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Sample records for high-harmonic fast wave

  1. Modeling of high harmonic fast wave current drive on EAST tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J. C.; Gong, X. Y. Li, F. Y.; Dong, J. Q.; Gao, Q. D.; Zhang, N.

    2015-10-15

    High harmonic fast waves (HHFW) are among the candidates for non-inductive current drive (CD), which is essential for long-pulse or steady-state operation of tokamaks. Current driven with HHFW in EAST tokamak plasmas is numerically studied. The HHFW CD efficiency is found to increase non-monotonically with the wave frequency, and this phenomenon is attributed to the multi-pass absorption of HHFW. The sensitivity of CD efficiency to the value of the parallel refraction index of the launched wave is confirmed. The quasilinear effects, assessed as significant in HHFW current drive with the GENRAY/CQL3D package, cause a significant increase in CD efficiency as RF power is increased, which is very different from helicon current drive. Simulations for a range of toroidal dc electric fields, in combination with a range of fast wave powers, are also presented and indicate that the presence of the DC field can also enhance the CD efficiency.

  2. Investigation of Ion Absorption of the High Harmonic Fast Wave in NSTX using HPRT

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, A.; Menard, J.E.; and LeBlanc, B.P.

    2001-05-18

    Understanding high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) power absorption by ions in a spherical torus (ST) is of critical importance to assessing the wave's viability as a means of heating and especially driving current. In this work, the HPRT code is used to calculate absorption for helium and deuterium, with and without minority hydrogen in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) plasmas using experimental EFIT code equilibria and kinetic profiles. HPRT is a two-dimensional ray-tracing code which uses the full hot plasma dielectric to compute the perpendicular wave number along the hot electron and cold ion plasma ray path. Ion and electron absorption dependence on antenna phasing, ion temperature, beta (subscript t), and minority temperature and concentration is analyzed. These results form the basis for comparisons with other codes, such as CURRAY, METS, TORIC, and AORSA.

  3. Advances in High-harmonic Fast Wave Physics in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G; Hosea, J C; LeBlanc, B P; Phillips, C K; Podesta, M; Valeo, E J; Wilson, J R; Ahn, J -W; Chen, G; Green, D L; Jaeger, E F; Maingi, R; Ryan, P M; Wilgen, J B; Heidbrink, W W; Liu, D; Bonoli, P T; Brecht, T; Choi, M

    2009-12-01

    Improved core high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating at longer wavelengths and during start-up and plasma current ramp-up, has now been obtained by lowering the edge density with lithium wall conditioning, thereby moving the critical density for perpendicular fast-wave propagation away from the vessel wall. Lithium conditioning allowed significant HHFW core electron heating of deuterium neutral beam injection (NBI) fuelled H-mode plasmas to be observed for the first time. Large edge localized modes were observed immediately after the termination of rf power. Visible and infrared camera images show that fast wave interactions can deposit considerable rf energy on the outboard divertor. HHFW-generated parametric decay instabilities were observed to heat ions in the plasma edge and may be the cause for a measured drag on edge toroidal rotation during HHFW heating. A significant enhancement in neutron rate and fast-ion profile were measured in NBI-fuelled plasmas when HHFW heating was applied. __________________________________________________

  4. Advances in high-harmonic fast wave physics in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Bell, R. E.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Phillips, C. K.; Podesta, M.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Ahn, J-W.; Chen, G.; Green, D. L.; Jaeger, E. F.; Maingi, R.; Ryan, P. M.; Wilgen, J. B.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Liu, D.; Bonoli, P. T.; Brecht, T.; Choi, M.

    2010-05-15

    Improved core high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating at longer wavelengths and during start-up and plasma current ramp-up has now been obtained by lowering the edge density with lithium wall conditioning, thereby moving the critical density for perpendicular fast-wave propagation away from the vessel wall. Lithium conditioning allowed significant HHFW core electron heating of deuterium neutral beam injection (NBI) fuelled H-mode plasmas to be observed for the first time. Large edge localized modes were observed immediately after the termination of rf power. Visible and infrared camera images show that fast wave interactions can deposit considerable rf energy on the outboard divertor. HHFW-generated parametric decay instabilities were observed to heat ions in the plasma edge and may be the cause for a measured drag on edge toroidal rotation during HHFW heating. A significant enhancement in neutron rate and fast-ion profile was measured in NBI-fuelled plasmas when HHFW heating was applied.

  5. Exploration of High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    J.R. Wilson; R.E. Bell; S. Bernabei; M. Bitter; P. Bonoli; D. Gates; J. Hosea; B. LeBlanc; T.K. Mau; S. Medley; J. Menard; D. Mueller; M. Ono; C.K. Phillips; R.I. Pinsker; R. Raman; A. Rosenberg; P. Ryan; S. Sabbagh; D. Stutman; D. Swain; Y. Takase; J. Wilgen; the NSTX Team

    2003-02-11

    High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating has been proposed as a particularly attractive means for plasma heating and current drive in the high-beta plasmas that are achievable in spherical torus (ST) devices. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [Ono, M., Kaye, S.M., Neumeyer, S., et al., Proceedings, 18th IEEE/NPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering, Albuquerque, 1999, (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ (1999), p. 53.)] is such a device. An radio-frequency (rf) heating system has been installed on NSTX to explore the physics of HHFW heating, current drive via rf waves and for use as a tool to demonstrate the attractiveness of the ST concept as a fusion device. To date, experiments have demonstrated many of the theoretical predictions for HHFW. In particular, strong wave absorption on electrons over a wide range of plasma parameters and wave parallel phase velocities, wave acceleration of energetic ions, and indications of current drive for directed wave spectra have been observed. In addition HHFW heating has been used to explore the energy transport properties of NSTX plasmas, to create H-mode (high-confinement mode) discharges with a large fraction of bootstrap current and to control the plasma current profile during the early stages of the discharge.

  6. High-Harmonic Fast Wave Driven H-mode Plasmas on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    B.P. LeBlanc; R.E. Bell; S.I. Bernabei; K. Indireshkumar; S.M. Kaye; R. Maingi; T.K. Mau; D.W. Swain; G. Taylor; P.M. Ryan; J.B Wilgen; J.R. Wilson

    2003-05-01

    The launch of High-Harmonic Fast Waves (HHFW) routinely provides auxiliary power to NSTX plasmas, where it is used to heat electrons and pursue drive current. H-mode transitions have been observed in deuterium discharges, where only HHFW and ohmic heating, and no neutral beam injection (NBI), were applied to the plasma. The usual H-mode signatures are observed. A drop of the Da light marks the start of a stored energy increase, which can double the energy content. These H-mode plasmas also have the expected kinetic profile signatures with steep edge density and electron temperature pedestal. Similar to its NBI driven counterpart--also observed on NSTX-- the HHFW H mode have density profiles that features ''ears'' in the peripheral region. These plasmas are likely candidates for long pulse operation because of the combination of bootstrap current, associated with H-mode kinetic profiles, and active current drive, which can be generated with HHFW power.

  7. Recent Developments in High-Harmonic Fast Wave Physics in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    B.P. LeBlanc, R.E. Bell, P. Bonoli, R. Harvey, W.W. Heidbrink, J.C. Hosea, S.M. Kaye, D. Liu, R. Maingi, S.S. Medley, M. Ono, M. Podestà, C.K. Phillips, P.M. Ryan, A.L. Roquemore, G. Taylor, J.R. Wilson and the NSTX Team

    2010-10-06

    Understanding the interaction between ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) fast waves and the fast-ions created by neutral beam injection (NBI) is critical for future devices such as ITER, which rely on a combination ICRF and NBI. Experiments in NSTX which use 30 MHz High-Harmonic Fast-Wave (HHFW) ICRF and NBI heating show a competition between electron heating via Landau damping and transit-time magnetic pumping, and radio-frequency wave acceleration of NBI generated fast ions. Understanding and mitigating some of the power loss mechanisms outside the last closed flux surface (LCFS) has resulted in improved HHFW heating inside the LCFS. Nevertheless a significant fraction of the HHFW power is diverted away from the enclosed plasma. Part of this power is observed locally on the divertor. Experimental observations point toward the radio-frequency (RF) excitation of surface waves, which disperse wave power outside the LCFS, as a leading loss mechanism. Lithium coatings lower the density at the antenna, thereby moving the critical density for perpendicular fast-wave propagation away from the antenna and surrounding material surfaces. Visible and infrared imaging reveal flows of RF power along open field lines into the divertor region. In L-mode -- low average NBI power -- conditions, the fast-ion D-alpha (FIDA) diagnostic measures a near doubling and broadening of the density profile of the upper energetic level of the fast ions concurrent with the presence of HHFW power launched with k// =-8m-1. We are able to heat NBI-induced H-mode plasmas with HHFW. The captured power is expected to be split between absorption by the electrons and absorption by the fast ions, based on TORIC calculation. In the case discussed here the Te increases over the whole profile when ~2MW of HHFW power with antenna k// =13m-1 is applied after the H-mode transition.. But somewhat unexpectedly fast-ion diagnostics do not observe a change between the HHFW heated NBI discharge and the

  8. Transition From High Harmonic Fast Wave to Whistler/Helicon Regime in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, S. P.; Pinsker, R. I.; Porkolab, M.

    2014-10-01

    Experiments are being prepared1 on DIII-D in which fast waves (FWs) at 0.5 GHz will be used to drive current noninductively in the mid-radius region. Previous DIII-D experiments used FWs at ~0.1 GHz to drive central current; in this work we examine the frequency dependence of wave propagation and damping in the 0.1-1.0 GHz range with the goal of identifying the optimum frequency range for a particular application. Strongly enhanced electron damping and reduced ion damping at higher frequencies must be weighed against increasing coupling difficulties at higher frequencies and more restrictive wave accessibility at low toroidal field. Wave propagation and accessibility is studied with ray tracing models in slab, cylindrical, and fully toroidal geometries. Analytic expressions for electron and ion damping will be derived with an emphasis on understanding the transition from the moderate-to-high ion cyclotron harmonic regime to the very high harmonic or ``whistler''/``helicon''/lower hybrid FW regime. Work supported in part by the National Undergraduate Fellowship Program in Plasma Physics and Fusion Energy Sciences and the US Department of Energy under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  9. Advances in High-Harmonic Fast Wave Physics in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Gary

    2009-11-01

    Improved core high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating, particularly at longer wavelengths and during low-density start-up and current ramp-up, has now been obtained by lowering the edge density with lithium conditioning, thereby moving the propagation onset away from the vessel wall. Significant core electron heating of deuterium neutral beam injection (NBI) fuelled H-modes has been observed for the first time over a range of launched wavelengths. The observed broadening of the electron heating profile in H-mode relative to L-mode plasmas is consistent with simulations obtained with ray tracing and full wave models. Newly taken camera images indicate that fast wave interactions can deposit considerable RF energy on the outboard divertor plate, especially at longer wavelengths that begin to propagate closer to the vessel walls. Edge power loss can also arise from HHFW-generated parametric decay instabilities that drive ions in the edge onto direct loss orbits that intersect the wall, and may be the cause for an observed drag on edge toroidal rotation in combined HHFW and NBI discharges. Fast-Ion D-alpha emission clearly shows fast-ion profile broadening in the plasma core that is much greater than predicted by Fokker-Planck modeling when HHFW power is applied to NBI-fuelled plasmas, pointing to the need for a full-orbit treatment in the simulation. Large ELMs have been observed immediately following the termination of RF power, whether the power turn off is programmed or due to antenna arcing. RF power has been successfully applied during large ELMs by setting the source reflection coefficient trip levels to relatively high values -- an approach potentially important for ITER ICRF heating. Plans for an HHFW ELM-resilience upgrade will be presented.

  10. Advances in High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating of NSTX H-mode Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Philip Michael; Ahn, Joonwook; Bell, R. E.; Bonoli, P.; Chen, Guangye; Green, David L; Harvey, R. W.; Hosea, J.; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Kaye, S.; LeBlanc, B; Maingi, Rajesh; Phillips, Cynthia; Podesta, M.; Taylor, G.; Wilgen, John B; Wilson, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    High-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive is being developed in NSTX to provide bulk electron heating and q(0) control during non-inductively sustained Hmode plasmas fuelled by deuterium neutral-beam injection (NBI). In addition, it is used to assist the plasma current ramp-up. A major modification to increase the RF power limit was made in 2009; the original end-grounded, single end-powered current straps of the 12- element array were replaced with center-grounded, double end-powered straps. Greater than 3 MW have been coupled into NBI-driven, ELMy H-mode plasmas with this upgraded antenna. Improved core HHFW heating, particularly at longer wavelengths and during low-density start-up and plasma current ramp-up, has been obtained by lowering the edge density with lithium wall conditioning, thereby moving the critical density for fast-wave propagation away from the vessel wall [1]. Significant core electron heating of NBI-fuelled H-modes has been observed for the first time over a range of launched wavelengths and H-modes can be accessed by HHFW alone. Visible and IR camera images of the antenna and divertor indicate that fast wave interactions can deposit considerable RF energy on the outboard divertor plate, especially at longer wavelengths that begin to propagate closer to the vessel walls. Edge power loss can also arise from HHFWgenerated parametric decay instabilities; edge ion heating is observed that is wavelength dependent. During plasmas where HHFW is combined with NBI, there is a significant enhancement in neutron rate, and fast-ion D-alpha (FIDA) emission measurements clearly show broadening of the fast-ion profile in the plasma core. Large edge localized modes (ELMs) have been observed immediately following the termination of RF power, whether the power turn off is programmed or due to antenna arcing. Causality has not been established but new experiments are planned and will be reported. Fast digitization of the reflected power signal

  11. Edge Ion Heating by Launched High Harmonic Fast Waves in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    T.M. Biewer; R.E. Bell; S.J. Diem; C.K. Phillips; J.R. Wilson; P.M. Ryan

    2004-12-01

    A new spectroscopic diagnostic on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) measures the velocity distribution of ions in the plasma edge simultaneously along both poloidal and toroidal views. An anisotropic ion temperature is measured during high-power high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) radio-frequency (rf) heating in helium plasmas, with the poloidal ion temperature roughly twice the toroidal ion temperature. Moreover, the measured spectral distribution suggests that two populations of ions are present and have temperatures of typically 500 eV and 50 eV with rotation velocities of -50 km/s and -10 km/s, respectively (predominantly perpendicular to the local magnetic field). This bi-modal distribution is observed in both the toroidal and poloidal views (for both He{sup +} and C{sup 2+} ions), and is well correlated with the period of rf power application to the plasma. The temperature of the hot component is observed to increase with the applied rf power, which was scanned between 0 and 4.3 MW . The 30 MHz HHFW launched by the NSTX antenna is expected and observed to heat core electrons, but plasma ions do not resonate with the launched wave, which is typically at >10th harmonic of the ion cyclotron frequency in the region of observation. A likely ion heating mechanism is parametric decay of the launched HHFW into an Ion Bernstein Wave (IBW). The presence of the IBW in NSTX plasmas during HHFW application has been directly confirmed with probe measurements. IBW heating occurs in the perpendicular ion distribution, consistent with the toroidal and poloidal observations. Calculations of IBW propagation indicate that multiple waves could be created in the parametric decay process, and that most of the IBW power would be absorbed in the outer 10 to 20 cm of the plasma, predominantly on fully stripped ions. These predictions are in qualitative agreement with the observations, and must be accounted for when calculating the energy budget of the plasma.

  12. Profile Modifications Resulting from Early High-harmonic Fast Wave heating in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Mendard, J.E.; LeBlanc, Wilson, J.R.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Stutman, D.; and Swain, D.W.

    2001-05-18

    Experiments have been performed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to inject high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) power early during the plasma current ramp-up in an attempt to reduce the current penetration rate to raise the central safety factor during the flattop phase of the discharge. To date, up to 2 MW of HHFW power has been coupled to deuterium plasmas as early as t = 50 ms using the slowest interstrap phasing of k|| approximately equals 14 m(superscript)-1 (nf = 24). Antenna-plasma gap scans have been performed and find that for small gaps (5-8 cm), electron heating is observed with relatively small density rises and modest reductions in current penetration rate. For somewhat larger gaps (10-12 cm), weak electron heating is observed but with a spontaneous density rise at the plasma edge similar to that observed in NSTX H-modes. In the larger gap configuration, EFIT code reconstructions (without MSE [motional Stark effect]) find that resistive flux consumption is reduced as much as 30%, the internal inductance is maintained below 0.6 at 1 MA into the flattop, q(0) is increased significantly, and the MHD stability character of the discharges is strongly modified.

  13. High-Harmonic Fast-Wave Power Flow Along Magnetic Field Lines in the Scrape-Off Layer of NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R. J.; Hosea, J.; Kramer, G.; Ahn, Joonwook; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S.; Gray, T. K.; Green, David L; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Jaworski, M. A.; LeBlanc, B; McLean, Adam G; Maingi, Rajesh; Phillips, C. K.; Roquemore, L.; Ryan, Philip Michael; Sabbagh, S. A.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.

    2012-01-01

    A significant fraction of high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) power applied to NSTX can be lost to the scrape-off layer (SOL) and deposited in bright and hot spirals on the divertor rather than in the core plasma. We show that the HHFW power flows to these spirals along magnetic field lines passing through the SOL in front of the antenna, implying that the HHFW power couples across the entire width of the SOL rather than mostly at the antenna face. This result will help guide future efforts to understand and minimize these edge losses in order to maximize fast-wave heating and current drive.

  14. High-harmonic fast-wave power flow along magnetic field lines in the scrape-off layer of NSTX.

    PubMed

    Perkins, R J; Hosea, J C; Kramer, G J; Ahn, J-W; Bell, R E; Diallo, A; Gerhardt, S; Gray, T K; Green, D L; Jaeger, E F; Jaworski, M A; LeBlanc, B P; McLean, A; Maingi, R; Phillips, C K; Roquemore, L; Ryan, P M; Sabbagh, S; Taylor, G; Wilson, J R

    2012-07-27

    A significant fraction of high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) power applied to NSTX can be lost to the scrape-off layer (SOL) and deposited in bright and hot spirals on the divertor rather than in the core plasma. We show that the HHFW power flows to these spirals along magnetic field lines passing through the SOL in front of the antenna, implying that the HHFW power couples across the entire width of the SOL rather than mostly at the antenna face. This result will help guide future efforts to understand and minimize these edge losses in order to maximize fast-wave heating and current drive.

  15. HEATING AND CURRENT DRIVE IN NSTX WITH ELECTRON BERNSTEIN WAVES AND HIGH HARMONIC FAST WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, Abhay K

    2010-06-14

    A suitable theoretical and computational framework for studying heating and current drive by electron Bernstein waves in the National Spherical Torus Experiment has been developed. This framework can also be used to study heating and current drive by electron Bernstein waves in spherical tori and other magnetic confinement devices. It is also useful in studying the propagation and damping of electron cyclotron waves in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

  16. High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating Efficiency Enhancement and Current Drive at Longer Wavelength on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J.; Bell, R. E.; LeBlanc, B; Phillips, Cynthia; Taylor, G.; Valeo, Dr Ernest; Wilson, J. R.; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Ryan, Philip Michael; Wilgen, John B; Yuh, H.; Levinton, F.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Tritz, K.; Parker, J.; Bonoli, P.; Harvey, R. W.

    2008-01-01

    High harmonic fast wave heating and current drive CD are being developed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1435 2001 for supporting startup and sustainment of the spherical torus plasma. Considerable enhancement of the core heating efficiency from 44% to 65% has been obtained for CD phasing of the antenna strap-to-strap = 90 , k= 8 m 1 by increasing the magnetic field from 4.5 to 5.5 kG. This increase in efficiency is strongly correlated to moving the location of the onset density for perpendicular fast wave propagation nonsetBk 2 / away from the antenna face and wall, and hence reducing the propagating surface wave fields. Radio frequency RF waves propagating close to the wall at lower B and k can enhance power losses from both the parametric decay instability PDI and wave dissipation in sheaths and structures around the machine. The improved efficiency found here is attributed to a reduction in the latter, as PDI losses are little changed at the higher magnetic field. Under these conditions of higher coupling efficiency, initial measurements of localized CD effects have been made and compared with advanced RF code simulations.

  17. High-harmonic fast wave heating experiments in CDX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Menard, J.; Majeski, R.; Ono, M.; Wilson, J.R.; Munsat, T.; Seki, T.

    1997-12-01

    One of the primary objectives of the proposed National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) is the investigation of very high {beta} regimes. Consequently, finding efficient methods of non-inductive heating and current drive required to heat and sustain such plasmas is of considerable importance. High-frequency fast waves are a promising candidate in this regard. However, in NSTX, the field-line pitch at the outer midplane will range from 0 up to 60 degrees from plasma start-up to current flattop. Thus, antenna strap orientation with respect to the edge magnetic field may have a serious impact on power coupling and absorption. To address this issue, the vacuum vessel of the Current Drive Experiment -- Upgrade (CDX-U) spherical tokamak has been upgraded to accommodate a rotatable two-strap antenna capable of handling several hundred kilowatts in short pulses. Details of the antenna design and results from loading measurements made as a function of power, strap angle, and strap phasing will be presented. Results from microwave scattering experiments will also be discussed.

  18. High-harmonic fast wave heating experiments in CDX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menard, J.; Majeski, R.; Ono, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Munsat, T.; Seki, T.

    1997-04-01

    One of the primary objectives of the proposed National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) [1] is the investigation of very high β regimes. Consequently, finding efficient methods of non-inductive heating and current drive required to heat and sustain such plasmas is of considerable importance. High frequency fast waves are a promising candidate in this regard. However, in NSTX, the field-line pitch at the outer midplane will range from 0 to up to 60 degrees from plasma start-up to current flat-top. Thus, antenna strap orientation with respect to the edge magnetic field may have a serious impact on power coupling and absorption. To address this issue, the vacuum vessel of the Current Drive Experiment—Upgrade (CDX-U) spherical tokamak has been upgraded to accommodate a rotatable two-strap antenna capable of handling several hundred kilowatts in short pulses. Details of the antenna design and results from loading measurements made as a function of power, strap angle, and strap phasing will be presented. Results from microwave scattering experiments will also be discussed.

  19. High-harmonic fast wave heating experiments in CDX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Menard, J.; Majeski, R.; Ono, M.; Wilson, J.R.; Munsat, T.; Seki, T.

    1997-04-01

    One of the primary objectives of the proposed National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) [1] is the investigation of very high {beta} regimes. Consequently, finding efficient methods of non-inductive heating and current drive required to heat and sustain such plasmas is of considerable importance. High frequency fast waves are a promising candidate in this regard. However, in NSTX, the field-line pitch at the outer midplane will range from 0 to up to 60 degrees from plasma start-up to current flat-top. Thus, antenna strap orientation with respect to the edge magnetic field may have a serious impact on power coupling and absorption. To address this issue, the vacuum vessel of the Current Drive Experiment{emdash}Upgrade (CDX-U) spherical tokamak has been upgraded to accommodate a rotatable two-strap antenna capable of handling several hundred kilowatts in short pulses. Details of the antenna design and results from loading measurements made as a function of power, strap angle, and strap phasing will be presented. Results from microwave scattering experiments will also be discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Effect of the scrape-off layer in AORSA full wave simulations of fast wave minority, mid/high harmonic, and helicon heating regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, N. Gerhardt, S.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Phillips, C. K.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Jaeger, E. F.; Lau, C.; Blazevski, D.; Green, D. L.; Berry, L.; Ryan, P. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R.; Qin, C. M.; and others

    2015-12-10

    Several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves, have found strong interactions between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 3D AORSA results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX), where a full antenna spectrum is reconstructed, are shown, confirming the same behavior found for a single toroidal mode results in Bertelli et al, Nucl. Fusion, 54 083004, 2014, namely, a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is moved away from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Additionally, full wave simulations have been extended to “conventional” tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for Alcator C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime unlike NSTX/NSTX-U and DIII-D, which operate in the mid/high harmonic regime. A substantial discussion of some of the main aspects, such as (i) the pitch angle of the magnetic field; (ii) minority heating vs. mid/high harmonic regimes is presented showing the different behavior of the RF field in the SOL region for NSTX-U scenarios with different plasma current. Finally, the preliminary results of the impact of the SOL region on the evaluation of the helicon current drive efficiency in DIII-D is presented for the first time and briefly compared with the different regimes

  1. Effect of the scrape-off layer in AORSA full wave simulations of fast wave minority, mid/high harmonic, and helicon heating regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, Nicola; Jaeger, E. F.; Lau, Cornwall H; Blazevski, Dan; Green, David L; Berry, Lee Alan; Bonoli, P. T.; Gerhardt, S.P.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Phillips, Cynthia; Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R.; Qin, C M; Ryan, P. M.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, Randy; Wright, J.; Zhang, X J

    2015-01-01

    Several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves, have found strong interactions between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 3D AORSA results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX), where a full antenna spectrum is reconstructed, are shown, confirming the same behavior found for a single toroidal mode results in Bertelli et al, Nucl. Fusion, 54 083004, 2014, namely, a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is moved away from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Additionally, full wave simulations have been extended to "conventional" tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for Alcator C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime unlike NSTX/NSTX-U and DIII-D, which operate in the mid/high harmonic regime. A substantial discussion of some of the main aspects, such as (i) the pitch angle of the magnetic field; (ii) minority heating vs. mid/high harmonic regimes is presented showing the different behavior of the RF field in the SOL region for NSTX-U scenarios with different plasma current. Finally, the preliminary results of the impact of the SOL region on the evaluation of the helicon current drive efficiency in DIII-D is presented for the first time and briefly compared with the different regimes

  2. Full wave simulations of fast wave efficiency and power losses in the scrape-off layer of tokamak plasmas in mid/high harmonic and minority heating regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertelli, N.; Jaeger, E. F.; Hosea, J. C.; Phillips, C. K.; Berry, L.; Bonoli, P. T.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Green, D.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Qin, C. M.; Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R.; Ryan, P. M.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J. C.; Zhang, X. J.

    2016-01-01

    Several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves (HHFW), have found strong interaction between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 2D and 3D AORSA results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) have shown a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is removed from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Here, full wave simulations have been extended for ‘conventional’ tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results in HHFW regime show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime. This article is dedicated to the memory of Cynthia K. Phillips

  3. Full wave simulations of fast wave efficiency and power losses in the scrape-off layer of tokamak plasmas in mid/high harmonic and minority heating regimes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bertelli, N.; Jaeger, E. F.; Hosea, J. C.; Phillips, C. K.; Berry, L.; Bonoli, P. T.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Green, D.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; et al

    2015-12-17

    Here, several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves (HHFW), have found strong interaction between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 2D and 3D AORSAmore » results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) have shown a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is removed from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Here, full wave simulations have been extended for 'conventional' tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results in HHFW regime show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime.« less

  4. Full wave simulations of fast wave efficiency and power losses in the scrape-off layer of tokamak plasmas in mid/high harmonic and minority heating regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, N.; Jaeger, E. F.; Hosea, J. C.; Phillips, C. K.; Berry, L.; Bonoli, P. T.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Green, D.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Qin, C. M.; Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R.; Ryan, P. M.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J. C.; Zhang, X. J.

    2015-12-17

    Here, several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves (HHFW), have found strong interaction between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 2D and 3D AORSA results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) have shown a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is removed from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Here, full wave simulations have been extended for 'conventional' tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results in HHFW regime show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime.

  5. Phase coherence of parametric-decay modes during high-harmonic fast-wave heating in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, J. A.; Wilson, J. R.; Hosea, J. C.; Greenough, N. L.; Perkins, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    Third-order spectral analysis, in particular, the auto bicoherence, was applied to probe signals from high-harmonic fast-wave heating experiments in the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Strong evidence was found for parametric decay of the 30 MHz radio-frequency (RF) pump wave, with a low-frequency daughter wave at 2.7 MHz, the local majority-ion cyclotron frequency. The primary decay modes have auto bicoherence values around 0.85, very close to the theoretical value of one, which corresponds to total phase coherence with the pump wave. The threshold RF pump power for onset of parametric decay was found to be between 200 kW and 400 kW.

  6. High Non-inductive Fraction H-mode Discharges Generated by High-harmonic Fast Wave Heating and Current Drive in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Hosea, J.; Kessel, C. E.; LeBlanc, B; Mueller, D.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Ryan, Philip Michael; Bonoli, P.; Harvey, R. W.

    2012-01-01

    A deuterium H-mode discharge with a plasma current of 300 kA, an axial toroidal magnetic field of 0.55 T, and a calculated non-inductive plasma current fraction of 0.7 1 has been generated in the National Spherical Torus Experiment by 1.4MW of 30MHz high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive. Seventy-five percent of the non-inductive current was generated inside an internal transport barrier that formed at a normalized minor radius 0.4. Three quarters of the non-inductive current was bootstrap current, and the remaining non-inductive current was generated directly by HHFW power inside a normalized minor radius 0.2. VC 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  7. High-harmonic Fast Wave Heating and Current Drive Results for Deuterium H-mode Plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    G. Taylor, P.T. Bonoli, R.W. Harvey, J.C. hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, C.K. Phillisp, P.M. Ryan, E.J. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, J.C. Wright, and the NSTX Team

    2012-07-25

    A critical research goal for the spherical torus (ST) program is to initiate, ramp-up, and sustain a discharge without using the central solenoid. Simulations of non-solenoidal plasma scenarios in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [1] predict that high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) [2] can play an important roll in enabling fully non-inductive (fNI {approx} 1) ST operation. The NSTX fNI {approx} 1 strategy requires 5-6 MW of HHFW power (PRF) to be coupled into a non-inductively generated discharge [3] with a plasma current, Ip {approx} 250-350 kA, driving the plasma into an HHFW H-mode with Ip {approx} 500 kA, a level where 90 keV deuterium neutral beam injection (NBI) can heat the plasma and provide additional CD. The initial approach on NSTX has been to heat Ip {approx} 300 kA, inductively heated, deuterium plasmas with CD phased HHFW power [2], in order to drive the plasma into an H-mode with fNI {approx} 1.

  8. High voltage test-stand research done on ICRF antenna elements of the high-harmonic fast-wave system of NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, R. J.; Ahn, J.-W.; Bortolon, A.; Brunkhorst, C.; Ellis, R.; Fredd, E.; Greenough, N.; Hosea, J. C.; Kung, C.; Miller, D.

    2015-12-01

    The twelve-strap high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) antenna on NSTX has exhibited a high-voltage standoff around 25 kV during previous experimental campaigns; this standoff needs to be improved for increased power coupling. During the recent NSTX-U upgrade period, a test-stand was set up with two antenna straps along with Faraday screens for testing purposes. Using a diagnostic suite consisting of a fast camera, a residual gas analyzer, a pressure gage, high-voltage probes, and an infrared camera, several interesting discoveries were made, leading to possible improvements of the antenna RF voltage operation level. First, arcing was observed outside the Faraday shields towards the low-voltage ("grounded") end of the straps (faraday shield box ends); this arcing was successfully eliminated by installing an additional grounding point between the Faraday shield box and the vessel wall. Second, considerable outgassing was observed during the RF pulse and the amount of outgassing was found to decrease with increasing RF power, possibly indicative of multipacting. Finally, infrared camera measurements of heating on the Faraday shield assembly suggest that the return currents on the Faraday shield box are highly localized at the box sides and possibly account for the pressure increase observed. Computations of these RF currents using Microwave Studio show qualitative agreement with the heated regions. New grounding points between the antenna box and the vessel have been implemented in NSTX-U, where future tests will be done to determine if the high-voltage standoff has improved. Further antenna improvements will be sought through future experiments on the test stand.

  9. High Voltage Test-Stand Research Done on ICRF Antenna Elements of the High-Harmonic Fast-Wave System of NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R. J.; Ahn, J.W.; Bortolon, A.; Brunkhorst, C.; Ellis, R.; Fredd, E.; Greenough, Nevell; Hosea, J.; Kung, C. C.; Miller, D.

    2015-01-01

    The twelve-strap high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) antenna on NSTX has exhibited a high-voltage standoff around 25 kV during previous experimental campaigns; this standoff needs to be improved for increased power coupling. During the recent NSTX-U upgrade period, a test-stand was set up with two antenna straps along with Faraday screens for testing purposes. Using a diagnostic suite consisting of a fast camera, a residual gas analyzer, a pressure gage, high-voltage probes, and an infrared camera, several interesting discoveries were made, leading to possible improvements of the antenna RF voltage operation level. First, arcing was observed outside the Faraday shields towards the low-voltage ("grounded") end of the straps (faraday shield box ends); this arcing was successfully eliminated by installing an additional grounding point between the Faraday shield box and the vessel wall. Second, considerable outgassing was observed during the RF pulse and the amount of outgassing was found to decrease with increasing RF power, possibly indicative of multipacting. Finally, infrared camera measurements of heating on the Faraday shield assembly suggest that the return currents on the Faraday shield box are highly localized at the box sides and possibly account for the pressure increase observed. Computations of these RF currents using Microwave Studio show qualitative agreement with the heated regions. New grounding points between the antenna box and the vessel have been implemented in NSTX-U, where future tests will be done to determine if the high-voltage standoff has improved. Further antenna improvements will be sought through future experiments on the test stand.

  10. ITER Plasma at Ion Cyclotron Frequency Domain: The Fusion Alpha Particles Diagnostics Based on the Stimulated Raman Scattering of Fast Magnetosonic Wave off High Harmonic Ion Bernstein Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2014-10-01

    A novel method for alpha particle diagnostics is proposed. The theory of stimulated Raman scattering, SRS, of the fast wave and ion Bernstein mode, IBM, turbulence in multi-ion species plasmas, (Stefan University Press, La Jolla, CA, 2008). is utilized for the diagnostics of fast ions, (4)He (+2), in ITER plasmas. Nonlinear Landau damping of the IBM on fast ions near the plasma edge leads to the space-time changes in the turbulence level, (inverse alpha particle channeling). The space-time monitoring of the IBM turbulence via the SRS techniques may prove efficient for the real time study of the fast ion velocity distribution function, spatial distribution, and transport. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs., La Jolla, CA 92037.

  11. The contribution of radio-frequency rectification to field-aligned losses of high-harmonic fast wave power to the divertor in the National Spherical Torus eXperiment

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R. J. Hosea, J. C.; Jaworski, M. A.; Diallo, A.; Bell, R. E.; Bertelli, N.; Gerhardt, S.; Kramer, G. J.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Phillips, C. K.; Podestà, M.; Roquemore, L.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.; Ahn, J.-W.; Gray, T. K.; McLean, A.; Sabbagh, S.

    2015-04-15

    The National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) can exhibit a major loss of high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) power along scrape-off layer (SOL) field lines passing in front of the antenna, resulting in bright and hot spirals on both the upper and lower divertor regions. One possible mechanism for this loss is RF sheaths forming at the divertors. Here, we demonstrate that swept-voltage Langmuir probe characteristics for probes under the spiral are shifted relative to those not under the spiral in a manner consistent with RF rectification. We estimate both the magnitude of the RF voltage across the sheath and the sheath heat flux transmission coefficient in the presence of the RF field. Although precise comparison between the computed heat flux and infrared (IR) thermography cannot yet be made, the computed heat deposition compares favorably with the projections from IR camera measurements. The RF sheath losses are significant and contribute substantially to the total SOL losses of HHFW power to the divertor for the cases studied. This work will guide future experimentation on NSTX-U, where a wide-angle IR camera and a dedicated set of coaxial Langmuir probes for measuring the RF sheath voltage directly will quantify the contribution of RF sheath rectification to the heat deposition from the SOL to the divertor.

  12. Oriented rotational wave-packet dynamics studies via high harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Frumker, E; Hebeisen, C T; Kajumba, N; Bertrand, J B; Wörner, H J; Spanner, M; Villeneuve, D M; Naumov, A; Corkum, P B

    2012-09-14

    We produce oriented rotational wave packets in CO and measure their characteristics via high harmonic generation. The wave packet is created using an intense, femtosecond laser pulse and its second harmonic. A delayed 800 nm pulse probes the wave packet, generating even-order high harmonics that arise from the broken symmetry induced by the orientation dynamics. The even-order harmonic radiation that we measure appears on a zero background, enabling us to accurately follow the temporal evolution of the wave packet. Our measurements reveal that, for the conditions optimum for harmonic generation, the orientation is produced by preferential ionization which depletes the sample of molecules of one orientation. PMID:23005628

  13. Two-wave regime of operation of the high-harmonic gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Savilov, A. V.; Denisov, G. G.; Kalynov, Yu. K.; Osharin, I. V.

    2015-04-15

    The use of the two-wave co-generation is proposed as a way to decrease the effective Q-factor of the operating near-cutoff wave of the gyrotron. In this two-wave regime, the operating wave represents a “hot” wave mode formed by two partial “cold” modes (near-cutoff and far-from-cutoff ones) coupled on the electron beam. It is shown that the use of this regime can provide a significant decrease of the Ohmic losses in low-relativistic high-harmonic gyrotrons operating in the THz frequency range.

  14. Generation Of High Non-inductive Plasma Current Fraction H-mode Discharges By High-harmonic Last Wave Heating In The National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G; Kessel, C E; LeBlanc, B P; Mueller, D; Phillips, D K; Valeo, E J; Wilson, J R; Ryan, P M; Bonoli, P T; Wright, J C

    2012-02-13

    1.4 MW of 30 MHz high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating, with current drive antenna phasing, has generated a Ip = 300kA, BT (0) = 0.55T deuterium H-mode plasma in the National Spherical Torus Experiment that has a non-inductive plasma current fraction, fNI = 0.7-1. Seventy-five percent of the non-inductive current was generated inside an internal transport barrier that formed at a normalized minor radius, r/a {approx} 0.4 . Three quarters of the non-inductive current was bootstrap current and the remaining non-inductive current was generated directly by HHFW power inside r/a {approx} 0.2.

  15. Applications of fast wave in spherical tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, S.C.; Chan, V.S.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Miller, R.L.; Prater, R.; Politzer, P.

    1997-04-01

    In spherical tokamaks (ST), the magnetic field strength varies over a wide range across the plasma, and at high betas it deviates significantly from the 1/R dependence of conventional tokamaks. This, together with the high density expected in ST, poses challenging problems for RF heating and current drive. In this paper, the authors investigate the various possible applications of fast waves (FW) in ST. The adjoint technique of calculating current drive is implemented in the raytracing code CURRAY. The applicability of high harmonic and subharmonic FW to steady state ST is considered. They find that high harmonic FW tends to be totally absorbed before reaching the core and may be considered a candidate for off axis current drive while the subharmonic FW tends to be absorbed mainly in the core region and may be considered for central current drive. A difficult problem is the maintenance of current at the startup stage. In the bootstrap ramp-up scenario, the current ramp-up is mainly provided by the bootstrap current. Under this condition, the role of rf becomes mainly the sustainment of plasma through electron heating. Using a slab full-wave code SEMAL, the authors find that the ion-ion-hybrid mode conversion scheme is a promising candidate. The effect of possible existence of edge Alfven resonance and high harmonic cyclotron resonance is investigated and regimes of minimization of edge heating identified.

  16. Applications of fast wave in spherical tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, S.C.; Chan, V.S.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Miller, R.L.; Prater, R.; Politzer, P.

    1997-04-01

    In spherical tokamaks (ST), the magnetic field strength varies over a wide range across the plasma, and at high betas it deviates significantly from the 1/R dependence of conventional tokamaks. This, together with the high density expected in ST, poses challenging problems for RF heating and current drive. In this paper, we investigate the various possible applications of fast waves (FW) in ST. The adjoint technique of calculating current drive is implemented in the raytracing code CURRAY. The applicability of high harmonic and subharmonic FW to steady state ST is considered. We find that high harmonic FW tends to be totally absorbed before reaching the core and may be considered a candidate for off axis current drive while the subharmonic FW tends to be absorbed mainly in the core region and may be considered for central current drive. A difficult problem is the maintenance of current at the startup stage. In the bootstrap ramp-up scenario, the current ramp-up is mainly provided by the bootstrap current. Under this condition, the role of rf becomes mainly the sustainment of plasma through electron heating. Using a slab full-wave code SEMAL, we find that the ion-ion-hybrid mode conversion scheme is a promising candidate. The effect of possible existence of edge Alfv{acute e}n resonance and high harmonic cyclotron resonance is investigated and regimes of minimization of edge heating identified. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. High-harmonic gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, D. B.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.

    1984-08-01

    There is currently much interest in the development of moderate to high power (1 kW - 1 MW) millimeter wave sources. Considered applications are mainly related to radar and communication systems. There are, however, also applications in plasma diagnostics, heating, and the nondestructive testing of dielectrics. The dominant source of high-power, high-frequency radiation has become the gyrotron. Jory et al. (1983) have reported operation of a 60 GHz, CW gyrotron, producing output powers in excess of 200 kW. High power, compact submillimeter-wave sources have become possible by making use of the concept of a high-harmonic gyrotron, in which the magnetic field can be reduced by an order of magnitude. Attention is given to synchronism, negative-mass instability, energy requirements, oscillators, efficiency, high power, dielectric loading, the peniotron, and amplifiers.

  18. Spectral Effects on Fast Wave Core Heating and Current Drive

    SciTech Connect

    C.K. Phillips, R.E. Bell, L.A. Berry, P.T. Bonoli, R.W. Harvey, J.C. Hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, P.M. Ryan, G. Taylor, E.J. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, J.C. Wright, H. Yuh, and the NSTX Team

    2009-05-11

    Recent results obtained with high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) on NSTX strongly support the hypothesis that the onset of perpendicular fast wave propagation right at or very near the launcher is a primary cause for a reduction in core heating efficiency at long wavelengths that is also observed in ICRF heating experiments in numerous tokamaks. A dramatic increase in core heating efficiency was first achieved in NSTX L-mode helium majority plasmas when the onset for perpendicular wave propagation was moved away from the antenna and nearby vessel structures. Efficient core heating in deuterium majority L mode and H mode discharges, in which the edge density is typically higher than in comparable helium majority plasmas, was then accomplished by reducing the edge density in front of the launcher with lithium conditioning and avoiding operational points prone to instabilities. These results indicate that careful tailoring of the edge density profiles in ITER should be considered to limit rf power losses to the antenna and plasma facing materials. Finally, in plasmas with reduced rf power losses in the edge regions, the first direct measurements of high harmonic fast wave current drive were obtained with the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic. The location and radial dependence of HHFW CD measured by MSE are in reasonable agreement with predictions from both full wave and ray tracing simulations.

  19. Apparatus and fast method for cancer cell classification based on high harmonic coherent diffraction imaging in reflection geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zürch, Michael; Foertsch, Stefan; Matzas, Mark; Pachmann, Katharina; Kuth, Rainer; Spielmann, Christian

    2014-03-01

    In cancer treatment it is highly desirable to identify and /or classify individual cancer cells in real time. Nowadays, the standard method is PCR which is costly and time-consuming. Here we present a different approach to rapidly classify cell types: we measure the pattern of coherently diffracted extreme ultraviolet radiation (XUV radiation at 38nm wavelength), allowing to distinguish different single breast cancer cell types. The output of our laser driven XUV light source is focused onto a single unstained and unlabeled cancer cell, and the resulting diffraction pattern is measured in reflection geometry. As we will further show, the outer shape of the object can be retrieved from the diffraction pattern with sub-micron resolution. For classification it is often not necessary to retrieve the image, it is only necessary to compare the diffraction patterns which can be regarded as a spatial fingerprint of the specimen. For a proof-of-principle experiment MCF7 and SKBR3 breast cancer cells were pipetted on gold-coated silica slides. From illuminating each single cell and measuring a diffraction pattern we could distinguish between them. Owing to the short bursts of coherent soft x-ray light, one could also image temporal changes of the specimen, i.e. studying changes upon drug application once the desired specimen is found by the classification method. Using a more powerful laser, even classifying circulating tumor cells (CTC) at a high throughput seems possible. This lab-sized equipment will allow fast classification of any kind of cells, bacteria or even viruses in the near future.

  20. A DEMO relevant fast wave current drive high harmonic antenna exploiting the high impedance technique

    SciTech Connect

    Milanesio, D. Maggiora, R.

    2015-12-10

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) antennas are routinely adopted in most of the existing nuclear fusion experiments, even though their main goal, i.e. to couple high power to the plasma (MW), is often limited by rather severe drawbacks due to high fields on the antenna itself and on the unmatched part of the feeding lines. In addition to the well exploited auxiliary ion heating during the start-up phase, some non-ohmic current drive (CD) at the IC range of frequencies may be explored in view of the DEMO reactor. In this work, we suggest and describe a compact high frequency DEMO relevant antenna, based on the high impedance surfaces concept. High-impedance surfaces are periodic metallic structures (patches) usually displaced on top of a dielectric substrate and grounded by means of vertical posts embedded inside the dielectric, in a mushroom-like shape. These structures present a high impedance, within a given frequency band, such that the image currents are in-phase with the currents of the antenna itself, thus determining a significant efficiency increase. After a general introduction on the properties of high impedance surfaces, we analyze, by means of numerical codes, a dielectric based and a full metal solution optimized to be tested and benchmarked on the FTU experiment fed with generators at 433MHz.

  1. A DEMO relevant fast wave current drive high harmonic antenna exploiting the high impedance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.

    2015-12-01

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) antennas are routinely adopted in most of the existing nuclear fusion experiments, even though their main goal, i.e. to couple high power to the plasma (MW), is often limited by rather severe drawbacks due to high fields on the antenna itself and on the unmatched part of the feeding lines. In addition to the well exploited auxiliary ion heating during the start-up phase, some non-ohmic current drive (CD) at the IC range of frequencies may be explored in view of the DEMO reactor. In this work, we suggest and describe a compact high frequency DEMO relevant antenna, based on the high impedance surfaces concept. High-impedance surfaces are periodic metallic structures (patches) usually displaced on top of a dielectric substrate and grounded by means of vertical posts embedded inside the dielectric, in a mushroom-like shape. These structures present a high impedance, within a given frequency band, such that the image currents are in-phase with the currents of the antenna itself, thus determining a significant efficiency increase. After a general introduction on the properties of high impedance surfaces, we analyze, by means of numerical codes, a dielectric based and a full metal solution optimized to be tested and benchmarked on the FTU experiment fed with generators at 433MHz.

  2. Spectral effects on fast wave core heating and current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. K.; Bell, R. E.; Berry, L. A.; Bonoli, P. T.; Harvey, R. W.; Hosea, J. C.; Jaeger, E. F.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Ryan, P. M.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilgen, J. B.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J. C.; Yuh, H.; NSTX Team

    2009-07-01

    Recent results obtained with high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) on NSTX strongly support the hypothesis that the onset of perpendicular fast wave propagation right at or very near the launcher is a primary cause for a reduction in core heating efficiency at long wavelengths that is also observed in ICRF heating experiments in numerous tokamaks. A dramatic increase in core heating efficiency was first achieved in NSTX L-mode helium majority plasmas when the onset for perpendicular wave propagation was moved away from the antenna and nearby vessel structures. Efficient core heating in deuterium majority L-mode and H-mode discharges, in which the edge density is typically higher than in comparable helium majority plasmas, was then accomplished by reducing the edge density in front of the launcher with lithium conditioning and avoiding operational points prone to instabilities. These results indicate that careful tailoring of the edge density profiles in ITER should be considered to limit radio frequency (rf) power losses to the antenna and plasma facing materials. Finally, in plasmas with reduced rf power losses in the edge regions, the first direct measurements of HHFW CD were obtained with the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic. The location and radial dependence of HHFW CD measured by MSE are in reasonable agreement with predictions from both full wave and ray tracing simulations.

  3. Fast wave heating in the NSTX-Upgrade device

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, Nicola; Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, Lee Alan; Bonoli, P.; Budny, R. V.; Fu, GuoYong; Gerhardt, S.; Green, David L; Harvey, R. W.; Hosea, J.; Kramer, G.; LeBlanc, B; Perkins, R. J.; Phillips, C. K.; Ryan, Philip Michael; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J.

    2013-01-01

    NSTX-Upgrade will operate with toroidal magnetic fields (B T) up to 1 T, nearly twice the value used in the experiments on NSTX, and the available NBI power will be doubled. The doubling of B T while retaining the 30 MHz RF source frequency has moved the heating regime from the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) regime used in NSTX to the mid harmonic fast wave (MHFW) regime. By making use of the full wave code AORSA, this work shows that direct ion damping (mainly by thermal ions localized at the 5th harmonic resonance) might be significant in NSTX-Upgrade under TRANSP predicted full performance conditions and the electron and ion absorption is sensitive to the ratio of electron and ion temperature. Launching at high toroidal wave number appears to be one way to significantly reduce the ion damping. By using the extended AORSA code, which includes a detailed description of the scrape-off layer in the field solutions, we found a large electric field amplitude outside of the last closed flux surface as previously seen in NSTX from AORSA simulations (D. L. Green, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 145001 (2011)). Preliminary results by introducing a collision damping in the scrape-off layer in the AORSA code to represent a damping process are presented, showing for the first time absorbed power in the scrape-off layer.

  4. Fast wave heating in the NSTX-Upgrade device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertelli, N.; Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L.; Bonoli, P. T.; Budny, R.; Fu, G.-Y.; Gerhardt, S.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.; Hosea, J. C.; Kramer, G. J.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Phillips, C. K.; Ryan, P.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J. C.

    2014-02-01

    NSTX-Upgrade will operate with toroidal magnetic fields (BT) up to 1 T, nearly twice the value used in the experiments on NSTX, and the available NBI power will be doubled. The doubling of BT while retaining the 30 MHz RF source frequency has moved the heating regime from the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) regime used in NSTX to the mid harmonic fast wave (MHFW) regime. By making use of the full wave code AORSA, this work shows that direct ion damping (mainly by thermal ions localized at the 5th harmonic resonance) might be significant in NSTX-Upgrade under TRANSP predicted full performance conditions and the electron and ion absorption is sensitive to the ratio of electron and ion temperature. Launching at high toroidal wave number appears to be one way to significantly reduce the ion damping. By using the extended AORSA code, which includes a detailed description of the scrape-off layer in the field solutions, we found a large electric field amplitude outside of the last closed flux surface as previously seen in NSTX from AORSA simulations (D. L. Green, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 145001 (2011)). Preliminary results by introducing a collision damping in the scrape-off layer in the AORSA code to represent a damping process are presented, showing for the first time absorbed power in the scrape-off layer.

  5. Fast wave heating in the NSTX-Upgrade device

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, N.; Budny, R.; Fu, G.-Y.; Gerhardt, S.; Hosea, J. C.; Kramer, G. J.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Phillips, C. K.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L.; Green, D. L.; Ryan, P.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Harvey, R. W.

    2014-02-12

    NSTX-Upgrade will operate with toroidal magnetic fields (B{sub T}) up to 1 T, nearly twice the value used in the experiments on NSTX, and the available NBI power will be doubled. The doubling of B{sub T} while retaining the 30 MHz RF source frequency has moved the heating regime from the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) regime used in NSTX to the mid harmonic fast wave (MHFW) regime. By making use of the full wave code AORSA, this work shows that direct ion damping (mainly by thermal ions localized at the 5th harmonic resonance) might be significant in NSTX-Upgrade under TRANSP predicted full performance conditions and the electron and ion absorption is sensitive to the ratio of electron and ion temperature. Launching at high toroidal wave number appears to be one way to significantly reduce the ion damping. By using the extended AORSA code, which includes a detailed description of the scrape-off layer in the field solutions, we found a large electric field amplitude outside of the last closed flux surface as previously seen in NSTX from AORSA simulations (D. L. Green, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 145001 (2011)). Preliminary results by introducing a collision damping in the scrape-off layer in the AORSA code to represent a damping process are presented, showing for the first time absorbed power in the scrape-off layer.

  6. Fast magnetoacoustic wave trains in coronal holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoe, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Kupriyanova, E. G.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Rapidly propagating coronal EUV disturbances recently discovered in the solar corona are interpreted in terms of guided fast magnetoacoustic waves. Fast magnetoacoustic waves experience geometric dispersion in waveguides, which causes localised, impulsive perturbations to develop into quasi-periodic wave trains. Aims: We consider the formation of fast wave trains in a super-radially expanding coronal hole modelled by a magnetic funnel with a field-aligned density profile that is rarefied in comparison to the surrounding plasma. This kind of structure is typical of coronal holes, and it forms a fast magnetoacoustic anti-waveguide as a local maximum in the Alfvén speed. Methods: We performed 2D MHD numerical simulations for impulsively generated perturbations to the system. Both sausage and kink perturbations are considered and the role of the density contrast ratio investigated. Results: The anti-waveguide funnel geometry refracts wave energy away from the structure. However, in this geometry the quasi-periodic fast wave trains are found to appear, too, and so can be associated with the observed rapidly propagating coronal EUV disturbances. The wave trains propagate along the external edge of the coronal hole. The fast wave trains generated in coronal holes exhibit less dispersive evolution than in the case of a dense waveguide. Conclusions: We conclude that an impulsive energy release localised in a coronal plasma inhomogeneity develops into a fast wave train for both kink and sausage disturbances and for both waveguide and anti-waveguide transverse plasma profiles.

  7. Observation of Electronic Structure Minima in High-Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Woerner, Hans Jakob; Villeneuve, D. M.; Niikura, Hiromichi; Bertrand, Julien B.; Corkum, P. B.

    2009-03-13

    We report detailed measurements of the high-harmonic spectra generated from argon atoms. The spectra exhibit a deep minimum that is shown to be independent of the laser intensity, and is thus a clear measure of the electronic structure of the atom. We show that exact field-free continuum wave functions reproduce the minimum, but plane wave and Coulomb wave functions do not. This remarkable observation suggests that electronic structure can be accurately determined in high-harmonic experiments despite the presence of the strong laser field. Our results clarify the relation between high-harmonic generation and photoelectron spectroscopy. The use of exact continuum functions also resolves the ambiguity associated with the choice of the dispersion relation.

  8. High-harmonic ion cyclotron heating and current drive in ultra-small aspect ratio tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, D.B.; Jaeger, E.F.; Carter, M.D.; Berry, L.A.

    1996-11-01

    Ultra-small aspect ratio tokamaks present a totally new plasma environment for heating and current drive experiments and involve a number of physics issues that have not previously been explored. These devices operate at low magnetic field and relatively high density so that the effective dielectric constant of the plasma to high harmonic fast waves (HHFW), is quite high, and perpendicular wavelength of fast waves is very short. {lambda} {approximately} 2.0 cm compared with {lambda} - 10-20 cm. This makes possible strong electron absorption at high harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency, {Omega}{sub i}, and at fairly high phase velocity in relation to electron thermal velocity. If the antenna system can control the parallel wave spectrum, this offers the promise of high efficiency off-axis current drive and the possibility for current drive radial profile control. Antenna phasing is ineffective for profile control in conventional tokamaks because of central absorption. There are also challenges for antenna design in this regime because of the high dielectric constant and the large angle of the magnetic field with respect to the equatorial plane ({approximately}45{degrees}), which varies greatly during current ramp. Preliminary experiments in this HHFW regime are being carried out in CDX-U.

  9. Fast Waves in Smooth Coronal Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopin, I.; Nagorny, I.

    2015-03-01

    This work investigates the effect of transverse density structuring in coronal slab-like waveguides on the properties of fast waves. We generalized previous results obtained for the exponential and Epstein profiles to the case of an arbitrary transverse density distribution. The criteria are given to determine the possible (trapped or leaky) wave regime, depending on the type of density profile function. In particular, there are plasma slabs with transverse density structuring that support pure trapped fast waves for all wavelengths. Their phase speed is nearly equal to the external Alfvén speed for the typical parameters of coronal loops. Our findings are obtained on the basis of Kneser’s oscillation theorem. To confirm the results, we analytically solved the wave equation evaluated at the cutoff point and the original wave equation for particular cases of transverse density distribution. We also used the WKB method and obtained approximate solutions of the wave equation at the cutoff point for an arbitrary transverse density profile. The analytic results were supplemented by numerical solutions of the obtained dispersion relations. The observed high-quality quasi-periodic pulsations of flaring loops are interpreted in terms of the trapped fundamental fast-sausage mode in a slab-like coronal waveguide.

  10. Efficiency of current drive by fast waves

    SciTech Connect

    Karney, C.F.F.; Fisch, N.J.

    1984-08-01

    The Rosenbluth form for the collision operator for a weakly relativistic plasma is derived. The formalism adopted by Antonsen and Chu can then be used to calculate the efficiency of current drive by fast waves in a relativistic plasma. Accurate numerical results and analytic asymptotic limits for the efficiencies are given.

  11. Absorption of Fast Waves at Moderate to High Ion Cyclotron Harmonics: Experimental Results and Theoretical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsker, R. I.; Choi, M.; Prater, R.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Luo, Y.; Baity, F. W.; Murakami, M.; Porkolab, M.

    2006-10-01

    Strong absorption of fast Alfvén waves (FW) by ion cyclotron damping has been observed in DIII-D at the 4th and 5th harmonic of an injected beam while only weak absorption is observed at the 8th harmonic. The experimental results are compared with three different theoretical models; differences between the predictions of the models suggest the possible importance of finite-width orbit effects at high harmonics. In a linear model, it is found that damping on fast ions from neutral beam injection can be significant even at the 8th harmonic under experimentally relevant conditions. This is tested in experiments in DIII-D with FW power at 60 MHz and at 116 MHz. A novel Dα charge exchange recombination diagnostic is used to observe interaction of the FW power with beam ions. The results are compared with modeling with quasilinear and with orbit-following codes.

  12. High-harmonic generation in aligned water molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Song; Devin, Julien; Hoffmann, Matthias; Cryan, James; Kaldun, Andreas; Bucksbaum, Philip

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the use of high harmonic generation (HHG) in aligned molecular vapors has become a powerful tool to study ultrafast dynamics of electronic and nuclear wave packets. In our new experimental setup, we are able to orient H2 O and D2 O molecules using a single cycle terahertz (THz) pulse. Aligning water is especially interesting as the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of water contains a node in the xz plane of the molecular frame, allowing us to perform HHG from second highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO-1) only, by setting the polarization of the fundamental laser along the z-axis of the aligned water molecules. We are particularly interested in the HOMO-1 state, as there is fast motion of the H-O-H angle leading to sub-wavelength dynamics. On this poster we present our all-optical alignment setup where HHG and single-cycle THz generation take place in high-vacuum, where measurements with arbitrary polarization angles between the two are possible. In addition, we discuss the effects of the molecular orientation on HHG, including symmetry breaking that could produce even harmonics and isotope effects between H2 O and D2 O due to different vibrational energies. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division.

  13. Fast wave evanescence in filamentary boundary plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J. R.

    2014-02-15

    Radio frequency waves for heating and current drive of plasmas in tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices must first traverse the scrape-off-layer (SOL) before they can be put to their intended use. The SOL plasma is strongly turbulent and intermittent in space and time. These turbulent properties of the SOL, which are not routinely taken into account in wave propagation codes, can have an important effect on the coupling of waves through an evanescent SOL or edge plasma region. The effective scale length for fast wave (FW) evanescence in the presence of short-scale field-aligned filamentary plasma turbulence is addressed in this paper. It is shown that although the FW wavelength or evanescent scale length is long compared with the dimensions of the turbulence, the FW does not simply average over the turbulent density; rather, the average is over the exponentiation rate. Implications for practical situations are discussed.

  14. Investigations of Low and Moderate Harmonic Fast Wave Physics on CDX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaleta, J.; Majeski, R.; Phillips, C. K.; Kaita, R.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Zakharov, L.; Rodgers, D.

    2002-11-01

    The physics of the low harmonic fast wave regime has been studied extensively in tokamak environments, but is largely unexplored for ST's which typically have high dielectric constant and higher ion beta than tokamaks. In this regime mode conversion to the IBW becomes significant(M. Ono. High Harmonic Fast Waves in High Beta Plasmas. Phys. Plasmas),2:4075, November 1995. Low harmonic fast wave heating studies are currently underway in CDX-U to investigate the potential for bulk ion heating. In preparation for these studies, the available RF power in CDX-U has been increased to ( ˜1/2 MW) and the operating frequency of the CDX RF transmitter was lowered to operate in the range of 8-10 MHz, providing access to the harmonics range 2Ω_i ˜4Ωi in hydrogen. A similar regime is accessible for the 30 MHz RF system on NSTX, at 0.6 Tesla in hydrogen. An analysis of preliminary experimental results on CDX-U together with with a summary of numerical and theoretical studies over the regimes of interest for NSTX and CDX-U will be presented.

  15. Investigations of Low and Moderate Harmonic Fast Wave Physics on CDX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaleta, J.; Majeski, R.; Phillips, C. K.

    2001-10-01

    The physics of low harmonic fast wave regime has been studied extensively in tokamak environments, but is largely unexplored for ST's which typically have high dielectric constant and higher ion beta than tokamaks. In this regime mode conversion to the IBW becomes significant(M. Ono. High Harmonic Fast Waves in High Beta Plasmas. Phys. Plasmas), 2:4075, November 1995. Preparations are underway to conduct low harmonic fast wave heating experiments to investigate the potential for bulk ion heating and shear flow drive. The available RF power in CDX-U has been increased to ( ~1/2 MW) and the operating frequency of the CDX RF transmitter will be lowered to operate in the range of 8-10 MHz. This provides access to the harmonics range 2Ω_i ~4Ωi in hydrogen. A similar regime is accessible for the 30 MHz RF system on NSTX, at 0.6 Tesla in hydrogen. An overview of the CDX-U RF system modifications will be presented, as well as preliminary numerical studies of damping and mode conversion from METS and several hot plasma dispersion relation codes.

  16. Vacuum high-harmonic generation in the shock regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhl, P.; King, B.; Ruhl, H.

    2015-09-01

    Electrodynamics becomes nonlinear and permits the self-interaction of fields when the quantized nature of vacuum states is taken into account. The effect on a plane probe pulse propagating through a stronger constant crossed background is calculated using numerical simulation and by analytically solving the corresponding wave equation. The electromagnetic shock resulting from vacuum high-harmonic generation is investigated and a nonlinear shock parameter identified.

  17. Understanding ion cyclotron harmonic fast wave heating losses in the scrape off layer of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, N; Jaeger, E F; Hosea, J C; Phillips, C K; Berry, L; Bonoli, P T; Gerhardt, S P; Green, D; LeBlanc, B; Perkins, R J; Ryan, P M; Taylor, G; Valeo, E J; Wilso, J R; Wright, J C

    2014-07-01

    Fast waves at harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency, which have been used successfully on National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), will also play an important role in ITER and are a promising candidate for the Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) designs based on spherical torus (ST). Experimental studies of high harmonic fast waves (HHFW) heating on the NSTX have demonstrated that substantial HHFW power loss occurs along the open field lines in the scrape-off layer (SOL), but the mechanism behind the loss is not yet understood. The full wave RF code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain, is applied to specific NSTX discharges in order to predict the effects and possible causes of this power loss. In the studies discussed here, a collisional damping parameter has been implemented in AORSA as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. A prediction for the NSTX Upgrade (NSTX-U) experiment, that will begin operation next year, is also presented, indicating a favorable condition for the experiment due to a wider evanescent region in edge density.*Research supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 with Princeton University.

  18. The Effects of Wave Escape on Fast Magnetosonic Wave Turbulence in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2012-01-01

    One of the leading models for electron acceleration in solar flares is stochastic acceleration by weakly turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ("fast waves"). In this model, large-scale flows triggered by magnetic reconnection excite large-wavelength fast waves, and fast-wave energy then cascades from large wavelengths to small wavelengths. Electron acceleration by large-wavelength fast-waves is weak, and so the model relies on the small-wavelength waves produced by the turbulent cascade. In order for the model to work, the energy cascade time for large-wavelength fast waves must be shorter than the time required for the waves to propagate out of the solar-flare acceleration region. To investigate the effects of wave escape, we solve the wave kinetic equation for fast waves in weak turbulence theory, supplemented with a homogeneous wave-loss term.We find that the amplitude of large-wavelength fast waves must exceed a minimum threshold in order for a significant fraction of the wave energy to cascade to small wavelengths before the waves leave the acceleration region.We evaluate this threshold as a function of the dominant wavelength of the fast waves that are initially excited by reconnection outflows.

  19. High harmonic generation from impulsively aligned SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devin, Julien; Wang, Song; Kaldun, Andreas; Bucksbaum, Phil

    2016-05-01

    Previous work in high harmonics generation (HHG) in aligned molecular gases has mainly focused on rotational dynamics in order to determine the contributions of different orbitals to the ionization step. In our experiment, we focus on the shorter timescale of vibrational dynamics. We generate high harmonics from impulsively aligned SO2 molecules in a gas jet and record the emitted attosecond pulse trains in a home-built high resolution vacuum ultra violet (VUV) spectrometer. Using the high temporal resolution of our setup, we are able to map out the effects of vibrational wavepackets with a sub-femtosecond resolution. The target molecule, SO2 gas, is impulsively aligned by a near-infrared laser pulse and has accessible vibrations on the timescale of the short laser pulse used. We present first experimental results for the response to this excitation in high-harmonics. We observe both fast oscillations in the time domain as well as shifts of the VUV photon energy outside of the pulse overlaps. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division and by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.

  20. High-harmonic generation in cavitated plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Comier-Michel, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2008-05-15

    A method is proposed for producing coherent x-rays via high-harmonic generation using ultraintense lasers interacting with highly stripped ions in cavitated plasmas. This method relies on plasma cavitation by the wake of an intense drive beam (laser or electron beam) to produce an ion cavity. An ultrashort pulse laser propagating in the plasma-electron-free ion cavity generates laser harmonics. The longitudinal electron motion, which inhibits high-harmonic generation at high laser intensities, can be suppressed by the space-charge field in the ion cavity or by using a counterpropagating laser pulse. Periodic suppression of the longitudinal electron motion may also be used to quasi-phase-match. This method enables harmonic generation to be extended to the sub-A regime.

  1. High harmonic phase in molecular nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, Brian K.

    2009-10-17

    Electronic structure in atoms and molecules modulates the amplitude and phase of high harmonic generation (HHG). We report measurements of the high harmonic spectral amplitude and phase in N{sub 2}. The phase is measured interferometrically by beating the N{sub 2} harmonics with those of an Ar reference oscillator in a gas mixture. A rapid phase shift of 0.2{pi} is observed in the vicinity of the HHG spectral minimum, where a shift of {pi} had been presumed [J. Itatani et al., Nature 432, 867 (2004)]. We compare the phase measurements to a simulation of the HHG recombination step in N{sub 2} that is based on a simple interference model. The results of the simulation suggest that modifications beyond the simple interference model are needed to explain HHG spectra in molecules.

