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Sample records for high-frequency sedimentation cycles

  1. The impact of high-frequency sedimentation cycles on stratigraphic interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Perlmutter, M.A.; Radovich, B.J.; Matthews, M.D.

    1997-01-01

    Global cyclostratigraphy, a methodology that utilizes climate change to evaluate sediment flux, characterizes the impact of sediment cycles on stratigraphy. Climatic succession, sediment yield cycles, and the phase relationship of sediment cycles to eustatic cycles are all determined in the early stages of basin analysis. Sedimentologic information is then used to assist in sequence evaluations. Climatic successions are intrinsically associated with global position (paleogeography) and are not necessarily synchronous with glacioeustatic sea-level cycles. A preliminary evaluation of the effect of climate on sediment supply from modem river systems indicates that sediment yield may vary by well over two orders of magnitude during one climate cycle. Consequently, basins in different climatic belts can have distinctly different volumes and lithologies for systems tracts that have similar base-level changes. The stratigraphic computer program Sedpak was utilized to examine the possible impact of different sedimentation cycles on sequence interpretation and reservoir forecasts. The effect of sedimentation cycles on reservoir distribution in real world sequences is demonstrated with a comparison of the Miocene section of the Surma basin, Bangladesh, and the Plio-Pleistocene section of the Gulf of Mexico. In the Surma basin, reservoirs are most likely to occur in transgressive and highstand systems tracts, while reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico are more likely in lowstand prograding complexes.

  2. Phosphorus geochemical cycling inferences from high frequency lake monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockford, Lucy; Jordan, Philip; Taylor, David

    2013-04-01

    Freshwater bodies in Europe are required to return to good water quality status under the Water Framework Directive by 2015. A small inter-drumlin lake in the northeast of Ireland has been susceptible to eutrophic episodes and the presence of algal blooms during summer since annual monitoring began in 2002. While agricultural practice has been controlled by the implementation of the Nitrates Directive in 2006, the lake is failing to recover to good water quality status to meet with the Water Framework Directive objectives. Freshwaters in Ireland are regarded, in the main, as phosphorus (P) limited so identifying the sources of P possibly fuelling the algal blooms may provide an insight into how to improve water quality conditions. In a lake, these sources are divided between external catchment driven loads, as a result of farming and point sources, and P released from sediments made available to photic waters through internal lake mechanisms. High frequency sensors on data-sondes, installed on the lake in three locations, have provided chlorophyll a, redox potential, dissolved oxygen, temperature, pH, conductivity and turbidity data since March 2010. A data-sonde was installed in the hypolimnion to observe the change in lake conditions as P is released from lake sediments as a result of geochemical cycling with iron during anoxic periods. As compact high frequency sampling equipment for P analysis is still in its infancy for freshwaters, a proxy measurement of geochemical cycling in lakes would be useful to determine fully the extent of P contribution from sediments to the overall P load. Phosphorus was analysed once per month along with a number of other parameters and initial analysis of the high frequency data has shown changes in readings when known P release from lake sediments has occurred. Importantly, these data have shown when these P enriched hypolimnetic waters may be re-introduced to shallower waters in the photic zone, by changes in dissolved oxygen

  3. High Frequency Acoustic Reflection and Transmission in Ocean Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    scattering in ocean environments with special emphasis on propagation in shallow water waveguides and scattering from ocean sediments. 3 ) Development of...TYPE 3 . DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High Frequency Acoustic Reflection and Transmission in Ocean Sediments...REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 3

  4. Shallow Water Sediment Properties Derived from High-Frequency Shear and Interface Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-10

    FREQUENCY SHEAR ONR N00014-88-C-1238 AND INTERFACE WAVES 6. AUTHOR(S) JOHN EWING, JERRY A. CARTER, GEORGE H. SUTTON AND NOEL BARSTOW 7. PERFORMING...B4. PAGES 4739--4762. APRIL 10. 1992 Shallow Water Sediment Properties Derived From High-Frequency Shear and Interface Waves JOHN EWING Woods Hole...calculating thickness. The amplitude falloff with range establishes a Q velocity gradients and penetration depths [ Nettleton . 19401 estimate of 40 in

  5. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics 1: spectral properties of scattering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Grams, Paul E.; Kaplinski, Matt A.

    2014-01-01

    Bed-sediment classification using high-frequency hydro-acoustic instruments is challenging when sediments are spatially heterogeneous, which is often the case in rivers. The use of acoustic backscatter to classify sediments is an attractive alternative to analysis of topography because it is potentially sensitive to grain-scale roughness. Here, a new method is presented which uses high-frequency acoustic backscatter from multibeam sonar to classify heterogeneous riverbed sediments by type (sand, gravel,rock) continuously in space and at small spatial resolution. In this, the first of a pair of papers that examine the scattering signatures from a heterogeneous riverbed, methods are presented to construct spatially explicit maps of spectral properties from geo-referenced point clouds of geometrically and radiometrically corrected echoes. Backscatter power spectra are computed to produce scale and amplitude metrics that collectively characterize the length scales of stochastic measures of riverbed scattering, termed ‘stochastic geometries’. Backscatter aggregated over small spatial scales have spectra that obey a power-law. This apparently self-affine behavior could instead arise from morphological- and grain-scale roughnesses over multiple overlapping scales, or riverbed scattering being transitional between Rayleigh and geometric regimes. Relationships exist between stochastic geometries of backscatter and areas of rough and smooth sediments. However, no one parameter can uniquely characterize a particular substrate, nor definitively separate the relative contributions of roughness and acoustic impedance (hardness). Combinations of spectral quantities do, however, have the potential to delineate riverbed sediment patchiness, in a data-driven approach comparing backscatter with bed-sediment observations (which is the subject of part two of this manuscript).

  6. Towards in situ and high frequency estimates of suspended sediment properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Carreras, Núria; Schwab, Michael Peter; Klaus, Julian; Hissler, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Sediment properties, including sediment-associated chemical constituents and sediment physical properties (as colour), can exhibit significant variations within and between storm runoff events. However, the number of samples included in suspended sediment studies is often limited by the time consuming and expensive laboratory procedures for suspended sediment analysis after stream water sampling. This, in turn, restricts high frequency sampling campaigns to a limited number of events and reduces accuracy when aiming to estimate fluxes and loads of sediment-associated chemical constituents. Our contribution addresses the potential for portable ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) light spectrometers (220-730 nm) to estimate suspended sediment properties in situ and at high temporal resolution. As far as we know, these instruments have primarily been developed and used to quantify solute concentrations (e.g. DOC and NO3-N), total concentrations of dissolved and particulate forms (e.g. TOC) and turbidity. Here we argue that light absorbance values can be calibrated to estimate solely sediment properties. For our proof-of-concept experiment, we measured light absorbance at 15-min intervals at the Weierbach catchment (NW Luxembourg, 0.46 km2) from December 2013 to January 2015. We then performed a local calibration using suspended sediment loss-on-ignition (LOI) measurements (n=34). We assessed the performance of several regression models that relate light absorbance measurements with the percentage weight LOI. The robust regression method presented the lowest standard error of prediction (0.48{%}) and was selected for calibration (adjusted r2 = 0.76 between observed and predicted values). This study demonstrates that spectrometers can be used to estimate suspended sediment properties at high temporal resolution and for long time spans in a simple, non-destructive and affordable manner. The advantages and disadvantages of the method compared to traditional approaches will be

  7. Inversion of High Frequency Acoustic Data for Sediment Properties Needed for the Detection and Classification of UXOs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-26

    FINAL REPORT Inversion of High Frequency Acoustic Data for Sediment Properties Needed for the Detection and Classification of UXOs SERDP...display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3...2015 Inversion of High Frequency Acoustic Data for Sediment Properties Needed for the Detection and Classification of UXO’s W912HQ-12-C-0049 MR

  8. Automatic real-time control of suspended sediment based upon high frequency in situ measurements of nephelometric turbidity

    Treesearch

    Jack Lewis; Rand Eads

    1998-01-01

    Abstract - For estimating suspended sediment concentration (SSC) in rivers, turbidity is potentially a much better predictor than water discharge. Since about 1990, it has been feasible to automatically collect high frequency turbidity data at remote sites using battery-powered turbidity probes that are properly mounted in the river or stream. With sensors calibrated...

  9. Aeolian sediment transport on a beach: Thresholds, intermittency, and high frequency variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson-Arnott, R. G. D.; Bauer, B. O.

    2009-04-01

    During a field experiment designed to measure wind flow and sediment transport over the beach and foredune at Greenwich Dunes, Prince Edward Island National Park, measurements were made on October 11, 2004, during a storm with wind speeds ranging from 4 ms - 1 to over 20 ms - 1 . This paper examines thresholds of sand movement, intermittency and the relationship between fluctuating winds and transport intensity based on high frequency measurements of wind speed and saltation. Wind speed was measured at four points across the beach profile using cup anemometers set at a height of 0.6 m. The anemometers were co-located with saltation probes (set at a height of 0.02 m) that measure the impacts of saltating sand grains. The instruments were sampled at 1 Hz during runs of 1 or 2 h over an eight-hour period. Sand transport was highly intermittent early in the day when winds were only slightly above threshold and became more continuous towards the upper beach because of increasing fetch distance and decreasing surface moisture. Despite more continuous transport and increasing wind speed through the day, a zone of highly intermittent transport migrated landward across the beach as water levels rose due to storm surge. Examination of three thresholds related to measures of wind speed - the maximum wind speed without transport ( Utmax), minimum wind speed with transport ( Utmin) and the intermittency threshold ( Utγ) - showed that none provide a consistently robust measure of the threshold although they all provide some insight into conditions controlling entrainment. While graphs of instantaneous saltation intensity crudely mimic the pattern of fluctuating wind speed, statistical correlations over periods of 2-10 min were generally poor ( R2 < 0.25) even with considerable smoothing applied to the time series. Such poor correlation appears to reflect the spatial and temporal complexity of the beach surface, particularly the pattern of surface moisture as well as saltation

  10. The Laminated Marca Shale: High-Frequency Climate Cycles From the Latest Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A.; Kemp, A. E.; Weedon, G.; Barron, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    The Latest Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Marca Shale Member, California, displays a well-preserved record of alternating terrigenous and diatomaceous laminae couplets, remarkably similar in lithology to recent laminated sediments from the Gulf of California and Santa Barbara Basin. This similarity, together with the recognition of intra- and inter-annual variability in the diatom flora, implies an annual origin for these couplets. High-resolution backscattered electron imagery has identified two sublaminae types within the varved succession; near monospecific lamina of Chaetoceros-type resting spore and of large Azpeitiopsis morenoensis. The composition and occurrence of these laminae is similar to ENSO forced intra-annual variability of diatom flora along the modern Californian margin. Relative thickness variations in terrigenous and biogenic laminae (proxies for precipitation and productivity respectively) also exhibit similar characteristics to variability in Quaternary varves from the Santa Barbara Basin, shown to be imparted by ENSO forcing. In order to track changes in the levels of bottom water oxygenation within the basin, a bioturbation index was established. Periods when bioturbation was minimal (enhanced benthic anoxia) coincide with times of greatest diatomaceous export flux and also lowest flux of detrital material. Conversely, periods of enhanced bioturbation correspond with reduced diatomaceous export flux and an increased flux of detrital material, comparable with ENSO forced variations in diatomaceous and terrigenous export flux and associated benthic oxygenation levels in Pleistocene varves off the Californian margin. Power spectra obtained from time-series analysis of the bioturbation index and laminae thickness variations exhibit strong signals within the ENSO band. This research implies that high-frequency climate perturbations are inherent components of the climate system and that ENSO-type variability was not confined to the dynamic climate

  11. Shallow water sediment properties derived from high-frequency shear and interface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, John; Carter, Jerry A.; Sutton, George H.; Barstow, Noel

    1992-04-01

    Low-frequency sound propagation in shallow water environments is not restricted to the water column but also involves the subbottom. Thus, as well as being important for geophysical description of the seabed, subbottom velocity/attenuation structure is essential input for predictive propagation models. To estimate this structure, bottom-mounted sources and receivers were used to make measurements of shear and compressional wave propagation in shallow water sediments of the continental shelf, usually where boreholes and high-resolution reflection profiles give substantial supporting geologic information about the subsurface. This colocation provides an opportunity to compare seismically determined estimates of physical properties of the seabed with the "ground truth" properties. Measurements were made in 1986 with source/detector offsets up to 200 m producing shear wave velocity versus depth profiles of the upper 30-50 m of the seabed (and P wave profiles to lesser depths). Measurements in 1988 were made with smaller source devices designed to emphasize higher frequencies and recorded by an array of 30 sensors spaced at 1-m intervals to improve spatial sampling and resolution of shallow structure. These investigations with shear waves have shown that significant lateral and vertical variations in the physical properties of the shallow seabed are common and are principally created by erosional and depositional processes associated with glacial cycles and sea level oscillations during the Quaternary. When the seabed structure is relatively uniform over the length of the profiles, the shear wave fields are well ordered, and the matching of the data with full waveform synthetics has been successful, producing velocity/attenuation models consistent with the subsurface lithology indicated by coring results. Both body waves and interface waves have been modeled for velocity/attenuation as a function of depth with the aid of synthetic seismograms and other analytical

  12. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics: 2. Scattering signatures of Colorado River bed sediment in Marble and Grand Canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscombe, D.; Grams, P. E.; Kaplinski, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    In this, the second of a pair of papers on the statistical signatures of riverbed sediment in high-frequency acoustic backscatter, spatially explicit maps of the stochastic geometries (length and amplitude scales) of backscatter are related to patches of riverbed surfaces composed of known sediment types, as determined by georeferenced underwater video observations. Statistics of backscatter magnitudes alone are found to be poor discriminators between sediment types. However, the variance of the power spectrum and the intercept and slope from a power law spectral form (termed the spectral strength and exponent, respectively) successfully discriminate between sediment types. A decision tree approach was able to classify spatially heterogeneous patches of homogeneous sands, gravels (and sand-gravel mixtures), and cobbles/boulders with 95, 88, and 91% accuracy, respectively. Application to sites outside the calibration and surveys made at calibration sites at different times were plausible based on observations from underwater video. Analysis of decision trees built with different training data sets suggested that the spectral exponent was consistently the most important variable in the classification. In the absence of theory concerning how spatially variable sediment surfaces scatter high-frequency sound, the primary advantage of this data-driven approach to classify bed sediment over alternatives is that spectral methods have well-understood properties and make no assumptions about the distributional form of the fluctuating component of backscatter over small spatial scales.

  13. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics 2: scattering signatures of Colorado River bed sediment in Marble and Grand Canyons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Grams, Paul E.; Kaplinski, Matt A.

    2014-01-01

    In this, the second of a pair of papers on the statistical signatures of riverbed sediment in high-frequency acoustic backscatter, spatially explicit maps of the stochastic geometries (length- and amplitude-scales) of backscatter are related to patches of riverbed surfaces composed of known sediment types, as determined by geo-referenced underwater video observations. Statistics of backscatter magnitudes alone are found to be poor discriminators between sediment types. However, the variance of the power spectrum, and the intercept and slope from a power-law spectral form (termed the spectral strength and exponent, respectively) successfully discriminate between sediment types. A decision-tree approach was able to classify spatially heterogeneous patches of homogeneous sands, gravels (and sand-gravel mixtures), and cobbles/boulders with 95, 88, and 91% accuracy, respectively. Application to sites outside the calibration, and surveys made at calibration sites at different times, were plausible based on observations from underwater video. Analysis of decision trees built with different training data sets suggested that the spectral exponent was consistently the most important variable in the classification. In the absence of theory concerning how spatially variable sediment surfaces scatter high-frequency sound, the primary advantage of this data-driven approach to classify bed sediment over alternatives is that spectral methods have well understood properties and make no assumptions about the distributional form of the fluctuating component of backscatter over small spatial scales.

  14. High-Frequency Sound Interaction in Ocean Sediments: Modeling Environmental Controls

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    density, bulk modulus, viscosity , compressional speed all calculated from pore water temperature, salinity and pressure • Porometry: calculated porosity...effort. For several properties, physical handbook determination is adequate (e.g., pore water density, bulk modulus, viscosity , and sound speed can be...frequency acoustic penetration into, propagation within, and scattering from shallow- water ocean sediments. This project will provide the statistical

  15. Hypoxic cyclicity in sediments of Soledad Basin, Baja Mexico: A record of high-frequency climate fluctuations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westman, A. E.; Brooks, G. R.; Lea, C.

    2007-05-01

    The sedimentary record in Soledad Basin, 45 km west of Baja, Mexico, shows high-frequency oscillations in hypoxia, which can be linked to fluctuations in climate. Soledad Basin, a semi-enclosed basin with a sill depth of 290m, has been shown to exhibit variable levels of hypoxia throughout the geologic past. Located at the intersection of the California Current and California Undercurrent, Soledad Basin is highly responsive to changes in current strength and upwelling, the combination of which creates fluctuations in hypoxia. During climatic cool periods, the California Current is weakened decreasing upwelling and biologic productivity along the Baja Borderland. This causes increased hypoxia in Soledad Basin. The California Undercurrent is also weakened during these cooler periods and brings less nutrients and oxygen to the basin further increasing hypoxia. Since Soledad Basin sediments are undisturbed and have accumulated rapidly, this is a prime location to study high frequency variations in hypoxia in the sedimentary record. The objective of this study was to examine how and to what extent hypoxic events have been recorded in the sedimentary record of Soledad Basin, and gain insight into what controls these events. Surface sediment samples and a single 1.1m gravity core were collected aboard the S.S.V. Robert C. Seamans on a SEA Semester cruise in October 2005. The core was taken at a depth of 490 m near the deepest point of the basin. The core contained laminated sediments consisting of >95% mud. Using 210Pb analysis, a sedimentation rate of 15 cm over the past 100 years was determined, which is consistent with previous research. Trace metal analyses were performed at the cm-scale on selected intervals between 0.34-0.44m and 0.78-0.92m. These intervals correspond to dark organic-rich (>15% organic content) laminations alternating with lighter layers containing less organic material (<15% organic content). All sediments were found to be enriched in Molybdenum

  16. Quantifying Surface Processes and Stratigraphic Characteristics Resulting from Large Magnitude High Frequency and Small Magnitude Low Frequency Relative Sea Level Cycles: An Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Li, Q.; Esposito, C. R.; Straub, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Relative Sea-Level (RSL) change, which is a primary control on sequence stratigraphic architecture, has a close relationship with climate change. In order to explore the influence of RSL change on the stratigraphic record, we conducted three physical experiments which shared identical boundary conditions but differed in their RSL characteristics. Specifically, the three experiments differed with respect to two non-dimensional numbers that compare the magnitude and periodicity of RSL cycles to the spatial and temporal scales of autogenic processes, respectively. The magnitude of RSL change is quantified with H*, defined as the peak to trough difference in RSL during a cycle divided by a system's maximum autogenic channel depth. The periodicity of RSL change is quantified with T*, defined as the period of RSL cycles divided by the time required to deposit one channel depth of sediment, on average, everywhere in the basin. Experiments performed included: 1) a control experiment lacking RSL cycles, used to define a system's autogenics, 2) a high magnitude, high frequency RSL cycles experiment, and 3) a low magnitude, low frequency cycles experiment. We observe that the high magnitude, high frequency experiment resulted in the thickest channel bodies with the lowest width-to-depth ratios, while the low magnitude, long period experiment preserves a record of gradual shoreline transgression and regression producing facies that are the most continuous in space. We plan to integrate our experimental results with Delft3D numerical experiments models that sample similar non-dimensional characteristics of RSL cycles. Quantifying the influence of RSL change, normalized as a function of the spatial and temporal scales of autogenic processes will strengthen our ability to predict stratigraphic architecture and invert stratigraphy for paleo-environmental conditions.

  17. High-frequency thermal-electrical cycles for pyroelectric energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Bikram; Damodaran, Anoop R.; Cho, Hanna; Martin, Lane W.; King, William P.

    2014-11-21

    We report thermal to electrical energy conversion from a 150 nm thick BaTiO{sub 3} film using pyroelectric cycles at 1 kHz. A microfabricated platform enables temperature and electric field control with temporal resolution near 1 μs. The rapid electric field changes as high as 11 × 10{sup 5 }kV/cm-s, and temperature change rates as high as 6 × 10{sup 5 }K/s allow exploration of pyroelectric cycles in a previously unexplored operating regime. We investigated the effect of phase difference between electric field and temperature cycles, and electric field and temperature change rates on the electrical energy generated from thermal-electrical cycles based on the pyroelectric Ericsson cycle. Complete thermodynamic cycles are possible up to the highest cycle rates tested here, and the energy density varies significantly with phase shifts between temperature and electric field waveforms. This work could facilitate the design and operation of pyroelectric cycles at high cycle rates, and aid in the design of new pyroelectric systems.

  18. Remote sensing of sandy sediment ripples using high-frequency backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Kevin; Tang, Dajun

    2002-11-01

    The presence of bottom ripples changes the acoustic interaction with sediments. Two important ripple parameters are the height and spatial wavelength. In previous work, in situ measurements of ripple were made using stereophotography and electrical conductivity. Although these methods are accurate and dependable, they can only be carried out over limited areas (the order of 15 meters on the side). Using acoustic backscattering to remotely measure the ripple field, on the other hand, is fast and can cover much larger areas (the order of 50 m by 50 m). Data from a 300 kHz system with two closely spaced receivers was used to estimate ripple wavelength and height. Data analysis and numerical simulation show that, as long as the wavelength of the sound wave is much shorter than the ripple wavelength, it is straightforward to resolve the wavelength of the ripple field. To measure the ripple height, however, is more difficult. The best results were obtained when the horizontal projection of the sound beam was neither parallel nor perpendicular to the ripples. In simulations a composite model was used, where the large scale ripples and small scale roughness are treated as Kirchhoff and Lambertian scatterers, respectively. [Work supported by ONR-USA.

  19. Zero Voltage Soft Switching Duty Cycle Pulse Modulated High Frequency Inverter-Fed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishitobi, Manabu; Matsushige, Takayuki; Nakaoka, Mutsuo; Bessyo, Daisuke; Omori, Hideki; Terai, Haruo

    The utility grid voltage of commercial AC power source in Japan and USA is 100V, but in other Asian and European countries, it is 220V. In recent years, in Japan 200V outputted single-phase three-wire system begins to be used for high power applications. In 100V utility AC power applications and systems, an active voltage clamped quasi-resonant inverter circuit topology sing IGBTs has been effectively used so far for the consumer microwave oven. In this paper, presented is a half bridge type voltage-clamped asymmetrical soft switching PWM high-frequency inverter type AC-DC converter using IGBTs which is designed for consumer magnetron drive used as the consumer microwave oven in 200V utility AC power system. The zero voltage soft switching inverter treated here can use the same power rated switching semiconductor devices and three-winding high frequency transformer as those of the active voltage clamped quasi-resonant inverter using the IGBTs that has already been used for 100V utility AC power source. The operating performances of the voltage source single ended push pull (SEPP) type soft switching PWM inverter are evaluated and discussed for 100V and 200V common use consumer microwave oven. The harmonic line current components in the utility AC power side of the AC-DC power converter with ZVS-PWM SEPP inverter are reduced and improved on the basis of sine wave like pulse frequency modulation and sine wave like pulse width modulation for the utility AC voltage source.

  20. Improving understanding of mixed-land-use watershed suspended sediment regimes: Mechanistic progress through high-frequency sampling.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Elliott; Hubbart, Jason A

    2017-11-15

    Given the importance of suspended sediment to biogeochemical functioning of aquatic ecosystems, and the increasing concern of mixed-land-use effects on pollutant loading, there is an urgent need for research that quantitatively characterizes spatiotemporal variation of suspended sediment dynamics in contemporary watersheds. A study was conducted in a representative watershed of the central United States utilizing a nested-scale experimental watershed design, including five gauging sites (n=5) partitioning the catchment into five sub-watersheds. Hydroclimate stations at gauging sites were used to monitor air temperature, precipitation, and stream stage at 30-min intervals during the study (Oct. 2009-Feb. 2014). Streamwater grab samples were collected four times per week, at each site, for the duration of the study (Oct. 2009-Feb. 2014). Water samples were analyzed for suspended sediment using laser particle diffraction. Results showed significant differences (p<0.05) between monitoring sites for total suspended sediment concentration, mean particle size, and silt volume. Total concentration and silt volume showed a decreasing trend from the primarily agricultural upper watershed to the urban mid-watershed, and a subsequent increasing trend to the more suburban lower watershed. Conversely, mean particle size showed an opposite spatial trend. Results are explained by a combination of land use (e.g. urban stormwater dilution) and surficial geology (e.g. supply-controlled spatial variation of particle size). Correlation analyses indicated weak relationships with both hydroclimate and land use, indicating non-linear sediment dynamics. Suspended sediment parameters displayed consistent seasonality during the study, with total concentration decreasing through the growing season and mean particle size inversely tracking air temperature. Likely explanations include vegetation influences and climate-driven weathering cycles. Results reflect unique observations of

  1. High frequency Analysis of Stream Chemistry to Establish Elemental Cycling Regimes of High latitude Catchments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-13

    elemental cycles and disturbance of high-latitude ecosystems caused by climate change . Background Environmental issues Climate , ecosystem structure...Disturbance regimes may be accelerating in Interior Alaska, with unpredictable consequences for ecosystem processes. Climate change in Alaska has resulted in...of extreme precipitation events [ACIA, 2005; Serreze et al., 2000]. Changes in climate have coincided with decreased areal extent of permafrost and

  2. High-frequency oscillations in human and monkey neocortex during the wake-sleep cycle.

    PubMed

    Le Van Quyen, Michel; Muller, Lyle E; Telenczuk, Bartosz; Halgren, Eric; Cash, Sydney; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G; Dehghani, Nima; Destexhe, Alain

    2016-08-16

    Beta (β)- and gamma (γ)-oscillations are present in different cortical areas and are thought to be inhibition-driven, but it is not known if these properties also apply to γ-oscillations in humans. Here, we analyze such oscillations in high-density microelectrode array recordings in human and monkey during the wake-sleep cycle. In these recordings, units were classified as excitatory and inhibitory cells. We find that γ-oscillations in human and β-oscillations in monkey are characterized by a strong implication of inhibitory neurons, both in terms of their firing rate and their phasic firing with the oscillation cycle. The β- and γ-waves systematically propagate across the array, with similar velocities, during both wake and sleep. However, only in slow-wave sleep (SWS) β- and γ-oscillations are associated with highly coherent and functional interactions across several millimeters of the neocortex. This interaction is specifically pronounced between inhibitory cells. These results suggest that inhibitory cells are dominantly involved in the genesis of β- and γ-oscillations, as well as in the organization of their large-scale coherence in the awake and sleeping brain. The highest oscillation coherence found during SWS suggests that fast oscillations implement a highly coherent reactivation of wake patterns that may support memory consolidation during SWS.

  3. High-frequency oscillations in human and monkey neocortex during the wake–sleep cycle

    PubMed Central

    Le Van Quyen, Michel; Muller, Lyle E.; Telenczuk, Bartosz; Halgren, Eric; Cash, Sydney; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G.; Dehghani, Nima; Destexhe, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Beta (β)- and gamma (γ)-oscillations are present in different cortical areas and are thought to be inhibition-driven, but it is not known if these properties also apply to γ-oscillations in humans. Here, we analyze such oscillations in high-density microelectrode array recordings in human and monkey during the wake–sleep cycle. In these recordings, units were classified as excitatory and inhibitory cells. We find that γ-oscillations in human and β-oscillations in monkey are characterized by a strong implication of inhibitory neurons, both in terms of their firing rate and their phasic firing with the oscillation cycle. The β- and γ-waves systematically propagate across the array, with similar velocities, during both wake and sleep. However, only in slow-wave sleep (SWS) β- and γ-oscillations are associated with highly coherent and functional interactions across several millimeters of the neocortex. This interaction is specifically pronounced between inhibitory cells. These results suggest that inhibitory cells are dominantly involved in the genesis of β- and γ-oscillations, as well as in the organization of their large-scale coherence in the awake and sleeping brain. The highest oscillation coherence found during SWS suggests that fast oscillations implement a highly coherent reactivation of wake patterns that may support memory consolidation during SWS. PMID:27482084

  4. New Seasonal Shift in In-Stream Diurnal Nitrate Cycles Identified by Mining High-Frequency Data

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of in-situ monitoring devices, such as UV-spectrometers, makes the study of short-term stream chemistry variation relevant, especially the study of diurnal cycles, which are not yet fully understood. Our study is based on high-frequency data from an agricultural catchment (Studienlandschaft Schwingbachtal, Germany). We propose a novel approach, i.e. the combination of cluster analysis and Linear Discriminant Analysis, to mine from these data nitrate behavior patterns. As a result, we observe a seasonality of nitrate diurnal cycles, that differs from the most common cycle seasonality described in the literature, i.e. pre-dawn peaks in spring. Our cycles appear in summer and the maximum and minimum shift to a later time in late summer/autumn. This is observed both for water- and energy-limited years, thus potentially stressing the role of evapotranspiration. This concluding hypothesis on the role of evapotranspiration on nitrate stream concentration, which was obtained through data mining, broadens the perspective on the diurnal cycling of stream nitrate concentrations. PMID:27073838

  5. New Seasonal Shift in In-Stream Diurnal Nitrate Cycles Identified by Mining High-Frequency Data.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Alice H; Breuer, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of in-situ monitoring devices, such as UV-spectrometers, makes the study of short-term stream chemistry variation relevant, especially the study of diurnal cycles, which are not yet fully understood. Our study is based on high-frequency data from an agricultural catchment (Studienlandschaft Schwingbachtal, Germany). We propose a novel approach, i.e. the combination of cluster analysis and Linear Discriminant Analysis, to mine from these data nitrate behavior patterns. As a result, we observe a seasonality of nitrate diurnal cycles, that differs from the most common cycle seasonality described in the literature, i.e. pre-dawn peaks in spring. Our cycles appear in summer and the maximum and minimum shift to a later time in late summer/autumn. This is observed both for water- and energy-limited years, thus potentially stressing the role of evapotranspiration. This concluding hypothesis on the role of evapotranspiration on nitrate stream concentration, which was obtained through data mining, broadens the perspective on the diurnal cycling of stream nitrate concentrations.

  6. How important is subsidence in evaluating high frequency cycles in the interior of isolated carbonate platforms?

    SciTech Connect

    Lomando, A.J.; Ginsburg, R.

    1995-08-01

    Differential regional subsidence can play a strong role in determining facies composition of adjacent isolated platforms. In the majority of platform oil & gas fields, reservoir architecture is dominated by the composition and stratial geometries in the platform interiors rather than the platform rims. Most work to develop analogues from modern reef-rimmed isolated platforms has focused on the platform margins where reef growths rates are capable of keeping pace with the Holocene sea level rise plus tectonic subsidence. We have focused on platform interiors where accumulation rate and style may be more sensitive to accommodation space generated by regional passive margin subsidence. The Belize platforms are located on a series of parallel ridges which extend progressively eastward, farther from the regional subsidence hingeline near the coast. Greater regional subsidence is reflected in the open, deeper, patch reef and sand rich platform interiors in the outermost platform (Lighthouse and Glovers Platform) in comparison to the mud-dominated interior within the innermost platform (Turneffe), which has filled up due to lesser subsidence rate. The facies response to a portion of a single eustatic cycle produces a {open_quotes}keep-up{close_quotes} transgressive systems tract appearance at Lighthouse and Glovers but a {open_quotes}choked-up{close_quotes} high stand or regressive systems tract appearance within Turneffe. Chinchorro Bank, offshore Yucatan, is a special case where subsidence changes along the length of the platforms. The entire windward margin has a well developed reef system which has uniformly kept pace with the Holocene transgression. The northern platform interior contains a patch reef/sand rich character similar to Lighthouse Platform whereas the southern platform interior is {open_quotes}drowning{close_quotes} due to subsidence along a series of northwest trending faults which downstep southward.

  7. Influence of high-frequency strandline cycles on internal reservoir geometry: Point Lookout sandstone, New Mexico and Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, R.

    1989-03-01

    High-frequency (< 100,000 years) transgressive-regressive strandline couplets that form basic building blocks of individual marine shoreface sandstones strongly influence strandline migration pattern and internal reservoir geometry. At reservoir scale, couplets average 7-10 m thick and are characterized by repetitive stacking of genetically related sandstone-mud rock packages. Individual cycles, or architectural elements, correlate in 3-D outcrop for at least 30 km, are locally bundled into larger discrete packages of five to eight constituent cycles, and are distinguishable in well logs. Contrary to long-held opinion, many of these cycles are not asymmetric. Rather, they contain thin (< 3 m) transgressive systems tracts that are overlain by thicker (< 7 m) regressive systems tracts and which are separated from one another by a pronounced downdip surface. Transgressive mud rocks fine upward from siltstone to clay-shale and coarsen landward less than 10 km into thinly interbedded sandstones with abundant siderite lags. Regressive mud rocks coarsen upward and landward into prograding shoreface sandstones that may overlie transgressive sandstones in proximal positions. Landward facies transitions within transgressive and regressive components of a single cycle vary, resulting in complex lithofacies interlayering. The significance for reservoir studies is that repeated transgressive systems tracts form predictable intraformational stratigraphic markers which may influence both horizontal and vertical fluid migration pathways. Importantly, the standard vertical profile fails to properly interpret transgressive deposits (especially sandstones) in the absence of a well-constrained lateral model.

  8. Phase reduction of a limit cycle oscillator perturbed by a strong amplitude-modulated high-frequency force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyragas, Kestutis; Novičenko, Viktor

    2015-07-01

    The phase reduction method for a limit cycle oscillator subjected to a strong amplitude-modulated high-frequency force is developed. An equation for the phase dynamics is derived by introducing a new, effective phase response curve. We show that if the effective phase response curve is everywhere positive (negative), then an entrainment of the oscillator to an envelope frequency is possible only when this frequency is higher (lower) than the natural frequency of the oscillator. Also, by using the Pontryagin maximum principle, we have derived an optimal waveform of the perturbation that ensures an entrainment of the oscillator with minimal power. The theoretical results are demonstrated with the Stuart-Landau oscillator and model neurons.

  9. Sulfur cycling in freshwater sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klug, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Organic sulfur containing compounds represent greater than 80% of the total sulfur in sediments of eutrophic freshwater lakes. Although sedimentary sulfur is predominantly in the form of organic compounds, more sulfur is transformed by sulfate reduction than by any other process. Rates of sulfate reduction in these sediments average 7 mmol/sq m/day. This rate is 19 times greater than the net rate of production of inorganic sulfur from organic compounds on an annual basis.

  10. Physical mechanisms of the seasonal, subseasonal, and high-frequency variability in the seasonal cycle of summer precipitation in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwang-Yul; Roh, Joon-Woo; Lee, Dong-Kyou; Jhun, Jong-Ghap

    2010-07-01

    Three distinct physical mechanisms in the seasonal cycle of the 120 day (19 May to 15 September) summer precipitation in Korea (126°E-130°E, 33°N-38°N) were identified using the 1979-2008 observed precipitation records at 61 Korea Meteorological Administration stations. Detailed space-time structures of the physical mechanisms of precipitation variability were derived using the daily National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research reanalysis data over Asia (80°E-180°E, 0°-60°N). The seasonal cycle of summertime precipitation in Korea exhibits three principal temporal scales (seasonal, subseasonal, and high-frequency components) of variability, each with distinct physical mechanisms. The seasonal component represents the variability associated with the evolution of the Asian summer monsoon, specifically the East Asia summer monsoon, governed primarily by large-scale circulation as a result of changes in sea level pressure contrasts between the Asian continent and the surrounding oceans. The arrival and the duration of a monsoon front primarily shape the seasonal evolution of precipitation in Korea. The bimodal peaks are due to the low-level circulation change as a result of redistribution of temperature and, subsequently, of sea level pressure during summer. The subseasonal component has characteristic time scales of 10-30 days and is associated with eastward-moving upper-level disturbances at ˜40°N. The upper-level disturbances affect the meridional circulations, resulting in low-level convergence/divergence not only underneath but also to the south and to the north of the disturbance. From mid-July to mid-August, the subseasonal component is more clearly observable, and the period of oscillations is generally shorter, than during early or late summer. The high-frequency component with time scales of less than 10 days is associated with midlatitude baroclinic Rossby waves; synoptic-scale variations of upper

  11. Can We Use High Frequency Seismic Noise to Infer Local Sea States, Breaking Wave Power, and Sediment Transport?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppeliers, C.

    2016-12-01

    In the last decade, there has been increased interest in using seismology to characterize, locate, and quantify so-called non-traditional targets. In this talk, I summarize our efforts on attempting to correlate seismic records to the power and direction of breaking ocean waves in the near-shore surf zone. The eventual goal of this work is to determine the efficacy of using seismic monitoring to remotely monitor beach processes such as erosion, accretion, and/or sediment transport. Note that seismic energy generated by breaking waves is not the same as microseism, which is generated by deep water ocean swell and generates energy in a much lower frequency band. Indeed, we observe that breaking waves in the near-shore generate seismic waves in passband of 5-80 Hz. I deployed an eight-station linear array of high frequency seismometers in the dune field immediately adjacent to surf zone and recorded continuously for three weeks. I observed that during elevated sea states, and presumably larger breaking waves in the surf zone, the power spectral density of the wave-generated seismic energy shifts to lower frequencies and higher spectral amplitudes. A loose correlation between the seismic spectral power to the height and period of ocean waves suggests that seismic observations may be used as a proxy for local sea states. However, I found that traditional measures of ocean waves, in the form of significant wave height, Hs, and dominant period, S, misses a wealth of information about the ocean wave field, leading to only very loose correlations between the observed seismic spectrum and Hs and S. Rather, I found that the seismic energy is much more closely correlated to ocean wave spectral energy, suggesting that future work must include higher resolution measurements of ocean waves in the form of water-surface height time series or underwater acoustic monitoring of the surf zone. Also, I observed a significant hysteresis between the sea surface spectral energy the seismic

  12. Shallow stratigraphy and sedimentation history during high-frequency sea-level changes on the central California shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grossman, E.E.; Eittreim, S.L.; Field, M.E.; Wong, F.L.

    2006-01-01

    Analyses of high-resolution seismic-reflection data and sediment cores indicate that an extensive sediment deposit on the central California continental shelf is comprised of several late-Pleistocene to Holocene age facies. Offshore of the littoral zone, in water depths of 30-90 m, a 3-6 m thick veneer of fine sediment referred to as the mid-shelf mudbelt has formed along 50-100 km of the coast. The mudbelt drapes a parasequence characterized by prograding clinoforms that in places overlies a 1-3 m thick basal transgressive lag deposit. These facies overlie a prominent erosional unconformity that extends from the shore to the outer shelf. Eighteen calibrated 14CAMS ages of marine molluscs and terrestrial wood detritus sampled in cores range 15,800 yr BP to modern indicating a postglacial age for these sediments (one >55,000 yr BP represents relict sand). We model accumulation of these facies using (1) the topography of the underlying erosional unconformity interpreted from seismic reflection profiles, (2) observed sediment facies (grain size) distribution across the shelf (a proxy for wave/current sediment partitioning), and published estimates of (3) eustatic sea-level history, and (4) regional tectonics. Our model and data indicate that deposition of the transgressive lag began during early, slow postglacial sea-level rise and that a notable change in depositional environment occurred across an area of more than 200 km2 of the outer shelf likely in response to abrupt drowning during Meltwater Pulse 1B (11,500 yr BP). We propose that rapid progradation of clinoforms may have occurred during transgression because of the unique interaction of modest rates of sediment input and tectonic uplift, variable rates of eustatic sea-level rise and a complex stepped antecedent topography.

  13. Technologies Beyond Turbidity for Sediment Monitoring - Laser diffraction, High Frequency Acoustics and a new Combined acousto-optic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Yogesh C.

    2017-04-01

    Sediment monitoring was transformed when optical turbidity was first introduced 3 decades ago, creating a capacity to monitor sediments continuously. Despite many papers that have since noted that turbidity measures particle area concentration not volume, turbidity remains widely in use. In fact, the sensitivity to area rather than volume implies a 1/diameter variation with size on concentration measurement (Volts/volume). Consequently, small amounts of fine sediments can dominate larger amounts of sands - a phenomenon that has masked suspended load in many river profiles, as we will show. Laser diffraction, on the other hand, has constant sensitivity to a wide range of grain sizes, e.g. from 2-500 microns, and obtains size distribution at 1 4-phi size intervals, with LISST instruments. However, it is expensive. An 8MHz acoustic system has recently been introduced, LISST-ABS that has advantages of a flatter response to varying grain sizes than turbidity, a higher sensitivity to suspended load than wash load, and a greater tolerance to turbidity. The response (Volts/volume) is still not flat, exhibiting a size-dependence that is inverse of turbidity at small sizes where particles are in Rayleigh regime, i.e. where ka<1 at 8MHz - diameters smaller than 60 microns. This opposing tendency of optics and acoustics lead us to the concept of combining the two methods, and this is a new idea that we call acousto-optics. Over the 1-500 micron size range, instead of 3 orders of magnitude variation in sensitivity for optics, this sensor achieves constancy within a factor of 3 even for narrow size particles, and better for distributions. The acoustic and acousto-optic sensors should significantly enhance measurement quality for sediments. We shall review and present the new concept.

  14. The effective Q values inferred from the high-frequency decay parameter for the sediments in Taipei basin, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Wey; Wen, Kuo-Liang; Chang, Chi-Ling; Liu, Sheu-Yien

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the high-frequency decay parameter κ, proposed by Anderson and Hough (1984), are measured from the seismograms recorded by stations, which installed in the Taipei basin. The spectral amplitudes decay exponentially with frequency, f, which can be formulated as A(f)=A_0e-πκf, for f > fe, where A(f) is the spectral amplitude, and A0 depends on the earthquake source and epicenter distance, and the value of κ is independent of frequency, unit in second. The time windows applied to seismograms are suggested to be shear waves that are transformed to spectra by the technique of Fourier transform. The seismograms from the downhole array in Taipei Basin by Academia Sinica since 1992, provide a good opportunity to estimate the attenuation factor of the sedimentary strata over the Tertiary base rock beneath the Taipei basin (Wang et al., 2004). The seismograms of 23 earthquakes with magnitude ranges of 5.1-7.1 over the period of 2003-2010 at 9 downhole array stations are taken into calculation of the κ values for the shear waves. The results show that the κ values vary with depth and are in the range of 0.009-0.095 sec. The averaged Δκ values from observations range +/- 0.02 seconds respective to Δκ values at surface of each of station. The effective Q values for the sedimentary layers are inferred from the varied Δκ at each downhole stations following the evaluation method of 1-D analytical transfer function (Safak, 1995).

  15. Temporal Variability and Annual Fluxes of Water, Sediment and Particulate Phosphorus from a Headwater River in the Tropical Andes: Results from a High-frequency Monitoring Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wemple, B. C.; Schloegel, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Mazar River Project, a high-frequency hydrological monitoring program, aims to generate ecohydrological information to inform watershed management in high-mountain areas of southern Ecuador. Rapid development of hydropower, accompanied by new and improved road networks, has resulted in swift changes in land-use and land cover in Ecuador's tropical Andes, all of which underscore the need for detailed information on flow and sediment production from these river systems. National and regional payment for the protection of ecosystem services (PES) programs seek to target critical areas, such as these, for watershed conservation, but are often informed by minimal information on sustainable flows and impacts of land use activities. As part of a program to inform conservation and sustainable water management in the region, we established a hydrological monitoring station in southern Ecuador on the Mazar River, a tributary of the Paute River Basin, situated on the eastern Andean cordillera. The station is equipped with sensors to continuously monitor stream stage and turbidity and an automated sampler for event-based collection of stream water samples, providing high frequency data that reduces the uncertainty of observations. Here, we report observations of continuous runoff and turbidity over the first year of observation, present relationships between turbidity and concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS) and total particulate phosphorus (TP), and provide estimates of annual loads of TSS and TP. Runoff was highly variable over the monitoring period with flows ranging from less than 3 m3/s during baseflow to nearly 80 m3/s during the flood of record. During measured storm events, TSS exceeded 1000 mg/l with maximum measured concentrations exceeding 13 g/l during storm peaks. Turbidity was highly correlated with TSS, which was in turn highly correlated with TP, providing a robust data set for load estimation. We compare our results to other montane rivers in the

  16. High frequency epidural stimulation across the respiratory cycle evokes phrenic short-term potentiation after incomplete cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J; Streeter, Kristi A; Hanna, Marie H; Stamas, Anna C; Reier, Paul J; Baekey, David M; Fuller, David D

    2017-06-14

    C2 spinal hemilesion (C2Hx) paralyzes the ipsilateral diaphragm, but recovery is possible through activation of "crossed spinal" synaptic inputs to ipsilateral phrenic motoneurons. We tested the hypothesis that high frequency epidural stimulation (HF-ES) would potentiate ipsilateral phrenic output after subacute and chronic C2Hx. HF-ES (300 Hz) was applied to the ventrolateral C4 or T2 spinal cord ipsilateral to C2Hx in anesthetized and mechanically ventilated adult rats. Stimulus duration was 60-sec and currents ranged from 100-1000 µA. Bilateral phrenic nerve activity and ipsilateral hypoglossal nerve activity were recorded before and after HF-ES. Higher T2 stimulus currents potentiated ipsilateral phasic inspiratory activity at both 2- and 12-wks post-C2Hx, while higher stimulus currents delivered at C4 potentiated ipsilateral phasic phrenic activity only at 12-wks (P=0.028). Meanwhile, tonic output in the ipsilateral phrenic nerve reached 500% of baseline values at the high currents with no difference between 2- and 12-wks. HF-ES did not trigger inspiratory burst frequency changes. Similar responses occurred following T2 HF-ES. Increases in contralateral phrenic and XII nerve output were induced by C4 and T2 HF-ES at higher currents, but the relative magnitude of these changes was small compared to the ipsilateral phrenic response. We conclude that following incomplete cervical SCI, HF-ES of the ventrolateral mid-cervical or thoracic spinal cord can potentiate efferent phrenic motor output with little impact on inspiratory burst frequency. However, the substantial increases in tonic output indicate that the uninterrupted 60-sec stimulation paradigm used here is unlikely to be useful for respiratory muscle activation after spinal injury. Copyright © 2016, Journal of Neurophysiology.

  17. High frequency peritidal cycles in the lower member of the Late Cretaceous (Turonian, Coniasian-Santonian) El Hefhuf Formation, Bahariya Oases, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, M. A.; Tanner, Lawrence H.

    2017-06-01

    Carbonate lithofacies of the lower member of the El Hefhuf Formation (Turonian, Coniasian-Santonian) in the Bahariya Oases, Western Desert of Egypt comprise dolostone, burrowed dolostone, cherty dolostone, calcareous dedolostone, dolomitic quartzose lime-mudstone, and caliche. The dolostone and cherty dolostone formed in intertidal to supratidal environments, while dedolostone and caliche were formed during subaerial exposure. The dolomitic quartzose lime-mudstone was deposited in a restricted subtidal environment. Stable isotope analyses of the dolostone lithofacies are consistent with dolomitization by normal marine to evaporatively enriched dolomitizing fluids with only slight mixing of meteoric water. Therefore, dolomitization occurred in the intertidal and supratidal environments immediately following deposition. The dolostone and cherty dolostone lithofacies display pronounced cyclicity at the sub-meter scale, with individual cycles consisting of one (monolithic), two (diad) or at most three (triad) lithofacies. Most of all cycles show evidence of subaerial exposure at the top, such as brecciations, and many cycles are capped by calcareous palaeosol layers (caliche). In the absence of evidence for cycle periods at Milankovitch-scale frequencies, we reject orbital forcing as the cause of the cyclicity and suggest instead autocyclic depositional processes in the peritidal environment as the primary control on cyclicity, possibly modified by eustatic fluctuations at periods longer than the cycles recorded here. The significance of this study is to suggest formation of dolomite cycles due to high-frequency in sea level with intermittent subaerial exposure.

  18. Relevance of different spectral techniques to describe estuarine suspended sediment dynamics based on a high-frequency, long-term turbidity dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalón Rojas, Isabel; Schmidt, Sabine; Sottolichio, Aldo

    2015-04-01

    Sediment dynamics in estuaries are complex and strongly variable over time scales ranging from seconds to years. Various forcings (turbulence, tides, river inflow, wind waves, morphological and climatic changes) may cause the temporal and spatial variability of suspended sediment (SS) concentrations. The evaluation of these SS dynamics by in-situ measurements have traditionally faced three difficulties: (1) the quantification of low-frequency variability that requires continuous measures over long time periods; (2) inevitable gaps in data limiting the post-processing; (3) the need for recording other environmental variables in the same period and at a coherent sampling frequency. To record a high-frequency and long-term turbidity dataset, an automatic monitoring network (MAGEST) has been implemented in the Gironde estuary, a macrotidal and highly turbid system in the South-West France, in 2004. This 10-year turbidity time series is rather unique in European estuaries, enabling the evaluation of SS dynamics at all the significant time scales in one single analysis of the dataset. To achieve this, several methodologies of data analysis using different approaches are available, but their relevance, especially for the more recently developed ones, is almost unexplored. In this work, we present the test of four spectral techniques to the analysis of a high-frequency turbidity time series of an estuary such as the Gironde, to discuss advantages and limitations of each method. We compare the Power Spectral Analysis (PSA), the Singular Spectral Analysis (SSA), the Wavelet Transform (WT) and the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD). Advantages and limitations of each method are evaluated on the basis of five criteria: efficiency for incomplete time series, appropriateness for time-varying analysis, ability to recognize processes without the need of complementary environmental variables, capacity to calculate the relative importance of processes, and capacity to identify long

  19. Monitoring the Transport of Sediment During Tropical Cyclones From High-frequency Seismic Noise in Two Rivers of La Réunion Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, F. R.; Gonzalez, A.; Burtin, A.; Barruol, G.; Recking, A.; Join, J. L.; Delcher, E.

    2016-12-01

    La Réunion Island is a basaltic shield volcano located in the western Indian Ocean. The island undergoes heavy annual precipitations during tropical depressions and cyclones. These rainfalls modify the stream dynamics and sediment transport of rivers. The transport of sediment participates to the erosion of the volcanic island, however, in situ characterization is difficult during high water stage. In the frame of the Rivière des Pluies project, we are deploying a temporary seismic network of 10 three-component broadband seismometers around two rivers: Rivière des Pluies and Rivière du Mât. The goal of the project is to monitor spatial and temporal variations of the river's bed-load during tropical cyclones with high-frequency noise. Meteorological and hydrological stations are installed at both rivers providing valuable data such as precipitations, water discharge and water level. We will also sample the bed surface grain size distribution by visual count to determine its influence on the seismic noise. We present preliminary results from two broadband seismic stations located near instrumented streams. SALA station from the temporary RHUM-RUM seismic network (http://www.rhum-rum.net/en/) was installed close to the Rivière du Mât and the permanent GEOSCOPE RER station is located close to the Rivière de l'Est. We analyzed the footprint of the cyclone Bejisa in January 2014. We observe a significant increase of the precipitation when the cyclone eye is 300 km close to the island followed by the increase of the water discharge. Simultaneously the seismic signal shows a sudden increase of the power spectral density visible above 1 Hz. Further investigations on the relationship between the seismic noise and the hydrological and meteorological parameters will help us quantifying the river bed-load.

  20. A multivariate analytical method to characterize sediment attributes from high-frequency acoustic backscatter and ground-truthing data (Jade Bay, German North Sea coast)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondo, Manuela; Bartholomä, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    One of the burning issues on the topic of acoustic seabed classification is the lack of solid, repeatable, statistical procedures that can support the verification of acoustic variability in relation to seabed properties. Acoustic sediment classification schemes often lead to biased and subjective interpretation, as they ultimately aim at an oversimplified categorization of the seabed based on conventionally defined sediment types. However, grain size variability alone cannot be accounted for acoustic diversity, which will be ultimately affected by multiple physical processes, scale of heterogeneity, instrument settings, data quality, image processing and segmentation performances. Understanding and assessing the weight of all of these factors on backscatter is a difficult task, due to the spatially limited and fragmentary knowledge of the seabed from of direct observations (e.g. grab samples, cores, videos). In particular, large-scale mapping requires an enormous availability of ground-truthing data that is often obtained from heterogeneous and multidisciplinary sources, resulting into a further chance of misclassification. Independently from all of these limitations, acoustic segments still contain signals for seabed changes that, if appropriate procedures are established, can be translated into meaningful knowledge. In this study we design a simple, repeatable method, based on multivariate procedures, with the scope to classify a 100 km2, high-frequency (450 kHz) sidescan sonar mosaic acquired in the year 2012 in the shallow upper-mesotidal inlet of the Jade Bay (German North Sea coast). The tool used for the automated classification of the backscatter mosaic is the QTC SWATHVIEWTMsoftware. The ground-truthing database included grab sample data from multiple sources (2009-2011). The method was designed to extrapolate quantitative descriptors for acoustic backscatter and model their spatial changes in relation to grain size distribution and morphology. The

  1. Pleistocene sediment offloading and the global sulfur cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, S.; Paytan, A.; Wortmann, U. G.

    2015-05-01

    Quaternary sea level fluctuations have greatly affected the sediment budgets of the continental shelves. Previous studies suggested that this caused a considerable increase in the net loss of shelf sediments. Since sediment accumulation and erosion are closely tied to the formation and re-oxidation of pyrite, we use a high-resolution record of sulfur isotope ratios (34S / 32S) of marine sulfate to evaluate the implications of the so-called "shelf sediment offloading" on the global sulfur cycle. Modeling of our δ34S record suggests that erosion during sea level lowstands was only partly compensated by increased sedimentation during times of rising sea level and sea level highstands. Furthermore, our data suggests that shelf systems reached a new equilibrium state about 700 ka, which considerably slowed or terminated shelf sediment offloading.

  2. Pleistocene sediment offloading and the global sulfur cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, S.; Paytan, A.; Wortmann, U. G.

    2015-01-01

    Quaternary sea level fluctuations have greatly affected the sediment budgets of the continental shelves. Previous studies suggested that this caused a considerable increase in the net loss of shelf sediments. Since sediment accumulation and erosion are closely tied to the formation and re-oxidation of pyrite, we use a high resolution record of sulfur isotope ratios (34S / 32S) of marine sulfate to evaluate the implications of the so called "shelf sediment offloading" on the global sulfur cycle. Modeling of our δ34S record suggests that erosion during sea level lowstands was only partly compensated by increased sedimentation during times of rising sea level and sea level highstands. Furthermore, our data suggests that shelf systems reached a new equilibrium state about 700 kyr ago, which considerably slowed or terminated shelf sediment offloading.

  3. High frequency peritidal cycles of the upper Araras Group: Implications for disappearance of the neoproterozoic carbonate platform in southern Amazon Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnitzki, Isaac Daniel; Romero, Guilherme Raffaeli; Hidalgo, Renata; Nogueira, Afonso Cesar Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    The Araras Group is an extensive carbonate platform developed at the southeastern margin of the Amazon Craton during the Neoproterozoic. The Nobres Formation corresponds to the upper unit of the Neoproterozoic Araras Group. It is exposed in road cuts and quarries in the Northern Paraguay Belt, and is characterized by meter-scale shallowing upward cycles. Forty-four fourth-to fifth-order parasequence cycles are enclosed into three third order sequences/megacycles, unconformably overlain by siliciclastic deposits of the Alto Paraguay Group. The cycles are generally of peritidal type, limited by exposure surfaces composed of asymmetrical tidal flat/sabkha lithofacies in the basal Nobres Formation. They consist of fine dolostone, intraclastic dolostones with megaripples, stromatolites biostrome, sandy dolostone with enterolithic structures and silicified evaporite molds. Upsection, the cycles progressively become symmetrical, comprising arid tidal flat deposits with abundant stromatolite biostrome, fine-grained sandstone and rare evaporitic molds. The stacking patterns for hundreds of meters indicate continuous and recurrent generation of accommodation space, probably triggered by subsidence concomitant with relative sea-level changes. Palynomorphs found in the upper part of Nobres Formation comprehend spheroidal forms, such as Leiospharidia, rare filamentous and acanthomorphous acritarchs, mostly Tanarium correlated to the Ediacaran Complex Acantomorph Palynoflora of ˜580-570 Ma. Previous data of carbon isotopes and paleogeographic reconstructions, and also the presence of evaporites and storm-influenced deposits in the Araras Group, suggest a wet to tropical setting for Amazonia during the Mid-Ediacaran, which is incompatible with previous claims for Gaskiers-related glacial sedimentation in the region. During the final stages of evolution of the Araras carbonate platform, a progressive input of terrigenous has occurred in the peritidal setting likely due tectonic

  4. Sulfur and carbon cycling in organic-rich marine sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Nearshore, continental shelf, and slope sediments are important sites of microbially mediated carbon and sulfur cycling. Marine geochemists investigated the rates and mechanisms of cycling processes in these environments by chemical distribution studies, in situ rate measurements, and steady state kinetic modeling. Pore water chemical distributions, sulfate reduction rates, and sediment water chemical fluxes were used to describe cycling on a ten year time scale in a small, rapidly depositing coastal basin, Cape Lookout Bight, and at general sites on the upper continental slope off North Carolina, U.S.A. In combination with 210 Pb sediment accumulation rates, these data were used to establish quantitative carbon and sulfur budgets as well as the relative importance of sulfate reduction and methanogeneis as the last steps in the degradation of organic matter.

  5. Manganese cycles in Arctic marine sediments - Climate signals or diagenesis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    März, C.; Stratmann, A.; Eckert, S.; Schnetger, B.; Brumsack, H.-J.

    2009-04-01

    In comparison to sediments from other parts of the world ocean, the inorganic geochemistry of Arctic Ocean sediments is poorly investigated. However, marked light to dark brown layers are well-known features of Quaternary Arctic sediments, and have been related to variable Mn contents. Brown layers represent intervals relatively rich in Mn (often > 1 wt.%), while yellowish-greyish intervals contain less Mn. As these brown layers are widespread in pelagic Quaternary deposits of the Arctic Ocean, there are attempts to use them as stratigraphic, age-equivalent marker horizons that are genetically related to global climate changes (e.g. Jakobsson et al., 2000; Löwemark et al., 2008). In the Arctic Ocean, other conventional stratigraphic methods often fail, therefore the use of Mn-rich layers as a chemostratigraphic tool seems to be a promising approach. However, several inorganic-geochemical and modelling studies of Mn cycles in the Arctic as well as in other parts of the world ocean have shown that multiple Mn layers in marine sediments can be created by non-steady state diagenetic processes, i.e. secondary Mn redistribution in the sediment due to microbially mediated dissolution-reprecipitation reactions (e.g. Li et al., 1969; Gobeil et al., 1997; Burdige, 2006; Katsev et al., 2006). Such biogeochemical processes can lead to rapid migration or fixation of redox boundaries in the sediment, resulting in the formation or (partial) destruction of metal-rich layers several thousands of years after sediment deposition. As this clearly would alter primary paleoenvironmental signals recorded in the sediments, we see an urgent need to unravel the real stratigraphic potential of Arctic Mn cycles before they are readily established as standard tools. For this purpose, we are studying Mn cycles in Arctic Ocean sediments recovered during R/V Polarstern expedition ARK XXIII/3 on the Mendeleev Ridge (East Siberian Sea). First results of pore water and sediment composition

  6. Effects of sediments on the reproductive cycle of corals.

    PubMed

    Jones, R; Ricardo, G F; Negri, A P

    2015-11-15

    Dredging, river plumes and natural resuspension events can release sediments into the water column where they exert a range of effects on underlying communities. In this review we examine possible cause-effect pathways whereby light reduction, elevated suspended sediments and sediment deposition could affect the reproductive cycle and early life histories of corals. The majority of reported or likely effects (30+) were negative, including a suite of previously unrecognized effects on gametes. The length of each phase of the life-cycle was also examined together with analysis of water quality conditions that can occur during a dredging project over equivalent durations, providing a range of environmentally relevant exposure scenarios for future testing. The review emphasizes the need to: (a) accurately quantify exposure conditions, (b) identify the mechanism of any effects in future studies, and (c) recognize the close interlinking of proximate factors which could confound interpretation of studies. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Iron cycling microbial communities in sediments of the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Carolina; Delwig, Olaf; Noriega-Ortega, Beatriz; Dähnke, Kirstin; Böttcher, Michael E.; Friedrich, Michael W.

    2014-05-01

    The biogeochemical cycling of iron is a key early diagenetic process. However, limited information exists about the diversity and metabolic pathways of microorganisms linked to iron cycling in marine sediments. The goal of this study was to determine the bacterial community diversity in sediments showing ongoing dissimilatory iron reduction using 454-pyrosequencing as a first step in characterizing microorganisms potentially involved in iron reduction. For this purpose, two 35 cm cores were sampled from ferruginous sediments in the Skagerrak (SK) and the Bothnian Bay (BB) from the North-Sea Baltic Sea and the northern Baltic Sea respectively. Pore water profiles showed Fe2+ and Mn2+ levels of ~140-150 µM throughout the core below a 6 cm thick oxidized surface layer in SK sediments and ~300 µM below a 2 cm thick surface layer in BB sediments. Dissolved sulphide levels were below detection in both sediments. No significant depletion of SO42- occurred at both sites, further supported by stable S and O isotope analyses of dissolved sulfate at SK site. Only very minor net sulfate reduction is suggested here from the trend in sulphur isotope signatures, in agreement with previously reported gross microbial sulphate rate measurements (Canfield et al., 1993;GCA). Based on these biogeochemical constraints, Fe reduction in the studied sediments is therefore dominated by microbial dissimilatory iron reduction, while cryptic Fe-S-cycling can be largely excluded. 16S rRNA gene sequences indicate Proteobacteria as the dominating microbial group in these sediments. Potential iron and manganese reducing bacteria included Geobacteraceae, Pelobacteraceae, Shewanellaceae, and Oceanospirillales. Additionally, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were present. Also, Fe-oxidizers were present and their occurrence correlated in depth with a Fe-oxide-rich layer, most likely a former buried Fe-oxidation front. Gene sequences point to the presence of Mariprofundus in SK sediments and

  8. SULFUR CYCLING IN THALASSIA TESTUDINUM SEAGRASS BED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quarles, Robert L., Jessica A. Rivord and Richard Devereux. In press. Sulfur Cycling in Thalassia testudinum Seagrass Bed Sediments (Abstract). To be presented at the SWS/GERS Fall Joint Society Meeting: Communication and Collaboration: Coastal Systems of the Gulf of Mexico and S...

  9. SULFUR CYCLING IN THALASSIA TESTUDINUM SEAGRASS BED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quarles, Robert L., Jessica A. Rivord and Richard Devereux. In press. Sulfur Cycling in Thalassia testudinum Seagrass Bed Sediments (Abstract). To be presented at the SWS/GERS Fall Joint Society Meeting: Communication and Collaboration: Coastal Systems of the Gulf of Mexico and S...

  10. Geochemical evidence for cryptic sulfur cycling in salt marsh sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Jennifer V.; Antler, Gilad; Turchyn, Alexandra V.

    2016-11-01

    Cryptic sulfur cycling is an enigmatic process in which sulfate is reduced to some lower-valence state sulfur species and subsequently quantitatively reoxidized; the rate and microbial energetics of this process and how prevalent it may be in the environment remain controversial. Here we investigate sulfur cycling in salt marsh sediments from Norfolk, England where we observe high ferrous iron concentrations with no depletion of sulfate or change in the sulfur isotope ratio of that sulfate, but a 5‰ increase in the oxygen isotope ratio in sulfate, indicating that sulfate has been through a reductive cycle replacing its oxygen atoms. This cryptic sulfur cycle was replicated in laboratory incubations using 18O-enriched water, demonstrating that the field results do not solely result from mixing processes in the natural environment. Numerical modeling of the laboratory incubations scaled to represent the salt marsh sediments suggests that the uptake rate of sulfate during this cryptic sulfur cycling is similar to the uptake rate of sulfate during the fastest microbial sulfate reduction that has been measured in the natural environment. The difference is that during cryptic sulfur cycling, all of the sulfur is subsequently reoxidized to sulfate. We discuss mechanisms for this pathway of sulfur cycling including the possible link to the subsurface iron cycle.

  11. Benthic exchange and biogeochemical cycling in permeable sediments.

    PubMed

    Huettel, Markus; Berg, Peter; Kostka, Joel E

    2014-01-01

    The sandy sediments that blanket the inner shelf are situated in a zone where nutrient input from land and strong mixing produce maximum primary production and tight coupling between water column and sedimentary processes. The high permeability of the shelf sands renders them susceptible to pressure gradients generated by hydrodynamic and biological forces that modulate spatial and temporal patterns of water circulation through these sediments. The resulting dynamic three-dimensional patterns of particle and solute distribution generate a broad spectrum of biogeochemical reaction zones that facilitate effective decomposition of the pelagic and benthic primary production products. The intricate coupling between the water column and sediment makes it challenging to quantify the production and decomposition processes and the resultant fluxes in permeable shelf sands. Recent technical developments have led to insights into the high biogeochemical and biological activity of these permeable sediments and their role in the global cycles of matter.

  12. Self-sedimentation of fossil phytoplankton blooms, laminated hemipelagic sediments and the oceanic carbon cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.A.; Lange, C.B.

    1996-12-31

    The flux of phytoplankton-derived organic carbon from the surface ocean to the deep sea and underlying sediments is a nonuniform process that significantly impacts biogeochemical cycles, atmospheric pCO{sub 2} / O{sub 2} and organic carbon enrichment in marine sediments. Some marine phytoplankton actively drive the sedimentation process by the formation of sticky transparent gels which facilitate aggregation, rapid sinking and efficient export flux. Here we present fossil evidence of unfragmented, low-diversity phytoplankton assemblages preserved as sedimentary laminations and as preserved aggregates that are attributable to a similar phytoplankton-driven sedimentary mechanism, here termed {open_quotes}self-sedimentation{close_quotes}. Heterogeneities in the texture and/or composition of sediment supply are necessary for the production of laminatedhemipelagic sediments; the absence of hydraulic and biological reworking permits preservation of these sedimentary laminae. Distinctly-laminated core intervals are characterized by large compositional contrasts between adjacent laminae; many such high-bimodality couplets are attributable to self-sedimentation of phytoplankton blooms. Self-sedimentation propels the formation of some conspicuous hemipelagic sedimentary laminations and results in efficient carbon and opal flux to the sediments. These records suggest that phytoplankton-mediated changes in the efficiency of the biological carbon pump may govern many accumulations of organic-rich hydrocarbon source rock as well as many abrupt changes in atmospheric pCO{sub 2} and climate.

  13. Self-sedimentation of fossil phytoplankton blooms, laminated hemipelagic sediments and the oceanic carbon cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.A. ); Lange, C.B. )

    1996-01-01

    The flux of phytoplankton-derived organic carbon from the surface ocean to the deep sea and underlying sediments is a nonuniform process that significantly impacts biogeochemical cycles, atmospheric pCO[sub 2] / O[sub 2] and organic carbon enrichment in marine sediments. Some marine phytoplankton actively drive the sedimentation process by the formation of sticky transparent gels which facilitate aggregation, rapid sinking and efficient export flux. Here we present fossil evidence of unfragmented, low-diversity phytoplankton assemblages preserved as sedimentary laminations and as preserved aggregates that are attributable to a similar phytoplankton-driven sedimentary mechanism, here termed [open quotes]self-sedimentation[close quotes]. Heterogeneities in the texture and/or composition of sediment supply are necessary for the production of laminatedhemipelagic sediments; the absence of hydraulic and biological reworking permits preservation of these sedimentary laminae. Distinctly-laminated core intervals are characterized by large compositional contrasts between adjacent laminae; many such high-bimodality couplets are attributable to self-sedimentation of phytoplankton blooms. Self-sedimentation propels the formation of some conspicuous hemipelagic sedimentary laminations and results in efficient carbon and opal flux to the sediments. These records suggest that phytoplankton-mediated changes in the efficiency of the biological carbon pump may govern many accumulations of organic-rich hydrocarbon source rock as well as many abrupt changes in atmospheric pCO[sub 2] and climate.

