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Sample records for high-intensity laser interactions

  1. High-intensity laser-atom interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachain, Charles J.

    2014-11-01

    Following a historical introduction on the nature of light and its interaction with matter, a survey is given of the development of lasers capable of delivering short pulses of very intense radiation. The peak intensities of these laser pulses are so high that the corresponding laser fields can compete with, or even dominate, the Coulomb field in governing the dynamics of atomic systems. As a result, new phenomena, known as multiphoton processes, can occur. An outline is given of the basic properties found in the study of three important multiphoton processes. Firstly, the multiphoton ionization of atoms and the phenomenon of “above-threshold ionization”. Secondly, the emission by atoms of high-order harmonics of the frequency of the driving laser and their use to generate laser pulses having durations in the attosecond range. Thirdly, laser-assisted electron-atom collisions. A review is then given of the main non-perturbative methods which have been used to perform theoretical studies of multiphoton processes.

  2. High-power, high-intensity laser propagation and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, Phillip; Hafizi, Bahman

    2014-05-15

    This paper presents overviews of a number of processes and applications associated with high-power, high-intensity lasers, and their interactions. These processes and applications include: free electron lasers, backward Raman amplification, atmospheric propagation of laser pulses, laser driven acceleration, atmospheric lasing, and remote detection of radioactivity. The interrelated physical mechanisms in the various processes are discussed.

  3. The shaped critical surface in high intensity laser plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, D. W.; Kemp, G. E.; Link, A.; Freeman, R. R.; Van Woerkom, L. D.

    2011-01-15

    This paper describes an investigation of the properties of the relativistic critical surface in a high intensity laser-plasma interaction, specifically the spatial morphology of the surface and its effect upon the divergence of the reflected light. The particle-in-cell code LSP running in two dimensions (2d3v) was used to model the formation of the critical surface and to show that it resides at a varying depth into the material that is dependent on both the intensity radial dependence of the laser focus as well as the shape of the longitudinal vacuum-material interface. The result is a shaped 'mirror' surface that creates a reflected beam with phase and amplitude information informed by the extent of the preplasma present before the intense laser pulse arrived. A robust, highly effective means of experimentally determining the preplasma conditions for any high intensity laser-matter interaction is proposed using this effect. The important physics is elucidated with a simplified model that, within reasonable intensity bounds, recasts the effect of the complex laser-plasma interaction on the reflected beam into a standard Gaussian optics calculation.

  4. Gigagauss Magnetic Field Generation from High Intensity Laser Solid Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefcik, J.; Perry, M. D.; Lasinski, B. F.; Langdon, A. B.; Cowan, T.; Hammer, J.; Hatchett, S.; Hunt, A.; Key, M. H.; Moran, M.; Pennington, D.; Snavely, R.; Trebes, J.; Wilks, S. C.

    2004-11-01

    Intense laser (>1021 W/cm2) sources using pulse compression techniques in the sub-picosecond time frame have been used to create dynamic electric field strengths in excess of 100 Megavolts/micron with associated magnetic field strengths in the gigagauss regime. We have begun a series of experiments using the Petawatt Laser system at LLNL to determine the potential of these sources for a variety of applications. Hot electron spectra from laser-target interactions in Au have been measured with energies up to 100 MeV. Hot x-ray production has been measured using filtered thermoluminescent dosimeters and threshold nuclear activation (γ,n) from giant resonance interactions. High-resolution radiographs through ρr ≥ 165 gm/cm2 have been obtained. Dose levels in the x-ray band from 2-8 MeV have been measured at the level of several rads at one meter from the target for a single pulse. The physics of these sources and the scaling relationships and laser technology required to provide high magnetic fields are discussed. Results of preliminary magnetic field calculations are presented along with potential applications of this technology and estimates of the fundamental scaling limits for future development.

  5. Short-pulse high intensity laser thin foil interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audebert, Patrick

    2003-10-01

    The technology of ultrashort pulse laser generation has progressed to the point that optical pulses larger than 10 J, 300 fs duration or shorter are routinely produced. Such pulses can be focused to intensities exceeding 10^18 W/cm^2. With high contrast pulses, these focused intensities can be used to heat solid matter to high temperatures with minimal hydrodynamic expansion, producing an extremely high energy-density state of matter for a short period of time. This high density, high temperature plasma can be studied by x-ray spectroscopy. We have performed experiments on thin foils of different elements under well controlled conditions at the 100 Terawatt laser at LULI to study the characteristics X-ray emission of laser heated solids. To suppress the ASE effect, the laser was frequency doubled. S-polarized light with a peak intensity of 10^19W/cm^2 was used to minimize resonance absorption. To decrease the effect of longitudinal temperature gradients very thin (800 μ) aluminum foil targets were used. We have also studied the effect of radial gradient by limiting the measured x-ray emission zone using 50μ or 100μ pinhole on target. The spectra, in the range 7-8Å, were recorded using a conical crystal spectrometer coupled to a 800 fs resolution streak camera. A Fourier Domain Interferometry (FDI) of the back of the foil was also performed providing a measurement of the hydrodynamic expansion as function of time for each shot. To simulate the experiment, we used the 1D hydrodynamic code FILM with a given set of plasma parameter (ρ, Te) as initial conditions. The X-ray emission was calculated by post processing hydrodynamic results with a collisional-radiative model which uses super-configuration average atomic data. The simulation reproduces the main features of the experimental time resolved spectrum.

  6. Spectroscopic Analysis of High Intensity Laser Beam Jets Interaction Experiments on the Leopard Laser at UNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, E. E.; Weller, M. E.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Moschella, J. J.; Shrestha, I.; Shlyapsteva, V. V.; Stafford, A.; Keim, S. F.; University of Nevada Reno Team

    2013-10-01

    Results of Ar gas-puff experiments performed on the high power Leopard laser at UNR are presented. Flux density of laser radiation in focal spot was up to 2 × 1016 W/cm2 (pulse duration was 0.8 ns and laser wavelength was 1.057 μm). Specifically, spectroscopic analysis of K-shell Ar spectra are investigated and compared as functions of the orientation of the laser beam to linear gas jet. The laser beam axis was positioned either along the jet plane or orthogonal to it at a distance of 1 mm from the nozzle output. The diagnostics used included a time-integrated x-ray spectrometer along with a set of filtered Si diodes with various cutoff energies. In order to identify lines, a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) kinetic model was utilized and was also used to determine plasma parameters such as electron temperature and density. The importance of the spectroscopic study of high intensity laser beam-jets interaction experiments is discussed. This work was supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Basic Research Award # HDTRA1-13-1-0033, to University of Nevada, Reno, and in part by the DOE/NNSA Cooperative agreements DE-NA0001984 and DE-FC52-06NA27616.

  7. ANALYSIS AND MITIGATION OF X-RAY HAZARD GENERATED FROM HIGH INTENSITY LASER-TARGET INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, R.; Liu, J.C.; Prinz, A.A.; Rokni, S.H.; Woods, M.; Xia, Z.; /SLAC

    2011-03-21

    Interaction of a high intensity laser with matter may generate an ionizing radiation hazard. Very limited studies have been made, however, on the laser-induced radiation protection issue. This work reviews available literature on the physics and characteristics of laser-induced X-ray hazards. Important aspects include the laser-to-electron energy conversion efficiency, electron angular distribution, electron energy spectrum and effective temperature, and bremsstrahlung production of X-rays in the target. The possible X-ray dose rates for several femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser systems used at SLAC, including the short pulse laser system for the Matter in Extreme Conditions Instrument (peak power 4 TW and peak intensity 2.4 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) were analysed. A graded approach to mitigate the laser-induced X-ray hazard with a combination of engineered and administrative controls is also proposed.

  8. James Clerk Maxwell Prize Address: High Intensity Laser Propagation and Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprangle, Phillip

    2013-10-01

    High intensity laser radiation sources cover a wide range of parameters, e.g., peak powers from tera to peta watts, pulse lengths from pico to femto seconds, repetition rates ranging from kilo to mega hertz and average powers of many tens of watts. This talk will cover, among other things, some of the unique physical processes which result when high intensity laser radiation interacts with gases and plasmas. One of the interesting topics to be discussed is the propagation of these laser pulses in a turbulent atmosphere which results in a multitude of coupled linear and nonlinear processes including filamentation and scintillation. Phase conjugation techniques to reduce the effects of atmospheric turbulence (scintillation) will be described. This talk will also discuss a range of potential applications of these high intensity lasers, including: electron acceleration in spatially periodic and tapered plasma channels, detection of radioactive material using electromagnetic signatures, atmospheric lasing of N2 molecules, as well as incoherent and coherent x-ray generation mechanisms. Research supported by NRL, ONR and UMD.

  9. Femtosecond dynamics of energetic electrons in high intensity laser-matter interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pompili, R.; Anania, M. P.; Bisesto, F.; Botton, M.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Ferrario, M.; Galletti, M.; Henis, Z.; Petrarca, M.; Schleifer, E.; Zigler, A.

    2016-01-01

    Highly energetic electrons are generated at the early phases of the interaction of short-pulse high-intensity lasers with solid targets. These escaping particles are identified as the essential core of picosecond-scale phenomena such as laser-based acceleration, surface manipulation, generation of intense magnetic fields and electromagnetic pulses. Increasing the number of the escaping electrons facilitate the late time processes in all cases. Up to now only indirect evidences of these important forerunners have been recorded, thus no detailed study of the governing mechanisms was possible. Here we report, for the first time, direct time-dependent measurements of energetic electrons ejected from solid targets by the interaction with a short-pulse high-intensity laser. We measured electron bunches up to 7 nanocoulombs charge, picosecond duration and 12 megaelectronvolts energy. Our ’snapshots’ capture their evolution with an unprecedented temporal resolution, demonstrat- ing a significant boost in charge and energy of escaping electrons when increasing the geometrical target curvature. These results pave the way toward significant improvement in laser acceleration of ions using shaped targets allowing the future development of small scale laser-ion accelerators. PMID:27713541

  10. Femtosecond dynamics of energetic electrons in high intensity laser-matter interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompili, R.; Anania, M. P.; Bisesto, F.; Botton, M.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Ferrario, M.; Galletti, M.; Henis, Z.; Petrarca, M.; Schleifer, E.; Zigler, A.

    2016-10-01

    Highly energetic electrons are generated at the early phases of the interaction of short-pulse high-intensity lasers with solid targets. These escaping particles are identified as the essential core of picosecond-scale phenomena such as laser-based acceleration, surface manipulation, generation of intense magnetic fields and electromagnetic pulses. Increasing the number of the escaping electrons facilitate the late time processes in all cases. Up to now only indirect evidences of these important forerunners have been recorded, thus no detailed study of the governing mechanisms was possible. Here we report, for the first time, direct time-dependent measurements of energetic electrons ejected from solid targets by the interaction with a short-pulse high-intensity laser. We measured electron bunches up to 7 nanocoulombs charge, picosecond duration and 12 megaelectronvolts energy. Our ’snapshots’ capture their evolution with an unprecedented temporal resolution, demonstrat- ing a significant boost in charge and energy of escaping electrons when increasing the geometrical target curvature. These results pave the way toward significant improvement in laser acceleration of ions using shaped targets allowing the future development of small scale laser-ion accelerators.

  11. Radiation Dose Measurement for High-Intensity Laser Interactions with Solid Targets at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Taiee

    2015-09-25

    A systematic study of photon and neutron radiation doses generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions is underway at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We found that these laser-solid experiments are being performed using a 25 TW (up to 1 J in 40 fs) femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source’s (LCLS) Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) facility. Additionally, radiation measurements were performed with passive and active detectors deployed at various locations inside and outside the target chamber. Results from radiation dose measurements for laser-solid experiments at SLAC MEC in 2014 with peak intensity between 1018 to 7.1x1019 W/cm2 are presented.

  12. Proton acceleration with high intensity lasers interacting on micro-cone targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Humieres, Emmanuel; Cowan, Tom; Gaillard, Sandrine; Le Galloudec, Nathalie; Rassuchine, Jennifer; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2006-10-01

    In the last few years, intense research has been conducted on laser-accelerated ion sources and their applications [1,2]. Proton beams accelerated from solid planar targets have exceptional properties that open new opportunities for ion beam generation and control. Experiments conducted at LANL and LULI have shown that high intensity lasers interacting on micro-cone targets can produce proton beams more collimated and more energetic than with planar targets. These micro-cone targets are composed of a curved cone attached to a micro-table. 2D PIC simulations were performed to understand the experiments and separate the effect of the cone from the effect of the micro-table. These new targets could help increase the laser-accelerated protons maximum energy to the 100 MeV range. [1] J. Fuchs et al., Nature Physics 2, 48 (2006). [2] T.Toncian et al., Science Vol. 312, 21 April 2006, p.410-413.

  13. Resistively enhanced proton acceleration via high-intensity laser interactions with cold foil targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbon, Paul

    2005-08-01

    The acceleration of MeV protons by high-intensity laser interaction with foil targets is studied using a recently developed plasma simulation technique. Based on a hierarchical N-body tree algorithm, this method provides a natural means of treating three-dimensional, collisional transport effects hitherto neglected in conventional explicit particle-in-cell simulations. For targets with finite resistivity, hot electron transport is strongly inhibited, even at temperatures in the MeV range. This leads to suppression of ion acceleration from the rear of the target and an enhancement in energies and numbers of protons originating from the front.

  14. Appearance of Density Cavitations in the Laser Wake in Simulations of High Intensity Laser-Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.-L.

    2009-01-22

    Nonlinear interactions of high intensity, ultrashort laser pulses with underdense plasmas produce many interesting features that may appear in computer simulations. One of these features commonly observed in Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations is the spontaneous appearance of long-lived density cavitations in the plasma wake region behind the laser pulse. To study these cavitations, several small 2D PIC simulations are run in which plasma density, density ramps, total simulation time, laser pulsewidth, laser intensity, and laser polarization parameters have been varied. Based on the simulation results, some possible aspects of an experiment designed to directly detect these structures are discussed.

  15. Characterization of the fast electrons distribution produced in a high intensity laser target interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Westover, B.; Chen, C. D.; Patel, P. K.; McLean, H.; Beg, F. N.

    2014-03-15

    Experiments on the Titan laser (∼150 J, 0.7 ps, 2 × 10{sup 20} W cm{sup −2}) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory were carried out in order to study the properties of fast electrons produced by high-intensity, short pulse laser interacting with matter under conditions relevant to Fast Ignition. Bremsstrahlung x-rays produced by these fast electrons were measured by a set of compact filter-stack based x-ray detectors placed at three angles with respect to the target. The measured bremsstrahlung signal allows a characterization of the fast electron beam spectrum, conversion efficiency of laser energy into fast electron kinetic energy and angular distribution. A Monte Carlo code Integrated Tiger Series was used to model the bremsstrahlung signal and infer a laser to fast electron conversion efficiency of 30%, an electron slope temperature of about 2.2 MeV, and a mean divergence angle of 39°. Simulations were also performed with the hybrid transport code ZUMA which includes fields in the target. In this case, a conversion efficiency of laser energy to fast electron energy of 34% and a slope temperature between 1.5 MeV and 4 MeV depending on the angle between the target normal direction and the measuring spectrometer are found. The observed temperature of the bremsstrahlung spectrum, and therefore the inferred electron spectrum are found to be angle dependent.

  16. Experimental study on electron transport in high intensity laser solid interaction w/o cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baton, Sophie; Guillou, P.; Batani, D.; Rousseaux, C.; Kodama, R.; Aglitskiy, Y.

    2005-10-01

    New electron transport results have been obtained in the interaction of a high intensity laser with planar solid target w/o gold cone. The experiment has been performed at the LULI Laboratory with the 100 TW laser facility. The interaction took place either at 1.057 μm or at 0.53 μm wavelength. The targets consist of three layers planar targets molecularly bonded w/o gold cone glued on the front side. The target thickness and the surface size, the target holder, the ASE of the laser and its focalisation point have been varied in order to study their influence on the electron transport. Several diagnostics were implemented: visible rear side imaging, HISAC, X-ray-Kα imaging and spectroscopy and the angular distribution of the emitted protons. In our conditions, no significant cone effect was observed. Nevertheless these results seem to indicate that the behaviour of the fast electrons is highly influenced by the target mass.

  17. Revisiting argon cluster formation in a planar gas jet for high-intensity laser matter interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Y.; Hagmeijer, R.; van der Weide, E. T. A.; Bastiaens, H. M. J.; Boller, K.-J.

    2016-04-01

    We determine the size of argon clusters generated with a planar nozzle, based on the optical measurements in conjunction with theoretical modelling. Using a quasi-one dimensional model for the moments of the cluster size distribution, we determine the influence of critical physical assumptions. These refer to the surface tension depending on the presence of thermal equilibrium, the mass density of clusters, and different methods to model the growth rate of the cluster radius. We show that, despite strong variation in the predicted cluster size, , the liquid mass ratio, g, can be determined with high trustworthiness, because g is predicted as being almost independent of the specific model assumptions. Exploiting this observation, we use the calculated value for g to retrieve the cluster size from optical measurements, i.e., calibrated Rayleigh scattering and interferometry. Based on the measurements of the cluster size vs. the nozzle stagnation pressure, we provide a new power law for the prediction of the cluster size in experiments with higher values of the Hagena parameter (Γ*>104 ) . This range is of relevance for experiments on high-intensity laser matter interactions.

  18. Ion heating and thermonuclear neutron production from high-intensity subpicosecond laser pulses interacting with underdense plasmas.

    PubMed

    Fritzler, S; Najmudin, Z; Malka, V; Krushelnick, K; Marle, C; Walton, B; Wei, M S; Clarke, R J; Dangor, A E

    2002-10-14

    Thermonuclear fusion neutrons produced by D(d,n)3He reactions have been measured from the interaction of a high-intensity laser with underdense deuterium plasmas. For an input laser energy of 62 J, more than (1.0+/-0.2)x10(6) neutrons with a mean kinetic energy of (2.5+/-0.2) MeV were detected. These neutrons were observed to have an isotropic angular emission profile. By comparing these measurements with those using a secondary solid CD2 target it was determined that neutrons are produced from direct ion heating during this interaction.

  19. An in-vacuo optical levitation trap for high-intensity laser interaction experiments with isolated microtargets.

    PubMed

    Price, C J; Donnelly, T D; Giltrap, S; Stuart, N H; Parker, S; Patankar, S; Lowe, H F; Drew, D; Gumbrell, E T; Smith, R A

    2015-03-01

    We report on the design, construction, and characterisation of a new class of in-vacuo optical levitation trap optimised for use in high-intensity, high-energy laser interaction experiments. The system uses a focused, vertically propagating continuous wave laser beam to capture and manipulate micro-targets by photon momentum transfer at much longer working distances than commonly used by optical tweezer systems. A high speed (10 kHz) optical imaging and signal acquisition system was implemented for tracking the levitated droplets position and dynamic behaviour under atmospheric and vacuum conditions, with ±5 μm spatial resolution. Optical trapping of 10 ± 4 μm oil droplets in vacuum was demonstrated, over timescales of >1 h at extended distances of ∼40 mm from the final focusing optic. The stability of the levitated droplet was such that it would stay in alignment with a ∼7 μm irradiating beam focal spot for up to 5 min without the need for re-adjustment. The performance of the trap was assessed in a series of high-intensity (10(17) W cm(-2)) laser experiments that measured the X-ray source size and inferred free-electron temperature of a single isolated droplet target, along with a measurement of the emitted radio-frequency pulse. These initial tests demonstrated the use of optically levitated microdroplets as a robust target platform for further high-intensity laser interaction and point source studies. PMID:25832224

  20. An in-vacuo optical levitation trap for high-intensity laser interaction experiments with isolated microtargets.

    PubMed

    Price, C J; Donnelly, T D; Giltrap, S; Stuart, N H; Parker, S; Patankar, S; Lowe, H F; Drew, D; Gumbrell, E T; Smith, R A

    2015-03-01

    We report on the design, construction, and characterisation of a new class of in-vacuo optical levitation trap optimised for use in high-intensity, high-energy laser interaction experiments. The system uses a focused, vertically propagating continuous wave laser beam to capture and manipulate micro-targets by photon momentum transfer at much longer working distances than commonly used by optical tweezer systems. A high speed (10 kHz) optical imaging and signal acquisition system was implemented for tracking the levitated droplets position and dynamic behaviour under atmospheric and vacuum conditions, with ±5 μm spatial resolution. Optical trapping of 10 ± 4 μm oil droplets in vacuum was demonstrated, over timescales of >1 h at extended distances of ∼40 mm from the final focusing optic. The stability of the levitated droplet was such that it would stay in alignment with a ∼7 μm irradiating beam focal spot for up to 5 min without the need for re-adjustment. The performance of the trap was assessed in a series of high-intensity (10(17) W cm(-2)) laser experiments that measured the X-ray source size and inferred free-electron temperature of a single isolated droplet target, along with a measurement of the emitted radio-frequency pulse. These initial tests demonstrated the use of optically levitated microdroplets as a robust target platform for further high-intensity laser interaction and point source studies.

  1. An in-vacuo optical levitation trap for high-intensity laser interaction experiments with isolated microtargets

    SciTech Connect

    Price, C. J. Giltrap, S.; Stuart, N. H.; Parker, S.; Patankar, S.; Lowe, H. F.; Smith, R. A.; Donnelly, T. D.; Drew, D.; Gumbrell, E. T.

    2015-03-15

    We report on the design, construction, and characterisation of a new class of in-vacuo optical levitation trap optimised for use in high-intensity, high-energy laser interaction experiments. The system uses a focused, vertically propagating continuous wave laser beam to capture and manipulate micro-targets by photon momentum transfer at much longer working distances than commonly used by optical tweezer systems. A high speed (10 kHz) optical imaging and signal acquisition system was implemented for tracking the levitated droplets position and dynamic behaviour under atmospheric and vacuum conditions, with ±5 μm spatial resolution. Optical trapping of 10 ± 4 μm oil droplets in vacuum was demonstrated, over timescales of >1 h at extended distances of ∼40 mm from the final focusing optic. The stability of the levitated droplet was such that it would stay in alignment with a ∼7 μm irradiating beam focal spot for up to 5 min without the need for re-adjustment. The performance of the trap was assessed in a series of high-intensity (10{sup 17} W cm{sup −2}) laser experiments that measured the X-ray source size and inferred free-electron temperature of a single isolated droplet target, along with a measurement of the emitted radio-frequency pulse. These initial tests demonstrated the use of optically levitated microdroplets as a robust target platform for further high-intensity laser interaction and point source studies.

  2. Hard x-ray production from high intensity laser solid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sefcik, J. A., LLNL

    1998-06-03

    Intense laser (> 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}) driven hard x-ray sources offer a new alternative to conventional electron accelerator bremsstrahlung sources. These laser driven sources offer considerable simplicity in design and cost advantage for multiple axis views and have the potential for much higher spatial and temporal resolution than is achievable with accelerator sources We have begun a series of experiments using the Petawatt Laser system at LLNL to determine the potential of these sources for radiography applications Absolutely calibrated spectra extending to 20 MeV and high resolution radiographs through a {rho}r{>=}150 gm/cm{sup 2} have been obtained The physics of these sources and the scaling relationships and laser technology required to provide the dose levels necessary for radiography applications will be discussed Diagnostics of the laser produced electrons and photons will be addressed

  3. Recent experiment on fast electron transport in ultra-high intensity laser interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batani, D.; Baton, S.; Koenig, M.; Guillou, P.; Loupias, B.; Vinci, T.; Rousseaux, C.; Gremillet, L.; Morace, A.; Redaelli, R.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Kodama, R.; Ozaki, N.; Norimatsu, T.; Rassuchine, J.; Cowan, T.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Santos, J. J.

    2008-05-01

    We performed an experiment with cone targets in planar geometry devoted to the study of fast electron generation, propagation, and target heating. This was done at LULI with the 100 TW laser at intensities up to 1019 W/cm2. Fast electrons penetration, with and without cones, was studied with different diagnostics (Kα imaging, Kα spectroscopy, visible emission) for ω or 2ω irradiation. At ω, the pre-plasma generated by the laser pedestal fills the cone and prevents the beam from reaching the tip.

  4. Recent numerical results on double-layer simulation in high-intensity laser--plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Szichman, H.

    1988-06-01

    Numerical studies on dynamic electric fields and double layers created inside of plasmas irradiated at laser intensities of 10/sup 17/ and 10/sup 18/ Wcm/sup 2/ were carried out using a macroscopic two-fluid model including nonlinear forces and the complete intensity dependent optical response for heating and dielectric force effects. This was possible only by longer computation times since the temporal and spatial step sizes had to be reduced accordingly. Electrostatic fields as high as 10/sup 9/ and 10/sup 10/ Vcm were, respectively, measured for both laser intensities and the coupling of irradiated electromagnetic waves to generate Langmuir longitudinal waves is shown to be possible for the first time. The development and production of the well-known density minima (cavitons) because of nonlinear forces is also confirmed, their prominent appearance being in direct relation to the stronger effect of the high irradiances applied.

  5. Hot and cold electron dynamics following high-intensity laser matter interaction.

    PubMed

    Antici, P; Fuchs, J; Borghesi, M; Gremillet, L; Grismayer, T; Sentoku, Y; d'Humières, E; Cecchetti, C A; Mancić, A; Pipahl, A C; Toncian, T; Willi, O; Mora, P; Audebert, P

    2008-09-01

    The characteristics of fast electrons laser accelerated from solids and expanding into a vacuum from the rear target surface have been measured via optical probe reflectometry. This allows access to the time- and space-resolved dynamics of the fast electron density and temperature and of the energy partition into bulk (cold) electrons. In particular, it is found that the density of the hot electrons on the target rear surface is bell shaped, and that their mean energy at the same location is radially homogeneous and decreases with the target thickness. PMID:18851222

  6. Recent experiments on electron transport in high-intensity laser matter interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baton, S. D.; Batani, D.; Manclossi, M.; Morace, A.; Piazza, D.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Koenig, M.; Guillou, P.; Loupias, B.; Fuchs, J.; Amiranoff, F.; Rabec LeGloahec, M.; Popescu, H.; Rousseaux, C.; Borghesi, M.; Cecchetti, C.; Kodama, R.; Norimatsu, T.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Aglitskiy, Y.

    2005-12-01

    We present the results of some recent experiments performed at the LULI laboratory using the 100 TW laser facility concerning the study of the propagation of fast electrons in gas and solid targets. Novel diagnostics have been implemented including chirped shadowgraphy and proton radiography. Proton radiography images did show the presence of very strong fields in the gas probably produced by charge separation. In turn these imply a slowing down of the fast electron cloud as it penetrates in the gas and a strong inhibition of propagation. Indeed chirped shadowgraphy images show a strong reduction in time of the velocity of the electron cloud from the initial value, which is of the order of a fraction of c. We also performed some preliminary experiments with cone targets in order to verify the guiding effect and fast electron propagation in presence of the cone. Finally we compared results obtained by changing the target size. Here we only give a first presentation and preliminary analysis of data, which will be addressed in detail in a following paper.

  7. Fundamental Physics Explored with High Intensity Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, T.; Homma, K.

    2012-10-01

    Over the last century the method of particle acceleration to high energies has become the prime approach to explore the fundamental nature of matter in laboratory. It appears that the latest search of the contemporary accelerator based on the colliders shows a sign of saturation (or at least a slow-down) in increasing its energy and other necessary parameters to extend this frontier. We suggest two pronged approach enabled by the recent progress in high intensity lasers. First we envision the laser-driven plasma accelerator may be able to extend the reach of the collider. For this approach to bear fruit, we need to develop the technology of high averaged power laser in addition to the high intensity. For this we mention that the latest research effort of ICAN is an encouraging sign. In addition to this, we now introduce the concept of the noncollider paradigm in exploring fundamental physics with high intensity (and large energy) lasers. One of the examples we mention is the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) far beyond TeV without large luminosity. If we relax or do not require the large luminosity necessary for colliders, but solely in ultrahigh energy frontier, we are still capable of exploring such a fundamental issue. Given such a high energetic particle source and high-intensity laser fields simultaneously, we expect to be able to access new aspects on the matter and the vacuum structure from fundamental physical point of views. LWFA naturally exploits the nonlinear optical effects in the plasma when it becomes of relativistic intensity. Normally nonlinear optical effects are discussed based upon polarization susceptibility of matter to external fields. We suggest application of this concept even to the vacuum structure as a new kind of order parameter to discuss vacuum-originating phenomena at semimacroscopic scales. This viewpoint unifies the following observables with the unprecedented experimental environment we envision; the dispersion relation of

  8. Propagation In Matter Of Currents Of Relativistic Electrons Beyond The Alfven Limit, Produced In Ultra-High-Intensity Short-Pulse Laser-Matter Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batani, D.; Baton, S. D.; Manclossi, M.; Amiranoff, F.; Koenig, M.; Santos, J. J.; Martinolli, E.; Gremillet, L.; Popescu, H.; Antonicci, A.; Rousseaux, C.; Rabec Le Gloahec, M.; Hall, T.; Malka, V.; Cowan, T. E.; Stephens, R.; Key, M.; King, J.; Freeman, R.

    2004-12-01

    This paper reports the results of several experiments performed at the LULI laboratory (Palaiseau, France) concerning the propagation of large relativistic currents in matter from ultra-high-intensity laser pulse interaction with target. We present our results according to the type of diagnostics used in the experiments: 1) Kα emission and Kα imaging, 2) study of target rear side emission in the visible region, 3) time resolved optical shadowgraphy.

  9. PIC Simulations of Proton Acceleration with High Intensity Lasers: the Transparency Regime, and Interaction with Underdense Targets

    SciTech Connect

    D'Humieres, Emmanuel; Fuchs, Julien; Antici, Patrizio; Audebert, Patrick; Brambrink, Erik; Lefebvre, Erik; Malka, Victor; Mora, Patrick; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2006-11-27

    Laser-accelerated ion sources open new opportunities for ion beam generation and control, and could stimulate development of compact ion accelerators for many applications. The mechanisms of proton acceleration with solid targets have been intensively studied over the past years, and new target or laser setups are now needed to obtain even higher maximum proton energies. PIC simulations have shown that using ultra thin targets, the maximum proton energy can be greatly increased. The laser can pass through the target and heat target electrons more efficiently. Experiments were conducted to test the feasibility of ultra thin targets laser interaction. PIC simulations were performed and successfully compared to the experimental results. Recently, experiments have shown that a gaseous target can produce proton beams with characteristics comparable to those obtained with solid targets. PIC simulations were also used to study proton acceleration with an underdense target. The optimum thickness obtained corresponds to the thickness where the laser absorption and transmission are equal, and depends greatly on laser and target parameters. The plasma hot electron temperature has also been found to depend on both laser and target parameters. We developed a simple model for the scaling of the optimum thickness for proton acceleration on target and laser parameters.

  10. Relativistic effects in the interaction of high intensity ultra-short laser pulse with collisional underdense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Abedi, Samira; Dorranian, Davoud; Abari, Mehdi Etehadi; Shokri, Babak

    2011-09-15

    In this paper, the effect of weakly relativistic ponderomotive force in the interaction of intense laser pulse with nonisothermal, underdense, collisional plasma is studied. Ponderomotive force modifies the electron density and temperature distribution. By considering the weakly relativistic effect and ohmic heating of plasma electrons, the nonlinear dielectric permittivity of plasma medium is obtained and the equation of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma is solved. It is shown that with considering the ohmic heating of electrons and collisions, the effect of ponderomotive force in weakly relativistic regime leads to steepening the electron density profile and increases the temperature of plasma electrons noticeably. Bunches of electrons in plasma become narrower. By increasing the laser pulse strength, the wavelength of density oscillations decreases. In this regime of laser-plasma interaction, electron temperature increases sharply by increasing the intensity of laser pulse. The amplitude of electric and magnetic fields increases by increasing the laser pulse energy while their wavelength decreases and they lost their sinusoidal form.

  11. Short-pulse, high-intensity lasers at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.J.; Roberts, J.P.; Rodriguez, G.; Fulton, R.D.; Kyrala, G.A.; Schappert, G.T.

    1994-03-01

    Advances in ultrafast lasers and optical amplifiers have spurred the development of terawatt-class laser systems capable of delivering focal spot intensities approaching 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. At these extremely high intensities, the optical field strength is more than twenty times larger than the Bohr electric field, permitting investigations of the optical properties of matter in a previously unexplored regime. The authors describe two laser systems for high intensity laser interaction experiments: The first is a terawatt system based on amplification of femtosecond pulses in XeCl which yields 250 mJ in 275 fs and routinely produces intensifies on target in excess of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. The second system is based on chirped pulse amplification of 100-fs pulses in Ti:sapphire.

  12. Production of neutrons up to 18 MeV in high-intensity, short-pulse laser matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, D. P.; McNaney, J. M.; Swift, D. C.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Patel, P. K.; Petrov, G. M.; Davis, J.; Frenje, J. A.; Jarrott, L. C.; Tynan, G.; Beg, F. N.; Kodama, R.; Nakamura, H.; Lancaster, K. L.

    2011-10-15

    The generation of high-energy neutrons using laser-accelerated ions is demonstrated experimentally using the Titan laser with 360 J of laser energy in a 9 ps pulse. In this technique, a short-pulse, high-energy laser accelerates deuterons from a CD{sub 2} foil. These are incident on a LiF foil and subsequently create high energy neutrons through the {sup 7}Li(d,xn) nuclear reaction (Q = 15 MeV). Radiochromic film and a Thomson parabola ion-spectrometer were used to diagnose the laser accelerated deuterons and protons. Conversion efficiency into protons was 0.5%, an order of magnitude greater than into deuterons. Maximum neutron energy was shown to be angularly dependent with up to 18 MeV neutrons observed in the forward direction using neutron time-of-flight spectrometry. Absolutely calibrated CR-39 detected spectrally integrated neutron fluence of up to 8 x 10{sup 8} n sr{sup -1} in the forward direction.

  13. Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Warren, B.

    2012-12-01

    We present results from the grant entitled, Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions. The research significantly advanced the understanding of basic high-energy density science (HEDS) on ultra intense laser and particle beam plasma interactions. This advancement in understanding was then used to to aid in the quest to make 1 GeV to 500 GeV plasma based accelerator stages. The work blended basic research with three-dimensions fully nonlinear and fully kinetic simulations including full-scale modeling of ongoing or planned experiments. The primary tool was three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The simulations provided a test bed for theoretical ideas and models as well as a method to guide experiments. The research also included careful benchmarking of codes against experiment. High-fidelity full-scale modeling provided a means to extrapolate parameters into regimes that were not accessible to current or near term experiments, thereby allowing concepts to be tested with confidence before tens to hundreds of millions of dollars were spent building facilities. The research allowed the development of a hierarchy of PIC codes and diagnostics that is one of the most advanced in the world.

  14. Plasmas and Short-Pulse, High-Intensity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Thomas

    1999-11-01

    Many of the applications of short-pulse, high-intensity laser systems, including coherent UV and X-ray generation, compact particle accelerators, and non-perturbative nonlinear optics as well as the study of laser-matter interaction physics, require large intensity-interaction length products. In recent years, plasma structures resulting from the hydrodynamic evolution of laser-produced plasma filaments have proven to be attractive media for guiding pulses with peak powers approaching the terawatt level over lengths many times the vacuum Rayleigh range. The hydrodynamics of plasma waveguides have been characterized using time- and space-resolved interferometry measurements of electron density profiles. The laser-driven ionization and heating phase of the plasma filament creation is followed by hot electron driven plasma expansion. Density profiles suitable for optical guiding develop within the first few hundred picoseconds after plasma creation, during which rapid cooling occurs. At longer times the plasma expansion closely follows that of a cylindrical blast wave, with further cooling due to expansion work. The observed guided intensity profiles of end-coupled and tunnel-coupled pulses compare favorably with calculations of the quasi-bound waveguide modes based on the measured electron density profiles. Time- and space-resolved electron density measurements of a laser-driven concentric implosion were also performed. The implosion is the result of the interaction of a second laser pulse with an existing plasma waveguide. The two-pulse absorption and ionization significantly exceed that due to a single pulse of the same total energy. The author would like to acknowledge the significant contributions of Prof. Howard M. Milchberg to the work being presented.

  15. Proton shock acceleration using a high contrast high intensity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Maxence; Roedel, Christian; Kim, Jongjin; Aurand, Bastian; Curry, Chandra; Goede, Sebastian; Propp, Adrienne; Goyon, Clement; Pak, Art; Kerr, Shaun; Ramakrishna, Bhuvanesh; Ruby, John; William, Jackson; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    Laser-driven proton acceleration is a field of intense research due to the interesting characteristics of this novel particle source including high brightness, high maximum energy, high laminarity, and short duration. Although the ion beam characteristics are promising for many future applications, such as in the medical field or hybrid accelerators, the ion beam generated using TNSA, the acceleration mechanism commonly achieved, still need to be significantly improved. Several new alternative mechanisms have been proposed such as collisionless shock acceleration (CSA) in order to produce a mono-energetic ion beam favorable for those applications. We report the first results of an experiment performed with the TITAN laser system (JLF, LLNL) dedicated to the study of CSA using a high intensity (5x1019W/cm2) high contrast ps laser pulse focused on 55 μm thick CH and CD targets. We show that the proton spectrum generated during the interaction exhibits high-energy mono-energetic features along the laser axis, characteristic of a shock mechanism.

  16. Response of graphene to femtosecond high-intensity laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Adam; Cormode, Daniel; Reynolds, Collin; Newhouse-Illige, Ty; LeRoy, Brian J.; Sandhu, Arvinder S.

    2011-08-01

    We study the response of graphene to high-intensity, 50-femtosecond laser pulse excitation. We establish that graphene has a high ({approx}3 x 10{sup 12} Wcm{sup -2}) single-shot damage threshold. Above this threshold, a single laser pulse cleanly ablates graphene, leaving microscopically defined edges. Below this threshold, we observe laser-induced defect formation leading to degradation of the lattice over multiple exposures. We identify the lattice modification processes through in-situ Raman microscopy. The effective lifetime of chemical vapor deposition grown graphene under femtosecond near-infrared irradiation and its dependence on laser intensity is determined. These results also define the limits of non-linear applications of graphene in femtosecond high-intensity regime.

  17. Probing new physics using high-intensity laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marklund, Mattias; Ilderton, Anton; Lundin, Joakim

    2011-06-01

    Current high-intensity laser sources offer a multitude of research, experiment and application possibilities, ranging from e.g. ionisation studies of atomic and molecular systems to particle acceleration for medical purposes. Planned upgrades of existing laser sources will further increase the deliverable intensities and make certain lowintensity (as compared to the Schwinger field) tests of quantum electrodynamics viable. Moreover, secondary sources of radiation, and planned future facilities, offer several-orders-of-magnitude increases in intensities. Thus, it is highly relevant to ask what kind of physics that may be probed using future light sources.

  18. On extreme field limits in high power laser matter interactions: radiation dominant regimes in high intensity electromagnetic wave interaction with electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, Sergei V.; Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Kando, Masaki; Koga, James K.; Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Bulanov, Stepan S.; Zhidkov, Alexei G.; Kato, Yoshiaki; Korn, Georg

    2013-05-01

    We discuss the key important regimes of electromagnetic field interaction with charged particles. Main attention is paid to the nonlinear Thomson/Compton scattering regime with the radiation friction and quantum electrodynamics effects taken into account. This process opens a channel of high efficiency electromagnetic energy conversion into hard electromagnetic radiation in the form of ultra short high power gamma ray flashes.

  19. The effect of external magnetic field on the bremsstrahlung nonlinear absorption mechanism in the interaction of high intensity short laser pulse with collisional underdense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sedaghat, M.; Ettehadi-Abari, M.; Shokri, B. Ghorbanalilu, M.

    2015-03-15

    Laser absorption in the interaction between ultra-intense femtosecond laser and solid density plasma is studied theoretically here in the intensity range Iλ{sup 2}≃10{sup 14}−10{sup 16}Wcm{sup −2}μm{sup 2}. The collisional effect is found to be significant when the incident laser intensity is less than 10{sup 16}Wcm{sup −2}μm{sup 2}. In the current work, the propagation of a high frequency electromagnetic wave, for underdense collisional plasma in the presence of an external magnetic field is investigated. It is shown that, by considering the effect of the ponderomotive force in collisional magnetized plasmas, the increase of laser pulse intensity leads to steepening of the electron density profile and the electron bunches of plasma makes narrower. Moreover, it is found that the wavelength of electric and magnetic fields oscillations increases by increasing the external magnetic field and the density distribution of electrons also grows in comparison with the unmagnetized collisional plasma. Furthermore, the spatial damping rate of laser energy and the nonlinear bremsstrahlung absorption coefficient are obtained in the collisional regime of magnetized plasma. The other remarkable result is that by increasing the external magnetic field in this case, the absorption coefficient increases strongly.

  20. High-resolution x-ray imaging of Kα volume radiation induced by high-intensity laser pulse interaction with a copper target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtier, E.; Moinard, A.; Khattak, F. Y.; Renner, O.; Robert, T.; Santos, J. J.; Beaucourt, C.; Angelo, P.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Rosmej, F. B.

    2012-10-01

    In a proof of principle experiment using the LULI 100-TW laser facility ELFIE, we have demonstrated high spectral and spatial resolution of Kα volume radiation induced by energetic electrons generated by irradiating solid Cu targets with visible (0.53 µm) 350 fs laser pulses. Employing an x-ray spectrometer equipped with the spherically bent crystal of quartz (502) and with an image plate, single shot Cu-Kα radiation was recorded in first-order reflection allowing for a geometrical mapping of the emission induced by hot electrons with a spatial resolution down to 30 µm. The simultaneously achieved high spectral resolution permitted the identification of asymmetries in the Kα1-group emission profile. Data from the shot in which a part of the laser beam was incident at grazing angle to the target surface show a signature of enhanced lateral transport of energetic electrons.

  1. Frequency conversion of high-intensity, femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, P S

    1997-06-01

    Almost since the invention of the laser, frequency conversion of optical pulses via non- linear processes has been an area of active interest. However, third harmonic generation using ~(~1 (THG) in solids is an area that has not received much attention because of ma- terial damage limits. Recently, the short, high-intensity pulses possible with chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) laser systems allow the use of intensities on the order of 1 TW/cm2 in thin solids without damage. As a light source to examine single-crystal THG in solids and other high field inter- actions, the design and construction of a Ti:sapphire-based CPA laser system capable of ultimately producing peak powers of 100 TW is presented. Of special interest is a novel, all-reflective pulse stretcher design which can stretch a pulse temporally by a factor of 20,000. The stretcher design can also compensate for the added material dispersion due to propagation through the amplifier chain and produce transform-limited 45 fs pulses upon compression. A series of laser-pumped amplifiers brings the peak power up to the terawatt level at 10 Hz, and the design calls for additional amplifiers to bring the power level to the 100 TW level for single shot operation. The theory for frequency conversion of these short pulses is presented, focusing on conversion to the third harmonic in single crystals of BBO, KD*P, and d-LAP (deuterated I-arginine phosphate). Conversion efficiencies of up to 6% are obtained with 500 fs pulses at 1053 nm in a 3 mm thick BBO crystal at 200 GW/cm 2. Contributions to this process by unphasematched, cascaded second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are shown to be very significant. The angular relationship between the two orders is used to measure the tensor elements of C = xt3)/4 with Crs = -1.8 x 1O-23 m2/V2 and .15Cri + .54Crs = 4.0 x 1O-23 m2/V2. Conversion efficiency in d-LAP is about 20% that in BBO and conversion efficiency in KD*P is 1% that of BBO. It is calculated

  2. Interaction of High Intensity Electromagnetic Waves with Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    G. Shvets

    2008-10-03

    The focus of our work during the duration of this grant was on the following areas: (a) the fundamental plasma physics of intense laser-plasma interactions, including the nonlinear excitation of plasma waves for accelerator applications, as well as the recently discovered by us phenomenon of the relativistic bi-stability of relativistic plasma waves driven by a laser beatwave; (b) interaction of high power microwave beams with magnetized plasma, including some of the recently discovered by us phenomena such as the Undulator Induced Transparency (UIT) as well as the new approaches to dynamic manipulation of microwave pulses; (c) investigations of the multi-color laser pulse interactions in the plasma, including the recently discovered by us phenomenon of Electromagnetic Cascading (EC) and the effect of the EC of three-dimensional dynamics of laser pulses (enhanced/suppressed selffocusing etc.); (d) interaction of high-current electron beams with the ambient plasma in the context of Fast Ignitor (FI) physics, with the emphasis on the nonlinear dynamics of the Weibel instability and beam filamentation.

  3. Stereolithography based method of creating custom gas density profile targets for high intensity laser-plasma experiments.

    PubMed

    Jolly, S W; He, Z; McGuffey, C; Schumaker, W; Krushelnick, K; Thomas, A G R

    2012-07-01

    Laser based stereolithography methods are shown to be useful for production of gas targets for high intensity laser-plasma interaction experiments. A cylindrically symmetric nozzle with an opening of approximately 100 μm and a periodic attachment of variable periodicity are outlined in detail with associated density profile characterization. Both components are durable within the limits of relevant experiments.

  4. High Intensity Femtosecond XUV Pulse Interactions with Atomic Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, K.; Murphy, B.; Keto, J.; Ditmire, T.

    2009-09-10

    The interactions of large xenon clusters irradiated by intense, femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses at a wavelength of 38 nm have been studied. Using high harmonic generation from a 35 fs near-infrared terawatt laser, clusters have been irradiated by XUV pulses of 10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2} intensity. Charge states up to Xe{sup 8+} are observed, states well above that produced by single atom illumination, indicating that plasma continuum lowering is important. Furthermore the kinetic energy distribution of the exploding ions is consistent with a quasineutral hydrodynamic expansion, rather than a Coulomb explosion.

  5. High-intensity laser heating in liquids: Multiphoton absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Longtin, J.P.; Tien, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    At high laser intensities, otherwise transparent liquids can absorb strongly by the mechanism of multiphoton absorption, resulting in absorption and heating several orders of magnitude greater than classical, low-intensity mechanisms. The use of multiphoton absorption provides a new mechanism for strong, controlled energy deposition in liquids without bulk plasma formation, shock waves, liquid ejection, etc., which is of interest for many laser-liquid applications, including laser desorption of liquid films, laser particle removal, and laser water removal from microdevices. This work develops a microscopically based model of the heating during multiphoton absorption in liquids. The dependence on pulse duration, intensity, wavelength, repetition rate, and liquid properties is discussed. Pure water exposed to 266 nm laser radiation is investigated, and a novel heating mechanism for water is proposed that uses multiple-wavelength laser pulses.

  6. High Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT) versus TENS and NSAIDs in low back pain: clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zati, Allesandro; Fortuna, Damiano; Valent, A.; Filippi, M. V.; Bilotta, Teresa W.

    2004-09-01

    Low back pain, caused by lumbar disc herniation, is prevalently treated with a conservative approach. In this study we valued the efficacy of High Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT), compared with accepted therapies such as TENS and NSAIDs. Laser therapy obtained similar results in the short term, but better clinical effect over time than TENS and NSAIDs. In conclusion high intensity laser therapy appears to be a interesting new treatment, worthy of further research.

  7. High-order harmonics from bow wave caustics driven by a high-intensity laser

    SciTech Connect

    Pirozhkov, A.S.; Kando, M.; Esirkepov, T.Zh.; and others

    2012-07-11

    We propose a new mechanism of high-order harmonic generation during an interaction of a high-intensity laser pulse with underdense plasma. A tightly focused laser pulse creates a cavity in plasma pushing electrons aside and exciting the wake wave and the bow wave. At the joint of the cavity wall and the bow wave boundary, an annular spike of electron density is formed. This spike surrounds the cavity and moves together with the laser pulse. Collective motion of electrons in the spike driven by the laser field generates high-order harmonics. A strong localization of the electron spike, its robustness to oscillations imposed by the laser field and, consequently, its ability to produce high-order harmonics is explained by catastrophe theory. The proposed mechanism explains the experimental observations of high-order harmonics with the 9 TW J-KAREN laser (JAEA, Japan) and the 120 TW Astra Gemini laser (CLF RAL, UK) [A. S. Pirozhkov, et al., arXiv:1004.4514 (2010); A. S. Pirozhkov et al, AIP Proceedings, this volume]. The theory is corroborated by high-resolution two-and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  8. High-order harmonics from bow wave caustics driven by a high-intensity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Kando, M.; Gallegos, P.; Ahmed, H.; Ragozin, E. N.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T. A.; Kawachi, T.; Sagisaka, A.; Koga, J. K.; Coury, M.; Green, J.; Foster, P.; Brenner, C.; Dromey, B.; Symes, D. R.; Mori, M.; Kawase, K.; Kameshima, T.; Fukuda, Y.; Chen, L. M.; Daito, I.; Ogura, K.; Hayashi, Y.; Kotaki, H.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Nishimori, N.; Imazono, T.; Kondo, K.; Kimura, T.; Tajima, T.; Daido, H.; Rajeev, P.; Mckenna, P.; Borghesi, M.; Neely, D.; Kato, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2012-07-01

    We propose a new mechanism of high-order harmonic generation during an interaction of a high-intensity laser pulse with underdense plasma. A tightly focused laser pulse creates a cavity in plasma pushing electrons aside and exciting the wake wave and the bow wave. At the joint of the cavity wall and the bow wave boundary, an annular spike of electron density is formed. This spike surrounds the cavity and moves together with the laser pulse. Collective motion of electrons in the spike driven by the laser field generates high-order harmonics. A strong localization of the electron spike, its robustness to oscillations imposed by the laser field and, consequently, its ability to produce high-order harmonics is explained by catastrophe theory. The proposed mechanism explains the experimental observations of high-order harmonics with the 9 TW J-KAREN laser (JAEA, Japan) and the 120 TW Astra Gemini laser (CLF RAL, UK) [A. S. Pirozhkov, et al., arXiv:1004.4514 (2010); A. S. Pirozhkov et al, AIP Proceedings, this volume]. The theory is corroborated by high-resolution two-and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  9. Energy gain and spectral tailoring of ion beams using ultra-high intensity laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Rajendra; Swantusch, Marco; Cerchez, Mirela; Spickermann, Sven; Auorand, Bastian; Wowra, Thomas; Boeker, Juergen; Willi, Oswald

    2015-11-01

    The field of laser driven ion acceleration over the past decade has produced a huge amount of research. Nowadays, several multi-beam facilities with high rep rate system, e.g. ELI, are being developed across the world for different kinds of experiments. The study of interaction dynamics of multiple beams possessing ultra-high intensity and ultra-short pulse duration is of vital importance. Here, we present the first experimental results on ion acceleration using two ultra-high intensity beams. Thanks to the unique capability of Arcturus laser at HHU Düsseldorf, two almost identical, independent beams in laser parameters such as intensity (>1020 W/cm2), pulse duration (30 fs) and contrast (>1010), could be accessed. Both beams are focused onto a 5 μm thin Ti target. While ensuring spatial overlap of the two beams, at relative temporal delay of ~ 50 ps (optimum delay), the proton and carbon ion energies were enhanced by factor of 1.5. Moreover, strong modulation in C4+ions near the high energy cut-off is observed later than the optimum delay for the proton enhancement. This offers controlled tailoring of the spectral content of heavy ions.

  10. Diffraction Gratings for High-Intensity Laser Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, J

    2008-01-23

    The scattering of light into wavelength-dependent discrete directions (orders) by a device exhibiting a periodic modulation of a physical attribute on a spatial scale similar to the wavelength of light has been the subject of study for over 200 years. Such a device is called a diffraction grating. Practical applications of diffraction gratings, mainly for spectroscopy, have been around for over 100 years. The importance of diffraction gratings in spectroscopy for the measurement of myriad properties of matter can hardly be overestimated. Since the advent of coherent light sources (lasers) in the 1960's, applications of diffraction gratings in spectroscopy have further exploded. Lasers have opened a vast application space for gratings, and apace, gratings have enabled entirely new classes of laser systems. Excellent reviews of the history, fundamental properties, applications and manufacturing techniques of diffraction gratings up to the time of their publication can be found in the books by Hutley (1) and more recently Loewen and Popov (2). The limited scope of this chapter can hardly do justice to such a comprehensive subject, so the focus here will be narrowly limited to characteristics required for gratings suitable for high-power laser applications, and methods to fabricate them. A particular area of emphasis will be on maximally-efficient large-aperture gratings for short-pulse laser generation.

  11. Thomson scattering in high-intensity chirped laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Holkundkar, Amol R.; Harvey, Chris Marklund, Mattias

    2015-10-15

    We consider the Thomson scattering of an electron in an ultra-intense laser pulse. It is well known that at high laser intensities, the frequency and brilliance of the emitted radiation will be greatly reduced due to the electron losing energy before it reaches the peak field. In this work, we investigate the use of a small frequency chirp in the laser pulse in order to mitigate this effect of radiation reaction. It is found that the introduction of a negative chirp means the electron enters a high frequency region of the field while it still has a large proportion of its original energy. This results in a significant enhancement of the frequency and intensity of the emitted radiation as compared to the case without chirping.

  12. Generation of Ultra-high Intensity Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    N.J. Fisch; V.M. Malkin

    2003-06-10

    Mainly due to the method of chirped pulse amplification, laser intensities have grown remarkably during recent years. However, the attaining of very much higher powers is limited by the material properties of gratings. These limitations might be overcome through the use of plasma, which is an ideal medium for processing very high power and very high total energy. A plasma can be irradiated by a long pump laser pulse, carrying significant energy, which is then quickly depleted in the plasma by a short counterpropagating pulse. This counterpropagating wave effect has already been employed in Raman amplifiers using gases or plasmas at low laser power. Of particular interest here are the new effects which enter in high power regimes. These new effects can be employed so that one high-energy optical system can be used like a flashlamp in what amounts to pumping the plasma, and a second low-power optical system can be used to extract quickly the energy from the plasma and focus it precisely. The combined system can be very compact. Thus, focused intensities more than 10{sup 25} W/cm{sup 2} can be contemplated using existing optical elements. These intensities are several orders of magnitude higher than what is currently available through chirped pump amplifiers.

  13. Recent High-Intensity Experiments at the Trident Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobble, James; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; Gautier, Cort; Kim, Yongho; Huang, Chengkun

    2014-10-01

    With near-diffraction-limited irradiance of 2 × 1020 W/cm2 on target and prelase contrast better than 10-8, we have accessed the regime of relativistic transparency (RT) at the Trident Laser. The goal was to assess electron debris emitted from the target rear surface with phase-contrast imaging (PCI) and current density measurements (hence, the total electron current). Companion diagnostics show whether the experiments are in the target-normal-sheath-acceleration mode or in the RT regime. The superb laser contrast allows us to shoot targets as thin as 50 nm. PCI at 527 nm is temporally resolved to 600 fs. It has shown the evolution of electron behavior over tens of ps, including thermal electrons accompanying the ion jet, accelerated to many tens of MeV earlier in time. Faraday-cup measurements indicate the transfer of many microC of charge during the laser drive. As a ride-along experiment using a gas Cherenkov detector (GCD), we have detected gamma rays of energy >5 MeV. This radiation has a prompt component and a lesser source, driven by accelerated ions, that is time resolved by the GCD. The ion time of flight is compared to Thomson parabola data. Electron energy spectra are also collected. This work is supported by US DOE/NNSA, performed at LANL, operated by LANS LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  14. Fast rate fracture of aluminum using high intensity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Douglas Allen

    Laser induced shock experiments were performed to study the dynamics of various solid state material processes, including shock-induced melt, fast rate fracture, and elastic to plastic response. Fast rate fracture and dynamic yielding are greatly influenced by microstructural features such as grain boundaries, impurity particles and alloying atoms. Fast fracture experiments using lasers are aimed at studying how material microstructure affects the tensile fracture characteristics at strain rates above 106 s-1. We used the Z-Beamlet Laser at Sandia National Laboratories to drive shocks via ablation and we measured the maximum tensile stress of aluminum targets with various microstructures. Using a velocity interferometer and sample recovery, we are able to measure the maximum tensile stress and determine the source of fracture initiation in these targets. We have explored the role that grain size, impurity particles and alloying in aluminum play in dynamic yielding and spall fracture at tensile strain rates of ˜3x106 s-1. Preliminary results and analysis indicated that material grain size plays a vital role in the fracture morphology and spall strength results. In a study with single crystal aluminum specimens, velocity measurements and fracture analysis revealed that a smaller amplitude tensile stress was initiated by impurity particles; however, these particles served no purpose in dynamic yielding. An aluminum-magnesium alloy with various grain sizes presented the lowest spall strength, but the greatest dynamic yield strength. Fracture mode in this alloy was initiated by both grain boundaries and impurity particles. With respect to dynamic yielding, alloying elements such as magnesium serve to decrease the onset of plastic response. The fracture stress and yield stress showed no evidence of grain size dependence. Hydrodynamic simulations with material strength models are used to compare with our experiments. In order to study the strain rate dependence of spall

  15. Paramount Deuteron Acceleration Using High-Intensity Short Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, F.; Raymond, A.; Zulick, C.; Willingale, L.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Petrov, G.; Davis, J.

    2012-10-01

    It has long been a challenge to efficiently generate laser-driven ion beams having none-proton ions as the dominant species since protons are generally present as contamination layers on the target surface. During recent experiments at the University of Michigan, ion beams composed mainly of deuterons were produced with only a small relative number of protons and oxygen ions. The experiments were performed with the 400 fs, 20 TW T-cubed laser which has focused intensity up to 4*10^19 W/cm^2 at 1053 nm and ASE intensity contrast of 10-7. The accelerated deuterons originate from liquid deuterium oxide deposited on both the front and rear surfaces of a cryogenically cooled Cu target (normally at -160C) by spraying ˜50 microliters of heavy water from 2 nozzles in the vicinity of the target's front and rear. The ion beams had a Maxwellian spectrum with maximum energy of 8 MeV for deuterons and 10 MeV for protons. Using a Thomson parabola ion spectrometer system combined with CR39 indicated that the forward-propagating deuteron beam had about 10^12 ions per steradian (integrated over spectrum). The FWHM of the beam was 20 degrees, ideal for applications involving neutron generation and isotope activation.