  2. Fast wave current drive: Experimental status and reactor prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.

    1988-03-01

    The fast wave is one of the two possible wave polarizations which propagate according to the basic theory of cold plasmas. It is distinguished from the other (slow wave) branch by having an electric field vector which is mainly orthogonal to the confining magnetic field of the plasma. The plasma and fast wave qualitatively assume different behavior depending on the frequency range of the launched wave. The high frequency fast wave (HFFW), with a frequency (..omega..2..pi.. )approximately) GHz) much higher than the ion cyclotron frequency (..cap omega../sub i/), suffers electron Landau damping and drives current by supplying parallel momentum to superthermal electrons in a fashion similar to lower hybrid (slow wave) current drive. In the simple theory the HFFW should be superior to the slow wave and can propagate to very high density and temperature without impediment. Experiments, however, have not conclusively shown that HFFW current drive can be achieved at densities above the slow wave current drive limit, possibly due to conversion of the launched fast waves into slow waves by density fluctuations. Alternatively, the low frequency fast wave (LFFW), with frequencies ()approxreverse arrowlt) 100 MHz) only a few times the ion cyclotron frequency, is damped by electron Landau damping and, in a hot plasma ()approxreverse arrowgt) 10 keV), by electron transit time magnetic pumping; current drive is achieved by pushing superthermal electrons, and efficiency is prediocted to be slightly better than for lower hybrid current drive. Most significantly, the slow wave does not propagate in high density plasma when ..omega.. )approximately) ..cap omega../sub i/, so parasitic coupling to the slow wave can be avoided, and no density and temperture limitations are foreseen. Experiments with fast wve current drive invariably find current drive efficiency as good as obtained in lower hybrid experiments at comparable, low temperatures. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  3. Benchmark of ICRF codes in mid and high harmonic regimes in view of NSTX-U operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertelli, Nicola; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Bilato, R.; Brambilla, M.; Jaeger, E. F.; Bonoli, P. T.

    2014-10-01

    NSTX-Upgrade (NSTX-U) is presently scheduled to operate at the beginning of 2015 with toroidal magnetic fields (BT) up to 1 T, nearly twice the value used in the experiments on NSTX, and with NBI power up to 10 MW. The doubling of BT while retaining the 30 MHz rf source frequency moves the heating regime from the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) regime (up to 10th harmonic) used in NSTX to the mid harmonic fast wave (MHFW) regime (up to 5th harmonic). Both the MHFW regime and the doubling of the NBI power can strongly affect the power absorption partitioning. In fact, the thermal and fast ions absorption can significantly increase. Thus, it is crucial to have an accurate evaluation of the power absorbed by fast and thermal ions for experimental analysis. Detailed benchmarking comparisons between the full wave codes TORIC v.5, TORIC v.6, AORSA, and the ray tracing code GENRAY have been performed. Finally, numerical predictions on NSTX-U are discussed for different scenarios. Work supported by U.S. DOE Contract # DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  4. Recent Fast Wave Coupling and Heating Studies on NSTX, with Possible Implications for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    J.C. Hosea, R.E. Bell, E. Feibush, R.W. Harvey, E.F. Jaeger, B.P LeBlanc, R. Maingi, C.K. Phillips, L. Roquemore, P.M. Ryan, G. Taylor, K. Tritz, E.J. Valeo, J. Wilgen, J.R. Wilson, and the NSTX Team

    2009-07-21

    The goal of the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) research on NSTX is to maximize the coupling of RF power to the core of the plasma by minimizing the coupling of RF power to edge loss processes. HHFW core plasma heating efficiency in helium and deuterium L-mode discharges is found to improve markedly on NSTX when the density 2 cm in front of the antenna is reduced below that for the onset of perpendicular wave propagation (nonset ∝ B*k|| 2/ω). In NSTX, the observed RF power losses in the plasma edge are driven in the vicinity of the antenna as opposed to resulting from multi-pass edge damping. PDI surface losses through ion-electron collisions are estimated to be significant. Recent spectroscopic measurements suggest that additional PDI losses could be caused by the loss of energetic edge ions on direct loss orbits and perhaps result in the observed clamping of the edge rotation. Initial deuterium H-mode heating studies reveal that core heating is degraded at lower kφ (- 8 m-1 relative to 13 m-1) as for the Lmode case at elevated edge density. Fast visible camera images clearly indicate that a major edge loss process is occurring from the plasma scrape off layer (SOL) in the vicinity of the antenna and along the magnetic field lines to the lower outer divertor plate. Large type I ELMs, which are observed at both kφ values, appear after antenna arcs caused by precursor blobs, low level ELMs, or dust. For large ELMs without arcs, the source reflection coefficients rise on a 0.1 ms time scale, which indicates that the time derivative of the reflection coefficient can be used to discriminate between arcs and ELMs.

  5. Experimental studies of fast wave propagation in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Ikezi, H.; Pinsker, R.I.; Chiu, S.C.; deGrassie, J.S.

    1995-06-01

    Fast Alfven waves radiated from the phased array antenna in the DIII-D tokamak and used for heating and current drive are studied by employing a B-loop array mounted on the vacuum vessel wall. The wave propagation direction controlled by the antenna phasing is clearly observed. A small divergence of the rays arising from the anisotropic nature of the fast wave is found. Comparison with a ray tracing code confirms that the ray position calculated by the code is accurate up to at least one toroidal turn of the rays. Conservation of Rk{sub t} which is a basic assumption in computer codes is tested. Although the upshift of toroidal wavenumber k{sub t} at small major radius R is confirmed, Rk{sub t} is not well conserved. A mass density interferometer is demonstrated by employing the extraordinary fast wave.

  6. Correlated Terahertz and High Harmonic Generation from Aligned Nitrogen Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yindong; Meng, Chao; Wang, Xiaowei; Lv, Zhihui; Zhang, Dongwen; Chen, Wenbo; Zhao, Jing; Yuan, Jianmin; Zhao, Zengxiu

    2016-05-01

    When laser beams are focused on atoms and molecules, wide spectral range of photons can be radiated from the source. In the region of high energy, high harmonic generation (HHG), covering tens to hundreds electron volts, emit within the attosecond timescale. In the low energy region, terahertz wave generation (TWG) can also be generated. Synchronizing TWG with HHG is to take snapshot of the electronic dynamics with time-scale spanning over 6 orders of magnitudes. In this abstract, we report the joint measurements on TWG and HHG from pre-aligned molecules. By calibrating the angular ionization rates with the alignment dependent TWG, we reconstruct the photoionization cross section (PICS) of nitrogen in one run of experiment. The measured PICS is found to be consistent with theoretical predications, although some discrepancies exist. This all-optical method provides a new alternative for investigating molecular structures (Yindong Huang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 123002, 2015).

  7. Fast-wave Power Flow Along SOL Field Lines In NSTX nd The Associated Power Deposition Profile Across The SOL In Front Of The Antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Roy

    2013-06-21

    Fast-wave heating and current drive efficiencies can be reduced by a number of processes in the vicinity of the antenna and in the scrape off layer (SOL). On NSTX from around 25% to more than 60% of the high-harmonic fast-wave power can be lost to the SOL regions, and a large part of this lost power flows along SOL magnetic field lines and is deposited in bright spirals on the divertor floor and ceiling. We show that field-line mapping matches the location of heat deposition on the lower divertor, albeit with a portion of the heat outside of the predictions. The field-line mapping can then be used to partially reconstruct the profile of lost fast-wave power at the midplane in front of the antenna, and the losses peak close to the last closed flux surface (LCFS) as well as the antenna. This profile suggests a radial standing-wave pattern formed by fast-wave propagation in the SOL, and this hypothesis will be tested on NSTX-U. Advanced RF codes must reproduce these results so that such codes can be used to understand this edge loss and to minimize RF heat deposition and erosion in the divertor region on ITER.

  8. Fast wave current drive system design for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    deGrassie, J.S.; Callis, R.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Moeller, C..; Petty, C.C.; Phelps, D.R.; Pinsker, R.I.; Remsen, D.; Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.; Taylor, D.J.; Arnold, W.; Martin, S.

    1992-09-01

    DIII-D has a major effort underway to develop the physics and technology of fast wave electron heating and current drive in conjunction with electron cyclotron heating. The present system consists of a four strap antenna driven by one 2 MW transmitter in the 32--60 MHz band. Experiments have been successful in demonstrating the physics of heating and current drive. In order to validate fast wave current drive for future machines a greater power capability is necessary to drive all of the plasma current. Advanced tokamak modeling for DIII-D has indicated that this goal can be met for plasma configurations of interest (i.e. high {beta} VH-mode discharges) with 8 MW of transmitter fast wave capability. It is proposed that four transmitters drive fast wave antennas at three locations in DIII-D to provide the power for current drive and current profile modification. As the next step in acquiring this capability, two modular four strap antennas are in design and the procurement of a high power transmitter in the 30--120 MHz range is in progress. Additionally, innovations in the technology are being investigated, such as the use of a coupled combine antenna to reduce the number of required feedthroughs and to provide for parallel phase velocity variation with a relatively small change in frequency, and the use of fast ferrite tuners to provide millisecond timescale impedance matching. A successful test of a low power fast ferrite prototype was conducted on DIII-D.

  9. Fast wave current drive system design for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    deGrassie, J.S.; Callis, R.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Moeller, C..; Petty, C.C.; Phelps, D.R.; Pinsker, R.I.; Remsen, D. ); Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.; Taylor, D.J. ); Arnold, W.; Martin, S. )

    1992-09-01

    DIII-D has a major effort underway to develop the physics and technology of fast wave electron heating and current drive in conjunction with electron cyclotron heating. The present system consists of a four strap antenna driven by one 2 MW transmitter in the 32--60 MHz band. Experiments have been successful in demonstrating the physics of heating and current drive. In order to validate fast wave current drive for future machines a greater power capability is necessary to drive all of the plasma current. Advanced tokamak modeling for DIII-D has indicated that this goal can be met for plasma configurations of interest (i.e. high [beta] VH-mode discharges) with 8 MW of transmitter fast wave capability. It is proposed that four transmitters drive fast wave antennas at three locations in DIII-D to provide the power for current drive and current profile modification. As the next step in acquiring this capability, two modular four strap antennas are in design and the procurement of a high power transmitter in the 30--120 MHz range is in progress. Additionally, innovations in the technology are being investigated, such as the use of a coupled combine antenna to reduce the number of required feedthroughs and to provide for parallel phase velocity variation with a relatively small change in frequency, and the use of fast ferrite tuners to provide millisecond timescale impedance matching. A successful test of a low power fast ferrite prototype was conducted on DIII-D.

  10. Fast wave current drive on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    deGrassie, J.S.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.

    1995-07-01

    The physics of electron heating and current drive with the fast magnetosonic wave has been demonstrated on DIII-D, in reasonable agreement with theoretical modeling. A recently completed upgrade to the fast wave capability should allow full noninductive current drive in steady state advanced confinement discharges and provide some current density profile control for the Advanced Tokamak Program. DIII-D now has three four-strap fast wave antennas and three transmitters, each with nominally 2 MW of generator power. Extensive experiments have been conducted with the first system, at 60 MHz, while the two newer systems have come into operation within the past year. The newer systems are configured for 60 to 120 MHz. The measured FWCD efficiency is found to increase linearly with electron temperature as {gamma} = 0.4 {times} 10{sup 18} T{sub eo} (keV) [A/m{sup 2}W], measured up to central electron temperature over 5 keV. A newly developed technique for determining the internal noninductive current density profile gives efficiencies in agreement with this scaling and profiles consistent with theoretical predictions. Full noninductive current drive at 170 kA was achieved in a discharge prepared by rampdown of the Ohmic current. Modulation of microwave reflectometry signals at the fast wave frequency is being used to investigate fast wave propagation and damping. Additionally, rf pick-up probes on the internal boundary of the vessel provide a comparison with ray tracing codes, with dear evidence for a toroidally directed wave with antenna phasing set for current drive. There is some experimental evidence for fast wave absorption by energetic beam ions at high cyclotron harmonic resonances.

  11. Research of fast Magnetoacoustic Wave in Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N.

    2015-12-01

    The characteristics of magnetohydrodynamic fast wave propagation in the solar stratified atmosphere are studied here. Partly ionization considered beside the stratified solar atmosphere consisting chromosphere, transition region and corona in the form of a two-fluid MHD function. Different magnetic field were used in the simulation. Then the wave propagation in the solar stratified atmosphere are studied by the ray tracing method. The result may explain the characteristic in observations of Moreton and EUV waves. The speeds and propagated characteristics in chromosphere and corona of the wavefronts are in agreement with those observed in Moreton and EIT waves, respectively.

  12. Secondary Fast Magnetoacoustic Waves Trapped in Randomly Structured Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ding; Li, Bo; Walsh, Robert W.

    2016-09-01

    Fast magnetoacoustic waves are an important tool for inferring parameters of the solar atmosphere. We numerically simulate the propagation of fast wave pulses in randomly structured plasmas that mimic the highly inhomogeneous solar corona. A network of secondary waves is formed by a series of partial reflections and transmissions. These secondary waves exhibit quasi-periodicities in both time and space. Since the temporal and spatial periods are related simply through the speed of the fast wave, we quantify the properties of secondary waves by examining the dependence of the average temporal period (\\bar{p}) on the initial pulse width (w 0) and studying the density contrast ({δ }ρ ) and correlation length (L c ) that characterize the randomness of the equilibrium density profiles. For small-amplitude pulses, {δ }ρ does not alter \\bar{p} significantly. Large-amplitude pulses, on the other hand, enhance the density contrast when {δ }ρ is small but have a smoothing effect when {δ }ρ is sufficiently large. We found that \\bar{p} scales linearly with L c and that the scaling factor is larger for a narrower pulse. However, in terms of the absolute values of \\bar{p}, broader pulses generate secondary waves with longer periods, and this effect is stronger in random plasmas with shorter correlation lengths. Secondary waves carry the signatures of both the leading wave pulse and the background plasma. Our study may find applications in magnetohydrodynamic seismology by exploiting the secondary waves detected in the dimming regions after coronal mass ejections or extreme ultraviolet waves.

  13. Fast wave density and species mix diagnostic (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, G. W.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Ikezi, H.; Pinsker, R. I.

    2001-01-01

    Since fast Alfven waves propagate across a plasma at the Alfven speed, the plasma mass density can be determined through interferometry. In previous measurements on the DIII-D tokamak,1 fast waves ({approx}100 MHz, {approx}5 W) were launched from an antenna at the outer midplane, but detection of the signal was hampered by poor sensitivity of the receiving antenna, which was mounted behind protective graphite tiles on the inner wall. We modified several graphite tiles to act as more sensitive receiving antennas. At lower frequencies ({approx}25 MHz), fast waves can reflect from the ion--ion hybrid cutoff layer. The position of this layer is sensitive to the ratio of hydrogen to deuterium in the plasma. Receiving antennas on the outer wall will measure the hydrogen concentration through reflectometry. Launching other frequencies may yield impurity density ratios as well. These techniques may be useful for measuring relative densities if D, T, and {alpha} particles in burning plasmas.

  14. Vacuum high-harmonic generation and electromagnetic shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhl, P.; King, B.; Ruhl, H.

    2016-04-01

    > When one takes into account the presence of virtual charged states in the quantum vacuum, a nonlinear self-interaction can arise in the propagation of electromagnetic fields. This self-interaction is often referred to as `real photon-photon scattering'. When the centre-of-mass energy of colliding photons is much lower than the rest energy of an electron-positron pair, this quantum effect can be included in the classical field equations of motion as a vacuum current and charge density using the Heisenberg-Euler Lagrangian. Using analytical and numerical methods for subcritical fields, the intrinsic solution to Maxwell's equations has been found for counterpropagating probe and pump plane waves in the presence of vacuum four- and six-wave mixing. In the corresponding all-order solution for the scattered probe, a route to vacuum high-harmonic generation is identified in which a long phase length can compensate for the weakness of interacting fields. The resulting shocks in the probe carrier wave and envelope are studied for different parameter regimes and polarisation set-ups. In this special issue, we study two additional set-ups: that of a slowly varying single-cycle background to highlight the effect of an oscillating background on the probe harmonic spectrum, and that of a few-cycle probe to highlight the smoothing of the harmonic peaks produced by a wider spectrum of probe photons. We also correct sign errors in an earlier publication.

  15. Fast and Efficient Approach in Surface Wave Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanli, A. I.

    2010-12-01

    Fast and Efficient Approach in Surface Wave Analysis Ali Ismet KANLI Istanbul University, Engineering Faculty, Department of Geophysical Engineering, 34320, Avcilar Campus, Istanbul-Turkey, E-mail: kanli@istanbul.edu.tr Abstract: A two-step surface wave analysis method is proposed including both the MASW (Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves) and Micro-tremor based techniques. This is an integrated approach and the MASW survey data are gathered to obtain the shear wave velocity-depth information up to at least 30 meters by using a special type active seismic source called as SR-II or Kangaroo. In the second step, the microtremor data which are based on surface waves from seismic noise at each site are used to determine the shear-wave velocity-depth profiles. In the second step of the process, the multichannel analysis of surface waves data are given as constraints in the microtremor inversion process. This proposed algorithm allows us to calculate shear wave velocity-depth information with all geotechnical parameters from near surface to bedrock depths very fast and efficiently.

  16. Linear coupling of planetary scale waves in ionospheric zonal shear winds: Generation of fast magnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanishvili, R.; Chagelishvili, G.; Uchava, E.; Kharshiladze, O.

    2016-04-01

    Our goal is to gain new insight into the physics of wave dynamics in ionospheric zonal shear flows. We study the shear flow non-normality induced linear coupling of planetary scale (slow) modified Rossby waves and westward propagating fast magnetized (Khantadze) waves using an approach different from the existing one to the linear wave dynamics. The performed analysis allows us to separate from each other different physical processes, grasp their interplay, and, by this way, construct the basic physics of the linear coupling of the slow and fast waves in an ionospheric zonal flow with linear shear of mean velocity, U0=(S y ,0 ) . It should be noted from the beginning that we consider incompressible flow and the classified "slow" and "fast" waves are not connected with the similarly labeled magnetosonic waves in compressible heliosphere. We show that: the modified Rossby waves generate fast magnetized waves due to the coupling for a quite wide range of ionospheric and shear flow parameters; the linear transient processes are highly anisotropic in wavenumber plane; the generation of the magnetized waves/oscillations is most efficient/optimal for S ≃0.1 (S is the shear rate normalized to the combination of the angular velocity and latitude, Ω0 cos θ0 ); the streamwise wave number of the optimally generated magnetized wave harmonics decreases (the length scale increases) with increasing the Hall parameter, α. At the end, we discuss nonlinear consequences of the described anisotropic linear dynamics—they should lead to an anisotropy of nonlinear cascade processes (in wavenumber plane). In turn, an interplay of the analyzed quite strong transient growth of the fast magnetic waves with anisotropic nonlinear processes should ensure self-sustenance of (stochastic or regular) magnetic perturbations.

  17. High-harmonic spectroscopy of molecular isomers

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, M. C. H.; Brichta, J.-P.; Bhardwaj, V. R.; Spanner, M.; Patchkovskii, S.

    2011-11-15

    We demonstrate that high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) spectroscopy can be used to probe stereoisomers of randomly oriented 1,2-dichloroethylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) and 2-butene (C{sub 4}H{sub 8}). The high-harmonic spectra of these isomers are distinguishable over a range of laser intensities and wavelengths. Time-dependent numerical calculations of angle-dependent ionization yields for 1,2-dichloroethylene suggest that the harmonic spectra of molecular isomers reflect differences in their strong-field ionization. The subcycle ionization yields for the cis isomer are an order of magnitude higher than those for the trans isomer. The sensitivity in discrimination of the harmonic spectra of cis- and trans- isomers is greater than 8 and 5 for 1,2-dichloroethylene and 2-butene, respectively. We show that HHG spectroscopy cannot differentiate the harmonic spectra of the two enantiomers of the chiral molecule propylene oxide (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}O).

  18. Slow Magnetosonic Waves and Fast Flows in Active Region Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Wang, T. J.; Davila, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast (approx 100-300 km/s) quasiperiodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow-driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux tubes and the establishment of siphon flow.We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast-mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magnetosonic waves is close to the coronal sound speed. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased we find that slow shock-like wave trains are produced. When the upflows are driven periodically, undamped oscillations are produced with periods determined by the periodicity of the upflows. Based on the results of the 3D MHD model we suggest that the observed slow magnetosonic waves and persistent upflows may be produced by the same impulsive events at the bases of ARs.

  19. SLOW MAGNETOSONIC WAVES AND FAST FLOWS IN ACTIVE REGION LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Ofman, L.; Wang, T. J.; Davila, J. M.

    2012-08-01

    Recent extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast ({approx}100-300 km s{sup -1}) quasi-periodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow-driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux tubes and the establishment of siphon flow. We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast-mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magnetosonic waves is close to the coronal sound speed. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased we find that slow shock-like wave trains are produced. When the upflows are driven periodically, undamped oscillations are produced with periods determined by the periodicity of the upflows. Based on the results of the 3D MHD model we suggest that the observed slow magnetosonic waves and persistent upflows may be produced by the same impulsive events at the bases of ARs.

  20. Safe Fast Reactor Based on Nuclear Burning Wave Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Fomin, S.; Mel'nik, Yu.; Pilipenko, V.; Shul'ga, N.

    2006-07-01

    The deterministic approach for describing the phenomenon of self-sustained regime of nuclear burning wave in a fast critical reactor is developed. The results of calculations of the space-time evolution of neutron flux and the fuel burn-up in such a system are presented. (authors)

  1. Real-time observation of interfering crystal electrons in high-harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Hohenleutner, M; Langer, F; Schubert, O; Knorr, M; Huttner, U; Koch, S W; Kira, M; Huber, R

    2015-07-30

    Acceleration and collision of particles has been a key strategy for exploring the texture of matter. Strong light waves can control and recollide electronic wavepackets, generating high-harmonic radiation that encodes the structure and dynamics of atoms and molecules and lays the foundations of attosecond science. The recent discovery of high-harmonic generation in bulk solids combines the idea of ultrafast acceleration with complex condensed matter systems, and provides hope for compact solid-state attosecond sources and electronics at optical frequencies. Yet the underlying quantum motion has not so far been observable in real time. Here we study high-harmonic generation in a bulk solid directly in the time domain, and reveal a new kind of strong-field excitation in the crystal. Unlike established atomic sources, our solid emits high-harmonic radiation as a sequence of subcycle bursts that coincide temporally with the field crests of one polarity of the driving terahertz waveform. We show that these features are characteristic of a non-perturbative quantum interference process that involves electrons from multiple valence bands. These results identify key mechanisms for future solid-state attosecond sources and next-generation light-wave electronics. The new quantum interference process justifies the hope for all-optical band-structure reconstruction and lays the foundation for possible quantum logic operations at optical clock rates.

  2. Real-time observation of interfering crystal electrons in high-harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Hohenleutner, M; Langer, F; Schubert, O; Knorr, M; Huttner, U; Koch, S W; Kira, M; Huber, R

    2015-07-30

    Acceleration and collision of particles has been a key strategy for exploring the texture of matter. Strong light waves can control and recollide electronic wavepackets, generating high-harmonic radiation that encodes the structure and dynamics of atoms and molecules and lays the foundations of attosecond science. The recent discovery of high-harmonic generation in bulk solids combines the idea of ultrafast acceleration with complex condensed matter systems, and provides hope for compact solid-state attosecond sources and electronics at optical frequencies. Yet the underlying quantum motion has not so far been observable in real time. Here we study high-harmonic generation in a bulk solid directly in the time domain, and reveal a new kind of strong-field excitation in the crystal. Unlike established atomic sources, our solid emits high-harmonic radiation as a sequence of subcycle bursts that coincide temporally with the field crests of one polarity of the driving terahertz waveform. We show that these features are characteristic of a non-perturbative quantum interference process that involves electrons from multiple valence bands. These results identify key mechanisms for future solid-state attosecond sources and next-generation light-wave electronics. The new quantum interference process justifies the hope for all-optical band-structure reconstruction and lays the foundation for possible quantum logic operations at optical clock rates. PMID:26223624

  3. On Plasma Rotation Induced by Traveling Fast Alfvin Waves

    SciTech Connect

    F.W. Perkins; R.B. White; and V.S. Chan

    2001-08-09

    Absorption of fast Alfven waves by the minority fundamental ion-cyclotron resonance, coupled with finite banana width physics, generates torque distributions and ultimately rotational shear layers in the bulk plasma, even when the toroidal wavenumber k(subscript ''phi'') = n/R of the fast wave vanishes (n=0) and cyclotron absorption introduces no angular momentum nor canonical angular momentum [F.W. Perkins, R.B. White, P.T. Bonoli, and V.S. Chan, Phys. Plasmas 8 (2001) 2181]. The present work extends these results to travelling waves with non-zero n where heating directly introduces angular momentum. Since tokamak fast-wave antennas have approximately one wavelength per toroidal field coil, the toroidal mode number n lies in the range n = 10-20, independent of machine size. A zero-dimensional analysis shows that the rotation rate arising from direct torque is comparable to that of the rotational shear layer and has the same scaling. Nondimensional rotation profiles for n = (-10, 10) show modest changes from the n = 0 case in the expected direction. For a balanced antenna spectrum, the nondimensional rotational profile (averaged over n = -10, 10) lies quite close to the n = 0 profile.

  4. Experimental studies of fast wave propagation in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Ikezi, H.; Pinsker, R.I.; Chiu, S.C.; deGrassie, J.S.

    1996-02-01

    Fast Alfv{acute e}n waves radiated from the phased array antenna in the DIII-D tokamak and used for heating and current drive are studied by employing a {dot {ital B}}-loop array mounted on the vacuum vessel wall. The wave propagation direction controlled by the antenna phasing is clearly observed. A small divergence of the rays arising from the anisotropic nature of the fast wave is found. Comparison with a ray tracing code confirms that the ray position calculated by the code is accurate up to at least one toroidal turn of the rays. Conservation of {ital Rk}{sub t} which is a basic assumption in computer codes is tested. Although the upshift of toroidal wavenumber {ital k}{sub t} at small major radius {ital R} is confirmed, {ital Rk}{sub {ital t}} is not well conserved. A mass density interferometer is demonstrated by employing the extraordinary fast wave. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. On the conservation of fast calcium wave speeds.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, L

    2002-10-01

    Calcium waves were first seen about 25 years ago as the giant, 10 micro m/s wave or tsunami which crosses the cytoplasm of an activating medaka fish egg [J Cell Biol 76 (1978) 448]. By 1991, reports of such waves with approximately 10 micro m/s velocities through diverse, activating eggs and with approximately 30 micro m/s velocities through diverse, fully active systems had been compiled to form a class of what are now called fast calcium waves [Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 88 (1991) 9883; Bioessays 21 (1999) 657]. This compilation is now updated to include organisms from algae and sponges up to blowflies, squid and men and organizational levels from mammalian brains and hearts as well as chick embryos down to muscle, nerve, epithelial, blood and cancer cells and even cell-free extracts. Plots of these data confirm the narrow, 2-3-fold ranges of fast wave speeds through activating eggs and 3-4-fold ones through fully active systems at a given temperature. This also indicate Q(10)'s of 2.7-fold per 10 degrees C for both activating eggs and for fully activated cells.Speeds through some ultraflat preparations which are a few-fold above the conserved range are attributed to stretch propagated calcium entry (SPCE) rather than calcium-induced calcium release (CICR).

  6. IBW and Fast Wave Launching and Damping on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    First Author = J.C. Hosea

    1997-01-01

    Antennas to provide direct IBW (ion-Bernstein wave) excitation and to improve the launched spectrum and power handling for mode-coverted (MC) IBW excitation have been installed on TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) to support studies of transport barrier formation inside the TFTR plasma. Initial IBW launching/heating experiments have been performed at f(subscript) rf (nonsubsript) = 76 MHz and 50.6 MHz for several antenna and plasma positions, several mangetic fields [D, T, H, (superscript) 3 (nonsuperscript) He resonances], and with and without neutral-beam injection. Although the measured surface density profiles in front of the antenna should theoretically support IBW launching to the plasma core via EPW (electron plasma wave) excitation, loading resistance parameter dependence and heating results suggest that the wave energy is being deposited mostly in the plasma periphery. The potential roles of surface fast-wave and near-field excitation/damping on the IBW performance are discussed. Also MC IBW damping of the fast wave has been significantly improved through the removal of lithium 7 from the plasma.

  7. Generation of sheet currents by high frequency fast MHD waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of fast magnetosonic waves of high frequency propagating into an axisymmetric equilibrium plasma is studied. By using the methods of weakly nonlinear geometrical optics, it is shown that the perturbation travels in the equatorial plane while satisfying a transport equation which enables us to predict the time and location of formation of shock waves. For plasmas of large magnetic Prandtl number, this would result into the creation of sheet currents which may give rise to magnetic reconnection and destruction of the original equilibrium.

  8. Nonlinear fast sausage waves in homogeneous magnetic flux tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhalyaev, Badma B.; Ruderman, Michael S.

    2015-12-01

    > We consider fast sausage waves in straight homogeneous magnetic tubes. The plasma motion is described by the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations in the cold plasma approximation. We derive the nonlinear Schrödinger equation describing the nonlinear evolution of an envelope of a carrier wave. The coefficients of this equation are expressed in terms Bessel and modified Bessel functions. They are calculated numerically for various values of parameters. In particular, we show that the criterion for the onset of the modulational or Benjamin-Fair instability is satisfied. The implication of the obtained results for solar physics is discussed.

  9. High-harmonic probing of electronic coherence in dynamically aligned molecules.

    PubMed

    Kraus, P M; Zhang, S B; Gijsbertsen, A; Lucchese, R R; Rohringer, N; Wörner, H J

    2013-12-13

    We introduce and demonstrate a new approach to measuring coherent electron wave packets using high-harmonic spectroscopy. By preparing a molecule in a coherent superposition of electronic states, we show that electronic coherence opens previously unobserved high-harmonic-generation channels that connect distinct but coherently related electronic states. Performing the measurements in dynamically aligned nitric oxide molecules we observe the complex temporal evolution of the electronic coherence under coupling to nuclear motion. Choosing a weakly allowed transition to prepare the wave packet, we demonstrate an unprecedented sensitivity that arises from optical interference between coherent and incoherent pathways. This mechanism converts a 0.1% excitation fraction into a ∼20% signal modulation.

  10. Strongly Dispersive Transient Bragg Grating for High Harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, J.; Spector, L.S.; Gaarde, M.B.; McFarland, B.K.; Bucksbaum, P.H.; Guhr, Markus; /SLAC, PULSE /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2010-06-04

    We create a transient Bragg grating in a high harmonic generation medium using two counterpropagating pulses. The Bragg grating disperses the harmonics in angle and can diffract a large bandwidth with temporal resolution limited only by the source size.

  11. Nonlinear interaction of kinetic Alfven wave with fast magnetosonic wave and turbulent spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Modi, K. V.; Sharma, R. P.

    2013-03-15

    In the present paper, authors have investigated nonlinear interaction of kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) and fast magnetosonic wave for intermediate {beta}-plasma (m{sub e}/m{sub i} Much-Less-Than {beta} Much-Less-Than 1). Authors have developed the set of dimensionless equations in the presence of ponderomotive nonlinearity due to KAW in the dynamics of fast magnetosonic wave. Numerical simulation has been carried out to study the effect of nonlinear coupling and resulting turbulent/power spectrum for the different angles of propagation of fast magnetosonic wave applicable to solar wind at 1 AU. The localization of KAW has been found which becomes more complex as the angle of propagation of fast magnetosonic wave decreases. Results also reveal the steepening of power spectrum as the angle of propagation decreases which can be responsible for heating and acceleration of plasma particles in solar wind. Relevance of the obtained result is pointed out with observation received by Cluster spacecraft for the solar wind 1 AU.

  12. Brilliant high harmonic sources with extended cut-off

    SciTech Connect

    Seres, Josef; Spielmann, Christian; Seres, Enikoe

    2010-02-02

    The most challenging application of time resolved spectroscopy is to directly watch the structural and electronic dynamics. Here we present several ways for realizing laser driven x-ray sources, offering atomic spatial and temporal resolution. Our approaches are based on high harmonic generation and include quasi-phase matching in two successive gas jets, extending the cut-off by high harmonic generation in an ion channel, and amplification of HHG in a plasma based amplifier.

  13. Single-shot fluctuations in waveguided high-harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Goh, S J; Tao, Y; van der Slot, P J M; Bastiaens, H J M; Herek, J; Biedron, S G; Danailov, M B; Milton, S V; Boller, K-J

    2015-09-21

    For exploring the application potential of coherent soft x-ray (SXR) and extreme ultraviolet radiation (XUV) provided by high-harmonic generation, it is important to characterize the central output parameters. Of specific importance are pulse-to-pulse (shot-to-shot) fluctuations of the high-harmonic output energy, fluctuations of the direction of the emission (pointing instabilities), and fluctuations of the beam divergence and shape that reduce the spatial coherence. We present the first single-shot measurements of waveguided high-harmonic generation in a waveguided (capillary-based) geometry. Using a capillary waveguide filled with Argon gas as the nonlinear medium, we provide the first characterization of shot-to-shot fluctuations of the pulse energy, of the divergence and of the beam pointing. We record the strength of these fluctuations vs. two basic input parameters, which are the drive laser pulse energy and the gas pressure in the capillary waveguide. In correlation measurements between single-shot drive laser beam profiles and single-shot high-harmonic beam profiles we prove the absence of drive laser beam-pointing-induced fluctuations in the high-harmonic output. We attribute the main source of high-harmonic fluctuations to ionization-induced nonlinear mode mixing during propagation of the drive laser pulse inside the capillary waveguide. PMID:26406689

  14. Fokker-Planck/Ray Tracing for Electron Bernstein and Fast Wave Modeling in Support of NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R. W.

    2009-11-12

    This DOE grant supported fusion energy research, a potential long-term solution to the world's energy needs. Magnetic fusion, exemplified by confinement of very hot ionized gases, i.e., plasmas, in donut-shaped tokamak vessels is a leading approach for this energy source. Thus far, a mixture of hydrogen isotopes has produced 10's of megawatts of fusion power for seconds in a tokamak reactor at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in New Jersey. The research grant under consideration, ER54684, uses computer models to aid in understanding and projecting efficacy of heating and current drive sources in the National Spherical Torus Experiment, a tokamak variant, at PPPL. The NSTX experiment explores the physics of very tight aspect ratio, almost spherical tokamaks, aiming at producing steady-state fusion plasmas. The current drive is an integral part of the steady-state concept, maintaining the magnetic geometry in the steady-state tokamak. CompX further developed and applied models for radiofrequency (rf) heating and current drive for applications to NSTX. These models build on a 30 year development of rf ray tracing (the all-frequencies GENRAY code) and higher dimensional Fokker-Planck rf-collisional modeling (the 3D collisional-quasilinear CQL3D code) at CompX. Two mainline current-drive rf modes are proposed for injection into NSTX: (1) electron Bernstein wave (EBW), and (2) high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) modes. Both these current drive systems provide a means for the rf to access the especially high density plasma--termed high beta plasma--compared to the strength of the required magnetic fields. The CompX studies entailed detailed modeling of the EBW to calculate the efficiency of the current drive system, and to determine its range of flexibility for driving current at spatial locations in the plasma cross-section. The ray tracing showed penetration into NSTX bulk plasma, relatively efficient current drive, but a limited ability to produce current over the whole

  15. Fast Waves at the Base of the Cochlea.

    PubMed

    Recio-Spinoso, Alberto; Rhode, William S

    2015-01-01

    Georg von Békésy observed that the onset times of responses to brief-duration stimuli vary as a function of distance from the stapes, with basal regions starting to move earlier than apical ones. He noticed that the speed of signal propagation along the cochlea is slow when compared with the speed of sound in water. Fast traveling waves have been recorded in the cochlea, but their existence is interpreted as the result of an experiment artifact. Accounts of the timing of vibration onsets at the base of the cochlea generally agree with Békésy's results. Some authors, however, have argued that the measured delays are too short for consistency with Békésy's theory. To investigate the speed of the traveling wave at the base of the cochlea, we analyzed basilar membrane (BM) responses to clicks recorded at several locations in the base of the chinchilla cochlea. The initial component of the BM response matches remarkably well the initial component of the stapes response, after a 4-μs delay of the latter. A similar conclusion is reached by analyzing onset times of time-domain gain functions, which correspond to BM click responses normalized by middle-ear input. Our results suggest that BM responses to clicks arise from a combination of fast and slow traveling waves. PMID:26062000

  16. Fast Waves at the Base of the Cochlea.

    PubMed

    Recio-Spinoso, Alberto; Rhode, William S

    2015-01-01

    Georg von Békésy observed that the onset times of responses to brief-duration stimuli vary as a function of distance from the stapes, with basal regions starting to move earlier than apical ones. He noticed that the speed of signal propagation along the cochlea is slow when compared with the speed of sound in water. Fast traveling waves have been recorded in the cochlea, but their existence is interpreted as the result of an experiment artifact. Accounts of the timing of vibration onsets at the base of the cochlea generally agree with Békésy's results. Some authors, however, have argued that the measured delays are too short for consistency with Békésy's theory. To investigate the speed of the traveling wave at the base of the cochlea, we analyzed basilar membrane (BM) responses to clicks recorded at several locations in the base of the chinchilla cochlea. The initial component of the BM response matches remarkably well the initial component of the stapes response, after a 4-μs delay of the latter. A similar conclusion is reached by analyzing onset times of time-domain gain functions, which correspond to BM click responses normalized by middle-ear input. Our results suggest that BM responses to clicks arise from a combination of fast and slow traveling waves.

  17. Frequency and damping rate of fast sausage waves

    SciTech Connect

    Farahani, S. Vasheghani; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Goossens, M.; Hornsey, C.

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the frequency and damping rate of fast axisymmetric waves that are subject to wave leakage for a one-dimensional magnetic cylindrical structure in the solar corona. We consider the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dispersion relation for axisymmetric MHD waves superimposed on a straight magnetic cylinder in the zero β limit, similar to a jet or loop in the solar corona. An analytic study accompanied by numerical calculations has been carried out to model the frequency, damping rate, and phase speed of the sausage wave around the cut-off frequency and in the long wavelength limit. Analytic expressions have been obtained based on equations around the points of interest. They are linear approximations of the dependence of the sausage frequency on the wave number around the cut-off wavelength for both leaky and non-leaky regimes and in the long wavelength limit. Moreover, an expression for the damping rate of the leaky sausage wave has been obtained both around the cut-off frequency and in the long wavelength limit. These analytic results are compared with numerical computations. The expressions show that the complex frequencies are mainly dominated by the density ratio. In addition, it is shown that the damping eventually becomes independent of the wave number in the long wavelength limit. We conclude that the sausage mode damping directly depends on the density ratios of the internal and external media where the damping declines in higher density contrasts. Even in the long wavelength limit, the sausage mode is weakly damped for high-density contrasts. As such, sausage modes could be observed for a significant number of periods in high-density contrast loops or jets.

  18. Non-collinear generation of angularly isolated circularly polarized high harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickstein, Daniel D.; Dollar, Franklin J.; Grychtol, Patrik; Ellis, Jennifer L.; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Shaw, Justin M.; Fan, Tingting; Dorney, Kevin M.; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret M.; Durfee, Charles G.

    2015-11-01

    We generate angularly isolated beams of circularly polarized extreme ultraviolet light through the first implementation of non-collinear high harmonic generation with circularly polarized driving lasers. This non-collinear technique offers numerous advantages over previous methods, including the generation of higher photon energies, the separation of the harmonics from the pump beam, the production of both left and right circularly polarized harmonics at the same wavelength and the capability of separating the harmonics without using a spectrometer. To confirm the circular polarization of the beams and to demonstrate the practicality of this new light source, we measure the magnetic circular dichroism of a 20 nm iron film. Furthermore, we explain the mechanisms of non-collinear high harmonic generation using analytical descriptions in both the photon and wave models. Advanced numerical simulations indicate that this non-collinear mixing enables the generation of isolated attosecond pulses with circular polarization.

  19. Resonance absorption of propagating fast waves in a cold plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1990-01-01

    Absorption of propagating waves impinging on a surface in which the plasma and magnetic field may change is investigated by examining in depth the problem of a combination of cold plasma, uniform magnetic field and a surface density which varies linearly from zero at the left end to some finite value at the right end, beyond which the density is constant. Two cases are considered: one in which the plasma is a vacuum everywhere to the left of the surface (which may correspond to coronal conditions) and one in which the plasma density jumps to a very large value to the left of the surface (which may mimic the magnetosphere with the dense region at the left corresponding to the plasmasphere). A complete discussion of the resonance absorption of propagating fast waves for the case considered by Kiveloson and Southwood (1986) is presented, emphasizing approximate analytical results whenever possible; these results are then compared with exact numerical solutions.

  20. Fast wave current drive antenna performance on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberry, M.J.; Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Chiu, S.C.; Jackson, G.L.; Lippmann, S.I.; Prater, R. ); Porkolab, M. . Plasma Fusion Center); Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.J. )

    1991-10-01

    Fast wave current drive (FWCD) experiments at 60 MHz are being performed on the DIII-D tokamak for the first time in high electron temperature, high {beta} target plasmas. A four-element phased-array antenna is used to launch a directional wave spectrum with the peak n{sub {parallel}} value ({approx equal} 7) optimized for strong single-pass electron absorption due to electron Landau damping. For this experiment, high power FW injection (2 MW) must be accomplished without voltage breakdown in the transmission lines or antenna, and without significant impurity influx. In addition, there is the technological challenge of impedance matching a four-element antenna while maintaining equal currents and the correct phasing (90{degree}) in each of the straps for a directional spectrum. In this paper we describe the performance of the DIII-D FWCD antenna during initial FW electron heating and current drive experiments in terms of these requirements.

  1. Fast wave current drive antenna performance on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberry, M.J.; Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Chiu, S.C.; Jackson, G.L.; Lippmann, S.I.; Prater, R.; Porkolab, M.; Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1991-10-01

    Fast wave current drive (FWCD) experiments at 60 MHz are being performed on the DIII-D tokamak for the first time in high electron temperature, high {beta} target plasmas. A four-element phased-array antenna is used to launch a directional wave spectrum with the peak n{sub {parallel}} value ({approx_equal} 7) optimized for strong single-pass electron absorption due to electron Landau damping. For this experiment, high power FW injection (2 MW) must be accomplished without voltage breakdown in the transmission lines or antenna, and without significant impurity influx. In addition, there is the technological challenge of impedance matching a four-element antenna while maintaining equal currents and the correct phasing (90{degree}) in each of the straps for a directional spectrum. In this paper we describe the performance of the DIII-D FWCD antenna during initial FW electron heating and current drive experiments in terms of these requirements.

  2. Observation of mode conversion of m = minus 1 fast waves on the Alfven resonance layer

    SciTech Connect

    Amagishi, Y. )

    1990-03-12

    Fast waves or MHD surface waves of {ital m}={minus}1 (poloidal mode number of left-hand rotation) have been observed to be mode converted on the Alfven resonance layer. The converted waves are a quasielectrostatic form of the shear Alfven waves, i.e., kinetic Alfven wave and/or the resistive mode.

  3. Fast electronic resistance switching involving hidden charge density wave states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaskivskyi, I.; Mihailovic, I. A.; Brazovskii, S.; Gospodaric, J.; Mertelj, T.; Svetin, D.; Sutar, P.; Mihailovic, D.

    2016-05-01

    The functionality of computer memory elements is currently based on multi-stability, driven either by locally manipulating the density of electrons in transistors or by switching magnetic or ferroelectric order. Another possibility is switching between metallic and insulating phases by the motion of ions, but their speed is limited by slow nucleation and inhomogeneous percolative growth. Here we demonstrate fast resistance switching in a charge density wave system caused by pulsed current injection. As a charge pulse travels through the material, it converts a commensurately ordered polaronic Mott insulating state in 1T-TaS2 to a metastable electronic state with textured domain walls, accompanied with a conversion of polarons to band states, and concurrent rapid switching from an insulator to a metal. The large resistance change, high switching speed (30 ps) and ultralow energy per bit opens the way to new concepts in non-volatile memory devices manipulating all-electronic states.

  4. Fast electronic resistance switching involving hidden charge density wave states

    PubMed Central

    Vaskivskyi, I.; Mihailovic, I. A.; Brazovskii, S.; Gospodaric, J.; Mertelj, T.; Svetin, D.; Sutar, P.; Mihailovic, D.

    2016-01-01

    The functionality of computer memory elements is currently based on multi-stability, driven either by locally manipulating the density of electrons in transistors or by switching magnetic or ferroelectric order. Another possibility is switching between metallic and insulating phases by the motion of ions, but their speed is limited by slow nucleation and inhomogeneous percolative growth. Here we demonstrate fast resistance switching in a charge density wave system caused by pulsed current injection. As a charge pulse travels through the material, it converts a commensurately ordered polaronic Mott insulating state in 1T–TaS2 to a metastable electronic state with textured domain walls, accompanied with a conversion of polarons to band states, and concurrent rapid switching from an insulator to a metal. The large resistance change, high switching speed (30 ps) and ultralow energy per bit opens the way to new concepts in non-volatile memory devices manipulating all-electronic states. PMID:27181483

  5. Gravitational wave asteroseismology with fast rotating neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gaertig, Erich; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2011-03-15

    We investigate damping and growth times of the quadrupolar f mode for rapidly rotating stars and a variety of different polytropic equations of state in the Cowling approximation. This is the first study of the damping/growth time of these types of oscillations for fast-rotating neutron stars in a relativistic treatment where the spacetime degrees of freedom of the perturbations are neglected. We use these frequencies and damping/growth times to create robust empirical formulae which can be used for gravitational-wave asteroseismology. The estimation of the damping/growth time is based on the quadrupole formula and our results agree very well with Newtonian ones in the appropriate limit.

  6. High frequency fast wave current drive for DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, R.; Lerche, E.; Van Eester, D.; Nightingale, M.

    2011-12-01

    A steady-state tokamak reactor (SSTR) requires a high efficiency current drive system, from plug to driven mega-amps. RF systems working in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) have high efficiency from plug to antenna but a limited current drive (CD) efficiency and centrally peaked CD profiles. The latter feature is not adequate for a SSTR where the current should be sufficiently broad to keep the central safety factor (possibly significantly) above 1. In addition, the fact that the fast wave (FW) is evanescent at the edge limits coupling, requiring high voltage operation, which makes the system dependent on plasma edge properties and prone to arcing, reducing its reliability. A possible way to overcome these weaknesses is to operate at higher frequency (10 times or more the cyclotron frequency). The advantages are: (1) The coupling can be much better (waves propagate in vacuum) if the parallel refractive index n∥ is kept below one, (2) The FW group velocity tends to align to the magnetic field, so the power circumnavigates the magnetic axis and can drive off-axis current, (3) Due to the latter property, n∥ can be upshifted along the wave propagation path, allowing low n∥ launch (hence good coupling, large CD efficiency) with ultimately good electron absorption (which requires higher n∥). Note however that the n∥ upshift is a self-organized feature, that electron absorption is in competition with α-particle absorption and that uncoupling of the FW from the lower hybrid resonance at the edge requires n∥ slightly above one. The latter possibly counterproductive features might complicate the picture. The different aspects of this potentially attractive off-axis FWCD scheme are discussed.

  7. Can a Fast-Mode EUV Wave Generate a Stationary Front?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P. F.; Fang, C.; Chandra, R.; Srivastava, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of stationary "EIT waves" about 16 years ago posed a big challenge to the then favorite fast-mode wave model for coronal "EIT waves". It encouraged various non-wave models and played an important role in convergence of the opposing viewpoints toward the recent consensus that there are two types of EUV waves. However, it was recently discovered that a stationary wave front can also be generated when a fast-mode wave passes through a magnetic quasi-separatrix layer (QSL). In this article, we perform a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulation of the interaction between a fast-mode wave and a magnetic QSL, and a stationary wave front is reproduced. The analysis of the numerical results indicates that near the plasma beta {˜} 1 layer in front of the magnetic QSL, part of the fast-mode wave is converted to a slow-mode MHD wave, which is then trapped inside the magnetic loops, forming a stationary wave front. Our results imply that we have to be cautious in identifying the nature of a wave, since there may be mode conversion during the propagation of the waves driven by solar eruptions.

  8. STEREO OBSERVATIONS OF FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES IN THE EXTENDED SOLAR CORONA ASSOCIATED WITH EIT/EUV WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Ryun-Young; Ofman, Leon; Kramar, Maxim; Olmedo, Oscar; Davila, Joseph M.; Thompson, Barbara J.; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2013-03-20

    We report white-light observations of a fast magnetosonic wave associated with a coronal mass ejection observed by STEREO/SECCHI/COR1 inner coronagraphs on 2011 August 4. The wave front is observed in the form of density compression passing through various coronal regions such as quiet/active corona, coronal holes, and streamers. Together with measured electron densities determined with STEREO COR1 and Extreme UltraViolet Imager (EUVI) data, we use our kinematic measurements of the wave front to calculate coronal magnetic fields and find that the measured speeds are consistent with characteristic fast magnetosonic speeds in the corona. In addition, the wave front turns out to be the upper coronal counterpart of the EIT wave observed by STEREO EUVI traveling against the solar coronal disk; moreover, stationary fronts of the EIT wave are found to be located at the footpoints of deflected streamers and boundaries of coronal holes, after the wave front in the upper solar corona passes through open magnetic field lines in the streamers. Our findings suggest that the observed EIT wave should be in fact a fast magnetosonic shock/wave traveling in the inhomogeneous solar corona, as part of the fast magnetosonic wave propagating in the extended solar corona.

  9. Predicting High Harmonic Ion Cyclotron Heating Efficiency in Tokamak Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, D. L.; Berry, L. A.; Chen, G.; Ryan, P. M.; Canik, J. M.; Jaeger, E. F.

    2011-09-01

    Observations of improved radio frequency (rf) heating efficiency in ITER relevant high-confinement (H-)mode plasmas on the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment are investigated by whole-device linear simulation. The steady-state rf electric field is calculated for various antenna spectra and the results examined for characteristics that correlate with observations of improved or reduced rf heating efficiency. We find that launching toroidal wave numbers that give fast-wave propagation in the scrape-off plasma excites large amplitude (˜kVm-1) coaxial standing modes between the confined plasma density pedestal and conducting vessel wall. Qualitative comparison with measurements of the stored plasma energy suggests that these modes are a probable cause of degraded heating efficiency.

  10. Predicting high harmonic ion cyclotron heating efficiency in Tokamak plasmas.

    PubMed

    Green, D L; Berry, L A; Chen, G; Ryan, P M; Canik, J M; Jaeger, E F

    2011-09-30

    Observations of improved radio frequency (rf) heating efficiency in ITER relevant high-confinement (H-)mode plasmas on the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment are investigated by whole-device linear simulation. The steady-state rf electric field is calculated for various antenna spectra and the results examined for characteristics that correlate with observations of improved or reduced rf heating efficiency. We find that launching toroidal wave numbers that give fast-wave propagation in the scrape-off plasma excites large amplitude (∼kV m(-1)) coaxial standing modes between the confined plasma density pedestal and conducting vessel wall. Qualitative comparison with measurements of the stored plasma energy suggests that these modes are a probable cause of degraded heating efficiency.

  11. High harmonic generation in a semi-infinite gas cell.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Julia; Christensen, E; Powers, N; Rhynard, S; Painter, J; Peatross, J

    2004-09-20

    Ten-millijoule 35-femtosecond laser pulses interact with a cell of helium or neon that extends from a focusing lens to an exit foil near the laser focus. High harmonic orders in the range of 50 to 100 are investigated as a function of focal position relative to the exit foil. An aperture placed in front of the focusing lens increases the brightness of observed harmonics by more than an order of magnitude. Counter-propagating light is used to directly probe where the high harmonics are generated within the laser focus. In neon, the harmonics are generated in the last few millimeters before the exit foil, limited by absorption. In helium, the harmonics are produced over a much longer distance. PMID:19483992

  12. Effect of Alfvén resonance on low-frequency fast wave current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. Y.; Batchelor, D. B.; Carter, M. D.; Jaeger, E. F.; Stallings, D. C.

    1995-08-01

    The Alfvén resonances may occur on the low- and high-field sides for a low-frequency fast wave current drive scenario proposed for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [Nucl. Fusion 31, 1135 (1991)]. At the resonance on the low-field side, the fast wave may be mode converted into a short-wavelength slow wave, which can be absorbed by electrons at the plasma edge, before the fast wave propagates into the core area of the plasma. Such absorption may cause a significant parasitic power loss.

  13. Standing Alfven Waves Transitioned from Fast-Growing, Travelling Waves: Indications from Electron Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Wang, Z. H.; Zong, Q.; Hao, Y.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Kivelson, M.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2014-12-01

    Ultra-Low Frequency (ULF) electromagnetic oscillations, usually interpreted as standing Alfven waves, are a major candidate to accelerate electrons to relativistic energies in the Earth's Van Allen radiation belt. Electrons can promptly gain energy from ULF waves when they resonate with each other via a process named drift resonance, which is characterized in spacecraft observations by an energy dependence of phase differences between electron fluxes and electromagnetic oscillations. Such a dependence, recently observed by Van Allen Probes, has been presented as a most unambiguous identification of the drift-resonance electron acceleration (Claudepierre et al., 2013). In this paper, we revisit the same event to find that in the early stage of the ULF oscillations, the observed phase relationship appeared to be not fully consistent with the drift resonance theory. We further examine these apparent inconsistencies, to suggest that they arose from the fast growth of travelling Alfven waves before they were transitioned into the more typical standing waves. These observations, therefore, provide a rare opportunity to understand the generation, evolution, and particle-interaction of ULF oscillations in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  14. The Ultraviolet Surprise. Efficient Soft X-Ray High Harmonic Generation in Multiply-Ionized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Popmintchev, Dimitar; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Dollar, Franklin; Mancuso, Christopher; Perez-Hernandez, Jose A.; Chen, Ming-Chang; Hankla, Amelia; Gao, Xiaohui; Shim, Bonggu; Gaeta, Alexander L.; Tarazkar, Maryam; Romanov, Dmitri A.; Levis, Robert J.; Gaffney, Jim A.; Foord, Mark; Libby, Stephen B.; Jaron-Becker, Agnieskzka; Becker, Andreas; Plaja, Luis; Muranane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Popmintchev, Tenio

    2015-12-04

    High-harmonic generation is a universal response of matter to strong femtosecond laser fields, coherently upconverting light to much shorter wavelengths. Optimizing the conversion of laser light into soft x-rays typically demands a trade-off between two competing factors. Reduced quantum diffusion of the radiating electron wave function results in emission from each species which is highest when a short-wavelength ultraviolet driving laser is used. But, phase matching—the constructive addition of x-ray waves from a large number of atoms—favors longer-wavelength mid-infrared lasers. We identified a regime of high-harmonic generation driven by 40-cycle ultraviolet lasers in waveguides that can generate bright beams in the soft x-ray region of the spectrum, up to photon energies of 280 electron volts. Surprisingly, the high ultraviolet refractive indices of both neutral atoms and ions enabled effective phase matching, even in a multiply ionized plasma. We observed harmonics with very narrow linewidths, while calculations show that the x-rays emerge as nearly time-bandwidth–limited pulse trains of ~100 attoseconds.

  15. The Ultraviolet Surprise. Efficient Soft X-Ray High Harmonic Generation in Multiply-Ionized Plasmas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Popmintchev, Dimitar; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Dollar, Franklin; Mancuso, Christopher; Perez-Hernandez, Jose A.; Chen, Ming-Chang; Hankla, Amelia; Gao, Xiaohui; Shim, Bonggu; Gaeta, Alexander L.; et al

    2015-12-04

    High-harmonic generation is a universal response of matter to strong femtosecond laser fields, coherently upconverting light to much shorter wavelengths. Optimizing the conversion of laser light into soft x-rays typically demands a trade-off between two competing factors. Reduced quantum diffusion of the radiating electron wave function results in emission from each species which is highest when a short-wavelength ultraviolet driving laser is used. But, phase matching—the constructive addition of x-ray waves from a large number of atoms—favors longer-wavelength mid-infrared lasers. We identified a regime of high-harmonic generation driven by 40-cycle ultraviolet lasers in waveguides that can generate bright beams inmore » the soft x-ray region of the spectrum, up to photon energies of 280 electron volts. Surprisingly, the high ultraviolet refractive indices of both neutral atoms and ions enabled effective phase matching, even in a multiply ionized plasma. We observed harmonics with very narrow linewidths, while calculations show that the x-rays emerge as nearly time-bandwidth–limited pulse trains of ~100 attoseconds.« less

  16. Energy and energy flux in axisymmetric slow and fast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreels, M. G.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Grant, S. D. T.; Jess, D. B.; Goossens, M.

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We aim to calculate the kinetic, magnetic, thermal, and total energy densities and the flux of energy in axisymmetric sausage modes. The resulting equations should contain as few parameters as possible to facilitate applicability for different observations. Methods: The background equilibrium is a one-dimensional cylindrical flux tube model with a piecewise constant radial density profile. This enables us to use linearised magnetohydrodynamic equations to calculate the energy densities and the flux of energy for axisymmetric sausage modes. Results: The equations used to calculate the energy densities and the flux of energy in axisymmetric sausage modes depend on the radius of the flux tube, the equilibrium sound and Alfvén speeds, the density of the plasma, the period and phase speed of the wave, and the radial or longitudinal components of the Lagrangian displacement at the flux tube boundary. Approximate relations for limiting cases of propagating slow and fast sausage modes are also obtained. We also obtained the dispersive first-order correction term to the phase speed for both the fundamental slow body mode under coronal conditions and the slow surface mode under photospheric conditions. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Heating a plasma by a broadband stream of fast electrons: Fast ignition, shock ignition, and Gbar shock wave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gus’kov, S. Yu.; Nicolai, Ph.; Ribeyre, X.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2015-09-15

    An exact analytic solution is found for the steady-state distribution function of fast electrons with an arbitrary initial spectrum irradiating a planar low-Z plasma with an arbitrary density distribution. The solution is applied to study the heating of a material by fast electrons of different spectra such as a monoenergetic spectrum, a step-like distribution in a given energy range, and a Maxwellian spectrum, which is inherent in laser-produced fast electrons. The heating of shock- and fast-ignited precompressed inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets as well as the heating of a target designed to generate a Gbar shock wave for equation of state (EOS) experiments by laser-produced fast electrons with a Maxwellian spectrum is investigated. A relation is established between the energies of two groups of Maxwellian fast electrons, which are responsible for generation of a shock wave and heating the upstream material (preheating). The minimum energy of the fast and shock igniting beams as well as of the beam for a Gbar shock wave generation increases with the spectral width of the electron distribution.

  18. Using dynamic interferometric synthetic aperature radar (InSAR) to image fast-moving surface waves

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Paul

    2005-06-28

    A new differential technique and system for imaging dynamic (fast moving) surface waves using Dynamic Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is introduced. This differential technique and system can sample the fast-moving surface displacement waves from a plurality of moving platform positions in either a repeat-pass single-antenna or a single-pass mode having a single-antenna dual-phase receiver or having dual physically separate antennas, and reconstruct a plurality of phase differentials from a plurality of platform positions to produce a series of desired interferometric images of the fast moving waves.

  19. Fast Magnetoacoustic Wave Trains of Sausage Symmetry in Cylindrical Waveguides of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestov, S.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Kuzin, S.

    2015-12-01

    Fast magnetoacoustic waves guided along the magnetic field by plasma non-uniformities, in particular coronal loops, fibrils, and plumes, are known to be highly dispersive, which lead to the formation of quasi-periodic wave trains excited by a broadband impulsive driver, e.g., a solar flare. We investigated the effects of cylindrical geometry on the fast sausage wave train formation. We performed magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of fast magnetoacoustic perturbations of a sausage symmetry, propagating from a localized impulsive source along a field-aligned plasma cylinder with a smooth radial profile of the fast speed. The wave trains are found to have pronounced period modulation, with the longer instant period seen in the beginning of the wave train. The wave trains also have a pronounced amplitude modulation. Wavelet spectra of the wave trains have characteristic tadpole features, with the broadband large-amplitude heads preceding low-amplitude quasi-monochromatic tails. The mean period of the wave train is about the transverse fast magnetoacoustic transit time across the cylinder. The mean parallel wavelength is about the diameter of the wave-guiding plasma cylinder. Instant periods are longer than the sausage wave cutoff period. The wave train characteristics depend on the fast magnetoacoustic speed in both the internal and external media, the smoothness of the transverse profile of the equilibrium quantities, and also the spatial size of the initial perturbation. If the initial perturbation is localized at the axis of the cylinder, the wave trains contain higher radial harmonics that have shorter periods.

  20. FAST MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVE TRAINS OF SAUSAGE SYMMETRY IN CYLINDRICAL WAVEGUIDES OF THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Shestov, S.; Kuzin, S.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    Fast magnetoacoustic waves guided along the magnetic field by plasma non-uniformities, in particular coronal loops, fibrils, and plumes, are known to be highly dispersive, which lead to the formation of quasi-periodic wave trains excited by a broadband impulsive driver, e.g., a solar flare. We investigated the effects of cylindrical geometry on the fast sausage wave train formation. We performed magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of fast magnetoacoustic perturbations of a sausage symmetry, propagating from a localized impulsive source along a field-aligned plasma cylinder with a smooth radial profile of the fast speed. The wave trains are found to have pronounced period modulation, with the longer instant period seen in the beginning of the wave train. The wave trains also have a pronounced amplitude modulation. Wavelet spectra of the wave trains have characteristic tadpole features, with the broadband large-amplitude heads preceding low-amplitude quasi-monochromatic tails. The mean period of the wave train is about the transverse fast magnetoacoustic transit time across the cylinder. The mean parallel wavelength is about the diameter of the wave-guiding plasma cylinder. Instant periods are longer than the sausage wave cutoff period. The wave train characteristics depend on the fast magnetoacoustic speed in both the internal and external media, the smoothness of the transverse profile of the equilibrium quantities, and also the spatial size of the initial perturbation. If the initial perturbation is localized at the axis of the cylinder, the wave trains contain higher radial harmonics that have shorter periods.

  1. Noble gas clusters and nanoplasmas in high harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aladi, M.; Bolla, R.; Rácz, P.; Földes, I. B.

    2016-02-01

    We report a study of high harmonic generation from noble gas clusters of xenon atoms in a gas jet. Harmonic spectra were investigated as a function of backing pressure, showing spectral shifts due to the nanoplasma electrons in the clusters. At certain value of laser intensity this process may oppose the effect of the well-known ionization-induced blueshift. In addition, these cluster-induced harmonic redshifts may give the possibility to estimate cluster density and cluster size in the laser-gas jet interaction range.

  2. High Harmonic Generation from Multiple Orbitals in N2

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, B.; Farrell, Joseph P.; Bucksbaum, Philip H.; Guehr, Markus; /SLAC, Pulse /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2009-03-05

    Molecular electronic states energetically below the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) should contribute to laser-driven high harmonic generation (HHG), but this behavior has not been observed previously. Our measurements of the HHG spectrum of N{sub 2} molecules aligned perpendicular to the laser polarization showed a maximum at the rotational half-revival. This feature indicates the influence of electrons occupying the orbital just below the N{sub 2} HOMO, referred to as the HOMO-1. Such observations of lower-lying orbitals are essential to understanding subfemtosecond/subangstrom electronic motion in laser-excited molecules.

  3. Control of Laser High-Harmonic Generation with Counterpropagating Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronov, S. L.; Kohl, I.; Madsen, J. B.; Simmons, J.; Terry, N.; Titensor, J.; Wang, Q.; Peatross, J.

    2001-09-01

    Relatively weak counterpropagating light is shown to disrupt the emission of laser high-harmonic generation. Harmonic orders ranging from the teens to the low thirties produced by a 30-femtosecond pulse in a narrow argon jet are ``shut down'' with a contrast as high as 2 orders of magnitude by a chirped 1-picosecond counterpropagating laser pulse (60 times less intense). Alternatively, under poor phase-matching conditions, the counterpropagating light boosts harmonic production by similar contrast through quasiphase matching where out-of-phase emission is suppressed.

  4. Tomography of high harmonic generation in a cluster jet.

    PubMed

    Pai, Chih-Hao; Kuo, Cheng-Cheng; Lin, Ming-Wei; Wang, Jyhpyng; Chen, Szu-yuan; Lin, Jiunn-Yuan

    2006-04-01

    Tomographic measurement of high harmonic generation in a cluster jet was demonstrated by programming the cluster density distribution with a laser machining technique. The growth of harmonic energy with the propagation of the pump pulse was resolved by scanning the end of the argon cluster distribution in the path of the pump pulse. A downstream shift of the position of rapid growth and a decrease of the slope with increasing backing pressure as results of changes in the phase-matching condition were observed, which explains the presence of an optimal backing pressure. PMID:16599232

  5. Analytic scaling analysis of high harmonic generation conversion efficiency.

    PubMed

    Falcão-Filho, E L; Gkortsas, M; Gordon, Ariel; Kärtner, Franz X

    2009-06-22

    Closed form expressions for the high harmonic generation (HHG) conversion efficiency are obtained for the plateau and cutoff regions. The presented formulas eliminate most of the computational complexity related to HHG simulations, and enable a detailed scaling analysis of HHG efficiency as a function of drive laser parameters and material properties. Moreover, in the total absence of any fitting procedure, the results show excellent agreement with experimental data reported in the literature. Thus, this paper opens new pathways for the global optimization problem of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) sources based on HHG.

  6. Semiclassical analysis of high harmonic generation in bulk crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vampa, G.; McDonald, C. R.; Orlando, G.; Corkum, P. B.; Brabec, T.

    2015-02-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) in solids is investigated. We find that interband emission is dominant for the midinfrared laser driver frequencies, whereas intraband emission dominates the far-infrared range. Interband HHG is similar to atomic HHG and therewith opens the possibility to apply atomic attosecond technology to the condensed matter phase. Interband emission is investigated with a quasiclassical method, by which HHG can be modeled based on the classical trajectory analysis of electron-hole pairs. This analysis yields a simple approximate cutoff law for HHG in solids. Differences between HHG in atoms and solids are identified that are important for adapting atomic attosecond technology to make it applicable to condensed matter.

  7. Conventional, Bayesian, and Modified Prony's methods for characterizing fast and slow waves in equine cancellous bone

    PubMed Central

    Groopman, Amber M.; Katz, Jonathan I.; Holland, Mark R.; Fujita, Fuminori; Matsukawa, Mami; Mizuno, Katsunori; Wear, Keith A.; Miller, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional, Bayesian, and the modified least-squares Prony's plus curve-fitting (MLSP + CF) methods were applied to data acquired using 1 MHz center frequency, broadband transducers on a single equine cancellous bone specimen that was systematically shortened from 11.8 mm down to 0.5 mm for a total of 24 sample thicknesses. Due to overlapping fast and slow waves, conventional analysis methods were restricted to data from sample thicknesses ranging from 11.8 mm to 6.0 mm. In contrast, Bayesian and MLSP + CF methods successfully separated fast and slow waves and provided reliable estimates of the ultrasonic properties of fast and slow waves for sample thicknesses ranging from 11.8 mm down to 3.5 mm. Comparisons of the three methods were carried out for phase velocity at the center frequency and the slope of the attenuation coefficient for the fast and slow waves. Good agreement among the three methods was also observed for average signal loss at the center frequency. The Bayesian and MLSP + CF approaches were able to separate the fast and slow waves and provide good estimates of the fast and slow wave properties even when the two wave modes overlapped in both time and frequency domains making conventional analysis methods unreliable. PMID:26328678

  8. Conventional, Bayesian, and Modified Prony's methods for characterizing fast and slow waves in equine cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Groopman, Amber M; Katz, Jonathan I; Holland, Mark R; Fujita, Fuminori; Matsukawa, Mami; Mizuno, Katsunori; Wear, Keith A; Miller, James G

    2015-08-01

    Conventional, Bayesian, and the modified least-squares Prony's plus curve-fitting (MLSP + CF) methods were applied to data acquired using 1 MHz center frequency, broadband transducers on a single equine cancellous bone specimen that was systematically shortened from 11.8 mm down to 0.5 mm for a total of 24 sample thicknesses. Due to overlapping fast and slow waves, conventional analysis methods were restricted to data from sample thicknesses ranging from 11.8 mm to 6.0 mm. In contrast, Bayesian and MLSP + CF methods successfully separated fast and slow waves and provided reliable estimates of the ultrasonic properties of fast and slow waves for sample thicknesses ranging from 11.8 mm down to 3.5 mm. Comparisons of the three methods were carried out for phase velocity at the center frequency and the slope of the attenuation coefficient for the fast and slow waves. Good agreement among the three methods was also observed for average signal loss at the center frequency. The Bayesian and MLSP + CF approaches were able to separate the fast and slow waves and provide good estimates of the fast and slow wave properties even when the two wave modes overlapped in both time and frequency domains making conventional analysis methods unreliable.