  14. Sediment flux modeling: Simulating nitrogen, phosphorus, and silica cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Jeremy M.; Brady, Damian C.; Di Toro, Dominic M.; Boynton, Walter R.; Cornwell, Jeffrey C.; Kemp, W. Michael

    2013-10-01

    Sediment-water exchanges of nutrients and oxygen play an important role in the biogeochemistry of shallow coastal environments. Sediments process, store, and release particulate and dissolved forms of carbon and nutrients and sediment-water solute fluxes are significant components of nutrient, carbon, and oxygen cycles. Consequently, sediment biogeochemical models of varying complexity have been developed to understand the processes regulating porewater profiles and sediment-water exchanges. We have calibrated and validated a two-layer sediment biogeochemical model (aerobic and anaerobic) that is suitable for application as a stand-alone tool or coupled to water-column biogeochemical models. We calibrated and tested a stand-alone version of the model against observations of sediment-water flux, porewater concentrations, and process rates at 12 stations in Chesapeake Bay during a 4-17 year period. The model successfully reproduced sediment-water fluxes of ammonium (NH4+), nitrate (NO3-), phosphate (PO43-), and dissolved silica (Si(OH)4 or DSi) for diverse chemical and physical environments. A root mean square error (RMSE)-minimizing optimization routine was used to identify best-fit values for many kinetic parameters. The resulting simulations improved the performance of the model in Chesapeake Bay and revealed (1) the need for an aerobic-layer denitrification formulation to account for NO3- reduction in this zone, (2) regional variability in denitrification that depends on oxygen levels in the overlying water, (3) a regionally-dependent solid-solute PO43- partitioning that accounts for patterns in Fe availability, and (4) a simplified model formulation for DSi, including limited sorption of DSi onto iron oxyhydroxides. This new calibration balances the need for a universal set of parameters that remain true to biogeochemical processes with site-specificity that represents differences in physical conditions. This stand-alone model can be rapidly executed on a

  15. Life cycle assessment for dredged sediment placement strategies.

    PubMed

    Bates, Matthew E; Fox-Lent, Cate; Seymour, Linda; Wender, Ben A; Linkov, Igor

    2015-04-01

    Dredging to maintain navigable waterways is important for supporting trade and economic sustainability. Dredged sediments are removed from the waterways and then must be managed in a way that meets regulatory standards and properly balances management costs and risks. Selection of a best management alternative often results in stakeholder conflict regarding tradeoffs between local environmental impacts associated with less expensive alternatives (e.g., open water placement), more expensive measures that require sediment disposal in constructed facilities far away (e.g., landfills), or beneficial uses that may be perceived as risky (e.g., beach nourishment or island creation). Current sediment-placement decisions often focus on local and immediate environmental effects from the sediment itself, ignoring a variety of distributed and long-term effects from transportation and placement activities. These extended effects have implications for climate change, resource consumption, and environmental and human health, which may be meaningful topics for many stakeholders not currently considered. Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) provides a systematic and quantitative method for accounting for this wider range of impacts and benefits across all sediment management project stages and time horizons. This paper applies a cradle-to-use LCA to dredged-sediment placement through a comparative analysis of potential upland, open water, and containment-island placement alternatives in the Long Island Sound region of NY/CT. Results suggest that, in cases dealing with uncontaminated sediments, upland placement may be the most environmentally burdensome alternative, per ton-kilometer of placed material, due to the emissions associated with diesel fuel combustion and electricity production and consumption required for the extra handling and transportation. These results can be traded-off with the ecosystem impacts of the sediments themselves in a decision-making framework. Published by

  16. Molybdenum Cycling in Upwelling Sediments: An Example from Namibian Margin Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, G. L.; Goldhammer, T.; Formolo, M.; Brunner, B.; Ferdelman, T.

    2008-12-01

    The paleo-redox application of molybdenum (Mo) isotopes is strongly tied to our knowledge of the modern marine Mo cycle. Elemental mass balance indicates that ~47% of the Mo supplied to the oceans is removed to deep sea sediments, leaving the remaining Mo to "near-shore" reducing sediments (1). The Black Sea is likely the best studied reducing environment with regards to Mo isotopes, yet accounts for only a small fraction of the Mo mass balance. The accumulation of Mo in continental margin sediments has been recently re-assessed and may account for a larger fraction of the marine Mo reservoir than previously thought (2). In the presence of sulfide, the molybdate anion is transformed, by the replacement of oxygen with sulfur, to particle reactive oxy-thiomolybdates (3). This is often cited as the mechanism by which Mo removal proceeds in the Black Sea where sulfide concentrations in the water are high. In contrast, in continental margin settings, the removal mechanism is poorly understood, and the extent to which sulfur cycling plays a role remains un-quantified. To better understand removal/cycling processes in a continental margin setting, where sulfide may only be present in the pore waters and not in the water column, Mo was studied in an array of marine settings off the Namibian coast. Surface sediments were collected across a transect from near-shore/high productivity to deep water/low productivity sediments. These sediments were incubated in bag experiments to study the relationship between sulfur and Mo cycling. Molybdenum concentrations in the Namibian sediments range from detrital values at the lowest productivity site to 25 ppm in surface sediments with high productivity. Preliminary results allude to a correlation between sulfate reduction rates and Mo accumulation in these sediments. Detailed studies of Mo, Mo isotopes, other trace metals, and sulfur investigations from both sediment cores and bag experiments will be presented. (1)Bertine and Turekian

  17. Root-induced cycling of lead in salt marsh sediments.

    PubMed

    Sundby, Bjørn; Caetano, Miguel; Vale, Carlos; Gobeil, Charles; George, Luther W; Nuzzio, Donald B

    2005-04-01

    A gold-mercury amalgam microelectrode was used in situ to measure Pb(II) by anodic stripping voltammetry and O2, Fe(II), Mn(II), and HS- by square-wave voltammetry in sediment pore water in a Haliomione portulacoides stand in a Tagus estuary salt marsh. The measurements were made in spring, summer, and fall, and were supplemented with analysis of Pb in solid phases and stable isotope analysis of Pb. In spring, the pore water was anoxic, Fe(II) reached concentrations as high as 1700 micromol/L, and Pb(II) was undetectable (<0.1 micromol/L). However, in summer, the pore water was oxic, Fe(II) was undetectable, and Pb(II) was present throughout the 20 cm deep root zone in concentrations reaching 6 micromol/L. In fall, low levels of O2 and Pb(II) were detected in the upper half of the root zone, and low concentrations of Fe(II) were detected in the lower half. The annual cycle of Pb is controlled by the growth and decay of roots. Roots deliver oxygen, which oxidizes lead-bearing solid phases and releases Pb(II) to the sediment pore water. Iron oxides, which form in the rhizosphere when Fe(II) is oxidized, are apparently not efficient sorbents for Pb(II) under the organic-rich conditions in this sediment. This allows Pb(II) to remain soluble and available for uptake by the roots. In fall and winter,when roots decay and the oxygen flux to the sediment stops, Pb is released from the decaying roots and returned to and precipitated in the anoxic sediment, likely as a sulfide. On an annual basis more than 20% of the total mass of Pb in the root zone cycles between root tissue and inorganic sediment phases. Depending on location, anthropogenic Pb constitutes 30-90% of total Pb in Tagus Estuary salt marshes.

  18. Arctic ocean sediment texture and the Pleistocene climate cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.L.; Morris, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    Arctic Ocean sediment texture accurately reflects the Plio-Pleistocene climate cycle. The precision of paleoclimate interpretation is improved when deglaciation is recognized as a distinct climate stage, overlapping both glacial and interglacial stages, and for the later Pleistocene, perhaps never completed. Oxygen isotope stratigraphy and foraminifera productivity are out of phase but can be understood in the context of the transitional nature of the glacial, deglacial and interglacial climate stages of the Arctic Ocean.

  19. Ni cycling in mangrove sediments from New Caledonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noël, Vincent; Morin, Guillaume; Juillot, Farid; Marchand, Cyril; Brest, Jessica; Bargar, John R.; Muñoz, Manuel; Marakovic, Grégory; Ardo, Sandy; Brown, Gordon E.

    2015-11-01

    sediment layers. Ni-incorporation in pyrite is especially observed beneath an inland Avicennia stand where anoxic conditions are dominant. In contrast, beneath a Rhizophora stand closer to the ocean, where the redox cycle is intensified due to the tide cycle, partial re-oxidation of Ni-bearing pyrites favors nickel mobility, as confirmed by Ni-mass balance estimates and by higher Ni concentration in the pore waters. These findings have important environmental implications for better evaluating the protective role of mangroves against trace metal dispersion into marine ecosystems. They may also help in predicting the response of mangrove ecosystems to increasing anthropogenic pressure on coastal areas.

  20. Ecophysiology of Fe-cycling bacteria in acidic sediments.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shipeng; Gischkat, Stefan; Reiche, Marco; Akob, Denise M; Hallberg, Kevin B; Küsel, Kirsten

    2010-12-01

    Using a combination of cultivation-dependent and -independent methods, this study aimed to elucidate the diversity of microorganisms involved in iron cycling and to resolve their in situ functional links in sediments of an acidic lignite mine lake. Using six different media with pH values ranging from 2.5 to 4.3, 117 isolates were obtained that grouped into 38 different strains, including 27 putative new species with respect to the closest characterized strains. Among the isolated strains, 22 strains were able to oxidize Fe(II), 34 were able to reduce Fe(III) in schwertmannite, the dominant iron oxide in this lake, and 21 could do both. All isolates falling into the Gammaproteobacteria (an unknown Dyella-like genus and Acidithiobacillus-related strains) were obtained from the top acidic sediment zones (pH 2.8). Firmicutes strains (related to Bacillus and Alicyclobacillus) were only isolated from deep, moderately acidic sediment zones (pH 4 to 5). Of the Alphaproteobacteria, Acidocella-related strains were only isolated from acidic zones, whereas Acidiphilium-related strains were isolated from all sediment depths. Bacterial clone libraries generally supported and complemented these patterns. Geobacter-related clone sequences were only obtained from deep sediment zones, and Geobacter-specific quantitative PCR yielded 8 × 10(5) gene copy numbers. Isolates related to the Acidobacterium, Acidocella, and Alicyclobacillus genera and to the unknown Dyella-like genus showed a broad pH tolerance, ranging from 2.5 to 5.0, and preferred schwertmannite to goethite for Fe(III) reduction. This study highlighted the variety of acidophilic microorganisms that are responsible for iron cycling in acidic environments, extending the results of recent laboratory-based studies that showed this trait to be widespread among acidophiles.

  1. Working Memory Impairment in Calcineurin Knock-out Mice Is Associated with Alterations in Synaptic Vesicle Cycling and Disruption of High-Frequency Synaptic and Network Activity in Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, Jeffrey R.; Levenson, Jonathan M.; Kim, Sung Hyun; Gibson, Helen E.; Richardson, Kristen A.; Sivula, Michael; Li, Bing; Ashford, Crystle J.; Heindl, Karen A.; Babcock, Ryan J.; Rose, David M.; Hempel, Chris M.; Wiig, Kjesten A.; Laeng, Pascal; Levin, Margaret E.; Ryan, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    Working memory is an essential component of higher cognitive function, and its impairment is a core symptom of multiple CNS disorders, including schizophrenia. Neuronal mechanisms supporting working memory under normal conditions have been described and include persistent, high-frequency activity of prefrontal cortical neurons. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular basis of working memory dysfunction in the context of neuropsychiatric disorders. To elucidate synaptic and neuronal mechanisms of working memory dysfunction, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of a mouse model of schizophrenia, the forebrain-specific calcineurin knock-out mouse. Biochemical analyses of cortical tissue from these mice revealed a pronounced hyperphosphorylation of synaptic vesicle cycling proteins known to be necessary for high-frequency synaptic transmission. Examination of the synaptic vesicle cycle in calcineurin-deficient neurons demonstrated an impairment of vesicle release enhancement during periods of intense stimulation. Moreover, brain slice and in vivo electrophysiological analyses showed that loss of calcineurin leads to a gene dose-dependent disruption of high-frequency synaptic transmission and network activity in the PFC, correlating with selective working memory impairment. Finally, we showed that levels of dynamin I, a key presynaptic protein and calcineurin substrate, are significantly reduced in prefrontal cortical samples from schizophrenia patients, extending the disease relevance of our findings. Our data provide support for a model in which impaired synaptic vesicle cycling represents a critical node for disease pathologies underlying the cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. PMID:23825400

  2. [High frequency ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sattler, E

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has become a standard procedure in clinical dermatology. Devices with intermediate high frequencies of 7.5-15 MHz are used in dermato-oncology for the staging and postoperative care of skin tumor patients and in angiology for improved vessel diagnostics. In contrast, the high frequency ultrasound systems with 20-100 MHz probes offer a much higher resolution, yet with a lower penetration depth of about 1 cm. The main indications are the preoperative measurements of tumor thickness in malignant melanoma and other skin tumors and the assessment of inflammatory and soft tissue diseases, offering information on the course of these dermatoses and allowing therapy monitoring. This article gives an overview on technical principles, devices, mode of examination, influencing factors, interpretation of the images, indications but also limitations of this technique.

  3. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or "halo" at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

  4. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

  5. Relationship between high-frequency sediment-level oscillations in the swash zone and inner surf zone wave characteristics under calm wave conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Swash zone topography rapidly responds to the surf zone waves. Understanding how sandy beaches respond to wave action is critical for beach erosion research, and plays a critical role in the design and maintenance of shore protection structures. The main objectives of this study were to detect the relationship between high-frequency beachface oscillations and surf zone wave characteristics under plunging breakers by using Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA). The study site is located in Houjiangwan Bay, eastern Guangdong. Topography data were sampled at 6 min intervals. The wave characteristic parameters were calculated by spectrum method. During the field work, the beach showed a reflective state and plunging breakers controlled the surf zone. The beach cusp topography was destructed gradually. The analysis provides 4 canonical correlation processes between the beachface variations and surf zone waves, which explained 95.28% of the overall variation in the data. The result shows wave steepness, the irregularity factor and spectral broadness factor had strong impacts on the topography. The wave steepness was the most important factor for beach profile variations. The results of the present study indicate that data-driven statistical analysis, such as CCA, is useful for analyzing profile response to waves if there is strong correlation between the two variables (beach profiles and wave).

  6. Temporal variability of exchange between groundwater and surface water based on high-frequency direct measurements of seepage at the sediment-water interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberry, Donald O.; Sheibley, Rich W.; Cox, Stephen E.; Simonds, Frederic W.; Naftz, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Seepage at the sediment-water interface in several lakes, a large river, and an estuary exhibits substantial temporal variability when measured with temporal resolution of 1 min or less. Already substantial seepage rates changed by 7% and 16% in response to relatively small rain events at two lakes in the northeastern USA, but did not change in response to two larger rain events at a lake in Minnesota. However, seepage at that same Minnesota lake changed by 10% each day in response to withdrawals from evapotranspiration. Seepage increased by more than an order of magnitude when a seiche occurred in the Great Salt Lake, Utah. Near the head of a fjord in Puget Sound, Washington, seepage in the intertidal zone varied greatly from −115 to +217 cm d−1 in response to advancing and retreating tides when the time-averaged seepage was upward at +43 cm d−1. At all locations, seepage variability increased by one to several orders of magnitude in response to wind and associated waves. Net seepage remained unchanged by wind unless wind also induced a lake seiche. These examples from sites distributed across a broad geographic region indicate that temporal variability in seepage in response to common hydrological events is much larger than previously realized. At most locations, seepage responded within minutes to changes in surface-water stage and within minutes to hours to groundwater recharge associated with rainfall. Likely implications of this dynamism include effects on water residence time, geochemical transformations, and ecological conditions at and near the sediment-water interface.

  7. ALMA High Frequency Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, J. D.; Mason, B.; Impellizzeri, V.; Kameno, S.; Fomalont, E.; Chibueze, J.; Takahashi, S.; Remijan, A.; Wilson, C.; ALMA Science Team

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the ALMA High Frequency Campaign is to improve the quality and efficiency of science observing in Bands 8, 9, and 10 (385-950 GHz), the highest frequencies available to the ALMA project. To this end, we outline observing modes which we have demonstrated to improve high frequency calibration for the 12m array and the ACA, and we present the calibration of the total power antennas at these frequencies. Band-to-band (B2B) transfer and bandwidth switching (BWSW), techniques which improve the speed and accuracy of calibration at the highest frequencies, are most necessary in Bands 8, 9, and 10 due to the rarity of strong calibrators. These techniques successfully enable increased signal-to-noise on the calibrator sources (and better calibration solutions) by measuring the calibrators at lower frequencies (B2B) or in wider bandwidths (BWSW) compared to the science target. We have also demonstrated the stability of the bandpass shape to better than 2.4% for 1 hour, hidden behind random noise, in Band 9. Finally, total power observing using the dual sideband receivers in Bands 9 and 10 requires the separation of the two sidebands; this procedure has been demonstrated in Band 9 and is undergoing further testing in Band 10.

  8. Tempo and scale of biogenic effects on high-frequency acoustic propagation near the marine sediment-water interface in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumars, Peter

    2003-04-01

    Organisms have natural scales, such as lifetimes, body sizes, frequencies of movement to new locations, and residence times of material in digestive systems, and each scale has potential implications for acoustic effects. The effects of groups of organisms, like organisms themselves, aggregate in space and time. This review, including an assortment of unpublished information, examines examples of such aggregations, many of them documented acoustically. Light synchronizes many activities. Macroscopic animals forage primarily under cover of darkness. This phasing applies both to animals that extend appendages above the sediment-water interface and to animals that leave the seabed at night. Whereas their bottom-modifying activities are concentrated in nocturnal or crepuscular fashion, the bottom-modifying activities of the visual feeders follow a different phasing and often dominate the rate of change in acoustic backscatter from the interface. Light also acts through its effects on primary production, often concentrated in a very thin surficial layer atop the seabed. The supersaturation of oxygen does, and microbubble nucleation may, result. Where tidal velocities are large, light-set patterns are often tidally modulated. Activities of animals living below the seabed, however, remain a mystery, whose primary hope for solution is acoustic. [Work supported by ONR and DEPSCoR.

  9. Linking Soil and Sediment Properties for research on Biogeochemical Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, N. J.

    2012-04-01

    Conventional perspectives on soil erosion include the on-site damage to soil and reductions in crop yield, as well as the resulting off-site effects on water quality, runoff and sediment loads in rivers. Our evolving understanding of the Earth System has added a new dimension to the role of soil erosion within the global geochemical cycles. First, the relevance of soil as a nutrient and Carbon (C) pool was recognized. Initially, the role of soils in the global C cycle was largely considered to be limited to a vertical exchange of greenhouse house gases (GHG) between vegetation, soil and atmosphere and thus mostly studied by soil scientists, plant ecologists and climatologists. Even Critical Zone research focused mostly on weathering and regolith properties and ignored lateral fluxes of dissolved or particulate organic matter. Since the late 1990s, a wider role of soils in biogeochemical cycles has emerged. Recent estimates place the lateral movement of C between soil and sediment pools in terrestrial ecosystems (including rivers and lakes) at approximately 0.6 to 1.5 Gt per year. Some of the eroded C is replaced by photosynthesis from the atmosphere, but at a cost of additional emissions, for example due to fertilizer production. The long-term fate of the eroded and deposited soil organic matter is subject to an open debate and suffers from a lack of reliable spatial information on lateral C fluxes and its subsequent fate in terrestrial ecosystems. The connection between soil C pool, GHG emissions and erosion illustrates the relevance of surface processes for the C fluxes between Earth's spheres. Accordingly, soil is now considered as mobile system to make accurate predictions about the consequences of global change for terrestrial biogeochemical cycles and climate feedbacks. This expanded perspective on soils as dynamic pool of weathering regolith, sediment, nutrients and C at the interface between the geospheres requires the analysis of relevant soil properties

  10. Linking soil and sediment properties for research on biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2013-04-01

    Conventional perspectives on soil erosion include the on-site damage to soil and reductions in crop yield, as well as the resulting off-site effects on water quality, runoff and sediment loads in rivers. Our evolving understanding of the Earth System has added a new dimension to the role of soil erosion within the global geochemical cycles. First, the relevance of soil as a nutrient and Carbon (C) pool was recognized. Initially, the role of soils in the global C cycle was largely considered to be limited to a vertical exchange of greenhouse house gases (GHG) between vegetation, soil and atmosphere and thus mostly studied by soil scientists, plant ecologists and climatologists. Even Critical Zone research focused mostly on weathering and regolith properties and ignored lateral fluxes of dissolved or particulate organic matter. Since the late 1990s, a wider role of soils in biogeochemical cycles has emerged. Recent estimates place the lateral movement of C between soil and sediment pools in terrestrial ecosystems (including rivers and lakes) at approximately 0.6 to 1.5 Gt per year. Some of the eroded C is replaced by photosynthesis from the atmosphere, but at a cost of additional emissions, for example due to fertilizer production. The long-term fate of the eroded and deposited soil organic matter is subject to an open debate and suffers from a lack of reliable spatial information on lateral C fluxes and its subsequent fate in terrestrial ecosystems. The connection between soil C pool, GHG emissions and erosion illustrates the relevance of surface processes for the C fluxes between Earth's spheres. Accordingly, soil is now considered as mobile system to make accurate predictions about the consequences of global change for terrestrial biogeochemical cycles and climate feedbacks. This expanded perspective on soils as dynamic pool of weathering regolith, sediment, nutrients and C at the interface between the geospheres requires the analysis of relevant soil properties

  11. High-frequency in situ optical measurements during a storm event: Assessing relationships between dissolved organic matter, sediment concentrations, and hydrologic processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saraceno, John F.; Pellerin, Brian A.; Downing, Bryan D.; Boss, Emmanuel; Bachand, Philip A. M.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2009-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) dynamics during storm events has received considerable attention in forested watersheds, but the extent to which storms impart rapid changes in DOM concentration and composition in highly disturbed agricultural watersheds remains poorly understood. In this study, we used identical in situ optical sensors for DOM fluorescence (FDOM) with and without filtration to continuously evaluate surface water DOM dynamics in a 415 km2agricultural watershed over a 4 week period containing a short-duration rainfall event. Peak turbidity preceded peak discharge by 4 h and increased by over 2 orders of magnitude, while the peak filtered FDOM lagged behind peak turbidity by 15 h. FDOM values reported using the filtered in situ fluorometer increased nearly fourfold and were highly correlated with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations (r2 = 0.97), providing a highly resolved proxy for DOC throughout the study period. Discrete optical properties including specific UV absorbance (SUVA254), spectral slope (S290–350), and fluorescence index (FI) were also strongly correlated with in situ FDOM and indicate a shift toward aromatic, high molecular weight DOM from terrestrially derived sources during the storm. The lag of the peak in FDOM behind peak discharge presumably reflects the draining of watershed soils from natural and agricultural landscapes. Field and experimental evidence showed that unfiltered FDOM measurements underestimated filtered FDOM concentrations by up to ∼60% at particle concentrations typical of many riverine systems during hydrologic events. Together, laboratory and in situ data provide insights into the timing and magnitude of changes in DOM quantity and quality during storm events in an agricultural watershed, and indicate the need for sample filtration in systems with moderate to high suspended sediment loads.

  12. High Frequency EPR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatteschi, D.

    EPR has traditionally been used in order to obtain structural information on transition metal compounds, with exciting frequencies in the range 9-35 GHz.The recent availability of high magnetic field has prompted the use of higher frequencies. In this contribution the advantages of using High-Field-High-Frequency EPR (HF EPR) experiments are reviewed. After a brief introduction aiming to recall the fundamentals of EPR spectroscopy, a short description of the experimental apparatus needed to perform HF EPR measurements is provided. The remaining sections report selected examples showing how much information can be obtained by HF EPR spectra. They range from individual ions with integer spin to molecular clusters. Particular attention is devoted to the so called Single Molecule Magnets, SMM, i.e. to molecular clusters which show slow relaxation of the magnetization at low temperature. This effect is due to Ising type magnetic anisotropy which has been efficiently monitored through HF EPR s pectroscopy.

  13. High frequency pulsed electromigration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, David Wayne

    Electromigration life tests were performed on copper-alloyed aluminum test structures that were representative of modern CMOS metallization schemes, complete with Ti/TiN cladding layers and a tungsten-plug contact at the cathode. A total of 18 electrical stress treatments were applied. One was a DC current of 15 mA. The other 17 were pulsed currents, varied according to duty cycle and frequency. The pulse amplitude was 15 mA (˜2.7 × 10sp6 A/cmsp2) for all treatments. Duty cycles ranged from 33.3% to 80%, and frequencies fell into three rough ranges-100 KHz, 1 MHz, and 100 MHz. The ambient test temperature was 200sp°C in all experiments. Six to 9 samples were subjected to each treatment. Experimental data were gathered in the form of test stripe resistance versus time, R(t). For purposes of lifetime analysis, "failure" was defined by the criterion R(t)/R(0) = 1.10, and the median time to failure, tsb{50}, was used as the primary basis of comparison between test groups. It was found that the dependence of tsb{50} on pulse duty cycle conformed rather well to the so-called "average current density model" for duty cycles of 50% and higher. Lifetimes were less enhanced for a duty cycle of 33.3%, but they were still considerably longer than an "on-time" model would predict. No specific dependence of tsb{50} on pulse frequency was revealed by the data, that is, reasonably good predictions of tsb{50} could be made by recognizing the dominant influence of duty cycle. These findings confirm that IC miniaturization can be more aggressively pursued than an on-time prediction would allow. It is significant that this was found to be true for frequencies on the order of 100 MHz, where many present day digital applications operate. Post-test optical micrographs were obtained for each test subject in order to determine the location of electromigration damage. The pulse duty cycle was found to influence the location. Most damage occurred at the cathode contact, regardless of

  14. Carbon and nitrogen cycling in thermally heated sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Burton, M.; Vennelakanti, S.; Havig, J. R.; Shock, E.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrothermally heated sediment environments, such as are found in abundance throughout Yellowstone National Park, host fully functional microbial ecosystems. As with any ecosystem, both sources and sinks of carbon, nitrogen, and a myriad of other nutrients and energy-driving factors must be supplied. While we know microbial communities in hydrothermal environments can be surprisingly diverse, we know little about basic ecological functions such as carbon and nitrogen cycling. Previous work has shown that carbon cycling in one hot spring in Yellowstone National Park [“Bison Pool”] and its associated runoff channel functions as a complex system. Analysis of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in sediments and biofilms across a temperature and chemical gradient at this location revealed that the four best studied carbon fixation pathways [Calvin, reverse tricarboxylic acid, acetyl-CoA, 3-hydroxypropionate cycles] may all be functioning in this system, and nitrogen fixation varies across the chemosynthetic/photosynthetic ecotone [1]. Microcosm experiments using biofilms from this hot spring as inoculae with 13C labeled carbon substrates indicate heterotrophic growth [2]. In addition, metagenomic analysis of environmental DNA has indicated the presence of genes involved in carbon fixation [both phototrophic and autotrophic], and heterotrophy, as well as nitrogen fixation [3]. Studies from other Yellowstone locations have also found genetic evidence for carbon and nitrogen fixation [4, 5]. Of particular interest is the role of individuals in carbon and nitrogen cycling as environmental conditions suitable for chemosynthetic and photosynthetic growth vary. This study explores the diversity of cbbM/cbbL [Calvin cycle], aclB/oor/porA [rTCA cycle], nifH [nitrogen fixation], nirK [nitrite reduction] and amoA [ammonia oxidation] genes across a variety of Yellowstone environments. The transition of genetic diversity within sediments and biofilms is focused on the chemosynthetic

  15. High-frequency ECG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tragardh, Elin; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2006-01-01

    The standard ECG is by convention limited to 0.05-150 Hz, but higher frequencies are also present in the ECG signal. With high-resolution technology, it is possible to record and analyze these higher frequencies. The highest amplitudes of the high-frequency components are found within the QRS complex. In past years, the term "high frequency", "high fidelity", and "wideband electrocardiography" have been used by several investigators to refer to the process of recording ECGs with an extended bandwidth of up to 1000 Hz. Several investigators have tried to analyze HF-QRS with the hope that additional features seen in the QRS complex would provide information enhancing the diagnostic value of the ECG. The development of computerized ECG-recording devices that made it possible to record ECG signals with high resolution in both time and amplitude, as well as better possibilities to store and process the signals digitally, offered new methods for analysis. Different techniques to extract the HF-QRS have been described. Several bandwidths and filter types have been applied for the extraction as well as different signal-averaging techniques for noise reduction. There is no standard method for acquiring and quantifying HF-QRS. The physiological mechanisms underlying HF-QRS are still not fully understood. One theory is that HF-QRS are related to the conduction velocity and the fragmentation of the depolarization wave in the myocardium. In a three-dimensional model of the ventricles with a fractal conduction system it was shown that high numbers of splitting branches are associated with HF-QRS. In this experiment, it was also shown that the changes seen in HF-QRS in patients with myocardial ischemia might be due to the slowing of the conduction velocity in the region of ischemia. This mechanism has been tested by Watanabe et al by infusing sodium channel blockers into the left anterior descending artery in dogs. In their study, 60 unipolar ECGs were recorded from the entire

  16. The origin of high-frequency platform carbonate cycles and third-order sequences (Lower Ordovician El Paso GP, west Texas): Constraints from outcrop data and stratigraphic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhammer, R.K.; Lehmann, P.J.; Dunn, P.A. )

    1993-05-01

    The passive-margin succession of the Diablo Platform is represented by the second-order Sauk C supersequence set, consisting of a basal transgressive clastic unit (The Bliss Sandstone) above the breakup unconformity, marking the second-order basal lowstand transgressive phase, overlain by 750 m of drift-related, shallow-marine platform carbonate (the El Paso Group) recording the second-order highstand. Due to late Paleozoic structuring of the Gondwanan passive margin, present exposures in Texas are in an updip shelf position and lack internal stratal geometries across depositional strike, so sequences and systems tracts are identified solely by the vertical stacking patterns of depositional subfacies and higher-frequency, fifth-order cycles. By analysis of outcrop data the authors develop a sequence-stratigraphic model for lower Paleozoic passive-margin, shallow-water, platform carbonates that de-emphasizes the physical expression of sequence boundaries and systems-tract boundaries and focuses on the vertical and lateral, meter-scale cyclic and subfacies architecture of carbonate shelf deposits in the framework of third-order depositional sequences. They rely on analyses of stratal stacking patterns to bridge the gap from cycle-scale stratigraphy to seismic-scale sequence stratigraphy. In many settings, like the Permian of west Texas, sequence boundaries are often obvious, but in others, especially shallow-dipping ramps or flat-topped platforms on passive margins, third-order sequence boundaries are less obvious, particularly in deformed terranes lacking two-dimensional dip continuity.

  17. Frequency-Dependent Low Cycle Fatigue of Sn1Ag0.1Cu(In/Ni) Solder Joints Subjected to High-Frequency Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, E. H.; Seah, S. K. W.; Shim, V. P. W.

    2014-02-01

    The low-cycle-fatigue characteristics of solder joints, formed by reflowing Sn98.8/Ag1.0/Cu0.1/In0.05/Ni0.02 solder over electroless nickel immersion gold-plated copper pads, were investigated by dynamic cyclic bending of printed circuit boards (PCBs). The PCB strain amplitudes were varied from 1.2 × 10-3 to 2.4 × 10-3 and the flexural frequencies ranged from 30 Hz to 150 Hz, to simulate drop impact-induced PCB resonant frequencies. A trend of drastically decreasing fatigue life with cyclic frequency was observed, in contrast with previous reports indicating the reverse; this is attributed to the different failure mechanisms activated. A systematic procedure involving optimization followed by transformation was used to condense the strain-frequency-life data into a master curve expressed in strain-life space.

  18. Characterizing seasonal variability of storm events based on very high frequency monitoring of hydrological and chemical variables: comparing patterns in hot spots and hot moments for nutrient and sediment export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fovet, Ophelie; Thelusma, Gilbert; Humbert, Guillaume; Dupas, Rémi; Faucheux, Mikael; Gilliet, Nicolas; Hamon, Yannick; Jaffrezic, Anne; Grimaldi, Catherine; Gruau, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Storm events are critical hot moments of emission for several dissolved and particulate chemical species at major stake for water quality (e.g. dissolved organic carbon DOC, suspended sediments, phosphorus). During such events, the solutes or particles are exported from heterogeneous sources through various pathways to stream leading to specific integrated signals at the outlet characterized by very short dynamics. This is merely true in headwater catchments where the total duration of such events ranges over 10h to 3 days, with very quick variations in stream flow and concentrations at the outlet occurring in a few hours. Thus for investigating properly event processes, high frequency monitoring of flow and water quality is required. We analysed 103 storm events in a 5 km2 agricultural headwater catchment, part of the AgrHys Observatory, on the basis of a 3-year-long data set which combined meterological (Rainfall), hydrological (flow and piezometry), and water quality (turbidity, conductivity, DOC and NO3 concentrations) data recorded at very high frequencies (from 1 to 20 min) thanks to dedicated sensors. We proposed a range of quantitative storm descriptors for characterizing input (rainfall), antecedent and initial conditions (groundwater levels and saturated area), and stream response in terms of level and dynamics of flow (Q), groundwater levels, and concentrations (C) but also the C-Q relationships. Three intra annual periods have been previously defined for base flow dynamic according to shallow groundwater table variations so that they correspond to different connectivity status in the catchment. The seasonal and inter-annual variability of the storm events have been analysed using the descriptors and based on these predefined periods. Results show that the hydrological flowpaths and the consequent storm chemistry were controlled by the hydrological base flow regime rather than by the rain input characteristics. This highlights that the exports of NO3

  19. Biogeochemical Cycle of Methanol in Anoxic Deep-Sea Sediments.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Katsunori; Tani, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Naoya; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Kano, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Ryo; Suzuki, Yohey

    2016-06-25

    The biological flux and lifetime of methanol in anoxic marine sediments are largely unknown. We herein reported, for the first time, quantitative methanol removal rates in subsurface sediments. Anaerobic incubation experiments with radiotracers showed high rates of microbial methanol consumption. Notably, methanol oxidation to CO2 surpassed methanol assimilation and methanogenesis from CO2/H2 and methanol. Nevertheless, a significant decrease in methanol was not observed after the incubation, and this was attributed to the microbial production of methanol in parallel with its consumption. These results suggest that microbial reactions play an important role in the sources and sinks of methanol in subseafloor sediments.

  20. The carbon cycle and biogeochemical dynamics in lake sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    The concentrations of organic carbon (OC) and CaCO3 in lake sediments are often inversely related. This relation occurs in surface sediments from different locations in the same lake, surface sediments from different lakes, and with depth in Holocene sediments. Where data on accumulation rates are available, the relation holds for organic carbon and CaCO3 accumulation rates as well. An increase of several percent OC is accompanied by a decrease of several tens of percent CaCO3 indicating that the inverse relation is not due to simple dilution of one component by another. It appears from core data that once the OC concentration in the sediments becomes greater than about 12%, the CO2 produced by decomposition of that OC and production of organic acids lowers the pH of anoxic pore waters enough to dissolve any CaCO3 that reaches the sediment-water interface. In a lake with a seasonally anoxic hypolimnion, processes in the water column also can produce an inverse relation between OC and CaCO3 over time. If productivity of the lake increases, the rain rate of OC from the epilimnion increases. Biogenic removal of CO2 and accompanying increase in pH also may increase the production of CaCO3. However, the decomposition of organic matter in the hypolimnion will decrease the pH of the hypolimnion causing greater dissolution of CaCO3 and therefore a decrease in the rain rate of CaCO3 to the sediment-water interface.

  1. [Principals of high frequency surgery].

    PubMed

    Bergler, W F; Hörmann, K; Hammerschmitt, N; Huber, K

    2004-10-01

    Electrosurgical instruments are routinely and daily applied at a variety of indications in Otorhinolaryngology. They can be used for cutting, coagulation and devitalisation. All have in common that the high frequency energy is transported into the tissue via an instrument and by this causes a thermal change. Depending on the duration and characteristic of the electricity a vaporisation of the tissue is effected through coagulation, devitalisation and carbonisation. The knowledge of the effects on the tissue by the choice of the different instrument parameters and application systems is essential for an ingenious therapeutically indication. In principal the following application methods for electrosurgery by modulation of the high frequency parameters are distinguished: the monopolar and the bipolar coagulation and devitalisation and the monopolar and the bipolar cutting. This article deals with the physical basis, the effects in the tissue as well as the single application methods of the high frequency surgery.

  2. Binaural beats at high frequencies.

    PubMed

    McFadden, D; Pasanen, E G

    1975-10-24

    Binaural beats have long been believed to be audible only at low frequencies, but an interaction reminiscent of a binaural beat can sometimes be heard when different two-tone complexes of high frequency are presented to the two ears. The primary requirement is that the frequency separation in the complex at one ear be slightly different from that in the other--that is, that there be a small interaural difference in the envelope periodicities. This finding is in accord with other recent demonstrations that the auditory system is not deaf to interaural time differences at high frequencies.

  3. The impact of electrogenic sulfide oxidation on elemental cycling and solute fluxes in coastal sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Alexandra M. F.; Malkin, Sairah Y.; Hidalgo-Martinez, Silvia; Meysman, Filip J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous sulfide oxidizing cable bacteria are capable of linking the oxidation of free sulfide in deep anoxic layers of marine sediments to the reduction of oxygen or nitrate in surface sediments by conducting electrons over centimeter-scale distances. Previous studies have shown that this newly discovered microbial process, referred to as electrogenic sulfide oxidation (e-SOx), may alter elemental cycling in sediments, but the nature and rates of the resulting biogeochemical transformations and their influence on benthic-pelagic coupling remain largely unknown. Here we quantify changes in sediment geochemistry and solute fluxes at the sediment-water interface as e-SOx develops and declines over time in laboratory incubations of organic-rich sediments from a seasonally hypoxic coastal basin (Marine Lake Grevelingen, The Netherlands). Our results show that e-SOx enhanced sediment O2 consumption and acidified subsurface sediment, resulting in the dissolution of calcium carbonate and iron sulfide minerals in deeper sediment horizons and the associated accumulation of dissolved iron, manganese, and calcium in porewater. Remobilized Fe diffusing upward was reoxidized at the sediment-water interface, producing an amorphous Fe oxide crust, while dissolved Fe diffusing downward was reprecipitated in the form of FeS as it encountered the free sulfide horizon. The development of e-SOx enhanced the diffusive release of dissolved Mn at the sediment-water interface, capped the phosphate efflux, generated a buildup of organic matter in surface sediments, and strongly stimulated the release of alkalinity from the sediment. About 75% of this alkalinity production was associated with net CaCO3 dissolution, while the remaining 25% was attributed to a pumping mechanism that transfers alkalinity from anodic H2S oxidation (an alkalinity sink) in deeper sediments to cathodic O2 reduction (an alkalinity source) near the sediment-water interface. The resulting sediment alkalinity

  4. Viral activities and life cycles in deep subseafloor sediments.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Tim; Orsi, William D; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-12-01

    Viruses are highly abundant in marine subsurface sediments and can even exceed the number of prokaryotes. However, their activity and quantitative impact on microbial populations are still poorly understood. Here, we use gene expression data from published continental margin subseafloor metatranscriptomes to qualitatively assess viral diversity and activity in sediments up to 159 metres below seafloor (mbsf). Mining of the metatranscriptomic data revealed 4651 representative viral homologues (RVHs), representing 2.2% of all metatranscriptome sequence reads, which have close translated homology (average 77%, range 60-97% amino acid identity) to viral proteins. Archaea-infecting RVHs are exclusively detected in the upper 30 mbsf, whereas RVHs for filamentous inoviruses predominate in the deepest sediment layers. RVHs indicative of lysogenic phage-host interactions and lytic activity, notably cell lysis, are detected at all analysed depths and suggest a dynamic virus-host association in the marine deep biosphere studied here. Ongoing lytic viral activity is further indicated by the expression of clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat-associated cascade genes involved in cellular defence against viral attacks. The data indicate the activity of viruses in subsurface sediment of the Peruvian margin and suggest that viruses indeed cause cell mortality and may play an important role in the turnover of subseafloor microbial biomass.

  5. High-frequency broadband transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    London, S. E.; Tomashevich, S. V.

    1981-05-01

    A systematic review of the theory and design principles of high-frequency broadband transformers is presented. It is shown that the transformers of highest performance are those whose coils consist of strips of double-wire and multiwire transmission lines. Such devices are characterized by a wide operating frequency range, and make possible operation at microwave frequencies at high levels of transmitted power.

  6. High frequency integrated MOS filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, C.

    1990-01-01

    Several techniques exist for implementing integrated MOS filters. These techniques fit into the general categories of sampled and tuned continuous-time filters. Advantages and limitations of each approach are discussed. This paper focuses primarily on the high frequency capabilities of MOS integrated filters.

  7. Biogeochemistry of the coupled manganese-iron-sulfur cycles of intertidal surface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosselmann, K.; Boettcher, M. E.; Billerbeck, M.; Walpersdorf, E.; Debeer, D.; Brumsack, H.-J.; Huettel, M.; Joergensen, B. B.

    2003-04-01

    The biogeochemistry of the coupled iron-manganese-sulfur-carbon cycles was studied in temperate intertidal surface sediments of the German Wadden Sea (North Sea). Coastal sampling sites include sand, mixed and mud flats with different organic matter and metal contents and permeability reflecting different hydrodynamic regimes. The field study focusses on the influence of temperature, organic matter load, and sediment types on the dynamics of biogeochemical reactions on different time scales (season, day-night, tidal cycles). One of the main interests was related to the cycling of metals (Mn, Fe) in relation to the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Pore water profiles were investigated by sediment sectioning and high resolution gel sampling techniques. Microbial sulfate reduction rates were measured using radiolabeled sulfate with the whole core incubation technique and the spatial distribution of bacterial activity was visualised by using "2D-photoemulsion-monitoring technique". The biogeochemical sulfur cycle was additionally characterised by the stable isotope ratios (S,O) of different sulfur species (e.g., SO_4, AVS, pyrite). Element transfers (metals, nutrients) across the sediment-water interface were additionally quantified by the application of benthic flux chambers. Microbial sulfate reduction was generally highest in the suboxic zone of the surface sediments indicating its potential importance for the mobilization of iron and manganese. In organic matter poor permeable sediments tidal effects additionally influence the spatial and temporal distribution of dissolved redox-sensitive metals. In organic matter-rich silty and muddy sediments, temperature controlled the microbial sulfate reduction rates. Depth-integrated sulfate reduction rates in sandy sediments were much lower and controlled by both temperature and organic matter. Formation of anoxic sediment surfaces due to local enhanced organic matter load (so-called "black spots") may create windows

  8. Enzymatic assays of sediments from North Pond (IODP Expedition 336) to elucidate microbial phosphorus cycling strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defforey, D.; Paytan, A.

    2015-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a key macronutrient for living cells and its availability is limited in the deep subseafloor environment, a habitat estimated to contain up to 1% of Earth's total biomass. The existence and activity of deep subseafloor microbial populations have profound implications on global biogeochemical cycles and our understanding of the limits of life. However, little is known about the impact of the deep biosphere on sedimentary P cycling and P diagenetic processes. Our previous work has shown that sedimentary P at North Pond is mainly present in mineral phases, and that refractory organic P is detectable throughout the sediment column. The latter could constitute a P source to the deep biosphere. Alternatively, microorganisms could have mechanisms to harvest P from recalcitrant mineral phases. The aim of this study is to determine the presence and maximum potential activity of enzymes involved in microbial P uptake in deep-sea sediments. These include phosphomonoesterases, such as alkaline phosphatase, phosphodiesterases, pyrophosphatase and phosphonatases. The sediment samples used for this study were collected at North Pond, a sediment pond located on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, during IODP Expedition 336. This work will provide key insights into the microbial P uptake mechanisms at play in open ocean sediments, and their effects on sedimentary P cycling. These results, in conjunction with our previous work investigating P geochemistry at North Pond, will yield valuable information regarding the impact of the deep biosphere on P cycling in open ocean sediments.

  9. The life sulfuric: microbial ecology of sulfur cycling in marine sediments

    PubMed Central

    Wasmund, Kenneth; Mußmann, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Summary Almost the entire seafloor is covered with sediments that can be more than 10 000 m thick and represent a vast microbial ecosystem that is a major component of Earth's element and energy cycles. Notably, a significant proportion of microbial life in marine sediments can exploit energy conserved during transformations of sulfur compounds among different redox states. Sulfur cycling, which is primarily driven by sulfate reduction, is tightly interwoven with other important element cycles (carbon, nitrogen, iron, manganese) and therefore has profound implications for both cellular‐ and ecosystem‐level processes. Sulfur‐transforming microorganisms have evolved diverse genetic, metabolic, and in some cases, peculiar phenotypic features to fill an array of ecological niches in marine sediments. Here, we review recent and selected findings on the microbial guilds that are involved in the transformation of different sulfur compounds in marine sediments and emphasise how these are interlinked and have a major influence on ecology and biogeochemistry in the seafloor. Extraordinary discoveries have increased our knowledge on microbial sulfur cycling, mainly in sulfate‐rich surface sediments, yet many questions remain regarding how sulfur redox processes may sustain the deep‐subsurface biosphere and the impact of organic sulfur compounds on the marine sulfur cycle. PMID:28419734

  10. Speciation and cycling of mercury in Lavaca Bay, Texas, sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, N.S.; Gill, G.A.; Cappellino, S.; Dobbs, C.; Mcshea, L.; Driscoll, C.; Mason, R.; Rudd, J.

    1999-01-01

    Sediment depth profiles of total mercury (THg) and monomethylmercury (MMHg) were collected at 15 sites in an anthropogenically contaminated estuarine system (Lavaca Bay, TX). THg in the solid phase increased with depth to a maximum located at 10--30 cm, which corresponds to historic industrial discharges to the bay. MMHg in the solid phase was highest in the upper 0--3 cm of the cores, decreasing rapidly with depth. The MMHg content of the surface sediment was a narrowly constrained fraction of the total over a range of sediment types, while making up only 0.01--0.05% of THg at depth. Porewater concentrations exhibited trends similar to but more exaggerated than in the solid phase. The distribution coefficients (log K{sub d}) for inorganic Hg were similar in most samples, averaging 4.89 {+-} 0.43. The log K{sub d} for MMHg averaged 2.70 {+-} 0.78 over all sites and depths but exhibited a subsurface minimum of 2.29 {+-} 0.67 at the point of maximum dissolved Fe. A time series showed a maximum in both solid phase and porewater MMHg during the early spring, followed by a decrease throughout the remainder of the year.

  11. Surface sediments of transboundary Lake Peipsi: composition, dynamics and role in matter cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punning, Jaan-Mati; Raukas, Anto; Terasmaa, Jaanus; Vaasma, Tiit

    2009-04-01

    To describe and analyse the role of sediments in the matter cycling in large shallow transboundary Lake Peipsi (L. Peipsi) in north-eastern Europe, detailed surface-sediment mapping was conducted. On the basis of grain size the surface sediments fall into three groups: coarse-grained sediments (prevailingly sands in the lake’s southern part), fine-grained sediments (mainly silts) and silty sands, both in the central deeper part within the 8-m depth contour. The groups of deposits have a distinct spatial distribution, determined mainly by the current system in the lake. The main source of bottom sediments is the erosion of the lake floor and shores, the role of the river input seems to be limited. Fine-grained organic-rich sediments are very cohesive, playing the main role in the circulation of various inorganic and organic pollutants like nutrients and xenobiotics. Due to the cohesive character of the sediments their physical and chemical properties are extremely diverse and if the near-bottom shear stress increases (extreme meteorological events, changes in the water level, etc.), the lake floor may be subjected to episodic erosion and resuspension, which may cause remobilisation of impurities in muddy sediments and their return to the food chain.

  12. High-Frequency Channel Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-30

    High-Frequency Channel Characterization Michael B. Porter, Paul Hursky, Martin Siderius Heat , Light, and Sound Research, Inc. 12730 High...Physical Sciences (Bruce Abraham) • Arizona State University (Tolga Duman, Subhadeep Roy) • Heat , Light, and Sound Research, Inc.(M. Porter, A. Abawi, P...NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Heat , Light, and Sound Research, Inc,12730 High

  13. Evaluation of shallow sediment methane cycling in a pockmark field on the Chatham Rise, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffin, R. B.; Rose, P. S.; Klaucke, I.; Bialas, J.; Pecher, I. A.; Gorman, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic studies have identified an extensive field (>20,000 km2) of seafloor depressions, or pockmarks, on the southwestern flank of the Chatham Rise, New Zealand. It has been suggested that these pockmarks result from gas hydrate dissociation linked to sea-level changes during glacial-interglacial cycles. Gas hydrates are predominately composed of methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas. Surface sediment cores (~ 8 m) were collected from the pockmark field on the Chatham Rise during a research cruise in February 2013 to evaluate the association of the features with CH4 releases. A suite of geochemical parameters are interpreted to determine the methane contribution to solid phase sediment and pore water. The upward flux of CH4 in sediments is often quantified using pore water sulfate (SO42-) profiles, assuming steady-state consumption of SO42- and CH4 by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM): CH4 + SO42- → HCO3- + HS- + H2O. This reaction is one of the primary controls on CH4 distributions in sediments. This work will present pore water SO42-, sulfide (HS-) and chloride (Cl-) depth profiles in sediment collected from the pockmark field. Theoretical SO42- distributions in the absence of AOM are compared to observed SO42- profiles as a preliminary assessment of the influence of CH4 on sediment geochemistry in and around the seafloor depressions. In addition isotopically-light CH4 is incorporated into sediment carbon pools via AOM and subsequent CO2 fixation. Stable carbon isotope distributions in the organic and inorganic carbon pools are presented to determine the influence of CH4 in sediments in the vicinty of the pockmarks. Collectively, the geochemical data are used to assess the role of gas hydate dissociation in pockmark formation on the Chatham Rise. Despite sesimic data interpretation in this region there is no modern day contribution of CH4 to shallow sediment carbon cycling and data are presented to assess paleogeochemical methane cycling.

  14. Ni cycling in mangrove sediments from New Caledonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, V. S.; Morin, G.; Juillot, F.; Marchand, C.; Brest, J.; Bargar, J.; Munoz, M.; Ardo, S.; Brown, G. E.

    2014-12-01

    In New Caledonia, mangroves receive large inputs of lateritic materials eroded from massive ultramafic deposits enriched in Fe, Ni, Mn, Cr, and Co. Because of the major physicochemical gradients, especially redox gradients, that characterize these ecosystems, mineralogical transformations may influence the crystal-chemistry and bioavailability of Ni and its mobility towards a lagoon of over 20,000 km2. Bulk and spatially resolved chemical analyses by SEM-EDXS were coupled with Ni K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy analysis to characterize the vertical and lateral changes in Ni speciation across the intertidal zone of a mangrove forest in the Vavouto Bay (New Caledonia) where Ni concentrations range from 1000 to 5300 mg•kg-1. XAFS results indicate that phyllosilicates and goethite inherited from the eroded lateritic materials are the dominant Ni-bearing phases in the surface horizons of the mangrove sediments. They are fully preserved at depth in the dry and oxic salt flat area, located on the inland side of the coast. In contrast, beneath the vegetated Rhizophoras and Avicennias stands Ni-bearing goethites rapidly diminish with increasing depth in the anoxic horizons of the sediments, and pyrite and organic complexes become the dominant Ni-containing species. Moreover, Ni incorporation in pyrite is more developed in the sediments beneath the intermediate Avicennia stand than beneath the Rhizophora stand that is closest to the shore. Such lateral changes in Ni speciation may be related to reoxidation of Ni-bearing pyrites in the Rhizophora stand, which is subject to periodic alternation of reducing and oxidizing events due to tidal fluctuations. These major changes in Ni speciation could significantly influence Ni mobility across the interidal zone. Indeed, as estimated with respect to Ti concentration, which is taken as a geochemical invariant, Ni is found to be immobile in the salt flat, to accumulate beneath the Avicennia stand, and to

  15. Constraining magnesium cycling in marine sediments using magnesium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, J. A.; Schrag, D. P.

    2010-09-01

    Magnesium concentrations in deep-sea sediment pore-fluids typically decrease down core due to net precipitation of dolomite or clay minerals in the sediments or underlying crust. To better characterize and differentiate these processes, we have measured magnesium isotopes in pore-fluids and sediment samples from Ocean Drilling Program sites (1082, 1086, 1012, 984, 1219, and 925) that span a range of oceanographic settings. At all sites, magnesium concentrations decrease with depth. At sites where diagenetic reactions are dominated by the respiration of organic carbon, pore-fluid δ 26Mg values increase with depth by as much as 2‰. Because carbonates preferentially incorporate 24Mg (low δ 26Mg), the increase in pore-fluid δ 26Mg values at these sites is consistent with the removal of magnesium in Mg-carbonate (dolomite). In contrast, at sites where the respiration of organic carbon is not important and/or weatherable minerals are abundant, pore-fluid δ 26Mg values decrease with depth by up to 2‰. The decline in pore-fluid δ 26Mg at these sites is consistent with a magnesium sink that is isotopically enriched relative to the pore-fluid. The identity of this enriched magnesium sink is likely clay minerals. Using a simple 1D diffusion-advection-reaction model of pore-fluid magnesium, we estimate rates of net magnesium uptake/removal and associated net magnesium isotope fractionation factors for sources and sinks at all sites. Independent estimates of magnesium isotope fractionation during dolomite precipitation from measured δ 26Mg values of dolomite samples from sites 1082 and 1012 are very similar to modeled net fractionation factors at these sites, suggesting that local exchange of magnesium between sediment and pore-fluid at these sites can be neglected. Our results indicate that the magnesium incorporated in dolomite is 2.0-2.7‰ depleted in δ 26Mg relative to the precipitating fluid. Assuming local exchange of magnesium is minor at the rest of the

  16. Biogeochemical constraints on uranium cycling in redox active floodplain sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, V.; Boye, K.; Bargar, J.; Maher, K.; Bone, S. E.; Cardarelli, E.; Dam, W. L.; Johnson, R. H.

    2016-12-01

    Long-term persistence of uranium (U) in groundwater at legacy ore-processing sites in the upper Colorado River Basin (CRB) is a major concern for DOE, stakeholders, and local property owners [1]. The first investigations of U distribution in contaminated floodplains at Grand Junction, Naturita, and Rifle (CO) show that U is retained in organic-rich sulfidic sediments referred to as naturally reduced zones (NRZs) [2]. The retention mechanisms (e.g., complexation, precipitation or adsorption) and the processes responsible for U accumulation in NRZs will directly determine the capacity of the sediments to prevent U mobilization. However, these processes remain poorly understood at local and regional scales yet they are critical to management and remediation of these sites. To investigate the regional role and functionality of NRZs to U mobility, we collected NRZ sediment cores from five sites across the upper CRB and examined them on the millimeter scale to determine the Fe, S and U molecular speciation. This work shows that organic-rich NRZs regionally accumulate U mainly as non-crystalline U(IV), but also as U(VI)-sorbed. Once accumulated, U(IV) is oxidized to U(VI) during low water table stage and is trapped by sorption. Thus seasonally redox-variable NRZs can accumulate significant inventories of U(VI). The ability of NRZs to control U mobility is directly related to the time- and space dependence of reducing conditions, which is controlled by hydrologic conditions, organic composition and sediment texture. Two functional types of NRZs were thus distinguished. (1) Highly reduced fine-grained NRZs characterized by occurrence of monosulfides and disulfides of iron (S2- and S-), where reducing conditions and U accumulation are more intense. And (2) weakly reduced coarse-grained NRZs only characterized by occurrence of iron disulfides, where the reactive U-compounds can rapidly oxidize due to oxidants from groundwater. These results show that NRZs are regionally

  17. The microbial nitrogen cycling potential is impacted by polyaromatic hydrocarbon pollution of marine sediments

    DOE PAGES

    Scott, Nicole M.; Hess, Matthias; Bouskill, Nick J.; ...

    2014-03-25

    During hydrocarbon exposure, the composition and functional dynamics of marine microbial communities are altered, favoring bacteria that can utilize this rich carbon source. Initial exposure of high levels of hydrocarbons in aerobic surface sediments can enrich growth of heterotrophic microorganisms having hydrocarbon degradation capacity. As a result, there can be a localized reduction in oxygen potential within the surface layer of marine sediments causing anaerobic zones. We hypothesized that increasing exposure to elevated hydrocarbon concentrations would positively correlate with an increase in denitrification processes and the net accumulation of dinitrogen. This hypothesis was tested by comparing the relative abundance ofmore » genes associated with nitrogen metabolism and nitrogen cycling identified in 6 metagenomes from sediments contaminated by polyaromatic hydrocarbons from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and 3 metagenomes from sediments associated with natural oil seeps in the Santa Barbara Channel. An additional 8 metagenomes from uncontaminated sediments from the Gulf of Mexico were analyzed for comparison. We predicted relative changes in metabolite turnover as a function of the differential microbial gene abundances, which showed predicted accumulation of metabolites associated with denitrification processes, including anammox, in the contaminated samples compared to uncontaminated sediments, with the magnitude of this change being positively correlated to the hydrocarbon concentration and exposure duration. Furthermore, these data highlight the potential impact of hydrocarbon inputs on N cycling processes in marine sediments and provide information relevant for system scale models of nitrogen metabolism in affected ecosystems.« less

  18. The microbial nitrogen cycling potential is impacted by polyaromatic hydrocarbon pollution of marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Nicole M.; Hess, Matthias; Bouskill, Nick J.; Mason, Olivia U.; Jansson, Janet K.; Gilbert, Jack A.

    2014-03-25

    During hydrocarbon exposure, the composition and functional dynamics of marine microbial communities are altered, favoring bacteria that can utilize this rich carbon source. Initial exposure of high levels of hydrocarbons in aerobic surface sediments can enrich growth of heterotrophic microorganisms having hydrocarbon degradation capacity. As a result, there can be a localized reduction in oxygen potential within the surface layer of marine sediments causing anaerobic zones. We hypothesized that increasing exposure to elevated hydrocarbon concentrations would positively correlate with an increase in denitrification processes and the net accumulation of dinitrogen. This hypothesis was tested by comparing the relative abundance of genes associated with nitrogen metabolism and nitrogen cycling identified in 6 metagenomes from sediments contaminated by polyaromatic hydrocarbons from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and 3 metagenomes from sediments associated with natural oil seeps in the Santa Barbara Channel. An additional 8 metagenomes from uncontaminated sediments from the Gulf of Mexico were analyzed for comparison. We predicted relative changes in metabolite turnover as a function of the differential microbial gene abundances, which showed predicted accumulation of metabolites associated with denitrification processes, including anammox, in the contaminated samples compared to uncontaminated sediments, with the magnitude of this change being positively correlated to the hydrocarbon concentration and exposure duration. Furthermore, these data highlight the potential impact of hydrocarbon inputs on N cycling processes in marine sediments and provide information relevant for system scale models of nitrogen metabolism in affected ecosystems.

  19. The microbial nitrogen cycling potential in marine sediments is impacted by polyaromatic hydrocarbon pollution

    DOE PAGES

    Gilbert, Jack A.

    2014-03-25

    During hydrocarbon exposure, the composition and functional dynamics of marine microbial communities are altered, favoring bacteria that can utilize this rich carbon source. Initial exposure of high levels of hydrocarbons in aerobic surface sediments can enrich growth of heterotrophic microorganisms having hydrocarbon degradation capacity. As a result, there can be a localized reduction in oxygen potential within the surface layer of marine sediments causing anaerobic zones. We hypothesized that increasing exposure to elevated hydrocarbon concentrations would positively correlate with an increase in denitrification processes and the net accumulation of dinitrogen. This hypothesis was tested by comparing the relative abundance ofmore » genes associated with nitrogen metabolism and nitrogen cycling identified in 6 metagenomes from sediments contaminated by polyaromatic hydrocarbons from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and 3 metagenomes from sediments associated with natural oil seeps in the Santa Barbara Channel. An additional 8 metagenomes from uncontaminated sediments from the Gulf of Mexico were analyzed for comparison. We predicted relative changes in metabolite turnover as a function of the differential microbial gene abundances, which showed predicted accumulation of metabolites associated with denitrification processes, including anammox, in the contaminated samples compared to uncontaminated sediments, with the magnitude of this change being positively correlated to the hydrocarbon concentration and exposure duration. These data highlight the potential impact of hydrocarbon inputs on N cycling processes in marine sediments and provide information relevant for system scale models of nitrogen metabolism in affected ecosystems.« less

  20. The microbial nitrogen cycling potential is impacted by polyaromatic hydrocarbon pollution of marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Nicole M.; Hess, Matthias; Bouskill, Nick; Mason, Olivia U; Jansson, Janet K; Gilbert, Jack A.

    2014-03-25

    During hydrocarbon exposure, the composition and functional dynamics of marine microbial communities are altered, favoring bacteria that can utilize this rich carbon source. Initial exposure of high levels of hydrocarbons in aerobic surface sediments can enrich growth of heterotrophic microorganisms having hydrocarbon degradation capacity. As a result, there can be a localized reduction in oxygen potential within the surface layer of marine sediments causing anaerobic zones. We hypothesized that increasing exposure to elevated hydrocarbon concentrations would positively correlate with an increase in denitrification processes and the net accumulation of dinitrogen. This hypothesis was tested by comparing the relative abundance of genes associated with nitrogen metabolism and nitrogen cycling identified in 6 metagenomes from sediments contaminated by polyaromatic hydrocarbons from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and 3 metagenomes from sediments associated with natural oil seeps in the Santa Barbara Channel. An additional 8 metagenomes from uncontaminated sediments from the Gulf of Mexico were analyzed for comparison. We predicted relative changes in metabolite turnover as a function of the differential microbial gene abundances, which showed predicted accumulation of metabolites associated with denitrification processes, including anammox, in the contaminated samples compared to uncontaminated sediments, with the magnitude of this change being positively correlated to the hydrocarbon concentration and exposure duration. These data highlight the potential impact of hydrocarbon inputs on N cycling processes in marine sediments and provide information relevant for system scale models of nitrogen metabolism in affected ecosystems

  1. The microbial nitrogen cycling potential is impacted by polyaromatic hydrocarbon pollution of marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Scott, Nicole M; Hess, Matthias; Bouskill, Nick J; Mason, Olivia U; Jansson, Janet K; Gilbert, Jack A

    2014-01-01

    During hydrocarbon exposure, the composition and functional dynamics of marine microbial communities are altered, favoring bacteria that can utilize this rich carbon source. Initial exposure of high levels of hydrocarbons in aerobic surface sediments can enrich growth of heterotrophic microorganisms having hydrocarbon degradation capacity. As a result, there can be a localized reduction in oxygen potential within the surface layer of marine sediments causing anaerobic zones. We hypothesized that increasing exposure to elevated hydrocarbon concentrations would positively correlate with an increase in denitrification processes and the net accumulation of dinitrogen. This hypothesis was tested by comparing the relative abundance of genes associated with nitrogen metabolism and nitrogen cycling identified in 6 metagenomes from sediments contaminated by polyaromatic hydrocarbons from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and 3 metagenomes from sediments associated with natural oil seeps in the Santa Barbara Channel. An additional 8 metagenomes from uncontaminated sediments from the Gulf of Mexico were analyzed for comparison. We predicted relative changes in metabolite turnover as a function of the differential microbial gene abundances, which showed predicted accumulation of metabolites associated with denitrification processes, including anammox, in the contaminated samples compared to uncontaminated sediments, with the magnitude of this change being positively correlated to the hydrocarbon concentration and exposure duration. These data highlight the potential impact of hydrocarbon inputs on N cycling processes in marine sediments and provide information relevant for system scale models of nitrogen metabolism in affected ecosystems.

  2. Terrestrial sedimentation and the carbon cycle: coupling weathering and erosion to carbon burial

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stallard, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    This paper examines the linkages between the carbon cycle and sedimentary processes on land. Available data suggest that sedimentation on land can bury vast quantities of organic carbon, roughly 1015 g C yr-1. To evaluate the relative roles of various classes of processes in the burial of carbon on land, terrestrial sedimentation was modeled as a series of 864 scenarios. Each scenario represents a unique choice of intensities for seven classes of processes and two different global wetland distributions. Comparison was made with presumed preagricultural conditions. The classes of processes were divided into two major component parts: clastic sedimentation of soil-derived carbon and organic sedimentation of autochthonous carbon. For clastic sedimentation, masses of sediment were considered for burial as reservoir sediment, lake sediment, and combined colluvium, alluvium, and aeolian deposits. When the ensemble of models is examined, the human-induced burial of 0.6-1.5.1015 g yr-1 of carbon on land is entirely plausible. This sink reaches its maximum strength between 30 ?? and 50??N. Paddy lands stand out as a type of land use that warrants future study, but the many faces of rice agriculture limit generalization. In an extreme scenario, paddy lands alone could be made to bury about 1.1015 g C yr-1. Arguing that terrestrial sedimentation processes could be much of the sink for the so called 'missing carbon' is reasonable. Such a hypothesis, however, requires major redesign of how the carbon cycle is modeled. Unlike ecosystem processes that are amenable to satellite monitoring and parallel modeling, many aspects of terrestrial sedimentation are hidden from space.

  3. H2 cycling and microbial bioenergetics in anoxic sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The simple biochemistry of H2 is central to a large number of microbial processes, affecting the interaction of organisms with each other and with the environment. In anoxic sediments, the great majority of microbial redox processes involve H2 as a reactant, product, or potential by-product, and the thermodynamics of these processes are thus highly sensitive to fluctuations in environmental H2 concentrations. In turn, H2 concentrations are controlled by the activity of H2-consuming microorganisms, which efficiently utilize this substrate down to levels which correspond to their bioenergetic limitations. Consequently, any environmental change which impacts the thermodynamics of H2-consuming organisms is mirrored by a corresponding change in H2 concentrations. This phenomenon is illustrated in anoxic sediments from Cape Lookout Bight, NC, USA: H2 concentrations are controlled by a suite of environmental parameters (e.g., temperature, sulfate concentrations) in a fashion which can be quantitatively described by a simple thermodynamic model. These findings allow us to calculate the apparent minimum quantity of biologically useful energy in situ. We find that sulfate reducing bacteria are not active at energy yields below -18 kJ per mole sulfate, while methanogenic archaea exhibit a minimum close to -10 kJ per mole methane.

  4. H2 cycling and microbial bioenergetics in anoxic sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The simple biochemistry of H2 is central to a large number of microbial processes, affecting the interaction of organisms with each other and with the environment. In anoxic sediments, the great majority of microbial redox processes involve H2 as a reactant, product, or potential by-product, and the thermodynamics of these processes are thus highly sensitive to fluctuations in environmental H2 concentrations. In turn, H2 concentrations are controlled by the activity of H2-consuming microorganisms, which efficiently utilize this substrate down to levels which correspond to their bioenergetic limitations. Consequently, any environmental change which impacts the thermodynamics of H2-consuming organisms is mirrored by a corresponding change in H2 concentrations. This phenomenon is illustrated in anoxic sediments from Cape Lookout Bight, NC, USA: H2 concentrations are controlled by a suite of environmental parameters (e.g., temperature, sulfate concentrations) in a fashion which can be quantitatively described by a simple thermodynamic model. These findings allow us to calculate the apparent minimum quantity of biologically useful energy in situ. We find that sulfate reducing bacteria are not active at energy yields below -18 kJ per mole sulfate, while methanogenic archaea exhibit a minimum close to -10 kJ per mole methane.

  5. Sea-level responses to sediment transport over the last ice age cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrier, K.; Mitrovica, J. X.

    2013-12-01

    Sea-level changes over the last ice age cycle were instrumental in steering Earth's topographic evolution. These sea-level variations were driven by changes in surface mass loads, including not only ice and ocean mass variations but also the transfer of rock from eroding mountains to sedimentary deposits. Here we use an extended numerical model of ice age sea level (Dalca et al., 2013) to explore how sediment erosion and deposition affected global sea-level variations over the last ice age cycle. The model takes histories of ice and sediment loads as inputs, and it computes gravitationally self-consistent sea level responses by accounting for the deformational, gravitational, and rotational perturbations in the Earth's viscoelastic form. In these model simulations, we use published estimates of erosion rates, sedimentation rates, and ice sheet variations to constrain sediment and ice loading since the Last Interglacial. We explore sea-level responses to several erosional and depositional scenarios, and in each we quantify the relative contributions of crustal deformation and gravitational perturbation to the computed sea-level change. We also present a case study to illustrate the effects that sediment transfer can have on sea level at the regional scale. In particular, we focus on the region surrounding the Indus River, where fluvial sediment fluxes are among the highest on Earth. Preliminary model results suggest that sediment fluxes from Asia to the ocean are large enough to produce a significant response in sea level along the northeastern coast of the Arabian Sea. Moreover, they suggest that modeled sea-level histories are sensitive to the timing and spatial distribution of sediment erosion and deposition. For instance, sediment deposition along the continental shelf - which may have been the primary site of Indus River sediment deposition during the Holocene - produces a different sea-level response than sediment deposition on the deep-sea Indus Fan, where

  6. Temperature and the sulfur cycle control monomethylmercury cycling in high Arctic coastal marine sediments from Allen Bay, Nunavut, Canada.

    PubMed

    St Pierre, K A; Chétélat, J; Yumvihoze, E; Poulain, A J

    2014-01-01

    Monomethylmercury (MMHg) is a neurotoxin of concern in the Canadian Arctic due to its tendency to bioaccumulate and the importance of fish and wildlife in the Inuit diet. In lakes and wetlands, microbial sediment communities are integral to the cycling of MMHg; however, the role of Arctic marine sediments is poorly understood. With projected warming, the effect of temperature on the production and degradation of MMHg in Arctic environments also remains unclear. We examined MMHg dynamics across a temperature gradient (4, 12, 24 °C) in marine sediments collected in Allen Bay, Nunavut. Slurries were spiked with stable mercury isotopes and amended with specific microbial stimulants and inhibitors, and subsampled over 12 days. Maximal methylation and demethylation potentials were low, ranging from below detection to 1.13 pmol g(-1) h(-1) and 0.02 pmol g(-1) h(-1), respectively, suggesting that sediments are likely not an important source of MMHg to overlying water. Our results suggest that warming may result in an increase in Hg methylation - controlled by temperature-dependent sulfate reduction, without a compensatory increase in demethylation. This study highlights the need for further research into the role of high Arctic marine sediments and climate on the Arctic marine MMHg budget.