  16. Could quantum gravity phenomenology be tested with high intensity lasers?

    SciTech Connect

    Magueijo, Joao

    2006-06-15

    In phenomenological quantum gravity theories, Planckian behavior is triggered by the energy of elementary particles approaching the Planck energy, E{sub P}, but it is also possible that anomalous behavior strikes systems of particles with total energy near E{sub P}. This is usually perceived to be pathological and has been labeled 'the soccer ball problem'. We point out that there is no obvious contradiction with experiment if coherent collections of particles with bulk energy of order E{sub P} do indeed display Planckian behavior, a possibility that would open a new experimental window. Unfortunately, field theory realizations of 'doubly' (or deformed) special relativity never exhibit a soccer ball problem; we present several formulations where this is undeniably true. Upon closer scrutiny we discover that the only chance for Planckian behavior to be triggered by large coherent energies involves the details of second quantization. We find a formulation where the quanta have their energy-momentum (mass-shell) relations deformed as a function of the bulk energy of the coherent packet to which they belong, rather than the frequency. Given ongoing developments in laser technology, such a possibility would be of great experimental interest.

  17. The Edward Teller Medal Lecture: High Intensity Lasers and the Road to Ignition (lirpp Vol. 13)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, M. H.

    2016-10-01

    There has been much progress in the development of high intensity lasers and in the science of laser driven inertially confined fusion such that ignition is now a near term prospect. This lecture reviews the field with particular emphasis on areas of my own involvement.

  18. The Edward teller medal lecture: High intensity lasers and the road to ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, M. H.

    1997-04-01

    There has been much progress in the development of high intensity lasers and in the science of laser driven inertially confined fusion such that ignition is now a near term prospect. This lecture reviews the field with particular emphasis on areas of my own involvement.

  19. The Edward teller medal lecture: High intensity lasers and the road to ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M.H.

    1997-04-01

    There has been much progress in the development of high intensity lasers and in the science of laser driven inertially confined fusion such that ignition is now a near term prospect. This lecture reviews the field with particular emphasis on areas of my own involvement. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. The Edward Teller medal lecture: High intensity lasers and the road to ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M. H.

    1997-04-15

    There has been much progress in the development of high intensity lasers and in the science of laser driven inertially confined fusion such that ignition is now a near term prospect. This lecture reviews the field with particular emphasis on areas of my own involvement.

  1. Edward Teller medal lecture: high intensity lasers and the road to ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M.H.

    1997-06-02

    There has been much progress in the development of high intensity lasers and in the science of laser driven inertially confined fusion such that ignition is now a near term prospect. This lecture reviews the field with particular emphasis on areas of my own involvement.

  2. Laser-enhanced cavitation during high intensity focused ultrasound: An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Huizhong; Zhang, Ti; Yang, Xinmai

    2013-01-01

    Laser-enhanced cavitation during high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) was studied in vivo using a small animal model. Laser light was employed to illuminate the sample concurrently with HIFU radiation. The resulting cavitation was detected with a passive cavitation detector. The in vivo measurements were made under different combinations of HIFU treatment depths, laser wavelengths, and HIFU durations. The results demonstrated that concurrent light illumination during HIFU has the potential to enhance cavitation effect by reducing cavitation threshold in vivo. PMID:23653486

  3. Characterizing Hot Electron Generation and Transport via Bremsstrahlung Emission on the High Intensity OMEGA EP Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, J.; McGuffey, C.; Krauland, C.; Sorokovikova, A.; Qiao, B.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Stephens, R. B.; Chen, C. D.; Westover, B.; McLean, H. S.

    2014-10-01

    The investigation of high intensity laser generated fast electron beams is important for a number of High Energy Density Science applications, which include proton sources and fast ignition among others. A series of experimental campaigns performed using the kilojoule, 10-ps OMEGA EP laser closely examined the impact of a preformed plasma on laser plasma interaction and electron generation. Here we present the analysis of the measured bremsstrahlung x-ray radiation and the inferred results on fast electron characteristics. Simulations, performed with the Monte-Carlo code package ITS 3.0, generate the x-ray response of the target to an injected electron beam with a given temperature, energy and divergence angle. The simulated x-rays are then compared to those collected by the bremsstrahlung spectrometers, which allows us to characterize fast electrons created in the experiment. Preliminary results show a decrease in hot electron temperature with an increase in pre-pulse, which is further corroborated by magnetic electron and Cu-K α spectrometers. This work performed under the auspices of the US DOE under contracts DE-FOA-0000583 (FES, NNSA), DE-NA0002026 (NLUF) and DE-FC02-04ER54789 (FSC).

  4. Acceleration of Ultra-Low Emittance Proton and Ion Beams with High Intensity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Thomas E.

    2002-11-01

    Intense beams of several MeV protons and ions, generated by the interaction of high-intensity short pulse lasers with thin foils, have been observed by many researchers in recent years.(S.P. Hatchett et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2076 (2000); T.E. Cowan et al., Nucl. Inst. Meth. A 455, 130 (2000); R.A. Snavely et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 2945 (2000); S.C. Wilks et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 532 (2000); E. Clark et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 670 (2000).) In experiments performed at the 100 TW LULI laser, we have succeeded to control the ion acceleration process to produce ultra high quality proton beams, whose transverse emittance is <0.006 π mm-mrad (rms-normalized), a factor of 100 lower than is typical of conventional RF linear accelerators. Within the envelope of the entire beam, we could focus individual proton beamlets to 100 nm spatial scales. This required control of the laser-plasma interaction, of the transport of MA currents of relativistic electrons through the target substrate, and of the surface topology and source material layering on the target foil rear-surface.(M. Roth et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 5, 061002 (2002).) By varying the source material, we also accelerated light ion beams, such as He-like fluorine, to over 5 MeV/nucleon.(M. Hegelich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 085002 (2002).) From PIC simulations we understand the highest-energy and lowest-divergence proton acceleration as a transient laser-driven virtual cathode effect occurring at the target rear-surface. We have also confirmed the acceleration of ions from the front surface (A. Maksimchuk et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 4108 (2000).), which we find exhibits an intense low-energy component, but only a tenuous high-energy component, in agreement with PIC simulations. This work was performed with corporate support of General Atomics.

  5. Overview of inertial fusion and high-intensity laser plasma research in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassart, J.

    2004-12-01

    Inertial fusion science is driven by 'the quest for ignition'. For many years, a 'conventional' route towards inertial fusion has been investigated using two different approaches: ignition by an inertial central hot spot could be obtained either through the direct or the indirect drive scheme. Both imply the use of a very large facility to operate the driver, which is a powerful laser in the current projects (LMJ in France as well as NIF in the US). The LMJ construction being on the way, a large amount of experimental and computational work is currently being done to deepen the understanding of ignition requirements. On the other hand, the so-called 'fast ignition' approach has led to an increasingly important amount of scientific work since it was proposed at the beginning of the 1990s. During the last several years (from the previous IFSA held in Kyoto in 2001), several PW-class high-intensity laser facilities have been built in Europe. In the meantime, a large number of interesting results related to fast electron and proton production have been obtained with the existing facilities. Observation of laser-irradiated solid targets has provided the first evidence of electron bunches separated by half the period of light. Nevertheless, target heating remains modest. On the other hand, multi-megaelectronvolt highly collimated electron beams have been produced by table-top lasers interacting with the low-density plasmas. They open the feasibility of a lot of applications: x-ray probe beams in plasma physics, biology, chemistry, injector for conventional accelerators, etc). Laser-produced proton beams is also a growing field, with a lot of promising applications: proton therapy, radio-isotope production, diagnostic for transient phenomena in laser-plasma interaction, etc. Inertial fusion research is fostered by a sustained effort of organization and coordination at the national level (the creation of an Institute for Lasers and Plasmas in France) as well as at the

  6. Study of the plasma expansion produced on ultra-thin foil targets with a high intensity and ultrashort laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnedyuk, Semen; Fourmaux, Sylvain; Buffechoux, Sebastien; Albertazzi, Bruno; Martin, Francois; Kieffer, Jean Claude

    2011-10-01

    INRS-EMT, Université du Québec, 1650 Lionel Boulet, Varennes J3X 1S2, Québec, Canada LULI, UMR 7605, CNRS - CEA - Université Paris 6 - Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France Abstract: A high intensity ultrashort laser pulse, with an intensity of the order of 1019 W/cm2, focused onto a thin foil target generates a plasma and highly energetic ion (including proton) beams from its front and rear sides which propagate along the target normal. Another interest of laser plasma interaction with ultra-thin foil is the possibility to deposit energy in the entire laser absorption depth before any expansion thus enabling target isochoric heating. With a target thickness of 30 or 15 nm the laser pulse should interact in volume and enable to reach very high temperature while the target is still at solid density. The resulting cooling of the target will then be ultra-fast and potential X-ray emission should be ultrashort. The 100 TW class laser system at the Advanced Laser Light Source facility enables laser plasma interaction study with femtosecond laser pulses, ultra thin foil targets and high contrast laser pulse intensity ratio. We used a shadowgraph diagnostic with a femtosecond laser probe to characterize the plasma expansion.

  7. Fast ion acceleration from thin foils irradiated by ultra-high intensity, ultra-high contrast laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, R.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Doria, D.; Quinn, K. E.; Romagnani, L.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.; Andreev, A. A.; Brenner, C. M.; Gallegos, P.; Carroll, D. C.; McKenna, P.; Tresca, O.; Dover, N. P.; Najmudin, Z.; Palmer, C. A. J.; Neely, D.; Green, J. S.; Foster, P. S.; Schreiber, J.; and others

    2011-09-19

    Ion acceleration resulting from the interaction of ultra-high intensity (2 x 10{sup 20 }W/cm{sup 2}) and ultra-high contrast ({approx}10{sup 10}) laser pulses with 0.05-10 {mu}m thick Al foils at normal (0 deg.) and 35 deg. laser incidence is investigated. When decreasing the target thickness from 10 {mu}m down to 0.05 {mu}m, the accelerated ions become less divergent and the ion flux increases, particularly at normal (0 deg.) laser incidence on the target. A laser energy conversion into protons of {approx}6.5% is estimated at 35 deg. laser incidence. Experimental results are in reasonable agreement with theoretical estimates and can be a benchmark for further theoretical and computational work.

  8. Picosecond 14.7 nm interferometry of high intensity laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Filevich, J; Smith, R F; Moon, S J; Rocca, J J; Keenan, R; Nilsen, J; Shlyaptsev, V N; Hunter, J R; Ng, A; Marconi, M C

    2004-10-14

    We have developed a compact, 14.7 nm, sub-5 ps x-ray laser source at LLNL together with a Mach-Zehnder type Diffraction Grating Interferometer built at Colorado State University for probing dense, high intensity laser-produced plasmas. The short wavelength and pulse length of the probe reduces refraction and absorption effects within the plasma and minimizes plasma motion blurring. This unique diagnostic capability gives precise 2-D density profile snapshots and is generating new data for rapidly evolving laser-heated plasmas. A review of the results from dense, mm-scale line focus plasma experiments will be described with detailed comparisons to hydrodynamic simulations.

  9. Creating astrophysically relevant jets from locally heated targets irradiated by a high-intensity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Holger; Robinson, Alex

    2014-10-01

    The formation mechanism of jets in the vicinity of young stellar objects has been the subject of investigations for many years. It is thought that jets are formed by the stellar wind interacting with an inhomogeneous plasma. A density gradient from the equator to the poles causes the wind to encounter the inward facing reverse shock at an oblique angle. The wind is focused into a conical flow towards the poles where it emerges as a narrow jet. This mechanism is inaccessible to direct observations due to the small scales on which it operates. Using high intensity lasers to produce comparable jets offers a way to investigate the mechanisms in the laboratory. Previous investigations of jets in the laboratory have directly generated the conical flow, skipping the first part of the formation mechanism. We present simulations of a novel method of generating jets in the laboratory by using magnetic fields generated by resistivity gradients to control the fast electron flow. The return current selectively heats a small region inside the target which drives a blast wave into the low density region behind the target. A conical high density shell focuses the outflow into a narrow jet. We find jets with aspect ratios of over 15 and Mach numbers between 2.5 and 4.3. This work is funded by the European Research Council, Grant STRUCMAGFAST.

  10. High Intensity Laser Power Beaming Architecture for Space and Terrestrial Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, Taysir; Fast, Brian; Raible, Daniel; Dinca, Dragos; Tollis, Nick; Jalics, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    High Intensity Laser Power Beaming (HILPB) has been developed as a technique to achieve Wireless Power Transmission (WPT) for both space and terrestrial applications. In this paper, the system architecture and hardware results for a terrestrial application of HILPB are presented. These results demonstrate continuous conversion of high intensity optical energy at near-IR wavelengths directly to electrical energy at output power levels as high as 6.24 W from the single cell 0.8 cm2 aperture receiver. These results are scalable, and may be realized by implementing receiver arraying and utilizing higher power source lasers. This type of system would enable long range optical refueling of electric platforms, such as MUAV s, airships, robotic exploration missions and provide power to spacecraft platforms which may utilize it to drive electric means of propulsion.

  11. Explosive vaporization of a large transparent droplet irradiated by a high intensity laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J Z; Lam, J K; Wood, C F; Chu, B T; Chang, R K

    1987-11-15

    Shadowgraph studies of the explosive vaporization of a transparent water droplet after irradiation by a high intensity beam show that dielectric breakdown occurs within the droplet shadow face and generates a dense plasma, which absorbs the laser pulse. The convective forces expel the vapor from the droplet shadow face. We have deduced (1) the vapor propagation velocities, (2) the recoil velocity of the remaining droplet, and (3) the deformation rate of the illuminated face. Droplets are noted to eject fingerlike material from the surface facing the single laser-vaporized droplet when the asymmetrical vapor intercepts the neighboring droplets.

  12. Ultra-High-Intensity Lasers for Gravitational Wave Generation and Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, R. M. L.; Li, Fangyu; Li, Ruxin

    2006-01-01

    Ultra-high-intensity lasers are used to generate and detect short-pulse or high-frequency-gravitational-waves (HFGWs) in the laboratory. According to accepted definitions HFGWs have frequencies in excess of 100kHz (pulses less than 10μs duration) and may have the most promise for terrestrial generation and practical, scientific, and commercial application. Shanghai-Institute-of-Optics-and-Fine-Mechanics' (SIOM) lasers are described whose action against targets emulates a double-star system and generates a GW flux at a focus midway between two such GW-generation lasers. The detector is a coupling-system of semitransparent beam-splitters and a narrow, 2.5-millimeter-radius, pulsed-Gaussian-laser-detection beam passing through a static 15T magnetic field. It is sensitive to GW amplitudes of ~10-32 and detects the 10-17 to ~10-32-amplitude GWs to be generated, with signal-to-noise ratios greater than one. The experimental approach, which involves new mechanisms (e.g., high-intensity lasers causing >=1.5×105N-impulsive force on laser targets), is quite different from previous work involving older technology. It is concluded that the GW-generation and detection apparatus is now feasible and will result in a successful laboratory experiment to test theory and this paper will serve to attract ideas from various disciplines to improve the prospects for a successful experiment. As a space technology application, if the Ultra-high-intensity lasers were space borne and at lunar distance (e.g., at the Moon and the lunar L3 libration point) and the quadrupole formalism approximately holds for GW radiators (laser targets) many GW wavelengths apart, then the HFGW power would be about 2×103 W and the flux would be about 1013 to 1014 Wm-2 during each pulse at an infinitesimal focal spot between the laser targets. The focal spot could be located at any point on or below the surface of the Earth by adjusting the laser timing and laser target orientations.

  13. High-intensity laser-accelerated ion beam produced from cryogenic micro-jet target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, M.; Kim, J. B.; Curry, C. B.; Aurand, B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Göde, S.; Goyon, C.; Hazi, A.; Kerr, S.; Pak, A.; Propp, A.; Ramakrishna, B.; Ruby, J.; Willi, O.; Williams, G. J.; Rödel, C.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the successful operation of a newly developed cryogenic jet target at high intensity laser-irradiation. Using the frequency-doubled Titan short pulse laser system at Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we demonstrate the generation of a pure proton beam a with maximum energy of 2 MeV. Furthermore, we record a quasi-monoenergetic peak at 1.1 MeV in the proton spectrum emitted in the laser forward direction suggesting an alternative acceleration mechanism. Using a solid-density mixed hydrogen-deuterium target, we are also able to produce pure proton-deuteron ion beams. With its high purity, limited size, near-critical density, and high-repetition rate capability, this target is promising for future applications.

  14. Channeling of multikilojoule high-intensity laser beams in an inhomogeneous plasma.

    PubMed

    Ivancic, S; Haberberger, D; Habara, H; Iwawaki, T; Anderson, K S; Craxton, R S; Froula, D H; Meyerhofer, D D; Stoeckl, C; Tanaka, K A; Theobald, W

    2015-05-01

    Channeling experiments were performed that demonstrate the transport of high-intensity (>10(18)W/cm(2)), multikilojoule laser light through a millimeter-sized, inhomogeneous (∼300-μm density scale length) laser-produced plasma up to overcritical density, which is an important step forward for the fast-ignition concept. The background plasma density and the density depression inside the channel were characterized with a novel optical probe system. The channel progression velocity was measured, which agrees well with theoretical predictions based on large scale particle-in-cell simulations, confirming scaling laws for the required channeling laser energy and laser pulse duration, which are important parameters for future integrated fast-ignition channeling experiments. PMID:26066111

  15. Hole-boring in clouds by high-intensity laser beams: theory.

    PubMed

    Harney, R C

    1977-11-01

    The physics of hole-boring in clouds and fogs by high-intensity ir laser beams is investigated in a zerothorder approximation. Simple analytical expressions are obtained which describe the phenomena of interest. Application of these expressions to various types of clouds and fogs yields order-of-magnitude estimates of the laser powers required to bore holes of a given size and quality. The power requirements for hole-boring through light ground fogs or thin overcasts are in excess of 100 kW, while hole-boring through thicker overcasts will require laser powers much in excess of 10 MW. Dispersal of ground fogs over an extended area will require laser powers in the 10(8)-10(9)-W range and thus may not be cost effective simply in terms of energy consumption.

  16. Channeling of multikilojoule high-intensity laser beams in an inhomogeneous plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancic, S.; Haberberger, D.; Habara, H.; Iwawaki, T.; Anderson, K. S.; Craxton, R. S.; Froula, D. H.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Stoeckl, C.; Tanaka, K. A.; Theobald, W.

    2015-05-01

    Channeling experiments were performed that demonstrate the transport of high-intensity (>10 18W /cm2), multikilojoule laser light through a millimeter-sized, inhomogeneous (˜300 -μ m density scale length) laser-produced plasma up to overcritical density, which is an important step forward for the fast-ignition concept. The background plasma density and the density depression inside the channel were characterized with a novel optical probe system. The channel progression velocity was measured, which agrees well with theoretical predictions based on large scale particle-in-cell simulations, confirming scaling laws for the required channeling laser energy and laser pulse duration, which are important parameters for future integrated fast-ignition channeling experiments.

  17. Channeling of multikilojoule high-intensity laser beams in an inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ivancic, S.; Haberberger, D.; Habara, H.; Iwawaki, T.; Anderson, K. S.; Craxton, R. S.; Froula, D. H.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Stoeckl, C.; Tanaka, K. A.; Theobald, W.

    2015-05-01

    Channeling experiments were performed that demonstrate the transport of high-intensity (>10¹⁸ W/cm²), multikilojoule laser light through a millimeter-sized, inhomogeneous (~300-μm density scale length) laser produced plasma up to overcritical density, which is an important step forward for the fast-ignition concept. The background plasma density and the density depression inside the channel were characterized with a novel optical probe system. The channel progression velocity was measured, which agrees well with theoretical predictions based on large scale particle-in-cell simulations, confirming scaling laws for the required channeling laser energy and laser pulse duration, which are important parameters for future integrated fast-ignition channeling experiments.

  18. Spectroscopic study of gold nanoparticle formation through high intensity laser irradiation of solution

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Takahiro Sato, Shunichi; Herbani, Yuliati; Ursescu, Daniel; Banici, Romeo; Dabu, Razvan Victor

    2013-08-15

    A spectroscopic study of the gold nanoparticle (NP) formation by high-intensity femtosecond laser irradiation of a gold ion solution was reported. The effect of varying energy density of the laser on the formation of gold NPs was also investigated. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak of the gold nanocolloid in real-time UV-visible absorption spectra during laser irradiation showed a distinctive progress; the SPR absorption peak intensity increased after a certain irradiation time, reached a maximum and then gradually decreased. During this absorption variation, at the same time, the peak wavelength changed from 530 to 507 nm. According to an empirical equation derived from a large volume of experimental data, the estimated mean size of the gold NPs varied from 43.4 to 3.2 nm during the laser irradiation. The mean size of gold NPs formed at specific irradiation times by transmission electron microscopy showed the similar trend as that obtained in the spectroscopic analysis. From these observations, the formation mechanism of gold NPs during laser irradiation was considered to have two steps. The first is a reduction of gold ions by reactive species produced through a non-linear reaction during high intensity laser irradiation of the solution; the second is the laser fragmentation of produced gold particles into smaller pieces. The gold nanocolloid produced after the fragmentation by excess irradiation showed high stability for at least a week without the addition of any dispersant because of the negative charge on the surface of the nanoparticles probably due to the surface oxidation of gold nanoparticles. A higher laser intensity resulted in a higher efficiency of gold NPs fabrication, which was attributed to a larger effective volume of the reaction.

  19. Ionization and acceleration of heavy ions in high-Z solid target irradiated by high intensity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahito, D.; Kishimoto, Y.

    2016-05-01

    In the interaction between high intensity laser and solid film, an ionization dynamics inside the solid is dominated by fast time scale convective propagation of the internal sheath field and the slow one by impact ionization due to heated high energy electrons coupled with nonlocal heat transport. Furthermore, ionization and acceleration due to the localized external sheath field which co- propagates with Al ions constituting the high energy front in the vacuum region. Through this process, the maximum charge state and then q/A increase in the rear side, so that ions near the front are further accelerated to high energy.

  20. High-intensity laser therapy during chronic degenerative tenosynovitis experimentally induced in broiler chickens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuna, Damiano; Rossi, Giacomo; Bilotta, Teresa W.; Zati, Allesandro; Gazzotti, Valeria; Venturini, Antonio; Pinna, Stefania; Serra, Christian; Masotti, Leonardo

    2002-10-01

    The aims of this study was the safety and the efficacy of High Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT) on chronic degenerative tenosynovitis. We have effectuated the histological evaluation and seroassay (C reactive protein) on 18 chickens affect by chronic degenerative tenosynovitis experimentally induced. We have been employed a Nd:YAG laser pulsed wave; all irradiated subjects received the same total energy (270 Joule) with a fluence of 7,7 J/cm2 and intensity of 10,7 W/cm2. The histological findings revealed a distinct reduction of the mineralization of the choral matrix, the anti-inflammatory effect of the laser, the hyperplasia of the synoviocytes and ectasia of the lymphatic vessels.

  1. Probing vacuum birefringence using x-ray free electron and optical high-intensity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbstein, Felix; Sundqvist, Chantal

    2016-07-01

    Vacuum birefringence is one of the most striking predictions of strong field quantum electrodynamics: Probe photons traversing a strong field region can indirectly sense the applied "pump" electromagnetic field via quantum fluctuations of virtual charged particles which couple to both pump and probe fields. This coupling is sensitive to the field alignment and can effectively result in two different indices of refraction for the probe photon polarization modes giving rise to a birefringence phenomenon. In this article, we perform a dedicated theoretical analysis of the proposed discovery experiment of vacuum birefringence at an x-ray free electron laser/optical high-intensity laser facility. Describing both pump and probe laser pulses realistically in terms of their macroscopic electromagnetic fields, we go beyond previous analyses by accounting for various effects not considered before in this context. Our study facilitates stringent quantitative predictions and optimizations of the signal in an actual experiment.

  2. Time Integrated Soft X-ray Imaging in High Intensity Laser Experiments (thesis)

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, David

    2009-01-01

    2009 marks a significant achievement and the dawn of a new era in high intensity laser research with the final commissioning of all 192 beams at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). NIF is a department of energy (DOE) funded project more than 10 years in the making located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The following research was done as one of many preliminary experiments done to prepare for these historic events. The primary focus of the experimental campaign this paper addresses is to test and develop a thermal x-radiation source using a short pulse laser. This data is hoped to provide information about the thermal transport mechanisms important in the development of prediction models in High Energy Density (HED) science. One of several diagnostics fielded was a soft x-ray imager (SXRI) which is detailed in this paper. The SXRI will be used to measure the relative size of the heated region and also the relative level of specific x-ray emissions among several shot and target configurations. The laser system used was the Titan laser located in the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Titan uses the JLF Janus Nd:glass laser west frontend system with a Optical Parametric Chirped Pulse Amplification (OPCPA) in place of the nanosecond oscillator. The system is capable of producing laser intensities of over a petawatt with several tens of joules delivered in the beam.

  3. Laser Injection Optics for High-Intensity Transmission in Multimode Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    SETCHELL,ROBERT E.

    2000-08-29

    An increasing number of applications are requiring fiber transmission of high-intensity laser pulses. The authors particular interests have led them to examine carefully the fiber transmission of Q-switched pulses from multimode Nd:YAG lasers at their fundamental wavelength. The maximum pulse energy that can be transmitted through a particular fiber is limited by the onset of laser-induced breakdown and damage mechanisms. Laser breakdown at the fiber entrance face is often the first limiting process to be encountered, but other mechanisms can result in catastrophic damage at either fiber face, within the initial entry segment of the fiber, and at other internal sites along the fiber path. In the course of their studies they have examined a number of factors that govern the relative importance of different mechanisms, including laser characteristics, the design and alignment of injection optics, fiber end-face preparation, and fiber routing. The present study emphasizes the important criteria for injection optics in high-intensity fiber transmission, and illustrates the opportunities that now exist for innovative designs of optics to meet these criteria. The consideration of diffractive optics to achieve desired injection criteria began in 1993, and they have evaluated a progression of designs since that time. In the present study, two recent designs for injection optics are compared by testing a sufficient number of fibers with each design to establish statistics for the onset of laser-induced breakdown and damage. In this testing they attempted to hold constant other factors that can influence damage statistics. Both designs performed well, although one was less successful in meeting all injection criteria and consequently showed a susceptibility to a particular damage process.

  4. Nanochannels fabricated by high-intensity femtosecond laser pulses on dielectric surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Mourou, Gerard; Joglekar, Ajit; Herbstman, Jeffrey F.; Hunt, Alan J.

    2007-10-01

    Direct scanning electron microscopy examination reveals a complex structure of narrow, micron-deep, internal nanochannels within shallow, nanoscale, external craters fabricated on glass and sapphire surfaces by single high-intensity femtosecond laser pulses, with nearly the same intensity thresholds for both features. Formation of the channels is accompanied by extensive expulsion of molten material produced via surface spallation and phase explosion mechanisms, and redeposited around the corresponding external craters. Potential mechanisms underlying fabrication of the unexpectedly deep channels in dielectrics are considered.

  5. Charge transport processes in LiNbO3:Fe at high intensity laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jermann, F.; Krätzig, E.

    1992-07-01

    Light-induced refractive index changes in LiNbO3:Fe crystals are investigated at high light intensities (>109 Wm-2). Holographic gratings are recorded and erased with frequency-doubled pulses of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. We find new intensity dependent contributions to the holographic sensitivity, to the photoconductivity, and to the saturation value of refractive index change. Light-induced absorption changes are also detected. These results indicate that the Fe2+/Fe3+ charge transport model, well established for low intensities, has to be modified for high intensities by assuming additional centers which trap and supply electrons.

  6. Proton stopping power measurements using high intensity short pulse lasers produced proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. N.; Atzeni, S.; Gauthier, M.; Higginson, D. P.; Mangia, F.; Marques, J.-R.; Riquier, R.; Fuchs, J.

    2014-03-01

    Proton stopping power measurements in solids and gases, typically made using proton accelerators, Van de Graf machines, etc., have existed now for many decades for many elements and compounds. We propose a new method of making this type of measurement using a different source, namely proton beams created by high intensity short pulse lasers. The advantage of this type of source is that there is the high number of particles and short bunch lengths, which is ideal for measurements of evolving mediums such as hot dense plasmas. Our measurements are consistent with exiting data and theory which validates this method.

  7. Optical Frequency Optimization of a High Intensity Laser Power Beaming System Utilizing VMJ Photovoltaic Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raible, Daniel E.; Dinca, Dragos; Nayfeh, Taysir H.

    2012-01-01

    An effective form of wireless power transmission (WPT) has been developed to enable extended mission durations, increased coverage and added capabilities for both space and terrestrial applications that may benefit from optically delivered electrical energy. The high intensity laser power beaming (HILPB) system enables long range optical 'refueling" of electric platforms such as micro unmanned aerial vehicles (MUAV), airships, robotic exploration missions and spacecraft platforms. To further advance the HILPB technology, the focus of this investigation is to determine the optimal laser wavelength to be used with the HILPB receiver, which utilizes vertical multi-junction (VMJ) photovoltaic cells. Frequency optimization of the laser system is necessary in order to maximize the conversion efficiency at continuous high intensities, and thus increase the delivered power density of the HILPB system. Initial spectral characterizations of the device performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) indicate the approximate range of peak optical-to-electrical conversion efficiencies, but these data sets represent transient conditions under lower levels of illumination. Extending these results to high levels of steady state illumination, with attention given to the compatibility of available commercial off-the-shelf semiconductor laser sources and atmospheric transmission constraints is the primary focus of this paper. Experimental hardware results utilizing high power continuous wave (CW) semiconductor lasers at four different operational frequencies near the indicated band gap of the photovoltaic VMJ cells are presented and discussed. In addition, the highest receiver power density achieved to date is demonstrated using a single photovoltaic VMJ cell, which provided an exceptionally high electrical output of 13.6 W/sq cm at an optical-to-electrical conversion efficiency of 24 percent. These results are very promising and scalable, as a potential 1.0 sq m HILPB receiver of

  8. High-intensity laser-driven proton acceleration enhancement from hydrogen containing ultrathin targets

    SciTech Connect

    Dollar, F.; Reed, S. A.; Matsuoka, T.; Bulanov, S. S.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; McGuffey, C.; Rousseau, P.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Willingale, L.; Yanovsky, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Litzenberg, D. W.

    2013-09-30

    Laser driven proton acceleration experiments from micron and submicron thick targets using high intensity (2 × 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}), high contrast (10{sup −15}) laser pulses show an enhancement of maximum energy when hydrogen containing targets were used instead of non-hydrogen containing. In our experiments, using thin (<1μm) plastic foil targets resulted in maximum proton energies that were consistently 20%–100% higher than when equivalent thickness inorganic targets, including Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Al, were used. Proton energies up to 20 MeV were measured with a flux of 10{sup 7} protons/MeV/sr.

  9. High-intensity laser for Ta and Ag implantation into different substrates for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutroneo, M.; Mackova, A.; Malinsky, P.; Matousek, J.; Torrisi, L.; Ullschmied, J.

    2015-07-01

    High-intensity lasers generating non-equilibrium plasma, can be employed to accelerate ions in the keV-MeV region, useful for many applications. In the present work, we performed study of ion implantation into different substrates by using a high-intensity laser at the PALS laboratory in Prague. Multi-energy ions generated by plasma from Ta and Ag targets were implanted into polyethylene and metallic substrates (Al, Ti) at energies of tens of keV per charge state. The ion emission was monitored online using time-of-flight detectors and electromagnetic deflection systems. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) was used to characterise the elemental composition in the implanted substrates by ion plasma emission and to provide the implanted ion depth profiling. These last measurements enable offline plasma characterisation and provide information on the useful potentiality of multi-ion species and multi-energy ion implantation into different substrates. XPS analysis gives information on the chemical bonds and their modifications in the first superficial implanted layers. The depth distributions of implanted Ta and Ag ions were compared with the theoretical ones achieved by using the SRIM-2012 simulation code.

  10. Comparison of high-intensity laser therapy and ultrasound treatment in the patients with lumbar discopathy.

    PubMed

    Boyraz, Ismail; Yildiz, Ahmet; Koc, Bunyamin; Sarman, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficiency of high intensity laser and ultrasound therapy in patients who were diagnosed with lumbar disc herniation and who were capable of performing physical exercises. 65 patients diagnosed with lumbar disc were included in the study. The patients were randomly divided into three groups: Group 1 received 10 sessions of high intensity laser to the lumbar region, Group 2 received 10 sessions of ultrasound, and Group 3 received medical therapy for 10 days and isometric lumbar exercises. The efficacy of the treatment modalities was compared with the assessment of the patients before the therapy at the end of the therapy, and in third month after the therapy. Comparing the changes between groups, statically significant difference was observed in MH (mental health) parameter before treatment between Groups 1 and 2 and in MH parameter and VAS score in third month of the therapy between Groups 2 and 3. However, the evaluation of the patients after ten days of treatment did not show significant differences between the groups compared to baseline values. We found that HILT, ultrasound, and exercise were efficient therapies for lumbar discopathy but HILT and ultrasound had longer effect on some parameters. PMID:25883952

  11. Comparison of high-intensity laser therapy and ultrasound treatment in the patients with lumbar discopathy.

    PubMed

    Boyraz, Ismail; Yildiz, Ahmet; Koc, Bunyamin; Sarman, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficiency of high intensity laser and ultrasound therapy in patients who were diagnosed with lumbar disc herniation and who were capable of performing physical exercises. 65 patients diagnosed with lumbar disc were included in the study. The patients were randomly divided into three groups: Group 1 received 10 sessions of high intensity laser to the lumbar region, Group 2 received 10 sessions of ultrasound, and Group 3 received medical therapy for 10 days and isometric lumbar exercises. The efficacy of the treatment modalities was compared with the assessment of the patients before the therapy at the end of the therapy, and in third month after the therapy. Comparing the changes between groups, statically significant difference was observed in MH (mental health) parameter before treatment between Groups 1 and 2 and in MH parameter and VAS score in third month of the therapy between Groups 2 and 3. However, the evaluation of the patients after ten days of treatment did not show significant differences between the groups compared to baseline values. We found that HILT, ultrasound, and exercise were efficient therapies for lumbar discopathy but HILT and ultrasound had longer effect on some parameters.

  12. Comparison of High-Intensity Laser Therapy and Ultrasound Treatment in the Patients with Lumbar Discopathy

    PubMed Central

    Boyraz, Ismail; Yildiz, Ahmet; Koc, Bunyamin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficiency of high intensity laser and ultrasound therapy in patients who were diagnosed with lumbar disc herniation and who were capable of performing physical exercises. 65 patients diagnosed with lumbar disc were included in the study. The patients were randomly divided into three groups: Group 1 received 10 sessions of high intensity laser to the lumbar region, Group 2 received 10 sessions of ultrasound, and Group 3 received medical therapy for 10 days and isometric lumbar exercises. The efficacy of the treatment modalities was compared with the assessment of the patients before the therapy at the end of the therapy, and in third month after the therapy. Comparing the changes between groups, statically significant difference was observed in MH (mental health) parameter before treatment between Groups 1 and 2 and in MH parameter and VAS score in third month of the therapy between Groups 2 and 3. However, the evaluation of the patients after ten days of treatment did not show significant differences between the groups compared to baseline values. We found that HILT, ultrasound, and exercise were efficient therapies for lumbar discopathy but HILT and ultrasound had longer effect on some parameters. PMID:25883952

  13. Characterization of High-Intensity Laser Propagation in the Relativistic Transparent Regime through Measurements of Energetic Proton Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Willingale, L.; Nagel, S. R.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Bellei, C.; Dangor, A. E.; Kaluza, M. C.; Kamperidis, C.; Kneip, S.; Krushelnick, K.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Nilson, P. M.; Najmudin, Z.; Clarke, R. J.; Heathcote, R.; Lopes, N.; Nazarov, W.

    2009-03-27

    Experiments were performed to investigate the propagation of a high intensity (I{approx}10{sup 21} W cm{sup -2}) laser in foam targets with densities ranging from 0.9n{sub c} to 30n{sub c}. Proton acceleration was used to diagnose the interaction. An improvement in proton beam energy and efficiency is observed for the lowest density foam (n{sub e}=0.9n{sub c}), compared to higher density foams. Simulations show that the laser beam penetrates deeper into the target due to its relativistic propagation and results in greater collimation of the ensuing hot electrons. This results in the rear surface accelerating electric field being larger, increasing the efficiency of the acceleration. Enhanced collimation of the ions is seen to be due to the self-generated azimuthal magnetic and electric fields at the rear of the target.

  14. Impact of Pre-Plasma on Fast Electron Generation and Transport from Short Pulse High Intensity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, J.; McGuffey, C.; Krauland, C.; Jarrott, L. C.; Sorokovikova, A.; Qiao, B.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Park, J.; Link, A.; Chen, H.; McLean, H. S.; Wagner, C.; Minello, V.; McCary, E.; Meadows, A.; Spinks, M.; Gaul, E.; Dyer, G.; Hegelich, B. M.; Martinez, M.; Donovan, M.; Ditmire, T.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results and analysis from recent short pulse laser matter experiments using the Texas Petawatt Laser to study the impact of pre-plasma on fast electron generation and transport. The experimental setup consisted of 3 separate beam elements: a main, high intensity, short pulse beam for the interaction, a secondary pulse of equal intensity interacting with a separate thin foil target to generate protons for side-on proton imaging and a third, low intensity, wider beam to generate a varied scale length pre-plasma. The main target consisted of a multilayer planar Al foil with a buried Cu fluor layer. The electron beam was characterized with multiple diagnostics, including several bremsstrahlung spectrometers, magnetic electron spectrometers and Cu-K α imaging. The protons from the secondary target were used to image the fields on the front of the target in the region of laser plasma interaction. Features seen in the interaction region by these protons will be presented along with characteristics of the generated electron beam. This work performed under the auspices of the US DOE under Contracts DE-FOA-0000583 (FES, NNSA).

  15. Laser-energy transfer and enhancement of plasma waves and electron beams by interfering high-intensity laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Saleh, N; Chen, S; Sheng, Z M; Umstadter, D

    2003-11-28

    The effects of interference due to crossed laser beams were studied experimentally in the high-intensity regime. Two ultrashort (400 fs), high-intensity (4 x 10(17) and 1.6 x 10(18) W/cm(2)) and 1 microm wavelength laser pulses were crossed in a plasma of density 4 x 10(19) cm(3). Energy was observed to be transferred from the higher-power to the lower-power pulse, increasing the amplitude of the plasma wave propagating in the direction of the latter. This results in increased electron self-trapping and plasma-wave acceleration gradient, which led to an increased number of hot electrons (by 300%) and hot-electron temperature (by 70%) and a decreased electron-beam divergence angle (by 45%), as compared with single-pulse illumination. Simulations reveal that increased stochastic heating of electrons may have also contributed to the electron-beam enhancement.

  16. The study towards high intensity high charge state laser ion sources.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H Y; Jin, Q Y; Sha, S; Zhang, J J; Li, Z M; Liu, W; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Zhao, H W

    2014-02-01

    As one of the candidate ion sources for a planned project, the High Intensity heavy-ion Accelerator Facility, a laser ion source has been being intensively studied at the Institute of Modern Physics in the past two years. The charge state distributions of ions produced by irradiating a pulsed 3 J/8 ns Nd:YAG laser on solid targets of a wide range of elements (C, Al, Ti, Ni, Ag, Ta, and Pb) were measured with an electrostatic ion analyzer spectrometer, which indicates that highly charged ions could be generated from low-to-medium mass elements with the present laser system, while the charge state distributions for high mass elements were relatively low. The shot-to-shot stability of ion pulses was monitored with a Faraday cup for carbon target. The fluctuations within ±2.5% for the peak current and total charge and ±6% for pulse duration were demonstrated with the present setup of the laser ion source, the suppression of which is still possible.

  17. The study towards high intensity high charge state laser ion sources.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H Y; Jin, Q Y; Sha, S; Zhang, J J; Li, Z M; Liu, W; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Zhao, H W

    2014-02-01

    As one of the candidate ion sources for a planned project, the High Intensity heavy-ion Accelerator Facility, a laser ion source has been being intensively studied at the Institute of Modern Physics in the past two years. The charge state distributions of ions produced by irradiating a pulsed 3 J/8 ns Nd:YAG laser on solid targets of a wide range of elements (C, Al, Ti, Ni, Ag, Ta, and Pb) were measured with an electrostatic ion analyzer spectrometer, which indicates that highly charged ions could be generated from low-to-medium mass elements with the present laser system, while the charge state distributions for high mass elements were relatively low. The shot-to-shot stability of ion pulses was monitored with a Faraday cup for carbon target. The fluctuations within ±2.5% for the peak current and total charge and ±6% for pulse duration were demonstrated with the present setup of the laser ion source, the suppression of which is still possible. PMID:24593615

  18. Axial segregation in high intensity discharge lamps measured by laser absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Flikweert, A.J.; Nimalasuriya, T.; Groothuis, C.H.J.M.; Kroesen, G.M.W.; Stoffels, W.W.

    2005-10-01

    High intensity discharge lamps have a high efficiency. These lamps contain rare-earth additives (in our case dysprosium iodide) which radiate very efficiently. A problem is color separation in the lamp because of axial segregation of the rare-earth additives, caused by diffusion and convection. Here two-dimensional atomic dysprosium density profiles are measured by means of laser absorption spectroscopy; the order of magnitude of the density is 10{sup 22} m{sup -3}. The radially resolved atomic density measurements show a hollow density profile. In the outer parts of the lamp molecules dominate, while the center is depleted of dysprosium atoms due to ionization. From the axial profiles the segregation parameter is determined. It is shown that the lamp operates on the right-hand side of the Fischer curve [J. Appl. Phys. 47, 2954 (1976)], i.e., a larger convection leads to less segregation.

  19. Temporal Narrowing of Neutrons Produced by High-Intensity Short-Pulse Lasers.

    PubMed

    Higginson, D P; Vassura, L; Gugiu, M M; Antici, P; Borghesi, M; Brauckmann, S; Diouf, C; Green, A; Palumbo, L; Petrascu, H; Sofia, S; Stardubtsev, M; Willi, O; Kar, S; Negoita, F; Fuchs, J

    2015-07-31

    The production of neutron beams having short temporal duration is studied using ultraintense laser pulses. Laser-accelerated protons are spectrally filtered using a laser-triggered microlens to produce a short duration neutron pulse via nuclear reactions induced in a converter material (LiF). This produces a ∼3  ns duration neutron pulse with 10(4)  n/MeV/sr/shot at 0.56 m from the laser-irradiated proton source. The large spatial separation between the neutron production and the proton source allows for shielding from the copious and undesirable radiation resulting from the laser-plasma interaction. This neutron pulse compares favorably to the duration of conventional accelerator sources and should scale up with, present and future, higher energy laser facilities to produce brighter and shorter neutron beams for ultrafast probing of dense materials.

  20. Temporal Narrowing of Neutrons Produced by High-Intensity Short-Pulse Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginson, D. P.; Vassura, L.; Gugiu, M. M.; Antici, P.; Borghesi, M.; Brauckmann, S.; Diouf, C.; Green, A.; Palumbo, L.; Petrascu, H.; Sofia, S.; Stardubtsev, M.; Willi, O.; Kar, S.; Negoita, F.; Fuchs, J.

    2015-07-01

    The production of neutron beams having short temporal duration is studied using ultraintense laser pulses. Laser-accelerated protons are spectrally filtered using a laser-triggered microlens to produce a short duration neutron pulse via nuclear reactions induced in a converter material (LiF). This produces a ˜3 ns duration neutron pulse with 104 n /MeV /sr /shot at 0.56 m from the laser-irradiated proton source. The large spatial separation between the neutron production and the proton source allows for shielding from the copious and undesirable radiation resulting from the laser-plasma interaction. This neutron pulse compares favorably to the duration of conventional accelerator sources and should scale up with, present and future, higher energy laser facilities to produce brighter and shorter neutron beams for ultrafast probing of dense materials.

  1. Dynamics and structure of self-generated magnetics fields on solids following high contrast, high intensity laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Albertazzi, B.; Chen, S. N.; Fuchs, J.; Antici, P.; Böker, J.; Swantusch, M.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.; Breil, J.; Feugeas, J. L.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; D'Humières, E.; Dervieux, V.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Romagnagni, L.; Lancia, L.; Shepherd, R.; Sentoku, Y.; Starodubtsev, M.; and others

    2015-12-15

    The dynamics of self-generated magnetic B-fields produced following the interaction of a high contrast, high intensity (I > 10{sup 19 }W cm{sup −2}) laser beam with thin (3 μm thick) solid (Al or Au) targets is investigated experimentally and numerically. Two main sources drive the growth of B-fields on the target surfaces. B-fields are first driven by laser-generated hot electron currents that relax over ∼10–20 ps. Over longer timescales, the hydrodynamic expansion of the bulk of the target into vacuum also generates B-field induced by non-collinear gradients of density and temperature. The laser irradiation of the target front side strongly localizes the energy deposition at the target front, in contrast to the target rear side, which is heated by fast electrons over a much larger area. This induces an asymmetry in the hydrodynamic expansion between the front and rear target surfaces, and consequently the associated B-fields are found strongly asymmetric. The sole long-lasting (>30 ps) B-fields are the ones growing on the target front surface, where they remain of extremely high strength (∼8–10 MG). These B-fields have been recently put by us in practical use for focusing laser-accelerated protons [B. Albertazzi et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 043502 (2015)]; here we analyze in detail their dynamics and structure.

  2. Comparison of Square and Radial Geometries for High Intensity Laser Power Beaming Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raible, Daniel E.; Fast, Brian R.; Dinca, Dragos; Nayfeh, Taysir H.; Jalics, Andrew K.

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to further advance a realizable form of wireless power transmission (WPT), high intensity laser power beaming (HILPB) has been developed for both space and terrestrial applications. Unique optical-to-electrical receivers are employed with near infrared (IR-A) continuous-wave (CW) semiconductor lasers to experimentally investigate the HILPB system. In this paper, parasitic feedback, uneven illumination and the implications of receiver array geometries are considered and experimental hardware results for HILPB are presented. The TEM00 Gaussian energy profile of the laser beam presents a challenge to the effectiveness of the receiver to perform efficient photoelectric conversion, due to the resulting non-uniform illumination of the photovoltaic cell arrays. In this investigation, the geometry of the receiver is considered as a technique to tailor the receiver design to accommodate the Gaussian beam profile, and in doing so it is demonstrated that such a methodology is successful in generating bulk receiver output power levels reaching 25 W from 7.2 sq cm of photovoltaic cells. These results are scalable, and may be realized by implementing receiver arraying and utilizing higher power source lasers to achieve a 1.0 sq m receiver capable of generating over 30 kW of electrical power. This type of system would enable long range optical "refueling" of electric platforms, such as MUAV s, airships, robotic exploration missions and provide power to spacecraft platforms which may utilize it to drive electric means of propulsion. In addition, a smaller HILPB receiver aperture size could be utilized to establish a robust optical communications link within environments containing high levels of background radiance, to achieve high signal to noise ratios.

  3. Fast ignition by laser driven particle beams of very high intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Hora, H.; Read, M. N.; Badziak, J.; Glowacz, S.; Jablonski, S.; Wolowski, J.; Skladanowski, Z.; Li, Y.-T.; Liang, T.-J.; Liu Hong; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie; Cang Yu; Osman, F.; Miley, G. H.; Zhang Weiyan; He Xiantu; Peng Hansheng; Jungwirth, K.; Rohlena, K.

    2007-07-15

    Anomalous observations using the fast ignition for laser driven fusion energy are interpreted and experimental and theoretical results are reported which are in contrast to the very numerous effects usually observed at petawatt-picosecond laser interaction with plasmas. These anomalous mechanisms result in rather thin blocks (pistons) of these nonlinear (ponderomotive) force driven highly directed plasmas of modest temperatures. The blocks consist in space charge neutral plasmas with ion current densities above 10{sup 10} A/cm{sup 2}. For the needs of applications in laser driven fusion energy, much thicker blocks are required. This may be reached by a spherical configuration where a conical propagation may lead to thick blocks for interaction with targets. First results are reported in view of applications for the proton fast igniter and other laser-fusion energy schemes.

  4. Rewriting the rules governing high intensity interactions of light with matter.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Alex B; McCorkindale, John C; Poopalasingam, Sankar; Longworth, James W; Simon, Peter; Szatmári, Sándor; Rhodes, Charles K

    2016-04-01

    The trajectory of discovery associated with the study of high-intensity nonlinear radiative interactions with matter and corresponding nonlinear modes of electromagnetic propagation through material that have been conducted over the last 50 years can be presented as a landscape in the intensity/quantum energy [I-ħω] plane. Based on an extensive series of experimental and theoretical findings, a universal zone of anomalous enhanced electromagnetic coupling, designated as the fundamental nonlinear domain, can be defined. Since the lower boundaries of this region for all atomic matter correspond to ħω ~ 10(3) eV and I  ≈  10(16) W cm(-2), it heralds a future dominated by x-ray and γ-ray studies of all phases of matter including nuclear states. The augmented strength of the interaction with materials can be generally expressed as an increase in the basic electromagnetic coupling constant in which the fine structure constant α  →  Z(2)α, where Z denotes the number of electrons participating in an ordered response to the driving field. Since radiative conditions strongly favoring the development of this enhanced electromagnetic coupling are readily produced in self-trapped plasma channels, the processes associated with the generation of nonlinear interactions with materials stand in natural alliance with the nonlinear mechanisms that induce confined propagation. An experimental example involving the Xe (4d(10)5s(2)5p(6)) supershell for which Z  ≅  18 that falls in the specified anomalous nonlinear domain is described. This yields an effective coupling constant of Z(2)α  ≅  2.4  >  1, a magnitude comparable to the strong interaction and a value rendering as useless conventional perturbative analyses founded on an expansion in powers of α. This enhancement can be quantitatively understood as a direct consequence of the dominant role played by coherently driven multiply-excited states in the dynamics of the coupling

  5. Rewriting the rules governing high intensity interactions of light with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Alex B.; McCorkindale, John C.; Poopalasingam, Sankar; Longworth, James W.; Simon, Peter; Szatmári, Sándor; Rhodes, Charles K.

    2016-04-01

    The trajectory of discovery associated with the study of high-intensity nonlinear radiative interactions with matter and corresponding nonlinear modes of electromagnetic propagation through material that have been conducted over the last 50 years can be presented as a landscape in the intensity/quantum energy [I-ħω] plane. Based on an extensive series of experimental and theoretical findings, a universal zone of anomalous enhanced electromagnetic coupling, designated as the fundamental nonlinear domain, can be defined. Since the lower boundaries of this region for all atomic matter correspond to ħω ~ 103 eV and I  ≈  1016 W cm-2, it heralds a future dominated by x-ray and γ-ray studies of all phases of matter including nuclear states. The augmented strength of the interaction with materials can be generally expressed as an increase in the basic electromagnetic coupling constant in which the fine structure constant α  →  Z 2 α, where Z denotes the number of electrons participating in an ordered response to the driving field. Since radiative conditions strongly favoring the development of this enhanced electromagnetic coupling are readily produced in self-trapped plasma channels, the processes associated with the generation of nonlinear interactions with materials stand in natural alliance with the nonlinear mechanisms that induce confined propagation. An experimental example involving the Xe (4d105s25p6) supershell for which Z  ≅  18 that falls in the specified anomalous nonlinear domain is described. This yields an effective coupling constant of Z 2 α  ≅  2.4  >  1, a magnitude comparable to the strong interaction and a value rendering as useless conventional perturbative analyses founded on an expansion in powers of α. This enhancement can be quantitatively understood as a direct consequence of the dominant role played by coherently driven multiply-excited states in the dynamics of the coupling. It is also

  6. Rewriting the rules governing high intensity interactions of light with matter.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Alex B; McCorkindale, John C; Poopalasingam, Sankar; Longworth, James W; Simon, Peter; Szatmári, Sándor; Rhodes, Charles K

    2016-04-01

    The trajectory of discovery associated with the study of high-intensity nonlinear radiative interactions with matter and corresponding nonlinear modes of electromagnetic propagation through material that have been conducted over the last 50 years can be presented as a landscape in the intensity/quantum energy [I-ħω] plane. Based on an extensive series of experimental and theoretical findings, a universal zone of anomalous enhanced electromagnetic coupling, designated as the fundamental nonlinear domain, can be defined. Since the lower boundaries of this region for all atomic matter correspond to ħω ~ 10(3) eV and I  ≈  10(16) W cm(-2), it heralds a future dominated by x-ray and γ-ray studies of all phases of matter including nuclear states. The augmented strength of the interaction with materials can be generally expressed as an increase in the basic electromagnetic coupling constant in which the fine structure constant α  →  Z(2)α, where Z denotes the number of electrons participating in an ordered response to the driving field. Since radiative conditions strongly favoring the development of this enhanced electromagnetic coupling are readily produced in self-trapped plasma channels, the processes associated with the generation of nonlinear interactions with materials stand in natural alliance with the nonlinear mechanisms that induce confined propagation. An experimental example involving the Xe (4d(10)5s(2)5p(6)) supershell for which Z  ≅  18 that falls in the specified anomalous nonlinear domain is described. This yields an effective coupling constant of Z(2)α  ≅  2.4  >  1, a magnitude comparable to the strong interaction and a value rendering as useless conventional perturbative analyses founded on an expansion in powers of α. This enhancement can be quantitatively understood as a direct consequence of the dominant role played by coherently driven multiply-excited states in the dynamics of the coupling

  7. Hybrid ion acceleration with ultrathin composite foils irradiated by high intensity circularly-polarized laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, A. A.; Steinke, S.; Schnuerer, M.; Sokollik, T.; Sandner, W.; Henig, A.; Nickles, P. V.; Platonov, K. Y.

    2010-12-15

    A complete analytical description of ion acceleration in the laser radiation-pressure regime is presented. The combined effects of hot electron and light-pressure phenomena are used to qualitatively and quantitatively describe most recent experimental results in this regime. An essential part of the developed model is exhibited in the calculation of nonlinear laser light reflection and transmission properties, as well as in the spectral characterization of the laser light after interaction. The validity of the analytical model is supported by recent experimental results and by particle-in-cell simulations.

  8. Low- and high-intensity lasers in the treatment of herpes simplex virus 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Bello-Silva, Marina Stella; de Freitas, Patricia Moreira; Aranha, Ana Cecília Corrêa; Lage-Marques, José Luiz; Simões, Alyne; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos

    2010-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is one of the most common viral infections of the human being. Although most of the seropositive persons do not manifest symptoms, infected individuals may present recurrent infections, characterized by cold sores. HSV-1 infection can result in potentially harmful complications in some patients, especially in those with compromised immunity. We report a clinical case of a patient with severe oral HSV-1 infection in the lower lip. The treatment of the lesions with the association of high-intensity (erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet, 2.94 mum, 80 mJ/pulse, 2-4 Hz) and low-intensity (indium gallium aluminum phosphide, 660 nm, 3.8 J/cm(2), 10 mW) lasers has not been reported in the literature. During treatment, no systemic or topical medication was used. Pain sensitivity was completely gone after the first irradiation with the low-intensity laser. During the healing process, lesions were traumatized twice, on the days 4 and 7. Even though the lesions were completely healed within 10 days. PMID:19712025

  9. A two-color terawatt laser system for high-intensity laser-plasma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, James; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Downer, Michael

    2012-10-01

    In some high-field laser-plasma experiments, it is advantageous to accompany the main high-energy (˜1 J) laser with a second high-energy pulse (˜0.1 J) which has been frequency-shifted by ˜10%. Such a pulse-pair would have a low walk-off velocity while remaining spectrally distinct for use in two-color pump-probe experiments. Moreover, by shifting the second pulse by ˜plasma frequency, it is theoretically possible to enhance or suppress relativistic self-focusing, which is the first (uncontrolled) step in many laser-plasma experiments. We report a hybrid chirped pulse Raman amplifier (CPRA)/Ti-Sapphire amplifier (>200 mJ, 15-20 nm bandwidth (FWHM), >60 fs duration) that is capable of performing such two-color high-field experiments. When amplified and compressed, this beam's power exceeds 1 TW. This two-color capability can be added to any commercial terawatt laser system without compromising the energy, duration or beam quality of the main system. We will report progress with a two-color seeded relativistic self-phase modulation experiment.