  9. Determining attenuation properties of interfering fast and slow ultrasonic waves in cancellous bone

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Amber M.; Hoffman, Joseph J.; Anderson, Christian C.; Holland, Mark R.; Nagatani, Yoshiki; Mizuno, Katsunori; Matsukawa, Mami; Miller, James G.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that interference between fast waves and slow waves can lead to observed negative dispersion in cancellous bone. In this study, the effects of overlapping fast and slow waves on measurements of the apparent attenuation as a function of propagation distance are investigated along with methods of analysis used to determine the attenuation properties. Two methods are applied to simulated data that were generated based on experimentally acquired signals taken from a bovine specimen. The first method uses a time-domain approach that was dictated by constraints imposed by the partial overlap of fast and slow waves. The second method uses a frequency-domain log-spectral subtraction technique on the separated fast and slow waves. Applying the time-domain analysis to the broadband data yields apparent attenuation behavior that is larger in the early stages of propagation and decreases as the wave travels deeper. In contrast, performing frequency-domain analysis on the separated fast waves and slow waves results in attenuation coefficients that are independent of propagation distance. Results suggest that features arising from the analysis of overlapping two-mode data may represent an alternate explanation for the previously reported apparent dependence on propagation distance of the attenuation coefficient of cancellous bone. PMID:21973378

  10. Determining attenuation properties of interfering fast and slow ultrasonic waves in cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Amber M; Hoffman, Joseph J; Anderson, Christian C; Holland, Mark R; Nagatani, Yoshiki; Mizuno, Katsunori; Matsukawa, Mami; Miller, James G

    2011-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that interference between fast waves and slow waves can lead to observed negative dispersion in cancellous bone. In this study, the effects of overlapping fast and slow waves on measurements of the apparent attenuation as a function of propagation distance are investigated along with methods of analysis used to determine the attenuation properties. Two methods are applied to simulated data that were generated based on experimentally acquired signals taken from a bovine specimen. The first method uses a time-domain approach that was dictated by constraints imposed by the partial overlap of fast and slow waves. The second method uses a frequency-domain log-spectral subtraction technique on the separated fast and slow waves. Applying the time-domain analysis to the broadband data yields apparent attenuation behavior that is larger in the early stages of propagation and decreases as the wave travels deeper. In contrast, performing frequency-domain analysis on the separated fast waves and slow waves results in attenuation coefficients that are independent of propagation distance. Results suggest that features arising from the analysis of overlapping two-mode data may represent an alternate explanation for the previously reported apparent dependence on propagation distance of the attenuation coefficient of cancellous bone.

  11. Fast wave current drive modeling using the combined RANT3D and PICES Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, E. F.; Murakami, M.; Stallings, D. C.; Carter, M. D.; Wang, C. Y.; Galambos, J. D.; Batchelor, D. B.; Baity, F. W.; Bell, G. L.; Wilgen, J. B.; Chiu, S. C.; DeGrassie, J. S.; Forest, C. B.; Kupfer, K.; Petty, C. C.; Pinsker, R. T.; Prater, R.; Lohr, J.; Lee, K. M.

    1996-02-01

    Two numerical codes are combined to give a theoretical estimate of the current drive and direct electron heating by fast waves launched from phased antenna arrays on the DIII-D tokamak. Results are compared with experiment.

  12. High harmonics from solids probe Angstrom scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yong Sing; Reis, David; Ghimire, Shambhu

    2016-05-01

    The basic microscopic mechanism for the high harmonics generation (HHG) in isolated atoms and molecules has been understood in the 90's. Since then the gas harmonics have been utilized widely in ultrafast x-ray science, from attosecond pulse generation to imaging molecular orbitals of the target molecule. In contrast, the solid-state harmonic generation mechanism is currently being investigated following the recent experimental discovery in zinc oxide crystal. In particular, because of the fundamental differences, attributed to the high density and periodicity of the crystal, it was not clear if the solid-state harmonics could be used to reveal bonding structures in crystals. Here we report our experimental results on generation of XUV harmonics in single crystal MgO subjected to the field strengths on the order of 1V/Å without damage. High harmonics in MgO show strong crystal orientation dependence as well as a strong laser ellipticity dependence. By exploiting these unique characteristics, we demonstrate that XUV harmonics from bulk crystals can probe Angstrom scale electronic structure of the crystal.

  13. Large-amplitude hydromagnetic waves in collisionless relativistic plasma - Exact solution for the fast-mode magnetoacoustic wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, A.

    1983-01-01

    An exact nonlinear solution is found to the relativistic kinetic and electrodynamic equations (in their hydromagnetic limit) that describes the large-amplitude fast-mode magnetoacoustic wave propagating normal to the magnetic field in a collisionless, previously uniform plasma. It is pointed out that a wave of this kind will be generated by transverse compression of any collisionless plasma. The solution is in essence independent of the detailed form of the particle momentum distribution functions. The solution is obtained, in part, through the method of characteristics; the wave exhibits the familiar properties of steepening and shock formation. A detailed analysis is given of the ultrarelativistic limit of this wave.

  14. Observation of fast-ion Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance with shear Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yang; Heidbrink, W. W.; Boehmer, H.; McWilliams, R.; Vincena, S.; Carter, T. A.; Gekelman, W.; Leneman, D.; Pribyl, P.

    2008-10-15

    The Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance ({omega}-k{sub z}v{sub z}={omega}{sub f}) between fast ions and shear Alfven waves is experimentally investigated ({omega}, wave frequency; k{sub z}, axial wavenumber; v{sub z}, fast-ion axial speed; {omega}{sub f}, fast-ion cyclotron frequency). A test particle beam of fast ions is launched by a Li{sup +} source in the helium plasma of the LArge Plasma Device (LAPD) [W. Gekelman, H. Pfister, Z. Lucky, J. Bamber, D. Leneman, and J. Maggs, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)], with shear Alfven waves (SAW) (amplitude {delta} B/B up to 1%) launched by a loop antenna. A collimated fast-ion energy analyzer measures the nonclassical spreading of the beam, which is proportional to the resonance with the wave. A resonance spectrum is observed by launching SAWs at 0.3-0.8{omega}{sub ci}. Both the magnitude and frequency dependence of the beam-spreading are in agreement with the theoretical prediction using a Monte Carlo Lorentz code that launches fast ions with an initial spread in real/velocity space and random phases relative to the wave. Measured wave magnetic field data are used in the simulation.

  15. High harmonic generation in underdense plasmas by intense laser pulses with orbital angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Mendonça, J. T.; Vieira, J.

    2015-12-15

    We study high harmonic generation produced by twisted laser pulses, with orbital angular momentum in the relativistic regime, for pulse propagation in underdense plasma. We consider fast time scale processes associated with an ultra-short pulse, where the ion motion can be neglected. We use both analytical models and numerical simulations using a relativistic particle-in-cell code. The present description is valid for relativistic laser intensities, when the normalized field amplitude is much larger than one, a ≫ 1. We also discuss two distinct processes associated with linear and circular polarization. Using both analytical solutions and particle-in-cell simulations, we are able to show that, for laser pulses in a well defined Laguerre-Gauss mode, angular momentum conservation is observed during the process of harmonic generation. Intensity modulation of the harmonic spectrum is also verified, as imposed by the nonlinear time-scale for energy transfer between different harmonics.

  16. MODELING SUPER-FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES OBSERVED BY SDO IN ACTIVE REGION FUNNELS

    SciTech Connect

    Ofman, L.; Liu, W.; Title, A.; Aschwanden, M.

    2011-10-20

    Recently, quasi-periodic, rapidly propagating waves have been observed in extreme ultraviolet by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument in about 10 flare/coronal mass ejection (CME) events thus far. A typical example is the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/CME event that exhibited arc-shaped wave trains propagating in an active region (AR) magnetic funnel with {approx}5% intensity variations at speeds in the range of 1000-2000 km s{sup -1}. The fast temporal cadence and high sensitivity of AIA enabled the detection of these waves. We identify them as fast magnetosonic waves driven quasi-periodically at the base of the flaring region and develop a three-dimensional MHD model of the event. For the initial state we utilize the dipole magnetic field to model the AR and include gravitationally stratified density at coronal temperature. At the coronal base of the AR, we excite the fast magnetosonic wave by periodic velocity pulsations in the photospheric plane confined to a funnel of magnetic field lines. The excited fast magnetosonic waves have similar amplitude, wavelength, and propagation speeds as the observed wave trains. Based on the simulation results, we discuss the possible excitation mechanism of the waves, their dynamical properties, and the use of the observations for coronal MHD seismology.

  17. Ptychographic hyperspectral spectromicroscopy with an extreme ultraviolet high harmonic comb.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bosheng; Gardner, Dennis F; Seaberg, Matthew H; Shanblatt, Elisabeth R; Porter, Christina L; Karl, Robert; Mancuso, Christopher A; Kapteyn, Henry C; Murnane, Margaret M; Adams, Daniel E

    2016-08-01

    We report a proof-of-principle demonstration of a new scheme of spectromicroscopy in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral range, where the spectral response of the sample at different wavelengths is imaged simultaneously. This scheme is enabled by combining ptychographic information multiplexing (PIM) with a tabletop EUV source based on high harmonic generation, where four spectrally narrow harmonics near 30 nm form a spectral comb structure. Extending PIM from previously demonstrated visible wavelengths to the EUV/X-ray wavelengths promises much higher spatial resolution and a more powerful spectral contrast mechanism, making PIM an attractive spectromicroscopy method in both microscopy and spectroscopy aspects. In addition to spectromicroscopy, this method images the multicolor EUV beam in situ, making this a powerful beam characterization technique. In contrast to other methods, the techniques described here use no hardware to separate wavelengths, leading to efficient use of the EUV radiation. PMID:27505837

  18. Ptychographic hyperspectral spectromicroscopy with an extreme ultraviolet high harmonic comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bosheng; Gardner, Dennis F.; Seaberg, Matthew H.; Shanblatt, Elisabeth R.; Porter, Christina L.; Karl, Robert; Mancuso, Christopher A.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret M.; Adams, Daniel E.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a new scheme of spectromicroscopy in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral range, where the spectral response of the sample at different wavelengths is imaged simultaneously. It is enabled by applying ptychographical information multiplexing (PIM) to a tabletop EUV source based on high harmonic generation, where four spectrally narrow harmonics near 30 nm form a spectral comb structure. Extending PIM from previously demonstrated visible wavelengths to the EUV/X-ray wavelengths promises much higher spatial resolution and more powerful spectral contrast mechanism, making PIM an attractive spectromicroscopy method in both the microscopy and the spectroscopy aspects. Besides the sample, the multicolor EUV beam is also imaged in situ, making our method a powerful beam characterization technique. No hardware is used to separate or narrow down the wavelengths, leading to efficient use of the EUV radiation.

  19. High harmonic generation in the undulators for free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukovsky, K.

    2015-10-01

    We present the analysis of the undulator radiation (UR) with account for major sources of the spectral line broadening. For relativistic electrons we obtain the analytical expressions for the UR spectrum, the intensity and the emission line shape with account for the finite size of the beam, the emittance and the energy spread. Partial compensation of the divergency by properly imposed weak constant magnetic component is demonstrated in the analytical form. Considering the examples of radiation from single and double frequency undulators, we study high harmonic generation with account for all major sources of homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening with account for the characteristics of the electrons beam. We apply our analysis to free electron laser (FEL) calculations and we compare the obtained results with the radiation of a FEL on the supposition of the ideal undulator.

  20. Creating high-harmonic beams with controlled orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Gariepy, Genevieve; Leach, Jonathan; Kim, Kyung Taec; Hammond, T J; Frumker, E; Boyd, Robert W; Corkum, P B

    2014-10-10

    A beam with an angular-dependant phase Φ = ℓϕ about the beam axis carries an orbital angular momentum of ℓℏ per photon. Such beams are exploited to provide superresolution in microscopy. Creating extreme ultraviolet or soft-x-ray beams with controllable orbital angular momentum is a critical step towards extending superresolution to much higher spatial resolution. We show that orbital angular momentum is conserved during high-harmonic generation. Experimentally, we use a fundamental beam with |ℓ| = 1 and interferometrically determine that the harmonics each have orbital angular momentum equal to their harmonic number. Theoretically, we show how any small value of orbital angular momentum can be coupled to any harmonic in a controlled manner. Our results open a route to microscopy on the molecular, or even submolecular, scale.

  1. Polarization gating of high harmonic generation in the water window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Ren, Xiaoming; Yin, Yanchun; Cheng, Yan; Cunningham, Eric; Wu, Yi; Chang, Zenghu

    2016-06-01

    We implement the polarization gating (PG) technique with a two-cycle, 1.7 μm driving field to generate an attosecond supercontinuum extending to the water window spectral region. The ellipticity dependence of the high harmonic yield over a photon energy range much broader than previous work is measured and compared with a semi-classical model. When PG is applied, the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) is swept to study its influence on the continuum generation. PG with one-cycle (5.7 fs) and two-cycle (11.3 fs) delay are tested, and both give continuous spectra spanning from 50 to 450 eV under certain CEP values, strongly indicating the generation of isolated attosecond pulses in the water window region.

  2. Research on fast rise time EMP radiating-wave simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Lisi; Liu, Haitao; Wang, Yun

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents an antenna of High altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) radiating-wave simulator which expands the testing zone larger than the traditional transmission line simulator. The numerical results show that traverse electramagnetic (TEM) antenna can be used to radiate HEMP simulation radiating wave, but in low frequency band the emissive capability is poor. The experiment proves the numerical model is valid. The results of this paper show that TEM antenna can be used to HEMP radiating-wave simulator, and can prove the low frequency radiation capability through resistance loaded method.

  3. Extreme ultraviolet high-harmonic spectroscopy of solids.

    PubMed

    Luu, T T; Garg, M; Kruchinin, S Yu; Moulet, A; Hassan, M Th; Goulielmakis, E

    2015-05-28

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) high-harmonic radiation emerging from laser-driven atoms, molecules or plasmas underlies powerful attosecond spectroscopy techniques and provides insight into fundamental structural and dynamic properties of matter. The advancement of these spectroscopy techniques to study strong-field electron dynamics in condensed matter calls for the generation and manipulation of EUV radiation in bulk solids, but this capability has remained beyond the reach of optical sciences. Recent experiments and theoretical predictions paved the way to strong-field physics in solids by demonstrating the generation and optical control of deep ultraviolet radiation in bulk semiconductors, driven by femtosecond mid-infrared fields or the coherent up-conversion of terahertz fields to multi-octave spectra in the mid-infrared and optical frequencies. Here we demonstrate that thin films of SiO2 exposed to intense, few-cycle to sub-cycle pulses give rise to wideband coherent EUV radiation extending in energy to about 40 electronvolts. Our study indicates the association of the emitted EUV radiation with intraband currents of multi-petahertz frequency, induced in the lowest conduction band of SiO2. To demonstrate the applicability of high-harmonic spectroscopy to solids, we exploit the EUV spectra to gain access to fine details of the energy dispersion profile of the conduction band that are as yet inaccessible by photoemission spectroscopy in wide-bandgap dielectrics. In addition, we use the EUV spectra to trace the attosecond control of the intraband electron motion induced by synthesized optical transients. Our work advances lightwave electronics in condensed matter into the realm of multi-petahertz frequencies and their attosecond control, and marks the advent of solid-state EUV photonics.

  4. Extreme ultraviolet high-harmonic spectroscopy of solids.

    PubMed

    Luu, T T; Garg, M; Kruchinin, S Yu; Moulet, A; Hassan, M Th; Goulielmakis, E

    2015-05-28

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) high-harmonic radiation emerging from laser-driven atoms, molecules or plasmas underlies powerful attosecond spectroscopy techniques and provides insight into fundamental structural and dynamic properties of matter. The advancement of these spectroscopy techniques to study strong-field electron dynamics in condensed matter calls for the generation and manipulation of EUV radiation in bulk solids, but this capability has remained beyond the reach of optical sciences. Recent experiments and theoretical predictions paved the way to strong-field physics in solids by demonstrating the generation and optical control of deep ultraviolet radiation in bulk semiconductors, driven by femtosecond mid-infrared fields or the coherent up-conversion of terahertz fields to multi-octave spectra in the mid-infrared and optical frequencies. Here we demonstrate that thin films of SiO2 exposed to intense, few-cycle to sub-cycle pulses give rise to wideband coherent EUV radiation extending in energy to about 40 electronvolts. Our study indicates the association of the emitted EUV radiation with intraband currents of multi-petahertz frequency, induced in the lowest conduction band of SiO2. To demonstrate the applicability of high-harmonic spectroscopy to solids, we exploit the EUV spectra to gain access to fine details of the energy dispersion profile of the conduction band that are as yet inaccessible by photoemission spectroscopy in wide-bandgap dielectrics. In addition, we use the EUV spectra to trace the attosecond control of the intraband electron motion induced by synthesized optical transients. Our work advances lightwave electronics in condensed matter into the realm of multi-petahertz frequencies and their attosecond control, and marks the advent of solid-state EUV photonics. PMID:26017451

  5. 3D WKB solution for fast magnetoacoustic wave behaviour around an X-line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, J. A.; Botha, G. J. J.; Régnier, S.; Spoors, D. L.

    2016-06-01

    Context. We study the propagation of a fast magnetoacoustic wave in a 3D magnetic field created from two magnetic dipoles. The magnetic topology contains an X-line. Aims: We aim to contribute to the overall understanding of MHD wave propagation within inhomogeneous media, specifically around X-lines. Methods: We investigate the linearised, 3D MHD equations under the assumptions of ideal and cold plasma. We utilise the WKB approximation and Charpit's method during our investigation. Results: It is found that the behaviour of the fast magnetoacoustic wave is entirely dictated by the local, inhomogeneous, equilibrium Alfvén speed profile. All parts of the wave experience refraction during propagation, where the magnitude of the refraction effect depends on the location of an individual wave element within the inhomogeneous magnetic field. The X-line, along which the Alfvén speed is identically zero, acts as a focus for the refraction effect. There are two main types of wave behaviour: part of the wave is either trapped by the X-line or escapes the system, and there exists a critical starting region around the X-line that divides these two types of behaviour. For the set-up investigated, it is found that 15.5% of the fast wave energy is trapped by the X-line. Conclusions: We conclude that linear, β = 0 fast magnetoacoustic waves can accumulate along X-lines and thus these will be specific locations of fast wave energy deposition and thus preferential heating. The work here highlights the importance of understanding the magnetic topology of a system. We also demonstrate how the 3D WKB technique described in this paper can be applied to other magnetic configurations.

  6. Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance of fast ions with circularly polarized shear Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yang; Heidbrink, W. W.; Zhou Shu; Boehmer, H.; McWilliams, R.; Carter, T. A.; Vincena, S.; Lilley, M. K.

    2009-05-15

    The Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance between fast ions and shear Alfven waves (SAWs) has been experimentally investigated with a test-particle fast-ion (Li{sup +}) beam launched in the helium plasma of the Large Plasma Device [Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)]. Left- or right-hand circularly polarized SAWs are launched by an antenna with four current channels. A collimated fast-ion energy analyzer characterizes the resonance by measuring the nonclassical spreading of the averaged beam signal. Left-hand circularly polarized SAWs resonate with the fast ions but right-hand circularly polarized SAWs do not. The measured fast-ion profiles are compared with simulations by a Monte Carlo Lorentz code that uses the measured wave field data.

  7. Fast wave stabilization/destabilization of ion temperature gradient drift waves in a tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panwar, Anuraj; Ryu, Chang-Mo

    2015-11-01

    A kinetic description is developed for the stabilization/destabilization of ion temperature gradient drift waves by a large amplitude whistler wave. Parametric coupling of a whistler wave with the low frequency drift waves can yields whistler sidebands of their sum and difference frequencies. The whistler pump and sidebands can exert a ponderomotive force on electrons and modify the eigen-frequency of drift waves. This coupling process can lead to the stabilization/destabilization of drift waves, depending on the wave numbers of the interacting waves as well as the whistler pump power. The effectiveness of obliquely propagating whistler pump is also examined.

  8. Slow Wave Excitation in the ICRF and HHFW Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. K.; Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Bonoli, P. T.; Valeo, E. J.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Ryan, P. M.; Smithe, D. N.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    Theoretical considerations and high spatial resolution numerical simulations of radio frequency (rf) wave heating in tokamaks and in spherical toruses (ST) indicate that fast waves launched into tokamaks in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) or into spherical toruses in the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) regime may excite a short wavelength slow mode inside of the plasma discharge due to the presence of hot electrons that satisfy the condition ωwave frequency, k∥ is the local parallel component of the wave vector, and vte is the local electron thermal speed. This excited slow wave may be related to the electrostatic ion cyclotron wave that propagates for frequencies above the fundamental ion cyclotron frequency [1] in warm plasmas or to a high frequency version of a kinetic Alfvén wave [2]. This slow wave, if physically real, would provide another path for rf power absorption in tokamaks and ST devices.

  9. A fast algorithm for the simulation of arterial pulse waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Tao; Hu, Dan; Cai, David

    2016-06-01

    One-dimensional models have been widely used in studies of the propagation of blood pulse waves in large arterial trees. Under a periodic driving of the heartbeat, traditional numerical methods, such as the Lax-Wendroff method, are employed to obtain asymptotic periodic solutions at large times. However, these methods are severely constrained by the CFL condition due to large pulse wave speed. In this work, we develop a new numerical algorithm to overcome this constraint. First, we reformulate the model system of pulse wave propagation using a set of Riemann variables and derive a new form of boundary conditions at the inlet, the outlets, and the bifurcation points of the arterial tree. The new form of the boundary conditions enables us to design a convergent iterative method to enforce the boundary conditions. Then, after exchanging the spatial and temporal coordinates of the model system, we apply the Lax-Wendroff method in the exchanged coordinate system, which turns the large pulse wave speed from a liability to a benefit, to solve the wave equation in each artery of the model arterial system. Our numerical studies show that our new algorithm is stable and can perform ∼15 times faster than the traditional implementation of the Lax-Wendroff method under the requirement that the relative numerical error of blood pressure be smaller than one percent, which is much smaller than the modeling error.

  10. Fast numerical treatment of nonlinear wave equations by spectral methods

    SciTech Connect

    Skjaeraasen, Olaf; Robinson, P. A.; Newman, D. L.

    2011-02-15

    A method is presented that accelerates spectral methods for numerical solution of a broad class of nonlinear partial differential wave equations that are first order in time and that arise in plasma wave theory. The approach involves exact analytical treatment of the linear part of the wave evolution including growth and damping as well as dispersion. After introducing the method for general scalar and vector equations, we discuss and illustrate it in more detail in the context of the coupling of high- and low-frequency plasma wave modes, as modeled by the electrostatic and electromagnetic Zakharov equations in multiple dimensions. For computational efficiency, the method uses eigenvector decomposition, which is particularly advantageous when the wave damping is mode-dependent and anisotropic in wavenumber space. In this context, it is shown that the method can significantly speed up numerical integration relative to standard spectral or finite difference methods by allowing much longer time steps, especially in the limit in which the nonlinear Schroedinger equation applies.

  11. The sensitivities of high-harmonic generation and strong-field ionization to coupled electronic and nuclear dynamics.

    PubMed

    Baykusheva, Denitsa; Kraus, Peter M; Zhang, Song Bin; Rohringer, Nina; Wörner, Hans Jakob

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivities of high-harmonic generation (HHG) and strong-field ionization (SFI) to coupled electronic and nuclear dynamics are studied, using the nitric oxide (NO) molecule as an example. A coherent superposition of electronic and rotational states of NO is prepared by impulsive stimulated Raman scattering and probed by simultaneous detection of HHG and SFI yields. We observe a fourfold higher sensitivity of high-harmonic generation to electronic dynamics and attribute it to the presence of inelastic quantum paths connecting coherently related electronic states [Kraus et al., Phys. Rev. Lett.111, 243005 (2013)]. Whereas different harmonic orders display very different sensitivities to rotational or electronic dynamics, strong-field ionization is found to be most sensitive to electronic motion. We introduce a general theoretical formalism for high-harmonic generation from coupled nuclear-electronic wave packets. We show that the unequal sensitivities of different harmonic orders to electronic or rotational dynamics result from the angle dependence of the photorecombination matrix elements which encode several autoionizing and shape resonances in the photoionization continuum of NO. We further study the dependence of rotational and electronic coherences on the intensity of the excitation pulse and support the observations with calculations.

  12. Electromagnetic ELF wave intensification associated with fast earthward flows in mid-tail plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, J.; Ni, B.; Cully, C. M.; Donovan, E. F.; Thorne, R. M.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2012-03-01

    In this study we perform a statistical survey of the extremely-low-frequency wave activities associated with fast earthward flows in the mid-tail central plasma sheet (CPS) based upon THEMIS measurements. We reveal clear trends of increasing wave intensity with flow enhancement over a broad frequency range, from below fLH (lower-hybrid resonant frequency) to above fce (electron gyrofrequency). We mainly investigate two electromagnetic wave modes, the lower-hybrid waves at frequencies below fLH, and the whistler-mode waves in the frequency range fLH < f < fce. The waves at f < fLH dramatically intensify during fast flow intervals, and tend to contain strong electromagnetic components in the high-plasma-beta CPS region, consistent with the theoretical expectation of the lower-hybrid drift instability in the center region of the tail current sheet. ULF waves with very large perpendicular wavenumber might be Doppler-shifted by the flows and also partly contribute to the observed waves in the lower-hybrid frequency range. The fast flow activity substantially increases the occurrence rate and peak magnitude of the electromagnetic waves in the frequency range fLH < f < fce, though they still tend to be short-lived and sporadic in occurrence. We also find that the electron pitch-angle distribution in the mid-tail CPS undergoes a variation from negative anisotropy (perpendicular temperature smaller than parallel temperature) during weak flow intervals, to more or less positive anisotropy (perpendicular temperature larger than parallel temperature) during fast flow intervals. The flow-related electromagnetic whistler-mode wave tends to occur in conjunction with positive electron anisotropy.

  13. Fast-mode magnetohydrodynamic waves in coronal holes and the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fla, T.; Habbal, S. R.; Holzer, T. E.; Leer, E.

    1984-01-01

    Fast-mode MHD waves in the solar corona can propagate in any direction relative to the background magnetic field. In coronal holes, they refract into regions of low Alfven speed and are relatively difficult to damp. These characteristics lead to the possibility that fast-mode waves transport energy from magnetically closed coronal regions into coronal holes, that they are refracted into the central regions of coronal holes, and that they deposit most of their energy in the region of supersonic flow of high-speed solar wind streams emanating from coronal holes. To investigate whether this possibility might be realized and fast-mode waves might play a significant role in driving high-speed streams, a parameter study is carried out to examine the propagation and damping of fast-mode waves in various coronal hole models. This study indicates a broad range of coronal hole parameters for which fast-mode waves can play such a role and emphasizes the need for an improved knowledge of large-scale coronal magnetic structure, which is required before any firm conclusions can be drawn.

  14. Resonant Alfven wave instabilities driven by streaming fast particles

    SciTech Connect

    Zachary, A.

    1987-05-08

    A plasma simulation code is used to study the resonant interactions between streaming ions and Alfven waves. The medium which supports the Alfven waves is treated as a single, one-dimensional, ideal MHD fluid, while the ions are treated as kinetic particles. The code is used to study three ion distributions: a cold beam; a monoenergetic shell; and a drifting distribution with a power-law dependence on momentum. These distributions represent: the field-aligned beams upstream of the earth's bow shock; the diffuse ions upstream of the bow shock; and the cosmic ray distribution function near a supernova remnant shock. 92 refs., 31 figs., 12 tabs.

  15. Fast characterization of two ultrasound longitudinal waves in cancellous bone using an adaptive beamforming technique.

    PubMed

    Taki, Hirofumi; Nagatani, Yoshiki; Matsukawa, Mami; Mizuno, Katsunori; Sato, Toru

    2015-04-01

    The received signal in through-transmission ultrasound measurements of cancellous bone consists of two longitudinal waves, called the fast and slow waves. Analysis of these fast and slow waves may reveal characteristics of the cancellous bone that would be good indicators of osteoporosis. Because the two waves often overlap, decomposition of the received signal is an important problem in the characterization of bone quality. This study proposes a fast and accurate decomposition method based on the frequency domain interferometry imaging method with a modified wave transfer function that uses a phase rotation parameter. The proposed method accurately characterized the fast and slow waves in the experimental study, and the residual intensity, which was normalized with respect to the received signal intensity, was less than -20 dB over the bone specimen thickness range from 6 to 15 mm. In the simulation study, the residual intensity was less than -20 dB over the specimen thickness range from 3 to 8 mm. Decomposition of a single received signal takes only 5 s using a laptop personal computer with a single central processing unit. The proposed method has great potential to provide accurate and rapid measurements of indicators of osteoporosis in cancellous bone.

  16. Acceleration of the Fast Solar Wind by Solitary Waves in Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, Leon

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to develop a new model for the acceleration of the fast solar wind by nonlinear. time-dependent multidimensional MHD simulations of waves in solar coronal holes. Preliminary computational studies indicate that nonlinear waves are generated in coronal holes by torsional Alfv\\'{e}n waves. These waves in addition to thermal conduction may contribute considerably to the accelerate the solar wind. Specific goals of this proposal are to investigate the generation of nonlinear solitary-like waves and their effect on solar wind acceleration by numerical 2.5D MHD simulation of coronal holes with a broad range of plasma and wave parameters; to study the effect of random disturbances at the base of a solar coronal hole on the fast solar wind acceleration with a more advanced 2.5D MHD model and to compare the results with the available observations; to extend the study to a full 3D MHD simulation of fast solar wind acceleration with a more realistic model of a coronal hole and solar boundary conditions. The ultimate goal of the three year study is to model the, fast solar wind in a coronal hole, based on realistic boundary conditions in a coronal hole near the Sun, and the coronal hole structure (i.e., density, temperature. and magnetic field geometry,) that will become available from the recently launched SOHO spacecraft.

  17. Acceleration of the Fast Solar Wind by Solitary Waves in Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, Leon

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to develop a new model for the acceleration of the fast solar wind by nonlinear, time-dependent multidimensional MHD simulations of waves in solar coronal holes. Preliminary computational studies indicate that solitary-like waves are generated in coronal holes nonlinearly by torsional Alfven waves. These waves in addition to thermal conduction may contribute considerably to the accelerate the solar wind. Specific goals of this proposal are to investigate the generation of nonlinear solitary-like waves and their effect on solar wind acceleration by numerical 2.5D MHD simulation of coronal holes with a broad range of plasma and wave parameters; to study the effect of random disturbances at the base of a solar coronal hole on the fast solar wind acceleration with a more advanced 2.5D MHD model and to compare the results with the available observations; to extend the study to a full 3D MHD simulation of fast solar wind acceleration with a more realistic model of a coronal hole and solar boundary conditions. The ultimate goal of the three year study is to model the fast solar wind in a coronal hole, based on realistic boundary conditions in a coronal hole near the Sun, and the coronal hole structure (i.e., density, temperature, and magnetic field geometry) that will become available from the recently launched SOHO spacecraft.

  18. A Fast and Reliable Method for Surface Wave Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmin, M. P.; Ritzwoller, M. H.; Levshin, A. L.

    - We describe a method to invert regional or global scale surface-wave group or phase-velocity measurements to estimate 2-D models of the distribution and strength of isotropic and azimuthally anisotropic velocity variations. Such maps have at least two purposes in monitoring the nuclear Comprehensive Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT): (1) They can be used as data to estimate the shear velocity of the crust and uppermost mantle and topography on internal interfaces which are important in event location, and (2) they can be used to estimate surface-wave travel-time correction surfaces to be used in phase-matched filters designed to extract low signal-to-noise surface-wave packets.The purpose of this paper is to describe one useful path through the large number of options available in an inversion of surface-wave data. Our method appears to provide robust and reliable dispersion maps on both global and regional scales. The technique we describe has a number of features that have motivated its development and commend its use: (1) It is developed in a spherical geometry; (2) the region of inference is defined by an arbitrary simple closed curve so that the method works equally well on local, regional, or global scales; (3) spatial smoothness and model amplitude constraints can be applied simultaneously; (4) the selection of model regularization and the smoothing parameters is highly flexible which allows for the assessment of the effect of variations in these parameters; (5) the method allows for the simultaneous estimation of spatial resolution and amplitude bias of the images; and (6) the method optionally allows for the estimation of azimuthal anisotropy.We present examples of the application of this technique to observed surface-wave group and phase velocities globally and regionally across Eurasia and Antarctica.

  19. Detection of Fast-moving Waves Propagating Outward along Sunspots’ Radial Direction in the Photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junwei; Chen, Ruizhu; Hartlep, Thomas; Kosovichev, Alexander G.

    2015-08-01

    Helioseismic and magnetohydrodynamic waves are abundant in and above sunspots. Through cross-correlating oscillation signals in the photosphere observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, we reconstruct how waves propagate away from virtual wave sources located inside a sunspot. In addition to the usual helioseismic wave, a fast-moving wave is detected traveling along the sunspot’s radial direction from the umbra to about 15 Mm beyond the sunspot boundary. The wave has a frequency range of 2.5-4.0 mHz with a phase velocity of 45.3 km s-1, substantially faster than the typical speeds of Alfvén and magnetoacoustic waves in the photosphere. The observed phenomenon is consistent with a scenario of that a magnetoacoustic wave is excited at approximately 5 Mm beneath the sunspot. Its wavefront travels to and sweeps across the photosphere with a speed higher than the local magnetoacoustic speed. The fast-moving wave, if truly excited beneath the sunspot’s surface, will help open a new window for studying the internal structure and dynamics of sunspots.

  20. DETECTION OF FAST-MOVING WAVES PROPAGATING OUTWARD ALONG SUNSPOTS’ RADIAL DIRECTION IN THE PHOTOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Junwei; Chen, Ruizhu; Hartlep, Thomas; Kosovichev, Alexander G.

    2015-08-10

    Helioseismic and magnetohydrodynamic waves are abundant in and above sunspots. Through cross-correlating oscillation signals in the photosphere observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, we reconstruct how waves propagate away from virtual wave sources located inside a sunspot. In addition to the usual helioseismic wave, a fast-moving wave is detected traveling along the sunspot’s radial direction from the umbra to about 15 Mm beyond the sunspot boundary. The wave has a frequency range of 2.5–4.0 mHz with a phase velocity of 45.3 km s{sup −1}, substantially faster than the typical speeds of Alfvén and magnetoacoustic waves in the photosphere. The observed phenomenon is consistent with a scenario of that a magnetoacoustic wave is excited at approximately 5 Mm beneath the sunspot. Its wavefront travels to and sweeps across the photosphere with a speed higher than the local magnetoacoustic speed. The fast-moving wave, if truly excited beneath the sunspot’s surface, will help open a new window for studying the internal structure and dynamics of sunspots.

  1. Analytical estimates of electron quasi-linear diffusion by fast magnetosonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourenas, D.; Artemyev, A. V.; Agapitov, O. V.; Krasnoselskikh, V.

    2013-06-01

    Quantifying the loss of relativistic electrons from the Earth's radiation belts requires to estimate the effects of many kinds of observed waves, ranging from ULF to VLF. Analytical estimates of electron quasi-linear diffusion coefficients for whistler-mode chorus and hiss waves of arbitrary obliquity have been recently derived, allowing useful analytical approximations for lifetimes. We examine here the influence of much lower frequency and highly oblique, fast magnetosonic waves (also called ELF equatorial noise) by means of both approximate analytical formulations of the corresponding diffusion coefficients and full numerical simulations. Further analytical developments allow us to identify the most critical wave and plasma parameters necessary for a strong impact of fast magnetosonic waves on electron lifetimes and acceleration in the simultaneous presence of chorus, hiss, or lightning-generated waves, both inside and outside the plasmasphere. In this respect, a relatively small frequency over ion gyrofrequency ratio appears more favorable, and other propitious circumstances are characterized. This study should be useful for a comprehensive appraisal of the potential effect of fast magnetosonic waves throughout the magnetosphere.

  2. Avalanche of stimulated forward scattering in high harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Serrat, Carles; Roca, David; Budesca, Josep M; Seres, Jozsef; Seres, Enikoe; Aurand, Bastian; Hoffmann, Andreas; Namba, Shinichi; Kuehl, Thomas; Spielmann, Christian

    2016-04-18

    Optical amplifiers in all ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum exhibit an essential characteristic, namely the input signal during the propagation in the amplifier medium is multiplied by the avalanche effect of the stimulated emission to produce exponential growth. We perform a theoretical study motivated and supported by experimental data on a He gas amplifier driven by intense 30-fs-long laser pulses and seeded with attosecond pulse trains generated in a separated Ne gas jet. We demonstrate that the strong-field theory in the frame of high harmonic generation fully supports the appearance of the avalanche effect in the amplification of extreme ultraviolet attosecond pulse trains. We theoretically separate and identify different physical processes taking part in the interaction and we demonstrate that X-ray parametric amplification dominates over others. In particular, we identify strong-field mediated intrapulse X-ray parametric processes as decisive for amplification at the single-atom level. We confirm that the amplification takes place at photon energies where the amplifier is seeded and when the seed pulses are perfectly synchronized with the driving strong field in the amplifier. Furthermore, propagation effects, phase matching and seed synchronization can be exploited to tune the amplified spectral range within the seed bandwidth. PMID:27137242

  3. High-harmonic generation from an atomically thin semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hanzhe; Li, Yilei; Ghimire, Shambhu; Heinz, Tony; Reis, David

    The process of high-harmonic generation (HHG) from ultrashort laser pulses has recently been observed in bulk solids, complementing the well-established process in the gas phase. HHG is of interest both as a source of ultrashort pulses in the attosecond regime that has photon energies extending up to the soft x-ray region and as a method of probing material response outside the regime of perturbative nonlinear optics. In this paper, we present the observation of HHG from a single atomic layer of MoS2 driven by a strong infrared pulse of 100 fs duration and 0.3 eV photon energy. We observe distinct harmonics up to the 13th order of the infrared excitation. The non-perturbative nature of the HHG process is demonstrated by the weak power dependence of the harmonic intensities. To gain further insight into the process, we have investigated the variation of the HHG signal with sample orientation and the ellipticity of pump excitation. We compare and contrast the process with that from the bulk MoS2 crystal. We find significant differences in the response for the monolayer and bulk crystal, which can be understood in terms of the distinct crystallographic symmetries in the two cases.

  4. Fast neural solution of a nonlinear wave equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, Nikzad; Barhen, Jacob

    1992-01-01

    A neural algorithm for rapidly simulating a certain class of nonlinear wave phenomena using analog VLSI neural hardware is presented and applied to the Korteweg-de Vries partial differential equation. The corresponding neural architecture is obtained from a pseudospectral representation of the spatial dependence, along with a leap-frog scheme for the temporal evolution. Numerical simulations demonstrated the robustness of the proposed approach.

  5. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION Quasi self-adjoint nonlinear wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibragimov, N. H.; Torrisi, M.; Tracinà, R.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we generalize the classification of self-adjoint second-order linear partial differential equation to a family of nonlinear wave equations with two independent variables. We find a class of quasi self-adjoint nonlinear equations which includes the self-adjoint linear equations as a particular case. The property of a differential equation to be quasi self-adjoint is important, e.g. for constructing conservation laws associated with symmetries of the differential equation.

  6. Fast Neural Solution Of A Nonlinear Wave Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barhen, Jacob; Toomarian, Nikzad

    1996-01-01

    Neural algorithm for simulation of class of nonlinear wave phenomena devised. Numerically solves special one-dimensional case of Korteweg-deVries equation. Intended to be executed rapidly by neural network implemented as charge-coupled-device/charge-injection device, very-large-scale integrated-circuit analog data processor of type described in "CCD/CID Processors Would Offer Greater Precision" (NPO-18972).

  7. Parametric instabilities in the fast-wave heating of tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, V.K.

    1984-12-01

    A high-power whistler wave launched into a tokomak is susceptible to resonant decay into ion-cyclotron and lower-hybrid waves when the lower-hybrid resonance layer ..omega../sub lh/ = ..omega../sub 0/ exists in the outer region of the plasma x/sup 2//a/sup 2/> or approx. =0.6, where ..omega../sub 0/ is the frequency of the whistler, ..omega../sub lh/ is the lower-hybrid frequency, x is the distance away from the center of the plasma, and a is the minor radius. For Princeton Large Torus parameters, this requires a line average density n> or approx. =6 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/ when the whistler frequency ..omega../sub 0/approx. =800 MHz and the threshold pump power for the onset of the instability is 100 kW. The threshold power is determined by the convection losses and it increases nonlinearly with the temperature and very rapidly with decreasing density. The parametric instability would tend to deposit the momentum and energy of the pump wave in the outer region of the plasma.

  8. Parametric instabilities in the fast-wave heating of tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, V. K.

    1984-12-01

    A high-power whistler wave launched into a tokomak is susceptible to resonant decay into ion-cyclotron and lower-hybrid waves when the lower-hybrid resonance layer ωlh=ω0 exists in the outer region of the plasma x2/a2≳0.6, where ω0 is the frequency of the whistler, ωlh is the lower-hybrid frequency, x is the distance away from the center of the plasma, and a is the minor radius. For Princeton Large Torus parameters, this requires a line average density n≳6×1013 cm-3 when the whistler frequency ω0≂800 MHz and the threshold pump power for the onset of the instability is 100 kW. The threshold power is determined by the convection losses and it increases nonlinearly with the temperature and very rapidly with decreasing density. The parametric instability would tend to deposit the momentum and energy of the pump wave in the outer region of the plasma.

  9. Commensal searches for microhertz gravitational waves and fast radio bursts: A pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Hobbs, George; Ravi, Vikram

    2014-04-01

    In this pilot observing programme, we propose to observe at high cadence the transient gravitational-wave and radio-wave Universe. The goals of these observations are threefold: 1) To improve the timing precision of secondary pulsars in the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) to accelerate the detection of gravitational waves; 2) To characterise the gravitational wave universe in the hitherto unexplored microhertz frequency band; and 3) To develop methods and search for fast radio bursts (FRBs) while conducting precision time experiments. To achieve these goals, we request 120 hours of observations with the Parkes multibeam system, divided into 10 epochs comprising 12-hour LST days. This pilot project acts as a feasibility study for modifications to both the PPTA project and the International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA), the consortium coordinating timing array observations in Australia, Europe, and North America, and assess the feasibility of searching for fast radio bursts while conduction precision timing observations.

  10. Calculation of coupling to slow and fast waves in the LHRF from phased waveguide arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.; Duvall, R.E.; Fortgang, C.M.; Colestock, P.L.

    1986-04-01

    A previously reported algorithm for solving the problem of coupling electromagnetic energy in the LHRF from a phased array of identical rectangular waveguides to a plane-stratified, magnetized cold plasma is numerically implemented. The resulting computer codes are sufficiently general to allow for an arbitrary number of waveguides with finite dimensions in both poloidal and toroidal directions, and are thus capable of computing coupling to both slow and fast waves in the plasma. Some of the details of the implementation and the extension of the algorithm to allow study of the Fourier spectrum of slow and fast waves launched by the array are discussed. Good agreement is found with previously reported, less general work for the slow wave launching case. The effect of phasing multirow arrays in the poloidal direction is studied, and an asymmetry between phasing 'up' and 'down' is found that persists in the case where the plasma adjacent to the array is uniform. A 4 x 3 array designed to launch fast waves of high phase velocity is studied. By using the optimal poloidal phasing, low reflection coefficients (absolute value of R/sup 2/ less than or equal to 20%) are found under some not unrealistic edge plasma conditions, but most of the input power is trapped in the outermost layer of the plasma. Implications of our results for fast wave current drive experiments are discussed.

  11. Circularly polarized Magnetic Field of Whistler Wave during Fast Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xiang; Wongwaitayakornkul, Pakorn; Bellan, Paul; Bellan Group Team

    2014-10-01

    Obliquely propagating whistler waves are expected to have circularly polarized magnetic components and to be associated with fast magnetic reconnection. In the Caltech plasma jet experiment, a current-carrying collimated jet is created from the merging of eight plasma-filled flux ropes. Fast magnetic reconnection occurs during the merging process. When the current- carrying jet undergoes fast kink instability, a lateral Rayleigh-Taylor instability occurs on the jet surface and induces another fast magnetic reconnection event. A capacitive coupling probe placed near the jet has measured fast electric field fluctuations at 15MHz which is in the whistler regime for this plasma. A 3D fast Bdot probe with good electrostatic rejection has been specifically designed to measure the 3D magnetic components of the whistler wave. Preliminary results have revealed a 3D 15 MHz magnetic fluctuation. Work is underway to increase the sensitivity of the induction probe and also to reduce electrostatic pickup. With the improved probe, the polarization property of the magnetic component of the whistler wave is expected to be resolved if it exists.

  12. Landau Damping of Transverse Waves in the Exosphere by Fast Particle Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidman, D. A.; Jaggi, R. K.

    1962-01-01

    We have investigated the Landau damping of transverse waves propagating in the thermal exospheric plasma, by fast particle fluxes which also exist in these regions. The most intense non-thermal fluxes so far detected are those of the auroral producing electrons and protons measured by McIlwain. We find that these fluxes may considerably damp the propagation of whistler modes through some regions. The damping of hydromagnetic waves in the exosphere by this mechanism is negligible.

  13. The preplasma effect on the properties of the shock wave driven by a fast electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llor Aisa, E.; Ribeyre, X.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2016-08-01

    Strong shock wave generation by a mono-energetic fast electron beam in a plasma with an increasing density profile is studied theoretically. The proposed analytical model describes the shock wave characteristics for a homogeneous plasma preceded by a low density precursor. The shock pressure and the time of shock formation depend on the ratio of the electron stopping length to the preplasma areal density and on the initial energy of injected electrons. The conclusions of theoretical model are confirmed in numerical simulations.

  14. Preliminary study of slow and fast ultrasonic waves using MR images of trabecular bone phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis-Najera, S. E.; Neria-Pérez, J. A.; Medina, L.; Garipov, R.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Cancellous bone is a complex tissue that performs physiological and biomechanical functions in all vertebrates. It is made up of trabeculae that, from a simplified structural viewpoint, can be considered as plates and beams in a hyperstatic structure that change with time leading to osteoporosis. Several methods has been developed to study the trabecular bone microstructure among them is the Biot's model which predicts the existence of two longitudinal waves in porous media; the slow and the fast waves, that can be related to porosity of the media. This paper is focused on the experimental detection of the two Biot's waves of a trabecular bone phantom, consisting of a trabecular network of inorganic hydroxyapatite. Experimental measurements of both waves were performed using through transmission ultrasound. Results had shown clearly that the propagation of two waves propagation is transversal to the trabecular alignment. Otherwise the waves are overlapped and a single wave seems to be propagated. To validate these results, magnetic resonance images were acquired to assess the trabecular direction, and to assure that the pulses correspond to the slow and fast waves. This approach offers a methodology for non-invasive studies of trabecular bones.

  15. Preliminary study of slow and fast ultrasonic waves using MR images of trabecular bone phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Solis-Najera, S. E. E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx Neria-Pérez, J. A. E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx Medina, L. E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx; Garipov, R.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2014-11-07

    Cancellous bone is a complex tissue that performs physiological and biomechanical functions in all vertebrates. It is made up of trabeculae that, from a simplified structural viewpoint, can be considered as plates and beams in a hyperstatic structure that change with time leading to osteoporosis. Several methods has been developed to study the trabecular bone microstructure among them is the Biot’s model which predicts the existence of two longitudinal waves in porous media; the slow and the fast waves, that can be related to porosity of the media. This paper is focused on the experimental detection of the two Biot’s waves of a trabecular bone phantom, consisting of a trabecular network of inorganic hydroxyapatite. Experimental measurements of both waves were performed using through transmission ultrasound. Results had shown clearly that the propagation of two waves propagation is transversal to the trabecular alignment. Otherwise the waves are overlapped and a single wave seems to be propagated. To validate these results, magnetic resonance images were acquired to assess the trabecular direction, and to assure that the pulses correspond to the slow and fast waves. This approach offers a methodology for non-invasive studies of trabecular bones.

  16. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: A gravitational wave window on extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarkson, Chris; Seahra, Sanjeev S.

    2007-05-01

    We report on the possibility of detecting a submillimetre-sized extra dimension by observing gravitational waves (GWs) emitted by point-like objects orbiting a braneworld black hole. Matter in the 'visible' universe can generate a discrete spectrum of high frequency GWs with amplitudes moderately weaker than the predictions of general relativity, while GW signals generated by matter on a 'shadow' brane hidden in the bulk are potentially strong enough to be detected using current technology. We know of no other astrophysical phenomena that produce GWs with a similar spectrum, which stresses the need to develop detectors capable of measuring this high-frequency signature of large extra dimensions.

  17. Fast calculation of spherical computer generated hologram using spherical wave spectrum method.

    PubMed

    Jackin, Boaz Jessie; Yatagai, Toyohiko

    2013-01-14

    A fast calculation method for computer generation of spherical holograms in proposed. This method is based on wave propagation defined in spectral domain and in spherical coordinates. The spherical wave spectrum and transfer function were derived from boundary value solutions to the scalar wave equation. It is a spectral propagation formula analogous to angular spectrum formula in cartesian coordinates. A numerical method to evaluate the derived formula is suggested, which uses only N(logN)2 operations for calculations on N sampling points. Simulation results are presented to verify the correctness of the proposed method. A spherical hologram for a spherical object was generated and reconstructed successfully using the proposed method.

  18. Partial Reflection and Trapping of a Fast-mode Wave in Solar Coronal Arcade Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Innes, D. E.

    2015-04-01

    We report on the first direct observation of a fast-mode wave propagating along and perpendicular to cool (171 Å) arcade loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). The wave was associated with an impulsive/compact flare near the edge of a sunspot. The EUV wavefront expanded radially outward from the flare center and decelerated in the corona from 1060 to 760 km s-1 within ˜3-4 minutes. Part of the EUV wave propagated along a large-scale arcade of cool loops and was partially reflected back to the flare site. The phase speed of the wave was about 1450 km s-1, which is interpreted as a fast-mode wave. A second overlying loop arcade, orientated perpendicular to the cool arcade, is heated and becomes visible in the AIA hot channels. These hot loops sway in time with the EUV wave, as it propagated to and fro along the lower loop arcade. We suggest that an impulsive energy release at one of the footpoints of the arcade loops causes the onset of an EUV shock wave that propagates along and perpendicular to the magnetic field.

  19. PARTIAL REFLECTION AND TRAPPING OF A FAST-MODE WAVE IN SOLAR CORONAL ARCADE LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pankaj; Innes, D. E.

    2015-04-20

    We report on the first direct observation of a fast-mode wave propagating along and perpendicular to cool (171 Å) arcade loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). The wave was associated with an impulsive/compact flare near the edge of a sunspot. The EUV wavefront expanded radially outward from the flare center and decelerated in the corona from 1060 to 760 km s{sup −1} within ∼3–4 minutes. Part of the EUV wave propagated along a large-scale arcade of cool loops and was partially reflected back to the flare site. The phase speed of the wave was about 1450 km s{sup −1}, which is interpreted as a fast-mode wave. A second overlying loop arcade, orientated perpendicular to the cool arcade, is heated and becomes visible in the AIA hot channels. These hot loops sway in time with the EUV wave, as it propagated to and fro along the lower loop arcade. We suggest that an impulsive energy release at one of the footpoints of the arcade loops causes the onset of an EUV shock wave that propagates along and perpendicular to the magnetic field.

  20. Structured mass density slab as a waveguide of fast magnetoacoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínek, P.; Karlický, M.

    Coronal loops are waveguides for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. These loops are expected to be structured. Therefore, in the present paper, we numerically studied the propagation of the fast MHD waves in the structured density slab (composed from a broad density slab with one axisymmetric narrow sub-slab superposed), and analysed the wave signals. Then, this structured slab was divided into its components, i.e., to simple broad and narrow slabs and the same analysis was made. We compared results of both these cases. For the calculations we adopted a two-dimensional (2D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, in which we solved a full set of ideal time-dependent MHD equations using the FLASH code, applying the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) method. To initiate the fast sausage magnetoacoustic waves, we used axisymmetric Gaussian velocity perturbation. Wave signals were detected in different locations along the slab and as a diagnostic tool of these waves, the wavelet analysis method has been used. We found that for the structured density slab with sufficiently sharp boundaries, i.e., for good quality waveguides (without an energy leakage), the guided waves in the structured slab behave similarly as in its separated (simple slab) components.

  1. Fast wave stabilization/destabilization of drift waves in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pawan; Tripathi, V. K.

    2013-03-15

    Four wave-nonlinear coupling of a large amplitude whistler with low frequency drift wave and whistler wave sidebands is examined. The pump and whistler sidebands exert a low frequency ponderomotive force on electrons introducing a frequency shift in the drift wave. For whistler pump propagating along the ambient magnetic field B{sub s}z-caret with wave number k(vector sign){sub 0}, drift waves of wave number k(vector sign)=k(vector sign){sub Up-Tack }+k{sub ||}z-caret see an upward frequency shift when k{sub Up-Tack }{sup 2}/k{sub 0}{sup 2}>4k{sub ||}/k{sub 0} and are stabilized once the whistler power exceeds a threshold value. The drift waves of low transverse wavelength tend to be destabilized by the nonlinear coupling. Oblique propagating whistler pump with transverse wave vector parallel to k(vector sign){sub Up-Tack} is also effective but with reduced effectiveness.

  2. Hybrid single-beam reconstruction technique for slow and fast varying wave fields.

    PubMed

    Falaggis, Konstantinos; Kozacki, Tomasz; Kujawinska, Malgorzata

    2015-06-01

    An iterative single-beam wave field reconstruction technique that employs both non-paraxial, wave propagation based and paraxial deterministic phase retrieval techniques is presented. This approach overcomes two major obstacles that exist in the current state of the art techniques: iterative methods do not reconstruct slowly varying wave fields due to slow convergence and stagnation, and deterministic methods have paraxial limits, making the reconstructions of quickly varying object features impossible. In this work, a hybrid approach is reported that uses paraxial wave field corrections within iterative phase retrieval solvers. This technique is suitable for cases ranging from slow to fast varying wave fields, and unlike the currently available methods, can also reconstruct measurement objects with different regions of both slowly and quickly varying object features. It is further shown that this technique gives a higher accuracy than current single-beam phase retrieval techniques, and in comparison to the iterative methods, has a higher convergence speed.

  3. Fast and accurate analytical model to solve inverse problem in SHM using Lamb wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddar, Banibrata; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Lamb wave propagation is at the center of attention of researchers for structural health monitoring of thin walled structures. This is due to the fact that Lamb wave modes are natural modes of wave propagation in these structures with long travel distances and without much attenuation. This brings the prospect of monitoring large structure with few sensors/actuators. However the problem of damage detection and identification is an "inverse problem" where we do not have the luxury to know the exact mathematical model of the system. On top of that the problem is more challenging due to the confounding factors of statistical variation of the material and geometric properties. Typically this problem may also be ill posed. Due to all these complexities the direct solution of the problem of damage detection and identification in SHM is impossible. Therefore an indirect method using the solution of the "forward problem" is popular for solving the "inverse problem". This requires a fast forward problem solver. Due to the complexities involved with the forward problem of scattering of Lamb waves from damages researchers rely primarily on numerical techniques such as FEM, BEM, etc. But these methods are slow and practically impossible to be used in structural health monitoring. We have developed a fast and accurate analytical forward problem solver for this purpose. This solver, CMEP (complex modes expansion and vector projection), can simulate scattering of Lamb waves from all types of damages in thin walled structures fast and accurately to assist the inverse problem solver.

  4. Fast and slow magnetosonic waves in two-dimensional spin-1/2 quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mushtaq, A.; Vladimirov, S. V.

    2010-10-15

    Using the spin-1/2 resistive quantum magnetohydrodynamics model, linear and nonlinear relations for slow and fast magnetosonic modes are derived. Spin effects are incorporated via spin force and macroscopic spin magnetization current. The plasma resistivity is shown to play a role of dissipation in the system. With the aid of tanh method the traveling wave solution of Kadomstev-Petviashvili-Burgers is obtained. The solution shows a general shock wave profile superposed by a perturbative solitary-wave contribution. The dynamics of fast and slow magnetosonic shock and soliton, respectively, in the presence and absence of dissipation is investigated with respect to electron spin magnetization, quantum diffraction, and plasma statistic. It is found that results obtained from the spin quantum plasmas differ significantly from the nonspin quantum plasmas. The relevance of the present work to dense astrophysical plasmas such as pulsar magnetosphere is pointed out.

  5. Fast multiscale Gaussian beam methods for wave equations in bounded convex domains

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Gang; Lai, Jun; Qian, Jianliang

    2014-03-15

    Motivated by fast multiscale Gaussian wavepacket transforms and multiscale Gaussian beam methods which were originally designed for pure initial-value problems of wave equations, we develop fast multiscale Gaussian beam methods for initial boundary value problems of wave equations in bounded convex domains in the high frequency regime. To compute the wave propagation in bounded convex domains, we have to take into account reflecting multiscale Gaussian beams, which are accomplished by enforcing reflecting boundary conditions during beam propagation and carrying out suitable reflecting beam summation. To propagate multiscale beams efficiently, we prove that the ratio of the squared magnitude of beam amplitude and the beam width is roughly conserved, and accordingly we propose an effective indicator to identify significant beams. We also prove that the resulting multiscale Gaussian beam methods converge asymptotically. Numerical examples demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method.

  6. Modeling of fast wave absorption by beam ions in DIII-D discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Mau, T. K.; Petty, C. C.; Porkolab, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    1999-09-20

    In recent discharges on DIII-D, neutron measurements indicated absorption of the fast wave by energetic deuterium beam ions when the fourth harmonic resonance is on axis, but little or no interaction for the fifth harmonic. In this work, a geometric optics code is used to quantify the beam ion absorption of fast waves as the frequency (or on-axis harmonic resonance) is varied. Isotropic and anisotropic Maxwellians are used to model the beam ion distribution. Wave power flow in this harmonic range has been found to exhibit a strong poloidal and toroidal behavior in its initial transits across the plasma. Absorption along the rays is calculated using the fully thermal and magnetized treatment. Competing with the beam ions for absorption are the minority hydrogen and background electrons. The modeling results are only in partial agreement with experimental observations, indicating that more detailed physics may need to be included. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  7. Monte-Carlo Orbit/Full Wave Simulation of Fast Alfven Wave (FW) Damping on Resonant Ions in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, M.; Chan, V.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Tang, V.; Bonoli, P.; Wright, J.

    2005-09-26

    To simulate the resonant interaction of fast Alfven wave (FW) heating and Coulomb collisions on energetic ions, including finite orbit effects, a Monte-Carlo code ORBIT-RF has been coupled with a 2D full wave code TORIC4. ORBIT-RF solves Hamiltonian guiding center drift equations to follow trajectories of test ions in 2D axisymmetric numerical magnetic equilibrium under Coulomb collisions and ion cyclotron radio frequency quasi-linear heating. Monte-Carlo operators for pitch-angle scattering and drag calculate the changes of test ions in velocity and pitch angle due to Coulomb collisions. A rf-induced random walk model describing fast ion stochastic interaction with FW reproduces quasi-linear diffusion in velocity space. FW fields and its wave numbers from TORIC are passed on to ORBIT-RF to calculate perpendicular rf kicks of resonant ions valid for arbitrary cyclotron harmonics. ORBIT-RF coupled with TORIC using a single dominant toroidal and poloidal wave number has demonstrated consistency of simulations with recent DIII-D FW experimental results for interaction between injected neutral-beam ions and FW, including measured neutron enhancement and enhanced high energy tail. Comparison with C-Mod fundamental heating discharges also yielded reasonable agreement.

  8. Estimation of material parameters from slow and fast shear waves in an incompressible, transversely isotropic material.

    PubMed

    Tweten, Dennis J; Okamoto, Ruth J; Schmidt, John L; Garbow, Joel R; Bayly, Philip V

    2015-11-26

    This paper describes a method to estimate mechanical properties of soft, anisotropic materials from measurements of shear waves with specific polarization and propagation directions. This method is applicable to data from magnetic resonance elastography (MRE), which is a method for measuring shear waves in live subjects or in vitro samples. Here, we simulate MRE data using finite element analysis. A nearly incompressible, transversely isotropic (ITI) material model with three parameters (shear modulus, shear anisotropy, and tensile anisotropy) is used, which is appropriate for many fibrous, biological tissues. Both slow and fast shear waves travel concurrently through such a material with speeds that depend on the propagation direction relative to fiber orientation. A three-parameter estimation approach based on directional filtering and isolation of slow and fast shear wave components (directional filter inversion, or DFI) is introduced. Wave speeds of each isolated shear wave component are estimated using local frequency estimation (LFE), and material properties are calculated using weighted least squares. Data from multiple finite element simulations are used to assess the accuracy and reliability of DFI for estimation of anisotropic material parameters.

  9. Estimation of material parameters from slow and fast shear waves in an incompressible, transversely isotropic material.

    PubMed

    Tweten, Dennis J; Okamoto, Ruth J; Schmidt, John L; Garbow, Joel R; Bayly, Philip V

    2015-11-26

    This paper describes a method to estimate mechanical properties of soft, anisotropic materials from measurements of shear waves with specific polarization and propagation directions. This method is applicable to data from magnetic resonance elastography (MRE), which is a method for measuring shear waves in live subjects or in vitro samples. Here, we simulate MRE data using finite element analysis. A nearly incompressible, transversely isotropic (ITI) material model with three parameters (shear modulus, shear anisotropy, and tensile anisotropy) is used, which is appropriate for many fibrous, biological tissues. Both slow and fast shear waves travel concurrently through such a material with speeds that depend on the propagation direction relative to fiber orientation. A three-parameter estimation approach based on directional filtering and isolation of slow and fast shear wave components (directional filter inversion, or DFI) is introduced. Wave speeds of each isolated shear wave component are estimated using local frequency estimation (LFE), and material properties are calculated using weighted least squares. Data from multiple finite element simulations are used to assess the accuracy and reliability of DFI for estimation of anisotropic material parameters. PMID:26476762

  10. Fast Wave Trains Associated with Solar Eruptions: Insights from 3D Thermodynamic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, C.; Liu, W.; Torok, T.; Linker, J.; Mikic, Z.; Ofman, L.

    2015-12-01

    EUV imaging observations during the SDO/AIA era have provided new insights into a variety of wave phenomena occurring in the low solar corona. One example is the observation of quasi-periodic, fast-propagating wave trains that are associated with solar eruptions, including flares and CMEs. While there has been considerable progress in understanding such waves from both an observational and theoretical perspective, it remains a challenge to pin down their physical origin. In this work, we detail our results from a case-study 3D thermodynamic MHD simulation of a coronal mass ejection where quasi-periodic wave trains are generated during the simulated eruption. We find a direct correlation between the onset of non-steady reconnection in the flare current sheet and the generation of quasi-periodic wave train signatures when patchy, collimated downflows interact with the flare arcade. Via forward modeling of SDO/AIA observables, we explore how the appearance of the wave trains is affected by line-of-sight integration and the multi-thermal nature of the coronal medium. We also examine how the wave trains themselves are channeled by natural waveguides formed in 3D by the non-uniform background magnetic field. While the physical association of the reconnection dynamics to the generation of quasi-periodic wave trains appears to be a compelling result, unanswered questions posed from recent observations as well as future prospects will be discussed.

  11. The structure of fast sausage waves in current-carrying coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bembitov, D. B.; Mikhalyaev, B. B.; Ruderman, M. S.

    2014-09-01

    We study fast sausage waves in a model coronal loop that consists of a cylindrical core with axial magnetic field and coaxial annulus with purely azimuthal magnetic field. The magnetic field is discontinuous at the tube and core boundaries, and there are surface currents with the opposite directions on these boundaries. The principal mode of fast sausage waves in which the magnetic pressure perturbation has no nodes in the radial direction can exist for arbitrary wavelength. The results for the fundamental radial mode of sausage waves are applied to the interpretation of observed periodic pulsations of microwave emission in flaring loops with periods of a few tens of seconds. Radial plasma motion has opposite directions at the tube and core boundaries. This leads to the periodic contraction and expansion of the annulus. We assume that the principal mode of fast sausage waves in the current-carrying coronal loops is able to produce a current sheet. However, the nonlinear analysis is needed to confirm this conjecture.

  12. Lloyd’s mirror interference lithography with EUV radiation from a high-harmonic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-su; Baksh, Peter; Odstrcil, Michal; Miszczak, Magdalena; Frey, Jeremy G.; Juschkin, Larissa; Brocklesby, William S.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate interference lithography using a high-harmonic source. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation is produced by high-harmonic generation with 800 nm light from a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser (40 fs pulses, 1 kHz, 2 W average power) in argon gas. Interference patterns created using Lloyd’s mirror setup and monochromatized radiation at the 27th harmonic (29 nm) are recorded using a ZEP-520A photoresist, producing features with <200 nm pitch. The effect of the use of femtosecond pulsed EUV radiation on the recorded pattern is investigated. The capability of the high-harmonic source for high-resolution patterning is discussed.

  13. Fast and slow wave detection in bovine cancellous bone in vitro using bandlimited deconvolution and Prony's method.

    PubMed

    Wear, Keith; Nagatani, Yoshiki; Mizuno, Katsunori; Matsukawa, Mami

    2014-10-01

    Fast and slow waves were detected in a bovine cancellous bone sample for thicknesses ranging from 7 to 12 mm using bandlimited deconvolution and the modified least-squares Prony's method with curve fitting (MLSP + CF). Bandlimited deconvolution consistently isolated two waves with linear-with-frequency attenuation coefficients as evidenced by high correlation coefficients between attenuation coefficient and frequency: 0.997 ± 0.002 (fast wave) and 0.986 ± 0.013 (slow wave) (mean ± standard deviation). Average root-mean-squared (RMS) differences between the two algorithms for phase velocities were 5 m/s (fast wave, 350 kHz) and 13 m/s (slow wave, 750 kHz). Average RMS differences for signal loss were 1.6 dB (fast wave, 350 kHz) and 0.4 dB (slow wave, 750 kHz). Phase velocities for thickness = 10 mm were 1726 m/s (fast wave, 350 kHz) and 1455 m/s (slow wave, 750 kHz). Results show support for the model of two waves with linear-with frequency attenuation, successful isolation of fast and slow waves, good agreement between bandlimited deconvolution and MLSP + CF as well as with a Bayesian algorithm, and potential variations of fast and/or slow wave properties with bone sample thickness.