  7. Bacterial sulfur cycling shapes microbial communities in surface sediments of an ultramafic hydrothermal vent field.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Regina; Røy, Hans; Augustin, Nico; Gennerich, Hans-Hermann; Peters, Marc; Wenzhoefer, Frank; Amann, Rudolf; Meyerdierks, Anke

    2011-10-01

    The ultramafic-hosted Logatchev hydrothermal field (LHF) is characterized by vent fluids, which are enriched in dissolved hydrogen and methane compared with fluids from basalt-hosted systems. Thick sediment layers in LHF are partly covered by characteristic white mats. In this study, these sediments were investigated in order to determine biogeochemical processes and key organisms relevant for primary production. Temperature profiling at two mat-covered sites showed a conductive heating of the sediments. Elemental sulfur was detected in the overlying mat and metal-sulfides in the upper sediment layer. Microprofiles revealed an intensive hydrogen sulfide flux from deeper sediment layers. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that filamentous and vibrioid, Arcobacter-related Epsilonproteobacteria dominated the overlying mats. This is in contrast to sulfidic sediments in basalt-hosted fields where mats of similar appearance are composed of large sulfur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria. Epsilonproteobacteria (7-21%) and Deltaproteobacteria (20-21%) were highly abundant in the surface sediment layer. The physiology of the closest cultivated relatives, revealed by comparative 16S rRNA sequence analysis, was characterized by the capability to metabolize sulfur components. High sulfate reduction rates as well as sulfide depleted in (34)S further confirmed the importance of the biogeochemical sulfur cycle. In contrast, methane was found to be of minor relevance for microbial life in mat-covered surface sediments. Our data indicate that in conductively heated surface sediments microbial sulfur cycling is the driving force for bacterial biomass production although ultramafic-hosted systems are characterized by fluids with high levels of dissolved methane and hydrogen. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. New chronology for the southern Kalahari Group sediments - implications for sediment-cycle dynamics and basin development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matmon, Ari; Hidy, Alan; Vainer, Shlomy; Crouvi, Onn; Fink, David; Erel, Yigal; Aster Team; Horwitz, Liora; Chazan, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Kalahari Group sediments accumulated in the Kalahari basin, which started forming during the breakup of Gondwana in the early Cretaceous. These sediments cover an extensive part of southern Africa and form a low-relief landscape. Current models assume that the Kalahari Group accumulated throughout the entire Cenozoic. However, chronology has been restricted to early-middle Cenozoic biostratigraphic correlations and to OSL dating of only the past ~300 ka. We present a new chronological framework that reveals a dynamic nature of sedimentation in the southern Kalahari. Cosmogenic burial ages obtained from a 55 m section of Kalahari Group sediments from the Mamatwan Mine, southern Kalahari, indicate that the majority of deposition at this location occurred rapidly at 1-1.2 Ma. This Pleistocene sequence overlies the Archaean basement, forming a significant hiatus that permits the possibility of many Phanerozoic cycles of deposition and erosion no longer preserved in the sedimentary record. Our data also establish the existence of a shallow early-middle Pleistocene water body that persisted for >450 ka prior to this rapid period of deposition and suggesting an Okavango-like environment. Evidence from neighboring archaeological excavations in southern Africa suggests an association of high-density hominin occupation with this water body.

  9. Temperature and Cyanobacterial Bloom Biomass Influence Phosphorous Cycling in Eutrophic Lake Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mo; Ye, Tian-Ran; Krumholz, Lee R.; Jiang, He-Long

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms frequently occur in freshwater lakes, subsequently, substantial amounts of decaying cyanobacterial bloom biomass (CBB) settles onto the lake sediments where anaerobic mineralization reactions prevail. Coupled Fe/S cycling processes can influence the mobilization of phosphorus (P) in sediments, with high releases often resulting in eutrophication. To better understand eutrophication in Lake Taihu (PRC), we investigated the effects of CBB and temperature on phosphorus cycling in lake sediments. Results indicated that added CBB not only enhanced sedimentary iron reduction, but also resulted in a change from net sulfur oxidation to sulfate reduction, which jointly resulted in a spike of soluble Fe(II) and the formation of FeS/FeS2. Phosphate release was also enhanced with CBB amendment along with increases in reduced sulfur. Further release of phosphate was associated with increases in incubation temperature. In addition, CBB amendment resulted in a shift in P from the Fe-adsorbed P and the relatively unreactive Residual-P pools to the more reactive Al-adsorbed P, Ca-bound P and organic-P pools. Phosphorus cycling rates increased on addition of CBB and were higher at elevated temperatures, resulting in increased phosphorus release from sediments. These findings suggest that settling of CBB into sediments will likely increase the extent of eutrophication in aquatic environments and these processes will be magnified at higher temperatures. PMID:24682039

  10. Mixing and cycling of uranium, thorium and 210Pb in Puget Sound sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, R.; Peterson, M. L.; Bennett, J. T.; Somayajulu, B. L. K.

    1984-10-01

    Activity profiles of excess 234Th, excess 210Pb, 232Th, 230Th, 234U and 238U, and 228/232Th ratios determined in eight box cores of sediment from six sites in central Puget Sound provide new insights into the dynamic nature of solid phase mixing in surface sediments, the exchange of 228Ra and other soluble species across the sediment-water interface, and the cycling of U, Th and 210Pb in this coastal zone. Comparison of excess 234Th inventories in sediments with its production rate in the overlying water column indicates a mean residence time of at most 14 days for particles in the central Puget Sound water column. Surface sediment horizons with excess 234Th have no excess 228Th which might be used to ascertain sediment accumulation rates over the past decade. Instead, deficiencies of 228Th due to loss of soluble 228Ra from pore water to the overlying water persist to 20-30 cm, revealing that exchange of soluble chemicals between pore and overlying waters reaches these depths in the extensively bioturbated sediments of Puget Sound. Solid phase U isotope concentrations tend to increase by up to a factor of two with depth in sediments, as a result of dissolved U being biologically pumped down into sediments where it is partially removed when conditions become mildly reducing. 232Th and 230Th activities and 230/232Th ratios are constant with depth in sediments, indicating constant detrital phase compositions and essentially no authigenic 230Th. Steady state 210Pb depositional activities in and fluxes to Puget Sound sediments average only about onehalf those for sediments of the open Washington coast north of the Columbia River mouth, primarily because of a much lower supply of dissolved 210Pb in sea waters adverting into Puget Sound. Excess 234Th profiles in sediments reveal much more detail about the depth dependency, dynamic nature and recent history of solid phase mixing processes than excess 210Pb profiles. At least six of eight 234Th profiles show that mixing

  11. Pyrosequencing evidence for iron-cycling microbial communities in sediments of the Skagerrak and Bothnian Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Carolina; Dellwig, Olaf; Noriega-Ortega, Beatriz; Dähnke, Kirstin; Gehre, Matthias; Böttcher, Michael E.; Friedrich, Michael W.

    2015-04-01

    The diversity and metabolic pathways of microorganisms linked to Fe cycling in marine sediments are still poorly understood. Marine microorganisms in general are difficult to isolate and those that have been successfully isolated may not represent the main endogenous population. Various culture-independent techniques have been applied to characterize marine microbial communities, but only recently, has high throughput pyrosequencing been applied in marine sediment studies. Initial results are promising in capturing the full complexity of microbial communities in sediments. We performed a pyrosequencing-based study in marine and brackish sediments of the Baltic Sea; to our knowledge this is the first pyrosequencing study focused on the zone of Fe cycling. The goal of this study was to determine the bacterial and archaeal community composition near the sediment surface showing ongoing Fe cycling as a first step in characterizing the microorganisms potentially involved in Fe cycling. Two 35-cm-cores were sampled from ferruginous sediments in the Skagerrak, SK, North-Baltic Sea and the Bothnian Bay, BB, Northern Baltic Sea. Porewater (Fe2+, Mn2+, SO42-) and solid phase (Fe, Mn, total S) concentrations were measured and 16S rRNA genes were analysed using 454-pyrosequencing. Additionally, stable S and O isotope signatures of dissolved sulfate were measured at SK site. Sediment biogeochemistry indicated an intense suboxic zone with accumulation of dissolved Fe in the top 30 cm but only minor net sulfate (SO42-) reduction at both sites. Pore water profiles showed Fe2+ and Mn2+ levels of ~140-150 µM throughout the core below a 6 cm thick oxidized surface layer in SK sediments and ~300 µM below a 2 cm thick surface layer in BB sediments. Dissolved sulfide levels were below the detection limit in both sediments. Stable S and O isotope signatures suggest only minor net sulfate reduction. Fe reduction in the studied sediments is dominated by microbial dissimilatory Fe

  12. The 18.6 yr nodal cycle and its impact on tidal sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oost, A. P.; de Haas, H.; Ijnsen, F.; van den Boogert, J. M.; de Boer, P. L.

    1993-09-01

    The 18.6 yr nodal cycle modulates tidal amplitudes and currents, and consequently sedimentation in tide-influenced sedimentary environments. Data are presented which show that such effects are obvious along the coast of the Dutch barrier islands and in the sedimentary fill of abandoned channels.

  13. MODELING NITROGEN-CARBON CYCLING AND OXYGEN CONSUMPTION IN BOTTOM SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model framework is presented for simulating nitrogen and carbon cycling at the sediment–water interface, and predicting oxygen consumption by oxidation reactions inside the sediments. Based on conservation of mass and invoking simplifying assumptions, a coupled system of diffus...

  14. MODELING NITROGEN-CARBON CYCLING AND OXYGEN CONSUMPTION IN BOTTOM SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model framework is presented for simulating nitrogen and carbon cycling at the sediment–water interface, and predicting oxygen consumption by oxidation reactions inside the sediments. Based on conservation of mass and invoking simplifying assumptions, a coupled system of diffus...

  15. Manganese redox cycling in Lake Imandra: impact on nitrogen and the trace metal sediment record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingri, J.; Pekka, L.; Dauvalter, V.; Rodushkin, I.; Peinerud, E.

    2011-01-01

    Sediment and water samples from the mine-polluted Yokostrovskaya basin in Lake Imandra have been analysed. Three major processes have influenced the accumulation and distribution of metals in the sediment: (1) Development of the apatite-nepheline and the sulfide ore mining industries. (2) Secondary formation of sulphides in the upper sediment column. (3) Redox cycling of Mn in the surface sediment and in the bottom water. This study demonstrate the dominant role of the Mn redox cycling in controlling distribution of several major and trace elements, especially during the winter stratification period. Mn oxides act as a major scavenger and carrier for the non-detrital fraction of Al, Ca, K, Mg, P, Ba, Co, Cu, Ni, Mo and Zn in the bottom water. Aluminium, Ca, K, Mg, P, Cu, Ni and Zn are mainly sorbed at the surface of the particulate Mn phase, while Ba and Mo form a phase (or inner sphere complex) with Mn. Co is associated with the Mn-rich phase, probably by oxidation of Co(II) to a trivalent state by the particulate Mn surface. Formation and dissolution of Mn particles most likely also control anoxic ammonium oxidation to nitrate and reduction of nitrate to N2. It is shown that secondary sulphides in Lake Imandra sediments are fed with trace metals primarily scavenged from the dissolved phase in the water column. This enrichment process, driven by the Mn-redox cycle, therefore changes the sediment record by the transfer of a dissolved pollution signal to the particulate sediment record, thus making it more complicated to trace direct influence of particles from different pollution sources.

  16. Impact of sulfate pollution on anaerobic biogeochemical cycles in a wetland sediment.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Darren S; Mitchell, Alison

    2012-03-15

    The impact of sulfate pollution is increasingly being seen as an issue in the management of inland aquatic ecosystems. In this study we use sediment slurry experiments to explore the addition of sulfate, with or without added carbon, on the anaerobic biogeochemical cycles in a wetland sediment that previously had not been exposed to high levels of sulfate. Specifically we looked at the cycling of S (sulfate, dissolved and particulate sulfide--the latter measured as acid volatile sulfide; AVS), C (carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, methane and the short chain volatile fatty acids formate, acetate, butyrate and propionate), N (dinitrogen, ammonium, nitrate and nitrite) and redox active metals (Fe(II) and Mn(II)). Sulfate had the largest effects on the cycling of S and C. All the added S at lower loadings were converted to AVS over the course of the experiment (30 days). At the highest loading (8 mmol) less than 50% of consumed S was converted to AVS, however this is believed to be a kinetic effect. Although sulfate reduction was occurring in sediments with added sulfate, dissolved sulfide concentrations remained low throughout the study. Sulfate addition affected methanogenesis. In the absence of added carbon, addition of sulfate, even at a loading of 1 mmol, resulted in a halving of methane formation. The initial rate of formation of methane was not affected by sulfate if additional carbon was added to the sediment. However, there was evidence for anaerobic methane oxidation in those sediments with added sulfate and carbon, but not in those sediments treated only with carbon. Surprisingly, sulfate addition had little apparent impact on N dynamics; previous studies have shown that sulfide can inhibit denitrification and stimulate dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia. We propose that because most of the reduced sulfur was in particulate form, levels of dissolved sulfide were too low to interfere with the N cycle. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  17. Short-term cycle of eolian dust (Kosa) recorded in Lake Kawaguchi sediments, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyotani, Tomohiro; Koshimizu, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    The fluctuation during the last 100 yr of the eolian dust (Kosa aerosol) originating from arid and semi-arid areas of China has been reconstructed by using the sediments from Lake Kawaguchi, central Japan with high temporal resolution. The quantification of Kosa contribution to the sediments was carried out by a new method using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EDX) proposed by us. The correlation plot of (Na 2O+K 2O) contents against SiO 2 was used for individual Si-rich particles having SiO 2 content over 80%. The Kosa fraction of Si-rich particles in Lake Kawaguchi sediments during the last 100 yr is approximately 10-30%. The fluctuation of the Kosa fraction during the last 100 yr does not coincide with that of the total amount of Si-rich particles, because detrital components from Japanese igneous rocks control the fluctuation of the total number of Si-rich particles. The discrimination method based on single particle analysis is more effective than that of bulk analysis for the lake sediments formed by complex matrix components. We can first show a short-term (approximately 10-20 yr scale) cycle in Kosa aerosol fluctuation. Higher sedimentation rates (5-10 yr-cm) of the Lake Kawaguchi sediments and the new analytical method using SEM-EDX revealed a remarkable fluctuation pattern of Kosa aerosol, suggesting climate cycles much shorter than glacial-interglacial. Such short-term cycles may be related to sun-spots. The number of days of Kosa events during the last 30 yr, obtained by visual observation by Meteorological Agency of Japan, also supports the presence of such a short-term cycle.

  18. Hydraulic and sediment transport properties of autogenic avulsion cycles on submarine fans with supercritical distributaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Paul B.; Strom, Kyle B.; Hoyal, David C. J. D.

    2015-07-01

    Submarine fans, like other distributive systems, are built by repeated avulsion cycles. However, relative to deltas and alluvial fans, much less is known about avulsions in subaqueous settings. In this study, we ran a set of subaqueous fan experiments to investigate the mechanics associated with autogenic avulsion cycles of self-formed channels and lobe deposits on steep slopes. The experiments used saline density currents with crushed plastic to emulate sustained turbidity currents and bed load transport. We collected detailed hydraulic and bathymetric measurements and made use of a 1-D laterally expanding density current model to better understand different aspects of the avulsion cycle. Our results reveal three major components of the avulsion cycles: (1) distributary channel incision, extension, and stagnation; (2) mouth bar aggradation and hydraulic jump initiation; and (3) hydraulic jump sedimentation and upstream retreat. Interestingly, in all but one experiment, the avulsion cycles led to fans that remained perched above the basin slope break. Experimental data and hydraulic theory were used to unravel actual mechanics associated with cycles. We found that channels stopped extending into the basin due to a decay in sediment transport capacity relative to sediment supply and that the reduction in capacity was primarily an outcome of expansion-driven velocity reduction; dilution played a secondary role. Once channel extension ceased, mouth bar deposits aggraded to a thickness approximately equal to the critical step height needed to create a choked flow condition. The choke then initiated a hydraulic jump on the upstream side of the bar. Once formed, the jump detained a majority of the incoming sediment and forced the channel-to-lobe transition upstream, filling the channel with steep backset bedding and capping the entire channel with a mounded lobate deposit. These intrinsic processes repeated through multiple avulsion cycles to build the fan.

  19. Short-chain alkane cycling in deep Gulf of Mexico cold-seep sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibert, R.; Joye, S. B.; Hunter, K.

    2015-12-01

    Mixtures of light hydrocarbon gases are common in deep Gulf of Mexico cold-seep sediments, and are typically dissolved in pore fluids, adsorbed to sediment particles, trapped in methane ice, or as free gas. The dominant component in these natural gas mixtures is usually methane (>80% C1), but ethane (C2) and propane (C3) are nearly always present in trace amounts (<1% total). The processes that control the concentration and isotopic signature of these gases in sediments are well explained for methane, but the controls for C2/C3 cycling are still a relative mystery. Methane production proceeds in deep anoxic sediments by either 1) thermocatalytic cracking of fossil organic matter, or 2) as a direct product of microbial metabolism, i.e. methanogenesis. In surface sediments, it appears that both microbial consumption and chemical deposition of methane (i.e. as methane clathrate) ensures that >95% of the methane produced at depth never reaches the water column. Production of C1 and C2 in deep-sea sediments has been historically attributed only to thermocatalytic processes, though limited data suggests production of C2/C3 compounds through the activity of archaea at depth. Furthermore, carbon isotopic data on ethane and propane from deep cores of Gulf of Mexico sediments suggest alkanogenesis at >3 m depth in the sediment column and alkane oxidation in uppermost oxidant-rich sediments. Additional studies have also isolated microorganisms capable of oxidizing ethane and propane in the laboratory, but field studies of microbial-driven dynamics of C2/C3 gases in cold-seep sediments are rare. Here, we present the results of a series of incubation experiments using sediment slurries culled from surface sediments from one of the most prolific natural oil and gas seeps in the Gulf of Mexico. Rates of alkane oxidation were measured under a variety of conditions to assess the surface-driven microbial controls on C2/C3 cycling in cold-seep environments. Such microbial processes

  20. Organic matter remineralization predominates phosphorus cycling in the mid-Bay sediments in the Chesapeake Bay.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sunendra R; Kukkadapu, Ravi K; Burdige, David J; Bowden, Mark E; Sparks, Donald L; Jaisi, Deb P

    2015-05-19

    Chesapeake Bay, the largest and most productive estuary in the U.S., suffers from varying degrees of water quality issues fueled by both point and nonpoint nutrient sources. Restoration of the Bay is complicated by the multitude of nutrient sources, their variable inputs, and complex interaction between imported and regenerated nutrients. These complexities not only restrict formulation of effective restoration plans but also open up debates on accountability issues with nutrient loading. A detailed understanding of sediment phosphorus (P) dynamics provides information useful in identifying the exchange of dissolved constituents across the sediment-water interface as well as helps to better constrain the mechanisms and processes controlling the coupling between sediments and the overlying waters. Here we used phosphate oxygen isotope ratios (δ(18)O(P)) in concert with sediment chemistry, X-ray diffraction, and Mössbauer spectroscopy on sediments retrieved from an organic rich, sulfidic site in the mesohaline portion of the mid-Bay to identify sources and pathway of sedimentary P cycling and to infer potential feedbacks on bottom water hypoxia and surface water eutrophication. Authigenic phosphate isotope data suggest that the regeneration of inorganic P from organic matter degradation (remineralization) is the predominant, if not sole, pathway for authigenic P precipitation in the mid-Bay sediments. This indicates that the excess inorganic P generated by remineralization should have overwhelmed any pore water and/or bottom water because only a fraction of this precipitates as authigenic P. This is the first research that identifies the predominance of remineralization pathway and recycling of P within the Chesapeake Bay. Therefore, these results have significant implications on the current understanding of sediment P cycling and P exchange across the sediment-water interface in the Bay, particularly in terms of the sources and pathways of P that sustain hypoxia

  1. The Relationship Between Sediment Properties and Sedimentation Patterns on a Macrotidal Gravel Beach over a Semi-lunar Tidal Cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscombe, D.; Masselink, G.

    2007-12-01

    Detailed measurements of profile and sediment dynamics have been obtained from a macrotidal gravel barrier beach in southern England. Surface and sub-surface sediment samples, beach profiles, and disturbance depths were taken from the intertidal zone on consecutive low tides over semi-lunar tidal cycles, along with continuous wave and tide measurements. Results from two separate field surveys are presented, representing 26 and 24 consecutive low tides, respectively. A combination of Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) and Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis was used to identify a number of consistent relationships in morphological and sedimentological variables not readily apparent using ordinary correlations. The disadvantage of such statistical models is that the relationships obtained cannot be expressed in physically meaningful units, which does limit its utility in physical-numerical modelling. However, the results reveal some interesting relationships between gravel beachface sedimentology and morphological change. For example, beachface morphology and sedimentology are more similar at a given spatial location over time than over space (cross-shore) at any individual time. Subsurface sedimentology over the depth of disturbance indicates that the beach step can be traced through the sediment characteristics. Indeed, the study suggests that gravel beachface sedimentology is 'slaved' to morphological change rather than vice-versa; and that the relationship becomes more evident as secondary morphological features develop on the beachface. The results imply that median sediment size and geometric sorting are suitable parameters for detecting such relationships. Strong hysteresis over space was present in the EOF modes associated with the most variance in the data sets, for both sediment size and sorting. Statistically significant relationships were found between the temporal modes of (absolute) size/sorting and net sedimentation associated with the

  2. High frequency power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Mikund R.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this project was to provide the technology of high frequency, high power transmission lines to the 100 kW power range at 20 kHz frequency. In addition to the necessary design studies, a 150 m long, 600 V, 60 A transmission line was built, tested and delivered for full vacuum tests. The configuration analysis on five alternative configurations resulted in the final selection of the three parallel Litz straps configuration, which gave a virtually concentric design in the electromagnetic sense. Low inductance, low EMI and flexibility in handling are the key features of this configuration. The final design was made after a parametric study to minimize the losses, weight and inductance. The construction of the cable was completed with no major difficulties. The R,L,C parameters measured on the cable agreed well with the calculated values. The corona tests on insulation samples showed a safety factor of 3.

  3. High frequency power distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Mikund R.

    1986-04-01

    The objective of this project was to provide the technology of high frequency, high power transmission lines to the 100 kW power range at 20 kHz frequency. In addition to the necessary design studies, a 150 m long, 600 V, 60 A transmission line was built, tested and delivered for full vacuum tests. The configuration analysis on five alternative configurations resulted in the final selection of the three parallel Litz straps configuration, which gave a virtually concentric design in the electromagnetic sense. Low inductance, low EMI and flexibility in handling are the key features of this configuration. The final design was made after a parametric study to minimize the losses, weight and inductance. The construction of the cable was completed with no major difficulties. The R,L,C parameters measured on the cable agreed well with the calculated values. The corona tests on insulation samples showed a safety factor of 3.

  4. Organic Matter Remineralization Predominates Phosphorus Cycling in the Mid-Bay Sediments in the Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Sunendra, Joshi R.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Burdige, David J.; Bowden, Mark E.; Sparks, Donald L.; Jaisi, Deb P.

    2015-05-19

    The Chesapeake Bay, the largest and most productive estuary in the US, suffers from varying degrees of water quality issues fueled by both point and non–point source nutrient sources. Restoration of the bay is complicated by the multitude of nutrient sources, their variable inputs and hydrological conditions, and complex interacting factors including climate forcing. These complexities not only restrict formulation of effective restoration plans but also open up debates on accountability issues with nutrient loading. A detailed understanding of sediment phosphorus (P) dynamics enables one to identify the exchange of dissolved constituents across the sediment- water interface and aid to better constrain mechanisms and processes controlling the coupling between the sediments and the overlying waters. Here we used phosphate oxygen isotope ratios (δ18Op) in concert with sediment chemistry, XRD, and Mössbauer spectroscopy on the sediment retrieved from an organic rich, sulfidic site in the meso-haline portion of the mid-bay to identify sources and pathway of sedimentary P cycling and to infer potential feedback effect on bottom water hypoxia and surface water eutrophication. Isotope data indicate that the regeneration of inorganic P from organic matter degradation (remineralization) is the predominant, if not sole, pathway for authigenic P precipitation in the mid-bay sediments. We interpret that the excess inorganic P generated by remineralization should have overwhelmed any bottom-water and/or pore-water P derived from other sources or biogeochemical processes and exceeded saturation with respect to authigenic P precipitation. It is the first research that identifies the predominance of remineralization pathway against remobilization (coupled Fe-P cycling) pathway in the Chesapeake Bay. Therefore, these results are expected to have significant implications for the current understanding of P cycling and benthic-pelagic coupling in the bay, particularly on the

  5. The Influence of Changes in Carbon and Nitrate Supply on Nitrogen Cycling in Marine Sediments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algar, C. K.

    2016-02-01

    Human activity has increased dissolved nitrogen (nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium) inputs to coastal and shelf waters. Because nitrogen is often a limiting nutrient in aquatic systems the resulting increase in primary production and subsequent deposition can lead to O2 depletion at depth. Sediment microbes can ameliorate nutrient loading by converting bio-available nitrate (nitrogen that other organisms such as phytoplankton can utilize) to biologically unavailable nitrogen gas (N2), which is subsequently lost to the atmosphere. However this process of denitrification is not the only nitrogen cycling process that occurs in sediments. Nitrate can also undergo dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA), and because ammonium remains bioavailable, nitrogen is retained in the system and can further contribute to eutrophication. An understanding of the factors regulating these processes is necessary to evaluate how coastal and shelf sediments will respond to continued nutrient loading under changing environmental conditions. Here we use a combination of numerical modeling and manipulated laboratory experiments to examine how the sediment nitrogen cycle responds changes in the coupled delivery of carbon and nitrogen to the sediment surface, and how this effects the return of nutrients to the overlying water. This work suggests that the ratio of carbon to nitrogen supply may control which nitrate reduction pathway dominates, with denitrification dominating when the ratio of carbon to nitrogen supply is low, and DNRA dominating when the ratio of carbon to nitrogen availability is high. These results suggests that DNRA may a play larger role in coastal and shelf sediments then previously thought and may limit the ability of sediments to act as a sink for bioavailable nitrogen.

  6. High Frequency Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Qing Zhe; Daviso, Eugenio; Can, Thach V.; Markhasin, Evgeny; Jawla, Sudheer K.; Swager, Timothy M.; Temkin, Richard J.; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Conspectus During the three decades 1980–2010, magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR developed into the method of choice to examine many chemical, physical and biological problems. In particular, a variety of dipolar recoupling methods to measure distances and torsion angles can now constrain molecular structures to high resolution. However, applications are often limited by the low sensitivity of the experiments, due in large part to the necessity of observing spectra of low-γ nuclei such as the I = ½ species 13C or 15N. The difficulty is still greater when quadrupolar nuclei, like 17O or 27Al, are involved. This problem has stimulated efforts to increase the sensitivity of MAS experiments. A particularly powerful approach is dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) which takes advantage of the higher equilibrium polarization of electrons (which conventionally manifests in the great sensitivity advantage of EPR over NMR). In DNP, the sample is doped with a stable paramagnetic polarizing agent and irradiated with microwaves to transfer the high polarization in the electron spin reservoir to the nuclei of interest. The idea was first explored by Overhauser and Slichter in 1953. However, these experiments were carried out on static samples, at magnetic fields that are low by current standards. To be implemented in contemporary MAS NMR experiments, DNP requires microwave sources operating in the subterahertz regime — roughly 150–660 GHz — and cryogenic MAS probes. In addition, improvements were required in the polarizing agents, because the high concentrations of conventional radicals that are required to produce significant enhancements compromise spectral resolution. In the last two decades scientific and technical advances have addressed these problems and brought DNP to the point where it is achieving wide applicability. These advances include the development of high frequency gyrotron microwave sources operating in the subterahertz frequency range. In addition, low

  7. LOSCAR: Long-term Ocean-atmosphere-Sediment CArbon cycle Reservoir Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeebe, R. E.

    2011-06-01

    The LOSCAR model is designed to efficiently compute the partitioning of carbon between ocean, atmosphere, and sediments on time scales ranging from centuries to millions of years. While a variety of computationally inexpensive carbon cycle models are already available, many are missing a critical sediment component, which is indispensable for long-term integrations. One of LOSCAR's strengths is the coupling of ocean-atmosphere routines to a computationally efficient sediment module. This allows, for instance, adequate computation of CaCO3 dissolution, calcite compensation, and long-term carbon cycle fluxes, including weathering of carbonate and silicate rocks. The ocean component includes various biogeochemical tracers such as total carbon, alkalinity, phosphate, oxygen, and stable carbon isotopes. We have previously published applications of the model tackling future projections of ocean chemistry and weathering, pCO2 sensitivity to carbon cycle perturbations throughout the Cenozoic, and carbon/calcium cycling during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. The focus of the present contribution is the detailed description of the model including numerical architecture, processes and parameterizations, tuning, and examples of input and output. Typical CPU integration times of LOSCAR are of order seconds for several thousand model years on current standard desktop machines. The LOSCAR source code in C can be obtained from the author by sending a request to loscar.model@gmail.com.

  8. A model to quantify sediment mixing across alluvial piedmonts with cycles of aggradation and incision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malatesta, Luca C.; Berger, Quentin; Avouac, Jean-Philippe

    2017-04-01

    The accurate interpretation of clastic sedimentary records hinges on a good understanding of the timescale and mode of sediment transport from source to sink. An environmental signal can be accurately recorded in the stratigraphy if it is transported quickly without being mixed with older sediments, or it can be entirely shredded by a slow transport and significant mixing along the way. Both transformations can happen in alluvial piedmonts by successive episodes of aggradation and incision. For example, in the Tian Shan the sediment flux reaching the foreland basin is mixed with sediments of up to 0.5 Ma age, mixing and blurring the environmental signals it carries. We present here a numerical model that reproduces cycles of aggradation and incision on an alluvial fan and keeps track of the age composition in the sediment outflow. The model is based on three fundamental time- and length-scales: the period of aggradation-incision cycles, the depth of incision with respect to net aggradation, and the pattern of lateral migration. All three parameters can be reasonably easily surveyed in the field and with remote sensing. For simple geometries, we replace the numerical model with a probabilistic light analytical model. The output of both models quantifies sediment mixing in terms of the probability of finding a given minimum proportion of sediments of age T or older in the output flux. We apply and test the analytical and numerical models to the Eastern Tian Shan where we can rely on independent measurements of mixing and buffering. There, rivers repeatedly aggraded and incised 100's of meters every 20 to 30 kyr with two main effects: 1) the delivery of coarse sediments to the basin is delayed by at least 7 to 14 kyrs between being first evacuated from the mountain and later re-eroded and transported basinward; 2) the outflux of coarse sediments from the piedmont contains a significant amount of recycled material that was deposited on the piedmont as early as the

  9. Amplifying High Frequency Acoustic Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, C

    2004-02-05

    In search of the hypothetical Higgs boson, a prototype electron accelerator structure has been developed for use in the Next Linear Collider (NLC), SLAC's proposed version of the machine necessary to create the predicted particle. The Next Linear Test Accelerator (NLCTA), designed to provide O.5GeV-lTeV center-of-mass collision energy, generates electromagnetic breakdowns inside its copper structure while the beam is running. The sparks vaporize the surface of the copper, and will eventually ruin the accelerator. They also create high-frequency (hf) acoustic signals (100 kHz-1 MHz). Acoustic sensors have been placed on the structure, however current knowledge regarding sound propagation in copper limits spark location to within one centimeter. A system was needed that simulates the sparks so further study of acoustic propagation can be pursued; the goal is locate them to within one millimeter. Various tests were done in order to identify an appropriate hf signal source, and to identify appropriate acoustic sensors to use. A high-voltage spark generator and the same sensors used on the actual structure proved most useful for the system. Two high-pass filters were also fabricated in order to measure signals that might be created above 2MHz. The 11-gain filter was used on the acoustic simulation system that was developed, and the 100-gain filter will be used on the NLCTA.

  10. High Frequency Linacs for Hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaldi, Ugo; Braccini, Saverio; Puggioni, Paolo

    The use of radiofrequency linacs for hadrontherapy was proposed about 20 years ago, but only recently has it been understood that the high repetition rate together with the possibility of very rapid energy variations offers an optimal solution to the present challenge of hadrontherapy: "paint" a moving tumor target in three dimensions with a pencil beam. Moreover, the fact that the energy, and thus the particle range, can be electronically adjusted implies that no absorber-based energy selection system is needed, which, in the case of cyclotron-based centers, is the cause of material activation. On the other side, a linac consumes less power than a synchrotron. The first part of this article describes the main advantages of high frequency linacs in hadrontherapy, the early design studies, and the construction and test of the first high-gradient prototype which accelerated protons. The second part illustrates some technical issues relevant to the design of copper standing wave accelerators, the present developments, and two designs of linac-based proton and carbon ion facilities. Superconductive linacs are not discussed, since nanoampere currents are sufficient for therapy. In the last two sections, a comparison with circular accelerators and an overview of future projects are presented.

  11. High-Frequency Inductor Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, L. K.

    2014-01-01

    The Finemet-type nanocrystalline alloy represents an advanced soft-magnetic metal-metal-type nanocomposite with an eddy-current-determined high- frequency limit. A survey of different heat treatments under tensile stress is presented to tailor the hysteresis loop by induced transversal anisotropy. The flattened loop having reduced effective permeability enhances the eddy- current limit in the MHz region; For example, continuous stress annealing in a tubular furnace of 1 m length at 650°C, pulling the ribbon with a velocity of 4 m/min under a tensile stress of 200 MPa, results in a wound core having a permeability of 120 and a frequency limit of 10 MHz. Careful annealing preserves the static coercivity below 10 A/m. The power loss at 0.1 T and 100 kHz is only 82 mW/cm3, which is an order of magnitude lower then the values obtained for Sendust™ cores in similar conditions.

  12. Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria Mediate Microbial Community Succession and Element Cycling in Launched Marine Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Ihara, Hideyuki; Hori, Tomoyuki; Aoyagi, Tomo; Takasaki, Mitsuru; Katayama, Yoko

    2017-01-01

    A large amount of marine sediment was launched on land by the Great East Japan earthquake. Here, we employed both on-site and laboratory studies on the launched marine sediment to investigate the succession of microbial communities and its effects on geochemical properties of the sediment. Twenty-two-month on-site survey showed that microbial communities at the uppermost layer (0–2 mm depth) of the sediment changed significantly with time, whereas those at the deeper layer (20–40 mm depth) remained nearly unchanged and kept anaerobic microbial communities. Nine months after the incidence, various sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) prevailed in the uppermost layer, in which afterwards diverse chemoorganotrophic bacteria predominated. Geochemical analyses indicated that the concentration of metals other than Fe was lower in the uppermost layer than that in the deeper layer. Laboratory study was carried out by incubating the sediment for 57 days, and clearly indicated the dynamic transition of microbial communities in the uppermost layer exposed to atmosphere. SOB affiliated in the class Epsilonproteobacteria rapidly proliferated and dominated at the uppermost layer during the first 3 days, after that Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria and chemoorganotrophic bacteria were sequentially dominant. Furthermore, the concentration of sulfate ion increased and the pH decreased. Consequently, SOB may have influenced the mobilization of heavy metals in the sediment by metal-bound sulfide oxidation and/or sediment acidification. These results demonstrate that SOB initiated the dynamic shift from the anaerobic to aerobic microbial communities, thereby playing a critical role in element cycling in the marine sediment. PMID:28217124

  13. Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria Mediate Microbial Community Succession and Element Cycling in Launched Marine Sediment.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Hideyuki; Hori, Tomoyuki; Aoyagi, Tomo; Takasaki, Mitsuru; Katayama, Yoko

    2017-01-01

    A large amount of marine sediment was launched on land by the Great East Japan earthquake. Here, we employed both on-site and laboratory studies on the launched marine sediment to investigate the succession of microbial communities and its effects on geochemical properties of the sediment. Twenty-two-month on-site survey showed that microbial communities at the uppermost layer (0-2 mm depth) of the sediment changed significantly with time, whereas those at the deeper layer (20-40 mm depth) remained nearly unchanged and kept anaerobic microbial communities. Nine months after the incidence, various sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) prevailed in the uppermost layer, in which afterwards diverse chemoorganotrophic bacteria predominated. Geochemical analyses indicated that the concentration of metals other than Fe was lower in the uppermost layer than that in the deeper layer. Laboratory study was carried out by incubating the sediment for 57 days, and clearly indicated the dynamic transition of microbial communities in the uppermost layer exposed to atmosphere. SOB affiliated in the class Epsilonproteobacteria rapidly proliferated and dominated at the uppermost layer during the first 3 days, after that Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria and chemoorganotrophic bacteria were sequentially dominant. Furthermore, the concentration of sulfate ion increased and the pH decreased. Consequently, SOB may have influenced the mobilization of heavy metals in the sediment by metal-bound sulfide oxidation and/or sediment acidification. These results demonstrate that SOB initiated the dynamic shift from the anaerobic to aerobic microbial communities, thereby playing a critical role in element cycling in the marine sediment.

  14. High frequency-heated air turbojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miron, J. H. D.

    1986-01-01

    A description is given of a method to heat air coming from a turbojet compressor to a temperature necessary to produce required expansion without requiring fuel. This is done by high frequency heating, which heats the walls corresponding to the combustion chamber in existing jets, by mounting high frequency coils in them. The current transformer and high frequency generator to be used are discussed.

  15. Modeling studies of dissolved organic matter cycling in Santa Barbara Basin (CA, USA) sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdige, David J.; Komada, Tomoko; Magen, Cédric; Chanton, Jeffrey P.

    2016-12-01

    Here we describe new reaction-transport models for the cycling of dissolved organic matter (DOM, both dissolved organic carbon [DOC] and dissolved organic nitrogen [DON]) in anoxic marine sediments, and apply these models to data from Santa Barbara Basin sediment cores (maximum depth of 4.6 m). Model results show that most organic carbon (and nitrogen) flow in the sediments occurs through reactive DOM intermediates that turn over rapidly to produce inorganic remineralization end-products. Refractory DOM is also produced, and the vast majority of this refractory DOM is not remineralized and either escapes as a benthic flux across the sediment-water interface or is buried. Except near the sediment surface, refractory DOM represents >95% of the total pore water DOM. Pore water DOM appears to be consistently depleted in nitrogen as compared to its source organic matter, which may be the result of differential production of carbon- versus nitrogen-containing refractory DOM during remineralization. Refractory DOC (DOCr) in Santa Barbara Basin sediment pore waters is largely produced from degradation of sediment particulate organic carbon (POC). In addition, there is an upward basal flux of DOCr that is strongly depleted in 14C (-810‰). The Δ14C value of DOCr varies according to its source, ranging from +60‰ (a component of surface sediment POC enriched with radiocarbon from nuclear weapons testing in the 1960's) to -810‰ (the basal DOC flux). Each contributes to the DOCr benthic flux, which has a weighted-average Δ14C value of -40‰. The model-determined DOCr benthic flux is roughly half of the total DOC benthic flux, consistent with observations in the literature that sediments are a source of both labile and refractory DOC to bottom waters. These results support previous arguments that sediment benthic fluxes represent an important source of refractory DOC to the oceans. The benthic flux of refractory DOC from these sediments may also contribute pre-aged DOC

  16. Microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction and Fe cycling in iron-rich freshwater wetland sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, E.E.

    1995-12-31

    The dynamics of Fe cycling and the interaction between microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction and other anaerobic microbial respiratory processes were examined in Fe-rich, sulfate-poor freshwater wetland sediments. Sediment incubation experiments demonstrated that reduction of Fe(III) oxides (amorphous, soluble in dilute HCl) dominated anaerobic carbon mineralization at Fe(III) concentrations in excess of 10 mmol per liter wet sediment. The kinetics of Fe(III) reduction were found to be first-order with respect to the concentration of Fe(III) oxide, although estimated first-order rate constants varied in relation to the absolute rates of Fe(III) reduction, suggesting a co-dependency on the concentration of easily degradable organic carbon. High concentrations of amorphous Fe(III) oxides (10-100 mmol L wet sed {sup -1}) were found in surface sediments (0-3 cm) of unvegetated zones of the wetland and in the rhizosphere (0-10 cm) of emergent aquatic plants, sufficient (based on sediment incubation experiments) to allow Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) to dominate anaerobic carbon mineralization. A rapid redox cycling of Fe is apparent in these localized zones based on observed rates of Fe(III) reduction and the abundance/depth distribution of Fe(Ill) oxides. Preliminary culture enrichment studies indicate that FeRB present in these sediments are capable of metabolizing a range of both natural and contaminant aromatic hydrocarbons, which suggests a potential for utilization of natural and/or artificial Fe-rich wetland systems for organic contaminant bioremediation.

  17. Use of life cycle assessments to evaluate the environmental footprint of contaminated sediment remediation.

    PubMed

    Sparrevik, Magnus; Saloranta, Tuomo; Cornelissen, Gerard; Eek, Espen; Fet, Annik Magerholm; Breedveld, Gijs D; Linkov, Igor

    2011-05-15

    Ecological and human risks often drive the selection of remedial alternatives for contaminated sediments. Traditional human and ecological risk assessment (HERA) includes assessing risk for benthic organisms and aquatic fauna associated with exposure to contaminated sediments before and after remediation as well as risk for human exposure but does not consider the environmental footprint associated with implementing remedial alternatives. Assessment of environmental effects over the whole life cycle (i.e., Life Cycle Assessment, LCA) could complement HERA and help in selecting the most appropriate sediment management alternative. Even though LCA has been developed and applied in multiple environmental management cases, applications to contaminated sediments and marine ecosystems are in general less frequent. This paper implements LCA methodology for the case of the polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and -furans (PCDD/F)-contaminated Grenland fjord in Norway. LCA was applied to investigate the environmental footprint of different active and passive thin-layer capping alternatives as compared to natural recovery. The results showed that capping was preferable to natural recovery when analysis is limited to effects related to the site contamination. Incorporation of impacts related to the use of resources and energy during the implementation of a thin layer cap increase the environmental footprint by over 1 order of magnitude, making capping inferior to the natural recovery alternative. Use of biomass-derived activated carbon, where carbon dioxide is sequestered during the production process, reduces the overall environmental impact to that of natural recovery. The results from this study show that LCA may be a valuable tool for assessing the environmental footprint of sediment remediation projects and for sustainable sediment management.

  18. Spatial distribution of N-cycling microbial communities showed complex patterns in constructed wetland sediments.

    PubMed

    Correa-Galeote, David; Marco, Diana E; Tortosa, Germán; Bru, David; Philippot, Laurent; Bedmar, Eulogio J

    2013-02-01

    Constructed wetlands are used for biological treatment of wastewater from agricultural lands carrying pollutants such as nitrates. Nitrogen removal in wetlands occurs from direct assimilation by plants and through microbial nitrification and denitrification. We investigated the spatial distribution of N-cycling microbial communities and genes involved in nitrification and denitrification in constructed wetland sediments receiving irrigation water. We used quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) to characterize microbial communities. Geostatistical variance analysis was used to relate them with vegetation cover and biogeochemical sediment properties. The spatial distribution of the N-cycling microbial communities of sediments was heterogeneous and complex. Total communities of bacteria and crenarchaea showed different spatial distributions. Analysis of autocorrelation patterns through semivariance indicated a tendency towards a patchy distribution over scales around 10 m for genes involved in the nitrification and denitrification processes. In contrast, biogeochemical sediment properties showed diverse spatial distributions. While almost no patchiness was found for pH and moisture, patchiness at scales between 8 and 10 m was detected for carbon, nitrate and ammonia. Denitrification variables showed spatial autocorrelation at scales comparable to genes. However, denitrifying enzyme activity and potential N(2)O production showed a common spatial pattern, different from that of the N(2)O/(N(2)O + N(2)).

  19. [Sulfate reduction and microbial processes of the methane cycle in the sediments of the Sevastopol bay].

    PubMed

    Pimenov, N V; Egorov, V N; Kanapatskiĭ, T A; Malakhova, T V; Artemov, Iu G; Sigalevich, P A; Malakhova, L V

    2013-01-01

    The rates of microbial processes of sulfate reduction and of the methane cycle were measured in the bottom sediments of the Sevastopol basin, where seeps of gaseous methane have been previously found. Typically for marine environments, sulfate reduction played the major role in the terminal phase of decomposition of organic matter (OM) in reduced sediments of this area. The rate of this process depended on the amount of available OM. The rate of methanogenesis in the sediments increased with depth, peaking in the subsurface horizons, where decreased sulfate concentration was detected in the pore water. The highest rates of sulfate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation were found close to the methane-sulfate transition zone as is typical of most investigated marine sediments. The data on the carbon isotopic composition of gaseous methane from the seeps and dissolved CH4 from the bottom sediments, as well as on the rates of microbial methanogenesis and methane oxidation indicate that the activity of the methane seeps results from accumulation of biogenic methane in the cavities of the underlying geological structures with subsequent periodic release of methane bubbles into the water column.

  20. Effects of temperature and organic pollution on nutrient cycling in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Lazaro, C.; Valdemarsen, T.; Holmer, M.

    2015-08-01

    Increasing ocean temperature due to climate change is an important anthropogenic driver of ecological change in coastal systems. In these systems sediments play a major role in nutrient cycling. Our ability to predict ecological consequences of climate change is enhanced by simulating real scenarios. Based on predicted climate change scenarios, we tested the effect of temperature and organic pollution on nutrient release from coastal sediments to the water column in a mesocosm experiment. PO43- release rates from sediments followed the same trends as organic matter mineralization rates, increased linearly with temperature and were significantly higher under organic pollution than under nonpolluted conditions. NH4+ release only increased significantly when the temperature rise was above 6 °C, and it was significantly higher in organic polluted compared to nonpolluted sediments. Nutrient release to the water column was only a fraction from the mineralized organic matter, suggesting PO43- retention and NH4+ oxidation in the sediment. Bioturbation and bioirrigation appeared to be key processes responsible for this behavior. Considering that the primary production of most marine basins is N-limited, the excess release of NH4+ at a temperature rise > 6 °C could enhance water column primary productivity, which may lead to the deterioration of the environmental quality. Climate change effects are expected to be accelerated in areas affected by organic pollution.

  1. High Frequency Chandler Wobble Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, F.; Stuck, J.; Thomas, M.

    2003-04-01

    and OMCT forcing fields give no hint for increased excitation power in the Chandler band. Thus it is assumed, that continuous high frequency excitation due to stochastic weather phenomena is responsible for the perpetuation of the Chandler wobble.

  2. Hemipelagic shelf sedimentation and climatic cycles: the basal Jurassic (Blue Lias) of South Britain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weedon, G. P.

    1986-01-01

    The sedimentology, cyclicity and hiatuses of the Blue Lias Formation (basal Jurassic) were investigated at five localities in South Britain. Most carbonate mud, which is the dominant carbonate component, has been neomorphosed to microspar. However, carbonate mud was apparently supplied by coccoliths in zooplankton faecal pellets, suggesting hemipelagic sedimentation. Clay is assumed to have been supplied by rivers. The three sediment types involved reflect cyclic changes in bottom-water oxygenation levels combined with changes in the clay-to-carbonate mud ratio. Walsh power spectra have been applied for the first time to measured sections in order to investigate the control of cyclicity. This application is analogous to palaeoclimatological studies of Pleistocene oxygen-isotope (ice-volume) records. The spectra show that 1 or 2 sedimentary cycles, of constant thickness, occur in four out of five sections, each of which represents several million years. The maximum possible duration of these cycles is too short for their generation by sea-level changes. Their regularity, stability and order of duration (tens of thousands of years) are consistent with the hypothesis of sedimentary cyclicity controlled by climatic change, itself forced by orbital changes in insolation (Milankovitch theory). The duration of both cycles recognised is less than 93,000 years (93 ka) and may record changes in orbital precession (21 ka) and obliquity (41 ka). Assuming that one ammonite zone represents 1 Ma, comparison of the longest-possible with the implied durations of the cycles, suggests that the sections are at best 20-40% complete. Loss of sediment may have occurred during winter storms or hurricanes. A model relating the sedimentary cycles to changes in the volume of runoff is proposed.

  3. The Link between Microbial Diversity and Nitrogen Cycling in Marine Sediments Is Modulated by Macrofaunal Bioturbation

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani Foshtomi, Maryam; Braeckman, Ulrike; Derycke, Sofie; Sapp, Melanie; Van Gansbeke, Dirk; Sabbe, Koen; Willems, Anne; Vincx, Magda; Vanaverbeke, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The marine benthic nitrogen cycle is affected by both the presence and activity of macrofauna and the diversity of N-cycling microbes. However, integrated research simultaneously investigating macrofauna, microbes and N-cycling is lacking. We investigated spatio-temporal patterns in microbial community composition and diversity, macrofaunal abundance and their sediment reworking activity, and N-cycling in seven subtidal stations in the Southern North Sea. Spatio-Temporal Patterns of the Microbial Communities Our results indicated that bacteria (total and β-AOB) showed more spatio-temporal variation than archaea (total and AOA) as sedimentation of organic matter and the subsequent changes in the environment had a stronger impact on their community composition and diversity indices in our study area. However, spatio-temporal patterns of total bacterial and β-AOB communities were different and related to the availability of ammonium for the autotrophic β-AOB. Highest bacterial richness and diversity were observed in June at the timing of the phytoplankton bloom deposition, while richness of β-AOB as well as AOA peaked in September. Total archaeal community showed no temporal variation in diversity indices. Macrofauna, Microbes and the Benthic N-Cycle Distance based linear models revealed that, independent from the effect of grain size and the quality and quantity of sediment organic matter, nitrification and N-mineralization were affected by respectively the diversity of metabolically active β-AOB and AOA, and the total bacteria, near the sediment-water interface. Separate models demonstrated a significant and independent effect of macrofaunal activities on community composition and richness of total bacteria, and diversity indices of metabolically active AOA. Diversity of β-AOB was significantly affected by macrofaunal abundance. Our results support the link between microbial biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in marine sediments, and provided

  4. Microbial populations involved in cycling of dimethyl sulfide and methanethiol in freshwater sediments.

    PubMed

    Lomans, B P; Luderer, R; Steenbakkers, P; Pol, A; van Der Drift, C; Vogels, G D; Op den Camp, H J

    2001-03-01

    Although several microorganisms that produce and degrade methanethiol (MT) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) have been isolated from various habitats, little is known about the numbers of these microorganisms in situ. This study reports on the identification and quantification of microorganisms involved in the cycling of MT and DMS in freshwater sediments. Sediment incubation studies revealed that the formation of MT and DMS is well balanced with their degradation. MT formation depends on the concentrations of both sulfide and methyl group-donating compounds. A most-probable number (MPN) dilution series with syringate as the growth substrate showed that methylation of sulfide with methyl groups derived from syringate is a commonly occurring process in situ. MT appeared to be primarily degraded by obligately methylotrophic methanogens, which were found in the highest positive dilutions on DMS and mixed substrates (methanol, trimethylamine [TMA], and DMS). Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of the total DNA isolated from the sediments and of the DNA isolated from the highest positive dilutions of the MPN series (mixed substrates) revealed that the methanogens that are responsible for the degradation of MT, DMS, methanol, and TMA in situ are all phylogenetically closely related to Methanomethylovorans hollandica. This was confirmed by sequence analysis of the product obtained from a nested PCR developed for the selective amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from M. hollandica. The data from sediment incubation experiments, MPN series, and molecular-genetics detection correlated well and provide convincing evidence for the suggested mechanisms for MT and DMS cycling and the common presence of the DMS-degrading methanogen M. hollandica in freshwater sediments.

  5. Impacts of bioturbation on temporal variation in bacterial and archaeal nitrogen-cycling gene abundance in coastal sediments

    PubMed Central

    Laverock, B; Tait, K; Gilbert, J A; Osborn, A M; Widdicombe, S

    2014-01-01

    In marine environments, macrofauna living in or on the sediment surface may alter the structure, diversity and function of benthic microbial communities. In particular, microbial nitrogen (N)-cycling processes may be enhanced by the activity of large bioturbating organisms. Here, we study the effect of the burrowing mud shrimp Upogebia deltaura upon temporal variation in the abundance of genes representing key N-cycling functional guilds. The abundance of bacterial genes representing different N-cycling guilds displayed different temporal patterns in burrow sediments in comparison with surface sediments, suggesting that the burrow provides a unique environment where bacterial gene abundances are influenced directly by macrofaunal activity. In contrast, the abundances of archaeal ammonia oxidizers varied temporally but were not affected by bioturbation, indicating differential responses between bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers to environmental physicochemical controls. This study highlights the importance of bioturbation as a control over the temporal variation in nitrogen-cycling microbial community dynamics within coastal sediments. PMID:24596269

  6. 75 FR 81284 - Nationwide Use of High Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology; Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Nationwide Use of High Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology... of High Frequency (HF) and Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Sound Navigation and Ranging (SONAR) Technology... less than a week; however, for environmental disasters such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill,...

  7. Lightweight, high-frequency transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    The 25-kVA space transformer was developed under contract by Thermal Technology Laboratory, Buffalo, N. Y. The NASA Lewis transformer technology program attempted to develop the baseline technology. For the 25-kVA transformer the input voltage was chosen as 200 V, the output voltage as 1500 V, the input voltage waveform as square wave, the duty cycle as continuous, the frequency range (within certain constraints) as 10 to 40 kHz, the operating temperatures as 85 deg. and 130 C, the baseplate temperature as 50 C, the equivalent leakage inductance as less than 10 micro-h, the operating environment as space, and the life expectancy as 10 years. Such a transformer can also be used for aircraft, ship and terrestrial applications.

  8. Natural Organobromine in Marine Sediments: New Evidence of Biogeochemical Br Cycling

    SciTech Connect

    A Leri; J Hakala; M Marcus; A Lanzirotti; C Reddy; S Myneni

    2011-12-31

    Organobromine (Br{sub org}) compounds, commonly recognized as persistent, toxic anthropogenic pollutants, are also produced naturally in terrestrial and marine systems. Several enzymatic and abiotic bromination mechanisms have been identified, as well as an array of natural Br{sub org} molecules associated with various marine organisms. The fate of the carbon-bromine functionality in the marine environment, however, remains largely unexplored. Oceanographic studies have noted an association between bromine (Br) and organic carbon (C{sub org}) in marine sediments. Even so, there has been no direct chemical evidence that Br in the sediments exists in a stable form apart from inorganic bromide (Br{sub inorg}), which is widely presumed conservative in marine systems. To investigate the scope of natural Br{sub org} production and its fate in the environment, we probed Br distribution and speciation in estuarine and marine sediments using in situ X-ray spectroscopy and spectromicroscopy. We show that Br{sub org} is ubiquitous throughout diverse sedimentary environments, occurring in correlation with C{sub org} and metals such as Fe, Ca, and Zn. Analysis of sinking particulate carbon from the seawater column links the Br{sub org} observed in sediments to biologically produced Br{sub org} compounds that persist through humification of natural organic matter (NOM). Br speciation varies with sediment depth, revealing biogeochemical cycling of Br between organic and inorganic forms as part of the burial and degradation of NOM. These findings illuminate the chemistry behind the association of Br with Corg in marine sediments and cast doubt on the paradigmatic classification of Br as a conservative element in seawater systems.

  9. Accelerated sulfur cycle in coastal marine sediment beneath areas of intensive shellfish aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Asami, Hiroki; Aida, Masato; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2005-06-01

    Prokaryotes in marine sediments taken from two neighboring semi-enclosed bays (the Yamada and Kamaishi bays) at the Sanriku coast in Japan were investigated by the culture-independent molecular phylogenetic approach coupled with chemical and activity analyses. These two bays were chosen in terms of their similar hydrogeological and chemical characteristics but different usage modes; the Yamada bay has been used for intensive shellfish aquaculture, while the Kamaishi bay has a commercial port and is not used for aquaculture. Substantial differences were found in the phylogenetic composition of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries constructed for the Yamada and Kamaishi sediments. In the Yamada library, phylotypes affiliated with delta-Proteobacteria were the most abundant, and those affiliated with gamma-Proteobacteria were the second-most abundant. In contrast, the Kamaishi library was occupied by phylotypes affiliated with Planctomycetes, gamma-Proteobacteria, delta-Proteobacteria, and Crenarchaeota. In the gamma-Proteobacteria, many Yamada phylotypes were related to free-living and symbiotic sulfur oxidizers, whereas the Kamaishi phylotype was related to the genus Pseudomonas. These results allowed us to hypothesize that sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria have become abundant in the Yamada sediment. This hypothesis was supported by quantitative competitive PCR (qcPCR) with group-specific primers. The qcPCR also suggested that organisms closely related to Desulfotalea in the Desulfobulbaceae were the major sulfate-reducing bacteria in these sediments. In addition, potential sulfate reduction and sulfur oxidation rates in the sediment samples were determined, indicating that the sulfur cycle has become active in the Yamada sediment beneath the areas of intensive shellfish aquaculture.

  10. Accelerated Sulfur Cycle in Coastal Marine Sediment beneath Areas of Intensive Shellfish Aquaculture

    PubMed Central

    Asami, Hiroki; Aida, Masato; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2005-01-01

    Prokaryotes in marine sediments taken from two neighboring semienclosed bays (the Yamada and Kamaishi bays) at the Sanriku coast in Japan were investigated by the culture-independent molecular phylogenetic approach coupled with chemical and activity analyses. These two bays were chosen in terms of their similar hydrogeological and chemical characteristics but different usage modes; the Yamada bay has been used for intensive shellfish aquaculture, while the Kamaishi bay has a commercial port and is not used for aquaculture. Substantial differences were found in the phylogenetic composition of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries constructed for the Yamada and Kamaishi sediments. In the Yamada library, phylotypes affiliated with δ-Proteobacteria were the most abundant, and those affiliated with γ-Proteobacteria were the second-most abundant. In contrast, the Kamaishi library was occupied by phylotypes affiliated with Planctomycetes, γ-Proteobacteria, δ-Proteobacteria, and Crenarchaeota. In the γ-Proteobacteria, many Yamada phylotypes were related to free-living and symbiotic sulfur oxidizers, whereas the Kamaishi phylotype was related to the genus Pseudomonas. These results allowed us to hypothesize that sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria have become abundant in the Yamada sediment. This hypothesis was supported by quantitative competitive PCR (qcPCR) with group-specific primers. The qcPCR also suggested that organisms closely related to Desulfotalea in the Desulfobulbaceae were the major sulfate-reducing bacteria in these sediments. In addition, potential sulfate reduction and sulfur oxidation rates in the sediment samples were determined, indicating that the sulfur cycle has become active in the Yamada sediment beneath the areas of intensive shellfish aquaculture. PMID:15932986

  11. Iron Cycling in Marine Sediments - New Insights from Isotope Analysis on Sequentially Extracted Fe Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, S.; Kasten, S.; Poulton, S.; Hartmann, J.; Staubwasser, M.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive Fe (oxyhydr)oxides preferentially undergo early diagenetic cycling and may cause a diffusive flux of dissolved Fe2+ from sediments towards the sediment-water interface. The partitioning of Fe in sediments has traditionally been studied by applying sequential extractions based on reductive dissolution of Fe minerals. We complemented the sequential leaching method by Poulton and Canfield [1] in order to be able to gain δ56Fe data for specific Fe fractions, as such data are potentially useful to study Fe cycling in marine environments. The specific mineral fractions are Fe-carbonates, ferrihydrite + lepidocrocite, goethite + hematite, and magnetite. Leaching was performed with acetic acid, hydroxylamine-HCl, Na-dithionite and oxalic acid. The processing of leachates for δ56Fe analysis involved boiling the samples in HCl/HNO3/H2O2, Fe precipitation and anion exchange column chromatography. The new method was applied to short sediment cores from the North Sea and a bay of King George Island (South Shetland Islands, Antarctica). Downcore mineral-specific variations in δ56Fe revealed differing contributions of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides to redox cycling. A slight decrease in easily reducible Fe oxides correlating with a slight increase in δ56Fe for this fraction with depth, which is in line with progessive dissimilatory iron reduction [2,3], is visible in the top 10 cm of the North Sea core, but not in the antarctic sediments. Less reactive (dithionite and oxalate leachable) fractions did not reveal isotopic trends. The acetic acid-soluble fraction displayed pronounced δ56Fe trends at both sites that cannot be explained by acid volatile sulfides that are also extracted by acetic acid [1]. We suggest that low δ56Fe values in this fraction relative to the pool of easily reducible Fe oxides result from adsorbed Fe(II) that was open to isotopic exchange with oxide surfaces, affirming the experimental results of Crosby el al. [2]. Hence, δ56Fe analyses on marine

  12. Effects of drain-fill cycling on chlorpyrifos mineralization in wetland sediment-water microcosms.

    PubMed

    Gebremariam, Seyoum Yami; Beutel, Marc W

    2010-03-01

    Constructed treatment wetlands are efficient at retaining a range of pesticides, however the ultimate fate of many of these compound is not well understood. This study evaluated the effect of drain-fill cycling on the mineralization of chlorpyrifos, a commonly used organophosphate insecticide, in wetland sediment-water microcosms. Monitoring of the fate of (14)C ring-labeled chlorpyrifos showed that drain-fill cycling resulted in significantly lower mineralization rates relative to permanently flooded conditions. The reduction in mineralization was linked to enhanced partitioning of the pesticide to the sediment phase, which could potentially inhibit chlorpyrifos hydrolysis and mineralization. Over the nearly two-month experiment, less than 2.5% of the added compound was mineralized. While rates of mineralization in this experiment were higher than those reported for other soils and sediments, their low magnitude underscores how persistent chlorpyrifos and its metabolites are in aquatic environments, and suggests that management strategies and ecological risk assessment should focus more on ultimate mineralization rather than the simple disappearance of the parent compound.

  13. High frequency microbubble-switched oscillations modulated by microfluidic transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fanghao; Dai, Xianming; Li, Chen

    2012-08-01

    Creating high frequency two-phase oscillations (HF-TPOs) remains an important goal in advancing microscale fluidic logic devices, micro-mixers, micro-actuators, and flow controls. However, thermally driven TPO frequency has been hindered by confinements of compressible vapor bubbles and low thermal diffusivity in microfluidic systems. In this study, a mechanism creating high frequency microbubbles growth/collapse cycle has been developed to achieve HF-TPOs. A "microfluidic transistor" was conceptualized and fabricated to passively sustain and modulate HF-TPOs. Three orders of magnitude higher TPO frequency has been achieved compared to TPOs reported in literatures under similar working conditions.

  14. High Frequency Radar Astronomy With HAARP

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    a period of several years, the High frequency Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ) transmitting array near Gakona, Alaska , has increased in total...High Frequency Radar Astronomy With HAARP Paul Rodriguez Naval Research Laboratory Information Technology Division Washington, DC 20375, USA Edward...high frequency (HF) radar facility used for research purposes. The basic science objective of HAARP is to study nonlinear effects associated with

  15. Connections between climate, food limitation, and carbon cycling in abyssal sediment communities

    PubMed Central

    Ruhl, Henry A.; Ellena, Jacob A.; Smith, Kenneth L.

    2008-01-01

    Diverse faunal groups inhabit deep-sea sediments over much of Earth's surface, but our understanding of how interannual-scale climate variation alters sediment community components and biogeochemical processes remains limited. The vast majority of deep-sea communities depend on a particulate organic carbon food supply that sinks from photosynthetically active surface waters. Variations in food supply depend, in part, on surface climate conditions. Proposed ocean iron fertilization efforts are also intended to alter surface production and carbon export from surface waters. Understanding the ecology of the abyssal sediment community and constituent metazoan macrofauna is important because they influence carbon and nutrient cycle processes at the seafloor through remineralization, bioturbation, and burial of the sunken material. Results from a 10-year study in the abyssal NE Pacific found that climate-driven variations in food availability were linked to total metazoan macrofauna abundance, phyla composition, rank-abundance distributions, and remineralization over seasonal and interannual scales. The long-term analysis suggests that broad biogeographic patterns in deep-sea macrofauna community structure can change over contemporary timescales with changes in surface ocean conditions and provides significant evidence that sediment community parameters can be estimated from atmospheric and upper-ocean conditions. These apparent links between climate, the upper ocean, and deep-sea biogeochemistry need to be considered in determining the long-term carbon storage capacity of the ocean. PMID:18974223

  16. Storage stability of light cycle oil: Studies for the root substance of insoluble sediment formation

    SciTech Connect

    Motohashi, Katsunori; Nakazono, Kingo; Oki, Masami

    1995-04-01

    The storage stabilities of a raw and pretreated light cycle oils (LCOs) have been studied under the condition of ASTM D2274-88. The raw LCO was pretreated by five methods; 10% sulfuric acid-extraction, 10% sodium hydroxide-extraction, methanol-extraction, active clay- treatment, and catalytic hydrotreating. The raw and pretreated LCOs were aged at 95{degrees}C for 144 hours while oxygen was bubbled. The pretreatment except 10% sulfuric acid-extraction showed the decreasing sediments. After removing the sediments by filtration, the changes of component of the residual oils before and after aging, were analyzed by GUMS, GC/AED and GC/NPD. Remarkable changes were observed in nitrogen compounds such as anilines and indoles, sulfur compounds such as thiophenols, and oxygen compounds such as phenol and its derivatives. It was clarified that the sediment formation was caused by the mutual interactions among heteroatom-containing compounds mentioned above. In addition, unstable hydrocarbons were suggested to behave as key-compounds for sediment formation.

  17. Genomic reconstruction of novel sediment phyla enlightens roles in sedimentary biogeochemical cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, B.; Lazar, C.; Seitz, K.; Teske, A.; Hinrichs, K. U.; Dick, G.

    2015-12-01

    Estuaries are among the most productive habitats on the planet. Microbes in estuary sediments control the turnover of organic carbon, and the anaerobic cycling of nitrogen and sulfur. These communities are complex and primarily made up of uncultured lineages, thus little is known about how ecological and metabolic processes are partitioned in sediments. We reconstructed 82 bacterial and 24 archaeal high-quality genomes from different redox regimes (sulfate-rich, sulfate-methane transition zone, and methane-rich zones) of estuary sediments. These bacteria belong to 23 distinct groups, including uncultured candidate phyla (eg. KSB1, TA06, and KD3-62), and three newly described phyla (WOR-1, and -2, and -3). The archaea encompass 8 widespread sediment lineages including MGB-D, RC-III and IV, Z7ME43, Parvarchaeota, Lokiarchoaeta (MBG-B), SAGMEG, Bathyarchaeota (groups MCG-1, -6, -7, and -15) and previously unrecognized deeply branched phylum "Thorarchaeota". The uncultured phyla mediate essential biogeochemical processes of the estuarine environment. Z7ME43 archaea have genes for S disproportionation (S0 reduction and thiosulfate reduction and oxidation). SAGMEG appear to be strict anaerobes capable of coupling CO/H2 oxidation to either S0 or nitrite reduction and have novel RubisCO genes for carbon fixation. Thorarchaeota contain pathways for acetate production from the degradation of detrital proteins and intermediate S cycling. Furthermore, the gene content of this group revealed links in the evolutionary histories of archaea and eukaryotes. This dataset extents our knowledge of the metabolic potential of several uncultured phyla. We were able to chart the flow of carbon and nutrients through the multiple layers of bacterial processing and reveal potential ecological interactions within the communities.

  18. Microbial community diversity associated with carbon and nitrogen cycling in permeable shelf sediments.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Evan M; Mills, Heath J; Kostka, Joel E

    2006-09-01

    Though a large fraction of primary production and organic matter cycling in the oceans occurs on continental shelves dominated by sandy deposits, the microbial communities associated with permeable shelf sediments remain poorly characterized. Therefore, in this study, we provide the first detailed characterization of microbial diversity in marine sands of the South Atlantic Bight through parallel analyses of small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene (Bacteria), nosZ (denitrifying bacteria), and amoA (ammonia-oxidizing bacteria) sequences. Communities were analyzed by parallel DNA extractions and clone library construction from both sediment core material and manipulated sediment within column experiments designed for geochemical rate determinations. Rapid organic-matter degradation and coupled nitrification-denitrification were observed in column experiments at flow rates resembling in situ conditions over a range of oxygen concentrations. Numerous SSU rRNA phylotypes were affiliated with the phyla Proteobacteria (classes Alpha-, Delta-, and Gammaproteobacteria), Planctomycetes, Cyanobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Bacteroidetes. Detectable sequence diversity of nosZ and SSU rRNA genes increased in stratified redox-stabilized columns compared to in situ sediments, with the Alphaproteobacteria comprising the most frequently detected group. Alternatively, nitrifier communities showed a relatively low and stable diversity that did not covary with the other gene targets. Our results elucidate predominant phylotypes that are likely to catalyze carbon and nitrogen cycling in marine sands. Although overall diversity increased in response to redox stabilization and stratification in column experiments, the major phylotypes remained the same in all of our libraries, indicating that the columns sufficiently mimic in situ conditions.