  10. Propagation and absorption of high-intensity femtosecond laser radiation in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Kononenko, V V; Konov, V I; Gololobov, V M; Zavedeev, E V

    2014-12-31

    Femtosecond interferometry has been used to experimentally study the photoexcitation of the electron subsystem of diamond exposed to femtosecond laser pulses of intensity 10{sup 11} to 10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2}. The carrier concentration has been determined as a function of incident intensity for three harmonics of a Ti : sapphire laser (800, 400 and 266 nm). The results demonstrate that, in a wide range of laser fluences (up to those resulting in surface and bulk graphitisation), a well-defined multiphoton absorption prevails. We have estimated nonlinear absorption coefficients for pulsed radiation at λ = 800 nm (four-photon transition) and at 400 and 266 nm (indirect and direct two-photon transitions, respectively). It has also been shown that, at any considerable path length of a femtosecond pulse in diamond (tens of microns or longer), the laser beam experiences a severe nonlinear transformation, determining the amount of energy absorbed by the lattice, which is important for the development of technology for diamond photostructuring by ultrashort pulses. The competition between wave packet self-focusing and the plasma defocusing effect is examined as a major mechanism governing the propagation of intense laser pulses in diamond. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  11. High Intensity Mirror-Free Nanosecond Ytterbium Fiber Laser System in Master Oscillator Power Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun-Lin, Louis Chang

    Rare-earth-doped fiber lasers and amplifiers are relatively easy to efficiently produce a stable and high quality laser beam in a compact, robust, and alignment-free configuration. Recently, high power fiber laser systems have facilitated wide spread applications in academics, industries, and militaries in replacement of bulk solid-state laser systems. The master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) composed of a highly-controlled seed, high-gain preamplifiers, and high-efficiency power amplifiers are typically utilized to scale up the pulse energy, peak power, or average power. Furthermore, a direct-current-modulated nanosecond diode laser in single transverse mode can simply provide a compact and highly-controlled seed to result in the flexible output parameters, such as repetition rate, pulse duration, and even temporal pulse shape. However, when scaling up the peak power for high intensity applications, such a versatile diode-seeded nanosecond MOPA laser system using rare-earth-doped fibers is unable to completely save its own advantages compared to bulk laser systems. Without a strong seeding among the amplifiers, the guided amplified spontaneous amplification is easy to become dominant during the amplification, leading to the harmful self-lasing or pulsing effects, and the difficulty of the quantitative numerical comparison. In this dissertation, we study a high-efficiency and intense nanosecond ytterbium fiber MOPA system with good beam quality and stability for high intensity applications. The all-PM-fiber structure is achieved with the output extinction ratio of >12 dB by optimizing the interconnection of high power optical fibers. The diode-seeded MOPA configuration without parasitic stimulated amplification (PAS) is implemented using the double-pass scheme to extract energy efficiently for scaling peak power. The broadband PAS was studied experimentally, which matches well with our numerical simulation. The 1064-nm nanosecond seed was a direct

  12. High Energy K(alpha) Radiography Using High-intensity, Short-pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Izumi, N; Key, M H; King, J A; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Patel, P K; Price, D F; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Snavely, R A; Tabak, M; Town, R J; Wickersham, J E; Stoeckl, C; Storm, M; Theobald, W; Chambers, D M; Eagelton, R; Goldsack, T; Clarke, R J; Heathcote, R; Giraldez, E; Nikroo, A; Steinman, D A; Stephens, R B; Zhang, B B

    2005-11-16

    We have performed experiments using Callisto, the Vulcan 100 TW and the Vulcan Petawatt high intensity lasers to understand the characteristics of high energy, K{alpha} x-ray sources and to implement workable radiography solutions at 20-100 keV. Our measurements show that the K{alpha} size from a simple foil target is larger than 60 {micro}m, far larger than the experiment resolution requirement. The total K{alpha} yield is independent of target thicknesses verifying that refluxing plays a major role in photon generation. Smaller radiating volumes emit brighter K{alpha} radiation. 1-D radiography experiments using small-edge-on foils resolved 10 {micro}m features with high contrast. We tested a variety of small volume 2-D point sources such as cones, wires, and embedded wires, measuring photon yields and comparing our measurements with predictions from hybrid-PIC LSP simulations. In addition to high-energy, high-resolution backlighters, future experiments will also need imaging detectors and diagnostic tools that are workable in the 20-100 keV energy range. An initial look at some of these detector issues is also presented.

  13. High-energy K{alpha} radiography using high-intensity, short-pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.-S.; Chung, H.-K.; Izumi, N.; Key, M.H.; King, J.A.; Koch, J.A.; Landen, O.L.; Patel, P.K.; Price, D.F.; Remington, B.A.; Robey, H.F.; Snavely, R.A.; Tabak, M.; Town, R.P.J.; Wickersham, J.E.; Chambers, D.M.; Eagleton, R.; Goldsack, T.; Clarke, R.J.; Heathcote, R.

    2006-05-15

    The characteristics of 22-40 keV K{alpha} x-ray sources are measured. These high-energy sources are produced by 100 TW and petawatt high-intensity lasers and will be used to develop and implement workable radiography solutions to probe high-Z and dense materials for the high-energy density experiments. The measurements show that the K{alpha} source size from a simple foil target is larger than 60 {mu}m, too large for most radiography applications. The total K{alpha} yield is independent of target thicknesses, verifying that refluxing plays a major role in photon generation. Smaller radiating volumes emit brighter K{alpha} radiation. One-dimensional radiography experiments using small-edge-on foils resolved 10 {mu}m features with high contrast. Experiments were performed to test a variety of small volume two-dimensional point sources such as cones, wires, and embedded wires, measured photon yields, and compared the measurements with predictions from hybrid-particle-in-cell simulations. In addition to high-energy, high-resolution backlighters, future experiments will also need imaging detectors and diagnostic tools that are workable in the high-energy range. An initial look at some of these detector issues is also presented.

  14. Temporal resolution criterion for correctly simulating relativistic electron motion in a high-intensity laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Arefiev, Alexey V.; Cochran, Ginevra E.; Schumacher, Douglass W.; Robinson, Alexander P. L.; Chen, Guangye

    2015-01-15

    Particle-in-cell codes are now standard tools for studying ultra-intense laser-plasma interactions. Motivated by direct laser acceleration of electrons in sub-critical plasmas, we examine temporal resolution requirements that must be satisfied to accurately calculate electron dynamics in strong laser fields. Using the motion of a single electron in a perfect plane electromagnetic wave as a test problem, we show surprising deterioration of the numerical accuracy with increasing wave amplitude a{sub 0} for a given time-step. We go on to show analytically that the time-step must be significantly less than λ/ca{sub 0} to achieve good accuracy. We thus propose adaptive electron sub-cycling as an efficient remedy.

  15. Propagation instabilities of high-intensity laser-produced electron beams.

    PubMed

    Tatarakis, M; Beg, F N; Clark, E L; Dangor, A E; Edwards, R D; Evans, R G; Goldsack, T J; Ledingham, K W D; Norreys, P A; Sinclair, M A; Wei, M-S; Zepf, M; Krushelnick, K

    2003-05-01

    Measurements of energetic electron beams generated from ultrahigh intensity laser interactions (I>10(19) W/cm(2)) with dense plasmas are discussed. These interactions have been shown to produce very directional beams, although with a broad energy spectrum. In the regime where the beam density approaches the density of the background plasma, we show that these beams are unstable to filamentation and "hosing" instabilities. Particle-in-cell simulations also indicate the development of such instabilities. This is a regime of particular interest for inertial confinement fusion applications of these beams (i.e., "fast ignition").

  16. Long term effects of high intensity laser therapy in lateral epicondylitis patients.

    PubMed

    Akkurt, Ekrem; Kucuksen, Sami; Yılmaz, Halim; Parlak, Selman; Sallı, Ali; Karaca, Gülten

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate short- and long-term effects of high-intensity laser therapy (HILT) in lateral epicondylitis (LE) patients. Thirty patients with LE diagnosis (23 unilateral and 7 bilateral in total 37 elbows) were treated using HILT. LE patients were evaluated before, right after, and 6 months following HILT intervention post-treatment using visual analogue scale for pain (VAS) during activity and resting. Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Score and hand grip strength test (HGST) were used. The participants of the present study were also evaluated using Short-Form 36 (SF-36) before and 6 months after the treatment. Out of the 30 patients, 8 were male and 22 female with a mean age of 47.2 ± 9.7. The activity and resting VAS, DASH, and HGST scores revealed statistically significant improvement (p = 0.001) following treatment. Whereas VAS activity, DASH, and HGST scores increased after treatment until post-treatment 6 months significantly (p = 0.001), VAS resting scores remained stable (p = 0.476). A statistically significant improvement was also evident in the physical and mental components of SF-36 scores following treatment until post-treatment 6 months compared to pre-treatment scores (p = 0.001). In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that HILT is a reliable, safe, and effective treatment option in LE patients in the short and long term considering pain, functional status, and quality of life. PMID:26714978

  17. Focusing and transport of high-intensity multi-MeV proton bunches from a compact laser-driven source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busold, S.; Schumacher, D.; Deppert, O.; Brabetz, C.; Frydrych, S.; Kroll, F.; Joost, M.; Al-Omari, H.; Blažević, A.; Zielbauer, B.; Hofmann, I.; Bagnoud, V.; Cowan, T. E.; Roth, M.

    2013-10-01

    Laser ion acceleration provides for compact, high-intensity ion sources in the multi-MeV range. Using a pulsed high-field solenoid, for the first time high-intensity laser-accelerated proton bunches could be selected from the continuous exponential spectrum and delivered to large distances, containing more than 109 particles in a narrow energy interval around a central energy of 9.4 MeV and showing ≤30mrad envelope divergence. The bunches of only a few nanoseconds bunch duration were characterized 2.2 m behind the laser-plasma source with respect to arrival time, energy width, and intensity as well as spatial and temporal bunch profile.

  18. Effect of low level laser therapy and high intensity laser therapy on endothelial cell proliferation in vitro: preliminary communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukowicz, Malgorzata; Szymanska, Justyna; Goralczyk, Krzysztof; Zajac, Andrzej; Rość, Danuta

    2013-01-01

    Background: The main purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of power intensity and wavelength of Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) and HILT (High Intensity Laser Therapy) on endothelial cell proliferation. Material and methods: The tests were done on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Cultures were exposed to laser irradiation of 660 nm and 670 nm at different dosages, power output was 10 - 40 mW as well as 820 nm with power 100 mW and 808 nm with power 1500 mW. Energy density was from 0.28 to 11,43 J/cm2. Cell proliferation of a control and tested culture was evaluated with a colorimetric device to detect live cells. The tests were repeated 8 times. Results: We observed good effects of LLLT on live isolated ECs and no effects in experiments on previous deep-frozen cultures. Also HILT stimulated the proliferation of HUVEC. Conclusion: Endothelial cells play a key role in vascular homeostasis in humans. We observed the stimulatory effect of LLLT and HILT on proliferation of HUVEC. Many factors influence the proliferation of EC, so is it necessary to continue the experiment with different doses, intensity and cell concentration.

  19. Plume splitting and rebounding in a high-intensity CO{sub 2} laser induced air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Anmin; Jiang Yuanfei; Liu Hang; Jin Mingxing; Ding Dajun

    2012-07-15

    The dynamics of plasma plume formed by high-intensity CO{sub 2} laser induced breakdown of air at atmospheric pressure is investigated. The laser wavelength is 10.6 {mu}m. Measurements were made using 3 ns gated fast photography as well as space and time resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The behavior of the plasma plume was studied with a laser energy of 3 J and 10 J. The results show that the evolution of the plasma plume is very complicated. The splitting and rebounding of the plasma plume is observed to occur early in the plumes history.

  20. Feasibility of laser-integrated high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment for bladder tumors: in vitro study (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Van Phuc; Park, Suhyun; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that photothemal therapy combined with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can provide a promising method to achieve rapid thermal coagulation during surgical procedures. The current study investigated the feasibility of the laser-integrated high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) application to treat bladder tumors by enhancing thermal effects and therapeutic depth in vitro. To generate thermal coagulation, a single element HIFU transducer with a central frequency of 2.0 MHz was used to transmit acoustic energy to 15 fresh porcine bladders injected with an artificial tumor (100 µl gelatin and hemoglobin solution) in vitro. Simultaneously, an 80-W 532-nm laser system was also implemented to induce thermal necrosis in the targeted tissue. The intensity of 570 W/cm2 at the focus of HIFU and laser energy of 0.9 W were applied to all the samples for 40 s. The temperature rise increased up to about 1.6 or 3 folds (i.e., ΔT=32±3.8 K for laser-integrated HIFU, ΔT=20±6.5 K for HIFU only, and ΔT=11±5.6 K for laser only). The estimated lesion depth also increased by 1.3 and 2 folds during the dual-thermal treatment, in comparison with the treatment by either HIFU or laser. The results indicated that the laser-integrated HIFU treatment can be an efficient hyperthermic method for tumor coagulation.

  1. Characterization of warm dense matter (WDM) from high intensity laser driven shockwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauland, Christine; Wei, Mingsheng; Santos, Joao; Belancourt, Patrick; Theobald, Wolfgang; Keiter, Paul; Beg, Farhat

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the transport physics of an intense relativistic electron beam in various plasma regimes is crucial for many high-energy-density applications, such as fast heating for advanced ICF schemes and ion sources. Most short pulse laser-matter interaction experiments for electron transport studies have been performed with initially cold targets where the resistivity is far from that in warm dense and hot dense plasmas. In order to extend fast electron transport and energy coupling studies in pre-assembled plasmas, we must first characterize those regime possibilities. We present initial experiments conducted on the OMEGA EP laser (~ 1014 W/cm2) to characterize WDM created from the shock compression of low density (ρ0 ~ 330 mg/cc) CRF foams and solid Al foil targets. In foam targets, imaging x-ray Thomson scattering is used to measure spatial profiles of the temperature, ionization state and relative material density. The ASBO diagnostic and radiation hydrodynamics simulations deduce shock pressure in Al targets of various thicknesses. Details of the experiment and available data will be presented. The work was funded by the US DOE/NNSA NLUF Program.

  2. Dominant deuteron acceleration with a high-intensity laser for isotope production and neutron generation

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimchuk, A.; Raymond, A.; Yu, F.; Dollar, F.; Willingale, L.; Zulick, C.; Krushelnick, K.; Petrov, G. M.; Davis, J.

    2013-05-13

    Experiments on the interaction of an ultra-short pulse laser with heavy-water, ice-covered copper targets, at an intensity of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, were performed demonstrating the generation of a 'pure' deuteron beam with a divergence of 20 Degree-Sign , maximum energy of 8 MeV, and a total of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} deuterons with energy above 1 MeV-equivalent to a conversion efficiency of 1.5%{+-} 0.2%. Subsequent experiments on irradiation of a {sup 10}B sample with deuterons and neutron generation from d-d reactions in a pitcher-catcher geometry, resulted in the production of {approx}10{sup 6} atoms of the positron emitter {sup 11}C and a neutron flux of (4{+-}1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} neutrons/sterad, respectively.

  3. High-Intensity Laser-to-Hot-Electron Conversion Efficiency from 1 to 2100 J Using the OMEGA EP Laser System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilson, P. M.

    2010-11-01

    Intense laser--matter interactions generate high-current electron beams. The laser-electron conversion efficiency is an important parameter for fast ignition and for developing intense x-ray sources for flash-radiography and x-ray-scattering experiments. These applications may require kilojoules of laser energy focused to greater than 10^18 W/cm^2 with pulse durations of tens of picoseconds. Previous experiments have measured the conversion efficiency with picosecond and subpicosecond laser pulses with energies up to ˜500 J. The research extends conversion-efficiency measurements to 1- to 10-ps laser pulses with energies up to 2100 J using the OMEGA EP Laser System and shows that the conversion efficiency is constant (20±10%) over the entire range The conversion efficiency is measured for interactions with finite-mass, thin-foil targets. A collimated electron jet exits the target rear surface and initiates rapid target charging, causing the majority of laser-accelerated electrons to recirculate (reflux) within the target. The total fast-electron energy is inferred from K-photon spectroscopy. Time-resolved x-ray emission data suggest that electrons are accelerated into the target over the entire laser-pulse duration with approximately constant conversion. This work provides significant insight into high-intensity laser--target interactions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement Nos. DE-FC52-08NA28302 and DE-FC02-04ER54789. [4pt] In collaboration with R. Betti, A. A. Solodov (LLE/FSC), R. S. Craxton, J. A. Delettrez, C. Dorrer, L. Gao, P. A. Jaanimagi, J. H. Kelly, B. E. Kruschwitz, D. D. Meyerhofer, J. F. Myatt, T. C. Sangster, C. Stoeckl, W. Theobald, B. Yaakobi, J. D. Zuegel (LLE), A. J. MacKinnon, P. K. Patel (LLNL), K. U. Akli (General Atomics), L. Willingale, K. M. Krushelnick (U. of Michigan).

  4. Characterization of near-LTE, high-temperature and high-density aluminum plasmas produced by ultra-high intensity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dervieux, V.; Loupias, B.; Baton, S.; Lecherbourg, L.; Glize, K.; Rousseaux, C.; Reverdin, C.; Gremillet, L.; Blancard, C.; Silvert, V.; Pain, J.-C.; Brown, C. R. D.; Allan, P.; Hill, M. P.; Hoarty, D. J.; Renaudin, P.

    2015-09-01

    Ultra-high-intensity lasers have opened up a new avenue for the creation and detailed spectral measurements of dense plasmas in extreme thermodynamic conditions. In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility of heating a dense plasma (ρ > 1 gcm-3) to a maximum temperature of 560 ± 40 eV using a few-Joule, relativistic-intensity laser pulse. Particle-in-cell, radiation-hydrodynamic and atomic physics simulation tools are used together for a full description of the plasma dynamics, from laser interaction to late-time expansion and x-ray emission, yielding overall good agreement with the spectral measurements. We discuss the sensitivity of our analysis to space-time gradients, non-equilibrium ionization processes and hot electron effects.

  5. X-ray polarization spectroscopy to study anisotropic velocity distribution of hot electrons produced by an ultra-high-intensity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inubushi, Y.; Okano, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Cai, H.; Nagatomo, H.; Kai, T.; Kawamura, T.; Batani, D.; Morace, A.; Redaelli, R.; Fourment, C.; Santos, J. J.; Malka, G.; Boscheron, A.; Bonville, O.; Grenier, J.; Canal, Ph.; Lacoste, B.; Lepage, C.; Marmande, L.; Mazataud, E.; Casner, A.; Koenig, M.; Fujioka, S.; Nakamura, T.; Johzaki, T.; Mima, K.

    2010-03-01

    The anisotropy of the hot-electron velocity distribution in ultra-high-intensity laser produced plasma was studied with x-ray polarization spectroscopy using multilayer planar targets including x-ray emission tracer in the middle layer. This measurement serves as a diagnostic for hot-electron transport from the laser-plasma interaction region to the overdense region where drastic changes in the isotropy of the electron velocity distribution are observed. These polarization degrees are consistent with analysis of a three-dimensional polarization spectroscopy model coupled with particle-in-cell simulations. Electron velocity distribution in the underdense region is affected by the electric field of the laser and that in the overdense region becomes wider with increase in the tracer depth. A full-angular spread in the overdense region of 22.4°-2.4+5.4 was obtained from the measured polarization degree.

  6. Self-focusing of the high intensity ultra short laser pulse propagating through relativistic magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekshahi, Moslem; Dorranian, Davoud; Askari, Hassan Ranjbar

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, evolution of the spot size of the ultra short intense laser beam propagating in underdense magnetized cold plasma, taking into account the nonlinearity up to third order and the relativistic effect, has been studied. The plasma embedded in a constant external magnetic field that is set in the plane perpendicular to the electric field vector of the laser beam with different directions. The paraxial wave equation in plasma has been used and the source dependent expansion (SDE) method is employed to solve the equation. Using continuity equation and equation of motion for plasma electrons in the electric field of laser beam a set of equations for the evolution of laser beam structure in plasma is found. Results show that imposing the external magnetic field enhances self-focusing property of the laser beam. Taking into account the relativistic effect increases the effect of the external magnetic field on self-focusing of the laser beam. Increasing the angle between the laser beam magnetic field and external magnetic field will decrease the self-focusing property.

  7. Progress on the XG-III high-intensity laser facility with three synchronized beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jingqin; Zhu, Qihua; Xie, Na; Zhou, Kainan; Huang, Xiaojun; Zeng, Xiaoming; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Xiaodong; Xie, Xudong; Zhao, Lei; Zuo, Yanlei; Jiang, Dongbin; Sun, Li; Guo, Yi; Zhou, Song; Wen, Jing; Li, Qing; Huang, Zheng; Jiang, Xuejun; Jing, Feng

    2015-02-01

    The paper presents the technical design and progress on a special high-power laser facility, i.e. XG-III, which is being used for high-field physics research and fast ignition research. The laser facility outputs synchronized nanosecond, picosecond and femtosecond beams with three wavelengths, i.e. 527 nm, 1053 nm and 800 nm respectively, and multiple combinations of the beams can be used for physics experiments. The commissioning of the laser facility was completed by the end of 2013. The measurement results show that the main parameters of the three beams are equal to or greater than the designed ones.

  8. Optical observation of shock waves and cavitation bubbles in high intensity laser-induced shock processes

    SciTech Connect

    Marti-Lopez, L.; Ocana, R.; Porro, J. A.; Morales, M.; Ocana, J. L.

    2009-07-01

    We report an experimental study of the temporal and spatial dynamics of shock waves, cavitation bubbles, and sound waves generated in water during laser shock processing by single Nd:YAG laser pulses of nanosecond duration. A fast ICCD camera (2 ns gate time) was employed to record false schlieren photographs, schlieren photographs, and Mach-Zehnder interferograms of the zone surrounding the laser spot site on the target, an aluminum alloy sample. We recorded hemispherical shock fronts, cylindrical shock fronts, plane shock fronts, cavitation bubbles, and phase disturbance tracks.

  9. High intensity vacuum ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet production by noncollinear mixing in laser vaporized media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todt, Michael A.; Albert, Daniel R.; Davis, H. Floyd

    2016-06-01

    A method is described for generating intense pulsed vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser radiation by resonance enhanced four-wave mixing of commercial pulsed nanosecond lasers in laser vaporized mercury under windowless conditions. By employing noncollinear mixing of the input beams, the need of dispersive elements such as gratings for separating the VUV/XUV from the residual UV and visible beams is eliminated. A number of schemes are described, facilitating access to the 9.9-14.6 eV range. A simple and convenient scheme for generating wavelengths of 125 nm, 112 nm, and 104 nm (10 eV, 11 eV, and 12 eV) using two dye lasers without the need for dye changes is described.

  10. Evolution of high intensity ultrashort laser pulse spot size propagating through magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekshahi, Moslem; Dorranian, Davoud

    2013-06-01

    Evolution of the spot size of ultrashort laser pulse propagating in underdense magnetized cold plasma has been studied taking into account the effect of nonlinearity up to third order. The plasma is embedded in an external magnetic field with constant strength and variable direction on a plane perpendicular to electric field vector of the laser pulse. The time derivative of the third order nonlinear current density of plasma electron is used in the paraxial wave equation in plasma and the source dependence expansion method is employed to solve the equation. Results show that, influence of the direction of the external magnetic field on spot size is significant. So that, increasing angle between laser pulse magnetic field vector and external magnetic field decreases the effect of external magnetic field and leads to decreasing the focal length of plasma lens. Also, the effects of laser pulse intensity and external magnetic field strength on the self-focusing property of laser pulse for different direction of the external magnetic field have been studied.

  11. Ellipsoidal plasma mirror focusing of high power laser pulses to ultra-high intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R.; King, M.; Gray, R. J.; Carroll, D. C.; Dance, R. J.; Armstrong, C.; Hawkes, S. J.; Clarke, R. J.; Robertson, D. J.; Neely, D.; McKenna, P.

    2016-03-01

    The design and development of an ellipsoidal F/1 focusing plasma mirror capable of increasing the peak intensity achievable on petawatt level laser systems to >1022 W cm-2 is presented. A factor of 2.5 reduction in the focal spot size is achieved when compared to F/3 focusing with a conventional (solid state) optic. We find a factor of 3.6 enhancement in peak intensity, taking into account changes in plasma mirror reflectivity and focal spot quality. The sensitivity of the focusing plasma optic to misalignment is also investigated. It is demonstrated that an increase in the peak laser intensity from 3 ×1020 W cm-2 to 1021 W cm-2 results in a factor of 2 increase in the maximum energy of sheath-accelerated protons from a thin foil positioned at the focus of the intense laser light.

  12. High-intensity Nd:YAG laser accelerates bone regeneration in calvarial defect models.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwansik; Kim, In Sook; Cho, Tae Hyung; Seo, Young-Kwon; Hwang, Soon Jung

    2015-08-01

    High-power pulsed lasers have been recently regarded to be anabolic to bone, but in vivo evidence is still lacking. This study aimed to investigate the capacity of bone repair using a high-power, Q-switched, pulsed, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser, using bilateral calvarial defect models having non-critical sized, 5 mm (rat) or 8 mm (rabbit) diameter. One of the bilateral defects, which were all filled with collagen sponge or left empty, was irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser once every 2 days for 2 weeks at a constant total fluence rate (344 J/cm(2) ), output power (0.75 W), pulse repetition rate (15 pps) and wavelength (1064 nm) and examined for the laser effect. The same experimental scheme was designed using a rabbit calvarial defect model implanted with sponge, which was explored for the dose effect of output power at 0.75 and 3 W with the same quantities of the other parameters. New bone formation was evaluated by micro-computed tomography-based analysis and histological observation at 4 weeks after surgery. Laser irradiation significantly increased new bone formation by approximately 45%, not only in the sponge-filled defects of rats but also when the defects were left empty, compared to the non-irradiated group. Consistently, both doses of output power (0.75 and 3 W) enhanced new bone formation, but there was no significant difference between the two doses. This study is one of the first to demonstrate the beneficial effect of Nd:YAG lasers on the regeneration of bone defects which were left empty or filled with collagen sponge, suggesting its great potential in postoperative treatment targeting local bone healing.

  13. Nonlocal electron transport in the presence of high-intensity laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Epperlein, E.M.; Short, R.W. )

    1994-08-01

    We investigate electron transport in a plasma heated by spatially modulated laser irradiation. When the heating rate is greater than the electron-electron collision rate, the thermal conductivity is reduced by a factor of 3 to 4 from the Spitzer-Haerm [Phys. Rev. 89, 977 (1953)] value for [ital K][lambda][sub [ital e

  14. Reflectivity of plasmas created by high-intensity, ultra-short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, D.M.

    1994-06-01

    Experiments were performed to characterize the creation and evolution of high-temperature (T{sub e}{approximately}100eV), high-density (n{sub e}>10{sup 22}cm{sup {minus}3}) plasmas created with intense ({approximately}10{sup 12}-10{sup 16}W/cm{sup 2}), ultra-short (130fs) laser pulses. The principle diagnostic was plasma reflectivity at optical wavelengths (614nm). An array of target materials (Al, Au, Si, SiO{sub 2}) with widely differing electronic properties tested plasma behavior over a large set of initial states. Time-integrated plasma reflectivity was measured as a function of laser intensity. Space- and time-resolved reflectivity, transmission and scatter were measured with a spatial resolution of {approximately}3{mu}m and a temporal resolution of 130fs. An amplified, mode-locked dye laser system was designed to produce {approximately}3.5mJ, {approximately}130fs laser pulses to create and nonintrusively probe the plasmas. Laser prepulse was carefully controlled to suppress preionization and give unambiguous, high-density plasma results. In metals (Al and Au), it is shown analytically that linear and nonlinear inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption, resonance absorption, and vacuum heating explain time-integrated reflectivity at intensities near 10{sup 16}W/cm{sup 2}. In the insulator, SiO{sub 2}, a non-equilibrium plasma reflectivity model using tunneling ionization, Helmholtz equations, and Drude conductivity agrees with time-integrated reflectivity measurements. Moreover, a comparison of ionization and Saha equilibration rates shows that plasma formed by intense, ultra-short pulses can exist with a transient, non-equilibrium distribution of ionization states. All targets are shown to approach a common reflectivity at intensities {approximately}10{sup 16}W/cm{sup 2}, indicating a material-independent state insensitive to atomic or solid-state details.

  15. Microwave emission by nonlinear crystals irradiated with a high-intensity, mode-locked laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghesani, A. F.; Braggio, C.; Guarise, M.

    2016-06-01

    We report on the experimental investigation of the efficiency of some nonlinear crystals to generate microwave (RF) radiation as a result of optical rectification (OR) when irradiated with intense pulse trains delivered by a mode-locked laser at 1064 nm. We have investigated lithium triborate (LBO), lithium niobate (LiNbO3), zinc selenide (ZnSe), and also potassium titanyl orthophosphate (KTP) for comparison with previous measurements. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions based on the form of the second-order nonlinear susceptibility tensor. For some crystals we investigated also the second harmonic generation (SHG) to cross check the theoretical model. We confirm the theoretical prediction that OR leads to the production of higher order RF harmonics that are overtones of the laser repetition rate.

  16. Target physics results at 248 nm wavelength from the Aurora laser system high-intensity campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Watt, R.G.; Cobble, J.; Gomez, C.; Kephart, J.; Kristal, R.; Turner, T.P.; Oertel, J.; Thomas, S.; Netz, D.; Jones, J.

    1990-10-01

    Au and Si targets have been irradiated using the Aurora KrF laser system, and diagnosed with x-ray and optical diagnostics. The x-ray diagnostics were sensitive to the 0.1--10 keV range. Initial, manually aligned results indicate significant plasma heating and intense x-ray production, with incident peak intensities on target of 1 {minus} 2 {times} 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} in a focal spot of order 500 {mu}m diameter. Total energy delivered to the target in 36 of the available 48 target beams was approximately 1200 J in pulses with FWHM in the 3--5 ns range. M-band radiation was observed from Au foil targets. Initial bandwidth measurements on the laser indicate {approx}20 cm{sup {minus}1} without bandwidth enhancement efforts.

  17. Computational modeling of laser-tissue interaction

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.; Amendt, P.; Bailey, D.S.; Eder, D.C.; Maitland, D.J.; Glinsky, M.E.; Strauss, M.; Zimmerman, G.B.

    1996-05-01

    Computational modeling can play an important role both in designing laser-tissue interaction experiments and in understanding the underlying mechanisms. This can lead to more rapid and less expensive development if new procedures and instruments, and a better understanding of their operation. We have recently directed computer programs and associated expertise developed over many years to model high intensity laser-matter interactions for fusion research towards laser-tissue interaction problem. A program called LATIS is being developed to specifically treat laser-tissue interaction phenomena, such as highly scattering light transport, thermal coagulation, and hydrodynamic motion.

  18. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE PAGES

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; et al

    2015-03-06

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitudemore » in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.« less

  19. Continuous dual-wavelength, high-intensive Nd:YAG laser in operative urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznikov, Leonid L.; Pupkova, Ludmila S.; Miroshnicov, B. I.; Snezhko, D. A.; Nikitichev, A. A.; Pokrovskiy, Vasiliy P.; Gomberg, Vladimir G.

    1994-05-01

    A ruby laser with a 0.694 mkm wavelength was used as a source of a new model of laser lithotriptor. The optical irradiation parameters selected included 1 mks duration pulse, frequency from 1 to 5 Hz, energy at an output of up to 120 mJ, transmitted via light guide quartz fiber of 400 kmk. The tip of the light guide was directed to the calculus through a catheterized cystoscope. Light guide position control was done by the presence of a specific acoustic signal accompanying plasma formation. Plasma is not formed by laser action on the ureter wall. In doubtful cases we used roentgenological examination. After lithotripsy and direct processing by irradiation, histological investigations of the ureter wall showed only slight submucosal hemorrhage or revealed no changes. Implantation of the calculus and fiber particles into the ureter wall was not observed. Twenty-nine patients were subjected to lithotripsy of calculus (oxalates, urates, phosphates) in the low and mid-ureter. Usually from 1000 to 3000 impulses were used to destroy the calculus. Calculus fragments passed without assistance (13 patients) or were removed by extractors (7 patients). The recovery of passing of urine and removal of renal colic were observed during lithotripsy if obturation had occurred (8 patients). Ureteral perforation, blood loss, and acute pyelonephritis did not occur.

  20. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; Vetter, S.; Maxwell, T. J.; Ding, Y.; Coffee, R.; Wakatsuki, S.; Huang, Z.

    2015-03-06

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitude in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.

  1. SiC detector damage and characterization for high intensity laser-plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Cannavò, A.

    2016-05-01

    Silicon-Carbide (SiC) detectors are always more extensively employed as diagnostics in laser-generated plasma due to their remarkable properties such as their high band gap, high carrier velocity, high detection efficiency, high radiation resistance and low leakage current at room temperature. SiC detectors, in comparison with Si detectors, have the advantage of being insensitive to visible light, having low reverse current at high temperature and high radiation hardness. A similar energy resolution characterizes the two types of detectors, being 0.8% in Si and 1.0% in SiC, as measured detecting 5.8 MeV alpha particles. Generally, SiC detectors are employed as laser-plasma diagnostics in time-of-flight configuration, permitting the simultaneous detection of photons, electrons and ions based on discrimination of velocity. SiC detectors can be employed in the proportionality regime, because their response is proportional to the radiation energy deposited in the active layer. Using thin absorbers in front of the detectors makes it possible to have further information on the radiation nature, intensity and energy. Surface characterization of SiC before and after prolonged exposure to hot plasma laser generated shows the formation of bulk defects and thin film deposition on the detector surface limiting the device functionality.

  2. Helium and hydrogen plasma waveguides for high-intensity laser channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zgadzaj, Rafal Bogumil

    The results of cross polarized pump-probe experiments in preformed He plasma waveguides are reported. Pump and probe have same wavelength and duration of 800nm and 80fs respectively. Peak pump intensity is Iguided = 0.2x1018 W/cm2 ˜1000 Iprobe. Single shot probe spectra and mode profiles at the channel exit are discriminated from the pump with a polarization analyzer and captured at various relative time delays Deltat. Frequency-domain interference (FDI) between the probe and a weak depolarized component of the pump is observed for |Deltat| ≳ 100fs. Although the depolarized component is nearly undetectable through measurement of pump leakage alone, FDI sensitively reveals its substantially non-Gaussian structure. The possible depolarization mechanisms are analyzed. When probe is positioned at the leading edge of the pump, Deltat ≲ 0, its spectrum suffers a blue shift not measurable in the transmitted pump itself. The evidence suggests the channel interior is fully ionized and the partially formed channel ends are the origin of both depolarization and blue shift. A robust, pulsed, differentially-pumped plasma channel generation cell for high intensity guiding experiments has been developed. The design includes an axicon lens, windows for transverse interferometry, and permits injection of one or two different gases (main gas plus high Z seed gas) with several millisecond injection times and simultaneous 0.1ms pressure sensing resolution. Very well formed plasma waveguides have been formed in helium as well as hydrogen, at repeatable and well controlled pressures up to 1000Torr, with very uniform interior density, rapid density drop at boundaries, and very low exterior density. The possible danger associated with the use of large amounts of hydrogen was considered and a complex safety system was designed, constructed and used. Extensive analysis of channel profile reconstruction through transverse interferometry was performed. This includes an intuitive

  3. Transport of high intensity laser-generated hot electrons in cone coupled wire targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beg, Farhat

    2008-04-01

    In this talk, we present results from a series of experiments where cone-wire targets were employed both to assess hot electron coupling efficiency, and to reveal the source temperature of the hot electrons. Experiments were performed on the petawatt laser at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. A 500J, 1ps laser (I ˜ 4 x 10^20 W/cm-2) was focused by an f/3 off-axis parabolic mirror into hollow aluminum cones joined at their tip to Cu wires of diameters from 10 to 40 μm. The three main diagnostics fielded were a copper Kalpha Bragg crystal imager, a single hit CCD camera spectrometer and a Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) spectrometer. The resulting data were cross-calibrated to obtain the absolute Kalpha yield. Comparison of the axially diminishing absolute Cu Kα intensity with modeling shows that the penetration of the hot electrons is consistent with one dimensional ohmic potential limited transport (1/e length ˜ 100 μm). The laser coupling efficiency to electron energy within the wire is shown to be proportional to the cross sectional area of the wire, reaching 15% for 40 μm wires. We find that the hot electron temperature within the wire was <=750 keV, significantly lower than that predicted by the ponderomotive scaling. A comparison of the experimental results with 2D hybrid PIC simulations using e-PLAS code will be presented and relevance to Fast Ignition will be discussed at the meeting. *In collaboration with J.A. King, M.H. Key, K.U. Akli, R.R. Freeman, J. Green, S. P. Hatchett, D. Hey, P. Jaanimagi, J. Koch, K. L. Lancaster, T. Ma, A.J. MacKinnon, A. MacPhee, R. Mason, P.A. Norreys, P.K Patel, T. Phillips, R. Stephens, W. Theobald, R.P.J. Town, M. Wei, L. Van Woerkom, B. Zhang.

  4. Efficient generation of fast ions from surface modulated nanostructure targets irradiated by high intensity short-pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Alexander; Kumar, Naveen; Pukhov, Alexander; Platonov, Konstantin

    2011-10-15

    It's shown that the imposition of sub-laser wavelength relief structures on the surface of mass-limited-targets results into several folds higher short-pulse laser absorption, and consequently the efficient generation of fast ions. The optimum relief parameters for enhanced short-pulse laser absorption and higher ion acceleration are estimated numerically by particle-in-cell simulations and then corroborated by analytical scalings. The stability of the pre-imposed surface modulation during the laser pulse foil interaction is also examined.

  5. Using high-intensity laser-generated energetic protons to radiograph directly driven implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Stoeckl, C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Nilson, P.; Sangster, T. C.; Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A.; Patel, P.

    2012-01-01

    The recent development of petawatt-class lasers with kilojoule-picosecond pulses, such as OMEGA EP [L. Waxer et al., Opt. Photonics News 16, 30 (2005), 10.1364/OPN.16.7.000030], provides a new diagnostic capability to study inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density (HED) plasmas. Specifically, petawatt OMEGA EP pulses have been used to backlight OMEGA implosions with energetic proton beams generated through the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism. This allows time-resolved studies of the mass distribution and electromagnetic field structures in ICF and HED plasmas. This principle has been previously demonstrated using Vulcan to backlight six-beam implosions [A. J. Mackinnon et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 045001 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.045001]. The TNSA proton backlighter offers better spatial and temporal resolution but poorer spatial uniformity and energy resolution than previous D3He fusion-based techniques [C. Li et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 10E725 (2006), 10.1063/1.2228252]. A target and the experimental design technique to mitigate potential problems in using TNSA backlighting to study full-energy implosions is discussed. The first proton radiographs of 60-beam spherical OMEGA implosions using the techniques discussed in this paper are presented. Sample radiographs and suggestions for troubleshooting failed radiography shots using TNSA backlighting are given, and future applications of this technique at OMEGA and the NIF are discussed.

  6. Raman spectra from symmetric hydrogen bonds in water by high-intensity laser-induced breakdown.

    PubMed

    Men, Zhiwei; Fang, Wenhui; Li, Dongfei; Li, Zhanlong; Sun, Chenglin

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectra of ice VII and X were investigated using strong plasma shockwave generated by laser-induced breakdown (LIB) in liquid water. Simultaneously, the occurrence of the hydrogen emission lines of 656 nm (Hα), 486 nm (Hβ), 434 nm (Hγ) and 410 nm (Hδ) was observed. At 5 × 10(12) W/cm(2) optical power density, the O-H symmetric stretching, translational and librational modes of ice VII and a single peak at 785 cm(-1) appeared in the spectra. The band was assigned to the Raman-active O-O mode of the monomolecular phase, which was the symmetric hydrogen bond of cuprite ice X. The spectra indicated that ice VII and X structure were formed, as the trajectory of the strong plasma shockwave passes through the stable Pressure-Temperature range of ice VII and X. The shockwave temperature and pressure were calculated by the Grüneisen model.

  7. Raman spectra from Symmetric Hydrogen Bonds in Water by High-intensity Laser-induced Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Men, Zhiwei; Fang, Wenhui; Li, Dongfei; Li, Zhanlong; Sun, Chenglin

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectra of ice VII and X were investigated using strong plasma shockwave generated by laser-induced breakdown (LIB) in liquid water. Simultaneously, the occurrence of the hydrogen emission lines of 656 nm (Hα), 486 nm (Hβ), 434 nm (Hγ) and 410 nm (Hδ) was observed. At 5 × 1012 W/cm2 optical power density, the O-H symmetric stretching, translational and librational modes of ice VII and a single peak at 785 cm−1 appeared in the spectra. The band was assigned to the Raman-active O-O mode of the monomolecular phase, which was the symmetric hydrogen bond of cuprite ice X. The spectra indicated that ice VII and X structure were formed, as the trajectory of the strong plasma shockwave passes through the stable Pressure-Temperature range of ice VII and X. The shockwave temperature and pressure were calculated by the Grüneisen model. PMID:24709652

  8. Longitudinal laser ion acceleration in low density targets: experimental optimization on the Titan laser facility and numerical investigation of the ultra-high intensity limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Humières, E.; Chen, S.; Lobet, Mathieu; Sciscio, M.; Antici, Patrizio; Bailly-Grandvaux, Mathieu; Gangolf, Thomas; Revet, Guilhem; Santos, Joao J.; Schroer, Anna-Marie; Willi, O.; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir T.; Pepin, Henri; Fuchs, Julien

    2015-05-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies suggest the possibility of enhancing the efficiency and ease of laser acceleration of protons and ions using underdense or near critical plasmas through electrostatic shocks. Very promising results were recently obtained in this regime. In these experiments, a first ns pulse was focused on a thin target to explode it and a second laser with a high intensity was focused on the exploded foil. The delay between two lasers allowed to control the density gradient seen by the second laser pulse. The transition between various laser ion acceleration regimes depending on the density gradient length was studied. With a laser energy of a few Joules, protons with energies close to the energies of TNSA accelerated protons were obtained for various exploded foils configurations. In the high energy regime (~180 J), protons with energies significantly higher than the ones of TNSA accelerated protons were obtained when exploding the foil while keeping a good beam quality. These results demonstrate that low-density targets are promising candidates for an efficient proton source that can be optimized by choosing appropriate plasma conditions. New experiments were also performed in this regime with gas jets. Scaling shock acceleration in the low density regime to ultra high intensities is a challenge as radiation losses and electron positron pair production change the optimization of the shock process. Using large-scale Particle-In-Cell simulations, the transition to this regime in which intense beams of relativistic ions can be produced is investigated.

  9. Relativistic self-focusing of ultra-high intensity X-ray laser beams in warm quantum plasma with upward density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Habibi, M.; Ghamari, F.

    2014-05-15

    The results of a numerical study of high-intensity X-ray laser beam interaction with warm quantum plasma (WQP) are presented. By means of an upward ramp density profile combined with quantum factors specially the Fermi velocity, we have demonstrated significant relativistic self-focusing (RSF) of a Gaussian electromagnetic beam in the WQP where the Fermi temperature term in the dielectric function is important. For this purpose, we have considered the quantum hydrodynamics model that modifies refractive index of inhomogeneous WQPs with the inclusion of quantum correction through the quantum statistical and diffraction effects in the relativistic regime. Also, to better illustration of the physical difference between warm and cold quantum plasmas and their effect on the RSF, we have derived the envelope equation governing the spot size of X-ray laser beam in Q-plasmas. In addition to the upward ramp density profile, we have found that the quantum effects would be caused much higher oscillation and better focusing of X-ray laser beam in the WQP compared to that of cold quantum case. Our computational results reveal the importance of the use of electrons density profile and Fermi speed in enhancing self-focusing of laser beam.

  10. Laser-induced fluorescence thermometry of heating in water from short bursts of high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Al-Qraini, Moath M; Canney, Michael S; Oweis, Ghanem F

    2013-04-01

    Free field experimental measurements of the temperature rise of water in the focal region of a 2 MHz high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducer were performed. The transducer was operated in pulse-mode with millisecond bursts, at acoustic intensities of 5 to 18.5 kW/cm(2) at the focus, resulting in non-linear wave propagation and shock wave formation. Pulsed, planar, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) was used as a fast rise-time, non-intrusive, temperature measurement method of the water present in the focal region. LIF thermometry is based on calibrating the temperature-dependent fluorescence intensity signal emitted by a passive dye dissolved in water when excited by a pulse of laser light. The laser beam was formed into a thin light sheet to illuminate a planar area in the HIFU focal region. The laser light sheet was oriented transverse to the acoustic axis. Cross-sectional, instantaneous temperature field measurements within the HIFU focal volume showed that the water temperature increased steadily with increasing HIFU drive voltage. Heating rates of 4000-7000°C/s were measured within the first millisecond of the HIFU burst. Increasing the length of the burst initially resulted in an increase in the water temperature within the HIFU focal spot (up to ∼3 ms), after which it steadied or slightly dropped. Acoustic streaming was measured and shown to be consistent with the reduction in heating with increased burst length due to convective cooling. LIF thermometry may thus be a viable non-invasive method for the characterization of HIFU transducers at high power intensities.

  11. Self-focusing of a high-intensity laser in a collisional plasma under weak relativistic-ponderomotive nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, D. N.; Islam, M. R.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Jang, D. G.; Suk, H.

    2013-12-15

    Self-focusing a laser beam in collisional plasma is investigated under the weak relativistic-ponderomotive nonlinearity. In this case, the plasma equilibrium density is modified and it causes generation of the nonlinearity due to the Ohmic heating of electrons, collisions, and the weak relativistic-ponderomotive force during the interaction of the laser beam with the plasma. Our theoretical and simulation results show that a significant nonlinearity in laser self-focusing can occur under the weak relativistic-ponderomotive regime for some appropriate simulation parameters.

  12. HILL: The High-Intensity Laser Laboratory Core Team's Reply to Questions from the NNSA Experimental Facilities Panel

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, B J

    2012-08-02

    Question 1 - The type of physics regimes that HILL can access for weapons studies is quite interesting. The question that arises for the proposal team is what priority does this type of experimental data have versus data that can be obtained with NIF, and Z. How does HILL rank in priority compared to MARIE 1.0 in terms of the experimental data it will provide? We reiterate that isochoric heating experiments to be conducted with HILL are complementary to the high energy density physics experiments at NIF and Z and uniquely access states of matter that neither other facility can access. It is our belief that HILL will enable several important questions, e.g., as related to mix morphology, radiation transfer from corrugated surfaces, and equations of state, to be run to ground through carefully diagnosed, 'unit-physics' experiments. Such experiments will substantially improve confidence in our computer models and provide a rigorous science basis for certification. Question 2 - A secondary question relates to the interests of LLNL and SNL in the physics that HILL can address. This should be spelled out clearly. I would like to see the other labs be part of the discussion regarding how important this capability would be if built. Both sister Labs have a keen interest in the physics enabled by high-intensity, high-energy lasers, as evinced by the Z Petawatt and NIF ARC upgrades to their signature facilities. LANL scientists have teamed with scientists from both Laboratories in high-intensity laser 'first experiments' envisioned for HILL and we fully intend to continue these profitable discussions going forward. In the preparation of the HILL proposal, feedback was solicited from the broader HEDP and weapons science communities. The consensus view was that HILL filled a critical gap and that there was a need for a facility like HILL to address outstanding questions in weapons science. It was recognized that co-location of HILL with a facility such as MaRIE 1.0, Z, NIF, or

  13. MR thermometry analysis program for laser- or high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-induced heating at a clinical MR scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun Ju; Jeong, Kiyoung; Oh, Seung Jae; Kim, Daehong; Park, Eun Hae; Lee, Young Han; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry is a noninvasive method for monitoring local temperature change during thermal therapy. In this study, a MR temperature analysis program was established for a laser with gold nanorods (GNRs) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-induced heating MR thermometry. The MR temperature map was reconstructed using the water proton resonance frequency (PRF) method. The temperature-sensitive phase difference was acquired by using complex number subtraction instead of direct phase subtraction in order to avoid another phase unwrapping process. A temperature map-analyzing program was developed and implemented in IDL (Interactive Data Language) for effective temperature monitoring. This one program was applied to two different heating devices at a clinical MR scanner. All images were acquired with the fast spoiled gradient echo (fSPGR) pulse sequence on a 3.0 T GE Discovery MR750 scanner with an 8-channel knee array coil or with a home-built small surface coil. The analyzed temperature values were confirmed by using values simultaneously measured with an optical temperature probe (R2 = 0.996). The temperature change in small samples induced by a laser or by HIFU was analyzed by using a raw data, that consisted of complex numbers. This study shows that our MR thermometry analysis program can be used for thermal therapy study with a laser or HIFU at a clinical MR scanner. It can also be applied to temperature monitoring for any other thermal therapy based on the PRF method.

  14. Regimes of the interactions of high-intensity plane electromagnetic waves with electron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shiryaev, O. B.

    2008-01-15

    A set of fully nonlinear equations is derived from the Maxwell equations and the electron and ion fluid dynamics in one-dimensional geometry as a model of the interactions of extremely intense plane electromagnetic waves with cold locally non-neutral electron-ion plasmas. The problem is solved for phase velocities close to the speed of light numerically and with the help of asymptotic techniques. Depending on the field magnitudes, three nonlinear regimes are found to occur in the system. At plane-wave intensities inducing relativistic electron fluid dynamics but insufficient to cause significant ion motions, the model reverts to the classic Akhiezer-Polovin problem and yields its solutions describing the nonlinear self-modulation of the electromagnetic fields in plasmas. The types of regimes sustained at field strengths entailing substantial ion dynamics are the self-modulation with a splitting of the plane-wave field spectrum into a set of closely spaced bands, and the harmonics generation with a spectrum comprising broadly distanced bands. The latter two regimes correspond to a subcritical and an overcritical range of the plasma longitudinal field potentials.

  15. Modelling gamma-ray photon emission and pair production in high-intensity laser–matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgers, C.P.; Kirk, J.G.; Duclous, R.; Blackburn, T.G.; Brady, C.S.; Bennett, K.; Arber, T.D.; Bell, A.R.

    2014-03-01

    In high-intensity (>10{sup 21} Wcm{sup −2}) laser–matter interactions gamma-ray photon emission by the electrons can strongly affect the electron's dynamics and copious numbers of electron–positron pairs can be produced by the emitted photons. We show how these processes can be included in simulations by coupling a Monte Carlo algorithm describing the emission to a particle-in-cell code. The Monte Carlo algorithm includes quantum corrections to the photon emission, which we show must be included if the pair production rate is to be correctly determined. The accuracy, convergence and energy conservation properties of the Monte Carlo algorithm are analysed in simple test problems.

  16. Nonlinear threshold effect in the Z-scan method of characterizing limiters for high-intensity laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tereshchenko, S. A.; Savelyev, M. S.; Podgaetsky, V. M.; Gerasimenko, A. Yu.; Selishchev, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    A threshold model is described which permits one to determine the properties of limiters for high-powered laser light. It takes into account the threshold characteristics of the nonlinear optical interaction between the laser beam and the limiter working material. The traditional non-threshold model is a particular case of the threshold model when the limiting threshold is zero. The nonlinear characteristics of carbon nanotubes in liquid and solid media are obtained from experimental Z-scan data. Specifically, the nonlinear threshold effect was observed for aqueous dispersions of nanotubes, but not for nanotubes in solid polymethylmethacrylate. The threshold model fits the experimental Z-scan data better than the non-threshold model. Output characteristics were obtained that integrally describe the nonlinear properties of the optical limiters.

  17. Possibility of applying a hydrodynamic model to describe the laser erosion of metals irradiated by high-intensity nanosecond pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kozadaev, K V

    2014-04-28

    We report the results of experimental investigations of the production and development of plasma-vapour plumes upon irradiation of metal targets by nanosecond (10–100 ns) pulses with a high (10{sup 8}–10{sup 10} W cm{sup -2}) power density under atmospheric conditions. The transition from a quasi-stationary thermal mechanism of metal erosion to an explosion hydrodynamic one takes place when the radiation power density increases from 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 9} W cm{sup -2}. The resultant experimental information is extremely important for the laser deposition of metal nanostructures under atmospheric conditions, which is possible only for power densities of 10{sup 8}–10{sup 9} W cm{sup -2}. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  18. Development and Application of a Predictive Computational Tool for Short-Pulse, High-Intensity Target Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Town, R J; Chung, H; Langdon, A B; Lasinski, B F; Lund, S M; McCandless, B C; Still, C H; Tabak, M

    2007-01-26

    The widely differing spatial, temporal, and density scales needed to accurately model the fast ignition process and other short-pulse laser-plasma interactions leads to a computationally challenging project that is difficult to solve using a single code. This report summarizes the work performed on a three year LDRD to couple together three independent codes using PYTHON to build a new integrated computational tool. An example calculation using this new model is described.

  19. Pulsed Laser Tissue Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Joseph T.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Jansen, E. Duco; Motamedi, Massoud; Welch, Ashley J.

    Pulsed lasers, by virtue of their ability to deliver energy in a spatially and temporally confined fashion, are able to micromachine biological tissues. The clinical success of pulsed laser treatment, however, is often limited by the extent of damage that is caused to the tissue in the vicinity of the ablation crater. In general, pulsed ablation is a trade off between thermal damage to surrounding tissue, caused by relatively long pulses (>100 ms), and mechanical damage to surrounding tissue, caused by relatively short pulses (<1 ms). To identify the origin of pulsed laser induced damage, the possible laser tissue interactions and ablation are discussed here and in Chapter 14. The purpose of this chapter is to provide the reader with a condensed overview of the parameters that must be considered in the process of pulsed laser ablation of soft tissue. In this chapter, pulsed infrared ablation of biological soft tissue is used as a paradigm to illustrate the concepts and design considerations. Generally speaking, the absorption of laser light may lead to photothermal, photomechanical or photochemical interaction with the irradiated tissue [1-5]. The vast majority of therapeutic laser-tissue interactions is based on photothermal interactions where laser energy is converted into heat. Subsequent to thermalization of the absorbed optical energy, heat transfer mechanisms, in particular conduction allow thermal diffusion from high temperature areas to surrounding regions. When laser penetration depth is less than the laser spot radius, the thermal diffusion time, τ th, can be defined as:

  20. Pre-exercise low-level laser therapy improves performance and levels of oxidative stress markers in mdx mice subjected to muscle fatigue by high-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Silva, Andreia Aparecida de Oliveira; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; D'Avila, Katia de Angelis Lobo; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Albertini, Regiane; França, Cristiane Miranda; Nishida, Joen Akemi; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to determine if the levels of oxidative stress markers are influenced by low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in mdx mice subjected to high-intensity exercise training on an electric treadmill. We used 21 C57BL/10ScSn-Dmdmdx/J mice and 7 C57BL/10ScSn mice, all aged 4 weeks. The mice were divided into four groups: a positive control group of normal, wild-type mice (WT); a negative control group of untreated mdx mice; a group of mdx mice that underwent forced high-intensity exercise on a treadmill (mdx fatigue); and another group of mdx mice with the same characteristics that were treated with LLLT at a single point on the gastrocnemius muscle of the hind paw and underwent forced high-intensity exercise on a treadmill. The mdx mice treated with LLLT showed significantly lower levels of creatine kinase (CK) and oxidative stress than mdx mice that underwent forced high-intensity exercise on a treadmill. The activities of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) were higher in control mdx mice than in WT mice. LLLT also significantly reduced the level of this marker. LLLT had a beneficial effect also on the skeletal muscle performance of mdx mice. However, the single application of LLLT and the dose parameters used in this study were not able to change the morphology of a dystrophic muscle.

  1. Searching for minicharged particles via birefringence, dichroism and Raman spectroscopy of the vacuum polarized by a high-intensity laser wave

    SciTech Connect

    Villalba-Chávez, S. Müller, C.

    2013-12-15

    Absorption and dispersion of probe photons in the field of a high-intensity circularly polarized laser wave are investigated. The optical theorem is applied for determining the absorption coefficients in terms of the imaginary part of the vacuum polarization tensor. Compact expressions for the vacuum refraction indices and the photon absorption coefficients are obtained in various asymptotic regimes of interest. The outcomes of this analysis reveal that, far from the region relatively close to the threshold of the two-photon reaction, the birefringence and dichroism of the vacuum are small and, in some cases, strongly suppressed. On the contrary, in a vicinity of the region in which the photo-production of a pair occurs, these optical properties are manifest with lasers of moderate intensities. We take advantage of such a property in the search of minicharged particles by considering high-precision polarimetric experiments. In addition, Raman-like electromagnetic waves resulting from the inelastic part of the vacuum polarization tensor are suggested as an alternative form for finding exclusion limits on these hypothetical charge carriers. The envisaged parameters of upcoming high-intensity laser facilities are used for establishing upper bounds on the minicharged particles. -- Highlights: •Via dichroism and birefringence of the vacuum by a strong laser wave, minicharged particles can be probed. •The discovery potential is the highest in a vicinity of the first pair production threshold. •As alternative observable, Raman scattered waves are put forward.

  2. Adaptation and penetration of resin-based root canal sealers in root canals irradiated with high-intensity lasers.

    PubMed

    Moura-Netto, Cacio; Mello-Moura, Anna Carolina Volpi; Palo, Renato Miotto; Prokopowitsch, Igor; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Marques, Marcia Martins

    2015-03-01

    This research analyzed the quality of resin-based sealer adaptation after intracanal laser irradiation. Extracted teeth (n = 168) were root canal treated and divided into four groups, according to dentin surface treatment: no laser; Nd:YAG laser (1.5 W, 100 mJ, 15 Hz); diode laser (2.5 W in CW), and Er:YAG laser (1 W, 100 mJ, 10 Hz). The teeth were divided into four subgroups according to the sealer used: AH Plus, EndoREZ, Epiphany, and EpiphanySE. For testing the sealing after root canal obturation, the penetration of silver nitrate solution was measured, whereas to evaluate the adaptation and penetration of the sealer into the dentin, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used. The ESEM images were analyzed using a four-grade criteria score by three evaluators. The inter-examiner agreement was confirmed by Kappa test and the scores statistically compared by the Kruskal-Wallis' test (p < 0.05). Both adaptation and sealer penetration in root canals were not affected by the laser irradiation. Nd:YAG and diode laser decreased the tracer penetration for AH Plus, whereas EndoREZ and EpiphanySE performances were affected by Nd:YAG irradiation (p < 0.05). It can be concluded that intracanal laser irradiation can be used as an adjunct in endodontic treatment; however, the use of hydrophilic resin sealers should be avoided when root canals were irradiated with Nd:YAG laser.

  3. Additional focusing of a high-intensity laser beam in a plasma with a density ramp and a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Devki Nandan; Hur, Min Sup; Suk, Hyyong

    2007-08-20

    Propagation of a high power Gaussian laser beam through a plasma with a density ramp where a magnetic field is present has been investigated. The spot size of the laser beam decreases as the beam penetrates into the plasma due to the role of a plasma density ramp. The studies show that the combined effect of a plasma density ramp and a magnetic field enhances the self-focusing property of the laser beam. Both factors not only reduce the spot size of the laser beam but also maintain it with only a mild ripple over several Rayleight lengths.