  14. Nonlinear fast growth of surface gravity waves under the action of wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetti, Maura; Marchiando, Nadège; Berti, Nicolas; Kasparian, Jérôme

    2014-05-01

    The generation of ocean waves by wind is a highly nonlinear problem where the physical processes at the air-water interface are difficult to measure and to model for the presence of turbulence in both fluids. Direct field measurements of the induced pressure by airflow on waves are rare and difficult to perform, thus the underlying mechanisms leading to wave amplification are still unclear. We consider here the Miles' mechanism, which is characterised by growth rates, ΓM/f, in the range from 10-3-10-2 for fast-moving waves and in the range 10-2-1 for slow-moving waves and waves in laboratory tank experiments. This prompted us to investigate the case with Miles' growth rates of first order in the wave steepness, ΓM/f = O(ɛ), instead of the usually considered one, ΓM/f = O(ɛ2), where ɛ is the wave steepness which both in ocean and tank experiments can be of the order of 0.1. We use the method of multiple scales for deriving the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation with wave growth rate of first order in the wave steepness. We find that a simple coordinate transformation reduces the wind-forced NLS equation into the standard NLS equation with constant coefficients. Thus, we show how the Peregrine, Akhmediev and Kuznetsov-Ma solutions are modified in the presence of this first-order wind. In particular, the lifetime of both the Peregrine and the Akhmediev solitons increases for large growth rates and the maximum amplitude of these solitons slightly increases for growth rates larger than a certain value. The enhancement of both lifetime and maximum amplitude of rogue waves under the action of wind has been observed in tank experiments and numerical simulations of dispersive focusing, thus confirming the relevance in this context of the case ΓM/f = O(ɛ) considered in the present study.

  15. Sawtooth control using beam ions accelerated by fast waves in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, M.; Turnbull, A. D.; Chan, V. S.; Chu, M. S.; Lao, L. L.; Jeon, Y. M.; Li, G.; Ren, Q.; Pinsker, R. I.

    2007-11-15

    The accuracy of the Porcelli sawtooth model is evaluated using realistic numerical calculations for a DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] experiment with neutral beam injection and fast wave heating. Simulation results confirm that beam ions accelerated by the fast waves play a crucial role in delaying the normal sawtooth crash and inducing giant sawteeth with large amplitude and long period. A single giant sawtooth period was analyzed in detail in an effort to evaluate the efficacy of the Porcelli model in quantitatively predicting a particular sawtooth crash by evaluating the model through the sawtooth period using equilibria reconstructed from the discharge data. The kinetic stabilizing contribution of fast trapped ions is found to depend strongly on both the experimentally reconstructed magnetic shear at the q=1 surface (s{sub 1}) and the calculated poloidal beta of trapped beam ions inside the q=1 surface. To within estimates of the error from the equilibrium reconstructions and the simulation fast ion particle statistics, the results are consistent with the observed sawtooth crash. The calculations indicate that the sawtooth crash is ultimately triggered by the resistive kink in the ion-kinetic regime after the stabilizing contribution from the fast ions is reduced due to an increase in s{sub 1} as the discharge evolves.

  16. Plane-wave ultrasound beamforming using a nonuniform fast Fourier transform.

    PubMed

    Kruizinga, Pieter; Mastik, Frits; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F W; van Soest, Gijs

    2012-12-01

    Beamforming of plane-wave ultrasound echo signals in the Fourier domain provides fast and accurate image reconstruction. Conventional implementations perform a k-space interpolation from the uniform sampled grid to a nonuniform acoustic dispersion grid. In this paper, we demonstrate that this step can be replaced by a nonuniform Fourier transform. We study the performance of the nonuniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT) in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and computational cost, and show that the NUFFT offers an advantage in the trade-off between speed and accuracy, compared with other frequency-domain beamforming strategies.

  17. Fast calculation method of computer-generated cylindrical hologram using wave-front recording surface.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Piao, Mei-lan; Li, Gang; Kim, Nam

    2015-07-01

    Fast calculation method for a computer-generated cylindrical hologram (CGCH) is proposed. The method consists of two steps: the first step is a calculation of a virtual wave-front recording surface (WRS), which is located between the 3D object and CGCH. In the second step, in order to obtain a CGCH, we execute the diffraction calculation based on the fast Fourier transform (FFT) from the WRS to the CGCH, which are in the same concentric arrangement. The computational complexity is dramatically reduced in comparison with direct integration method. The simulation results confirm that our proposed method is able to improve the computational speed of CGCH.

  18. Traveling wave antenna for fast wave heating and current drive in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Ikezi, H.; Phelps, D.A.

    1995-07-01

    The traveling wave antenna for heating and current drive in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies is shown theoretically to have loading and wavenumber spectrum which are largely independent of plasma conditions. These characteristics have been demonstrated in low power experiments on the DIII-D tokamak, in which a standard four-strap antenna was converted to a traveling wave antenna through use of external coupling elements. The experiments indicate that the array maintains good impedance matching without dynamic tuning during abrupt changes in the plasma, such as during L- to H-mode transitions, edge localized mode activity, and disruptions. An analytic model was developed which exhibits the features observed in the experiments. Guidelines for the design of traveling wave antennas are derived from the validated model.

  19. Fast calculation method for computer-generated cylindrical hologram based on wave propagation in spectral domain.

    PubMed

    Jackin, Boaz Jessie; Yatagai, Toyohiko

    2010-12-01

    A fast calculation method for computer generation of cylindrical holograms is proposed. The calculation method is based on wave propagation in spectral domain and in cylindrical co-ordinates, which is otherwise similar to the angular spectrum of plane waves in cartesian co-ordinates. The calculation requires only two FFT operations and hence is much faster. The theoretical background of the calculation method, sampling conditions and simulation results are presented. The generated cylindrical hologram has been tested for reconstruction in different view angles and also in plane surfaces.

  20. Generation of circularly polarized high harmonic radiation using a transmission multilayer quarter waveplate.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jürgen; Guggenmos, Alexander; Hofstetter, Michael; Chew, Soo Hoon; Kleineberg, Ulf

    2015-12-28

    High harmonic radiation is meanwhile nearly extensively used for the spectroscopic investigation of electron dynamics with ultimate time resolution. The majority of high harmonic beamlines provide linearly polarized radiation created in a gas target. However, circular polarization greatly extends the spectroscopic possibilities for high harmonics, especially in the analysis of samples with chirality or prominent spin polarization. We produced a free-standing multilayer foil as a transmission EUV quarter waveplate and applied it for the first time to high harmonic radiation. We measured a broadband (4.6 eV FWHM) ellipticity of 75% at 66 eV photon energy with a transmission efficiency of 5%. The helicity is switchable and the ellipticity can be adjusted to lower values by angle tuning. As a single element it can be easily integrated in any existing harmonic beamline without major changes.

  1. Influence of High Harmonics of Magnetic Fields on Trapped Magnetic Fluxes in HTS Bulk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, K.; Miyagi, D.; Tsukamoto, O.

    Various kinds of HTS bulk motors are proposed and have been developed. Generally, those motors are driven by semiconductor inverters and currents fed to the armature windings contain high harmonics. Therefore, the bulks are exposed to high harmonics magnetic fields and AC losses are produced in the bulks. The AC losses deteriorate the efficiency of the motors and cause temperature rise of the bulks which decrease the trapped magnetic fluxes of the bulks. Usually, electro-magnetic shielding devices are inserted between the bulks and armature windings. However, the shielding devices degrade compactness of the motors. Therefore, it is important to have knowledge of the influence of the high harmonics magnetic fields on the AC losses and trapped magnetic fluxes of the bulk for optimum design of the shielding devices. In this work, the authors experimentally study the influence of high harmonics magnetic fields.

  2. Generation of circularly polarized high harmonic radiation using a transmission multilayer quarter waveplate.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jürgen; Guggenmos, Alexander; Hofstetter, Michael; Chew, Soo Hoon; Kleineberg, Ulf

    2015-12-28

    High harmonic radiation is meanwhile nearly extensively used for the spectroscopic investigation of electron dynamics with ultimate time resolution. The majority of high harmonic beamlines provide linearly polarized radiation created in a gas target. However, circular polarization greatly extends the spectroscopic possibilities for high harmonics, especially in the analysis of samples with chirality or prominent spin polarization. We produced a free-standing multilayer foil as a transmission EUV quarter waveplate and applied it for the first time to high harmonic radiation. We measured a broadband (4.6 eV FWHM) ellipticity of 75% at 66 eV photon energy with a transmission efficiency of 5%. The helicity is switchable and the ellipticity can be adjusted to lower values by angle tuning. As a single element it can be easily integrated in any existing harmonic beamline without major changes. PMID:26832020

  3. ITER equilibrium with bootstrap currents, lower hybrid current drive and fast wave current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.

    1989-03-01

    A current drive system is proposed for the technology phase of ITER which relies on rf power and bootstrap currents. The rf/bootstrap system permits operation at high safety factor, and we consider the axial value to be q/sub a/ approx. = 1.9, which minimizes the need for seed current near the magnetic axis. Lower hybrid power (/approximately/30 MW) provides current density near the surface, ICRF (/approximately/65 MHz, /approximately/30 MW) fast waves generate current near the axis, and high frequency fast waves (/approximately/250 MHz, /approximately/74 MW) supply the remaining current density. The system is not yet optimized but appears to offer great flexibility (ion heating for ignition, current rampup, etc.) with relatively inexpensive and well developed technology. 29 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Hybrid Metameterials Enable Fast Electrical Modulation Of Freely Propagating Terahertz Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hou-tong; O' Hara, John F; Taylor, Antoinette J

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate fast electrical modulation of freely propagating THz waves at room temperature using hybrid metamaterial devices. the devices are planar metamaterials fabricated on doped semiconducor epitaxial layers, which form hybrid metamaterial - Schottky diode structures. With an applied ac voltage bias, we show modulation of THz radiation at inferred frequencies over 2 MHz. The modulation speed is limited by the device depletion capacitance which may be reduced for even faster operation.

  5. Observation of quasi-periodic solar radio bursts associated with propagating fast-mode waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, C. R.; Nisticò, G.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Zimovets, I. V.; White, S. M.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: Radio emission observations from the Learmonth and Bruny Island radio spectrographs are analysed to determine the nature of a train of discrete, periodic radio "sparks" (finite-bandwidth, short-duration isolated radio features) which precede a type II burst. We analyse extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging from SDO/AIA at multiple wavelengths and identify a series of quasi-periodic rapidly-propagating enhancements, which we interpret as a fast wave train, and link these to the detected radio features. Methods: The speeds and positions of the periodic rapidly propagating fast waves and the coronal mass ejection (CME) were recorded using running-difference images and time-distance analysis. From the frequency of the radio sparks the local electron density at the emission location was estimated for each. Using an empirical model for the scaling of density in the corona, the calculated electron density was used to obtain the height above the surface at which the emission occurs, and the propagation velocity of the emission location. Results: The period of the radio sparks, δtr = 1.78 ± 0.04 min, matches the period of the fast wave train observed at 171 Å, δtEUV = 1.7 ± 0.2 min. The inferred speed of the emission location of the radio sparks, 630 km s-1, is comparable to the measured speed of the CME leading edge, 500 km s-1, and the speeds derived from the drifting of the type II lanes. The calculated height of the radio emission (obtained from the density) matches the observed location of the CME leading edge. From the above evidence we propose that the radio sparks are caused by the quasi-periodic fast waves, and the emission is generated as they catch up and interact with the leading edge of the CME. The movie associated to Fig. 2 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  6. Variational full wave calculation of fast wave current drive in DIII-D using the ALCYON code

    SciTech Connect

    Becoulet, A.; Moreau, D.

    1992-04-01

    Initial fast wave current drive simulations performed with the ALCYON code for the 60 MHz DIII-D experiment are presented. Two typical shots of the 1991 summer campaign were selected with magnetic field intensities of 1 and 2 teslas respectively. The results for the wave electromagnetic field in the plasma chamber are displayed. They exhibit a strong enrichment of the poloidal mode number m-spectrum which leads to the upshift of the parallel wavenumber, {kappa}{perpendicular}, and to the wave absorption. The m-spectrum is bounded when the local poloidal wavenumber reaches the Alfven wavenumber and the {kappa}{perpendicular} upshifts do not destroy the wave directionality. Linear estimations of the driven current are made. The current density profiles are found to be peaked and we find that about 88 kA can be driven in the 1 tesla/1.7 keV phase with 1.7 MW coupled to the electrons. In the 2 tesla/3.4 keV case, 47 kA are driven with a total power of 1.5 MW, 44% of which are absorbed on the hydrogen minority, through the second harmonic ion cyclotron resonance. The global efficiency is then 0.18 {times} 10{sup 19} A m{sup {minus}2}W{sup {minus}1} if one considers only the effective power going to the electrons.

  7. Realistic Modeling of SDO/AIA-discovered Coronal Fast MHD Wave Trains in Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, Leon; Liu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution EUV observations by space telescopes have provided plenty of evidence for coronal MHD waves in active regions. In particular, SDO/AIA discovered quasi-periodic, fast-mode propagating MHD wave trains (QFPs), which can propagate at speeds of ~1000 km/s perpendicular to the magnetic field. Such waves can provide information on the energy release of their associated flares and the magnetized plasma structure of the active regions. Before we can use these waves as tools for coronal seismology, 3D MHD modeling is required for disentangling observational ambiguities and improving the diagnostic accuracy. We present new results of observationally contained models of QFPs using our recently upgraded radiative, thermally conductive, visco-resistive 3D MHD code. The waves are excited by time-depended boundary conditions constrained by the spatial (localized) and quasi-periodic temporal evolution of a C-class flare typically associated with QFPs. We investigate the excitation, propagation, and damping of the waves for a range of key model parameters, such as the background temperature, density, magnetic field structure, and the location of the flaring site within the active region. We synthesize EUV intensities in multiple AIA channels and then obtain the model parameters that best reproduce the properties of observed QFPs. We discuss the implications of our model results for the seismological application of QFPs and for understanding the dynamics of their associated flares.

  8. Fast wave propagation in auditory cortex of an awake cat using a chronic microelectrode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, Russell S.; Rousche, Patrick J.; Kipke, Daryl R.

    2007-06-01

    We investigated fast wave propagation in auditory cortex of an alert cat using a chronically implanted microelectrode array. A custom, real-time imaging template exhibited wave dynamics within the 33-microwire array (3 mm2) during ten recording sessions spanning 1 month post implant. Images were based on the spatial arrangement of peri-stimulus time histograms at each recording site in response to auditory stimuli consisting of tone pips between 1 and 10 kHz at 75 dB SPL. Functional images portray stimulus-locked spiking activity and exhibit waves of excitation and inhibition that evolve during the onset, sustained and offset period of the tones. In response to 5 kHz, for example, peak excitation occurred at 27 ms after onset and again at 15 ms following tone offset. Variability of the position of the centroid of excitation during ten recording sessions reached a minimum at 31 ms post onset (σ = 125 µm) and 18 ms post offset (σ = 145 µm), suggesting a fine place/time representation of the stimulus in the cortex. The dynamics of these fast waves also depended on stimulus frequency, likely reflecting the tonotopicity in auditory cortex projected from the cochlea. Peak wave velocities of 0.2 m s-1 were also consistent with those purported across horizontal layers of cat visual cortex. The fine resolution offered by microimaging may be critical for delivering optimal coding strategies used with an auditory prosthesis. Based on the initial results, future studies seek to determine the relevance of these waves to sensory perception and behavior. The work was performed at Department of Bioengineering, Arizona State University, ECG 334 MS-9709 Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-9709, USA.

  9. Fast electron flux driven by lower hybrid wave in the scrape-off layer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. L.; Xu, G. S.; Wang, H. Q.; Wan, B. N.; Chen, R.; Wang, L.; Gan, K. F.; Yang, J. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Liu, S. C.; Li, M. H.; Ding, S.; Yan, N.; Zhang, W.; Hu, G. H.; Liu, Y. L.; Shao, L. M.; Li, J.; Chen, L.; Zhao, N.; and others

    2015-02-15

    The fast electron flux driven by Lower Hybrid Wave (LHW) in the scrape-off layer (SOL) in EAST is analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. The five bright belts flowing along the magnetic field lines in the SOL and hot spots at LHW guard limiters observed by charge coupled device and infrared cameras are attributed to the fast electron flux, which is directly measured by retarding field analyzers (RFA). The current carried by the fast electron flux, ranging from 400 to 6000 A/m{sup 2} and in the direction opposite to the plasma current, is scanned along the radial direction from the limiter surface to the position about 25 mm beyond the limiter. The measured fast electron flux is attributed to the high parallel wave refractive index n{sub ||} components of LHW. According to the antenna structure and the LHW power absorbed by plasma, a broad parallel electric field spectrum of incident wave from the antennas is estimated. The radial distribution of LHW-driven current density is analyzed in SOL based on Landau damping of the LHW. The analytical results support the RFA measurements, showing a certain level of consistency. In addition, the deposition profile of the LHW power density in SOL is also calculated utilizing this simple model. This study provides some fundamental insight into the heating and current drive effects induced by LHW in SOL, and should also help to interpret the observations and related numerical analyses of the behaviors of bright belts and hot spots induced by LHW.

  10. Fast and accurate inference on gravitational waves from precessing compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Rory; Field, Scott E.; Blackburn, Kent; Haster, Carl-Johan; Pürrer, Michael; Raymond, Vivien; Schmidt, Patricia

    2016-08-01

    Inferring astrophysical information from gravitational waves emitted by compact binaries is one of the key science goals of gravitational-wave astronomy. In order to reach the full scientific potential of gravitational-wave experiments, we require techniques to mitigate the cost of Bayesian inference, especially as gravitational-wave signal models and analyses become increasingly sophisticated and detailed. Reduced-order models (ROMs) of gravitational waveforms can significantly reduce the computational cost of inference by removing redundant computations. In this paper, we construct the first reduced-order models of gravitational-wave signals that include the effects of spin precession, inspiral, merger, and ringdown in compact object binaries and that are valid for component masses describing binary neutron star, binary black hole, and mixed binary systems. This work utilizes the waveform model known as "IMRPhenomPv2." Our ROM enables the use of a fast reduced-order quadrature (ROQ) integration rule which allows us to approximate Bayesian probability density functions at a greatly reduced computational cost. We find that the ROQ rule can be used to speed-up inference by factors as high as 300 without introducing systematic bias. This corresponds to a reduction in computational time from around half a year to half a day for the longest duration and lowest mass signals. The ROM and ROQ rules are available with the main inference library of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, LALInference.

  11. Nanosecond Pulse Discharges and Fast Ionization Wave Discharges: Fundamental Kinetic Processes and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamovich, Igor

    2011-10-01

    Over the last two decades, nanosecond pulse discharges and Fast Ionization Wave (FIW) discharges have been studied extensively, both theoretically and experimentally. Current interest in characterization of these discharges is driven mainly by their potential for applications such as plasma chemical fuel reforming, plasma-assisted combustion, high-speed flow control, pumping of electric discharge excited lasers, and generation of high-energy electrons. A unique capability of FIW discharges to generate significant ionization and high concentrations of excited species at high pressures and over large distances, before ionization instabilities have time to develop, is very attractive for these applications. Recent advances in laser optical diagnostics offer an opportunity of making non-intrusive, spatially and time-resolved measurements of electron density and electric field distributions in high-speed ionization wave discharges, on nanosecond time scale. Insight into FIW formation and propagation dynamics also requires development of predictive kinetic models, and their experimental validation. Although numerical kinetic models may incorporate detailed kinetics of charged and neutral species in the propagating ionization wave front (including non-local electron kinetics), analytic models are also attractive due to their capability of elucidating fundamental trends of discharge development. The talk gives an overview of recent progress in experimental characterization and kinetic modeling of nanosecond pulse and fast ionization wave discharges in nitrogen and air over a wide range of pulse repetition rates, 0.1-40 kHz. FIW discharge plasmas sustained at high pulse repetition rates are diffuse and volume filling, with most of the power coupled to the plasma behind the wave, at E/N = 200-300 Td and energy loading of 1-2 meV/molecule/pulse. The results demonstrate significant potential of large volume, diffuse, high pulse repetition rate FIW discharges for novel plasma

  12. Fast solution of elliptic partial differential equations using linear combinations of plane waves.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Jordá, José M

    2016-02-01

    Given an arbitrary elliptic partial differential equation (PDE), a procedure for obtaining its solution is proposed based on the method of Ritz: the solution is written as a linear combination of plane waves and the coefficients are obtained by variational minimization. The PDE to be solved is cast as a system of linear equations Ax=b, where the matrix A is not sparse, which prevents the straightforward application of standard iterative methods in order to solve it. This sparseness problem can be circumvented by means of a recursive bisection approach based on the fast Fourier transform, which makes it possible to implement fast versions of some stationary iterative methods (such as Gauss-Seidel) consuming O(NlogN) memory and executing an iteration in O(Nlog(2)N) time, N being the number of plane waves used. In a similar way, fast versions of Krylov subspace methods and multigrid methods can also be implemented. These procedures are tested on Poisson's equation expressed in adaptive coordinates. It is found that the best results are obtained with the GMRES method using a multigrid preconditioner with Gauss-Seidel relaxation steps. PMID:26986436

  13. A wideband fast multipole boundary element method for half-space/plane-symmetric acoustic wave problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chang-Jun; Chen, Hai-Bo; Chen, Lei-Lei

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a novel wideband fast multipole boundary element approach to 3D half-space/plane-symmetric acoustic wave problems. The half-space fundamental solution is employed in the boundary integral equations so that the tree structure required in the fast multipole algorithm is constructed for the boundary elements in the real domain only. Moreover, a set of symmetric relations between the multipole expansion coefficients of the real and image domains are derived, and the half-space fundamental solution is modified for the purpose of applying such relations to avoid calculating, translating and saving the multipole/local expansion coefficients of the image domain. The wideband adaptive multilevel fast multipole algorithm associated with the iterative solver GMRES is employed so that the present method is accurate and efficient for both lowand high-frequency acoustic wave problems. As for exterior acoustic problems, the Burton-Miller method is adopted to tackle the fictitious eigenfrequency problem involved in the conventional boundary integral equation method. Details on the implementation of the present method are described, and numerical examples are given to demonstrate its accuracy and efficiency.

  14. Fast solution of elliptic partial differential equations using linear combinations of plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Jordá, José M.

    2016-02-01

    Given an arbitrary elliptic partial differential equation (PDE), a procedure for obtaining its solution is proposed based on the method of Ritz: the solution is written as a linear combination of plane waves and the coefficients are obtained by variational minimization. The PDE to be solved is cast as a system of linear equations A x =b , where the matrix A is not sparse, which prevents the straightforward application of standard iterative methods in order to solve it. This sparseness problem can be circumvented by means of a recursive bisection approach based on the fast Fourier transform, which makes it possible to implement fast versions of some stationary iterative methods (such as Gauss-Seidel) consuming O (N logN ) memory and executing an iteration in O (N log2N ) time, N being the number of plane waves used. In a similar way, fast versions of Krylov subspace methods and multigrid methods can also be implemented. These procedures are tested on Poisson's equation expressed in adaptive coordinates. It is found that the best results are obtained with the GMRES method using a multigrid preconditioner with Gauss-Seidel relaxation steps.

  15. Fast-mode Coronal Wave Trains Detected by SDO/AIA: Recent Observational Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Downs, Cooper; Ofman, Leon

    2016-05-01

    Quasi-periodic Fast Propagating wave trains (QFPs) are a new observational phenomenon discovered by SDO/AIA in extreme ultraviolet (EUV). They are fast-mode magnetosonic waves, closely related to quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flare emission ranging from radio to X-ray wavelengths. The significance of QFPs lies in their diagnostic potential, because they can provide critical clues to flare energy release and serve as new tools for coronal seismology. In this presentation, we report recent advances in observing QFPs. In particular, using differential emission measure (DEM) inversion, we found clear evidence of heating and cooling cycles that are consistent with alternating compression and rarefaction expected for magnetosonic wave pulses. We also found that different local magnetic and plasma environments can lead to two distinct types of QFPs located in different spatial domains with respect to their accompanying coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Moreover, recent IRIS observations of QFP source regions revealed sawtooth-like flare ribbon motions, indicative of pulsed magnetic reconnection, that are correlated with QFP excitation. More interestingly, from a statistical survey of over 100 QFP events, we found a preferential association with eruptive flares rather than confined flares. We will discuss the implications of these results and the potential roles of QFPs in coronal heating, energy transport, and solar eruptions.

  16. Fast Magnetosonic Waves and Global Coronal Seismology in the Extended Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Ryun Young; Zhang, J.; Kramar, M.; Wang, T.; Ofman, L.; Davila, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    We present global coronal seismology, for the first time, that allows us to determine inhomogeneous magnetic field strengths in a wide range of the extended solar corona. We use observations of propagating disturbance associated with a coronal mass ejection observed on 2011 August 4 by the COR1 inner coronagraphs on board the STEREO spacecraft. We establish that the disturbance is in fact a fast magnetosonic wave as the upper coronal counterpart of the EIT wave observed by STEREO EUVI and travels across magnetic field lines with inhomogeneous speeds, passing through various coronal regions such as quiet/active corona, coronal holes, and streamers. We derive magnetic field strengths along the azimuthal trajectories of the fronts at heliocentric distances 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 Rs, using the varying speeds and electron densities. The derived magnetic field strengths are consistent with values determined with a potential field source surface model and reported in previous works. The ranges of the magnetic field strengths at these heliocentric distances are 0.44 ± 0.29, 0.23 ± 0.15, and 0.26 ± 0.14 G, respectively. The uncertainty in determining magnetic field strengths is about 40 %. This work demonstrates that observations of fast magnetosonic waves by white-light coronagraphs can provide us with a unique way to diagnose magnetic field strength of an inhomogeneous medium in a wide spatial range of the extended solar corona.

  17. Influence of an Ultra Fast Kelvin Wave on the Migrating Diurnal Tide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, L. C.; Palo, S. E.; Liu, H.

    2008-12-01

    The migrating diurnal tide is one of the dominant dynamical features of the Earth's Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) region, particularly at low latitudes. While the long term evolution of the migrating diurnal tide is dependent primarily upon seasonal changes in the solar heating profile and the background atmosphere, short term fluctuations on the order of a few days have been observed, occurring at time scales too short to be explained by changes in solar heating. These short-term fluctuations are often manifested as a modulation of tidal amplitudes at frequencies corresponding to those of propagating planetary wave modes, suggesting that short term variability in the tide can be driven by nonlinear wave-wave interactions between the tide and various propagating planetary waves also present in the region. However, many questions still remain about the nature of such interactions. The conditions under which various planetary waves may or may not interact with the atmospheric tides, as well as the mechanisms and overall effects of a planetary wave / tidal interaction are still unclear. In this study, we explore the effect of ultra fast Kelvin waves (UFKWs) on the migrating diurnal tide. The UFKWs are eastward propagating disturbances that occur sporadically throughout the year in the low latitude MLT region where the migrating diurnal tide is large. The NCAR Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) is used to simulate a control case without a UFKW and cases in which a UFKW of various magnitudes is present. Use of a global circulation model in this way allows us to characterize the effects of UFKW on the migrating diurnal tide and to investigate the underlying physical processes responsible for the interactions. Initial studies have indicated the UFKW does clearly modulate the amplitude of the tidal parameters influencing the overall amplitude and spatial structure of the migrating diurnal tide.

  18. Anticorrelated Emission of High Harmonics and Fast Electron Beams From Plasma Mirrors.

    PubMed

    Bocoum, Maïmouna; Thévenet, Maxence; Böhle, Frederik; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Vernier, Aline; Jullien, Aurélie; Faure, Jérôme; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo

    2016-05-01

    We report for the first time on the anticorrelated emission of high-order harmonics and energetic electron beams from a solid-density plasma with a sharp vacuum interface-plasma mirror-driven by an intense ultrashort laser pulse. We highlight the key role played by the nanoscale structure of the plasma surface during the interaction by measuring the spatial and spectral properties of harmonics and electron beams emitted by a plasma mirror. We show that the nanoscale behavior of the plasma mirror can be controlled by tuning the scale length of the electron density gradient, which is measured in situ using spatial-domain interferometry. PMID:27203328

  19. Anticorrelated Emission of High Harmonics and Fast Electron Beams From Plasma Mirrors.

    PubMed

    Bocoum, Maïmouna; Thévenet, Maxence; Böhle, Frederik; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Vernier, Aline; Jullien, Aurélie; Faure, Jérôme; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo

    2016-05-01

    We report for the first time on the anticorrelated emission of high-order harmonics and energetic electron beams from a solid-density plasma with a sharp vacuum interface-plasma mirror-driven by an intense ultrashort laser pulse. We highlight the key role played by the nanoscale structure of the plasma surface during the interaction by measuring the spatial and spectral properties of harmonics and electron beams emitted by a plasma mirror. We show that the nanoscale behavior of the plasma mirror can be controlled by tuning the scale length of the electron density gradient, which is measured in situ using spatial-domain interferometry.

  20. Gaussian-Schell analysis of the transverse spatial properties of high-harmonic beams

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, David T.; O’Keeffe, Kevin; Anderson, Patrick N.; Hooker, Simon M.

    2016-01-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) is an established means of producing coherent, short wavelength, ultrafast pulses from a compact set-up. Table-top high-harmonic sources are increasingly being used to image physical and biological systems using emerging techniques such as coherent diffraction imaging and ptychography. These novel imaging methods require coherent illumination, and it is therefore important to both characterize the spatial coherence of high-harmonic beams and understand the processes which limit this property. Here we investigate the near- and far-field spatial properties of high-harmonic radiation generated in a gas cell. The variation with harmonic order of the intensity profile, wavefront curvature, and complex coherence factor is measured in the far-field by the SCIMITAR technique. Using the Gaussian-Schell model, the properties of the harmonic beam in the plane of generation are deduced. Our results show that the order-dependence of the harmonic spatial coherence is consistent with partial coherence induced by both variation of the intensity-dependent dipole phase as well as finite spatial coherence of the driving radiation. These findings are used to suggest ways in which the coherence of harmonic beams could be increased further, which would have direct benefits to imaging with high-harmonic radiation. PMID:27465654

  1. Synergy in Two-Frequency Fast Wave Cyclotron Harmonic Absorption in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R. I.; Choi, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Zhu, Y.; Porkolab, M.; Baity, F. W.; Hosea, J. C.

    2009-11-26

    Fast waves (FWs) at 60 MHz and at 90 MHz are coupled to DIII-D discharges for central heating and current drive at net FW power up to 3.5 MW. The primary absorption mechanism is intended to be direct electron damping in the plasma core. In discharges at B = 2 T with fast deuteron populations from neutral beam injection, 4th and 6th deuterium cyclotron harmonic absorption on the fast ions competes with direct electron damping. Previous experiments have shown that the 6{omega}{sub D} absorption of the 90 MHz FWs is weaker than the 4{omega}{sub D} absorption of 60 MHz FWs, in agreement with a model that includes unspecified edge losses. Recent experiments have shown that if the fast deuterons are accelerated by absorption of 60 MHz (4{omega}{sub D}) FWs, adding 90 MHz power (6{omega}{sub D}) can increase the fusion neutron rate by a larger increment than is obtained with 90 MHz power alone. Details of this synergy between 4{omega}{sub D} and 6{omega}{sub D} absorption are presented.

  2. DIII-D Experiments on Cyclotron Harmonic Absorption of Fast Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsker, R. I.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Baity, F. W.; Porkolab, M.

    2005-10-01

    In the presence of a sufficiently dense population of fast ions from either neutral beam heating or from fusion products in a burning plasma, ion cyclotron damping of fast waves (FW) is important even at moderate to high ion cyclotron harmonics. DIII-D experiments have coupled up to 3 MW of FW power at 60 MHz and at 116 MHz to investigate damping on fast ions at harmonics from the 2nd harmonic of hydrogen to the 8th harmonic of deuterium. In agreement with linear theory, strong absorption was observed on fast ions from an injected 81 keV deuterium beam at the 4th and 5th harmonics for 60 MHz FW. Comparison of 4th and 8th deuterium harmonic absorption at a fixed magnetic field have shown that the latter is weak at low density, also as expected. However, at high density the 8th harmonic absorption continued to be much weaker than at the 4th, in apparent contradiction to predictions of strong absorption at both harmonics under those conditions. Possible explanations of the discrepancy are discussed.

  3. Love-wave sensors combined with microfluidics for fast detection of biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Matatagui, Daniel; Fontecha, José Luis; Fernández, María Jesús; Gràcia, Isabel; Cané, Carles; Santos, José Pedro; Horrillo, María Carmen

    2014-07-15

    The following paper examines a time-efficient method for detecting biological warfare agents (BWAs). The method is based on a system of a Love-wave immunosensor combined with a microfluidic chip which detects BWA samples in a dynamic mode. In this way a continuous flow-through of the sample is created, promoting the reaction between antigen and antibody and allowing a fast detection of the BWAs. In order to prove this method, static and dynamic modes have been simulated and different concentrations of BWA simulants have been tested with two immunoreactions: phage M13 has been detected using the mouse monoclonal antibody anti-M13 (AM13), and the rabbit immunoglobulin (Rabbit IgG) has been detected using the polyclonal antibody goat anti-rabbit (GAR). Finally, different concentrations of each BWA simulants have been detected with a fast response time and a desirable level of discrimination among them has been achieved.

  4. Love-wave sensors combined with microfluidics for fast detection of biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Matatagui, Daniel; Fontecha, José Luis; Fernández, María Jesús; Gràcia, Isabel; Cané, Carles; Santos, José Pedro; Horrillo, María Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The following paper examines a time-efficient method for detecting biological warfare agents (BWAs). The method is based on a system of a Love-wave immunosensor combined with a microfluidic chip which detects BWA samples in a dynamic mode. In this way a continuous flow-through of the sample is created, promoting the reaction between antigen and antibody and allowing a fast detection of the BWAs. In order to prove this method, static and dynamic modes have been simulated and different concentrations of BWA simulants have been tested with two immunoreactions: phage M13 has been detected using the mouse monoclonal antibody anti-M13 (AM13), and the rabbit immunoglobulin (Rabbit IgG) has been detected using the polyclonal antibody goat anti-rabbit (GAR). Finally, different concentrations of each BWA simulants have been detected with a fast response time and a desirable level of discrimination among them has been achieved. PMID:25029282

  5. Love-Wave Sensors Combined with Microfluidics for Fast Detection of Biological Warfare Agents

    PubMed Central

    Matatagui, Daniel; Fontecha, José Luis; Fernández, María Jesús; Gràcia, Isabel; Cané, Carles; Santos, José Pedro; Horrillo, María Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The following paper examines a time-efficient method for detecting biological warfare agents (BWAs). The method is based on a system of a Love-wave immunosensor combined with a microfluidic chip which detects BWA samples in a dynamic mode. In this way a continuous flow-through of the sample is created, promoting the reaction between antigen and antibody and allowing a fast detection of the BWAs. In order to prove this method, static and dynamic modes have been simulated and different concentrations of BWA simulants have been tested with two immunoreactions: phage M13 has been detected using the mouse monoclonal antibody anti-M13 (AM13), and the rabbit immunoglobulin (Rabbit IgG) has been detected using the polyclonal antibody goat anti-rabbit (GAR). Finally, different concentrations of each BWA simulants have been detected with a fast response time and a desirable level of discrimination among them has been achieved. PMID:25029282

  6. Design of long-pulse fast wave current drive antennas for DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baity, F. W.; Batchelor, D. B.; Bills, K. C.; Fogelman, C. H.; Jaeger, E. F.; Ping, J. L.; Riemer, B. W.; Ryan, P. M.; Stallings, D. C.; Taylor, D. J.; Yugo, J. J.

    1994-10-01

    Two new long-pulse fast wave current drive (FWCD) antennas will be installed on DIII-D in early 1994. These antennas will increase the available FWCD power from 2 MW to 6 MW for pulse lengths of up to 2 s, and to 4 MW for up to 10 s. Power for the new antennas is from two ASDEX-type 30- to 120-MHz transmitters. When operated at 90° phasing into a low-density plasma (˜4×1019m-3) with hot electrons (˜10 keV), these two new antennas are predicted to drive approximately 1 MA of plasma current.

  7. Electromagnetic Modeling of a Fast Traveling-Wave Beam Chopper for the SNS Project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey

    1998-04-01

    High current and severe restrictions on beam losses, below 1 nA/m, in the designed linac for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) require clean and fast --- with the rise time from 2% to 98% less than 2.5 ns --- beam chopping in its front end, at the beam energy 2.5 MeV. The development of new traveling-wave deflecting current structures, based on meander lines, is discussed. Three-dimensional time-domain computer simulations are used to study transient effects in the chopper and to optimize its design.

  8. Gravitational-wave Constraints on the Progenitors of Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callister, Thomas; Kanner, Jonah; Weinstein, Alan

    2016-07-01

    The nature of fast radio bursts (FRBs) remains enigmatic. Highly energetic radio pulses of millisecond duration, FRBs are observed with dispersion measures consistent with an extragalactic source. A variety of models have been proposed to explain their origin. One popular class of theorized FRB progenitor is the coalescence of compact binaries composed of neutron stars and/or black holes. Such coalescence events are strong gravitational-wave emitters. We demonstrate that measurements made by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave observatories can be leveraged to severely constrain the validity of FRB binary coalescence models. Existing measurements constrain the binary black hole rate to approximately 5% of the FRB rate, and results from Advanced LIGO’s O1 and O2 observing runs may place similarly strong constraints on the fraction of FRBs due to binary neutron star and neutron star-black hole progenitors.

  9. Towards a fast-running method for blast-wave mitigation by a prismatic blast wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Éveillard, Sébastien; Lardjane, Nicolas; Vinçont, Jean-Yves; Sochet, Isabelle

    A procedure aimed at developing a fast-running method for blast-wave effects characterization behind a protection barrier is presented. Small-scale experiments of a hemispherical gaseous charge (stoichiometric propane-oxygen mixture) without and with a prismatic protective barrier are used to validate the use of an in-house CFD code for gaseous detonation. From numerical experiments, pressure loss of a blast wave at a corner is quantified. These fits, in conjunction with TM5-1300 reflection charts, are used to estimate the maximum overpressure around a protective barrier through geometrical and empirical laws. The results show good agreement with numerical and experimental data from the ANR-BARPPRO research project.

  10. Fast dynamics and relaxation of colloidal drops during the drying process using multispeckle diffusing wave spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Yong; Hwang, Ji Won; Jung, Hyun Wook; Kim, Sung Hyun; Lee, Seong Jae; Yoon, Kisun; Weitz, David A

    2013-01-22

    The fast dynamics generated by the Brownian motion of particles in colloidal drops, and the related relaxation during drying, which play key roles in suspension systems, were investigated incorporating multispeckle diffusing wave spectroscopy (MSDWS). MSDWS equipment was implemented to analyze the relaxation properties of suspensions under a nonergodic and nonstationary drying process, which cannot be elucidated by conventional light scattering methods, such as dynamic light scattering and diffusing wave spectroscopy. Rapid particle movement can be identified by the characteristic relaxation time, which is closely related to the Brownian motion due to thermal fluctuations of the particles. In the compacting stage of the drying process, the characteristic relaxation time increased gradually with the drying time because the particles in the colloidal drop were constrained by themselves. Moreover, variations of the initial concentration and particle size considerably affected the complete drying time and characteristic relaxation time, producing a shorter relaxation time for a low concentrated suspension with small particles. PMID:23281633

  11. Axis-dependence of molecular high harmonic emission in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Spector, Limor S; Artamonov, Maxim; Miyabe, Shungo; Martinez, Todd; Seideman, Tamar; Guehr, Markus; Bucksbaum, Philip H

    2014-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation in an atomic or molecular gas is a promising source of sub-femtosecond vacuum ultraviolet coherent radiation for transient scattering, absorption, metrology and imaging applications. High harmonic spectra are sensitive to Ångstrom-scale structure and motion of laser-driven molecules, but interference from radiation produced by random molecular orientations obscures this in all but the simplest cases, such as linear molecules. Here we show how to extract full body-frame high harmonic generation information for molecules with more complicated geometries by utilizing the methods of coherent transient rotational spectroscopy. To demonstrate this approach, we obtain the relative strength of harmonic emission along the three principal axes in the asymmetric-top sulphur dioxide. This greatly simplifies the analysis task of high harmonic spectroscopy and extends its usefulness to more complex molecules.

  12. CONTRIBUTION OF VELOCITY VORTICES AND FAST SHOCK REFLECTION AND REFRACTION TO THE FORMATION OF EUV WAVES IN SOLAR ERUPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongjuan; Liu, Siqing; Gong, Jiancun; Wu, Ning; Lin, Jun

    2015-06-01

    We numerically study the detailed evolutionary features of the wave-like disturbance and its propagation in the eruption. This work is a follow-up to Wang et al., using significantly upgraded new simulations. We focus on the contribution of the velocity vortices and the fast shock reflection and refraction in the solar corona to the formation of the EUV waves. Following the loss of equilibrium in the coronal magnetic structure, the flux rope exhibits rapid motions and invokes the fast-mode shock at the front of the rope, which then produces a type II radio burst. The expansion of the fast shock, which is associated with outward motion, takes place in various directions, and the downward expansion shows the reflection and the refraction as a result of the non-uniform background plasma. The reflected component of the fast shock propagates upward and the refracted component propagates downward. As the refracted component reaches the boundary surface, a weak echo is excited. The Moreton wave is invoked as the fast shock touches the bottom boundary, so the Moreton wave lags the type II burst. A secondary echo occurs in the area where reflection of the fast shock encounters the slow-mode shock, and the nearby magnetic field lines are further distorted because of the interaction between the secondary echo and the velocity vortices. Our results indicate that the EUV wave may arise from various processes that are revealed in the new simulations.

  13. One dimensional full wave analysis of slow-to-fast mode conversion in lower hybrid frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Guo-Zhang; Gao, Zhe

    2014-12-15

    The linear conversion from the slow wave to the fast wave in the lower hybrid range of frequencies is analyzed numerically by using the set of field equations describing waves in a cold plane-stratified plasma. The equations are solved as a two-point boundary value problem, where the polarizations of each mode are set consistently in the boundary conditions. The scattering coefficients and the field patterns are obtained for various density profiles. It is shown that, for large density scale length, the results agree well with the traditional cognitions. In contrast, the reflected component and the probable transmitted-converted component from the conversion region, which are neglected in the usual calculations, become significant when the scale length is smaller than the wavelength of the mode. The inclusion of these new components will improve the accuracy of the simulated propagation and deposition for the injected rf power when the conversion process is involved within a sharp-varying density profile. Meanwhile, the accessibility of the incident slow wave for the low frequency case is also affected by the scale length of the density profile.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Fast-mode Magnetosonic Waves Excited by Plasmoid Ejections in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liping; Zhang, Lei; He, Jiansen; Peter, Hardi; Tu, Chuanyi; Wang, Linghua; Zhang, Shaohua; Feng, Xueshang

    2015-02-01

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory has directly imaged the fast-propagating magnetosonic waves (FMWs) successively propagating outward along coronal magnetic funnels. In this study we perform a numerical investigation of the excitation of FMWs in the interchange reconnection scenario, with footpoint shearing flow being used to energize the system and drive the reconnection. The modeling results show that as a result of magnetic reconnection, the plasma in the current sheet is heated up by Joule dissipation to ~10 MK and is ejected rapidly, developing the hot outflows. Meanwhile, the current sheet is torn into plasmoids, which are shot quickly both upward and downward. When the plasmoids reach the outflow regions, they impact and collide with the ambient magnetic field there, which consecutively launches FMWs. The FMWs propagate outward divergently away from the impact regions, with a phase speed of the Alfvén speed of ~1000 km s-1. In the k - ω diagram of the Fourier wave power, the FMWs display a broad frequency distribution with a straight ridge that represents the dispersion relation. With the WKB approximation, at the distance of 15 Mm from the wave source region, we estimate the energy flux of FMWs to be E ~ 7.0 × 106 erg cm-2 s-1, which is ~50 times smaller than the energy flux related to the tube-channeled reconnection outflow. These simulation results indicate that energetically and dynamically the outflow is far more important than the waves.

  15. A faster aggregation for 3D fast evanescent wave solvers using rotations

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaert, Ignace Pissoort, Davy; Olyslager, Femke

    2007-11-10

    A novel technique to accelerate the aggregation and disaggregation stages in evanescent plane wave methods is presented. The new method calculates the six plane wave radiation patterns from a multipole expansion (aggregation) and calculates the multipole expansion of an incoming field from the six plane wave incoming field patterns. It is faster than the direct approach for multipole orders larger than one, and becomes six times faster for large multipole orders. The method relies on a connection between the discretizations of the six integral representations, and on the fact that the Wigner D-matrices become diagonal for rotations around the z-axis. The proposed technique can also be extended to the vectorial case in two different ways, one of which is very similar to the scalar case. The other method relies on a Beltrami decomposition of the fields and is faster than the direct approach for any multipole order. This decomposition is also not limited to evanescent wave solvers, but can be used in any vectorial multilevel fast multipole algorithm.

  16. GLOBAL CORONAL SEISMOLOGY IN THE EXTENDED SOLAR CORONA THROUGH FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES OBSERVED BY STEREO SECCHI COR1

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Ryun-Young; Kramar, Maxim; Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon; Davila, Joseph M.; Chae, Jongchul; Zhang, Jie

    2013-10-10

    We present global coronal seismology for the first time, which allows us to determine inhomogeneous magnetic field strength in the extended corona. From the measurements of the propagation speed of a fast magnetosonic wave associated with a coronal mass ejection (CME) and the coronal background density distribution derived from the polarized radiances observed by the STEREO SECCHI COR1, we determined the magnetic field strengths along the trajectories of the wave at different heliocentric distances. We found that the results have an uncertainty less than 40%, and are consistent with values determined with a potential field model and reported in previous works. The characteristics of the coronal medium we found are that (1) the density, magnetic field strength, and plasma β are lower in the coronal hole region than in streamers; (2) the magnetic field strength decreases slowly with height but the electron density decreases rapidly so that the local fast magnetosonic speed increases while plasma β falls off with height; and (3) the variations of the local fast magnetosonic speed and plasma β are dominated by variations in the electron density rather than the magnetic field strength. These results imply that Moreton and EIT waves are downward-reflected fast magnetosonic waves from the upper solar corona, rather than freely propagating fast magnetosonic waves in a certain atmospheric layer. In addition, the azimuthal components of CMEs and the driven waves may play an important role in various manifestations of shocks, such as type II radio bursts and solar energetic particle events.

  17. Multielectron Correlation in High-Harmonic Generation: A 2D Model Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sukiasyan, Suren; McDonald, Chris; Destefani, Carlos; Brabec, Thomas; Ivanov, Misha Yu.

    2009-06-05

    We analyze the role of multielectron dynamics in high-harmonic generation spectroscopy, using an example of a two-electron system. We identify and systematically quantify the importance of correlation and exchange effects. One of the main sources for correlation is identified to be the polarization of the ion by the recombining continuum electron. This effect, which plays an important qualitative and quantitative role, seriously undermines the validity of the standard approaches to high-harmonic generation, which ignore the contribution of excited ionic states to the radiative recombination of the continuum electron.

  18. Subattosecond keV beats of the high-harmonic x-ray field produced with few-cycle mid-IR laser pulses: Magnetic-field effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelina, A. S.; Emelin, M. Yu.; Ryabikin, M. Yu.

    2016-04-01

    Using the theoretical description beyond the dipole approximation, we examine the impact of the electron magnetic drift caused by a strong midinfrared laser field on the feasibility and ultimate limitations of the method proposed recently [C. Hernández-García et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 033002 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.033002] as a route to the generation of zeptosecond x-ray waveforms; this method relies on the interference of high-harmonic emission from multiple reencounters of the electron wave packet with the ion. We show that the electron magnetic drift serves as the spectral filter changing the relative weights of the contributions to the high-harmonic signal from different rescattering events. For a range of driving wavelengths in the midinfrared, the use of the control of the carrier-envelope phase, occasionally in combination with the spectral filtering, to cope with the magnetic drift effect is shown to facilitate the production of intense high-contrast keV beats of durations shorter than 0.8 attosecond. The limitations on the laser wavelengths usable for implementing this approach are determined by the growing unamendable imbalance between the contributions of interfering paths and by an overall decline in the efficiency of high-harmonic generation at longer driving wavelengths.

  19. QUASI-PERIODIC FAST-MODE WAVE TRAINS WITHIN A GLOBAL EUV WAVE AND SEQUENTIAL TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS DETECTED BY SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wei; Nitta, Nariaki V.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Ofman, Leon

    2012-07-01

    We present the first unambiguous detection of quasi-periodic wave trains within the broad pulse of a global EUV wave (so-called EIT wave) occurring on the limb. These wave trains, running ahead of the lateral coronal mass ejection (CME) front of 2-4 times slower, coherently travel to distances {approx}> R{sub Sun }/2 along the solar surface, with initial velocities up to 1400 km s{sup -1} decelerating to {approx}650 km s{sup -1}. The rapid expansion of the CME initiated at an elevated height of 110 Mm produces a strong downward and lateral compression, which may play an important role in driving the primary EUV wave and shaping its front forwardly inclined toward the solar surface. The wave trains have a dominant 2 minute periodicity that matches the X-ray flare pulsations, suggesting a causal connection. The arrival of the leading EUV wave front at increasing distances produces an uninterrupted chain sequence of deflections and/or transverse (likely fast kink mode) oscillations of local structures, including a flux-rope coronal cavity and its embedded filament with delayed onsets consistent with the wave travel time at an elevated (by {approx}50%) velocity within it. This suggests that the EUV wave penetrates through a topological separatrix surface into the cavity, unexpected from CME-caused magnetic reconfiguration. These observations, when taken together, provide compelling evidence of the fast-mode MHD wave nature of the primary (outer) fast component of a global EUV wave, running ahead of the secondary (inner) slow component of CME-caused restructuring.

  20. Quasi-periodic Fast-mode Wave Trains Within a Global EUV Wave and Sequential Transverse Oscillations Detected by SDO-AIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Wei; Ofman, Leon; Nitta, Nariaki; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Tarbell, Theodore D.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first unambiguous detection of quasi-periodic wave trains within the broad pulse of a global EUV wave (so-called EIT wave) occurring on the limb. These wave trains, running ahead of the lateral coronal mass ejection (CME) front of 2-4 times slower, coherently travel to distances greater than approximately solar radius/2 along the solar surface, with initial velocities up to 1400 kilometers per second decelerating to approximately 650 kilometers per second. The rapid expansion of the CME initiated at an elevated height of 110 Mm produces a strong downward and lateral compression, which may play an important role in driving the primary EUV wave and shaping its front forwardly inclined toward the solar surface. The wave trains have a dominant 2 minute periodicity that matches the X-ray flare pulsations, suggesting a causal connection. The arrival of the leading EUV wave front at increasing distances produces an uninterrupted chain sequence of deflections and/or transverse (likely fast kink mode) oscillations of local structures, including a flux-rope coronal cavity and its embedded filament with delayed onsets consistent with the wave travel time at an elevated (by approximately 50%) velocity within it. This suggests that the EUV wave penetrates through a topological separatrix surface into the cavity, unexpected from CME-caused magnetic reconfiguration. These observations, when taken together, provide compelling evidence of the fast-mode MHD wave nature of the primary (outer) fast component of a global EUV wave, running ahead of the secondary (inner) slow component of CME-caused restructuring.

  1. Fast inhomogeneous plane wave algorithm for the analysis of electromagnetic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bin; Chew, Weng Cho; Velamparambil, Sanjay

    2001-01-01

    The fast inhomogeneous plane wave algorithm has been developed to accelerate the solution of three-dimensional electromagnetic scattering problems in free space. By expanding the kernel of the Green's function using the Weyl identity and choosing a proper steepest descent path, the diagonalization of the translation matrix is achieved after the interpolation and extrapolation techniques are applied. The proposed algorithm is implemented on top of the scalable multipole engine, a portable implementation of the dynamic multilevel fast multipole algorithm for distributed-memory computers. The computational time per matrix vector multiplication is reduced to O(NlogN) and the memory requirement is reduced to O(N), where N is the number of unknowns in the discretized integral equation. The algorithm is validated by applying it to the solution of the electromagnetic scattering from the perfect electric conducting scatterers. This approach can be easily extended to more general problems with complicated Green's function expressed in terms of the plane wave spectral integrals, such as the ones encountered in the multilayered medium studies.

  2. Multilevel fast multipole algorithm for elastic wave scattering by large three-dimensional objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Mei Song; Chew, Weng Cho

    2009-02-01

    Multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA) is developed for solving elastic wave scattering by large three-dimensional (3D) objects. Since the governing set of boundary integral equations (BIE) for the problem includes both compressional and shear waves with different wave numbers in one medium, the double-tree structure for each medium is used in the MLFMA implementation. When both the object and surrounding media are elastic, four wave numbers in total and thus four FMA trees are involved. We employ Nyström method to discretize the BIE and generate the corresponding matrix equation. The MLFMA is used to accelerate the solution process by reducing the complexity of matrix-vector product from O(N2) to O(NlogN) in iterative solvers. The multiple-tree structure differs from the single-tree frame in electromagnetics (EM) and acoustics, and greatly complicates the MLFMA implementation due to the different definitions for well-separated groups in different FMA trees. Our Nyström method has made use of the cancellation of leading terms in the series expansion of integral kernels to handle hyper singularities in near terms. This feature is kept in the MLFMA by seeking the common near patches in different FMA trees and treating the involved near terms synergistically. Due to the high cost of the multiple-tree structure, our numerical examples show that we can only solve the elastic wave scattering problems with 0.3-0.4 millions of unknowns on our Dell Precision 690 workstation using one core.

  3. Absorption of Fast Waves at Moderate to High Ion Cyclotron Harmonics on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsker, R. I.; Porkolab, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Luo, Y.; Petty, C. C.; Prater, R.; Choi, M.; Baity, F. W.; Fredd, E.; Hosea, J. C.; Harvey, R. W.; Smirnov, A. P.; Murakami, M.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2005-09-01

    The absorption of fast Alfvén waves (FW) by ion cyclotron harmonic damping in the range of harmonics from fourth to eighth is studied theoretically and with experiments in the DIII-D tokamak. A formula for linear ion cyclotron absorption on Maxwellian ion species is used to estimate the single-pass damping for various cases of experimental interest. It is found that damping on fast ions from neutral beam injection can be significant even at the eighth harmonic if the fast ion beta and the background plasma density are both high enough. The predictions are tested in several L-mode experiments in DIII-D with FW power at 60 MHz and at 116 MHz. It is found that 4th and 5th harmonic absorption of the 60 MHz power on the beam ions can be quite strong, but 8th harmonic absorption of the 116 MHz power appears to be weaker than expected. Possible explanations of the discrepancy are discussed.

  4. Absorption of fast waves at moderate to high ion cyclotron harmonics on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsker, R. I.; Porkolab, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Luo, Y.; Petty, C. C.; Prater, R.; Choi, M.; Schaffner, D. A.; Baity, F. W.; Fredd, E.; Hosea, J. C.; Harvey, R. W.; Smirnov, A. P.; Murakami, M.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2006-07-01

    The absorption of fast Alfvén waves (FW) by ion cyclotron harmonic damping in the range of harmonics from 4th to 8th is studied theoretically and with experiments in the DIII-D tokamak. A formula for linear ion cyclotron absorption on ions with an arbitrary distribution function which is symmetric about the magnetic field is used to estimate the single-pass damping for various cases of experimental interest. It is found that damping on fast ions from neutral beam injection can be significant even at the 8th harmonic if the fast ion beta, the beam injection energy and the background plasma density are high enough and the beam injection geometry is appropriate. The predictions are tested in several L-mode experiments in DIII-D with FW power at 60 MHz and at 116 MHz. It is found that 4th and 5th harmonic absorption of the 60 MHz power on the beam ions can be quite strong, but 8th harmonic absorption of the 116 MHz power appears to be weaker than expected. The linear modelling predicts a strong dependence of the 8th harmonic absorption on the initial pitch-angle of the injected beam, which is not observed in the experiment. Possible explanations of the discrepancy are discussed.

  5. Absorption of Fast Waves at Moderate to High Ion Cyclotron Harmonics on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Prater, R.; Choi, M.; Porkolab, M.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Luo, Y.; Baity, F.W.; Murakami, M.; Fredd, E.; Hosea, J.C.; Harvey, R.W.; Smirnov, A.P.; Van Zeeland, M.A.

    2005-09-26

    The absorption of fast Alfven waves (FW) by ion cyclotron harmonic damping in the range of harmonics from fourth to eighth is studied theoretically and with experiments in the DIII-D tokamak. A formula for linear ion cyclotron absorption on Maxwellian ion species is used to estimate the single-pass damping for various cases of experimental interest. It is found that damping on fast ions from neutral beam injection can be significant even at the eighth harmonic if the fast ion beta and the background plasma density are both high enough. The predictions are tested in several L-mode experiments in DIII-D with FW power at 60 MHz and at 116 MHz. It is found that 4th and 5th harmonic absorption of the 60 MHz power on the beam ions can be quite strong, but 8th harmonic absorption of the 116 MHz power appears to be weaker than expected. Possible explanations of the discrepancy are discussed.

  6. Transverse instability of a plane front of fast impact ionization waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kyuregyan, A. S.

    2012-05-15

    The transverse instability of a plane front of fast impact ionization waves in p{sup +}-n-n{sup +} semiconductor structures with a finite concentration of donors N in the n layer has been theoretically analyzed. It is assumed that the high velocity u of impact ionization waves is ensured owing to the avalanche multiplication of the uniform background of electrons and holes whose concentration {sigma}{sub b} ahead of the front is high enough for the continuum approximation to be applicable. The problem of the calculation of the growth rate s of a small harmonic perturbation with wavenumber k is reduced to the eigenvalue problem for a specific homogeneous Volterra equation of the second kind containing the sum of double and triple integrals of an unknown eigenfunction. This problem has been solved by the method of successive approximations. It has been shown that the function s(k) for small k values increases monotonically in agreement with the analytical theory reported in Thermal Engineering 58 (13), 1119 (2011), reaches a maximum s{sub M} at k = k{sub M}, then decreases, and becomes negative at k > k{sub 01}. This behavior of the function s(k) for short-wavelength perturbations is due to a decrease in the distortion of the field owing to a finite thickness of the space charge region of the front and 'smearing' of perturbation of concentrations owing to the transverse transport of charge carriers. The similarity laws for perturbations with k Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To k{sub M} have been established: at fixed {sigma}{sub b} values and the maximum field strength on the front E{sub 0M}, the growth rate s depends only on the ratio k/N and the boundary wavenumber k{sub 01} {proportional_to} N. The parameters s{sub M}, k{sub M}, and k{sub 01}, which determine the perturbation growth dynamics and the upper boundary of the instability region for impact ionization waves, have been presented as functions of E{sub 0M}. These dependences indicate that the model of a plane

  7. Experimental Study of RF Sheath Formation on a Fast Wave Antenna and Limiter in the LAPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Michael; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; van Compernolle, Bart; Carter, Troy

    2015-11-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) will be an essential component of heating power in ITER. During ICRH, radio frequency (RF) sheaths may form both at the exciting antenna and further away, e.g. in the divertor region, and may cause wall material sputtering and decreased RF power coupling to the plasma. It is important to do detailed laboratory experiments that fully diagnose the sheaths and wave fields. This is not possible in fusion devices. A new RF system has recently been constructed for performing such studies in the LAPD plasma column (ne ~1012 -1013cm-3 , Te ~ 1 - 10 eV ,B0 ~ 400 - 2000 G , diameter ~ 60cm , length ~ 18 m) . The RF system is capable of pulsing at the 1 Hz rep. rate of the LAPD plasma and operating between 2-6 MHz (1st - 9th harmonic of fci in H) with a power output of 200 kW. First results of this system driving a single-strap fast wave antenna will be presented. Emissive and Langmuir probe measurements in the vicinity of both the antenna and a remote limiter and wave coupling measured by magnetic pickup loops will be presented.

  8. Observational and Theoretical Challenges to Wave or Turbulence Accelerations of the Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. Aaron

    2008-01-01

    We use both observations and theoretical considerations to show that hydromagnetic waves or turbulence cannot produce the acceleration of the fast solar wind and the related heating of the open solar corona. Waves do exist as shown by Hinode and other observations, and can play a role in the differential heating and acceleration of minor ions but their amplitudes are not sufficient to power the wind, as demonstrated by extrapolation of magnetic spectra from Helios and Ulysses observations. Dissipation mechanisms invoked to circumvent this conclusion cannot be effective for a variety of reasons. In particular, turbulence does not play a strong role in the corona as shown by both eclipse observations of coronal striations and theoretical considerations of line-tying to a nonturbulent photosphere, nonlocality of interactions, and the nature of kinetic dissipation. In the absence of wave heating and acceleration, the chromosphere and transition region become the natural source of open coronal energization. We suggest a variant of the velocity filtration approach in which the emergence and complex churning of the magnetic flux in the chromosphere and transition region continuously and ubiquitously produces the nonthermal distributions required. These particles are then released by magnetic carpet reconnection at a wide range of scales and produce the wind as described in kinetic approaches. Since the carpet reconnection is not the main source of the energization of the plasma, there is no expectation of an observable release of energy in nanoflares.

  9. Experimental investigation of the shock wave in a fast discharge with cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Antsiferov, P. S.; Dorokhin, L. A.

    2013-08-15

    The work is devoted to the registration and the study of the properties of cylindrical shock waves generated in the fast discharge (dI/dt ∼ 10{sup 12} A/s) inside the ceramic tube (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) filled by argon at pressures of 100 and 300 Pa. The shock wave appears at the inner wall of the insulator and moves to the discharge axis with a velocity of about (3−4) × 10{sup 6} cm/s with subsequent cumulation. The plasma behind the front is heated enough to produce radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region, which makes it possible to study its structure by means of a pinhole camera with a microchannel plate detector. The time resolution of the registration system was 10 ns. The analysis of VUV spectra of the plasma shows that the electron temperature behind the shock wave front is about several eV; after the moment of cumulation, its temperature increases to 20–30 eV.

  10. Inverse problems in cancellous bone: Estimation of the ultrasonic properties of fast and slow waves using Bayesian probability theory

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christian C.; Bauer, Adam Q.; Holland, Mark R.; Pakula, Michal; Laugier, Pascal; Bretthorst, G. Larry; Miller, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative ultrasonic characterization of cancellous bone can be complicated by artifacts introduced by analyzing acquired data consisting of two propagating waves (a fast wave and a slow wave) as if only one wave were present. Recovering the ultrasonic properties of overlapping fast and slow waves could therefore lead to enhancement of bone quality assessment. The current study uses Bayesian probability theory to estimate phase velocity and normalized broadband ultrasonic attenuation (nBUA) parameters in a model of fast and slow wave propagation. Calculations are carried out using Markov chain Monte Carlo with simulated annealing to approximate the marginal posterior probability densities for parameters in the model. The technique is applied to simulated data, to data acquired on two phantoms capable of generating two waves in acquired signals, and to data acquired on a human femur condyle specimen. The models are in good agreement with both the simulated and experimental data, and the values of the estimated ultrasonic parameters fall within expected ranges. PMID:21110589

  11. Fast dropouts of multi-MeV electrons due to combined effects of EMIC and whistler mode waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourenas, D.; Artemyev, A. V.; Ma, Q.; Agapitov, O. V.; Li, W.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate how whole populations of 2-6 MeV electrons can be quickly lost from the Earth's outer radiation belt at L= 3-6 through precipitation into the atmosphere due to quasi-linear pitch angle scattering by combined electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) and whistler mode waves of realistic intensities occurring at the same or different local times. We provide analytical estimates of the corresponding relativistic electron lifetimes, emphasizing that the combined effects of both waves can lead to very fast (2-10 h) dropouts. Scaling laws for the loss timescales are derived, allowing us to determine the various plasma and wave parameter domains potentially leading to strong and fast dropouts. The analysis reveals that the fastest MeV electron dropouts occur at approximately the same rate over some high energy range and almost independently of EMIC wave amplitudes above a certain threshold. These results should help to better understand the dynamic variability of the radiation belts.

  12. Millimeter-wave center of curvature test for a fast paraboloid.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Samuel; Padin, Stephen

    2012-01-20

    We describe a technique for measuring the surface profile of a radio telescope with a fast paraboloidal primary. The technique uses a sensor, at the center of curvature of the primary, consisting of a millimeter-wave source and an array of receivers to measure the field in the caustic. The sensor is mounted on the telescope enclosure and it moves with the telescope, so the measurements can be used for continuous, slow, closed-loop control of the surface. Sensor decenter and despace errors, due to wind buffeting and thermal deformation of the sensor support, do not compromise the surface measurements because they result in profile errors that are mainly translation, which has no effect on astronomical observations, or tilt and defocus, which can be measured using astronomical sources. If the position of the sensor is known to 20 μm rms, the surface can be measured to ~1  μm rms at λ=3 mm.

  13. Experimental observation of ultrasound fast and slow waves through three-dimensional printed trabecular bone phantoms.

    PubMed

    Mézière, F; Juskova, P; Woittequand, J; Muller, M; Bossy, E; Boistel, Renaud; Malaquin, L; Derode, A

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, ultrasound measurements of 1:1 scale three-dimensional (3D) printed trabecular bone phantoms are reported. The micro-structure of a trabecular horse bone sample was obtained via synchrotron x-ray microtomography, converted to a 3D binary data set, and successfully 3D-printed at scale 1:1. Ultrasound through-transmission experiments were also performed through a highly anisotropic version of this structure, obtained by elongating the digitized structure prior to 3D printing. As in real anisotropic trabecular bone, both the fast and slow waves were observed. This illustrates the potential of stereolithography and the relevance of such bone phantoms for the study of ultrasound propagation in bone.

  14. State-Space Realization of the Wave-Radiation Force within FAST: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Duarte, T.; Sarmento, A.; Alves, M.; Jonkman, J.

    2013-06-01

    Several methods have been proposed in the literature to find a state-space model for the wave-radiation forces. In this paper, four methods were compared, two in the frequency domain and two in the time domain. The frequency-response function and the impulse response of the resulting state-space models were compared against the ones derived by the numerical code WAMIT. The implementation of the state-space module within the FAST offshore wind turbine computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool was verified, comparing the results against the previously implemented numerical convolution method. The results agreed between the two methods, with a significant reduction in required computational time when using the state-space module.

  15. Development of a fast traveling-wave beam chopper for the National Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S.S.; Jason, A.J.; Krawczyk, F.L.; Power, J.

    1997-10-01

    High current and severe restrictions on beam losses, below 1 nA/m, in the designed linac for the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) require clean and fast--with the rise time from 2% to 98% less than 2.5 ns to accommodate a 402.5-MHz beam structure--beam chopping in its front end, at the beam energy 2.5 MeV. The R and D program includes both modification of the existing LANSCE coax-plate chopper to reduce parasitic coupling between adjacent plates, and development of new traveling-wave deflecting structures, in particular, based on a meander line. Using analytical methods and three-dimensional time-domain computer simulations the authors study transient effects in such structures to choose an optimal chopper design.