  19. Plant Responses to High Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Vian, Alain; Davies, Eric; Gendraud, Michel; Bonnet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    High frequency nonionizing electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF) that are increasingly present in the environment constitute a genuine environmental stimulus able to evoke specific responses in plants that share many similarities with those observed after a stressful treatment. Plants constitute an outstanding model to study such interactions since their architecture (high surface area to volume ratio) optimizes their interaction with the environment. In the present review, after identifying the main exposure devices (transverse and gigahertz electromagnetic cells, wave guide, and mode stirred reverberating chamber) and general physics laws that govern EMF interactions with plants, we illustrate some of the observed responses after exposure to HF-EMF at the cellular, molecular, and whole plant scale. Indeed, numerous metabolic activities (reactive oxygen species metabolism, α- and β-amylase, Krebs cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, chlorophyll content, terpene emission, etc.) are modified, gene expression altered (calmodulin, calcium-dependent protein kinase, and proteinase inhibitor), and growth reduced (stem elongation and dry weight) after low power (i.e., nonthermal) HF-EMF exposure. These changes occur not only in the tissues directly exposed but also systemically in distant tissues. While the long-term impact of these metabolic changes remains largely unknown, we propose to consider nonionizing HF-EMF radiation as a noninjurious, genuine environmental factor that readily evokes changes in plant metabolism. PMID:26981524

  20. The microbial methane cycle in subsurface sediments. Final project report, July 1, 1993--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, E.L.; Ammerman, J.W.; Suflita, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    The objectives of this study were to determine the factors controlling microbial activity and survival in the subsurface and, specifically, to determine whether microbial communities in aquitards and in aquifer microenvironments provide electron donors and/or acceptors that enhance microbial survival in aquifers. Although the original objectives were to focus on methane cycling, the authors pursued an opportunity to study sulfur cycling in aquifer systems, a process of much greater importance in microbial activity and survival, and in the mobility of metals in the subsurface. Furthermore, sulfur cycling is pertinent to the Subsurface Science Program`s study at Cerro Negro, New Mexico. The study combined field and laboratory approaches and microbiological, molecular, geochemical, and hydrogeological techniques. During drilling operations, sediments were collected aseptically and assayed for a variety of microorganisms and metabolic capabilities including total counts, viable aerobic heterotrophs, total anaerobic heterotrophs, sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfate reduction activity (in situ and in slurries), methanogens, methanotrophs, and Fe- and S-oxidizers, among others. Geochemical analyses of sediments included organic carbon content and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio, sulfur chemistry (reduced sulfur, sulfate), {sup 34}S/{sup 32}S, {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C, {sup 14}C, tritium, etc. The authors drilled eight boreholes in the Eocene Yegua formation at four localities on the Texas A&M University campus using a hollow-stem auger drilling rig. The drilling pattern forms a T, with three well clusters along the dip direction and two along strike. Four boreholes were sampled for sediments and screened at the deepest sand interval encountered, and four boreholes were drilled to install wells in shallower sands. Boreholes range in depth from 8 to 31 m, with screened intervals ranging from 6 to 31 m. Below are the results of these field studies.

  1. A microbial arsenic cycle in sediments of an acidic mine impoundment: Herman Pit, Clear Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blum, Jodi S.; McCann, Shelley; Bennett, S.; Miller, Laurence G.; Stolz, J. R.; Stoneburner, B.; Saltikov, C.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of prokaryotes in the redox reactions of arsenic occurring between its +5 [arsenate; As(V)] and +3 [arsenite; As(III)] oxidation states has been well established. Most research to date has focused upon circum-neutral pH environments (e.g., freshwater or estuarine sediments) or arsenic-rich “extreme” environments like hot springs and soda lakes. In contrast, relatively little work has been conducted in acidic environments. With this in mind we conducted experiments with sediments taken from the Herman Pit, an acid mine drainage impoundment of a former mercury (cinnabar) mine. Due to the large adsorptive capacity of the abundant Fe(III)-rich minerals, we were unable to initially detect in solution either As(V) or As(III) added to the aqueous phase of live sediment slurries or autoclaved controls, although the former consumed added electron donors (i.e., lactate, acetate, hydrogen), while the latter did not. This prompted us to conduct further experiments with diluted slurries using the live materials from the first incubation as inoculum. In these experiments we observed reduction of As(V) to As(III) under anoxic conditions and reduction rates were enhanced by addition of electron donors. We also observed oxidation of As(III) to As(V) in oxic slurries as well as in anoxic slurries amended with nitrate. We noted an acid-tolerant trend for sediment slurries in the cases of As(III) oxidation (aerobic and anaerobic) as well as for anaerobic As(V) reduction. These observations indicate the presence of a viable microbial arsenic redox cycle in the sediments of this extreme environment, a result reinforced by the successful amplification of arsenic functional genes (aioA, and arrA) from these materials.

  2. Lightning protection devices for high frequencies equipments

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre, J.

    1983-01-01

    Contents: Mechanism of a Lightning Stroke from Antenna to Ground; Principles of Protection Devices for Feeders; Electrical Characteristics of H.F. Protection Devices; Calculation of H.F. Protection Devices; Catalogue Devices for High Frequency Protection; Some Measurement Results for Tees; Measurement Results for Decoupling Line Devices; Installation of High Frequency Devices.

  3. Nitrogen cycling processes and microbial community composition in bed sediments in the Yukon River at Pilot Station

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Repert, Deborah A.; Underwood, Jennifer C.; Smith, Richard L.; Song, Bongkeun

    2014-01-01

    Information on the contribution of nitrogen (N)-cycling processes in bed sediments to river nutrient fluxes in large northern latitude river systems is limited. This study examined the relationship between N-cycling processes in bed sediments and N speciation and loading in the Yukon River near its mouth at the Bering Sea. We conducted laboratory bioassays to measure N-cycling processes in sediment samples collected over distinct water cycle seasons. In conjunction, the microbial community composition in the bed sediments using genes involved in N-cycling (narG, napA, nosZ, and amoA) and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequences was examined. Temporal variation was observed in net N mineralization, nitrate uptake, and denitrification rate potentials and correlated strongly with sediment carbon (C) and extractable N content and microbial community composition rather than with river water nutrient concentrations. The C content of the bed sediment was notably impacted by the spring flood, ranging from 1.1% in the midst of an ice-jam to 0.1% immediately after ice-out, suggesting a buildup of organic material (OM) prior to scouring of the bed sediments during ice break up. The dominant members of the microbial community that explained differences in N-processing rates belonged to the genera Crenothrix,Flavobacterium, and the family of Comamonadaceae. Our results suggest that biogeochemical processing rates in the bed sediments appear to be more coupled to hydrology, nutrient availability in the sediments, and microbial community composition rather than river nutrient concentrations at Pilot Station.

  4. Nitrogen cycling processes and microbial community composition in bed sediments in the Yukon River at Pilot Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repert, Deborah A.; Underwood, Jennifer C.; Smith, Richard L.; Song, Bongkeun

    2014-12-01

    Information on the contribution of nitrogen (N)-cycling processes in bed sediments to river nutrient fluxes in large northern latitude river systems is limited. This study examined the relationship between N-cycling processes in bed sediments and N speciation and loading in the Yukon River near its mouth at the Bering Sea. We conducted laboratory bioassays to measure N-cycling processes in sediment samples collected over distinct water cycle seasons. In conjunction, the microbial community composition in the bed sediments using genes involved in N-cycling (narG, napA, nosZ, and amoA) and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequences was examined. Temporal variation was observed in net N mineralization, nitrate uptake, and denitrification rate potentials and correlated strongly with sediment carbon (C) and extractable N content and microbial community composition rather than with river water nutrient concentrations. The C content of the bed sediment was notably impacted by the spring flood, ranging from 1.1% in the midst of an ice-jam to 0.1% immediately after ice-out, suggesting a buildup of organic material (OM) prior to scouring of the bed sediments during ice break up. The dominant members of the microbial community that explained differences in N-processing rates belonged to the genera Crenothrix, Flavobacterium, and the family of Comamonadaceae. Our results suggest that biogeochemical processing rates in the bed sediments appear to be more coupled to hydrology, nutrient availability in the sediments, and microbial community composition rather than river nutrient concentrations at Pilot Station.

  5. Sediment trapping in the Changjiang Estuary: Observations in the North Passage over a spring-neap tidal cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangyu; Zhu, Jianrong; Yuan, Rui; Qiu, Cheng; Wu, Hui

    2016-08-01

    Water current, salinity, and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) were measured at three anchored boat sites along the North Passage (NP) of the Changjiang Estuary over a spring-neap tidal cycle, in order to study sediment trapping and siltation in the estuary. Pronounced stratification was observed during the late flood tide and the following early ebb tide, along with an advancing and retreating salt wedge, whereas strong vertical mixing occurred during the late ebb when the effect of the salt wedge faded. Therefore, the SSC in the flood-ebb tidal cycle tended to be asymmetric. In the upper reach of the NP, the seaward advective near-bed sediment transport dominated the total near-bed sediment transport, whereas in the middle reach of the NP, the landward tidal pumping component dominated. Accordingly, a notable convergent near-bed residual sediment transport was generated near the middle reach. Because the convergence of residual sediment transport in the region of a salt wedge is generally recognized as sediment trapping, convergent near-bed residual sediment transport is the cause of the high sedimentation rate in the NP.

  6. Mechanisms for high-frequency cyclicity in the Upper Jurassic limestone of northeastern Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.R.; Ward, W.C. ); Goldhammer, R.K. )

    1991-03-01

    The 520 m of Upper Jurassic Zuloaga Limestone exposed in the Sierra de Bunuelos in southern Coahuila comprise 118 cycles of peritidal carbonate rock deposited on a gently dipping ramp. Field studies with Fischer plots and time-series analysis suggest that a Milankovitchian glacioeustasy mechanism is inadequate to describe the Zuloaga cycles. Autocyclic progradation may have been the major influence on depositional cyclicity. Depositional cycles in the Zuloaga Formation typically are a few meters thick and asymmetric with subtidal wackestone and packstone grading upward into subtidal grainstone or into intertidal stromatolites. Width of the carbonate ramp is estimated to have been about 150 km. Sedimentation rates for these peritidal carbonate environments apparently exceeded subsidence rates inasmuch as most of the carbonate platform remained near sea level during Zuloaga deposition. The area was tectonically quiescent during the late Jurassic. Autocyclic shoreline progradation is a feasible mechanism for producing the high-frequency cycles, as suggested by (1) poor correlation with predicted Milankovitch periodicity shown by time-series analysis, (2) little evidence of subaerial exposure, (3) development of complete peritidal cycles, (4) general progradational sequences within each third-order unit, and (5) absence of polar glaciation during Late Jurassic.

  7. Microbial cycling of mercury in contaminated pelagic and wetland sediments of San Pablo Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marvin-DiPasquale, M. C.; Agee, J.L.; Bouse, R.M.; Jaffe, B.E.

    2003-01-01

    San Pablo Bay is an estuary, within northern San Francisco Bay, containing elevated sediment mercury (Hg) levels because of historic loading of hydraulic mining debris during the California gold-rush of the late 1800s. A preliminary investigation of benthic microbial Hg cycling was conducted in surface sediment (0-4 cm) collected from one salt-marsh and three open-water sites. A deeper profile (0-26 cm) was evaluated at one of the open-water locations. Radiolabeled model Hg-compounds were used to measure rates of both methylmercury (MeHg) production and degradation by bacteria. While all sites and depths had similar total-Hg concentrations (0.3-0.6 ppm), and geochemical signatures of mining debris (as eNd, range: -3.08 to -4.37), in-situ MeHg was highest in the marsh (5.4??3.5 ppb) and ??? 0.7 ppb in all open-water sites. Microbial MeHg production (potential rate) in 0-4 surface sediments was also highest in the marsh (3.1 ng g-1 wet sediment day-1) and below detection (<0.06 ng g-1 wet sediment day-1) in open-water locations. The marsh exhibited a methylation/demethylation (M/D) ratio more than 25x that of all open-water locations. Only below the surface 0-4-cm horizon was significant MeHg production potential evident in the open-water sediment profile (0.2-1.1 ng g-1 wet sediment day-1). In-situ Hg methylation rates, calculated from radiotracer rate constants, and in-situ inorganic Hg(II) concentrations compared well with potential rates. However, similarly calculated in-situ rates of MeHg degradation were much lower than potential rates. These preliminary data indicate that wetlands surrounding San Pablo Bay represent important zones of MeHg production, more so than similarly Hg-contaminated adjacent open-water areas. This has significant implications for this and other Hg-impacted systems, where wetland expansion is currently planned.

  8. Magnetic Properties of Bermuda Rise Sediments Controlled by Glacial Cycles During the Late Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roud, S.

    2015-12-01

    Sediments from ODP site 1063 (Bermuda Rise, North Atlantic) contain a high-resolution record of geomagnetic field behavior during the Brunhes Chron. We present rock magnetic data of the upper 160 mcd (<900 ka) from hole 1063D that show magnetic properties vary in concert with glacial cycles. Magnetite appears to be the main magnetic carrier in the carbonate-dominated interglacial horizons, yet exhibits contrasting grain size distributions depending on the redox state of the horizons. Higher contributions of single domain magnetite exist above the present day sulfate reduction zone (ca. 44 mcd) with relatively higher multidomain magnetite components below that likely arise from the partial dissolution of SD magnetite in the deeper, anoxic horizons. Glacial horizons on the other hand, characterized by enhanced terrigenous deposition, show no evidence for diagenetic dissolution but do indicate the presence of authigenic greigite close to glacial maxima (acquisition of gyro-remanence, strong magnetostatic interactions and SD properties). Glacial horizons contain hematite (maxima in HIRM and S-Ratio consistent with a reddish hue) and exhibit higher ARM anisotropy and pronounced sedimentary fabrics. We infer that post depositional processes affected the magnetic grain size and mineralogy of Bermuda rise sediments deposited during the late Pleistocene. Hematite concentration is interpreted to reflect primary terrigenous input that is likely derived from the Canadian Maritime Provinces. A close correlation between HIRM and magnetic foliation suggests that changes in sediment composition (terrigenous vs. marine biogenic) were accompanied by changes in the depositional processes at the site.

  9. Investigation of Technetium Redox Cycling in FRC Background Sediments using EXAFS and Gamma Camera Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, J.R.; McBeth, J.M.; Lear, G.; Morris, K.; Burke, I.T.; Livens, F.R.; Ellis, B.; Lawson, R.

    2006-04-05

    Technetium-99 is a priority pollutant at numerous DOE sites, due to its long half-life (2.1 x 105 years), high mobility as Tc(VII) in oxic waters, and bioavailability as a sulfate analogue. {sup 99}Tc is far less mobile under anaerobic conditions, forming insoluble Tc(IV) precipitates. As anaerobic microorganisms can reduce soluble Tc(VII) to insoluble Tc(IV), microbial metabolism may have the potential to treat sediments and waters contaminated with Tc. Baseline studies of fundamental mechanisms of Tc(VII) bioreduction and precipitation (reviewed by Lloyd et al., 2005, in press) have generally used pure cultures of metal-reducing bacteria, in order to develop conceptual models for the biogeochemical cycling of {sup 99}Tc. There is, however, comparatively little known about interactions of metal-reducing bacteria with environmentally relevant trace concentrations of {sup 99}Tc, against a more complex biogeochemical background provided by mixed microbial communities in aquifer sediments. The objective of this project is to probe the site specific biogeochemical conditions that control the mobility of {sup 99}Tc at the US DOE Field Research Center Site (FRC; Oak Ridge, Tennessee). This information is required for the rational design of in situ bioremediation strategies for technetium-contaminated subsurface environments. We are using a combination of geochemical, mineralogical, microbiological and spectroscopic techniques to determine the solubility and phase associations of {sup 99}Tc in FRC sediments, and characterize the underpinning biogeochemical controls.

  10. Sulfur and iron cycling in deep-subsurface, coal bed-containing sediments off Shimokita (Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedinger, N.; Smirnoff, M. N.; Gilhooly, W.; Phillips, S. C.; Lyons, T. W.; 337 Scientific Party, I.

    2013-12-01

    The main goal of IODP Expedition 337 was the identification and characterization of the deep coal bed biosphere and hydrocarbon system off the Shimokita Peninsula (Japan) in the northwestern Pacific using the D/V Chikyu. To accomplish this scientific objective, it was also necessary to investigate the inorganic biogeochemistry in order to identify possible electron acceptors and bio-essential nutrients. These biogeochemical parameters greatly influence both, the composition and abundance of microbial communities as well as the organic carbon cycle. In turn, the microbially mediated carbon cycle influences the diagenetic reactions in the subsurface, thus, altering geochemical and physical characteristics of the material. Here we present results from metal and sulfur geochemical analyses from the deep-subsurface sediments (about 1250 to 2466 mbsf) at Site C0020 off Shimokita. The measured concentrations of acid volatile sulfur (AVS) as well as chromium reducible sulfur (CRS) reflect the alteration of iron oxides to iron sulfides and indicate that the main sulfur-bearing phase in the investigated sediments is pyrite. Concentrations of intermediate sulfur species are minor and occur mainly in the coal-bearing interval. Our data show that the uppermost sediments contain higher amounts of pyrite (up to 1.2 wt.%) with an average of 0.5 wt.% compared to the deeper deposits (below about 1800 mbsf), which show an average of 0.16 wt.%. In contrast, iron oxide concentrations are highest in the deeper sediment sections (up to 0.4%), where pyrite concentrations are low. The alteration of iron oxides to sulfides in theses lower section was probably governed by the amount of available sulfide in the pore water. The occurrence of (bio-)reactive iron phases in these deeply buried sediments has implications for the deep biosphere as those minerals have the potential to serve as electron acceptors during burial, including reactions involving deep sourced electron donors, such as

  11. Distributions, abundances and activities of microbes associated with the nitrogen cycle in riparian and stream sediments of a river tributary.

    PubMed

    Kim, Haryun; Bae, Hee-Sung; Reddy, K Ramesh; Ogram, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    River tributaries are ecologically important environments that function as sinks of inorganic nitrogen. To gain greater insight into the nitrogen cycle (N-cycle) in these environments, the distributions and activities of microbial populations involved in the N-cycle were studied in riparian and stream sediments of the Santa Fe River (SFR) tributaries located in northern Florida, USA. Riparian sediments were characterized by much higher organic matter content, and extracellular enzyme activities, including cellobiohydrolase, β-d-glucosidase, and phenol oxidase than stream sediments. Compared with stream sediments, riparian sediments exhibited significantly higher activities of nitrification, denitrification, dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA) and anaerobic ammonia oxidation; correspondingly, with higher copies of amoA (a biomarker for enumerating nitrifiers), nirS and nirK (for denitrifiers), and nrfA (for DNRA bacteria). Among N-cycle processes, denitrification showed the highest activities and the highest concentrations of the corresponding gene (nirK and nirS) copy numbers. In riparian sediments, substantial nitrification activities (6.3 mg-N kg soil(-1)d(-1) average) and numbers of amoA copies (7.3 × 10(7) copies g soil(-1) average) were observed, and nitrification rates correlate with denitrification rates. The guild structures of denitrifiers and nitrifiers in riparian sediments differed significantly from those found in stream sediments, as revealed by analysis of nirS and archaeal amoA sequences. This study shows that riparian sediments serve as sinks for inorganic nitrogen loads from non-point sources of agricultural runoff, with nitrification and denitrification associated with elevated levels of carbon and nitrogen contents and extracellular enzyme activities.

  12. Prestin and high frequency hearing in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyi; Liu, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the evolution of ultrasonic hearing in echolocating bats and cetaceans has involved adaptive amino acid replacements in the cochlear gene prestin. A substantial number of these changes have occurred in parallel in both groups, suggesting that particular amino acid residues might confer greater auditory sensitivity to high frequencies. Here we review some of these findings, and consider whether similar signatures of prestin protein sequence evolution also occur in mammals that possess high frequency hearing for passive localization and conversely, whether this gene has undergone less change in mammals that lack high frequency hearing. PMID:21655450

  13. Propagation of high frequencies in Scandinavia

    SciTech Connect

    Bame, D.

    1989-04-01

    To determine if seismic signals at frequencies up to 50 Hz are useful for detecting events and discriminating between earthquakes and explosions, approximately 180 events from the three-component high-frequency seismic element (HFSE) installed at the center of the Norwegian Regional Seismic Array (NRSA) have been analyzed. The attenuation of high-frequency signals in Scandinavia varies with distance, azimuth, magnitude, and source effects. Most of the events were detected with HFSE, although detections were better on the NRSA where signal processing techniques were used. Based on a preliminary analysis, high-frequency data do not appear to be a useful discriminant in Scandinavia. 21 refs., 29 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Biogeography and diversity of methane and sulfur-cycling ecotypes in deep subsurface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. M.; Biddle, J.; Girguis, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    The microbially mediated anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is critical for regulating the flux of methane from the ocean. AOM is coupled to sulfate availability in many anoxic marine environments, which has been extensively studied at cold seeps, hydrothermal vents, and the sulfate-methane transition zone at the seafloor. The microbes known to catalyze AOM form phylogenetically distinct anaerobic methanotroph (ANME) clusters and sometimes live in concert with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Strikingly, certain ANME groups and subgroups have been shown to occupy different ecological niches in both hydrocarbon seep and hydrothermal vent sediments. However, the environmental parameters that select for certain phylogenetic variants or 'ecotypes' in a wide range of marine systems are still unknown. A marine environment that remains elusive to characterization of potential ANME and SRB ecotype diversity is methane hydrate formations in the deep subsurface. Current estimates indicate that seafloor hydrates may exceed 10,000 GtC at standard temperature and pressure conditions. However, only a handful of studies have investigated the potential for AOM in the deep subsurface associated with methane hydrates. To gain a better understanding of the distribution of methane- and sulfur- cycling ecotypes in biogeochemically distinct marine subsurface ecosystems, we generated a substantial library of 16S rRNA gene sequences for these uncultivable deep sea microorganisms using Illumina sequencing. Sediment strata were collected from the methane-hydrate associated deep subsurface of Hydrate Ridge (30 - 100 mbsf), hydrocarbon cold seeps of Monterey Bay, metalliferous sedimented hydrothermal vents of Juan de Fuca Ridge, and organic-rich hydrothermally influenced sediments of Guaymas Basin. We used the Illumina MiSeq sequencing platform to assess Archaeal and Bacterial richness in a total of 36 deep sea sediment samples followed by qPCR for quantification of ANME and SRB phylotype

  15. The effects of wastewater discharge on the microbiological nitrogen cycle of the lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarenheimo, Jatta; Aalto, Sanni L.; Tiirola, Marja

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic wastewater inputs alter the natural dynamics of nitrogen (N) cycle by providing high concentrations of nitrate and organic matter to the sediment microbes. It can also change the microbial community composition and N removal potential but this is currently not that well studied. To study these aspects, we conducted ecosystem-scale experiment in Lake Keurusselkä, Finland. In the experiment, the wastewater discharge to the recipient lake was optimized with sediment filtration, which increased the surface and retention time of the nitrified wastewater with the sediment. In addition to N transformation rates, which showed that optimization enhanced denitrification, we studied the microbial responses at the sediment. Genetic potential of nitrogen transformation processes, such as denitrification, dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) and nitrification were studied by targeting the functional genes (i.e. nirS, nirK, nosZI, nosZII, nrfA, amoAarchaea and amoAbacteria) with quantitative PCR and digital droplet PCR. In addition, changes in the microbial community composition along the wastewater gradient were examined by using next generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. In line with our hypothesis, the relative abundance of denitrifying genes followed the observed denitrification rates, being highest near the nitrate-rich wastewater discharge. Furthermore the microbial community composition in the discharge point differed clearly from the control and downstream sites, having also the highest numbers of rare OTUs. Abundance of nitrifying bacteria was higher than nitrifying archaea near the waste water discharge, whereas the opposite was seen at the control site. The results indicate that wastewater is not only increasing the denitrification rates, but can also alter the structure and genetic potential microbial communities.

  16. 78 FR 70567 - Nationwide Use of High Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology; Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ...] Nationwide Use of High Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology; Final Programmatic... Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PEA) for the Nationwide Use of High Frequency (HF) and Ultra High..., for environmental disasters such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, SONAR equipment could be used...

  17. Environmental Controls on Nitrogen and Sulfur Cycles in Surficial Aquatic Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Chuanhui; Laverman, Anniet M.; Pallud, Céline E.

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) have disturbed their biogeochemical cycling in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. The N and S cycles interact with one another through competition for labile forms of organic carbon between nitrate-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Furthermore, the N and S cycles could interact through nitrate (NO3-) reduction coupled to S oxidation, consuming NO3-, and producing sulfate (SO42-). The research questions of this study were: (1) what are the environmental factors explaining variability in N and S biogeochemical reaction rates in a wide range of surficial aquatic sediments when NO3- and SO42- are present separately or simultaneously, (2) how the N and S cycles could interact through S oxidation coupled to NO3- reduction, and (3) what is the extent of sulfate reduction inhibition by nitrate, and vice versa. The N and S biogeochemical reaction rates were measured on intact surface sediment slices using flow-through reactors. The two terminal electron acceptors NO3- and SO42- were added either separately or simultaneously and NO3- and SO42- reduction rates as well as NO3- reduction linked to S oxidation were determined. We used redundancy analysis, to assess how environmental variables were related to these rates. Our analysis showed that overlying water pH and salinity were two dominant environmental factors that explain 58% of the variance in the N and S biogeochemical reaction rates when NO3- and SO42- were both present. When NO3- and SO42- were added separately, however, sediment N content in addition to pH and salinity accounted for 62% of total variance of the biogeochemical reaction rates. The SO42- addition had little effect on NO3- reduction; neither did the NO3- addition inhibit SO42- reduction. The presence of NO3- led to SO42- production most likely due to the oxidation of sulfur. Our observations suggest that metal-bound S, instead of free sulfide produced by SO42- reduction, was responsible

  18. High frequency testing of rubber mounts.

    PubMed

    Vahdati, Nader; Saunders, L Ken Lauderbaugh

    2002-04-01

    Rubber and fluid-filled rubber engine mounts are commonly used in automotive and aerospace applications to provide reduced cabin noise and vibration, and/or motion accommodations. In certain applications, the rubber mount may operate at frequencies as high as 5000 Hz. Therefore, dynamic stiffness of the mount needs to be known in this frequency range. Commercial high frequency test machines are practically nonexistent, and the best high frequency test machine on the market is only capable of frequencies as high as 1000 Hz. In this paper, a high frequency test machine is described that allows test engineers to study the high frequency performance of rubber mounts at frequencies up to 5000 Hz.

  19. Overview of the Advanced High Frequency Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the competencies, selected areas of research and technology development activities, and current external collaborative efforts of the NASA Glenn Research Center's Advanced High Frequency Branch.

  20. High power, high frequency component test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen; Krawczonek, Walter

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has available a high frequency, high power laboratory facility for testing various components of aerospace and/or terrestrial power systems. This facility is described here. All of its capabilities and potential applications are detailed.

  1. An introduction to high frequency radioteletype systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnau, Roger R.

    1989-10-01

    A basic introductory guide is provided to modern High Frequency (HF) data communications systems. Described are modern commercial radioteletype systems, data communication protocols, and various secrets of the trade.

  2. Neural coding of high-frequency tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    Available evidence was presented indicating that neural discharges in the auditory nerve display characteristic periodicities in response to any tonal stimulus including high-frequency stimuli, and that this periodicity corresponds to the subjective pitch.

  3. Real-time, high frequency QRS electrocardiograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T. (Inventor); DePalma, Jude L. (Inventor); Moradi, Saeed (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Real time cardiac electrical data are received from a patient, manipulated to determine various useful aspects of the ECG signal, and displayed in real time in a useful form on a computer screen or monitor. The monitor displays the high frequency data from the QRS complex in units of microvolts, juxtaposed with a display of conventional ECG data in units of millivolts or microvolts. The high frequency data are analyzed for their root mean square (RMS) voltage values and the discrete RMS values and related parameters are displayed in real time. The high frequency data from the QRS complex are analyzed with imbedded algorithms to determine the presence or absence of reduced amplitude zones, referred to herein as RAZs. RAZs are displayed as go, no-go signals on the computer monitor. The RMS and related values of the high frequency components are displayed as time varying signals, and the presence or absence of RAZs may be similarly displayed over time.

  4. High-frequency conductivity of photoionized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Anakhov, M. V.; Uryupin, S. A.

    2016-08-15

    The tensor of the high-frequency conductivity of a plasma created via tunnel ionization of atoms in the field of linearly or circularly polarized radiation is derived. It is shown that the real part of the conductivity tensor is highly anisotropic. In the case of a toroidal velocity distribution of photoelectrons, the possibility of amplification of a weak high-frequency field polarized at a sufficiently large angle to the anisotropy axis of the initial nonequilibrium distribution is revealed.

  5. Connecting the cycles: Impact of sediment, carbon and nutrient erosion on GHG emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, N. J.

    2012-04-01

    The role of agriculture in generating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through the use of fertilizers and fossil fuels is well documented. The negative impacts of soil erosion on agricultural land and its productivity have also been studied extensively. The lateral movement of soil through terrestrial ecosystems has also been recognized as a significant flux of C within the global C cycle. Soil erosion removes approximately 0.5 Gt of C/a from agricultural land. Much of this C is deposited in the landscape, effectively burying the organic matter from the atmosphere and taking it, at least for an unspecified time, out of the C exchange between soil and atmosphere. Such calculations raise the notion that soil erosion generates an unintentional benefit for climate, owing to the long-term burial of soil organic C. But limiting the assessment of the impact of soil erosion on climate change to organic C burial ignores, apart from economic and social damages, the coupling between biogeochemical cycles. For example, the eroded N has to be replaced, at least in part by artificial fertilizers, to maintain soil fertility. At this point the sediment, C and N cycles meet, because the production of fertilizer generates greenhouse gases. The production of one ton of fertilizer generates on the order of 850 kg of CO2 (West and Marland, 2002). Applying this number to the 0.5 Gt C erosion estimate, the amount of N lost owing to erosion each year yields CO2 emissions of 0.02-0.04 Pg/a. These emissions correspond to 15-30% of the organic C buried owing to soil erosion. In this presentation, the full complexity of biogeochemical cycling on agricultural land is explored and connections between cycles which require consideration for a full GHG emission balance of soil erosion on agricultural land are identified.

  6. Time-dependent behavior of a placed bed of cohesive sediment subjected to erosion and deposition cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, G.; Valentine, K.; Fagherazzi, S.

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to explore the behavior of a cohesive sediment bed that undergoes cycles of erosion and deposition under diluted conditions. A bed of bentonite (montmorillonite) sediment was placed in two annular flumes and subjected to daily erosion tests for a period of 80 days, mimicking intermittent moderate-energy disturbances like tidal currents and wind waves. After each erosion test, the suspended sediment was allowed to settle back in the flumes. The amount of suspended sediment measured at the top of the water column at the end of each erosion test decreased in the first 5 days, concurrently with an increase in the bulk-settling velocity near the bed. This pattern is explained by turbulence-induced flocculation of clay particles and consequent formation of a surface floc layer. After about 20 days, the amount of suspended sediment measured at the top of the water column at the end of each erosion test increased and the settling velocity decreased, whereas the suspended sediment concentration measured near the bed remained nearly constant. We explain such trend by the cumulative release of slow-settling particles from the bed. This experiment suggests that the superficial layer of a placed bed that is periodically eroded and redeposited experiences competing processes: the sediment that is resuspended at every cycle becomes less erodible, but prolonged exposure to shear stress increases the pool of eroded sediment over time. The total amount of resuspended sediment seems to become constant after several tens of cycle, suggesting that the release of particles from the bed by cumulative erosion is balanced by the binding of such particles to the bed.

  7. Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment of Sediment Remediation at the London Olympic Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, D.; Al-Tabbaa, A.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, there is an emerging 'green and sustainable remediation' (GSR) movement. It is drawing increasing attention from both the government and the industry, because this GSR movement is promising in accelerating process in addressing the contaminated land issue, by overcoming regulatory barriers, encouraging technological innovation, and balancing life cycle environmental stewardship with economic vitality and social well-being. Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been increasingly used by both researchers and industrial practitioners in an initiative to make environmental remediation greener and more sustainable. Life cycle sustainability assessment (LCSA), aiming at expanding the traditional LCA model in both breadth and depth (e.g. to incorporate both environmental and social-economic sustainability), is an important research direction in the existing LCA research field. The present study intends to develop a LCSA method based on a hybrid LCA model and economic input-output (EIO) data. The LCSA method is applied to a contaminated sediment remediation project conducted at the London Olympic Park site.

  8. Nitrogen Cycling In The Deep Subsurface Underlying Oligotrophic Open Ocean Regions: Metagenomic Analyses of North Pond Sediment Microbial Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziebis, W.

    2016-12-01

    Recent research of the deep ocean floor underlying open ocean regions in the Atlantic and Pacific has revealed that oxygen penetrates several tens of meters into the sediment column from the overlying water. And, in contrast to the better-studied continental margin setting, nitrate also persists within these organic-poor sediments throughout the sediment column. Moreover, in places where seawater flows through the basaltic crust, it has been shown that oxygen diffuses upward into the overlying sediment, creating an oxic sediment layer above the basalt. The flanks of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge are characterized by sediment-filled depressions that are surrounded by a steep topography of basaltic outcrops, which are the conduits for low-temperature hydrothermally driven seawater circulation through the basaltic basement. IODP Expedition 336 targeted North Pond, one of such sediment ponds. 3 sites were drilled which varied in sediment thickness from about 90 m (U1382B, U1384A) to 40 m (U1383D/E). Oxygen penetrated deeply into the sediment column from the overlying water (30 m) and diffused upward from the basaltic basement to several meters (10 - 20 m) above the basalt. Aerobic respiration created an anoxic zone in the middle of the sediment column. Concurrently, nitrate accumulated above bottom seawater concentrations to up to 50 µM. Previous investigations, using a stable isotope approach, showed an active subsurface nitrogen cycle. We obtained samples from all 3 drilling sites and selected 10 samples from the oxic upper layer, the upper suboxic transition zone, the anoxic middle, the lower suboxic zone and the deep oxic layer above the basalt for detailed analyses. We extracted intact cells from large volumes of sediment (1 L) using a density centrifugation approach for amplicon (16s rRNA) and metagenome sequencing, with the goal to characterize the phylogenetic and functional gene inventory in these different sediment layers. We will provide first results on the deep

  9. A geomorphic-geochemical framework for quantifying the cycling of sediment-associated contaminants in fluvial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Patrick; Lopez-Tarazon, Jose; Williams, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Recent high-profile contamination events linked to extreme floods have underlined the persistent environmental risk posed by legacy metals stored in fluvial systems worldwide. While we understand that the fate of sediment-associated metals is largely determined by the dynamics of the fluvial transport system, we still lack a process-based understanding of the spatial and temporal mechanisms that affect the physical and geochemical transfer of metals through catchments. This interdisciplinary project will exploit advances in geomorphic and geochemical analyses to develop a methodological approach and conceptual framework to answer key questions related to the dynamics and timescales of metal cycling in fluvial systems. The approach will be tested in two reaches of the mining-impacted Afon Twymyn, Wales. The main objectives are: (i) quantify the physical transport of sediment and metals over a range of river flows and model sediment pathways; (ii) establish the geochemical mobility and speciation of sediment-associated metals and how this is modified through the sediment pathways. To achieve these objectives a geomorphic-geochemical combined methodology will be applied. It includes: (i) Aerial imagery that will be acquired from UAV surveys pre- and post-high flows and transformed into high-resolution DEMs using Structure-from-Motion; (ii) suspended sediment flux will be estimated indirectly by field calibration with a logging turbidimeter; (iii) 2D hydraulic and sediment transport model (Delft3D) will be used to quantify the transport of sediment and associated metals and to map the source, pathway and sink of contaminated sediment; (iv) soil and sediment samples (including suspended sediment) will be collected pre- and post-high flows for geochemical (concentration, speciation) and mineralogical (XRD, SEM) analyses; (v) finally, a geochemical model (Geochemists Workbench) will be developed to generate hypotheses that explain observed geochemical change as a function

  10. High Frequency Acoustic Reflection and Transmission in Ocean Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    interaction with the ocean floor. 3 ) An inversion methodology that can provide input parameters for the resulting physical model from reflection...scattering from rough interfaces in a shallow water waveguide, 2) Development of a fully three dimensional finite element scattering model and 3 ...failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 2010 2. REPORT TYPE 3

  11. High-Frequency Sound Interaction in Ocean Sediments: Environmental Controls

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-30

    mm. Several of the long diver cores were impregnated with resin and scanned using X - ray microfocus computed tomography (XMCT) to determine fine...computed tomography images. In, Proc. GeoX 2006 -2nd Intern. Worksh. X - Ray Comp. Tomogr. Geomaterials, [in press] Richardson, M.D., D.R. Jackson, K.L...and p-wave velocity), X -radiography, core description and photography, and grain-size analysis. Preliminary results indicate that the upper 3 m of

  12. Linking Sediment Microbial Communities to Carbon Cycling in High-Latitude Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, J. B.; Varner, R. K.; Johnson, J. E.; Owusu-Dommey, A.; Binder, M.; Woodcroft, B. J.; Wik, M.; Freitas, N. L.; Boyd, J. A.; Crill, P. M.; Saleska, S. R.; Tyson, G. W.; Rich, V. I.

    2015-12-01

    It is well recognized that thawing permafrost peatlands are likely to provide a positive feedback to climate change via CH4 and CO2 emissions. High-latitude lakes in these landscapes have also been identified as sources of CH4 and CO2 loss to the atmosphere. To investigate microbial contributions to carbon loss from high-latitude lakes, we characterized sediment geochemistry and microbiota via cores collected from deep and shallow regions of two lakes (Inre Harrsjön and Mellersta Harrsjön) in Arctic Sweden in July, 2012. These lakes are within the Stordalen Mire long-term ecological area, a focal site for investigating the impacts of climate change-related permafrost thaw, and the lakes in this area are responsible for ~55% of the CH4 loss from this hydrologically interconnected system. Across 40 samples from 4 to 40 cm deep within four sediment cores, Illumina 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that the sedimentary microbiota was dominated by candidate phyla OP9 and OP8 (Atribacteria and Aminicenantes, respectively, including putative fermenters and anaerobic respirers), predicted methanotrophic Gammaproteobacteria, and predicted methanogenic archaea from the Thermoplasmata Group E2 clade. We observed some overlap in community structure with nearby peatlands, which tend to be dominated by methanogens and Acidobacteria. Sediment microbial communities differed significantly between lakes, by overlying lake depth (shallow vs. deep), and by depth within a core, with each trend corresponding to parallel differences in biogeochemical measurements. Overall, our results support the potential for significant microbial controls on carbon cycling in high-latitude lakes associated with thawing permafrost, and ongoing metagenomic analyses of focal samples will yield further insight into the functional potential of these microbial communities and their dominant members.

  13. Impacts of shrimp farming cultivation cycles on macrobenthic assemblages and chemistry of sediments.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Luisa F; Eça, Gilmara F; Barros, Francisco; Hatje, Vanessa

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a shrimp farm cultivation cycle in the composition of sediments and on the structure of macrobenthic assemblages. Concentrations of nutrients, Zn and Cu were significantly higher in impact than control areas. In general, the level of contaminants was highest during the harvesting period and in sites closest to the discharge of effluents. Abundances and number of taxa of benthic invertebrates were at least one order of magnitude smaller in impacted areas than in controls. The structure of the benthic assemblages was significantly different at these two treatments. The combined use of biological and chemical data showed to be efficient to provide precise answers regarding the extent of impacts caused by shrimp cultivation. The results provide the basis for a better understanding of impacts of this activity and can subsidize the development of better management practices for coastal areas.

  14. Bond cycles recorded in terrestrial Pleistocene sediments of southwestern British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicock, Stephen R.; Lian, Olav B.; Mathewes, Rolf W.

    1999-08-01

    Recent data from exposures of terrestrial Pleistocene sediments in the Fraser Lowland of southwestern British Columbia reveal at least two Bond cycles within Oxygen Isotope Stage 2. The maximum of the Coquitlam Stade coincides with the timing of Heinrich event H2, the Port Moody Interstade with Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) interstade 2, the maximum of the Vashon Stade with H1, and the Fort Langley interval with D-O interstade 1. The Sumas Stade apparently preceded H0 (Younger Dryas) but could have been in response to the same climatic signal. The timing of Sumas advances may be explained by a combination of glacio-isostatic rebound, destabilisation of the ice margin, and rapid movement over a short distance on soft muddy beds of a rising sea floor, thereby leading the timing of North Atlantic events by hundreds of years. In contrast, Coquitlam and Vashon advances were mainly over permeable glaciofluvial sediments and because of this their maxima probably did not precede the timing of H2 and H1. The Port Moody Interstade coincided with the global Last Glacial Maximum, due in part to the moderating effect of moist summer storms in a southward-shifted jet stream that influenced the Fraser Lowland at that time.

  15. Connecting the dots: linking nitrogen cycle gene expression to nitrogen fluxes in marine sediment mesocosms

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Jennifer L.; Babbin, Andrew R.; Kearns, Patrick J.; Ward, Bess B.

    2014-01-01

    Connecting molecular information directly to microbial transformation rates remains a challenge, despite the availability of molecular methods to investigate microbial biogeochemistry. By combining information on gene abundance and expression for key genes with quantitative modeling of nitrogen fluxes, we can begin to understand the scales on which genetic signals vary and how they relate to key functions. We used quantitative PCR of DNA and cDNA, along with biogeochemical modeling to assess how the abundance and expression of microbes responsible for two steps in the nitrogen cycle changed over time in estuarine sediment mesocosms. Sediments and water were collected from coastal Massachusetts and maintained in replicated 20 L mesocosms for 45 days. Concentrations of all major inorganic nitrogen species were measured daily and used to derive rates of nitrification and denitrification from a Monte Carlo-based non-negative least-squares analysis of finite difference equations. The mesocosms followed a classic regeneration sequence in which ammonium released from the decomposition of organic matter was subsequently oxidized to nitrite and then further to nitrate, some portion of which was ultimately denitrified. Normalized abundances of ammonia oxidizing archaeal ammonia monoxoygenase (amoA) transcripts closely tracked rates of ammonia oxidation throughout the experiment. No such relationship, however, was evident between denitrification rates and the normalized abundance of nitrite reductase (nirS and nirK) transcripts. These findings underscore the complexity of directly linking the structure of the microbial community to rates of biogeochemical processes. PMID:25191309

  16. Possible roles of uncultured archaea in carbon cycling in methane-seep sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, Marcos Y.; Lazar, Cassandre S.; Elvert, Marcus; Lin, Yu-Shih; Zhu, Chun; Heuer, Verena B.; Teske, Andreas; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Studies on microbial carbon cycling uniformly confirm that anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria represent the dominant and most active fraction of the sedimentary microbial community in methane-seep sediments. However, little is known about other frequently observed and abundant microbial taxa, their role in carbon cycling and association with the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Here, we provide a comprehensive characterization of stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) from several intact polar lipid (IPL) classes and metabolite pools in a downcore profile at a cold seep within the oxygen minimum zone off Pakistan. We aimed to evaluate microbial carbon metabolism using IPLs in relation to redox conditions, metabolites and 16S rRNA gene libraries. The 13C-depleted signature of carbon pools and microbial metabolites in pore waters (e.g., dissolved inorganic carbon, lactate and acetate) demonstrated high accumulation of AOM-associated biomass and subsequent turnover thereof. ANMEs accounted for a small fraction of the archaeal 16S rRNA gene survey, whereas sequences of other uncultured benthic archaea dominated the clone libraries, particularly the Marine Benthic Group D. On the basis of lipid diversity and carbon isotope information, we suggest that structurally diverse phospho- and glycolipids, including the recently identified unsaturated tetraethers that are particularly abundant in this setting, are likely derived from archaea other than ANMEs. Through the evaluation of δ13C values of individual IPL, our results indicate heterotrophy as a possible metabolic pathway of archaea in these AOM-dominated sediments.

  17. Rates and environmental controls of sediment N and S cycles in diverse aquatic ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, C.; Pallud, C. E.

    2010-12-01

    Chuanhui Gu and Celine Pallud Recent studies of coupled NO3- driven SO42- production found chemolithoautotrophic bacterial metabolism may remove NO3- by coupling its reduction with the oxidation of reduced S to SO42-. The objectives of this study were to investigate the magnitude and interaction of NO3- and SO42- metabolic rates (e.g. nitrate reduction rate, ammonium production rate, sulfate production rate, and sulfate reduction rate, etc) across diverse freshwater, saline, and hypersaline water systems. Metabolic rates of major N and S cycles were measured on intact sediment cores using flow through reactors. Single TEA (i.e.NO3- or SO42-) addition and simultaneous TEAs addition caused a variety of responses in the N and S metabolic rates. We used a multivariate statistics tool, redundancy analysis, to access how environmental factors might control the variability of these metabolic rates. Our analysis showed pH, overlying water SO42- concentration, and salinity were three dominant environmental factors that control the N and S metabolic rates. The three factors combined explained 62% of variance of the metabolic rates. When NO3- and SO42- were both present, however, sediment As content, grain size, and N content determined the variability of the metabolic rates. These three factors together accounted for 58% of total variance of the metabolic rates. The different sets of environmental controls over the N and S metabolic rates under single TEA vs. two TEA conditions indicate the interior coupling between N and S cycles. These results showed there is no single set of environmental variables that can be used to predict the spatial variability of N and S metabolic rates, and controls on N processing in landscape subject to S and N pollution are more complex than previously appreciated.

  18. Source-to-sink cycling of aeolian sediment in the north polar region of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, R. C.; Kocurek, G.

    2012-12-01

    Aeolian sand dunes are prominent features on the landscapes of Earth, Mars, Venus and Titan and sedimentary deposits interpreted as aeolian in origin are found in the rock records of Earth and Mars. The widespread occurrence of aeolian dunes on the surface of these worlds and within their deep-time depositional records suggests that aeolian systems are and likely have been a default depositional environment for the Solar System. Within an aeolian source-to-sink context, we hypothesize that planet-specific boundary conditions strongly impact production, transport, accumulation and preservation of aeolian sediment, whereas dunes and dune-field patterns remain largely similar. This hypothesis is explored within the north polar region of Mars, which hosts the most extensive aeolian dune fields and aeolian sedimentary deposits yet recognized on Mars and appears to be a region of dynamic source-to-sink cycling of aeolian sediments. The Planum Boreum Cavi Unit rests beneath north polar ice cap of Mars and is composed of several hundred meters of niveo-aeolian dune cross-stratification. The overall architecture of the unit consists of sets of preserved dune topography with an upward increase in the abundance of ice. Dune sets are defined by stabilized, polygonally fractured bounding surfaces, erosional bounding surfaces and typical internal lee foresets made of sediment and ice. The accumulation of the Cavi Unit is interpreted as occurring through freezing and serves as an example of a cold temperature boundary condition on aeolian sediment accumulation. Preservation of the Cavi Unit arises because of deposition of the overlying ice cap and contrasts with preservation of aeolian sediment on Earth, which is largely driven by eustasy and tectonics. The Cavi Unit is thought to be one source of sediment for the north polar Olympia Undae Dune Field. The region of Olympia Undae near the Cavi Unit shows a reticulate dune field pattern composed of two sets of nearly orthogonal

  19. Biogeochemistry and biodiversity of methane cycling in subsurface marine sediments (Skagerrak, Denmark).

    PubMed

    Parkes, R John; Cragg, Barry A; Banning, Natasha; Brock, Fiona; Webster, Gordon; Fry, John C; Hornibrook, Ed; Pancost, Richard D; Kelly, Sam; Knab, Nina; Jørgensen, Bo B; Rinna, Joachim; Weightman, Andrew J

    2007-05-01

    This biogeochemical, molecular genetic and lipid biomarker study of sediments ( approximately 4 m cores) from the Skagerrak (Denmark) investigated methane cycling in a sediment with a clear sulfate-methane-transition zone (SMTZ) and where CH(4) supply was by diffusion, rather than by advection, as in more commonly studied seep sites. Sulfate reduction removed sulfate by 0.7 m and CH(4) accumulated below. (14)C-radiotracer measurements demonstrated active H(2)/CO(2) and acetate methanogenesis and anaerobic oxidation of CH(4) (AOM). Maximum AOM rates occurred near the SMTZ ( approximately 3 nmol cm(-3) day(-1) at 0.75 m) but also continued deeper, overall, at much lower rates. Maximum rates of H(2)/CO(2) and acetate methanogenesis occurred below the SMTZ but H(2)/CO(2) methanogenesis rates were x 10 those of acetate methanogenesis, and this was consistent with initial values of (13)C-depleted CH(4) (delta(13)C c.-80 per thousand). Areal AOM and methanogenic rates were similar ( approximately 1.7 mmol m(-2) day(-1)), hence, CH(4) flux is finely balanced. A 16S rRNA gene library from 1.39 m combined with methanogen (T-RFLP), bacterial (16S rRNA DGGE) and lipid biomarker depth profiles showed the presence of populations similar to some seep sites: ANME-2a (dominant), ANME-3, Methanomicrobiales, Methanosaeta Archaea, with abundance changes with depth corresponding to changes in activities and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Below the SMTZ to approximately 1.7 m CH(4) became progressively more (13)C depleted (delta(13)C -82 per thousand) indicating a zone of CH(4) recycling which was consistent with the presence of (13)C-depleted archaeol (delta(13)C -55 per thousand). Pore water acetate concentrations decreased in this zone (to approximately 5 microM), suggesting that H(2), not acetate, was an important CH(4) cycling intermediate. The potential biomarkers for AOM-associated SRB, non-isoprenoidal ether lipids, increased below the SMTZ but this distribution reflected 16S

  20. Microbial Fe cycling and mineralization in sediments of an acidic, hypersaline lake (Lake Tyrell, Victoria, Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, E. E.; Blöthe, M.; Shelobolina, E.

    2009-12-01

    Lake Tyrrell is a variably acidic, hypersaline, Fe-rich lake located in Victoria, Australia. Terrestrial acid saline lakes like Lake Tyrrell may be analogs for ancient Martian surface environments, as well as possible extant subsurface environments. To investigate the potential for microbial Fe cycling under acidic conditions and high salt concentration, we collected sediment core samples during three field trips between 2006 and 2008 from the southern, acidic edge of the lake. Materials from the cores were used for chemical and mineralogical analyses, as well as for molecular (16S rRNA genes) and culture-based microbiological studies. Near-surface (< 1 m depth) pore fluids contained low but detectable dissolved oxygen (ca. 50 uM), significant dissolved Fe(II) (ca. 500 uM), and nearly constant pH of around 4 - conditions conducive to enzymatic Fe(II) oxidation. High concentrations of Fe(III) oxides begin accumulate at a depth of ca. 10 cm, and may reflect the starting point for formation of massive iron concretions that are evident at and beneath the sediment surface. MPN analyses revealed low (10-100 cells/mL) but detectable populations of aerobic, halophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing organisms on the sediment surface and in the near-surface ground water. With culture-dependent methods at least three different halotolerant lithoautotrophic cultures growing on Fe(II), thiosulfate, or tetrathionate from different acidic sites were obtained. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that these organisms are similar to previous described gamma proteobacteria Thiobacillus prosperus (95%), Halothiobacillus kellyi (99%), Salinisphaera shabanense (95%) and a Marinobacter species. (98%). 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing data from two different sites with a pH range between 3 and 4.5 revealed a dominance of gamma proteobacteria. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing libraries from both cores were dominated by sequences related to the Ectothiorhodospiraceae family, which includes the taxa

  1. Iron Cycling in Sediment of the North Atlantic: Preliminary Results from R/V Knorr Expedition 223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C. H.; Estes, E. R.; Dyar, M. D.; Murray, R. W.; Spivack, A. J.; Sauvage, J.; McKinley, C. C.; Present, T. M.; Homola, K.; Pockalny, R. A.; D'Hondt, S.

    2015-12-01

    Iron (Fe) in marine sediments is a significant microbial electron acceptor [Fe(III)] in suboxic conditions and is an electron donor [Fe(II)] in oxic conditions. In the transition from oxic to suboxic sediment, a portion of solid Fe is reduced and mobilized as soluble Fe(II) into interstitial water during the oxidation of organic matter. The presence of Fe and its oxidation state in oxic sediment provides insight into an important metabolic and mineral reaction pathway in subseafloor sediment. We recovered bulk sediment and interstitial water at western North Atlantic sites during Expedition 223 on the R/V Knorr in November, 2014. The expedition targeted regions with predominantly oxic sediment and regions with predominantly anoxic sediment, ideal for investigating redox Fe cycling between solid and aqueous phases. At Site 10 (14.4008N, 50.6209W, 4455m water depth), interstitial dissolved oxygen is depleted within the upper few meters of sediment. At Site 12 (29.6767N, 58.3285W, 5637m water depth), interstitial dissolved oxygen is present throughout the cored sediment column (10s of meters). Here we present total solid Fe concentration for 45 bulk sediment samples and total aqueous Fe and Mn concentrations for 50 interstitial water samples analyzed via ICP-ES. We additionally present Fe(II) and Fe(III) speciation results from 10 solid sediment samples determined by Mossbauer spectroscopy. We trace downcore fluctuations in Fe in solid and aqueous phases to understand Fe cycling in oxic, suboxic, and transitional regimes. Our preliminary data indicate that solid Fe concentration ranges from 4-6 wt % at the oxic site; aqueous Fe ranges from below detection to 20μM and aqueous Mn ranges from 1 to 125 μM at the anoxic site. In the anoxic sediment (Site 10), 86-90% of the total Fe is oxidized [Fe(III)] and 10-14% as reduced [Fe(II)], compared to 3-6% as reduced [Fe(II)] at the oxic site (Site 12), even in sediment as old as 25 million years.

  2. A high frequency silicon pressure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahng, S. K.; Gross, C.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical and design considerations as well as fabrication and experimental work involved in the development of high-frequency silicon pressure sensors with an ultra-small diaphragm are discussed. A sensor is presented with a rectangular diaphragm of 0.0127 cm x 0.0254 cm x 1.06 micron; the sensor has a natural frequency of 625 kHz and a sensitivity of 0.82 mv/v-psi. High-frequency results from shock tube testing and low-frequency (less than 50 kHz) comparison with microphones are given.

  3. Metrology For High-Frequency Nanoelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Wallis, T. Mitch; Imtiaz, Atif; Nembach, Hans T.; Rice, Paul; Kabos, Pavel

    2007-09-26

    Two metrological tools for high-frequency measurements of nanoscale systems are described: (i) two/N-port analysis of nanoscale devices as well as (ii) near-field scanning microwave microscopy (NSMM) for materials characterization. Calibrated two/N-port measurements were made on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) welded to a coplanar waveguide. Significant changes in the extracted high-frequency electrical response of the welded MWNT were measured when the contacts to the MWNT were modified. Additionally, NSMM was used to characterize films of nanotube soot deposited on copper and sapphire substrates. The material properties of the films showed a strong dependence on the substrate material.

  4. High-frequency Oscillations in Eyewalls of Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weibiao; Chen, Shumin

    2017-04-01

    High-frequency oscillations, with periods of about 2 hours, are first identified by applying wavelet analysis to observed minutely wind speeds around the eye and eyewall of tropical cyclones (TCs). Analysis of a model simulation of Typhoon Hagupit (2008) shows that the oscillations also occur in the intensity of TC, vertical motion, convergence activity and air density around the eyewall. Sequences of oscillations in these variables follow a certain order. In a typical cycle, the drop of density in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) is followed by an increase in the inward radial wind; this enhanced frictional convergence causes increase in density, followed by a decrease in the inward radial wind. The increase in convergence in the PBL causes increase of updraft at the top of the PBL, followed by high vertical velocity at high altitude of 8-10 km, then the increase of the maximum wind speed, and vice versa. Key words: tropical cyclone, high-frequency oscillations, eyewall, intensity

  5. High-frequency jet ventilation in a neonatal foal.

    PubMed

    Bain, F T; Brock, K A; Koterba, A M

    1988-04-01

    High-frequency jet ventilation was performed on a premature foal for respiratory difficulty attributable to in utero-acquired pneumonia. The procedure involves delivery of compressed gas through a small-bore cannula at frequencies up to 400 cycles/min. Ventilation settings of drive pressure, frequency, and FIO2 were varied to optimize PaO2 and PaCO2 values. The foal was ventilated with this equipment for 14 hours. Evidence of a favorable response to this method of ventilation was observed in the form of improvement in arterial blood gas values as well as the foal's attitude and degree of respiratory effort. High-frequency jet ventilation appears to be a useful method of ventilation for respiratory disease in neonatal foals; however, there remains no clear-cut advantage over conventional positive-pressure ventilation.

  6. Analysis of Results from ASIAEX East China Sea: Mid to High Frequency Bottom Loss

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    The paper, “Mid to High Frequency Bottom Loss in the East China Sea” [1] has been submitted to the, IEEE J . Oceanic Eng. special issue on Asian...Potty, Dajun Tang, Jungyul Na and Yiquan Qi, “Sediments in the East China Sea”, accepted to IEEE J . Oceanic Eng. , 2003. PUBLICATIONS [1...Jeewoong Choi and Peter H. Dahl, “Mid to High Frequency Bottom Loss in the East China Sea”, IEEE J . Oceanic Eng. [submitted, refereed] [2] Dajun

  7. Sedimentation

    Treesearch

    Cliff R. Hupp; Michael R. Schening

    2000-01-01

    Sedimentation is arguably the most important water-quality concern in the United States. Sediment trapping is cited frequently as a major function of riverine-forested wetlands, yet little is known about sedimcntation rates at the landscape scale in relation to site parameters, including woody vegetation type, elevation, velocity, and hydraulic connection to the river...

  8. Determining the Effects of Oiled Sediment on Fish Life Cycle Endpoints using the Sheepshead Minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determination of long-term effects of exposure to crude oil is critical for ascertaining population-level risk following spill events. A 19-week life-cycle experiment was conducted with the estuarine sheepshead minnow exposed to natural sediment spiked with weathered Louisiana S...

  9. Determining the Effects of Oiled Sediment on Fish Life Cycle Endpoints using the Sheepshead Minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determination of long-term effects of exposure to crude oil is critical for ascertaining population-level risk following spill events. A 19-week life-cycle experiment was conducted with the estuarine sheepshead minnow exposed to natural sediment spiked with weathered Louisiana S...

  10. Interactions between microbial iron reduction and metal geochemistry: effect of redox cycling on transition metal speciation in iron bearing sediments.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D Craig; Picardal, Flynn F; Coby, Aaron J

    2006-03-15

    Microbial iron reduction is an important biogeochemical process that can affect metal geochemistry in sediments through direct and indirect mechanisms. With respectto Fe(III) (hydr)oxides bearing sorbed divalent metals, recent reports have indicated that (1) microbial reduction of goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures preferentially removes ferrihydrite, (2) this process can incorporate previously sorbed Zn(II) into an authigenic crystalline phase that is insoluble in 0.5 M HCl, (3) this new phase is probably goethite, and (4) the presence of nonreducible minerals can inhibit this transformation. This study demonstrates that a range of sorbed transition metals can be selectively sequestered into a 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase and that the process can be stimulated through sequential steps of microbial iron reduction and air oxidation. Microbial reduction experiments with divalent Cd, Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn indicate that all metals save Mn experienced some sequestration, with the degree of metal incorporation into the 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase correlating positively with crystalline ionic radius at coordination number = 6. Redox cycling experiments with Zn adsorbed to synthetic goethite/ferrihydrite or iron-bearing natural sediments indicate that redox cycling from iron reducing to iron oxidizing conditions sequesters more Zn within authigenic minerals than microbial iron reduction alone. In addition, the process is more effective in goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures than in iron-bearing natural sediments. Microbial reduction alone resulted in a -3x increase in 0.5 M HCl insoluble Zn and increased aqueous Zn (Zn-aq) in goethite/ferrihydrite, but did not significantly affect Zn speciation in natural sediments. Redox cycling enhanced the Zn sequestration by approximately 12% in both goethite/ferrihydrite and natural sediments and reduced Zn-aq to levels equal to the uninoculated control in goethite/ferrihydrite and less than the uninoculated control in natural sediments. These

  11. Psychophysical tuning curves at very high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Ifat; Plack, Christopher J.

    2005-10-01

    For most normal-hearing listeners, absolute thresholds increase rapidly above about 16 kHz. One hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of the hearing-threshold curve is imposed by the transmission characteristics of the middle ear, which attenuates the sound input [Masterton et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 45, 966-985 (1969)]. An alternative hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of hearing is imposed by the tonotopicity of the cochlea [Ruggero and Temchin, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 13206-13210 (2002)]. The aim of this study was to test these hypotheses. Forward-masked psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) were derived for signal frequencies of 12-17.5 kHz. For the highest signal frequencies, the high-frequency slopes of some PTCs were steeper than the slope of the hearing-threshold curve. The results also show that the human auditory system displays frequency selectivity for characteristic frequencies (CFs) as high as 17 kHz, above the frequency at which absolute thresholds begin to increase rapidly. The findings suggest that, for CFs up to 17 kHz, the high-frequency limitation in humans is imposed in part by the middle-ear attenuation, and not by the tonotopicity of the cochlea.

  12. Landau damping with high frequency impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz,M.

    2009-05-04

    Coupled bunch longitudinal stability in the presence of high frequency impedances is considered. A frequency domain technique is developed and compared with simulations. The frequency domain technique allows for absolute stability tests and is applied to the problem of longitudinal stability in RHIC with the new 56 MHz RF system.

  13. Fe-phyllosilicate redox cycling organisms from a redox transition zone in Hanford 300 Area sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Benzine, Jason; Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Xiong, Mai Yia; Kennedy, David W.; McKinley, James P.; Lin, Xueju; Roden, Eric E.

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms capable of reducing or oxidizing structural iron (Fe) in Fe-bearing phyllosilicate minerals were enriched and isolated from a subsurface redox transition zone at the Hanford 300 Area site in eastern Washington, USA. Both conventional and in situ "i-chip" enrichment strategies were employed. One Fe(III)-reducing Geobacter (G. bremensis strain R1, Deltaproteobacteria) and six Fe(II) phyllosilicate-oxidizing isolates from the Alphaproteobacteria (Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains 22, is5, and in8p8), Betaproteobacteria (Cupriavidus necator strain A5-1, Dechloromonas agitata strain is5), and Actinobacteria (Nocardioides sp. strain in31) were recovered. The G. bremensis isolate grew by oxidizing acetate with the oxidized form of NAu-2 smectite as the electron acceptor. The Fe(II)-oxidizers grew by oxidation of chemically reduced smectite as the energy source with nitrate as the electron acceptor. The Bradyrhizobium isolates could also carry out aerobic oxidation of biotite. This is the first report of the recovery of a Fe(II)-oxidizing Nocardioides, and to date only one other Fe(II)-oxidizing Bradyrhizobium is known. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the isolates were similar to ones found in clone libraries from Hanford 300 sediments and groundwater, suggesting that such organisms may be present and active in situ. Whole genome sequencing of the isolates is underway, the results of which will enable comparative genomic analysis of mechanisms of extracellular phyllosilicate Fe redox metabolism, and facilitate development of techniques to detect the presence and expression of genes associated with microbial phyllosilicate Fe redox cycling in sediments.

  14. Fe-phyllosilicate redox cycling organisms from a redox transition zone in Hanford 300 Area sediments

    PubMed Central

    Benzine, Jason; Xiong, Mai Yia; Kennedy, David W.; McKinley, James P.; Lin, Xueju; Roden, Eric E.

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms capable of reducing or oxidizing structural iron (Fe) in Fe-bearing phyllosilicate minerals were enriched and isolated from a subsurface redox transition zone at the Hanford 300 Area site in eastern Washington, USA. Both conventional and in situ “i-chip” enrichment strategies were employed. One Fe(III)-reducing Geobacter (G. bremensis strain R1, Deltaproteobacteria) and six Fe(II) phyllosilicate-oxidizing isolates from the Alphaproteobacteria (Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains 22, is5, and in8p8), Betaproteobacteria (Cupriavidus necator strain A5-1, Dechloromonas agitata strain is5), and Actinobacteria (Nocardioides sp. strain in31) were recovered. The G. bremensis isolate grew by oxidizing acetate with the oxidized form of NAu-2 smectite as the electron acceptor. The Fe(II)-oxidizers grew by oxidation of chemically reduced smectite as the energy source with nitrate as the electron acceptor. The Bradyrhizobium isolates could also carry out aerobic oxidation of biotite. This is the first report of the recovery of a Fe(II)-oxidizing Nocardioides, and to date only one other Fe(II)-oxidizing Bradyrhizobium is known. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the isolates were similar to ones found in clone libraries from Hanford 300 sediments and groundwater, suggesting that such organisms may be present and active in situ. Whole genome sequencing of the isolates is underway, the results of which will enable comparative genomic analysis of mechanisms of extracellular phyllosilicate Fe redox metabolism, and facilitate development of techniques to detect the presence and expression of genes associated with microbial phyllosilicate Fe redox cycling in sediments. PMID:24379809

  15. Nucleation and growth of todorokite from birnessite: Implications for trace-metal cycling in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, Amy L.; Shaw, Samuel; Peacock, Caroline L.

    2014-11-01

    The phyllomanganate birnessite is the main Mn-bearing phase in oxic marine sediments, and through coupled sorption and redox exerts a strong control on the oceanic concentration of micronutrient trace metals. However, under diagenesis and mild hydrothermal conditions, birnessite undergoes transformation to the tectomanganate todorokite. The mechanistic details of this transformation are important for the speciation and mobility of metals sequestered by birnessite, and are necessary in order to quantify the role of marine sediments in global trace element cycles. Here we transform a synthetic, poorly crystalline, hexagonal birnessite, analogous to marine birnessite, into todorokite under a mild reflux procedure, developed to mimic marine diagenesis and mild hydrothermal conditions. We characterize our birnessite and reflux products as a time series, employing X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), BET surface area analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). We provide new insight into the crystallization pathway and mechanism of todorokite formation from birnessite under conditions analogous to those found in marine diagenetic and hydrothermal settings. Specifically we propose a new four-stage process for the transformation of birnessite to todorokite, beginning with todorokite nucleation, then crystal growth from solution to form todorokite primary particles, followed by their self-assembly and oriented growth via oriented attachment to form crystalline todorokite laths, culminating in traditional crystal ripening. We suggest that, contrary to current understanding, trace metals like Ni might retard the transformation of birnessite to todorokite and be released to marine sedimentary pore-waters during this diagenetic process, thus potentially providing a benthic flux of these micronutrients to seawater.

  16. Stable isotope biogeochemistry of the sulfur cycle in modern marine sediments: I. Seasonal dynamics in a temperate intertidal sandy surface sediment.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Michael; Hespenheide, Britta; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen; Bosselmann, Katja

    2004-12-01

    A biogeochemical and stable isotope geochemical study was carried out in surface sediments of an organic-matter poor temperate intertidal sandy surface sediment (German Wadden Sea of the North Sea) to investigate the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria and the dynamics of the vertical partitioning of sedimentary sulfur, iron, and manganese species in relation to the availability of total organic carbon (TOC) and mud contents. The contents and stable isotopic compositions ((34)S/(32)S) of total reduced inorganic sulfur species (TRIS) and dissolved sulfate were measured. Maximum oxygen penetration depths were estimated from the onset of a blackening of the sediments due to FeS accumulation and ranged from 5 to 10 mm below surface (mmbsf). A zone of relatively moderate relative organic-matter enrichment was found between 5 and 20 mmbsf leading to enhanced activities of sulfate-reducing bacteria with sulfate-reduction rates (SRR) up to 350 nmol cm(-3) d(-1). Below this zone, microbial SRR dropped significantly. Depth integrated SRR seem to depend not only on temperature but also on the availability of reactive organic matter. The sulfur-isotopic composition of TRIS was depleted in (34)S by 33-40 per thousand with respect to coexisting dissolved sulfate (constant at about +21 per thousand vs. Vienna-Canyon Diablo Troilite (V-CDT)). Since sulfate reduction is not limited by dissolved sulfate (open system), depth variations of the isotopic composition of TRIS reflect changes in overall isotope effect due to superimposed microbial and abiotic reactions. Most of the solid-phase iron and manganese was bonded to (non-reactive) heavy minerals. However, a layer of reactive Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxi(hydroxi)des was found in the uppermost sediment section due to re-oxidation of dissolved Fe(II) and Mn(II) species at the sediment-water interface. Metal cycling below the surface is at least partially coupled to intense sulfur cycling.

  17. Role of freeze-thaw cycles and chlorpyrifos insecticide use on diffuse Cd loss and sediment accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fangli; Ouyang, Wei; Hao, Fanghua; Jiao, Wei; Shan, Yushu; Lin, Chunye

    2016-06-01

    Freeze-thaw cycles are predicted to increase in cold temperate regions. The potential influence of the interactions of freeze-thaw cycles and agrochemicals on the release of Cd into river water is unknown. In this study, the interactions of freeze-thaw cycles and chlorpyrifos (FC) on Cd mobility in soils were analysed. The spatial variability of soil Cd under long-term intensive tillage in a freeze-thaw agro-system was also identified. The temporal variation of sediment Cd was detected based on analysis of the sediment geochemistry. The results showed that FC increased soil Cd mobility, with an increase of approximately 10% in CaCl2-extractable Cd. The increased mobile fractions of water-soluble and exchangeable Cd originated from the decreased fraction of Fe-Mn-oxide-associated Cd and organic matter-bound Cd. The total Cd content in the surface soil followed the zonally decreasing trend of dry land > paddy land > natural land. The Cd concentrations and sedimentation rates of the sediment core generally increased from 1943 to 2013 due to agricultural exploration and farmland irrigation system construction, indicating an increase of the Cd input flux into water. The results provide valuable information about the soil Cd transport response to the influence of climatic and anthropogenic factors in cold intensive agro-systems.