  4. Adaptation and penetration of resin-based root canal sealers in root canals irradiated with high-intensity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura-Netto, Cacio; Mello-Moura, Anna Carolina Volpi; Palo, Renato Miotto; Prokopowitsch, Igor; Pameijer, Cornelis H.; Marques, Marcia Martins

    2015-03-01

    This research analyzed the quality of resin-based sealer adaptation after intracanal laser irradiation. Extracted teeth (n=168) were root canal treated and divided into four groups, according to dentin surface treatment: no laser; Nd:YAG laser (1.5 W, 100 mJ, 15 Hz) diode laser (2.5 W in CW), and Er:YAG laser (1 W, 100 mJ, 10 Hz). The teeth were divided into four subgroups according to the sealer used: AH Plus, EndoREZ, Epiphany, and EpiphanySE. For testing the sealing after root canal obturation, the penetration of silver nitrate solution was measured, whereas to evaluate the adaptation and penetration of the sealer into the dentin, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used. The ESEM images were analyzed using a four-grade criteria score by three evaluators. The inter-examiner agreement was confirmed by Kappa test and the scores statistically compared by the Kruskal-Wallis' test (p<0.05). Both adaptation and sealer penetration in root canals were not affected by the laser irradiation. Nd:YAG and diode laser decreased the tracer penetration for AH Plus, whereas EndoREZ and EpiphanySE performances were affected by Nd:YAG irradiation (p<0.05). It can be concluded that intracanal laser irradiation can be used as an adjunct in endodontic treatment; however, the use of hydrophilic resin sealers should be avoided when root canals were irradiated with Nd:YAG laser.

  5. Formation of silver nanoparticles inside a soda-lime glass matrix in the presence of a high intensity Ar{sup +} laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Niry, M. D.; Khalesifard, H. R.; Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Ahangary, A.; Azizian-Kalandaragh, Y.

    2012-02-01

    Formation and motion of the silver nanoparticles inside an ion-exchanged soda-lime glass in the presence of a focused high intensity continuous wave Ar{sup +} laser beam (intensity: 9.2 x 10{sup 4} W/cm{sup 2}) have been studied in here. One-dimensional diffusion equation has been used to model the diffusion of the silver ions into the glass matrix, and a two-dimensional reverse diffusion model has been introduced to explain the motion of the silver clusters and their migration toward the glass surface in the presence of the laser beam. The results of the mentioned models were in agreement with our measurements on thickness of the ion-exchange layer by means of optical microscopy and recorded morphology of the glass surface around the laser beam axis by using a Mirau interferometer. SEM micrographs were used to extract the size distribution of the migrated silver particles over the glass surface.

  6. Resonance laser-plasma excitation of coherent terahertz phonons in the bulk of fluorine-bearing crystals under high-intensity femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Potemkin, F V; Mareev, E I; Khodakovskii, N G; Mikheev, P M

    2013-08-31

    The dynamics of coherent phonons in fluorine-containing crystals was investigated by pump-probe technique in the plasma production regime. Several phonon modes, whose frequencies are overtones of the 0.38-THz fundamental frequency, were simultaneously observed in a lithium fluoride crystal. Phonons with frequencies of 1 and 0.1 THz were discovered in a calcium fluoride crystal and coherent phonons with frequencies of 1 THz and 67 GHz were observed in a barium fluoride crystal. Furthermore, in the latter case the amplitudes of phonon mode oscillations were found to significantly increase 15 ps after laser irradiation. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  7. High intensive light channel formation in the post-filamentation region of ultrashort laser pulses in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geints, Yu E.; Ionin, A. A.; Mokrousova, D. V.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Sunchugasheva, E. S.; Zemlyanov, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of the post-filamentation stage of focused high-power Ti:Sa-laser pulses in air is presented. For the first time to our knowledge, the angular and spatial characteristics of specific spatially localized light structures, the ionization-free post-filament channels (PFCs), formed inside the laser beam in the post-filamentation region are systematically quantified under different external focusing and energy of initial pulse. We show that PFC angular divergence tends to decrease with the increase of the laser pulse energy and beam focal distance. These findings are discussed in the framework of the Bessel–Gauss-like beam formation in a course of pulse filamentation stage.

  8. High intensive light channel formation in the post-filamentation region of ultrashort laser pulses in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geints, Yu E.; Ionin, A. A.; Mokrousova, D. V.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Sunchugasheva, E. S.; Zemlyanov, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of the post-filamentation stage of focused high-power Ti:Sa-laser pulses in air is presented. For the first time to our knowledge, the angular and spatial characteristics of specific spatially localized light structures, the ionization-free post-filament channels (PFCs), formed inside the laser beam in the post-filamentation region are systematically quantified under different external focusing and energy of initial pulse. We show that PFC angular divergence tends to decrease with the increase of the laser pulse energy and beam focal distance. These findings are discussed in the framework of the Bessel-Gauss-like beam formation in a course of pulse filamentation stage.

  9. Measuring the strong electrostatic and magnetic fields with proton radiography for ultra-high intensity laser channeling on fast ignition.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Y; Ivancic, S; Iwawaki, T; Habara, H; Lei, A L; Theobald, W; Tanaka, K A

    2014-11-01

    In order to investigate the intense laser propagation and channel formation in dense plasma, we conducted an experiment with proton deflectometry on the OMEGA EP Laser facility. The proton image was analyzed by tracing the trajectory of mono-energetic protons, which provides understanding the electric and magnetic fields that were generated around the channel. The estimated field strengths (E ∼ 10(11) V/m and B ∼ 10(8) G) agree with the predictions from 2D-Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, indicating the feasibility of the proton deflectometry technique for over-critical density plasma. PMID:25430358

  10. Measuring the strong electrostatic and magnetic fields with proton radiography for ultra-high intensity laser channeling on fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Uematsu, Y.; Iwawaki, T.; Habara, H. Tanaka, K. A.; Ivancic, S.; Theobald, W.; Lei, A. L.

    2014-11-15

    In order to investigate the intense laser propagation and channel formation in dense plasma, we conducted an experiment with proton deflectometry on the OMEGA EP Laser facility. The proton image was analyzed by tracing the trajectory of mono-energetic protons, which provides understanding the electric and magnetic fields that were generated around the channel. The estimated field strengths (E ∼ 10{sup 11} V/m and B ∼ 10{sup 8} G) agree with the predictions from 2D-Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, indicating the feasibility of the proton deflectometry technique for over-critical density plasma.

  11. Review of laser-solid interaction and its possibilities for space propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K. G.

    1972-01-01

    Literature on laser-solid interaction is surveyed and the important regimes of this process are delineated. This information is used to discuss the possibility of a laser induced ablation thruster. It is concluded that such a thruster may be feasible if a sufficiently high intensity, high frequency laser beam is available and that further study of interaction is needed.

  12. A treatise on the interaction of molecular systems with short-pulsed highly-intense external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Amit K.; Adhikari, Satrajit; Baer, Michael

    2010-11-01

    In this review, we consider two gauges: one, the field-free gauge, is formed by the field-free electronic eigenstates and the other, the field-dressed gauge, is formed by the field-dressed electronic basis set. The field-free gauge is used, of course, in the case of time-independent systems but then it is also the more common one to be used in the case of molecular systems exposed to external fields. This gauge is conceptually simple and therefore numerically friendly - two features which make it versatile for numerical application. The field-dressed gauge is, eventually, more involved but yields deeper insight which might lead to a better understanding of the complicated interaction between a molecular system and external fields. In addition, these features can be exploited to develop efficient and reliable approximations that may save CPU (computer processing unit) time in numerical applications. These two gauges are the main topics of the present review. Once the general derivation of the two gauges is completed, two additional issues are discussed: (i) we extend these gauges to include external fields formed by non-classical photon-state distributions (also known as non-coherent Fock-state distributions). These photon state distributions, recently considered for the first time for molecular systems [A.K. Paul, S. Adhikari, M. Baer, R. Baer, Phys. Rev. A 81 (2010) 013412], are interesting on their own footing. Although here they mainly serve as a vehicle to test the above-mentioned novel approximations, we also devote part of the review to studying the importance of non-coherent Fock states for obtaining an unbiased correct understanding of the interaction of molecular systems with strong, short-pulsed laser fields. For this purpose, we study the photo-dissociation process of H2+ and show (a) that the approximations, recently introduced, diminish the CPU time by about one order of magnitude with minimal loss of accuracy and (b) indeed non-coherent Fock states

  13. Temperature changes on the root surfaces of mandibular incisors after an 810-nm high-intensity intracanal diode laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Fonseca Alvarez, Andrea; Moura-Netto, Cacio; Daliberto Frugoli, Alexandre; Fernando, Casemiro; Correa Aranha, Ana Cecilia; Davidowicz, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Temperature changes caused by laser irradiation can promote damage to the surrounding dental tissues. In this study, we evaluated the temperature changes of recently extracted human mandibular incisors during intracanal irradiation with an 810-nm diode laser at different settings. Fifty mandibular incisors were enlarged up to an apical size of ISO No. 40 file. After the final rinse with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 0.2% lauryl sodium sulfate biologic detergent, and sterile water, samples were irradiated with circular movements from apex to crown through five different settings of output power (1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, and 3.5 W) in continuous mode. The temperature changes were measured on both sides of the apical and middle root thirds using two thermopar devices. A temperature increase of 7 °C was considered acceptable as a safe threshold when applying the diode laser. Results: The results showed that only 3.5-W output power increased the outer surface temperature above the critical value. Conclusion: The recommended output power can be stipulated as equal to or less than 3 W to avoid overheating during diode laser irradiation on thin dentin walls.

  14. Laser physics and laser-tissue interaction.

    PubMed

    Welch, A J; Torres, J H; Cheong, W F

    1989-01-01

    Within the last few years, lasers have gained increasing use in the management of cardiovascular disease, and laser angioplasty has become a widely performed procedure. For this reason, a basic knowledge of lasers and their applications is essential to vascular surgeons, cardiologists, and interventional radiologists. To elucidate some fundamental concepts regarding laser physics, we describe how laser light is generated and review the properties that make lasers useful in medicine. We also discuss beam profile and spotsize, as well as dosimetric specifications for laser angioplasty. After considering laser-tissue interaction and light propagation in tissue, we explain how the aforementioned concepts apply to direct laser angioplasty and laser-balloon angioplasty. An understanding of these issues should prove useful not only in performing laser angioplasty but in comparing the reported results of various laser applications.

  15. Strong sub-terahertz surface waves generated on a metal wire by high-intensity laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Tokita, Shigeki; Sakabe, Shuji; Nagashima, Takeshi; Hashida, Masaki; Inoue, Shunsuke

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz pulses trapped as surface waves on a wire waveguide can be flexibly transmitted and focused to sub-wavelength dimensions by using, for example, a tapered tip. This is particularly useful for applications that require high-field pulses. However, the generation of strong terahertz surface waves on a wire waveguide remains a challenge. Here, ultrafast field propagation along a metal wire driven by a femtosecond laser pulse with an intensity of 1018 W/cm2 is characterized by femtosecond electron deflectometry. From experimental and numerical results, we conclude that the field propagating at the speed of light is a half-cycle transverse-magnetic surface wave excited on the wire and a considerable portion of the kinetic energy of laser-produced fast electrons can be transferred to the sub-surface wave. The peak electric field strength of the surface wave and the pulse duration are estimated to be 200 MV/m and 7 ps, respectively. PMID:25652694

  16. Strong sub-terahertz surface waves generated on a metal wire by high-intensity laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Tokita, Shigeki; Sakabe, Shuji; Nagashima, Takeshi; Hashida, Masaki; Inoue, Shunsuke

    2015-02-05

    Terahertz pulses trapped as surface waves on a wire waveguide can be flexibly transmitted and focused to sub-wavelength dimensions by using, for example, a tapered tip. This is particularly useful for applications that require high-field pulses. However, the generation of strong terahertz surface waves on a wire waveguide remains a challenge. Here, ultrafast field propagation along a metal wire driven by a femtosecond laser pulse with an intensity of 10(18) W/cm(2) is characterized by femtosecond electron deflectometry. From experimental and numerical results, we conclude that the field propagating at the speed of light is a half-cycle transverse-magnetic surface wave excited on the wire and a considerable portion of the kinetic energy of laser-produced fast electrons can be transferred to the sub-surface wave. The peak electric field strength of the surface wave and the pulse duration are estimated to be 200 MV/m and 7 ps, respectively.

  17. Strong sub-terahertz surface waves generated on a metal wire by high-intensity laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Tokita, Shigeki; Sakabe, Shuji; Nagashima, Takeshi; Hashida, Masaki; Inoue, Shunsuke

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz pulses trapped as surface waves on a wire waveguide can be flexibly transmitted and focused to sub-wavelength dimensions by using, for example, a tapered tip. This is particularly useful for applications that require high-field pulses. However, the generation of strong terahertz surface waves on a wire waveguide remains a challenge. Here, ultrafast field propagation along a metal wire driven by a femtosecond laser pulse with an intensity of 10(18) W/cm(2) is characterized by femtosecond electron deflectometry. From experimental and numerical results, we conclude that the field propagating at the speed of light is a half-cycle transverse-magnetic surface wave excited on the wire and a considerable portion of the kinetic energy of laser-produced fast electrons can be transferred to the sub-surface wave. The peak electric field strength of the surface wave and the pulse duration are estimated to be 200 MV/m and 7 ps, respectively. PMID:25652694

  18. Computer simulation of heat and mass transfer in tissue during high-intensity long-range laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Director, L B; Frid, S E; Mendeleev VYa; Scovorod'Ko, S N

    1998-09-11

    Three-dimensional transient finite difference numerical model of the biological tissue irradiated by powerful laser beam is developed. It is used to simulate the thermal behavior of tissue assuming that radiation wavelength is chosen to give rise for volumetric heat sources. A three-dimensional seven-flow model is used to calculate radiation propagation. Evaporation and burn-out of tissue resulting in a through hole along the axis of the beam are taken into account. Besides the water boiling and corresponding changes of thermal and optical tissue properties the model takes into account one of the heat steam transfer mechanisms. Estimates are carried out for the effects of diffusion transfer and vaporization of water from the tissue surface. Kinetics of protein denaturation process are calculated by Arrenius equation. The problem is solved numerically using discrete grid technique and adaptive time-step control algorithm.

  19. Time-dependent density functional theory of high-intensity short-pulse laser irradiation on insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, S. A.; Yabana, K.; Shinohara, Y.; Otobe, T.; Lee, K.-M.; Bertsch, G. F.

    2015-11-01

    We calculate the energy deposition by very short laser pulses in SiO2 (α -quartz) with a view to establishing systematics for predicting damage and nanoparticle production. The theoretical framework is time-dependent density functional theory, implemented by the real-time method in a multiscale representation. For the most realistic simulations we employ a meta-GGA Kohn-Sham potential similar to that of Becke and Johnson. We find that the deposited energy in the medium can be accurately modeled as a function of the local electromagnetic pulse fluence. The energy-deposition function can in turn be quite well fitted to the strong-field Keldysh formula for a range of intensities from below the melting threshold to well beyond the ablation threshold. We find reasonable agreement between the damage threshold and the energy required to melt the substrate. Also, the depth of the ablated crater at higher energies is fairly well reproduced assuming that the material ablated with the energy exceeds that required to convert it to an atomic fluid. However, the calculated ablation threshold is higher than experiment, suggesting a nonthermal mechanism for the surface ablation.

  20. Efficacy of high-intensity laser therapy in the treatment of chronic neck pain: a randomized double-blind placebo-control trial.

    PubMed

    Alayat, Mohamed Salaheldien Mohamed; Mohamed, Ashraf Abdelaal; Helal, Omar Farouk; Khaled, Osama Ahmed

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of high-intensity laser therapy (HILT) in treatment of patients with chronic neck pain (CNP) on cervical range of motion (ROM), pain, and functional activity. Sixty male patients participated in this study with mean (SD) age of 35.47 (4.18) years. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups and treated with HILT plus exercise (HILT + EX) and placebo laser plus exercise (PL + EX) in groups 1 and 2, respectively. The outcomes measured were cervical ROM, pain level by visual analog scale (VAS), and functional activity by neck disability index (NDI) score. Statistical analyses were performed to compare the differences between baseline and post-treatment. The level of statistical significance was set as p < 0.05. Cervical ROM significantly increased after 6 weeks of treatment in all groups. VAS and NDI results showed significant decrease post-treatment in both groups. HILT + EX effectively increased cervical ROM and decreased VAS and NDI scores after 6 weeks of treatment compared to PL + EX. HILT + EX is an effective physical therapy modality for patients with CNP compared to PL + EX therapy. The combination of HILT + EX effectively increased cervical ROM, functional activity, and reduced pain after 6 weeks of treatment. PMID:26914684

  1. Flash imaging of fine structures of cellular organelles by contact x-ray microscopy with a high intensity laser plasma x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kado, Masataka; Ishino, Masahiko; Kishimoto, Maki; Tamotsu, Satoshi; Yasuda, Keiko; Kinjo, Yasuhito; Shinohara, Kunio

    2011-09-01

    X-ray flash imaging by contact microscopy with a highly intense laser-plasma x-ray source was achieved for the observation of wet biological cells. The exposure time to obtain a single x-ray image was about 600 ps as determined by the pulse duration of the driving laser pulse. The x-ray flash imaging makes it possible to capture an x-ray image of living biological cells without any artificial treatment such as staining, fixation, freezing, and so on. The biological cells were cultivated directly on the surface of the silicon nitride membranes, which are used for the x-ray microscope. Before exposing the cells to x-rays they were observed by a conventional fluorescent microscope as reference, since the fluorescent microscopes can visualize specific organelles stained with fluorescent dye. Comparing the x-ray images with the fluorescent images of the exact same cells, each cellular organelle observed in the x-ray images was identified one by one and actin filaments and mitochondria were clearly identified in the x-ray images.

  2. High Intensity Polarized Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Redwine, Robert P.

    2012-07-31

    The goal of the project was to investigate the possibility of building a very high intensity polarized electron gun for the Electron-Ion Collider. This development is crucial for the eRHIC project. The gun implements a large area cathode, ring-shaped laser beam and active cathode cooling. A polarized electron gun chamber with a large area cathode and active cathode cooling has been built and tested. A preparation chamber for cathode activation has been built and initial tests have been performed. Major parts for a load-lock chamber, where cathodes are loaded into the vacuum system, have been manufactured.

  3. Effect of high-intensity laser therapy in the management of myofascial pain syndrome of the trapezius: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Dundar, Umit; Turkmen, Utku; Toktas, Hasan; Solak, Ozlem; Ulasli, Alper Murat

    2015-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) of the trapezius muscle is one of the main causes of neck pain. In this randomized, double-blind study, we evaluated the effects of high-intensity laser therapy (HILT) in female patients with chronic MPS of the trapezius muscle. The patients were assigned to two groups. The HILT group was treated with HILT and exercise, and the sham therapy group was treated with placebo HILT and exercise. The patients were assessed for pain, cervical active range of motion, disability, and quality of life. Evaluations were performed before treatment (week 0) and after treatment (weeks 4 and 12). Both groups showed significant improvement in all parameters at weeks 4 and 12. However, in a comparison of the percentage changes in the parameters at weeks 4 and 12 relative to pretreatment values, the HILT group showed greater improvement in pain scores, the neck disability index, and several subparts of the short-form 36 health survey (SF-36) (physical functioning, role limitations due to physical functioning, bodily pain, general health perceptions, social functioning, and role limitations due to emotional problems) than did the sham therapy group. We conclude that HILT is an effective therapeutic method in the treatment of patients with chronic MPS of the trapezius muscle.

  4. Energy transport and isochoric heating of a low-Z, reduced-mass target irradiated with a high intensity laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, H.; Nakamura, H.; Tanabe, M.; Fujiwara, T.; Yamamoto, N.; Fujioka, S.; Mima, K.; Mishra, R.; Sentoku, Y.; Mancini, R.; Hakel, P.; Ohshima, S.; Batani, D.; Veltcheva, M.; Desai, T.; Jafer, R.; Kawamura, T.; Koike, F.

    2011-02-15

    Heat transport in reduced-mass targets irradiated with a high intensity laser pulse was studied. K{alpha} lines from partially ionized chlorine embedded in the middle of a triple-layered plastic target were measured to evaluate bulk electron temperature in the tracer region inside the target. Two groups of K{alpha} lines, one from Cl{sup +}-Cl{sup 6+} (hereby called ''cold K{alpha}''), and the other from Cl{sup 9+} and Cl{sup 10+} (''shifted K{alpha}'') are observed from different regions within the target. Two-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations show two distinct heating mechanisms occurring concurrently: uniform heating by refluxing electrons and local heating by diffusive electrons in the central region. These two heating processes, which made the target temperature distribution nonuniform, are responsible for producing the two groups of K{alpha} lines in the experiment. The blue-shift of cold K{alpha} lines in the experiment is the signature of higher temperatures achieved by the refluxing heating in smaller-mass targets.

  5. Characterisation of a MeV Bremsstrahlung x-ray source produced from a high intensity laser for high areal density object radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Courtois, C.; Compant La Fontaine, A.; Bazzoli, S.; Bourgade, J. L.; Gazave, J.; Lagrange, J. M.; Landoas, O.; Dain, L. Le; Pichoff, N.; Edwards, R.; Aedy, C.; Mastrosimone, D.; Pien, G.; Stoeckl, C.

    2013-08-15

    Results of an experiment to characterise a MeV Bremsstrahlung x-ray emission created by a short (<10 ps) pulse, high intensity (1.4 × 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser are presented. X-ray emission is characterized using several diagnostics; nuclear activation measurements, a calibrated hard x-ray spectrometer, and dosimeters. Results from the reconstructed x-ray energy spectra are consistent with numerical simulations using the PIC and Monte Carlo codes between 0.3 and 30 MeV. The intense Bremsstrahlung x-ray source is used to radiograph an image quality indicator (IQI) heavily filtered with thick tungsten absorbers. Observations suggest that internal features of the IQI can be resolved up to an external areal density of 85 g/cm{sup 2}. The x-ray source size, inferred by the radiography of a thick resolution grid, is estimated to be approximately 400 μm (full width half maximum of the x-ray source Point Spread Function)

  6. Laser-capillary interaction for the EXIN project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisesto, F. G.; Anania, M. P.; Bacci, A. L.; Bellaveglia, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Galletti, M.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Marocchino, A.; Mostacci, A.; Petrarca, M.; Pompili, R.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2016-09-01

    The EXIN project is under development within the SPARC_LAB facility of the National Laboratory of Frascati (LNF-INFN). This project aims to accelerate pre-existing electron bunches with high brightness by exploiting the wakefield plasma acceleration technique, while preserving the initial brightness. The wakefield is excited inside a dielectric capillary by high intensity laser pulses produced by the FLAME laser interacting with a gas. In this work, we present numerical simulations in order to optimize energy coupling between our laser with super-Gaussian transverse profile and a dielectric capillary. Moreover, an overview of the experimental layout will be given.

  7. High intensity neutrino beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, A. K.

    2015-07-15

    High-intensity proton accelerator complex enabled long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments with a precisely controlled neutrino beam. The beam power so far achieved is a few hundred kW with enourmorous efforts of accelerator physicists and engineers. However, to fully understand the lepton mixing structure, MW-class accelerators are desired. We describe the current intensity-frontier high-energy proton accelerators, their plans to go beyond and technical challenges in the neutrino beamline facilities.

  8. Fast Ignition relevant study of the flux of high intensity laser generated electrons via a hollow cone into a laser-imploded plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M; Adam, J; Akli, K; Borgheshi, M; Chen, M; Evans, R; Freeman, R; Hatchett, S; Hill, J; Heron, A; King, J; Lancaster, K; Mackinnon, A; Norreys, P; Phillips, T; Romagnani, L; Snavely, R; Stephens, R; Stoeckl, C

    2005-10-11

    An integrated experiment relevant to fast ignition is described. A Cu doped CD spherical shell target is imploded around an inserted hollow Au cone by a six beam 600J, 1ns laser to a peak density of 4gcm{sup -3} and a diameter of 100 {micro}m. A 10 ps, 20TW laser pulse is focused into the cone at the time of peak compression. The flux of high-energy electrons through the imploded material is determined from the yield of Cu K{alpha} fluorescence by comparison with a Monte Carlo model and is estimated to carry 15% of the laser energy. Collisional and Ohmic heating are modeled. An electron spectrometer shows significantly greater reduction of the transmitted electron flux than is due to binary collisions and Ohmic potential. Enhanced scattering by instability-induced magnetic fields is suggested.

  9. Laser-electron Compton interaction in plasma channels

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Hirose, T.

    1998-10-01

    A concept of high intensity femtosecond laser synchrotron source (LSS) is based on Compton backscattering of focused electron and laser beams. The short Rayleigh length of the focused laser beam limits the length of interaction to a few picoseconds. However, the technology of the high repetition rate high-average power picosecond lasers required for high put through LSS applications is not developed yet. Another problem associated with the picosecond laser pulses is undesirable nonlinear effects occurring when the laser photons are concentrated in a short time interval. To avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering, the laser beam has to be split, and the required hard radiation flux is accumulated over a number of consecutive interactions that complicates the LSS design. In order to relieve the technological constraints and achieve a practically feasible high-power laser synchrotron source, the authors propose to confine the laser-electron interaction region in the extended plasma channel. This approach permits to use nanosecond laser pulses instead of the picosecond pulses. That helps to avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering regime and allows to utilize already existing technology of the high-repetition rate TEA CO{sub 2} lasers operating at the atmospheric pressure. They demonstrate the advantages of the channeled LSS approach by the example of the prospective polarized positron source for Japan Linear Collider.

  10. LASER-ELECTRON COMPTON INTERACTION IN PLASMA CHANNELS

    SciTech Connect

    POGORELSKY,I.V.

    1998-10-01

    A concept of high intensity femtosecond laser synchrotron source (LSS) is based on Compton backscattering of focused electron and laser beams. The short Rayleigh length of the focused laser beam limits the length of interaction to a few picoseconds. However, the technology of the high repetition rate high-average power picosecond lasers required for high put through LSS applications is not developed yet. Another problem associated with the picosecond laser pulses is undesirable nonlinear effects occurring when the laser photons are concentrated in a short time interval. To avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering, the laser beam has to be split, and the required hard radiation flux is accumulated over a number of consecutive interactions that complicates the LSS design. In order to relieve the technological constraints and achieve a practically feasible high-power laser synchrotron source, we propose to confine the laser-electron interaction region in the extended plasma channel. This approach permits to use nanosecond laser pulses instead of the picosecond pulses. That helps to avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering regime and allows to utilize already existing technology of the high-repetition rate TEA CO{sub 2} lasers operating at the atmospheric pressure. We demonstrate the advantages of the channeled LSS approach by the example of the prospective polarized positron source for Japan Linear Collider.

  11. Study of 1–8 keV K-α x-ray emission from high intensity femtosecond laser produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, V. Naik, P. A.; Chakera, J. A.; Bagchi, S.; Tayyab, M.; Gupta, P. D.

    2014-04-15

    We report an experimental study on the optimization of a laser plasma based x-ray source of ultra-short duration K-α line radiation. The interaction of pulses from a CPA based Ti:sapphire laser (10 TW, 45 fs, 10 Hz) system with magnesium, titanium, iron and copper solid target generates bright 1-8 keV K-α x-ray radiation. The x-ray yield was optimized with the laser pulse duration (at fixed fluence) which is varied in the range of 45 fs to 1.4 ps. It showed a maximum at laser pulse duration of ∼740 fs, 420 fs, 350 and 250 fs for Mg (1.3 keV), Ti (4.5 keV), Fe (6.4 keV) and Cu (8.05 keV) respectively. The x-ray yield is observed to be independent of the sign of the chirp. The scaling of the K-α yield (I{sub x} ∝ I{sub L}{sup β}) for 45 fs and optimized pulse duration were measured for laser intensities in the region of 3 × 10{sup 14} – 8 × 10{sup 17}. The x-ray yield shows a much faster scaling exponent β = 1.5, 2.1, 2.4 and 2.6 for Mg, Ti, Fe and Cu respectively at optimized pulse duration compared to scaling exponent of 0.65, 1.3, 1.5, and 1.7 obtained for 45 fs duration laser pulses. The laser to x-ray energy conversion efficiencies obtained for different target materials are η{sub Mg} = 1.2 × 10{sup −5}, η{sub Ti} = 3.1 × 10{sup −5}, η{sub Fe} = 2.7 × 10{sup −5}, η{sub Cu} = 1.9 × 10{sup −5}. The results have been explained from the efficient generation of optimal energy hot electrons at longer laser pulse duration. The faster scaling observed at optimal pulse duration indicates that the x-ray source is generated at the target surface and saturation of x-ray emission would appear at larger laser fluence. An example of utilization of the source for measurement of shock-wave profiles in a silicon crystal by time resolved x-ray diffraction is also presented.

  12. High intensity ultrasound.

    PubMed

    ter Haar, G

    2001-03-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a technique that was first investigated in the 1940s as a method of destroying selective regions within the brain in neuro-surgical An ultrasound beam can be brought to a tight focus at a distance from its source, and if sufficient energy is concentrated within the focus, the cells lying within this focal volume are killed, whereas those lying elsewhere are spared. This is a noninvasive method of producing selective and trackless tissue destruction in deep seated targets in the body, without damage to overlying tissues. This field, known both as HIFU and focused ultrasound surgery (FUS), is reviewed in this article.

  13. High-intensity, high-contrast laser pulses generated from the fully diode-pumped Yb:glass laser system POLARIS.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Marco; Keppler, Sebastian; Bödefeld, Ragnar; Kessler, Alexander; Liebetrau, Hartmut; Körner, Jörg; Hellwing, Marco; Schorcht, Frank; Jäckel, Oliver; Sävert, Alexander; Polz, Jens; Arunachalam, Ajay Kawshik; Hein, Joachim; Kaluza, Malte C

    2013-03-01

    We report on the first generation of high-contrast, 164 fs duration pulses from the laser system POLARIS reaching focused peak intensities in excess of 2×10(20) W/cm2. To our knowledge, this is the highest peak intensity reported so far that has been achieved with a diode-pumped, solid-state laser. Several passive contrast enhancement techniques have been specially developed and implemented, achieving a relative prepulse intensity smaller than 10(-8) at t=-30 ps before the main pulse. Furthermore a closed-loop adaptive-optics system has been installed. Together with angular chirp compensation, this method has led to a significant reduction of the focal spot size and an increase of the peak intensity.

  14. Fast ignition relevant study of the flux of high intensity laser-generated electrons via a hollow cone into a laser-imploded plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M

    2007-11-20

    An integrated experiment relevant to fast ignition. A Cu-doped deuterated polymer spherical shell target with an inserted hollow Au cone is imploded by a six-beam 900-J, 1-ns laser. A 10-ps, 70-J laser pulse is focused into the cone at the time of peak compression. The flux of high-energy electrons through the imploded material is determined from the yield of Cu K{sub {alpha}} fluorescence by comparison with a Monte Carlo model. The electrons are estimated to carry about 15% of the laser energy. Collisional and Ohmic heating are modeled, and Ohmic effects are shown to be relatively unimportant. An electron spectrometer shows significantly greater reduction of the transmitted electron flux than is calculated in the model. Enhanced scattering by instability-induced magnetic fields is suggested. An extension of this fluor-based technique to measurement of coupling efficiency to the ignition hot spot in future larger-scale fast ignition experiments is outlined.

  15. Laser shaping of a relativistic circularly polarized pulse by laser foil interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, D. B.; Zhuo, H. B.; Yu, T. P.; Yang, X. H.; Shao, F. Q.; Ma, Y. Y.; Yin, Y.; Ouyang, J. M.; Ge, Z. Y.; Zhang, G. B.; Wang, P.

    2013-07-15

    Laser shaping of a relativistic circularly polarized laser pulse in ultra-intense laser thin-foil interaction is investigated by theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations. It is found that the plasma foil as a nonlinear optical shutter has an obvious cut-out effect on the laser temporal and spatial profiles. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that the high intensity part of a Gaussian laser pulse can be well extracted from the whole pulse. The transmitted pulse with longitudinal steep rise front and transverse super-Gaussian profile is thus obtained which would be beneficial for the radiation pressure acceleration regime. The Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability is observed in the simulations, which destroys the foil and results in the cut-out effect of the pulse in the rise front of a circularly polarized laser.

  16. Short-term effects of high-intensity laser therapy, manual therapy, and Kinesio taping in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pekyavas, Nihan Ozunlu; Baltaci, Gul

    2016-08-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS) is a major contributing factor of shoulder pain; and treatment approaches (Kinesio® taping [KT], Exercise [EX], manual therapy [MT], and high-intensity laser therapy [HILT]) have been developed to treat the pain. The key objective of this study was to compare the effects of KT, MT, and HILT on the pain, the range of motion (ROM), and the functioning in patients with SAIS. Seventy patients with SAIS were randomly divided into four groups based on the treatment(s) each group received [EX (n = 15), KT + EX (n = 20), MT + KT + EX (n = 16), and MT + KT + HILT + EX (n = 19)]. All the patients were assessed before and at the end of the treatment (15th day). The main outcome assessments included the evaluation of severity of pain by visual analogue scale (VAS) and shoulder flexion, abduction, and external rotation ROM measurements by a universal goniometry. Shoulder pain and disability index (SPADI) was used to measure pain and disability associated with shoulder pathology. Statistically significant differences were found in the treatment results of all parameters in MT + KT + EX and HILT + MT + KT + EX groups (p < 0.05). When the means of ROM and SPADI results of three groups were compared, statistically significant differences were found between all the groups (p < 0.05). These differences were significant especially between the groups MT + KT + EX and KT + EX (p < 0.05) and HILT + MT + KT + EX and KT + EX (p < 0.05). HILT and MT were found to be more effective in minimizing pain and disability and increasing ROM in patients with SAIS. Further studies with follow-up periods are required to determine the advantages of these treatments conclusively. PMID:27220527

  17. Effect of 830 nm low-level laser therapy applied before high-intensity exercises on skeletal muscle recovery in athletes.

    PubMed

    Leal Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro Brandão; Baroni, Bruno Manfredini; De Marchi, Thiago; Taufer, Daiana; Manfro, Débora Sgandella; Rech, Morgana; Danna, Vanessa; Grosselli, Douglas; Generosi, Rafael Abeche; Marcos, Rodrigo Labat; Ramos, Luciano; Bjordal, Jan Magnus

    2009-11-01

    Our aim was to investigate the immediate effects of bilateral, 830 nm, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on high-intensity exercise and biochemical markers of skeletal muscle recovery, in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial set in a sports physiotherapy clinic. Twenty male athletes (nine professional volleyball players and eleven adolescent soccer players) participated. Active LLLT (830 nm wavelength, 100 mW, spot size 0.0028 cm(2), 3-4 J per point) or an identical placebo LLLT was delivered to five points in the rectus femoris muscle (bilaterally). The main outcome measures were the work performed in the Wingate test: 30 s of maximum cycling with a load of 7.5% of body weight, and the measurement of blood lactate (BL) and creatine kinase (CK) levels before and after exercise. There was no significant difference in the work performed during the Wingate test (P > 0.05) between subjects given active LLLT and those given placebo LLLT. For volleyball athletes, the change in CK levels from before to after the exercise test was significantly lower (P = 0.0133) for those given active LLLT (2.52 U l(-1) +/- 7.04 U l(-1)) than for those given placebo LLLT (28.49 U l(-1) +/- 22.62 U l(-1)). For the soccer athletes, the change in blood lactate levels from before exercise to 15 min after exercise was significantly lower (P < 0.01) in the group subjected to active LLLT (8.55 mmol l(-1) +/- 2.14 mmol l(-1)) than in the group subjected to placebo LLLT (10.52 mmol l(-1) +/- 1.82 mmol l(-1)). LLLT irradiation before the Wingate test seemed to inhibit an expected post-exercise increase in CK level and to accelerate post-exercise lactate removal without affecting test performance. These findings suggest that LLLT may be of benefit in accelerating post-exercise recovery. PMID:19057981

  18. The interaction of intense subpicosecond laser pulses with underdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Coverdale, C.A.

    1995-05-11

    Laser-plasma interactions have been of interest for many years not only from a basic physics standpoint, but also for their relevance to numerous applications. Advances in laser technology in recent years have resulted in compact laser systems capable of generating (psec), 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} laser pulses. These lasers have provided a new regime in which to study laser-plasma interactions, a regime characterized by L{sub plasma} {ge} 2L{sub Rayleigh} > c{tau}. The goal of this dissertation is to experimentally characterize the interaction of a short pulse, high intensity laser with an underdense plasma (n{sub o} {le} 0.05n{sub cr}). Specifically, the parametric instability known as stimulated Raman scatter (SRS) is investigated to determine its behavior when driven by a short, intense laser pulse. Both the forward Raman scatter instability and backscattered Raman instability are studied. The coupled partial differential equations which describe the growth of SRS are reviewed and solved for typical experimental laser and plasma parameters. This solution shows the growth of the waves (electron plasma and scattered light) generated via stimulated Raman scatter. The dispersion relation is also derived and solved for experimentally accessible parameters. The solution of the dispersion relation is used to predict where (in k-space) and at what frequency (in {omega}-space) the instability will grow. Both the nonrelativistic and relativistic regimes of the instability are considered.

  19. Laser interaction with pseudoblood clots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paisley, Dennis L.; Stahl, David B.

    1997-05-01

    In recent years lasers have become a common tool for medical procedures. Lasers are typically used to deliver energy/power to a biological specimen to alter its characteristics, fuse tissue or destroy a particular structure. Under a Los Alamos CRADA, we have been working with a medical laser company and a laser medical center to study the laser interaction with pseudo-blood clots that are typical of those found in human coronary arteries. A 577-nm flash lamp pumped dye laser beam is pulsed through a 300- micron optical fiber to deliver the laser energy on the surface of a pseudo-clot material. The fiber and pseudo-clot are surrounded by water or x-ray contrast fluid transparent at 577 and 514 nm. The laser-pulse/clot interaction creates a bubble at the water-clot interface. The bubble expands out and collapses back on the pseudo-clot resulting part of the clot being removed. Using a backlight technique with an electronic framing camera we record the bubble growth, expansion, and collapse, and the debris generated by the interaction.

  20. X-ray spectral diagnostics of laser harmonic generation in the interaction of relativistic femtosecond laser pulses with clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faenov, A. Ya; Oks, E.; Dalimier, E.; Skobelev, I. Yu; Pikuz, S. A.; Pikuz, T. A.; Zhvaniya, I. A.; Fukuda, Y.; Andreev, A.; Koga, J.; Sakaki, H.; Kotaki, H.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Hayashi, Y.; Kawachi, T.; Kando, M.; Kondo, K.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Kodama, R.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that the production of X-ray emission spectra in the interaction of high-intensity laser radiation with cluster targets may be affected by the bichromatic oscillating electric field arising from the generation of the second harmonic of laser radiation. A technique is proposed for diagnosing harmonic generation in laser - cluster interactions using the spectral line profiles of multiply charged helium ions. The efficiency of second harmonic generation at a laser intensity of 3 × 1018 W cm-2 is shown to amount to about 2%.

  1. Optimum laser intensity for the production of energetic deuterium ions from laser-cluster interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.; Dyer, G.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bernstein, A. C.; Gaul, E.; Rougk, J.; Aymond, F.; Donovan, M. E.; Ditmire, T.

    2013-09-15

    We measured, using Petawatt-level pulses, the average ion energy and neutron yield in high-intensity laser interactions with molecular clusters as a function of laser intensity. The interaction volume over which fusion occurred (1–10 mm{sup 3}) was larger than previous investigations, owing to the high laser power. Possible effects of prepulses were examined by implementing a pair of plasma mirrors. Our results show an optimum laser intensity for the production of energetic deuterium ions both with and without the use of the plasma mirrors. We measured deuterium plasmas with 14 keV average ion energies, which produced 7.2 × 10{sup 6} and 1.6 × 10{sup 7} neutrons in a single shot with and without plasma mirrors, respectively. The measured neutron yields qualitatively matched the expected yields calculated using a cylindrical plasma model.

  2. Thermal therapeutic method for selective treatment of deep-lying tissue by combining laser and high-intensity focused ultrasound energy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Haemin; Kang, Jeeun; Chang, Jin Ho

    2014-05-01

    Photothermal therapy is performed by delivering laser radiation into the target lesion containing tissue chromophores so as to induce localized heating. For high treatment efficacy, the laser wavelength should be selected to maximize the absorption of incident laser radiation in the tissue chromophores. However, even with the optimal laser wavelength, both the absorption and the scattering of laser energy in tissue openly hamper treatment efficacy in deep-lying lesions. To overcome the limitation, we propose a dual thermal therapeutic method in which both laser and acoustic energies are transmitted to increase therapeutic depth while maintaining high target selectivity of photothermal therapy. Through skin-mimicking phantom experiments, it was verified that the two different energies are complementary in elevation of tissue temperature, and the treatment depth using laser radiation is increased along with acoustic energy.

  3. Laser-plasma interactions relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, K.B.

    1998-11-02

    Research into laser-driven inertial confinement fusion is now entering a critical juncture with the construction of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Many of the remaining unanswered questions concerning NIF involve interactions between lasers and plasmas. With the eventual goal of fusion power in mind, laser-plasma interactions relevant to laser fusion schemes is an important topic in need of further research. This work experimentally addresses some potential shortcuts and pitfalls on the road to laser-driven fusion power. Current plans on NIF have 192 laser beams directed into a small cylindrical cavity which will contain the fusion fuel; to accomplish this the beams must cross in the entrance holes, and this intersection will be in the presence of outward-flowing plasma. To investigate the physics involved, interactions of crossing laser beams in flowing plasmas are investigated with experiments on the Nova laser facility at LLNL. It was found that in a flowing plasma, energy is transferred between two crossing laser beams, and this may have deleterious consequences for energy balance and ignition in NIF. Possible solutions to this problem are presented. A recently-proposed alternative to standard laser-driven fusion, the ''fast ignitor'' concept, is also experimentally addressed in this dissertation. Many of the laser-plasma interactions necessary for the success of the fast ignitor have not previously been explored at the relevant laser intensities. Specifically, the transfer of high-intensity laser energy to electrons at solid-target interfaces is addressed. 20-30% conversion efficiencies into forward-propagated electrons were measured, along with an average electron energy that varied with the type of target material. The directionality of the electrons was also measured, revealing an apparent beaming of the highest energy electrons. This work was extended to various intensities and pulse lengths and a

  4. High intensity proton synchrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craddock, M. K.

    1986-10-01

    Strong initiatives are being pursued in a number of countries for the construction of ``kaon factory'' synchrotrons capable of producing 100 times more intense proton beams than those available now from machines such as the Brookhaven AGS and CERN PS. Such machines would yield equivalent increases in the fluxes of secondary particles (kaons, pions, muons, antiprotons, hyperons and neutrinos of all varieties)—or cleaner beams for a smaller increase in flux—opening new avenues to various fundamental questions in both particle and nuclear physics. Major areas of investigation would be rare decay modes, CP violation, meson and hadron spectroscopy, antinucleon interactions, neutrino scattering and oscillations, and hypernuclear properties. Experience with the pion factories has already shown how high beam intensities make it possible to explore the ``precision frontier'' with results complementary to those achievable at the ``energy frontier''. This paper will describe proposals for upgrading and AGS and for building kaon factories in Canada, Europe, Japan and the United States, emphasizing the novel aspects of accelerator design required to achieve the desired performance (typically 100 μA at 30 GeV).

  5. [Comparative analysis of application of highly intensive laser irradiation and electrocoagulation during laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed for destructive forms of an acute calculous cholecystitis].

    PubMed

    Nichitayio, M Yu; Bazyak, A M; Klochan, V V; Grusha, P K; Goman, A V

    2015-02-01

    Comparative analysis of results of the laser diode (the wave length 940 nm) and elec- trocoagulation application while performing laparoscopic cholecystectomy was con- ducted. For an acute calculous cholecystitis 52 patients were operated, in whom instead of electrocoagulation the laser was applied, provide for reduction of thermal impact on tissues, the complications absence, reduction of the patients stationary treatment duration postoperatively from (5.2 ± 1.2) to (4.9 ± 0.6) days.

  6. Development of a high intensity laser for efficient spin exchange optical pumping in a spin maser measurement of the 129Xe EDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funayama, Chikako; Furukawa, Takeshi; Sato, Tomoya; Ichikawa, Yuichi; Ohtomo, Yuichi; Sakamoto, Yu; Kojima, Shuichiro; Suzuki, Takahiro; Chikamori, Masatoshi; Hikota, Eri; Tsuchiya, Masato; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Bidinosti, Christopher; Ino, Takashi; Ueno, Hideki; Matsuo, Yukari; Fukuyama, Takeshi; Asahi, Koichiro

    2014-09-01

    We aim to search for an atomic electric dipole moment (EDM) in 129Xe beyond the present upper limit at the level of 10-28 e cm. The enhancement of the spin polarization through the efficient spin-exchange optical pumping process is important for stable maser operation. Previously, a distributed feedback (DFB) laser and a spatially separated tapered amplifier (TA) were used for the optical pumping. The characteristics of the TA-DFB laser, such as its narrow line width and high frequency stability, enable us to produce a large spin polarization. However, the power of the TA-DFB laser was not sufficient for stable operation of the 3He spin-maser comagnetometer. Recently, we have been preparing a new laser system containing an external cavity laser diode (ECLD) and a more intense TA for more efficient pumping. In the presentation, we discuss the Rb and noble gases polarizations achieved with our new ECLD compared to that with the DFB laser, and evaluate the advantages gained by employing the ECLD.

  7. Spatially coherent high-order harmonics generated at optimal high gas pressure with high-intensity one- or two-color laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Cheng; Lin, C. D.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the gas-pressure dependence of macroscopic harmonic spectra generated in a high-ionization medium using intense 800-nm laser pulses. The harmonics obtained at the optimal pressure show good spatial coherence with small divergence (less than 2 mrad) in the far field. By analyzing the evolution of the laser's electric field as it propagates, we find that dynamic phase matching conditions are fulfilled in the second half of the gas cell and that harmonic yields do not depend on the position of the gas cell with respect to the focusing position. We also demonstrate that harmonic yields at the optimal pressure can be further enhanced by increasing input laser energy or by adding a few percent of second or third harmonic to the fundamental.

  8. Light-induced absorption in BaTiO 3 and KNbO 3 generated with high intensity laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buse, K.; Krätzig, E.

    1992-09-01

    Light-induced absorption generated with nanosecond laser pulses (wavelength 532 nm, intensities up to 500 GWm -2) is investigated in BaTiO 3 and KNbO 3. The measurements strongly support the two-center model for absorption processes in these materials. Comparison with the results of cw experiments clearly indicates that at high light intensities additional shallow traps become active.

  9. New developments in energy transfer and transport studies in relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norreys, P. A.; Green, J. S.; Lancaster, K. L.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Scott, R. H. H.; Perez, F.; Schlenvoight, H.-P.; Baton, S.; Hulin, S.; Vauzour, B.; Santos, J. J.; Adams, D. J.; Markey, K.; Ramakrishna, B.; Zepf, M.; Quinn, M. N.; Yuan, X. H.; McKenna, P.; Schreiber, J.; Davies, J. R.; Higginson, D. P.; Beg, F. N.; Chen, C.; Ma, T.; Patel, P.

    2010-12-01

    Two critical issues related to the success of fast ignition inertial fusion have been vigorously investigated in a co-ordinated campaign in the European Union and the United States. These are the divergence of the fast electron beam generated in intense, PW laser-plasma interactions and the fast electron energy transport with the use of high intensity contrast ratio laser pulses. Proof is presented that resistivity gradient-induced magnetic fields can guide fast electrons over significant distances in (initially) cold metallic targets. Comparison of experiments undertaken in both France and the United States suggests that an important factor in obtaining efficient coupling into dense plasma is the irradiation with high intensity contrast ratio laser pulses, rather than the colour of the laser pulse itself.

  10. Dynamics of high-energy proton beam acceleration and focusing from advanced hemisphere-cone target by high-intensity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, B.; Foord, M. E.; Stephens, R. B.; Wei, M. S.; Patel, P.; McLean, H.; Key, M.; Beg, F. N.

    2012-10-01

    The ability to focus intense proton beam to higher intensities and smaller focal diameters makes it very attractive for the applications ranging from isochoric heating of plasma [1], imaging implosion dynamics [2], to proton fast ignition (FI) [3], opening a new avenue of research for high energy density physics (HEDP). The roles of the laser-heated electrons in determining conversion efficiency and focus have not been previously considered [4]. In this talk, we shall present the recent theoretical and numerical calculations that self-consistently describe the evolution of the proton beam starting with the laser-generation of electrons and continuing through to ballistic proton motion, 15ps later. An analytical model is given for the electrostatic field in the plasma during acceleration, which determines the focusing characteristics of the beam.[4pt] [1] P. K. Patel et al., PRL 91, 125004 (2003).[0pt] [2] M. Borghesi, et al., PPCF 43, A267 (2001).[0pt] [3] M. Roth et al., PRL 86, 436 (2001).[0pt] [4] T. Bartal et al., Nat. Phys. 8, 139 (2012).

  11. Mechanism and computational model for Lyman-α-radiation generation by high-intensity-laser four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louchev, Oleg A.; Bakule, Pavel; Saito, Norihito; Wada, Satoshi; Yokoyama, Koji; Ishida, Katsuhiko; Iwasaki, Masahiko

    2011-09-01

    We present a theoretical model combined with a computational study of a laser four-wave mixing process under optical discharge in which the non-steady-state four-wave amplitude equations are integrated with the kinetic equations of initial optical discharge and electron avalanche ionization in Kr-Ar gas. The model is validated by earlier experimental data showing strong inhibition of the generation of pulsed, tunable Lyman-α (Ly-α) radiation when using sum-difference frequency mixing of 212.6 nm and tunable infrared radiation (820-850 nm). The rigorous computational approach to the problem reveals the possibility and mechanism of strong auto-oscillations in sum-difference resonant Ly-α generation due to the combined effect of (i) 212.6-nm (2+1)-photon ionization producing initial electrons, followed by (ii) the electron avalanche dominated by 843-nm radiation, and (iii) the final breakdown of the phase matching condition. The model shows that the final efficiency of Ly-α radiation generation can achieve a value of ˜5×10-4 which is restricted by the total combined absorption of the fundamental and generated radiation.

  12. Mechanism and computational model for Lyman-{alpha}-radiation generation by high-intensity-laser four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar gas

    SciTech Connect

    Louchev, Oleg A.; Saito, Norihito; Wada, Satoshi; Bakule, Pavel; Yokoyama, Koji; Ishida, Katsuhiko; Iwasaki, Masahiko

    2011-09-15

    We present a theoretical model combined with a computational study of a laser four-wave mixing process under optical discharge in which the non-steady-state four-wave amplitude equations are integrated with the kinetic equations of initial optical discharge and electron avalanche ionization in Kr-Ar gas. The model is validated by earlier experimental data showing strong inhibition of the generation of pulsed, tunable Lyman-{alpha} (Ly-{alpha}) radiation when using sum-difference frequency mixing of 212.6 nm and tunable infrared radiation (820-850 nm). The rigorous computational approach to the problem reveals the possibility and mechanism of strong auto-oscillations in sum-difference resonant Ly-{alpha} generation due to the combined effect of (i) 212.6-nm (2+1)-photon ionization producing initial electrons, followed by (ii) the electron avalanche dominated by 843-nm radiation, and (iii) the final breakdown of the phase matching condition. The model shows that the final efficiency of Ly-{alpha} radiation generation can achieve a value of {approx}5x10{sup -4} which is restricted by the total combined absorption of the fundamental and generated radiation.

  13. Direct observation of resonance effects in laser cluster interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zweiback, J

    1999-06-01

    Time resolved dynamics of high intensity laser interactions with atomic clusters have been studied with both theoretical analysis and experiment. A short-pulse Ti:sapphire laser system, which could produce 50 mJ of energy in a 50 fs pulse, was built to perform these experiments. The laser used a novel single grating stretcher and was pumped, in part, by a custom Nd:YLF laser system, including 19 mm Nd:YLF amplifiers. It was found that there is an optimal pulse width to maximize absorption for a given cluster size. This optimal pulse width ranged from 400 fs for 85 A radius xenon clusters to 1.2 ps for 205 {angstrom} radius xenon clusters. Using a pump-probe configuration, the absorption of the probe radiation was observed to reach a maximum for a particular time delay between pump and probe, dependent on the cluster size. The delay for peak absorption was 800, 1400, and 2100 fs for 85 {angstrom}, 130 {angstrom}, and 170 {angstrom} radius xenon clusters respectively. Model calculations suggest that these effects are due to resonant heating of the spherical plasma in agreement with the hydrodynamic interpretation of cluster interactions. While this simple hydrodynamic code produces reasonable agreement with data, it does not include bulk plasma or non-linear propagation effects and is limited to the regime where resonant behavior dominates. We also measured the scattered laser light from the laser-cluster interaction. Similar to the absorption measurements, there is an optimal pulse width which maximizes the scattered signal. This pulse width is larger than the optimal pulse width for absorption. This disagrees with model calculations which show both pulse widths being similar. Further experiments measuring the scattered light in a pump-probe configuration should help to resolve this disagreement.

  14. PIC-DSMC analysis on interaction of a laser induced discharge and shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamura, Kohei

    2015-09-01

    Laser induced discharge and the shock wave have attracted great interest for use in the electrical engineering. When the high intensity laser (10 GW >) is focused in the atmosphere, the breakdown occurs and the discharge wave propagates toward to the laser irradiation. The shock wave is generated around the discharge wave, which is called as the laser supported detonation wave. After breakdown occurred, the initial electron of the avalanche ionization is produced by the photoionization due to the plasma radiation. It is well recognized that the radiation of the laser plasma affects the propagation mechanism of the laser induced discharge wave after the initiation of the breakdown. However, it is difficult to observe the interaction between the plasma radiation and the electron avalanche in the ionization-wave front in experimentally except in the high intensity laser. In the numerical calculation of the laser-induced discharge, the fluid dynamics based on the Navier-Stokes equation have been widely used. However, it is difficult to investigate the avalanche ionization at the wave front using the fluid dynamics simulation. To investigate the interaction of the ionization-wave front and the shock wave, it is appropriate to utilize the PIC-DSMC method. The present study showed the propagation of the ionization front of the discharge wave and the shock wave using the particle simulation. This work was supported by Kato Foundation for Promotion of Science and Japan Power Academy.

  15. Laser tissue interaction in direct myocardial revascularization.

    PubMed

    Shehada, R E; Mansour, H N; Grundfest, W S

    2000-06-01

    This investigation examines the various laser choices used for transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMLR) with emphasis on the laser-tissue interaction. A series of in vivo (porcine model, n=27) and in vitro experiments were performed to study the effects of CO(2), holmium:YAG, and XeCl excimer lasers on the histological outcome of TMR channels. Computerized histopathological analysis has revealed that the CO(2) and holmium:YAG lasers produce substantial unpredictable thermal damage and differ predominantly in the amount of the mechanical injury or tissue shredding. In comparison, the excimer laser appears to produce the most uniform tissue ablation with the least thermal and shockwave damage.

  16. Interactions of intense laser radiation with plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, M. H.

    1981-04-01

    The dominant physical processes involved in the interaction of intense laser radiation with plasma are discussed with emphasis on their dependence on the wavelength of the laser radiation. Hydrodynamic pressure resulting from these interactions, acceleration of spherical shell targets, and fluid instability associated with the acceleration are discussed with reference to compression of plasma in laser driven implosions. Experimental data are presented to illustrate the various phenomena.

  17. Extreme field limits in the interaction of laser light with ultrarelativistic electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Hayashi, Y.; Kando, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Koga, J.; Kondo, K.; Kotaki, H.; Pirozhkov, A.; Bulanov, S. S.; Zhidkov, A.; Chen, P.; Neely, D.; Kato, Y.; Narozhny, N. B.; Korn, G.

    2012-07-11

    The critical electric field of quantum electrodynamics is so strong that it produces electron-positron pairs from vacuum, converting the energy of light into matter. This field has become feasible through the construction of extremely high power lasers or/and with the sophisticated use of nonlinear processes in relativistic plasmas. A feasibility of the experiments on the collision of laser light and high intensity electromagnetic pulses, generated by relativistic flying mirrors, with relativistic electrons for the studying of extreme field limits in the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves is discussed.

  18. Extreme field limits in the interaction of laser light with ultrarelativistic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Hayashi, Y.; Kando, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Koga, J.; Kondo, K.; Kotaki, H.; Pirozhkov, A.; Bulanov, S. S.; Zhidkov, A.; Chen, P.; Neely, D.; Kato, Y.; Narozhny, N. B.; Korn, G.

    2012-07-01

    The critical electric field of quantum electrodynamics is so strong that it produces electron-positron pairs from vacuum, converting the energy of light into matter. This field has become feasible through the construction of extremely high power lasers or/and with the sophisticated use of nonlinear processes in relativistic plasmas. A feasibility of the experiments on the collision of laser light and high intensity electromagnetic pulses, generated by relativistic flying mirrors, with relativistic electrons for the studying of extreme field limits in the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves is discussed.

  19. MeV negative ion generation from ultra-intense laser interaction with a water spray

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Ramakrishna, B.; Borghesi, M.; Doria, D.; Zepf, M.; Sarri, G.; Ehrentraut, L.; Steinke, S.; Sandner, W.; Schnuerer, M.; Andreev, A.; Nickles, P. V.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2011-08-01

    MeV negative oxygen ions are obtained from a water spray target irradiated by high intensity (5 x 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) and ultrashort (50 fs) laser pulses. Generation of negative ions is ascribed to electron-capture processes that the laser-accelerated high-energy positive ion experiences when it interacts with atoms in the spray. This mechanism implies the existence of a large number of MeV neutral oxygen atoms, which is consistent with indirect experimental evidence.

  20. Microengineering Laser Plasma Interactions at Relativistic Intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, S.; Ji, L. L.; Audesirk, H.; George, K. M.; Snyder, J.; Krygier, A.; Poole, P.; Willis, C.; Daskalova, R.; Chowdhury, E.; Lewis, N. S.; Schumacher, D. W.; Pukhov, A.; Freeman, R. R.; Akli, K. U.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the first successful proof-of-principle experiment to manipulate laser-matter interactions on microscales using highly ordered Si microwire arrays. The interaction of a high-contrast short-pulse laser with a flat target via periodic Si microwires yields a substantial enhancement in both the total and cutoff energies of the produced electron beam. The self-generated electric and magnetic fields behave as an electromagnetic lens that confines and guides electrons between the microwires as they acquire relativistic energies via direct laser acceleration.

