesting that RuCO might affect HSP90 activity. Moreover, RuCO induced mutant p53 protein destabilization accompanied by promotion of ubiquitination and proteasome degradation. The induction of HO-1 by cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPP) showed consistent results, while the addition of tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPP), an HO-1 enzymatic inhibitor, diminished the RuCO-mediated effect. RuCO induction of HO-1 expression was reduced by a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor (SB203580). Additionally, treatment with a chemopreventive compound, curcumin, induced HO-1 expression accompanied with reduction of HSP90 client protein expression. The induction of HO-1 by curcumin inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-acetate (TPA)-elicited matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression and tumor invasion. In conclusion, we provide novel evidence underlying HO-1's antitumor mechanism. CO, a byproduct of HO-1, suppresses HSP90 protein activity, and the induction of HO-1 may possess potential as a cancer therapeutic. - Highlights: • CO and HO-1 inhibited the growth of human breast cancer cells. • CO and HO-1 attenuated HSP90 and its client proteins expression. • CO induced mutant p53 protein ubiquitination and

  20. Novel high frequency devices with graphene and GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Pei

    This work focuses on exploring new materials and new device structures to develop novel devices that can operate at very high speed. In chapter 2, the high frequency performance limitations of graphene transistor with channel length less than 100 nm are explored. The simulated results predict that intrinsic cutoff frequency fT of graphene transistor can be close to 2 THz at 15 nm channel length. In chapter 3, we explored the possibility of developing a 2D materials based vertical tunneling device. An analytical model to calculate the channel potentials and current-voltage characteristics in a Symmetric tunneling Field-Effect-Transistor (SymFET) is presented. The symmetric resonant peak in SymFET is a good candidate for high-speed analog applications. Rest of the work focuses on Gallium Nitride (GaN), several novel device concepts based on GaN heterostructure have been proposed for high frequency and high power applications. In chapter 4, we compared the performance of GaN Schottky diodes on bulk GaN substrates and GaN-on-sapphire substrates. In addition, we also discussed the lateral GaN Schottky diode between metal/2DEGs. The advantage of lateral GaN Schottky diodes is the intrinsic cutoff frequency is in the THz range. In chapter 5, a GaN Heterostructure barrier diode (HBD) is designed using the polarization charge and band offset at the AlGaN/GaN heterojunction. The polarization charge at AlGaN/GaN interface behaves as a delta-doping which induces a barrier without any chemical doping. The IV characteristics can be explained by the barrier controlled thermionic emission current. GaN HBDs can be directly integrated with GaN HEMTs, and serve as frequency multipliers or mixers for RF applications. In chapter 6, a GaN based negative effective mass oscillator (NEMO) is proposed. The current in NEMO is estimated under the ballistic limits. Negative differential resistances (NDRs) can be observed with more than 50% of the injected electrons occupied the negative