  18. Role of freeze-thaw cycles and chlorpyrifos insecticide use on diffuse Cd loss and sediment accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangli; Ouyang, Wei; Hao, Fanghua; Jiao, Wei; Shan, Yushu; Lin, Chunye

    2016-01-01

    Freeze-thaw cycles are predicted to increase in cold temperate regions. The potential influence of the interactions of freeze-thaw cycles and agrochemicals on the release of Cd into river water is unknown. In this study, the interactions of freeze-thaw cycles and chlorpyrifos (FC) on Cd mobility in soils were analysed. The spatial variability of soil Cd under long-term intensive tillage in a freeze-thaw agro-system was also identified. The temporal variation of sediment Cd was detected based on analysis of the sediment geochemistry. The results showed that FC increased soil Cd mobility, with an increase of approximately 10% in CaCl2-extractable Cd. The increased mobile fractions of water-soluble and exchangeable Cd originated from the decreased fraction of Fe-Mn-oxide-associated Cd and organic matter-bound Cd. The total Cd content in the surface soil followed the zonally decreasing trend of dry land > paddy land > natural land. The Cd concentrations and sedimentation rates of the sediment core generally increased from 1943 to 2013 due to agricultural exploration and farmland irrigation system construction, indicating an increase of the Cd input flux into water. The results provide valuable information about the soil Cd transport response to the influence of climatic and anthropogenic factors in cold intensive agro-systems. PMID:27250820

  19. Roles of sorption and tube-dwelling benthos in the cycling of phosphorus in Bering Sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, Emily S.; Shull, David H.; Devol, Allan H.

    2012-06-01

    Adsorption of dissolved phosphate onto iron-hydroxides has been shown to be one of the primary regulators of phosphorus cycling in sediments. Bioturbation and bioirrigation by benthic infauna modify this cycling by accelerating the transport of dissolved and particulate phosphorus and by changing rates of reactions that occur in the sediment, such as the adsorption of phosphate by amorphous iron hydroxides. Hydrographic processes vary regionally in the Bering Sea and nutrient exchange between the sediments of the broad shallow shelf and overlying water may influence water column productivity. These characteristics make the Bering Sea a good study site for examining the processes that influence sedimentary cycling of phosphorus. To examine these processes, we collected samples in four domains (southern middle shelf, southern outer shelf, southern off shelf (consisting of the continental slope and Bering Sea basin) and northern Bering shelf) based on hydrographic regime. At each station we directly measured phosphate flux and sediment oxygen consumption using whole-core incubations. We also measured infaunal burrow abundances, amorphous iron-hydroxide concentrations and phosphate sorption. We found that three out of the four domains had a high affinity for trapping phosphate in the sediment, as indicated by their adsorption coefficients (6.59-81.81). However, the measured phosphate fluxes could not be explained by the adsorption capacity of the sediment alone. The results indicated that on the middle shelf, the phosphate flux positively co-varied with infaunal burrow abundances. The high number of organisms in this domain (10-32 burrows per 50 cm2 core) enhances the flux of phosphate to the overlying water. Controls on the phosphate flux on the middle shelf cannot be properly understood unless benthic infaunal abundance is taken into account.

  20. Biostimulation induces syntrophic interactions that impact C, S and N cycling in a sediment microbial community

    SciTech Connect

    Handley, KM; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Steefel, Carl I; Sharon, I; Williams, Ken; Miller, CS; Frischkorn, Kyle C; Chourey, Karuna; Thomas, Brian; Shah, Manesh B; Long, Phil; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-01-01

    Stimulation of subsurface microorganisms to induce reductive immobilization of metals is a promising approach for bioremediation, yet the overall microbial community response is typically poorly understood. Here we used community proteogenomics to test the hypothesis that excess input of acetate activates syntrophic interactions among autotrophs and heterotrophs. A flow-through sediment column was incubated in a groundwater well of an acetate-amended aquifer. Genomic sequences from the community recovered during microbial sulfate reduction were used to econstruct, de novo, near-complete genomes for Desulfobacter (Deltaproteobacteria) and relatives of Sulfurovum and Sulfurimonas (Epsilonproteobacteria), and Bacteroidetes. Partial genomes were obtained for Clostridiales (Firmicutes) and Desulfuromonadales-like Deltaproteobacteria. The majority of proteins identified by mass spectrometry corresponded to Desulfobacter-like species, and demonstrate the role of this organism in sulfate reduction (Dsr and APS), nitrogen-fixation (Nif) and acetate oxidation to CO2 during amendment. Results suggest less abundant Desulfuromonadales and Bacteroidetes also actively contributed to CO2 production via the TCA cycle. Proteomic data indicate that sulfide was partially re-oxidized by Epsilonproteobacteria through nitrate-dependent sulfide oxidation (using Nap, Nir, Nos, SQR and Sox), with CO2 fixed using the reverse TCA cycle. Modeling shows that this reaction was thermodynamically possible, and kinetically favorable relative to acetate-dependent denitrification. We conclude that high-levels of carbon amendment aimed to stimulate anaerobic heterotrophy led to carbon fixation in co-dependent chemoautotrophs. These results have implications for understanding complex ecosystem behavior, and show that high levels of organic carbon supplementation can expand the range of microbial functionalities accessible for ecosystem manipulation.

  1. Turbulence in unsteady flow at high frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Gary D.

    1990-01-01

    Turbulent flows subjected to oscillations of the mean flow were simulated using a large-eddy simulation computer code for flow in a channel. The objective of the simulations was to provide better understanding of the effects of time-dependent disturbances on the turbulence of a boundary layer and of the underlying physical phenomena regarding the basic interaction between the turbulence and external disturbances. The results confirmed that turbulence is sensitive to certain ranges of frequencies of disturbances. However, no direct connection was found between the frequency of imposed disturbances and the characteristic 'burst' frequency of turbulence. New insight into the nature of turbulence at high frequencies was found. Viscous phenomena near solid walls were found to be the dominant influence for high-frequency perturbations.

  2. Turbulence in unsteady flow at high frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Gary D.

    1990-01-01

    Turbulent flows subjected to oscillations of the mean flow were simulated using a large-eddy simulation computer code for flow in a channel. The objective of the simulations was to provide better understanding of the effects of time-dependent disturbances on the turbulence of a boundary layer and of the underlying physical phenomena regarding the basic interaction between the turbulence and external disturbances. The results confirmed that turbulence is sensitive to certain ranges of frequencies of disturbances. However, no direct connection was found between the frequency of imposed disturbances and the characteristic 'burst' frequency of turbulence. New insight into the nature of turbulence at high frequencies was found. Viscous phenomena near solid walls were found to be the dominant influence for high-frequency perturbations.

  3. High frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Abukari, S. S. Mensah, S. Y.; Twum, A.; Mensah, N. G.; Adu, K. A.; Rabiu, M.

    2012-12-15

    We report on theoretical analysis of high frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes. Using the kinetic equation with constant relaxation time, an analytical expression for the complex conductivity is obtained. The real part of the complex conductivity is initially negative at zero frequency and become more negative with increasing frequency, until it reaches a resonance minimum at ω ∼ ω{sub B} for metallic zigzag CNs and ω < ω{sub B} for armchair CNs. This resonance enhancement is indicative for terahertz gain without the formation of current instabilities induced by negative dc conductivity. We noted that due to the high density of states of conduction electrons in metallic zigzag carbon nanotubes and the specific dispersion law inherent in hexagonal crystalline structure result in a uniquely high frequency conductivity than the corresponding values for metallic armchair carbon nanotubes. We suggest that this phenomenon can be used to suppress current instabilities that are normally associated with a negative dc differential conductivity.

  4. High-current, high-frequency capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1983-06-01

    The NASA Lewis high-current, high-frequency capacitor development program was conducted under a contract with Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., San Diego, California. The program was started to develop power components for space power systems. One of the components lacking was a high-power, high-frequency capacitor. Some of the technology developed in this program may be directly usable in an all-electric airplane. The materials used in the capacitor included the following: the film is polypropylene, the impregnant is monoisopropyl biphenyl, the conductive epoxy is Emerson and Cuming Stycast 2850 KT, the foil is aluminum, the case is stainless steel (304), and the electrode is a modified copper-ceramic.

  5. High-current, high-frequency capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The NASA Lewis high-current, high-frequency capacitor development program was conducted under a contract with Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., San Diego, California. The program was started to develop power components for space power systems. One of the components lacking was a high-power, high-frequency capacitor. Some of the technology developed in this program may be directly usable in an all-electric airplane. The materials used in the capacitor included the following: the film is polypropylene, the impregnant is monoisopropyl biphenyl, the conductive epoxy is Emerson and Cuming Stycast 2850 KT, the foil is aluminum, the case is stainless steel (304), and the electrode is a modified copper-ceramic.

  6. Apparatus for measuring high frequency currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagmann, Mark J. (Inventor); Sutton, John F. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring high frequency currents includes a non-ferrous core current probe that is coupled to a wide-band transimpedance amplifier. The current probe has a secondary winding with a winding resistance that is substantially smaller than the reactance of the winding. The sensitivity of the current probe is substantially flat over a wide band of frequencies. The apparatus is particularly useful for measuring exposure of humans to radio frequency currents.

  7. High Frequency Guided Wave Virtual Array SAFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, R.; Pardini, A.; Diaz, A.

    2003-03-01

    The principles of the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) are generalized for application to high frequency plate wave signals. It is shown that a flaw signal received in long-range plate wave propagation can be analyzed as if the signals were measured by an infinite array of transducers in an unbounded medium. It is shown that SAFT-based flaw sizing can be performed with as few as three or less actual measurement positions.

  8. High-Frequency Percussive Ventilation Revisited

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    physiologic and clin- ical outcomes. Pediatric and adult inhalational injury studies have linked HFPV to an improvement in static lung compliance...sedation–analgesic combinations (usually fentanyl with the individual or combined use of midazolam and propofol and/or dexmedetomidine), patient...1998;84:1174–7. 34. Frantz ID III, Close RH. Alveolar pressure swings during high frequency ventilation in rabbits. Pediatr Res 1985;19:162–6. 35. Pillow

  9. [High-frequency oscillatory ventilation in neonates].

    PubMed

    2002-09-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) may be considered as an alternative in the management of severe neonatal respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. In patients with diffuse pulmonary disease, HFOV can applied as a rescue therapy with a high lung volume strategy to obtain adequate alveolar recruitment. We review the mechanisms of gas exchange, as well as the indications, monitoring and special features of the use HVOF in the neonatal period.

  10. Microbial Mercury Cycling in San Francisco Bay Sediments: From Regions to the Rhizosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, V. A.; Mann, A.; Romeis, J.; Marvin-Dipasquale, M. C.; Agee, J. L.; Kieu, L. H.; Harms, H. A.

    2004-05-01

    The San Francisco Bay (SFB) estuary is hydrodynamically diverse ecosystem with extensive mercury contamination associated with historic gold and mercury mining wastes, and in a region with an unprecedented number of wetland restoration projects planned or ongoing. Wetlands are known to be active areas for the microbial transformation of Hg(II) to methylmercury (MeHg), which bioaccumulates in the food web. A better understanding of this microbial process, in these restored wetlands and other sub-habitats, is critical if Hg contamination is to be successfully managed in this system. An examination of MeHg production and degradation in sediments has been conducted at multiple spatial scales throughout the SFB estuary and its tributaries over the past four years. At the regional scale, we will present data from the brackish Bay, the delta, and rivers and reservoirs in tributary watersheds. Within the freshwater delta and river regions, a new project is focusing on emergent marsh, non-vegetated open water, and submerged-macrophyte zones. At the smallest scale, we consider microbial Hg cycling in the root zone (rhizosphere) of dominant wetland plants and propose a conceptual model of the key biogoechemical reactions that may make this transitional zone one of the most important with respect to Hg(II)-methylation.

  11. Extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics.

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Vigliano, David; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Williams, Jeffery Thomas; Wouters, Gregg A.; Bacon, Larry Donald; Mar, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to understand the fundamental physics of extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics. To accomplish this objective, we produced models, conducted simulations, and performed measurements to identify the mechanisms of effects as frequency increases into the millimeter-wave regime. Our purpose was to answer the questions, 'What are the tradeoffs between coupling, transmission losses, and device responses as frequency increases?', and, 'How high in frequency do effects on electronic systems continue to occur?' Using full wave electromagnetics codes and a transmission-line/circuit code, we investigated how extremely high-frequency RF propagates on wires and printed circuit board traces. We investigated both field-to-wire coupling and direct illumination of printed circuit boards to determine the significant mechanisms for inducing currents at device terminals. We measured coupling to wires and attenuation along wires for comparison to the simulations, looking at plane-wave coupling as it launches modes onto single and multiconductor structures. We simulated the response of discrete and integrated circuit semiconductor devices to those high-frequency currents and voltages, using SGFramework, the open-source General-purpose Semiconductor Simulator (gss), and Sandia's Charon semiconductor device physics codes. This report documents our findings.

  12. Ionospheric modifications in high frequency heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-01-15

    Featured observations in high-frequency (HF) heating experiments conducted at Arecibo, EISCAT, and high frequency active auroral research program are discussed. These phenomena appearing in the F region of the ionosphere include high-frequency heater enhanced plasma lines, airglow enhancement, energetic electron flux, artificial ionization layers, artificial spread-F, ionization enhancement, artificial cusp, wideband absorption, short-scale (meters) density irregularities, and stimulated electromagnetic emissions, which were observed when the O-mode HF heater waves with frequencies below foF2 were applied. The implication and associated physical mechanism of each observation are discussed and explained. It is shown that these phenomena caused by the HF heating are all ascribed directly or indirectly to the excitation of parametric instabilities which instigate anomalous heating. Formulation and analysis of parametric instabilities are presented. The results show that oscillating two stream instability and parametric decay instability can be excited by the O-mode HF heater waves, transmitted from all three heating facilities, in the regions near the HF reflection height and near the upper hybrid resonance layer. The excited Langmuir waves, upper hybrid waves, ion acoustic waves, lower hybrid waves, and field-aligned density irregularities set off subsequent wave-wave and wave-electron interactions, giving rise to the observed phenomena.

  13. Ionospheric modifications in high frequency heating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-01-01

    Featured observations in high-frequency (HF) heating experiments conducted at Arecibo, EISCAT, and high frequency active auroral research program are discussed. These phenomena appearing in the F region of the ionosphere include high-frequency heater enhanced plasma lines, airglow enhancement, energetic electron flux, artificial ionization layers, artificial spread-F, ionization enhancement, artificial cusp, wideband absorption, short-scale (meters) density irregularities, and stimulated electromagnetic emissions, which were observed when the O-mode HF heater waves with frequencies below foF2 were applied. The implication and associated physical mechanism of each observation are discussed and explained. It is shown that these phenomena caused by the HF heating are all ascribed directly or indirectly to the excitation of parametric instabilities which instigate anomalous heating. Formulation and analysis of parametric instabilities are presented. The results show that oscillating two stream instability and parametric decay instability can be excited by the O-mode HF heater waves, transmitted from all three heating facilities, in the regions near the HF reflection height and near the upper hybrid resonance layer. The excited Langmuir waves, upper hybrid waves, ion acoustic waves, lower hybrid waves, and field-aligned density irregularities set off subsequent wave-wave and wave-electron interactions, giving rise to the observed phenomena.

  14. High frequency x-ray generator basics.

    PubMed

    Sobol, Wlad T

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present basic functional principles of high frequency x-ray generators. The emphasis is put on physical concepts that determine the engineering solutions to the problem of efficient generation and control of high voltage power required to drive the x-ray tube. The physics of magnetically coupled circuits is discussed first, as a background for the discussion of engineering issues related to high-frequency power transformer design. Attention is paid to physical processes that influence such factors as size, efficiency, and reliability of a high voltage power transformer. The basic electrical circuit of a high frequency generator is analyzed next, with focus on functional principles. This section investigates the role and function of basic components, such as power supply, inverter, and voltage doubler. Essential electronic circuits of generator control are then examined, including regulation of voltage, current and timing of electrical power delivery to the x-ray tube. Finally, issues related to efficient feedback control, including basic design of the AEC circuitry are reviewed.

  15. Molecular biological and isotopic biogeochemical prognoses of the nitrification-driven dynamic microbial nitrogen cycle in hadopelagic sediments.

    PubMed

    Nunoura, Takuro; Nishizawa, Manabu; Kikuchi, Tohru; Tsubouchi, Taishi; Hirai, Miho; Koide, Osamu; Miyazaki, Junichi; Hirayama, Hisako; Koba, Keisuke; Takai, Ken

    2013-11-01

    There has been much progress in understanding the nitrogen cycle in oceanic waters including the recent identification of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing (anammox) bacteria, and in the comprehensive estimation in abundance and activity of these microbial populations. However, compared with the nitrogen cycle in oceanic waters, there are fewer studies concerning the oceanic benthic nitrogen cycle. To further elucidate the dynamic nitrogen cycle in deep-sea sediments, a sediment core obtained from the Ogasawara Trench at a water depth of 9760 m was analysed in this study. The profiles obtained for the pore-water chemistry, and nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopic compositions of pore-water nitrate in the hadopelagic sediments could not be explained by the depth segregation of nitrifiers and nitrate reducers, suggesting the co-occurrence of nitrification and nitrate reduction in the shallowest nitrate reduction zone. The abundance of SSU rRNA and functional genes related to nitrification and denitrification are consistent with the co-occurrence of nitrification and nitrate reduction observed in the geochemical analyses. This study presents the first example of cooperation between aerobic and anaerobic nitrogen metabolism in the deep-sea sedimentary environments.

  16. LOSCAR: Long-term Ocean-atmosphere-Sediment CArbon cycle Reservoir Model v2.0.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeebe, R. E.

    2012-01-01

    The LOSCAR model is designed to efficiently compute the partitioning of carbon between ocean, atmosphere, and sediments on time scales ranging from centuries to millions of years. While a variety of computationally inexpensive carbon cycle models are already available, many are missing a critical sediment component, which is indispensable for long-term integrations. One of LOSCAR's strengths is the coupling of ocean-atmosphere routines to a computationally efficient sediment module. This allows, for instance, adequate computation of CaCO3 dissolution, calcite compensation, and long-term carbon cycle fluxes, including weathering of carbonate and silicate rocks. The ocean component includes various biogeochemical tracers such as total carbon, alkalinity, phosphate, oxygen, and stable carbon isotopes. LOSCAR's configuration of ocean geometry is flexible and allows for easy switching between modern and paleo-versions. We have previously published applications of the model tackling future projections of ocean chemistry and weathering, pCO2 sensitivity to carbon cycle perturbations throughout the Cenozoic, and carbon/calcium cycling during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. The focus of the present contribution is the detailed description of the model including numerical architecture, processes and parameterizations, tuning, and examples of input and output. Typical CPU integration times of LOSCAR are of order seconds for several thousand model years on current standard desktop machines. The LOSCAR source code in C can be obtained from the author by sending a request to loscar.model@gmail.com.

  17. Nearshore versus offshore copper loading in Lake Superior sediments: Implications for transport and cycling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolak, J.J.; Long, D.T.; Kerfoot, W.C.; Beals, T.M.; Eisenreich, Steven J.

    1999-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the fate and transport of metals in Lake Superior is necessary in order to predict the ability of Lake Superior to recover from anthropogenic perturbations (copper mining). Sediment cores were collected from nearshore and offshore sites in Lake Superior and used to evaluate spatial and temporal variations in copper loading associated with mining-related activities. Although both settings have been strongly affected by anthropogenic releases of copper, copper concentrations in nearshore cores are significantly greater than those found in offshore cores, implying that nearshore copper loading is dominated by simple deposition and burial of sediment generated from mining activities. Temporal variations in copper profiles in sediments from nearshore environments closely mimic copper production rates. Conversely, copper loading histories derived from offshore sediments are not well correlated to production rates. The offshore sediment cores, when compared with analogous cores from Lakes Ontario and Michigan, show that the average, lake-wide intensity of copper loading in Lake Superior is comparable to the other two lakes, despite the fact that Lake Superior has received the largest total burden of anthropogenic copper. Cu/Zn ratios, used to evaluate the amount of copper loading derived from mining discharges, vary strongly in nearshore environments in response to loading. Cu/Zn ratios in offshore sediments are much less variable, implying that copper loading may be regulated by additional mechanisms (solution chemistry and/or biologic uptake). Study of trace metal partitioning within Lake Superior sediments indicates that the organic fraction of the sediment contains the majority of the copper. Copper concentrations in offshore sediments are significantly correlated to organic carbon content of the sediment whereas copper concentrations in nearshore sediments are not. These findings support the model that transport and deposition of particles

  18. Controlling factors of spatial and temporal preservation of the geochronological signal in sediments during an orogenic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rat, Juliette; Mouthereau, Frédéric; Bernet, Matthias; Brichau, Stéphanie; Balvay, Mélanie; Garzanti, Eduardo; Ando, Sergio

    2017-04-01

    Detrital content of sediments preserved in basins provide constraints on the nature of source rocks, dynamics of sediment transport, and potentially on tectonics and climate changes. U-Pb dating method on detrital zircon is ideally suited for provenance studies due to the ability of U-Pb age data to resist several orogenic cycles. However, with the aim to track sediment source evolution over a single orogenic cycle and determine characteristic time and parameters controlling the geochronological signal preservation throughout the cycle from rifting, mountain building to post-collision evolution, low-temperature thermochronology combined with sediment petrography are more appropriate than the U-Pb dating approach taken alone. To better understanding processes at play in the long-term geochronological signal preservation we focus on the sediment record associated with the Iberia plate tectonic evolution, which is part of the OROGEN research project, co-financed by BRGM, TOTAL & CNRS. The Iberian plate recorded a period of extension in the Late Jurassic, followed during the Early Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian) by a major thinning event documented by thick syn-rift sediments in intraplate basins and plate-scale heating/cooling of the Iberia crust, as argued by published fission track ages. Paleogeographic reconstructions that are based on stratigraphic and lithofacies analyses in northern Iberia (Iberian Range, Pyrenees and Basque-Cantabrians Range), describe a large domain of continental/fluvial and shallow-marine siliciclastic deposition. The related detrital content was then recycled during the subsequent Pyrenean orogenic phase in the Ebro foreland basin, and eventually transfer to the Mediterranean realm during post-orogenic re-excavation of the Ebro basin. In this study, we complete the published time-temperature paths in the mesozoic syn-rift basins by providing new thermo-chronological analyses of well-dated syn-collision and post-collision stratigraphic sections

  19. Global synchronous changes in the carbon isotopic composition of carbonate sediments unrelated to changes in the global carbon cycle

    PubMed Central

    Swart, Peter K.

    2008-01-01

    The carbon isotopic (δ13C) composition of bulk carbonate sediments deposited off the margins of four carbonate platforms/ramp systems (Bahamas, Maldives, Queensland Plateau, and Great Australian Bight) show synchronous changes over the past 0 to 10 million years. However, these variations are different from the established global pattern in the δ13C measured in the open oceans over the same time period. For example, from 10 Ma to the present, the δ13C of open oceanic carbonate has decreased, whereas platform margin sediments analyzed here show an increase. It is suggested that the δ13C patterns in the marginal platform deposits are produced through admixing of aragonite-rich sediments, which have relatively positive δ13C values, with pelagic materials, which have lower δ13C values. As the more isotopically positive shallow-water carbonate sediments are only produced when the platforms are flooded, there is a connection between changes in global sea level and the δ13C of sediments in marginal settings. These data indicate that globally synchronous changes in δ13C can take place that are completely unrelated to variations in the global carbon cycle. Fluctuations in the δ13C of carbonate sediments measured during previous geological periods may also be subject to similar processes, and global synchroniety of δ13C can no longer necessarily be considered an indicator that such changes are related to, or caused by, variations in the burial of organic carbon. Inferences regarding the interpretation of changes in the cycling of organic carbon derived from δ13C records should be reconsidered in light of the findings presented here. PMID:18772393

  20. Global synchronous changes in the carbon isotopic composition of carbonate sediments unrelated to changes in the global carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Swart, Peter K

    2008-09-16

    The carbon isotopic (delta(13)C) composition of bulk carbonate sediments deposited off the margins of four carbonate platforms/ramp systems (Bahamas, Maldives, Queensland Plateau, and Great Australian Bight) show synchronous changes over the past 0 to 10 million years. However, these variations are different from the established global pattern in the delta(13)C measured in the open oceans over the same time period. For example, from 10 Ma to the present, the delta(13)C of open oceanic carbonate has decreased, whereas platform margin sediments analyzed here show an increase. It is suggested that the delta(13)C patterns in the marginal platform deposits are produced through admixing of aragonite-rich sediments, which have relatively positive delta(13)C values, with pelagic materials, which have lower delta(13)C values. As the more isotopically positive shallow-water carbonate sediments are only produced when the platforms are flooded, there is a connection between changes in global sea level and the delta(13)C of sediments in marginal settings. These data indicate that globally synchronous changes in delta(13)C can take place that are completely unrelated to variations in the global carbon cycle. Fluctuations in the delta(13)C of carbonate sediments measured during previous geological periods may also be subject to similar processes, and global synchroniety of delta(13)C can no longer necessarily be considered an indicator that such changes are related to, or caused by, variations in the burial of organic carbon. Inferences regarding the interpretation of changes in the cycling of organic carbon derived from delta(13)C records should be reconsidered in light of the findings presented here.

  1. Iron, sulphur and phosphorus cycling in the rhizosphere sediments of a eutrophic Ruppia cirrhosa meadow (Valle Smarlacca, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzoni, Roberta; Giordani, Gianmarco; Bartoli, Marco; Welsh, David T.; Viaroli, Pierluigi

    2001-02-01

    The growth dynamics of a residual Ruppia cirrhosa meadow of the eutrophic Valle Smarlacca lagoon, Italy, were monitored over an annual cycle and related to the cycling of iron, sulphur and phosphorus in the rhizosphere sediments. The Ruppia biomass and rates of gross primary production increased during spring and early summer, but declined rapidly thereafter. This biomass decline was particularly evident for the below-ground biomass. Microelectrode profiling demonstrated a clear seasonal trend in sediment redox potential, with the sediments becoming increasingly reduced during spring and summer. In addition, high concentrations of toxic free sulphides (up to 7 mM) were detected in the porewater during summer and autumn. Radial oxygen release by the seagrass roots rather than iron precipitation appears to be the principal detoxification mechanism for sulphides in the rhizosphere. However, in summer this system becomes saturated, leading to the accumulation of free sulphides. This results in a positive feedback regime, with the sulphides causing root/rhizome mortality, which further reduces oxygen release to the rhizosphere and thereby favours sulphate reduction activity and further accumulation of sulphides. A redox-dependent exchange of phosphate between the iron-bound, exchangeable and porewater pools was observed. However, these changes were quantitatively of little importance due to the small pool sizes and the very low concentrations of labile ferric iron in the sediments throughout the year. Overall, the data indicate that in addition to light competition with other primary producers, eutrophication may also negatively impact seagrass communities through changes in sediment redox and sulphide concentrations. These interactions between eutrophication, water column primary production and bacterial metabolism in the sediment could play a part in the catastrophic collapses of seagrass communities which have been observed in many coastal areas on a worldwide scale.

  2. Distribution and preservation of black carbon in the East China Sea sediments: Perspectives on carbon cycling at continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Ying; Wang, Jinlong

    2016-02-01

    We determined the concentrations and radiocarbon (14C) compositions of black carbon (BC) in the sediments of the East China Sea (ECS). The BC concentrations, which were in the range of 0.30-1.52 mg/g, accounted for 12-65% of the total organic carbon (TOC). The distribution of BC in ECS sediments was controlled by factors such as grain size, distance from the coast, and deposition rate. Radiocarbon measurements of BC yielded ages of 6350-10,440 years before present (BP), suggesting that the percentage of BC derived from biomass combustion was in the range of 29-48%. The BC burial flux in sediments of the ECS was estimated to be ∼1.39×106 t/yr, which was similar to burial fluxes reported for shelf sediments in other areas. However, the magnitude of the total BC sink was far greater than that of any other shelf regions studied to date, indicating the global importance of BC accumulation in the ECS, and the magnitude of BC input from large rivers (e.g., the Changjiang). The riverine delivery of BC to the ECS (73%) was far greater than that of atmospheric flux (27%). Further study of the BC cycle and the interactions of BC with other organic compounds in marginal seas was required to better understand the role of BC in the global carbon cycle.

  3. High-frequency Rayleigh-wave method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xu, Y.; Luo, Y.; Chen, C.; Liu, J.; Ivanov, J.; Zeng, C.

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency (???2 Hz) Rayleigh-wave data acquired with a multichannel recording system have been utilized to determine shear (S)-wave velocities in near-surface geophysics since the early 1980s. This overview article discusses the main research results of high-frequency surface-wave techniques achieved by research groups at the Kansas Geological Survey and China University of Geosciences in the last 15 years. The multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method is a non-invasive acoustic approach to estimate near-surface S-wave velocity. The differences between MASW results and direct borehole measurements are approximately 15% or less and random. Studies show that simultaneous inversion with higher modes and the fundamental mode can increase model resolution and an investigation depth. The other important seismic property, quality factor (Q), can also be estimated with the MASW method by inverting attenuation coefficients of Rayleigh waves. An inverted model (S-wave velocity or Q) obtained using a damped least-squares method can be assessed by an optimal damping vector in a vicinity of the inverted model determined by an objective function, which is the trace of a weighted sum of model-resolution and model-covariance matrices. Current developments include modeling high-frequency Rayleigh-waves in near-surface media, which builds a foundation for shallow seismic or Rayleigh-wave inversion in the time-offset domain; imaging dispersive energy with high resolution in the frequency-velocity domain and possibly with data in an arbitrary acquisition geometry, which opens a door for 3D surface-wave techniques; and successfully separating surface-wave modes, which provides a valuable tool to perform S-wave velocity profiling with high-horizontal resolution. ?? China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009.

  4. High frequency dynamic pressure calibration technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, P. A.; Zasimowich, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    A high frequency dynamic calibration technique for pressure transducers has been developed using a siren pressure generator (SPG). The SPG is an inlet-area-modulated device generating oscillating waveforms with dynamic pressure amplitudes up to 58.6 kPa (8.5 psi) in a frequency range of 1 to 10 kHz. A description of the generator, its operating characteristics and instrumentation used for pressure amplitude and frequency measurements is given. Waveform oscillographs and spectral analysis of the pressure transducers' output signals are presented.

  5. High frequency dynamic pressure calibration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, P. A.; Zasimowich, R. F.

    A high frequency dynamic calibration technique for pressure transducers has been developed using a siren pressure generator (SPG). The SPG is an inlet-area-modulated device generating oscillating waveforms with dynamic pressure amplitudes up to 58.6 kPa (8.5 psi) in a frequency range of 1 to 10 kHz. A description of the generator, its operating characteristics and instrumentation used for pressure amplitude and frequency measurements is given. Waveform oscillographs and spectral analysis of the pressure transducers' output signals are presented.

  6. RF Breakdown in High Frequency Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Doebert, S

    2004-05-27

    RF breakdown in high-frequency accelerators appears to limit the maximum achievable gradient as well as the reliability of such devices. Experimental results from high power tests, obtained mostly in the framework of the NLC/GLC project at 11 GHz and from the CLIC study at 30 GHz, will be used to illustrate the important issues. The dependence of the breakdown phenomena on rf pulse length, operating frequency and fabrication material will be described. Since reliability is extremely important for large scale accelerators such as a linear collider, the measurements of breakdown rate as a function of the operating gradient will be highlighted.

  7. The LASI high-frequency ellipticity system

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    A high-frequency, high-resolution, electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (5) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (6) visualization of complex structures during the survey.

  8. The LASI high-frequency ellipticity system

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    A high-frequency, high-resolution, electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (5) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (6) visualization of complex structures during the survey.

  9. Inverter design for high frequency power distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A class of simple resonantly commutated inverters are investigated for use in a high power (100 KW - 1000 KW) high frequency (10 KHz - 20 KHz) AC power distribution system. The Mapham inverter is found to provide a unique combination of large thyristor turn-off angle and good utilization factor, much better than an alternate 'current-fed' inverter. The effects of loading the Mapham inverter entirely with rectifier loads are investigated by simulation and with an experimental 3 KW 20 KHz inverter. This inverter is found to be well suited to a power system with heavy rectifier loading.

  10. In situ sensing to understand diel turbidity cycles, suspended solids, and nutrient transport in Clear Creek, Iowa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loperfido, J. V.; Just, Craig L.; Papanicolaou, Athanasios N.; Schnoor, Jerald L.

    2010-06-01

    Recent advances in sensor technology have made high-frequency environmental data readily available. In this study, high-frequency monitoring of turbidity revealed diel turbidity cycles with peak values during the nighttime and lower values occurring during daytime. Particles responsible for these cycles were fixed suspended solids consisting mostly of aluminosilicates (clay particles) emanating from bed sediments. High-frequency data were used to investigate the transport of total suspended solids (TSS) during base flow. A majority of the base flow TSS loading occurred during the nighttime in a small agricultural catchment in Iowa, United States. Elevated nighttime turbidity coincided with an increased total suspended phosphorus loading during nighttime. Bioturbation, as a result of nocturnal feeding of fishes, is the suspected cause of the diel turbidity cycles. High-frequency monitoring was also used to detect TSS loading during storm events. Results from this study highlight the importance of high-frequency environmental measurements to reveal and understand biogeochemical transport phenomena.

  11. The linkage between marine sediment records and changes in Holocene Saharan landscape: simulating the dust cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egerer, Sabine; Claussen, Martin; Reick, Christian; Stanelle, Tanja

    2016-04-01

    Marine sediment records reveal an abrupt and strong increase in dust deposition in the North Atlantic at the end of the African Humid Period about 4.9 ka to 5.5 ka ago (deMenocal et al., 2000; McGee et al., 2013). The change in dust flux has been attributed to varying Saharan land surface cover. Alternatively, the enhanced dust accumulation is linked to enhanced surface winds and a consequent intensification of coastal upwelling. We present simulation results from a recent sensitivity study, where we demonstrate for the first time the direct link between dust accumulation in marine cores and changes in Saharan land surface during the Holocene. We have simulated timeslices of he mid-Holocene (6 ka BP) and pre-industrial (1850 AD) dust cycle as a function of Saharan land surface cover and atmosphere-ocean conditions using the coupled atmosphere-aerosol model ECHAM6.1-HAM2.1. We prescribe mid-Holocene vegetation cover based on a vegetation reconstruction from pollen data (Hoelzmann et al., 1998) and mid-Holocene lake surface area is determined using a water routing and storage model (Tegen et al., 2002). In agreement with data from marine sediment cores, our simulations show that mid-Holocene dust deposition fluxes in the North Atlantic were two to three times lower compared with pre-industrial fluxes. We identify Saharan land surface characteristics to be the main control on dust transport from North Africa to the North Atlantic. We conclude that the variation in dust accumulation in marine cores is likely related to a transition of the Saharan landscape during the Holocene and not due to changes in atmospheric or ocean conditions alone. Reference: deMenocal, P., Ortiz, J., Guilderson, T., Adkins, J., Sarnthein, M., Baker, L., and Yarusinsky, M.: Abrupt onset and termination of the African Humid Period:: rapid climate responses to gradual insolation forcing, Quaternary Science Reviews, 19, 347-361, 2000. Hoelzmann, P., Jolly, D., Harrison, S. P., Laarif, F

  12. Luminescence Dating of Sediments from the Luthern Valley, Central Switzerland, and Implications for the Chronology of the Last Glacial Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preusser, Frank; Müller, Benjamin U.; Schlüchter, Christian

    2001-03-01

    The advancing glaciers of the last glacial maximum either eroded or deeply buried older sediments in the Swiss Alpine Foreland. However, part of the Swiss Plateau was not covered by ice and is therefore an excellent area for investigating climate and environmental change during the Upper Pleistocene. Repeated fluvial sequences can be studied in several pits along the Luthern Valley. The chronological framework is based on lithostratigraphy, pollen analysis, U/Th dating, and, recently, heavy mineral analysis and luminescence dating. The oldest unit, the Untere Zeller Schotter braided river deposit, represents cold climate conditions and presumably a glaciation prior to the Eemian Interglaciation. The last interglacial period and the very beginning of the last glacial cycle is represented by the Mittlere Zeller Schotter, sediments of a meandering fluvial system. Younger braided river sediments, the Obere Zeller Schotter, seem to correlate with the cold climate of oxygen isotope stage (OIS) 4. Weathering of the top of the Obere Zeller Schotter is likely to represent the OIS 3. The advancing Reuss glacier caused erosion of the recent Luthern Valley, cutting into older sediments, with local loess accumulation during the last glacial maximum as indicated by cover sediments on top of the fluvial sequence.

  13. Effects of conventional and biodegradable microplastics on a marine ecosystem engineer (Arenicola marina) and sediment nutrient cycling.

    PubMed

    Green, Dannielle Senga; Boots, Bas; Sigwart, Julia; Jiang, Shan; Rocha, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Effects of microplastic pollution on benthic organisms and ecosystem services provided by sedimentary habitats are largely unknown. An outdoor mesocosm experiment was done to realistically assess the effects of three different types of microplastic pollution (one biodegradable type; polylactic acid and two conventional types; polyethylene and polyvinylchloride) at increasing concentrations (0.02, 0.2 and 2% of wet sediment weight) on the health and biological activity of lugworms, Arenicola marina (Linnaeus, 1758), and on nitrogen cycling and primary productivity of the sediment they inhabit. After 31 days, A. marina produced less casts in sediments containing microplastics. Metabolic rates of A. marina increased, while microalgal biomass decreased at high concentrations, compared to sediments with low concentrations or without microplastics. Responses were strongest to polyvinylchloride, emphasising that different materials may have differential effects. Each material needs to be carefully evaluated in order to assess their risks as microplastic pollution. Overall, both conventional and biodegradable microplastics in sandy sediments can affect the health and behaviour of lugworms and directly or indirectly reduce primary productivity of these habitats.

  14. [Environment effects of algae-caused black spots: impacts on Fe-Mn-S cycles in water-sediment interface].

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Feng; He, Jun; Fan, Cheng-Xin; Zhang, Lei; Shen, Qiu-Shi; Zhong, Ji-Cheng; Yan, Shao-Hua

    2010-11-01

    The driving effects of algal cells settlement in the water-sediment interface on Fe, Mn, S biogeochemistry in laboratory through static cultivation device. Results showed that dissolved oxygen would be exhausted by algae cells in 50 min after the cyanobacteria cells settled to the sediment surface. Soon the water-sediment interface formed the severe anoxia and Fe-Mn oxides and sulfides were deoxidized quickly in the strong reducing environment. The Fe2+, Mn2+ content in interface increased to the summit at the 4th day and their concentrations were 4.40 mg/L and 2.35 mg/L, respectively. When it comes to the end of the experiment, the Fe2+ content had a little reduction and Mn2+ reduced quickly, their concentrations were 3.37 mg/L and 0.97 mg/L at the end of experiment. However, S2- concentration in interface reached the highest at the 2nd day and its content was 0.63 mg/L, and its concentration was only 0.12 mg/L at the end since it has been reduced. The ORP was--150 mV in the sediment surface and indicated that the sediment environment was a strong reducing environment. Phenomenon of algal cells induced black spots in water bodies was the main driving factors on Fe/Mn oxides and sulfides biogeochemistry cycle, and also the extreme anoxia environment would have great harm on the water body's ecology.

  15. Diversity of sulfur-cycle prokaryotes in freshwater lake sediments investigated using aprA as the functional marker gene.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tomohiro; Kojima, Hisaya; Takano, Yoshinori; Fukui, Manabu

    2013-09-01

    The diversity of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRPs) and sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes (SOPs) in freshwater lake ecosystems was investigated by cloning and sequencing of the aprA gene, which encodes for a key enzyme in dissimilatory sulfate reduction and sulfur oxidation. To understand their diversity better, the spatial distribution of aprA genes was investigated in sediments collected from six geographically distant lakes in Antarctica and Japan, including a hypersaline lake for comparison. The microbial community compositions of freshwater sediments and a hypersaline sediment showed notable differences. The clones affiliated with Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae were frequently detected in all freshwater lake sediments. The SOP community was mainly composed of four major phylogenetic groups. One of them formed a monophyletic cluster with a sulfur-oxidizing betaproteobacterium, Sulfuricella denitrificans, but the others were not assigned to specific genera. In addition, the AprA sequences, which were not clearly affiliated to either SRP or SOP lineages, dominated the libraries from four freshwater lake sediments. The results showed the wide distribution of some sulfur-cycle prokaryotes across geographical distances and supported the idea that metabolic flexibility is an important feature for SRP survival in low-sulfate environments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Nitrogen cycling and community structure of proteobacterial beta-subgroup ammonia-oxidizing bacteria within polluted marine fish farm sediments.

    PubMed

    McCaig, A E; Phillips, C J; Stephen, J R; Kowalchuk, G A; Harvey, S M; Herbert, R A; Embley, T M; Prosser, J I

    1999-01-01

    A multidisciplinary approach was used to study the effects of pollution from a marine fish farm on nitrification rates and on the community structure of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the underlying sediment. Organic content, ammonium concentrations, nitrification rates, and ammonia oxidizer most-probable-number counts were determined in samples of sediment collected from beneath a fish cage and on a transect at 20 and 40 m from the cage. The data suggest that nitrogen cycling was significantly disrupted directly beneath the fish cage, with inhibition of nitrification and denitrification. Although visual examination indicated some slight changes in sediment appearance at 20 m, all other measurements were similar to those obtained at 40 m, where the sediment was considered pristine. The community structures of proteobacterial beta-subgroup ammonia-oxidizing bacteria at the sampling sites were compared by PCR amplification of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA), using primers which target this group. PCR products were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and with oligonucleotide hybridization probes specific for different ammonia oxidizers. A DGGE doublet observed in PCR products from the highly polluted fish cage sediment sample was present at a lower intensity in the 20-m sample but was absent from the pristine 40-m sample station. Band migration, hybridization, and sequencing demonstrated that the doublet corresponded to a marine Nitrosomonas group which was originally observed in 16S rDNA clone libraries prepared from the same sediment samples but with different PCR primers. Our data suggest that this novel Nitrosomonas subgroup was selected for within polluted fish farm sediments and that the relative abundance of this group was influenced by the extent of pollution.

  17. Nitrogen Cycling and Community Structure of Proteobacterial β-Subgroup Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria within Polluted Marine Fish Farm Sediments

    PubMed Central

    McCaig, Allison E.; Phillips, Carol J.; Stephen, John R.; Kowalchuk, George A.; Harvey, S. Martyn; Herbert, Rodney A.; Embley, T. Martin; Prosser, James I.

    1999-01-01

    A multidisciplinary approach was used to study the effects of pollution from a marine fish farm on nitrification rates and on the community structure of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the underlying sediment. Organic content, ammonium concentrations, nitrification rates, and ammonia oxidizer most-probable-number counts were determined in samples of sediment collected from beneath a fish cage and on a transect at 20 and 40 m from the cage. The data suggest that nitrogen cycling was significantly disrupted directly beneath the fish cage, with inhibition of nitrification and denitrification. Although visual examination indicated some slight changes in sediment appearance at 20 m, all other measurements were similar to those obtained at 40 m, where the sediment was considered pristine. The community structures of proteobacterial β-subgroup ammonia-oxidizing bacteria at the sampling sites were compared by PCR amplification of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA), using primers which target this group. PCR products were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and with oligonucleotide hybridization probes specific for different ammonia oxidizers. A DGGE doublet observed in PCR products from the highly polluted fish cage sediment sample was present at a lower intensity in the 20-m sample but was absent from the pristine 40-m sample station. Band migration, hybridization, and sequencing demonstrated that the doublet corresponded to a marine Nitrosomonas group which was originally observed in 16S rDNA clone libraries prepared from the same sediment samples but with different PCR primers. Our data suggest that this novel Nitrosomonas subgroup was selected for within polluted fish farm sediments and that the relative abundance of this group was influenced by the extent of pollution. PMID:9872782

  18. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Dymond, Jr., Lauren E.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Grimm, William G.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Ola, Samuel A.; Simpson, James E.; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter; Turner, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and I or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to adjust the driving frequency of the oscillator.

  19. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Dolan, James T.; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang

    2000-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  20. High-Frequency Fluctuations During Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jara-Almonte, J.; Ji, H.; Daughton, W. S.; Roytershteyn, V.; Yamada, M.; Yoo, J.; Fox, W. R., II

    2014-12-01

    During collisionless reconnection, the decoupling of the field from the plasma is known to occur only within the localized ion and electron diffusion regions, however predictions from fully kinetic simulations do not agree with experimental observations on the size of the electron diffusion region, implying differing reconnection mechanisms. Previous experiments, along with 2D and 3D simulations, have conclusively shown that this discrepancy cannot be explained by either classical collisions or Lower-Hybrid Drift Instability (Roytershtyn 2010, 2013). Due to computational limitations, however, previous simulations were constrained to have minimal scale separation between the electron skin depth and the Debye length (de/λD ~ 10), much smaller than in experiments (de/λD ~ 300). This lack of scale-separation can drastically modify the electrostatic microphysics within the diffusion layer. Using 3D, fully explicit kinetic simulations with a realistic and unprecedentedly large separation between the Debye length and the electron skin depth, de/λD = 64, we show that high frequency electrostatic waves (ω >> ωLH) can exist within the electron diffusion region. These waves generate small-scale turbulence within the electron diffusion region which acts to broaden the layer. Anomalous resistivity is also generated by the turbulence and significantly modifies the force balance. In addition to simulation results, initial experimental measurements of high frequency fluctuations (electrostatic and electromagnetic, f ≤ 1 GHz) in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) will be presented.

  1. High Frequency Plasma Generators for Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divergilio, W. F.; Goede, H.; Fosnight, V. V.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a one year program to experimentally adapt two new types of high frequency plasma generators to Argon ion thrusters and to analytically study a third high frequency source concept are presented. Conventional 30 cm two grid ion extraction was utilized or proposed for all three sources. The two plasma generating methods selected for experimental study were a radio frequency induction (RFI) source, operating at about 1 MHz, and an electron cyclotron heated (ECH) plasma source operating at about 5 GHz. Both sources utilize multi-linecusp permanent magnet configurations for plasma confinement. The plasma characteristics, plasma loading of the rf antenna, and the rf frequency dependence of source efficiency and antenna circuit efficiency are described for the RFI Multi-cusp source. In a series of tests of this source at Lewis Research Center, minimum discharge losses of 220+/-10 eV/ion were obtained with propellant utilization of .45 at a beam current of 3 amperes. Possible improvement modifications are discussed.

  2. High frequency ultrasonic scattering by biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shung, K. Kirk; Maruvada, Subha

    2002-05-01

    High frequency (HF) diagnostic ultrasonic imaging devices at frequencies higher than 20 MHz have found applications in ophthalmology, dermatology, and vascular surgery. To be able to interpret these images and to further the development of these devices, a better understanding of ultrasonic scattering in biological tissues such as blood, liver, myocardium in the high frequency range is crucial. This work has previously been hampered by the lack of suitable transducers. With the availability of HF transducers going to 90 MHz, HF attenuation and backscatter experiments have been made on porcine red blood cell (RBC) suspensions, for which much data on attenuation and backscatter can be found in the literature in the lower frequency range for frequencies, from 30 to 90 MHz and on bovine tissues for frequencies from 10 to 30 MHz using a modified substitution method that allow the utilization of focused transducers. These results will be reviewed in this talk along with relevant theoretical models that could be applied to interpreting them. The relevance of the parameter that has been frequently used in the biomedical ultrasound literature to describe backscattering, the backscattering coefficient, will be critically examined.

  3. Protection circuitry for high frequency ultrasonic NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaggares, N. Chris; Tang, Raymond K.; Sinclair, A. N., Prof.; Foster, F. S., Prof.; Haraierciwz, Kasia; Starkoski, Brian

    2000-05-01

    Most commercial ultrasonic NDE equipment employs a voltage spike to stimulate a piezoelectric transducer. To protect the signal processing unit from damage from this spike, a voltage limiter or "diode clamp" is included in the pulser-receiver, and limits the voltage reaching the amplifier or oscilloscope. In this project, the deleterious effects of such limiters on the ultrasonic echo in the high frequency (50-100 MHz range) have been quantified: these effects include significant distortion in the frequency content, and oscillations causing a drop in timing resolution by over a factor of 2. To address these problems, a high-voltage high-frequency switch has been designed to replace the voltage limiter; the switch directs the high-voltage spike away from the signal processing/display unit, towards an impedance-matched termination. A prototype circuit has been built, based on two high-voltage MOSFET's acting as a switch for the bi-polar stimulation pulse. The reduction in echo distortion and improvement in time resolution have been successfully modeled with the CAD tool HSPICE, although parasitic capacitance in the current generation of commercial MOSFET's is a continuing concern.

  4. Noise temperature in graphene at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengel, Raúl; Iglesias, José M.; Pascual, Elena; Martín, María J.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical method for obtaining the frequency-dependent noise temperature in monolayer graphene is presented. From the mobility and diffusion coefficient values provided by Monte Carlo simulation, the noise temperature in graphene is studied up to the THz range, considering also the influence of different substrate types. The influence of the applied electric field is investigated: the noise temperature is found to increase with the applied field, dropping down at high frequencies (in the sub-THz range). The results show that the low-frequency value of the noise temperature in graphene on a substrate tends to be reduced as compared to the case of suspended graphene due to the important effect of remote polar phonon interactions, thus indicating a reduced emitted noise power; however, at very high frequencies the influence of the substrate tends to be significantly reduced, and the differences between the suspended and on-substrate cases tend to be minimized. The values obtained are comparable to those observed in GaAs and semiconductor nitrides.

  5. Interactions Between Microbial Iron Reduction and Metal Geochemistry: Effect of Redox Cycling on Transition Metal Speciation in Iron Bearing Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    D. Craig Cooper; Flynn W. Picardal; Aaron J. Coby

    2006-02-01

    Microbial iron reduction is an important biogeochemical process that can affect metal geochemistry in sediments through direct and indirect mechanisms. With respect to Fe(III) (hydr)oxides bearing sorbed divalent metals, recent reports have indicated that (1) microbial reduction of goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures preferentially removes ferrihydrite, (2) this process can incorporate previously sorbed Zn(II) into an authigenic crystalline phase that is insoluble in 0.5 M HCl, (3) this new phase is probably goethite, and (4) the presence of nonreducible minerals can inhibit this transformation. This study demonstrates that a range of sorbed transition metals can be selectively sequestered into a 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase and that the process can be stimulated through sequential steps of microbial iron reduction and air oxidation. Microbial reduction experiments with divalent Cd, Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn indicate that all metals save Mn experienced some sequestration, with the degree of metal incorporation into the 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase correlating positively with crystalline ionic radius at coordination number = 6. Redox cycling experiments with Zn adsorbed to synthetic goethite/ferrihydrite or iron-bearing natural sediments indicate that redox cycling from iron reducing to iron oxidizing conditions sequesters more Zn within authigenic minerals than microbial iron reduction alone. In addition, the process is more effective in goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures than in iron-bearing natural sediments. Microbial reduction alone resulted in a ~3× increase in 0.5 M HCl insoluble Zn and increased aqueous Zn (Zn-aq) in goethite/ferrihydrite, but did not significantly affect Zn speciation in natural sediments. Redox cycling enhanced the Zn sequestration by ~12% in both goethite/ferrihydrite and natural sediments and reduced Zn-aq to levels equal to the uninoculated control in goethite/ferrihydrite and less than the uninoculated control in natural sediments. These data suggest

  6. Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Subsequent Oxidation of Sediment Containing Fe-silicates and Fe-oxides: Effect of Redox Cycling on Fe(III) Bioreduction

    SciTech Connect

    Komlos, John; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zachara, John M.; Jaffe, Peter R.

    2007-07-01

    Microbial reduction of iron has been shown to be important in the transformation and remediation of contaminated sediments. Re-oxidation of microbially reduced iron may occur in sediments that experience oxidation-reduction cycling and can thus impact the extent of contaminant remediation. The purpose of this research was to quantify iron oxidation in a flow-through column filled with biologically-reduced sediment and to compare the iron phases in the re-oxidized sediment to both the pristine and biologically-reduced sediment. The sediment contained both Fe(III)-oxides (primarily goethite) and silicate Fe (illite/vermiculite) and was biologically reduced in phosphate buffered (PB) medium during a 497 day column experiment with acetate supplied as the electron donor. Long-term iron reduction resulted in partial reduction of silicate Fe(III) without any goethite reduction, based on Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements. This reduced sediment was treated with an oxygenated PB solution in a flow-through column resulting in the oxidation of 38% of the biogenic Fe(II). Additional batch experiments showed that the Fe(III) in the oxidized sediment was more quickly reduced compared to the pristine sediment, indicating that oxidation of the sediment not only regenerated Fe(III) but also enhanced iron reduction compared to the pristine sediment. Oxidation-reduction cycling may be a viable method to extend iron-reducing conditions during in-situ bioremediation.

  7. Linking sediment structure, hydrological functioning and biogeochemical cycling in disturbed coastal saltmarshes and implications for vegetation development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Kate; Harvey, Gemma; James, Tempest; Simon, Carr; Michelle, Morris

    2014-05-01

    with preferential horizontal flows. The undisturbed saltmarsh displayed typical vertical geochemical sediment profiles. However, in the restored sites total Fe and Mn are elevated at depth indicating an absence of diagenetic cycling, whilst porewater sulphate and nitrate increased at depth suggesting that vertical solute transport is impeded in restored sites. In surface sediments, though total Hg concentrations are similar, Hg methylation rates are significantly higher than in the undisturbed saltmarsh suggesting that surface anoxia and poor drainage may result in increased mobilization and bioavailability of Hg. These findings have implications for the wider biogeochemical ecosystem services offered by saltmarsh restoration and the water-logged, anoxic conditions produced are unsuitable for seedling germination and plant growth. This highlights the need for integrated understanding of physical and biogeochemical processes.

  8. Mercury cycling in stream ecosystems. 2. Benthic methylmercury production and bed sediment - Pore water partitioning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marvin-DiPasquale, M.; Lutz, M.A.; Brigham, M.E.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Aiken, G.R.; Orem, W.H.; Hall, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    Mercury speciation, controls on methylmercury (MeHg) production, and bed sediment - pore water partitioning of total Hg (THg) and MeHg were examined in bed sediment from eight geochemically diverse streams where atmospheric deposition was the predominant Hg input. Across all streams, sediment THg concentrations were best described as a combined function of sediment percent fines (%fines; particles < 63 ??m) and organic content. MeHg concentrations were best described as a combined function of organic content and the activity of the Hg(II)-methylating microbial community and were comparable to MeHg concentrations in streams with Hg inputs from industrial and mining sources. Whole sediment tin-reducible inorganic reactive Hg (Hg(II)R) was used as a proxy measure for the Hg(II) pool available for microbial methylation. In conjunction with radiotracer-derived rate constants of 203Hg(II) methylation, Hg(II)R was used to calculate MeHg production potential rates and to explain the spatial variability in MeHg concentration. The %Hg(II)R (of THg) was low (2.1 ?? 5.7%) and was inversely related to both microbial sulfate reduction rates and sediment total reduced sulfur concentration. While sediment THg concentrations were higher in urban streams, %MeHg and %Hg(II)R were higher in nonurban streams. Sediment pore water distribution coefficients (log Kd's) for both THg and MeHg were inversely related to the log-transformed ratio of pore water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to bed sediment %fines. The stream with the highest drainage basin wetland density also had the highest pore water DOC ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  9. Parametric nanomechanical amplification at very high frequency.

    PubMed

    Karabalin, R B; Feng, X L; Roukes, M L

    2009-09-01

    Parametric resonance and amplification are important in both fundamental physics and technological applications. Here we report very high frequency (VHF) parametric resonators and mechanical-domain amplifiers based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Compound mechanical nanostructures patterned by multilayer, top-down nanofabrication are read out by a novel scheme that parametrically modulates longitudinal stress in doubly clamped beam NEMS resonators. Parametric pumping and signal amplification are demonstrated for VHF resonators up to approximately 130 MHz and provide useful enhancement of both resonance signal amplitude and quality factor. We find that Joule heating and reduced thermal conductance in these nanostructures ultimately impose an upper limit to device performance. We develop a theoretical model to account for both the parametric response and nonequilibrium thermal transport in these composite nanostructures. The results closely conform to our experimental observations, elucidate the frequency and threshold-voltage scaling in parametric VHF NEMS resonators and sensors, and establish the ultimate sensitivity limits of this approach.

  10. Degradation of PAHs by high frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Manariotis, Ioannis D; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V

    2011-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are persistent organic compounds, which have been reported in the literature to efficiently degrade at low (e.g. 20 kHz) and moderate (e.g. 506 kHz) ultrasound frequencies. The present study focuses on degradation of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene by ultrasound at three different relatively high frequencies (i.e. 582, 862, and 1142 kHz). The experimental results indicate that for all three frequencies and power inputs ≥ 133 W phenanthrene degrades to concentrations lower than our experimental detection limit (<1 μg/L). Phenanthrene degrades significantly faster at 582 kHz than at 862 and 1142 kHz. For all three frequencies, the degradation rates per unit mass are similar for naphthalene and phenanthrene and lower for pyrene. Furthermore, naphthalene degradation requires less energy than phenanthrene, which requires less energy than pyrene under the same conditions. No hexane-extractable metabolites were identified in the solutions.

  11. Computer modeling of tactical high frequency antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Bobby G., Jr.

    1992-06-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to compare the performance of three tactical high frequency antennas to be used as possible replacement for the Tactical Data Communications Central (TDCC) antennas. The antennas were modeled using the Numerical Electromagnetics Code, Version 3 (NEC3), and the Eyring Low Profile and Buried Antenna Modeling Program (PAT7) for several different frequencies and ground conditions. The performance was evaluated by comparing gain at the desired takeoff angles, the voltage standing wave ratio of each antenna, and its omni-directional capability. The buried antenna models, the ELPA-302 and horizontal dipole, were most effective when employed over poor ground conditions. The best performance under all conditions tested was demonstrated by the HT-20T. Each of these antennas have tactical advantages and disadvantages and can optimize communications under certain conditions. The selection of the best antenna is situation dependent. An experimental test of these models is recommended to verify the modeling results.

  12. High-frequency resonant-tunneling oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. R.; Parker, C. D.; Calawa, A. R.; Manfra, M. J.; Chen, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Advances in high-frequency resonant-tunneling-diode (RTD) oscillators are described. Oscillations up to a frequency of 420 GHz have been achieved in the GaAs/AlAs system. Recent results obtained with In0.53Ga0.47As/AlAs and InAs/AlSb RTDs show a greatly increased power density and indicate the potential for fundamental oscillations up to about 1 THz. These results are consistent with a lumped-element equivalent circuit model of the RTD. The model shows that the maximum oscillation frequency of the GaAs/AlAs RTDs is limited primarily by series resistance, and that the power density is limited by low peak-to-valley current ratio.

  13. Plasma effects in high frequency radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C.T.

    1981-02-08

    This paper is intended as a survey of collective plasma processes which can affect the transfer of high frequency radiation in a hot dense plasma. We are rapidly approaching an era when this subject will become important in the laboratory. For pedagogical reasons we have chosen to examine plasma processes by relating them to a particular reference plasma which will consist of fully ionized carbon at a temperature kT=1 KeV (10/sup 70/K) and an electron density N = 3 x 10/sup 23/cm/sup -3/, (which corresponds to a mass density rho = 1 gm/cm/sup 3/ and an ion density N/sub i/ = 5 x 10/sup 22/ cm/sup -3/). We will consider the transport in such a plasma of photons ranging from 1 eV to 1 KeV in energy. Such photons will probably be frequently used as diagnostic probes of hot dense laboratory plasmas.

  14. High-frequency micromechanical columnar resonators

    PubMed Central

    Kehrbusch, Jenny; Ilin, Elena A; Bozek, Peter; Radzio, Bernhard; Oesterschulze, Egbert

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency silicon columnar microresonators are fabricated using a simple but effective technological scheme. An optimized fabrication scheme was invented to obtain mechanically protected microcolumns with lateral dimensions controlled on a scale of at least 1 μm. In this paper, we investigate the influence of the environmental conditions on the mechanical resonator properties. At ambient conditions, we observed a frequency stability δf/f of less than 10−6 during 5 h of operation at almost constant temperature. However, varying the temperature shifts the frequency by approximately −173 Hz °C− 1. In accordance with a viscous damping model of the ambient gas, we perceived that the quality factor of the first flexural mode decreased with the inverse of the square root of pressure. However, in the low-pressure regime, a linear dependence was observed. We also investigated the influence of the type of the immersing gas on the resonant frequency. PMID:27877296

  15. High-Frequency Mechanostimulation of Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kadem, Laith F; Suana, K Grace; Holz, Michelle; Wang, Wei; Westerhaus, Hannes; Herges, Rainer; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2017-01-02

    Cell adhesion is regulated by molecularly defined protein interactions and by mechanical forces, which can activate a dynamic restructuring of adhesion sites. Previous attempts to explore the response of cell adhesion to forces have been limited to applying mechanical stimuli that involve the cytoskeleton. In contrast, we here apply a new, oscillatory type of stimulus through push-pull azobenzenes. Push-pull azobenzenes perform a high-frequency, molecular oscillation upon irradiation with visible light that has frequently been applied in polymer surface relief grating. We here use these oscillations to address single adhesion receptors. The effect of molecular oscillatory forces on cell adhesion has been analyzed using single-cell force spectroscopy and gene expression studies. Our experiments demonstrate a reinforcement of cell adhesion as well as upregulated expression levels of adhesion-associated genes as a result of the nanoscale "tickling" of integrins. This novel type of mechanical stimulus provides a previously unprecedented molecular control of cellular mechanosensing.

  16. High-frequency ultrasonic wire bonding systems

    PubMed

    Tsujino; Yoshihara; Sano; Ihara

    2000-03-01

    The vibration characteristics of longitudinal-complex transverse vibration systems with multiple resonance frequencies of 350-980 kHz for ultrasonic wire bonding of IC, LSI or electronic devices were studied. The complex vibration systems can be applied for direct welding of semiconductor tips (face-down bonding, flip-chip bonding) and packaging of electronic devices. A longitudinal-complex transverse vibration bonding system consists of a complex transverse vibration rod, two driving longitudinal transducers 7.0 mm in diameter and a transverse vibration welding tip. The vibration distributions along ceramic and stainless-steel welding tips were measured at up to 980 kHz. A high-frequency vibration system with a height of 20.7 mm and a weight of less than 15 g was obtained.

  17. Fundamentals of bipolar high-frequency surgery.

    PubMed

    Reidenbach, H D

    1993-04-01

    In endoscopic surgery a very precise surgical dissection technique and an efficient hemostasis are of decisive importance. The bipolar technique may be regarded as a method which satisfies both requirements, especially regarding a high safety standard in application. In this context the biophysical and technical fundamentals of this method, which have been known in principle for a long time, are described with regard to the special demands of a newly developed field of modern surgery. After classification of this method into a general and a quasi-bipolar mode, various technological solutions of specific bipolar probes, in a strict and in a generalized sense, are characterized in terms of indication. Experimental results obtained with different bipolar instruments and probes are given. The application of modern microprocessor-controlled high-frequency surgery equipment and, wherever necessary, the integration of additional ancillary technology into the specialized bipolar instruments may result in most useful and efficient tools of a key technology in endoscopic surgery.

  18. Anaerobic oxidation of short-chain alkanes in hydrothermal sediments: potential influences on sulfur cycling and microbial diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, MM; Hoarfrost, AL; Bose, A; Joye, SB; Girguis, PR

    2013-05-14

    Short-chain alkanes play a substantial role in carbon and sulfur cycling at hydrocarbon-rich environments globally, yet few studies have examined the metabolism of ethane (C-2), propane (C-3), and butane (C-4) in anoxic sediments in contrast to methane (C-1). In hydrothermal vent systems, short-chain alkanes are formed over relatively short geological time scales via thermogenic processes and often exist at high concentrations. The sediment-covered hydrothermal vent systems at Middle Valley (MV Juan de Fuca Ridge) are an ideal site for investigating the anaerobic oxidation of C-1-C-4 alkanes, given the elevated temperatures and dissolved hydrocarbon species characteristic of these metalliferous sediments. We examined whether MV microbial communities oxidized C-1-C-4 alkanes under mesophilic to thermophilic sulfate-reducing conditions. Here we present data from discrete temperature (25, 55, and 75 degrees C) anaerobic batch reactor incubations of MV sediments supplemented with individual alkanes. Co-registered alkane consumption and sulfate reduction (SR) measurements provide clear evidence for C-1-C-4 alkane oxidation linked to SR over time and across temperatures. In these anaerobic batch reactor sediments, 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing revealed that Deltaproteobacteria, particularly a novel sulfate-reducing lineage, were the likely phylotypes mediating the oxidation of C-2-C-4 alkanes. Maximum C-1-C-4 alkane oxidation rates occurred at 55 degrees C, which reflects the mid-core sediment temperature profile and corroborates previous studies of rate maxima for the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Of the alkanes investigated, C-3 was oxidized at the highest rate over time, then C-4, C-2, and C-1, respectively. The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the potential competition between the anaerobic oxidation of C-2-C(4)alkanes with AOM for available oxidants and the influence on the fate of C-1 derived from these hydrothermal systems.

  19. Anaerobic oxidation of short-chain alkanes in hydrothermal sediments: potential influences on sulfur cycling and microbial diversity.

    PubMed

    Adams, Melissa M; Hoarfrost, Adrienne L; Bose, Arpita; Joye, Samantha B; Girguis, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    Short-chain alkanes play a substantial role in carbon and sulfur cycling at hydrocarbon-rich environments globally, yet few studies have examined the metabolism of ethane (C2), propane (C3), and butane (C4) in anoxic sediments in contrast to methane (C1). In hydrothermal vent systems, short-chain alkanes are formed over relatively short geological time scales via thermogenic processes and often exist at high concentrations. The sediment-covered hydrothermal vent systems at Middle Valley (MV, Juan de Fuca Ridge) are an ideal site for investigating the anaerobic oxidation of C1-C4 alkanes, given the elevated temperatures and dissolved hydrocarbon species characteristic of these metalliferous sediments. We examined whether MV microbial communities oxidized C1-C4 alkanes under mesophilic to thermophilic sulfate-reducing conditions. Here we present data from discrete temperature (25, 55, and 75°C) anaerobic batch reactor incubations of MV sediments supplemented with individual alkanes. Co-registered alkane consumption and sulfate reduction (SR) measurements provide clear evidence for C1-C4 alkane oxidation linked to SR over time and across temperatures. In these anaerobic batch reactor sediments, 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing revealed that Deltaproteobacteria, particularly a novel sulfate-reducing lineage, were the likely phylotypes mediating the oxidation of C2-C4 alkanes. Maximum C1-C4 alkane oxidation rates occurred at 55°C, which reflects the mid-core sediment temperature profile and corroborates previous studies of rate maxima for the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Of the alkanes investigated, C3 was oxidized at the highest rate over time, then C4, C2, and C1, respectively. The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the potential competition between the anaerobic oxidation of C2-C4alkanes with AOM for available oxidants and the influence on the fate of C1 derived from these hydrothermal systems.

  20. Sulfur cycling of intertidal Wadden Sea sediments (Konigshafen, Island of Sylt, Germany): sulfate reduction and sulfur gas emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, E.; Bodenbender, J.; Jensen, M. H.; Rennenberg, H.; Jensen, K. M.

    2000-05-01

    Sulfate reduction rates (SRR t) and reduced inorganic sulfur pools (RIS) in Wadden Sea sediment as well as sulfur gas emissions directly to the atmosphere were measured at intervals of 2 to 12 months from 1991 to 1994. Three stations were chosen in the intertidal embayment, Königshafen, representing the range of sediments found in the Wadden Sea: Organic-poor coarse sand, organic-poor and Arenicola marina inhabited medium sand, and organic-rich muddy sand. Maximum SRR t were 2 to 5 times higher in muddy sand than in the sandy sediments. The depth-integrated SRR t varied 12 to 13-fold on a seasonal basis at the three stations. Although temperature controls biochemical processes, the overall control is more complex due to the simultaneous influence of other seasonal factors such as availability of organic matter and oxidation level of surface sediment. The sedimentary RIS pools were low due to iron limitation and contained only 30% acid volatile sulfur (AVS). Muddy sand had up to an order of magnitude more RIS than the two sandy sediments. The turnover of RIS was rapid (turnover time from ˜1 to 32 h), fastest during summer and at the sandy stations. The emission of S-gases was dominated by H 2S during summer (45-67% of the total), and was highest in muddy and lowest in coarse sand. H 2S was less important in early spring (3-49% of the total). Other sulfur gases, such as COS, DMS and CS 2, each accounted for less than 20% of the total sulfur emissions with no specific temporal and spatial pattern. Due to the low content of metals in the sediment, the reduced sulfur pools are cycled rapidly with chemical and biological reoxidation at oxic-anoxic boundaries as a major sink. Thus, the emissions of H 2S account for less than 1‰ of the sulfide produced.

  1. The Effect of Nitrogen Enrichment on C1-Cycling Microorganisms and Methane Flux in Salt Marsh Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Irina C.; Vivanco, Lucía; Bentley, Peris N.; Martiny, Jennifer B. H.