  1. Highlights of laser-tissue interaction mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabay, Shimon

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the fundamentals of good practice when using the laser in medicine and surgery. As a 'good practice' recommendation, the laser beam wavelength and power should be determined to match the desired thermal effect. The energy losses to the surroundings of the initial absorbing volume, caused by the heat diffusion mechanism, are strongly dependent on the exposure time duration. The differences in the absorption and scattering coefficients of some tissue components are used for selectively destroying those components having the higher absorption coefficients. Selective destruction of some tissue components can be achieved even for components having the same absorption coefficient but different dimensions. The laser therapy strategy is discussed: the effective use of lasers in medicine can be achieved only if the physician has an extensive understanding of the laser-tissue interaction mechanisms; continuing education and training is a must for laser surgeons to improve their skill to get clinically optimal results.

  2. High intensity portable fluorescent light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, F. B.

    1972-01-01

    Eight high intensity portable fluorescent lights were produced. Three prototype lights were also produced, two of which were subsequently updated to the physical and operational configuration of the qualification and flight units. Positioning of lamp apertures and reflectors in these lights is such that the light is concentrated and intensified in a specific pattern rather than widely diffused. Indium amalgam control of mercury vapor pressure in the lamp gives high output at lamp ambient temperatures up to 105 C. A small amount of amalgam applied to each electrode stem helps to obtain fast warm-up. Shrinking a Teflon sleeve on the tube and potting metal caps on each end of the lamp minimizes dispersion of mercury vapor and glass particles in the event of accidental lamp breakage. Operation at 20 kHz allows the lamps to consume more power than at low frequency, thus increasing their light output and raising their efficiency. When used to expose color photographic film, light from the lamps produces results approximately equal to sunlight.

  3. High Efficiency Electron-Laser Interactions in Tapered Helical Undulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duris, Joseph Patrick

    Efficient coupling of relativistic electron beams with high power radiation lies at the heart of advanced accelerator and light source research and development. The inverse free electron laser is a stable accelerator capable of harnessing very high intensity laser electric fields to efficiently transfer large powers from lasers to electron beams. In this dissertation, we first present the theoretical framework to describe the interaction, and then apply our improved understanding of the IFEL to the design and numerical study of meter-long, GeV IFELs for compact light sources. The central experimental work of the dissertation is the UCLA BNL helical inverse free electron laser experiment at the Accelerator Test Facility in Brookhaven National Laboratory which used a strongly tapered 54cm long, helical, permanent magnet undulator and a several hundred GW CO2 laser to accelerate electrons from 52 to 106MeV, setting new records for inverse free electron laser energy gain (54MeV) and average accelerating gradient (100MeV/m). The undulator design and fabrication as well as experimental diagnostics are presented. In order to improve the stability and quality of the accelerated electron beam, we redesigned the undulator for a slightly reduced output energy by modifying the magnet gap throughout the undulator, and we used this modified undulator to demonstrated capture of >25% of the injected beam without prebunching. In the study of heavily loaded GeV inverse free electron lasers, we show that a majority of the power may be transferred from a laser to the accelerated electron beam. Reversing the process to decelerate high power electron beams, a mechanism we refer to as tapering enhanced stimulated superradiant amplification, offers a clear path to high power light sources. We present studies of radiation production for a wide range of wavelengths (10mum, 13nm, and 0.3nm) using this method and discuss the design for a deceleration experiment using the same undulator used

  4. Laser Ion Acceleration from the Interaction of Ultra-Intense laser Pulse with thi foils

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M

    2004-03-12

    The discovery that ultra-intense laser pulses (I > 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) can produce short pulse, high energy proton beams has renewed interest in the fundamental mechanisms that govern particle acceleration from laser-solid interactions. Experiments have shown that protons present as hydrocarbon contaminants on laser targets can be accelerated up to energies > 50 MeV. Different theoretical models that explain the observed results have been proposed. One model describes a front-surface acceleration mechanism based on the ponderomotive potential of the laser pulse. At high intensities (I > 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}), the quiver energy of an electron oscillating in the electric field of the laser pulse exceeds the electron rest mass, requiring the consideration of relativistic effects. The relativistically correct ponderomotive potential is given by U{sub p} = ([1 + I{lambda}{sup 2}/1.3 x 10{sup 18}]{sup 1/2} - 1) m{sub o}c{sup 2}, where I{lambda}{sup 2} is the irradiance in W{micro}m{sup 2}/cm{sup 2} and m{sub o}c{sup 2} is the electron rest mass.At laser irradiance of I{lambda}{sup 2} {approx} 10{sup 20} W{micro}m{sup 2}/cm{sup 2}, the ponderomotive potential can be of order several MeV. A few recent experiments--discussed in Chapter 3 of this thesis--consider this ponderomotive potential sufficiently strong to accelerate protons from the front surface of the target to energies up to tens of MeV. Another model, known as Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA), describes the mechanism as an electrostatic sheath on the back surface of the laser target. According to the TNSA model, relativistic hot electrons created at the laser-solid interaction penetrate the foil where a few escape to infinity. The remaining hot electrons are retained by the target potential and establish an electrostatic sheath on the back surface of the target.

  5. Observation of Quasi Mono-Energetic Protons in Laser Spray-Target Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishna, B.; Borghesi, M.; Doria, D.; Sarri, G.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Andreev, A.; Ehrentraut, L.; Sandner, W.; Schnuerer, M.; Steinke, S.; Nickles, P. V.

    2010-02-02

    Laser driven ion acceleration arises from charge separation effects caused by an ultrahigh intensity laser pulse. Limited mass targets confine the accelerated electrons within the target size and prevent the large area spreading seen in extended foil targets. Furthermore, if the target size is smaller than the laser wavelength and focal spot diameter, homogeneous heating of the target is ensured. Observation of quasi-monoenergetic protons in the interaction of a high intensity high contrast laser pulse at 5x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} with 150 nm--diameter water droplets is investigated. An ensemble of such objects is formed in a spray. Quasi mono energetic proton bursts of energy Eapprox1.6 MeV are observed and are associated with a specific ionization and explosion dynamics of the spheres.

  6. Laser-Material Interaction of Powerful Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Komashko, A

    2003-01-06

    Laser-material interaction of powerful (up to a terawatt) ultrashort (several picoseconds or shorter) laser pulses and laser-induced effects were investigated theoretically in this dissertation. Since the ultrashort laser pulse (USLP) duration time is much smaller than the characteristic time of the hydrodynamic expansion and thermal diffusion, the interaction occurs at a solid-like material density with most of the light energy absorbed in a thin surface layer. Powerful USLP creates hot, high-pressure plasma, which is quickly ejected without significant energy diffusion into the bulk of the material, Thus collateral damage is reduced. These and other features make USLPs attractive for a variety of applications. The purpose of this dissertation was development of the physical models and numerical tools for improvement of our understanding of the process and as an aid in optimization of the USLP applications. The study is concentrated on two types of materials - simple metals (materials like aluminum or copper) and wide-bandgap dielectrics (fused silica, water). First, key physical phenomena of the ultrashort light interaction with metals and the models needed to describe it are presented. Then, employing one-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics code enhanced with models for laser energy deposition and material properties at low and moderate temperatures, light absorption was self-consistently simulated as a function of laser wavelength, pulse energy and length, angle of incidence and polarization. Next, material response on time scales much longer than the pulse duration was studied using the hydrocode and analytical models. These studies include examination of evolution of the pressure pulses, effects of the shock waves, material ablation and removal and three-dimensional dynamics of the ablation plume. Investigation of the interaction with wide-bandgap dielectrics was stimulated by the experimental studies of the USLP surface ablation of water (water is a model of

  7. Short-pulse laser beam interactions with biocompatible polymer materials and tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    1996-12-01

    Pulsed laser beams, of very short duration, appear to be very promising tools for polymer surface processing. Recently we have studied the interaction of picosecond and femtosecond laser radiation in the visible region of the spectrum with synthetic polymer films and we have compared these studies with our similar studies with nanosecond duration laser radiation. Biocompatible polymers have been extensively used for sutures, vascular grafts or bone and other hard tissue replacements. The use of surgical lasers for intervention on biocompatible material - tissue interfaces has attracted a great deal of interest, as both the high intensity, short pulse duration lasers and the prosthetic biomaterials are in increasing use. Our recent ablation studies, using ultrashort laser pulses, of biocompatible materials, are described in this article. Lasers were introduced in medical research in the early sixties but the laser beam ability to remove efficiently and safely soft or hard tissue, the lateral thermal damage and the final surface characteristics are still under investigation. In the past few years, by virtue of their water or water and hydroxyapatite content respectively, exhibit strong absorption restricting residual thermal damage to a relatively small zone. Recently we have investigated the interaction of short pulse laser radiation of picosecond and femtosecond duration with soft and hard tissue, as this unexplored field is expected to be a potential alternative in powerful laser processing of biomedical structures. The experimental results obtained, including ablation rates, ablation wavelength dependence, pulse duration dependence, fluence dependence, etc. are presented. These results are discussed according to simple theoretical models of laser energy absorption and the possible mechanisms of ultrashort pulse laser ablation, which in some cases involves multiphoton photodissociation processes. Finally, the design characteristics of the lasers employed in our

  8. Femtosecond Laser Interaction with Energetic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, E; Benterou, J; Lee, R; Roeske, F; Stuart, B

    2002-03-25

    Femtosecond laser ablation shows promise in machining energetic materials into desired shapes with minimal thermal and mechanical effects to the remaining material. We will discuss the physical effects associated with machining energetic materials and assemblies containing energetic materials, based on experimental results. Interaction of ultra-short laser pulses with matter will produce high temperature plasma at high-pressure which results in the ablation of material. In the case of energetic material, which includes high explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics, this ablation process must be accomplished without coupling energy into the energetic material. Experiments were conducted in order to characterize and better understand the phenomena of femtosecond laser pulse ablation on a variety of explosives and propellants. Experimental data will be presented for laser fluence thresholds, machining rates, cutting depths and surface quality of the cuts.

  9. Laser-induced gas-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, T. J.

    Chemical reactions in homogeneous systems activated by laser radiation have been extensively investigated for more than a decade. The applications of lasers to promote gas-surface interactions have just been realized in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to examine the fundamental processes involved in laser-induced gas-surface chemical interactions. Specifically, the photon-enhanced adsorption, adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-solid reactions, product formation and desorption processes are discussed in detail. The dynamic processes involved in photoexcitation of the electronic and vibrational states, the energy transfer and relaxation in competition with chemical interactions are considered. These include both single and multiple photon adsorption, and fundamental and overtone transitions in the excitation process, and inter- and intra-molecular energy transfer, and coupling with phonons, electron-hole pairs and surface plasmons in the energy relaxation process. Many current experimental and theoretical studies on the subject are reviewed and discussed with the goal of clarifying the relative importance of the surface interaction steps and relating the resulting concepts to the experimentally observed phenomena. Among the many gas-solid systems that have been investigated, there has been more extensive use of CO adsorbed on metals, and SF 6 and XeF 2 interactions with silicon as examples to illustrate the many facets of the electronically and vibrationally activated surface processes. Results on IR laser stimulated desorption of C 5H 5N and C 5D 5N molecules from various solid surfaces are also presented. It is clearly shown that rapid intermolecular energy exchange and molecule to surface energy transfer can have important effects on photodesorption cross sections and isotope selectivities. It is concluded that utilization of lasers in gas-surface studies not only can provide fundamental insight into the mechanism and dynamics involved in heterogeneous

  10. Unresonant interaction of laser beams with microdroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascu, M. L.; Popescu, G. V.; Ticos, C. M.; Andrei, I. R.

    2012-03-01

    The interaction of distilled water microdroplets (volumes of 3-4μl) with pulsed laser beams emitted at 532nm is described. At 532nm the distilled water absorption is very low and the interaction of a water bead with the laser radiation is dominated by unresonant phenomena. Following the collision of the laser beam with a microdroplet in suspended/ hanging/pendant position in air, deformations and mechanical vibrations of the droplets are produced. The conditions in which the droplets lose material as a consequence of the impact with laser beams are also explored. The effects produced on the droplet were studied pulse by pulse and depend on: droplet's content, beam wavelength, power and focusing conditions, irradiation geometry and adhesion of the bead to the capillary on which it is suspended. The laser pulses energies were varied in four steps: 0.25mJ, 0.4mJ, 0.7mJ and 1mJ. The pulse full time width was 5ns and the typical focus diameter on the droplet was 90μm; the beam had a relatively low divergence around the focus point. The microdroplets and the modification/evolution of their shapes are visualised by recordings performed at 10kframes/second. Following a microdroplet interaction with the laser beam one may also produce at a controlled moment in time nanodroplets propagating at high (probably supersonic) speeds and microdroplets propagating at slower speeds. One may also produce pendant droplets of smaller dimensions than the initial one as well as micro/nano gas bubbles in the pendant droplet's material/volume. In a second set of experiment was recorded at high speed the behaviour of the microdroplets of Rhodamine 6G in distilled water at resonant interaction with similar laser pulses, at the same power levels. The optical phenomena considering that the microdroplets contents are Newtonian liquids which dominate the beads behaviour at interaction with the laser beams, are discussed.

  11. Numerical modeling of laser-matter interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marczak, Jan; Jach, Karol; Sarzynski, Antoni

    2003-10-01

    Laser radiation is often used in cleaning and conservation of artworks. Interaction of laser radiation with matter is so sophisticated process that analytical solutions rarely bring the valuable formulas. Even numerical methods seldom give quantitative insight into the physics of processes. Chemical and physical properties of surface impurity layers may change from point to point within the same sample. Absorption coefficient of the layers depends on such factors as weather or air humidity. In spite of this, theoretical description of laser cleaning is necessary, as it allows to explain some characteristic features of processes under investigation. In this work we present a model for laser pulse interaction with graphite layer placed on aluminium substrate. The model is limited to one dimensional hydrodynamic equations. The following phenomena are included into the model: absorption and reflection of laser radiation, heat conductivity, radiation transport in grey body approximation, shock waves, ionisation and the elastic properties of the media. Numerical calculations and experimental results give a qualitative agreement.

  12. Laser-plasma interactions for fast ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, A. J.; Fiuza, F.; Debayle, A.; Johzaki, T.; Mori, W. B.; Patel, P. K.; Sentoku, Y.; Silva, L. O.

    2014-05-01

    In the electron-driven fast-ignition (FI) approach to inertial confinement fusion, petawatt laser pulses are required to generate MeV electrons that deposit several tens of kilojoules in the compressed core of an imploded DT shell. We review recent progress in the understanding of intense laser-plasma interactions (LPI) relevant to FI. Increases in computational and modelling capabilities, as well as algorithmic developments have led to enhancement in our ability to perform multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of LPI at relevant scales. We discuss the physics of the interaction in terms of laser absorption fraction, the laser-generated electron spectra, divergence, and their temporal evolution. Scaling with irradiation conditions such as laser intensity are considered, as well as the dependence on plasma parameters. Different numerical modelling approaches and configurations are addressed, providing an overview of the modelling capabilities and limitations. In addition, we discuss the comparison of simulation results with experimental observables. In particular, we address the question of surrogacy of today's experiments for the full-scale FI problem.

  13. Study of Laser Interaction with Thin Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Cutter, K P; Fochs, S N; Pax, P H; Rotter, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Yamamoto, R M

    2009-03-06

    For many targets of interest, the thickness is small compared to the conduction length during the engagement. In addition, the laser-material interaction region can be treated as flat. We have studied this regime with our 25 kW solid-state laser. We have demonstrated that airflow can reduce by approximately 40% the energy required to break through a thin target. This reduction is caused by the bulging of the softened material and the tearing and removal of the material by aerodynamic forces. We present elastic modeling which explains these results.

  14. Ultra-intense, short pulse laser-plasma interactions with applications to the fast ignitor

    SciTech Connect

    Wilks, S.C.; Kruer, W.L.; Young, P.E.; Hammer, J.; Tabak, M.

    1995-04-01

    Due to the advent of chirped pulse amplification (CPA) as an efficient means of creating ultra-high intensity laser light (I > 5{times}10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}) in pulses less than a few picoseconds, new ideas for achieving ignition and gain in DT targets with less than 1 megajoule of input energy are currently being pursued. Two types of powerful lasers are employed in this scheme: (1) channeling beams and (2) ignition beams. The current state of laser-plasma interactions relating to this fusion scheme will be discussed. In particular, plasma physics issues in the ultra-intense regime are crucial to the success of this scheme. We compare simulation and experimental results in this highly nonlinear regime.

  15. HIGH-INTENSITY, HIGH CHARGE-STATE HEAVY ION SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    ALESSI,J.G.

    2004-08-16

    There are many accelerator applications for high intensity heavy ion sources, with recent needs including dc beams for RIA, and pulsed beams for injection into synchrotrons such as RHIC and LHC. The present status of sources producing high currents of high charge state heavy ions is reviewed. These sources include ECR, EBIS, and Laser ion sources. Benefits and limitations for these type sources are described. Possible future improvements in these sources are also mentioned.

  16. Hazards from High Intensity Lamps and Arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, D. H.

    1970-01-01

    The principal occupational health problem generally associated with high intensity arc lamps results from exposure of the eye and skin to ultraviolet radiation. Occasionally, the chorioretinal burns are of concern. The eye is generally more susceptible than the skin to injury from high intensity optical radiation sources whether ultraviolet, visible or infrared. Recent developments in technology have shown that some high intensity optical radiation sources which have output parameters greatly different from those encountered in the natural environment present a serious chorioretinal burn hazard.

  17. Modeling of laser interactions with composite materials

    DOE PAGES

    Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Boley, Charles D.

    2013-05-07

    In this study, we develop models of laser interactions with composite materials consisting of fibers embedded within a matrix. A ray-trace model is shown to determine the absorptivity, absorption depth, and optical power enhancement within the material, as well as the angular distribution of the reflected light. We also develop a macroscopic model, which provides physical insight and overall results. We show that the parameters in this model can be determined from the ray trace model.

  18. The scaling of electron and positron generation in intense laser-solid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hui; Link, A.; Fiuza, F.; Hazi, A.; Heeter, R. F.; Kemp, A. J.; Kemp, G. E.; Nagel, S. R.; Park, J.; Tommasini, R.; Williams, G. J.; Sentoku, Y.; Audebert, P.; Hill, M.; Hobbs, L.; Kerr, S.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Myatt, J.

    2015-05-15

    This paper presents experimental scalings of the electrons and positrons produced by intense laser-target interactions at relativistic laser intensities (10{sup 18}–10{sup 20} W cm{sup −2}). The data were acquired from three short-pulse laser facilities with laser energies ranging from 80 to 1500 J. We found a non-linear (≈E{sub L}{sup 2}) scaling of positron yield [Chen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 215001 (2015)] and a linear scaling of electron yield with the laser energy. These scalings are explained by theoretical and numerical analyses. Positron acceleration by the target sheath field is confirmed by the positron energy spectrum, which has a pronounced peak at energies near the sheath potential, as determined by the observed maximum energies of accelerated protons. The parameters of laser-produced electron-positron jets are summarized together with the theoretical energy scaling. The measured energy-squared scaling of relativistic electron-positron jets indicates the possibility to create an astrophysically relevant experimental platform with such jets using multi-kilojoule high intensity lasers currently under construction.

  19. Interaction of Intense Lasers with Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvets, Gennady

    1995-01-01

    This thesis addresses two important topics in nonlinear laser plasma physics: the interaction of intense lasers with a non thermal homogeneous plasma, the excitation of laser wakefields in hollow plasma channels, and the stability of channel guided propagation of laser pulses. In the first half of this thesis a new theoretical approach to the nonlinear interaction of intense laser pulses with underdense plasmas is developed. Unlike previous treatments, this theory is three-dimensional, relativistically covariant, and does not assume that a<<1, where a=eA/mc^2 is a dimensionless vector potential. This formalism borrows the diagrammatic techniques from quantum field theory, yet remains classical. This classical field theory, which treats cold plasma as a relativistic field interacting with the electromagnetic fields, introduces an artificial length scale which is smaller than any physically relevant spatial scale. By adopting a special (Arnowitt -Fickler) gauge, electromagnetic waves in a cold relativistic plasma are separated into "photons" and "plasmons" which are the relativistic extensions of electrostatic and electromagnetic waves in a cold stationary plasma. The field-theoretical formalism is applied to a variety of nonlinear problems including harmonic generation, parametric instabilities, and nonlinear corrections to the index of refraction. For the first time the rate of the second harmonic emission from a homogeneous plasma is calculated and its dependence on the polarization of the incident radiation is studied. An experimental check of this calculation is suggested, based on the predicted non-linear polarization rotation (the second harmonic is emitted polarized perpendicularly to polarization of the incident signal). The concept of renormalization is applied to the plasma and electromagnetic radiation (photons and plasmons). To the lowest order, this corresponds to relativistically correcting the electron mass for its oscillation in an intense EM field

  20. High-Intensity Plasma Glass Melter

    SciTech Connect

    2004-01-01

    Modular high-intensity plasma melter promises improved performance, reduced energy use, and lower emissions. The glass industry has used the same basic equipment for melting glass for the past 100 years.

  1. Subpicosecond KrF{asterisk}-laser plasma interaction at intensities between 10{sup 14} and 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Teubner, U.; Gibbon, P.; Foerster, E.; Fallies, F.; Audebert, P.; Geindre, J.P.; Gauthier, J.C.

    1996-07-01

    The interaction of high-intensity subpicosecond KrF{asterisk}-laser pulses with aluminium plasmas is investigated at intensities between 10{sup 14} and 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. Using a one-dimensional hydrocode, the laser energy absorption and time evolution of plasma parameters have been studied as a function of laser intensity, incidence angle, and polarization. Complementary particle-in-cell simulations have also been performed to check the collisionless absorption component carried by hot electrons and ions. These simulations are compared to previous experiments on laser pulse absorption and x-ray generation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Ion beam control in laser plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Izumiyama, T.; Sato, D.; Nagashima, T.; Takano, M.; Barada, D.; Gu, Y. J.; Ma, Y. Y.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Wang, W. M.

    2016-03-01

    By a two-stage successive acceleration in laser ion acceleration, our 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate a remarkable increase in ion energy by a few hundreds of MeV; the maximum proton energy reaches about 250MeV. The ions are accelerated by the inductive continuous post-acceleration in a laser plasma interaction together with the target normal sheath acceleration and the breakout afterburner mechanism. An intense short-pulse laser generates a strong current by high-energy electrons accelerated, when an intense short- pulse laser illuminates a plasma target. The strong electric current creates a strong magnetic field along the high-energy electron current in the plasma. During the increase phase in the magnetic field strength, the moving longitudinal inductive electric field is induced by the Faraday law, and accelerates the forward-moving ions continously. The multi-stage acceleration provides a unique controllability in the ion energy and its quality.

  3. Controlling Second Harmonic Efficiency of Laser Beam Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Walsh, Brian M. (Inventor); Reichle, Donald J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method is provided for controlling second harmonic efficiency of laser beam interactions. A laser system generates two laser beams (e.g., a laser beam with two polarizations) for incidence on a nonlinear crystal having a preferred direction of propagation. Prior to incidence on the crystal, the beams are optically processed based on the crystal's beam separation characteristics to thereby control a position in the crystal along the preferred direction of propagation at which the beams interact.

  4. Selected problems of interaction of laser radiation with tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajac, Andrzej

    2000-11-01

    In these paper the selected physical processes of interaction of laser beams with biological tissues are presented. From the wide area of medical applications of laser systems three very interesting problems are presented: medical application of pulsed lasers sources (from some hundred of microseconds to femtoseconds of laser pulse duration), the physical processes accompanied with an interaction of laser beams in spectral range 2000-3000nm, and the selected methods of optical diagnostics of a human tissues parameters. The fundamental scientific, technical, and construction problems of novel laser systems for medical applications are presented. These problems are illustrated by the results of the clinical and laboratory experiments.

  5. Proton acceleration in the interaction of high power laser and cryogenic hydrogen targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Rohini; Fiuza, Frederico; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2014-10-01

    High intensity laser driven ion acceleration has attracted great interest due to many prospective applications ranging from inertial confinement fusion, cancer therapy, particle accelerators. Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations are performed to model and design experiments at MEC for high power laser interaction with cryogenic hydrogen targets of tunable density and thickness. Preliminary 1D and 2D simulations, using fully relativistic particle-in-cell code PICLS, show a unique regime of proton acceleration, e.g. ~ 300 MeV peak energy protons are observed in the 1D run for interaction of ~1020 W/cm2, 110 fs intense laser with 6nc dense (nc = 1021 cm-3) and 2 micron thin target. The target is relativistically under-dense for the laser and we observe that a strong (multi-terawatt) shock electric field is produced and protons are reflected to high velocities by this field. Further, the shock field and the laser field keep propagating through the hydrogen target and meets up with target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) electric field produced at the target rear edge and vacuum interface and this superposition amplifies the TNSA fields resulting in higher proton energy. In addition, the electrons present at the rear edge of the target continue to gain energy via strong interaction with laser that crosses the target and these accelerated electrons maintains higher electric sheath fields which further provides acceleration to protons. We will also present detailed investigation with 2D PICLS simulations to gain a better insight of such physical processes to characterize multidimensional effects and establish analytical scaling between laser and target conditions for the optimization of proton acceleration.

  6. Excimer laser interaction with dentin of the human tooth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.; Gilliam, Ruth L.; Baker, George R.

    1989-01-01

    The use an excimer laser produced many unusual conical structures within the dentin of the inner part of the human tooth. By varying the frequency of the laser one can disperse the energy and cause more bleeding in laser surgery, but not destroy the cells associated with the incision. Therefore, the healing process will virtually be without scarring. Whereas, using the infrared laser the blood loss would be less, but the healing process would tend to be longer because cells are being destroyed due to the cauterization effect of the laser. The question is, are these structures produced as an interaction with the laser or are they an intrinsic part of the structure. The effects of the laser interaction upon dentin was studied, and in using electron microscopy the interaction of the excimer laser upon the tooth dentin and other various biological tissue is more clearly understood.

  7. Rapidly pulsed, high intensity, incoherent light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A rapid pulsing, high intensity, incoherent light is produced by selectively energizing a plurality of discharge lamps with a triggering circuit. Each lamp is connected to a capacitor, and a power supply is electrically connected to all but one of the capacitors. This last named capacitor is electrically connected to a discharge lamp which is connected to the triggering circuit.

  8. Pseudorelativistic laser-semiconductor quantum plasma interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunliang; Eliasson, Bengt

    2016-04-01

    A model is presented for the nonlinear interaction between a large-amplitude laser and semiconductor plasma in the semirelativistic quantum regime. The collective behavior of the electrons in the conduction band of a narrow-gap semiconductor is modeled by a Klein-Gordon equation, which is nonlinearly coupled with the electromagnetic (EM) wave through the Maxwell equations. The parametric instabilities involving the stimulated Raman scattering and modulational instabilities are analyzed theoretically and the resulting dispersion relation relation is solved numerically to assess the quantum effects on the instability. The study of the quasi-steady-state solution of the system and direct numerical simulations demonstrate the possibility of the formation of localized EM solitary structures trapped in electrons density holes. PMID:27176416

  9. Pseudorelativistic laser-semiconductor quantum plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunliang; Eliasson, Bengt

    2016-04-01

    A model is presented for the nonlinear interaction between a large-amplitude laser and semiconductor plasma in the semirelativistic quantum regime. The collective behavior of the electrons in the conduction band of a narrow-gap semiconductor is modeled by a Klein-Gordon equation, which is nonlinearly coupled with the electromagnetic (EM) wave through the Maxwell equations. The parametric instabilities involving the stimulated Raman scattering and modulational instabilities are analyzed theoretically and the resulting dispersion relation relation is solved numerically to assess the quantum effects on the instability. The study of the quasi-steady-state solution of the system and direct numerical simulations demonstrate the possibility of the formation of localized EM solitary structures trapped in electrons density holes.

  10. High-Quality Ion Beam Generation in Laser Plasma Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, Toshihiro; Takano, Masahiro; Izumiyzma, Takeshi; Barada, Daisuke; Kawata, Shigeo; Gu, Yan Jun; Kong, Qing; Xiao Wang, Ping; Ma, Yan Yun; Wang, Wei Min

    We focus on a control of generation of high-quality ion beam. In this study, near-critical density plasmas are employed and are illuminated by high intensity short laser pulses; we have successfully generated high-energy ions by multiple-stages acceleration. We performed particle-in-cell simulations in this paper. Near-critical density plasmas are employed at the proton source and also in the post acceleration. A beam bunching method is also proposed to control the ion beam length.

  11. Relativistic AC gyromagnetic effects in ultraintense laser-matter interaction.

    PubMed

    Geindre, J P; Audebert, P; Marjoribanks, R S

    2006-08-25

    We demonstrate that in ultraintense ultrafast laser-matter interaction, the interplay of laser-induced oscillating space-charge fields with laser E and B fields can strongly affect whether the interaction is relativistic or not: stronger laser fields may not in fact produce more relativistic plasma interactions. We show that there exists a regime of interaction, in the relation of laser intensity and incident angle, for which the Brunel effect of electron acceleration is strongly suppressed by AC gyromagnetic fields, at a frequency different from the laser field. Analytically and with 1.5D particle-in-cell modeling, we show that from gyromagnetic effects, even in the absence of usual J x B second-harmonic contributions, there are strong effects on the harmonic emission and on the generation of attosecond pulses. PMID:17026310

  12. Magnets for high intensity proton synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Jean-Francois Ostiguy, Vladimir Kashikhine and Alexander Makarov

    2002-09-19

    Recently, there has been considerable interest at Fermilab for the Proton Driver, a future high intensity proton machine. Various scenarios are under consideration, including a superconducting linac. Each scenario present some special challenges. We describe here the magnets proposed in a recent study, the Proton Driver Study II, which assumes a conventional warm synchrotron, roughly of the size of the existing FNAL booster, but capable of delivering 380 kW at 8 GeV.

  13. Study of laser-plasma interaction using a physics-based model for understanding the physical mechanism of double-pulse effect in nanosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Benxin; Zhou Yun; Forsman, Andrew

    2009-12-21

    This paper studies the double-pulse effect in high-intensity ({>=}{approx}GW/cm{sup 2}) nanosecond (ns) laser ablation, which refers to the significant material removal rate enhancement for ablation by two ns laser pulses (often separated by a delay time of {approx}10 to 100 ns). The early-stage interaction of the second laser pulse with the plasma plume created by the first pulse is very important for understanding the physical mechanism of the double pulse effect. However, the plasma properties in the early stage (during a laser pulse or within 20 to 30 ns after the completion of the pulse) are very difficult to measure experimentally. In this letter, a physics-based predictive model is used as the investigation tool, which was previously verified based on experiments on plasma properties in the late stage, which are relatively easy to measure. The study shows that the second laser pulse does not directly strike the target condensed phase. Instead, it mainly interacts with the plasma plume created by the first laser pulse, heats and accelerates the ablated material in the plume lingering above the target surface.

  14. ELECTRON COUD DYNAMICS IN HIGH-INTENSITY RINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    WANG, L.; WEI, J.

    2005-05-16

    Electron cloud due to beam-induced multipacting is one of the main concerns for the high intensity. Electrons generated and accumulated inside the beam pipe form an ''electron cloud'' that interacts with the circulating charged particle beam. With sizeable amount of electrons, this interaction can cause beam instability, beam loss and emittance growth. At the same time, the vacuum pressure will rise due to electron desorption. This talk intends to provide an overview of the mechanism and dynamics of the typical electron multipacting in various magnetic fields and mitigation measures with different beams.

  15. Special session on environment and energy, and repeated emphasis from early-`80s onwards, hybrid-drive targets for penetrating beams, that encompasses ultra high intensity lasers and/or particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.W. ||

    1994-10-05

    In this special session, we discuss {bold global} {bold climate} {bold change} concerns, as well as {bold cleanup} {bold of} {bold wastes} {bold and}/{bold or} {bold toxic} {bold materials}, their relations to energy and other technologies. We especially bring together scientists to discuss available and/or developable technologies of amelioration or cleanup, for consideration of unusual uses of {bold Lasers}, {bold Particle} {bold Beams} {bold and} {bold other} {bold plasma} Phenomena. {copyright}{ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics} 1994

  16. On the scaling of multicrystal data sets collected at high-intensity X-ray and electron sources

    PubMed Central

    Coppens, Philip; Fournier, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    The need for data-scaling has become increasingly evident as time-resolved pump-probe photocrystallography is rapidly developing at high intensity X-ray sources. Several aspects of the scaling of data sets collected at synchrotrons, XFELs (X-ray Free Electron Lasers) and high-intensity pulsed electron sources are discussed. They include laser-ON/laser-OFF data scaling, inter- and intra-data set scaling. PMID:26798829

  17. Interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-arc hybrid welding of magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liming; Chen, Minghua

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents the results of the investigation on the interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-arc hybrid welding on magnesium alloy AZ31B using the spectral diagnose technique. By comparably analyzing the variation in plasma information (the shape, the electron temperature and density) of single tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding with the laser-arc hybrid welding, it is found that the laser affects the arc plasma through the keyhole forming on the workpiece. Depending on the welding parameters there are three kinds of interactions taking place between laser and arc plasma.

  18. Lasers and new trends in laser-tissue interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, Alexandros A.; Papadopoulos, Dimitris N.

    2004-06-01

    Mid-IR lasers are already used successfully in numerous surgical operations. The Er:YAG and the HF laser, are the main laser sources emitting in the 3.0 μm range of the spectrum, and as this wavelength coincides with the peak of the water and other main soft and hard tissue components absorption curves, it is clear that these lasers would be very useful in numerous medical fields as dentistry, dermatology, angioplasty, ophthalmology etc. Recently, the development of flexible, low loss, able to deliver high power and safe to enter the human body waveguides and fibers for pulsed mid-infrared laser radiation initiated the efforts of the extension of laser surgery in the area of the minimally invasive endoscopy. The laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) is proposed for diagnosis in several pathologies, as in arterial atherosclerosis, in malignancy or for early dental caries detection. LIF is also investigated as a suitable method for monitoring the on line laser surgery interventions.

  19. High intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1973-12-11

    This invention relates to a high intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source comprising a neutron-producing source which emits pulses of fast neutrons, a moderator block adjacent to the last neutron source, a reflector block which encases the fast neutron source and the moderator block and has a thermal neutron exit port extending therethrough from the moderator block, and a neutron energy- dependent decoupling reflector liner covering the interior surfaces of the thermal neutron exit port and surrounding all surfaces of the moderator block except the surface viewed by the thermal neutron exit port. (Official Gazette)

  20. Interaction of CO 2 laser radiation with glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhukharov, V.; Dimitrov, D.; Tonchev, D.

    1989-05-01

    An illustration of an interaction of pulsed multimode TEA CO 2 laser radiation, through or without a mask, as well as of a laser scanning process of a frequency Q-modulated cw CO 2 laser beam on glass surfaces has been shown. As an object of investigation glass articles with composition as a standard industrial potassium-boron silicate glass, we have used. A complex of investigations shows that the laser treatment leads to qualitative constant changes (well defined peeling structure) depending on the time surface treatment, defocusing and the pulse length of the laser output.

  1. High intensity discharge device containing oxytrihalides

    DOEpatents

    Lapatovich, Walter P.; Keeffe, William M.; Liebermann, Richard W.; Maya, Jakob

    1987-01-01

    A fill composition for a high intensity discharge device including mercury, niobium oxytrihalide, and a molecular stabilization agent is provided. The molar ratio of niobium oxytrihalide to the molecular stabilization agent in the fill is in the range of from about 5:1 to about 7.5:1. Niobium oxytrihalide is present in the fill in sufficient amount to produce, by dissociation in the discharge, atomic niobium, niobium oxide, NbO, and niobium dioxide, NbO.sub.2, with the molar ratio of niobium-containing vapor species to mercury in the fill being in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.50:1; and mercury pressure of about 1 to about 50 atmospheres at lamp operating temperature. There is also provided a high intensity discharge device comprising a sealed light-transmissive arc tube; the arc tube including the above-described fill; and an energizing means for producing an electric discharge within the arc tube.

  2. High intensity discharge device containing oxytrihalides

    DOEpatents

    Lapatovich, W.P.; Keeffe, W.M.; Liebermann, R.W.; Maya, J.

    1987-06-09

    A fill composition for a high intensity discharge device including mercury, niobium oxytrihalide, and a molecular stabilization agent is provided. The molar ratio of niobium oxytrihalide to the molecular stabilization agent in the fill is in the range of from about 5:1 to about 7.5:1. Niobium oxytrihalide is present in the fill in sufficient amount to produce, by dissociation in the discharge, atomic niobium, niobium oxide, NbO, and niobium dioxide, NbO[sub 2], with the molar ratio of niobium-containing vapor species to mercury in the fill being in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.50:1; and mercury pressure of about 1 to about 50 atmospheres at lamp operating temperature. There is also provided a high intensity discharge device comprising a sealed light-transmissive arc tube; the arc tube including the above-described fill; and an energizing means for producing an electric discharge within the arc tube. 7 figs.

  3. Interaction of Laser Induced Micro-shockwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leela, Ch.; Bagchi, Suman; Tewari, Surya P.; Kiran, P. Prem

    Laser induced Shock Waves (LISWs) characterized by several optical methods provide Equation of State (EOS) for a variety of materials used in high-energy density physics experiments at Mbar pressures [1, 2]. Other applications include laser spark ignition for fuel-air mixtures, internal combustion engines, pulse detonation engines, laser shock peening [3], surface cleaning [4] and biological applications (SW lithotripsy) [5] to name a few.

  4. Laser-matter interaction at intensities of 10 sup 12 W/cm sup 2 and below

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, S.R.; Dingus, R.S.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Kopp, R.A.; Stover, E.K.; Watt, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    For single pulsed laser-matter interactions at sufficiently high intensity, the electron density in the ablated vapor is large enough to absorb the laser radiation before it can reach the dense target material. The resulting interaction can be described in terms of energy flows: laser energy is absorbed in the plasma in front of the target and reappears as thermal electron energy and secondary radiation, part of which impinges upon and heats the dense target material at the dense material-vapor interface. This heating in turn drives ablation, thereby providing a self-consistent mass source for the laser absorption, energy conversion, and transmission. Under typical conditions of laser intensity, pulse width and spot size, the flow patterns can be strongly two-dimensional. We have modified the inertial confinement fusion code LASNEX to simulate gaseous and some dense material aspects for the relatively low intensity, long-pulse-length conditions to interest in many laser-related applications. The unique aspect to our treatment consists of an ablation model which defines a dense material vapor interface and then calculates the mass flow across this interface. The model, at present, treats the dense material as a rigid, two-dimensional simulational mass and heat reservoir, suppressing all hydrodynamical motion in the dense material. The modeling is being developed and refined through simulation of experiments, as well as through the investigation of internal inconsistencies, and some simulations of model problems. 5 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Nonlinear Laser-Plasma Interaction in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Geissel, Matthias; Awe, Thomas James; Bliss, David E.; Campbell, Edward Michael; Gomez, Matthew R.; Harding, Eric; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Jennings, Christopher Ashley; Kimmel, Mark W.; et al

    2016-03-04

    Sandia National Laboratories is pursuing a variation of Magneto-Inertial Fusion called Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion, or MagLIF. The MagLIF approach requires magnetization of the deuterium fuel, which is accomplished by an initial external B-Field and laser-driven pre-heat. Although magnetization is crucial to the concept, it is challenging to couple sufficient energy to the fuel, since laser-plasma instabilities exist, and a compromise between laser spot size, laser entrance window thickness, and fuel density must be found. Ultimately, nonlinear processes in laser plasma interaction, or laser-plasma instabilities (LPI), complicate the deposition of laser energy by enhanced absorption, backscatter, filamentation and beam-spray. Wemore » determine and discuss key LPI processes and mitigation methods. Results with and without improvement measures are presented.« less

  6. Nonlinear laser-plasma interaction in magnetized liner inertial fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissel, Matthias; Awe, T. J.; Bliss, D. E.; Campbell, M. E.; Gomez, M. R.; Harding, E.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Hansen, S. B.; Jennings, C.; Kimmel, M. W.; Knapp, P.; Lewis, S. M.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Scoglietti, D. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Shores, J. E.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Smith, I. C.; Speas, C. S.; Vesey, R. A.; Porter, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is pursuing a variation of Magneto-Inertial Fusion called Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion, or MagLIF. The MagLIF approach requires magnetization of the deuterium fuel, which is accomplished by an initial external B-Field and laser-driven pre-heat. While magnetization is crucial to the concept, it is challenging to couple sufficient energy to the fuel, since laser-plasma instabilities exist, and a compromise between laser spot size, laser entrance window thickness, and fuel density must be found. Nonlinear processes in laser plasma interaction, or laser-plasma instabilities (LPI), complicate the deposition of laser energy by enhanced absorption, backscatter, filamentation and beam-spray. Key LPI processes are determined, and mitigation methods are discussed. Results with and without improvement measures are presented.

  7. Laser-tissue photothermal interaction and tissue temperature change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, Andrea K.; Chen, Wei R.; Jassemnejad, Baha; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, John A.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2000-06-01

    Responses of tissue to laser stimulation are crucial in both disease diagnostics and treatment. In general, when tissue absorbs laser energy photothermal interaction occurs. The most important signature of the photothermal reaction is the tissue temperature change during and after the laser irradiation. Experimentally, the tissue reaction to laser irradiation can be measured by numerous methods including direct temperature measurement and measurement of perfusion change. In this study, a multiple-channel temperature probe was used to measure tissue temperature change during irradiation of lasers with different wavelengths at different power settings. Tissue temperature in chicken breast tissue as well as skin and breast tumor of rats was measured during irradiation of an 805-nm diode laser. The vertical profiles of temperature were obtained using simultaneous measurement at several different locations. The absorption of laser energy by tissue was enhanced by injecting laser-absorbing dye into the tissue. A Nd:YAG laser of 1064-nm wavelength was also used to irradiate turkey breast tissue. Our results showed that both laser penetration ability and photothermal reaction depended on the wavelength of lasers. In the case of 805-nm laser, the temperature increased rapidly only in the region close to the laser source and the thermal equilibrium could be reached within a short time period. The laser absorbing dye drastically enhanced the thermal reaction, resulting in approximately 4-fold temperature increase. On the contrary, the laser beam with 1064-nm wavelength penetrated deeply into tissue and the tissue temperature continued increasing even after a 10-minute laser irradiation.

  8. The High Intensity Horizon at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Tschirhart, R.S.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Fermilab's high intensity horizon is 'Project-X' which is a US led initiative with strong international participation that aims to realize a next generation proton source that will dramatically extend the reach of Intensity Frontier research. The Project-X research program includes world leading sensitivity in long-baseline and short-baseline neutrino experiments, a rich program of ultra-rare muon and kaon decays, opportunities for next-generation electric dipole moment experiments and other nuclear/particle physics probes, and a platform to investigate technologies for next generation energy applications. A wide range of R&D activities has supported mission critical accelerator subsystems, such as high-gradient superconducting RF accelerating structures, efficient RF power systems, cryo-modules and cryogenic refrigeration plants, advanced beam diagnostics and instrumentation, high-power targetry, as well as the related infrastructure and civil construction preparing for a construction start of a staged program as early as 2017.

  9. Nanoplasma Formation by High Intensity Hard X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, T.; Jurek, Z.; Fukuzawa, H.; Motomura, K.; Nagaya, K.; Wada, S.; Johnsson, P.; Siano, M.; Mondal, S.; Ito, Y.; Kimura, M.; Sakai, T.; Matsunami, K.; Hayashita, H.; Kajikawa, J.; Liu, X.-J.; Robert, E.; Miron, C.; Feifel, R.; Marangos, J. P.; Tono, K.; Inubushi, Y.; Yabashi, M.; Son, S.-K.; Ziaja, B.; Yao, M.; Santra, R.; Ueda, K.

    2015-01-01

    Using electron spectroscopy, we have investigated nanoplasma formation from noble gas clusters exposed to high-intensity hard-x-ray pulses at ~5 keV. Our experiment was carried out at the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free electron LAser (SACLA) facility in Japan. Dedicated theoretical simulations were performed with the molecular dynamics tool XMDYN. We found that in this unprecedented wavelength regime nanoplasma formation is a highly indirect process. In the argon clusters investigated, nanoplasma is mainly formed through secondary electron cascading initiated by slow Auger electrons. Energy is distributed within the sample entirely through Auger processes and secondary electron cascading following photoabsorption, as in the hard x-ray regime there is no direct energy transfer from the field to the plasma. This plasma formation mechanism is specific to the hard-x-ray regime and may, thus, also be important for XFEL-based molecular imaging studies. In xenon clusters, photo- and Auger electrons contribute more significantly to the nanoplasma formation. Good agreement between experiment and simulations validates our modelling approach. This has wide-ranging implications for our ability to quantitatively predict the behavior of complex molecular systems irradiated by high-intensity hard x-rays. PMID:26077863

  10. Activities of developing high-power KrF lasers and studying laser plasmas interaction physics at CIAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Naiyan; Shan, Yusheng; Ma, Weiyi; Yang, Dawei; Kun, Gong; Wang, Xiaojun; Tang, Xiuzhang; Tao, Yezheng; Ma, Jinglong; Jiang, Xingdong

    2002-01-01

    This report reviews the scientific activities on high power laser and laser plasma physics at CIAE. A 6-beam KrF excimer laser system (100 J/23 ns/248 nm/1013 W/cm2, 15 min/shot) has been built, the Raman technologies used to upgrade it to 1014 W/cm2 has been studied. A UV femtosecond Ti:sapphire/KrF hybrid laser (50 mJ/220 fs/248 nm/1017 W/cm2) has been developed also, hot electron generation research has been carried out in the fs laser. In the near future, the fs laser will be amplified in six-beam laser system to produce ultra-high intensity to do fundamental researches on Fast Ignition of ICF.

  11. Enhancing Bremsstrahlung production from ultraintense laser-solid interactions with front surface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Sheng; Krygier, Andrew G.; Schumacher, Douglass W.; Akli, Kramer U.; Freeman, Richard R.

    2014-10-01

    We report the results of a combined study of particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo modeling that investigates the production of Bremsstrahlung radiation produced when an ultraintense laser interacts with a tower-structured target. These targets are found to significantly narrow the electron angular distribution as well as produce significantly higher energies. These features combine to create a significant enhancement in directionality and energy of the Bremstrahlung radiation produced by a high-Z converter target. These studies employ short-pulse, high intensity laser pulses, and indicate that novel target design has potential to greatly enhance the yield and narrow the directionality of high energy electrons and γ-rays. We find that the peak γ-ray brightness for this source is 6.0 × 1019 s-1 mm-2 mrad-2 at 10 MeV and 1.4 × 1019 s-1 mm-2 mrad-2 at 100 MeV (0.1% bandwidth). Contribution to the Topical Issue "X-ray generation from ultrafast lasers", edited by Germán J. de Valcárcel, Luis Roso and Amelle Zaïr.

  12. Enhanced Isochoric Heating in High Contrast Laser-Nano-Cone Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, T. E.; Rassuchine, J.; D'Humieres, E.; Sentoku, Y.; Baton, S.; Gillou, P.; Koenig, M.; Fuchs, J.; Audebert, P.; Kodama, R.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Norimatsu, T.; Batani, D.; Morace, A.; Bedaello, R.; Gremillet, L.; Rousseaux, C.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Santos, J. J.; Hansen, S.

    2007-11-01

    We discuss the interaction of very high-contrast high-intensity laser pulses with sharp-tipped, nanofabricated Cu cone targets (see [1]), using frequency doubled light at the LULI 100 TW laser (λ=0.53 um, I=4x10^18 W/cm^2). Previous work at 1φ showed that pre-formed plasma, due to ASE, degraded the laser-cone coupling. At 2φ, high-resolution spectroscopy of Cu Kα emission shows high charge states, implying peak temperatures of up to 400 eV, comparable to the smallest reduced mass targets (50 μm dia x 20 μm thick). This implies a new confinement mechanism which, from 2D collisional PIC simulations, is due to self-generated resistive magnetic fields (up to 10 MG) which confine the hot electrons to the tip region of the cone. Supported by Access to Research Infrastructures in the EU Sixth Framework Programme (contract RII3-CT-2003-506350, Laserlab Europe), and UNR DOE/NNSA grant DE-FC52-01NV14050. [1] Y. Sentoku et al., Phys. Plasmas, 11 3083 (2004).

  13. Laser plasma interactions in fused silica cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xianzhong; Mao, Xianglei; Mao, Samuel S.; Yoo, Jong H.; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2003-06-24

    The effect of laser energy on formation of a plasma inside a cavity was investigated. The temperature and electron number density of laser-induced plasmas in a fused silica cavity were determined using spectroscopic methods, and compared with laser ablation on a flat surface. Plasma temperature and electron number density during laser ablation in a cavity with aspect ratio of 4 increased faster with irradiance after the laser irradiance reached a threshold of 5 GW/cm{sup 2}. The threshold irradiance of particulate ejection was lower for laser ablation in a cavity compared with on a flat surface; the greater the cavity aspect ratio, the lower the threshold irradiance. The ionization of silicon becomes saturated and the crater depths were increased approximately by an order of magnitude after the irradiance reached the threshold. Phase explosion was discussed to explain the large change of both plasma characteristics and mass removal when irradiance increased beyond a threshold value. Self-focusing of the laser beam was discussed to be responsible for the decrease of the threshold in cavities.

  14. Dense Monoenergetic Proton Beams from Chirped Laser-Plasma Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galow, Benjamin J.; Salamin, Yousef I.; Liseykina, Tatyana V.; Harman, Zoltán; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2011-10-01

    Interaction of a frequency-chirped laser pulse with single protons and a hydrogen gas target is studied analytically and by means of particle-in-cell simulations, respectively. The feasibility of generating ultraintense (107 particles per bunch) and phase-space collimated beams of protons (energy spread of about 1%) is demonstrated. Phase synchronization of the protons and the laser field, guaranteed by the appropriate chirping of the laser pulse, allows the particles to gain sufficient kinetic energy (around 250 MeV) required for such applications as hadron cancer therapy, from state-of-the-art laser systems of intensities of the order of 1021W/cm2.

  15. Chemistry of Parchment-Laser Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchinger, L.; Pentzien, S.; Koter, R.; Kautek, W.

    Laser-induced chemical modifications of various types of contemporary and ancient parchments have been studied. Such research in physico-chemical diagnostics is the prerequisite of computer-aided laser destructionless processing based on off-line and on-line diagnostics. The photometric determination of the water-soluble degradation products of collagen proved to be a sensitive method to detect laser-induced alterations of parchment even below the ablation threshold fluence. It is indicative for changes on the molecular level. The shrinking temperature measurement by the micro-hot-table technique turned out to be sensitive only to laser treatment that caused photochemical reactions (i.e. UV, 308 nm). At the visible (532 nm) and the infrared wavelengths (1064 nm), photochemical alterations are absent, solely thermally induced crosslinking of the collagen fibres is observed. Scanning electron microscopy proved only sensitive to phase changes like melting accompanying ablation above the threshold fluence.

  16. Laser-matter Interaction with Submerged Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Mariella, R; Rubenchik, A; Norton, M; Donohue, G; Roberts, K

    2010-03-25

    With the long-term goal in mind of investigating if one could possibly design a 'universal solid-sample comminution technique' for debris and rubble, we have studied pulsed-laser ablation of solid samples that were contained within a surrounding fluid. Using pulses with fluences between 2 J and 0.3 J, wavelengths of 351 and 527 nm, and samples of rock, concrete, and red brick, each submerged in water, we have observed conditions in which {micro}m-scale particles can be preferentially generated in a controlled manner, during the laser ablation process. Others have studied laser peening of metals, where their attention has been to the substrate. Our study uses non-metallic substrates and analyzes the particles that are ablated from the process. The immediate impact of our investigation is that laser-comminution portion of a new systems concept for chemical analysis has been verified as feasible.

  17. Comparative study on interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-GTA welding and laser-GMA welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Minghua; Xu, Jiannan; Xin, Lijun; Zhao, Zuofu; Wu, Fufa

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes an investigation on differences in interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-gas tungsten arc (LT) welding and laser-gas metal arc (LM) welding. The characteristics of LT heat source and LM heat source, such as plasma behavior, heat penetration ability and spectral information were comparably studied. Based on the plasma discharge theory, the interactions during plasma discharge were modeled and analyzed. Results show that in both LT and LM welding, coupling discharge between the laser keyhole plasma and arc happens, which strongly enhance the arc. But, the enhancing effect in LT welding is much more sensitive than that in LM welding when parameters are adjusted.

  18. The influence of laser-particle interaction in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Helmut; Loper, Kristofer H.; Hahn, David W.; Niemax, Kay

    2011-02-01

    Particles produced by previous laser shots may have significant influence on the analytical signal in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma (LA-ICP) spectrometry if they remain close to the position of laser sampling. The effects of these particles on the laser-induced breakdown event are demonstrated in several ways. LIBS-experiments were conducted in an ablation cell at atmospheric conditions in argon or air applying a dual-pulse arrangement with orthogonal pre-pulse, i.e., plasma breakdown in a gas generated by a focussed laser beam parallel and close to the sample surface followed by a delayed crossing laser pulse in orthogonal direction which actually ablates material from the sample and produces the LIBS plasma. The optical emission of the LIBS plasma as well as the absorption of the pre-pulse laser was measured. In the presence of particles in the focus of the pre-pulse laser, the plasma breakdown is affected and more energy of the pre-pulse laser is absorbed than without particles. As a result, the analyte line emission from the LIBS plasma of the second laser is enhanced. It is assumed that the enhancement is not only due to an increase of mass ablated by the second laser but also to better atomization and excitation conditions favored by a reduced gas density in the pre-pulse plasma. Higher laser pulse frequencies increase the probability of particle-laser interaction and, therefore, reduce the shot-to-shot line intensity variation as compared to lower particle loadings in the cell. Additional experiments using an aerosol chamber were performed to further quantify the laser absorption by the plasma in dependence on time both with and without the presence of particles. The overall implication of laser-particle interactions for LIBS and LA-ICP-MS/OES are discussed.

  19. An MPP hydrocode to study laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, R L; Langdon, A B; Langer, S H; Still, C H; Suter, L J; Williams E A

    1998-10-01

    Because of the increased size and power inherent in a laser-AGEX on NIF, laser-plasma interactions (LPI) observed in NOVA AGEX play an increasingly important role. The process by which filamentation and stimulated backscatter grow is complex. Furthermore, there is a competition among the instabilities so that lessening one can increase another. Therefore, simulating them is an integral part to successful experiments on NIF. In this paper, we present a massively parallel hydrocode to simulate laser-plasma interactions in NIF-relevant AGEX regimes.

  20. Absorption of femtosecond laser pulses in interaction with solid targets.

    PubMed

    Dong, Q L; Zhang, J; Teng, H

    2001-08-01

    We have studied the effects of the plasma density scale length on the absorption mechanism of the femtosecond (fs) laser pulses interacting with solid targets. Experiments and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate that the vacuum heating is the main absorption in the plasma in the interaction of fs laser pulses with solid targets when no prepulses are applied. The energy spectrum of hot electrons ejected out of or injected into the plasma show a bitemperature distribution. While the first temperature of the two groups of hot electrons can be attributed to the "pull-and-push" exertion of the laser field, the second temperature refers to the electrons accelerated by the static part (in front of the target) and the oscillating part (in the plasma layer) of the laser-induced electric field, respectively. PIC simulations also show that with an appropriate density scale length, the femtosecond laser energy can be absorbed locally through different mechanisms.

  1. Applications of High Intensity Proton Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Rajendran; Mishra, Shekhar

    2010-06-01

    Superconducting radiofrequency linac development at Fermilab / S. D. Holmes -- Rare muon decay experiments / Y. Kuno -- Rare kaon decays / D. Bryman -- Muon collider / R. B. Palmer -- Neutrino factories / S. Geer -- ADS and its potential / J.-P. Revol -- ADS history in the USA / R. L. Sheffield and E. J. Pitcher -- Accelerator driven transmutation of waste: high power accelerator for the European ADS demonstrator / J. L. Biarrotte and T. Junquera -- Myrrha, technology development for the realisation of ADS in EU: current status & prospects for realisation / R. Fernandez ... [et al.] -- High intensity proton beam production with cyclotrons / J. Grillenberger and M. Seidel -- FFAG for high intensity proton accelerator / Y. Mori -- Kaon yields for 2 to 8 GeV proton beams / K. K. Gudima, N. V. Mokhov and S. I. Striganov -- Pion yield studies for proton driver beams of 2-8 GeV kinetic energy for stopped muon and low-energy muon decay experiments / S. I. Striganov -- J-Parc accelerator status and future plans / H. Kobayashi -- Simulation and verification of DPA in materials / N. V. Mokhov, I. L. Rakhno and S. I. Striganov -- Performance and operational experience of the CNGS facility / E. Gschwendtner -- Particle physics enabled with super-conducting RF technology - summary of working group 1 / D. Jaffe and R. Tschirhart -- Proton beam requirements for a neutrino factory and muon collider / M. S. Zisman -- Proton bunching options / R. B. Palmer -- CW SRF H linac as a proton driver for muon colliders and neutrino factories / M. Popovic, C. M. Ankenbrandt and R. P. Johnson -- Rapid cycling synchrotron option for Project X / W. Chou -- Linac-based proton driver for a neutrino factory / R. Garoby ... [et al.] -- Pion production for neutrino factories and muon colliders / N. V. Mokhov ... [et al.] -- Proton bunch compression strategies / V. Lebedev -- Accelerator test facility for muon collider and neutrino factory R&D / V. Shiltsev -- The superconducting RF linac for muon

  2. Investigation of energy partitioning from Leopard short-pulse laser interactions in mass limited targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, B.; Sawada, H.; Yabuuchi, T.; McLean, H.; Patel, P.; Beg, F.