  16. Investigations of Low and Moderate Harmonic Fast Wave Physics on CDX-U

    SciTech Connect

    J. Spaleta; R. Majeski; C.K. Phillips; R.J. Dumont; R. Kaita; V. Soukhanovskii; L. Zakharov

    2003-07-14

    Third harmonic hydrogen cyclotron fast wave heating studies are planned in the near term on CDX-U to investigate the potential for bulk ion heating. In preparation for these studies, the available radio-frequency power in CDX-U has been increased to 0.5 MW. The operating frequency of the CDX-U radio-frequency transmitter was lowered to operate in the range of 8-10 MHz, providing access to the ion harmonic range 2* {approx} 4* in hydrogen. A similar regime is accessible for the 30 MHz radio-frequency system on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), at 0.6 Tesla in hydrogen. Preliminary computational studies over the plasma regimes of interest for NSTX and CDX-U indicate the possibility of strong localized absorption on bulk ion species.

  17. Millimeter-wave center of curvature test for a fast paraboloid.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Samuel; Padin, Stephen

    2012-01-20

    We describe a technique for measuring the surface profile of a radio telescope with a fast paraboloidal primary. The technique uses a sensor, at the center of curvature of the primary, consisting of a millimeter-wave source and an array of receivers to measure the field in the caustic. The sensor is mounted on the telescope enclosure and it moves with the telescope, so the measurements can be used for continuous, slow, closed-loop control of the surface. Sensor decenter and despace errors, due to wind buffeting and thermal deformation of the sensor support, do not compromise the surface measurements because they result in profile errors that are mainly translation, which has no effect on astronomical observations, or tilt and defocus, which can be measured using astronomical sources. If the position of the sensor is known to 20 μm rms, the surface can be measured to ~1  μm rms at λ=3 mm. PMID:22270658

  18. Design Concepts For A Long Pulse Upgrade For The DIII-D Fast Wave Antenna Array

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Philip Michael; Baity Jr, F Wallace; Caughman, John B; Goulding, Richard Howell; Hosea, J.; Greenough, Nevell; Nagy, Alex; Pinsker, R.; Rasmussen, David A

    2009-01-01

    A goal in the 5-year plan for the fast wave program on DIII-D is to couple a total of 3.6 MW of RF power into a long pulse, H-mode plasma for central electron heating. The present short-pulse 285/300 antenna array would need to be replaced with one capable of at least 1.2 MW, 10 s operation at 60 MHz into an H-mode (low resistive loading) plasma condition. The primary design under consideration uses a poloidally-segmented strap (3 sections) for reduced strap voltage near the plasma/Faraday screen region. Internal capacitance makes the antenna structure self-resonant at 60 MHz, strongly reducing peak E-fields in the vacuum coax and feed throughs.

  19. Development of a Fast Traveling-Wave Beam Chopper for National Spallation Neutron Source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.; Jason, Andrew J.; Krawczyk, Frank L.

    1997-05-01

    High current and severe restrictions on beam losses, below 1 nA/m, in the designed linac for the NSNS require clean and fast (with the rise time from 2% to 98% less than 2.5 ns to accommodate a 402.5 MHz beam structure) beam chopping in its front end, at beam energy 2.5 MeV. The present R&D program includes both modification of the existing LANSCE coax-plate chopper to reduce parasitic coupling between adjacent plates, and development of new traveling-wave deflecting structures, in particular, based on a meander line. Using analytical methods and three-dimensional time-domain computer simulations we study transient effects in such structures to choose an optimal chopper design.

  20. Strong fast long-period waves in the Efpalio 2010 earthquake records: explanation in terms of leaking modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vackář, Jiří; Zahradník, Jiří; Sokos, Efthimios

    2014-01-01

    The January 18, 2010, shallow earthquake in the Corinth Gulf, Greece ( M w 5.3) generated unusually strong long-period waves (periods 4-8 s) between the P and S wave arrival. These periods, being significantly longer than the source duration, indicated a structural effect. The waves were observed in epicentral distances 40-250 km and were significant on radial and vertical component. None of existing velocity models of the studied region provided explanation of the waves. By inverting complete waveforms, we obtained an 1-D crustal model explaining the observation. The most significant feature of the best-fitting model (as well as the whole suite of models almost equally well fitting the waveforms) is a strong velocity step at depth about 4 km. In the obtained velocity model, the fast long-period wave was modeled by modal summation and identified as a superposition of several leaking modes. In this sense, the wave is qualitatively similar to P long or Pnl waves, which however are usually reported in larger epicentral distances. The main innovation of this paper is emphasis to smaller epicentral distances. We studied properties of the wave using synthetic seismograms. The wave has a normal dispersion. Azimuthal and distance dependence of the wave partially explains its presence at 46 stations of 70 examined. Depth dependence shows that the studied earthquake was very efficient in the excitation of these waves just due to its shallow centroid depth (4.5 km).

  1. A fast neuronal signal-sensitive continuous-wave near-infrared imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Sun, Bailei; Gong, Hui; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Jinyan; Wang, Bangde; Luo, Qingming

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a continuous-wave near-infrared imaging system to measure fast neuronal signals. We used a simultaneous sampling method with a separate high-speed analog-to-digital converter for each input channel, which provides a much larger point sample in a digital lock-in algorithm, higher temporal resolution, and lower crosstalk among detected channels. Without any analog filter, digital lock-in detection with a large point sample suppresses noise excellently, making the system less complex and offering better flexibility. In addition, using a custom-made collimator, more photons can reach the brain tissue due to the smaller divergence angle. Performance analysis shows high detection sensitivity (on the order of 0.1 pW) and high temporal resolution (˜50 Hz, 48 channels). Simulation experiments show that intensity changes on the order of 0.01% can be resolved by our instrument when averaging over approximately 500 stimuli. In vivo experiments over the motor cortex show that our instrument can detect fast neuronal signals in the human brain.

  2. Fast methods for computing scene raw signals in millimeter-wave sensor simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Richard F.; Reynolds, Terry M.; Satterfield, H. Dewayne

    2010-04-01

    Modern millimeter wave (mmW) radar sensor systems employ wideband transmit waveforms and efficient receiver signal processing methods for resolving accurate measurements of targets embedded in complex backgrounds. Fast Fourier Transform processing of pulse return signal samples is used to resolve range and Doppler locations, and amplitudes of scattered RF energy. Angle glint from RF scattering centers can be measured by performing monopulse arithmetic on signals resolved in both delta and sum antenna channels. Environment simulations for these sensors - including all-digital and hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) scene generators - require fast, efficient methods for computing radar receiver input signals to support accurate simulations with acceptable execution time and computer cost. Although all-digital and HWIL simulations differ in their representations of the radar sensor (which is itself a simulation in the all-digital case), the signal computations for mmW scene modeling are closely related for both types. Engineers at the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) have developed various fast methods for computing mmW scene raw signals to support both HWIL scene projection and all-digital receiver model input signal synthesis. These methods range from high level methods of decomposing radar scenes for accurate application of spatially-dependent nonlinear scatterer phase history, to low-level methods of efficiently computing individual scatterer complex signals and single precision transcendental functions. The efficiencies of these computations are intimately tied to math and memory resources provided by computer architectures. The paper concludes with a summary of radar scene computing performance on available computer architectures, and an estimate of future growth potential for this computational performance.

  3. A square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetric method for determination of fast green dye.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghamdi, Ali F

    2009-01-01

    Square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetric (SW-AdSV) determinations of trace concentrations of the coloring agent fast green were described. The analytical methodology used was based on the adsorptive preconcentration of the dye on the hanging mercury drop electrode, and then a negative sweep was initiated. In pH 10 carbonate supporting electrolyte, fast green gave a well-defined and sensitive SW-AdSV peak at -1220 mV. The electroanalytical determination of this dye was found to be optimized in carbonate buffer (pH 10) with the following experimental conditions: accumulation time (120 s); accumulation potential (-0.8 V); scan rate (800 mV/s); pulse amplitude (90 mV); frequency (90 Hz); surface area of the working electrode (0.6 mm2); and the convection rate (2000 rpm). Under these optimized conditions, the AdSV peak current was proportional over the concentration range 2 x 10(-8) -6 x 10(-7) M (r = 0.999), with an LOD of 1.63 x 10(-10) M (0.132 ppb). This analytical approach possessed more enhanced sensitivity than conventional chromatography or spectrophotometry, and was simple and quick. The precision of the method in terms of RSD was 0.17%, whereas the accuracy was evaluated via the mean recovery of 99.6%. Possible interferences by several substances usually present as food additive azo dyes (E110, E102, E123, and E129), natural and artificial sweeteners, and antioxidants were also investigated. Applicability of the developed electroanalysis method was illustrated via the determination of fast green in ice cream and soft drink samples.

  4. Compact millimeter-wave devices: Cherenkov CARM, voltage CARM and high harmonic gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, Neville C., Jr.

    1989-11-01

    The dielectric loaded cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARN) experiments were extremely disappointing. Even with a high quality electron beam, the performance of the device did not improve. The analytical theory of Bragg reflectors was developed. The reflection is found by solving the coupled differential equations by the eigenvalue/eiginvector method.

  5. High ion-harmonics fast wave heating in NSTX and CDX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menard, J.; Majeski, R.; Ono, M.; Wilson, J. R.

    1996-02-01

    Low-aspect-ratio tokamaks (LARTs) have received recent attention because of encouraging results from small scale experiments and because of the LART's potential for attaining high stable β in next generation devices. For this potential to be realized, efficient methods of non-inductive heating and current drive required to heat and sustain such plasmas must be found. A typical next generation high β LART experiment has an unusually large dielectric ω2pe/Ω2ce˜100, compared to the conventional tokamak value of ˜1. In the high dielectric regime considered here, lower hybrid and electron cyclotron waves have severe accessibility problems. In contrast to these limitations, recent calculations by M. Ono [1] indicate that fast waves in the intermediate frequency regime with ω≊20Ωci≪ωLH experience sufficient damping on electrons to consider localized power deposition and have a high ion β accessibility limit. In an attempt to model this regime, ray tracing calculations for NSTX and CDX-U have been performed and modelling results will be presented for cases of interest.

  6. High ion-harmonics fast wave heating in NSTX and CDX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Menard, J.; Majeski, R.; Ono, M.; Wilson, J.R.

    1996-02-01

    Low-aspect-ratio tokamaks (LARTs) have received recent attention because of encouraging results from small scale experiments and because of the LART{close_quote}s potential for attaining high stable {beta} in next generation devices. For this potential to be realized, efficient methods of non-inductive heating and current drive required to heat and sustain such plasmas must be found. A typical next generation high {beta} LART experiment has an unusually large dielectric {omega}{sup 2}{sub {ital pe}}/{Omega}{sup 2}{sub {ital ce}}{approximately}100, compared to the conventional tokamak value of {approximately}1. In the high dielectric regime considered here, lower hybrid and electron cyclotron waves have severe accessibility problems. In contrast to these limitations, recent calculations by M. Ono [1] indicate that fast waves in the intermediate frequency regime with {omega}{approx_equal}20{Omega}{sub {ital ci}}{lt}{omega}{sub {ital LH}} experience sufficient damping on electrons to consider localized power deposition and have a high ion {beta} accessibility limit. In an attempt to model this regime, ray tracing calculations for NSTX and CDX-U have been performed and modelling results will be presented for cases of interest. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. The gradient waves of perturbations as an instability factor in fast-flow lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedoseev, A. I.; Mushenkov, A. V.; Odintsov, A. I.; Smirnov, A. P.

    2016-07-01

    We study the mechanism of the self-oscillation instability associated with the nonlinear interaction of radiation with a moving active medium in a fast-flow gas laser. The results of our analytical and numerical calculations of the frequencies and increments of the small self-oscillation perturbations in an unstable cavity of the laser with a non-uniform pumping rate are presented. In the analytical model the small perturbations of the gain in each point of the flow consist of two parts. The first part includes the ‘local’ perturbations that are not related to a motion of the medium. The second part includes the ‘flow’ perturbations that arise upstream of the flow due to the gradients of the pumping rate and the laser field intensity. These perturbations are carried by the flow in the form of traveling waves. The interference of the ‘gradient’ waves of the flow perturbations results in the resonant properties of the feedback produced by the flow. It is demonstrated that it is feasible to control the lasing regime based on these resonant properties of the feedback. The simulation of the nonlinear lasing regimes demonstrates that the conversion of continuous lasing into the periodical self-pulsing regime is not accompanied by a significant reduction in the average power output.

  8. Fast simulated annealing inversion of surface waves on pavement using phase-velocity spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryden, N.; Park, C.B.

    2006-01-01

    The conventional inversion of surface waves depends on modal identification of measured dispersion curves, which can be ambiguous. It is possible to avoid mode-number identification and extraction by inverting the complete phase-velocity spectrum obtained from a multichannel record. We use the fast simulated annealing (FSA) global search algorithm to minimize the difference between the measured phase-velocity spectrum and that calculated from a theoretical layer model, including the field setup geometry. Results show that this algorithm can help one avoid getting trapped in local minima while searching for the best-matching layer model. The entire procedure is demonstrated on synthetic and field data for asphalt pavement. The viscoelastic properties of the top asphalt layer are taken into account, and the inverted asphalt stiffness as a function of frequency compares well with laboratory tests on core samples. The thickness and shear-wave velocity of the deeper embedded layers are resolved within 10% deviation from those values measured separately during pavement construction. The proposed method may be equally applicable to normal soil site investigation and in the field of ultrasonic testing of materials. ?? 2006 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  9. Using the third state of matter: high harmonic generation from liquid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heissler, P.; Lugovoy, E.; Hörlein, R.; Waldecker, L.; Wenz, J.; Heigoldt, M.; Khrennikov, K.; Karsch, S.; Krausz, F.; Abel, B.; Tsakiris, G. D.

    2014-11-01

    High harmonic generation on solid and gaseous targets has been proven to be a powerful platform for the generation of attosecond pulses. Here we demonstrate a novel technique for the XUV generation on a smooth liquid surface target in vacuum, which circumvents the problem of low repetition rate and limited shot numbers associated with solid targets, while it maintains some of its merits. We employed atomically smooth, continuous liquid jets of water, aqueous salt solutions and ethanol that allow uninterrupted high harmonic generation due to the coherent wake emission mechanism for over 8 h. It has been found that the mechanism of plasma generation is very similar to that for smooth solid target surfaces. The vapor pressure around the liquid target in our setup has been found to be very low such that the presence of the gas phase around the liquid jet could be neglected.

  10. Tomographic reconstruction of circularly polarized high-harmonic fields: 3D attosecond metrology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cong; Tao, Zhensheng; Hernández-García, Carlos; Matyba, Piotr; Carr, Adra; Knut, Ronny; Kfir, Ofer; Zusin, Dimitry; Gentry, Christian; Grychtol, Patrik; Cohen, Oren; Plaja, Luis; Becker, Andreas; Jaron-Becker, Agnieszka; Kapteyn, Henry; Murnane, Margaret

    2016-02-01

    Bright, circularly polarized, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray high-harmonic beams can now be produced using counter-rotating circularly polarized driving laser fields. Although the resulting circularly polarized harmonics consist of relatively simple pairs of peaks in the spectral domain, in the time domain, the field is predicted to emerge as a complex series of rotating linearly polarized bursts, varying rapidly in amplitude, frequency, and polarization. We extend attosecond metrology techniques to circularly polarized light by simultaneously irradiating a copper surface with circularly polarized high-harmonic and linearly polarized infrared laser fields. The resulting temporal modulation of the photoelectron spectra carries essential phase information about the EUV field. Utilizing the polarization selectivity of the solid surface and by rotating the circularly polarized EUV field in space, we fully retrieve the amplitude and phase of the circularly polarized harmonics, allowing us to reconstruct one of the most complex coherent light fields produced to date. PMID:26989782

  11. Tomographic reconstruction of circularly polarized high-harmonic fields: 3D attosecond metrology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cong; Tao, Zhensheng; Hernández-García, Carlos; Matyba, Piotr; Carr, Adra; Knut, Ronny; Kfir, Ofer; Zusin, Dimitry; Gentry, Christian; Grychtol, Patrik; Cohen, Oren; Plaja, Luis; Becker, Andreas; Jaron-Becker, Agnieszka; Kapteyn, Henry; Murnane, Margaret

    2016-02-01

    Bright, circularly polarized, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray high-harmonic beams can now be produced using counter-rotating circularly polarized driving laser fields. Although the resulting circularly polarized harmonics consist of relatively simple pairs of peaks in the spectral domain, in the time domain, the field is predicted to emerge as a complex series of rotating linearly polarized bursts, varying rapidly in amplitude, frequency, and polarization. We extend attosecond metrology techniques to circularly polarized light by simultaneously irradiating a copper surface with circularly polarized high-harmonic and linearly polarized infrared laser fields. The resulting temporal modulation of the photoelectron spectra carries essential phase information about the EUV field. Utilizing the polarization selectivity of the solid surface and by rotating the circularly polarized EUV field in space, we fully retrieve the amplitude and phase of the circularly polarized harmonics, allowing us to reconstruct one of the most complex coherent light fields produced to date.

  12. Tomographic reconstruction of circularly polarized high-harmonic fields: 3D attosecond metrology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cong; Tao, Zhensheng; Hernández-García, Carlos; Matyba, Piotr; Carr, Adra; Knut, Ronny; Kfir, Ofer; Zusin, Dimitry; Gentry, Christian; Grychtol, Patrik; Cohen, Oren; Plaja, Luis; Becker, Andreas; Jaron-Becker, Agnieszka; Kapteyn, Henry; Murnane, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Bright, circularly polarized, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray high-harmonic beams can now be produced using counter-rotating circularly polarized driving laser fields. Although the resulting circularly polarized harmonics consist of relatively simple pairs of peaks in the spectral domain, in the time domain, the field is predicted to emerge as a complex series of rotating linearly polarized bursts, varying rapidly in amplitude, frequency, and polarization. We extend attosecond metrology techniques to circularly polarized light by simultaneously irradiating a copper surface with circularly polarized high-harmonic and linearly polarized infrared laser fields. The resulting temporal modulation of the photoelectron spectra carries essential phase information about the EUV field. Utilizing the polarization selectivity of the solid surface and by rotating the circularly polarized EUV field in space, we fully retrieve the amplitude and phase of the circularly polarized harmonics, allowing us to reconstruct one of the most complex coherent light fields produced to date. PMID:26989782

  13. Diffractive imaging using a polychromatic high-harmonic generation soft-x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilanian, Ruben A.; Chen, Bo; Williams, Garth J.; Quiney, Harry M.; Nugent, Keith A.; Teichmann, Sven; Hannaford, Peter; Dao, Lap V.; Peele, Andrew G.

    2009-07-01

    A new approach to diffractive imaging using polychromatic diffraction data is described. The method is tested using simulated and experimental data and is shown to yield high-quality reconstructions. Diffraction data produced using a high-harmonic generation source are considered explicitly here. The formalism can be readily adapted, however, to any short-wavelength source producing a discrete spectrum and possessing sufficient spatial coherence.

  14. High-harmonic XUV source for time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dakovski, Georgi L; Li, Yinwan; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Rodriguez, George

    2009-01-01

    We present a laser-based apparatus for visible pump/XUV probe time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TRARPES) utilizing high-harmonic generation from a noble gas. Femtosecond temporal resolution for each selected harmonic is achieved by using a time-delay-compensated monochromator (TCM). The source has been used to obtain photoemission spectra from insulators (UO{sub 2}) and ultrafast pump/probe processes in semiconductors (GaAs).

  15. Opportunities for chiral discrimination using high harmonic generation in tailored laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Olga; Mairesse, Yann; Patchkovskii, Serguei

    2015-12-01

    Chiral discrimination with high harmonic generation (cHHG method) has been introduced in the recent work by R Cireasa et al (2015 Nat. Phys. 11 654-8). In its original implementation, the cHHG method works by detecting high harmonic emission from randomly oriented ensemble of chiral molecules driven by elliptically polarized field, as a function of ellipticity. Here we discuss future perspectives in the development of this novel method, the ways of increasing chiral dichroism using tailored laser pulses, new detection schemes involving high harmonic phase measurements, and concentration-independent approaches. Using the example of the epoxypropane molecule CH3CHCH2O (also known as 1,2-propylene oxide), we show theoretically that application of two-color counter-rotating elliptically polarized laser fields yields an order of magnitude enhancement of chiral dichroism compared to single color elliptical fields. We also describe how one can introduce a new functionality to cHHG: concentration-independent measurement of the enatiomeric excess in a mixture of randomly oriented left-handed and right-handed molecules. Finally, for arbitrary configurations of laser fields, we connect the observables of the cHHG method to the amplitude and phase of chiral response, providing a basis for reconstructing wide range of chiral dynamics from cHHG measurements, with femtosecond to sub-femtosecond temporal resolution.

  16. Towards enabling femtosecond helicity-dependent spectroscopy with high-harmonic sources.

    PubMed

    Lambert, G; Vodungbo, B; Gautier, J; Mahieu, B; Malka, V; Sebban, S; Zeitoun, P; Luning, J; Perron, J; Andreev, A; Stremoukhov, S; Ardana-Lamas, F; Dax, A; Hauri, C P; Sardinha, A; Fajardo, M

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in high-harmonic generation gave rise to soft X-ray pulses with higher intensity, shorter duration and higher photon energy. One of the remaining shortages of this source is its restriction to linear polarization, since the yield of generation of elliptically polarized high harmonics has been low so far. We here show how this limitation is overcome by using a cross-polarized two-colour laser field. With this simple technique, we reach high degrees of ellipticity (up to 75%) with efficiencies similar to classically generated linearly polarized harmonics. To demonstrate these features and to prove the capacity of our source for applications, we measure the X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) effect of nickel at the M2,3 absorption edge around 67 eV. There results open up the way towards femtosecond time-resolved experiments using high harmonics exploiting the powerful element-sensitive XMCD effect and resolving the ultrafast magnetization dynamics of individual components in complex materials. PMID:25649329

  17. Analytical analysis of slow and fast pressure waves in a two-dimensional cellular solid with fluid-filled cells.

    PubMed

    Dorodnitsyn, Vladimir; Van Damme, Bart

    2016-06-01

    Wave propagation in cellular and porous media is widely studied due to its abundance in nature and industrial applications. Biot's theory for open-cell media predicts the existence of two simultaneous pressure waves, distinguished by its velocity. A fast wave travels through the solid matrix, whereas a much slower wave is carried by fluid channels. In closed-cell materials, the slow wave disappears due to a lack of a continuous fluid path. However, recent finite element (FE) simulations done by the authors of this paper also predict the presence of slow pressure waves in saturated closed-cell materials. The nature of the slow wave is not clear. In this paper, an equivalent unit cell of a medium with square cells is proposed to permit an analytical description of the dynamics of such a material. A simplified FE model suggests that the fluid-structure interaction can be fully captured using a wavenumber-dependent spring support of the vibrating cell walls. Using this approach, the pressure wave behavior can be calculated with high accuracy, but with less numerical effort. Finally, Rayleigh's energy method is used to investigate the coexistence of two waves with different velocities. PMID:27369159

  18. Stochastic acceleration of electrons by fast magnetosonic waves in solar flares: the effects of anisotropy in velocity and wavenumber space

    SciTech Connect

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.

    2014-11-20

    We develop a model for stochastic acceleration of electrons in solar flares. As in several previous models, the electrons are accelerated by turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ({sup f}ast waves{sup )} via transit-time-damping (TTD) interactions. (In TTD interactions, fast waves act like moving magnetic mirrors that push the electrons parallel or anti-parallel to the magnetic field). We also include the effects of Coulomb collisions and the waves' parallel electric fields. Unlike previous models, our model is two-dimensional in both momentum space and wavenumber space and takes into account the anisotropy of the wave power spectrum F{sub k} and electron distribution function f {sub e}. We use weak turbulence theory and quasilinear theory to obtain a set of equations that describes the coupled evolution of F{sub k} and f {sub e}. We solve these equations numerically and find that the electron distribution function develops a power-law-like non-thermal tail within a restricted range of energies E in (E {sub nt}, E {sub max}). We obtain approximate analytic expressions for E {sub nt} and E {sub max}, which describe how these minimum and maximum energies depend upon parameters such as the electron number density and the rate at which fast-wave energy is injected into the acceleration region at large scales. We contrast our results with previous studies that assume that F{sub k} and f {sub e} are isotropic, and we compare one of our numerical calculations with the time-dependent hard-X-ray spectrum observed during the 1980 June 27 flare. In our numerical calculations, the electron energy spectra are softer (steeper) than in models with isotropic F{sub k} and f {sub e} and closer to the values inferred from observations of solar flares.

  19. Gravitational wave asteroseismology of fast rotating neutron stars with realistic equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doneva, Daniela D.; Gaertig, Erich; Kokkotas, Kostas D.; Krüger, Christian

    2013-08-01

    In the present paper we study the oscillations of fast rotating neutron stars with realistic equations of state (EoS) within the Cowling approximation. We derive improved empirical relations for gravitational wave asteroseismology with f-modes, and for the first time we consider not only quadrupolar oscillations but also modes with higher spherical order (l=|m|=3, 4). After performing a systematic comparison with polytropic EoS, we show that the empirical relations found in this case approximately also hold for realistic EoS. In addition, we show that these relations will not change significantly even if the Cowling approximation is dropped and the full general relativistic case is considered, although the normalization used here (frequencies and damping times in the nonrotating limit) could differ considerably. We also address the inverse problem; i.e., we investigate in detail what kind of observational data are required in order to determine characteristic neutron star parameters. It is shown that masses, radii and rotation rates can be estimated quite accurately using the derived asteroseismology relations. We also compute the instability window for certain models, i.e., the limiting curve in a T-Ω plane where the secular Chandrasekhar-Friedman-Schutz instability overcomes dissipative effects, and we show that some of the modern realistic EoS will lead to a larger instability window compared to all of the polytropic ones presented so far in the literature. Additionally, we calculate the r-mode instability window and compare it with the f-mode case. The overall results for the instability window suggest that it is vital to take into account oscillations with l=3, 4 when considering gravitational wave asteroseismology using the f-mode in rapidly rotating neutron stars, as these modes can become unstable for a much larger range of parameters than pure quadrupolar oscillations.

  20. Development and testing of a fast Fourier transform high dynamic-range spectral diagnostics for millimeter wave characterization.

    PubMed

    Thoen, D J; Bongers, W A; Westerhof, E; Oosterbeek, J W; de Baar, M R; van den Berg, M A; van Beveren, V; Bürger, A; Goede, A P H; Graswinckel, M F; Hennen, B A; Schüller, F C

    2009-10-01

    A fast Fourier transform (FFT) based wide range millimeter wave diagnostics for spectral characterization of scattered millimeter waves in plasmas has been successfully brought into operation. The scattered millimeter waves are heterodyne downconverted and directly digitized using a fast analog-digital converter and a compact peripheral component interconnect computer. Frequency spectra are obtained by FFT in the time domain of the intermediate frequency signal. The scattered millimeter waves are generated during high power electron cyclotron resonance heating experiments on the TEXTOR tokamak and demonstrate the performance of the diagnostics and, in particular, the usability of direct digitizing and Fourier transformation of millimeter wave signals. The diagnostics is able to acquire 4 GHz wide spectra of signals in the range of 136-140 GHz. The rate of spectra is tunable and has been tested between 200,000 spectra/s with a frequency resolution of 100 MHz and 120 spectra/s with a frequency resolution of 25 kHz. The respective dynamic ranges are 52 and 88 dB. Major benefits of the new diagnostics are a tunable time and frequency resolution due to postdetection, near-real time processing of the acquired data. This diagnostics has a wider application in astrophysics, earth observation, plasma physics, and molecular spectroscopy for the detection and analysis of millimeter wave radiation, providing high-resolution spectra at high temporal resolution and large dynamic range. PMID:19895061

  1. Magnetic resonance elastography of slow and fast shear waves illuminates differences in shear and tensile moduli in anisotropic tissue.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J L; Tweten, D J; Benegal, A N; Walker, C H; Portnoi, T E; Okamoto, R J; Garbow, J R; Bayly, P V

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical anisotropy is an important property of fibrous tissues; for example, the anisotropic mechanical properties of brain white matter may play a key role in the mechanics of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The simplest anisotropic material model for small deformations of soft tissue is a nearly incompressible, transversely isotropic (ITI) material characterized by three parameters: minimum shear modulus (µ), shear anisotropy (ϕ=µ1µ-1) and tensile anisotropy (ζ=E1E2-1). These parameters can be determined using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) to visualize shear waves, if the angle between the shear-wave propagation direction and fiber direction is known. Most MRE studies assume isotropic material models with a single shear (µ) or tensile (E) modulus. In this study, two types of shear waves, "fast" and "slow", were analyzed for a given propagation direction to estimate anisotropic parameters µ, ϕ, and ζ in two fibrous soft materials: turkey breast ex vivo and aligned fibrin gels. As expected, the speed of slow shear waves depended on the angle between fiber direction and propagation direction. Fast shear waves were observed when the deformations due to wave motion induced stretch in the fiber direction. Finally, MRE estimates of anisotropic mechanical properties in turkey breast were compared to estimates from direct mechanical tests. PMID:26920505

  2. Prediction of Sawtooth Periods in Fast-Wave Heated DIII-D Experiments Using Extensions of the Porcelli Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, A. D.; Choi, M.; Lao, L. L.; Chan, V. S.; Chu, M. S.; Jeon, Y. M.; Li, G.; Ren, Q.; Gorelenkov, N.

    2007-11-01

    Validation of a predictive sawtooth model is important for burning plasma experiments such as ITER. The Porcelli model using simplified expressions for the key contributions has been found to predict average sawtooth periods reasonably well in existing tokamaks. We evaluate this model using realistic models for the ideal MHD contribution from GATO, and a nonisotropic fast ion contribution using ORBIT-RF and TORIC for the rf-modified fast-ion pressure. Application to the first giant sawtooth cycle in a DIII-D discharge where beam ions accelerated by fast waves modify the sawteeth shows the model can predict the crash time consistent with the experimental crash. The stabilizing contributions depend strongly on uncertainties in the magnetic shear at q=1 and the fast ion poloidal beta. The model will be also applied to other sawteeth in the same discharge and compared to predictions from the more complete NOVA-K stability code with full anistropy.

  3. Theoretical study of the inversion motion of the ammonia cation with subfemtosecond resolution for high-harmonic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Förster, Johann; Saenz, Alejandro

    2013-05-10

    In a recent PACER (Probing Attosecond dynamics with Chirp-Encoded Recollisions) experiment on ammonia that comprises a comparison of the high-harmonic spectra of the isotopes NH3 and ND3, the nuclear dynamics of the created ammonia cation is traced with a time resolution of about 100 attoseconds. For modelling the experiment the autocorrelation functions between the neutral initial state and the ionic wave packet are extracted from experimental photoelectron spectra incorporating a correction for the geometry-dependent strong-field ionisation probability. Good agreement is found between model and experiment, but in addition an unexpected maximum in the autocorrelation ratio is predicted by the model, however occurring at 5 fs and thus outside the experimentally covered time interval. In this work the autocorrelation functions are calculated explicitly using a one-dimensional model for describing the inversion motion of ammonia and its cation, adopting a position-dependent mass for considering the coupling with the stretching mode of the hydrogen atoms in neutral ammonia. This results in a clear physical picture explaining the occurrence of the previously predicted maximum in the ratio of the autocorrelation functions. Furthermore, different initial states and two different ways of incorporating strong-field corrections to the Franck-Condon approximation are briefly discussed.

  4. High resolution fast wave reflectometry: JET design and implications for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Cupido, L.; Igreja, R.; Serra, F.; Manso, M. E.; Cardinali, A.; Murari, A.

    2008-10-15

    The measurement of the fuel mixture remains a very difficult task in thermonuclear plasmas, where the hydrogen isotopes are fully stripped and do not emit line radiation. On the other hand, direct determination of the ion species mix will be essential in the reactor to keep the mixture close to 50/50 and maximize the fusion output. In this paper, the design of fast wave reflectometry for JET is reviewed to show the potential of such a method in the perspective of ITER. The main design elements of the antenna and the detection system, based on vectorial measurements, are reported. The main challenges to such a diagnostic, mainly the intrinsic ion cyclotron emission from the plasma and the extensive use of ion cyclotron radiofrequencies as additional heating, are addressed in detail. The overall design indicates that the proposed system would be able to provide a measurement of the fuel ratio with spatial resolution in the range of few centimeters and temporal resolution in the range of 1 ms in the vast majority of JET scenarios.

  5. Generation of plasma rotation in a tokamak by ion-cyclotron absorption of fast Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    F.W. Perkins; R.B. White; P. Bonoli

    2000-06-13

    Control of rotation in tokamak plasmas provides a method for suppressing fine-scale turbulent transport by velocity shear and for stabilizing large-scale magnetohydrodynamic instabilities via a close-fitting conducting shell. The experimental discovery of rotation in a plasma heated by the fast-wave minority ion cyclotron process is important both as a potential control method for a fusion reactor and as a fundamental issue, because rotation arises even though this heating process introduces negligible angular momentum. This paper proposes and evaluates a mechanism which resolves this apparent conflict. First, it is assumed that angular momentum transport in a tokamak is governed by a diffusion equation with a no-slip boundary condition at the plasma surface and with a torque-density source that is a function of radius. When the torque density source consists of two separated regions of positive and negative torque density, a non-zero central rotation velocity results, even when the total angular momentum input vanishes. Secondly, the authors show that localized ion-cyclotron heating can generate regions of positive and negative torque density and consequently central plasma rotation.

  6. Slow-time-scale magnetic fields driven by fast-time-scale waves in an underdense relativistic Vlasov plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shao-ping; He, X. T.; Zheng, C. Y.

    2001-01-01

    Slow-time-scale magnetic fields driven by fast-time-scale electromagnetic waves or plasma waves are examined from the perspective of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations for a relativistic Vlasov plasma. An equation for slow-time-scale magnetic field is obtained. The field proposed in the present paper is a result of wave-wave beating which drives a solenoidal current. The magnitude of the slow-time-scale magnetic field proposed here can be as high as 20 MG at the critical surface for a laser intensity I=1018W/cm2 at wavelength λ0=1.05 μm. The predicted magnetic field is observed in two-dimensional particle simulations presented here.

  7. A scheme for recording a fast process at nanosecond scale by using digital holographic interferometry with continuous wave laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Zhao, Jianlin; Di, Jianglei; Jiang, Biqiang

    2015-04-01

    A scheme for recording fast process at nanosecond scale by using digital holographic interferometry with continuous wave (CW) laser is described and demonstrated experimentally, which employs delayed-time fibers and angular multiplexing technique and can realize the variable temporal resolution at nanosecond scale and different measured depths of object field at certain temporal resolution. The actual delay-time is controlled by two delayed-time fibers with different lengths. The object field information in two different states can be simultaneously recorded in a composite hologram. This scheme is also suitable for recording fast process at picosecond scale, by using an electro-optic modulator.

  8. Monte Carlo orbit/full wave simulation of ion cyclotron resonance frequency wave damping on resonant ions in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, M.; Chan, V.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Chiu, S.C.; Heidbrink, W.W.

    2005-07-15

    To investigate the experimentally observed interaction between beam ion species and fast Alfven wave (FW), a Monte Carlo code, ORBIT-RF [V. S. Chan, S. C. Chiu, and Y. A. Omelchenko, Phys. Plasmas 9, 501 (2002)], which solves the time-dependent Hamiltonian guiding center drift equations, has been upgraded to incorporate a steady-state neutral beam ion slowing-down distribution, a quasilinear high harmonic radio frequency diffusion operator and the wave fields from the two-dimensional ion cyclotron resonance frequency full wave code (TORIC4) [M. Brambilla, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 41, 1 (1999)]. Comparison of ORBIT-RF simulation of power absorption with fixed amplitudes of FW fields from TORIC4 power absorption calculation, which assumes Maxwellian plasma distributions, attains agreement within a factor of two. The experimentally measured enhanced neutron rate is reproduced to within 30% from ORBIT-RF simulation using a single dominant toroidal and poloidal wave number.

  9. Fast calculation method for optical diffraction on tilted planes by use of the angular spectrum of plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, Kyoji; Schimmel, Hagen; Wyrowski, Frank

    2003-09-01

    A novel method for simulating field propagation is presented. The method, based on the angular spectrum of plane waves and coordinate rotation in the Fourier domain, removes geometric limitations posed by conventional propagation calculation and enables us to calculate complex amplitudes of diffracted waves on a plane not parallel to the aperture. This method can be implemented by using the fast Fourier transformation twice and a spectrum interpolation. It features computation time that is comparable with that of standard calculation methods for diffraction or propagation between parallel planes. To demonstrate the method, numerical results as well as a general formulation are reported for a single-axis rotation.

  10. Time and Space Resolved High Harmonic Imaging of Electron Tunnelling from Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, O.

    2009-05-01

    High harmonic generation in intense laser fields carries the promise of combining sub-Angstrom spatial and attosecond temporal resolution of electronic structures and dynamics in molecules, see e.g. [1-3]. High harmonic emission occurs when an electron detached from a molecule by an intense laser field recombines with the parent ion [4]. Similar to Young's double-slit experiment, recombination to several ``lobes'' of the same molecular orbital can produce interference minima and maxima in harmonic intensities [1]. These minima (maxima) carry structural information -- they occur when the de-Broglie wavelength of the recombining electron matches distances between the centers. We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that amplitude minima (maxima) in the harmonic spectra can also have dynamical origin, reflecting multi-electron dynamics in the molecule. We use high harmonic spectra to record this dynamics and reconstruct the position of the hole left in the molecule after ionization. Experimental data are consistent with the hole starting in different places as the ionization dynamics changes from tunnelling to the multi-photon regime. Importantly, hole localization and subsequent attosecond dynamics are induced even in the tunnelling limit. Thus, even ``static'' tunnelling induced by a tip of a tunnelling microscope will generate similar attosecond dynamics in a sample. We anticipate that our approach will become standard in disentangling spatial and temporal information from high harmonic spectra of molecules.[4pt] In collaboration with Serguei Patchkovskii, National Research Council, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6, Canada; Yann Mairesse, NRC Canada and CELIA, Universit'e Bordeaux I, UMR 5107 (CNRS, Bordeaux 1, CEA), 351 Cours de la Lib'eration, 33405 Talence Cedex, France; Nirit Dudovich, NRC Canada and Department of Physics of Complex Systems, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel; David Villeneuve, Paul Corkum, NRC Canada

  11. Cavity-Enhanced High-Harmonic Generation with Spatially Tailored Driving Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pupeza, I.; Högner, M.; Weitenberg, J.; Holzberger, S.; Esser, D.; Eidam, T.; Limpert, J.; Tünnermann, A.; Fill, E.; Yakovlev, V. S.

    2014-03-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate high-harmonic generation in a 78-MHz enhancement cavity with a transverse mode having on-axis intensity maxima at the focus and minima at an opening in the following mirror. We find that the conversion efficiency is comparable to that achievable with a Gaussian mode, whereas the output coupling efficiency can be significantly improved over any other demonstrated technique. This approach offers additional power scaling advantages and additional degrees of freedom in shaping the harmonic emission, paving the way to high-power extreme-ultraviolet frequency combs and the generation of multi-MHz repetition-rate-isolated attosecond pulses.

  12. High Harmonic Spectroscopy of Multichannel Dynamics in Strong-Field Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Mairesse, Y.; Higuet, J.; Fabre, B.; Mevel, E.; Constant, E.; Dudovich, N.; Shafir, D.; Patchkovskii, S.; Walters, Z.; Smirnova, O.; Ivanov, M. Yu.

    2010-05-28

    We perform high harmonic generation spectroscopy of aligned nitrogen molecules to characterize the attosecond dynamics of multielectron rearrangement during strong-field ionization. We use the spectrum and ellipticity of the harmonic light to reconstruct the relative phase between different ionization continua participating in the ionization, and thus determine the shape and location of the hole left in the molecule by strong-field ionization. Our interferometric technique uses transitions between the ionic states, induced by the laser field on the subcycle time scale.

  13. Coordinated THEMIS and ground-based magnetometer study of ULF wave excitation during a fast solar wind stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ian; Rae, Jonathan; Larson, Davin; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Bonnell, J. W.; Kale, Zoe; McFadden, James; Singer, Howard; Angelopoulos, V.; Russell, Christopher; Auster, Uli; Mende, Stephen

    AB: We present results from a study of ULF waves observed during a conjunction between the THEMIS constellation and ground-based magnetometers of the combined CARISMA and THEMIS ground-based observatory (GBO) arrays during a fast solar wind stream in August 2007. Long wavetrain waves in the Pc4 and Pc5 bands were seen across the ground-based arrays during a conjugate overpass of the THEMIS constellation in the dusk magnetosphere over CARISMA on August 8th. The Pc4 waves, also seen on THEMIS, were very monochromatic with many characteristics reminiscent of giant pulsations (Pgs) except that they occurred in the dusk sector. The multiple satellite measurements, including supporting measurements from GOES satellites in this sector, allow characterization of the wavenumbers, spatial scale, and comparison of the widths of the waves on the ground and in space. The monochromatic nature of the Pc4 waves, and their dominant polarization in the D-component on the ground, suggests that they are poloidal Alfven waves perhaps driven by injected ions in the afternoon-side magnetosphere. We use the unique capabilities of the combined THEMIS-GOES constellation, and the extensive ground-based coverage, to address the issue of the source of wave excitation during this high speed stream. Attention is given to internal excitation by energetic ions spectra.

  14. Coordinated THEMIS and ground-based magnetometer study of ULF wave excitation during a fast solar wind stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, I. R.; Rae, I. J.; Glassmeier, K.; Mende, S. B.; Angelopoulos, V.; Auster, U.; Russell, C. T.; Singer, H. J.; Bonnell, J. W.; Mozer, F. S.; Larson, D.; Carlson, C.; McPhadden, J.

    2007-12-01

    We present results from a study of ULF waves observed during a conjunction between the THEMIS constellation and ground-based magnetometers of the combined CARISMA and THEMIS ground-based observatory (GBO) arrays during a fast solar wind stream in August 2007. Long wavetrain waves in the Pc4 and Pc5 bands were seen across the ground-based arrays during a conjugate overpass of the THEMIS constellation in the dusk magnetosphere over CARISMA on August 8th. The Pc4 waves, also seen on THEMIS, were very monochromatic with many characteristics reminiscent of giant pulsations (Pgs) except that they occurred in the dusk sector. The multiple satellite measurements, including supporting measurements from GOES satellites in this sector, allow characterization of the wavenumbers, spatial scale, and comparison of the widths of the waves on the ground and in space. The monochromatic nature of the Pc4 waves, and their dominant polarization in the D-component on the ground, suggests that they are poloidal Alfven waves perhaps driven by injected ions in the afternoon-side magnetosphere. We use the unique capabilities of the combined THEMIS-GOES constellation, and the extensive ground-based coverage, to address the issue of the source of wave excitation during this high speed stream. Attention is given to internal excitation by energetic ions spectra, and drivers at the dayside magnetopause.

  15. Convective generation and vertical propagation of fast gravity waves on Mars: One- and two-dimensional modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, Takeshi; Watanabe, Ayuka; Maejima, Yasumitsu

    2016-03-01

    Generation of gravity waves by convection was studied using a nonlinear two-dimensional model. A boundary-layer convection forced by a horizontally-uniform heating and a plume forced by a localized heating representing a local dust storm were tested. The results suggest that vigorous convection occurs due to the low density of the martian atmosphere and that short-period waves having frequencies near the buoyancy frequency can be preferentially generated. The propagation of those gravity waves to thermospheric heights was studied using a linearized one-dimensional model. Because of the fast vertical propagation the waves attain large amplitudes in the lower thermosphere, being consistent with Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey's accelerometer measurements and MAVEN's neutral and ion measurements. The heating and cooling caused by the waves are expected to be significant in the energy budget of the thermosphere, and the vertical mixing induced by those gravity waves should influence the homopause height. Since the thermospheric densities of light, minor species increase with the lowering of the homopause, a lower homopause may have enhanced the escape of such species to space for early Mars, where slower, weaker gravity waves should dominate.

  16. Wave Driven Fast Ion Loss in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    E.D. Fredrickson; C.Z. Cheng; D. Darrow; G. Fu; N.N. Gorelenkov; G. Kramer; S.S. Medley; J. Menard; L. Roquemore; D. Stutman; R.B. White

    2003-01-28

    Spherical tokamaks, with their relatively low toroidal field, extend fast-ion-driven instability physics to parameter ranges not normally accessed in conventional tokamaks. The low field means that both the fast-ion Larmor radius normalized to the plasma minor radius and the ratio of the fast-ion velocity to the Alfven speed are relatively large. The large Larmor radius of the ions enhances their interaction with instability modes, influencing the structure of the unstable mode spectrum. The relatively large fast-ion velocity allows for a larger population of fast ions to be in resonance with the mode, increasing the drive. It is therefore an important goal of the present proof-of-principle spherical tokamaks to evaluate the role of fast-ion-driven instabilities in fast-ion confinement. This paper presents the first observations of fast-ion losses resulting from toroidal Alfven eigenmodes and a new, fishbone-like, energetic particle mode.

  17. Quasi-periodic fast-mode magnetosonic wave trains within coronal waveguides associated with flares and CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Ofman, Leon; Broder, Brittany; Karlický, Marian; Downs, Cooper

    2016-03-01

    Quasi-periodic, fast-mode, propagating wave trains (QFPs) are a new observational phenomenon recently discovered in the solar corona by the Solar Dynamics Observatory with extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging observations. They originate from flares and propagate at speeds up to ˜2000 km s-1 within funnel-shaped waveguides in the wakes of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). QFPs can carry suffcient energy fluxes required for coronal heating during their occurr ences. They can provide new diagnostics for the solar corona and their associated flares. We present recent observations of QFPs focusing on their spatio-temporal properties, temperature dependence, and statistical correlation with flares and CMEs. Of particular interest is the 2010-Aug-01 C3.2 flare with correlated QFPs and drifting zebra and fiber radio bursts, which might be different manifestations of the same fast-mode wave trains. We also discuss the potential roles of QFPs in accelerating and/or modulating the solar wind.

  18. SLOW PATCHY EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET PROPAGATING FRONTS ASSOCIATED WITH FAST CORONAL MAGNETO-ACOUSTIC WAVES IN SOLAR ERUPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Ding, M. D.; Chen, P. F.

    2015-08-15

    Using the high spatiotemporal resolution extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we conduct a statistical study of the observational properties of the coronal EUV propagating fronts. We find that it might be a universal phenomenon for two types of fronts to coexist in a large solar eruptive event. It is consistent with the hybrid model of EUV propagating fronts, which predicts that coronal EUV propagating fronts consist of both a fast magneto-acoustic wave and a nonwave component. We find that the morphologies, propagation behaviors, and kinematic features of the two EUV propagating fronts are completely different from each other. The fast magneto-acoustic wave fronts are almost isotropic. They travel continuously from the flaring region across multiple magnetic polarities to global distances. On the other hand, the slow nonwave fronts appear as anisotropic and sequential patches of EUV brightening. Each patch propagates locally in the magnetic domains where the magnetic field lines connect to the bottom boundary and stops at the magnetic domain boundaries. Within each magnetic domain, the velocities of the slow patchy nonwave component are an order of magnitude lower than that of the fast-wave component. However, the patches of the slow EUV propagating front can jump from one magnetic domain to a remote one. The velocities of such a transit between different magnetic domains are about one-third to one-half of those of the fast-wave component. The results show that the velocities of the nonwave component, both within one magnetic domain and between different magnetic domains, are highly nonuniform due to the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field in the lower atmosphere.

  19. 4 MW upgrade to the DIII-D fast wave current drive system

    SciTech Connect

    deGrassie, J.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Cary, W.P.

    1993-10-01

    The DIII-D fast wave current drive (FWCD) system is being upgraded by an additional 4 MW in the 30 to 120 MHz frequency range. This capability adds to the existing 2 MW 30 to 60 MHz system. Two new ABB transmitters of the type that are in use on the ASDEX-Upgrade tokamak in Garching will be used to drive two new water-cooled four-strap antennas to be installed in DIII-D in early 1994. The transmission and tuning system for each antenna will be similar to that now in use for the first 2 MW system on DIII-D, but with some significant improvements. One improvement consists of adding a decoupler element to counter the mutual coupling between the antenna straps which results in large imbalances in the power to a strap for the usual current drive intrastrap phasing of 90{degrees}. Another improvement is to utilize pressurized, ceramic-insulated transmission lines. The intrastrap phasing will again be controlled in pairs, with a pair of straps coupled in a resonant loop configuration, locking their phase difference at either 0 or 180{degrees}, depending upon the length of line installed. These resonant loops will incorporate a phase shifter so that they will be able to be tuned to resonance at several frequencies in the operating band of the transmitter. With the frequency change capability of the ABB generators, the FWCD frequency will thus be selectable on a shot-to-shot basis, from this preselected set of frequencies. The schedule is for experiments to begin with this added 4 MW capability in mid-1994. The details of the system are described.

  20. Fast quantitative retardance imaging of biological samples using quadri-wave interferometry (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aknoun, Sherazade; Bon, Pierre; Savatier, Julien; Monneret, Serge; Wattellier, Benoit F.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the use of polarized spatially coherent illumination to perform linear retardance imaging and measurements of semi-transparent biological samples using a quantitative phase imaging technique [1]. Quantitative phase imaging techniques [2-5] are used in microscopy for the imaging of semi-transparent samples and gives information about the optical path difference (OPD). The strength of those techniques is their non-invasive (the sample is not labelled) and fast approach. However, this high contrast is non-specific and cannot be linked to specific properties of the sample. To overcome this limitation, we propose to use polarized light in combination with QPI. Indeed, anisotropy has been used to reveal ordered fibrous structures in biological samples without any staining or labelling with polarized light microscopy [6-8]. Recent studies have shown polarimetry as a potential diagnostic tool for various dermatological diseases on thick tissue samples [9]. Particularly, specific collagen fibers spatial distribution has been demonstrated to be a signature for the optical diagnosis and prognosis of cancer in tissues [10]. In this paper, we describe a technical improvement of our technique based on high-resolution quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometry (QWLSI) and liquid crystal retarder to perform quantitative linear birefringence measurements on biological samples. The system combines a set of quantitative phase images with different excitation polarizations to create birefringence images. These give information about the local retardance and orientation of biological anisotropic components. We propose using a commercial QWLSI [11] (SID4Bio, Phasics SA, Saint Aubin, France) directly plugged onto a lateral video port of an inverted microscope (TE2000-U, Nikon, Japan). We are able to take retardance images in less than 1 second which allows us to record dynamic phenomena (living cells study) and make high speed acquisitions to reconstruct tissues virtual

  1. Direct Electron Heating Observed by Fast Waves in ICRF Range on a Low-Density Low Temperature Tokamak ADITYA

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, K.; Kulkarni, S.; Rathi, D.; Varia, A.; Jadav, H.; Parmar, K.; Kadia, B.; Joshi, R.; Srinivas, Y.; Singh, R.; Kumar, S.; Dani, S.; Gayatri, A.; Yogi, R.; Singh, M.; Joisa, Y.; Rao, C.; Kumar, S.; Jha, R.; Manchanda, R.

    2011-12-23

    Fast wave electron heating experiments are carried out on Aditya tokamak [R = 0.75 m, a = 0.25m,Bt = 0.75T,ne{approx}1-3E13/cc,Te{approx}250eV] with the help of indigenously developed 200 kW, 20-40 MHz RF heating system. Significant direct electron heating is observed by fast waves in hydrogen plasma with prompt rise in electron temperature with application of RF power and it increases linearly with RF power. A corresponding increase in plasma beta and hence increase in stored diamagnetic energy is also observed in presence of RF. We observe an improvement of energy confinement time from 2-4msec during ohmic heating phase to 3-6msec in RF heating phase. This improvement is within the ohmic confinement regime for the present experiments. The impurity radiation and electron density do not escalate significantly with RF power. The direct electron heating by fast wave in Aditya is also predicted by ion cyclotron resonance heating code TORIC.

  2. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D.; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J.; Mancuso, Christopher A.; Hogle, Craig W.; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L.; Dorney, Kevin M.; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G.; Fullerton, Eric E.; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M.; Milošević, Dejan B.; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A.; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform. PMID:26534992

  3. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J; Mancuso, Christopher A; Hogle, Craig W; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L; Dorney, Kevin M; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G; Fullerton, Eric E; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M; Milošević, Dejan B; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C

    2015-11-17

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform.

  4. EUV mask observations using a coherent EUV scatterometry microscope with a high-harmonic-generation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujino, Takahiro; Tanaka, Yusuke; Harada, Tetsuo; Nagata, Yutaka; Watanabe, Takeo; Kinoshita, Hiroo

    2015-07-01

    In extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the EUV mask, which has an absorber layer and a Mo/Si multilayer on a glass substrate, strongly affects the EUV phase. EUV actinic metrology is required to evaluate the feature of defect printability and the critical dimension (CD) value. The 3D structure modulates the EUV phase, causing the pattern position and focus shift. A microscope that observes in phase contrast necessary. We have developed a coherent EUV scatterometry microscope (CSM) for observing EUV patterns with quantitative phase contrast. The exposure light is coherent EUV light. For the industrial use, we have developed a laboratory coherent source of high-harmonic-generation (HHG) EUV light. High harmonics is pumped by a scale of a Ti:Sapphire laser. In the previous study, a very long exposure time of 1000 s was necessary to detect We upgraded the relay optics. The detection performance of an absorber defect using the new relay optics is We observed the line-end oversize defect and the oversize defect in the 112 nm hole pattern and 180 nm hole pattern. The upgraded system has a detection size limit of a line-end 24-nm-oversize defect with 10 s exposure time, which is 2,688 nm2 (52 × 52 nm2) absorber defect. This result shows high performance capability of HHG-CSM for detecting small defect.

  5. OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF THE QUASI-PERIODIC FAST-PROPAGATING MAGNETOSONIC WAVES AND THE ASSOCIATED FLARE ON 2011 MAY 30

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu

    2012-07-01

    On 2011 May 30, quasi-periodic fast-propagating (QFP) magnetosonic waves accompanied by a C2.8 flare were directly imaged by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The QFP waves successively emanated from the flare kernel, they propagated along a cluster of open coronal loops with a phase speed of {approx}834 km s{sup -1} during the flare's rising phase, and the multiple arc-shaped wave trains can be fitted with a series of concentric circles. We generate the k - {omega} diagram of the Fourier power and find a straight ridge that represents the dispersion relation of the waves. Along the ridge, we find a lot of prominent nodes which represent the available frequencies of the QFP waves. On the other hand, the frequencies of the flare are also obtained by analyzing the flare light curves using the wavelet technique. The results indicate that almost all the main frequencies of the flare are consistent with those of the QFP waves. This suggests that the flare and the QFP waves were possibly excited by a common physical origin. On the other hand, a few low frequencies (e.g., 2.5 mHz (400 s) and 0.7 mHz (1428 s)) revealed by the k - {omega} diagram cannot be found in the accompanying flare. We propose that these low frequencies were possibly due to the leakage of the pressure-driven p-mode oscillations from the photosphere into the low corona, which should be a noticeable mechanism for driving the QFP waves observed in the corona.

  6. Observational Study of the Quasi-periodic Fast-propagating Magnetosonic Waves and the Associated Flare on 2011 May 30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuandeng; Liu, Yu

    2012-07-01

    On 2011 May 30, quasi-periodic fast-propagating (QFP) magnetosonic waves accompanied by a C2.8 flare were directly imaged by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The QFP waves successively emanated from the flare kernel, they propagated along a cluster of open coronal loops with a phase speed of ~834 km s-1 during the flare's rising phase, and the multiple arc-shaped wave trains can be fitted with a series of concentric circles. We generate the k - ω diagram of the Fourier power and find a straight ridge that represents the dispersion relation of the waves. Along the ridge, we find a lot of prominent nodes which represent the available frequencies of the QFP waves. On the other hand, the frequencies of the flare are also obtained by analyzing the flare light curves using the wavelet technique. The results indicate that almost all the main frequencies of the flare are consistent with those of the QFP waves. This suggests that the flare and the QFP waves were possibly excited by a common physical origin. On the other hand, a few low frequencies (e.g., 2.5 mHz (400 s) and 0.7 mHz (1428 s)) revealed by the k - ω diagram cannot be found in the accompanying flare. We propose that these low frequencies were possibly due to the leakage of the pressure-driven p-mode oscillations from the photosphere into the low corona, which should be a noticeable mechanism for driving the QFP waves observed in the corona.

  7. Fast P-wave precursors in New Zealand: high velocity material associated with the subducted Hikurangi Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, H.; LeGood, M.; Stuart, G.; Reyners, M.; Eberhart-Phillips, D. E.; Gubbins, D.

    2015-08-01

    Seismic tomography has revealed very high P-wave velocities, over 8.5 km s-1, at shallow depths, 30-100 km, beneath New Zealand. Here we study fast, high-frequency arrivals at North and South Island stations that contain additional information about the crust and mantle structure. These arrivals, which are from earthquakes within or close to the land mass, have a characteristic high-frequency precursor followed by a lower frequency, larger amplitude, main phase. Precursors were seen on at least one station from 262 of 306 candidate events; the best-recorded 76 events were analysed for wave speed, frequency content and polarization. Time-distance plots are consistent with two phases travelling at 8.38 ± 0.03 and 6.93 ± 0.05 km s-1. The precursor has typical frequencies 4-9 Hz, the second arrival 2-4 Hz. Polarizations are off-azimuth by 30° and steeper than predicted by ray tracing through a smooth 3-D tomographic model. These results are explained by propagation through a dipping layer of order 10 km thick with seismic velocity around 8.5 km s-1; it is too thin to propagate frequencies below 4 Hz and waves refract from it at a steep, out-of-plane angle, explaining the anomalous polarization. Ray paths cover a region coinciding with the subducted Hikurangi Plateau; the fast layer is interpreted as the lowest section of the plateau that has transformed to eclogite, which has the same fast seismic velocity that we observe. Unlike the fast, eclogitic layers identified in subduction zones such as the Kermadecs, this layer is shallower, at 30 km, than the eclogite transformation; we therefore propose that it formed at the base of the thick plateau prior to subduction.

  8. On the Estimation of T-Wave Alternans Using the Spectral Fast Fourier Transform Method

    PubMed Central

    Armoundas, Antonis A; Mela, Theofanie; Merchant, Faisal M

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND T-wave alternans (TWA), has been associated with increased vulnerability to ventricular tachyarrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD). However, both random (white) noise and (patho)physiologic processes (i.e. premature ventricular contractions [PVCs], heart and respiration rates) may hamper TWA estimation and therefore, lessen its clinical utility for risk stratification. OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of random noise and certain (patho)physiologic processes on the estimation of TWA using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) method and to develop methods to overcome these potential sources of error. METHODS We used a combination of human electrocardiogram data and computer simulations to assess the effects of a PVC, random and colored noise on the accuracy of TWA estimation. RESULTS We quantitatively demonstrate that replacing a “bad” beat with an odd/even median beat is a more accurate approach than replacing it with the overall average or the overall median beat. We also show that phase resetting may have a significant effect on alternans estimation and that estimation of alternans using frequencies greater than 0.4922 cycles/beat in a 128-point FFT provides the most accurate approach for estimating the alternans when phase resetting is likely to occur. Additionally, our data demonstrate that the number of indeterminate TWA tests due to high levels of noise can be reduced when the alternans voltage exceeds a new higher threshold. Also, the amplitude of random noise has a significant effect on alternans estimation and should be considered to adjust the alternans voltage threshold for noise levels greater than 1.8 μV. Finally, we quantitatively demonstrate that colored noise may lead to a false positive or a false negative result. We propose methods to estimate the effect of these (patho)physiologic processes on the alternans estimation in order to determine whether a TWA test is likely to be a true positive or a true negative. CONCLUSION This

  9. Wide-field broadband extreme ultraviolet transmission ptychography using a high-harmonic source.

    PubMed

    Baksh, Peter D; Odstrčil, Michal; Kim, Hyun-Su; Boden, Stuart A; Frey, Jeremy G; Brocklesby, William S

    2016-04-01

    High-harmonic generation (HHG) provides a laboratory-scale source of coherent radiation ideally suited to lensless coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) in the EUV and x-ray spectral region. Here we demonstrate transmission extreme ultraviolet (EUV) ptychography, a scanning variant of CDI, using radiation at a wavelength around 29 nm from an HHG source. Image resolution is diffraction-limited at 54 nm and fields of view up to ∼100  μm are demonstrated. These results demonstrate the potential for wide-field, high-resolution, laboratory-scale EUV imaging using HHG-based sources with potential application in biological imaging or EUV lithography pellicle inspection. PMID:27192225

  10. Relativistic high harmonics and (sub-)attosecond pulses: relativistic spikes and relativistic mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pukhov, A.; Baeva, T.; An der Brügge, D.; Münster, S.

    2009-11-01

    Using particle-in-cell simulations, we study high harmonic generation from overdense plasmas in the relativistic regime. Different incidence angles as well as different laser polarizations are considered and scalings are recovered. It is shown that the theory of relativistic spikes and the BGP power-law spectra [Phys. Rev. E 74, 046404 (2006)] describes well the normal incidence and s-polarized obliquely incident laser pulses. In the case of p-polarized laser pulses, exceptions from the BGP theory can appear when the quasi-static vector potential build-up at the plasma boundary becomes equal to that of the laser. In this case, the spectrum flattens significantly and has a lower cutoff.

  11. Single-pass high harmonic generation at high repetition rate and photon flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hädrich, Steffen; Rothhardt, Jan; Krebs, Manuel; Demmler, Stefan; Klenke, Arno; Tünnermann, Andreas; Limpert, Jens

    2016-09-01

    Sources of short wavelength radiation with femtosecond to attosecond pulse durations, such as synchrotrons or free electron lasers, have already made possible numerous, and will facilitate more, seminal studies aimed at understanding atomic and molecular processes on fundamental length and time scales. Table-top sources of coherent extreme ultraviolet to soft x-ray radiation enabled by high harmonic generation (HHG) of ultrashort pulse lasers have also gained significant attention in the last few years due to their enormous potential for addressing a plethora of applications, therefore constituting a complementary source to large-scale facilities (synchrotrons and free electron lasers). Ti:sapphire based laser systems have been the workhorses for HHG for decades, but are limited in repetition rate and average power. On the other hand, it has been widely recognized that fostering applications in fields such as photoelectron spectroscopy and microscopy, coincidence detection, coherent diffractive imaging and frequency metrology requires a high repetition rate and high photon flux HHG sources. In this article we will review recent developments in realizing the demanding requirement of producing a high photon flux and repetition rate at the same time. Particular emphasis will be put on suitable ultrashort pulse and high average power lasers, which directly drive harmonic generation without the need for external enhancement cavities. To this end we describe two complementary schemes that have been successfully employed for high power fiber lasers, i.e. optical parametric chirped pulse amplifiers and nonlinear pulse compression. Moreover, the issue of phase-matching in tight focusing geometries will be discussed and connected to recent experiments. We will highlight the latest results in fiber laser driven high harmonic generation that currently produce the highest photon flux of all existing sources. In addition, we demonstrate the first promising applications and

  12. Numerical investigation of fast-wave propagation and radio-frequency sheath interaction with a shaped tokamak wall

    SciTech Connect

    Kohno, H.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2015-07-15

    Interactions between propagating fast waves and radio-frequency (RF) sheaths in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies are numerically investigated based on a cold fluid plasma model coupled with a sheath boundary condition. In this two-dimensional study, the capability of the finite element code rfSOL, which was developed in previous numerical work, is extended to analyze self-consistent RF sheath-plasma interaction problems in a tokamak with a non-circular cross-section. It is found that a large sheath voltage is generated near the edges of the limiter-shaped deformation as a result of the conversion from fast to slow waves on the sheaths. The sheath voltage associated with this conversion is particularly significant in the localized region where the contact angle between the magnetic field line and the conducting wall varies rapidly along the curved sheath surface, which is consistent with the results in previous one-dimensional theoretical work. The dependences of the RF sheaths on various parameters in plasma such as the toroidal wavenumber, edge plasma density, and the degree of the RF wave absorption in the core region are also examined in detail.

  13. Flare-associated Fast-mode Coronal Wave Trains Discovered by SDO/AIA: Physical Properties and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Ofman, L.; Downs, C.; Cheung, C. M. M.; Broder, B.; De Pontieu, B.

    2015-12-01

    Quasi-periodic Fast Propagating wave trains (QFPs) are a new observational phenomenon discovered in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). They are fast-mode magnetosonic waves, closely related to quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flare emission ranging from radio to X-ray wavelengths. The significance of QFPs lies in their diagnostic potential, because they can provide critical clues to flare energy release and serve as new tools for coronal seismology. In this presentation, we report recent advances in observing and modeling QFPs. For example, using differential emission measure (DEM) inversion, we found clear evidence of heating and cooling cycles that are consistent with alternating compression and rarefaction expected for magnetosonic wave pulses. Moreover, recent IRIS observations of QFP source regions revealed sawtooth-like flare ribbon motions, indicative of pulsed magnetic reconnection, that are correlated with QFP excitation. More interestingly, from a survey of over 100 QFP events, we found a preferential association with eruptive flares rather than confined flares. We will discuss the implications of these results and the potential roles of QFPs in coronal heating, energy transport, and solar eruptions.

  14. Black tea lowers blood pressure and wave reflections in fasted and postprandial conditions in hypertensive patients: a randomised study.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Davide; Draijer, Richard; Desideri, Giovambattista; Mulder, Theo; Ferri, Claudio

    2015-02-04

    Hypertension and arterial stiffening are independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality. Flavonoids may exert some vascular protection. We investigated the effects of black tea on blood pressure (BP) and wave reflections before and after fat load in hypertensives. According to a randomized, double-blind, controlled, cross-over design, 19 patients were assigned to consume black tea (129 mg flavonoids) or placebo twice a day for eight days (13 day wash-out period). Digital volume pulse and BP were measured before and 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after tea consumption. Measurements were performed in a fasted state and after a fat load. Compared to placebo, reflection index and stiffness index decreased after tea consumption (p<0.0001). Fat challenge increased wave reflection, which was counteracted by tea consumption (p<0.0001). Black tea decreased systolic and diastolic BP (-3.2 mmHg, p<0.005 and -2.6 mmHg, p<0.0001; respectively) and prevented BP increase after a fat load (p<0.0001). Black tea consumption lowers wave reflections and BP in the fasting state, and during the challenging haemodynamic conditions after a fat load in hypertensives. Considering lipemia-induced impairment of arterial function may occur frequently during the day, our findings suggest regular consumption of black tea may be relevant for cardiovascular protection.

  15. Nonlinear Resonant Excitation of Fast Sausage Waves in Current-Carrying Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhalyaev, B. B.; Bembitov, D. B.

    2014-11-01

    We consider a model of a coronal loop that is a cylindrical magnetic tube with two surface electric currents. Its principal sausage mode has no cut-off in the long-wavelength limit. For typical coronal conditions, the period of the mode is between one and a few minutes. The sausage mode of flaring loops could cause long-period pulsations observed in microwave and hard X-ray ranges. There are other examples of coronal oscillations: long-period pulsations of active-region quiet loops in the soft X-ray emission are observed. We assume that these can also be caused by sausage waves. The question arises of how the sausage waves are generated in quiet loops. We assume that they can be generated by torsional oscillations. This process can be described in the framework of the nonlinear three-wave interaction formalism. The periods of interacting torsional waves are similar to the periods of torsional oscillations observed in the solar atmosphere. The timescale of the sausage-wave excitation is not much longer than the periods of interacting waves, so that the sausage wave is excited before torsional waves are damped.