    2012-01-01

    Methane (CH4) flux from ecosystems is driven by C1-cycling microorganisms – the methanogens and the methylotrophs. Little is understood about what regulates these communities, complicating predictions about how global change drivers such as nitrogen enrichment will affect methane cycling. Using a nitrogen addition gradient experiment in three Southern California salt marshes, we show that sediment CH4 flux increased linearly with increasing nitrogen addition (1.23 μg CH4 m−2 day−1 for each g N m−2 year−1 applied) after 7 months of fertilization. To test the reason behind this increased CH4 flux, we conducted a microcosm experiment altering both nitrogen and carbon availability under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Methanogenesis appeared to be both nitrogen and carbon (acetate) limited. N and C each increased methanogenesis by 18%, and together by 44%. In contrast, methanotrophy was stimulated by carbon (methane) addition (830%), but was unchanged by nitrogen addition. Sequence analysis of the sediment methylotroph community with the methanol dehydrogenase gene (mxaF) revealed three distinct clades that fall outside of known lineages. However, in agreement with the microcosm results, methylotroph abundance (assayed by qPCR) and composition (assayed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis) did not vary across the experimental nitrogen gradient in the field. Together, these results suggest that nitrogen enrichment to salt marsh sediments increases methane flux by stimulating the methanogen community. PMID:22470369

  2. The effect of nitrogen enrichment on c(1)-cycling microorganisms and methane flux in salt marsh sediments.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Irina C; Vivanco, Lucía; Bentley, Peris N; Martiny, Jennifer B H

    2012-01-01

    Methane (CH(4)) flux from ecosystems is driven by C(1)-cycling microorganisms - the methanogens and the methylotrophs. Little is understood about what regulates these communities, complicating predictions about how global change drivers such as nitrogen enrichment will affect methane cycling. Using a nitrogen addition gradient experiment in three Southern California salt marshes, we show that sediment CH(4) flux increased linearly with increasing nitrogen addition (1.23 μg CH(4) m(-2) day(-1) for each g N m(-2) year(-1) applied) after 7 months of fertilization. To test the reason behind this increased CH(4) flux, we conducted a microcosm experiment altering both nitrogen and carbon availability under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Methanogenesis appeared to be both nitrogen and carbon (acetate) limited. N and C each increased methanogenesis by 18%, and together by 44%. In contrast, methanotrophy was stimulated by carbon (methane) addition (830%), but was unchanged by nitrogen addition. Sequence analysis of the sediment methylotroph community with the methanol dehydrogenase gene (mxaF) revealed three distinct clades that fall outside of known lineages. However, in agreement with the microcosm results, methylotroph abundance (assayed by qPCR) and composition (assayed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis) did not vary across the experimental nitrogen gradient in the field. Together, these results suggest that nitrogen enrichment to salt marsh sediments increases methane flux by stimulating the methanogen community.

  3. sup 210 Po and sup 210 Pb remobilization from lake sediments in relation to iron and manganese cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, G.; Hemond, H.F. )

    1990-08-01

    The behavior of {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb was studied in the water column of an oligotrophic, dimictic lake. Direct uptake of the radionuclides by sediments was negligible compared to removal on particles, and {sup 210}Pb scavenging was 4 times that of {sup 210}Po. Both nuclides were found to be significantly remobilized from sediments into the stratified, anoxic water column. Releases seem to be linked to the cycling of the transition metals, iron and possibly manganese. The distribution of both iron and {sup 210}Pb in stratified, anoxic waters can be modeled as constant release and rapid horizontal mixing/dilution; vertical turbulent transport had a negligible effect on element distributions. Upon contact with oxygen, iron rapidly reprecipitates, forming a particulate maximum and rescavenging {sup 210}Pb. Unlike {sup 210}Pb, much {sup 210}Po is released from sediments before overlying water becomes completely anoxic, leading to unsupported {sup 210}Po. {sup 210}Po cycling in the stratified water column is more complex than that of {sup 210}Pb, and additional removal mechanism(s) may be active, including perhaps oxidation of soluble Po(II) to insoluble Po(IV).

  4. The annual cycle of sedimentation in Saanich inlet, British Columbia: implications for the interpretation of diatom fossil assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancetta, Constance; Calvert, Stephen E.

    1988-01-01

    Data derived from monthly sediment traps at three depths near the head and mouth of Saanich Inlet yield a detailed record of the seasonal cycle of production and vertical flux to the sediments. The material is primarily composed of diatom frustules and silt-to-clay-sized lithic fragments, with dinoflagellates and naked algae present in summer samples. Diatoms dominate from April to September while clastics dominate from October to March. Particles occur primarily in loose flocs; pellets are common in early winter and in summer material, and consist of an indiscriminant mixture of the same particles seen in co-occurring flocs. The seasonal succession of taxa is similar at both sites and is transported to the sediment with little modification by dissolution. Carbon flux is a poor indicator or productivity, due to the strong effect of recycling in the surface waters during spring and uncertainty as to the source of the carbon accumulating in the traps. Although diatom flux is an adequate indicator of primary production, transforming each taxon to equivalent cell volume yields a more accurate picture of the seasonal cycle of production. Relative abundance (taxon percentage) data can be as useful as, and in some cases more accurate than, absolute flux (number per unit time), while number-per-gram may be highly misleading as an estimator of production. Lateral advection and benthic resuspension affect monthly data and annual valve-flux data, but appear to have no net effect upon annual percentage data.

  5. Cycling of iron and trace metals in the sediments of acidic lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Gubala, C.P.

    1988-01-01

    This study focused on four lakes receiving acidic deposition located in the Adirondack Park, New York, U.S.A. The biogeochemistry of sediments and interstitial water along a depth transect in Big Moose, Lake was examined by chemical analysis of sediment and pore water. Solid phases of iron, manganese, aluminum, lead and zinc were quantified, using a sequential chemical extraction process. {sup 210}Pb dating, and equilibrium and diffusion transport modeling were used to assess the degree of post-depositional reprocessing of these metals. The sediment chemistry of Dart Lake, Lake Rondaxe and South Lake, were compared to the sediment processes observed in Big Moose Lake to assess inter-lake variability.

  6. High-frequency dynamics of ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Kruse, Dustin E; Dayton, Paul A; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2005-11-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents enhance echoes from the microvasculature and enable the visualization of flow in smaller vessels. Here, we optically and acoustically investigate microbubble oscillation and echoes following insonation with a 10 MHz center frequency pulse. A high-speed camera system with a temporal resolution of 10 ns, which provides two-dimensional (2-D) frame images and streak images, is used in optical experiments. Two confocally aligned transducers, transmitting at 10 MHz and receiving at 5 MHz, are used in acoustical experiments in order to detect subharmonic components. Results of a numerical evaluation of the modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation are used to predict the dynamics of a microbubble and are compared to results of in vitro experiments. From the optical observations of a single microbubble, nonlinear oscillation, destruction, and radiation force are observed. The maximum bubble expansion, resulting from insonation with a 20-cycle, 10-MHz linear chirp with a peak negative pressure of 3.5 MPa, has been evaluated. For an initial diameter ranging from 1.5 to 5 microm, a maximum diameter less than 8 microm is produced during insonation. Optical and acoustical experiments provide insight into the mechanisms of destruction, including fragmentation and active diffusion. High-frequency pulse transmission may provide the opportunity to detect contrast echoes resulting from a single pulse, may be robust in the presence of tissue motion, and may provide the opportunity to incorporate high-frequency ultrasound into destruction-replenishment techniques.

  7. Corrosion monitoring using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Corrosion develops due to adverse environmental conditions during the life cycle of a range of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the structural integrity. The nondestructive detection and monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. The wave propagation and interference of the different guided wave modes depends on the thickness of the structure. Laboratory experiments were conducted and the wall thickness reduced by consecutive milling of the steel structure. Further measurements were conducted using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath and the damage severity monitored. From the measured signal change due to the wave mode interference the wall thickness reduction was monitored. The high frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  8. High-Frequency Dynamics of Ultrasound Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yang; Kruse, Dustin E.; Dayton, Paul A.; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents enhance echoes from the microvasculature and enable the visualization of flow in smaller vessels. Here, we optically and acoustically investigate microbubble oscillation and echoes following insonation with a 10 MHz center frequency pulse. A high-speed camera system with a temporal resolution of 10 ns, which provides two-dimensional (2-D) frame images and streak images, is used in optical experiments. Two confocally aligned transducers, transmitting at 10 MHz and receiving at 5 MHz, are used in acoustical experiments in order to detect subharmonic components. Results of a numerical evaluation of the modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation are used to predict the dynamics of a microbubble and are compared to results of in vitro experiments. From the optical observations of a single microbubble, nonlinear oscillation, destruction, and radiation force are observed. The maximum bubble expansion, resulting from insonation with a 20-cycle, 10-MHz linear chirp with a peak negative pressure of 3.5 MPa, has been evaluated. For an initial diameter ranging from 1.5 to 5 μm, a maximum diameter less than 8 μm is produced during insonation. Optical and acoustical experiments provide insight into the mechanisms of destruction, including fragmentation and active diffusion. High-frequency pulse transmission may provide the opportunity to detect contrast echoes resulting from a single pulse, may be robust in the presence of tissue motion, and may provide the opportunity to incorporate high-frequency ultrasound into destruction-replenishment techniques. PMID:16422410

  9. Corrosion monitoring using high-frequency guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, P.

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion can develop due to adverse environmental conditions during the life cycle of a range of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the reduction of the strength and thus degradation of the structural integrity. The monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic wedge transducers with single sided access to the structure, guided wave modes were selectively generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. The wave propagation and interference of the different guided wave modes depends on the thickness of the structure. Laboratory experiments were conducted for wall thickness reduction due to milling of the steel structure. From the measured signal changes due to the wave mode interference the reduced wall thickness was monitored. Good agreement with theoretical predictions was achieved. The high frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  10. Impact of Aeolian Dry Deposition of Reactive Iron Minerals on Sulfur Cycling in Sediments of the Gulf of Aqaba

    PubMed Central

    Blonder, Barak; Boyko, Valeria; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Antler, Gilad; Sinichkin, Uriel; Knossow, Nadav; Klein, Rotem; Kamyshny, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    The Gulf of Aqaba is an oligotrophic marine system with oxygen-rich water column and organic carbon-poor sediments (≤0.6% at sites that are not influenced by anthropogenic impact). Aeolian dust deposition from the Arabian, Sinai, and Sahara Deserts is an important source of sediment, especially at the deep-water sites of the Gulf, which are less affected by sediment transport from the Arava Desert during seasonal flash floods. Microbial sulfate reduction in sediments is inferred from the presence of pyrite (although at relatively low concentrations), the presence of sulfide oxidation intermediates, and by the sulfur isotopic composition of sulfate and solid-phase sulfides. Saharan dust is characterized by high amounts of iron minerals such as hematite and goethite. We demonstrated, that the resulting high sedimentary content of reactive iron(III) (hydr)oxides, originating from this aeolian dry deposition of desert dust, leads to fast re-oxidation of hydrogen sulfide produced during microbial sulfate reduction and limits preservation of reduced sulfur in the form of pyrite. We conclude that at these sites the sedimentary sulfur cycle may be defined as cryptic. PMID:28676799

  11. Impact of Aeolian Dry Deposition of Reactive Iron Minerals on Sulfur Cycling in Sediments of the Gulf of Aqaba.

    PubMed

    Blonder, Barak; Boyko, Valeria; Turchyn, Alexandra V; Antler, Gilad; Sinichkin, Uriel; Knossow, Nadav; Klein, Rotem; Kamyshny, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    The Gulf of Aqaba is an oligotrophic marine system with oxygen-rich water column and organic carbon-poor sediments (≤0.6% at sites that are not influenced by anthropogenic impact). Aeolian dust deposition from the Arabian, Sinai, and Sahara Deserts is an important source of sediment, especially at the deep-water sites of the Gulf, which are less affected by sediment transport from the Arava Desert during seasonal flash floods. Microbial sulfate reduction in sediments is inferred from the presence of pyrite (although at relatively low concentrations), the presence of sulfide oxidation intermediates, and by the sulfur isotopic composition of sulfate and solid-phase sulfides. Saharan dust is characterized by high amounts of iron minerals such as hematite and goethite. We demonstrated, that the resulting high sedimentary content of reactive iron(III) (hydr)oxides, originating from this aeolian dry deposition of desert dust, leads to fast re-oxidation of hydrogen sulfide produced during microbial sulfate reduction and limits preservation of reduced sulfur in the form of pyrite. We conclude that at these sites the sedimentary sulfur cycle may be defined as cryptic.

  12. Effects of shelter and enrichment on the ecology and nutrient cycling of microbial communities of subtidal carbonate sediments.

    PubMed

    Forehead, Hugh I; Kendrick, Gary A; Thompson, Peter A

    2012-04-01

    The interactions between physical disturbances and biogeochemical cycling are fundamental to ecology. The benthic microbial community controls the major pathway of nutrient recycling in most shallow-water ecosystems. This community is strongly influenced by physical forcing and nutrient inputs. Our study tests the hypotheses that benthic microbial communities respond to shelter and enrichment with (1) increased biomass, (2) change in community composition and (3) increased uptake of inorganic nutrients from the water column. Replicate in situ plots were sheltered from physical disturbance and enriched with inorganic nutrients or left without additional nutrients. At t(0) and after 10 days, sediment-water fluxes of nutrients, O(2) and N(2) , were measured, the community was characterized with biomarkers. Autochthonous benthic microalgal (BMA) biomass increased 30% with shelter and a natural fivefold increase in nutrient concentration; biomass did not increase with greater enrichment. Diatoms remained the dominant taxon of BMA, suggesting that the sediments were not N or Si limited. Bacteria and other heterotrophic organisms increased with enrichment and shelter. Daily exchanges of inorganic nutrients between sediments and the water column did not change in response to shelter or nutrient enrichment. In these sediments, physical disturbance, perhaps in conjunction with nutrient enrichment, was the primary determinant of microbial biomass. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Benthic sediment composition and nutrient cycling in an Intermittently Closed and Open Lake Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spooner, D. R.; Maher, W.

    2009-01-01

    Surfical sediments within Corunna Lake, a moderate size Intermittently Closed and Open Lake Lagoon (ICOLL), were examined for solid phase nutrient concentrations (TN, TP, TOC,) and solute exchange rates between the sediment and water column (O 2, NO 3-N, NH 4-N, FRP, and N 2). The surfical sediments in Corunna Lake contained high concentrations of TN (5 mg/g dry mass), total phosphorus (0.6 mg/g dry mass), and TOC (~ 5% dry mass). The carbon stable isotope ratio ( δ13C) and TOC:TN ratios ( δ13C ~ - 24, TOC:TN ~ 11-14) demonstrated that the composition of the organic matter in the sediment was a mixture derived primarily of degraded planktonic matter. The close association between TP and Fe concentrations highlighted the potential role Fe plays in mediating Filterable Reactive Phosphorus (FRP) concentrations in the water column of Corunna Lake. In situ benthic chamber incubations were used to measure benthic fluxes. Solute exchange rates between the sediment and water column in Corunna Lake were similar to other reported studies (O 2 = - 469 to - 1765 µmol m - 2 h - 1, NH 4-N = 0.1-63 µmol m - 2 h - 1, NO 2/NO 3-N = 0 µmol m - 2 h - 1, FRP = - 4-1.6 µmol m - 2 h - 1and N 2 = 12-356 µmol m - 2 h - 1). As more carbon was deposited and mineralized the efficiency of the bacterial population to denitrify nitrogen in the sediment decreases. The linkage between land use and benthic biogeochemistry was also explored. A dairy farm exists in the middle catchment of Corunna Lake, and the receiving bay sediment consistently demonstrated the highest oxygen consumption rates in winter and spring (- 1408 µmol m - 2 h - 1 in winter, - 1691 µmol m - 2 h - 1 in spring) and lowest denitrification efficiencies during summer (~ 3%). Nitrate/nitrite fluxes were not observed during any of the chamber incubations, with the concentrations of nitrate/nitrite being below detection limits (< 10 μg/L). Seasonal changes influenced the rates of solute exchange between the sediment and

  14. Effects of Louisiana crude oil on the sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) during a life-cycle exposure to laboratory oiled sediment.

    PubMed

    Raimondo, Sandy; Hemmer, Becky L; Lilavois, Crystal R; Krzykwa, Julie; Almario, Alex; Awkerman, Jill A; Barron, Mace G

    2016-11-01

    Determining the long-term effects of crude oil exposure is critical for ascertaining population-level ecological risks of spill events. A 19-week complete life-cycle experiment was conducted with the estuarine sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) exposed to reference (uncontaminated) sediment spiked with laboratory weathered South Louisiana crude (SLC) oil at five concentrations as well as one unspiked sediment control and one seawater (no sediment) control. Newly hatched larvae were exposed to the oiled sediments at measured concentrations of < 1 (sediment control), 50, 103, 193, 347, and 711 mg total polyaromatic hydrocarbons (tPAH)/kg dry sediment. Juveniles were exposed through the reproductively active adult phase at measured concentrations of <1 (sediment control), 52, 109, 199, 358, and 751 mg tPAH/kg sediment. Throughout the exposure, fish were assessed for growth, survival, and reproduction. Resulting F1 embryos were then collected, incubated, and hatched in clean water to determine if parental full life-cycle exposure to oiled sediment produced trans-generational effects. Larvae experienced significantly reduced standard length (5-13% reduction) and wet weight (13-35% reduction) at concentrations at and above 50 and 103 mg tPAH/kg sediment, respectively. At 92 and 132 days post hatch (dph), standard length was reduced (7-13% reduction) at 199 and 109 mg tPAH/kg dry sediment, respectively, and wet weight for both time periods was reduced at concentrations at and above 109 mg tPAH/kg dry sediment (21-38% reduction). A significant reduction (51-65%) in F0 fecundity occurred at the two highest test concentrations, but no difference was observed in F1 embryo survival. This study is the first to report the effects of chronic laboratory exposure to oiled sediment, and will assist the development of population models for evaluating risk to benthic spawning fish species exposed to oiled sediments. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1627

  15. The Effects of Zebra Mussels on Nitrogen Cycling and Sediment Physiochemical Characteristics: A Laboratory Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruesewitz, D. A.; Tank, J. L.; Bernot, M. J.

    2005-05-01

    Many ecosystems experiencing anthropogenic nitrogen loading have also been invaded by zebra mussels (ZM), therefore it is important to understand how these human-induced changes interact. In particular, ZM may impact biogeochemical transformations. We hypothesized that high NH4+ waste from ZM will increase sediment nitrification rates, and increase NO3--N available for denitrification. To test this prediction, aquaria were stocked with either no ZM or 10,000 individuals m-2. Sediment nitrification (via nitrapyrin-inhibition technique), denitrification (via chloramphenicol-amended acetylene block technique), and sediment O2 profiles (using microelectrodes) were measured weekly for 1 month. The presence of ZM increased nitrification and denitrification rates over initial conditions throughout all weeks (RM ANOVA, p<0.05). Sediment nitrification in the ZM aquaria increased to 47 ± 2.1 μ g NH4+ -NgAFDM-1h-1 by the 3rd week in comparison to 24 ± 4.4 μ g NH4+ -NgAFDM-1h-1 in control aquaria. Sediment denitrification peaked at week 2 in the ZM aquaria at 330 ± 24 μ g N2O gAFDM-1h-1 but remained low in control aquaria throughout. There was a stronger correlation between nitrification and denitrification rates in the presence of ZM (R=0.32, 0.12 respectively). These results, in addition to more frequent hypoxia in sediment oxygen profiles, suggest closer coupling between nitrification and denitrification when ZM are present.

  16. CO2 leakage from carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) systems affects organic matter cycling in surface marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Rastelli, Eugenio; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Amaro, Teresa; Greco, Silvestro; Lo Martire, Marco; Carugati, Laura; Queirós, Ana M; Widdicombe, Stephen; Danovaro, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), involving the injection of CO2 into the sub-seabed, is being promoted worldwide as a feasible option for reducing the anthropogenic CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. However, the effects on the marine ecosystems of potential CO2 leakages originating from these storage sites have only recently received scientific attention, and little information is available on the possible impacts of the resulting CO2-enriched seawater plumes on the surrounding benthic ecosystem. In the present study, we conducted a 20-weeks mesocosm experiment exposing coastal sediments to CO2-enriched seawater (at 5000 or 20,000 ppm), to test the effects on the microbial enzymatic activities responsible for the decomposition and turnover of the sedimentary organic matter in surface sediments down to 15 cm depth. Our results indicate that the exposure to high-CO2 concentrations reduced significantly the enzymatic activities in the top 5 cm of sediments, but had no effects on subsurface sediment horizons (from 5 to 15 cm depth). In the surface sediments, both 5000 and 20,000 ppm CO2 treatments determined a progressive decrease over time in the protein degradation (up to 80%). Conversely, the degradation rates of carbohydrates and organic phosphorous remained unaltered in the first 2 weeks, but decreased significantly (up to 50%) in the longer term when exposed at 20,000 ppm of CO2. Such effects were associated with a significant change in the composition of the biopolymeric carbon (due to the accumulation of proteins over time in sediments exposed to high-pCO2 treatments), and a significant decrease (∼20-50% at 5000 and 20,000 ppm respectively) in nitrogen regeneration. We conclude that in areas immediately surrounding an active and long-lasting leak of CO2 from CCS reservoirs, organic matter cycling would be significantly impacted in the surface sediment layers. The evidence of negligible impacts on the deeper sediments should be considered with

  17. Rapid post-seismic landslide evacuation boosted by dynamic river width and implications for sediment fluxes during the seismic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, Philippe; Croissant, Thomas; Lague, Dimitri; Davy, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    along the fluvial network and of the exported sediment flux throughout several seismic cycles. These results highlight how landscapes and sediment fluxes respond on longer time scales to a succession of earthquakes able to trigger landslides.

  18. Active Control of High-Frequency Combustor Instability Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2003-01-01

    To reduce the environmental impact of aerospace propulsion systems, extensive research is being done in the development of lean-burning (low fuel-to-air ratio) combustors that can reduce emissions throughout the mission cycle. However, these lean-burning combustors have an increased susceptibility to thermoacoustic instabilities-high-pressure oscillations much like sound waves that can cause severe high-frequency vibrations in the combustor. These pressure waves can fatigue the combustor components and even the downstream turbine blades. This can significantly decrease the combustor and turbine safe operating life. Thus, suppression of the thermoacoustic combustor instabilities is an enabling technology for lean, low-emissions combustors. Under the Propulsion and Power Program, the NASA Glenn Research Center in partnership with Pratt & Whitney, United Technologies Research Center, and Georgia Institute of Technology is developing technologies for the active control of combustion instabilities.

  19. Metal cycling during sediment early diagenesis in a water reservoir affected by acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Torres, E; Ayora, C; Canovas, C R; García-Robledo, E; Galván, L; Sarmiento, A M

    2013-09-01

    The discharge of acid mine drainage (AMD) into a reservoir may seriously affect the water quality. To investigate the metal transfer between the water and the sediment, three cores were collected from the Sancho Reservoir (Iberian Pyrite Belt, SW Spain) during different seasons: turnover event; oxic, stratified period; anoxic and under shallow perennially oxic conditions. The cores were sliced in an oxygen-free atmosphere, after which pore water was extracted by centrifugation and analyzed. A sequential extraction was then applied to the sediments to extract the water-soluble, monosulfide, low crystallinity Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide, crystalline Fe(III)-oxide, organic, pyrite and residual phases. The results showed that, despite the acidic chemistry of the water column (pH<4), the reservoir accumulated a high amount of autochthonous organic matter (up to 12 wt.%). Oxygen was consumed in 1mm of sediment due to organic matter and sulfide oxidation. Below the oxic layer, Fe(III) and sulfate reduction peaks developed concomitantly and the resulting Fe(II) and S(II) were removed as sulfides and probably as S linked to organic matter. During the oxic season, schwertmannite precipitated in the water column and was redissolved in the organic-rich sediment, after which iron and arsenic diffused upwards again to the water column. The flux of precipitates was found to be two orders of magnitude higher than the aqueous one, and therefore the sediment acted as a sink for As and Fe. Trace metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Ni, Co) and Al always diffused from the reservoir water and were incorporated into the sediments as sulfides and oxyhydroxides, respectively. In spite of the fact that the benthic fluxes estimated for trace metal and Al were much higher than those reported for lake and marine sediments, they only accounted for less than 10% of their total inventory dissolved in the column water.

  20. Resent developments in high-frequency surface-wave techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, J.; Pan, Y.; Zeng, C.

    2012-12-01

    calculate phase velocities when wavelengths < 2.5 h (h is the thickness of the topmost layer). Both solutions have been verified using numerical modeling both in the time-space and the frequency-velocity domains. The algorithm that we newly developed can handle any arbitrary velocity models, which is the foundation of high-frequency Rayleigh-wave methods and is critical to near-surface applications. Seismic numerical modeling is a matured technique in oil/gas seismic exploration. Applying algorithms used in oil/gas industry to near-surface seismic modeling needs extra caution. Unconsolidated sediments are most common materials in near surface, which results in extremely high Poisson's ratios, such as 0.49. Numerical modeling of P-Sv data with the perfect match layer technique works successfully in oil/gas industry. When a Poisson's ratio of a medium is 0.38 or higher, however, it fails. With the multiaxial perfect match layer (MPML) technique, we successfully handle this problem of modeling high-frequency P-Sv data due to a medium with a Poisson's ratio being higher than 0.38. Modeling results of high-frequency P-Sv data with high Poisson's ratios in the time-space and the frequency-velocity domains demonstrate the beauty of the MPML.

  1. Biotic and abiotic pathways of phosphorus cycling in minerals and sediments: insights from oxygen isotopes in phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Jaisi, Deb P.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Stout, Lisa M.; Varga, Tamas; Blake, Ruth E.

    2011-07-06

    A key question to address in the development of oxygen isotope ratios in phosphate (18Op) as a tracer of biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus in ancient and modern environments is the nature of isotopic signatures associated with uptake and cycling of mineral-bound phosphate by microorganisms. Here we present experimental results aimed at understanding the biotic and abiotic pathway of P cycling during biological uptake of phosphate sorbed to ferrihydrite and the selective uptake of specific sedimentary phosphate phases by Escherichia coli, Vibrio fischeri and Marinobacter aquaeolei. Results indicate that a significant fraction of ferrihydrite-bound phosphate is biologically available. The fraction of phosphate taken up by E. coli attained an equilibrium isotopic composition in a short time (<50 hrs) due to efficient O-isotope exchange between phosphate and water (biotic pathway). The difference in isotopic composition between newly equilibrated aqueous and residual sorbed phosphate promoted the exchange of intact phosphate radicals (abiotic pathway) so that this difference gradually became negligible. In sediment containing different P phases, E. coli and V. fischeri ‘extracted’ loosely sorbed phosphate first while M. aquaeolei preferred iron-oxide bound phosphate. Each bacterium imprinted a biotic isotopic signature on each P phase that it took up and cycled. For example, the 18Op value of the sorbed phosphate phase shifted gradually towards equilibrium isotopic composition and the value of Fe oxide-bound phosphate showed slight changes at first, but when new iron oxides were formed, co-precipitated/occluded phosphate retained 18O values of aqueous phosphate at that time. Concentrations and isotopic compositions of authigenic and detrital phosphates did not change, suggesting that these phosphate phases were not utilized by bacteria. These findings support burgeoning applications of 18Op as a tracer of phosphorus cycling in sediments, soils and aquatic

  2. Long-term (two annual cycles) phytoremediation of heavy metal-contaminated estuarine sediments by Phragmites australis.

    PubMed

    Cicero-Fernández, Diego; Peña-Fernández, Manuel; Expósito-Camargo, Jose A; Antizar-Ladislao, Blanca

    2017-09-25

    The long-term (i.e., two consecutive annual cycles) ability of Phragmites australis to remediate estuarine sediments contaminated with heavy metals (Co, Ni, Mo, Cd, Pb, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn and Hg) and trace elements of concern (As, Se, Ba) was investigated using an experimental approach on a pilot plant scale. The accumulation of these elements on belowground and aboveground tissues was monitored during vegetative and senescence periods for two populations of P. australis, originally from contaminated (MIC) and non-contaminated (GAL) estuaries, respectively. The initial concentration of the elements in the contaminated estuarine sediment decreased in the following order: Fe>Mn>Zn>Pb>Ba>Cr>As>Cu>Ni>Co>Mo>Cd>Se>Hg. A similar trend was recorded in the belowground biomass following remediation, suggesting the potential role of P. australis as an effective biomonitoring tool. Hg was not detected in any plant tissue. An overall annual increase of concentration levels in belowground tissue was observed. Overall, this study suggested that P. australis populations from GAL were substantially more efficient in taking up Ni, Mo and Cr during the second annual cycle in both belowground and aboveground tissue than P. australis populations from MIC. Calculated bio-concentration factors (BCF) suggested a clear metal excluder strategy for Co, Cd, Pb, Cu and Fe, with accumulation and stabilisation belowground, with limited translocation into aerial tissues observed during the length of this study. An excluder behaviour for Zn, Ba and Mn was detected during the second annual cycle, coinciding with a substantial increase of concentration levels belowground. This study demonstrated for the first time the long term efficacy of P. australis for phytoremediation of heavy metal contaminated estuarine sediments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Indirect effects of climate change on zinc cycling in sediments: The role of changing water levels.

    PubMed

    Nedrich, Sara M; Burton, G Allen

    2017-03-06

    Increased variability in lake and river water levels associated with changing climate, could impact the fate and effects of metals in redox sensitive sediments through the alteration of microbial communities, acid-base and redox chemistry. The objective of this study is to determine the influence of water level fluctuation on metal speciation in pore water and predict environmental risk to high carbonate systems. Using experimental microcosms with sediments collected from four metal contaminated coastal freshwater wetlands in Michigan, we conducted water level fluctuation experiments. Porewater and sediment metals (Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Zn) and important metal binding phases (iron-oxide speciation, acid-volatile sulfide) were quantified. In a short-term drying (seiche) experiment, there were decreases in all porewater metals upon inundation of saturated sediments. During a drought experiment, re-inundation of oxidized sediments increased porewater Cu, Zn, Mg, Ca for most sites. Porewater Zn increased upon inundation to levels exceeding the USEPA threshold for chronic toxicity. These data show the dissolution of metal carbonates and metal sulfates contributes to metal release after re-flooding. These data show we may expect increased ecological risk to organisms present in drought sensitive regions where altered hydroperiods are likely to increase metal bioavailability. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. A High Frequency Model of Cascade Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    1998-01-01

    Closed form asymptotic expressions for computing high frequency noise generated by an annular cascade in an infinite duct containing a uniform flow are presented. There are two new elements in this work. First, the annular duct mode representation does not rely on the often-used Bessel function expansion resulting in simpler expressions for both the radial eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the duct. In particular, the new representation provides an explicit approximate formula for the radial eigenvalues obviating the need for solutions of the transcendental annular duct eigenvalue equation. Also, the radial eigenfunctions are represented in terms of exponentials eliminating the numerical problems associated with generating the Bessel functions on a computer. The second new element is the construction of an unsteady response model for an annular cascade. The new construction satisfies the boundary conditions on both the cascade and duct walls simultaneously adding a new level of realism to the noise calculations. Preliminary results which demonstrate the effectiveness of the new elements are presented. A discussion of the utility of the asymptotic formulas for calculating cascade discrete tone as well as broadband noise is also included.

  5. Extremely high-frequency therapy in oncology.

    PubMed

    Teppone, Mikhail; Avakyan, Romen

    2010-11-01

    This article represents a review of the literature, mainly from Russian sources, dealing with the therapeutic application of low-intensity electromagnetic radiation in the millimeter band applied to experimental and clinical oncology. At the early stage of these studies, efficacy and safety of millimeter electromagnetic radiation (extremely high frequency [EHF]) was proved for various types of malignant tumors. The majority of the further studies demonstrated the high efficacy and safety of millimeter wave radiation in treating patients suffering from both benign and malignant tumors. Developments led to treatment on skin melanoma, cancer of the ear-nose-throat, bowel and breast cancer, cancer of the uterus, lung, and stomach, solid tumors, as well as lymphoma. The main indications for this therapy are (1) preparation prior to radical treatment; (2) prevention and treatment of side-effects and complications from chemotherapy and radiotherapy; (3) prevention of metastases, relapses, and dissemination of the tumor; (4) treatment of the paraneoplastic syndrome; and (5) palliative therapy of incurable patients. In spite of the fact that not all mechanisms underlying effects of EHF therapy are known as yet, this therapeutic modality has been shown to have great potential in clinical oncology from studies performed in Eastern Europe and Russia.

  6. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-01-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  7. A high frequency electromagnetic impedance imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Hung-Wen; Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex

    2003-01-15

    Non-invasive, high resolution geophysical mapping of the shallow subsurface is necessary for delineation of buried hazardous wastes, detecting unexploded ordinance, verifying and monitoring of containment or moisture contents, and other environmental applications. Electromagnetic (EM) techniques can be used for this purpose since electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity are representative of the subsurface media. Measurements in the EM frequency band between 1 and 100 MHz are very important for such applications, because the induction number of many targets is small and the ability to determine the subsurface distribution of both electrical properties is required. Earlier workers were successful in developing systems for detecting anomalous areas, but quantitative interpretation of the data was difficult. Accurate measurements are necessary, but difficult to achieve for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface. We are developing a broadband non-invasive method for accurately mapping the electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of the shallow subsurface using an EM impedance approach similar to the MT exploration technique. Electric and magnetic sensors were tested to ensure that stray EM scattering is minimized and the quality of the data collected with the high-frequency impedance (HFI) system is good enough to allow high-resolution, multi-dimensional imaging of hidden targets. Additional efforts are being made to modify and further develop existing sensors and transmitters to improve the imaging capability and data acquisition efficiency.

  8. High-frequency plasma-heating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brambilla, Marco; Lallia, Pascal

    1978-01-01

    An array of adjacent wave guides feed high-frequency energy into a vacuum chamber in which a toroidal plasma is confined by a magnetic field, the wave guide array being located between two toroidal current windings. Waves are excited in the wave guide at a frequency substantially equal to the lower frequency hybrid wave of the plasma and a substantially equal phase shift is provided from one guide to the next between the waves therein. For plasmas of low peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TE.sub.01 mode and the output electric field is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. For exciting waves in plasmas of high peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TM.sub.01 mode and the magnetic field at the wave guide outlets is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. The wave excited at the outlet of the wave guide array is a progressive wave propagating in the direction opposite to that of the toroidal current and is, therefore, not absorbed by so-called "runaway" electrons.

  9. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-03-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  10. Aerodynamics of high frequency flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zheng; Roll, Jesse; Cheng, Bo; Deng, Xinyan

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic performance of high frequency flapping wings using a 2.5 gram robotic insect mechanism developed in our lab. The mechanism flaps up to 65Hz with a pair of man-made wing mounted with 10cm wingtip-to-wingtip span. The mean aerodynamic lift force was measured by a lever platform, and the flow velocity and vorticity were measured using a stereo DPIV system in the frontal, parasagittal, and horizontal planes. Both near field (leading edge vortex) and far field flow (induced flow) were measured with instantaneous and phase-averaged results. Systematic experiments were performed on the man-made wings, cicada and hawk moth wings due to their similar size, frequency and Reynolds number. For insect wings, we used both dry and freshly-cut wings. The aerodynamic force increase with flapping frequency and the man-made wing generates more than 4 grams of lift at 35Hz with 3 volt input. Here we present the experimental results and the major differences in their aerodynamic performances.

  11. High-frequency graphene voltage amplifier.

    PubMed

    Han, Shu-Jen; Jenkins, Keith A; Valdes Garcia, Alberto; Franklin, Aaron D; Bol, Ageeth A; Haensch, Wilfried

    2011-09-14

    While graphene transistors have proven capable of delivering gigahertz-range cutoff frequencies, applying the devices to RF circuits has been largely hindered by the lack of current saturation in the zero band gap graphene. Herein, the first high-frequency voltage amplifier is demonstrated using large-area chemical vapor deposition grown graphene. The graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) has a 6-finger gate design with gate length of 500 nm. The graphene common-source amplifier exhibits ∼5 dB low frequency gain with the 3 dB bandwidth greater than 6 GHz. This first AC voltage gain demonstration of a GFET is attributed to the clear current saturation in the device, which is enabled by an ultrathin gate dielectric (4 nm HfO(2)) of the embedded gate structures. The device also shows extrinsic transconductance of 1.2 mS/μm at 1 V drain bias, the highest for graphene FETs using large-scale graphene reported to date.

  12. High-Frequency Observations of Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Marchenko-Jorstad, S. G.; Mattox, J. R.; Wehrle, A. E.; Aller, M. F.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the results of high-frequency VLBA observations of 42 gamma-ray bright blazars monitored at 22 and 43 GHz between 1993.9 and 1997.6. In 1997 the observations included polarization-sensitive imaging. The cores of gamma-ray blazars are only weakly polarized, with EVPAs (electric-vector position angles) usually within 40 deg of the local direction of the jet. The EVPAs of the jet components are usually within 20 deg of the local jet direction. The apparent speeds of the gamma-ray bright blazars are considerably faster than in the general population of bright compact radio sources. Two X-ray flares (observed with RXTE) of the quasar PKS 1510-089 appear to be related to radio flares, but with the radio leading the X-ray variations by about 2 weeks. This can be explained either by synchrotron self-Compton emission in a component whose variations are limited by light travel time or by the Mirror Compton model.

  13. High-Frequency Observations of Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Marchenko-Jorstad, S. G.; Mattox, J. R.; Wehrle, A. E.; Aller, M. F.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the results of high-frequency VLBA observations of 42 gamma ray bright blazars monitored at 22 and 43 GHz between 1993.9 and 1997-6. In 1997 the observations included polarization-sensitive imaging. The cores of gamma ray blazars are only weakly polarized, with EVPAs (electric-vector position angles) usually within 40 degrees of the local direction of the jet. The EVPAs of the jet components are usually within 20 degrees of the local jet direction. The apparent speeds of the gamma ray bright blazars are considerably faster than in the general population of bright compact radio sources. Two X-ray flares (observed with RXTE) of the quasar PKS 1510-089 appear to be related to radio flares, but with the radio leading the X-ray variations by about 2 weeks. This can be explained either by synchrotron self-Compton emission in a component whose variations are limited by light travel time or by the Mirror Compton model.

  14. High-Frequency Observations of Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Marchenko-Jorstad, S. G.; Mattox, J. R.; Wehrle, A. E.; Aller, M. F.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the results of high-frequency VLBA observations of 42 gamma ray bright blazars monitored at 22 and 43 GHz between 1993.9 and 1997-6. In 1997 the observations included polarization-sensitive imaging. The cores of gamma ray blazars are only weakly polarized, with EVPAs (electric-vector position angles) usually within 40 degrees of the local direction of the jet. The EVPAs of the jet components are usually within 20 degrees of the local jet direction. The apparent speeds of the gamma ray bright blazars are considerably faster than in the general population of bright compact radio sources. Two X-ray flares (observed with RXTE) of the quasar PKS 1510-089 appear to be related to radio flares, but with the radio leading the X-ray variations by about 2 weeks. This can be explained either by synchrotron self-Compton emission in a component whose variations are limited by light travel time or by the Mirror Compton model.

  15. Analysis of high frequency geostationary ocean colour data using DINEOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvera-Azcárate, Aida; Vanhellemont, Quinten; Ruddick, Kevin; Barth, Alexander; Beckers, Jean-Marie

    2015-06-01

    DINEOF (Data Interpolating Empirical Orthogonal Functions), a technique to reconstruct missing data, is applied to turbidity data obtained through the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) on board Meteosat Second Generation 2. The aim of this work is to assess if the tidal variability of the southern North Sea in 2008 can be accurately reproduced in the reconstructed dataset. Such high frequency data have not previously been analysed with DINEOF and present new challenges, like a strong tidal signal and long night-time gaps. An outlier detection approach that exploits the high temporal resolution (15 min) of the SEVIRI dataset is developed. After removal of outliers, the turbidity dataset is reconstructed with DINEOF. In situ Smartbuoy data are used to assess the accuracy of the reconstruction. Then, a series of tidal cycles are examined at various positions over the southern North Sea. These examples demonstrate the capability of DINEOF to reproduce tidal variability in the reconstructed dataset, and show the high temporal and spatial variability of turbidity in the southern North Sea. An analysis of the main harmonic constituents (annual cycle, daily cycle, M2 and S2 tidal components) is performed, to assess the contribution of each of these modes to the total variability of turbidity. The variability not explained by the harmonic fit, due to the natural processes and satellite processing errors as noise, is also assessed.

  16. Development of a Complete Life Cycle Sediment Toxicity Test for the Sheepshead Minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Existing sediment toxicity test methods are limited to acute and chronic exposure of invertebrates and acute exposure of vertebrates, with limited guidance on the chronic exposure of vertebrates, specifically fishes. A series of life stage-specific studies were conducted to dete...

  17. Development of a Complete Life Cycle Sediment Toxicity Test for the Sheepshead Minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Existing sediment toxicity test methods are limited to acute and chronic exposure of invertebrates and acute exposure of vertebrates, with limited guidance on the chronic exposure of vertebrates, specifically fishes. A series of life stage-specific studies were conducted to dete...

  18. Numerical modelling of subglacial erosion and sediment transport and its application to the North American ice sheets over the Last Glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melanson, Alexandre; Bell, Trevor; Tarasov, Lev

    2013-05-01

    Present-day sediment distribution offers a potentially strong constraint on past ice sheet evolution. Glacial system models (GSMs), however, cannot address this constraint while lacking appropriate representations of subglacial sediment production and transport. Incorporating these elements in GSMs is also required in order to quantify the impact of a changing sediment cover on glacial cycle dynamics. Towards these goals, we present a subglacial process model (hereafter referred to as the sediment model) that incorporates mechanisms for sediment production, entrainment, transport, and deposition. Bedrock erosion is calculated by both Hallet's and Boulton's abrasion laws separately, and by a novel quarrying law parametrized as a function of subglacial cavity extent. These process-oriented erosion laws are compared against a simple empirical relationship between erosion rate and the work done by basal stress. Sediment entrainment is represented by Philip's law for regelation intrusion and soft-bed deformation is included as a subglacial sediment transport mechanism. The model is driven by the data-calibrated MUN (3D) GSM and a newly developed subglacial hydrology module. The sediment model is applied to the last North American glacial cycle and predicts sediment thickness and cumulative erosion patterns. Results are obtained in the context of a sensitivity analysis and are compared against the present-day distribution of glacigenic sediment and geological estimates of Laurentide Ice Sheet erosion. Given plausible ranges for the sensitivity parameters, chosen a priori based on available literature or on heuristic arguments, the calculated erosion depths overlap with the geological estimates of Laurentide erosion. Most of the runs in the sensitivity set produce unrealistically thick and continuous moraines along the eastern, southern and western margins of the North American ice complex, which suggests that the model overestimates sediment entrainment and thus

  19. Microbial Nitrogen Cycling Associated with the Early Diagenesis of Organic Matter in Subseafloor Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.

    2015-12-01

    The early diagenesis of organic matter is the major energy source of marine sedimentary biosphere and thus controls its population size; however, the vertical distribution of any functional groups along with the diagenesis of organic matter is remained unclear, especially for those microbes involved in nitrogen transformation which serve as a major control on the nitrogen flux between reservoirs. Here we investigated the vertical distributions of various functional groups in five sediment cores retrieved from Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR), with emphasis on the nitrifiers, denitrifiers and anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (anammox). We observed the clear geochemical zonation associated with organic matter diagenesis in the sediments based on the pore water profiles of oxygen, nitrate, ammonium, manganese and sulfate, with distinct geochemical transition zones at the boundaries of geochemical zones, including oxic-anoxic transition zone (OATZ) and nitrate-manganese reduction zone (NMTZ). Nitrate was produced in surface oxygenated sediments and nitrate consumption mainly took place at the NMTZ, splitted between re-oxidation of ammonium and manganese (II). Abundances of ammonia oxidizers, nitrite oxidizers, and denitrifiers, estimated through quantitative PCR targeting their respective functional genes, generally decrease with depth, but constantly elevated around the OATZ, NMTZ, and manganese-reduction zone as well. Anammox bacteria were only detected around the NMTZ where both nitrate/nitrite and ammonium are available. These depth profiles of functional groups were also confirmed by the community structure profiling by prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene tag pyrosequencing. Cell-specific rates of nitrification and denitrification, calculated from the bulk net reaction rates divided by functional group abundances, were similar to those values from oligotrophic sediments like North Pond and thus suggested that nitrifiers and denitirifiers populations were in maintenance

  20. Carbon, nutrient and trace metal cycling in sandy sediments: A comparison of high-energy beaches and backbarrier tidal flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckhardt, Anja; Beck, Melanie; Seidel, Michael; Riedel, Thomas; Wehrmann, Achim; Bartholomä, Alexander; Schnetger, Bernhard; Dittmar, Thorsten; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    In order to evaluate the importance of coastal sandy sediments and their contribution to carbon, nutrient and metal cycling we investigated two beach sites on Spiekeroog Island, southern North Sea, Germany, and a tidal flat margin, located in Spiekeroog's backbarrier area. We also analyzed seawater and fresh groundwater on Spiekeroog Island, to better define endmember concentrations, which influence our study sites. Intertidal sandy flats and beaches are characterized by pore water advection. Seawater enters the sediment during flood and pore water drains out during ebb and at low tide. This pore water circulation leads to continuous supply of fresh organic substrate to the sediments. Remineralization products of microbial degradation processes, i.e. nutrients, and dissolved trace metals from the reduction of particulate metal oxides, are enriched in the pore water compared to open seawater concentrations. The spatial distribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nutrients (PO43-, NO3-, NO2-, NH4+, Si(OH)4 and total alkalinity), trace metals (dissolved Fe and Mn) as well as sulfate suggests that the exposed beach sites are subject to relatively fast pore water advection, which leads to organic matter and oxygen replenishment. Frequent pore water exchange further leads to comparatively low nutrient concentrations. Sulfate reduction does not appear to play a major role during organic matter degradation. High nitrate concentrations indicate that redox conditions are oxic within the duneward freshwater influenced section, while ammonification, denitrification, manganese and iron reduction seem to prevail in the ammonium-dominated seawater circulation zone. In contrast, the sheltered tidal flat margin site exhibits a different sedimentology (coarser beach sands versus finer tidal flat sands) and nutrients, dissolved manganese and DOC accumulate in the pore water. Ammonium is the dominant pore water nitrogen species and intense sulfate reduction leads to the formation

  1. Bacterial communities potentially involved in iron-cycling in Baltic Sea and North Sea sediments revealed by pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Carolina; Dellwig, Olaf; Dähnke, Kirstin; Gehre, Matthias; Noriega-Ortega, Beatriz E; Böttcher, Michael E; Meister, Patrick; Friedrich, Michael W

    2016-04-01

    To gain insight into the bacterial communities involved in iron-(Fe) cycling under marine conditions, we analysed sediments with Fe-contents (0.5-1.5 wt %) from the suboxic zone at a marine site in the Skagerrak (SK) and a brackish site in the Bothnian Bay (BB) using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Several bacterial families, including Desulfobulbaceae, Desulfuromonadaceae and Pelobacteraceae and genera, includingDesulfobacterandGeobacter, known to reduce Fe were detected and showed highest abundance near the Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox boundary. Additional genera with microorganisms capable of coupling fermentation to Fe-reduction, includingClostridiumandBacillus, were observed. Also, the Fe-oxidizing families Mariprofundaceae and Gallionellaceae occurred at the SK and BB sites, respectively, supporting Fe-cycling. In contrast, the sulphate (SO4 (2-)) reducing bacteriaDesulfococcusandDesulfobacteriumwere more abundant at greater depths concurring with a decrease in Fe-reducing activity. The communities revealed by pyrosequencing, thus, match the redox stratification indicated by the geochemistry, with the known Fe-reducers coinciding with the zone of Fe-reduction. Not the intensely studied model organisms, such asGeobacterspp., but rather versatile microorganisms, including sulphate reducers and possibly unknown groups appear to be important for Fe-reduction in these marine suboxic sediments.

  2. S and O Isotope Studies of Microbial S Cycling in the Deep Biosphere of Marine Sediments: Eastern Equatorial Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, R. E.; Bottcher, M. E.; Surkov, A. V.; Ferdelman, T. G.; Jorgensen, B. B.

    2004-12-01

    We have determined the oxygen (18O/16O) and sulfur (34S/32S) isotope ratios of porewater sulfate to depths of over 400 mbsf in sediments from open-ocean and upwelling sites in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific ocean. Sulfate δ 18O ranges from near-normal seawater values (9.5 permil) at organic-poor open-ocean sites, to approximately 30 permil at sites with higher organic matter content and higher associated microbial activity. Depth-correlative trends of δ 18O, δ 34S, alkalinity, methane, ammonium and the presence of sulfide, indicate significant oxidation of sedimentary organic matter by sulfate-reducing microbial populations as well as anaerobic oxidation of methane. δ 18O-SO4 values at low-activity sites reveal the presence of significant microbial sulfur-cycling activity despite relatively flat sulfate concentration and δ 34S profiles. This activity may include contributions from several processes including: enzyme-catalyzed equilibration between oxygen in sulfate and water superimposed upon microbial sulfate reduction, sulfide oxidation, and bacterial disproportionation of sulfur intermediates. Large isotope enrichment factors observed at low-activity sites (40-80 permil) likely reflect concurrent processes of: kinetic isotope fractionation, equilibrium fractionation between sulfate and water, and sulfide oxidation at low rates of sulfate reduction. Results of this study indicate that coupled measurements of S and O isotope ratios of porewater sulfate are a powerful tool for tracing microbial activity and sulfur cycling in marine sediments.

  3. Sensor Measurements and Sediment Incubations Indicate Diurnal Redox Cycling Associate With Arsenic Mobilization at a Bangladeshi Rice Paddy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, T.; Lin, C.; Ramanathan, N.; Neumann, R.; Harvey, C.; Jay, J.

    2007-12-01

    The presence of arsenic in the groundwater has led to the largest environmental poisoning in history; tens of millions of people in the Ganges Delta continue to drink groundwater that is dangerously contaminated with arsenic (As). Rice fields receive large loads of arsenic with irrigation water and provide recharge to the underlying aquifer. It is currently not known whether rice fields are a sink or source of arsenic in the hydrologic system. In the dry season, as As(III)-containing minerals are oxidized, As(V) is released and will adhere to Fe hydr(oxide) minerals. When sediments are inundated with water, reducing conditions will then drive reduction of Fe hydr(oxides) and release of As. We have been intensively studying a field site in Munshiganj, Bangladesh with extremely high levels of arsenic in groundwater (up to 1.2 mg/L). To better understand geochemical and microbial processes leading to As mobilization in surface sediment, we deployed sensors to take temporally dense measurements across our experimental rice paddy. Data collected in both 2006 and 2007 showed trends in geochemical parameters indicating that diurnal, possibly plant-induced, processes may be important. Over a two month period, nitrate concentrations decrease consistently each day as ammonium levels increase, presumably through temperature driven reductive processes. Nitrate concentrations in the subsurface then increase while ammonium levels decrease, possibly due to root oxygen leakage or rapid infiltration of oxygen rich surface water. Using sediment from the rice paddy and artificial irrigation water, laboratory microcosms were constructed to simulate the diurnal cycles observed at the field site. In carbon-ammended treatments, Fe and As cycling can occur on the order of days. Oscillations in redox conditions on diurnal as well as seasonal time scales may be important in the mobilization of arsenic into aquifers. By elucidating As mobilization mechanisms at an experimental rice paddy

  4. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  5. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  6. Tracking heterotrophic and autotrophic carbon cycling by magnetotactic bacteria in freshwater sediments using DNA stable isotope probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürşat Coşkun, Ömer; Roud, Sophie; He, Kuang; Petersen, Nikolai; Gilder, Stuart; Orsi, William D.

    2017-04-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are diverse, widespread, motile prokaryotes which biomineralize nanosize magnetic minerals, either magnetite or gregite, under highly conserved genetic control and have magnetotaxis to align their position in aquatic environment according to Earth's magnetic field. They play important roles on some geobiological cycle of important minerals such as iron, sulphur, nitrogen and carbon. Yet, to date, their importance in carbon cycle and carbon source in their natural environment have not been previously studied. In this study, we focused on freshwater benthic carbon cycling of MTB and total bacteria using DNA stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP) technique coupled with quantitative PCR (qPCR). Pond sediments from Unterlippach (Germany) were amended with 13C-labelled sodium bicarbonate and 13C-labelled organic matter, and incubated in the dark over a two week time period. Applying separate qPCR assays specific for total bacteria and MTB, respectively, allowed us to estimate the contribution of MTB to total heterotrophic and autotrophic carbon cycling via DNA-SIP. After one week, there was a slight degree of autotrophic activity which increased markedly after two weeks. Comparing total DNA to the qPCR data revealed that changes in the buoyant density of DNA was due mainly to autotrophic bacterial production. DNA-SIP also identified heterotrophic utilization of 13C-labelled organic matter by MTB after 1 week. The qPCR data also allowed us to estimate uptake rates based on the incubation times for heterotrophic and autotrophic MTB. High-throughput DNA sequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that most of the MTB involved in carbon cycling were related to the Magnetococcus genus. This study sheds light on the carbon sources for MTB in a natural environment and helps unravel their ecological role in the carbon cycle.

  7. Anaerobic oxidation of short-chain alkanes in hydrothermal sediments: potential influences on sulfur cycling and microbial diversity

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Melissa M.; Hoarfrost, Adrienne L.; Bose, Arpita; Joye, Samantha B.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    Short-chain alkanes play a substantial role in carbon and sulfur cycling at hydrocarbon-rich environments globally, yet few studies have examined the metabolism of ethane (C2), propane (C3), and butane (C4) in anoxic sediments in contrast to methane (C1). In hydrothermal vent systems, short-chain alkanes are formed over relatively short geological time scales via thermogenic processes and often exist at high concentrations. The sediment-covered hydrothermal vent systems at Middle Valley (MV, Juan de Fuca Ridge) are an ideal site for investigating the anaerobic oxidation of C1–C4 alkanes, given the elevated temperatures and dissolved hydrocarbon species characteristic of these metalliferous sediments. We examined whether MV microbial communities oxidized C1–C4 alkanes under mesophilic to thermophilic sulfate-reducing conditions. Here we present data from discrete temperature (25, 55, and 75°C) anaerobic batch reactor incubations of MV sediments supplemented with individual alkanes. Co-registered alkane consumption and sulfate reduction (SR) measurements provide clear evidence for C1–C4 alkane oxidation linked to SR over time and across temperatures. In these anaerobic batch reactor sediments, 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing revealed that Deltaproteobacteria, particularly a novel sulfate-reducing lineage, were the likely phylotypes mediating the oxidation of C2–C4 alkanes. Maximum C1–C4 alkane oxidation rates occurred at 55°C, which reflects the mid-core sediment temperature profile and corroborates previous studies of rate maxima for the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Of the alkanes investigated, C3 was oxidized at the highest rate over time, then C4, C2, and C1, respectively. The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the potential competition between the anaerobic oxidation of C2–C4alkanes with AOM for available oxidants and the influence on the fate of C1 derived from these hydrothermal systems. PMID:23717305

  8. [Effects of high-frequency artificial respiration on the rhythm of heart contraction in cats].

    PubMed

    Pokrovskiĭ, V M; Abushkevich, V G; Dashkovskiĭ, A I; Shapiro, S V; Diak, I A

    1989-07-01

    High-frequency artificial hyperventilation of cat lung with a rate above the initial rhythm of the heart reconstructs the rhythm so that each breathing cycle coincides with one systole of the heart. Synchronization of breathing movements and heart systoles is easily removed by atropine, and cold blockade of vagus nerves by open artificial pneumothorax.

  9. Effects of planting Phragmites australis on nitrogen removal, microbial nitrogen cycling, and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing and denitrifying microorganisms in sediments.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Tadashi; Nishimura, Yoshiko; Ogata, Yuka; Sei, Kazunari; Mori, Kazuhiro; Ike, Michihiko

    2015-10-21

    We examined the effect of planting an emergent aquatic plant (Phragmites australis) on nitrogen removal from sediments using a 42-d pot experiment. The experimental pot systems comprised two types of sediments planted with and without young P. australis. Total nitrogen (total N), total dissolved N, and NH4-N in the sediments decreased markedly after planting. In contrast, those levels decreased only slightly in the unplanted sediments. The decrease in total N in the P. australis-planted sediments was 7-20 times those in the unplanted sediments. Abundances of bacterial 16S rRNA, archaeal 16S rRNA, ammonia-oxidizing bacterial ammonia monooxygenase (amoA), ammonia-oxidizing archaeal amoA, and denitrifying bacterial nitrite reductase (nirK) genes increased significantly in sediments after planting. Phragmites australis appears to have released oxygen and created a repeating cycle of oxidizing and reducing conditions in the sediments. These conditions should promote mineralization of organic N, nitrification, and denitrification in the sediments. Phragmites australis absorbed bioavailable nitrogen generated by microbial nitrogen metabolism. During the 42-d period after planting, 31-44% of total N was removed by microbial nitrogen cycling, and 56-69% was removed via absorption by P. australis. These results suggest that planting P. australis can increase microbial populations and their activities, and that nitrogen removal can be accelerated by the combined functions of P. australis and microorganisms in the sediment. Thus, planting P. australis has considerable potential as an effective remediation technology for eutrophic sediments.

  10. Halogens in the Dry Valleys Lakes, Antarctica: dynamic cycling between water, sediment, and cryogenic evaporites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, G. T.; Dowling, C. B.; Harbert, A.; Lu, H.; Lyons, W. B.; Welch, K. A.

    2006-12-01

    Many of the McMurdo Dry Valleys lakes of Antarctica exhibit saline to hypersaline bottom waters whose chemistry is distinct from that of sea water. The source and relative abundance of dissolved Cl, Br, and I in these unusual waters has been modified by several potential processes including: seawater incursions, water- rock interactions, microbial scavenging, glacial melting and precipitation, and atmospheric deposition. Since all of these processes are affected by both long-term and short-term climate change, lake waters and the salts that are deposited around them provide sensitive indicators of lake dessication and refilling in the past. We present elemental analyses, not only of the lake water, but also of bottom sediments and cryogenic evaporites recovered from the Dry Valleys. XRD analyses indicate that gypsum and antarcticite are precipitated around saline lakes presently situated more than 40 km from the ocean (Vanda, Don Juan, Joyce), while mirabilite is found near small pools in the Garwood Valley, only a few km from the ocean. Lake water enrichments in Ca and Cl, relative to Na suggest that either dissolution of gypsum and antarcticite has occurred in Don Juan Pond and Lake Vanda, or that these two small bodies of water previously lost sodium to mirabilite formation. Lakes Fryxell and Joyce, as well as waters in Garwood Valley show near-sea water ratios. Dissolved iodine, and to a lesser extent bromine, are commonly associated with diagenesis of marine organic matter in regions of high productivity, so it is surprising that the Dry Valleys lake waters are enriched in these two elements. These enrichments are also apparent in pore fluids of shallow sediments on the lake bottoms. In addition, the sediments themselves are highly enriched in iodine in the upper 5 cm (up to 77 ppm). This is likely due to remobilization of dissolved iodide, which is mobile in reduced form, but becomes fixed as adsorbed or organic iodine upon diffusing into shallow oxic

  11. Trace element cycling in a subterranean estuary: Part 1. Geochemistry of the permeable sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charette, Matthew A.; Sholkovitz, Edward R.; Hansel, Colleen M.

    2005-04-01

    Subterranean estuaries are characterized by the mixing of terrestrially derived groundwater and seawater in a coastal aquifer. Subterranean estuaries, like their river water-seawater counterparts on the surface of the earth, represent a major, but less visible, hydrological and geochemical interface between the continents and the ocean. This article is the first in a two-part series on the biogeochemistry of the subterranean estuary at the head of Waquoit Bay (Cape Cod, MA, USA). The pore-water distributions of salinity, Fe and Mn establish the salt and redox framework of this subterranean estuary. The biogeochemistry of Fe, Mn, P, Ba, U and Th will be addressed from the perspective of the sediment composition. A second article will focus on the groundwater and pore-water chemistries of Fe, Mn, U and Ba. Three sediment cores were collected from the head of Waquoit Bay where the coastal aquifer consists of permeable sandy sediment. A selective dissolution method was used to measure the concentrations of P, Ba, U and Th that are associated with "amorphous (hydr)oxides of iron and manganese" and "crystalline Fe and Mn (hydr)oxides." The deeper sections of the cores are characterized by large amounts of iron (hydr)oxides that are precipitated onto organic C-poor quartz sand from high-salinity pore waters rich in dissolved ferrous iron. Unlike Fe (hydr)oxides, which increase with depth, the Mn (hydr)oxides display midcore maxima. This type of vertical stratification is consistent with redox-controlled diagenesis in which Mn (hydr)oxides are formed at shallower depths than iron (hydr)oxides. P and Th are enriched in the deep sections of the cores, consistent with their well-documented affinity for Fe (hydr)oxides. In contrast, the downcore distribution of Ba, especially in core 3, more closely tracks the concentration of Mn (hydr)oxides. Even though Mn (hydr)oxides are 200-300 times less abundant than Fe (hydr)oxides in the cores, Mn (hydr)oxides are known to have an

  12. Biotic and abiotic pathways of phosphorus cycling in minerals and sediments: insights from oxygen isotope ratios in phosphate.

    PubMed

    Jaisi, Deb P; Kukkadapu, Ravi K; Stout, Lisa M; Varga, Tamas; Blake, Ruth E

    2011-08-01

    A key question to address in the development of oxygen isotope ratios in phosphate (δ(18)O(p)) as a tracer of biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus in ancient and modern environments is the nature of isotopic signatures associated with uptake and cycling of mineral-bound phosphate by microorganisms. Here, we present experimental results aimed at understanding the biotic and abiotic pathways of P cycling during biological uptake of phosphate sorbed to ferrihydrite and the selective uptake of sedimentary phosphate phases by Escherichia coli and Marinobacter aquaeolei. Results indicate that a significant fraction of ferrihydrite-bound phosphate is biologically available. The fraction of phosphate taken up by E. coli attained an equilibrium isotopic composition in a short time (<50 h) due to efficient O-isotope exchange (between O in PO(4) and O in water; that is, actual breaking and reforming of P-O bonds) (biotic pathway). The difference in isotopic composition between newly equilibrated aqueous and residual sorbed phosphate groups promoted the ion exchange (analogous to isotopic mixing) of intact phosphate ions (abiotic pathway) so that this difference gradually became negligible. In sediment containing different P phases, E. coli extracted loosely sorbed phosphate first, whereas M. aquaeolei preferred Fe-oxide-bound phosphate. The presence of bacteria always imprinted a biotic isotopic signature on the P phase that was taken up and cycled. For example, the δ(18)O(p) value of loosely sorbed phosphate shifted gradually toward equilibrium isotopic composition. The δ(18)O(p) value of Fe-oxide-bound phosphate, however, showed only slight changes initially but, when new Fe-oxides were formed, coprecipitated/occluded phosphate retained δ(18)O values of the aqueous phosphate at the time of formation of new Fe oxides. Concentrations and isotopic compositions of authigenic and detrital phosphates did not change, suggesting that these phosphate phases were not utilized by

  13. Effects of interelectrode gap on high frequency and very high frequency capacitively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bera, Kallol; Rauf, Shahid; Ramaswamy, Kartik; Collins, Ken

    2009-07-15

    Capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) discharges using high frequency (HF) and very high frequency (VHF) sources are widely used for dielectric etching in the semiconductor industry. A two-dimensional fluid plasma model is used to investigate the effects of interelectrode gap on plasma spatial characteristics of both HF and VHF CCPs. The plasma model includes the full set of Maxwell's equations in their potential formulation. The peak in plasma density is close to the electrode edge at 13.5 MHz for a small interelectrode gap. This is due to electric field enhancement at the electrode edge. As the gap is increased, the plasma produced at the electrode edge diffuses to the chamber center and the plasma becomes more uniform. At 180 MHz, where electromagnetic standing wave effects are strong, the plasma density peaks at the chamber center at large interelectrode gap. As the interelectrode gap is decreased, the electron density increases near the electrode edge due to inductive heating and electrostatic electron heating, which makes the plasma more uniform in the interelectrode region.

  14. Redox conditions and trace metal cycling in coastal sediments from the maritime Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monien, Patrick; Lettmann, Karsten Alexander; Monien, Donata; Asendorf, Sanja; Wölfl, Anne-Cathrin; Lim, Chai Heng; Thal, Janis; Schnetger, Bernhard; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-09-01

    Redox-sensitive trace metals (Mn, Fe, U, Mo, Re), nutrients and terminal metabolic products (NO3-, NH4+, PO43-, total alkalinity) were investigated for the first time in pore waters of Antarctic coastal sediments. The results of this study reveal a high spatial variability in redox conditions in surface sediments from Potter Cove, King George Island, western Antarctic Peninsula. Particularly in the shallower areas of the bay the significant correlation between sulphate depletion and total alkalinity, the inorganic product of terminal metabolism, indicates sulphate reduction to be the major pathway of organic matter mineralisation. In contrast, dissimilatory metal oxide reduction seems to be prevailing in the newly ice-free areas and the deeper troughs, where concentrations of dissolved iron of up to 700 μM were found. We suggest a combination of several factors to be responsible for the domination of metal oxide reduction over sulphate reduction in these areas. These include the increased accumulation of fine-grained material with high amounts of reducible metal oxides, a reduced availability of metabolisable organic matter and an enhanced physical and biological disturbance by bottom water currents, ice scouring and burrowing organisms. Based on modelled iron fluxes we calculate the contribution of the Antarctic shelf to the pool of potentially bioavailable iron (Feb) to be 6.9 × 103 to 790 × 103 t yr-1. Consequently, these shelf sediments would provide an Feb flux of 0.35-39.5 mg m-2 yr-1 (median: 3.8 mg m-2 yr-1) to the Southern Ocean. This contribution is in the same order of magnitude as the flux provided by icebergs and significantly higher than the input by aeolian dust. For this reason suboxic shelf sediments form a key source of iron for the high nutrient-low chlorophyll (HNLC) areas of the Southern Ocean. This source may become even more important in the future due to rising temperatures at the WAP accompanied by enhanced glacier retreat and the

  15. Vertical structure and horizontal variations in the cycling of methane in the sediment of Lake Onego, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Camille; Perga, Marie-Elodie; Frossard, Victor; Pasche, Natacha; Hofmann, Hilmar; Ariztegui, Daniel; Dubois, Nathalie; Belkina, Natalya; Lyautey, Emilie

    2017-04-01

    Lake Onego, the second largest lake in Europe, is a dystrophic, seasonally ice-covered lake in Karelia, Russia. Like most winter-covered lakes, its study has largely been limited to the summer period. However, it is well known that methane production is still ongoing in lake sediments during winter, potentially resulting in accumulation and major release upon thawing. Within the "Life Under The Ice" research project, our objectives were to assess winter contribution to the annual methane flux in Lake Onego, and to understand conditions and factors influencing methane cycling. During two on-ice field campaigns in March 2015 and 2016, sediment cores were retrieved at different sites of Petrozavodsk Bay, located in the north-western part of the lake. DNA and RNA were extracted from these cores to investigate the functional structure of microbial communities. Genes involved in methanogenesis, anaerobic and aerobic methane oxidations were quantified along with the concentrations and isotopic ratio of methane in the sediment pore water. Incubations, fingerprinting and sequencing of mcrA genes were also realized. Vertically, the sediment is structured in a deep anoxic zone (below 10 cm) where mcrA gene and transcript copies increased implying methanogenesis, a transitional zone (5-8 cm) hosting methanotrophic organisms (Cand. Methanoperedens) able to oxidize the diffusing methane anaerobically by coupling nitrate reduction (Haroon et al., 2013), and a shallower oxic zone where methanotrophs were detected (pmoA gene and transcripts) and where methane concentrations drop below detection limit. Sediment cores were also collected at three sites along a transect from the mouth of the river Shuya (the major inflow to the bay) to the open lake. Functional assemblage close to the river mouth had higher diversity and higher potential production rates and consumption of methane than further in the lake. However, the methane produced was almost completely consumed regardless of the

  16. Dynamic Cycling of Barium in Marine Sediments: A Case study From a Gas Hydrate Potential Region Offshore Southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S.; You, C.

    2007-12-01

    The dissociation and dissolution of gas hydrate in marine sediments affects importantly of Ba and methane cycle. Three piston cores, MD052911, MD052912 and MD052913, collected during Marion Dufresne cruise from a potential gas hydrate area offshore southwestern Taiwan, were used for dissolved SO42- and Ba2+ analyses in pore waters, as well as exchangeable Ba2+ in sediments, to study hydrate gas venting history. The formation of barite front was identified in each core at shallow depth and theirs respective accumulation ages were estimated using a simple diffusion model. Dissolved SO42- and Ba2+ indicate that the sulfate hydrate transition (SHT) depth is located at 900, 1100 and 760 cm in MD052911, MD052912 and MD052913, respectively. Dissolved Ba2+ increased largely below the depth where sulfate depletion occurred and reached a maximum concentration of 14.8, 12.4 and 6.2 £gM at 660, 1800 and 760 cm, respectively. The detected sedimentary barite front coincides with the modern boundary of upward diffusion of pore water Ba2+, occurring right above the SHT boundary in all three cores and reaches a Ba concentration of 23, 54 and 40 ppm, respectively. Estimated upwardly diffusive Ba2+ flux is 1.93*10-6, 8.86*10-7 and 6.55*10-7 mmol/cm2/yr, which may take 25,000, 110,000 and 213,000 years respectively to accumulate such barite front. Sulfate reduction rate (SRR) in the study area, average ~70 £gM/yr, falls in a similar range as those of regions with intermediately low methane flux and SHT depth of 10-40m. The calculated downward sulfate fluxes, 1.78*10- 3 - 3.2*10-3 mmol/cm2/yr, agree with observations at methane-rich margins where methane were dominantly consumed by oxidation. The authigenic barite fronts formation above the SHT serves as a useful tool to assess the flux variation of upward methane at present and in the past. The unique low concentration of detritus barite in sediments offshore Taiwan cause rather low Ba2+ in pore waters and low exchangeable Ba2+ (23

  17. Nitrogen cycling between sediment and the shallow-water column in the transition zone of the Potomac River and estuary. I. Nitrate and ammonium fluxes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, N.S.