    2013-10-01

    The energy distribution in the interaction of a high-intensity, short-pulse laser with a mass limited target was investigated by simultaneously collecting x-ray and particle data. The Leopard laser system at the Nevada Terawatt Facility delivered 15 J of energy in a 350 fs pulse duration. With a beam spot size limited to within 8 μm, the target interaction achieved a peak intensity of 1019 W/cm2 at 20° incidence. The size of the Cu foil targets was varied from 2-20 μm in thickness and from 50 by 50 μm to 2000 by 2000 μm in surface area. A Bragg crystal x-ray spectrometer and a spherical crystal imager were used to measure 7.5-9.5 keV x-rays and 8.05 keV monochromatic x-ray images respectively. The escaping electrons and protons in the rear were monitored with a magnet-based electron spectrometer and radiochromic film. Preliminary results show both a decrease of the K β/K α ratio and a stronger He α emission for smaller sized targets, less than 250 by 250 μm. The detailed analyses of the K α images and particle data will be presented.

  3. Pulsed laser interactions with space debris: Target shape effects

    DOE PAGES

    Liedahl, D. A.; Rubenchik, A.; Libby, S. B.; Nikolaev, S.; Phipps, C. R.

    2013-05-24

    Among the approaches to the proposed mitigation and remediation of the space debris problem is the de-orbiting of objects in low Earth orbit through irradiation by ground-based high-intensity pulsed lasers. Laser ablation of a thin surface layer causes target recoil, resulting in the depletion of orbital angular momentum and accelerated atmospheric re-entry. However, both the magnitude and direction of the recoil are shape dependent, a feature of the laser-based remediation concept that has received little attention. Since the development of a predictive capability is desirable, we have investigated the dynamical response to ablation of objects comprising a variety of shapes.more » We derive and demonstrate a simple analytical technique for calculating the ablation-driven transfer of linear momentum, emphasizing cases for which the recoil is not exclusively parallel to the incident beam. For the purposes of comparison and contrast, we examine one case of momentum transfer in the low-intensity regime, where photon pressure is the dominant momentum transfer mechanism, showing that shape and orientation effects influence the target response in a similar, but not identical, manner. As a result, we address the related problem of target spin and, by way of a few simple examples, show how ablation can alter the spin state of a target, which often has a pronounced effect on the recoil dynamics.« less

  4. Pulsed laser interactions with space debris: Target shape effects

    SciTech Connect

    Liedahl, D. A.; Rubenchik, A.; Libby, S. B.; Nikolaev, S.; Phipps, C. R.

    2013-05-24

    Among the approaches to the proposed mitigation and remediation of the space debris problem is the de-orbiting of objects in low Earth orbit through irradiation by ground-based high-intensity pulsed lasers. Laser ablation of a thin surface layer causes target recoil, resulting in the depletion of orbital angular momentum and accelerated atmospheric re-entry. However, both the magnitude and direction of the recoil are shape dependent, a feature of the laser-based remediation concept that has received little attention. Since the development of a predictive capability is desirable, we have investigated the dynamical response to ablation of objects comprising a variety of shapes. We derive and demonstrate a simple analytical technique for calculating the ablation-driven transfer of linear momentum, emphasizing cases for which the recoil is not exclusively parallel to the incident beam. For the purposes of comparison and contrast, we examine one case of momentum transfer in the low-intensity regime, where photon pressure is the dominant momentum transfer mechanism, showing that shape and orientation effects influence the target response in a similar, but not identical, manner. As a result, we address the related problem of target spin and, by way of a few simple examples, show how ablation can alter the spin state of a target, which often has a pronounced effect on the recoil dynamics.

  5. Laser-Bioplasma Interaction: The Blood Type Transmutation Induced by Multiple Ultrashort Wavelength Laser Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of ultrashort wavelength multi laser beams with the flowing blood thin films leads to the transmutation of the blood types A, B, and AB into O type. This is a novel mechanism of importance for the transfusion medicine. Laser radiation is in resonance with the eigen-frequency modes of the antigen proteins and forces the proteins to parametrically oscillate until they get kicked out from the surface. The stripping away of antigens is done by the scanning-multiple-lasers of a high repetition rate in the blue-purple frequency domain. The guiding-lasers are in the red-green frequency domain. The laser force, (parametric interaction with the antigen eigen-oscillation), upon the antigen protein molecule must exceed its weight. The scanning laser beam is partially reflected as long as the antigen(s) is not eliminated. The process of the protein detachment can last a few minutes. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs., Stefan University.

  6. BEAM LOSS MECHANISMS IN HIGH INTENSITY LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    In the present operation of the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, 60-Hz, 825-us H beam pulses are accelerated to 910 MeV, and then compressed to less than a microsecond in the storage ring, to deliver 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. The beam loss in the superconducting portion of the linac is higher than expected, and it has shown a surprising counter-intuitive correlation with quadrupole magnetic fields, with a loss minimum occurring when the quadrupoles are set to approximately half their design values. This behavior can now be explained by a recent set of experiments that show the beam loss is primarily due to intra-beam stripping. Beam halo is another important beam loss contributor, and collimation in the 2.5 MeV Medium Energy Beam Transport has proven to be an effective mitigation strategy. In this presentation, we will summarize these and other beam loss mechanisms that are important for high intensity linacs.

  7. High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgecock, T. R.; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densam, C.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Wildner, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoni, S.; Hansen, C.; Benedetto, E.; Jensen, E.; Kosmicki, A.; Martini, M.; Osborne, J.; Prior, G.; Stora, T.; Melo Mendonca, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Waaijer, C.; Cupial, P.; Chancé, A.; Longhin, A.; Payet, J.; Zito, M.; Baussan, E.; Bobeth, C.; Bouquerel, E.; Dracos, M.; Gaudiot, G.; Lepers, B.; Osswald, F.; Poussot, P.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wurtz, J.; Zeter, V.; Bielski, J.; Kozien, M.; Lacny, L.; Skoczen, B.; Szybinski, B.; Ustrycka, A.; Wroblewski, A.; Marie-Jeanne, M.; Balint, P.; Fourel, C.; Giraud, J.; Jacob, J.; Lamy, T.; Latrasse, L.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.; Mitrofanov, S.; Loiselet, M.; Keutgen, Th.; Delbar, Th.; Debray, F.; Trophine, C.; Veys, S.; Daversin, C.; Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A. C.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; De Angelis, G.; Prete, G.; Collazuol, G.; Laveder, M.; Mazzocco, M.; Mezzetto, M.; Signorini, C.; Vardaci, E.; Di Nitto, A.; Brondi, A.; La Rana, G.; Migliozzi, P.; Moro, R.; Palladino, V.; Gelli, N.; Berkovits, D.; Hass, M.; Hirsh, T. Y.; Schaumann, M.; Stahl, A.; Wehner, J.; Bross, A.; Kopp, J.; Neuffer, D.; Wands, R.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, P.; Agarwalla, S. K.; Cervera Villanueva, A.; Donini, A.; Ghosh, T.; Gómez Cadenas, J. J.; Hernández, P.; Martín-Albo, J.; Mena, O.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Agostino, L.; Buizza-Avanzini, M.; Marafini, M.; Patzak, T.; Tonazzo, A.; Duchesneau, D.; Mosca, L.; Bogomilov, M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Akhmedov, E.; Blennow, M.; Lindner, M.; Schwetz, T.; Fernández Martinez, E.; Maltoni, M.; Menéndez, J.; Giunti, C.; González García, M. C.; Salvado, J.; Coloma, P.; Huber, P.; Li, T.; López Pavón, J.; Orme, C.; Pascoli, S.; Meloni, D.; Tang, J.; Winter, W.; Ohlsson, T.; Zhang, H.; Scotto-Lavina, L.; Terranova, F.; Bonesini, M.; Tortora, L.; Alekou, A.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Kurup, A.; Jenner, L. J.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Pozimski, J.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P.; Beard, K.; Bogacz, A.; Berg, J. S.; Stratakis, D.; Witte, H.; Snopok, P.; Bliss, N.; Cordwell, M.; Moss, A.; Pattalwar, S.; Apollonio, M.

    2013-02-01

    The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fréjus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of μ+ and μ- beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case is a 100 kt magnetized iron neutrino detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular He6 and Ne18, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fréjus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the physics reach of each facility, in particular for the measurement of CP violation in the lepton sector, and estimated the cost of construction. These have demonstrated that the best facility to build is the Neutrino Factory. However, if a powerful proton driver is constructed for another purpose or if the MEMPHYS detector is built for astroparticle physics, the Super Beam also becomes very attractive.

  8. High-Intensity Sweeteners and Energy Balance

    PubMed Central

    Swithers, Susan E.; Martin, Ashley A.; Davidson, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    Recent epidemiological evidence points to a link between a variety of negative health outcomes (e.g. metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease) and the consumption of both calorically sweetened beverages and beverages sweetened with high-intensity, non-caloric sweeteners. Research on the possibility that non-nutritive sweeteners promote food intake, body weight gain, and metabolic disorders has been hindered by the lack of a physiologically-relevant model that describes the mechanistic basis for these outcomes. We have suggested that based on Pavlovian conditioning principles, consumption of non-nutritive sweeteners could result in sweet tastes no longer serving as consistent predictors of nutritive postingestive consequences. This dissociation between the sweet taste cues and the caloric consequences could lead to a decrease in the ability of sweet tastes to evoke physiological responses that serve to regulate energy balance. Using a rodent model, we have found that intake of foods or fluids containing non-nutritive sweeteners was accompanied by increased food intake, body weight gain, accumulation of body fat, and weaker caloric compensation, compared to consumption of foods and fluids containing glucose. Our research also provided evidence consistent with the hypothesis that these effects of consuming saccharin may be associated with a decrement in the ability of sweet taste to evoke thermic responses, and perhaps other physiological, cephalic phase, reflexes that are thought to help maintain energy balance. PMID:20060008

  9. Portable, high intensity isotopic neutron source provides increased experimental accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, W. C.; Stewart, D. C.; Wahlgren, M. A.

    1968-01-01

    Small portable, high intensity isotopic neutron source combines twelve curium-americium beryllium sources. This high intensity of neutrons, with a flux which slowly decreases at a known rate, provides for increased experimental accuracy.

  10. Chaos in laser-matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerhalt, J.; Milonni, P.; Shih, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    This is a set of lecture notes given by the authors at the Universities of Rochester, Arkansas and Puerto Rico. This volume introduces the main ideas of chaos and its applications to a broad range of problems in quantum optics, electronics and laser physics. Contents: Introduction; Nonlinearity; The Period Doubling Route to Chaos; The Duffing Oscillator; Strange Attractors; Two-Frequency Route to Chaos; Intermittency; Dimensions of Attractors; Noise, The Lorenz Model and the Single-Mode Laser; Chaotic Lasers: Theory and Experiment; Hamiltonian Systems; The Henon-Heiles System; The Standard Mapping; Fat Fractals; Ergodicity and Mixing; Chaos and the Microwave Ionization of Hydrogen; The Kicked Pendulum: Classical Theory and Quantum Theory; Chaos and Multiple-Photon Excitation of Molecular Vibrations; Chaos and Molecular Rotations; Ideas in Quantum Chaos; Outlook.

  11. Fast-electron refluxing effects on anisotropic hard-x-ray emission from intense laser-plasma interactions.

    PubMed

    McKeever, K; Makita, M; Nersisyan, G; Dzelzainis, T; White, S; Kettle, B; Dromey, B; Zepf, M; Sarri, G; Doria, D; Ahmed, H; Lewis, C L S; Riley, D; Robinson, A P L

    2015-03-01

    Fast-electron generation and dynamics, including electron refluxing, is at the core of understanding high-intensity laser-plasma interactions. This field is itself of strong relevance to fast ignition fusion and the development of new short-pulse, intense, x-ray, γ-ray, and particle sources. In this paper, we describe experiments that explicitly link fast-electron refluxing and anisotropy in hard-x-ray emission. We find the anisotropy in x-ray emission to be strongly correlated to the suppression of refluxing. In contrast to some previous work, the peak of emission is directly along the rear normal to the target rather than along either the incident laser direction or the specular reflection direction. PMID:25871224

  12. Laser-beam interactions with materials

    SciTech Connect

    Allmen, M.V.

    1987-01-01

    Lasers are becoming popular tools and research instruments in materials research, metallurgy, semiconductor technology and engineering. This text treats, from a physicist's point of view, the processes that lasers can induce in materials. A broad view of the field and its perspectives is given: physical topics covered range from optics to shock waves, and applications range from semiconductor annealing to fusion-plasma production. Intuitive analytical models are used whenever possible, in order to foster creative thinking and facilitate access to newcomers and nonspecialists.

  13. Optodynamics: dynamic aspects of laser beam-surface interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Možina, J.; Diaci, J.

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents a synthesis of the results of our original research in the area of laser-material interaction and pulsed laser material processing with a special emphasis on the dynamic aspects of laser beam-surface interaction, which include the links between the laser material removal and the resulting material motion. In view of laser material processing, a laser beam is not only considered as a tool but also as a generator of information about the material transformation. The information is retained and conveyed by different kinds of optically induced mechanical waves. Several generation/detection schemes have been developed to extract this information, especially in the field of non-destructive material evaluation. Blast and acoustic waves, which propagate in the air surrounding the work-piece, have been studied using microphone detection as well as various setups of the laser beam deflection probe. Stress waves propagating through the work-piece have been studied using piezoelectric transducers and laser interferometers.

  14. Mechanisms of Laser-Tissue Interaction: II. Tissue Thermal Properties

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Mohammad Ali; Erfanzadeh, Mohsen; Mohajerani, Ezeddin

    2013-01-01

    Laser-tissue interaction is of great interest due to its significant application in biomedical optics in both diagnostic and treatment purposes. Major aspects of the laser-tissue interaction which has to be considered in biomedical studies are the thermal properties of the tissue and the thermal changes caused by the interaction of light and tissue. In this review paper the effects of light on the tissue at different temperatures are discussed. Then, due to the noticeable importance of studying the heat transfer quantitatively, the equations governing this phenomenon are presented. Finally a method of medical diagnosis called thermography and some of its applications are explained. PMID:25606316

  15. High Intensity Organic Light-emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xiangfei

    This thesis is dedicated to the fabrication, modeling, and characterization to achieve high efficiency organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) for illumination applications. Compared to conventional lighting sources, OLEDs enabled the direct conversion of electrical energy into light emission and have intrigued the world's lighting designers with the long-lasting, highly efficient illumination. We begin with a brief overview of organic technology, from basic organic semiconductor physics, to its application in optoelectronics, i.e. light-emitting diodes, photovoltaics, photodetectors and thin-film transistors. Due to the importance of phosphorescent materials, we will focus on the photophysics of metal complexes that is central to high efficiency OLED technology, followed by a transient study to examine the radiative decay dynamics in a series of phosphorescent platinum binuclear complexes. The major theme of this thesis is the design and optimization of a novel architecture where individual red, green and blue phosphorescent OLEDs are vertically stacked and electrically interconnected by the compound charge generation layers. We modeled carrier generation from the metal-oxide/doped organic interface based on a thermally assisted tunneling mechanism. The model provides insights to the optimization of a stacked OLED from both electrical and optical point of view. To realize the high intensity white lighting source, the efficient removal of heat is of a particular concern, especially in large-area devices. A fundamental transfer matrix analysis is introduced to predict the thermal properties in the devices. The analysis employs Laplace transforms to determine the response of the system to the combined effects of conduction, convection, and radiation. This perspective of constructing transmission matrices greatly facilitates the calculation of transient coupled heat transfer in a general multi-layer composite. It converts differential equations to algebraic forms, and

  16. Characterization of laser beam interaction with carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janićijević, Milovan; Srećković, Milesa; Kaluđerović, Branka; Bojanić, Slobodan; Družijanić, Dragan; Dinulović, Mirko; Kovačević, Aleksander

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents simulation and experimental results for the exposure of some carbon-based materials to alexandrite and Nd3+:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser radiation. Simulation of the heating effects was carried out using the COMSOL Multiphysics 3.5 package for samples of carbon-based P7295-2 fiber irradiated using an alexandrite laser and carbon-based P4396-2 fiber irradiated using an Nd3+:YAG laser, as well as by applying finite element modeling for P7295-2 samples irradiated using an Nd3+:YAG laser. In the experimental part, P7295-2 samples were exposed to alexandrite laser radiation while samples of carbon-based composite 3D C/C were exposed to Nd3+:YAG laser radiation. Micrographs of the laser induced craters were obtained by light and scanning electron microscopy, and the images analyzed using the ImageJ software. The results obtained enable identification of the laser-material interaction spots, and characterization of the laser induced changes in the materials investigated.

  17. Return current and proton emission from wire targets interacting with an intense short pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beg, Farhat

    2004-05-01

    One of the important characteristics of short pulse high intensity laser-solid interactions is the generation of energetic charged particles, which result from the very efficient conversion of laser energy into hot electrons. Since the electrons in the electric field of the laser have relativistic quiver motions, the temperature of the hot electron distribution of the plasma produced at such extreme intensities can become very high. A large number of hot electrons (1013-1014) having an average energy of the order of 1-2 MeV can be generated as intensities exceed 1019 Wcm-2. Since the resulting beam current exceeds the Alfvén limit, a neutralizing return current of cold plasma electrons moving in the opposite direction is produced. Another source of return current is that due to the escape of very energetic electrons from the target, which then creates a large electrostatic potential due to charge separation. These return currents can cause significant ohmic heating. In addition escaping electrons establish the large electrostatic fields, accelerating a large number of protons from the target with energies of 10's of MeV. The experiments reported here were performed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory with the VULCAN laser facility at intensity greater than 5 x1019 Wcm-2 on wire targets. In some shots an additional wire or foil was placed nearby. The laser was blocked by the main wire target so that no laser light reached the additional wire or foil. Three main observations were made: (i) a Z-pinch was driven in the wire due to the return current, (ii) optical transition radiation (OTR) at 2w was generated and (iii) energetic proton emission was observed. The wire targets were observed to be ohmically heated and were m=0 unstable. The OTR emission is likely due to electron bunches accelerated by the ponderomotive force of the laser. The proton emission was in a form of thin disk perpendicular to the wire and centered on the wire at the laser focus. Proton

  18. Short-pulse laser interactions with disordered materials and liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Phinney, L.M.; Goldman, C.H.; Longtin, J.P.; Tien, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    High-power, short-pulse lasers in the picosecond and subpicosecond range are utilized in an increasing number of technologies, including materials processing and diagnostics, micro-electronics and devices, and medicine. In these applications, the short-pulse radiation interacts with a wide range of media encompassing disordered materials and liquids. Examples of disordered materials include porous media, polymers, organic tissues, and amorphous forms of silicon, silicon nitride, and silicon dioxide. In order to accurately model, efficiently control, and optimize short-pulse, laser-material interactions, a thorough understanding of the energy transport mechanisms is necessary. Thus, fractals and percolation theory are used to analyze the anomalous diffusion regime in random media. In liquids, the thermal aspects of saturable and multiphoton absorption are examined. Finally, a novel application of short-pulse laser radiation to reduce surface adhesion forces in microstructures through short-pulse laser-induced water desorption is presented.

  19. Ultrashort pulse high intensity laser illumination of a simple metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milchberg, H. M.; Freeman, R. R.; Davey, S. C.

    1988-10-01

    We have observed the self-reflection of intense, sub-picosecond 308 nm light pulse incident on a planar Al target and have inferred the electrical conductivity of solid density Al. The pulse lengths were sufficiently short that no significant expansion of the target occurred during the measurement.

  20. Long Range Interactions With Laser Cooled Neutral Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gattobigio, Giovanni Luca; Michaud, Franck; Labeyrie, Guillaume; Kaiser, Robin; Loureiro, Jorge; Mendonca, Jose Tito; Tercas, Hugo; Pohl, Thomas

    2008-09-07

    Multiple scattering of light in a trap of laser cooled neutral atoms leads to repulsion forces between the atoms. The corresponding interactions have long range behavior in 1/r{sup 2} and are thus similar to Coulomb interaction in an one component confined plasma. Consequences of these interactions will be described in this paper, including the limitation of the spatial density one can obtain in such systems and self-sustained oscillations of the cloud.

  1. Dependence of laser-plasma interaction physics on laser wavelength and plasma scalelength

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, E.M.

    1984-04-09

    We discuss the dependence of many features of laser-plasma interaction physics on both the laser wavelength and plasma dimensions. Experimental results that are presented include absorption, stimulated Brillouin scattering, suprathermal electron production, and optical signatures of the two plasmon decay and stimulated Raman instabilities. While the experiments show beneficial effects of decreasing laser wavelength on the coupling physics, the mix and efficiency of the various interaction processes is shown to be strongly dependent on the size of the underdense plasma. 42 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Noise in strong laser-atom interactions: Phase telegraph noise

    SciTech Connect

    Eberly, J.H.; Wodkiewicz, K.; Shore, B.W.

    1984-11-01

    We discuss strong laser-atom interactions that are subjected to jump-type (random telegraph) random-phase noise. Physically, the jumps may arise from laser fluctuations, from collisions of various kinds, or from other external forces. Our discussion is carried out in two stages. First, direct and partially heuristic calculations determine the laser spectrum and also give a third-order differential equation for the average inversion of a two-level atom on resonance. At this stage a number of general features of the interaction are able to be studied easily. The optical analog of motional narrowing, for example, is clearly predicted. Second, we show that the theory of generalized Poisson processes allows laser-atom interactions in the presence of random telegraph noise of all kinds (not only phase noise) to be treated systematically, by means of a master equation first used in the context of quantum optics by Burshtein. We use the Burshtein equation to obtain an exact expression for the two-level atom's steady-state resonance fluorescence spectrum, when the exciting laser exhibits phase telegraph noise. Some comparisons are made with results obtained from other noise models. Detailed treatments of the effects ofmly jumps, or as a model of finite laser bandwidth effects, in which the laser frequency exhibits random jumps. We show that these two types of frequency noise can be distinguished in light-scattering spectra. We also discuss examples which demonstrate both temporal and spectral motional narrowing, nonexponential correlations, and non-Lorentzian spectra. Its exact solubility in finite terms makes the frequency-telegraph noise model an attractive alternative to the white-noise Ornstein-Uhlenbeck frequency noise model which has been previously applied to laser-atom interactions.

  3. PIC Simulation of Laser Plasma Interactions with Temporal Bandwidths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsung, Frank; Weaver, J.; Lehmberg, R.

    2015-11-01

    We are performing particle-in-cell simulations using the code OSIRIS to study the effects of laser plasma interactions in the presence of temperal bandwidths under conditions relevant to current and future shock ignition experiments on the NIKE laser. Our simulations show that, for sufficiently large bandwidth, the saturation level, and the distribution of hot electrons, can be effected by the addition of temporal bandwidths (which can be accomplished in experiments using smoothing techniques such as SSD or ISI). We will show that temporal bandwidth along play an important role in the control of LPI's in these lasers and discuss future directions. This work is conducted under the auspices of NRL.

  4. Theoretical investigations of the processes of laser interaction with ocular tissues for laser applications in ophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustovalov, V. K.; Jean, B.

    2006-08-01

    Theoretical investigations and the results of computer modeling of the optical, thermophysical, and thermochemical processes during laser interaction with ocular tissues are reviewed in this paper. Physical-mathematical models and results of numerical simulation of the processes are presented. The computer modeling was applied for investigations of laser heating and coagulation of ocular tissues for treatment of retina diseases and intraocular tumors, cyclophotocoagulation of the ciliary body for treatment of glaucoma, and laser thermal keratoplasty of the cornea. The influence of radiation parameters on the selectivity of laser coagulation of laminated ocular tissues is considered. The results obtained are of essential interest for laser applications in ophthalmology and can be used for investigation of heating and coagulation of tissues in different fields of laser medicine.

  5. Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Huifeng; Yuan Hong; Tang Zhiping

    2013-01-28

    When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

  6. Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Huifeng; Yuan, Hong; Tang, Zhiping

    2013-01-01

    When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

  7. Maxwell solvers for the simulations of the laser-matter interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuter, Rachel; Grech, Mickael; Gonzalez de Alaiza Martinez, Pedro; Bonnaud, Guy; d'Humières, Emmanuel

    2014-06-01

    With the advent of high intensity laser beams, solving the Maxwell equations with a free-dispersive algorithm is becoming essential. Several Maxwell solvers, implemented in Particle-In-Cell codes, have been proposed. We present here some of them by describing their computational stencil in two-dimensional geometry and defining their stability area as well as their numerical dispersion relation. Numerical simulations of Backward Raman amplification and laser wake-field are presented to compare these different solvers.

  8. A Novel Compact Electron Spectrometer for Hot Electron Measurement in Pulsed Laser Solid Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Patel, P; Price, D F; Young, B K; Springer, P T; Berry, R; Booth, R; Bruns, C; Nelson, D

    2002-07-05

    Ultra-intense laser-matter interactions provide a unique source of temporally short, broad spectrum electrons, which may be utilized in many varied applications. One such, which we are pursuing, is as part of a novel diagnostic to trace magnetic field lines in a magnetically-confined fusion device. An essential aspect of this scheme is to have a detailed characterization of the electron angular and energy distribution. To this effect we designed and constructed a compact electron spectrometer that uses permanent magnets for electron energy dispersion and over 100 scintillating fibers coupled to a 1024 x 1024 pixel CCD as the detection system. This spectrometer has electron energy coverage from 10 keV to 2 MeV. We tested the spectrometer on a high intensity (10{sup 17} to 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}) short pulse (< 100 fs) laser, JanUSP, at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory using various solid targets. The details of the spectrometer and the experimental results will be reported.

  9. Hot dense matter creation in short-pulse laser interaction with tamped foils

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S; Pasley, J; Beg, F; Gregori, G; Evans, R G; Notley, M; Mackinnon, A; Glenzer, S; Hansen, S; King, J; Chung, H; Wilks, S; Stephens, R; Freeman, R; Weber, R; Saiz, E G; Khattak, F; Riley, D

    2006-08-15

    The possibility of producing hot dense matter has important applications for the understanding of transport processes in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) [1] and laboratory astrophysics experiments [2]. While the success of ICF requires the correct solution of a complex interaction between laser coupling, equation-of-state, and particle transport problems, the possibility of experimentally recreating conditions found during the ignition phase in a simplified geometry is extremely appealing. In this paper we will show that hot dense plasma conditions found during ICF ignition experiments can be reproduced by illuminating a tamped foil with a high intensity laser. We will show that temperatures on the order of kiloelectronvolts at solid densities can be achieved under controlled conditions during the experiment. Hydrodynamic tamping by surface coatings allows to reach higher density regimes by enabling the diagnosis of matter that has not yet begun to decompress, thus opening the possibility of directly investigating strongly coupled systems [3]. Our experimental diagnostics is based on K-shell spectroscopy coupled to x-ray imaging techniques. Such techniques have recently become prevalent in the diagnosis of hot dense matter [4]. By looking at the presence, and relative strengths, of lines associated with different ionization states, spectroscopy provides considerable insight into plasma conditions. At the same time, curved crystal imaging techniques allow for the spatial resolution of different regions of the target, both allowing for comparison of heating processes with the results of Particle-In-Cell (PIC) and hybrid simulation codes.

  10. Manifestation of anharmonic resonance in the interaction of intense ultrashort laser pulses with microstructured targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalui, Malay; Kundu, M.; Madhu Trivikram, T.; Ray, Krishanu; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2016-10-01

    Identification of the basic processes responsible for an efficient heating of intense laser produced plasmas is one of the important features of high intensity laser matter interaction studies. Collisionless absorption due to the anharmonicity in the self-consistent electrostatic potential of the plasma, known as anharmonic resonance (AHR), has been proposed to be a basic mechanism but a clear experimental demonstration is needed. Here, we show that microstructured targets enhance X-ray emission and the polarization dependence ascribes the enhancement to anharmonic resonance heating. It is found that p-polarized pulses of 5 ×1017 W/cm2 intensity bring in a 16-fold enhancement in the X-ray emission in the energy range 20-350 keV compared to s-polarized pulses with microstructured targets. This ratio is 2 for the case of polished targets under otherwise identical conditions. Particle-in-cell simulations clearly show that AHR is the key absorption mechanism responsible for this effect.

  11. Development of High Power Lasers for Materials Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, L A

    2003-04-11

    radiation for radiography, particle beam generation and eventually for a new class of fusion experiments call fast ignition. We have also built a record setting 50 watts of average output from a picosecond class laser and are using this technology for materials processing such as fine hole drilling and safe cutting of munitions. The laser science and technology program has developed and deployed a laser guide star on the Lick telescope on Mt. Hamilton and most recently on the Keck telescope in Hawaii. Our current development work in this area is focused on developing a much more compact all solid state diode pumped laser fiber system. Finally in a program originally initiated by DARPA we have developed a phase conjugated Nd:glass laser system with record setting performance and successfully deployed it for Navy and Air Force satellite imaging applications and have more recently successfully transferred it to industry for use in an emerging technology called laser peening. This laser technology is capable of 25 J to 100 J per pulse, 10 ns to 1000 ns pulse duration, 5 Hz laser. The technology has been industrially deployed and is proving to be highly effective in generating high intensity shocks that induce compressive residual stress into metal components. The compressive stress retards fatigue and stress corrosion cracking and is proving to extend the lifetime of high value components by factors of ten. This processing adds lifetime, enhances safety and can improve performance of aircraft systems. Laser peening is now being evaluated to reduce the weight of aircraft and may play a major role in the future combat system and its air transport by enabling lighter craft, longer range and greater payload. The laser peening technology is also being moved forward in NRC license application as the means to eliminate stress corrosion cracking for Yucca Mountain nuclear waste disposal canisters as well as a broad range of other applications.

  12. Numerical investigation of new regimes in laser-plasma and laser-solid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trines, R. M. G. M.; Lancaster, Kate; Norreys, Peter; Silva, Luis; Fonseca, Ricardo; Hooker, Simon

    2006-10-01

    The steady increase in the capabilities of the world's strongest lasers opens up parameter regimes for laser-plasma and laser- solid interaction experiments that were inaccessible before. This is even more true if one considers projected upgrades, such as the Vulcan 10 PW upgrade or the Astra Gemini system (two 50 fs pulses of 500 TW each). In order to become familiar with the physical processes that dominate laser-matter interactions in these regimes, extensive numerical investigations are needed. In this paper, we present the results of particle-in-cell simulations of laser-plasma interactions for electron acceleration in the blowout regime, using Astra Gemini-style pulses, as well as laser-solid interactions for fast ignition fusion research, using Vulcan Petawatt-style pulses. The simulations have been performed using the Osiris framework. New features of the interaction processes that are a direct consequence of the elevated pulse capabilities will be highlighted, and consequences for future experiments will be discussed.

  13. On the design of experiments for the study of extreme field limits in the interaction of laser with ultrarelativistic electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Hayashi, Y.; Kando, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Koga, J. K.; Kondo, K.; Kotaki, H.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Bulanov, S. S.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Chen, P.; Neely, D.; Kato, Y.; Narozhny, N. B.; Korn, G.

    2011-12-01

    We propose the experiments on the collision of laser light and high intensity electromagnetic pulses generated by relativistic flying mirrors, with electron bunches produced by a conventional accelerator and with laser wake field accelerated electrons for studying extreme field limits in the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves. The regimes of dominant radiation reaction, which completely changes the electromagnetic wave-matter interaction, will be revealed in the laser plasma experiments. This will result in a new powerful source of ultra short high brightness gamma-ray pulses. A possibility of the demonstration of the electron-positron pair creation in vacuum in a multi-photon processes can be realized. This will allow modeling under terrestrial laboratory conditions neutron star magnetospheres, cosmological gamma ray bursts and the Leptonic Era of the Universe.

  14. Laser-Matter Interactions with a 527 nm Drive

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, S; Niemann, C; Witman, P; Wegner, P; Mason, D; Haynam, C; Parham, T; Datte, P

    2007-02-16

    The primary goal of this Exploratory Research is to develop an understanding of laser-matter interactions with 527-nm light (2{omega}) for studies of interest to numerous Laboratory programs including inertial confinement fusion (ICF), material strength, radiation transport, and hydrodynamics. In addition, during the course of this work we will develop the enabling technology and prototype instrumentation to diagnose a high fluence laser beam for energy, power, and near field intensity profile at 2{omega}. Through this Exploratory Research we have established an extensive experimental and modeling data base on laser-matter interaction with 527 nm laser light (2{omega}) in plasma conditions of interest to numerous Laboratory programs. The experiments and the laser-plasma interaction modeling using the code pF3D have shown intensity limits and laser beam conditioning requirements for future 2{omega} laser operations and target physics experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These findings have set requirements for which present radiation-hydrodynamic simulations indicate the successful generation of relevant pressure regimes in future 2{omega} experiments. To allow these experiments on the NIF, optics and optical mounts were prepared for the 18mm Second Harmonic Generation Crystal (SHG crystal) that would provide the desired high conversion efficiency from 1{omega} to 2{omega}. Supporting experimental activities on NIF included high-energy 1{omega} shots at up to 22kJ/beamline (4MJ full NIF 1{omega} equivalent energy) that demonstrated, in excess, the 1{omega} drive capability of the main laser that is required for 2{omega} operations. Also, a very extensive 3{omega} campaign was completed (see ''The National Ignition Facility Laser Performance Status'' UCRL-JRNL-226553) that demonstrated that not only doubling the laser, but also tripling the laser (a much more difficult and sensitive combination) met our model predictions over a wide range of laser

  15. Nail-like targets for laser plasma interaction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pasley, J; Wei, M; Shipton, E; Chen, S; Ma, T; Beg, F N; Alexander, N; Stephens, R B; MacPhee, A G; Hey, D; Pape, S L; Patel, P; Mackinnon, A J; Key, M H; Offermann, D; Link, A; Chowdhury, E; Van-Woerkom, L D; Freeman, R R

    2007-12-18

    The interaction of ultra-high power picosecond laser pulses with solid targets is of interest both for benchmarking the results of hybrid particle in cell (PIC) codes and also for applications to re-entrant cone guided fast ignition. We describe the construction of novel targets in which copper/titanium wires are formed into 'nail-like' objects by a process of melting and micromachining, so that energy can be reliably coupled to a 24 {micro}m diameter wire. An extreme-ultraviolet image of the interaction of the Titan laser with such a target is shown.

  16. Plasmonic terahertz detector response at high intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutin, A.; Kachorovskii, V.; Muraviev, A.; Shur, M.

    2012-07-01

    Recent work on plasmonic terahertz detection using field effect transistors (FETs) has yielded detectors with high responsivity. Therefore, deviation from small signal mode of operation, when the detector signal is simply proportional to the THz intensity, must be considered. This work presents a new analytical model to predict terahertz response in a FET at arbitrary intensity levels. The proposed analytical model was experimentally validated using a 0.13 μm InGaAs high electron mobility transistor and optically pumped CO2 gas laser operating at 1.63 THz of varying output intensities. The model is suitable for implementation in circuit simulators and might be used for device optimization and THz circuit design.

  17. Ultlra-intense laser-matter interactions at extreme parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Hegellich, Bjorn M

    2010-11-24

    The field of shortpulse lasers has seen rapid growth in the recent years with the three major boundaries of energy, pulse duration and repetition rate being pushed in ever extremer regions. At peak powers, already exceeding 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}, in virtually every experiment in relativistic laser physics, the laser pulse interacts with a more or less extended and heated plasma, due to prepulses and ASE-like pedestals on ps - ns time scales. By developing a new technique for ultrahigh contrast, we were able to initiate the next paradigm shift in relativistic laser-matter interactions, allowing us to interact ultrarelativistic pulses volumetrically with overdense targets. This becomes possible by using target and laser parameters that will turn the target relativistically transparent during the few 10s-100s femtoseconds fo the interaction. Specifically, we interact an ultraintese, ultrahigh contrast pulse with solid density, free standing, nanometer diamond target. This paradigm change towards a volumetric overdense interaction in turn enables new particle acceleration mechanisms for both electrons and ions, as well as forward directed relativistic surface harmonics. We report here on first experiments done on those topics at the 200 TW Trident laser at Los Alamos as well as at the Ti:Sapphire system at MBI. We will compare the experimental data to massive large scale 3D simulations done on the prototype of LANL's new Petafiop supercomputer Roadrunner, which is leading the current top 500 list. Specifically, we developed a shortpulse OPA based pulse cleaning technique. Fielding it at the Trident 200 TW laser at Los Alamos, we were able to improve the pulse contrast by 6 orders of magnitude to better than 2 x 10{sup -12} at less than a ps. This enabled for the first time the interaction of a 100J, 200TW laser pulse with a truly solid target with virtually no expansion before the main pulse - target interaction, making possible the use of very thin targets, The

  18. Radiating electron source generation in ultraintense laser-foil interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capdessus, R.; King, M.; McKenna, P.

    2016-08-01

    A radiating electron source is shown to be created by a laser pulse (with intensity of 1023 W/cm2 and duration equal to 30 fs) interacting with a near-critical density plasma. It is shown that the back radiation reaction resulting from high energy synchrotron radiation tends to counteract the action of the ponderomotive force. This enhances the collective dynamics of the radiating electrons in the highest field areas, resulting in the production of a compact radiation source (containing 80% of the synchrotron radiation emission), with an energy on the order of tens of MeV over the laser pulse duration. These phenomena are investigated using a QED-particle-in-cell code, and compared with a kinetic model accounting for the radiation reaction force in the electron distribution function. The results shed new light on electron-photon sources at ultra-high laser intensities and could be tested on future laser facilities.

  19. Studies on laser-plasma interaction physics for shock ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheut, Y.; Batani, D.; Nicolai, Ph.; Antonelli, L.; Krousky, E.

    2015-04-01

    We realized a series of experiments to study the physics of laser-plasma interaction in an intensity regime of interest for the novel "Shock Ignition" approach to Inertial Fusion. Experiments were performed at the Prague Asterix Laser System laser in Prague using two laser beams: an "auxiliary" beam, for pre-plasma creation, with intensity around 7 × 1013 W/cm2 (250 ps, 1ω, λ = 1315 nm) and the "main" beam, up to 1016 W/cm (250 ps, 3ω, λ = 438 nm), to launch a shock. The main goal of these experiments is to study the process of the formation of a very strong shock and the influence of hot electrons in the generation of very high pressures. The shock produced by the ablation of the plastic layer is studied by shock breakout chronometry. The generation of hot electrons is analyzed by imaging Kα emission.

  20. Nonlinear modal interactions in parity-time (PT) symmetric lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Li; El-Ganainy, Ramy

    2016-05-01

    Parity-time symmetric lasers have attracted considerable attention lately due to their promising applications and intriguing properties, such as free spectral range doubling and single-mode lasing. In this work we discuss nonlinear modal interactions in these laser systems under steady state conditions, and we demonstrate that several gain clamping scenarios can occur for lasing operation in the -symmetric and -broken phases. In particular, we show that, depending on the system’s design and the external pump profile, its operation in the nonlinear regime falls into two different categories: in one the system is frozen in the phase space as the applied gain increases, while in the other the system is pulled towards its exceptional point. These features are first illustrated by a coupled mode formalism and later verified by employing the Steady-state Ab-initio Laser Theory (SALT). Our findings shine light on the robustness of single-mode operation against saturation nonlinearity in -symmetric lasers.

  1. Electron acceleration in long scale laser - plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamperidis, Christos; Mangles, Stuart P. D.; Nagel, Sabrina R.; Bellei, Claudio; Krushelnick, Karl; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Bourgeois, Nicola; Marques, Jean Raphael; Kaluza, Malte C.

    2006-10-01

    Broad energy electron bunches are produced through the Self-Modulated Laser Wakefield Acceleration scheme at the 30J, 300 fsec laser, LULI, France, with long scale underdense plasmas, created in a He filled gas cell and in He gas jet nozzles of various lengths. With c.τlaser>>λplasma, electrons reached Emax ˜ 200MeV. By carefully controlling the dynamics of the interaction and by simultaneous observations of the electron energy spectra and the forward emitted optical spectrum, we found that a plasma density threshold (˜5.10^18 cm-3) exists for quasi-monoenergetic (˜30MeV) features to appear. The overall plasma channel size was inferred from the collected Thomson scattered light. 2D PIC simulations indicate that the main long laser pulse breaks up into small pulselets that eventually get compressed and tightly focused inside the first few plasma periods, leading to a bubble like acceleration of electron bunches.

  2. Momentum induced by laser-tissue interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Dingus, R.S.

    1993-01-01

    Impulsive momentum is imparted to residual tissue during pulsed-laser ablation because the moss ablated is generally ejected with a sizable velocity. Accurate measurements of the impulse are possible, which can provide an important monitor of the ablation process. Simple models can be used to predict the impulse under a variety of conditions; in some cases, complex radiation-hydrodynamic code calculations are required. In this paper, this modeling is discussed along with the dependence of momentum on the pulsed heating and target conditions. Momentum measurement techniques are discussed briefly. The behavior is explained in terms of dimensionless parameters and the impulse coupling coefficient as a function of incident fluence, which has a well defined threshold as well as a maximum. Complications in the mixed liquid-vapor phase are also addressed.

  3. Momentum induced by laser-tissue interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Dingus, R.S.

    1993-04-01

    Impulsive momentum is imparted to residual tissue during pulsed-laser ablation because the moss ablated is generally ejected with a sizable velocity. Accurate measurements of the impulse are possible, which can provide an important monitor of the ablation process. Simple models can be used to predict the impulse under a variety of conditions; in some cases, complex radiation-hydrodynamic code calculations are required. In this paper, this modeling is discussed along with the dependence of momentum on the pulsed heating and target conditions. Momentum measurement techniques are discussed briefly. The behavior is explained in terms of dimensionless parameters and the impulse coupling coefficient as a function of incident fluence, which has a well defined threshold as well as a maximum. Complications in the mixed liquid-vapor phase are also addressed.

  4. Axial interaction free-electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-09-02

    Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies. 5 figs.

  5. Axial interaction free-electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1997-01-01

    Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies.

  6. X-Ray Free Electron Laser Interaction With Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, S

    2009-05-12

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) will enable studying new areas of laser-matter interaction. We summarize the current understanding of the interaction of XFEL pulses with matter and describe some of the simulation approaches that are used to design experiments on future XFEL sources. Modified versions of these models have been successful in guiding and analyzing experiments performed at the extreme-ultraviolet FEL FLASH at wavelengths of 6 nm and longer. For photon energies of several keV, no XFEL-matter interaction experiments have been performed yet but data is anticipated to become available in the near future, which will allow to test our understanding of the interaction physics in this wavelength regime.

  7. Laser-Tissue Interaction in Tattoo Removal by Q-Switched Lasers

    PubMed Central

    Barua, Shyamanta

    2015-01-01

    Q-switched (QS) lasers are widely considered the gold standard for tattoo removal, with excellent clinical results, impressive predictability, and a good safety profile. The generation of giant pulses by the method of Q-switching is responsible for the unique laser-tissue interaction that is seen in tattoo removal by QS lasers. The QS lasers work by impaction and dissolution of the tattoo pigments. Mechanical fragmentation of the tattoo pigments encased in intracellular lamellated organelles followed by their phagocytosis by macrophages is thought to be the major event in the clearance of pigments by QS lasers. A few novel techniques have been tried in recent times to hasten the clearance of tattoo pigments. PMID:25949016

  8. Selective Laser Sintering of Filled Polymer Systems: Bulk Properties and Laser Beam Material Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wudy, Katrin; Lanzl, Lydia; Drummer, Dietmar

    Additive manufacturing techniques, such as selective laser melting of plastics, generate components directly from a CAD data set without using a specific mold. The range of materials commercially available for selective laser sintering merely includes some semi crystalline polymers mainly polyamides, which leads to an absence of realizable component properties. The presented investigations are concerned with the manufacturing and analysis of components made from filled polymer systems by means of selective laser sintering. The test specimens were generated at varied filler concentration, filler types and manufacturing parameter like laser power or scan speed. In addition to the characterization of the mixed powders, resulting melt depth were analyzed in order to investigate the beam material interaction. The basic understanding of the influence of different fillers, filler concentration and manufacturing parameters on resulting component properties will lead to new realizable component properties and thus fields of application of selective laser sintering.

  9. Laser-tissue interaction in tattoo removal by q-switched lasers.

    PubMed

    Barua, Shyamanta

    2015-01-01

    Q-switched (QS) lasers are widely considered the gold standard for tattoo removal, with excellent clinical results, impressive predictability, and a good safety profile. The generation of giant pulses by the method of Q-switching is responsible for the unique laser-tissue interaction that is seen in tattoo removal by QS lasers. The QS lasers work by impaction and dissolution of the tattoo pigments. Mechanical fragmentation of the tattoo pigments encased in intracellular lamellated organelles followed by their phagocytosis by macrophages is thought to be the major event in the clearance of pigments by QS lasers. A few novel techniques have been tried in recent times to hasten the clearance of tattoo pigments.

  10. Interaction of high intensity focused ultrasound with biological materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.; Mal, A.; Feng, F.; Kabo, M.; Wang, J.

    2002-01-01

    This work is motivated by the possible medical application of focused ultrasound in minimally invasive treatment of a variety of disorders including those associated with soft tissue or disk element disruption in the vicinity of the spine causing impingement on the spinal cord.

  11. Treatment of glaucoma with high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Aptel, Florent; Lafon, Cyril

    2015-05-01

    Glaucoma is a common disease mainly due to an increase in pressure inside the eye, leading to a progressive destruction of the optic nerve, potentially to blindness. Intraocular pressure (IOP) is the result of a balance between production of liquid that fills the eye--aqueous humour--and its resorption. All treatments for glaucoma aim to reduce IOP and can therefore have two mechanisms of action: reducing aqueous humour production by the partial destruction or medical inhibition of the ciliary body--the anatomical structure responsible for production of aqueous humour--or facilitating the evacuation of aqueous humour from the eye. Several physical methods can be used to destroy the ciliary body, e.g. laser, cryotherapy, microwave. All these methods have two major drawbacks: they are non-selective for the organ to be treated and they have an unpredictable dose–effect relationship. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can be used to coagulate the ciliary body and avoid these drawbacks. A commercially available device was marketed in the 1980s, but later abandoned, essentially for technical reasons. A smaller circular device using miniaturised transducers was recently developed and proposed for clinical practice. Experimental studies have shown selective coagulation necrosis of the treated ciliary body. The first three clinical trials in humans have shown that this device was well tolerated and allowed a significant, predictable and sustained reduction of IOP. The aim of this contribution is to present a summary of the work concerning the use of HIFU to treat glaucoma.

  12. On the scaling of multicrystal data sets collected at high-intensity X-ray and electron sources

    DOE PAGES

    Coppens, Philip; Fournier, Bertrand

    2015-11-11

    Here, the need for data-scaling has become increasingly evident as time-resolved pump-probe photocrystallography is rapidly developing at high intensity X-ray sources. Several aspects of the scaling of data sets collected at synchrotrons, XFELs (X-ray Free Electron Lasers) and high-intensity pulsed electron sources are discussed. They include laser-ON/laser-OFF data scaling, inter- and intra-data set scaling. (C) 2015 Author(s). All article content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

  13. Proposal for precision wavelength measurement of the Ni-like gadolinium x-ray laser formed during the interaction of a nanostructured target with an ultrashort laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, E. P.

    2015-10-01

    The wavelengths of the 3d 94d [J = 0]-3d 94p [J = 1] transitions of x-ray lasers in Ni-like sequence ions with nucleus charges Z  ⩽  79 are refined. The results of calculations are within the experimental error. It was found that the wavelengths of 3d3/294d3/2{} [J = 0]-3d3/29 4p 1/2 [J = 1] and 3d3/29 4d 3/2[J = 0]-3d5/29 4p 3/2[J = 1] transitions in Sm34+ and Gd36+, respectively, are in the range of 6.70-6.75 nm. Exactly for this narrow range, multilayer mirrors with high reflectance are developed. The gain of the x-ray laser with λ = 6.748 nm in Gd36+ is calculated under the assumption that plasma is formed during the interaction of a nanostructured (cluster-like) gadolinium target with high-intensity pump laser radiation. The optimum plasma density, temperature, length, and pump parameters are determined to achieve the highest Gd36+ ion fraction and emission quantum yield of ~1013 photons.

  14. Laser-material interactions: A study of laser energy coupling with solids

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, M A

    1993-11-01

    This study of laser-light interactions with solid materials ranges from low-temperature heating to explosive, plasma-forming reactions. Contained are four works concerning laser-energy coupling: laser (i) heating and (ii) melting monitored using a mirage effect technique, (iii) the mechanical stress-power generated during high-powered laser ablation, and (iv) plasma-shielding. First, a photothermal deflection (PTD) technique is presented for monitoring heat transfer during modulated laser heating of opaque solids that have not undergone phase-change. Of main interest is the physical significance of the shape, magnitude, and phase for the temporal profile of the deflection signal. Considered are the effects that thermophysical properties, boundary conditions, and geometry of the target and optical probe-beam have on the deflection response. PTD is shown to monitor spatial and temporal changes in heat flux leaving the surface due to changes in laser energy coupling. The PTD technique is then extended to detect phase-change at the surface of a solid target. Experimental data shows the onset of melt for indium and tin targets. The conditions for which melt can be detected by PTD is analyzed in terms of geometry, incident power and pulse length, and thermophysical properties of the target and surroundings. Next, monitoring high-powered laser ablation of materials with stress-power is introduced. The motivation for considering stress-power is given, followed by a theoretical discussion of stress-power and how it is determined experimentally. Experiments are presented for the ablation of aluminum targets as a function of energy and intensity. The stress-power response is analyzed for its physical significance. Lastly, the influence of plasma-shielding during high-powered pulsed laser-material interactions is considered. Crater size, emission, and stress-power are measured to determine the role that the gas medium and laser pulse length have on plasma shielding.

  15. Improving the Capabilities of a Continuum Laser Plasma Interaction Code

    SciTech Connect

    Hittinger, J F; Dorr, M R

    2006-06-15

    The numerical simulation of plasmas is a critical tool for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). We have been working to improve the predictive capability of a continuum laser plasma interaction code pF3d, which couples a continuum hydrodynamic model of an unmagnetized plasma to paraxial wave equations modeling the laser light. Advanced numerical techniques such as local mesh refinement, multigrid, and multifluid Godunov methods have been adapted and applied to nonlinear heat conduction and to multifluid plasma models. We describe these algorithms and briefly demonstrate their capabilities.

  16. Electron acceleration via high contrast laser interacting with submicron clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Lu; Chen Liming; Wang Weiming; Yan Wenchao; Yuan Dawei; Mao Jingyi; Wang Zhaohua; Liu Cheng; Shen Zhongwei; Li Yutong; Dong Quanli; Lu Xin; Ma Jinglong; Wei Zhiyi; Faenov, Anatoly; Pikuz, Tatiana; Li Dazhang; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie

    2012-01-02

    We experimentally investigated electron acceleration from submicron size argon clusters-gas target irradiated by a 100 fs, 10 TW laser pulses having a high-contrast. Electron beams are observed in the longitudinal and transverse directions to the laser propagation. The measured energy of the longitudinal electron reaches 600 MeV and the charge of the electron beam in the transverse direction is more than 3 nC. A two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation of the interaction has been performed and it shows an enhancement of electron charge by using the cluster-gas target.

  17. POWER RECYCLING OF BURST-MODE LASER PULSES FOR LASER PARTICLE INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    A number of laser-particle interaction experiments such as the laser assisted hydrogen ion beam stripping or X-/ -ray generations via inverse-Compton scattering involve light sources operating in a burst mode to match the tem-poral structure of the particle beam. To mitigate the laser power challenge, it is important to make the interaction inside an optical cavity to recycle the laser power. In many cases, conventional cavity locking techniques will not work since the burst normally has a very small duty factor and low repetition rate and it is impossible to gen-erate an effective control signal. This work reports on the development of a doubly-resonant optical cavity scheme and its locking techniques that enables a simultaneous resonance of two laser beams with different spectra and/or temporal structures. We demonstrate that such a cavity can be used to recycle burst-mode ultra-violet laser pulses with arbitrary burst lengths and repetition rates.

  18. Measurement of the target current by inductive probe during laser interaction on terawatt laser system PALS

    SciTech Connect

    Cikhardt, J.; Klír, D.; Řezáč, K.; Krása, J.; De Marco, M.; Pfeifer, M.; Velyhan, A.; Krouský, E.; Cikhardtová, B.; Kubeš, P.; Kravárik, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Skála, J.

    2014-10-15

    Measurements of the return-current flowing through a solid target irradiated with the sub-nanosecond kJ-class Prague Asterix Laser System is reported. A new inductive target probe was developed which allows us measuring the target current derivative in a kA/ns range. The dependences of the target current on the laser pulse energy for cooper, graphite, and polyethylene targets are reported. The experiment shows that the target current is proportional to the deposited laser energy and is strongly affected by the shot-to-shot fluctuations. The corresponding maximum target charge exceeded a value of 10 μC. A return-current dependence of the electromagnetic pulse produced by the laser-target interaction is presented.

  19. Deposition of tantalum carbide coatings on graphite by laser interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veligdan, James; Branch, D.; Vanier, P. E.; Barietta, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Graphite surfaces can be hardened and protected from erosion by hydrogen at high temperatures by refractory metal carbide coatings, which are usually prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or chemical vapor reaction (CVR) methods. These techniques rely on heating the substrate to a temperature where a volatile metal halide decomposes and reacts with either a hydrocarbon gas or with carbon from the substrate. For CVR techniques, deposition temperatures must be in excess of 2000 C in order to achieve favorable deposition kinetics. In an effort to lower the bulk substrate deposition temperature, the use of laser interactions with both the substrate and the metal halide deposition gas has been employed. Initial testing involved the use of a CO2 laser to heat the surface of a graphite substrate and a KrF excimer laser to accomplish a photodecomposition of TaCl5 gas near the substrate. The results of preliminary experiments using these techniques are described.

  20. Interactions between lasers and two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Lu, Junpeng; Liu, Hongwei; Tok, Eng Soon; Sow, Chorng-Haur

    2016-05-01

    The recent increasing research interest in two-dimensional (2D) layered materials has led to an explosion of in the discovery of novel physical and chemical phenomena in these materials. Among the 2D family, group-VI transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), such as represented by MoS2 and WSe2, are remarkable semiconductors with sizable energy band gaps, which make the TMDs promising building blocks for new generation optoelectronics. On the other hand, the specificity and tunability of the band gaps can generate particularly strong light-matter interactions between TMD crystals and specific photons, which can trigger complex and interesting phenomena such as photo-scattering, photo-excitation, photo-destruction, photo-physical modification, photochemical reaction and photo-oxidation. Herein, we provide an overview of the phenomena explained by various interactions between lasers and the 2D TMDs. Characterizations of the optical fundamentals of the TMDs via laser spectroscopies are reviewed. Subsequently, photoelectric conversion devices enabled by laser excitation and the functionality extension and performance improvement of the TMDs materials via laser modification are comprehensively summarized. Finally, we conclude the review by discussing the prospects for further development in this research area.

  1. Interactions between lasers and two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Lu, Junpeng; Liu, Hongwei; Tok, Eng Soon; Sow, Chorng-Haur

    2016-05-01

    The recent increasing research interest in two-dimensional (2D) layered materials has led to an explosion of in the discovery of novel physical and chemical phenomena in these materials. Among the 2D family, group-VI transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), such as represented by MoS2 and WSe2, are remarkable semiconductors with sizable energy band gaps, which make the TMDs promising building blocks for new generation optoelectronics. On the other hand, the specificity and tunability of the band gaps can generate particularly strong light-matter interactions between TMD crystals and specific photons, which can trigger complex and interesting phenomena such as photo-scattering, photo-excitation, photo-destruction, photo-physical modification, photochemical reaction and photo-oxidation. Herein, we provide an overview of the phenomena explained by various interactions between lasers and the 2D TMDs. Characterizations of the optical fundamentals of the TMDs via laser spectroscopies are reviewed. Subsequently, photoelectric conversion devices enabled by laser excitation and the functionality extension and performance improvement of the TMDs materials via laser modification are comprehensively summarized. Finally, we conclude the review by discussing the prospects for further development in this research area. PMID:27141556

  2. Nonlinear neutrino-photon interactions inside strong laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meuren, Sebastian; Keitel, Christoph H.; Di Piazza, Antonino

    2015-06-01

    Even though neutrinos are neutral particles and interact only via the exchange of weak gauge bosons, charged leptons and quarks can mediate a coupling to the photon field beyond tree level. Inside a relativistically strong laser field nonlinear effects in the laser amplitude can play an important role, as electrons and positrons interact nonperturbatively with the coherent part of the photon field. Here, we calculate for the first time the leading-order contribution to the axial-vector-vector current-coupling tensor inside an arbitrary plane-wave laser field (which is taken into account exactly by employing the Furry picture). The current-coupling tensor appears in the calculation of various electroweak processes inside strong laser fields like photon emission or trident electron-positron pair production by a neutrino. Moreover, as we will see below, the axial-vector-vector current-coupling tensor contains the Adler-Bell-Jackiw (ABJ) anomaly. This occurrence renders the current-coupling tensor also interesting from a fundamental point of view, as it is the simplest Feynman diagram in an external field featuring this kind of anomaly.

  3. Structural and functional bases of laser-microvessels interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Valentine I.; Terman, Oleg A.; Builin, Vitalij; Lebedeva, Natalia A.; Samoilov, Nickolai

    1993-07-01

    Structural and functional microcirculatory changes in tissues and organs (muscles, liver, derma, epinephros, brain cortex) under various dosages and powers of laser irradiation in the red (633 nm) and near infrared (890 nm) spectrum regions have been studied in experiments and clinic. In case of nonsensitized tissues the `photoactivation' range of power densities and doses of laser irradiation has been established. We have identified a short-term reaction of microvessels and a long-term reaction (adaptation). The former consists of intensification of microcirculation and metabolism rise in parenchymatous cells; the latter is connected with neoangiogenesis acceleration. The intensification of the blood microcirculation includes a dilation of microvessels of all orders, an amplification of arteriolar vasomotions and an opening of `reserved' capillaries. Data on the structural reconstruction of myocytes and endotheliocytes have shown that the high differential parenchymatous cells and its membrane structures are sensitive to low energy laser irradiation and, on the other hand, under low energy laser irradiation there is an activation of synthetic processes in the cells. Thus, during the laser-tissue interaction in such complex system as human organism the microcirculation plays the key role among the other systems.