  16. On the potential of mid-IR lasers for generating high harmonics with subnanometer wavelengths in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Emelin, M Yu; Ryabikin, M Yu

    2013-03-31

    The influence of the magnetic field of a laser pulse and the depletion of bound levels of working-medium atoms on the generation of high harmonics of mid-IR laser radiation in gases is investigated using numerical quantum-mechanical calculations. The maximum attainable spectral widths of high harmonics are estimated for model atoms with different ionisation potentials taking into account the aforementioned limiting effects. It is shown (within a two-dimensional model) that high harmonics with wavelengths to several angstroms can be generated by irradiating helium atoms with high-power femtosecond pulses of a laser [5] with a centre wavelength of 3.9 {mu}m. The possibility of observing experimentally relativistic effects using modern desktop mid-IR laser sources is demonstrated. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  17. Long-term operation of surface high-harmonic generation from relativistic oscillating mirrors using a spooling tape

    SciTech Connect

    Bierbach, Jana; Yeung, Mark; Eckner, Erich; Roedel, Christian; Kuschel, Stephan; Zepf, Matt; Paulus, Gerhard G.

    2015-05-01

    Surface high-harmonic generation in the relativistic regime is demonstrated as a source of extreme ultra-violet (XUV) pulses with extended operation time. Relativistic high-harmonic generation is driven by a frequency-doubled high-power Ti:Sapphire laser focused to a peak intensity of 3·1019 W/cm2 onto spooling tapes. We demonstrate continuous operation over up to one hour runtime at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. Harmonic spectra ranging from 20 eV to 70 eV (62 nm to 18 nm) were consecutively recorded by an XUV spectrometer. An average XUV pulse energy in the µJ range is measured. With the presented setup, relativistic surface high-harmonic generation becomes a powerful source of coherent XUV pulses that might enable applications in, e.g. attosecond laser physics and the seeding of free-electron lasers, when the laser issues causing 80-% pulse energy fluctuations are overcome.

  18. Fast and Slow Mode Solitary Waves in a Five Component Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Sijo; Michael, Manesh; Varghese, Anu; Sreekala, G.; Venugopal, Chandu

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated fast and slow mode solitary profiles in a five component plasma consisting of positively and negatively charged pair ions, hydrogen ions and hotter and colder electrons. Of these, the heavier ions and colder photo-electrons are of cometary origin while the other components are of solar origin; the electrons being described by kappa distributions. The Zakharov-Kuznetzov (ZK) equation is derived and solutions for fast and slow mode solitary structures are plotted for parameters relevant to that of comet Halley. From the figures, it is seen that the presence of hydrogen ion determines the polarity of fast and slow mode solitary structures. Also different pair ions like He, C and O have significant effect on the width of the fast and slow mode solitary structures.

  19. Wave Driven Fast Ion Loss in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    E.D. Fredrickson; C.Z. Cheng; D. Darrow; G. Fu; N.N. Gorelenkov; G. Kramer; S.S. Medley; J. Menard; L. Roquemore; D. Stutman; R.B. White

    2003-08-05

    The study of fast ion instabilities in conventional aspect ratio tokamaks is motivated in large part by their potential to negatively impact the ignition threshold in fusion reactors by causing fast ion losses. Spherical tokamak's (ST), with intrinsically low magnetic fields, are particularly susceptible to fast ion driven instabilities. The 3.5 MeV alpha's from the D-T [deuterium-tritium] fusion reaction in proposed ST reactors will have velocities much higher than the Alfven speed. The Larmor radius of the fusion alphas, normalized to the plasma size, will also be larger than for conventional aspect ratio tokamak reactors. The resulting longer wavelengths of the *AE instabilities will be more effective in driving fast ion loss. The change in magnetic topology also influences the mode structure, as in the case of the Compressional Alfven Eigenmodes (CAE) seen on NSTX.

  20. Fast-ion D-alpha diagnostic for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Heidbrink, W. W.; Bell, R. E.; Luo, Y.; Solomon, W.

    2006-10-15

    A fast-ion D-alpha (FIDA) diagnostic is under development for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The FIDA technique is a charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy measurement that exploits the large Doppler shift of Balmer-alpha light from energetic hydrogenic atoms to infer the fast-ion density. The principal objective of the NSTX installation is to measure the transport of beam ions caused by fast-ion driven instabilities; detection of perpendicular acceleration of fast ions during high harmonic fast wave heating is another important goal. Recent data from a DIII-D FIDA diagnostic guide the design. The planned NSTX diagnostic consists of two separate instruments focusing on different aspects of the measurement. One instrument uses a transmission grating spectrometer to measure the perpendicular energy spectrum and the spatial profile every 10 ms; the anticipated resolution is {approx}10 keV in energy and {approx}5 cm in radius. A second instrument employs bandpass filters to detect fast-ion redistribution events with millisecond temporal resolution.

  1. Fast Response and High Sensitivity ZnO/glass Surface Acoustic Wave Humidity Sensors Using Graphene Oxide Sensing Layer

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Weipeng; He, Mei; Meng, Nan; He, Xingli; Wang, Wenbo; Chen, Jinkai; Shi, Tianjin; Hasan, Tawfique; Xu, Zhen; Xu, Yang; Luo, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    We report ZnO/glass surface acoustic wave (SAW) humidity sensors with high sensitivity and fast response using graphene oxide sensing layer. The frequency shift of the sensors is exponentially correlated to the humidity change, induced mainly by mass loading effect rather than the complex impedance change of the sensing layer. The SAW sensors show high sensitivity at a broad humidity range from 0.5%RH to 85%RH with < 1 sec rise time. The simple design and excellent stability of our GO-based SAW humidity sensors, complemented with full humidity range measurement, highlights their potential in a wide range of applications. PMID:25425458

  2. Gyro-resonant scattering of radiation belt electrons during the solar minimum by fast magnetosonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shprits, Yuri Y.; Runov, Andrei; Ni, Binbin

    2013-02-01

    In the current study, we perform statistical analysis of the magnetosonic (MS) waves (also often referred to as extremely low frequency (ELF) equatorial noise) in the range between the ion cyclotron frequency and the lower hybrid resonance frequency within 10° of the magnetic equator. Observations were made between 2 and 9 RE using THEMIS Filter Bank (FBK) data. ELF waves with spectral power exceeding 10-6 nT2/Hz are registered in ~3% of all samples in the inner magnetosphere. The survey has shown that, during the solar minimum, the average amplitude of equatorial ELF waves is less than 0.025 nT. Interpreting ELF events as MS waves, we have evaluated the corresponding wave-induced resonant scattering coefficients of radiation belt energetic electrons. We also study the effect of heavy ions on the scattering rates. The analysis reveals that the scattering by magnetosonic waves for various plasma compositions during geomagnetically quiet times is by up to two orders of magnitude slower than was previously reported and cannot significantly contribute to the long-term dynamics of the radiation belts. Computed electron scattering rates by magnetosonic waves extends to higher αeq when the fraction of H+ in the plasma decreases, while the range of pitch angles for which resonance occurs remains relatively insensitive to the plasma composition. While inclusion of multi-ion species into the wave dispersion relation produces noticeable changes in bounce-averaged scattering rates, the average rates are still significantly below typical scattering rates of chorus or hiss waves.

  3. Modeling radiation belt electron acceleration by ULF fast mode waves, launched by solar wind dynamic pressure fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degeling, A. W.; Rankin, R.; Zong, Q.-G.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the magnetospheric MHD and energetic electron response to a Storm Sudden Commencement (SSC) and subsequent magnetopause buffeting, focusing on an interval following an SSC event on 25 November 2001. We find that the electron flux signatures observed by LANL, Cluster, and GOES spacecraft during this event can largely be reproduced using an advective kinetic model for electron phase space density, using externally prescribed electromagnetic field inputs, (herein described as a "test-kinetic model") with electromagnetic field inputs provided by a 2-D linear ideal MHD model for ULF waves. In particular, we find modulations in electron flux phase shifted by 90° from the local azimuthal ULF wave electric field (Eφ) and a net enhancement in electron flux after 1.5 h for energies between 500 keV and 1.5 MeV near geosynchronous orbit. We also demonstrate that electrons in this energy range satisfy the drift resonance condition for the ULF waves produced by the MHD model. This confirms the conclusions reached by Tan et al. (2011), that the energization process in this case is dominated by drift-resonant interactions between electrons and MHD fast mode waves, produced by fluctuations in solar wind dynamic pressure.

  4. Fast damping of ultralow frequency waves excited by interplanetary shocks in the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chengrui; Rankin, Robert; Zong, Qiugang

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of Cluster spacecraft data shows that intense ultralow frequency (ULF) waves in the inner magnetosphere can be excited by the impact of interplanetary shocks and solar wind dynamic pressure variations. The observations reveal that such waves can be damped away rapidly in a few tens of minutes. Here we examine mechanisms of ULF wave damping for two interplanetary shocks observed by Cluster on 7 November 2004 and 30 August 2001. The mechanisms considered are ionospheric joule heating, Landau damping, and waveguide energy propagation. It is shown that Landau damping provides the dominant ULF wave damping for the shock events of interest. It is further demonstrated that damping is caused by drift-bounce resonance with ions in the energy range of a few keV. Landau damping is shown to be more effective in the plasmasphere boundary layer due to the higher proportion of Landau resonant ions that exist in that region.

  5. Mirror modes and fast magnetoacoustic waves near the magnetic pileup boundary of comet P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassmeier, Karl-Heintz; Motschmann, Uwe; Mazelle, C.; Neubauer, Fritz M.; Sauer, K.; Fuselier, S. A.; Acuna, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    Large-amplitude ultralow-frequency wave structure observed on both sides of the magnetic pileup boundary of comet P/Halley during the flyby of the Giotto spacecraft have been analyzed using suprathermal electron density and magnetic field observations. Upstream of the boundary, electron density and magnetic field magnitude variations are anticorrelated, while in the pileup region these quantities are clearly correlated. Both in front of and behind the pileup boundary the observed waves are quasi-perpendicular wave structures as a minimum variance analysis shows. A detailed comparison of our observations in the prepileup region with theoretical and numerical results shows that the mirror mode mode waves may have been generated by a mirror instability driven by the pressure anisotropy of the ring-type distributions of the heavy (water group) pickup cometary ions.

  6. Evidence of wave-particle duality for single fast hydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, H T; Fischer, D; Berenyi, Z; Cocke, C L; Gudmundsson, M; Haag, N; Johansson, H A B; Källberg, A; Levin, S B; Reinhed, P; Sassenberg, U; Schuch, R; Simonsson, A; Støchkel, K; Cederquist, H

    2008-08-22

    We report the direct observation of interference effects in a Young's double-slit experiment where the interfering waves are two spatially separated components of the de Broglie wave of single 1.3 MeV hydrogen atoms formed close to either target nucleus in H++H2 electron-transfer collisions. Quantum interference strongly influences the results even though the hydrogen atoms have a de Broglie wavelength, lambda_{dB}, as small as 25 fm.

  7. Alfvénic waves with sufficient energy to power the quiet solar corona and fast solar wind.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Scott W; De Pontieu, Bart; Carlsson, Mats; Hansteen, Viggo; Boerner, Paul; Goossens, Marcel

    2011-07-28

    Energy is required to heat the outer solar atmosphere to millions of degrees (refs 1, 2) and to accelerate the solar wind to hundreds of kilometres per second (refs 2-6). Alfvén waves (travelling oscillations of ions and magnetic field) have been invoked as a possible mechanism to transport magneto-convective energy upwards along the Sun's magnetic field lines into the corona. Previous observations of Alfvénic waves in the corona revealed amplitudes far too small (0.5 km s(-1)) to supply the energy flux (100-200 W m(-2)) required to drive the fast solar wind or balance the radiative losses of the quiet corona. Here we report observations of the transition region (between the chromosphere and the corona) and of the corona that reveal how Alfvénic motions permeate the dynamic and finely structured outer solar atmosphere. The ubiquitous outward-propagating Alfvénic motions observed have amplitudes of the order of 20 km s(-1) and periods of the order of 100-500 s throughout the quiescent atmosphere (compatible with recent investigations), and are energetic enough to accelerate the fast solar wind and heat the quiet corona. PMID:21796206

  8. Alfvénic waves with sufficient energy to power the quiet solar corona and fast solar wind.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Scott W; De Pontieu, Bart; Carlsson, Mats; Hansteen, Viggo; Boerner, Paul; Goossens, Marcel

    2011-07-27

    Energy is required to heat the outer solar atmosphere to millions of degrees (refs 1, 2) and to accelerate the solar wind to hundreds of kilometres per second (refs 2-6). Alfvén waves (travelling oscillations of ions and magnetic field) have been invoked as a possible mechanism to transport magneto-convective energy upwards along the Sun's magnetic field lines into the corona. Previous observations of Alfvénic waves in the corona revealed amplitudes far too small (0.5 km s(-1)) to supply the energy flux (100-200 W m(-2)) required to drive the fast solar wind or balance the radiative losses of the quiet corona. Here we report observations of the transition region (between the chromosphere and the corona) and of the corona that reveal how Alfvénic motions permeate the dynamic and finely structured outer solar atmosphere. The ubiquitous outward-propagating Alfvénic motions observed have amplitudes of the order of 20 km s(-1) and periods of the order of 100-500 s throughout the quiescent atmosphere (compatible with recent investigations), and are energetic enough to accelerate the fast solar wind and heat the quiet corona.

  9. Nonlinear fast magnetoacoustic wave propagation in the neighbourhood of a 2D magnetic X-point: oscillatory reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, J. A.; De Moortel, I.; Hood, A. W.; Brady, C. S.

    2009-01-01

    Context: This paper extends the models of Craig & McClymont (1991, ApJ, 371, L41) and McLaughlin & Hood (2004, A&A, 420, 1129) to include finite β and nonlinear effects. Aims: We investigate the nature of nonlinear fast magnetoacoustic waves about a 2D magnetic X-point. Methods: We solve the compressible and resistive MHD equations using a Lagrangian remap, shock capturing code (Arber et al. 2001, J. Comp. Phys., 171, 151) and consider an initial condition in {v}×{B} \\cdot {hat{z}} (a natural variable of the system). Results: We observe the formation of both fast and slow oblique magnetic shocks. The nonlinear wave deforms the X-point into a “cusp-like” point which in turn collapses to a current sheet. The system then evolves through a series of horizontal and vertical current sheets, with associated changes in connectivity, i.e. the system exhibits oscillatory reconnection. Our final state is non-potential (but in force balance) due to asymmetric heating from the shocks. Larger amplitudes in our initial condition correspond to larger values of the final current density left in the system. Conclusions: The inclusion of nonlinear terms introduces several new features to the system that were absent from the linear regime. A movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. Fast damping of poloidal Alfven waves by bounce-resonant ions: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Rankin, R.; Sydorenko, D.; Zong, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Interplanetary shocks and solar wind dynamic pressure variations can excite intense ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves in the inner magnetosphere. An analysis of two interplanetary shocks observed by Cluster on 7 November 2004 and 30 August 2001 shows that the poloidal waves excited in these events are damped away rapidly in tens of minutes. This damping is the result of wave-particle interactions involving H+ and O+ ions with energies in the range of several to a few tens of keV [Wang et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2015]. Damping is found to be more effective in the plasmasphere boundary layer due to the relatively higher proportion of Landau resonant ions that exists in that region. In the November 2004 shock event it has been suggested that energy-dispersed ions observed travelling parallel and anti-parallel direction to the geomagnetic field immediately after the shockare locally accelerated rather than originating from Earth's ionosphere. We use test-particle simulations to show that adiabatic advection of the particle differential flux caused bydrift-bounce-resonance with ULF waves is responsible for the energy-dispersed ions observed in these events. In the simulations,Liouville's theorem is used to reconstruct the iondistribution function and differential flux in a model dipole magnetosphere.It is shown that flux modulations of H and O ions can be reproduced when test-particle ions are advanced in the electric fields of the 3D ULF wave model we have developed.

  11. Noise-like pulses generated at high harmonics in a partially-mode-locked km-long Raman fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucon, A.; Barviau, B.; Fatome, J.; Finot, C.; Sylvestre, T.; Lee, M. W.; Grelu, P.; Millot, G.

    2012-02-01

    We present a 5-km-long Raman fiber laser that delivers pulses at high harmonics of the fundamental cavity repetition rate, up to 1 GHz. The observed nanosecond pulses that propagate in an anomalous dispersion regime possess a complex noise-like structure with a coherence time of around 1 picosecond.

  12. Co-counter asymmetry in fast wave heating and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, E.F.; Carter, M.D.; Berry, L.A.; Batchelor, D.B.; Forest, C.B.; Weitzner, H.

    1997-04-01

    Full wave ICRF coupling models show differences in plasma response when antenna arrays are phase to drive currents and counter to the plasma current. The source of this difference lies in the natural up- sown asymmetry of the antenna`s radiated power spectrum. This asymmetry is due to Hall terms in the wave equation, and occurs even without a poloidal magnetic field. When a poloidal field is included, the up-down asymmetry acquires a toroidal component. The result is that plasma absorption (i.e. antenna loading) is shifted or skewed toward the co-current drive direction, independent of the direction of the magnetic field. When wave are launched to drive current counter the plasma current , electron heating an current profiles are more peaked on axis, and this peaking becomes more pronounce a lower toroidal magnetic fields.

  13. Simulations of high harmonic generation from plasmonic nanoparticles in the terahertz region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grynko, Yevgen; Zentgraf, Thomas; Meier, Torsten; Förstner, Jens

    2016-09-01

    Metallic nanostructures are known for enhancing weak nonlinear processes when a resonant and coherent excitation takes place. With proper structural design, an additional boost of particular nonlinear processes is expected to be possible. Here, we present a numerical technique that is capable of simulating high harmonic generation from resonantly excited metallic nanoparticles in the terahertz frequency range. We demonstrate our method by investigating the nonlinear emission of arrays of plasmonic split-ring resonators at the range of ten terahertzs. Our multiscale, non-perturbative, and microscopic approach is based on a self-consistent combination of a hydrodynamic model for the nonlinear electronic material response and the discontinuous Garlerkin time-domain technique for the evaluation of the propagation of the electromagnetic field. It is predicted that the electronic nonlinearities of plasmonic nanoparticles give rise to several harmonics in the light emission when excited by intense terahertz radiation. Furthermore, our analysis predicts a non-perturbative scaling of higher harmonics at high excitation intensities.

  14. High-harmonic generation by field enhanced femtosecond pulses in metal-sapphire nanostructure

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seunghwoi; Kim, Hyunwoong; Kim, Yong Woo; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seungchul; Park, In-Yong; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic high-harmonic generation (HHG) drew attention as a means of producing coherent extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation by taking advantage of field enhancement occurring in metallic nanostructures. Here a metal-sapphire nanostructure is devised to provide a solid tip as the HHG emitter, replacing commonly used gaseous atoms. The fabricated solid tip is made of monocrystalline sapphire surrounded by a gold thin-film layer, and intended to produce EUV harmonics by the inter- and intra-band oscillations of electrons driven by the incident laser. The metal-sapphire nanostructure enhances the incident laser field by means of surface plasmon polaritons, triggering HHG directly from moderate femtosecond pulses of ∼0.1 TW cm−2 intensities. The measured EUV spectra exhibit odd-order harmonics up to ∼60 nm wavelengths without the plasma atomic lines typically seen when using gaseous atoms as the HHG emitter. This experimental outcome confirms that the plasmonic HHG approach is a promising way to realize coherent EUV sources for nano-scale near-field applications in spectroscopy, microscopy, lithography and atto-second physics. PMID:27721374

  15. Ultrafast high harmonics for probing the fastest spin and charge dynamics in magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grychtol, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Ultrafast light based on the high-harmonic up-conversion of femtosecond laser pulses have been successfully employed to access resonantly enhanced magnetic contrast at the Mabsorption edges of the 3d ferromagnets Fe, Co and Ni in a table-top setup. Thus, it has been possible to study element-specific dynamics in magnetic materials at femtosecond time scales in a laboratory environment, providing a wealth of opportunities for a greater fundamental understanding of correlated phenomena in solid-state matter. However, these investigations have so far been limited to linear polarized harmonics, since most techniques by which circular soft x-rays can be generated are highly inefficient reducing the photon flux to a level unfit for scientific applications. Besides presenting key findings of our ultrafast studies on charge and spin dynamics, we introduce a simple setup which allows for the efficient generation of circular harmonics bright enough for XMCD experiments. Our work thus represents a critical advance that enables element-specific imaging and spectroscopy of multiple elements simultaneously in magnetic and other chiral media with very high spatial and temporal resolution on the tabletop. In collboration with Ronny Knut, Emrah Turgut, Dmitriy Zusin, Christian Gentry, Henry Kapteyn, Margaret Murnane, JILA, University of Colorado, Boulder; Justin Shaw, Hans Nembach, Tom Silva, Electromagnetics Division, NIST, Boulder, CO; and Ofer Kfir, Avner Fleischer, Oren Cohen, Extreme Nonlinear Optics Group, Solid State Institute, Technion, Israel.

  16. A Theory of Dynamic Imaging of Coherent Molecular Rotations by High Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, F. H. M.; Abdurrouf, A.

    A dynamic theory of mapping coherent molecular motions from high harmonic generation signals is presented. Application to mapping of coherent rotational motions of linear molecules is made. Results of concrete calculations for N2, O2 and CO2 are analyzed both in time and frequency domains. A "magic angle" for the polarization geometry is predicted at which the HHG signals for all pump-probe delay times become equal for linear molecules of σg orbital symmetry. In contrast only a "crossing neighborhood" near the magic angle is predicted for molecules with orbitals of π symmetry. They are expected to help in identifying the orbital symmetry in the inverse problem of orbital reconstruction from experimental data. Comparison with available experimental data show remarkable agreement with all the salient properties of dynamic HHG signals of linear diatomic molecules, N2 and O2, and some simple organic molecules. Additional results for the triatomic molecule CO2 are discussed that might help to test the theory further.

  17. High-harmonic generation by field enhanced femtosecond pulses in metal-sapphire nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seunghwoi; Kim, Hyunwoong; Kim, Yong Woo; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seungchul; Park, In-Yong; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2016-10-01

    Plasmonic high-harmonic generation (HHG) drew attention as a means of producing coherent extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation by taking advantage of field enhancement occurring in metallic nanostructures. Here a metal-sapphire nanostructure is devised to provide a solid tip as the HHG emitter, replacing commonly used gaseous atoms. The fabricated solid tip is made of monocrystalline sapphire surrounded by a gold thin-film layer, and intended to produce EUV harmonics by the inter- and intra-band oscillations of electrons driven by the incident laser. The metal-sapphire nanostructure enhances the incident laser field by means of surface plasmon polaritons, triggering HHG directly from moderate femtosecond pulses of ~0.1 TW cm-2 intensities. The measured EUV spectra exhibit odd-order harmonics up to ~60 nm wavelengths without the plasma atomic lines typically seen when using gaseous atoms as the HHG emitter. This experimental outcome confirms that the plasmonic HHG approach is a promising way to realize coherent EUV sources for nano-scale near-field applications in spectroscopy, microscopy, lithography and atto-second physics.

  18. Data Acquisition in a High Harmonic Generation Lab and at LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Hirokawa, Takako; /U. Colorado, Boulder /SLAC

    2011-06-22

    In this paper, we examine data acquisition in a high harmonic generation (HHG) lab and preliminary data analysis with the Cyclohexadiene Collaboration at the Linac Coherent Lightsource (LCLS) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. HHG experiments have a large number of parameters that need to be monitored constantly. In particular, the pressure of the target is critical to HHG yield. However, this pressure can fluctuate wildly and without a tool to monitor it, it is difficult to analyze the correlation between HHG yield and the pressure. I used the Arduino microcontroller board and created a complementary MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI), thereby enhancing the ease with which users can acquire time-stamped parameter data. Using the Arduino, it is much easier to match the pressure to the corresponding HHG yield. Collecting data by using the Arduino and the GUI is flexible, user-friendly, and cost-effective. In the future, we hope to be able to control and monitor parts of the lab with the Arduino alone. While more parameter information is needed in the HHG lab, we needed to reduce the amount of data during the cyclohexadiene collaboration. This was achieved by sorting the data into bins and filtering out unnecessary details. This method was highly effective in that it minimized the amount of data without losing any valuable information. This effective preliminary data analysis technique will continue to be used to decrease the size of the collected data.

  19. Two-color probe of high harmonic generation from argon atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zengxiu; Yuan, Jianmin; Meng, Chao; Chen, Wenbo

    2014-05-01

    Two-color control of high harmonic generation has been proven a powerful in situ tool to characterize the intrinsic chirp of attosecond bursts. The weak second harmonic pulse introduces a phase modulation of the strong field quantum processes, leading to the generation of even-order harmonic. We measure the yields of even-order harmonics from argon gases as a function of the phase delay between the fundamental and its second harmonic pulse. We found that the modulation of even-order harmonics exhibits a phase jump around the 28th harmonic (48eV), closely resembling the result from. However, we show by varying laser intensity that the phase jump is unlikely to be attributed to the switching from short to long trajectories of HHG near the cut-off. In addition, we demonstrate that the phase of jump depends on the driving laser wavelength. Single-active-electron simulation fails to reproduce the experimental observation. We therefore suspect that multielectron response comes into play for the two-color control of HHG from Argon. Preliminary analysis suggests that there exists competing pathways of HHG from inner orbitals, even for argon atoms whose interaction with strong laser fields is usually assumed well described by SAE approximation.

  20. High Harmonic Generation XUV Spectroscopy for Studying Ultrafast Photophysics of Coordination Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryland, Elizabeth S.; Lin, Ming-Fu; Verkamp, Max A.; Vura-Weis, Josh

    2016-06-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectroscopy is an inner shell technique that probes the M2,3-edge excitation of atoms. Absorption of the XUV photon causes a 3p→3d transition, the energy and shape of which is directly related to the element and ligand environment. This technique is thus element-, oxidation state-, spin state-, and ligand field specific. A process called high-harmonic generation (HHG) enables the production of ultrashort (≈20fs) pulses of collimated XUV photons in a tabletop instrument. This allows transient XUV spectroscopy to be conducted as an in-lab experiment, where it was previously only possible at accelerator-based light sources. Additionally, ultrashort pulses provide the capability for unprecedented time resolution (≈70fs IRF). This technique has the capacity to serve a pivotal role in the study of electron and energy transfer processes in materials and chemical biology. I will present the XUV transient absorption instrument we have built over the past two years, along with preliminary data and simulations of the M2,3-edge absorption data of a battery of small inorganic molecules to demonstrate the high specificity of this ultrafast tabletop technique.

  1. Designs and numerical calculations for echo-enabled harmonic generation at very high harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penn, G.; Reinsch, M.

    2011-09-01

    The echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) scheme for driving an FEL using two seeded energy modulations at much longer wavelengths than the output wavelength is a promising concept for future seeded FELs. There are many competing requirements in the design of an EEHG beamline which need careful optimization. Furthermore, revised simulation tools and methods are necessary because of both the high harmonic numbers simulated and the complicated nature of the phase space manipulations which are intrinsic to the scheme. This paper explores the constraints on performance and the required tolerances for reaching wavelengths well below 1/100th of that of the seed lasers, and describes some of the methodology for designing such a beamline. Numerical tools, developed both for the GENESIS and GINGER FEL codes, are presented and used here for more accurate study of the scheme beyond a time-averaged model. In particular, the impact of the local structure in peak current and bunching, which is an inherent part of the EEHG scheme, is evaluated.

  2. Parametric excitation of coupled fast and slow upper hybrid waves by counter-propagating circularly polarized lasers in a magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Kanika; Baliyan, Sweta; Sajal, Vivek; Kumar, Ravindra; Sharma, Navneet K.

    2016-07-01

    The parametric decay of large amplitude non-resonant beating mode of counter-propagating lasers (having a frequency difference ≥ 2 ω p ) into a pair of upper hybrid waves is studied in magnetized plasma. One of the excited upper hybrid waves (known as fast wave) having phase velocity close to c , can be utilized for electron acceleration. The coupled mode equations of fast and slow upper hybrid waves are modelled by solving equation of motion and continuity equation simultaneously (using the density perturbation technique) to derive the dispersion relation for two plasmon decay process. The growth rate of the present excitation process using right circularly polarized beating lasers is higher as compared with the growth rates of the excitation processes using ordinary and extraordinary beating lasers. However, the growth rate is not significant in the case of left circularly polarized beating lasers. The growth rate ˜ 0.15 ω p s - 1 is achieved for right circularly polarized beating lasers having v 1 , 2 / c = 0.1 for scattering angle θ s ˜ 160 ° and applied magnetic field ˜ 90 T. The growth rate of fast upper hybrid wave was reduced with the applied axial magnetic field in the present case. The present work is not only significant for the electron acceleration by fast upper hybrid wave but also for diagnostic purpose.

  3. Influence of field emission on the propagation of cylindrical fast ionization wave in atmospheric-pressure nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of field emission of electrons from surfaces on the fast ionization wave (FIW) propagation in high-voltage nanosecond pulse discharge in the atmospheric-pressure nitrogen is studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions model. A strong influence of field emission on the FIW dynamics and plasma parameters is obtained. Namely, the accounting for the field emission makes possible the bridging of the cathode-anode gap by rather dense plasma (˜1013 cm-3) in less than 1 ns. This is explained by the generation of runaway electrons from the field emitted electrons. These electrons are able to cross the entire gap pre-ionizing it and promoting the ionization wave propagation. We have found that the propagation of runaway electrons through the gap cannot be accompanied by the streamer propagation, because the runaway electrons align the plasma density gradients. In addition, we have obtained that the field enhancement factor allows controlling the speed of ionization wave propagation.

  4. Lamb waves based fast subwavelength imaging using a DORT-MUSIC algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiaze; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2016-02-01

    A Lamb wave-based, subwavelength imaging algorithm is developed for damage imaging in large-scale, plate-like structures based on a decomposition of the time-reversal operator (DORT) method combined with the multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm in the space-frequency domain. In this study, a rapid, hybrid non-contact scanning system was proposed to image an aluminum plate using a piezoelectric linear array for actuation and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) line-scan for sensing. The physics of wave propagation, reflection, and scattering that underlies the response matrix in the DORT method is mathematically formulated in the context of guided waves. The singular value decomposition (SVD) and MUSIC-based imaging condition enable quantifying the damage severity by a `reflectivity' parameter and super-resolution imaging. With the flexibility of this scanning system, a considerably large area can be imaged using lower frequency Lamb waves with limited line-scans. The experimental results showed that the hardware system with a signal processing tool such as the DORT-MUSIC (TR-MUSIC) imaging technique can provide rapid, highly accurate imaging results as well as damage quantification with unknown material properties.

  5. Fast strain wave induced magnetization changes in long cobalt bars: Domain motion versus coherent rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.; Adenwalla, S.; Borchers, J. A.; Maranville, B. B.

    2015-02-14

    A high frequency (88 MHz) traveling strain wave on a piezoelectric substrate is shown to change the magnetization direction in 40 μm wide Co bars with an aspect ratio of 10{sup 3}. The rapidly alternating strain wave rotates the magnetization away from the long axis into the short axis direction, via magnetoelastic coupling. Strain-induced magnetization changes have previously been demonstrated in ferroelectric/ferromagnetic heterostructures, with excellent fidelity between the ferromagnet and the ferroelectric domains, but these experiments were limited to essentially dc frequencies. Both magneto-optical Kerr effect and polarized neutron reflectivity confirm that the traveling strain wave does rotate the magnetization away from the long axis direction and both yield quantitatively similar values for the rotated magnetization. An investigation of the behavior of short axis magnetization with increasing strain wave amplitude on a series of samples with variable edge roughness suggests that the magnetization reorientation that is seen proceeds solely via coherent rotation. Polarized neutron reflectivity data provide direct experimental evidence for this model. This is consistent with expectations that domain wall motion cannot track the rapidly varying strain.

  6. BENCHMARKING FAST-TO-ALFVEN MODE CONVERSION IN A COLD MHD PLASMA. II. HOW TO GET ALFVEN WAVES THROUGH THE SOLAR TRANSITION REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Shelley C.; Cally, Paul S. E-mail: paul.cally@monash.edu

    2012-05-20

    Alfven waves may be difficult to excite at the photosphere due to low-ionization fraction and suffer near-total reflection at the transition region (TR). Yet they are ubiquitous in the corona and heliosphere. To overcome these difficulties, we show that they may instead be generated high in the chromosphere by conversion from reflecting fast magnetohydrodynamic waves, and that Alfvenic TR reflection is greatly reduced if the fast reflection point is within a few scale heights of the TR. The influence of mode conversion on the phase of the reflected fast wave is also explored. This phase can potentially be misinterpreted as a travel speed perturbation with implications for the practical seismic probing of active regions.

  7. Fast magnetoacoustic solitary waves in dense magnetoplasmas in a cylindrical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, W.; Mahmood, A.; Rizvi, H.

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear properties of the quantum magnetoacoustic wave are studied in electron-ion magnetoplasmas. In this regard, cylindrical Korteweg deVries (CKdV) equation is derived for small amplitude perturbations. The solution of the planar KdV equation is obtained using the tanh method and is subsequently used as an initial profile to solve the CKdV equation. It is found that the system under consideration admits compressive solitary structures. Finally, it is found that the amplitude as well as the width of the nonplanar magnetosonic solitary structure increases with the increase in the magnetic field whereas a decrease is observed with the increase in number density of the system. The present study may be beneficial to understand the nonlinear wave propagation in nonplanar geometries in dense plasmas.

  8. Fast acceleration of 2D wave propagation simulations using modern computational accelerators.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Lifan; Cavazos, John; Huang, Howie H; Kay, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in modern computational accelerators like Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) and coprocessors provide great opportunities for making scientific applications run faster than ever before. However, efficient parallelization of scientific code using new programming tools like CUDA requires a high level of expertise that is not available to many scientists. This, plus the fact that parallelized code is usually not portable to different architectures, creates major challenges for exploiting the full capabilities of modern computational accelerators. In this work, we sought to overcome these challenges by studying how to achieve both automated parallelization using OpenACC and enhanced portability using OpenCL. We applied our parallelization schemes using GPUs as well as Intel Many Integrated Core (MIC) coprocessor to reduce the run time of wave propagation simulations. We used a well-established 2D cardiac action potential model as a specific case-study. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to study auto-parallelization of 2D cardiac wave propagation simulations using OpenACC. Our results identify several approaches that provide substantial speedups. The OpenACC-generated GPU code achieved more than 150x speedup above the sequential implementation and required the addition of only a few OpenACC pragmas to the code. An OpenCL implementation provided speedups on GPUs of at least 200x faster than the sequential implementation and 30x faster than a parallelized OpenMP implementation. An implementation of OpenMP on Intel MIC coprocessor provided speedups of 120x with only a few code changes to the sequential implementation. We highlight that OpenACC provides an automatic, efficient, and portable approach to achieve parallelization of 2D cardiac wave simulations on GPUs. Our approach of using OpenACC, OpenCL, and OpenMP to parallelize this particular model on modern computational accelerators should be applicable to other computational models of

  9. Fast events and waves in an active region of the Sun observed in Hα with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Andrade Nuño, B.; Bello González, N.; Blanco Rodríguez, J.; Kneer, F.; Puschmann, K. G.

    2008-08-01

    Context: We study the chromosphere of an active region of the Sun in the Hα line. Aims: The development of new instrumentation and new methods of data analysis allows to scrutinize the dynamics of the solar chromosphere with high spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution. The observations we present shed light on some magneto-dynamic processes occurring above an active region in the chromosphere. Methods: We took a time series of 55 min in Hα from AR 10875 at θ≈36°. We used the “Göttingen” Fabry-Perot spectrometer at the Vacuum Tower Telescope, Observatorio del Teide/Tenerife, to obtain two-dimensional spectrograms in Hα. Adaptive optics and image reconstruction yielded a spatial resolution better than 0.5 arcsec throughout the time sequence. From the wealth of structures, we selected areas of interest to study further, in detail, some ongoing processes. Results: A small straight surge developed aside of a pore with upward phase speed of 100 km s-1 and line-of-sight (LOS) velocity of 15 km s-1. The surge retreated rapidly with LOS velocity of 45 km s-1 at its mouth. It underwent a rebound and fell back again. Two sympathetic mini-flares were observed that lasted only approximately 40 s, but showed strong Hα emission. We found magnetoacoustic waves in long fibrils as mainly short wave trains, short packets or pulses, i.e., solitary waves consisting of small (1´´-2´´) blobs. They start at either end of the fibrils and travel with phase speeds of 12-14 km s-1, i.e., close to the tube speed and approximately the sound velocity for sufficiently large magnetic field strengths. Some waves speed up to reach velocities of the order of 30 km s-1. This is much lower than the expected Alfvén velocity of ≥200 km s-1 for reasonable magnetic field strengths and mass densities. We suggest that slow waves are not purely longitudinal, but possess gas velocities perpendicular to the direction of propagation of few km s-1. Also, fast waves travel along sinuous

  10. Study of Spurious Response near the Fast Shear Wave in SiO2/Al/LiNbO3 Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Rei; Fujiwara, Joji; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Tsurunari, Tetsuya; Nakanishi, Hidekazu; Hamaoka, Yosuke

    2013-07-01

    The shear horizontal (SH) mode on the SiO2/Al/LiNbO3 structure is studied because of its sufficient electromechanical coupling factor (K2) and good temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF). The authors proposed a method of suppressing the spurious response of the Rayleigh mode and the transverse mode for narrow duplex gap applications. For the narrow duplex gap application, the SiO2 thickness must be increased to achieve good TCF characteristics. However, another spurious response appears near the fast shear wave with increasing SiO2 thickness. In this paper, we discuss the suppression mechanism of the spurious response near the fast shear wave.

  11. A POSSIBLE DETECTION OF A FAST-MODE EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET WAVE ASSOCIATED WITH A MINI CORONAL MASS EJECTION OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Ruisheng; Jiang Yunchun; Hong Junchao; Yang Jiayan; Bi Yi; Yang Liheng; Yang Dan

    2011-10-01

    'Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) waves' are large-scale wavelike transients often associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In this Letter, we present a possible detection of a fast-mode EUV wave associated with a mini-CME observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory. On 2010 December 1, a small-scale EUV wave erupted near the disk center associated with a mini-CME, which showed all the low corona manifestations of a typical CME. The CME was triggered by the eruption of a mini-filament, with a typical length of about 30''. Although the eruption was tiny, the wave had the appearance of an almost semicircular front and propagated at a uniform velocity of 220-250 km s{sup -1} with very little angular dependence. The CME lateral expansion was asymmetric with an inclination toward north, and the southern footprints of the CME loops hardly shifted. The lateral expansion resulted in deep long-duration dimmings, showing the CME extent. Comparing the onset and the initial speed of the CME, the wave was likely triggered by the rapid expansion of the CME loops. Our analysis confirms that the small-scale EUV wave is a true wave, interpreted as a fast-mode wave.

  12. Infrasonic acoustic waves generated by fast air heating in sprite cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Caitano L.; Pasko, Victor P.

    2014-03-01

    Acceleration, expansion, and branching of sprite streamers can lead to concentration of high electrical currents in regions of space, that are observed in the form of bright sprite cores. Driven by this electrical current, a series of chemical processes take place in the sprite plasma. Excitation, followed by quenching of excited electronic states leads to energy transfer from charged to neutral species. The consequence is heating and expansion of air leading to emission of infrasonic acoustic waves. Results indicate that ≳0.01 Pa pressure perturbations on the ground, observed in association with sprites, can only be produced by exceptionally strong currents in sprite cores, exceeding 2 kA.

  13. Fiber-optic evanescent-wave spectroscopy for fast multicomponent analysis of human blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simhi, Ronit; Gotshal, Yaron; Bunimovich, David; Katzir, Abraham; Sela, Ben-Ami

    1996-07-01

    A spectral analysis of human blood serum was undertaken by fiber-optic evanescent-wave spectroscopy (FEWS) by the use of a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer. A special cell for the FEWS measurements was designed and built that incorporates an IR-transmitting silver halide fiber and a means for introducing the blood-serum sample. Further improvements in analysis were obtained by the adoption of multivariate calibration techniques that are already used in clinical chemistry. The partial least-squares algorithm was used to calculate the concentrations of cholesterol, total protein, urea, and uric acid in human blood serum. The estimated prediction errors obtained (in percent from the average value) were 6% for total protein, 15% for cholesterol, 30% for urea, and 30% for uric acid. These results were compared with another independent prediction method that used a neural-network model. This model yielded estimated prediction errors of 8.8% for total protein, 25% for cholesterol, and 21% for uric acid. spectroscopy, fiber-optic evanescent-wave spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer, blood, multivariate calibration, neural networks.

  14. First-principle description for the high-harmonic generation in a diamond by intense short laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otobe, T.

    2012-05-01

    We present a first-principles description for the electron excitation and the high-harmonic generation (HHG) in a diamond by intense laser pulse irradiation and their laser parameter dependence. Above band gap harmonics are generated after the peak of the incident laser pulse and have duration much shorter than the laser pulse. The intensity of individual harmonic peaks increases as laser intensity increases nonlinearly, and we find the blue shift of the HHG spectrum when the optical breakdown occurs.

  15. Long-term operation of surface high-harmonic generation from relativistic oscillating mirrors using a spooling tape

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bierbach, Jana; Yeung, Mark; Eckner, Erich; Roedel, Christian; Kuschel, Stephan; Zepf, Matt; Paulus, Gerhard G.

    2015-05-01

    Surface high-harmonic generation in the relativistic regime is demonstrated as a source of extreme ultra-violet (XUV) pulses with extended operation time. Relativistic high-harmonic generation is driven by a frequency-doubled high-power Ti:Sapphire laser focused to a peak intensity of 3·1019 W/cm2 onto spooling tapes. We demonstrate continuous operation over up to one hour runtime at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. Harmonic spectra ranging from 20 eV to 70 eV (62 nm to 18 nm) were consecutively recorded by an XUV spectrometer. An average XUV pulse energy in the µJ range is measured. With the presented setup, relativistic surface high-harmonic generationmore » becomes a powerful source of coherent XUV pulses that might enable applications in, e.g. attosecond laser physics and the seeding of free-electron lasers, when the laser issues causing 80-% pulse energy fluctuations are overcome.« less

  16. Lorentz drift compensation in high harmonic generation in the soft and hard X-ray regions of the spectrum.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Benjamin R; Popmintchev, Dimitar; Pisanty, Emilio; Hickstein, Daniel D; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C; Popmintchev, Tenio

    2016-09-19

    We present a semi-classical study of the effects of the Lorentz force on electrons during high harmonic generation in the soft and hard X-ray regions driven by near- and mid-infrared lasers with wavelengths from 0.8 to 20 μm, and at intensities below 1015 W/cm2. The transverse extent of the longitudinal Lorentz drift is compared for both Gaussian focus and waveguide geometries. Both geometries exhibit a longitudinal electric field component that cancels the magnetic Lorentz drift in some regions of the focus, once each full optical cycle. We show that the Lorentz force contributes a super-Gaussian scaling which acts in addition to the dominant high harmonic flux scaling of λ-(5-6) due to quantum diffusion. We predict that the high harmonic yield will be reduced for driving wavelengths > 6 μm, and that the presence of dynamic spatial mode asymmetries results in the generation of both even and odd harmonic orders. Remarkably, we show that under realistic conditions, the recollision process can be controlled and does not shut off completely even for wavelengths >10 μm and recollision energies greater than 15 keV. PMID:27661918

  17. Slow, large scales from fast, small ones in dispersive wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Leslie; Waleffe, Fabian

    2000-11-01

    Dispersive wave turbulence in systems of geophysical interest (beta-plane, rotating, stratified and rotating-stratified flows) has been simulated with random, isotropic small scale forcing and hyper-viscosity. This can be thought of as a Langevin model of the small space-time scales only with potential implications for climate modeling. In all cases, slow, coherent large scales are generated after long times of 2nd order in the nonlinear time scale. These slow, large scales ultimately dominate the flows. Beta-plane and rotating flow results were reported earlier [PoF 11, 1608]. In stratified flows, the energy accumulates in a 1D vertically sheared flow at selected large scales. As the rotation rate is increased, a progressive transition toward generation of all large scale vortical zero modes (quasi-geostrophic 3D flow) is observed. For yet higher rotation rate, energy accumulates primarily in a 2D quasi-geostrophic flow (cyclonic vortices) at all large scales.

  18. Fast plane wave density functional theory molecular dynamics calculations on multi-GPU machines

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Weile; Fu, Jiyun; Cao, Zongyan; Wang, Long; Chi, Xuebin; Gao, Weiguo; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2013-10-15

    Plane wave pseudopotential (PWP) density functional theory (DFT) calculation is the most widely used method for material simulations, but its absolute speed stagnated due to the inability to use large scale CPU based computers. By a drastic redesign of the algorithm, and moving all the major computation parts into GPU, we have reached a speed of 12 s per molecular dynamics (MD) step for a 512 atom system using 256 GPU cards. This is about 20 times faster than the CPU version of the code regardless of the number of CPU cores used. Our tests and analysis on different GPU platforms and configurations shed lights on the optimal GPU deployments for PWP-DFT calculations. An 1800 step MD simulation is used to study the liquid phase properties of GaInP.

  19. Optical emission from a fast shock wave - The remnants of Tycho's supernova and SN 1006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, R. A.; Raymond, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    The faint optical filaments in Tycho's supernova remnant appear to be emission from a shock front moving at 5600 km/s. The intensity of the hydrogen lines, the absence of forbidden lines of heavy elements in the spectrum, and the width of the filaments are explained by a model in which a collisionless shock wave is moving into partially neutral gas. The presence of the neutral gas can be used to set an upper limit of approximately 5 x 10 to the 47th power ergs to the energy in ionizing radiation emitted by a Type I supernova. The patchy neutral gas is probably part of the warm neutral component of the interstellar medium. The existing information on the remnant of SN 1006 indicates that its emission is similar in nature to that from Tycho's remnant.

  20. Tunable compression of template banks for fast gravitational-wave detection and localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Alvin J. K.; Gair, Jonathan R.

    2016-06-01

    One strategy for reducing the online computational cost of matched-filter searches for gravitational waves is to introduce a compressed basis for the waveform template bank in a grid-based search. In this paper, we propose and investigate several tunable compression schemes for a general template bank. Through offline compression, such schemes are shown to yield faster detection and localization of signals, along with moderately improved sensitivity and accuracy over coarsened banks at the same level of computational cost. This is potentially useful for any search involving template banks, and especially in the analysis of data from future space-based detectors such as eLISA, for which online grid searches are difficult due to the long-duration waveforms and large parameter spaces.

  1. Revealing molecular structure and dynamics through high harmonic generation driven by mid-IR fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marangos, Jonathan

    2010-03-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) from molecules has recently been shown to be a promising tool for measuring instantaneous molecular structure, sub-femtosecond domain structural rearrangements in molecules and even hole dynamics initiated by laser field ionisation. To fully exploit this promise it is essential that we can; (1) systematically decouple structural and dynamic effects so that both may simultaneously be determined in the measurement, (2) can extend the method of molecular HHG imaging to a wide range of molecules. Here we demonstrate important steps towards both these objectives. Up until now HHG imaging measurements have been restricted to drive laser wavelengths close to 800nm, due to the availability of CPA titanium sapphire lasers, which dictates the use of relatively high intensities (> 2.5 x 10^14 Wcm-2) if a harmonic spectrum spanning to ˜70 eV is to be observed which is required for extracting structural data from most small molecules. By using a mid-IR laser (at 1300 nm) we show that with an intensity ˜ 1 x 10^14 W cm-2 we can observe a wide molecular harmonic spectrum spanning to ˜ 70 eV even in molecules where ionization saturation would clamp the cut-off to much lower energies if an 800nm field were used. Thus we have been able to observe evidence for two-centre interference in two new molecules, N2O and C2H2 for the first time. Moreover we can use the ability to observe a broad harmonic spectrum over a large range of intensities to reveal the subtle interplay between structural and dynamic effects in CO2 and so provide a new window into hole dynamics. [4pt] In collaboration with R. Torres, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London; O. Smirnova, Max-Born-Institute, Berlin; T. Siegel and L. Brugnera, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London; I. Procino and Jonathan G. Underwood, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London; C. Altucci and R. Velotta, CNSIM and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli

  2. Fast acoustic streaming in standing waves: generation of an additional outer streaming cell.

    PubMed

    Reyt, Ida; Daru, Virginie; Bailliet, Hélène; Moreau, Solène; Valière, Jean-Christophe; Baltean-Carlès, Diana; Weisman, Catherine

    2013-09-01

    Rayleigh streaming in a cylindrical acoustic standing waveguide is studied both experimentally and numerically for nonlinear Reynolds numbers from 1 to 30 [Re(NL)=(U0/c0)(2)(R/δν)(2), with U0 the acoustic velocity amplitude at the velocity antinode, c0 the speed of sound, R the tube radius, and δν the acoustic boundary layer thickness]. Streaming velocity is measured by means of laser Doppler velocimetry in a cylindrical resonator filled with air at atmospheric pressure at high intensity sound levels. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically with high resolution finite difference schemes. The resonator is excited by shaking it along the axis at imposed frequency. Results of measurements and of numerical calculation are compared with results given in the literature and with each other. As expected, the axial streaming velocity measured and calculated agrees reasonably well with the slow streaming theory for small ReNL but deviates significantly from such predictions for fast streaming (ReNL>1). Both experimental and numerical results show that when ReNL is increased, the center of the outer streaming cells are pushed toward the acoustic velocity nodes until counter-rotating additional vortices are generated near the acoustic velocity antinodes.

  3. Regulation of ion drifts and anisotropies by parametrically unstable finite-amplitude Alfvén-cyclotron waves in the fast solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Maneva, Y. G.; Araneda, J. A.; Marsch, E.

    2014-03-10

    We study the preferential heating and differential acceleration of minor ions by dissipation of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) generated by parametric instabilities of a finite-amplitude monochromatic Alfvén-cyclotron pump wave. We consider the associated kinetic effects of Landau damping and nonlinear pitch-angle scattering of protons and α particles in the tenuous plasma of coronal holes and the fast solar wind. Various data collected by Wind spacecraft show signatures for a local transverse heating of the minor ions, presumably by Alfvén-cyclotron wave dissipation, and an unexpected parallel heating by a so far unknown mechanism. Here, we present the results from a set of 1.5 dimensional hybrid simulations in search for a plausible explanation for the observed field-aligned kinetic features in the fast solar wind minor ions. We investigate the origin and regulation of ion relative drifts and temperature anisotropies in low plasma β, fast solar wind conditions. Depending on their initial drifts, both ion species can heat up not only transversely through cyclotron resonance and non-resonant wave-particle interactions, but also strongly in the parallel direction by Landau damping of the daughter IAWs. We discuss the dependence of the relative ion drifts and temperature anisotropies on the plasma β of the individual species and we describe the effect of the pump wave amplitude on the ion heating and acceleration.

  4. Fast control of semiconductor qubits beyond the rotating-wave approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang; Kestner, J. P.; Wang, Xin; Das Sarma, S.

    2016-07-01

    We present a theoretical study of single-qubit operations by oscillatory fields on various semiconductor platforms. We explicitly show how to perform faster gate operations by going beyond the universally used rotating-wave approximation (RWA) regime, while using only two sinusoidal pulses. We first show for specific published experiments how much error is currently incurred by implementing pulses designed using standard RWA. We then show that an even modest increase in gate speed would cause problems in using RWA for gate design in the singlet-triplet (ST) and resonant-exchange (RX) qubits. We discuss the extent to which analytically keeping higher orders in the perturbation theory would address the problem. More strikingly, we give a new prescription for gating with strong coupling far beyond the RWA regime. We perform numerical calculations for the phases and the durations of two consecutive pulses to realize the key Hadamard and π/8 gates with coupling strengths up to several times the qubit splitting. Working in this manifestly non-RWA regime, the gate operation speeds up by two to three orders of magnitude and nears the quantum speed limit without requiring complicated pulse shaping or optimal control sequences.

  5. Non-destructive thermal wave method applied to study thermal properties of fast setting time endodontic cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picolloto, A. M.; Mariucci, V. V. G.; Szpak, W.; Medina, A. N.; Baesso, M. L.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Astrath, F. B. G.; Santos, A. D.; Moraes, J. C. S.; Bento, A. C.

    2013-11-01

    The thermal wave method is applied for thermal properties measurement in fast endodontic cement (CER). This new formula is developed upon using Portland cement in gel and it was successfully tested in mice with good biocompatibility and stimulated mineralization. Recently, thermal expansion and setting time were measured, conferring to this material twice faster hardening than the well known Angelus Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) the feature of fast hardening (˜7 min) and with similar thermal expansion (˜12 μstrain/ °C). Therefore, it is important the knowledge of thermal properties like thermal diffusivity, conductivity, effusivity in order to match thermally the tissue environment upon its application in filling cavities of teeth. Photothermal radiometry technique based on Xe illumination was applied in CER disks 600 μm thick for heating, with prepared in four particle sizes (25, 38, 45, and 53) μm, which were added microemulsion gel with variation volumes (140, 150, 160, and 170) μl. The behavior of the thermal diffusivity CER disks shows linear decay for increase emulsion volume, and in contrast, thermal diffusivity increases with particles sizes. Aiming to compare to MTA, thermal properties of CER were averaged to get the figure of merit for thermal diffusivity as (44.2 ± 3.6) × 10-3 cm2/s, for thermal conductivity (228 ± 32) mW/cm K, the thermal effusivity (1.09 ± 0.06) W s0.5/cm2 K and volume heat capacity (5.2 ± 0.7) J/cm3 K, which are in excellent agreement with results of a disk prepared from commercial MTA-Angelus (grain size < 10 μm using 57 μl of distilled water).

  6. Non-destructive thermal wave method applied to study thermal properties of fast setting time endodontic cement

    SciTech Connect

    Picolloto, A. M.; Mariucci, V. V. G.; Szpak, W.; Medina, A. N.; Baesso, M. L.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Astrath, F. B. G.; Bento, A. C.; Santos, A. D.; Moraes, J. C. S.

    2013-11-21

    The thermal wave method is applied for thermal properties measurement in fast endodontic cement (CER). This new formula is developed upon using Portland cement in gel and it was successfully tested in mice with good biocompatibility and stimulated mineralization. Recently, thermal expansion and setting time were measured, conferring to this material twice faster hardening than the well known Angelus Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) the feature of fast hardening (∼7 min) and with similar thermal expansion (∼12 μstrain/ °C). Therefore, it is important the knowledge of thermal properties like thermal diffusivity, conductivity, effusivity in order to match thermally the tissue environment upon its application in filling cavities of teeth. Photothermal radiometry technique based on Xe illumination was applied in CER disks 600 μm thick for heating, with prepared in four particle sizes (25, 38, 45, and 53) μm, which were added microemulsion gel with variation volumes (140, 150, 160, and 170) μl. The behavior of the thermal diffusivity CER disks shows linear decay for increase emulsion volume, and in contrast, thermal diffusivity increases with particles sizes. Aiming to compare to MTA, thermal properties of CER were averaged to get the figure of merit for thermal diffusivity as (44.2 ± 3.6) × 10{sup −3} cm{sup 2}/s, for thermal conductivity (228 ± 32) mW/cm K, the thermal effusivity (1.09 ± 0.06) W s{sup 0.5}/cm{sup 2} K and volume heat capacity (5.2 ± 0.7) J/cm{sup 3} K, which are in excellent agreement with results of a disk prepared from commercial MTA-Angelus (grain size < 10 μm using 57 μl of distilled water)

  7. Babich's expansion and the fast Huygens sweeping method for the Helmholtz wave equation at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wangtao; Qian, Jianliang; Burridge, Robert

    2016-05-01

    In some applications, it is reasonable to assume that geodesics (rays) have a consistent orientation so that the Helmholtz equation can be viewed as an evolution equation in one of the spatial directions. With such applications in mind, starting from Babich's expansion, we develop a new high-order asymptotic method, which we dub the fast Huygens sweeping method, for solving point-source Helmholtz equations in inhomogeneous media in the high-frequency regime and in the presence of caustics. The first novelty of this method is that we develop a new Eulerian approach to compute the asymptotics, i.e. the traveltime function and amplitude coefficients that arise in Babich's expansion, yielding a locally valid solution, which is accurate close enough to the source. The second novelty is that we utilize the Huygens-Kirchhoff integral to integrate many locally valid wavefields to construct globally valid wavefields. This automatically treats caustics and yields uniformly accurate solutions both near the source and remote from it. The third novelty is that the butterfly algorithm is adapted to accelerate the Huygens-Kirchhoff summation, achieving nearly optimal complexity O (Nlog ⁡ N), where N is the number of mesh points; the complexity prefactor depends on the desired accuracy and is independent of the frequency. To reduce the storage of the resulting tables of asymptotics in Babich's expansion, we use the multivariable Chebyshev series expansion to compress each table by encoding the information into a small number of coefficients. The new method enjoys the following desired features. First, it precomputes the asymptotics in Babich's expansion, such as traveltime and amplitudes. Second, it takes care of caustics automatically. Third, it can compute the point-source Helmholtz solution for many different sources at many frequencies simultaneously. Fourth, for a specified number of points per wavelength, it can construct the wavefield in nearly optimal complexity in terms

  8. High harmonic generation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckl, O. H.; Baer, C. R. E.; Kränkel, C.; Marchese, S. V.; Schapper, F.; Holler, M.; Südmeyer, T.; Robinson, J. S.; Tisch, J. W. G.; Couny, F.; Light, P.; Benabid, F.; Keller, U.

    2009-10-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) of intense infrared laser radiation (Ferray et al., J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 21:L31, 1988; McPherson et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 4:595, 1987) enables coherent vacuum-UV (VUV) to soft-X-ray sources. In the usual setup, energetic femtosecond laser pulses are strongly focused into a gas jet, restricting the interaction length to the Rayleigh range of the focus. The average photon flux is limited by the low conversion efficiency and the low average power of the complex laser amplifier systems (Keller, Nature 424:831, 2003; Südmeyer et al., Nat. Photonics 2:599, 2008; Röser et al., Opt. Lett. 30:2754, 2005; Eidam et al., IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 15:187, 2009) which typically operate at kilohertz repetition rates. This represents a severe limitation for many experiments using the harmonic radiation in fields such as metrology or high-resolution imaging. Driving HHG with novel high-power diode-pumped multi-megahertz laser systems has the potential to significantly increase the average photon flux. However, the higher average power comes at the expense of lower pulse energies because the repetition rate is increased by more than a thousand times, and efficient HHG is not possible in the usual geometry. So far, two promising techniques for HHG at lower pulse energies were developed: external build-up cavities (Gohle et al., Nature 436:234, 2005; Jones et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94:193, 2005) and resonant field enhancement in nanostructured targets (Kim et al., Nature 453:757, 2008). Here we present a third technique, which has advantages in terms of ease of HHG light extraction, transverse beam quality, and the possibility to substantially increase conversion efficiency by phase-matching (Paul et al., Nature 421:51, 2003; Ren et al., Opt. Express 16:17052, 2008; Serebryannikov et al., Phys. Rev. E (Stat. Nonlinear Soft Matter Phys.) 70:66611, 2004; Serebryannikov et al., Opt. Lett. 33:977, 2008; Zhang et al., Nat. Phys. 3

  9. Spatial profiles of electron and metastable atom densities in positive polarity fast ionization waves sustained in helium

    SciTech Connect

    Weatherford, Brandon R. E-mail: zax@esi-group.com E-mail: mjkush@umich.edu; Barnat, E. V. E-mail: zax@esi-group.com E-mail: mjkush@umich.edu; Xiong, Zhongmin E-mail: zax@esi-group.com E-mail: mjkush@umich.edu; Kushner, Mark J. E-mail: zax@esi-group.com E-mail: mjkush@umich.edu

    2014-09-14

    Fast ionization waves (FIWs), often generated with high voltage pulses over nanosecond timescales, are able to produce large volumes of ions and excited states at moderate pressures. The mechanisms of FIW propagation were experimentally and computationally investigated to provide insights into the manner in which these large volumes are excited. The two-dimensional structure of electron and metastable densities produced by short-pulse FIWs sustained in helium were measured using laser-induced fluorescence and laser collision-induced fluorescence diagnostics for times of 100–120 ns after the pulse, as the pressure was varied from 1 to 20 Torr. A trend of center-peaked to volume-filling to wall-peaked electron density profiles was observed as the pressure was increased. Instantaneous FIW velocities, obtained from plasma-induced emission, ranged from 0.1 to 3×10⁹cm s⁻¹, depending on distance from the high voltage electrode and pressure. Predictions from two-dimensional modeling of the propagation of a single FIW correlated well with the experimental trends in electron density profiles and wave velocity. Results from the model show that the maximum ionization rate occurs in the wavefront, and the discharge continues to propagate forward after the removal of high voltage from the powered electrode due to the potential energy stored in the space charge. As the pressure is varied, the radial distribution of the ionization rate is shaped by changes in the electron mean free path, and subsequent localized electric field enhancement at the walls or on the centerline of the discharge.

  10. Boosted High-Harmonics Pulse from a Double-Sided Relativistic Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kando, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Zhidkov, A. G.

    2009-07-01

    An ultrabright high-power x- and γ-radiation source is proposed. A high-density thin plasma slab, accelerating in the radiation pressure dominant regime by an ultraintense electromagnetic wave, reflects a counterpropagating relativistically strong electromagnetic wave, producing extremely time-compressed and intensified radiation. The reflected light contains relativistic harmonics generated at the plasma slab, all upshifted with the same factor as the fundamental mode of the incident light. The theory of an arbitrarily moving thin plasma slab reflectivity is presented.

  11. Boosted high-harmonics pulse from a double-sided relativistic mirror.

    PubMed

    Esirkepov, T Zh; Bulanov, S V; Kando, M; Pirozhkov, A S; Zhidkov, A G

    2009-07-10

    An ultrabright high-power x- and gamma-radiation source is proposed. A high-density thin plasma slab, accelerating in the radiation pressure dominant regime by an ultraintense electromagnetic wave, reflects a counterpropagating relativistically strong electromagnetic wave, producing extremely time-compressed and intensified radiation. The reflected light contains relativistic harmonics generated at the plasma slab, all upshifted with the same factor as the fundamental mode of the incident light. The theory of an arbitrarily moving thin plasma slab reflectivity is presented.

  12. Generation of He+ and O+ EMIC waves by the bunch distribution of O+ ions associated with fast magnetosonic shocks in the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. H.; Lee, L. C.

    2016-09-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are often observed in the magnetosphere with frequency usually in the H+ and He+ cyclotron bands and sometimes in the O+ band. The temperature anisotropy, caused by injection of energetic ions or by compression of magnetosphere, can efficiently generate H+ EMIC waves, but not as efficient for He+ or O+ EMIC waves. Here we propose a new generation mechanism for He+ and O+ EMIC waves associated with weak fast magnetosonic shocks, which are observed in the magnetosphere. These shocks can be associated with either dynamic pressure enhancement or shocks in the solar wind and can lead to the formation of a "bunch" distribution in the perpendicular velocity plane of O+ ions. The O+ bunch distribution can excite strong He+ EMIC waves and weak O+ and H+ waves. The dominant He+ EMIC waves are strong in quasi-perpendicular propagation and show harmonics in frequency spectrum of Fourier analysis. The proposed mechanism can explain the generation and some observed properties of He+ and O+ EMIC waves in the magnetosphere.

  13. Fast wave direct electron heating in advanced inductive and ITER baseline scenario discharges in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R. I.; Jackson, G. L.; Luce, T. C.; Politzer, P. A.; Austin, M. E.; Diem, S. J.; Kaufman, M. C.; Ryan, P. M.; Doyle, E. J.; Zeng, L.; Grierson, B. A.; Hosea, J. C.; Nagy, A.; Perkins, R.; Solomon, W. M.; Taylor, G.; Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D.; Porkolab, M.; Turco, F.

    2014-02-12

    Fast Wave (FW) heating and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) are used in the DIII-D tokamak to study plasmas with low applied torque and dominant electron heating characteristic of burning plasmas. FW heating via direct electron damping has reached the 2.5 MW level in high performance ELMy H-mode plasmas. In Advanced Inductive (AI) plasmas, core FW heating was found to be comparable to that of ECH, consistent with the excellent first-pass absorption of FWs predicted by ray-tracing models at high electron beta. FW heating at the ∼2 MW level to ELMy H-mode discharges in the ITER Baseline Scenario (IBS) showed unexpectedly strong absorption of FW power by injected neutral beam (NB) ions, indicated by significant enhancement of the D-D neutron rate, while the intended absorption on core electrons appeared rather weak. The AI and IBS discharges are compared in an effort to identify the causes of the different response to FWs.

  14. Enhancement of NUBEAM for the simulation of fast ion and RF-wave interaction based on the quasi-linear theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jae-Min; McCune, Douglas; Chang, C. S.

    2007-11-01

    The Monte-Carlo package NUBEAM for time-dependent modeling of fast ions in a tokamak geometry has been upgraded to simulate the effects of ICRF heating on the fast ions. The RF-wave field data is provided by executing TORIC5 inside TRANSP and passed to NUBEAM. An iterative algorithm has been implemented to match the RF-power absorption value calculated by NUBEAM with the level predicted by TORIC5. The effects of RF-wave fields on the fast ions are modeled by evaluating Monte-Carlo kicks based on the quasi-linear theory. Because of the unique feature of NUBEAM, the so called ``goosing'' which enables an order of magnitude faster calculation, special care needs to be taken in the Monte-Carlo simulation. The modification of the goose algorithm in the presence of RF-wave fields will be presented. Also, the necessary features of NUBEAM for future application to self-consistent coupling with an ICRF full wave code will be discussed.

  15. Electro-optical system for scanning microscopy of extreme ultraviolet masks with a high harmonic generation source.

    PubMed

    Naulleau, Patrick P; Anderson, Christopher N; Anderson, Erik H; Andreson, Nord; Chao, Weilun; Choi, Changhoon; Goldberg, Kenneth A; Gullikson, Eric M; Kim, Seong-Sue; Lee, Donggun; Miyakawa, Ryan; Park, Jongju; Rekawa, Seno; Salmassi, Farhad

    2014-08-25

    A self-contained electro-optical module for scanning extreme ultraviolet (EUV) reflection microscopy at 13.5 nm wavelength has been developed. The system has been designed to work with stand-alone commercially available EUV high harmonic generation (HHG) sources through the implementation of narrowband harmonic selecting multilayers and off-axis elliptical short focal length zoneplates. The module has been successfully integrated into an EUV mask scanning microscope achieving diffraction limited imaging performance (84 nm point spread function). PMID:25321224

  16. Quasi-phase-matching high harmonic generation using trains of pulses produced using an array of birefringent plates.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Kevin; Robinson, Tom; Hooker, Simon M

    2012-03-12

    Quasi-phase-matched high harmonic generation using trains of up to 8 counter-propagating pulses is explored. For trains of up to 4 pulses the measured enhancement of the harmonic signal scales with the number of pulses N as (N + 1)², as expected. However, for trains with N > 4, no further enhancement of the harmonic signal is observed. This effect is ascribed to changes of the coherence length Lc within the generating medium. Techniques for overcoming the variation of Lc are discussed. The pressure dependence of quasi-phase-matching is investigated and the switch from true-phase-matching to quasi-phase-matching is observed.