    1988-01-01

    A three-year study of seasonal variation in water-column and sediment nitrogen species was conducted in the transition zone of the Potomac River 35 m from the Virginia shore at a site with an average water-column depth of approximately 1 m over sandy sediment. A diffusion-controlled sampler was used to collect water samples from the water column, at the interface between the water column and sediment, and at several tens of centimeters into the sediment. Nitrate was the predominant dissolved nitrogen species in the water column. The importance of denitrification was inferred by nitrate fluxes which were directed into the sediment from the water column during approximately 75% of the sampling periods and ranged from 0??02 to 0??69 mmol m-2 day-1. Flux of nitrate from the sediment into the water column, ???0??1 mmol m-2 day-1, due possibly to nitrification in surficial sediment, occurred during one spring and two summer sampling periods. Ammonium fluxes were less than 0??1 mmol m-2 day-1 during 90% of the sampling periods. Of the ammonium fluxes that were >0??05 mmol m-2 day-1, all were fluxes into the sediment during sampling periods when sediment resuspension occurred, and all were into the water column during periods of calm. The mean value of ammonium flux (0??005 ?? 0??05 mmol m-2 day-1) from the sandy, shallow-water sediments was two orders of magnitude less than the ammonium fluxes from the deeper, silty channel sediments in the same reach of the river. Diffusive flux calculations suggest that approximately one order of magnitude more nitrate than ammonium is cycled between the shallow-water column and the sandy sediment in the transition zone of the Potomac River. ?? 1988.

  18. Life of fluorescent lamps operated at high frequencies with solid-state ballasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verderber, R. R.; Morse, O.; Rubinstein, F. M.

    1985-07-01

    Standard 40-watt, F-40, rapid-start, fluorescent lamps were operated with solid-state ballasts following the standard life-testing cycle of 3 hours on and 20 minutes off for more than 20,000 hours at high frequency. Lamp operating characteristics (starting voltage, filament voltage, arc current, and current-crest factor) were studied as factors affecting lamp life. Measurements show that fluorescent lamps can attain rated life at high frequency using solid-state ballasts. When lamps are operated in the dimmed mode, full filament power is required to sustain lamplife. The rate of lamp lumen depreciation is dependent on the lamp loading and not the operating frequency.

  19. High Frequency Acoustic Propagation using Level Set Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    solution of the high frequency approximation to the wave equation. Traditional solutions to the Eikonal equation in high frequency acoustics are...curvature can be extracted at any point of the front from the level set function (provided the normal and curvature are well-defined at that point ), and... points per wavelength to resolve the wave). Ray tracing is therefore the current standard for high frequency propagation modeling. LSM may provide

  20. High-frequency Probing Diagnostic for Hall Current Plasma Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    A.A. Litvak; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2001-10-25

    High-frequency oscillations (1-100 MHz) in Hall thrusters have apparently eluded significant experimental scrutiny. A diagnostic setup, consisting of a single Langmuir probe, a special shielded probe connector-positioner, and an electronic impedance-matching circuit, was successfully built and calibrated. Through simultaneous high-frequency probing of the Hall thruster plasma at multiple locations, high-frequency plasma waves have been identified and characterized for various thruster operating conditions.

  1. On-clip high frequency reliability and failure test structures

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, E.S.; Campbell, D.V.

    1997-04-29

    Self-stressing test structures for realistic high frequency reliability characterizations. An on-chip high frequency oscillator, controlled by DC signals from off-chip, provides a range of high frequency pulses to test structures. The test structures provide information with regard to a variety of reliability failure mechanisms, including hot-carriers, electromigration, and oxide breakdown. The system is normally integrated at the wafer level to predict the failure mechanisms of the production integrated circuits on the same wafer. 22 figs.

  2. On-clip high frequency reliability and failure test structures

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Eric S.; Campbell, David V.

    1997-01-01

    Self-stressing test structures for realistic high frequency reliability characterizations. An on-chip high frequency oscillator, controlled by DC signals from off-chip, provides a range of high frequency pulses to test structures. The test structures provide information with regard to a variety of reliability failure mechanisms, including hot-carriers, electromigration, and oxide breakdown. The system is normally integrated at the wafer level to predict the failure mechanisms of the production integrated circuits on the same wafer.

  3. Polluted harbor sediment and the annual reproductive cycle of the female flounder, Platichthys fiesus (L.)

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, P.A.H.; Lambert, J.G.D.; Goos, H.J.T.; Wezel, A.P. van; Opperhuizen, A.

    1995-12-31

    Compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs),and pesticides are metabolized by enzyme systems, which are also involved in steroid metabolism. Disturbances of reproduction may therefore occur through the interference of these compounds with the endocrine system. Several aspects of reproduction were studied in the flounder, Platichthys fiesus (L.), an euryhaline flatfish which inhabits coastal waters and is therefore a suitable biomonitor for the effects of chemical pollutants. Fish were kept during three years in mesocosm systems of which the first provided a control, while the second one contained polluted sediment, derived from the Rotterdam harbor. In November, all ovaries from both mesocosms contained vitellogenic oocytes. In May, all the control fish were previtellogenic, while the ovaries of fish from the polluted mesocosm contained, besides previtellogenic oocytes, a large number of vitellogenic oocytes, indicating that an estrogenic induction had occurred. The in vitro tissue incubations with androstenedione as precursor revealed that the ovarian capacity to synthesize testosterone (T), estrone (E{sub 2}) and 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}) didn`t differ between both mesocosms. In May, however, the levels of T and E{sub 2} as well as the level of the yolk-precursor vitellogenin were significantly higher in the polluted mesocosm. The conclusion from this study was that polluted harbor sediment contains compounds that effect normal reproductive development, i.e. the induction of premature vitellogenesis.

  4. Acid-Tolerant Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Play a Major Role in Iron Cycling in Acidic Iron Rich Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enright, K. A.; Moreau, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    Climate change drives drying and acidification of many rivers and lakes. Abundant sedimentary iron in these systems oxidizes chemically and biologically to form iron-ox(yhydrox)ide crusts and "hardpans". Given generally high sulfate concentrations, the mobilization and cycling of iron in these environments can be strongly influenced by bacterial sulfate reduction. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) induce reductive dissolution of oxidized iron phases by producing the reductant bisulfide as a metabolic product. These environmentally ubiquitous microbes also recycle much of the fixed carbon in sediment-hosted microbial mat communities. With prevalent drying, the buffering capacity for protons liberated from iron oxidation is exceeded, and the activity of sulfate-reducers is restricted to those species capable of tolerating low pH (and generally highly saline, i.e. sulfate-rich) conditions. These species will sustain the recycling of iron from more crystalline phases to more bioavailable species, as well as act as the only source of bisulfide for photosynthesizing microbial communities. The phylogeny and physiology of acid-tolerant SRB is therefore important to Fe, S and C cycling in iron-rich sedimentary environments, particularly those on a geochemical trajectory towards acidification. Previous studies have shown that these SRB species tend to be highly novel. We studied two distinct environments along a geochemical continuum towards acidification. In both settings, iron redox transformations exert a major, if not controlling, influence on reduction potential. An acidified, iron- rich tidal marsh receiving acid-mine drainage (San Francisco Bay, CA, USA) contained abundant textural evidence for reductive dissolution of Fe(III) in sediments with pH values varying from 2.4 - 3.8. From these sediments, full-length novel dsrAB gene sequences from acid-tolerant SRB were recovered, and sulfur isotope profiles reflected biological fractionation of sulfur under even the most

  5. Impact of glacial/interglacial changes in water column geochemistry on the diagenetic cycling of barium in Black Sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasten, S.; Henkel, S.; Mogollón, J. M.; Nöthen, K.; Franke, C.; Bogus, K.; Robin, E.; Bahr, A.; Blumenberg, M.; Pape, T.; Seifert, R.; Marz, C.; De Lange, G. J.

    2012-12-01

    Changes in depositional conditions and redox environment over time affect biogeochemical processes in the seabed and in this way control the variable and selective preservation, alteration and formation of various sediment constituents and attributes - including particulate organic matter, mineral assemblages and magnetic properties. As many of these solid-phase compounds are used as paleo-environmental tracers or stratigraphic tools an assessment of diagenetic influences on the sedimentary record is crucial for accurate environmental reconstructions. We present an integrated approach of pore-water and solid-phase geochemistry as well as transport reaction modeling for sediments of the Black Sea to assess the biogeochemical history of these deposits with particular emphasis on post-depositional redistribution of barium as a consequence of changes in water column geochemistry and redox (Henkel et al., 2012). High-resolution sedimentary records of major and minor elements (Al, Ba, Ca, Sr, Ti), total organic carbon (TOC), and profiles of pore-water constituents (SO42-, CH4, Ca2+, Ba2+, Mg2+, alkalinity) were obtained for two gravity cores (core 755, 501 m water depth and core 214, 1686 m water depth) from the northwestern Black Sea. The records were examined in order to gain insight into the cycling of Ba in anoxic marine sediments characterized by a shallow sulfate-methane transition (SMT) as well as the applicability of barite as a primary productivity proxy in such a setting. The Ba records are strongly overprinted by diagenetic barite (BaSO4) remobilization and precipitation; authigenic Ba enrichments were found at both sites at and slightly above the current SMT. Transport reaction modeling was applied to simulate the migration of the SMT during the changing geochemical conditions after the Holocene seawater intrusion into the Black Sea. Based on this, sediment intervals affected by diagenetic Ba redistribution were identified. Results reveal that the intense

  6. EXAFS analysis of iron cycling in mangrove sediments downstream a lateritized ultramafic watershed (Vavouto Bay, New Caledonia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noël, Vincent; Marchand, Cyril; Juillot, Farid; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Viollier, Eric; Marakovic, Gregory; Olivi, Luca; Delbes, Ludovic; Gelebart, Frédéric; Morin, Guillaume

    2014-07-01

    Mangrove forests are the dominant intertidal ecosystem of tropical coastlines. In New Caledonia, mangroves act as a buffer zone between massive Fe lateritic deposits and a lagoon partly registered by UNESCO as a World Heritage site. The New Caledonian mangroves are characterized by a botanical gradient composed of three main vegetal stands (i.e., Rhizophora spp., Avicennia marina and salt flat), which relies on the duration of tidal immersion that imposes gradients of pore-water salinity, oxygenation, and organic content in the sediment. In the present study, we have determined the distribution and speciation of Fe in mangrove sediments along this botanical gradient by using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Fe K-edge. Both XANES and EXAFS results show that iron speciation strongly follows the redox boundaries marking the intertidal and depth zonations. Fe-bearing minerals eroded from lateritic outcrops, mainly goethite (α-FeOOH) and phyllosilicates (serpentine and talc), are the major Fe hosts in the upward horizons. These mineral species progressively disappear with increasing depth where pyrite (FeS2) forms, in the hydromorphic Rhizophora and Avicennia zones. Sulfate reduction is not observed in the drier salt flat zone. In addition to these reduction processes, intense re-oxidation of aqueous Fe(II) and pyrite leads to the formation of poorly ordered ferrihydrite, lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and likely goethite in the upper sediments beneath Avicennia and Rhizophora stands. The relative proportion of the newly formed poorly ordered ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite is found to be higher in the Rhizophora mangrove stand, which is the closest to the shore. Tidal fluctuations may thus be a major cause for continuous Fe reduction-oxidation cycles in the vegetated mangrove stands, which could significantly affect the iron mass balance in mangrove systems.

  7. Variation in numbers and behaviour of waders during the tidal cycle: implications for the use of estuarine sediment flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granadeiro, José P.; Dias, Maria P.; Martins, Ricardo C.; Palmeirim, Jorge M.

    2006-05-01

    Estuarine sediment flats are essential feeding areas for waders, but their exploitation is constrained by the movements of tides. In this cyclic environment the exposure period of sediment flats decreases several fold from upper to lower flats, and the moving tidal waterline briefly creates particular conditions for waders and their prey. This study attempts to determine how the exposure period and the movement of the tide line influence the use of space and food resources by waders across the sediment flats. Wader counts and observations of feeding behaviour were carried out in all phases of the tidal cycle, in plots forming a transect from upper to lower flats, thus representing a gradient of exposure periods. Pecking, prey intake, and success rates varied little along the gradient. Some species actively followed the tide line while foraging, whereas others are evenly spread over the exposed flats. Black-tailed Godwit, Dunlin and Avocet were 'tide followers', whereas Grey Plover, Redshank and Bar-tailed Godwit were 'non-followers'. Densities of 'followers' near the tide line were up to five times higher than elsewhere. Species differed markedly in the way they used space on the flats, but in general the rate of biomass acquisition (in grams of ash-free dry weight per time exposed) was much higher in lower flats. However, this preference was insufficient to counter the much longer exposure of the upper flats, so the total amount of biomass consumed on the latter was greater. Therefore, it was in these upper flats that waders fulfilled most of their energetic needs. Consequently, upper flats are of particular importance for the conservation of wader assemblages, but because they are usually closer to shore they tend to suffer the highest pressure from disturbance and land reclamation.

  8. Hydrologic controls on nitrogen cycling processes and functional gene abundance in sediments of a groundwater flow-through lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Repert, Deborah A.; Smith, Richard L.; Song, Bongkeun; LeBlanc, Denis R.; McCobb, Timothy D.; Conaway, Christopher; Hyun, Sung Pil; Koh, Dong-Chan; Moon, Hee Sun; Kent, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    The fate and transport of inorganic nitrogen (N) is a critically important issue for human and aquatic ecosystem health because discharging N-contaminated groundwater can foul drinking water and cause algal blooms. Factors controlling N-processing were examined in sediments at three sites with contrasting hydrologic regimes at a lake on Cape Cod, MA. These factors included water chemistry, seepage rates and direction of groundwater flow, and the abundance and potential rates of activity of N-cycling microbial communities. Genes coding for denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), and nitrification were identified at all sites regardless of flow direction or groundwater dissolved oxygen concentrations. Flow direction was, however, a controlling factor in the potential for N-attenuation via denitrification in the sediments. Potential rates of denitrification varied from 6 to 4500 pmol N/g/h from the inflow to the outflow side of the lake, owing to fundamental differences in the supply of labile organic matter. The results of laboratory incubations suggested that when anoxia and limiting labile organic matter prevailed, the potential existed for concomitant anammox and denitrification. Where oxic lake water was downwelling, potential rates of nitrification at shallow depths were substantial (1640 pmol N/g/h). Rates of anammox, denitrification, and nitrification may be linked to rates of organic N-mineralization, serving to increase N-mobility and transport downgradient.

  9. Hydrologic Controls on Nitrogen Cycling Processes and Functional Gene Abundance in Sediments of a Groundwater Flow-Through Lake.

    PubMed

    Stoliker, Deborah L; Repert, Deborah A; Smith, Richard L; Song, Bongkeun; LeBlanc, Denis R; McCobb, Timothy D; Conaway, Christopher H; Hyun, Sung Pil; Koh, Dong-Chan; Moon, Hee Sun; Kent, Douglas B

    2016-04-05

    The fate and transport of inorganic nitrogen (N) is a critically important issue for human and aquatic ecosystem health because discharging N-contaminated groundwater can foul drinking water and cause algal blooms. Factors controlling N-processing were examined in sediments at three sites with contrasting hydrologic regimes at a lake on Cape Cod, MA. These factors included water chemistry, seepage rates and direction of groundwater flow, and the abundance and potential rates of activity of N-cycling microbial communities. Genes coding for denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), and nitrification were identified at all sites regardless of flow direction or groundwater dissolved oxygen concentrations. Flow direction was, however, a controlling factor in the potential for N-attenuation via denitrification in the sediments. Potential rates of denitrification varied from 6 to 4500 pmol N/g/h from the inflow to the outflow side of the lake, owing to fundamental differences in the supply of labile organic matter. The results of laboratory incubations suggested that when anoxia and limiting labile organic matter prevailed, the potential existed for concomitant anammox and denitrification. Where oxic lake water was downwelling, potential rates of nitrification at shallow depths were substantial (1640 pmol N/g/h). Rates of anammox, denitrification, and nitrification may be linked to rates of organic N-mineralization, serving to increase N-mobility and transport downgradient.

  10. On the Importance of High Frequency Gravity Waves for Ice Nucleation in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent investigations of the influence of atmospheric waves on ice nucleation in cirrus have identified a number of key processes and sensitivities: (1) ice concentrations produced by homogeneous freezing are strongly dependent on cooling rates, with gravity waves dominating upper tropospheric cooling rates; (2) rapid cooling driven by high-frequency waves are likely responsible for the rare occurrences of very high ice concentrations in cirrus; (3) sedimentation and entrainment tend to decrease ice concentrations as cirrus age; and (4) in some situations, changes in temperature tendency driven by high-frequency waves can quench ice nucleation events and limit ice concentrations. Here we use parcel-model simulations of ice nucleation driven by long-duration, constant-pressure balloon temperature time series, along with an extensive dataset of cold cirrus microphysical properties from the recent ATTREX high-altitude aircraft campaign, to statistically examine the importance of high-frequency waves as well as the consistency between our theoretical understanding of ice nucleation and observed ice concentrations. The parcel-model simulations indicate common occurrence of peak ice concentrations exceeding several hundred per liter. Sedimentation and entrainment would reduce ice concentrations as clouds age, but 1-D simulations using a wave parameterization (which underestimates rapid cooling events) still produce ice concentrations higher than indicated by observations. We find that quenching of nucleation events by high-frequency waves occurs infrequently and does not prevent occurrences of large ice concentrations in parcel simulations of homogeneous freezing. In fact, the high-frequency variability in the balloon temperature data is entirely responsible for production of these high ice concentrations in the simulations.

  11. Biotic and abiotic controls on co-occurring nitrogen cycling processes in shallow Arctic shelf sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTigue, N. D.; Gardner, W. S.; Dunton, K. H.; Hardison, A. K.

    2016-10-01

    The processes that convert bioavailable inorganic nitrogen to inert nitrogen gas are prominent in continental shelf sediments and represent a critical global sink, yet little is known of these pathways in the Arctic where 18% of the world's continental shelves are located. Moreover, few data from the Arctic exist that separate loss processes like denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) from recycling pathways like dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) or source pathways like nitrogen fixation. Here we present measurements of these co-occurring processes using 15N tracers. Denitrification was heterogeneous among stations and an order of magnitude greater than anammox and DNRA, while nitrogen fixation was undetectable. No abiotic factors correlated with interstation variability in biogeochemical rates; however, bioturbation potential explained most of the variation. Fauna-enhanced denitrification is a potentially important but overlooked process on Arctic shelves and highlights the role of the Arctic as a significant global nitrogen sink.

  12. The multiproxy analysis of a lacustrine-palustrine sediment core from Lebanon reveals four climate cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasse, F. A.; van Campo, E.; Demory, F.; Develle, A.; Tachikawa, K.; Buchet, N.; Sonzogni, C.; Thouveny, N.; Bard, E. G.; Vidal, L.

    2013-12-01

    The study of a sediment core retrieved from the small Yammouneh basin (34.06°N-34.09°N, 36.0°E-36.03°E, 1360 m a.s.l.), Lebanon, provides for the first time a nearly continuous record spanning approximately 360 ka in northern Levant. The basin, located on the eastern flank of Mount Lebanon, is mainly supplied by karstic springs which discharge snowmelt water infiltrated through the western highlands. Part of its water inputs is lost by seepage through its faulted bottom. The core, 73 m long, consists of four whitish carbonated intervals rich in lacustrine organism remains, interrupting a thick accumulation of colored silty clays almost devoid of shells but for ostracods. We analyzed sediment features (mineralogical and elemental composition, light microscopy and SEM observations, grain size), magnetic properties, pollen and calcite oxygen isotopes (δc) derived from ostracod shell composition. The chronological framework is based on 14C ages of wood fragments, U/Th dating, and a high resolution reconstruction of relative paleointensity variations correlated with regional (Portuguese margin) and global (Sint-800) master curves down to about 360 ka. Although the chronology still needs improvement, the 3 upper carbonated intervals undoubtedly fit Interglacials MIS 1, MIS 5.5 and MIS 7, respectively. The deepest one (49-60 m) is assigned to MIS 9 by its proxy analogies with dated Interglacials. The sequence covers a large part of MIS 10. Relationships between individual indicators are explored, in addition to visual comparisons of individual records, from the multiproxy matrix after resampling at a common depth scale of 25 cm. We compute simple linear coefficients between 20 variables, perform Principal Component Analyses based on all variables, on terrestrial pollen biomes, on all sedimentological proxies, and cross-correlations between them and δc. During Interglacial maxima, high local and regional efficient moisture is evidenced by dense arboreal vegetation of

  13. Biotic and abiotic controls on co-occurring nitrogen cycling processes in shallow Arctic shelf sediments

    PubMed Central

    McTigue, N. D.; Gardner, W. S.; Dunton, K. H.; Hardison, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The processes that convert bioavailable inorganic nitrogen to inert nitrogen gas are prominent in continental shelf sediments and represent a critical global sink, yet little is known of these pathways in the Arctic where 18% of the world's continental shelves are located. Moreover, few data from the Arctic exist that separate loss processes like denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) from recycling pathways like dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) or source pathways like nitrogen fixation. Here we present measurements of these co-occurring processes using 15N tracers. Denitrification was heterogeneous among stations and an order of magnitude greater than anammox and DNRA, while nitrogen fixation was undetectable. No abiotic factors correlated with interstation variability in biogeochemical rates; however, bioturbation potential explained most of the variation. Fauna-enhanced denitrification is a potentially important but overlooked process on Arctic shelves and highlights the role of the Arctic as a significant global nitrogen sink. PMID:27782213

  14. Anodes Stimulate Anaerobic Toluene Degradation via Sulfur Cycling in Marine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Daghio, Matteo; Vaiopoulou, Eleni; Patil, Sunil A.; Suárez-Suárez, Ana; Head, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocarbons released during oil spills are persistent in marine sediments due to the absence of suitable electron acceptors below the oxic zone. Here, we investigated an alternative bioremediation strategy to remove toluene, a model monoaromatic hydrocarbon, using a bioanode. Bioelectrochemical reactors were inoculated with sediment collected from a hydrocarbon-contaminated marine site, and anodes were polarized at 0 mV and +300 mV (versus an Ag/AgCl [3 M KCl] reference electrode). The degradation of toluene was directly linked to current generation of up to 301 mA m−2 and 431 mA m−2 for the bioanodes polarized at 0 mV and +300 mV, respectively. Peak currents decreased over time even after periodic spiking with toluene. The monitoring of sulfate concentrations during bioelectrochemical experiments suggested that sulfur metabolism was involved in toluene degradation at bioanodes. 16S rRNA gene-based Illumina sequencing of the bulk anolyte and anode samples revealed enrichment with electrocatalytically active microorganisms, toluene degraders, and sulfate-reducing microorganisms. Quantitative PCR targeting the α-subunit of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (encoded by dsrA) and the α-subunit of the benzylsuccinate synthase (encoded by bssA) confirmed these findings. In particular, members of the family Desulfobulbaceae were enriched concomitantly with current production and toluene degradation. Based on these observations, we propose two mechanisms for bioelectrochemical toluene degradation: (i) direct electron transfer to the anode and/or (ii) sulfide-mediated electron transfer. PMID:26497463

  15. Anodes Stimulate Anaerobic Toluene Degradation via Sulfur Cycling in Marine Sediments.

    PubMed

    Daghio, Matteo; Vaiopoulou, Eleni; Patil, Sunil A; Suárez-Suárez, Ana; Head, Ian M; Franzetti, Andrea; Rabaey, Korneel

    2015-10-23

    Hydrocarbons released during oil spills are persistent in marine sediments due to the absence of suitable electron acceptors below the oxic zone. Here, we investigated an alternative bioremediation strategy to remove toluene, a model monoaromatic hydrocarbon, using a bioanode. Bioelectrochemical reactors were inoculated with sediment collected from a hydrocarbon-contaminated marine site, and anodes were polarized at 0 mV and +300 mV (versus an Ag/AgCl [3 M KCl] reference electrode). The degradation of toluene was directly linked to current generation of up to 301 mA m(-2) and 431 mA m(-2) for the bioanodes polarized at 0 mV and +300 mV, respectively. Peak currents decreased over time even after periodic spiking with toluene. The monitoring of sulfate concentrations during bioelectrochemical experiments suggested that sulfur metabolism was involved in toluene degradation at bioanodes. 16S rRNA gene-based Illumina sequencing of the bulk anolyte and anode samples revealed enrichment with electrocatalytically active microorganisms, toluene degraders, and sulfate-reducing microorganisms. Quantitative PCR targeting the α-subunit of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (encoded by dsrA) and the α-subunit of the benzylsuccinate synthase (encoded by bssA) confirmed these findings. In particular, members of the family Desulfobulbaceae were enriched concomitantly with current production and toluene degradation. Based on these observations, we propose two mechanisms for bioelectrochemical toluene degradation: (i) direct electron transfer to the anode and/or (ii) sulfide-mediated electron transfer.

  16. Development and optimization of acoustic bubble structures at high frequencies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Judy; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian; Yasui, Kyuichi; Tuziuti, Toru; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Towata, Atsuya; Iida, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    At high ultrasound frequencies, active bubble structures are difficult to capture due to the decrease in timescale per acoustic cycle and size of bubbles with increasing frequencies. However the current study demonstrates an association between the spatial distribution of visible bubbles and that of the active bubble structure established in the path of the propagating acoustic wave. By monitoring the occurrence of these visible bubbles, the development of active bubbles can be inferred for high frequencies. A series of still images depicting the formation of visible bubble structures suggest that a strong standing wave field exists at early stages of wave propagation and weakens by the increase in the attenuation of the acoustic wave, caused by the formation of large coalesced bubbles. This attenuation is clearly demonstrated by the occurrence of a force which causes bubbles to be driven toward the liquid surface and limit standing wave fields to near the surface. This force is explained in terms of the acoustic streaming and traveling wave force. It is found that a strong standing wave field is established at 168 kHz. At 448 kHz, large coalesced bubbles can significantly attenuate the acoustic pressure amplitude and weaken the standing wave field. When the frequency is increased to 726 kHz, acoustic streaming becomes significant and is the dominant force behind the disruption of the standing wave structure. The disruption of the standing wave structure can be minimized under certain pulse ON and OFF ratios.

  17. Very high frequency plasma reactant for atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Il-Kwon; Yoo, Gilsang; Yoon, Chang Mo; Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young; Kim, Kangsik; Lee, Zonghoon; Jung, Hanearl; Lee, Chang Wan; Kim, Hyungjun; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram

    2016-11-01

    Although plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) results in several benefits in the formation of high-k dielectrics, including a low processing temperature and improved film properties compared to conventional thermal ALD, energetic radicals and ions in the plasma cause damage to layer stacks, leading to the deterioration of electrical properties. In this study, the growth characteristics and film properties of PE-ALD Al2O3 were investigated using a very-high-frequency (VHF) plasma reactant. Because VHF plasma features a lower electron temperature and higher plasma density than conventional radio frequency (RF) plasma, it has a larger number of less energetic reaction species, such as radicals and ions. VHF PE-ALD Al2O3 shows superior physical and electrical properties over RF PE-ALD Al2O3, including high growth per cycle, excellent conformality, low roughness, high dielectric constant, low leakage current, and low interface trap density. In addition, interlayer-free Al2O3 on Si was achieved in VHF PE-ALD via a significant reduction in plasma damage. VHF PE-ALD will be an essential process to realize nanoscale devices that require precise control of interfaces and electrical properties.

  18. The impact of acid mine drainage on the methylmercury cycling at the sediment-water interface in Aha Reservoir, Guizhou, China.

    PubMed

    He, Tianrong; Zhu, Yuzhen; Yin, Deliang; Luo, Guangjun; An, Yanlin; Yan, HaiYu; Qian, Xiaoli

    2015-04-01

    The methylmercury (MeHg) cycling at water-sediment interface in an acid mine drainage (AMD)-polluted reservoir (Aha Reservoir) and a reference site (Hongfeng Reservoir) were investigated and compared. Both reservoirs are seasonal anoxic and alkaline. The concentrations of sulfate, sulfide, iron, and manganese in Aha Reservoir were enriched compared to the reference levels in Hongfeng reservoir due to the AMD input. It was found that the MeHg accumulation layer in Aha Reservoir transitioned from the top sediment layer in winter to the water-sediment interface in spring and then to the overlying water above sediment in summer. It supported the assumption that spring methylation activity may start in sediments and migrate into the water column with seasonal variation. The weaker methylation in sediment during spring and summer was caused by the excessive sulfide (∼15-20 μM) that reduced the bioavailability of mercury, while sulfate reduction potential was in the optimal range for the methylation in the overlying water. This led to a transport flux of MeHg from water to sediment in spring and summer. In contrast, such inversion of MeHg accumulation layer did not occur in Hongfeng Reservoir. The sulfate reduction potential was in the optimal range for the methylation in top sediment, and dissolved MeHg was positively related to sulfide in pore water of Hongfeng Reservoir (r = 0.67, p < 0.001). This result suggested that accumulation of MeHg in lake water and cycling of MeHg at sediment-water interface associate with some sensitive environmental factors, such as sulfur.

  19. Effects of high frequency current in welding aluminum alloy 6061

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fish, R. E.

    1968-01-01

    Uncontrolled high frequency current causes cracking in the heat-affected zone of aluminum alloy 6061 weldments during tungsten inert gas ac welding. Cracking developed when an improperly adjusted superimposed high frequency current was agitating the semimolten metal in the areas of grain boundary.

  20. Influence of Smoking on Ultra-High-Frequency Auditory Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Prashanth; Varma, Gowtham; Dutta, Kristi Kaveri; Kumar, Prajwal; Goyal, Swati

    2017-04-01

    In this study, an attempt was made to determine the effect of smoking on ultra-high-frequency auditory sensitivity. The study also attempted to determine the relationship between the nature of smoking and ultra-high-frequency otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) and thresholds. The study sample included 25 smokers and 25 non-smokers. A detailed history regarding their smoking habits was collected. High-frequency audiometric thresholds and amplitudes of high-frequency distortion-product OAEs were analyzed for both ears from all participants. The results showed that the ultra-high-frequency thresholds were elevated and that there was reduction in the amplitudes of ultra-high-frequency OAEs in smokers. There was an increased risk of auditory damage with chronic smoking. The study results highlight the application of ultra-high-frequency OAEs and ultra-high-frequency audiometry for the early detection of auditory impairment. However, similar studies should be conducted on a larger population for better generalization of the results.

  1. Phase heterogeneity in carbonate production by marine fish influences their roles in sediment generation and the inorganic carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Salter, Michael A; Harborne, Alastair R; Perry, Chris T; Wilson, Rod W

    2017-04-10

    Marine teleost fish are important carbonate producers in neritic and oceanic settings. However, the fates of the diverse carbonate phases (i.e., mineral and amorphous forms of CaCO3) they produce, and their roles in sediment production and marine inorganic carbon cycling, remain poorly understood. Here we quantify the carbonate phases produced by 22 Bahamian fish species and integrate these data with regional fish biomass data from The Bahamas to generate a novel platform-scale production model that resolves these phases. Overall carbonate phase proportions, ordered by decreasing phase stability, are: ~20% calcite, ~6% aragonite, ~60% high-Mg calcite, and ~14% amorphous carbonate. We predict that these phases undergo differing fates, with at least ~14% (amorphous carbonate) likely dissolving rapidly. Results further indicate that fisheries exploitation in The Bahamas has potentially reduced fish carbonate production by up to 58% in certain habitats, whilst also driving a deviation from natural phase proportions. These findings have evident implications for understanding sedimentary processes in shallow warm-water carbonate provinces. We further speculate that marked phase heterogeneity may be a hitherto unrecognised feature of fish carbonates across a wide range of neritic and oceanic settings, with potentially major implications for understanding their role in global marine inorganic carbon cycling.

  2. Physiological and hydrological controls on mineral redox cycling by long-range electron transport by bacteria in anaerobic sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, K.; Werth, C. J.; Sanford, R. A.; Valocchi, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    The cycling of iron and manganese oxides plays a critical role in the bioavailability of trace elements and macronutrients, the flux of carbon across terrestrial and atmospheric ecosystems, and the remediation of groundwater contaminated by toxic metals and radionuclides. Bacteria control one half of the redox cycle as the primary drivers of iron and manganese reduction in anaerobic soils and sediments. However, Fe(III) and Mn(IV) are almost exclusively present under anaerobic conditions as insoluble oxides, the reduction of which are facilitated by extracellular electron transport via conductive `nanowires', electron shuttling, and direct contact with outer membrane cytochromes. Our research focus is on the relative contribution of nanowires and electron shuttles under different physiological and hydrological conditions, which remains unexplored. We present a novel microfluidic platform that allows us to directly observe these phenomena under a controlled environment representative of groundwater conditions, monitor the metabolic activity and redox state of bacteria, and determine the presence of reduced products in-situ using Raman spectroscopy. Using Geobacter sulfurreducens and Shewanella oneidensis as model metal-reducing bacteria, and insoluble manganese dioxide (i.e. birnessite) as an electron acceptor, we show that 1) electron shuttling is more effective under static conditions 2) the presence of exogenous shuttles allows efficient electron transport under all flow regimes 3) redox potential of the bulk medium exerts significant control over reduction by both nanowires and electron shuttles 4) shuttling is amplified by orders of magnitude in nanopores.

  3. Monitoring method and apparatus using high-frequency carrier

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, H.D.

    1996-04-30

    A method and apparatus for monitoring an electrical-motor-driven device by injecting a high frequency carrier signal onto the power line current. The method is accomplished by injecting a high frequency carrier signal onto an AC power line current. The AC power line current supplies the electrical-motor-driven device with electrical energy. As a result, electrical and mechanical characteristics of the electrical-motor-driven device modulate the high frequency carrier signal and the AC power line current. The high frequency carrier signal is then monitored, conditioned and demodulated. Finally, the modulated high frequency carrier signal is analyzed to ascertain the operating condition of the electrical-motor-driven device. 6 figs.

  4. Monitoring method and apparatus using high-frequency carrier

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Howard D.

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring an electrical-motor-driven device by injecting a high frequency carrier signal onto the power line current. The method is accomplished by injecting a high frequency carrier signal onto an AC power line current. The AC power line current supplies the electrical-motor-driven device with electrical energy. As a result, electrical and mechanical characteristics of the electrical-motor-driven device modulate the high frequency carrier signal and the AC power line current. The high frequency carrier signal is then monitored, conditioned and demodulated. Finally, the modulated high frequency carrier signal is analyzed to ascertain the operating condition of the electrical-motor-driven device.

  5. Exploring the effects of black mangrove (Avicennia germinans) expansions on nutrient cycling in smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) marsh sediments of southern Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, K. M.; Twilley, R. R.

    2011-12-01

    Located at the northernmost extent of mangroves in the Gulf of Mexico, coastal Louisiana (LA) provides an excellent opportunity to study the effects of a climate-induced vegetation shift on nutrient cycling within an ecosystem. Climate throughout the Gulf Coast region is experiencing a general warming trend and scientists predict both hotter summers (+1.5 to 4 °C) and warmer winters (+1.5 to 5.5 °C) by 2100. Over the last two decades, mild winter temperatures have facilitated the expansion of black mangrove trees (Avicennia germinans) into the smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) along parts of the LA coast. Due to differences in morphology and physiology between these two species, the expansion of Avicennia has the potential to greatly alter sediment biogeochemistry, especially nutrient cycling. With such an extensive history of coastal nutrient enrichment and eutrophication in the Mississippi River delta, it is important to understand how nutrient cycling, retention, and removal in this region will be affected by this climate-induced vegetation expansion. We examined the effect of this species shift on porewater salinity, sulfide, and dissolved inorganic nutrient concentrations (nitrite, nitrate, ammonium, and phosphate) as well as sediment oxidation-reduction potential, bulk density, and nutrient content (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus). We also measured net dinitrogen (N2:Ar), oxygen, and dissolved inorganic nutrient fluxes on intact, non-vegetated sediment cores collected from both Spartina and Avicennia habitats. Spartina sediments were more reducing, with higher concentrations of sulfides and ammonium. We found no significant difference between Spartina and Avicennia sediment dinitrogen, oxygen, or dissolved inorganic nutrient fluxes. Net dinitrogen fluxes for both habitat types were predominately positive, indicating higher rates of denitrification than nitrogen fixation at these sites. Sediments were primarily a nitrate sink, but functioned as both a

  6. Solar Cycle Driven Environmental Changes on Decadal to Centennial Scale of Late Miocene Lake Sediments (tortonian, Lake Pannon, Central Europe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piller, W. E.; Kern, A. K.; Harzhauser, M.; Soliman, A.; Mandic, O.

    2012-12-01

    oligotrophic and eutrophic conditions, which are frequently coupled with lake stratification and dysoxic bottom waters. These phases prevented ostracods and molluscs from settling and fostered the activity of sulfur bacteria. Several of the studied proxies reveal iterative patterns. To compare and detect these repetitive signals REDFIT spectra were generated and Gaussian filters were applied. The resulting cycles correspond to the lower and upper Gleissberg, the de Vries/Suess, the unnamed 500-year, 1000-year 1,500-year and the Hallstatt cycles. To test the solar-forcing-hypothesis, our data have been compared with those from a Holocene isotope dataset. Our data represent a first unequivocal detection of solar cycles in pre-Pleistocene sediments.

  7. Milankovitch orbital cycles encoded by diagenetic iron sulfides in Neogene sediments, Stirone River section, Northern Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunderson, K. L.; Kodama, K. P.; Anastasio, D. J.; Pazzaglia, F. J.

    2009-12-01

    We used rock magnetic parameters to identify Milankovitch orbital cycles in the marine sediments of the Messinian-Early Pleistocene Stirone River section, Northern Apennines, Italy. These measurements provide excellent proxies for subtle changes in depositional environment, including climate, in stratigraphic sections where facies variations are not evident. We measured 636 meters of section and collected samples every 1 meter, for which we measured magnetic susceptibility (MS), natural remanent magnetization (NRM), anhysteretic magnetization in a 40 mT peak alternating field(40mT ARM), and anhysteretic remanent magnetization in a 100 mT peak alternating field (100mT ARM). We present the results of our time-series analysis of the MS, 40mT ARM, and 100mT ARM stratigraphic series for 310 meters of section, encompassing the time period between 3.1 My and 1.8 My. During this time period, the power spectra produced from the MS stratigraphic series exhibits peaks with frequencies at 1/24m, 1/10m, and 1/6m. Based on our calculated mean sedimentation rate of 0.24 m/ky, we interpret the spectral peaks to be associated with the eccentricity, obliquity, and precessional orbital cycles, respectively. The 40mT ARM spectra exhibits peaks at similar periodicities, but the corresponding spectral peaks are broader and the spectral power is much lower. The 100mT ARM spectra shows an increase in spectral power with respect to the 40mT ARM, but it also exhibits broad spectral peaks. Low temperature (77 K) susceptibility (LT-MS) and isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition experiments were conducted to determine which magnetic minerals carry the MS signal. The observed increase of the MS at low temperature (6-140%) was not large enough to conclude that the MS is dominated by paramagnetic grains. IRM acquisition modeling indicates two components of magnetization: (1) a major component comprising ~85% of the magnetization with a mean coercivity of 67 mT and (2) a minor

  8. Microbial mercury cycling in sediments of the San Francisco Bay-Delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark; Agee, Jennifer L.

    2003-01-01

    Microbial mercury (Hg) methylation and methylmercury (MeHg) degradation processes were examined using radiolabled model Hg compounds in San Francisco Bay-Delta surface sediments during three seasonal periods: late winter, spring, and fall. Strong seasonal and spatial differences were evident for both processes. MeHg production rates were positively correlated with microbial sulfate reduction rates during late winter only. MeHg production potential was also greatest during this period and decreased during spring and fall. This temporal trend was related both to an increase in gross MeHg degradation, driven by increasing temperature, and to a build-up in pore water sulfide and solid phase reduced sulfur driven by increased sulfate reduction during the warmer seasons. MeHg production decreased sharply with depth at two of three sites, both of which exhibited a corresponding increase in reduced sulfur compounds with depth. One site that was comparatively oxidized and alkaline exhibited little propensity for net MeHg production. These results support the hypothesis that net MeHg production is greatest when and where gross MeHg degradation rates are low and dissolved and solid phase reduced sulfur concentrations are low.

  9. Microbial Mercury Cycling in Sediments of the San Francisco Bay-Delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marvin-DiPasquale, M.; Agee, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    Microbial mercury (Hg) methylation and methylmercury (MeHg) degradation processes were examined using radiolabled model Hg compounds in San Francisco Bay-Delta surface sediments during three seasonal periods: late winter, spring, and fall. Strong seasonal and spatial differences were evident for both processes. MeHg production rates were positively correlated with microbial sulfate reduction rates during late winter only. MeHg production potential was also greatest during this period and decreased during spring and fall. This temporal trend was related both to an increase in gross MeHg degradation, driven by increasing temperature, and to a build-up in pore water sulfide and solid phase reduced sulfur driven by increased sulfate reduction during the warmer seasons. MeHg production decreased sharply with depth at two of three sites, both of which exhibited a corresponding increase in reduced sulfur compounds with depth. One site that was comparatively oxidized and alkaline exhibited little propensity for net MeHg production. These results support the hypothesis that net MeHg production is greatest when and where gross MeHg degradation rates are low and dissolved and solid phase reduced sulfur concentrations are low.

  10. Impacts of shrimp farming cultivation cycles on benthic assemblages and chemistry of sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatje, V.; Ribeiro, L.; Barros, F.

    2016-02-01

    There is a growing concern, both locally and worldwide, for the recognition of the finite and fragile nature of the coastal ecosystems in which shrimp farming often takes place. Attempts to fully control and regulate shrimp farming activities and their potential adverse impacts in many countries have been so far unsuccessful. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial and temporal impacts of semi-intensive shrimp farming based on multiple lines of evidence using an asymmetrical design. Significant differences were observed between impact and control areas for the water column and sediments. Concentrations of nutrients, Zn and Cu were significantly higher in impact than control areas. In general, the level of contaminants was highest during the harvesting period and in sites nearby the discharge of effluents. Abundance and richness of benthic assemblages were at least one order of magnitude smaller in impacted areas than in controls. The structure of the benthic assemblages was significantly different at these two treatments. The combined use of biological and chemical data showed to be efficient to provide precise answers regarding the extent of impacts caused by shrimp cultivation in coastal ecosystems. The results provide the basis for a better understanding of impacts of this activity and can subsidize the development of better management practices for coastal areas.

  11. Hydrothermal Fe cycling and deep ocean organic carbon scavenging: Model-based evidence for significant POC supply to seafloor sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; Legendre, L. L.; Sander, S. G.; Niquil, N.; Luther, G. W.; Bharati, L.; Han, X.; Le Bris, N.

    2015-06-01

    Submarine hydrothermal venting has recently been identified to have the potential to impact ocean biogeochemistry at the global scale. This is the case because processes active in hydrothermal plumes are so vigorous that the residence time of the ocean, with respect to cycling through hydrothermal plumes, is comparable to that of deep ocean mixing caused by thermohaline circulation. Recently, it has been argued that seafloor venting may provide a significant source of bio-essential Fe to the oceans as the result of a close coupling between Fe and organic carbon in hydrothermal plumes. But a complementary question remains to be addressed: does this same intimate Fe-Corg association in hydrothermal plumes cause any related impact to the global C cycle? To address this, SCOR-InterRidge Working Group 135 developed a modeling approach to synthesize site-specific field data from the East Pacific Rise 9°50‧ N hydrothermal field, where the range of requisite data sets is most complete, and combine those inputs with global estimates for dissolved Fe inputs from venting to the oceans to establish a coherent model with which to investigate hydrothermal Corg cycling. The results place new constraints on submarine Fe vent fluxes worldwide, including an indication that the majority of Fe supplied to hydrothermal plumes should come from entrainment of diffuse flow. While this same entrainment is not predicted to enhance the supply of dissolved organic carbon to hydrothermal plumes by more than ∼10% over background values, what the model does indicate is that scavenging of carbon in association with Fe-rich hydrothermal plume particles should play a significant role in the delivery of particulate organic carbon to deep ocean sediments, worldwide.

  12. Effects of near-bottom water oxygen concentration on biogeochemical cycling of C, N and S in sediments of the Gulf of Gdansk (southern Baltic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukawska-Matuszewska, Katarzyna; Kielczewska, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    Sediments from four sampling sites in the Gulf of Gdansk were sampled to test how different oxygen concentrations in near-bottom water affects biogeochemical cycling of C, N and S. Vertical distributions of content of organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN) and total sulfur (TS) and number of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in sediments were determined. Pore water total alkalinity (TA), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), sulfate, hydrogen sulfide, ammonium and phosphate were analyzed and benthic fluxes of DIC, hydrogen sulfide and ammonium were calculated. Concentrations of OC and TN decreased and concentration of TS increased with sediment depth. Highest concentrations of OC, TN and TS were observed in silty clay sediments from hypoxic and anoxic sediments below the permanent halocline. Organic matter (OM) accumulation in sediments and oxygen deficiency in near-bottom water stimulate preservation of OC and burial of TS in this area. Concentrations of TA, DIC, hydrogen sulfide, ammonium and phosphate in pore water increased, while concentration of sulfate decreased with sediment depth. Hydrogen sulfide, ammonium and phosphate was a significant additional source of TA in pore water under hypoxic and anoxic conditions. Mineralization of OM at oxygen concentrations <2 ml l-1 occurred mainly via bacterial sulfate reduction. Diurnal hydrogen sulfide fluxes under hypoxic conditions ranged from 400 to 1240 μmol m-2 d-1. Ammonium fluxes were estimated on 534 - 924 μmol m-2 d-1. Corresponding fluxes measured under anoxic conditions were 266 μmol m-2 d-1 and 106 μmol m-2 d-1. Sediments under oxic conditions became a place of the intensive regeneration of carbon - DIC flux from sediment reached 2775 μmol m-2 day-1. Sediment-water DIC fluxes under hypoxic and anoxic conditions were much lower and ranged from 1015 to 1208 μmol m-2 d-1.

  13. A continuously weighing, high frequency sand trap: Wind tunnel and field evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Yang, XingHua; Huo, Wen; Ali, Mamtimin; Zheng, XinQian; Zhou, ChengLong; He, Qing

    2017-09-01

    A new continuously weighing, high frequency sand trap (CWHF) has been designed. Its sampling efficiency is evaluated in a wind tunnel and the potential of the new trap has been demonstrated in field trials. The newly designed sand trap allows fully automated and high frequency measurement of sediment fluxes over extensive periods. We show that it can capture the variations and structures of wind-driven sand transport processes and horizontal sediment flux, and reveal the relationships between sand transport and meteorological parameters. Its maximum sampling frequency can reach 10 Hz. Wind tunnel tests indicated that the sampling efficiency of the CWHF sand trap varies between 39.2 to 64.3%, with an average of 52.5%. It achieved a maximum sampling efficiency of 64.3% at a wind speed of 10 m s- 1. This is largely achieved by the inclusion of a vent hole which leads to a higher sampling efficiency than that of a step-like sand trap at high wind speeds. In field experiments, we show a good agreement between the mass of sediment from the CWHF sand trap, the wind speed at 2 m and the number of saltating particles at 5 cm above the ground surface. According to analysis of the horizontal sediment flux at four heights from the CWHF sand trap (25, 35, 50, and 100 cm), the vertical distribution of the horizontal sediment flux up to a height of 100 cm above the sand surface follows an exponential function. Our field experiments show that the new instrument can capture more detailed information on sediment transport with much reduced labor requirement. Therefore, it has great potential for application in wind-blown sand monitoring and process studies.

  14. Ultrasonic Measurements of Unconsolidated Saline Sediments During Freeze/Thaw Cycles: The Seismic Properties of Cryopeg Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, S.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    Saline permafrost and cryopegs (hypersaline unfrozen layers/zones within permafrost) are widespread in the Arctic coastal area as a result of marine transgression and regression in recent geological history. Owing to the freezing-point depression effect of soluble salts, they contain more unfrozen water than non-saline frozen sediments when subjected to the same permafrost temperatures (e.g., from 0 to -15 °C). Mapping subsurface cryopeg structure remains a challenging geophysical task due to the poor penetration of GPR in highly conductive fluids and related limitations for lower frequency EM techniques. Seismic profiling, particularly surface wave characterization, provides one possible approach to delineate the extent of cryopeg bodies. However, interpretation of such surveys is currently limited by the sparse database of measurements examining the seismic properties of unconsolidated materials saturated with saline fluids at sub-zero temperatures. We present the results of experiments examining seismic velocity in the ultrasonic range for both synthetic and natural permafrost sediments during freeze/thaw cycles; in these experiments, use of a range of brine salinities allows us to evaluate the properties of cryopeg sediments at in-situ conditions, a prerequisite for quantitative interpretation of seismic imaging results. Because of the abundant unfrozen water and less developed inter-granular ice structure, the seismic properties of saline permafrost typically falls between frozen and unfrozen soils. We conducted ultrasonic measurements of a freeze-thaw cycle on 20-30 Ottawa sand (grain size 590-840 μm) as well as natural mineral soils from the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO) saturated with brines of different salinities (0-2.5 M NaCl). For each salinity, seismic properties were measured using the ultrasonic (~1 MHz) pulse-transmission method in the temperature range from 20 to -30 °C. Similar to sediments saturated with low salinity fluids, seismic

  15. [Experiences in high frequency audiometry and possible applications (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Dieroff, H G

    1976-09-01

    Observations on the ultrasonic perception of noise-impaired persons gave rise to use the high frequency audiometry described by Fletcher for the early recognition of noise-induced damages. Using commercial equipment we found that the earpiece was not adapted to high frequency conditions. The adaptation problem and ways of modification are described in detail. After having improved the coupling features reproducible hearing curves were obtained. Examinations were carried out on workers, whose noise exposure exceeded the critical intensity by only a few dB. The following 3 categories of impairment were found: 1. Normal hearing between 125 and 8,000 Hz as well as in the high frequency region. 2. Unsignificant noise-induced impairments between 125 and 8,000 Hz; no high frequency hearing. 3. Acoustic hearing; no high frequency hearing. The results are discussed. It is supposed that high frequency hearing losses due to noise and chemical noxious exposure (streptomycin) are valuable in diagnostics and prognostics. Accordingly persons are to be assessed as noise sensitive, when there is no more high frequency hearing before practising noise work.

  16. Salt Marsh sediment 15N/13C "Push-Pull" assays reveal coupled sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S. M.; Tucker, J.; Thomas, F.; Sievert, S. M.; Cardon, Z. G.; Giblin, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    Salt marshes are extraordinarily productive ecosystems found in estuaries worldwide, hosting intensive sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon cycling. Although it has been hypothesized that in this environment sulfur oxidation may be important for energy flow, there is little direct data. At the heart of these hypothesized interactions are sulfur oxidizing microbes. Sulfur oxidizers can catalyze sulfide (re-)oxidation with nitrate as the electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions, producing ammonium (via DNRA) or dinitrogen gas (via denitrification). The form of sulfur present in marsh systems influences whether autotrophic or heterotrophic processes transform nitrate either to dinitrogen gas or ammonium through DNRA. To examine the fate of nitrate and interactions with sulfur, we conducted a series of "push-pull" experiments in marsh sediment at the Plum Island Ecosystems Long-Term Ecological Research site in Massachusetts. Porewater was extracted anoxically and amended with isotopically labeled nitrate (15N) and bicarbonate (13C). Porewater was pumped back into the sediment and then withdrawn at intervals of several hours. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen, sulfur, and carbon were measured as well as isotopes of nitrogen gas and ammonium. These push-pull experiments were conducted at several times during the growing season, to coincide with salt marsh grass initial growth (May), maximum growth (July), flowering (August), and senescence (October). Porewater sulfides were very low to non-detectable in May (time of initial plant growth) and increased to a maximum of 3 mM in October (time of plant senescence). Combined rates of denitrification and DNRA also varied seasonally: rates were higher in May (0.16 - 17.5 nmoles N/cm3/hr) and much lower in October (0 - 0.03 nmoles N/cm3/hr). Interestingly, DNRA rates were always higher than denitrification rates, often by an order of magnitude or more.

  17. Coral reef sedimentation on Rodrigues and the Western Indian Ocean and its impact on the carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Rees, Siwan A; Opdyke, Bradley N; Wilson, Paul A; Fifield, L Keith

    2005-01-15

    Coral reefs in the southwest Indian Ocean cover an area of ca. 18,530 km2 compared with a global reef area of nearly 300,000 km2. These regions are important as fishing grounds, tourist attractions and as a significant component of the global carbon cycle. The mass of calcium carbonate stored within Holocene neritic sediments is a number that we are only now beginning to quantify with any confidence, in stark contrast to the mass and sedimentation rates associated with pelagic calcium carbonate, which have been relatively well defined for decades. We report new data that demonstrate that the reefs at Rodrigues, like those at Reunion and Mauritius, only reached a mature state (reached sea level) by 2-3 ka: thousands of years later than most of the reefs in the Australasian region. Yet field observations show that the large lagoon at Rodrigues is already completely full of carbonate detritus (typical lagoon depth less than 1 m at low spring tide). The presence of aeolian dunes at Rodrigues indicates periodic exposure of past lagoons throughout the Pleistocene. The absence of elevated Pleistocene reef deposits on the island indicates that the island has not been uplifted. Most Holocene reefs are between 15 and 20 m in thickness and those in the southwest Indian Ocean appear to be consistent with this observation. We support the view that the CO2 flux associated with coral-reef growth acts as a climate change amplifier during deglaciation, adding CO2 to a warming world. southwest Indian Ocean reefs could have added 7-10% to this global flux during the Holocene.

  18. High-frequency energy in singing and speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monson, Brian Bruce

    While human speech and the human voice generate acoustical energy up to (and beyond) 20 kHz, the energy above approximately 5 kHz has been largely neglected. Evidence is accruing that this high-frequency energy contains perceptual information relevant to speech and voice, including percepts of quality, localization, and intelligibility. The present research was an initial step in the long-range goal of characterizing high-frequency energy in singing voice and speech, with particular regard for its perceptual role and its potential for modification during voice and speech production. In this study, a database of high-fidelity recordings of talkers was created and used for a broad acoustical analysis and general characterization of high-frequency energy, as well as specific characterization of phoneme category, voice and speech intensity level, and mode of production (speech versus singing) by high-frequency energy content. Directionality of radiation of high-frequency energy from the mouth was also examined. The recordings were used for perceptual experiments wherein listeners were asked to discriminate between speech and voice samples that differed only in high-frequency energy content. Listeners were also subjected to gender discrimination tasks, mode-of-production discrimination tasks, and transcription tasks with samples of speech and singing that contained only high-frequency content. The combination of these experiments has revealed that (1) human listeners are able to detect very subtle level changes in high-frequency energy, and (2) human listeners are able to extract significant perceptual information from high-frequency energy.

  19. Structural drilling using the high-frequency (sonic) rotary method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šporin, Jurij; Vukelić, Željko

    2017-03-01

    In Slovenia, there is widespread use of structural drilling along with classical core drilling. Recently, however, the need has arisen for a highly effective core drilling method with the aid of which high-quality core might be obtained. In order to achieve this aim, one among several Slovenian companies dealing with geological surveying has decided to implement structural drilling using a high-frequency drilling method. The following article presents the theoretical foundations for such a high-frequency method, as well as the manner of its implementation. In the final part of the article, a practical comparison between the conventional and the high-frequency core drilling methods is also provided.

  20. High-frequency threshold measurements using insert earphones.

    PubMed

    Tang, H; Letowski, T

    1992-10-01

    Several recent studies have reported large intersubject variability of high-frequency thresholds measured with circumaural earphones. In the present study, high-frequency thresholds of 10 subjects were measured with circumaural (Sennheiser HD-250) and insert (Etymotic ER-1) earphones at 10, 12, 14, and 16 kHz. Overall results show significantly smaller variability of the threshold data obtained with insert earphones than with circumaural earphones. The above data indicate that insert earphones may be more suitable for high-frequency testing than circumaural earphones.

  1. The dynamics of flow and sediment transport during Karakoram surge cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quincey, D. J.; Bishop, M. P.; Sevestre, H.; Glasser, N. F.

    2010-12-01

    An increasing number of glaciers have been reported to be advancing and thickening in the Karakoram, which is anomalous in the wider context of Himalayan mountain glacier recession. There has been a coincident increase in the number and magnitude of glacier surges, events that greatly accelerate surface erosional and depositional processes, with an associated impact on tectonic uplift rates. Despite their importance for landscape evolution on a variety of timescales, there remains a paucity of quantitative data relating to glacier surge dynamics, or any rigorous assessment of their impact on landscape geomorphology. In this study, optical matching of Landsat satellite image pairs is used to derive glacier velocity data for three glaciers before, during and after recent surge events. These data show that glacier flow can increase by up to two orders of magnitude during surge events when compared with quiescent velocities, and allow for first order determination of the importance of basal sliding vs internal deformation in glacier motion in the region. Multi-temporal geomorphological mapping highlights the rapid modification of glacier surface features that reflect a progressive re-arrangement of glacier flow within individual flow units and demonstrate that surface debris can be transported several kilometers down-glacier within a single surge cycle. Combined, these data provide a critical first step in understanding the short-term erosional capability of glaciers, which has important implications for understanding landscape evolution within a complex, tectonically active environment.

  2. Thaumarchaeotal Signature Gene Distribution in Sediments of the Northern South China Sea: an Indicator of the Metabolic Intersection of the Marine Carbon, Nitrogen, and Phosphorus Cycles?

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haixia; Yang, Jinying; Ge, Huangmin; Jiao, Nianzhi; Luan, Xiwu; Klotz, Martin G.

    2013-01-01

    Thaumarchaeota are abundant and active in marine waters, where they contribute to aerobic ammonia oxidation and light-independent carbon fixation. The ecological function of thaumarchaeota in marine sediments, however, has rarely been investigated, even though marine sediments constitute the majority of the Earth's surface. Thaumarchaeota in the upper layer of sediments may contribute significantly to the reservoir of nitrogen oxides in ocean waters and thus to productivity, including the assimilation of carbon. We tested this hypothesis in the northern South China Sea (nSCS), a section of a large oligotrophic marginal sea with limited influx of nutrients, including nitrogen, by investigating the diversity, abundance, community structure, and spatial distribution of thaumarchaeotal signatures in surface sediments. Quantitative real-time PCR using primers designed to detect 16S rRNA and amoA genes in sediment community DNA revealed a significantly higher abundance of pertinent thaumarchaeotal than betaproteobacterial genes. This finding correlates with high levels of hcd genes, a signature of thaumarchaeotal autotrophic carbon fixation. Thaumarchaeol, a signature lipid biomarker for thaumarchaeota, constituted the majority of archaeal lipids in marine sediments. Sediment temperature and organic P and silt contents were identified as key environmental factors shaping the community structure and distribution of the monitored thaumarchaeotal amoA genes. When the pore water PO43− concentration was controlled for via partial-correlation analysis, thaumarchaeotal amoA gene abundance significantly correlated with the sediment pore water NO2− concentration, suggesting that the amoA-bearing thaumarchaeota contribute to nitrite production. Statistical analyses also suggest that thaumarchaeotal metabolism could serve as a pivotal intersection of the carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles in marine sediments. PMID:23335759

  3. Thaumarchaeotal signature gene distribution in sediments of the northern South China Sea: an indicator of the metabolic intersection of the marine carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles?

    PubMed

    Dang, Hongyue; Zhou, Haixia; Yang, Jinying; Ge, Huangmin; Jiao, Nianzhi; Luan, Xiwu; Zhang, Chuanlun; Klotz, Martin G

    2013-04-01

    Thaumarchaeota are abundant and active in marine waters, where they contribute to aerobic ammonia oxidation and light-independent carbon fixation. The ecological function of thaumarchaeota in marine sediments, however, has rarely been investigated, even though marine sediments constitute the majority of the Earth's surface. Thaumarchaeota in the upper layer of sediments may contribute significantly to the reservoir of nitrogen oxides in ocean waters and thus to productivity, including the assimilation of carbon. We tested this hypothesis in the northern South China Sea (nSCS), a section of a large oligotrophic marginal sea with limited influx of nutrients, including nitrogen, by investigating the diversity, abundance, community structure, and spatial distribution of thaumarchaeotal signatures in surface sediments. Quantitative real-time PCR using primers designed to detect 16S rRNA and amoA genes in sediment community DNA revealed a significantly higher abundance of pertinent thaumarchaeotal than betaproteobacterial genes. This finding correlates with high levels of hcd genes, a signature of thaumarchaeotal autotrophic carbon fixation. Thaumarchaeol, a signature lipid biomarker for thaumarchaeota, constituted the majority of archaeal lipids in marine sediments. Sediment temperature and organic P and silt contents were identified as key environmental factors shaping the community structure and distribution of the monitored thaumarchaeotal amoA genes. When the pore water PO4(3-) concentration was controlled for via partial-correlation analysis, thaumarchaeotal amoA gene abundance significantly correlated with the sediment pore water NO2(-) concentration, suggesting that the amoA-bearing thaumarchaeota contribute to nitrite production. Statistical analyses also suggest that thaumarchaeotal metabolism could serve as a pivotal intersection of the carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles in marine sediments.

  4. Bridging spatially segregated redox zones with a microbial electrochemical snorkel triggers biogeochemical cycles in oil-contaminated River Tyne (UK) sediments.

    PubMed

    Viggi, Carolina Cruz; Matturro, Bruna; Frascadore, Emanuela; Insogna, Susanna; Mezzi, Alessio; Kaciulis, Saulius; Sherry, Angela; Mejeha, Obioma K; Head, Ian M; Vaiopoulou, Eleni; Rabaey, Korneel; Rossetti, Simona; Aulenta, Federico

    2017-10-03

    Marine sediments represent an important sink for a number of anthropogenic organic contaminants, including petroleum hydrocarbons following an accidental oil spill. Degradation of these compounds largely depends on the activity of sedimentary microbial communities linked to biogeochemical cycles, in which abundant elements such as iron and sulfur are shuttled between their oxidized and reduced forms. Here we show that introduction of a small electrically conductive graphite rod ("the electrochemical snorkel") into an oil-contaminated River Tyne (UK) sediment, so as to create an electrochemical connection between the anoxic contaminated sediment and the oxygenated overlying water, has a large impact on the rate of metabolic reactions taking place in the bulk sediment. The electrochemical snorkel accelerated sulfate reduction processes driven by organic contaminant oxidation and suppressed competitive methane-producing reactions. The application of a comprehensive suite of chemical, spectroscopic, biomolecular and thermodynamic analyses suggested that the snorkel served as a scavenger of toxic sulfide via a redox interaction with the iron cycle. Taken as a whole, the results of this work highlight a new strategy for controlling biological processes, such as bioremediation, through the manipulation of the electron flows in contaminated sediments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Catchment Very-High Frequency Hydrochemistry: the Critex Chemical House

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floury, P.; Gaillardet, J.; Tallec, G.; Blanchouin, A.; Ansart, P.

    2015-12-01

    Exploring the variations of river quality at very high frequency is still a big challenge that has fundamental implications both for understanding catchment ecosystems and for water quality monitoring. Within the French Critical Zone program CRITEX, we have proposed to develop a prototype called "Chemical House", applying the "lab on field" concept to one of the stream of the Orgeval Critical Zone Observatory. The Orgeval catchment (45 km2) is part of the Critical Zone RBV ("Réseau des bassins versants") network. It is a typical temperate agricultural catchment that has been intensively monitored for the last 50 years for hydrology and nutrient chemistry. Agricultural inputs and land use are also finely monitored making Orgeval an ideal basin to test the response of the Critical Zone to agricultural forcing. Geology consists of a typical sedimentary basin of Cenozoic age with horizontal layers of limestones, silcrete and marls, covered by a thin loamy layer. Two main aquifers are present within the catchment: the Brie and the Champigny aquifers. Mean runoff is 780 mm/yr. The Chemical House is a fully automated lab and installed directly along the river, which performs measurement of all major dissolved elements such as Na, Cl, Mg, Ca, NO3, SO4 and K every half hour. It also records all physical parameters (Temperature, pH, conductivity, O2 dissolved, Turbidity) of the water every minute. Orgeval Chemical House started to measure river chemistry on June 12, 2015 and has successfully now recorded several months of data. We will present the architecture of the Chemical House and the first reproducibility and accuracy tests made during the summer drought 2015 period. Preliminary results show that the chemical house is recoding significant nychtemeral (day/night) cycles for each element. We also observe that each element has its own behaviour along a day. First results open great prospects.

  6. High-frequency matrix converter with square wave input

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Joseph Alexander; Balda, Juan Carlos

    2015-03-31

    A device for producing an alternating current output voltage from a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage comprising, high-frequency, square-wave input a matrix converter and a control system. The matrix converter comprises a plurality of electrical switches. The high-frequency input and the matrix converter are electrically connected to each other. The control system is connected to each switch of the matrix converter. The control system is electrically connected to the input of the matrix converter. The control system is configured to operate each electrical switch of the matrix converter converting a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage across the first input port of the matrix converter and the second input port of the matrix converter to an alternating current output voltage at the output of the matrix converter.

  7. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Kye-Si Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-15

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  8. Self-demodulation of high-frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Vos, Hendrik J; Goertz, David E; de Jong, Nico

    2010-03-01

    High-frequency (>10 MHz) ultrasound is used in, e.g., small animal imaging or intravascular applications. Currently available ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have a suboptimal response for high frequencies. This study therefore investigates the nonlinear propagation effects in a high-frequency ultrasound field (25 MHz) and its use for standard UCA and diagnostic frequencies (1-3 MHz). Nonlinear mixing of two high-frequency carrier waves produces a low-frequency wave, known as the self-demodulation or parametric array effect. Hydrophone experiments showed that the self-demodulated field of a focused 25 MHz transducer (850 kPa source pressure) has an amplitude of 45 kPa at 1.5 MHz in water. Such pressure level is sufficient for UCA excitation. Experimental values are confirmed by numerical simulations using the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov equation on a spatially convergent grid.

  9. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kye-Si; Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-01

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  10. High frequency ultrasound with color Doppler in dermatology*

    PubMed Central

    Barcaui, Elisa de Oliveira; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Lopes, Flavia Paiva Proença Lobo; Piñeiro-Maceira, Juan; Barcaui, Carlos Baptista

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography is a method of imaging that classically is used in dermatology to study changes in the hypoderma, as nodules and infectious and inflammatory processes. The introduction of high frequency and resolution equipments enabled the observation of superficial structures, allowing differentiation between skin layers and providing details for the analysis of the skin and its appendages. This paper aims to review the basic principles of high frequency ultrasound and its applications in different areas of dermatology. PMID:27438191

  11. Basis of Ionospheric Modification by High-Frequency Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    for conducting ionospheric heating experiments in Gakona, Alaska, as part of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ) [5], is being...upgraded. The upgraded HAARP HF transmitting system will be a phased-array antenna of 180 elements. Each element is a cross dipole, which radiates a...supported by the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ), the Air Force Research Laboratory at Hanscom Air Force Base, MA, and by the Office

  12. High frequency, small signal MH loops of ferromagnetic thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, C. A.; Ong, K. G.

    2000-01-01

    A method is presented for transforming the high frequency bias susceptibility measurements of ferromagnetic thin films into the form of a MH loop with, depending upon the measurement geometry, the y-axis zero crossing giving a measure of the coercive force or anisotropy field. The loops provide a measure of the quantitative and qualitative high frequency switching properties of ferromagnetic thin films. c2000 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Characterizing Earthquake Rupture Properties Using Peak High-Frequency Offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, L.; Meng, L.

    2014-12-01

    Teleseismic array back-projection (BP) of high frequency (~1Hz) seismic waves has been recently applied to image the aftershock sequence of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake. The BP method proves to be effective in capturing early aftershocks that are difficult to be detected due to the contamination of the mainshock coda wave. Furthermore, since the event detection is based on the identification of the local peaks in time series of the BP power, the resulting event location corresponds to the peak high-frequency energy rather than the hypocenter. In this work, we show that the comparison between the BP-determined catalog and conventional phase-picking catalog provides estimates of the spatial and temporal offset between the hypocenter and the peak high-frequency radiation. We propose to measure this peak high-frequency shift of global earthquakes between M4.0 to M7.0. We average the BP locations calibrated by multiple reference events to minimize the uncertainty due to the variation of 3D path effects. In our initial effort focusing on the foreshock and aftershock sequence of the 2014 Iquique earthquake, we find systematic shifts of the peak high-frequency energy towards the down-dip direction. We find that the amount of the shift is a good indication of rupture length, which scales with the earthquake magnitude. Further investigations of the peak high frequency offset may provide constraints on earthquake source properties such as rupture directivity, rupture duration, rupture speed, and stress drop.