  4. Report from the NSLS workshop: Sources and applications of high intensity uv-vuv light

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.D.; Hastings, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    A workshop was held to evaluate sources and applications of high intensity, ultra violet (UV) radiation for biological, chemical, and materials sciences. The proposed sources are a UV free electron laser (FEL) driven by a high brightness linac and undulators in long, straight sections of a specially designed low energy (400 MeV) storage ring. These two distinct types of sources will provide a broad range of scientific opportunities that were discussed in detail during the workshop.

  5. Report from the NSLS workshop: Sources and applications of high intensity uv-vuv light

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.D.; Hastings, J.B.

    1990-12-31

    A workshop was held to evaluate sources and applications of high intensity, ultra violet (UV) radiation for biological, chemical, and materials sciences. The proposed sources are a UV free electron laser (FEL) driven by a high brightness linac and undulators in long, straight sections of a specially designed low energy (400 MeV) storage ring. These two distinct types of sources will provide a broad range of scientific opportunities that were discussed in detail during the workshop.

  6. High-intensity focused ultrasound therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Toyoaki; Nakano, Mayura; Hongo, Satoko; Shoji, Sunao; Nagata, Yohishiro; Satoh, Takefumi; Baba, Shiro; Usui, Yukio; Terachi, Toshiro

    2012-03-01

    Recent advances in high-intensity focused ultrasound, which was developed in the 1940s as a viable thermal tissue ablation approach, have increased its popularity. High-intensity focused ultrasound is currently utilized the most in Europe and Japan, but has not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration, USA, for this indication. The purpose of the present report is to review the scientific foundation of high-intensity focused ultrasound technology and the clinical outcomes achieved with commercially available devices. Recently published articles were reviewed to evaluate the current status of high-intensity focused ultrasound as a primary or salvage treatment option for localized prostate cancer. Improvements in the clinical outcome as a result of technical, imaging and technological advancements are described herein. A wide range of treatment options for organ-confined prostate cancer is available. However, high-intensity focused ultrasound is an attractive choice for men willing to choose less invasive options, although establishing the efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound requires longer follow-up periods. Technological advances, together with cultural and economic factors, have caused a dramatic shift from traditional open, radical prostatectomy to minimally invasive techniques. High-intensity focused ultrasound is likely to play a significant role in the future of oncology practice. PMID:22188161

  7. Solitary versus shock wave acceleration in laser-plasma interactions.

    PubMed

    Macchi, Andrea; Nindrayog, Amritpal Singh; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2012-04-01

    The excitation of nonlinear electrostatic waves, such as shock and solitons, by ultraintense laser interaction with overdense plasmas and related ion acceleration are investigated by numerical simulations. Stability of solitons and formation of shock waves is strongly dependent on the velocity distribution of ions. Monoenergetic components in ion spectra are produced by "pulsed" reflection from solitary waves. Possible relevance to recent experiments on "shock acceleration" is discussed. PMID:22680581

  8. ELECTRON CLOUD EFFECTS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; MACEK,R.J.

    2002-04-14

    One of the primary concerns in the design and operation of high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulators is the electron cloud and associated beam loss and instabilities. Electron-cloud effects are observed at high-intensity proton machines like the Los Alamos National Laboratory's PSR and CERN's SPS, and investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the design of next-generation high-intensity proton accelerators like the Spallation Neutron Source ring, emphasis is made in minimizing electron production and in enhancing Landau damping. This paper reviews the present understanding of the electron-cloud effects and presents mitigation measures.

  9. High Intensity Accelerator and Neutron Source in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xialing; Wei, J.; Loong, Chun

    2011-06-01

    High intensity Accelerator is being studied all over world for numerous applications, which includes the waste transmutation, spallation neutron source and material irradiation facilities. The R/D activities of the technology of High intensity accelerator are also developed in China for some year, and have some good facilities around China. This paper will reports the status of some high intensity accelerators and neutron source in China, which including ADS/RFQ; CARR; CSNS; PKUNIFTY & CPHS. This paper will emphatically report the Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) led by the Department of Engineering Physics of Tsinghua University in Beijing, China.

  10. Interaction between jets during laser-induced forward transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Patrascioiu, A.; Florian, C.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Morenza, J. L.; Serra, P.; Hennig, G.; Delaporte, P.

    2014-07-07

    Simultaneous two-beam laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) was carried out for various inter-beam separations, analyzing both the resulting printing outcomes and the corresponding liquid transfer dynamics. In a first experiment, droplets of an aqueous solution were printed onto a substrate at different inter-beam distances, which proved that a significant departure from the single-beam LIFT dynamics takes places at specific separations. In the second experiment, time-resolved imaging analysis revealed the existence of significant jet-jet interactions at those separations; such interactions proceed through a dynamics that results in remarkable jet deflection for which a possible onset mechanism is proposed.

  11. Operation of the Proto-MPEX High Intensity Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughman, J. B. O.; Goulding, R. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Bigelow, T. S.; Campbell, I. H.; Diem, S. J.; Martin, E. H.; Pesavento, P. V.; Rapp, J.; Ray, H. B.; Shaw, G. C.; Showers, M. A.; Luo, G.-N.

    2015-11-01

    The Prototype Materials Plasma Experiment (Proto-MPEX) is a linear high-intensity rf plasma source that combines a high-density helicon plasma generator with electron and ion heating sections. It is being used to study the physics of heating over-dense plasmas in a linear configuration. The helicon plasma is produced by coupling 13.56 MHz rf power at levels up to 100 kW. Microwaves at 28 GHz (~ 150 kW) are coupled to the electrons in the over-dense helicon plasma via Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW). Ion cyclotron heating (~ 30 kW) will be via a magnetic beach approach. Plasma diagnostics include Thomson Scattering and a retarding field energy analyzer near the target, while a microwave interferometer and double-Langmuir probes are used to determine plasma parameters elsewhere in the system. Filterscopes are being used to measure D-alpha emission and He line ratios at multiple locations, and IR cameras image the target plates to determine heat deposition. High plasma densities in the helicon region have been produced in He (>3x1019/m3) and D (>1.5x1019/m3) , and operation with on-axis magnetic field strength >1 T has been demonstrated. Details of the experimental results and future plans for studying plasma surface/RF antenna interactions will be presented. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  12. The PhIX High Intensity Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulding, R. H.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Peng, Y.-K. M.; Rapp, J.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Biewer, T. M.; Canik, J. M.; Chen, G.; Diem, S. J.; Meitner, S. J.; Owen, L. W.

    2012-10-01

    The Physics Integration eXperiment (PhIX) is a linear high-intensity rf plasma source presently being constructed at ORNL that combines a high density helicon plasma generator with an electron heating section. It will be used to explore the physics related to heating an overdense, streaming plasma in a linear geometry by whistler waves and Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW), including optimization of heating efficiency and maximization of particle flux. Interactions between the plasma production and heating regions, and the source and a downstream target, will also be investigated. Experiments using the device will provide data for the design of an rf powered high particle flux (˜10^24/m^2- s), high heat flux(˜10 MW /m^2) steady-state linear plasma-materials test station (PMTS). In preparatory experiments, the helicon device has operated at power levels up to 90 kW, producing high plasma densities in He (6 x10^19 m-3) and D (> 4 x10^19 m-3), and has also operated at high magnetic field strength up to 0.5 T. Separate ECH experiments have demonstrated both whistler and EBW coupling at 6 GHz to an overdense plasma. A review of these experiments will be presented, as well as an overview of PhIX and its status.

  13. Development of a cryogenic hydrogen microjet for high-intensity, high-repetition rate experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. B.; Göde, S.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    The advent of high-intensity, high-repetition-rate lasers has led to the need for replenishing targets of interest for high energy density sciences. We describe the design and characterization of a cryogenic microjet source, which can deliver a continuous stream of liquid hydrogen with a diameter of a few microns. The jet has been imaged at 1 μm resolution by shadowgraphy with a short pulse laser. The pointing stability has been measured at well below a mrad, for a stable free-standing filament of solid-density hydrogen.

  14. Space Station Live: High-Intensity Exercise in Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Lori Meggs talks with SPRINT Principal Investigator Lori Ploutz-Snyder to learn more about this high-intensity exercise research taking place aboard the International Sp...

  15. Light shield and cooling apparatus. [high intensity ultraviolet lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, T. G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A light shield and cooling apparatus was developed for a high intensity ultraviolet lamp including water and high pressure air for cooling and additional apparatus for shielding the light and suppressing the high pressure air noise.

  16. Effect of high intensity ultrasound on the allergenicity of shrimp*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen-Xing; Lin, Hong; Cao, Li-Min; Jameel, Khalid

    2006-01-01

    The tropomyosin fraction of shrimp proteins is potentially responsible for allergic reaction in individuals with genetic predisposition to allergy. However, there are no efficient and safe methods to reduce its allergenicity. High intensity ultrasound is known to change the structure of proteins. This study is aimed at assessing high intensity ultrasound’s effect on the allergenicity of shrimp allergen. Shrimp and purified shrimp allergen were treated with high intensity ultrasound for 30~180 min. Extracts of treated samples were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with pool serum of shrimp allergy patients and polyclonal anti-allergen antibodies and by immunoblotting after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Shrimp treated with high intensity ultrasound showed a decrease in allergenicity measured with ELISA. A linear relationship between the immune response induced by treated shrimp allergen and the applied treatment time was observed. The decrease in allergenicity was confirmed by immunoblot assays with shrimp allergic patients serum. Allergenicity of shrimp allergen extracted from treated shrimp was higher than that of purified shrimp allergen with the same treatment time. Gel-filtration HPLC was applied for analysis of shrimp allergen after treatment with high intensity ultrasound. Some fractions were appeared with increasing treatment time. The results suggested that high intensity ultrasound could be used to reduce the allergenicity of shrimp. PMID:16532525

  17. Model of high-order harmonic generation from laser interaction with a plasma grating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S J; Zhuo, H B; Zou, D B; Gan, L F; Zhou, H Y; Li, X Z; Yu, M Y; Yu, W

    2016-05-01

    Harmonic generation from linearly polarized high-intensity short-pulse laser normally impacting a solid plasma grating is investigated using analytical modeling and particle-in-cell simulation. It is found that when the radiation excited by the relativistic electron quiver motion in the laser fields suitably matches a harmonic of the grating periodicity, it will be significantly enhanced and peak with narrow angular spread in specific directions. The corresponding theory shows that the phenomenon can be attributed to an interference effect of the periodic grating on the excitation.

  18. Model of high-order harmonic generation from laser interaction with a plasma grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. J.; Zhuo, H. B.; Zou, D. B.; Gan, L. F.; Zhou, H. Y.; Li, X. Z.; Yu, M. Y.; Yu, W.

    2016-05-01

    Harmonic generation from linearly polarized high-intensity short-pulse laser normally impacting a solid plasma grating is investigated using analytical modeling and particle-in-cell simulation. It is found that when the radiation excited by the relativistic electron quiver motion in the laser fields suitably matches a harmonic of the grating periodicity, it will be significantly enhanced and peak with narrow angular spread in specific directions. The corresponding theory shows that the phenomenon can be attributed to an interference effect of the periodic grating on the excitation.

  19. Model of high-order harmonic generation from laser interaction with a plasma grating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S J; Zhuo, H B; Zou, D B; Gan, L F; Zhou, H Y; Li, X Z; Yu, M Y; Yu, W

    2016-05-01

    Harmonic generation from linearly polarized high-intensity short-pulse laser normally impacting a solid plasma grating is investigated using analytical modeling and particle-in-cell simulation. It is found that when the radiation excited by the relativistic electron quiver motion in the laser fields suitably matches a harmonic of the grating periodicity, it will be significantly enhanced and peak with narrow angular spread in specific directions. The corresponding theory shows that the phenomenon can be attributed to an interference effect of the periodic grating on the excitation. PMID:27300994

  20. Nonlinear modal interactions in parity-time (PT) symmetric lasers

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Li; El-Ganainy, Ramy

    2016-01-01

    Parity-time symmetric lasers have attracted considerable attention lately due to their promising applications and intriguing properties, such as free spectral range doubling and single-mode lasing. In this work we discuss nonlinear modal interactions in these laser systems under steady state conditions, and we demonstrate that several gain clamping scenarios can occur for lasing operation in the -symmetric and -broken phases. In particular, we show that, depending on the system’s design and the external pump profile, its operation in the nonlinear regime falls into two different categories: in one the system is frozen in the phase space as the applied gain increases, while in the other the system is pulled towards its exceptional point. These features are first illustrated by a coupled mode formalism and later verified by employing the Steady-state Ab-initio Laser Theory (SALT). Our findings shine light on the robustness of single-mode operation against saturation nonlinearity in -symmetric lasers. PMID:27143324

  1. An overview of the use of lasers in general dental practice: 1. Laser physics and tissue interactions.

    PubMed

    Sulieman, Munther

    2005-05-01

    High tech dentistry now involves the routine use of lasers in general dental practice for various procedures once thought only possible with the conventional dental drill or scalpel. In 1990, the first dental laser, the dLase 300 (American Dental Lasers, Corpus Christi,TX 78405 USA), was introduced to the profession. There are now many different types of laser used in dentistry using a variety of wavelengths. Each laser wavelength is absorbed differently by soft and hard tissues and the efficiency of the laser has been determined by the ability of the tissue to absorb or reflect that wavelength. This and the following article hope to give a broad overview of dental lasers and their clinical uses. This article gives an overview of the relevant laser physics and highlights the laser-tissue interactions.

  2. Refluxed electrons direct laser acceleration in ultrahigh laser and relativistic critical density plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhu, B.; Zhang, Z. M.; Zhou, W. M.; Gu, Y. Q.; Cao, L. H.

    2015-01-15

    Refluxed electrons direct laser acceleration is proposed so as to generate a high-charge energetic electron beam. When a laser pulse is incident on a relativistic critical density target, the rising edge of the pulse heats the target and the sheath fields on the both sides of the target reflux some electrons inside the expanding target. These electrons can be trapped and accelerated due to the self-transparency and the negative longitudinal electrostatic field in the expanding target. Some of the electrons can be accelerated to energies exceeding the ponderomotive limit 1/2a{sub 0}{sup 2}mc{sup 2}. Effective temperature significantly above the ponderomotive scaling is observed. Furthermore, due to the limited expanding length, the laser propagating instabilities are suppressed in the interaction. Thus, high collimated beams with tens of μC charge can be generated.

  3. Ultrashort laser pulses and ultrashort electron bunches generated in relativistic laser-plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Faure, J.; Glinec, Y.; Gallot, G.; Malka, V.

    2006-05-15

    An experimental study of the interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with underdense plasmas in the relativistic regime is presented. A parameter regime of particular interest was found: the so-called bubble regime. In this regime, the laser pulse is focused to relativistic intensities and its pulse duration is comparable to or shorter than the plasma period. A wealth of physical phenomena occurs for such physical parameters. These phenomena have multiple signatures which have been investigated experimentally: (i) the generation of a high quality electron beam (high energy, very collimated, quasimonoenergetic energy distribution); (ii) the laser pulse temporal shortening in nonlinear plasma waves. In addition, experimental results suggest that the electron beam produced in this way has temporal structures shorter than 50 fs.

  4. Inertial fusion with ultra-powerful lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabak, M.; Hammer, J.; Glinsky, M.; Kruer, W.; Wilks, S.; Woodworth, J.; Campbell, E. M.; Perry, M. D.; Mason, R.

    1993-10-01

    Ultra-high intensity lasers can be used to ignite ICF capsules with a few tens of kilojoules of light and can lead to high gain with as little as 100 kilojoules of incident laser light. We propose a scheme with three phases. First, a capsule is imploded as in the conventional approach to inertial fusion to assemble a high density fuel configuration. Second, a hole is bored through capsule corona composed of ablated material, pushing critical density close to the high density core of the capsule, by employing the ponderomotive force associated with high intensity laser light. Finally, the fuel is ignited by suprathermal electrons, produced in the high intensity laser plasma interactions, which propagate from critical density to this high density core. This paper reviews two models of energy gain in ICF capsules and explains why ultra-high intensity lasers allow access to the model producing the higher gains. This new scheme also drastically reduces the difficulty of the implosion and thereby allows lower quality fabrication and less stringent beam quality and symmetry requirements from the implosion driver. The difficulty of the fusion scheme is transferred to the technological difficulty of producing the ultra-high-intensity laser and of transporting this energy to the fuel.

  5. High-resolution multi-MeV x-ray radiography using relativistic laser-solid interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Courtois, C.; Compant La Fontaine, A.; Barbotin, M.; Bazzoli, S.; Brebion, D.; Bourgade, J. L.; Gazave, J.; Lagrange, J. M.; Landoas, O.; Le Dain, L.; Lefebvre, E.; Pichoff, N.; Edwards, R.; Aedy, C.; Biddle, L.; Drew, D.; Gardner, M.; Ramsay, M.; Simons, A.; Sircombe, N.

    2011-02-15

    When high intensity ({>=}10{sup 19} W cm{sup -2}) laser light interacts with matter, multi-MeV electrons are produced. These electrons can be utilized to generate a MeV bremsstrahlung x-ray emission spectrum as they propagate into a high-Z solid target positioned behind the interaction area. The short duration (<10 ps) and the small diameter (<500 {mu}m) of the x-ray pulse combined with the MeV x-ray spectrum offers an interesting alternative to conventional bremsstrahlung x-ray sources based on an electron accelerator used to radiograph dense, rapidly moving objects. In experiments at the Omega EP laser, a multi-MeV x-ray source is characterized consistently with number of independent diagnostics. An unfiltered x-ray dose of approximately 2 rad in air at 1 m and a source diameter of less than 350 {mu}m are inferred. Radiography of a complex and high area density (up to 61 g/cm{sup 2}) object is then performed with few hundred microns spatial resolution.

  6. Ion Acceleration from the Interaction of Ultra-Intense Lasers with Solid Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Matthew M.

    2004-01-01

    The discovery that ultra-intense laser pulses (I > 1018 W/cm2) can produce short pulse, high energy proton beams has renewed interest in the fundamental mechanisms that govern particle acceleration from laser-solid interactions. Experiments have shown that protons present as hydrocarbon contaminants on laser targets can be accelerated up to energies > 50 MeV. Different theoretical models that explain the observed results have been proposed. One model describes a front-surface acceleration mechanism based on the ponderomotive potential of the laser pulse. At high intensities (I > 1018 W/cm2), the quiver energy of an electron oscillating in the electric field of the laser pulse exceeds the electron rest mass, requiring the consideration of relativistic effects. The relativistically correct ponderomotive potential is given by Up = ([1 + Iλ2/1.3 x 1018]1/2 - 1) m{sub o}c2, where Iλ2 is the irradiance in W μm2/cm2 and moc2 is the electron rest mass. At laser irradiance of Iλ2 ~ 1020 W μm2/cm2, the ponderomotive potential can be of order several MeV. A few recent experiments--discussed in Chapter 3 of this thesis--consider this ponderomotive potential sufficiently strong to accelerate protons from the front surface of the target to energies up to tens of MeV. Another model, known as Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA), describes the mechanism as an electrostatic sheath on the back surface of the laser target. According to the TNSA model, relativistic hot electrons created at the laser-solid interaction penetrate the foil where a few escape to infinity. The remaining hot electrons are retained by the target potential and establish an electrostatic sheath on the back surface of the target. In this thesis we present several experiments that study the accelerated ions by

  7. Laser-plasma interactions in large gas-filled hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.E.; Powers, L.V.; Berger, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    Indirect-drive targets planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser consist of spherical fuel capsules enclosed in cylindrical Au hohlraums. Laser beams, arranged in cylindrical rings, heat the inside of the Au wall to produce x rays that in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Detailed calculations show that adequate implosion symmetry can be maintained by filling the hohlraum interior with low-density, low-Z gases. The plasma produced from the heated gas provides sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively. As the laser heats this gas, the gas becomes a relatively uniform plasma with small gradients in velocity and density. Such long-scale-length plasmas can be ideal mediums for stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). SBS can reflect a large fraction of the incident laser light before it is absorbed by the hohlraum; therefore, it is undesirable in an inertial confinement fusion target. To examine the importance of SBS in NIF targets, the authors used Nova to measure SBS from hohlraums with plasma conditions similar to those predicted for high-gain NIF targets. The plasmas differ from the more familiar exploding foil or solid targets as follows: they are hot (3 keV); they have high electron densities (n{sub e}=10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}); and they are nearly stationary, confined within an Au cylinder, and uniform over large distances (>2 mm). These hohlraums have <3% peak SBS backscatter for an interaction beam with intensities of 1-4 x 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, a laser wavelength of 0.351{micro}m, f/4 or f/8 focusing optics, and a variety of beam smoothing implementations. Based on these conditions the authors conclude that SBS does not appear to be a problem for NIF targets.

  8. Numerical modeling of pulsed laser-material interaction and of laser plume dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Qiang; Shi, Yina

    2015-03-10

    We have developed two-dimensional Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) code which is used to study the physical processes, the plasma absorption, the crater profile, and the temperature distribution on metallic target and below the surface. The ALE method overcomes problems with Lagrangian moving mesh distortion by mesh smoothing and conservative quantities remapping from Lagrangian mesh to smoothed one. A new second order accurate diffusion solver has been implemented for the thermal conduction and radiation transport on distorted mesh. The results of numerical simulation of pulsed laser ablation are presented. The influences of different processes, such as time evolution of the surface temperature, interspecies interactions (elastic collisions, recombination-dissociation reaction), interaction with an ambient gas are examined. The study presents particular interest for the analysis of experimental results obtained during pulsed laser ablation.

  9. Repeated high-intensity exercise in professional rugby union.

    PubMed

    Austin, Damien; Gabbett, Tim; Jenkins, David

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the frequency, duration, and nature of repeated high-intensity exercise in Super 14 rugby union. Time-motion analysis was used during seven competition matches over the 2008 and 2009 Super 14 seasons; five players from each of four positional groups (front row forwards, back row forwards, inside backs, and outside backs) were assessed (20 players in total). A repeated high-intensity exercise bout was considered to involve three or more sprints, and/or tackles and/or scrum/ruck/maul activities within 21 s during the same passage of play. The range of repeated high-intensity exercise bouts for each group in a match was as follows: 11-18 for front row forwards, 11-21 for back row forwards, 13-18 for inside backs, and 2-11 for outside backs. The durations of the most intense repeated high-intensity exercise bouts for each position ranged from 53 s to 165 s and the minimum recovery periods between repeated high-intensity exercise bouts ranged from 25 s for the back row forwards to 64 s for the front row forwards. The present results show that repeated high-intensity exercise bouts vary in duration and activities relative to position but all players in a game will average at least 10 changes in activity in the most demanding bouts and complete at least one tackle and two sprints. The most intense periods of activity are likely to last as long as 120 s and as little as 25 s recovery may separate consecutive repeated high-intensity exercise bouts. The present findings can be used by coaches to prepare their players for the most demanding passages of play likely to be experienced in elite rugby union. PMID:21756130

  10. Progress in Long Scale Length Laser-Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, S H; Arnold, P; Bardsley, G; Berger, R L; Bonanno, G; Borger, T; Bower, D E; Bowers, M; Bryant, R; Buckman, S; Burkhart, S C; Campbell, K; Chrisp, M P; Cohen, B I; Constantin, G; Cooper, F; Cox, J; Dewald, E; Divol, L; Dixit, S; Duncan, J; Eder, D; Edwards, J; Erbert, G; Felker, B; Fornes, J; Frieders, G; Froula, D H; Gardner, S D; Gates, C; Gonzalez, M; Grace, S; Gregori, G; Greenwood, A; Griffith, R; Hall, T; Hammel, B A; Haynam, C; Heestand, G; Henesian, M; Hermes, G; Hinkel, D; Holder, J; Holdner, F; Holtmeier, G; Hsing, W; Huber, S; James, T; Johnson, S; Jones, O S; Kalantar, D; Kamperschroer, J H; Kauffman, R; Kelleher, T; Knight, J; Kirkwood, R K; Kruer, W L; Labiak, W; Landen, O L; Langdon, A B; Langer, S; Latray, D; Lee, A; Lee, F D; Lund, D; MacGowan, B; Marshall, S; McBride, J; McCarville, T; McGrew, L; Mackinnon, A J; Mahavandi, S; Manes, K; Marshall, C; Mertens, E; Meezan, N; Miller, G; Montelongo, S; Moody, J D; Moses, E; Munro, D; Murray, J; Neumann, J; Newton, M; Ng, E; Niemann, C; Nikitin, A; Opsahl, P; Padilla, E; Parham, T; Parrish, G; Petty, C; Polk, M; Powell, C; Reinbachs, I; Rekow, V; Rinnert, R; Riordan, B; Rhodes, M

    2003-11-11

    The first experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have employed the first four beams to measure propagation and laser backscattering losses in large ignition-size plasmas. Gas-filled targets between 2 mm and 7 mm length have been heated from one side by overlapping the focal spots of the four beams from one quad operated at 351 nm (3{omega}) with a total intensity of 2 x 10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2}. The targets were filled with 1 atm of CO{sub 2} producing of up to 7 mm long homogeneously heated plasmas with densities of n{sub e} = 6 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} and temperatures of T{sub e} = 2 keV. The high energy in a NIF quad of beams of 16kJ, illuminating the target from one direction, creates unique conditions for the study of laser plasma interactions at scale lengths not previously accessible. The propagation through the large-scale plasma was measured with a gated x-ray imager that was filtered for 3.5 keV x rays. These data indicate that the beams interact with the full length of this ignition-scale plasma during the last {approx}1 ns of the experiment. During that time, the full aperture measurements of the stimulated Brillouin scattering and stimulated Raman scattering show scattering into the four focusing lenses of 6% for the smallest length ({approx}2 mm). increasing to 12% for {approx}7 mm. These results demonstrate the NIF experimental capabilities and further provide a benchmark for three-dimensional modeling of the laser-plasma interactions at ignition-size scale lengths.

  11. High-intensity intermittent activities at school: controversies and facts.

    PubMed

    Ratel, S; Lazaar, N; Dore, E; Baquet, G; Williams, C A; Berthoin, S; Van Praagh, E; Bedu, M; Duche, P

    2004-09-01

    In comparison to continuous aerobic type activity, little is known about high-intensity intermittent physical activity in children. Repeated short-term high-intensity activities (> maximal aerobic speed and <10 s) are more characteristic of the spontaneous physical activity of children. Recent studies have shown during repetitive bouts of sprints separated by short recovery intervals, that prepubescent children compared with adults are more able to maintain their performance without substantial fatigue. Moreover, repetitive runs at high velocities (near and higher than the maximal aerobic speed) separated by short recovery periods may elicit a high oxygen consumption in children. Several studies using interval training programmes for 7 weeks, twice a week for 30 min in physical education lessons showed that children's aerobic performance (maximal O2 uptake, maximal aerobic speed) could be enhanced. Training based on these repeated short-term high-intensity exercises could also improve children's anaerobic performance (short-term muscle power, strength and speed). Current evidence suggests that recovery from high-intensity exercises is faster in children than in adults and that repeated runs at high velocities separated by short recovery intervals can improve both aerobic and anaerobic performance. Although continuous aerobic type activity is more scientifically established as a training mode, repeated short-term high-intensity exercises in physical education programmes should be considered to enhance aerobic, as well as, anaerobic fitness in children. PMID:15756166

  12. Computation of reacting flowfield with radiation interaction in chemical lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, V.; Persselin, S.F.; Yang, T.T.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical procedure has been developed to provide a rapid and stable solution of the reacting and radiating flowfield in chemical laser cavities. A marching technique, implicit in both fluid mechanics and chemistry, is employed in solving the two-dimensional mixing layer equations. The aerokinetics and radiation interaction is calculated iteratively by solving the aerokinetic equations for the gain distribution and the propagation equations for the radiation field. In the iterative solution, a linearization method which leads to enhanced numerical efficiency is employed.

  13. Rippled beam free-electron laser amplifier using the axial free-electron laser interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-05-01

    A new microwave generation mechanism involving a scalloping annular electron beam is discussed. The beam interacts with the axial electric field of a TM{sub 0n} mode in a smooth circular waveguide through the axial free-electron laser interaction, in which the beam ripple period is synchronous with the phase slippage of the rf mode relative to the electron beam. In this paper, we analyze the ripple motion of the electron beam and derive the dispersion relation describing the exponential growth of the rf mode. We calculate the gain for a nominal design and as a function of beam current and ripple amplitude, and show that power gain on the order of 30 dB/m of interaction is achievable. We additionally demonstrate that, under the right conditions, the interaction is autoresonant. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Physics of high-intensity nanosecond electron source: Charge limit phenomenon in GaAs photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera-Gomez, A. |; Vergara, G.; Spicer, W.E.

    1996-05-01

    GaAs negative electron affinity cathodes are used as high-intensity, short-time electron source at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. When the cathodes are illuminated with high-intensity laser pulses draw peak currents that are extremely high, typically of tens of Amperes. Because of the high currents, some nonlinear effects are present. Very noticeable is the so-called charge limit (CL) effect, which consists of a limit on the total charge in each pulse; that is, the total bunch charge stops increasing as the light pulse intensity increases. The CL effect is directly related to a photovoltage built up in the surface as a consequence of the photoelectrons coming from the bulk. We discuss possible ways to minimize the formation of the surface photovoltage. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Modeling ultrafast shadowgraphy in laser-plasma interaction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siminos, E.; Skupin, S.; Sävert, A.; Cole, J. M.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Kaluza, M. C.

    2016-06-01

    Ultrafast shadowgraphy is a new experimental technique that uses few-cycle laser pulses to image density gradients in a rapidly evolving plasma. It enables structures that move at speeds close to the speed of light, such as laser driven wakes, to be visualized. Here we study the process of shadowgraphic image formation during the propagation of a few cycle probe pulse transversely through a laser-driven wake using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. In order to construct synthetic shadowgrams a near-field snapshot of the ultrashort probe pulse is analyzed by means of Fourier optics, taking into account the effect of a typical imaging setup. By comparing synthetic and experimental shadowgrams we show that the generation of synthetic data is crucial for the correct interpretation of experiments. Moreover, we study the dependence of synthetic shadowgrams on various parameters such as the imaging system aperture, the position of the object plane and the probe pulse delay, duration and wavelength. Finally, we show that time-dependent information from the interaction can be recovered from a single shot by using a broadband, chirped probe pulse and subsequent spectral filtering.

  16. Beam diagnostics at high-intensity storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M. )

    1994-10-10

    Beam diagnostics at high-intensity facilities feature their own special set of problems and characteristics, issues peculiar to high-intensity storage rings include beam loss, beam halos, extraction efficiency, beam in the gap, clearing electrodes, and beam-profile measurement. The Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) is a nice example of a high-intensity storage ring. I will discuss in some detail three diagnostic systems currently in use at the PSR: the beam-loss-monitor system, the electron-clearing system, and the beam-in-the-gap monitor. Much of our discussion is inspired by the problems we have encountered and the useful things we have learned while commissioning and developing the PSR. Another inspiration is our work on the next-generation neutron-spallation source, also known as the National Center for Neutron Research (NCNR).

  17. Beam diagnostics at high-intensity storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.

    1993-11-01

    Beam diagnostics at high-intensity facilities feature their own special set of problems and characteristics. Issues peculiar to high-intensity storage rings include beam loss, beam halos, extraction efficiency, beam in the gap, clearing electrodes, and beam-profile measurement. The Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) is a nice example of a high-intensity storage ring. The author discusses in some detail three diagnostic systems currently in use at the PSR: the beam-loss-monitor system, the electron-clearing system, and the beam-in-the-gap monitor. Much of the discussion is inspired by the problems that were encountered and the useful things learned while commissioning and developing the PSR. Another inspiration is the work on the next-generation neutron-spallation source, also known as the National Center for Neutron Research (NCNR).

  18. High-intensity aerobic interval exercise in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Philippe; Gayda, Mathieu; Juneau, Martin; Nigam, Anil

    2013-06-01

    Aerobic exercise training is strongly recommended in patients with heart failure (HF) and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) to improve symptoms and quality of life. Moderate-intensity aerobic continuous exercise (MICE) is the best established training modality in HF patients. For about a decade, however, another training modality, high-intensity aerobic interval exercise (HIIE), has aroused considerable interest in cardiac rehabilitation. Originally used by athletes, HIIE consists of repeated bouts of high-intensity exercise interspersed with recovery periods. The rationale for its use is to increase exercise time spent in high-intensity zones, thereby increasing the training stimulus. Several studies have demonstrated that HIIE is more effective than MICE, notably for improving exercise capacity in patients with HF. The aim of the present review is to describe the general principles of HIIE prescription, the acute physiological effects, the longer-term training effects, and finally the future perspectives of HIIE in patients with HF.

  19. Leukocyte-endothelium interaction: measurement by laser tweezers force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Kang; Chiu, Jeng-Jiann; Lee, Ming-Rou; Chou, Shih-Chin; Chen, Li-Jing; Hwang, Ned H C

    2006-09-01

    Leukocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium is an initial step of many inflammatory diseases. Although the atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of leukocyte-endothelial interaction have been recently introduced. with cell adhesion force unbinding curves (CAFUC). We obtained pico-Newton force in the initial interaction between a single living THP-1 cell and HUVEC monolayer using a custom-built laser tweezers (LT) system. The measured quantities included the non-linear force-distance relationship, and the effect of yielding in cell detachment. It is possible to introduce a time scale into the LT cell-detachment experiments for further exploration and more detailed information on the viscoelastic properties of living cells. PMID:16960761

  20. Laser-solid interaction and dynamics of the laser-ablated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.R.; Leboeuf, J.N.; Geohegan, D.B.; Wood, R.F.; Donato, J.M.; Liu, C.L.; Puretzky, A.A.

    1995-07-01

    Rapid transformations through the liquid and vapor phases induced by laser-solid interactions are described by the authors` thermal model with the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to determine the vaporization temperature under different surface pressure condition. Hydrodynamic behavior of the vapor during and after ablation is described by gas dynamic equations. These two models are coupled. Modeling results show that lower background pressure results lower laser energy density threshold for vaporization. The ablation rate and the amount of materials removed are proportional to the laser energy density above its threshold. The authors also demonstrate a dynamic source effect that accelerates the unsteady expansion of laser-ablated material in the direction perpendicular to the solid. A dynamic partial ionization effect is studied as well. A self-similar theory shows that the maximum expansion velocity is proportional to c{sub s}{alpha}, where 1 {minus} {alpha} is the slope of the velocity profile. Numerical hydrodynamic modeling is in good agreement with the theory. With these effects, {alpha} is reduced. Therefore, the expansion front velocity is significantly higher than that from conventional models. The results are consistent with experiments. They further study how the plume propagates in high background gas condition. Under appropriate conditions, the plume is slowed down, separates with the background, is backward moving, and hits the solid surface. Then, it splits into two parts when it rebounds from the surface. The results from the modeling will be compared with experimental observations where possible.

  1. Free electron laser (FEL) laser-tissue interaction with human cornea and optic nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, Karen M.; Edwards, Glenn S.; Shen, Jin-Hui; Shetlar, Debra J.; Robinson, Richard D.; O'Day, Denis M.

    1996-05-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) may be tuned to novel wavelengths to explore laser-tissue interactions for development or improvement of laser surgical procedures. This study investigated the effect of selected infrared wavelengths upon human cornea and optic nerve tissues. Human cadaver eyes were placed in 10% dextran solution to normalize corneal thickness, and solution was injected intraocularly to achieve a physiologic intraocular pressure. The corneas and optic nerves were lased with the 6.0 micrometer amide I band, 6.1 micrometer water absorbency peak, 6.45 micrometer amide II band, and 7.7 micrometer. The Vanderbilt FEL produces 5 microsecond long macropulses at 10 Hz with each macropulse consisting of 1 ps micropulses at 3 GHz. Histologic examination of the corneal tissue showed the least amount of collateral damage (10 - 20 micrometers) with the 6.0 micrometer amide I band, while marked shrinkage occurred with the 7.7 micrometer wavelength. For optic nerve tissue, the least amount of collateral damage (0 micrometer visible) occurred at 6.1 micrometer water absorbency peak and 6.45 micrometer amide II band, while the most damage (30 - 50 micrometers) was observed with the 7.7 micrometer wavelength. We conclude that different tissues may have different optimal wavelengths for surgical laser procedures.

  2. Analytical model for interaction of short intense laser pulse with solid target

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, S. X.; Ma, G. J.; Yu, Wei; Yu, M. Y.; Zhang, Q. J.; Sheng, Z. M.; Murakami, M.

    2011-04-15

    A simple but comprehensive two-dimensional analytical model for the interaction of a normally incident short intense laser pulse with a solid-density plasma is proposed. Electron cavitation near the target surface by the laser ponderomotive force induces a strong local electrostatic charge-separation field. The cavitation makes possible mode conversion of the laser light into longitudinal electron oscillation at laser frequency, even for initial normal incidence of laser pulse. The intense charge-separation field in the cavity can significantly enhance the laser induced uxB electron oscillation at twice laser frequency to density levels even higher than that of the initial target.

  3. Negative ion beam generation in laser plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jequier, Sophie; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir; Ter-Avetisyan, Sargis

    2013-10-01

    Detection of a large number of energetic negative ions and neutral atoms have been reported in recent intense laser plasma interaction experiments. These particles were produced from fast positive ions (proton, carbon, oxygen) accelerated from a laser produced plasma when they were passing through a cold spray of water or ethanol. The negative ions formation is strongly related to the fast positive ions, and it is explained by a process of a single electron capture - loss. Double charge exchange, elastic scattering and energy loss phenomena have been neglected since their cross sections are much smaller. Assuming independent atoms approximation, we study populations evolution through the interaction zone analytically and numerically by solving the rate equations using cross sections drawn from literature. Taking into account the energy distribution of the incident ions, the calculations give the final energy distribution for the different species that can be compared to experimental spectra. First results obtained for hydrogen in the water case indicate that this model can explain the main observed features. The results concerning the carbon and oxygen ions will be also presented as well as refinement of the cross sections since some cross sections are missing for these energies.

  4. Enhancement of laser plasma extreme ultraviolet emission by shockwave-laser interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bruijn, Rene de; Koshelev, Konstantin N.; Zakharov, Serguei V.; Novikov, Vladimir G.; Bijkerk, Fred

    2005-04-15

    A double laser pulse heating scheme has been applied to generate plasmas with enhanced emission in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). The plasmas were produced by focusing two laser beams (prepulse and main pulse) with a small spatial separation between the foci on a xenon gas jet target. Prepulses with ps-duration were applied to obtain high shockwave densities, following indications of earlier published results obtained using ns prepulses. EUV intensities around 13.5 nm and in the range 5-20 nm were recorded, and a maximum increase in intensity exceeding 2 was measured at an optimal delay of 140 ns between prepulse and main pulse. The gain in intensity is explained by the interaction of the shockwave produced by the prepulse with the xenon in the beam waist of the main pulse. Extensive simulation was done using the radiative magnetohydrodynamic code Z{sup *}.

  5. Efficient laser absorption and enhanced electron yield in the laser-target interaction by using a cone-nanolayer target

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Lihua; Cai Hongbao; Chen Mo; Wu Sizhong; Zhao Zongqing; Gu Yuqiu; Yu Wei; Yu, M. Y.; He, X. T.

    2011-05-15

    A cone-nanolayer target that combines the advantages of the conical and layered geometries for electron acceleration in laser-target interaction is proposed. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations show that the cone-nanolayer target can enhance laser absorption and electron yield. With suitable choice of the laser and target parameters, the cone-nanolayer target can be a controllable source of hot electrons at desired energy ranges.

  6. Interaction between high power 532nm laser and prostatic tissue: in vivo evaluation for laser prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Reza; Kang, Hyun Wook; Peng, Steven Yihlih; Stinson, Douglas; Beck, Michael; Koullick, Ed

    2011-03-01

    A previous in vitro study demonstrated that 180W was the optimal power to reduce photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) time for larger prostate glands. In this study, we investigated anatomic and histologic outcomes and ablation parameters of 180W laser performed with a new 750-μm side-firing fiber in a survival study of living canines. Eight male canines underwent anterograde PVP with the 180W 532-nm laser. Four each animals were euthanized 3 hours or 8 weeks postoperatively. Prostates were measured and histologically analyzed after hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC), or Gomori trichrome (GT) staining. Compared to the previous 120W laser, PVP with the 180W laser bloodlessly created a 76% larger cavity (mean 11.8 vs. 6.7 cm3; p=0.014) and ablated tissue at a 77% higher rate (mean 2.3 vs. 1.3 cm3/min; p=0.03) while H&E- and TTC-staining demonstrated its 33% thicker mean coagulation zone (2.0+/-0.4 vs. 1.5+/-0.3 mm). H&E-stained cross-sectional prostatic tissue specimens from the 3-hour (acute) group showed histologic evolution of concentric non-viable coagulation zone, partially viable hyperemic transition zone of repair, and viable non-treated zone. H&E- and GT-stained specimens from the 8-week (chronic) group revealed healed circumferentially epithelialized, non-edematous, prostatic urethral channels with no increase in collagen in the subjacent prostatic tissue vis-á-vis the normal control. Our canine study demonstrates that 180W 532-nm laser PVP with its new fiber has a significantly higher ablation rate with a more hemostatic coagulation zone, but equally favorable tissue interaction and healing, compared with our previous 120W canine study.

  7. High-intensity and resistance training and elite young athletes.

    PubMed

    Ratel, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Although in the past resistance and high-intensity exercise training among young children was the subject of numerous controversies, it is now well-documented that this training mode is a safe and effective means of developing maximal strength, maximal power output and athletic performance in youth, provided that exercises are performed with appropriate supervision and precautions. Muscular strength and power output values measured from vertical jump and Wingate anaerobic tests are higher in elite than in non-elite young athletes and normal children, and the specific training effects on maximal power output normalised for body size are clearly more distinct before puberty. At present, there is no scientific evidence to support the view that high-intensity and/or resistance training might hinder growth and maturation in young children. Pre-pubertal growth is not adversely affected by sport at a competitive level and anthropometric factors are of importance for choice of sport in children. However, coaches, teachers and parents should be aware that unsupervised high-intensity and resistance training programmes involving maximal loads or too frequently repeated resistance exercises increase the risk of injury. Resistance training alone is an effective additional means of developing athletic performance throughout planned youth sports training programmes. Strategies for enhancing the effectiveness and safety of youth resistance and high-intensity exercise training are discussed in this chapter. PMID:21178368

  8. Conceptual design of a superconducting high-intensity proton linac

    SciTech Connect

    Dominic Chan, K.C.

    1996-09-01

    A SCRF (superconducting RF linac) has been developed for a high-intensity proton linac which will be used as the driver for neutron sources. This design is conservative, using current SCRF technologies. As well as lowering operating cost, the design offers performance advantages in availability, beam loss, and upgradability, which are important for the application as a neutron source.

  9. High-Intensity Interval Training for Improving Postprandial Hyperglycemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Jonathan P.; Francois, Monique E.

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has garnered attention in recent years as a time-efficient exercise option for improving cardiovascular and metabolic health. New research demonstrates that HIIT may be particularly effective for improving postprandial hyperglycemia in individuals with, or at risk for, type 2 diabetes (T2D). These findings…

  10. Clinical applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    She, W H; Cheung, T T; Jenkins, C R; Irwin, M G

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound has been developed for therapeutic use in addition to its diagnostic ability. The use of focused ultrasound energy can offer a non-invasive method for tissue ablation, and can therefore be used to treat various solid tumours. High-intensity focused ultrasound is being increasingly used in the treatment of both primary and metastatic tumours as these can be precisely located for ablation. It has been shown to be particularly useful in the treatment of uterine fibroids, and various solid tumours including those of the pancreas and liver. High-intensity focused ultrasound is a valid treatment option for liver tumours in patients with significant medical co-morbidity who are at high risk for surgery or who have relatively poor liver function that may preclude hepatectomy. It has also been used as a form of bridging therapy while patients awaiting cadaveric donor liver transplantation. In this article, we outline the principles of high-intensity focused ultrasound and its clinical applications, including the management protocol development in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma in Hong Kong by performing a search on MEDLINE (OVID), EMBASE, and PubMed. The search of these databases ranged from the date of their establishment until December 2015. The search terms used were: high-intensity focused ultrasound, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, liver tumour, hepatocellular carcinoma, pancreas, renal cell carcinoma, prostate cancer, breast cancer, fibroids, bone tumour, atrial fibrillation, glaucoma, Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and neuropathic pain. PMID:27380753

  11. Nonlinear behavior in high-intensity discharge lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Bernd; Schwieger, Joerg; Wolff, Marcus; Manders, Freddy; Suijker, Jos

    2016-06-01

    The light flicker problem of high intensity discharge lamps is studied numerically and experimentally. It is shown that in some respects the systems behave very similar to the forced Duffing oscillator with a softening spring. In particular, the jump phenomenon and hysteresis are observed in the simulations and in the experiments.

  12. Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Liska, Donald J.; Schamaun, Roger G.; Clark, Donald C.; Potter, R. Christopher; Frank, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

  13. Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Liska, D.J.; Schamaun, R.G.; Clark, D.C.; Potter, R.C.; Frank, J.A.

    1980-03-11

    The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

  14. High Intensity Pressure Noise Transmission in Human Ear: A Three Dimensional Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawa, Takumi; Gan, Rong; Leckness, Kegan

    2015-03-01

    High intensity pressure noise generated by explosions and jet engines causes auditory damage and hearing loss of the military service personals, which are the most common disabilities in the veterans. Authors have investigated the high intensity pressure noise transmission from the ear canal to middle ear cavity. A fluid-structure interaction with a viscoelastic model for the tympanic membrane (TM) as well as the ossicular chain has been considered in the study. For the high intensity pressure simulation the geometry of the ear was based on a 3D finite element (FE) model of the human ear reported by Gan et al. (Ann Biomed Eng 2004). The model consists of the ear canal, TM, ossicular chain, and the middle ear cavity. The numerical approach includes two steps: 1) FE based finite-volume method simulation to compute pressure distributions in the ear canal and the middle ear cavity using CFX; and 2) FE modeling of TM and middle ear ossicles in response to high intensity sound using multi-physics analysis in ANSYS. The simulations provide the displacement of the TM/ossicular chain and the pressure fields in the ear canal and the middle ear cavity. These results are compared with human temporal bone experimental data obtained in our group. This work was supported by DOD W81XWH-14-1-0228.

  15. Measurement of the relaxation time of hot electrons in laser-solid interaction at relativistic laser intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Shepherd, R; Chung, H K; Dyer, G; Faenov, A; Fournier, K B; Hansen, S B; Hunter, J; Kemp, A; Pikuz, T; Ping, Y; Widmann, K; Wilks, S C; Beiersdorfer, P

    2006-08-22

    The authors have measured the relaxation time of hot electrons in short pulse laser-solid interactions using a picosecond time-resolved x-ray spectrometer and a time-integrated electron spectrometer. Employing laser intensities of 10{sup 17}, 10{sup 18}, and 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, they find increased laser coupling to hot electrons as the laser intensity becomes relativistic and thermalization of hot electrons at timescales on the order of 10 ps at all laser intensities. They propose a simple model based on collisional coupling and plasma expansion to describe the rapid relaxation of hot electrons. The agreement between the resulting K{sub {alpha}} time-history from this model with the experiments is best at highest laser intensity and less satisfactory at the two lower laser intensities.

  16. High efficiency proton beam generation through target thickness control in femtosecond laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J. S. Robinson, A. P. L.; Booth, N.; Carroll, D. C.; Rusby, D.; Wilson, L.; Dance, R. J.; Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; McKenna, P.; Murphy, C. D.

    2014-05-26

    Bright proton beams with maximum energies of up to 30 MeV have been observed in an experiment investigating ion sheath acceleration driven by a short pulse (<50 fs) laser. The scaling of maximum proton energy and total beam energy content at ultra-high intensities of ∼10{sup 21} W cm{sup −2} was investigated, with the interplay between target thickness and laser pre-pulse found to be a key factor. While the maximum proton energies observed were maximised for μm-thick targets, the total proton energy content was seen to peak for thinner, 500 nm, foils. The total proton beam energy reached up to 440 mJ (a conversion efficiency of 4%), marking a significant step forward for many laser-driven ion applications. The experimental results are supported by hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations.

  17. Current new applications of laser plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hauer, A.A.; Forslund, D.W.; McKinstrie, C.J.; Wark, J.S.; Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Hamil, R.A.; Kindel, J.M.

    1988-09-01

    This report describes several new applications of laser-produced plasmas that have arisen in the last few years. Most of the applications have been an outgrowth of the active research in laser/matter interaction inspired by the pursuit of laser fusion. Unusual characteristics of high-intensity laser/matter interaction, such as intense x-ray and particle emission, were noticed early in the field and are now being employed in a significant variety of applications outside the fusion filed. Applications range from biology to materials science to pulsed-power control and particle accelerators. 92 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Molecules and Clusters in Intense Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posthumus, Jan

    2001-06-01

    Preface; 1. Ultra-high intensity based on Ti:Sapphire Philip F. Taday and Andrew J. Langley; 2. Diatomic molecules in intense laser fields Jan H. Posthumus and James F. McCann; 3. Small polyatomic molecules in intense laser fields C. Cornaggia; 4. Coherent control in intense laser fields Eric Charron and Brian Sheehy; 5. Experimental studies of laser-heated rare gas clusters M. Lezius and M. Schmidt; 6. Single cluster explosions and high harmonic generation John W. G. Tisch and Emma Springate; 7. Intense laser interaction with extended cluster media Roland A. Smith and Todd Ditmire.

  19. Molecules and Clusters in Intense Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posthumus, Jan

    2009-09-01

    Preface; 1. Ultra-high intensity based on Ti:Sapphire Philip F. Taday and Andrew J. Langley; 2. Diatomic molecules in intense laser fields Jan H. Posthumus and James F. McCann; 3. Small polyatomic molecules in intense laser fields C. Cornaggia; 4. Coherent control in intense laser fields Eric Charron and Brian Sheehy; 5. Experimental studies of laser-heated rare gas clusters M. Lezius and M. Schmidt; 6. Single cluster explosions and high harmonic generation John W. G. Tisch and Emma Springate; 7. Intense laser interaction with extended cluster media Roland A. Smith and Todd Ditmire.

  20. High intensity compact Compton X-ray sources: Challenges and potential of applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, M.

    2014-07-01

    Thanks to the exceptional development of high power femtosecond lasers in the last 15 years, Compton based X-ray sources are in full development over the world in the recent years. Compact Compton sources are able to combine the compactness of the instrument with a beam of high intensity, high quality, tunable in energy. In various fields of applications such as biomedical science, cultural heritage preservation and material science researches, these sources should provide an easy working environment and the methods currently used at synchrotrons could be largely developed in a lab-size environment as hospitals, labs, or museums.

  1. A Non-destructive Imaging Method for Detecting Defect in Mortal Sample by High-intensity Aerial Ultrasonic Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osumi, Ayumu; Ito, Youichi

    We have studied a method of non-contact ultrasonic inspection that uses high-intensity aerial ultrasonic waves and optical equipment. Specially, the object is excited in noncontact way using high-intensity aerial ultrasonic waves and the vibration velocity on the object surface is measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). We analysis the vibration information on the surface of the object with the defect area and image the defect shape in materials. In this paper, it was examined to detect the defect in mortal by proposed method.

  2. Mono-Energetic Beams from Laser Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth,Cs.; van Tilborg, J.; Cary, John R.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Nieter, Chet

    2005-05-09

    A laser driven wakefield accelerator has been tuned to produce high energy electron bunches with low emittance and energy spread by extending the interaction length using a plasma channel. Wakefield accelerators support gradients thousands of times those achievable in RF accelerators, but short acceleration distance, limited by diffraction, has resulted in low energy beams with 100 percent electron energy spread. In the present experiments on the L'OASIS laser, the relativistically intense drive pulse was guided over 10 diffraction ranges by a plasma channel. At a drive pulse power of 9 TW, electrons were trapped from the plasma and beams of percent energy spread containing > 200 pC charge above 80 MeV and with normalized emittance estimated at< 2pi-mm-mrad were produced. Data and simulations (VORPAL code) show the high quality bunch was formed when beam loading turned off injection after initial trapping, and when the particles were extracted as they dephased from the wake. Up to 4TW was guided without trapping, potentially providing a platform for controlled injection. The plasma channel technique forms the basis of a new class of accelerators, with high gradients and high beam quality.

  3. Energy transport in laser-plasma interactions: a UK perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Kathryn

    2008-11-01

    A range of experimental and theoretical work has been performed recently to gain a greater insight into energy transport in laser plasma interactions. Experiments have been performed on the VULCAN Petawatt facility in the UK and the LULI2000 facility in France to look at energy transport as a function of a number of different parameters. The parameters studied range from the introduction of controlled pre-pulses, material properties / target geometry through to absorption as a function of density scale length. A wide range of diagnostics were used such as transverse shadowgraphy, rear-side optical emission imaging, X-ray imaging and spectroscopy, and streaked harmonic measurements. To support and stimulate this work, computational tools such as Vlasov-Fokker-Planck (LEDA, K2 (K2 constructed by M. Sherlock)) and radiation hydrodynamic codes. One highlight that will be discussed in detail is the observation of changes to the beam divergence pattern with the addition of a cone-guide. Preliminary results from very recent studies conducted at the VULCAN facility to study the characterization and energy transport in warm dense matter in the context of the HiPER project will be presented. A.P.L Robinson et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 025002 2008 K.L.Lancaster et al, submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett www.hiper-laser.org

  4. Electromagnetic Pulses Generated From Laser Target Interactions at Shenguang II Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinwen; Li, Tingshuai; Yi, Tao; Wang, Chuanke; Yang, Ming; Yang, Weiming; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2016-10-01

    Significant electromagnetic pulses (EMP) can be generated by the intensive laser irradiating solid targets in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). To evaluate the EMP intensity and distribution in and outside the laser chamber, we designed and fabricated a discone antenna with ultra-wide bands of over 10 GHz. The return loss (S11 parameter) of this antenna was below -10 dB and could even achieve under -30 dB at 3.1 GHz. The EMP intensity in this study at 80 cm and 40 cm away from the target chamber center (TCC) reached 400 kV/m and 2000 kV/m. The current results are expected to offer preliminary information to study physics regarding laser plasma interactions and will also lay experimental foundation for EMI shielding design to protect various diagnostics. supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. ZYGX2015J108) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11575166 and 51581140)

  5. Laser-nucleus interactions: The quasi-adiabatic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pálffy, Adriana; Buss, Oliver; Hoefer, Axel; Weidenmüller, Hans A.

    2015-10-01

    The interaction between nuclei and a strong zeptosecond laser pulse with coherent MeV photons is investigated theoretically. We provide a first semiquantitative study of the quasi-adiabatic regime where the photon absorption rate is comparable to the nuclear equilibration rate. In that regime, multiple photon absorption leads to the formation of a compound nucleus in the so-far unexplored regime of excitation energies several hundred MeV above the yrast line. The temporal dynamics of the process is investigated by means of a set of master equations that account for dipole absorption, stimulated dipole emission, neutron decay, and induced fission in a chain of nuclei. That set is solved numerically by means of state-of-the-art matrix exponential methods also used in nuclear fuel burn-up and radioactivity transport calculations. Our quantitative estimates predict the excitation path and range of nuclei reached by neutron decay and provide relevant information for the layout of future experiments.

  6. Occasional Addresses by Edward Teller at Conferences of Laser Interaction and Related Plasma Phenomena (LIRPP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, Heinrich; Miley, George H.

    2016-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Futurology of High Intensity Lasers (LIRPP Vol. 3A) * Lecture in Connection with the Edward Teller Medal Award (LIRPP Vol. 10) * Photo of the First Recipients of the Edward Teller Medal in 1991 * Photos from the Edward Teller Medal Celebration in 1997 * Photo with Participants of the LIRPP No. 12 Conference, 1995 * Photo with Edward Teller Medalists at IFSA01, Kyoto, 2001 * Keynote Address: The Edward Teller Lecture (LIRPP Vol. 11) * Keynote Address: Dr. Edward Teller (LIRPP Vol. 12) * Teller Award Presentation and Keynote Address (LIRPP Vol. 13) * Laudations of Awardees 1991-1995 (LIRPP Vol. 13) * Laudations of Awardees 1999-2003

  7. High intensity muon beam source for neutrino beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal Sayed, Hisham

    2015-09-01

    High intensity muon beams are essential for Muon accelerators like Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders. In this study we report on a global optimization of the muon beam production and capture based on end-to-end simulations of the Muon Front End. The study includes the pion beam production target geometry, capture field profile, and forming muon beam into microbunches for further acceleration. The interplay between the transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics during the capture and transport of muon beam is evaluated and discussed. The goal of the optimization is to provide a set of design parameters that delivers high intensity muon beam that could be fit within the acceptance of a muon beam accelerator.

  8. Review of High-intensity Interval Training in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shigenori; Mizoguchi, Tatsuya; Saeki, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    For the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is required. This involves optimal medical therapy, education on nutrition and exercise therapy, and smoking cessation. Of these, efficient exercise therapy is a key factor. A highly effective training protocol is therefore warranted, which requires a high rate of compliance. Although moderate-intensity continuous training has been the main training regimen recommended in cardiac rehabilitation guidelines, high-intensity interval training has been reported to be more effective in the clinical and experimental setting from the standpoint of peak oxygen uptake and central and peripheral adaptations. In this review, we illustrate the scientific evidence for high-intensity interval training. We then verify this evidence and discuss its significance and the remaining issues. PMID:27580530

  9. Review of High-intensity Interval Training in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shigenori; Mizoguchi, Tatsuya; Saeki, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    For the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is required. This involves optimal medical therapy, education on nutrition and exercise therapy, and smoking cessation. Of these, efficient exercise therapy is a key factor. A highly effective training protocol is therefore warranted, which requires a high rate of compliance. Although moderate-intensity continuous training has been the main training regimen recommended in cardiac rehabilitation guidelines, high-intensity interval training has been reported to be more effective in the clinical and experimental setting from the standpoint of peak oxygen uptake and central and peripheral adaptations. In this review, we illustrate the scientific evidence for high-intensity interval training. We then verify this evidence and discuss its significance and the remaining issues.