  17. Generation of vacuum ultraviolet radiation by intracavity high-harmonic generation toward state detection of single trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakui, Kentaro; Hayasaka, Kazuhiro; Ido, Tetsuya

    2014-12-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation around 159 nm is obtained toward direct excitation of a single trapped ion. An efficient fluoride-based VUV output coupler is employed for intracavity high-harmonic generation of a Ti:S oscillator. Using this coupler, where we measured its reflectance to be about 90 %, an average power reaching 6.4 W is coupled out from a modest fundamental power of 650 mW. When a single comb component out of 1.9 10 teeth is resonant to the atomic transition, 100s of fluorescence photons per second will be detectable under a realistic condition.

  18. Extreme ultra-violet burst, particle heating, and whistler wave emission in fast magnetic reconnection induced by kink-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Kil-Byoung; Zhai, Xiang; Bellan, Paul M.

    2016-03-01

    A spatially localized energetic extreme ultra-violet (EUV) burst is imaged at the presumed position of fast magnetic reconnection in a plasma jet produced by a coaxial helicity injection source; this EUV burst indicates strong localized electron heating. A circularly polarized high frequency magnetic field perturbation is simultaneously observed at some distance from the reconnection region indicating that the reconnection emits whistler waves and that Hall dynamics likely governs the reconnection. Spectroscopic measurement shows simultaneous fast ion heating. The electron heating is consistent with Ohmic dissipation, while the ion heating is consistent with ion trajectories becoming stochastic.

  19. Parametric excitation of fast upper hybrid waves by non-resonant beating of counter-propagating X-mode lasers in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Kanika; Sajal, Vivek Varshney, Prateek; Kumar, Ravindra; Sharma, Navneet K.

    2014-12-15

    Generation of fast and slow upper hybrid waves by two plasmon decay of non-resonant beating mode of two counter-propagating X-mode lasers is modelled in magnetized plasma. Two counter-propagating lasers having frequencies and wave-vectors (ω{sub 1},k{sub 1}) and (ω{sub 2},k{sub 2}), respectively, generate a non resonant beat wave at frequency difference ω{sub 0}≈ω{sub 1}∼ω{sub 2} and wave number k{sup →}{sub 0}≈k{sup →}{sub 1}+k{sup →}{sub 2} which parametrically excites a pair of copropagating fast and slow upper hybrid waves at ω{sub 0}≈2ω{sub h}+(3k{sub 1}{sup 2}v{sub th}{sup 2}/ω{sub h})  (1−ω{sub h}/ω{sub 1}) where ω{sub h} and v{sub th} are the upper hybrid frequency and electron thermal speed, respectively. The fast upper hybrid wave can be utilized for electron acceleration because its phase velocity is close to c. The growth rate of decay process is Γ∼ω{sub p}/10 at scattering angle θ{sub s}∼5π/6 and magnetic field ∼90  T, which is one order higher as compared to the growth rate of Raman process. The growth rate can be further enhanced (∼20%) by increasing the magnetic field ∼450 T.

  20. Iterated finite-orbit Monte Carlo simulations with full-wave fields for modeling tokamak ion cyclotron resonance frequency wave heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, M.; Chan, V. S.; Lao, L. L.; Pinsker, R. I.; Green, D.; Berry, L. A.; Jaeger, F.; Park, J. M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Liu, D.; Podesta, M.; Harvey, R.; Smithe, D. N.; Bonoli, P.

    2010-05-15

    The five-dimensional finite-orbit Monte Carlo code ORBIT-RF[M. Choi et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 1 (2005)] is successfully coupled with the two-dimensional full-wave code all-orders spectral algorithm (AORSA) [E. F. Jaeger et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 056101 (2006)] in a self-consistent way to achieve improved predictive modeling for ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) wave heating experiments in present fusion devices and future ITER [R. Aymar et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1301 (2001)]. The ORBIT-RF/AORSA simulations reproduce fast-ion spectra and spatial profiles qualitatively consistent with fast ion D-alpha [W. W. Heidbrink et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 49, 1457 (2007)] spectroscopic data in both DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] and National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1435 (2001)] high harmonic ICRF heating experiments. This work verifies that both finite-orbit width effect of fast-ion due to its drift motion along the torus and iterations between fast-ion distribution and wave fields are important in modeling ICRF heating experiments.

  1. Iterated finite-orbit Monte Carlo simulations with full-wave fields for modeling tokamak ion cyclotron resonance frequency wave heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, M.; Green, David L; Heidbrink, W. W.; Harvey, R. W.; Liu, D.; Chan, V. S.; Berry, Lee A; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Lao, L.L.; Pinsker, R. I.; Podesta, M.; Smithe, D. N.; Park, J. M.; Bonoli, P.

    2010-01-01

    The five-dimensional finite-orbit Monte Carlo code ORBIT-RF [M. Choi , Phys. Plasmas 12, 1 (2005)] is successfully coupled with the two-dimensional full-wave code all-orders spectral algorithm (AORSA) [E. F. Jaeger , Phys. Plasmas 13, 056101 (2006)] in a self-consistent way to achieve improved predictive modeling for ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) wave heating experiments in present fusion devices and future ITER [R. Aymar , Nucl. Fusion 41, 1301 (2001)]. The ORBIT-RF/AORSA simulations reproduce fast-ion spectra and spatial profiles qualitatively consistent with fast ion D-alpha [W. W. Heidbrink , Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 49, 1457 (2007)] spectroscopic data in both DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] and National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono , Nucl. Fusion 41, 1435 (2001)] high harmonic ICRF heating experiments. This work verifies that both finite-orbit width effect of fast-ion due to its drift motion along the torus and iterations between fast-ion distribution and wave fields are important in modeling ICRF heating experiments. (C) 2010 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3314336

  2. Vacuum high-harmonic generation in the shock regime and photon-photon scattering dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, B.; Böhl, P.; Ruhl, H.

    2016-02-01

    The presence of charged quantum virtual states permits a nonlinear self-interaction of the electromagnetic field in vacuum. This interaction can be described as real photon-photon scattering. This effect has been calculated for the case of colliding plane waves, when the centre- of-mass energy is much less than the electron rest energy. The quantum effect is included in the classical electromagnetic field equations of motion by a standard effective approach based upon a weak-field expansion of the Heisenberg-Euler Lagrangian. Solving for the resultant electromagnetic field indicates a signal for real photon-photon scattering when the plane waves overlap, which can be significantly larger than the usually-considered asymptotic values that reach detectors. By considering arbitrary numbers of four- and six-photon scattering, the process of vacuum higher harmonic generation has been studied both analytically and numerically. A route to prolific harmonic generation is identified that does not depend on field strengths being necessarily close to the Schwinger limit. The resulting vacuum electromagnetic shock wave has been studied and a nonlinear shock parameter identified.

  3. A Focused Transport Approach to SEP acceleration at a Fast Parallel Shock in the Corona Including Self-excitation of Alfvén Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    le Roux, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    It has been argued that the acceleration of SEPS at a quasi-parallel CME-driven shock to GeV energies in the corona only occurs if strong wave-excitation by SEPs ahead of the shock reduces the parallel mean free path upstream, thus boosting the rate of diffusive shock acceleration. To investigate this issue, we modeled SEP acceleration at a fast parallel traveling shock in the corona with an existing time-dependent focused transport model. The model has been expanded recently to also feature time-dependent self-excitation and damping of Alfvén waves by SEP anisotropies ahead of the shock based on standard quasi-linear theory. Alfvén wave propagation near the traveling shock is modeled based on standard theory for wave transport in a slowly varying non-uniform plasma medium. Preliminary results will be shown to illustrate the increase in wave power driven by SEP anisotropies upstream, the effect of the shock wave in shortening the wave length and increasing the wave amplitude of Alfvén waves, and the associated acceleration of SEPs by 1st order Fermi acceleration to high energies. The role of the acceleration of the cross-shock solar wind flow, which was found to create a downstream population of shock pre-heated particles which forms an additional source for injection into 1st order Fermi acceleration, will be discussed in terms of how it affects self-excitation of Alfvén waves and the formation of high-energy SEPs by 1st order Fermi acceleration.

  4. Route to optimal generation of soft X-ray high harmonics with synthesized two-color laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Cheng; Wang, Guoli; Le, Anh-Thu; Lin, C. D.

    2014-01-01

    High harmonics extending to X-rays have been generated from gases by intense lasers. To establish these coherent broadband radiations as an all-purpose tabletop light source for general applications in science and technology, new methods are needed to overcome the present low conversion efficiencies. Here we show that the conversion efficiency may be drastically increased with an optimized two-color pulse. By employing an optimally synthesized 2-µm mid-infrared laser and a small amount of its third harmonic, we show that harmonic yields from sub- to few-keV energy can be increased typically by ten-fold over the optimized single-color one. By combining with favorable phase-matching and together with the emerging high-repetition MHz mid-infrared lasers, we anticipate efficiency of harmonic yields can be increased by four to five orders in the near future, thus paving the way for employing high harmonics as useful broadband tabletop light sources from the extreme ultraviolet to the X-rays, as well as providing new tools for interrogating ultrafast dynamics of matter at attosecond timescales. PMID:25400015

  5. The flexible asymmetric shock tube (FAST): a Ludwieg tube facility for wave propagation measurements in high-temperature vapours of organic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathijssen, T.; Gallo, M.; Casati, E.; Nannan, N. R.; Zamfirescu, C.; Guardone, A.; Colonna, P.

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the commissioning of the flexible asymmetric shock tube (FAST), a novel Ludwieg tube-type facility designed and built at Delft University of Technology, together with the results of preliminary experiments. The FAST is conceived to measure the velocity of waves propagating in dense vapours of organic fluids, in the so-called non-ideal compressible fluid dynamics (NICFD) regime, and can operate at pressures and temperatures as high as 21 bar and 400°C, respectively. The set-up is equipped with a special fast-opening valve, separating the high-pressure charge tube from the low-pressure plenum. When the valve is opened, a wave propagates into the charge tube. The wave speed is measured using a time-of-flight technique employing four pressure transducers placed at known distances from each other. The first tests led to the following results: (1) the leakage rate of 5 × {10}^{-4} {mbar l s^{-1}} for subatmospheric and 5 × {10}^{-2} {mbar l s^{-1}} for a superatmospheric pressure is compatible with the purpose of the conceived experiments, (2) the process start-up time of the valve has been found to be between 2.1 and 9.0 ms, (3) preliminary rarefaction wave experiments in the dense vapour of siloxane {D}_6 (dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane, an organic fluid) were successfully accomplished up to temperatures of 300°C, and (4) a method for the estimation of the speed of sound from wave propagation experiments is proposed. Results are found to be within 2.1 % of accurate model predictions for various gases. The method is then applied to estimate the speed of sound of {D}_6 in the NICFD regime.

  6. Non-linear wave-particle interactions and fast ion loss induced by multiple Alfvén eigenmodes in the DIII-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Kramer, G. J.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Fisher, R. K.; Pace, D. C.; Petty, C. C.; Podesta, M.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2014-08-01

    A new non-linear feature has been observed in fast-ion loss from tokamak plasmas in the form of oscillations at the sum, difference and second harmonic frequencies of two independent Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs). Full orbit calculations and analytic theory indicate this non-linearity is due to coupling of fast-ion orbital response as it passes through each AE—a change in wave-particle phase k · r by one mode alters the force exerted by the next. The loss measurement is of barely confined, non-resonant particles, while similar non-linear interactions can occur between well-confined particles and multiple AEs leading to enhanced fast-ion transport.

  7. Mode Conversion of High-Field-Side-Launched Fast Waves at the Second Harmonic of Minority Hydrogen in Advanced Tokamak Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sund, R.; Scharer, J.

    2003-12-01

    Under advanced tokamak reactor conditions, the Ion-Bernstein wave (IBW) can be generated by mode conversion of a fast magnetosonic wave incident from the high-field side on the second harmonic resonance of a minority hydrogen component, with near 100% efficiency. IBWs have the recognized capacity to create internal transport barriers through sheared plasma flows resulting from ion absorption. The relatively high frequency (around 200 MHz) minimizes parasitic electron absorption and permits the converted IBW to approach the 5th tritium harmonic. It also facilitates compact antennas and feeds, and efficient fast wave launch. The scheme is applicable to reactors with aspect ratios < 3 such that the conversion and absorption layers are both on the high field side of the magnetic axis. Large machine size and adequate separation of the mode conversion layer from the magnetic axis minimize poloidal field effects in the conversion zone and permit a 1-D full-wave analysis. 2-D ray tracing of the IBW indicates a slightly bean-shaped equilibrium allows access to the tritium resonance.

  8. Sub-cycle control of multi-THz high-harmonic generation and all-coherent charge transport in bulk semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, C.; Schubert, O.; Hohenleutner, M.; Langer, F.; Baierl, S.; Maag, T.; Urbanek, B.; Edwards, E. R. J.; Woltersdorf, G.; Bougeard, D.; Huttner, U.; Golde, D.; Meier, T.; Kira, M.; Koch, S. W.; Huber, R.

    2015-02-01

    Ultrafast transport of electrons in semiconductors lies at the heart of high-speed electronics, electro-optics and fundamental solid-state physics. Intense phase-locked terahertz (THz) pulses at photon energies far below electronic interband resonances may serve as a precisely adjustable alternating bias, strongly exceeding d.c. breakdown voltages. Here, we exploit the near-field enhancement in gold metamaterial structures on undoped bulk GaAs, driven by few-cycle THz transients centered at 1 THz, to bias the semiconductor substrate with field amplitudes exceeding 12 MV/cm. Such fields correspond to a potential drop of the bandgap energy over a distance of only two unit cells. In this extremely off-resonant scenario characterized by a Keldysh parameter of γK ≈ 0.02, massive interband Zener tunneling injects a sizeable carrier density exceeding 1019 cm-3, and strong photoluminescence results. At a center frequency of 30 THz, THz transients with peak fields of 72 MV/cm analogously excite carriers in a bulk, semiconducting GaSe crystal, without metamaterial. Here, in contrast, we are able to drive coherent interband polarization and furthermore dynamical Bloch oscillations of electrons in the conduction band, on femtosecond time scales. The dynamics entail the generation of absolutely phase-stable high-harmonic transients containing spectral components up to the 22nd order of the fundamental frequency, spanning 12.7 optical octaves throughout the entire terahertz-to-visible domain between 0.1 and 675 THz. Our experiments establish a new field of light-wave electronics exploring coherent charge transport at optical clock rates and bring picosecond-scale electric circuitry at the interface of THz optics and electronics into reach.

  9. EUV burst, particle heating and whistler wave emission in fast magnetic reconnection induced by kink-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xiang; Chai, Kil-Byoung; Bellan, Paul; Bellan plasma Group Team

    2015-11-01

    Fast magnetic reconnection associated with a Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a kinked flux rope is studied in the Caltech jet experiment. As the kinked plasma accelerates laterally away from its equilibrium position, an effective gravity due to the acceleration results in a secondary Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This Rayleigh-Taylor instability erodes the plasma to a scale smaller than the ion skin depth and induces a fast magnetic reconnection. A spatially localized energetic EUV burst is observed at the position of fast magnetic reconnection, indicating strong localized electron heating. A circularly polarized high frequency magnetic field perturbation is simultaneously observed at some distance from the reconnection region indicating that the reconnection emits whistler waves and that Hall dynamics governs the reconnection. Spectroscopic measurement including Stark broadening and Doppler broadening shows simultaneous fast ion heating. It is also observed that the voltage across the source electrodes spikes when there is fast magnetic reconnection resulting from the fact that magnetic reconnection changes the magnetic flux linking the electrode circuit. The electron heating is consistent with Ohmic dissipation while the ion heating is consistent with stochastic heating.

  10. Two-color high-harmonic generation in plasmas: efficiency dependence on the generating particle properties.

    PubMed

    Emelina, Anna S; Emelin, Mikhail Yu; Ganeev, Rashid A; Suzuki, Masayuki; Kuroda, Hiroto; Strelkov, Vasily V

    2016-06-27

    The high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in silver, gold, and zinc plasma plumes irradiated by orthogonally polarized two-color field is studied theoretically and experimentally. We find an increase of the HHG efficiency in comparison with the single-color case, which essentially depends on the plasma species and harmonic order. An increase of more than an order of magnitude is observed for silver plasma, whereas for gold and zinc it is lower; these results are reproduced in our calculations that include both propagation and microscopic response studies. We show that the widely used theoretical approach assuming the 1s ground state of the generating particle fails to reproduce the experimental results; the agreement is achieved in our theory using the actual quantum numbers of the outer electron of the generating particles. Moreover, our theoretical studies highlight the redistribution of the electronic density in the continuum wave packet as an important aspect of the HHG enhancement in the two-color orthogonally polarized fields with comparable intensities: in the single-color field the electronic trajectories with almost zero return energy are the most populated ones; in the two-color case the total field maximum can be shifted in time so that the trajectories with high return energies (in particular, the cut-off trajectory) become the most populated ones. PMID:27410560

  11. Spectroscopic imaging of buried layers in 2+1D via tabletop ptychography with high-harmonic EUV illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Dennis F.; Porter, Christina L.; Shanblatt, Elisabeth R.; Mancini, Giulia F.; Karl, Robert; Tanksalvala, Michael; Bevis, Charles; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret M.; Adams, Daniel E.

    2016-03-01

    We use EUV coherent microscopy to obtain high-resolution images of buried interfaces, with chemical specificity, in 2+1 dimensions. We perform reflection mode, ptychographic, coherent diffractive imaging with tabletop EUV light, at 29nm, produced by high harmonic generation. Our damascene-style samples consist of copper structures inlaid in SiO2, polished nearly flat with chemical mechanical polishing. We obtain images of both an unaltered damascene as well as one buried below a 100nm thick layer of evaporated aluminum. The aluminum is opaque to visible light and thick enough that neither optical microscopy, SEM, nor AFM can access the buried interface. EUV microscopy is able to image the buried structures, non-destructively, in conditions where other techniques cannot.

  12. Flexible attosecond beamline for high harmonic spectroscopy and XUV/near-IR pump probe experiments requiring long acquisition times

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, S. J. Manschwetus, B.; Billon, M.; Bougeard, M.; Breger, P.; Géléoc, M.; Gruson, V.; Lin, N.; Ruchon, T.; Salières, P.; Carré, B.

    2015-03-15

    We describe the versatile features of the attosecond beamline recently installed at CEA-Saclay on the PLFA kHz laser. It combines a fine and very complete set of diagnostics enabling high harmonic spectroscopy (HHS) through the advanced characterization of the amplitude, phase, and polarization of the harmonic emission. It also allows a variety of photo-ionization experiments using magnetic bottle and COLTRIMS (COLd Target Recoil Ion Momentum Microscopy) electron spectrometers that may be used simultaneously, thanks to a two-foci configuration. Using both passive and active stabilization, special care was paid to the long term stability of the system to allow, using both experimental approaches, time resolved studies with attosecond precision, typically over several hours of acquisition times. As an illustration, applications to multi-orbital HHS and electron-ion coincidence time resolved spectroscopy are presented.

  13. Evidence of high harmonics from echo-enabled harmonic generation for seeding x-ray free electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Xiang, D; Colby, E; Dunning, M; Gilevich, S; Hast, C; Jobe, K; McCormick, D; Nelson, J; Raubenheimer, T O; Soong, K; Stupakov, G; Szalata, Z; Walz, D; Weathersby, S; Woodley, M

    2012-01-13

    Echo-enabled harmonic generation free electron lasers hold great promise for the generation of fully coherent radiation in x-ray wavelengths. Here we report the first evidence of high harmonics from the echo-enabled harmonic generation technique in the realistic scenario where the laser energy modulation is comparable to the beam slice energy spread. In this experiment, coherent radiation at the seventh harmonic of the second seed laser is generated when the energy modulation amplitude is about 2-3 times the slice energy spread. The experiment confirms the underlying physics of echo-enabled harmonic generation and may have a strong impact on emerging seeded x-ray free electron lasers that are capable of generating laserlike x rays which will advance many areas of science.

  14. Evidence of High Harmonics from Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation for Seeding X-ray Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Colby, E.; Dunning, M.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Weathersby, S.; Woodle, M.; /SLAC

    2012-02-15

    Echo-enabled harmonic generation free electron lasers hold great promise for the generation of fully coherent radiation in x-ray wavelengths. Here we report the first evidence of high harmonics from the echo-enabled harmonic generation technique in the realistic scenario where the laser energy modulation is comparable to the beam slice energy spread. In this experiment, coherent radiation at the seventh harmonic of the second seed laser is generated when the energy modulation amplitude is about 2-3 times the slice energy spread. The experiment confirms the underlying physics of echo-enabled harmonic generation and may have a strong impact on emerging seeded x-ray free electron lasers that are capable of generating laserlike x rays which will advance many areas of science.

  15. Fast retrospectively triggered local pulse-wave velocity measurements in mice with CMR-microscopy using a radial trajectory

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aortic pulse-wave velocity (PWV) is an important indicator of cardiovascular risk. In recent studies MRI methods have been developed to measure this parameter noninvasively in mice. Present techniques require additional hardware for cardiac and respiratory gating. In this work a robust self-gated measurement of the local PWV in mice without the need of triggering probes is proposed. Methods The local PWV of 6-months-old wild-type C57BL/6J mice (n=6) was measured in the abdominal aorta with a retrospectively triggered radial Phase Contrast (PC) MR sequence using the flow-area (QA) method. A navigator signal was extracted from the CMR data of highly asymmetric radial projections with short repetition time (TR=3 ms) and post-processed with high-pass and low-pass filters for retrospective cardiac and respiratory gating. The self-gating signal was used for a reconstruction of high-resolution Cine frames of the aortic motion. To assess the local PWV the volume flow Q and the cross-sectional area A of the aorta were determined. The results were compared with the values measured with a triggered Cartesian and an undersampled triggered radial PC-Cine sequence. Results In all examined animals a self-gating signal could be extracted and used for retrospective breath-gating and PC-Cine reconstruction. With the non-triggered measurement PWV values of 2.3±0.2 m/s were determined. These values are in agreement with those measured with the triggered Cartesian (2.4±0.2 m/s) and the triggered radial (2.3±0.2 m/s) measurement. Due to the strong robustness of the radial trajectory against undersampling an acceleration of more than two relative to the prospectively triggered Cartesian sampling could be achieved with the retrospective method. Conclusion With the radial flow-encoding sequence the extraction of a self-gating signal is feasible. The retrospective method enables a robust and fast measurement of the local PWV without the need of additional trigger hardware

  16. Importance of Second-Order Difference-Frequency Wave-Diffraction Forces in the Validation of a Fast Semi-Submersible Floating Wind Turbine Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Couling, A. J.; Goupee, A. J.; Robertson, A. N.; Jonkman, J. M.

    2013-06-01

    To better access the abundant offshore wind resource, efforts across the world are being undertaken to develop and improve floating offshore wind turbine technologies. A critical aspect of creating reliable, mature floating wind turbine technology is the development, verification, and validation of efficient computer-aided-engineering (CAE) tools that can be relied upon in the design process. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has created a comprehensive, coupled analysis CAE tool for floating wind turbines, FAST, which has been verified and utilized in numerous floating wind turbine studies. Several efforts are currently underway that leverage the extensive 1/50th-scale DeepCwind wind/wave basin model test dataset, obtained at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands (MARIN) in 2011, to validate the floating platform functionality of FAST to complement its already validated aerodynamic and structural simulation capabilities. In this paper, further work is undertaken to continue this validation. In particular, the ability of FAST to replicate global response behaviors associated with dynamic wind forces, second-order difference-frequency wave-diffraction forces and their interaction with one another are investigated.

  17. Ultrafast demagnetization dynamics at the M edges of magnetic elements observed using a tabletop high-harmonic soft x-ray source.

    PubMed

    La-O-Vorakiat, Chan; Siemens, Mark; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C; Mathias, Stefan; Aeschlimann, Martin; Grychtol, Patrik; Adam, Roman; Schneider, Claus M; Shaw, Justin M; Nembach, Hans; Silva, T J

    2009-12-18

    We use few-femtosecond soft x-ray pulses from high-harmonic generation to extract element-specific demagnetization dynamics and hysteresis loops of a compound material for the first time. Using a geometry where high-harmonic beams are reflected from a magnetized Permalloy grating, large changes in the reflected intensity of up to 6% at the M absorption edges of Fe and Ni are observed when the magnetization is reversed. A short pump pulse is used to destroy the magnetic alignment, which allows us to measure the fastest, elementally specific demagnetization dynamics, with 55 fs time resolution. The use of high harmonics for probing magnetic materials promises to combine nanometer spatial resolution, elemental specificity, and femtosecond-to-attosecond time resolution, making it possible to address important fundamental questions in magnetism. PMID:20366281

  18. DO OBLIQUE ALFVEN/ION-CYCLOTRON OR FAST-MODE/WHISTLER WAVES DOMINATE THE DISSIPATION OF SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE NEAR THE PROTON INERTIAL LENGTH?

    SciTech Connect

    He Jiansen; Tu Chuanyi; Marsch, Eckart; Yao Shuo

    2012-01-20

    To determine the wave modes prevailing in solar wind turbulence at kinetic scales, we study the magnetic polarization of small-scale fluctuations in the plane perpendicular to the data sampling direction (namely, the solar wind flow direction, V{sub SW}) and analyze its orientation with respect to the local background magnetic field B{sub 0,local}. As an example, we take only measurements made in an outward magnetic sector. When B{sub 0,local} is quasi-perpendicular to V{sub SW}, we find that the small-scale magnetic-field fluctuations, which have periods from about 1 to 3 s and are extracted from a wavelet decomposition of the original time series, show a polarization ellipse with right-handed orientation. This is consistent with a positive reduced magnetic helicity, as previously reported. Moreover, for the first time we find that the major axis of the ellipse is perpendicular to B{sub 0,local}, a property that is characteristic of an oblique Alfven wave rather than oblique whistler wave. For an oblique whistler wave, the major axis of the magnetic ellipse is expected to be aligned with B{sub 0,local}, thus indicating significant magnetic compressibility, and the polarization turns from right to left handedness as the wave propagation angle ({theta}{sub kB}) increases toward 90 Degree-Sign . Therefore, we conclude that the observation of a right-handed polarization ellipse with orientation perpendicular to B{sub 0,local} seems to indicate that oblique Alfven/ion-cyclotron waves rather than oblique fast-mode/whistler waves dominate in the 'dissipation' range near the break of solar wind turbulence spectra occurring around the proton inertial length.

  19. Experimental studies on fast-ion transport by Alfven wave avalanches on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Podesta, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Liu, D.; Ruskov, E.; Bell, R. E.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Kramer, G. J.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Medley, S. S.; Roquemore, A. L.; Crocker, N. A.; Kubota, S.; Yuh, H.

    2009-05-15

    Fast-ion transport induced by Alfven eigenmodes (AEs) is studied in beam-heated plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] through space, time, and energy resolved measurements of the fast-ion population. Fast-ion losses associated with multiple toroidicity-induced AEs (TAEs), which interact nonlinearly and terminate in avalanches, are characterized. A depletion of the energy range >20 keV, leading to sudden drops of up to 40% in the neutron rate over 1 ms, is observed over a broad spatial range. It is shown that avalanches lead to a relaxation of the fast-ion profile, which in turn reduces the drive for the instabilities. The measured radial eigenmode structure and frequency of TAEs are compared with the predictions from a linear magnetohydrodynamics stability code. The partial disagreement suggests that nonlinearities may compromise a direct comparison between experiment and linear theory.

  20. Resonance in fast-wave amplitude in the periphery of cylindrical plasmas and application to edge losses of wave heating power in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, R. J.; Hosea, J. C.; Bertelli, N.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.

    2016-07-01

    Heating magnetically confined plasmas using waves in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies typically requires coupling these waves over a steep density gradient. This process has produced an unexpected and deleterious phenomenon on the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX): a prompt loss of wave power along magnetic field lines in front of the antenna to the divertor. Understanding this loss may be key to achieving effective heating and expanding the operational space of NSTX-Upgrade. Here, we propose that a new type of mode, which conducts a significant fraction of the total wave power in the low-density peripheral plasma, is driving these losses. We demonstrate the existence of such modes, which are distinct from surface modes and coaxial modes, in a cylindrical cold-plasma model when a half wavelength structure fits into the region outside the core plasma. The latter condition generalizes the previous hypothesis regarding the occurrence of the edge losses and may explain why full-wave simulations predict these losses in some cases but not others. If valid, this condition implies that outer gap control is a potential strategy for mitigating the losses in NSTX-Upgrade in addition to raising the magnetic field or influencing the edge density.

  1. Resonance in fast-wave amplitude in the periphery of cylindrical plasmas and application to edge losses of wave heating power in tokamaks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perkins, R. J.; Hosea, J. C.; Bertelli, N.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.

    2016-07-01

    Heating magnetically confined plasmas using waves in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies typically requires coupling these waves over a steep density gradient. Furthermore, this process has produced an unexpected and deleterious phenomenon on the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX): a prompt loss of wave power along magnetic field lines in front of the antenna to the divertor. Understanding this loss may be key to achieving effective heating and expanding the operational space of NSTX-Upgrade. Here, we propose that a new type of mode, which conducts a significant fraction of the total wave power in the low-density peripheral plasma, is drivingmore » these losses. We demonstrate the existence of such modes, which are distinct from surface modes and coaxial modes, in a cylindrical cold-plasma model when a half wavelength structure fits into the region outside the core plasma. The latter condition generalizes the previous hypothesis regarding the occurence of the edge losses and may explain why full-wave simulations predict these losses in some cases but not others. If valid, this condition implies that outer gap control is a potential strategy for mitigating the losses in NSTX-Upgrade in addition to raising the magnetic field or influencing the edge density.« less

  2. DUAL TRIGGER OF TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS IN A PROMINENCE BY EUV FAST AND SLOW CORONAL WAVES: SDO/AIA AND STEREO/EUVI OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gosain, S.; Foullon, C.

    2012-12-20

    We analyze flare-associated transverse oscillations in a quiescent solar prominence on 2010 September 8-9. Both the flaring active region and the prominence were located near the west limb, with a favorable configuration and viewing angle. The full-disk extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images of the Sun obtained with high spatial and temporal resolution by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory show flare-associated lateral oscillations of the prominence sheet. The STEREO-A spacecraft, 81.{sup 0}5 ahead of the Sun-Earth line, provides an on-disk view of the flare-associated coronal disturbances. We derive the temporal profile of the lateral displacement of the prominence sheet by using the image cross-correlation technique. The displacement curve was de-trended and the residual oscillatory pattern was derived. We fit these oscillations with a damped cosine function with a variable period and find that the period is increasing. The initial oscillation period (P{sub 0}) is {approx}28.2 minutes and the damping time ({tau}{sub D}) {approx} 44 minutes. We confirm the presence of fast and slow EUV wave components. Using STEREO-A observations, we derive a propagation speed of {approx}250 km s{sup -1} for the slow EUV wave by applying the time-slice technique to the running difference images. We propose that the prominence oscillations are excited by the fast EUV wave while the increase in oscillation period of the prominence is an apparent effect, related to a phase change due to the slow EUV wave acting as a secondary trigger. We discuss implications of the dual trigger effect for coronal prominence seismology and scaling law studies of damping mechanisms.

  3. Millimeter-wave interferometry: an attractive technique for fast and accurate sensing of civil and mechanical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seoktae; Nguyen, Cam

    2014-04-01

    This paper discusses the RF interferometry at millimeter-wave frequencies for sensing applications and reports the development of a millimeter-wave interferometric sensor operating around 35 GHz. The sensor is completely realized using microwave integrated circuits (MICs) and microwave monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs). It has been used for various sensing including displacement and velocity measurement. The sensor achieves a resolution and maximum error of only 10 μm and 27 μm, respectively, for displacement sensing and can measure velocity as low as 27.7 mm/s with a resolution about 2.7mm/s. Quick response and accurate sensing, as demonstrated by the developed millimeter-wave interferometric sensor, make the millimeter-wave interferometry attractive for sensing of various civil and mechanical structures.

  4. Heating of ions by high frequency electromagnetic waves in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zestanakis, P. A.; Kominis, Y.; Hizanidis, K.; Ram, A. K.

    2013-07-15

    The heating of ions by high frequency electrostatic waves in magnetically confined plasmas has been a paradigm for studying nonlinear wave-particle interactions. The frequency of the waves is assumed to be much higher than the ion cyclotron frequency and the waves are taken to propagate across the magnetic field. In fusion type plasmas, electrostatic waves, like the lower hybrid wave, cannot access the core of the plasma. That is a domain for high harmonic fast waves or electron cyclotron waves—these are primarily electromagnetic waves. Previous studies on heating of ions by two or more electrostatic waves are extended to two electromagnetic waves that propagate directly across the confining magnetic field. While the ratio of the frequency of each wave to the ion cyclotron frequency is large, the frequency difference is assumed to be near the ion cyclotron frequency. The nonlinear wave-particle interaction is studied analytically using a two time-scale canonical perturbation theory. The theory elucidates the effects of various parameters on the gain in energy by the ions—parameters such as the amplitudes and polarizations of the waves, the ratio of the wave frequencies to the cyclotron frequency, the difference in the frequency of the two waves, and the wave numbers associated with the waves. For example, the ratio of the phase velocity of the envelope formed by the two waves to the phase velocity of the carrier wave is important for energization of ions. For a positive ratio, the energy range is much larger than for a negative ratio. So waves like the lower hybrid waves will impart very little energy to ions. The theoretical results are found to be in good agreement with numerical simulations of the exact dynamical equations. The analytical results are used to construct mapping equations, simplifying the derivation of the motion of ions, which are, subsequently, used to follow the evolution of an ion distribution function. The heating of ions can then be

  5. Particle simulations of mode conversion between slow mode and fast mode in lower hybrid range of frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Guozhang; Xiang, Nong; Wang, Xueyi; Huang, Yueheng; Lin, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The propagation and mode conversion of lower hybrid waves in an inhomogeneous plasma are investigated by using the nonlinear δf algorithm in a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation code based on the gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion (GeFi) scheme [Lin et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 47, 657 (2005)]. The characteristics of the simulated waves, such as wavelength, frequency, phase, and group velocities, agree well with the linear theoretical analysis. It is shown that a significant reflection component emerges in the conversion process between the slow mode and the fast mode when the scale length of the density variation is comparable to the local wavelength. The dependences of the reflection coefficient on the scale length of the density variation are compared with the results based on the linear full wave model for cold plasmas. It is indicated that the mode conversion for the waves with a frequency of 2.45 GHz (ω ˜ 3ωLH, where ωLH represents the lower hybrid resonance) and within Tokamak relevant amplitudes can be well described in the linear scheme. As the frequency decreases, the modification due to the nonlinear term becomes important. For the low-frequency waves (ω ˜ 1.3ωLH), the generations of the high harmonic modes and sidebands through nonlinear mode-mode coupling provide new power channels and thus could reduce the reflection significantly.

  6. High harmonic generation based time resolved ARPES at 30 eV with 50 meV energy resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohwer, Timm; Sie, Edbert J.; Mahmood, Fahad; Gedik, Nuh

    Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) has emerged as a leading technique in identifying equilibrium properties of complex electronic systems as well as their correlated dynamics. By using femtosecond high harmonic generation (HHG) pulses, this technique can be extended to monitor ultrafast changes in the electronic structure in response to an optical excitation. However, the broad bandwidth of the HHG pulses has been a major experimental limitation. In this contribution, we combine the HHG source with an off-axis Czerny-Turner XUV monochromator and a three-dimensional ``ARTOF'' photoelectron detector to achieve an unrivaled overall energy resolution of 50 meV in multiple harmonic energies. Moreover, the use of a stack of different gratings enables us to fine control both the photon energy and time vs. energy resolution to its particular needs. The performance of our setup is demonstrated by studies on the transition metal dichalcogenide IrTe2 which undergoes a first-order structural transition and accompanied reconstruction of the band structure upon cooling without the characteristic opening of an energy gap.

  7. High-Efficiency Broadband High-Harmonic Generation from a Single Quasi-Phase-Matching Nonlinear Crystal.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bao-Qin; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Chen-Yang; Liu, Rong-Juan; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2015-08-21

    Nonlinear frequency conversion offers an effective way to expand the laser wavelength range based on birefringence phase matching (BPM) or quasi-phase-matching (QPM) techniques in nonlinear crystals. So far, efficient high-harmonic generation is enabled only via multiple cascaded crystals because of the extreme difficulty to simultaneously satisfy BPM or QPM for multiple nonlinear up-conversion processes within a single crystal. Here we report the design and fabrication of a chirped periodic poled lithium niobate (CPPLN) nonlinear crystal that offers controllable multiple QPM bands to support 2nd-8th harmonic generation (HG) simultaneously. Upon illumination of a mid-IR femtosecond pulse laser, we observe the generation of an ultrabroadband visible white light beam corresponding to 5th-8th HG with a record high conversion efficiency of 18%, which is high compared to conventional supercontinuum generation, especially in the HG parts. Our CPPLN scheme opens up a new avenue to explore and engineer novel nonlinear optical interactions in solid state materials for application in ultrafast lasers and broadband laser sources. PMID:26340190

  8. High-Efficiency Broadband High-Harmonic Generation from a Single Quasi-Phase-Matching Nonlinear Crystal.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bao-Qin; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Chen-Yang; Liu, Rong-Juan; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2015-08-21

    Nonlinear frequency conversion offers an effective way to expand the laser wavelength range based on birefringence phase matching (BPM) or quasi-phase-matching (QPM) techniques in nonlinear crystals. So far, efficient high-harmonic generation is enabled only via multiple cascaded crystals because of the extreme difficulty to simultaneously satisfy BPM or QPM for multiple nonlinear up-conversion processes within a single crystal. Here we report the design and fabrication of a chirped periodic poled lithium niobate (CPPLN) nonlinear crystal that offers controllable multiple QPM bands to support 2nd-8th harmonic generation (HG) simultaneously. Upon illumination of a mid-IR femtosecond pulse laser, we observe the generation of an ultrabroadband visible white light beam corresponding to 5th-8th HG with a record high conversion efficiency of 18%, which is high compared to conventional supercontinuum generation, especially in the HG parts. Our CPPLN scheme opens up a new avenue to explore and engineer novel nonlinear optical interactions in solid state materials for application in ultrafast lasers and broadband laser sources.

  9. High-Efficiency Broadband High-Harmonic Generation from a Single Quasi-Phase-Matching Nonlinear Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bao-Qin; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Chen-Yang; Liu, Rong-Juan; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2015-08-01

    Nonlinear frequency conversion offers an effective way to expand the laser wavelength range based on birefringence phase matching (BPM) or quasi-phase-matching (QPM) techniques in nonlinear crystals. So far, efficient high-harmonic generation is enabled only via multiple cascaded crystals because of the extreme difficulty to simultaneously satisfy BPM or QPM for multiple nonlinear up-conversion processes within a single crystal. Here we report the design and fabrication of a chirped periodic poled lithium niobate (CPPLN) nonlinear crystal that offers controllable multiple QPM bands to support 2nd-8th harmonic generation (HG) simultaneously. Upon illumination of a mid-IR femtosecond pulse laser, we observe the generation of an ultrabroadband visible white light beam corresponding to 5th-8th HG with a record high conversion efficiency of 18%, which is high compared to conventional supercontinuum generation, especially in the HG parts. Our CPPLN scheme opens up a new avenue to explore and engineer novel nonlinear optical interactions in solid state materials for application in ultrafast lasers and broadband laser sources.

  10. Enhancing and controlling single-atom high-harmonic generation spectra: a time-dependent density-functional scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Alberto; Rubio, Angel; Gross, Eberhard K. U.

    2015-08-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) provides a flexible framework for the development of coherent light sources in the extreme-ultraviolet and soft X-ray regimes. However it suffers from low conversion efficiencies as the control of the HHG spectral and temporal characteristics requires manipulating electron trajectories on attosecond time scale. The phase matching mechanism has been employed to selectively enhance specific quantum paths leading to HHG. A few important fundamental questions remain open, among those how much of the enhancement can be achieved by the single-emitter and what is the role of correlations (or the electronic structure) in the selectivity and control of HHG generation. Here we address those questions by examining computationally the possibility of optimizing the HHG spectrum of isolated hydrogen and helium atoms by shaping the slowly varying envelope of a 800 nm, 200-cycles long laser pulse. The spectra are computed with a fully quantum mechanical description, by explicitly computing the time-dependent dipole moment of the systems using a time-dependent density-functional approach (or the single-electron Schrödinger equation for the case of H), on top of a one-dimensional model. The sought optimization corresponds to the selective enhancement of single harmonics, which we find to be significant. This selectivity is entirely due to the single atom response, and not to any propagation or phase-matching effect. Moreover, we see that the electronic correlation plays a role in the determining the degree of optimization that can be obtained.

  11. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with a femtosecond high harmonic light source using a two-dimensional imaging electron analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathias, S.; Miaja-Avila, L.; Murnane, M. M.; Kapteyn, H.; Aeschlimann, M.; Bauer, M.

    2007-08-01

    An experimental setup for time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy using a femtosecond 1kHz high harmonic light source and a two-dimensional electron analyzer for parallel energy and momentum detection is presented. A selection of the 27th harmonic (41.85eV) from the harmonic spectrum of the light source is achieved with a multilayer Mo /Si double mirror monochromator. The extinction efficiency of the monochromator in selecting this harmonic is shown to be better than 7:1, while the transmitted bandwidth of the selected harmonic is capable of supporting temporal pulse widths as short as 3fs. The recorded E(k ) photoelectron spectrum from a Cu(111) surface demonstrates an angular resolution of better than 0.6° (=0.03Å-1 at Ekin ,e=36eV). Used in a pump-probe configuration, the described experimental setup represents a powerful experimental tool for studying the femtosecond dynamics of ultrafast surface processes in real time.

  12. High harmonics focusing undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Varfolomeev, A.A.; Hairetdinov, A.H.; Smirnov, A.V.; Khlebnikov, A.S.

    1995-12-31

    It was shown in our previous work that there exist a possibility to enhance significantly the {open_quote}natural{close_quote} focusing properties of the hybrid undulator. Here we analyze the actual undulator configurations which could provide such field structure. Numerical simulations using 2D code PANDIRA were carried out and the enhanced focusing properties of the undulator were demonstrated. The obtained results provide the solution for the beam transport in a very long (short wavelength) undulator schemes.

  13. Fast one-dimensional wave-front propagation for x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Johannes; Malecki, Andreas; Sperl, Jonathan; Chabior, Michael; Schüttler, Markus; Bequé, Dirk; Cozzini, Cristina; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2014-10-01

    Numerical wave-optical simulations of X-ray differential phase-contrast imaging using grating interferometry require the oversampling of gratings and object structures in the range of few micrometers. Consequently, fields of view of few millimeters already use large amounts of a computer's main memory to store the propagating wave front, limiting the scope of the investigations to only small-scale problems. In this study, we apply an approximation to the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory to overcome these restrictions by dividing the two-dimensional wave front up into 1D lines, which are processed separately. The approach enables simulations with samples of clinically relevant dimensions by significantly reducing the memory footprint and the execution time and, thus, allows the qualitative comparison of different setup configurations. We analyze advantages as well as limitations and present the simulation of a virtual mammography phantom of several centimeters of size.

  14. Hybrid Fast Fourier Transform-plane wave based near-field far-field transformation for “body of revolution” antenna measurement grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, C. H.; Laitinen, T. A.; Eibert, T. F.

    2011-10-01

    Near-field measurement and transformation techniques are widely applied to characterize radiation patterns of antennas. Spherical and cylindrical near-field measurements have been researched extensively and various techniques with different probe compensation capabilities and complexities exist. Among those techniques applicable for (almost) arbitrary probes, the crucial computational efficiency has been achieved through the use of Fast Fourier Transform based preprocessing of the measurement data. It is shown in this paper that the Fast Fourier Transform based preprocessing can also be utilized in conjunction with the plane wave based fully probe-corrected near-field far-field transformation with low numerical complexity. The collection of probe signals is split into smaller subsets for individual orthogonal azimuthal Fourier modes by an Inverse Fast Fourier Transform. These smaller subsets can be transformed to the far field very efficiently with full probe correction. The technique presented in this paper is applicable for arbitrary "body of revolution" antenna measurement grids, including the important cases of cylindrical and spherical measurement grids. The "body of revolution" grids are rotationally symmetric around the z-axis and the probe signals must be available equidistantly in ϕ.

  15. Survey of the frequency dependent latitudinal distribution of the fast magnetosonic wave mode from Van Allen Probes Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument and Integrated Science waveform receiver plasma wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boardsen, Scott A.; Hospodarsky, George B.; Kletzing, Craig A.; Engebretson, Mark J.; Pfaff, Robert F.; Wygant, John R.; Kurth, William S.; Averkamp, Terrance F.; Bounds, Scott R.; Green, Jim L.; De Pascuale, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    We present a statistical survey of the latitudinal structure of the fast magnetosonic wave mode detected by the Van Allen Probes spanning the time interval of 21 September 2012 to 1 August 2014. We show that statistically, the latitudinal occurrence of the wave frequency (f) normalized by the local proton cyclotron frequency (fcP) has a distinct funnel-shaped appearance in latitude about the magnetic equator similar to that found in case studies. By comparing the observed E/B ratios with the model E/B ratio, using the observed plasma density and background magnetic field magnitude as input to the model E/B ratio, we show that this mode is consistent with the extra-ordinary (whistler) mode at wave normal angles (θk) near 90°. Performing polarization analysis on synthetic waveforms composed from a superposition of extra-ordinary mode plane waves with θk randomly chosen between 87 and 90°, we show that the uncertainty in the derived wave normal is substantially broadened, with a tail extending down to θk of 60°, suggesting that another approach is necessary to estimate the true distribution of θk. We find that the histograms of the synthetically derived ellipticities and θk are consistent with the observations of ellipticities and θk derived using polarization analysis. We make estimates of the median equatorial θk by comparing observed and model ray tracing frequency-dependent probability occurrence with latitude and give preliminary frequency dependent estimates of the equatorial θk distribution around noon and 4 RE, with the median of ~4 to 7° from 90° at f/fcP = 2 and dropping to ~0.5° from 90° at f/fcP = 30. The occurrence of waves in this mode peaks around noon near the equator at all radial distances, and we find that the overall intensity of these waves increases with AE*, similar to findings of other studies.

  16. Fast characterization of aluminum plates with TV-holography measurements of the frequency spectrum of multimode, quasi- monochromatic Lamb waves.

    PubMed

    Deán-Ben, X Luís; Trillo, Cristina; Doval, Angel F; Fernández, José L

    2011-06-01

    We introduce a novel approach for measuring the frequency spectrum of Lamb waves and, subsequently, for obtaining the thickness and the bulk wave velocities of isotropic, homogeneous plates. It is based on Fourier transforming a set of spatial and temporal samples of the acoustic displacement but, in contrast to the traditional approach that employs dense temporal sampling and a reduced set of spatial sampling locations, our data set is a sequence of 2-D high-resolution maps of the instantaneous out-of-plane displacement obtained with TV holography. We have devised three variants to obtain a set of points of the wavenumber-frequency space, based, respectively, on the spatial (1-D or 2-D) and on the spatio-temporal (3-D) Fourier transforms. The whole process to obtain these points can be easily automated and substantial time savings can be achieved, compared with other full-field techniques that require human intervention or with pointwise scanned probes. Experimental demonstration of the three variants with quasimonochromatic multimode Lamb waves in aluminum plates is presented. The characteristic parameters of the plates are calculated by fitting the theoretical model to the experimental points of the frequency spectrum. The analysis of the uncertainties shows that the accuracy of the method is only slightly lower than the accuracy of a previously reported method based on measuring the wavelength of single-modes, for which the data acquisition procedure is much slower.

  17. Low-harmonic magnetosonic waves observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posch, J. L.; Engebretson, M. J.; Olson, C. N.; Thaller, S. A.; Breneman, A. W.; Wygant, J. R.; Boardsen, S. A.; Kletzing, C. A.; Smith, C. W.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-08-01

    Purely compressional electromagnetic waves (fast magnetosonic waves), generated at multiple harmonics of the local proton gyrofrequency, have been observed by various types of satellite instruments (fluxgate and search coil magnetometers and electric field sensors), but most recent studies have used data from search coil sensors, and many have been restricted to high harmonics. We report here on a survey of low-harmonic waves, based on electric and magnetic field data from the Electric Fields and Waves double probe and Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science fluxgate magnetometer instruments, respectively, on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft during its first full precession through all local times, from 1 October 2012 to 13 July 2014. These waves were observed both inside and outside the plasmapause (PP), at L shells from 2.4 to ~6 (the spacecraft apogee), and in regions with plasma number densities ranging from 10 to >1000 cm-3. Consistent with earlier studies, wave occurrence was sharply peaked near the magnetic equator. Waves appeared at all local times but were more common from noon to dusk, and often occurred within 3 h after substorm injections. Outside the PP occurrence maximized broadly across noon, and inside the PP occurrence maximized in the dusk sector, in an extended plasmasphere. We confirm recent ray-tracing studies showing wave refraction and/or reflection at PP-like boundaries. Comparison with waveform receiver data indicates that in some cases these low-harmonic magnetosonic wave events occurred independently of higher-harmonic waves; this indicates the importance of including this population in future studies of radiation belt dynamics.

  18. Fast estimation from above of the maximum wave speed in the Riemann problem for the Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guermond, Jean-Luc; Popov, Bojan

    2016-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the construction of a fast algorithm for computing the maximum speed of propagation in the Riemann solution for the Euler system of gas dynamics with the co-volume equation of state. The novelty in the algorithm is that it stops when a guaranteed upper bound for the maximum speed is reached with a prescribed accuracy. The convergence rate of the algorithm is cubic and the bound is guaranteed for gasses with the co-volume equation of state and the heat capacity ratio γ in the range (1 , 5 / 3 ].

  19. An Effective Quality Control of Pharmacologically Active Volatiles of Houttuynia cordata Thunb by Fast Gas Chromatography-Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Fast gas chromatography-surface acoustic wave sensor (GC/SAW) has been applied for the detection of the pharmacological volatiles emanated from Houttuynia cordata Thunb which is from South Korea. H. cordata Thunb with unpleasant and fishy odors shows a variety of pharmacological activities such as anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and insect repellent. The aim of this study is to show a novel quality control by GC/SAW methodology for the discrimination of the three different parts of the plant such as leaves, aerial stems, and underground stems for H. cordata Thunb. Sixteen compounds were identified. β-Myrcene, cis-ocimene and decanal are the dominant volatiles for leaves (71.0%) and aerial stems (50.1%). While, monoterpenes (74.6%) are the dominant volatiles for underground stems. 2-Undecanone (1.3%) and lauraldehyde (3.5%) were found to be the characteristic components for leaves. Each part of the plant has its own characteristic fragrance pattern owing to its individual chemical compositions. Moreover, its individual characteristic fragrance patterns are conducive to discrimination of the three different parts of the plant. Consequently, fast GC/SAW can be a useful analytical method for quality control of the different parts of the plant with pharmacological volatiles as it provides second unit analysis, a simple and fragrant pattern recognition. PMID:26046325

  20. An Effective Quality Control of Pharmacologically Active Volatiles of Houttuynia cordata Thunb by Fast Gas Chromatography-Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se Yeon

    2015-06-03

    Fast gas chromatography-surface acoustic wave sensor (GC/SAW) has been applied for the detection of the pharmacological volatiles emanated from Houttuynia cordata Thunb which is from South Korea. H. cordata Thunb with unpleasant and fishy odors shows a variety of pharmacological activities such as anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and insect repellent. The aim of this study is to show a novel quality control by GC/SAW methodology for the discrimination of the three different parts of the plant such as leaves, aerial stems, and underground stems for H. cordata Thunb. Sixteen compounds were identified. β-Myrcene, cis-ocimene and decanal are the dominant volatiles for leaves (71.0%) and aerial stems (50.1%). While, monoterpenes (74.6%) are the dominant volatiles for underground stems. 2-Undecanone (1.3%) and lauraldehyde (3.5%) were found to be the characteristic components for leaves. Each part of the plant has its own characteristic fragrance pattern owing to its individual chemical compositions. Moreover, its individual characteristic fragrance patterns are conducive to discrimination of the three different parts of the plant. Consequently, fast GC/SAW can be a useful analytical method for quality control of the different parts of the plant with pharmacological volatiles as it provides second unit analysis, a simple and fragrant pattern recognition.

  1. A coatable, light-weight, fast-response nanocomposite sensor for the in situ acquisition of dynamic elastic disturbance: from structural vibration to ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhihui; Liu, Menglong; Xu, Hao; Liu, Weijian; Liao, Yaozhong; Jin, Hao; Zhou, Limin; Zhang, Zhong; Su, Zhongqing

    2016-06-01

    Inspired by an innovative sensing philosophy, a light-weight nanocomposite sensor made of a hybrid of carbon black (CB)/polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) has been developed. The nanoscalar architecture and percolation characteristics of the hybrid were optimized in order to fulfil the in situ acquisition of dynamic elastic disturbance from low-frequency vibration to high-frequency ultrasonic waves. Dynamic particulate motion induced by elastic disturbance modulates the infrastructure of the CB conductive network in the sensor, with the introduction of the tunneling effect, leading to dynamic alteration in the piezoresistivity measured by the sensor. Electrical analysis, morphological characterization, and static/dynamic electromechanical response interrogation were implemented to advance our insight into the sensing mechanism of the sensor, and meanwhile facilitate understanding of the optimal percolation threshold. At the optimal threshold (˜6.5 wt%), the sensor exhibits high fidelity, a fast response, and high sensitivity to ultrafast elastic disturbance (in an ultrasonic regime up to 400 kHz), yet with an ultralow magnitude (on the order of micrometers). The performance of the sensor was evaluated against a conventional strain gauge and piezoelectric transducer, showing excellent coincidence, yet a much greater gauge factor and frequency-independent piezoresistive behavior. Coatable on a structure and deployable in a large quantity to form a dense sensor network, this nanocomposite sensor has blazed a trail for implementing in situ sensing for vibration- or ultrasonic-wave-based structural health monitoring, by striking a compromise between ‘sensing cost’ and ‘sensing effectiveness’.

  2. Fast combustion waves and chemi-ionization processes in a flame initiated by a powerful local plasma source in a closed reactor.

    PubMed

    Artem'ev, K V; Berezhetskaya, N K; Kazantsev, S Yu; Kononov, N G; Kossyi, I A; Popov, N A; Tarasova, N M; Filimonova, E A; Firsov, K N

    2015-08-13

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the initiation of combustion in a stoichiometric methane-oxygen mixture by a freely localized laser spark and by a high-current multispark discharge in a closed chamber. It is shown that, preceding the stage of 'explosive' inflammation of a gas mixture, there appear two luminous objects moving away from the initiator along an axis: a relatively fast and uniform wave of 'incomplete combustion' under laser spark ignition and a wave with a brightly glowing plasmoid behind under ignition from high-current slipping surface discharge. The gas mixtures in both the 'preflame' and developed-flame states are characterized by a high degree of ionization as the result of chemical ionization (plasma density n(e)≈10(12) cm(-3)) and a high frequency of electron-neutral collisions (ν(en)≈10(12) s(-1)). The role of chemical ionization in constructing an adequate theory for the ignition of a gas mixture is discussed. The feasibility of the microwave heating of both the preflame and developed-flame plasma, supplementary to a chemical energy source, is also discussed.

  3. Fast combustion waves and chemi-ionization processes in a flame initiated by a powerful local plasma source in a closed reactor

    PubMed Central

    Artem'ev, K. V.; Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Kazantsev, S. Yu.; Kononov, N. G.; Kossyi, I. A.; Popov, N. A.; Tarasova, N. M.; Filimonova, E. A.; Firsov, K. N.

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the initiation of combustion in a stoichiometric methane–oxygen mixture by a freely localized laser spark and by a high-current multispark discharge in a closed chamber. It is shown that, preceding the stage of ‘explosive’ inflammation of a gas mixture, there appear two luminous objects moving away from the initiator along an axis: a relatively fast and uniform wave of ‘incomplete combustion’ under laser spark ignition and a wave with a brightly glowing plasmoid behind under ignition from high-current slipping surface discharge. The gas mixtures in both the ‘preflame’ and developed-flame states are characterized by a high degree of ionization as the result of chemical ionization (plasma density ne≈1012 cm−3) and a high frequency of electron–neutral collisions (νen≈1012 s−1). The role of chemical ionization in constructing an adequate theory for the ignition of a gas mixture is discussed. The feasibility of the microwave heating of both the preflame and developed-flame plasma, supplementary to a chemical energy source, is also discussed. PMID:26170426

  4. Fast combustion waves and chemi-ionization processes in a flame initiated by a powerful local plasma source in a closed reactor.

    PubMed

    Artem'ev, K V; Berezhetskaya, N K; Kazantsev, S Yu; Kononov, N G; Kossyi, I A; Popov, N A; Tarasova, N M; Filimonova, E A; Firsov, K N

    2015-08-13

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the initiation of combustion in a stoichiometric methane-oxygen mixture by a freely localized laser spark and by a high-current multispark discharge in a closed chamber. It is shown that, preceding the stage of 'explosive' inflammation of a gas mixture, there appear two luminous objects moving away from the initiator along an axis: a relatively fast and uniform wave of 'incomplete combustion' under laser spark ignition and a wave with a brightly glowing plasmoid behind under ignition from high-current slipping surface discharge. The gas mixtures in both the 'preflame' and developed-flame states are characterized by a high degree of ionization as the result of chemical ionization (plasma density n(e)≈10(12) cm(-3)) and a high frequency of electron-neutral collisions (ν(en)≈10(12) s(-1)). The role of chemical ionization in constructing an adequate theory for the ignition of a gas mixture is discussed. The feasibility of the microwave heating of both the preflame and developed-flame plasma, supplementary to a chemical energy source, is also discussed. PMID:26170426

  5. A coatable, light-weight, fast-response nanocomposite sensor for the in situ acquisition of dynamic elastic disturbance: from structural vibration to ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhihui; Liu, Menglong; Xu, Hao; Liu, Weijian; Liao, Yaozhong; Jin, Hao; Zhou, Limin; Zhang, Zhong; Su, Zhongqing

    2016-06-01

    Inspired by an innovative sensing philosophy, a light-weight nanocomposite sensor made of a hybrid of carbon black (CB)/polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) has been developed. The nanoscalar architecture and percolation characteristics of the hybrid were optimized in order to fulfil the in situ acquisition of dynamic elastic disturbance from low-frequency vibration to high-frequency ultrasonic waves. Dynamic particulate motion induced by elastic disturbance modulates the infrastructure of the CB conductive network in the sensor, with the introduction of the tunneling effect, leading to dynamic alteration in the piezoresistivity measured by the sensor. Electrical analysis, morphological characterization, and static/dynamic electromechanical response interrogation were implemented to advance our insight into the sensing mechanism of the sensor, and meanwhile facilitate understanding of the optimal percolation threshold. At the optimal threshold (∼6.5 wt%), the sensor exhibits high fidelity, a fast response, and high sensitivity to ultrafast elastic disturbance (in an ultrasonic regime up to 400 kHz), yet with an ultralow magnitude (on the order of micrometers). The performance of the sensor was evaluated against a conventional strain gauge and piezoelectric transducer, showing excellent coincidence, yet a much greater gauge factor and frequency-independent piezoresistive behavior. Coatable on a structure and deployable in a large quantity to form a dense sensor network, this nanocomposite sensor has blazed a trail for implementing in situ sensing for vibration- or ultrasonic-wave-based structural health monitoring, by striking a compromise between ‘sensing cost’ and ‘sensing effectiveness’.

  6. Different event-related patterns of gamma-band power in brain waves of fast- and slow-reacting subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Jokeit, H; Makeig, S

    1994-01-01

    Fast- and slow-reacting subjects exhibit different patterns of gamma-band electroencephalogram (EEG) activity when responding as quickly as possible to auditory stimuli. This result appears to confirm long-standing speculations of Wundt that fast- and slow-reacting subjects produce speeded reactions in different ways and demonstrates that analysis of event-related changes in the amplitude of EEG activity recorded from the human scalp can reveal information about event-related brain processes unavailable using event-related potential measures. Time-varying spectral power in a selected (35- to 43-Hz) gamma frequency band was averaged across trials in two experimental conditions: passive listening and speeded reacting to binaural clicks, forming 40-Hz event-related spectral responses. Factor analysis of between-subject event-related spectral response differences split subjects into two near-equal groups composed of faster- and slower-reacting subjects. In faster-reacting subjects, 40-Hz power peaked near 200 ms and 400 ms poststimulus in the react condition, whereas in slower-reacting subjects, 40-Hz power just before stimulus delivery was larger in the react condition. These group differences were preserved in separate averages of relatively long and short reaction-time epochs for each group. gamma-band (20-60 Hz)-filtered event-related potential response averages did not differ between the two groups or conditions. Because of this and because gamma-band power in the auditory event-related potential is small compared with the EEG, the observed event-related spectral response features must represent gamma-band EEG activity reliably induced by, but not phase-locked to, experimental stimuli or events. PMID:8022783

  7. A Description of the Full Particle Orbit Following SPIRAL Code for Simulating Fast-ion Experiments in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G.J.; Budny, R.V.; Bortolon, A.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Fu, G.Y.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Nazikian, R.; Valeo, E.; Van Zeeland, M.A.

    2012-07-27

    The numerical methods used in the full particle-orbit following SPIRAL code are described and a number of physics studies performed with the code are presented to illustrate its capabilities. The SPIRAL code is a test-particle code and is a powerful numerical tool to interpret and plan fast-ion experiments in Tokamaks. Gyro-orbit effects are important for fast ions in low-field machines such as NSTX and to a lesser extent in DIII-D. A number of physics studies are interlaced between the description of the code to illustrate its capabilities. Results on heat loads generated by a localized error-field on the DIII-D wall are compared to measurements. The enhanced Triton losses caused by the same localized error-field are calculated and compared to measured neutron signals. MHD activity such as tearing modes and Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmodes (TAEs) have a profound effect on the fast-ion content of Tokamak plasmas and SPIRAL can calculate the effects of MHD activity on the confined and lost fast-ion population as illustrated for a burst of TAE activity in NSTX. The interaction between Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating and fast ions depends solely on the gyro-motion of the fast ions and is captured exactly in the SPIRAL code. A calculation of ICRF absorption on beam ions in ITER is presented. The effects of high harmonic fast wave heating on the beam-ion slowing-down distribution in NSTX is also studied.

  8. A description of the full-particle-orbit-following SPIRAL code for simulating fast-ion experiments in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, G. J.; Budny, R. V.; Bortolon, A.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Fu, G. Y.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Nazikian, R.; Valeo, E.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2013-02-01

    The numerical methods used in the full particle-orbit following SPIRAL code are described and a number of physics studies performed with the code are presented to illustrate its capabilities. The SPIRAL code is a test-particle code and is a powerful numerical tool to interpret and plan fast-ion experiments in tokamaks. Gyro-orbit effects are important for fast ions in low-field machines such as NSTX and to a lesser extent in DIII-D. A number of physics studies are interlaced between the description of the code to illustrate its capabilities. Results on heat loads generated by a localized error-field on the DIII-D wall are compared with measurements. The enhanced Triton losses caused by the same localized error-field are calculated and compared with measured neutron signals. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity such as tearing modes and toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) have a profound effect on the fast-ion content of tokamak plasmas and SPIRAL can calculate the effects of MHD activity on the confined and lost fast-ion population as illustrated for a burst of TAE activity in NSTX. The interaction between ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating and fast ions depends solely on the gyro-motion of the fast ions and is captured exactly in the SPIRAL code. A calculation of ICRF absorption on beam ions in ITER is presented. The effects of high harmonic fast wave heating on the beam-ion slowing-down distribution in NSTX is also studied.

  9. Mergers of Charged Black Holes: Gravitational-wave Events, Short Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing

    2016-08-01

    The discoveries of GW150914, GW151226, and LVT151012 suggest that double black hole (BH-BH) mergers are common in the universe. If at least one of the two merging black holes (BHs) carries a certain amount of charge, possibly retained by a rotating magnetosphere, the inspiral of a BH-BH system would drive a global magnetic dipole normal to the orbital plane. The rapidly evolving magnetic moment during the merging process would drive a Poynting flux with an increasing wind power. The magnetospheric activities during the final phase of the merger would make a fast radio burst (FRB) if the BH charge can be as large as a factor of \\hat{q}˜ ({10}-9{--}{10}-8) of the critical charge Q c of the BH. At large radii, dissipation of the Poynting flux energy in the outflow would power a short-duration high-energy transient, which would appear as a detectable short-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) if the charge can be as large as \\hat{q}˜ ({10}-5{--}{10}-4). The putative short GRB coincident with GW150914 recorded by Fermi GBM may be interpreted with this model. Future joint GW/GRB/FRB searches would lead to a measurement or place a constraint on the charges carried by isolate BHs.

  10. Mergers of Charged Black Holes: Gravitational-wave Events, Short Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing

    2016-08-01

    The discoveries of GW150914, GW151226, and LVT151012 suggest that double black hole (BH–BH) mergers are common in the universe. If at least one of the two merging black holes (BHs) carries a certain amount of charge, possibly retained by a rotating magnetosphere, the inspiral of a BH–BH system would drive a global magnetic dipole normal to the orbital plane. The rapidly evolving magnetic moment during the merging process would drive a Poynting flux with an increasing wind power. The magnetospheric activities during the final phase of the merger would make a fast radio burst (FRB) if the BH charge can be as large as a factor of \\hat{q}˜ ({10}-9{--}{10}-8) of the critical charge Q c of the BH. At large radii, dissipation of the Poynting flux energy in the outflow would power a short-duration high-energy transient, which would appear as a detectable short-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) if the charge can be as large as \\hat{q}˜ ({10}-5{--}{10}-4). The putative short GRB coincident with GW150914 recorded by Fermi GBM may be interpreted with this model. Future joint GW/GRB/FRB searches would lead to a measurement or place a constraint on the charges carried by isolate BHs.

  11. Amplitude inversion of fast and slow converted waves for fracture characterization of the Montney Formation in Pouce Coupe field, Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFarlane, Tyler L.

    The Montney Formation of western Canada is one of the largest economically viable gas resource plays in North America with reserves of 449TCF. As an unconventional tight gas play, the well development costs are high due to the hydraulic stimulations necessary for economic success. The Pouce Coupe research project is a multidisciplinary collaboration between the Reservoir Characterization Project (RCP) and Talisman Energy Inc. with the objective of understanding the reservoir to enable the optimization of well placement and completion design. The work in this thesis focuses on identifying the natural fractures in the reservoir that act as the delivery systems for hydrocarbon flow to the wellbore. Characterization of the Montney Formation at Pouce Coupe is based on time-lapse multicomponent seismic surveys that were acquired before and after the hydraulic stimulation of two horizontal wells. Since shear-wave velocities and amplitudes of the PS-waves are known to be sensitive to near-vertical fractures, I utilize isotropic simultaneous seismic inversions on azimuthally-sectored PS1 and PS2 data sets to obtain measurements of the fast and slow shear-velocities. Specifically, I analyze two orthogonal azimuths that are parallel and perpendicular to the strike of the dominant fracture system in the field. These volumes are used to approximate the shear-wave splitting parameter (gamma(s*)) that is closely related to crack density. Since crack density has a significant impact on defining the percolation zone, the work presented in this thesis provides information that can be utilized to reduce uncertainty in the reservoirs fracture model. Isotropic AVO inversion of azimuthally limited PS-waves demonstrates sufficient sensitivity to detect contrast between the anisotropic elastic properties of the reservoir and is capable of identifying regions with high crack density. This is supported by integration with spinner production logs, hydraulic stimulation history of the field

  12. Waves and Tsunami Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frashure, K. M.; Chen, R. F.; Stephen, R. A.; Bolmer, T.; Lavin, M.; Strohschneider, D.; Maichle, R.; Micozzi, N.; Cramer, C.