  14. Investigating Sea Ice Regimes and Glacial Cycles of the Early Pleistocene in a Sediment Record from the Northwind Ridge, Western Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dipre, G.; Polyak, L. V.; Ortiz, J. D.; Cook, A.; Oti, E.

    2014-12-01

    We are conducting a comprehensive study of a sediment record from the Arctic Ocean in order to improve our understanding of paleoceanographic conditions during the early Pleistocene, a potential paleo-analog for the current and future states of the Arctic. The study deals with a sediment core raised on the HOTRAX 2005 expedition from the Northwind Ridge, western Arctic Ocean. By comparison with an earlier reported stratigraphy (Polyak et al., 2013), the core dates back to estimated ca. 1.5 Ma. A suite of paleobiological, lithological, and geochemical proxies will be utilized to reconstruct paleoceanographic environments in the early Pleistocene part of the record. In contrast to most Arctic Ocean sediment cores, calcareous microfossils occur in abundance to ca. 1.2 Ma. This enables the use of microfaunal assemblages as proxies for sea-ice conditions, which control the seasonal organic production. Physical properties such as sediment density, grain size, and sediment fabric (based on XCT imagery) will be employed to determine the impact of glaciations on sedimentation. By reconstructing sea-ice history and glacial cycles, we will gain insights into poorly understood controls on the Arctic environments during the early Pleistocene and Mid-Pleistocene Transition.

  15. A palaeoclimate investigation of the lacustrine sediments from Chew Bahir in Ethiopia spanning multiple glacial-interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Melanie; Dean, Jonathan; Asrat, Asfawossen; Chapot, Melissa; Cohen, Andrew; Deino, Alan; Foerster, Verena; Lamb, Henry; Roberts, Helen; Schäbitz, Frank; Trauth, Martin; Viehberg, Finn

    2017-04-01

    There are few long, continuous, terrestrial Pleistocene records from eastern Africa, therefore it has been difficult to establish the relative influences of different climate forcings on the region's hydroclimate and to understand the climatic conditions at the time of anatomically modern human origin and dispersal out of Africa. To address these gaps in our knowledge, we have cored lake sediments from Chew Bahir in southern Ethiopia, close to the site of the oldest-known anatomically modern human fossils at Omo-Kibish. Several dating techniques are being employed and preliminary results suggest that the record covers the past 500-550ka. Several proxy records are being produced; here we use the oxygen and carbon isotope composition of endogenic calcite to reconstruct changes in hydroclimate. The data suggest significant fluctuations in water balance, with seemingly more evaporative conditions during glacial periods and less evaporative conditions during interglacials. The sawtooth structure of the isotope data through glacial-interglacial cycles suggests a strong linkage between high latitude forcing and Ethiopian hydroclimate fluctuations. We make inferences about the possible correlation between climate and the dispersal of anatomically modern humans out of Africa.

  16. High-frequency depositional sequences and stratal stacking patterns in lower pliocene coastal deltas, mid-Norwegian continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, S.; Weimer, P.

    1996-12-01

    Extensive deltaic and coastal progradation occurred along the mid-Norwegian continental shelf during the early Pliocene. Thirty-eight well-developed, high-frequency (fourth-order) sequences are identified within the deltaic complex on multifold seismic data. The fourth-order sequences are arranged in four oblique progradational and two sigmoid progradational sequence sets. Deposition of the high-frequency sequences and their stacking patterns probably were in response to high-frequency cycles of relative changes in sea level cycles produced by variable rates of subsidence and uplift, superimposed on ;high-frequency eustatic cycles within a lower frequency eustatic system. The mixed aggrading/prograding sequence sets are interpreted to represent increased space-added accommodation rates and deposition within third-order highstand systems tracts. Conversely, the progradational sequence sets are interpreted to represent decreasing space-added accommodation rates and deposition within the third-order low-stand systems tracts. The recognition of multiple sequence sets likely reflects the effect of long-term relative fall in sea level (tectonic uplift?) super-imposed on high-frequency eustatic cycles.

  17. Noninvasive Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease Using 12-Lead High-Frequency Electrocardiograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian

    2006-01-01

    method is the presence versus the absence of reduced-amplitude zones (RAZs). In terms that must be simplified for the sake of brevity, an RAZ comprises several cycles of a high-frequency QRS signal during which the amplitude of the high-frequency oscillation in a portion of the signal is abnormally low (see figure). A given signal sample exhibiting an interval of reduced amplitude may or may not be classified as an RAZ, depending on quantitative criteria regarding peaks and troughs within the reduced-amplitude portion of the high-frequency QRS signal. This analysis is performed in all 12 leads in real time.

  18. ON THE FLARE INDUCED HIGH-FREQUENCY GLOBAL WAVES IN THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Brajesh; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Mathur, Savita; GarcIa, R. A. E-mail: pvk@prl.res.in E-mail: rafael.garcia@cea.fr

    2010-03-01

    Recently, Karoff and Kjeldsen presented evidence of strong correlation between the energy in the high-frequency part (5.3 < {nu} < 8.3 mHz) of the acoustic spectrum of the Sun and the solar X-ray flux. They have used disk-integrated intensity observations of the Sun obtained from the Variability of solar IRradiance and Gravity Oscillations instrument on board Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft. Similar signature of flares in velocity observations has not been confirmed till now. The study of low-degree high-frequency waves in the Sun is important for our understanding of the dynamics of the deeper solar layers. In this Letter, we present the analysis of the velocity observations of the Sun obtained from the Michelson and Doppler Imager (MDI) and the Global Oscillations at Low Frequencies (GOLF) instruments on board SOHO for some major flare events of the solar cycle 23. Application of wavelet techniques to the time series of disk-integrated velocity signals from the solar surface using the full-disk Dopplergrams obtained from the MDI clearly indicates that there is enhancement of high-frequency global waves in the Sun during the flares. This signature of flares is also visible in the Fourier Power Spectrum of these velocity oscillations. On the other hand, the analysis of disk-integrated velocity observations obtained from the GOLF shows only marginal evidence of effects of flares on high-frequency oscillations.

  19. Extended high frequency audiometry in users of personal listening devices.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Poornima; Upadhyay, Prabhakar; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Sunil; Singh, Gautam Bir

    Noise exposure leads to high frequency hearing loss. Use of Personal Listening Devices may lead to decline in high frequency hearing sensitivity because of prolonged exposure to these devices at high volume. This study explores the changes in hearing thresholds by Extended High Frequency audiometry in users of personal listening devices. A descriptive, hospital based observational study was performed with total 100 subjects in age group of 15-30years. Subjects were divided in two groups consisting of 30 subjects (Group A) with no history of Personal Listening Devices use and (Group B) having 70 subjects with history of use of Personal Listening Devices. Conventional pure tone audiometry with extended high frequency audiometry was performed in all the subjects. Significant differences in hearing thresholds of Personal Listening Device users were seen at high frequencies (3kHz, 4kHz and 6kHz) and extended high frequencies (9kHz, 10kHz, 11kHz, 13kHz, 14kHz, 15kHz and 16kHz) with p value <0.05. Elevated hearing thresholds were observed in personal listening devices users which were directly proportional to volume and duration of usage. In present study no significant changes were noted in hearing thresholds in PLD users before 5years of PLD use. However, hearing thresholds were significantly increased at 3kHz, 10kHz, 13kHz in PLD users having >5years usage at high volume. Thus, it can be reasonably concluded that extended high frequencies can be used for early detection of NIHL in PLD users. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Calcium homeostasis of isolated heart muscle cells exposed to pulsed high-frequency electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wolke, S.; Gollnick, F.; Meyer, R.; Neibig, U.; Elsner, R.

    1996-05-01

    The intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) of isolated ventricular cardiac myocytes of the guinea pig was measured during the application of pulsed high-frequency electromagnetic fields. The high-frequency fields were applied in a transverse electromagnetic cell designed to allow microscopic observation of the myocytes during the presence of the high-frequency fields. The [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was measured as fura-2 fluorescence by means of digital image analysis. Both the carrier frequency and the square-wave pulse-modulation pattern were varied during the experiments (carrier frequencies: 900, 1,300, and 1,800 MHz pulse modulated at 217 Hz with 14% duty cycle; pulsation pattern at 900 MHz; continuous wave, 16 Hz,and 50 Hz modulation with 50% duty cycle and 30 kHz modulation with 80% duty cycle). The mean specific absorption rate (SAR) values in the solution were within one order of magnitude of 1 mW/kg. They varied depending on the applied carrier frequency and pulse pattern. The experiments were designed in three phases: 500 s of sham exposure, followed by 500 s of field exposure, then chemical stimulation without field. The chemical stimulation (K{sup +}-depolarization) indicated the viability of the cells. The K{sup +} depolarization yielded a significant increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. Significant differences between sham exposure and high-frequency field exposure were not found except when a very small but statistically significant difference was detected in the case of 900 MHz/50 Hz. However, this small difference was not regarded as a relevant effect of the exposure.

  1. Compound specific amino acid δ15N in marine sediments: A new approach for studies of the marine nitrogen cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Fabian C.; Ravelo, A. Christina; Crusius, John; Casso, Michael A.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2014-10-01

    The nitrogen (N) isotopic composition (δ15N) of bulk sedimentary N (δ15Nbulk) is a common tool for studying past biogeochemical cycling in the paleoceanographic record. Empirical evidence suggests that natural fluctuations in the δ15N of surface nutrient N are reflected in the δ15N of exported planktonic biomass and in sedimentary δ15Nbulk. However, δ15Nbulk is an analysis of total combustible sedimentary N, and therefore also includes mixtures of N sources and/or selective removal or preservation of N-containing compounds. Compound-specific nitrogen isotope analyses of individual amino acids (δ15NAA) are novel measurements with the potential to decouple δ15N changes in nutrient N from trophic effects, two main processes that can influence δ15Nbulk records. As a proof of concept study to examine how δ15NAA can be applied in marine sedimentary systems, we compare the δ15NAA signatures of surface and sinking POM sources with shallow surface sediments from the Santa Barbara Basin, a sub-oxic depositional environmental that exhibits excellent preservation of sedimentary organic matter. Our results demonstrate that δ15NAA signatures of both planktonic biomass and sinking POM are well preserved in such surface sediments. However, we also observed an unexpected inverse correlation between δ15N value of phenylalanine (δ15NPhe; the best AA proxy for N isotopic value at the base of the food web) and calculated trophic position. We used a simple N isotope mass balance model to confirm that over long time scales, δ15NPhe values should in fact be directly dependent on shifts in ecosystem trophic position. While this result may appear incongruent with current applications of δ15NAA in food webs, it is consistent with expectations that paleoarchives will integrate N dynamics over much longer timescales. We therefore propose that for paleoceanographic applications, key δ15NAA parameters are ecosystem trophic position, which determines relative partitioning of 15N

  2. Contributions from glacially derived sediment to the global iron (oxyhydr)oxide cycle: Implications for iron delivery to the oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raiswell, Rob; Tranter, Martyn; Benning, Liane G.; Siegert, Martin; De'ath, Ros; Huybrechts, Philippe; Payne, Tony

    2006-06-01

    Estimates of glacial sediment delivery to the oceans have been derived from fluxes of meltwater runoff and iceberg calving, and their sediment loads. The combined total (2900 Tg yr -1) of the suspended sediment load in meltwaters (1400 Tg yr -1) and the sediment delivered by icebergs (1500 Tg yr -1) are within the range of earlier estimates. High-resolution microscopic observations show that suspended sediments from glacial meltwaters, supraglacial, and proglacial sediments, and sediments in basal ice, from Arctic, Alpine, and Antarctic locations all contain iron (oxyhydr)oxide nanoparticles, which are poorly crystalline, typically ˜5 nm in diameter, and which occur as single grains or aggregates that may be isolated or attached to sediment grains. Nanoparticles with these characteristics are potentially bioavailable. A global model comparing the sources and sinks of iron present as (oxyhydr)oxides indicates that sediment delivered by icebergs is a significant source of iron to the open oceans, beyond the continental shelf. Iceberg delivery of sediment containing iron as (oxyhydr)oxides during the Last Glacial Maximum may have been sufficient to fertilise the increase in oceanic productivity required to drawdown atmospheric CO 2 to the levels observed in ice cores.

  3. Presence of Nitrate-Accumulating Sulfur Bacteria and Their Influence on Nitrogen Cycling in a Shallow Coastal Marine Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Sayama, Mikio

    2001-01-01

    Nitrate flux between sediment and water, nitrate concentration profile at the sediment-water interface, and in situ sediment denitrification activity were measured seasonally at the innermost part of Tokyo Bay, Japan. For the determination of sediment nitrate concentration, undisturbed sediment cores were sectioned into 5-mm depth intervals and each segment was stored frozen at −30°C. The nitrate concentration was determined for the supernatants after centrifuging the frozen and thawed sediments. Nitrate in the uppermost sediment showed a remarkable seasonal change, and its seasonal maximum of up to 400 μM was found in October. The directions of the diffusive nitrate fluxes predicted from the interfacial concentration gradients were out of the sediment throughout the year. In contrast, the directions of the total nitrate fluxes measured by the whole-core incubation were into the sediment at all seasons. This contradiction between directions indicates that a large part of the nitrate pool extracted from the frozen surface sediments is not a pore water constituent, and preliminary examinations demonstrated that the nitrate was contained in the intracellular vacuoles of filamentous sulfur bacteria dwelling on or in the surface sediment. Based on the comparison between in situ sediment denitrification activity and total nitrate flux, it is suggested that intracellular nitrate cannot be directly utilized by sediment denitrification, and the probable fate of the intracellular nitrate is hypothesized to be dissimilatory reduction to ammonium. The presence of nitrate-accumulating sulfur bacteria therefore may lower nature's self-purification capacity (denitrification) and exacerbate eutrophication in shallow coastal marine environments. PMID:11472923

  4. Geochemical cycles in sediments deposited on the slopes of the Guaymas and Carmen Basins of the Gulf of California over the last 180 years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, W.; Pride, C.; Thunell, R.

    2004-01-01

    Sediments deposited on the slopes of the Guaymas and Carmen Basins in the central Gulf of California were recovered in two box cores. Q-mode factor analyses identified detrital-clastic, carbonate, and redox associations in the elemental composition of these sediments. The detrital-clastic fraction appears to contain two source components, a more mafic component presumably derived from the Sierra Madre Occidental along the west coast of Mexico, and a more felsic component most likely derived from sedimentary rocks (mostly sandstones) of the Colorado Plateau and delivered by the Colorado River. The sediments also contain significant siliceous biogenic components and minor calcareous biogenic components, but those components were not quantified in this study. Redox associations were identified in both cores based on relatively high concentrations of molybdenum, which is indicative of deposition under conditions of sulfate reduction. Decreases in concentrations of molybdenum in younger sediments suggest that the bottom waters of the Gulf have became more oxygenated over the last 100 years. Many geochemical components in both box cores exhibit distinct cyclicity with periodicities of 10-20 years. The most striking are 20-year cycles in the more mafic components (e.g., titanium), particularly in sediments deposited during the 19th century. In that century, the titanium cycles are in very good agreement with warm phases of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, implying that at times of greater influx of titanium-rich volcanic debris, there were more El Nin??os and higher winter precipitation. The cycles are interpreted as due to greater and lesser riverine influx of volcanic rock debris from the Sierra Madre. There is also spectral evidence for periodicities of 4-8 and 8-16 years, suggesting that the delivery of detrital-clastic material is responding to some multiannual (ENSO?) forcing.

  5. High frequency ocean acoustic tomography observation at coastal estuary areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zongxi; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Wuyi; Chen, Dongsheng

    2012-11-01

    The ocean acoustic tomography (OAT) technique can obtain oceanographic information and has received much interest. High frequency OAT (in a narrow kHz range) can be used for small and confined areas, such as estuaries and bays, with complicated hydrological conditions. In this study, we investigate the application of high-frequency reciprocal transmission OAT to assess the sound speed, temperature, and current field in the Xiamen sea area using computer simulations and sea experiments. Based on the temperature data obtained from remote sensing and the predefined stream function, high frequency OAT is employed to reconstruct the two-dimensional sound speed, temperature, and current fields of a 1.2km×1.2km small-scale region. The correlation coefficient of the computer inversion result and the original data is higher than 0.8. The result shows that increasing the number of acoustic stations decreases the influence of the travel-time errors in high frequency OAT; however, excessively increasing the number of stations could not significantly improve the inversion accuracy. Furthermore, this method has been tested by a sea experiment on monitoring the shallow water temperature of Wuyuan Bay. High frequency OAT might provide an effective method for temperature and current observation at coastal estuary areas.

  6. High-frequency thresholds: circumaural earphone versus insert earphone.

    PubMed

    Valente, M; Valente, M; Goebel, J

    1992-11-01

    Benefits of high-frequency audiometry in monitoring hearing sensitivity of patients administered ototoxic medications are well established. High-frequency thresholds have been reported to be variable, due in part to small differences in the placement of the earphone diaphragm over the opening of the ear canal. Reliability may be improved by using insert earphones (ER-2) when obtaining high-frequency thresholds. The purposes of this study were to determine high-frequency threshold test-retest reliability using Koss HV/1A+ and ER-2 earphones and to determine if significant differences are present between high-frequency thresholds obtained using these two earphones. Results obtained on 40 ears of 20 normal hearing adults revealed that differences between the test and retest thresholds for each earphone were not significant. Intrasubject threshold differences between the test and retest thresholds for each earphone were, for the most part, within +/- 10 dB at all test frequencies. Further, significantly greater intensity was required to measure threshold when using the ER-2 earphone when compared to the Koss HV/1A+ at all test frequencies.

  7. Application of high frequency color Doppler ultrasound in the monitoring of rheumatoid arthritis treatment

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, GUIMIN; WANG, LEI; JIA, XIUCHUAN; LI, FANG; YAN, YONGLONG; YU, ZHIBO; LI, LI; WEI, QUN; ZHANG, FENGXIAO

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the use of high frequency color Doppler ultrasound to measure synovial thickness and blood flow to assess the therapeutic value of the recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) II receptor antibody fusion protein in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatment. A total of 36 clinically-diagnosed patients with RA were treated with methotrexate tablets or the recombinant TNF-receptor antibody fusion protein for 24 weeks. Joint synovial thickness and synovial blood flow integrity were monitored by high frequency color Doppler in the second metacarpophalangeal joint in one hand. The correlation of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein (CRP) and 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28) with the ultrasound parameters were analyzed. Metacarpophalangeal second joint 2 (MCP2) synovial thickness, wrist joint synovial thickness and MCP2 synovial blood flow, prior and subsequent to the treatment, have a high correlation with DAS28 (P<0.05), and the MCP2 synovial blood flow integral has a strong correlation with CRP. Evaluating the wrist joint synovial thickness and synovial integrity of the second metacarpophalangeal joint using high frequency ultrasound detection can effectively evaluate the disease status in patients with RA. This procedure is potentially valuable as a means of evaluating the curative effects of RA treatments. PMID:25371736

  8. High-frequency gravity waves and homogeneous ice nucleation in tropical tropopause layer cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Ueyama, Rei; Pfister, Leonhard; Bui, Theopaul V.; Alexander, M. Joan; Podglajen, Aurélien; Hertzog, Albert; Woods, Sarah; Lawson, R. Paul; Kim, Ji-Eun; Schoeberl, Mark R.

    2016-06-01

    The impact of high-frequency gravity waves on homogeneous-freezing ice nucleation in cold cirrus clouds is examined using parcel model simulations driven by superpressure balloon measurements of temperature variability experienced by air parcels in the tropical tropopause region. We find that the primary influence of high-frequency waves is to generate rapid cooling events that drive production of numerous ice crystals. Quenching of ice nucleation events by temperature tendency reversal in the highest-frequency waves does occasionally produce low ice concentrations, but the overall impact of high-frequency waves is to increase the occurrence of high ice concentrations. The simulated ice concentrations are considerably higher than indicated by in situ measurements of cirrus in the tropical tropopause region. One-dimensional simulations suggest that although sedimentation reduces mean ice concentrations, a discrepancy of about a factor of 3 with observed ice concentrations remains. Reconciliation of numerical simulations with the observed ice concentrations will require inclusion of physical processes such as heterogeneous nucleation and entrainment.

  9. Carbon cycling on the continental margin evidence from sediment 14-C and nutrient elements. Progress report, October 1992--October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This progress report discusses field equipment acquisition, fabrication, sample collection and sample analysis of sea bottom sediments. Investigators also discussed the Neuse River Estuary Experiment.

  10. Switch over to the high frequency rf systems near transition

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.; Wei, J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to point out that since bunch narrowing naturally occurs in the acceleration process in the vicinity of transition, it should be possible to switch over to the high frequency system close to transition when the bunch has narrowed enough to fit directly into the high frequency bucket. The advantage of this approach is the simplicity, no extra components or gymnastics are required of the low frequency system. The disadvantage, of course, is for protons which do not go through transition. But on the other hand, there is no shortage of intensity for protons and so it should be possible to keep the phase space area low for protons, and then matching to the high frequency bucket should be easily accomplished by adiabatic compression. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Design of matching layers for high-frequency ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Chunlong; Ma, Jianguo; Chiu, Chi Tat; Williams, Jay A.; Fong, Wayne; Chen, Zeyu; Zhu, BenPeng; Xiong, Rui; Shi, Jing; Hsiai, Tzung K.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa

    2015-09-01

    Matching the acoustic impedance of high-frequency (≥100 MHz) ultrasound transducers to an aqueous loading medium remains a challenge for fabricating high-frequency transducers. The traditional matching layer design has been problematic to establish high matching performance given requirements on both specific acoustic impedance and precise thickness. Based on both mass-spring scheme and microwave matching network analysis, we interfaced metal-polymer layers for the matching effects. Both methods hold promises for guiding the metal-polymer matching layer design. A 100 MHz LiNbO3 transducer was fabricated to validate the performance of the both matching layer designs. In the pulse-echo experiment, the transducer echo amplitude increased by 84.4% and its -6dB bandwidth increased from 30.2% to 58.3% comparing to the non-matched condition, demonstrating that the matching layer design method is effective for developing high-frequency ultrasonic transducers.

  12. Design of matching layers for high-frequency ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Fei, Chunlong; Ma, Jianguo; Chiu, Chi Tat; Williams, Jay A; Fong, Wayne; Chen, Zeyu; Zhu, BenPeng; Xiong, Rui; Shi, Jing; Hsiai, Tzung K; Shung, K Kirk; Zhou, Qifa

    2015-09-21

    Matching the acoustic impedance of high-frequency (≥100 MHz) ultrasound transducers to an aqueous loading medium remains a challenge for fabricating high-frequency transducers. The traditional matching layer design has been problematic to establish high matching performance given requirements on both specific acoustic impedance and precise thickness. Based on both mass-spring scheme and microwave matching network analysis, we interfaced metal-polymer layers for the matching effects. Both methods hold promises for guiding the metal-polymer matching layer design. A 100 MHz LiNbO3 transducer was fabricated to validate the performance of the both matching layer designs. In the pulse-echo experiment, the transducer echo amplitude increased by 84.4% and its -6dB bandwidth increased from 30.2% to 58.3% comparing to the non-matched condition, demonstrating that the matching layer design method is effective for developing high-frequency ultrasonic transducers.

  13. Interface Strategy To Achieve Tunable High Frequency Attenuation.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hualiang; Zhang, Haiqian; Ji, Guangbin; Xu, Zhichuan J

    2016-03-01

    Among all polarizations, the interface polarization effect is the most effective, especially at high frequency. The design of various ferrite/iron interfaces can significantly enhance the materials' dielectric loss ability at high frequency. This paper presents a simple method to generate ferrite/iron interfaces to enhance the microwave attenuation at high frequency. The ferrites were coated onto carbonyl iron and could be varied to ZnFe2O4, CoFe2O4, Fe3O4, and NiFe2O4. Due to the ferrite/iron interface inducing a stronger dielectric loss effect, all of these materials achieved broad effective frequency width at a coating layer as thin as 1.5 mm. In particular, an effective frequency width of 6.2 GHz could be gained from the Fe@NiFe2O4 composite.

  14. Diversity of methane-cycling archaea in hydrothermal sediment investigated by general and group-specific PCR primers.

    PubMed

    Lever, Mark A; Teske, Andreas P

    2015-02-01

    The zonation of anaerobic methane-cycling Archaea in hydrothermal sediment of Guaymas Basin was studied by general primerpairs (mcrI, ME1/ME2, mcrIRD) targeting the alpha subunit of methyl coenzyme M reductase gene (mcrA) and by new group specific mcrA and 16S rRNA gene primer pairs. The mcrIRD primer pair outperformed the other general mcrA primer pairs indetection sensitivity and phylogenetic coverage. Methanotrophic ANME-1 Archaea were the only group detected with group specific primers only. The detection of 14 mcrA lineages surpasses the diversity previously found in this location. Most phylotypes have high sequence similarities to hydrogenotrophs, methylotrophs, and anaerobic methanotrophs previously detected at Guaymas Basin or at hydrothermal vents, cold seeps, and oil reservoirs worldwide. Additionally, five mcrA phylotypes belonging to newly defined lineages are detected. Two of these belong to deeply branching new orders, while the others are new species or genera of Methanopyraceae and Methermicoccaceae. Downcore diversity decreases from all groups detected in the upper 6 cm(2 to 40 °C, sulfate measurable to 4 cm) to only two groups below 6 cm (>40 °C). Despite the presence of hyperthermophilic genera (Methanopyrus, Methanocaldococcus) in cooler surface strata, no genes were detected below 10 cm (>60 °C). While mcrAbased and 16S rRNA gene-based community compositions are generally congruent, the deeply branching mcrA cannot be assigned to specific 16S rRNA gene lineages. Our study indicates that even among well-studied metabolic groups and in previously characterized model environments, major evolutionary branches are overlooked. Detecting these groups by improved molecular biological methods is a crucial first step toward understanding their roles in nature.

  15. Diversity of Methane-Cycling Archaea in Hydrothermal Sediment Investigated by General and Group-Specific PCR Primers

    PubMed Central

    Teske, Andreas P.

    2014-01-01

    The zonation of anaerobic methane-cycling Archaea in hydrothermal sediment of Guaymas Basin was studied by general primer pairs (mcrI, ME1/ME2, mcrIRD) targeting the alpha subunit of methyl coenzyme M reductase gene (mcrA) and by new group-specific mcrA and 16S rRNA gene primer pairs. The mcrIRD primer pair outperformed the other general mcrA primer pairs in detection sensitivity and phylogenetic coverage. Methanotrophic ANME-1 Archaea were the only group detected with group-specific primers only. The detection of 14 mcrA lineages surpasses the diversity previously found in this location. Most phylotypes have high sequence similarities to hydrogenotrophs, methylotrophs, and anaerobic methanotrophs previously detected at Guaymas Basin or at hydrothermal vents, cold seeps, and oil reservoirs worldwide. Additionally, five mcrA phylotypes belonging to newly defined lineages are detected. Two of these belong to deeply branching new orders, while the others are new species or genera of Methanopyraceae and Methermicoccaceae. Downcore diversity decreases from all groups detected in the upper 6 cm (∼2 to 40°C, sulfate measurable to 4 cm) to only two groups below 6 cm (>40°C). Despite the presence of hyperthermophilic genera (Methanopyrus, Methanocaldococcus) in cooler surface strata, no genes were detected below 10 cm (≥60°C). While mcrA-based and 16S rRNA gene-based community compositions are generally congruent, the deeply branching mcrA cannot be assigned to specific 16S rRNA gene lineages. Our study indicates that even among well-studied metabolic groups and in previously characterized model environments, major evolutionary branches are overlooked. Detecting these groups by improved molecular biological methods is a crucial first step toward understanding their roles in nature. PMID:25527539

  16. Real-Time, High-Frequency QRS Electrocardiograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; DePalma, Jude L.; Moradi, Saeed

    2003-01-01

    An electronic system that performs real-time analysis of the low-amplitude, high-frequency, ordinarily invisible components of the QRS portion of an electrocardiographic signal in real time has been developed. Whereas the signals readily visible on a conventional electrocardiogram (ECG) have amplitudes of the order of a millivolt and are characterized by frequencies <100 Hz, the ordinarily invisible components have amplitudes in the microvolt range and are characterized by frequencies from about 150 to about 250 Hz. Deviations of these high-frequency components from a normal pattern can be indicative of myocardial ischemia or myocardial infarction

  17. A MEMS-based high frequency x-ray chopper.

    PubMed

    Siria, A; Dhez, O; Schwartz, W; Torricelli, G; Comin, F; Chevrier, J

    2009-04-29

    Time-resolved x-ray experiments require intensity modulation at high frequencies (advanced rotating choppers have nowadays reached the kHz range). We here demonstrate that a silicon microlever oscillating at 13 kHz with nanometric amplitude can be used as a high frequency x-ray chopper. We claim that using micro-and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS), it will be possible to achieve higher frequencies in excess of hundreds of megahertz. Working at such a frequency can open a wealth of possibilities in chemistry, biology and physics time-resolved experiments.

  18. High-frequency generation in two coupled semiconductor superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matharu, Satpal; Kusmartsev, Feodor V.; Balanov, Alexander G.

    2013-10-01

    We theoretically show that two semiconductor superlattices arranged on the same substrate and coupled with the same resistive load can be used for a generation of high-frequency periodic and quasiperiodic signals. Each superlattice involved is capable to generate current oscillations associated with drift of domains of high charge concentration. However, the coupling with the common load can eventually lead to synchronization of the current oscillations in the interacting superlattices. We reveal how synchronization depends on detuning between devices and the resistance of the common load, and discuss the effects of coupling and detuning on the high-frequency power output from the system.

  19. Condenser Microphone Protective Grid Correction for High Frequency Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Erik; Bennett, Reginald

    2010-01-01

    Use of a protective grid on small diameter microphones can prolong the lifetime of the unit, but the high frequency effects can complicate data interpretation. Analytical methods have been developed to correct for the grid effect at high frequencies. Specifically, the analysis pertains to quantifying the microphone protective grid response characteristics in the acoustic near field of a rocket plume noise source. A frequency response function computation using two microphones will be explained. Experimental and instrumentation setup details will be provided. The resulting frequency response function for a B&K 4944 condenser microphone protective grid will be presented, along with associated uncertainties

  20. Casimir force between δ -δ' mirrors transparent at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Alessandra N.; Silva, Jeferson Danilo L.; Alves, Danilo T.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate, in the context of a real massless scalar field in 1 +1 dimensions, models of partially reflecting mirrors simulated by Dirac δ -δ' point interactions. In the literature, these models do not exhibit full transparency at high frequencies. In order to provide a more realistic feature for these models, we propose a modified δ -δ' point interaction that enables full transparency in the limit of high frequencies. Taking this modified δ -δ' model into account, we investigate the Casimir force, comparing our results with those found in the literature.

  1. Nutrient cycling at the sediment-water interface and in sediments at Chiricahueto marsh: a subtropical ecosystem associated with agricultural land uses.

    PubMed

    Soto-Jimenez, M F; Paez-Osuna, F; Bojorquez-Leyva, H

    2003-02-01

    A study was conducted to examine the potential role to accumulate and transform nitrogen and phosphorus of a common wetland type marsh; the site is located in a subtropical environment that receives agricultural pollutants. Chiricahueto marsh effectively removes N and P from surface waters. It is clear that the diagenetic processes are mainly controlled by the exponential decomposition of organic matter that takes place at the sediment-water interface and in the sedimentary column, under oxic and suboxic-anoxic conditions, respectively. Mass balances indicated a net sedimentation of 11.3 g Nm(-2)x yr (-1) and 3.9 g Pm(-2) x yr (-1), which results in an annual regeneration of 1.7 g Nm(-2) and 0.8 g Pm(-2) at the sediment-water interface under oxic conditions. A major remineralization rate was estimated in 6.4 g Nm(-2) x yr (-1) and 1.1g Pm(-2) x yr (-1) into the sedimentary column where suboxic to anoxic conditions occur by the utilization of nitrate, Fe and Mn as electron acceptors. The estimated burial fluxes in the deeper sediments (>50 cm) were 1.5 g Nm(-2) x yr (-1) and 0.4 g Pm(-2) x yr (-1).

  2. Spatiotemporal sequence of Himalayan debris flow from analysis of high-frequency seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtin, A.; Bollinger, L.; Cattin, R.; Vergne, J.; Nábělek, J. L.

    2009-10-01

    During the 2003 summer monsoon, the Hi-CLIMB seismological stations deployed across the Himalayan Range detected bursts of high-frequency seismic noise that lasted several hours to days. On the basis of the cross correlation of seismic envelopes recorded at 11 stations, we show that the largest transient event on 15 August was located nearby a village partially destroyed on that day by a devastating debris flow. This consistency in both space and time suggests that high-frequency seismic noise analysis can be used to monitor debris flow generation as well as the evacuation of the sediment. A systematic study of one year of seismic noise, focusing on the detection of similar events, provides information on the spatial and temporal occurrence of mass movements at the front of the Himalayas. With a 50% probability of occurrence of a daily event, a total of 46 debris flows are seismically detected. Most of them were generated in regions of steep slopes, large gullies, and loose soils during the 2003 summer monsoon storms. These events are compared to local meteorological data to determine rainfall thresholds for slope failures, including the cumulative rainfall needed to bring the soil moisture content to failure capacity. The inferred thresholds are consistent with previous estimates deduced from soil studies as well as sediment supply investigations in the area. These results point out the potential of using seismic noise as a dedicated tool for monitoring the spatiotemporal occurrence of landslides and debris flows on a regional scale.

  3. Sources and cycling of mercury in the paleo Arctic Ocean from Hg stable isotope variations in Eocene and Quaternary sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, J. D.; Blum, J. D.; Moore, T. C.; Polyak, L.; Jakobsson, M.; Meyers, P. A.; Biswas, A.

    2017-01-01

    Mercury stable isotopic compositions were determined for marine sediments from eight locations in the Arctic Ocean Basin. Mass dependent fractionation (MDF) and mass independent fractionation (MIF) of Hg stable isotopes were recorded across a variety of depositional environments, water depths, and stratigraphic ages. δ202Hg (MDF) ranges from -2.34‰ to -0.78‰; Δ199Hg (MIF) from -0.18‰ to +0.12‰; and Δ201Hg (MIF) from -0.29‰ to +0.05‰ for the complete data set (n = 33). Holocene sediments from the Chukchi Sea and Morris Jesup Rise record the most negative Δ199Hg values, while Pleistocene sediments from the Central Arctic Ocean record the most positive Δ199Hg values. The most negative δ202Hg values are recorded in Pleistocene sediments. Eocene sediments (Lomonosov Ridge) show some overlap in their Hg isotopic compositions with Quaternary sediments, with a sample of the Arctic Ocean PETM (56 Ma) most closely matching the average Hg isotopic composition of Holocene Arctic marine sediments. Collectively, these data support a terrestrially-dominated Hg source input for Arctic Ocean sediment through time, although other sources, as well as influences of sea ice, atmospheric mercury depletion events (AMDEs), and anthropogenic Hg (in core top samples) on Hg isotopic signatures must also be considered.

  4. Study of the succession of microbial communities for sulfur cycle response to ecological factors change in sediment of sewage system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanchen; Dong, Qian; Wu, Chen; Zhou, Xiaohong; Shi, Hanchang

    2015-06-01

    The biological reaction process of sulfur in biofilms and sediments causes serious problems of corrosion and odor in sewage systems. This study aims to reveal the distribution and shift of microbial diversity that survives inside the sediment in response to surrounding changes in sewage systems. The successions of microbial community were compared via denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and by constructing phylogenetic trees via maximum likelihood method. The results indicated that the shift of microbial diversity is not significant along the vertical layer inside the sediment. The influences of sediment accumulation time on the shift in microbial diversity are evident, particularly with the switch of the accumulation stage. Implementing a control strategy for oxygen injection and nitrate addition evidently inhibits and stimulates some dominant sulfate-reducing bacterial strains in the sediment. The diversity in the total bacteria is positively related with ORP, dissolved oxygen, and sulfide concentration.

  5. Excitation and Ionisation dynamics in high-frequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, D.

    2008-07-01

    excitation and sustainment of the discharge. As the pressure decreases the discharge operates in so-called 'alpha-mode' where the sheath expansion is responsible for discharge sustainment. Decreasing the pressure towards the limit of operation (below 1 Pa) the discharge operates in a regime where kinetic effects dominate plasma sustainment. Wave particle interactions resulting from the flux of highly energetic electrons interacting with thermal bulk electrons give rise to a series of oscillations in the electron excitation phase space at the sheath edge. This instability is responsible for a significant energy deposit in the plasma when so-called 'ohmic heating' is no longer efficient. In addition to this an interesting electron acceleration mechanism occurs during the sheath collapse. The large sheath width, due to low plasma densities at the lower pressure, and electron inertia allows the build up of a local electric field accelerating electrons towards the electrode. Multi-frequency plasmas, provide additional process control for technological applications, and through investigating the excitation dynamics in such discharges the limitations of functional separation is observed. Non-linear frequency coupling is observed in plasma boundary sheaths governed by two frequencies simultaneously. In an alpha-operated discharge the sheath edge velocity governs the excitation and ionisation within the plasma, and it will be shown that this is determined by the time varying sheath width. The nature of the coupling effects strongly depends on the ratio of the applied voltages. Under technologically relevant conditions (low frequency voltage >> high frequency voltage) interesting phenomena depending on the phase relation of the voltages are also observed and will be discussed.

  6. Collocations of High Frequency Noun Keywords in Prescribed Science Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menon, Sujatha; Mukundan, Jayakaran

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses the discourse of science through the study of collocational patterns of high frequency noun keywords in science textbooks used by upper secondary students in Malaysia. Research has shown that one of the areas of difficulty in science discourse concerns lexis, especially that of collocations. This paper describes a corpus-based…

  7. Practical techniques for enhancing the high-frequency MASW method

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    For soil exploration in the vadose zone, a high-frequency multi-channel analysis of surface waves (HF-MASW) method has been developed. In the study, several practical techniques were applied to enhance the overtone image of the HF-MASW method. They included (1) the self-adaptive MASW method using a ...

  8. Piezoelectric films for high frequency ultrasonic transducers in biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qifa; Lau, Sienting; Wu, Dawei; Shung, K. Kirk

    2011-01-01

    Piezoelectric films have recently attracted considerable attention in the development of various sensor and actuator devices such as nonvolatile memories, tunable microwave circuits and ultrasound transducers. In this paper, an overview of the state of art in piezoelectric films for high frequency transducer applications is presented. Firstly, the basic principles of piezoelectric materials and design considerations for ultrasound transducers will be introduced. Following the review, the current status of the piezoelectric films and recent progress in the development of high frequency ultrasonic transducers will be discussed. Then details for preparation and structure of the materials derived from piezoelectric thick film technologies will be described. Both chemical and physical methods are included in the discussion, namely, the sol–gel approach, aerosol technology and hydrothermal method. The electric and piezoelectric properties of the piezoelectric films, which are very important for transducer applications, such as permittivity and electromechanical coupling factor, are also addressed. Finally, the recent developments in the high frequency transducers and arrays with piezoelectric ZnO and PZT thick film using MEMS technology are presented. In addition, current problems and further direction of the piezoelectric films for very high frequency ultrasound application (up to GHz) are also discussed. PMID:21720451

  9. Music students: conventional hearing thresholds and at high frequencies.

    PubMed

    Lüders, Débora; Gonçalves, Cláudia Giglio de Oliveira; Lacerda, Adriana Bender de Moreira; Ribas, Ângela; Conto, Juliana de

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that hearing loss in musicians may cause difficulty in timbre recognition and tuning of instruments. To analyze the hearing thresholds from 250 Hz to 16,000 Hz in a group of music students and compare them to a non-musician group in order to determine whether high-frequency audiometry is a useful tool in the early detection of hearing impairment. Study design was a retrospective observational cohort. Conventional and high-frequency audiometry was performed in 42 music students (Madsen Itera II audiometer and TDH39P headphones for conventional audiometry, and HDA 200 headphones for high-frequency audiometry). Of the 42 students, 38.1% were female students and 61.9% were male students, with a mean age of 26 years. At conventional audiometry, 92.85% had hearing thresholds within normal limits; but even within the normal limits, the worst results were observed in the left ear for all frequencies, except for 4000 Hz; compared to the non-musician group, the worst results occurred at 500 Hz in the left ear, and at 250 Hz, 6000 Hz, 9000 Hz, 10,000 Hz, and 11,200 Hz in both the ears. The periodic evaluation of high-frequency thresholds may be useful in the early detection of hearing loss in musicians. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Measurement of high frequency waves using a wave follower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, S.; Shemdin, O. H.

    1983-01-01

    High frequency waves were measured using a laser-optical sensor mounted on a wave follower. Measured down-wind wave slope spectra are shown to be wind speed dependent; the mean square wave-slopes are generally larger than those measured by Cox and Munk (1954) using the sun glitter method.

  11. Fuzzy and conventional control of high-frequency ventilation.

    PubMed

    Noshiro, M; Matsunami, T; Takakuda, K; Ryumae, S; Kagawa, T; Shimizu, M; Fujino, T

    1994-07-01

    A high-frequency ventilator was developed, consisting of a single-phase induction motor, an unbalanced mass and a mechanical vibration system. Intermittent positive pressure respiration was combined with high-frequency ventilation to measure end-tidal pCO2. Hysteresis was observed between the rotational frequency of the high-frequency ventilator and end-tidal pCO2. A fuzzy proportional plus integral control system, designed on the basis of the static characteristics of the controlled system and a knowledge of respiratory physiology, successfully regulated end-tidal pCO2. The characteristics of gas exchange under high-frequency ventilation was approximated by a first-order linear model. A conventional PI control system, designed on the basis of the approximated model, regulated end-tidal pCO2 with a performance similar to that of the fuzzy PI control system. The design of the fuzzy control system required less knowledge about the controlled system than that of the conventional control system.

  12. High-Frequency Oscillations and Seizure Generation in Neocortical Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worrell, Greg A.; Parish, Landi; Cranstoun, Stephen D.; Jonas, Rachel; Baltuch, Gordon; Litt, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Neocortical seizures are often poorly localized, explosive and widespread at onset, making them poorly amenable to epilepsy surgery in the absence of associated focal brain lesions. We describe, for the first time in an unselected group of patients with neocortical epilepsy, the finding that high-frequency (60--100 Hz) epileptiform oscillations…

  13. Piezoelectric films for high frequency ultrasonic transducers in biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qifa; Lau, Sienting; Wu, Dawei; Shung, K Kirk

    2011-02-01

    Piezoelectric films have recently attracted considerable attention in the development of various sensor and actuator devices such as nonvolatile memories, tunable microwave circuits and ultrasound transducers. In this paper, an overview of the state of art in piezoelectric films for high frequency transducer applications is presented. Firstly, the basic principles of piezoelectric materials and design considerations for ultrasound transducers will be introduced. Following the review, the current status of the piezoelectric films and recent progress in the development of high frequency ultrasonic transducers will be discussed. Then details for preparation and structure of the materials derived from piezoelectric thick film technologies will be described. Both chemical and physical methods are included in the discussion, namely, the sol-gel approach, aerosol technology and hydrothermal method. The electric and piezoelectric properties of the piezoelectric films, which are very important for transducer applications, such as permittivity and electromechanical coupling factor, are also addressed. Finally, the recent developments in the high frequency transducers and arrays with piezoelectric ZnO and PZT thick film using MEMS technology are presented. In addition, current problems and further direction of the piezoelectric films for very high frequency ultrasound application (up to GHz) are also discussed.

  14. High-Frequency Axial Fatigue Test Procedures for Spectrum Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-20

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED NAVAL AIR WARFARE CENTER AIRCRAFT DIVISION PATUXENT RIVER, MARYLAND TECHNICAL INFORMATION MEMORANDUM...REPORT NO: NAWCADPAX/TIM-2016/49 HIGH-FREQUENCY AXIAL FATIGUE TEST PROCEEDURES FOR SPECTRUM LOADING by David T. Rusk, AIR ...4.3.3.5 Robert E. Taylor, AIR 4.3.4.1 20 July 2016 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. DEPARTMENT

  15. Factors Affecting the Benefits of High-Frequency Amplification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwitz, Amy R.; Ahlstrom, Jayne B.; Dubno, Judy R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to determine the extent to which high-frequency amplification helped or hindered speech recognition as a function of hearing loss, gain-frequency response, and background noise. Method: Speech recognition was measured monaurally under headphones for nonsense syllables low-pass filtered in one-third-octave steps…

  16. Surface modification of lignocellulosic fibers using high-frequency ultrasound

    Treesearch

    Jayant B. Gadhe; Ram B. Gupta; Thomas Elder

    2005-01-01

    Enzymatic and chemical oxidation of fiber surfaces has been reported in the literature as a method for producing medium density fiberboards without using synthetic adhesives. This work focuses on modifying the surface properties of wood fibers by the generation of free radicals using high-frequency ultrasound. A sonochemical reactor operating at 610 kHz is used to...

  17. Dynamics of high-frequency synchronization during seizures.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Giri P; Filatov, Gregory; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2013-05-01

    Pathological synchronization of neuronal firing is considered to be an inherent property of epileptic seizures. However, it remains unclear whether the synchrony increases for the high-frequency multiunit activity as well as for the local field potentials (LFPs). We present spatio-temporal analysis of synchronization during epileptiform activity using wide-band (up to 2,000 Hz) spectral analysis of multielectrode array recordings at up to 60 locations throughout the mouse hippocampus in vitro. Our study revealed a prominent structure of LFP profiles during epileptiform discharges, triggered by elevated extracellular potassium, with characteristic distribution of current sinks and sources with respect to anatomical structure. The cross-coherence of high-frequency activity (500-2,000 Hz) across channels was reduced during epileptic bursts compared with baseline activity and showed the opposite trend for lower frequencies. Furthermore, the magnitude of cross-coherence during epileptiform activity was dependent on distance: electrodes closer to the epileptic foci showed increased cross-coherence and electrodes further away showed reduced cross-coherence for high-frequency activity. These experimental observations were re-created and supported in a computational model. Our study suggests that different intrinsic and synaptic processes can mediate paroxysmal synchronization at low, medium, and high frequencies.

  18. High-frequency hearing in seals and sea lions.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Kane A; Reichmuth, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Existing evidence suggests that some pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, and walruses) can detect underwater sound at frequencies well above the traditional high-frequency hearing limits for their species. This phenomenon, however, is not well studied: Sensitivity patterns at frequencies beyond traditional high-frequency limits are poorly resolved, and the nature of the auditory mechanism mediating hearing at these frequencies is unknown. In the first portion of this study, auditory sensitivity patterns in the 50-180 kHz range were measured for one California sea lion (Zalophus californianus), one harbor seal (Phoca vitulina), and one spotted seal (Phoca largha). Results show the presence of two distinct slope-regions at the high-frequency ends of the audiograms of all three subjects. The first region is characterized by a rapid decrease in sensitivity with increasing frequency-i.e. a steep slope-followed by a region of much less rapid sensitivity decrease-i.e. a shallower slope. In the second portion of this study, a masking experiment was conducted to investigate how the basilar membrane of a harbor seal subject responded to acoustic energy from a narrowband masking noise centered at 140 kHz. The measured masking pattern suggests that the initial, rapid decrease in sensitivity on the high-frequency end of the subject's audiogram is not due to cochlear constraints, as has been previously hypothesized, but rather to constraints on the conductive mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. High-Frequency Oscillations and Seizure Generation in Neocortical Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worrell, Greg A.; Parish, Landi; Cranstoun, Stephen D.; Jonas, Rachel; Baltuch, Gordon; Litt, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Neocortical seizures are often poorly localized, explosive and widespread at onset, making them poorly amenable to epilepsy surgery in the absence of associated focal brain lesions. We describe, for the first time in an unselected group of patients with neocortical epilepsy, the finding that high-frequency (60--100 Hz) epileptiform oscillations…

  20. Studies of high-frequency seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minster, Jean-Bernard; Berger, Jonathan

    1991-03-01

    This final report results are: (1) a study of the location of regional seismic events using a sparse network, with an application to eastern Kazakhstan; (2) an analysis of high frequency seismic observations collected in eastern Kazakhstan, including in particular calibration chemical explosions; (3) a study of the discrimination of quarry blasts from single explosions, using sonogram analysis of data collected in eastern Kazakhstan; (4) the extension of the discrimination methodology developed in the previous paper to small aperture array data, and application to the automated discrimination between earthquake and quarry blasts at NORESS; (5) the use of a new technique, labelled beam stack imaging, to map shallow crust scatterers near a small aperture array, with applications to NORESS; (6) a study of the polarization characteristics of high-frequency borehole seismograms recorded near Anza, California; and (7) an analysis of attenuation and site effects on high-frequency seismic waves, using high-frequency borehole seismograms recorded in the San Jacinto fault zone, near Anza, California.

  1. Past seismic activity in Eastern Anatolia recorded over several glacial/interglacial cycles in the sediments of Lake Van

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockhecke, M.; Anselmetti, F.; Sturm, M.

    2012-12-01

    Lake sediments document besides paleoenvironmental and paleoclimate conditions also paleoseismic activity through various forms of deformation structures. These are especially visible in finely-laminated sediments. Being situated in a tectonically active region, the partly annually-laminated sedimentary sequence of the terminal Lake Van, recovered in 2010 under the context of the ICDP Paleovan project, shows dozens of earthquake-triggered microdeformations that document past seismic events of the last half a million years. Lithological and multiproxy analysis revealed that the Lake Van's depositional conditions varied in correspondence to Milankovitch and sub-Milankovitch cycles. Glacial/stadial and interglacial/interstadial conditions were recorded continuously over the last half a million years excluding two discontinuities, which indicate major hydrological and geomorphological changes in Lake Van's early history. Two sites were drilled 10 km apart: A primary drill site, situated on a ridge, covers the entire lake history since its initial transgression in the middle Pleistocene; A secondary drill site, located in a more shallow northern basin, covers the past 90'000 years. Multiple coring at both drill sites allows to establish two almost complete 220 m and 145 m long composite sections, respectively. Observing deformation structures in multiple parallel cores at each site is used as a criteria to distinguish 'true' paleoseismic deformation structures from potential drilling artifacts. Deformation structures consist of i) silt-filled vertical fractures, ii) microfaults with displacements at cm-scale, iii) microfolds, iv) liquefaction structures (mushroom, pseudonodules), iv) disturbed varve laminations and v) mixed layers. While the ridge site records the paleoseismic events as microdeformations, the northern basinal site rather records seismic events through the deposition of seismo-turbidites. In some cases, individual earthquake events can even be identified

  2. Biotic and a-biotic Mn and Fe cycling in deep sediments across a gradient of sulfate reduction rates along the California margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider-Mor, A.; Steefel, C.; Maher, K.

    2011-12-01

    The coupling between the biological and a-biotic processes controlling trace metals in deep marine sediments are not well understood, although the fluxes of elements and trace metals across the sediment-water interface can be a major contribution to ocean water. Four marine sediment profiles (ODP leg 167 sites 1011, 1017, 1018 and 1020)were examined to evaluate and quantify the biotic and abiotic reaction networks and fluxes that occur in deep marine sediments. We compared biogeochemical processes across a gradient of sulfate reduction (SR) rates with the objective of studying the processes that control these rates and how they affect major elements as well as trace metal redistribution. The rates of sulfate reduction, methanogenesis and anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) were constrained using a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow). Constraints for the model include: sediment and pore water concentrations, as well as %CaCO3, %biogenic silica, wt% carbon and δ13C of total organic carbon (TOC), particulate organic matter (POC) and mineral associated carbon (MAC). The sites are distinguished by the depth of AMO: a shallow zone is observed at sites 1018 (9 to 19 meters composite depth (mcd)) and 1017 (19 to 30 mcd), while deeper zones occur at sites 1011 (56 to 76 mcd) and 1020 (101 to 116 mcd). Sulfate reduction rates at the shallow AMO sites are on the order 1x10-16 mol/L/yr, much faster than rates in the deeper zone sulfate reduction (1-3x10-17 mol/L/yr), as expected. The dissolved metal ion concentrations varied between the sites, with Fe (0.01-7 μM) and Mn (0.01-57 μM) concentrations highest at Site 1020 and lowest at site 1017. The highest Fe and Mn concentrations occurred at various depths, and were not directly correlated with the rates of sulfate reduction and the maximum alkalinity values. The main processes that control cycling of Fe are the production of sulfide from sulfate reduction and the distribution of Fe-oxides. The Mn distribution

  3. Suspended sediment transport in the Deepwater Navigation Channel, Yangtze River Estuary, China, in the dry season 2009: 1. Observations over spring and neap tidal cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dehai; Wang, Xiao Hua; Cao, Zhenyi; Guan, Weibing

    2013-10-01

    The in situ data in the Deepwater Navigation Channel (DNC), Yangtze River Estuary (YRE), China, in the dry season 2009, shows spring tides associated with greater maximum velocities, more mixing, less stratification, and diffused fluid mud; whereas neap tides are associated with smaller maximum velocities, greater stratification, inhibited mixing, and stratified fluid muds. The balance of salt flux indicates the seaward salt transport is dominated by fluvial flows, and the landward salt transport is generated by compensation flows during spring tides, but shear effects during neap tidal cycles. The balance of suspended sediment flux illustrates the offshore sediment transport is dominated by fluvial flows as well, but the onshore transport is induced by tidal-pumping effects on spring tides, and shear effects on neaps. The suspended sediment transport is strongly affected by the salinity distribution and salinity-gradient-induced stratification in the DNC. The spring-neap asymmetry is generated by the estuarine gravitational circulation during low-flow conditions; while the flood-ebb asymmetric stratification within a tidal cycle is due to the semidiurnal tidally movement of the salt front.

  4. Automated Screening for High-Frequency Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    MacKinnon, Robert C.; Jansen, Marije; Moore, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Hearing loss at high frequencies produces perceptual difficulties and is often an early sign of a more general hearing loss. This study reports the development and validation of two new speech-based hearing screening tests in English that focus on detecting hearing loss at frequencies above 2000 Hz. Design: The Internet-delivered, speech-in noise tests used closed target-word sets of digit triplets or consonant–vowel–consonant (CVC) words presented against a speech-shaped noise masker. The digit triplet test uses the digits 0 to 9 (excluding the disyllabic 7), grouped in quasi-random triplets. The CVC test uses simple words (e.g., “cat”) selected for the high-frequency spectral content of the consonants. During testing, triplets or CVC words were identified in an adaptive procedure to obtain the speech reception threshold (SRT) in noise. For these new, high-frequency (HF) tests, the noise was low-pass filtered to produce greater masking of the low-frequency speech components, increasing the sensitivity of the test for HF hearing loss. Individual test tokens (digits, CVCs) were first homogenized using a group of 10 normal-hearing (NH) listeners by equalizing intelligibility across tokens at several speech-in-noise levels. Both tests were then validated and standardized using groups of 24 NH listeners and 50 listeners with hearing impairment. Performance on the new high frequency digit triplet (HF-triplet) and CVC (HF-CVC) tests was compared with audiometric hearing loss, and with that on the unfiltered, broadband digit triplet test (BB-triplet) test, and the ASL (Adaptive Sentence Lists) speech-in-noise test. Results: The HF-triplet and HF-CVC test results (SRT) both correlated positively and highly with high-frequency audiometric hearing loss and with the ASL test. SRT for both tests as a function of high-frequency hearing loss increased at nearly three times the rate as that of the BB-triplet test. The intraindividual variability (SD) on the

  5. Automated screening for high-frequency hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Vlaming, Marcel S M G; MacKinnon, Robert C; Jansen, Marije; Moore, David R

    2014-01-01

    Hearing loss at high frequencies produces perceptual difficulties and is often an early sign of a more general hearing loss. This study reports the development and validation of two new speech-based hearing screening tests in English that focus on detecting hearing loss at frequencies above 2000 Hz. The Internet-delivered, speech-in noise tests used closed target-word sets of digit triplets or consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words presented against a speech-shaped noise masker. The digit triplet test uses the digits 0 to 9 (excluding the disyllabic 7), grouped in quasi-random triplets. The CVC test uses simple words (e.g., "cat") selected for the high-frequency spectral content of the consonants. During testing, triplets or CVC words were identified in an adaptive procedure to obtain the speech reception threshold (SRT) in noise. For these new, high-frequency (HF) tests, the noise was low-pass filtered to produce greater masking of the low-frequency speech components, increasing the sensitivity of the test for HF hearing loss. Individual test tokens (digits, CVCs) were first homogenized using a group of 10 normal-hearing (NH) listeners by equalizing intelligibility across tokens at several speech-in-noise levels. Both tests were then validated and standardized using groups of 24 NH listeners and 50 listeners with hearing impairment. Performance on the new high frequency digit triplet (HF-triplet) and CVC (HF-CVC) tests was compared with audiometric hearing loss, and with that on the unfiltered, broadband digit triplet test (BB-triplet) test, and the ASL (Adaptive Sentence Lists) speech-in-noise test. The HF-triplet and HF-CVC test results (SRT) both correlated positively and highly with high-frequency audiometric hearing loss and with the ASL test. SRT for both tests as a function of high-frequency hearing loss increased at nearly three times the rate as that of the BB-triplet test. The intraindividual variability (SD) on the tests was about 2.1 (HF-triplet) and 1

  6. Understanding past climatic and hydrological variability in the Mediterranean from Lake Prespa sediment isotope and geochemical record over the Last Glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Melanie J.; Wagner, Bernd; Boehm, Anne; Panagiotopoulos, Konstantinos; Vane, Christopher H.; Snelling, Andrea; Haidon, Cheryl; Woodley, Ewan; Vogel, Hendrik; Zanchetta, Gianni; Baneschi, Ilaria

    2013-04-01

    Here we present stable isotope and geochemical data from Lake Prespa (Macedonia/Albania border) over the Last Glacial cycle (Marine Isotope Stages 5-1) and discuss past lake hydrology and climate (TIC, oxygen and carbon isotopes), as well as responses to climate of terrestrial and aquatic vegetation (TOC, Rock Eval pyrolysis, carbon isotopes, pollen). The Lake Prespa sediments broadly fall into 5 zones based on their sedimentology, geochemistry, palynology and the existing chronology. The Glacial sediments suggest low supply of carbon to the lake, but high summer productivity; intermittent siderite layers suggest that although the lake was likely to have mixed regularly leading to enhanced oxidation of organic matter, there must have been within sediment reducing conditions and methanogenesis. MIS 5 and 1 sediments suggest much more productivity, higher rates of organic material preservation possibly due to more limited mixing with longer periods of oxygen-depleted bottom waters. We also calculated lakewater δ18O from siderite (authigenic/Glacial) and calcite (endogenic/Holocene) and show much lower lakewater δ18O values in the Glacial when compared to the Holocene, suggesting the lake was less evaporative in the Glacial, probably as a consequence of cooler summers and longer winter ice cover. In the Holocene the oxygen isotope data suggests general humidity, with just 2 marked arid phases, features observed in other Eastern and Central Mediterranean lakes.

  7. [High-frequency ventilation. I. Distribution of alveolar pressure amplitudes during high frequency oscillation in the lung model].

    PubMed

    Theissen, J; Lunkenheimer, P P; Niederer, P; Bush, E; Frieling, G; Lawin, P

    1987-09-01

    The pattern of intrapulmonary pressure distribution was studied during high-frequency ventilation in order to explain the inconsistent results reported in the literature. Methods. Pressure and flow velocity (hot-wire anemometry) were measured in different lung compartments: 1. In transalveolar chambers sealed to the perforated pleural surfaces of dried pig lungs; 2. In emphysema-simulating airbags sealed to the isolated bronchial trees of dried pig lungs; and 3. In transalveolar chambers sealed to the perforated pleural surfaces of freshly excised pig lungs. Results. 1. The pressure amplitudes change from one area to another and depending on the exciting frequency. 2. High-frequency oscillation is associated with an increase in pressure amplitude when the exciting frequency rises, whereas with conventional high-frequency jet ventilation the pressure amplitude is more likely to decrease with frequency. 3. During high-frequency jet ventilation the local pressure amplitude changes with the position of the tube in the trachea rather than with the exciting frequency. 4. When the volume of the measuring chamber is doubled the resulting pressure amplitude falls to half the control value. 5. The pressure amplitude and mean pressure measured in the transalveolar chamber vary more or less independently from the peak flow velocity. High-frequency ventilation is thus seen to be a frequency-dependant, inhomogeneous mode of ventilation that can essentially be homogenized by systematically changing the exciting frequency. The frequency-dependant response to different lung areas to excitation is likely to result from an intrabronchially-localized aerodynamic effect rather than the mechanical properties of the lung parenchyma.

  8. Monitoring of corrosion damage using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, D.; Fromme, P.

    2014-03-01

    Due to adverse environmental conditions corrosion can develop during the life cycle of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the integrity and load bearing capacity of the structure. Structural health monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can in principle be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, high frequency guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. Wall thickness reduction was induced using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath. The corrosion damage was monitored based on the effect on the wave propagation and interference of the different modes. The change in the wave interference was quantified based on an analysis in the frequency domain (Fourier transform) and was found to match well with theoretical predictions for the wall thickness loss. High frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  9. Monitoring of corrosion damage using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, D.; Fromme, P.

    2015-03-01

    Due to adverse environmental conditions corrosion can develop during the life cycle of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the integrity and load bearing capacity of the structure. Structural health monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can in principle be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, high frequency guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. Wall thickness reduction was induced using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath. The corrosion damage was monitored based on the effect on the wave propagation and interference of the different modes. The change in the wave interference was quantified based on an analysis in the frequency domain (Fourier transform) and was found to match well with theoretical predictions for the wall thickness loss. High frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  10. Suppressing high-frequency temperature oscillations in microchannels with surface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yangying; Antao, Dion S.; Bian, David W.; Rao, Sameer R.; Sircar, Jay D.; Zhang, Tiejun; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2017-01-01

    Two-phase microchannel heat sinks are attractive for thermal management of high heat flux electronic devices, yet flow instability which can lead to thermal and mechanical fatigue remains a significant challenge. Much work has focused on long-timescale (˜seconds) flow oscillations which are usually related to the compressible volume in the loop. The rapid growth of vapor bubbles which can also cause flow reversal, however, occurs on a much shorter timescale (˜tens of milliseconds). While this high-frequency oscillation has often been visualized with high-speed imaging, its effect on the instantaneous temperature has not been fully investigated due to the typical low sampling rates of the sensors. Here, we investigate the temperature response as a result of the high-frequency flow oscillation in microchannels and the effect of surface microstructures on this temperature oscillation with a measurement data acquisition rate of 1000 Hz. For smooth surface microchannels, fluid flow oscillated between complete dry-out and rewetting annular flow due to the short-timescale flow instability, which caused high-frequency and large amplitude temperature oscillations (10 °C in 25 ms). In comparison, hydrophilic surface structures on the microchannel promoted capillary flow which delayed and suppressed dry-out in each oscillation cycle, and thus significantly reduced the temperature oscillation at high heat fluxes. This work suggests that promoting capillary wicking via surface structures is a promising technique to reduce thermal fatigue in high heat flux two-phase microchannel thermal management devices.

  11. Integrating turbulent flow, biogeochemical, and poromechanical processes in rippled coastal sediment (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, M. B.; Cook, P. L.; Jiang, H.; Traykovski, P.

    2010-12-01

    Coastal sediments are the locus of multiple coupled processes. Turbulent flow associated with waves and currents induces porewater flow through sediment leading to fluid exchange with the water column. This porewater flow is determined by the hydraulic and elastic properties of the sediment. Porewater flow also ultimately controls biogeochemical reactions in the sediment whose rates depend on delivery of reactants and export of products. We present results from numerical modeling studies directed at integrating these processes with the goal of shedding light on these complex environments. We show how denitrification rates inside ripples are largest at intermediate permeability which represents the optimal balance of reactant delivery and anoxic conditions. It is clear that nutrient cycling and distribution within the sediment is strongly dependent on the character of the multidimensional flow field inside of sediment. More recent studies illustrate the importance of the elastic properties of the saturated sediment on modulating fluid exchange between the water column and the sediment when pressure fluctuations along the sediment-water interface occur at the millisecond scale. Pressure fluctuations occur at this temporal scale due to turbulence and associated shedding of vortices due to the ripple geometry. This suggests that biogeochemical cycling may also be affected by these high-frequency elastic effects. Future studies should be directed towards this and should take advantage of modeling tools such as those we present.

  12. UTILITY OF A FULL LIFE-CYCLE COPEPOD BIOASSAY APPROACH FOR ASSESSMENT OF SEDIMENT-ASSOCIATED CONTAMINANT MIXTURES. (R825279)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    We compared a 21 day full life-cycle bioassay with an existing 14 day partial life-cycle bioassay for two species of meiobenthic copepods, Microarthridion littorale and Amphiascus tenuiremis. We hypothesized that full life-cycle tests would bette...

  13. UTILITY OF A FULL LIFE-CYCLE COPEPOD BIOASSAY APPROACH FOR ASSESSMENT OF SEDIMENT-ASSOCIATED CONTAMINANT MIXTURES. (R825279)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    We compared a 21 day full life-cycle bioassay with an existing 14 day partial life-cycle bioassay for two species of meiobenthic copepods, Microarthridion littorale and Amphiascus tenuiremis. We hypothesized that full life-cycle tests would bette...

  14. Climatic control of sediment transport from the Himalayas to the proximal NE Bengal Fan during the last glacial-interglacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joussain, Ronan; Colin, Christophe; Liu, Zhifei; Meynadier, Laure; Fournier, Léa; Fauquembergue, Kelly; Zaragosi, Sébastien; Schmidt, Frédéric; Rojas, Virginia; Bassinot, Franck

    2016-09-01

    Clay mineralogy, siliciclastic grain-size, major elements, 87Sr/86Sr, and εNd analyses of deep-sea sediments cored in the north-eastern Bay of Bengal are used to reconstruct evolution of detrital sources and sediment transport to the proximal part of the Bengal deep-sea fan during the last climatic cycle. εNd values (-13.3 to -9.7) and 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.721-0.733) indicate a mixture of sediments originating from the Ganges-Brahmaputra rivers and the Indo-Burman ranges. Interglacial Marine Isotopic Stages (MIS) 5 and 1 are associated with a higher contribution of sediments from the Ganges-Brahmaputra river system than is the case for glacial MIS 6, 4, 3, and 2. Siliciclasitic grain-size combined with Si/Al and Si/Fe ratios indicate coarser glacial sediments with numerous turbidite layers. Glacial turbidite layers display similar clay mineralogical compositions to hemipelagic sediments. Only few of turbidite layers (MIS 6, 4, and 2) are slightly unradiogenic (εNd -13.3), suggesting a higher contribution of Ganges-Brahmaputra river sediments. Independently of changes in the sedimentary sources, the smectite/(illite + chlorite) ratio of cores located on the NE Bengal Fan indicates higher inputs of primary minerals (illite and chlorite) from the highlands of the river basins (relief) during glacial MIS 6, 4, 3, and 2 and an increased contribution of pedogenic minerals (smectite and kaolinite) during interglacial MIS 5 and 1. Maximum smectite/(illite + chlorite) ratios during the warm sub-stages of MIS 5 suggest an intensification of summer monsoon rainfall associated with higher rates of physical erosion of the Indo-Gangetic flood-plain and/or dominant summer hydrological conditions transporting a higher proportion of sediments deriving from the Ganges-Brahmaputra rivers to the NE Bengal Fan. In addition, a higher production of smectite in soils of the Indo-Gangetic flood-plain during periods of intensification of monsoon rainfall cannot be excluded.

  15. Scaling comparison of high frequency simultaneous oceanic and atmospheric temperature time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, F. G.

    2012-04-01

    We consider a database of 7 years of high frequency (1 hour resolution) simultaneous temperature measurements in the atmosphere and coastal waters of Boulogne-sur-Mer (France). The oceanic data come from the MAREL Carnot system and the atmospheric data from Meteo France. We consider first the mean annual cycle and compare both curves, and then consider the scaling properties of the fluctuations and of their cross correlation. We perform the analyses using Fourier approach, structure functions and Empirical Mode Decomposition. With these approaches we can characterize the coupling between both series, and also propose a stochastic modelling describing the multiscale coupling between both fields.

  16. Quantifying manganese and nitrogen cycle coupling in manganese-rich, organic carbon-starved marine sediments: Examples from the Clarion-Clipperton fracture zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogollón, José M.; Mewes, Konstantin; Kasten, Sabine

    2016-07-01

    Extensive deep-sea sedimentary areas are characterized by low organic carbon contents and thus harbor suboxic sedimentary environments where secondary (autotrophic) redox cycling becomes important for microbial metabolic processes. Simulation results for three stations in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific with low organic carbon content (<0.5 dry wt %) and low sedimentation rates (10-1-100 mm ky-1) show that ammonium generated during organic matter degradation may act as a reducing agent for manganese oxides below the oxic zone. Likewise, at these sedimentary depths, dissolved reduced manganese may act as a reducing agent for oxidized nitrogen species. These manganese-coupled transformations provide a suboxic conversion pathway of ammonium and nitrate to dinitrogen. These manganese-nitrogen interactions further explain the presence and production of dissolved reduced manganese (up to tens of μM concentration) in sediments with high nitrate (>20 μM) concentrations.

  17. Parametric Study of High Frequency Pulse Detonation Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Anderw D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes development of high frequency pulse detonation