    2007-01-01

    Demonstrating wave processes quantitatively in the classroom using standard classroom tools (such as Slinkys and wave tanks) can be difficult. For example, waves often travel too fast for students to actually measure amplitude or wavelength. Also, when teaching propagating waves, reflections from the ends set up standing waves, which can confuse…

  13. A batch injection analysis system with square-wave voltammetric detection for fast and simultaneous determination of naphazoline and zinc.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Thiago da Costa; Freitas, Jhonys Machado; Munoz, Rodrigo Alejandro Abarza; Richter, Eduardo Mathias

    2016-05-15

    In this work, a batch-injection analysis system with square-wave voltammetric (BIA-SWV) detection was applied for the first time to the simultaneous determination of inorganic (zinc) and organic (naphazoline) species. Both compounds were detected in a single run (70 injections h(-1)) with a small injection volume (∼100 µL). The calibration curves exhibited linear response range between 3.0 and 21.0 μmol L(-1) (r=0.999) for naphazoline and between 10.0 and 60.0 μmol L(-1) (r=0.992) for zinc. The detection limits were 0.13 and 0.04 μmol L(-1) for zinc and naphazoline, respectively. Good reproducibility was achieved for multiple measurements of a solution containing both species (RSD<1.0%; n=20). The results obtained with the BIA-SWV method for the simultaneous determination of naphazoline and zinc were compared to those obtained by HPLC (naphazoline) and by FAAS (zinc); no statistically significant differences were observed (95% confidence level).

  14. Fast, purely growing collisionless reconnection as an eigenfunction problem related to but not involving linear whistler waves

    SciTech Connect

    Bellan, Paul M.

    2014-10-15

    If either finite electron inertia or finite resistivity is included in 2D magnetic reconnection, the two-fluid equations become a pair of second-order differential equations coupling the out-of-plane magnetic field and vector potential to each other to form a fourth-order system. The coupling at an X-point is such that out-of-plane even-parity electric and odd-parity magnetic fields feed off each other to produce instability if the scale length on which the equilibrium magnetic field changes is less than the ion skin depth. The instability growth rate is given by an eigenvalue of the fourth-order system determined by boundary and symmetry conditions. The instability is a purely growing mode, not a wave, and has growth rate of the order of the whistler frequency. The spatial profile of both the out-of-plane electric and magnetic eigenfunctions consists of an inner concave region having extent of the order of the electron skin depth, an intermediate convex region having extent of the order of the equilibrium magnetic field scale length, and a concave outer exponentially decaying region. If finite electron inertia and resistivity are not included, the inner concave region does not exist and the coupled pair of equations reduces to a second-order differential equation having non-physical solutions at an X-point.

  15. Study of nonlinear MHD equations governing the wave propagation in twisted coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parhi, S.; DeBruyne, P.; Goossens, M.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    1995-01-01

    The solar corona, modelled by a low beta, resistive plasma slab, sustains MHD wave propagations due to shearing footpoint motions in the photosphere. By using a numerical algorithm the excitation and nonlinear development of MHD waves in twisted coronal loops are studied. The plasma responds to the footpoint motion by sausage waves if there is no twist. The twist in the magnetic field of the loop destroys initially developed sausage-like wave modes and they become kinks. The transition from sausage to kink modes is analyzed. The twist brings about mode degradation producing high harmonics and this generates more complex fine structures. This can be attributed to several local extrema in the perturbed velocity profiles. The Alfven wave produces remnants of the ideal 1/x singularity both for zero and non-zero twist and this pseudo-singularity becomes less pronounced for larger twist. The effect of nonlinearity is clearly observed by changing the amplitude of the driver by one order of magnitude. The magnetosonic waves also exhibit smoothed remnants of ideal logarithmic singularities when the frequency of the driver is correctly chosen. This pseudo-singularity for fast waves is absent when the coronal loop does not undergo any twist but becomes pronounced when twist is included. On the contrary, it is observed for slow waves even if there is no twist. Increasing the twist leads to a higher heating rate of the loop. The larger twist shifts somewhat uniformly distributed heating to layers inside the slab corresponding to peaks in the magnetic field strength.

  16. Coherent terahertz radiation from high-harmonic component of modulated free-electron beam in a tapered two-asymmetric grating structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yaxin; Zhou Yucong; Dong Liang; Liu Shenggang

    2012-09-17

    Based on the mechanism of incoherent diffraction radiation excited by an electron bunch in a waveguide with periodic structure, this paper presents the concept of coherent terahertz (THz) radiation from the high-harmonic component of a modulated free-electron beam in a tapered two-asymmetric grating structure. The results show that in this mechanism 0.43 THz radiation can be generated with 10 A/cm{sup 2} current density, and the efficiency can reach 0.5%. Because of the low required current density and relative high efficiency, this concept shows the application potential for electron-beam-driven terahertz sources.

  17. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence using a biosensor design based on Ceria nanoparticles decorated reduced graphene oxide and Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Safiye; Faridbod, Farnoush; Norouzi, Parviz; Dezfuli, Amin Shiralizadeh; Ajloo, Davood; Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    A new strategy was introduced for ssDNA immobilization on a modified glassy carbon electrode. The electrode surface was modified using polyaniline and chemically reduced graphene oxide decorated cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2NPs-RGO). A single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe was immobilized on the modified electrode surface. Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry (FFT-SWV) was applied as detection technique and [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) redox signal was used as electrochemical marker. The hybridization of ssDNA with its complementary target caused a dramatic decrease in [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) FFT-SW signal. The proposed electrochemical biosensor was able to detect Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence encoding aerolysin protein. Under optimal conditions, the biosensor showed excellent selectivity toward complementary sequence in comparison with noncomplementary and two-base mismatch sequences. The dynamic linear range of this electrochemical DNA biosensor for detecting 20-mer oligonucleotide sequence of A. hydrophila was from 1 × 10(-15) to 1 × 10(-8) mol L(-1). The proposed biosensor was successfully applied for the detection of DNA extracted from A. hydrophila in fish pond water up to 0.01 μg mL(-1) with RSD of 5%. Besides, molecular docking was applied to consider the [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) interaction with ssDNA before and after hybridization.

  18. Use of a fast near-infrared spectrometer for absorption and emission measurements within the expanding blast wave of a high explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Jon D.; Carney, Joel; Lightstone, James; Piecuch, Scott

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate the use of a fast InGaAs array and spectrometer to measure properties related to near-infrared absorption and emission (750 nm -1500 nm) following a high explosive detonation. Using a broadband light source and a rigid absorption gauge, gas temperatures are measured at a rate of 20 kHz for a period of several milliseconds behind the blast wave from a PETN, PBXN-5, and PBXN-113 detonations. The temperature and concentration of water vapor is determined by fitting experimental transmission spectra to a simulated database. Strong emission signatures obtained during the PETN breakout event (integrated over approximately the first 20 microseconds) indicate the presence of high energy nitrogen and oxygen atoms. Measurements from water absorption at a distance of 23 cm from the PETN charge indicate temperatures decaying from 1600 K to 600 K during the first few milliseconds, and measurements of non-ideal explosives with optically thick postdetonation environments are also demonstrated. These measurements are intended to aid the development of detonation and explosive simulations.

  19. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence using a biosensor design based on Ceria nanoparticles decorated reduced graphene oxide and Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Safiye; Faridbod, Farnoush; Norouzi, Parviz; Dezfuli, Amin Shiralizadeh; Ajloo, Davood; Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    A new strategy was introduced for ssDNA immobilization on a modified glassy carbon electrode. The electrode surface was modified using polyaniline and chemically reduced graphene oxide decorated cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2NPs-RGO). A single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe was immobilized on the modified electrode surface. Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry (FFT-SWV) was applied as detection technique and [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) redox signal was used as electrochemical marker. The hybridization of ssDNA with its complementary target caused a dramatic decrease in [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) FFT-SW signal. The proposed electrochemical biosensor was able to detect Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence encoding aerolysin protein. Under optimal conditions, the biosensor showed excellent selectivity toward complementary sequence in comparison with noncomplementary and two-base mismatch sequences. The dynamic linear range of this electrochemical DNA biosensor for detecting 20-mer oligonucleotide sequence of A. hydrophila was from 1 × 10(-15) to 1 × 10(-8) mol L(-1). The proposed biosensor was successfully applied for the detection of DNA extracted from A. hydrophila in fish pond water up to 0.01 μg mL(-1) with RSD of 5%. Besides, molecular docking was applied to consider the [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) interaction with ssDNA before and after hybridization. PMID:26454462

  20. Noninvasive, low-noise, fast imaging of blood volume and deoxygenation changes in muscles using light-emitting diode continuous-wave imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuanqing; Lech, Gwen; Nioka, Shoko; Intes, Xavier; Chance, Britton

    2002-08-01

    This article focuses on optimizing the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of a three-wavelength light-emitting diode (LED) near-infrared continuous-wave (cw) imager and its application to in vivo muscle metabolism measurement. The shot-noise limited SNR is derived and calculated to be 2 x104 for the physiological blood concentrations of muscle. Aiming at shot-noise limited SNR performance and fast imaging, we utilize sample and hold circuits to reduce high-frequency noise. These circuits have also been designed to be parallel integrating, through which SNR of 2 x103 and 2 Hz imaging acquisition rate have been achieved when the probe is placed on a muscle model. The noise corresponds to 2 x10-4 optical density error, which suggests an in vitro resolution of 15. 4 nM blood volume and 46.8 nM deoxygenation changes. A 48 dB digital gain control circuit with 256 steps is employed to enlarge the dynamic range of the imager. We utilize cuff ischemia as a living model demonstration and its results are reported. The instrument is applied during exercise to measure the changes of blood volume and deoxygenation, which provides important information about muscle metabolism. We find that the primary source of noise encountered during exercise experiment is from the random motion of muscle. The results demonstrate that the LED cw imager is ideal for the noninvasive study of muscle metabolism.

  1. High-repetition-rate and high-photon-flux 70 eV high-harmonic source for coincidence ion imaging of gas-phase molecules.

    PubMed

    Rothhardt, Jan; Hädrich, Steffen; Shamir, Yariv; Tschnernajew, Maxim; Klas, Robert; Hoffmann, Armin; Tadesse, Getnet K; Klenke, Arno; Gottschall, Thomas; Eidam, Tino; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas; Boll, Rebecca; Bomme, Cedric; Dachraoui, Hatem; Erk, Benjamin; Di Fraia, Michele; Horke, Daniel A; Kierspel, Thomas; Mullins, Terence; Przystawik, Andreas; Savelyev, Evgeny; Wiese, Joss; Laarmann, Tim; Küpper, Jochen; Rolles, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Unraveling and controlling chemical dynamics requires techniques to image structural changes of molecules with femtosecond temporal and picometer spatial resolution. Ultrashort-pulse x-ray free-electron lasers have significantly advanced the field by enabling advanced pump-probe schemes. There is an increasing interest in using table-top photon sources enabled by high-harmonic generation of ultrashort-pulse lasers for such studies. We present a novel high-harmonic source driven by a 100 kHz fiber laser system, which delivers 1011 photons/s in a single 1.3 eV bandwidth harmonic at 68.6 eV. The combination of record-high photon flux and high repetition rate paves the way for time-resolved studies of the dissociation dynamics of inner-shell ionized molecules in a coincidence detection scheme. First coincidence measurements on CH3I are shown and it is outlined how the anticipated advancement of fiber laser technology and improved sample delivery will, in the next step, allow pump-probe studies of ultrafast molecular dynamics with table-top XUV-photon sources. These table-top sources can provide significantly higher repetition rates than the currently operating free-electron lasers and they offer very high temporal resolution due to the intrinsically small timing jitter between pump and probe pulses. PMID:27505779

  2. Turbulence structure of finite-beta perpendicular fast shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.

    1970-01-01

    In a finite-beta plasma ion cyclotron, radius dispersion which forms a trailing wave train for a perpendicular fast shock is examined. Collisionless dissipation is provided by the three wave decay of the wave train into very oblique fast and parallel Alfven waves. Particle thermalization results from Landau damping of oblique fast wave turbulence. The shock damping length to three wave decay is many ion cyclotron radii. Undamped Alfven turbulence should persist far downstream from the shock.

  3. Tabletop coherent diffractive microscopy with soft x-ray illumination from high harmonic generation at 29 nm and 13.5 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymondson, Daisy Arrelle

    Soft x-ray microscopy allows imaging at higher resolution than is possible with optical wavelengths. At the same time, it allows imaging of the internal structure of thick samples that cannot be viewed with electron microscopy. Optics for the soft x-ray region of the spectrum are limited, but coherent diffractive imaging techniques use computerized image reconstruction in place of a lens to form high-resolution images with x-rays. This dissertation presents a practical soft x-ray diffractive microscope with sub-100 nm resolution using tabletop coherent soft x-rays at 13.5 nm and 29 nm [1]. This represents the first demonstration of tabletop coherent imaging with 13.5 nm from high harmonics. Images with holography and phase retrieval are shown, with near-diffraction-limited resolution down to 53 nm [2--4]. The first tabletop diffractive images of biological samples with 13.5 nm and 29 nm beams are also shown [5]. This thesis also presents work on the construction of a high-power, high-repetition-rate laser amplifier implementing carrier-envelope phase stabilization. CEP stabilization provides unprecedented levels of control over the full electric field of an ultrafast laser. The first stage of the amplifier was stabilized to 250 mrad CEP noise on 100s timescales. The route to stabilizing the full 10 kHz, 30 W amplifier is outlined. This laser will be used for future coherent diffractive imaging applications at using high harmonic generation at 13.5 nm and shorter wavelengths, and will also be used for time-resolved studies of molecular dissociation [6].

  4. The Independent and Joint Association of Blood Pressure, Serum Total Homocysteine, and Fasting Serum Glucose Levels With Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Chinese Hypertensive Adults.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyun; Sun, Ningling; Yu, Tao; Fan, Fangfang; Zheng, Meili; Qian, Geng; Wang, Binyan; Wang, Yu; Tang, Genfu; Li, Jianping; Qin, Xianhui; Hou, Fanfan; Xu, Xiping; Yang, Xinchun; Chen, Yundai; Wang, Xiaobin; Huo, Yong

    2016-09-28

    This study aimed to investigate the independent and joint association of blood pressure (BP), homocysteine (Hcy), and fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV, a measure of arterial stiffness) in Chinese hypertensive adults.The analyses included 3967 participants whose BP, Hcy, FBG, and baPWV were measured along with other covariates. Systolic BP (SBP) was analyzed as 3 categories (SBP < 160 mmHg; 160 to 179 mmHg; ≥ 180 mmHg); Hcy as 3 categories (< 10 μmol/L; 10 to 14.9 μmol/L; ≥ 15.0 μmol/L) and FBG: normal (FBG < 5.6 mmol/L), impaired (5.6 mmol/L ≤ FBG < 7.0 mmol/L), and diabetes mellitus (FBG ≥ 7.0 mmol/L). We performed linear regression analyses to evaluate their associations with baPWV with adjustment for covariables.When analyzed individually, BP, Hcy, and FBG were each associated with baPWV. When BP and FBG were analyzed jointly, the highest baPWV value (mean ± SD: 2227 ± 466 cm/s) was observed in participants with FBG ≥ 7.0 mmol/L and SBP ≥ 180 mmHg (β = 432.5, P < 0.001), and the lowest baPWV value (mean ± SD: 1692 ± 289 cm/s) was seen in participants with NFG and SBP < 160 mmHg. When Hcy and FBG were analyzed jointly, the highest baPWV value (2072 ± 480 cm/s) was observed in participants with FBG ≥ 7.0 mmol/L and Hcy ≥ 15.0 μmol/L (β = 167.6, P < 0.001), while the lowest baPWV value (mean ± SD: 1773 ± 334 cm/s) was observed in participants with NFG and Hcy < 10 μmol/L.In Chinese hypertensive adults, SBP, Hcy, and FBG are individually and jointly associated with baPWV.Our findings underscore the importance of identifying individuals with multiple risk factors of baPWV including high SBP, FBG, and Hcy.

  5. Taming Magnetically Confined Plasmas with RF Waves: A Historical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porkolab, Miklos

    2009-11-01

    Heating and profile control by RF waves in magnetic fusion experiments has led to the development of a new area of physics, namely wave propagation and absorption in high temperature plasmas in complex magnetic field geometries. In addition, the development of high power microwave sources as well as novel antenna structures capable of handling high RF powers has also been necessary. In this talk I shall summarize the historical progression of relevant results in three frequency regimes, namely the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), the electron cyclotron frequency and its harmonics (ECRH), and the lower hybrid frequency range (LHRF). In the ICRF regime breakthrough heating results were obtained in the 1980s in tokamaks with good confinement of energetic ions, such as PLT, TFTR and JET. In the period of late 1970s to mid 1980s the theory of RF current drive (LHCD, ECCD and that of fast wave, or FWCD) was developed. Soon thereafter efficient lower hybrid current drive was demonstrated in tokamak experiments such as Versator II, Alcator--C and PLT, and later JT60-U, Tore-Supra and JET. High harmonic FWCD has been also demonstrated on DIII-D and NSTX. Long pulse multi-MW LHCD experiments are now in preparation on the new superconducting tokamaks EAST (China) and K-STAR (Korea). ECRH results in the 1980s and beyond progressed rapidly with the development of gyrotron sources at the MW level and subsequently efficient heating and current drive was demonstrated on DIII-D, Asdex-U, JT-60U and TCV, including the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes. Recent gyrotron tube development at the MW level at 170 GHz ensures the availability of ECH and ECCD on ITER. Finally, new results on RF induced transport phenomena have been discovered, such as enhanced plasma rotation and flow drive that hold promise for optimizing ITER performance.

  6. DIRECT IMAGING OF QUASI-PERIODIC FAST PROPAGATING WAVES OF {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} IN THE LOW SOLAR CORONA BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wei; Title, Alan M.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; De Pontieu, Bart; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Zhao Junwei; Ofman, Leon

    2011-07-20

    Quasi-periodic propagating fast mode magnetosonic waves in the solar corona were difficult to observe in the past due to relatively low instrument cadences. We report here evidence of such waves directly imaged in EUV by the new Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/coronal mass ejection event, we find arc-shaped wave trains of 1%-5% intensity variations (lifetime {approx}200 s) that emanate near the flare kernel and propagate outward up to {approx}400 Mm along a funnel of coronal loops. Sinusoidal fits to a typical wave train indicate a phase velocity of 2200 {+-} 130 km s{sup -1}. Similar waves propagating in opposite directions are observed in closed loops between two flare ribbons. In the k-{omega} diagram of the Fourier wave power, we find a bright ridge that represents the dispersion relation and can be well fitted with a straight line passing through the origin. This k-{omega} ridge shows a broad frequency distribution with power peaks at 5.5, 14.5, and 25.1 mHz. The strongest signal at 5.5 mHz (period 181 s) temporally coincides with quasi-periodic pulsations of the flare, suggesting a common origin. The instantaneous wave energy flux of (0.1-2.6) x 10{sup 7} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} estimated at the coronal base is comparable to the steady-state heating requirement of active region loops.

  7. Spatially localized, shock-wave-induced continuous and very fast mixing between gases and liquid in parallel flow /An experimental study/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devis, E.

    1977-01-01

    Shock-wave-induced patterns and turbulent supersonic shear flows over a stagnant bubble were determined for cases where recirculation and final mixing occurred within a very short time and within a distance of about 1 cm. The effect of a shock wave upon stratified laminas of gases in a shock tube was studied for a series of gases of different densities and molecular weights. Steady-state mixing of gas streams were investigated in wind tunnel experiments by means of a chemiluminescent reaction. Shock-wave-induced mixing which involves the introduction of a liquid jet into a supersonic gas stream is also described.

  8. Excitation of electrostatic waves in the electron cyclotron frequency range during magnetic reconnection in laboratory overdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwahata, A.; Igami, H.; Kawamori, E.; Kogi, Y.; Inomoto, M.; Ono, Y.

    2014-10-15

    We report the observation of electromagnetic radiation at high harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency that was considered to be converted from electrostatic waves called electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) during magnetic reconnection in laboratory overdense plasmas. The excitation of EBWs was attributed to the thermalization of electrons accelerated by the reconnection electric field around the X-point. The radiative process discussed here is an acceptable explanation for observed radio waves pulsation associated with major flares.

  9. The role of Rydberg and continuum levels in computing high harmonic generation spectra of the hydrogen atom using time-dependent configuration interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Luppi, Eleonora; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2013-10-28

    We study the role of Rydberg bound-states and continuum levels in the field-induced electronic dynamics associated with the High-Harmonic Generation (HHG) spectroscopy of the hydrogen atom. Time-dependent configuration-interaction (TD-CI) is used with very large atomic orbital (AO) expansions (up to L= 4 with sextuple augmentation and off-center functions) to describe the bound Rydberg levels, and some continuum levels. To address the lack of ionization losses in TD-CI with finite AO basis sets, we employed a heuristic lifetime for energy levels above the ionization potential. The heuristic lifetime model is compared against the conventional atomic orbital treatment (infinite lifetimes), and a third approximation which is TD-CI using only the bound levels (continuum lifetimes go to zero). The results suggest that spectra calculated using conventional TD-CI do not converge with increasing AO basis set size, while the zero lifetime and heuristic lifetime models converge to qualitatively similar spectra, with implications for how best to apply bound state electronic structure methods to simulate HHG. The origin of HHG spectral features including the cutoff and extent of interference between peaks is uncovered by separating field-induced coupling between different types of levels (ground state, bound Rydberg levels, and continuum) in the simulated electronic dynamics. Thus the origin of deviations between the predictions of the semi-classical three step model and the full simulation can be associated with particular physical contributions, which helps to explain both the successes and the limitations of the three step model.

  10. The possible importance of synchrotron/inverse Compton losses to explain fast MM-wave and hard X-ray emission of a solar event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Correia, E.; Kaufmann, P.; Costa, J. E. R.; Vaz, A. M. Z.; Dennis, B. R.

    1986-01-01

    The solar burst of 21 May 1984 presented a number of unique features. The time profile consisted of seven major structures (seconds), with a turnover frequency or approx. 90 GHz, well correlated in time to hard X-ray emission. Each structure consisted of multiple fast pulses (.1 seconds), which were analyzed in detail. A proportionality between the repetition rate of the pulses and the burst fluxes at 90 GHz and or approx. 100 keV hard X-rays, and an inverse proportionality between repetition rates and hard X-rays power law indices have been found. A synchrotron/inverse Compton model has been applied to explain the emission of the fast burst structures, which appear to be possible for the first three or four structures.

  11. The possible importance of synchrotron/inverse Compton losses to explain fast mm-wave and hard X-ray emission of a solar event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Correia, E.; Kaufmann, P.; Costa, J. E. R.; Zodivaz, A. M.; Dennis, B. R.

    1986-01-01

    The solar burst of 21 May 1984, presented a number of unique features. The time profile consisted of seven major structures (seconds), with a turnover frequency of greater than or approximately 90 GHz, well correlated in time to hard X-ray emission. Each structure consisted of multiple fast pulses (0.1 seconds), which were analyzed in detail. A proportionality between the repetition rate of the pulses and the burst fluxes at 90 GHz and greater than or approximately 100 keV hard X-rays, and an inverse proportionality between repetition rates and hard X-ray power law indices were found. A synchrotron/inverse Compton model was applied to explain the emission of the fast burst structures, which appear to be possible for the first three or four structures.

  12. Theoretical description of nonequilibrium behavior in charge density wave systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wen

    The fast development of time resolved photoemission (TRPES) techniques allow us to discover the rich features of nonequilibrium phenomena which may not appear in equilibrium. One of the most explored topics is the nonequilibrium behavior of a charge density wave (CDW) material. Being an ordered phase at low temperature, the CDW state provides a fertile ground to study electron-electron and electron-ion interactions. By driving this material out of equilibrium and taking ultrafast time resolution snapshots of its behavior, TRPES helps us understand these interactions and sheds light on the mechanisms behind these and other complex material properties, such as metal-insulator transitions, high temperature superconductivity, and magnetic phenomena. Recent experiments on TRPES in CDW materials show an ultrafast CDW gap closure in systems such as 1T--TaS2 and TbTe3 and the subsequent separation of time scales for the electron-electron interaction and the electron-lattice interaction. But it is still not clear what happens during the ultrashort period (in first 100 femtosecond). In this dissertation, we solve a two band model describing this ultrafast process in a CDW system. By fixing the lattice distortion effect in the CDW, we studied the nonequilibrium excitations of the electrons under a strong electric field. This research is performed by calculating nonequilibrium Green's functions (NGF) along the Kadanoff-Baym-Keldysh contour. We solved this nonequilibrium problem exactly. We show non-perturbative results and explore the nonlinear electronic behavior under an ultrashort light pulses. In addition to the TRPES problem, we also examined the behavior of Bloch oscillations under a large DC field, the response to an AC electric field, high harmonic generation from solids, and the crossover between frequency-driven excitation and amplitude-driven excitation.

  13. Spectral Anisotropy of Elsässer Variables in Two-dimensional Wave-vector Space as Observed in the Fast Solar Wind Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Limei; He, Jiansen; Zhang, Lei; Tu, Chuanyi; Marsch, Eckart; Chen, Christopher H. K.; Wang, Xin; Wang, Linghua; Wicks, Robert T.

    2016-01-01

    Intensive studies have been conducted to understand the anisotropy of solar wind turbulence. However, the anisotropy of Elsässer variables ({{\\boldsymbol{Z}}}+/- ) in 2D wave-vector space has yet to be investigated. Here we first verify the transformation based on the projection-slice theorem between the power spectral density {{PSD}}2{{D}}({k}\\parallel ,{k}\\perp ) and the spatial correlation function {{CF}}2{{D}}({r}\\parallel ,{r}\\perp ). Based on the application of the transformation to the magnetic field and the particle measurements from the WIND spacecraft, we investigate the spectral anisotropy of Elsässer variables ({{\\boldsymbol{Z}}}+/- ), and the distribution of residual energy {E}{{R}}, Alfvén ratio {R}{{A}}, and Elsässer ratio {R}{{E}} in the ({k}\\parallel ,{k}\\perp ) space. The spectra {{PSD}}2{{D}}({k}\\parallel ,{k}\\perp ) of {\\boldsymbol{B}}, {\\boldsymbol{V}}, and {{\\boldsymbol{Z}}}{major} (the larger of {{\\boldsymbol{Z}}}+/- ) show a similar pattern that {{PSD}}2{{D}}({k}\\parallel ,{k}\\perp ) is mainly distributed along a ridge inclined toward the k⊥ axis. This is probably the signature of the oblique Alfvénic fluctuations propagating outwardly. Unlike those of {\\boldsymbol{B}}, {\\boldsymbol{V}}, and {{\\boldsymbol{Z}}}{major}, the spectrum {{PSD}}2{{D}}({k}\\parallel ,{k}\\perp ) of {{\\boldsymbol{Z}}}{minor} is distributed mainly along the k⊥ axis. Close to the k⊥ axis, | {E}{{R}}| becomes larger while {R}{{A}} becomes smaller, suggesting that the dominance of magnetic energy over kinetic energy becomes more significant at small k∥. {R}{{E}} is larger at small k∥, implying that {{PSD}}2{{D}}({k}\\parallel ,{k}\\perp ) of {{\\boldsymbol{Z}}}{minor} is more concentrated along the k⊥ direction as compared to that of {{\\boldsymbol{Z}}}{major}. The residual energy condensate at small k∥ is consistent with simulation results in which {E}{{R}} is spontaneously generated by Alfvén wave interaction.

  14. Effects of the radial dependence of the fast electron diffusion coefficient on the current driven by lower-hybrid waves in tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xianmei; Wang Yanhui; Yu Limin; Shen Xin; Wang Jianbin

    2012-07-15

    The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) is one of the promising methods not only for driving the non-inductive current required for steady-state tokamak operation, but also for controlling the plasma current profile to improve confinement in tokamak experiments. A direct consequence of experimental imperfection is difficult to obtain reliable estimate of the radial diffusion coefficient (D{sub st}) of the lower hybrid driven current. In this paper, the radial profile of D{sub st} is estimated to investigate its effect on the current driven by lower hybrid wave (LHW) in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. Compared with the case of the constant radial diffusion coefficient, the efficiency of LHW driven current with the radial dependent diffusion coefficient D{sub st} ({rho}) becomes either higher or lower with respect to the plasma parameters, such as the density and the magnetic fluctuation. It is also found that the profiles of the LHW driven current are different. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the radial dependence of D{sub st} in order to get an accurate and reliable result in the numerical simulation of LHCD.

  15. Effects of the radial dependence of the fast electron diffusion coefficient on the current driven by lower-hybrid waves in tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianmei; Wang, Yanhui; Yu, Limin; Shen, Xin; Wang, Jianbin

    2012-07-01

    The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) is one of the promising methods not only for driving the non-inductive current required for steady-state tokamak operation, but also for controlling the plasma current profile to improve confinement in tokamak experiments. A direct consequence of experimental imperfection is difficult to obtain reliable estimate of the radial diffusion coefficient (Dst) of the lower hybrid driven current. In this paper, the radial profile of Dst is estimated to investigate its effect on the current driven by lower hybrid wave (LHW) in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. Compared with the case of the constant radial diffusion coefficient, the efficiency of LHW driven current with the radial dependent diffusion coefficient Dst (ρ) becomes either higher or lower with respect to the plasma parameters, such as the density and the magnetic fluctuation. It is also found that the profiles of the LHW driven current are different. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the radial dependence of Dst in order to get an accurate and reliable result in the numerical simulation of LHCD.

  16. Two-wave propagation in in vitro swine distal ulna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mano, Isao; Horii, Kaoru; Matsukawa, Mami; Otani, Takahiko

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasonic transmitted waves were obtained in an in vitro swine distal ulna specimen, which mimics a human distal radius, that consists of interconnected cortical bone and cancellous bone. The transmitted waveforms appeared similar to the fast waves, slow waves, and overlapping fast and slow waves measured in the specimen after removing the surface cortical bone (only cancellous bone). In addition, the circumferential waves in the cortical bone and water did not affect the fast and slow waves. This suggests that the fast-and-slow-wave phenomenon can be observed in an in vivo human distal radius.

  17. Cosmology: Home of a fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorimer, Duncan

    2016-02-01

    Our understanding of fast radio bursts -- intense pulses of radio waves -- and their use as cosmic probes promises to be transformed now that one burst has been associated with a galaxy of known distance from Earth. See Letter p.453

  18. Fast valve

    DOEpatents

    Van Dyke, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing.

  19. Fast valve

    DOEpatents

    Van Dyke, W.J.

    1992-04-07

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing. 4 figs.

  20. Impulsively generated fast coronal pulsations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwin, P. M.; Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid oscillations in the corona are discussed from a theoretical standpoint, developing some previous work on ducted, fast magnetoacoustic waves in an inhomogeneous medium. In the theory, impulsively (e.g., flare) generated mhd (magnetohydrodynamic) waves are ducted by regions of low Alfven speed (high density) such as coronal loops. Wave propagation in such ducts is strongly dispersive and closely akin to the behavior of Love waves in seismology, Pekeris waves in oceanography and guided waves in fiber optics. Such flare-generated magnetoacoustic waves possess distinctive temporal signatures consisting of periodic, quasi-periodic and decay phases. The quasi-periodic phase possesses the strongest amplitudes and the shortest time scales. Time scales are typically of the order of a second for inhomogeneities (coronal loop width) of 1000 km and Alfven speeds of 1000/kms, and pulse duration times are of tens of seconds. Quasi-periodic signatures have been observed in radio wavelengths for over a decade and more recently by SMM. It is hoped that the theoretical ideas outlined may be successfully related to these observations and thus aid the interpretation of oscillatory signatures recorded by SMM. Such signatures may also provide a diagnostic of coronal conditions. New aspects of the ducted mhd waves, for example their behavior in smoothly varying as opposed to tube-like inhomogeneities, are currently under investigation. The theory is not restricted to loops but applied equally to open field regions.

  1. The role of Biot slow waves in electroseismic wave phenomena.

    PubMed

    Pride, Steven R; Garambois, Stéphane

    2002-02-01

    The electromagnetic fields that are generated as a spherical seismic wave (either P or S) traverses an interface separating two porous materials are numerically modeled both with and without the generation of Biot slow waves at the interface. In the case of an incident fast-P wave, the predicted electric-field amplitudes when slow waves are neglected can easily be off by as much as an order of magnitude. In the case of an incident S wave, the error is much smaller (typically on the order of 10% or less) because not much S-wave energy gets converted into slow waves. In neglecting the slow waves, only six plane waves (reflected and transmitted fast-P, S, and EM waves) are available with which to match the eight continuity conditions that hold at each interface. This overdetermined problem is solved by placing weights on the eight continuity conditions so that those conditions that are most important for obtaining the proper response are emphasized. It is demonstrated that when slow waves are neglected, it is best to also neglect the continuity of the Darcy flow and fluid pressure across an interface. The principal conclusion of this work is that to properly model the electromagnetic (EM) fields generated at an interface by an incident seismic wave, the full Biot theory that allows for generation of slow waves must be employed.

  2. Conversion of compressional Alfven waves into ion-cyclotron waves in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Amagishi, Y.; Tsushima, A.; Inutake, M.

    1982-04-26

    Axisymmetric compressional Alfven (fast) waves, which propagate into a region of an increasing magnetic field in a cylindrical plasma, are observed to be converted into ion-cyclotron (slow) waves via ion-cyclotron resonances.

  3. Annual Scientific Report for DE-FG03-02NA00063 Coherent imaging of laser-plasma interactions using XUV high harmonic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. Henry C. Kapteyn

    2005-05-03

    In this project, we use coherent short-wavelength light generated using high-order harmonic generation as a probe of laser-plasma dynamics and phase transitions on femtosecond time-scales. The interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with materials and plasmas is relevant to stockpile stewardship, to understanding the equation of state of matter at high pressures and temperatures, and to plasma concepts such as the fast-ignitor ICF fusion concept and laser-based particle acceleration. Femtosecond laser technology makes it possible to use a small-scale setup to generate 20fs pulses with average power >10W at multiple kHz repetition rates, that can be focused to intensities in excess of 1017W/cm2. These lasers can be used either to rapidly heat materials to initiate phase transitions, or to create laser plasmas over a wide parameter space. These lasers can also be used to generate fully spatially coherent XUV beams with which to probe these materials and plasma systems. We are in process of implementing imaging studies of plasma hydrodynamics and warm, dense matter. The data will be compared with simulation codes of laser-plasma interactions, making it possible to refine and validate these codes.

  4. Interaction of fast waves with ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, S.C.; deGrassie, J.S.; Harvey, R.W.; Chan, V.S.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Stambaugh, R.D.; Ikezi, H.; Mau, T.K.; Heidbrink, W.W.

    1996-02-01

    To fully utilize the available power sources in DIII{endash}D (FW, NBI, ECH), understanding of the synergism between the heating mechanisms is important. In this paper the ion distribution, under simultaneous application of NBI and FW, is calculated from Fokker-Planck code CQL3D coupled to ray-tracing code CURRAY. It is found that interaction between energetic ions and FW can be minimized or maximized by adjusting various parameters such as magnetic field, density, beam energy, and FW frequency. Specifically, in DIII{endash}D, we find negligible interactions above 1.8 T and above 80 MHz, while the interaction increases at lower fields and frequencies. The results are compared with experiments in DIII{endash}D including the calculated neutron rate. Energetic ion orbit losses may play an important role in the ion distribution, and this effect is being investigated. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. A method for suppression of spurious fundamental-harmonic waves in gyrotrons operating at the second cyclotron harmonic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalynov, Yu. K.; Osharin, I. V.; Savilov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    A typical problem of gyrotrons operating at high harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency is the suppression of parasitic near-cutoff waves excited at lower harmonics. In this paper, a method for a significant improvement of the selectivity of the second-harmonic gyrotrons is proposed. This method is based on the use of quasi-regular cavities with short irregularities, which provide different effects on the process of excitation of the operating second-harmonic wave and the spurious fundamental-harmonic wave by the electron beam.

  6. Just How Does Sound Wave?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, Bob

    2006-01-01

    When children first hear the term "sound wave" perhaps they might associate it with the way a hand waves or perhaps the squiggly line image on a television monitor when sound recordings are being made. Research suggests that children tend to think sound somehow travels as a discrete package, a fast-moving invisible thing, and not something that…

  7. Limits of the plane wave approximation in the measurement of molecular properties.

    PubMed

    Walters, Zachary B; Tonzani, Stefano; Greene, Chris H

    2008-10-01

    Rescattering electrons offer great potential as probes of molecular properties on ultrafast timescales. The most famous example is molecular tomography, in which high harmonic spectra of oriented molecules are mapped to "tomographic images" of the relevant molecular orbitals. The accuracy of such reconstructions can be greatly affected by the distortion of scattering wave functions from their asymptotic forms due to interactions with the parent ion. We investigate the validity of the commonly used plane wave approximation in molecular tomography, showing how such distortions affect the resulting orbital reconstructions.

  8. Psychophysiological study on fasting therapy.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Suzuki, J; Yamauchi, Y

    1979-01-01

    The Tohoku University method of fasting therapy was performed on 380 patients. The clinical results revealed an efficacy rate of 87%. With regard to psychosomatic diseases, irritable colon syndrome, neurocirculatory asthenia, mild diabetes mellitus, obesity and borderline hypertension were good indications for this therapy. In order to clarify the therapeutic mechanism, several clinical examinations were administered before, during and after therapy. EEG data was analysed according to the power spectral method. The peak frequency decreased as fasting progressed, while it increased as re-fed continued. Percent energy of alpha waves after fasting therapy was significantly higher than that of the pre-fasting stage. The dexamethasone suppression rate of urine 17-OHCS after fasting therapy was significantly lower than that of the pre-fasting stage. It seems that ketone nutrition may work as a strong stressor in the brain cell, temporarily placing all biological mechanisms in a stress state and then activating the natural healing power inherent to the human body, thereby bringing about homeostasis.

  9. Wave propagation phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenenboom, P. H. L.

    The phenomenon of wave propagation is encountered frequently in a variety of engineering disciplines. It has been realized that for a growing number of problems the solution can only be obtained by discretization of the boundary. Advantages of the Boundary Element Method (BEM) over domain-type methods are related to the reduction of the number of space dimensions and of the modelling effort. It is demonstrated how the BEM can be applied to wave propagation phenomena by establishing the fundamental relationships. A numerical solution procedure is also suggested. In connection with a discussion of the retarded potential formulation, it is shown how the wave propagation problem can be cast into a Boundary Integral Formulation (BIF). The wave propagation problem in the BIF can be solved by time-successive evaluation of the boundary integrals. The example of pressure wave propagation following a sodium-water reaction in a Liquid Metal cooled Fast Breeder Reactor steam generator is discussed.

  10. Mathematics of oscillations and waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonyuk, P. N.

    2016-07-01

    Analytical definition of the sine function and the number π which is related to sine function allows to understand, how harmonic oscillations and waves appear. The functional equation for the sine is received. The new fast algorithm of calculation of the π number is formulated. In the elementary case oscillations and waves are harmonious or sinusoidal. The sine function appears not accidentally. This function can be defined as the solution of the functional equation characterizing periodic properties of oscillations and waves.

  11. Corrugation of Relativistic Magnetized Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, Martin; Ramos, Oscar; Gremillet, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    As a shock front interacts with turbulence it develops corrugation, which induces outgoing wave modes in the downstream plasma. For a fast shock wave, the incoming wave modes can either be fast magnetosonic waves originating downstream, outrunning the shock, or eigenmodes of the upstream plasma drifting through the shock. Using linear perturbation theory in relativistic MHD, this paper provides a general analysis of the corrugation of relativistic magnetized fast shock waves resulting from their interaction with small amplitude disturbances. Transfer functions characterizing the linear response for each of the outgoing modes are calculated as a function of the magnetization of the upstream medium and as a function of the nature of the incoming wave. Interestingly, if the latter is an eigenmode of the upstream plasma, we find that there exists a resonance at which the (linear) response of the shock becomes large or even diverges. This result may have profound consequences on the phenomenology of astrophysical relativistic magnetized shock waves.

  12. EVOLUTION OF FAST MAGNETOACOUSTIC PULSES IN RANDOMLY STRUCTURED CORONAL PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, D.; Li, B.; Pascoe, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Keppens, R. E-mail: bbl@sdu.edu.cn

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the evolution of fast magnetoacoustic pulses in randomly structured plasmas, in the context of large-scale propagating waves in the solar atmosphere. We perform one-dimensional numerical simulations of fast wave pulses propagating perpendicular to a constant magnetic field in a low-β plasma with a random density profile across the field. Both linear and nonlinear regimes are considered. We study how the evolution of the pulse amplitude and width depends on their initial values and the parameters of the random structuring. Acting as a dispersive medium, a randomly structured plasma causes amplitude attenuation and width broadening of the fast wave pulses. After the passage of the main pulse, secondary propagating and standing fast waves appear. Width evolution of both linear and nonlinear pulses can be well approximated by linear functions; however, narrow pulses may have zero or negative broadening. This arises because narrow pulses are prone to splitting, while broad pulses usually deviate less from their initial Gaussian shape and form ripple structures on top of the main pulse. Linear pulses decay at an almost constant rate, while nonlinear pulses decay exponentially. A pulse interacts most efficiently with a random medium with a correlation length of about half of the initial pulse width. This detailed model of fast wave pulses propagating in highly structured media substantiates the interpretation of EIT waves as fast magnetoacoustic waves. Evolution of a fast pulse provides us with a novel method to diagnose the sub-resolution filamentation of the solar atmosphere.

  13. Parallel fast gauss transform

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Rahul S; Sundar, Hari; Veerapaneni, Shravan

    2010-01-01

    We present fast adaptive parallel algorithms to compute the sum of N Gaussians at N points. Direct sequential computation of this sum would take O(N{sup 2}) time. The parallel time complexity estimates for our algorithms are O(N/n{sub p}) for uniform point distributions and O( (N/n{sub p}) log (N/n{sub p}) + n{sub p}log n{sub p}) for non-uniform distributions using n{sub p} CPUs. We incorporate a plane-wave representation of the Gaussian kernel which permits 'diagonal translation'. We use parallel octrees and a new scheme for translating the plane-waves to efficiently handle non-uniform distributions. Computing the transform to six-digit accuracy at 120 billion points took approximately 140 seconds using 4096 cores on the Jaguar supercomputer. Our implementation is 'kernel-independent' and can handle other 'Gaussian-type' kernels even when explicit analytic expression for the kernel is not known. These algorithms form a new class of core computational machinery for solving parabolic PDEs on massively parallel architectures.

  14. FIRST SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATION OF AN H{alpha} MORETON WAVE, EUV WAVE, AND FILAMENT/PROMINENCE OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, Ayumi; Isobe, Hiroaki; Ishii, Takako T.; Kitai, Reizaburo; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; UeNo, Satoru; Nagata, Shin'ichi; Morita, Satoshi; Nishida, Keisuke; Shibata, Kazunari; Shiota, Daikou; Oi, Akihito; Akioka, Maki

    2012-02-15

    We report on the first simultaneous observation of an H{alpha} Moreton wave, the corresponding EUV fast coronal waves, and a slow and bright EUV wave (typical EIT wave). We observed a Moreton wave, associated with an X6.9 flare that occurred on 2011 August 9 at the active region NOAA 11263, in the H{alpha} images taken by the Solar Magnetic Activity Research Telescope at Hida Observatory of Kyoto University. In the EUV images obtained by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory we found not only the corresponding EUV fast 'bright' coronal wave, but also the EUV fast 'faint' wave that is not associated with the H{alpha} Moreton wave. We also found a slow EUV wave, which corresponds to a typical EIT wave. Furthermore, we observed, for the first time, the oscillations of a prominence and a filament, simultaneously, both in the H{alpha} and EUV images. To trigger the oscillations by the flare-associated coronal disturbance, we expect a coronal wave as fast as the fast-mode MHD wave with the velocity of about 570-800 km s{sup -1}. These velocities are consistent with those of the observed Moreton wave and the EUV fast coronal wave.

  15. Gabor Wave Packet Method to Solve Plasma Wave Equations

    SciTech Connect

    A. Pletzer; C.K. Phillips; D.N. Smithe

    2003-06-18

    A numerical method for solving plasma wave equations arising in the context of mode conversion between the fast magnetosonic and the slow (e.g ion Bernstein) wave is presented. The numerical algorithm relies on the expansion of the solution in Gaussian wave packets known as Gabor functions, which have good resolution properties in both real and Fourier space. The wave packets are ideally suited to capture both the large and small wavelength features that characterize mode conversion problems. The accuracy of the scheme is compared with a standard finite element approach.

  16. Inhomogeneous high harmonic generation in krypton clusters.

    PubMed

    Ruf, H; Handschin, C; Cireasa, R; Thiré, N; Ferré, A; Petit, S; Descamps, D; Mével, E; Constant, E; Blanchet, V; Fabre, B; Mairesse, Y

    2013-02-22

    High order harmonic generation from clusters is a controversial topic: conflicting theories exist, with different explanations for similar experimental observations. From an experimental point of view, separating the contributions from monomers and clusters is challenging. By performing a spectrally and spatially resolved study in a controlled mixture of clusters and monomers, we are able to isolate a region of the spectrum where the emission purely originates from clusters. Surprisingly, the emission from clusters is depolarized, which is the signature of statistical inhomogeneous emission from a low-density source. The harmonic response to laser ellipticity shows that this generation is produced by a new recollisional mechanism, which opens the way to future theoretical studies.

  17. High harmonic generation in undulators for FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukovsky, K.

    2016-02-01

    The analytical study of the undulator radiation (UR), accounting for major sources of the spectral line broadening is presented. Analytical expressions for the UR spectrum and intensity are obtained. They demonstrate possibilities of the compensation of the divergency by the constant magnetic component. Some examples of single and double frequency undulators are considered. Generation of harmonics is studied with account for homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening in real devices. The obtained results with account for all broadening sources are applied for evaluation of free electron laser (FEL) performance and compared with those, obtained with the ideal undulator.

  18. FAST: FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Travis J.; Kauffman, Kyle T.; Amrine, Katherine C. H.; Carper, Dana L.; Lee, Raymond S.; Becich, Peter J.; Canales, Claudia J.; Ardell, David H.

    2015-01-01

    FAST (FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox) provides simple, powerful open source command-line tools to filter, transform, annotate and analyze biological sequence data. Modeled after the GNU (GNU's Not Unix) Textutils such as grep, cut, and tr, FAST tools such as fasgrep, fascut, and fastr make it easy to rapidly prototype expressive bioinformatic workflows in a compact and generic command vocabulary. Compact combinatorial encoding of data workflows with FAST commands can simplify the documentation and reproducibility of bioinformatic protocols, supporting better transparency in biological data science. Interface self-consistency and conformity with conventions of GNU, Matlab, Perl, BioPerl, R, and GenBank help make FAST easy and rewarding to learn. FAST automates numerical, taxonomic, and text-based sorting, selection and transformation of sequence records and alignment sites based on content, index ranges, descriptive tags, annotated features, and in-line calculated analytics, including composition and codon usage. Automated content- and feature-based extraction of sites and support for molecular population genetic statistics make FAST useful for molecular evolutionary analysis. FAST is portable, easy to install and secure thanks to the relative maturity of its Perl and BioPerl foundations, with stable releases posted to CPAN. Development as well as a publicly accessible Cookbook and Wiki are available on the FAST GitHub repository at https://github.com/tlawrence3/FAST. The default data exchange format in FAST is Multi-FastA (specifically, a restriction of BioPerl FastA format). Sanger and Illumina 1.8+ FastQ formatted files are also supported. FAST makes it easier for non-programmer biologists to interactively investigate and control biological data at the speed of thought. PMID:26042145

  19. FAST: FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Travis J; Kauffman, Kyle T; Amrine, Katherine C H; Carper, Dana L; Lee, Raymond S; Becich, Peter J; Canales, Claudia J; Ardell, David H

    2015-01-01

    FAST (FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox) provides simple, powerful open source command-line tools to filter, transform, annotate and analyze biological sequence data. Modeled after the GNU (GNU's Not Unix) Textutils such as grep, cut, and tr, FAST tools such as fasgrep, fascut, and fastr make it easy to rapidly prototype expressive bioinformatic workflows in a compact and generic command vocabulary. Compact combinatorial encoding of data workflows with FAST commands can simplify the documentation and reproducibility of bioinformatic protocols, supporting better transparency in biological data science. Interface self-consistency and conformity with conventions of GNU, Matlab, Perl, BioPerl, R, and GenBank help make FAST easy and rewarding to learn. FAST automates numerical, taxonomic, and text-based sorting, selection and transformation of sequence records and alignment sites based on content, index ranges, descriptive tags, annotated features, and in-line calculated analytics, including composition and codon usage. Automated content- and feature-based extraction of sites and support for molecular population genetic statistics make FAST useful for molecular evolutionary analysis. FAST is portable, easy to install and secure thanks to the relative maturity of its Perl and BioPerl foundations, with stable releases posted to CPAN. Development as well as a publicly accessible Cookbook and Wiki are available on the FAST GitHub repository at https://github.com/tlawrence3/FAST. The default data exchange format in FAST is Multi-FastA (specifically, a restriction of BioPerl FastA format). Sanger and Illumina 1.8+ FastQ formatted files are also supported. FAST makes it easier for non-programmer biologists to interactively investigate and control biological data at the speed of thought.

  20. Dynamics of Attosecond Electron Wave Packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauritsson, Johan

    2005-05-01

    We present results from some of the first experimental studies of attosecond electron wave packets created via the absorption of ultrashort extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light pulses [1]. The pulses, made via high harmonic generation, form an attosecond pulse train (APT) whose properties we can manipulate by a combination of spatial and spectral filtering. For instance, we show that on-target attosecond pulses of 170 as duration, which is close to the single cycle limit, can be produced [2]. The electron wave packets created when such an APT is used to ionize an atom are different from the tunneling wave packets familiar from strong field ionization. We show how to measure the dynamics of these wave packets in a strong infrared (IR) field, where the absorption of energy above the ionization threshold is found to depend strongly on the APT-IR delay [3]. We also demonstrate that altering the properties of the initial electron wave packet by manipulating the APT changes the subsequent continuum electron dynamics. Finally, we show how the phase of a longer, femtosecond electron wave packet can be modulated by a moderately strong IR pulse with duration comparable to or shorter than that of the electron wave packet. This experiment reveals how the normal ponderomotive shift of an XUV ionization event is modified when the IR pulse is shorter than the XUV pulse.[1] The experiments were done at Lund Institute of Technology, Sweden.[2] R. López-Martens, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 033001 (2005)[3] P. Johnsson, et al., submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett.

  1. Making Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeClark, Tom

    2000-01-01

    Presents an activity on waves that addresses the state standards and benchmarks of Michigan. Demonstrates waves and studies wave's medium, motion, and frequency. The activity is designed to address different learning styles. (YDS)

  2. Neighborhood fast food restaurants and fast food consumption: A national study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that neighborhood fast food restaurant availability is related to greater obesity, yet few studies have investigated whether neighborhood fast food restaurant availability promotes fast food consumption. Our aim was to estimate the effect of neighborhood fast food availability on frequency of fast food consumption in a national sample of young adults, a population at high risk for obesity. Methods We used national data from U.S. young adults enrolled in wave III (2001-02; ages 18-28) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (n = 13,150). Urbanicity-stratified multivariate negative binomial regression models were used to examine cross-sectional associations between neighborhood fast food availability and individual-level self-reported fast food consumption frequency, controlling for individual and neighborhood characteristics. Results In adjusted analysis, fast food availability was not associated with weekly frequency of fast food consumption in non-urban or low- or high-density urban areas. Conclusions Policies aiming to reduce neighborhood availability as a means to reduce fast food consumption among young adults may be unsuccessful. Consideration of fast food outlets near school or workplace locations, factors specific to more or less urban settings, and the role of individual lifestyle attitudes and preferences are needed in future research. PMID:21740571

  3. High amplitude waves in the expanding solar wind plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J. M.; Velli, M.; Grappin, R.

    1996-07-20

    We simulated the 1 D nonlinear time-evolution of high-amplitude Alfven, slow and fast magnetoacustic waves in the solar wind propagating outward at different angles to the mean magnetic (spiral) field, using the expanding box model. The simulation results for Alfven waves and fast magnetoacustic waves fit the observational constraints in the solar wind best, showing decreasing trends for energies and other rms-quantities due to expansion and the appearance of inward propagating waves as minor species in the wind. Inward propagating waves are generated by reflection of Alfven waves propagating at large angles to the magnetic field or they coincide with the occurrence of compressible fluctuations. It is the generation of sound due to ponderomotive forces of the Alfven wave which we can detect in the latter case. For slow magnetoacustic waves we find a kind of oscillation of the character of the wave between a sound wave and an Alfven wave. This is the more, the slow magnetoacustic wave is close to a sound wave in the beginning. On the other hand, fast magnetoacustic waves are much more dissipated than the other wave-types and their general behaviour is close to the Alfven. The normalized cross-helicity {sigma}{sub c} is close to one for Alfven-waves and this quantity is decreasing slightly when density-fluctuations are generated. {sigma}{sub c} decreases significantly when the waves are close to perpendicular propagation. Then, the waves are close to quasi-static structures.

  4. Measurement of the D alpha spectrum produced by fast ions in DIII-D.

    PubMed

    Luo, Y; Heidbrink, W W; Burrell, K H; Kaplan, D H; Gohil, P

    2007-03-01

    Fast ions are produced by neutral beam injection and ion cyclotron heating in toroidal magnetic fusion devices. As deuterium fast ions orbit around the device and pass through a neutral beam, some deuterons neutralize and emit D(alpha) light. For a favorable viewing geometry, the emission is Doppler shifted away from other bright interfering signals. In the 2005 campaign, we built a two channel charge-coupled device based diagnostic to measure the fast-ion velocity distribution and spatial profile under a wide variety of operating conditions. Fast-ion data are acquired with a time resolution of approximately 1 ms, spatial resolution of approximately 5 cm, and energy resolution of approximately 10 keV. Background subtraction and fitting techniques eliminate various contaminants in the spectrum. Neutral particle and neutron diagnostics corroborate the D(alpha) measurement. Examples of fast-ion slowing down and pitch angle scattering in quiescent plasma and fast-ion acceleration by high harmonic ion cyclotron heating are presented.

  5. Measurement of the D{sub {alpha}} spectrum produced by fast ions in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Burrell, K. H.; Kaplan, D. H.; Gohil, P.

    2007-03-15

    Fast ions are produced by neutral beam injection and ion cyclotron heating in toroidal magnetic fusion devices. As deuterium fast ions orbit around the device and pass through a neutral beam, some deuterons neutralize and emit D{sub {alpha}} light. For a favorable viewing geometry, the emission is Doppler shifted away from other bright interfering signals. In the 2005 campaign, we built a two channel charge-coupled device based diagnostic to measure the fast-ion velocity distribution and spatial profile under a wide variety of operating conditions. Fast-ion data are acquired with a time resolution of {approx}1 ms, spatial resolution of {approx}5 cm, and energy resolution of {approx}10 keV. Background subtraction and fitting techniques eliminate various contaminants in the spectrum. Neutral particle and neutron diagnostics corroborate the D{sub {alpha}} measurement. Examples of fast-ion slowing down and pitch angle scattering in quiescent plasma and fast-ion acceleration by high harmonic ion cyclotron heating are presented.

  6. On the Nature of Coronal EIT Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballai, I.; Erdélyi, R.; Pintér, B.

    2005-11-01

    Large-scale eruption events in the solar atmosphere can generate global waves, i.e., waves that propagate over distances comparable to the solar radius. In the low solar corona, global waves observed by SOHO EIT, generated by coronal mass ejections or flares, are usually referred to as ``EIT waves.'' The nature of these global waves is the subject of strong debate, and opinions are divided between different interpretations (e.g., fast magnetohydrodynamic waves, shock waves, nonwave feature, etc.). In the present Letter, we studied TRACE EUV data to show that these global coronal disturbances are indeed waves with a well-defined period. Supposing that the EIT waves transfer all their energy to interacting loops, we also estimate the minimum energy threshold carried by EIT waves.

  7. Relativistic electron scattering by magnetosonic waves: Effects of discrete wave emission and high wave amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Artemyev, A. V.; Mourenas, D.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we study relativistic electron scattering by fast magnetosonic waves. We compare results of test particle simulations and the quasi-linear theory for different spectra of waves to investigate how a fine structure of the wave emission can influence electron resonant scattering. We show that for a realistically wide distribution of wave normal angles θ (i.e., when the dispersion δθ≥0.5{sup °}), relativistic electron scattering is similar for a wide wave spectrum and for a spectrum consisting in well-separated ion cyclotron harmonics. Comparisons of test particle simulations with quasi-linear theory show that for δθ>0.5{sup °}, the quasi-linear approximation describes resonant scattering correctly for a large enough plasma frequency. For a very narrow θ distribution (when δθ∼0.05{sup °}), however, the effect of a fine structure in the wave spectrum becomes important. In this case, quasi-linear theory clearly fails in describing accurately electron scattering by fast magnetosonic waves. We also study the effect of high wave amplitudes on relativistic electron scattering. For typical conditions in the earth's radiation belts, the quasi-linear approximation cannot accurately describe electron scattering for waves with averaged amplitudes >300 pT. We discuss various applications of the obtained results for modeling electron dynamics in the radiation belts and in the Earth's magnetotail.

  8. Increased Speed: 3D Silicon Sensors. Fast Current Amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Sherwood; Kok, Angela; Kenney, Christopher; Jarron, Pierre; Hasi, Jasmine; Despeisse, Matthieu; Da Via, Cinzia; Anelli, Giovanni; /CERN

    2012-05-07

    The authors describe techniques to make fast, sub-nanosecond time resolution solid-state detector systems using sensors with 3D electrodes, current amplifiers, constant-fraction comparators or fast wave-form recorders, and some of the next steps to reach still faster results.

  9. Responder fast steering mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullard, Andrew; Shawki, Islam

    2013-10-01

    Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems (SAS) has designed, built and tested a 3.3-inch diameter fast steering mirror (FSM) for space application. This 2-axis FSM operates over a large angle (over 10 degree range), has a very high servo bandwidth (over 3.3 Khz closed loop bandwidth), has nanoradian-class noise, and is designed to support microradian class line of sight accuracy. The FSM maintains excellent performance over large temperature ranges (which includes wave front error) and has very high reliability with the help of fully redundant angle sensors and actuator circuits. The FSM is capable of achieving all its design requirements while also being reaction-compensated. The reaction compensation is achieved passively and does not need a separate control loop. The FSM has undergone various environmental testing which include exported forces and torques and thermal vacuum testing that support the FSM design claims. This paper presents the mechanical design and test results of the mechanism which satisfies the rigorous vacuum and space application requirements.

  10. Responder fast steering mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullard, Andrew; Shawki, Islam

    2013-09-01

    Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems (SAS) has designed, built and tested a 3.3-inch diameter fast steering mirror (FSM) for space application. This 2-axis FSM operates over a large angle (over 10 degree range), has a very high servo bandwidth (over 3.3 Khz closed loop bandwidth), has nanoradian-class noise, and is designed to support microradian class line of sight accuracy. The FSM maintains excellent performance over large temperature ranges (which includes wave front error) and has very high reliability with the help of fully redundant angle sensors and actuator circuits. The FSM is capable of achieving all its design requirements while also being reaction-compensated. The reaction compensation is achieved passively and does not need a separate control loop. The FSM has undergone various environmental testing which include exported forces and torques and thermal vacuum testing that support the FSM design claims. This paper presents the mechanical design and test results of the mechanism which satisfies the rigorous vacuum and space application requirements.

  11. Traveling-Wave Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    1998-01-01

    The traveling-wave tube (TWT) is a vacuum device invented in the early 1940's used for amplification at microwave frequencies. Amplification is attained by surrendering kinetic energy from an electron beam to a radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic wave. The demand for vacuum devices has been decreased largely by the advent of solid-state devices. However, although solid state devices have replaced vacuum devices in many areas, there are still many applications such as radar, electronic countermeasures and satellite communications, that require operating characteristics such as high power (Watts to Megawatts), high frequency (below 1 GHz to over 100 GHz) and large bandwidth that only vacuum devices can provide. Vacuum devices are also deemed irreplaceable in the music industry where musicians treasure their tube-based amplifiers claiming that the solid-state and digital counterparts could never provide the same "warmth" (3). The term traveling-wave tube includes both fast-wave and slow-wave devices. This article will concentrate on slow-wave devices as the vast majority of TWTs in operation fall into this category.

  12. Wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    Wave turbulence is the statistical mechanics of random waves with a broadband spectrum interacting via non-linearity. To understand its difference from non-random well-tuned coherent waves, one could compare the sound of thunder to a piece of classical music. Wave turbulence is surprisingly common and important in a great variety of physical settings, starting with the most familiar ocean waves to waves at quantum scales or to much longer waves in astrophysics. We will provide a basic overview of the wave turbulence ideas, approaches and main results emphasising the physics of the phenomena and using qualitative descriptions avoiding, whenever possible, involved mathematical derivations. In particular, dimensional analysis will be used for obtaining the key scaling solutions in wave turbulence - Kolmogorov-Zakharov (KZ) spectra.

  13. Segmented waves from a spatiotemporal transverse wave instability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lingfa; Berenstein, Igal; Epstein, Irving R

    2005-07-15

    We observe traveling waves emitted from Turing spots in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction. The newborn waves are continuous, but they break into segments as they propagate, and the propagation of these segments ultimately gives rise to spatiotemporal chaos. We model the wave-breaking process and the motion of the chaotic segments. We find stable segmented spirals as well. We attribute the segmentation to an interaction between front rippling via a transverse instability and front symmetry breaking by a fast-diffusing inhibitor far from the codimension-2 Hopf-Turing bifurcation, and the chaos to a secondary instability of the periodic segmentation.

  14. SURFACE ALFVEN WAVES IN SOLAR FLUX TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Goossens, M.; Andries, J.; Soler, R.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Arregui, I.; Terradas, J.

    2012-07-10

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere. Alfven waves and magneto-sonic waves are particular classes of MHD waves. These wave modes are clearly different and have pure properties in uniform plasmas of infinite extent only. Due to plasma non-uniformity, MHD waves have mixed properties and cannot be classified as pure Alfven or magneto-sonic waves. However, vorticity is a quantity unequivocally related to Alfven waves as compression is for magneto-sonic waves. Here, we investigate MHD waves superimposed on a one-dimensional non-uniform straight cylinder with constant magnetic field. For a piecewise constant density profile, we find that the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves have the same properties as surface Alfven waves at a true discontinuity in density. Contrary to the classic Alfven waves in a uniform plasma of infinite extent, vorticity is zero everywhere except at the cylinder boundary. If the discontinuity in density is replaced with a continuous variation of density, vorticity is spread out over the whole interval with non-uniform density. The fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves do not need compression to exist unlike the radial overtones. In thin magnetic cylinders, the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves with phase velocities between the internal and the external Alfven velocities can be considered as surface Alfven waves. On the contrary, the radial overtones can be related to fast-like magneto-sonic modes.

  15. High amplitude waves in the expanding solar wind plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, J. M.; Velli, M.; Grappin, R.

    1995-01-01

    We simulated the 1-D nonlinear time-evolution of high-amplitude Alfven, slow and fast magnetoacoustic waves in the solar wind propagating outward at different angles to the mean magnetic (spiral) field, using the expanding box model. The simulation results for Alfven waves and fast magnetoacustic waves fit the observational constraints in the solar wind best, showing decreasing trends for energies and other rms-quantities due to expansion and the appearance of inward propagating waves as minor species in the wind. Inward propagating waves are generated by reflection of Alfven waves propagating at large angles to the magnetic field or they coincide with the occurrence of compressible fluctuations. In our simulations, fast and slow magnetoacoustic waves seem to have a level in the density-fluctuations which is too high when we compare with the observations. Furthermore, the evolution of energies for slow magnetoacoustic waves differs strongly from the evolution of fluctuation energies in situ.

  16. Interaction of fast magnetoacoustic solitons in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jahangir, R.; Saleem, Khalid; Masood, W.; Siddiq, M.; Batool, Nazia

    2015-09-15

    One dimensional propagation of fast magnetoacoustic solitary waves in dense plasmas with degenerate electrons is investigated in this paper in the small amplitude limit. In this regard, Korteweg deVries equation is derived and discussed using the plasma parameters that are typically found in white dwarf stars. The interaction of fast magnetoacoustic solitons is explored by using the Hirota bilinear formalism, which admits multi soliton solutions. It is observed that the values of the propagation vectors determine the interaction of solitary waves. It is further noted that the amplitude of the respective solitary waves remain unchanged after the interaction; however, they do experience a phase shift.

  17. Interaction of fast magnetoacoustic solitons in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahangir, R.; Masood, W.; Siddiq, M.; Batool, Nazia; Saleem, Khalid

    2015-09-01

    One dimensional propagation of fast magnetoacoustic solitary waves in dense plasmas with degenerate electrons is investigated in this paper in the small amplitude limit. In this regard, Korteweg deVries equation is derived and discussed using the plasma parameters that are typically found in white dwarf stars. The interaction of fast magnetoacoustic solitons is explored by using the Hirota bilinear formalism, which admits multi soliton solutions. It is observed that the values of the propagation vectors determine the interaction of solitary waves. It is further noted that the amplitude of the respective solitary waves remain unchanged after the interaction; however, they do experience a phase shift.

  18. The theory of magnetohydrodynamic wave generation by localized sources. II - Collisionless dissipation of wave packets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, William

    1989-01-01

    The dispersion equation of Barnes (1966) is used to study the dissipation of asymptotic wave packets generated by localized periodic sources. The solutions of the equation are linear waves, damped by Landau and transit-time processes, in a collisionless warm plasma. For the case of an ideal MHD system, most of the waves emitted from a source are shown to cancel asympotically through destructive interference. The modes transporting significant flux to asymptotic distances are found to be Alfven waves and fast waves with theta (the angle between the magnetic field and the characteristics of the far-field waves) of about 0 and about pi/2.

  19. Fast food tips (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... challenge to eat healthy when going to a fast food place. In general, avoiding items that are deep ... challenge to eat healthy when going to a fast food place. In general, avoiding items that are deep ...

  20. Fast food (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Fast foods are quick, reasonably priced, and readily available alternatives to home cooking. While convenient and economical for a busy lifestyle, fast foods are typically high in calories, fat, saturated fat, ...