  10. Engineering Food Ingredients with High-Intensity Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Jochen; Kristbergsson, Kristberg; Kjartansson, Gunnar Thor

    The use of ultrasound in the food industry has increased in the last decades. Ultrasound has been used both to analyze food structure and composition at low ultrasonic intensities and high frequencies and to modify ingredients at high ultrasonic intensities and low frequencies. Application of the latter is referred to as high-intensity (power) ultrasonication and is generally carried out at frequencies of =0.1 MHz and ultrasonic intensities of 10-100 W cm-2. In the food industry, power ultrasonication has proved to be a highly effective food processing and preservation technology, and use of high-intensity ultrasound with or without heat may be used, for example, to denature enzymes, aid in the extraction of valuable compounds from plants and seeds, tenderize meat, and homogenize or disperse two-phase systems such as emulsions or suspensions (Mason et al., 1996).

  11. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy: an Overview for Radiologists

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-sun; Choi, Min Joo; Lim, Hyo Keun; Choi, Dongil

    2008-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound therapy is a novel, emerging, therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves, propagated through tissue media, as carriers of energy. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation as well as hemostasis, thrombolysis and targeted drug/gene delivery. However, the application of this technology still has many drawbacks. It is expected that current obstacles to implementation will be resolved in the near future. In this review, we provide an overview of high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy from the basic physics to recent clinical studies with an interventional radiologist's perspective for the purpose of improving the general understanding of this cutting-edge technology as well as speculating on future developments. PMID:18682666

  12. PULSED POWER APPLICATIONS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON RINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG, S.Y.; SANDBERG, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    Pulsed power technology has been applied in particle accelerators and storage rings for over four decades. It is most commonly used in injection, extraction, beam manipulation, source, and focusing systems. These systems belong to the class of repetitive pulsed power. In this presentation, we review and discuss the history, present status, and future challenge of pulsed power applications in high intensity proton accelerators and storage rings.

  13. An improved high intensity recycling helium-3 beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Hedgeland, H.; Kole, P. R.; Allison, W.; Ellis, J.; Jardine, A. P.

    2009-07-15

    We describe an improved high intensity, recycling, supersonic atomic beam source. Changes address several issues previously limiting performance and reliability of the apparatus, including the use of newly available vacuum pumps and modifications to the recycling system. We achieve a source intensity of 2.5x10{sup 19} atoms/s/sr, almost twice that previously achievable during recycling. Current limits on intensity are discussed.

  14. Beta-alanine supplementation in high-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Harris, Roger C; Sale, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Glycolysis involves the oxidation of two neutral hydroxyl groups on each glycosyl (or glucosyl) unit metabolised, yielding two carboxylic acid groups. During low-intensity exercise these, along with the remainder of the carbon skeleton, are further oxidised to CO(2) and water. But during high-intensity exercise a major portion (and where blood flow is impaired, then most) is accumulated as lactate anions and H(+). The accumulation of H(+) has deleterious effects on muscle function, ultimately impairing force production and contributing to fatigue. Regulation of intracellular pH is achieved over time by export of H(+) out of the muscle, although physicochemical buffers in the muscle provide the first line of defence against H(+) accumulation. In order to be effective during high-intensity exercise, buffers need to be present in high concentrations in muscle and have pK(a)s within the intracellular exercise pH transit range. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is ideal for this role given that it occurs in millimolar concentrations within the skeletal muscle and has a pK(a) of 6.83. Carnosine is a cytoplasmic dipeptide formed by bonding histidine and β-alanine in a reaction catalysed by carnosine synthase, although it is the availability of β-alanine, obtained in small amounts from hepatic synthesis and potentially in greater amounts from the diet that is limiting to synthesis. Increasing muscle carnosine through increased dietary intake of β-alanine will increase the intracellular buffering capacity, which in turn might be expected to increase high-intensity exercise capacity and performance where this is pH limited. In this study we review the role of muscle carnosine as an H(+) buffer, the regulation of muscle carnosine by β-alanine, and the available evidence relating to the effects of β-alanine supplementation on muscle carnosine synthesis and the subsequent effects of this on high-intensity exercise capacity and performance.

  15. Silicone rubber curing by high intensity infrared radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, T.; Tsai, J.; Cherng, C.; Chen, J.

    1994-08-10

    A high-intensity (12 kW) and compact (80 cm) infrared heating oven for fast curing (12 seconds) of tube-like silicone rubber curing studies is reported. Quality inspection by DSC and DMA and results from pilot-scale curing oven all suggest that infrared heating provides a better way of vulcanization regarding to curing time, quality, cost, and spacing over conventional hot air heating. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  16. NUMERICAL METHODS FOR THE SIMULATION OF HIGH INTENSITY HADRON SYNCHROTRONS.

    SciTech Connect

    LUCCIO, A.; D'IMPERIO, N.; MALITSKY, N.

    2005-09-12

    Numerical algorithms for PIC simulation of beam dynamics in a high intensity synchrotron on a parallel computer are presented. We introduce numerical solvers of the Laplace-Poisson equation in the presence of walls, and algorithms to compute tunes and twiss functions in the presence of space charge forces. The working code for the simulation here presented is SIMBAD, that can be run as stand alone or as part of the UAL (Unified Accelerator Libraries) package.

  17. Ion source and injection line for high intensity medical cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, XianLu Guan, Fengping; Yao, Hongjuan; Zhang, TianJue; Yang, Jianjun; Song, Guofang; Ge, Tao; Qin, Jiuchang

    2014-02-15

    A 14 MeV high intensity compact cyclotron, CYCIAE-14, was built at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). An injection system based on the external H− ion source was used on CYCIAE-14 so as to provide high intensity beam, while most positron emission tomography cyclotrons adopt internal ion source. A beam intensity of 100 μA/14 MeV was extracted from the cyclotron with a small multi-cusp H− ion source (CIAE-CH-I type) and a short injection line, which the H− ion source of 3 mA/25 keV H− beam with emittance of 0.3π mm mrad and the injection line of with only 1.2 m from the extraction of ion source to the medial plane of the cyclotron. To increase the extracted beam intensity of the cyclotron, a new ion source (CIAE-CH-II type) of 9.1 mA was used, with maximum of 500 μA was achieved from the cyclotron. The design and test results of the ion source and injection line optimized for high intensity acceleration will be given in this paper.

  18. Ion source and injection line for high intensity medical cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, XianLu; Guan, Fengping; Yao, Hongjuan; Zhang, TianJue; Yang, Jianjun; Song, Guofang; Ge, Tao; Qin, Jiuchang

    2014-02-01

    A 14 MeV high intensity compact cyclotron, CYCIAE-14, was built at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). An injection system based on the external H- ion source was used on CYCIAE-14 so as to provide high intensity beam, while most positron emission tomography cyclotrons adopt internal ion source. A beam intensity of 100 μA/14 MeV was extracted from the cyclotron with a small multi-cusp H- ion source (CIAE-CH-I type) and a short injection line, which the H- ion source of 3 mA/25 keV H- beam with emittance of 0.3π mm mrad and the injection line of with only 1.2 m from the extraction of ion source to the medial plane of the cyclotron. To increase the extracted beam intensity of the cyclotron, a new ion source (CIAE-CH-II type) of 9.1 mA was used, with maximum of 500 μA was achieved from the cyclotron. The design and test results of the ion source and injection line optimized for high intensity acceleration will be given in this paper.

  19. Effects of laser-plasma interactions on terahertz radiation from solid targets irradiated by ultrashort intense laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chun; Zhou Mulin; Ding Wenjun; Du Fei; Liu Feng; Li Yutong; Wang Weimin; Ma Jinglong; Chen Liming; Lu Xin; Dong Quanli; Wang Zhaohua; Wei Zhiyi; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie; Lou Zheng; Shi Shengcai

    2011-09-15

    Interactions of 100-fs laser pulses with solid targets at intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} and resultant terahertz (THz) radiation are studied under different laser contrast ratio conditions. THz emission is measured in the specular reflection direction, which appears to decrease as the laser contrast ratio varies from 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -6}. Correspondingly, the frequency spectra of the reflected light are observed changing from second harmonic dominant, three-halves harmonic dominant, to vanishing of both harmonics. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation also suggests that this observation is correlated with the plasma density scale length change. The results demonstrate that the THz emission is closely related to the laser-plasma interaction processes. The emission is strong when resonance absorption is a key feature of the interaction, and becomes much weaker when parametric instabilities dominate.

  20. Impurity and defect interactions during laser thermal annealing in Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milazzo, R.; Impellizzeri, G.; Piccinotti, D.; La Magna, A.; Fortunato, G.; De Salvador, D.; Carnera, A.; Portavoce, A.; Mangelinck, D.; Privitera, V.; Napolitani, E.

    2016-01-01

    The microscopic mechanisms involving dopants, contaminants, and defects in Ge during pulsed melting laser thermal annealing (LTA) are investigated in detail. Samples both un-implanted and implanted with As or B are processed by LTA as well as characterized in terms of chemical (1D and 3D), electrical, and strain profiling. The clustering of As is directly measured by 3D chemical profiling and correlated with its partial electrical activation along with a reduction of the lattice strain induced by As atoms. A semi-quantitative microscopic model involving the interaction with mobile As-vacancy (AsV) complexes is proposed to describe the clustering mechanism. Boron is shown to follow different clustering behavior that changes with depth and marked by completely different strain levels. Oxygen penetrates from the surface into all the samples as a result of LTA and, only in un-implanted Ge, it occupies an interstitial position inducing also positive strain in the lattice. On the contrary, data suggest that the presence of As or B forces O to assume different configurations with negligible strain, through O-V or O-B interactions for the two dopant species, respectively. These data suggest that LTA does not inject a significant amount of vacancies in Ge, at variance with Si, unless As atoms or possibly other n-type dopants are present. These results have to be carefully considered for modeling the LTA process in Ge and its implementation in technology.

  1. Muscle fatigue during high-intensity exercise in children.

    PubMed

    Ratel, Sébastien; Duché, Pascale; Williams, Craig A

    2006-01-01

    Children are able to resist fatigue better than adults during one or several repeated high-intensity exercise bouts. This finding has been reported by measuring mechanical force or power output profiles during sustained isometric maximal contractions or repeated bouts of high-intensity dynamic exercises. The ability of children to better maintain performance during repeated high-intensity exercise bouts could be related to their lower level of fatigue during exercise and/or faster recovery following exercise. This may be explained by muscle characteristics of children, which are quantitatively and qualitatively different to those of adults. Children have less muscle mass than adults and hence, generate lower absolute power during high-intensity exercise. Some researchers also showed that children were equipped better for oxidative than glycolytic pathways during exercise, which would lead to a lower accumulation of muscle by-products. Furthermore, some reports indicated that the lower ability of children to activate their type II muscle fibres would also explain their greater resistance to fatigue during sustained maximal contractions. The lower accumulation of muscle by-products observed in children may be suggestive of a reduced metabolic signal, which induces lower ratings of perceived exertion. Factors such as faster phosphocreatine resynthesis, greater oxidative capacity, better acid-base regulation, faster readjustment of initial cardiorespiratory parameters and higher removal of metabolic by-products in children could also explain their faster recovery following high-intensity exercise.From a clinical point of view, muscle fatigue profiles are different between healthy children and children with muscle and metabolic diseases. Studies of dystrophic muscles in children indicated contradictory findings of changes in contractile properties and the muscle fatigability. Some have found that the muscle of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) fatigued less

  2. Study of the yield of D-D, D-3He fusion reactions produced by the interaction of intense ultrafast laser pulses with molecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbui, Marina; Bang, Woosuk; Bonasera, Aldo; Hagel, Kris; Schmidt, Katarzyna; Natowitz, Joseph; Giuliani, Gianluca; Barbarino, Matteo; Dyer, Gilliss; Quevedo, Hernan; Gaul, Erhard; Borger, Ted; Bernstein, Aaron; Martinez, Mikael; Donovan, Michael; Ditmire, Todd; Kimura, Sachie; Mazzocco, Marco; Consoli, Fabrizio; De Angelis, Riccardo; Andreoli, Pierluigi

    2013-03-01

    The interaction of intense ultrafast laser pulses with molecular clusters produces a Coulomb explosion of the clusters. In this process, the positive ions from the clusters might gain enough kinetic energy to drive nuclear reactions. An experiment to measure the yield of D-D and D-3He fusion reactions was performed at University of Texas Center for High Intensity Laser Science. Laser pulses of energy ranging from 100 to 180 J and duration 150fs were delivered by the Petawatt laser. The temperature of the energetic deuterium ions was measured using a Faraday cup, whereas the yields of the D-D reactions were measured by detecting the characteristic 2.45 MeV neutrons and 3.02 MeV protons. In order to allow the simultaneous measurement of 3He(D,p)4He and D-D reactions, different concentrations of D2 and 3He or CD4 and 3He were mixed in the gas jet target. The 2.45 MeV neutrons from the D(D,n)3He reaction were detecteded as well as the 14.7 MeV protons from the 3He(D,p)4He reaction. The preliminary results will be shown.

  3. A Theory of Interaction Mechanism between Laser Beam and Paper Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piili, Heidi

    Paper making and converting industry in Europe is suffering from transfer of basic manufacturing to fast-growing economies, such as China and Brazil. Pulp and paper production volume in Finland, Sweden and France was the same in 2011 as it was in 2000. Meanwhile China has tripled its volume and Brazil doubled. This is a situation where innovative solutions for papermaking and converting industry are needed. Laser can be solution for this, as it is fast, flexible, accurate and reliable. Before industrial application, characteristics of laser beam and paper material interaction has to be understood. When this fundamental knowledge is known, new innovations can be created. Fulfilling the lack of information on interaction phenomena can assist in the way of lasers for wider use of technology in paper making and converting industry. This study was executed by treating dried kraft pulp (grammage 67 g m-2) with different laser power levels, focal point settings and interaction time. Laser equipment was TRUMPF TLF HQ2700 CO2 laser (wavelength 10.6 μm). Interaction between laser beam and dried kraft pulp was detected with multi-monitoring system (MMS), which consisted of spectrometer, pyrometer and active illumination imaging system. There is two different dominating mechanisms in interaction between laser beam and paper material. Furthermore, it was noticed that there is different interaction phases within these two interaction mechanisms. These interaction phases appear as function of time and as function of peak intensity of laser beam. Limit peak intensity divides interaction mechanism from one-phase interaction into dual-phase interaction.

  4. Four-color laser irradiation system for laser-plasma interaction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, D.M.; Henesian, M.A.; Wilcox, R.B.

    1996-06-01

    Since 1986, optical smoothing of the laser irradiance on targets for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) has gained increasing attention. Optical smoothing can significantly reduce wavefront aberrations that produce nonuniformities in the energy distribution of the focal spot. Hot spots in the laser irradiance can induce local self focusing of the light, producing filamentation of the plasma. Filamentation can have detrimental consequences on the hydrodynamics of an ICF plasma, and can affect the growth of parametric instabilities, as well as add to the complexity of the study of such instabilities as stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). As experiments approach and exceed breakeven (i.e., where driver energy = fusion yield), the likelihood of significant excitation of these processes increases. As a result, the authors are including a scheme for implementing optical-beam smoothing for target experiments in the baseline design for the proposed next-generation ICF facility--the National Ignition Facility (NIF). To verify the efficacy of this design for the suppression of parametric instabilites in NIF-like indirect-drive targets, the authors successfully modified a Nova beamline to simulate the proposed NIF conditions. In this article, they discuss the laser science associated with a four-color target campaign on Nova to test the effect of f-number (ratio of focal length to beam diameter) and temporal smoothing on the scaling of SBS with a four-segment interaction beam using NIF-like parameters. The results of the target series associated with the four-color configuration are discussed elsewhere.

  5. Laser-rock-fluid interaction: application of free-electron laser (FEL) in petroleum well drilling and completions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Darien G.; Graves, Ramona M.; O'Brien, Erin A.

    1999-07-01

    The results of the first year of a Gas Research Institute funded research program to study laser-rock-fluid interaction will be presented. The overall purpose of this research is to determine the feasibility, costs, benefits, and the environmental impact of using laser technology to drill and complete oil and gas wells. When drilling and completing petroleum wells, many rock types (sandstone, limestone, dolomite, granite, shale, salt, concrete) and fluids (fresh water, salt water, oil, hydrocarbon gas, drilling fluids) must be penetrated by the laser. The Free-Electron Laser (FEL) technology is attractive because of the ability to tune the laser to different wavelengths. Laser energy absorbed by rocks is related to the wavelength of the laser source. The mechanisms of rock destruction (spalling, melting and vaporization) are therefore a function of the wavelength. The ability to transmit laser energy over long distances (up to 5000 m or 15,000 ft) is also a function of wavelength. Results of tests conducted at the U.S. Air Force and the U.S. Army's high power laser facilities are presented. The challenges ahead to advance a fundamental change in the methods currently used to drill and complete petroleum wells are discussed.

  6. High-intensity terahertz pulses and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiarto, Edward Wibowo

    1997-09-01

    A large aperture transmitter based on an electrically biased photoconductor has been constructed, which is capable of generating ultrashort high-intensity pulses operating in the far-infrared (terahertz) frequency regime. The terahertz pulse is a single-cycle freely propagating electrical pulse with a 600 femtosecond pulse duration and a pulse energy close to 200 nanojoules. A complete characterization of the transmitter and its output pulse has been conducted, resulting in new understandings of the pulse generation mechanism and propagation behavior. More specifically, it was revealed for the first time that near-field diffraction plays a significant role in the propagation behavior of the terahertz pulse from the large aperture transmitter. The pulse alters its temporal shape significantly as it travels away from the transmitter, especially when it is focused by a parabolic mirror. The high-intensity pulse is intended to be utilized as a probe of high-field transport properties of free carriers in semiconductors and superconductors. The transient dynamics of hot-electrons in silicon and gallium arsenide are of particular interest, as they relate to current issues in modern electronic devices. A simulation model has been developed which predicts a nonlinear absorption of the terahertz pulses by free-electrons in the semiconductors due to velocity saturation effects. The high-intensity terahertz pulse has also been used to probe the nonlinear electrodynamics of high-T c superconductors. The results confirm the ability of the pulse to break pairs of superconducting electrons and convert them to normal state electrons. This will allow further studies to be conducted to resolve the exact pair-breaking mechanism, which is ultimately linked to a better understanding of some of the failure mechanisms in today's superconducting microwave devices.

  7. Beam instrumentation for future high intense hadron accelerators at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, M.; Hu, M.; Tassotto, G.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Scarpine, V.; Shin, S.; Zagel, J.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    High intensity hadron beams of up to 2 MW beam power are a key element of new proposed experimental facilities at Fermilab. Project X, which includes a SCRF 8 GeV H{sup -} linac, will be the centerpiece of future HEP activities in the neutrino sector. After a short overview of this, and other proposed projects, we present the current status of the beam instrumentation activities at Fermilab with a few examples. With upgrades and improvements they can meet the requirements of the new beam facilities, however design and development of new instruments is needed, as shown by the prototype and conceptual examples in the last section.

  8. HELIOS: A high intensity chopper spectrometer at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, T.E.; Broholm, C.; Fultz, B.

    1998-12-31

    A proposal to construct a high intensity chopper spectrometer at LANSCE as part of the SPSS upgrade project is discussed. HELIOS will be optimized for science requiring high sensitivity neutron spectroscopy. This includes studies of phonon density of states in small polycrystalline samples, magnetic excitations in quantum magnets and highly correlated electron systems, as well as parametric studies (as a function of pressure, temperature, or magnetic field) of S(Q,{omega}). By employing a compact design together with the use of supermirror guide in the incident flight path the neutron flux at HELIOS will be significantly higher than any other comparable instrument now operating.

  9. High intensity line source for x-ray spectrometer calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Thoe, R.S.

    1986-06-01

    A high intensity electron-impact x-ray source using a one-dimensional Pierce lens has been built for the purpose of calibrating a bent crystal x-ray spectrometer. This source focuses up to 100 mA of 20-keV electrons to a line on a liquid-cooled anode. The line (which can serve as a virtual slit for the spectrometer) measures approximately 800 ..mu.. x 2 cm. The source is portable and therefore adaptable to numerous types of spectrometer applications. One particular application, the calibration of a high resolution (r = 10/sup 4/) time-resolved cyrstal spectrometer, will be discussed in detail.

  10. Survey of proposed high intensity accelerators and their applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schriber, S.O.

    1994-09-01

    Many interesting applications are being considered for high intensity accelerators. Implications of the technology developments that are enhancing these opportunities, or making them possible, will be covered in context of the applications. Applications include those for research (in areas such as material science, biological sciences, nuclear and high energy physics), accelerator-driven transmutation technologies, defense, and medicine. Specific examples will be used to demonstrate the impact that technology development can have and how transfer of this technology to industry can have an impact in the consumer and commercial arenas. Technology Development in rf power, controls, beam optics, rf structures, magnets, injectors, and beam halos will be considered.

  11. High intensity focused ultrasound calibration - status and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivens, I. H.; ter Haar, G. R.

    2004-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (FUS) is increasingly being used as a cancer treatment. The technique uses focused high power sources located some distance from the target tumour to cause thermal damage, usually in organs such as the liver and kidney. For prostate cancer treatment, the energy is delivered using a trans-rectal probe. FUS usually uses frequencies between 0.5 and 4.0 MHz, with free-field spatial-peak intensity values quoted in the range 1-20 kW cm-2. This emerging therapy presents new challenges for calibration of the acoustic fields used and characterisation of exposures.

  12. Relativistic Single-Cycled Short-Wavelength Laser Pulse Compressed from a Chirped Pulse Induced by Laser-Foil Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, L. L.; Shen, B. F.; Li, D. X.; Wang, D.; Leng, Y. X.; Zhang, X. M.; Wen, M.; Wang, W. P.; Xu, J. C.; Yu, Y. H.

    2010-07-09

    By particle-in-cell simulation and analysis, we propose a plasma approach to generate a relativistic chirped pulse based on a laser-foil interaction. When two counterpropagating circularly polarized pulses interact with an overdense foil, the driving pulse (with a larger laser field amplitude) will accelerate the whole foil to form a double-layer structure, and the scattered pulse (with a smaller laser field amplitude) is reflected by this flying layer. Because of the Doppler effect and the varying velocity of the layer, the reflected pulse is up-shifted for frequency and chirped; thus, it could be compressed to a nearly single-cycled relativistic laser pulse with a short wavelength. Simulations show that a nearly single-cycled subfemtosecond relativistic pulse can be generated with a wavelength of 0.2 {mu}m after dispersion compensation.

  13. High-intensity sound in air saturated fibrous bulk porous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, H. L., II

    1982-01-01

    The interaction high-intensity sound with bulk porous materials in porous materials including Kevlar 29 is reported. The nonlinear behavior of the materials was described by dc flow resistivity tests. Then acoustic propagation and reflection were measured and small signal broadband measurements of phase speed and attenuation were carried out. High-intensity tests were made with 1, 2, and 3 kHz tone bursts to measure harmonic generation and extra attenuation of the fundamental. Small signal standing wave tests measured impedence between 0.1 and 3.5 kHz. High level tests with single cycle tone bursts at 1 to 4 kHz show that impedance increases with intensity. A theoretical analysis is presented for high-porosity, rigid-frame, isothermal materials. One dimensional equations of motion are derived and solved by perturbation. The experiments show that there is excess attenuation of the fundamental component and in some cases a close approach to saturation. A separate theoretical model, developed to explain the excess attenuation, yields predictions that are in good agreement with the measurements. Impedance and attenuation at high intensities are modeled.

  14. Discrete Variational Approach for Modeling Laser-Plasma Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, J. Paxon; Shadwick, B. A.

    2014-10-01

    The traditional approach for fluid models of laser-plasma interactions begins by approximating fields and derivatives on a grid in space and time, leading to difference equations that are manipulated to create a time-advance algorithm. In contrast, by introducing the spatial discretization at the level of the action, the resulting Euler-Lagrange equations have particular differencing approximations that will exactly satisfy discrete versions of the relevant conservation laws. For example, applying a spatial discretization in the Lagrangian density leads to continuous-time, discrete-space equations and exact energy conservation regardless of the spatial grid resolution. We compare the results of two discrete variational methods using the variational principles from Chen and Sudan and Brizard. Since the fluid system conserves energy and momentum, the relative errors in these conserved quantities are well-motivated physically as figures of merit for a particular method. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-SC0008382 and by the National Science Foundation under Contract No. PHY-1104683.

  15. Gauge transformations in multichannel laser-interaction Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, G. S. J.; Esry, B. D.

    2015-05-01

    In our previous studies of molecular photodissociation, we solved the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in full dimensionality, casting the laser-molecule interaction in a length-gauge form. The nuclear wave function is then expanded on a basis of symmetric top functions in the angular coordinates. However, a velocity gauge representation of the nuclear motion may be advantageous, and may reduce the number of partial waves required in the angular basis expansion. In molecular problems, the standard transformation between length and velocity gauge must take account of the presence of short-range non-linear radial dependence of the dipole. In problems involving a single channel, the short-range behavior is not removed by the gauge transformation, leading to a short-range mixed-gauge Hamiltonian. Having derived the form of this Hamiltonian, we extend our analysis to multichannel problems, where the gauge transformation is further complicated by off-diagonal dipole terms. We examine the impact of this transformation in full-dimensional calculations, particularly its effectiveness in reducing the required size of the angular basis. This work is supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S.A.

  16. A versatile interaction chamber for laser-based spectroscopic applications, with the emphasis on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotný, J.; Brada, M.; Petrilak, M.; Prochazka, D.; Novotný, K.; Hrdička, A.; Kaiser, J.

    2014-11-01

    The technical note describes the interaction chamber developed particularly for the laser spectroscopy technique applications, such as Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), Raman Spectroscopy and Laser-Induced Fluorescence. The chamber was designed in order to provide advanced possibilities for the research in mentioned fields and to facilitate routine research procedures. Parameters and the main benefits of the chamber are described, such as the built-in module for automatic 2D chemical mapping and the possibility to set different ambient gas conditions (pressure value and gas type). Together with the chamber description, selected LIBS application examples benefiting from chamber properties are described.

  17. Left ventricular mechanics and arterial-ventricular coupling following high-intensity interval exercise.

    PubMed

    Cote, Anita T; Bredin, Shannon S D; Phillips, Aaron A; Koehle, Michael S; Glier, Melissa B; Devlin, Angela M; Warburton, Darren E R

    2013-12-01

    High-intensity exercise induces marked physiological stress affecting the secretion of catecholamines. Sustained elevations in catecholamines are thought to desensitize cardiac beta receptors and may be a possible mechanism in impaired cardiac function following strenuous exercise. In addition, attenuated arterial-ventricular coupling may identify vascular mechanisms in connection with postexercise attenuations in ventricular function. Thirty-nine normally active (NA) and endurance-trained (ET) men and women completed an echocardiographic evaluation of left ventricular function before and after an acute bout of high-intensity interval exercise (15 bouts of 1:2 min work:recovery cycling: 100% peak power output and 50 W, respectively). Following exercise, time to peak twist and peak untwisting velocity were delayed (P < 0.01) but did not differ by sex or training status. Interactions for sex and condition (rest vs. exercise) were found for longitudinal diastolic strain rate (men, 1.46 ± 0.19 to 1.28 ± 0.23 s(-1) vs. women, 1.62 ± 0.25 to 1.63 ± 0.26 s(-1); P = 0.01) and arterial elastance (men 2.20 ± 0.65 to 3.24 ± 1.02 mmHg · ml(-1) · m(-2) vs. women 2.51 ± 0.61 to 2.93 ± 0.68 mmHg · ml(-1) · m(-2); P = 0.04). No cardiac variables were found associated with catecholamine levels. The change in twist mechanics was associated with baseline aortic pulse-wave velocity (r(2) = 0.27, P = 0.001). We conclude that males display greater reductions in contractility in response to high-intensity interval exercise, independent of catecholamine concentrations. Furthermore, a novel association of arterial stiffness and twist mechanics following high-intensity acute exercise illustrates the influence of vascular integrity on cardiac mechanics.

  18. Composite cure and shrinkage associated with high intensity curing light.

    PubMed

    Yap, Adrian U J; Wong, N Y; Siow, K S

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of cure and post-gel shrinkage of three visible light-cured composite resins (In Ten-S [IT], Ivoclar Vivadent; Z100 [ZO], 3M-ESPE; Tetric Ceram [TC], Ivoclar Vivadent) when polymerized with a very high intensity (1296 +/- 2 mW/cm2) halogen light (Astralis 10, Ivoclar Vivadent) for 10 seconds. Irradiation with a conventional (494 +/- 3 mW/cm2) halogen light (Spectrum, Dentsply) for 40 seconds was used for comparison. The effectiveness of cure was assessed by computing the hardness gradient between the top and bottom surfaces of 2-mm composite specimens after curing. A strain-monitoring device was used to measure the linear polymerization shrinkage associated with the various composites and curing lights. A sample size of five was used for both experiments. Data was analyzed using ANOVA/Scheffe's post-hoc and Independent Samples t-tests at significance level 0.05. Results showed that the effect of the curing method on the effectiveness of cure and shrinkage was material-dependent. Polymerization of IT and TC with Spectrum for 40 seconds resulted in significantly more effective cure than polymerization with Astralis for 10 seconds. Polymerization of ZO with Spectrum for 40 seconds resulted in significantly more shrinkage than polymerization with Astralis for 10 seconds. In view of the substantial time saving, using high intensity lights may be a viable method to polymerize composites.

  19. Free-field propagation of high intensity noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welz, Joseph P.; Mcdaniel, Oliver H.

    1990-01-01

    Observed spectral data from supersonic jet aircraft are known to contain much more high frequency energy than can be explained by linear acoustic propagation theory. It is believed that the high frequency energy is an effect of nonlinear distortion due to the extremely high acoustic levels generated by the jet engines. The objective, to measure acoustic waveform distortion for spherically diverging high intensity noise, was reached by using an electropneumatic acoustic source capable of generating sound pressure levels in the range of 140 to 160 decibels (re 20 micro Pa). The noise spectrum was shaped to represent the spectra generated by jet engines. Two microphones were used to capture the acoustic pressure waveform at different points along the propagation path in order to provide a direct measure of the waveform distortion as well as spectral distortion. A secondary objective was to determine that the observed distortion is an acoustic effect. To do this an existing computer prediction code that deals with nonlinear acoustic propagation was used on data representative of the measured data. The results clearly demonstrate that high intensity jet noise does shift the energy in the spectrum to the higher frequencies along the propagation path. In addition, the data from the computer model are in good agreement with the measurements, thus demonstrating that the waveform distortion can be accounted for with nonlinear acoustic theory.

  20. CW high intensity non-scaling FFAG proton drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, C.; Berz, M.; Makino, K.; Snopok, P.; /IIT, Chicago

    2011-04-01

    Accelerators are playing increasingly important roles in basic science, technology, and medicine including nuclear power, industrial irradiation, material science, and neutrino production. Proton and light-ion accelerators in particular have many research, energy and medical applications, providing one of the most effective treatments for many types of cancer. Ultra high-intensity and high-energy (GeV) proton drivers are a critical technology for accelerator-driven sub-critical reactors (ADS) and many HEP programs (Muon Collider). These high-intensity GeV-range proton drivers are particularly challenging, encountering duty cycle and space-charge limits in the synchrotron and machine size concerns in the weaker-focusing cyclotrons; a 10-20 MW proton driver is not presently considered technically achievable with conventional re-circulating accelerators. One, as-yet, unexplored re-circulating accelerator, the Fixed-field Alternating Gradient, or FFAG, is an attractive alternative to the cyclotron. Its strong focusing optics are expected to mitigate space charge effects, and a recent innovation in design has coupled stable tunes with isochronous orbits, making the FFAG capable of fixed-frequency, CW acceleration, as in the classical cyclotron. This paper reports on these new advances in FFAG accelerator technology and references advanced modeling tools for fixed-field accelerators developed for and unique to the code COSY INFINITY.

  1. Transcranial Clot Lysis Using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölscher, Thilo; Zadicario, Eyal; Fisher, David J.; Bradley, William G.

    2010-03-01

    Stroke is the third common cause of death worldwide. The majority of strokes are caused by sudden vessel occlusion, due to a blood clot. Vessel recanalization is the primary goal of all acute stroke treatment strategies. Initial data using ultrasound in combination with a therapeutic agent for clot lysis in stroke are promising. However, sound absorption and defocusing of the ultrasound beam occur during transskull insonation, limiting the efficiency of this approach to high extent. Using a transskull High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) head system we were able to lyse blood clots within seconds and in absence of further lytic agents. We could show that any correction for the distortion might be negligible to focus the ultrasound beam after transskull insonation. The use of transskull HIFU for immediate clot lysis in the human brain without the need of further drugs and disregarding individual skull bone characteristics could become a successful strategy in early stroke treatment. Using magnetic resonance tomography for neuronavigation MRI Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound has the potential to open new avenues for therapeutic applications in the brain including Stroke, Intracranial Hemorrhages, Braintumors, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Thalamic Pain, BBB opening, and local drug delivery. First results in transcranial clot lysis will be presented in this paper.

  2. Enhanced stability of nitrogen-sealed carbon nanotube saturable absorbers under high-intensity irradiation.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Amos; Fuse, Kazuyuki; Yamashita, Shinji

    2013-02-25

    Due to their broadband saturable absorption and fast response, carbon nanotubes have proven to be an excellent material for the modelocking of fiber lasers and have become a promising device for the implementation of novel laser configurations. However, it is imperative to address the issue of their long-term reliability under intense optical pulses before they can be exploited in widespread commercial applications. In this work, we study how carbon nanotubes degrade due to oxidation when exposed to high-intensity continuous-wave light and we demonstrate that by sealing the carbon nanotubes in a nitrogen gas, the damage threshold can be increased by over one order of magnitude. We then monitor over 24 hours the performance of the carbon nanotube saturable absorbers as the passive modelocking device of an erbium-doped fiber laser with intracavity powers ranging from 5 mW to 316 mW. We observe that when the carbon nanotubes are sealed in nitrogen environment, oxidation can be efficiently prevented and the laser can operate without any deterioration at intracavity powers higher than 300 mW. However, in the case where carbon nanotubes are unprotected (i.e. those directly exposed to the air in the environment), the nanotubes start to deteriorate at intracavity powers lower than 50 mW.

  3. CO2 and Er:YAG laser interaction with grass tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehun; Ki, Hyungson

    2013-01-01

    Plant leaves are multi-component optical materials consisting of water, pigments, and dry matter, among which water is the predominant constituent. In this article, we investigate laser interaction with grass using CO2 and Er:YAG lasers theoretically and experimentally, especially targeting water in grass tissues. We have first studied the optical properties of light absorbing constituents of grass theoretically, and then have identified interaction regimes and constructed interaction maps through a systematic experiment. Using the interaction maps, we have studied how interaction regimes change as process parameters are varied. This study reveals some interesting findings concerning carbonization and ablation mechanisms, the effect of laser beam diameter, and the ablation efficiency and quality of CO2 and Er:YAG lasers.

  4. 355, 532, and 1064 nm picosecond laser interaction with grass tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehun; Ki, Hyungson

    2012-12-01

    In this article, we investigate how 355, 532, and 1064 nm picosecond lasers interact with grass tissues. We have identified five interaction regimes, and based on this classification, interaction maps have been constructed from a systematic experiment. The optical properties of light absorbing grass constituents are studied theoretically in order to understand how and how much light is absorbed by grass tissues. Scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy are employed for observing morphological and structural changes of grass tissues. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first investigation into laser interaction with plant leaves and reveals some fundamental findings regarding how a laser interacts with grass tissues and how plant leaves can be processed using lasers.

  5. Interaction of plasmas in laser ion source with double laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Fuwa, Y.; Ikeda, S.; Kumaki, M.; Sekine, M.; Cinquegrani, D.; Romanelli, M.; Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M.; Iwashita, Y.

    2014-02-15

    Multiple laser shots could be used to elongate an ion beam pulse width or to intensify beam current from laser ion sources. In order to confirm the feasibility of the multiple shot scheme, we investigated the properties of plasmas produced by double laser shots. We found that when the interval of the laser shots is shorter than 10 μs, the ion current profile had a prominent peak, which is not observed in single laser experiments. The height of this peak was up to five times larger than that of single laser experiment.

  6. Hydrodynamic modeling of laser interaction with micro-structured targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velechovsky, J.; Limpouch, J.; Liska, R.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2016-09-01

    A model is developed for numerical simulations of laser absorption in plasmas made of porous materials, with particular interest in low-density foams. Laser absorption is treated on two spatial scales simultaneously. At the microscale, the expansion of a thin solid pore wall is modeled in one dimension and the information obtained is used in the macroscale fluid simulations for the description of the plasma homogenization behind the ionization front. This two-scale laser absorption model is implemented in the arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian hydrocode PALE. The numerical simulations of laser penetration into low-density foams compare favorably with published experimental data.

  7. Hydrodynamic modeling of laser interaction with micro-structured targets

    DOE PAGES

    Velechovsky, Jan; Limpouch, Jiri; Liska, Richard; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir

    2016-08-03

    A model is developed for numerical simulations of laser absorption in plasmas made of porous materials, with particular interest in low-density foams. Laser absorption is treated on two spatial scales simultaneously. At the microscale, the expansion of a thin solid pore wall is modeled in one dimension and the information obtained is used in the macroscale fluid simulations for the description of the plasma homogenization behind the ionization front. This two-scale laser absorption model is implemented in the arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian hydrocode PALE. In conclusion, the numerical simulations of laser penetration into low-density foams compare favorably with published experimental data.

  8. Hydrodynamic modeling of laser interaction with micro-structured targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velechovsky, J.; Limpouch, J.; Liska, R.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2016-09-01

    A model is developed for numerical simulations of laser absorption in plasmas made of porous materials, with particular interest in low-density foams. Laser absorption is treated on two spatial scales simultaneously. At the microscale, the expansion of a thin solid pore wall is modeled in one dimension and the information obtained is used in the macroscale fluid simulations for the description of the plasma homogenization behind the ionization front. This two-scale laser absorption model is implemented in the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian hydrocode PALE. The numerical simulations of laser penetration into low-density foams compare favorably with published experimental data.

  9. Laser-to-hot-electron conversion limitations in relativistic laser matter interactions due to multi-picosecond dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Schollmeier, Marius; Sefkow, Adam B.; Geissel, Matthias; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Flippo, Kirk A.; Gaillard, Sandrine A.; Johnson, Randy P.; Kimmel, Mark W.; Offermann, Dustin T.; Rambo, Patrick K.; et al

    2015-04-20

    High-energy short-pulse lasers are pushing the limits of plasma-based particle acceleration, x-ray generation, and high-harmonic generation by creating strong electromagnetic fields at the laser focus where electrons are being accelerated to relativistic velocities. Understanding the relativistic electron dynamics is key for an accurate interpretation of measurements. We present a unified and self-consistent modeling approach in quantitative agreement with measurements and differing trends across multiple target types acquired from two separate laser systems, which differ only in their nanosecond to picosecond-scale rising edge. Insights from high-fidelity modeling of laser-plasma interaction demonstrate that the ps-scale, orders of magnitude weaker rising edge ofmore » the main pulse measurably alters target evolution and relativistic electron generation compared to idealized pulse shapes. This can lead for instance to the experimentally observed difference between 45 MeV and 75 MeV maximum energy protons for two nominally identical laser shots, due to ps-scale prepulse variations. Our results indicate that the realistic inclusion of temporal laser pulse profiles in modeling efforts is required if predictive capability and extrapolation are sought for future target and laser designs or for other relativistic laser ion acceleration schemes.« less

  10. Laser-to-hot-electron conversion limitations in relativistic laser matter interactions due to multi-picosecond dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Schollmeier, Marius; Sefkow, Adam B.; Geissel, Matthias; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Flippo, Kirk A.; Gaillard, Sandrine A.; Johnson, Randy P.; Kimmel, Mark W.; Offermann, Dustin T.; Rambo, Patrick K.; Schwarz, Jens; Shimada, Tom

    2015-04-20

    High-energy short-pulse lasers are pushing the limits of plasma-based particle acceleration, x-ray generation, and high-harmonic generation by creating strong electromagnetic fields at the laser focus where electrons are being accelerated to relativistic velocities. Understanding the relativistic electron dynamics is key for an accurate interpretation of measurements. We present a unified and self-consistent modeling approach in quantitative agreement with measurements and differing trends across multiple target types acquired from two separate laser systems, which differ only in their nanosecond to picosecond-scale rising edge. Insights from high-fidelity modeling of laser-plasma interaction demonstrate that the ps-scale, orders of magnitude weaker rising edge of the main pulse measurably alters target evolution and relativistic electron generation compared to idealized pulse shapes. This can lead for instance to the experimentally observed difference between 45 MeV and 75 MeV maximum energy protons for two nominally identical laser shots, due to ps-scale prepulse variations. Our results indicate that the realistic inclusion of temporal laser pulse profiles in modeling efforts is required if predictive capability and extrapolation are sought for future target and laser designs or for other relativistic laser ion acceleration schemes.

  11. Calculating the radiation characteristics of accelerated electrons in laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Gu, Y. J.; Qu, J. F.; Ma, Y. Y.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we studied the characteristics of radiation emitted by electrons accelerated in a laser-plasma interaction by using the Lienard-Wiechert field. In the interaction of a laser pulse with a underdense plasma, electrons are accelerated by two mechanisms: direct laser acceleration (DLA) and laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). At the beginning of the process, the DLA electrons emit most of the radiation, and the DLA electrons emit a much higher peak photon energy than the LWFA electrons. As the laser-plasma interaction progresses, the LWFA electrons become the major radiation emitter; however, even at this stage, the contribution from DLA electrons is significant, especially to the peak photon energy.

  12. Azimuthal asymmetry in collective electron dynamics in relativistically transparent laser-foil interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; Gonzalez-Izquierdo, B.; Powell, H. W.; Carroll, D. C.; Murphy, C. D.; Stockhausen, L. C.; Rusby, D. R.; Scott, G. G.; Wilson, R.; Booth, N.; Symes, D. R.; Hawkes, S. J.; Torres, R.; Borghesi, M.; Neely, D.; McKenna, P.

    2014-09-01

    Asymmetry in the collective dynamics of ponderomotively-driven electrons in the interaction of an ultraintense laser pulse with a relativistically transparent target is demonstrated experimentally. The 2D profile of the beam of accelerated electrons is shown to change from an ellipse aligned along the laser polarization direction in the case of limited transparency, to a double-lobe structure aligned perpendicular to it when a significant fraction of the laser pulse co-propagates with the electrons. The temporally-resolved dynamics of the interaction are investigated via particle-in-cell simulations. The results provide new insight into the collective response of charged particles to intense laser fields over an extended interaction volume, which is important for a wide range of applications, and in particular for the development of promising new ultraintense laser-driven ion acceleration mechanisms involving ultrathin target foils.

  13. High-Intensity Sweeteners in Alternative Tobacco Products

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Shida; Beach, Evan S.; Sommer, Toby J.; Zimmerman, Julie B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Sweeteners in tobacco products may influence use initiation and reinforcement, with special appeal to adolescents. Recent analytical studies of smokeless tobacco products (snuff, snus, dissolvables) detected flavorants identical to those added to confectionary products such as hard candy and chewing gum. However, these studies did not determine the levels of sweeteners. The objective of the present study was to quantify added sweeteners in smokeless tobacco products, a dissolvable product, electronic cigarette liquids and to compare with sweetener levels in confectionary products. Methods: Sweetener content of US-sourced smokeless tobacco, electronic cigarette liquid, and confectionary product samples was analyzed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization–mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS). Results: All smokeless products contained synthetic high intensity sweeteners, with snus and dissolvables exceeding levels in confectionary products (as much as 25-fold). All snus samples contained sucralose and most also aspartame, but no saccharin. In contrast, all moist snuff samples contained saccharin. The dissolvable sample contained sucralose and sorbitol. Ethyl maltol was the most common sweet-associated component in electronic cigarette liquids. Discussion: Sweetener content was dependent on product category, with saccharin in moist snuff, an older category, sucralose added at high levels to more recently introduced products (snus, dissolvable) and ethyl maltol in electronic cigarette liquid. The very high sweetener concentrations may be necessary for the consumer to tolerate the otherwise aversive flavors of tobacco ingredients. Regulation of sweetener levels in smokeless tobacco products may be an effective measure to modify product attractiveness, initiation and use patterns. Implications: Dissolvables, snus and electronic cigarettes have been promoted as risk-mitigation products due to their relatively low content of nitrosamines and other tobacco

  14. Measurement of radiation produced by ultra short laser pulses interacting with solid targets

    SciTech Connect

    Fonseca, C.; Fernandez, F.; Mendez, C.; Ruiz, C.; Roso, L.

    2010-04-26

    Ionizing radiation was produced when ultra-short laser pulses collided obliquely on solid aluminium targets. As a result of the interaction, electrons and photons of some tens of keV were measured. We also analyzed the effect of laser polarization on the emitted radiation.

  15. Optimal conditions for tissue perforation using high intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Takashi; Kihara, Taizo; Ogawa, Kouji; Tanabe, Ryoko; Yosizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro; Kakimoto, Takashi; Yamashita, Hiromasa; Chiba, Toshio

    2012-10-01

    To perforate tissue lying deep part in body, a large size transducer was assembled by combining four spherical-shaped transducers, and the optimal conditions for tissue perforation have studied using ventricle muscle of chicken as a target. The ex vivo experiments showed that ventricle muscle was successfully perforated both when it was exposed to High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) directly and when it was exposed to HIFU through atrial muscle layer. Moreover, it was shown that calculated acoustic power distributions are well similar to the perforation patterns, and that the acoustic energy distributes very complexly near the focus. Lastly, perforation on the living rabbit bladder wall was demonstrated as a preliminary in vivo experiment.

  16. High intensity neutrino source superconducting solenoid cyrostat design

    SciTech Connect

    Page, T.M.; Nicol, T.H.; Feher, S.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is involved in the development of a 100 MeV superconducting linac. This linac is part of the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D Program. The initial beam acceleration in the front end section of the linac is achieved using room temperature spoke cavities, each of which is combined with a superconducting focusing solenoid. These solenoid magnets are cooled with liquid helium at 4.5K, operate at 250 A and have a maximum magnetic field strength of 7.5 T. The solenoid cryostat will house the helium vessel, suspension system, thermal shield, multilayer insulation, power leads, instrumentation, a vacuum vessel and cryogenic distribution lines. This paper discusses the requirements and detailed design of these superconducting solenoid cryostats.

  17. High-intensity cyclotron for the IsoDAR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, D.; IsoDAR Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    The IsoDAR experiment is the MIT proposal to investigate about several neutrino properties, in order to explain some anomalies experimentally observed. It requires 10mA of proton beam at the energy of 60MeV to produce a high-intensity electron antineutrino flux from the production and the decay of 8Li: it is an ambitious goal for the accelerator design, due also to the fact that the machine has to be placed near a neutrino detector, like KAMLAND or WATCHMAN, located in underground sites. A compact cyclotron able to accelerate H2+ molecule beam up to energy of 60MeV/amu is under study. The critical issues of this machine concern the beam injection due to the effects of space charge, the efficiency of the beam extraction and the technical solutions needed to the machine assembly. Here, the innovative solutions and the preliminary results achieved by the IsoDAR team are discussed.

  18. High Intensity Neutrino Source Superconducting Solenoid Cryostat Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, T. M.; Nicol, T. H.; Feher, S.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.

    2008-03-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is involved in the development of a 100 MeV superconducting linac. This linac is part of the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D Program. The initial beam acceleration in the front end section of the linac is achieved using room temperature spoke cavities, each of which is combined with a superconducting focusing solenoid. These solenoid magnets are cooled with liquid helium at 4.5 K, operate at 250 A and have a maximum magnetic field strength of 7.5 T. The solenoid cryostat will house the helium vessel, suspension system, thermal shield, multilayer insulation, power leads, instrumentation, a vacuum vessel and cryogenic distribution lines. This paper discusses the requirements and detailed design of these superconducting solenoid cryostats.

  19. [High-intensity interval training for young athletes].

    PubMed

    Engel, Florian Azad; Sperlich, Billy

    2014-06-01

    A computer-based literature research during July 2013 using the electronic databases PubMed, MEDLINE, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science was performed to assess the effect of the high intensity interval training (HIIT) on sport performance in healthy children and adolescents. Studies examining the effect of HIIT on aerobic and anaerobic performance pre and post to HIIT-Interventions in children and adolescents (9-18 years) were included. The results indicate increased aerobic and anaerobic performance following two or three HIIT sessions per week for a period of five to ten weeks, additional to normal training. Results regarding long term effects following HIIT have not been documented so far. In addition, due to the physiological characteris-tics during HIIT protocols improved fatigue resistance has been demonstrated in children as compared to adults, which may be interpreted as a prerequisite for the applicability of HIIT in children.

  20. High-intensity intermittent exercise and fat loss.

    PubMed

    Boutcher, Stephen H

    2011-01-01

    The effect of regular aerobic exercise on body fat is negligible; however, other forms of exercise may have a greater impact on body composition. For example, emerging research examining high-intensity intermittent exercise (HIIE) indicates that it may be more effective at reducing subcutaneous and abdominal body fat than other types of exercise. The mechanisms underlying the fat reduction induced by HIIE, however, are undetermined. Regular HIIE has been shown to significantly increase both aerobic and anaerobic fitness. HIIE also significantly lowers insulin resistance and results in a number of skeletal muscle adaptations that result in enhanced skeletal muscle fat oxidation and improved glucose tolerance. This review summarizes the results of HIIE studies on fat loss, fitness, insulin resistance, and skeletal muscle. Possible mechanisms underlying HIIE-induced fat loss and implications for the use of HIIE in the treatment and prevention of obesity are also discussed.

  1. Comparison of Two High Intensity Acoustic Test Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launay, A.; Tadao Sakita, M.; Kim, Youngkey K.

    2004-08-01

    In two different countries, at the same period of time, the institutes in charge of the development of space activities have decided to extend their satellite integration and test center, and to implement a reverberant acoustic chamber. In Brazil the INPE laboratory (LIT : Laboratorio de Integracao e Testes) and in South Korea the KARI laboratory (SITC : Satellite Integration and Test Center) started their projects in July 2000 for the RATF (Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility) and in May 2001 for the HIAC (High Intensity Acoustic Chamber) respectively, writing the technical specifications. The kick-off meetings took place in December 2000 and in February 2002 and the opening ceremonies in December 19, 2002 in Brazil and in August 22, 2003 in Korea. This paper compares the two projects in terms of design choices, manufacturing processes, equipment installed and technical final characteristics.

  2. Superheavy Elements Production in High Intensive Neutron Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutostansky, Yu. S.; Lyashuk, V. I.; Panov, I. V.

    2013-06-01

    The possibility of superheavy elements production in high intensive neutron fluxes is being studied. A model of the transuranium isotopes production under conditions of pulse nucleosynthesis in a neutron flux with densities of up to ~1025 neutron/cm2 is considered. The pulse process allows us to divide it in time into two stages: the process of multiple neutron captures (with t < 10-6 s) and the subsequent β-decay of neutron-rich nuclei. The modeling of the transuranium yields takes into account the adiabatic character of the process, the probability of delayed fission, and the emission of delayed neutrons. A target with a binary composition of 238U and 239Pu, 248Cm, and 251Cf isotopes is used to predict the yields of heavy and superheavy isotopes.

  3. TRIPS: The high intensity proton source for the TRASCO project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celona, L.; Ciavola, G.; Gammino, S.; Gobin, R.; Ferdinand, R.

    2000-02-01

    The TRASCO project (trasmutazione scorie) is a R&D program whose goal is the design of an accelerator driving system for nuclear waste transmutation. The high current continuous wave proton linear accelerator will drive a subcritical system to transmutate nuclear wastes, while producing energy. The proton source TRIPS is a high intensity microwave source, which should be highly reliable and that should provide a minimum proton current of 50 mA with a r-r' root mean square normalized emittance lower than 0.2 π mm mrad. A program of cooperation has been entered into with CEA-Saclay, where the IPHI project is in progress and the proton source SILHI has been designed and built using goals close to those of TRIPS. The construction of TRIPS is underway and the first beam is scheduled for the first half of 2000. The main features of this source and the results of the optics calculations are presented.

  4. Fermilab main injector: High intensity operation and beam loss control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Bruce C.; Adamson, Philip; Capista, David; Chou, Weiren; Kourbanis, Ioanis; Morris, Denton K.; Seiya, Kiyomi; Wu, Guan Hong; Yang, Ming-Jen

    2013-07-01

    From 2005 through 2012, the Fermilab Main Injector provided intense beams of 120 GeV protons to produce neutrino beams and antiprotons. Hardware improvements in conjunction with improved diagnostics allowed the system to reach sustained operation at 400 kW beam power. Transmission was very high except for beam lost at or near the 8 GeV injection energy where 95% beam transmission results in about 1.5 kW of beam loss. By minimizing and localizing loss, residual radiation levels fell while beam power was doubled. Lost beam was directed to either the collimation system or to the beam abort. Critical apertures were increased while improved instrumentation allowed optimal use of available apertures. We will summarize the improvements required to achieve high intensity, the impact of various loss control tools and the status and trends in residual radiation in the Main Injector.

  5. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is under high mortality but has few effective treatment modalities. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is becoming an emerging approach of noninvasively ablating solid tumor in clinics. A variety of solid tumors have been tried on thousands of patients in the last fifteen years with great success. The principle, mechanism, and clinical outcome of HIFU were introduced first. All 3022 clinical cases of HIFU treatment for the advanced pancreatic cancer alone or in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy in 241 published papers were reviewed and summarized for its efficacy, pain relief, clinical benefit rate, survival, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) score, changes in tumor size, occurrence of echogenicity, serum level, diagnostic assessment of outcome, and associated complications. Immune response induced by HIFU ablation may become an effective way of cancer treatment. Comments for a better outcome and current challenges of HIFU technology are also covered. PMID:25053938

  6. High Intensive Processes and Extreme States of Matter: Achievements and Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Simonenko, V. A.

    2006-08-03

    The paper briefly presents some main highlights of High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) achievements starting from its origin in the 1940s to the current time. A decisive role of high explosives (HE) is emphasized in studying high intensive processes and high energy density states of matter. Mechanisms of detonation and kinetics of energy release still remain acute in the HE studying. Research and scientific applications of nuclear explosions opened a new stage in HEDP development. They provided a million-fold increase of energy density if compared to that of high explosives. High intensive heat waves and strong shock waves were studied and used to measure dense plasma opacities and matter properties under extreme conditions. This data remains important for the development of theoretical models of matter. Powerful pulsed facilities (lasers, electric explosion installations, and charged particle accelerators) were constructed to extend opportunities for the HEDP research. One of their main goals is to study inertial confinement fusion. HEDP technologies and results are very useful in space and astrophysical research, and on the contrary, astrophysical studies enrich HEDP with new models, problems and solutions.

  7. High intensity exercise decreases global brain glucose uptake in humans

    PubMed Central

    Kemppainen, Jukka; Aalto, Sargo; Fujimoto, Toshihiko; Kalliokoski, Kari K; Långsjö, Jaakko; Oikonen, Vesa; Rinne, Juha; Nuutila, Pirjo; Knuuti, Juhani

    2005-01-01

    Physiological activation increases glucose uptake locally in the brain. However, it is not known how high intensity exercise affects regional and global brain glucose uptake. The effect of exercise intensity and exercise capacity on brain glucose uptake was directly measured using positron emission tomography (PET) and [18F]fluoro-deoxy-glucose ([18F]FDG). Fourteen healthy, right-handed men were studied after 35 min of bicycle exercise at exercise intensities corresponding to 30, 55 and 75% of V˙O2max on three separate days. [18F]FDG was injected 10 min after the start of the exercise. Thereafter exercise was continued for another 25 min. PET scanning of the brain was conducted after completion of the exercise. Regional glucose metabolic rate (rGMR) decreased in all measured cortical regions as exercise intensity increased. The mean decrease between the highest and lowest exercise intensity was 32% globally in the brain (38.6 ± 4.6 versus 26.1 ± 5.0 μmol (100 g)−1 min−1, P < 0.001). Lactate availability during exercise tended to correlate negatively with the observed brain glucose uptake. In addition, the decrease in glucose uptake in the dorsal part of the anterior cingulate cortex (37% versus 20%, P < 0.05 between 30% and 75% of V˙O2max) was significantly more pronounced in subjects with higher exercise capacity. These results demonstrate that brain glucose uptake decreases with increase in exercise intensity. Therefore substrates other than glucose, most likely lactate, are utilized by the brain in order to compensate the increased energy needed to maintain neuronal activity during high intensity exercise. Moreover, it seems that exercise training could be related to adaptive metabolic changes locally in the frontal cortical regions. PMID:16037089

  8. Recent developments for high-intensity proton linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Garnett, R.W.; Gray, E.R.; Nath, S.

    1996-04-01

    High-intensity proton linacs are being proposed for new projects around the world, especially for tritium production, and for pulsed spallation neutron sources. Typical requirements for these linacs include peak beam current of about 100 mA, and final energies of 1 GeV and higher, APT, a tritium production linac, requires cw operation to obtain sufficient average tritium production linac, requires cw operation to obtain sufficient average beam power, and H{sup +} ion sources appear capable of providing the required current and emittances. The pulsed spallation neutron source requires a linac as an injector to one or more accumulator rings, and favors the use of an H{sup minus} beam to allow charge-exchange injection into the rings. For both applications high availability is demanded; the fraction of scheduled beam time for actual production must be 75% or more. Such a high availability requires low beam-loss to avoid radioactivation of the accelerator, and to allow hands-on maintenance that will keep the mean repair and maintenance times short. To keep the accelerator activation sufficiently low, the beam loss should not exceed about 0.1 to 1.0 nA/m, except perhaps for a few localized places, where special design adaptations could be made. The requirement of such small beam losses at such a high intensity presents a new beam physics challenge. This challenge will require greater understanding of the beam distribution, including the low- density beam halo, which is believed to be responsible for most of the beam losses. Furthermore, it will be necessary to choose the apertures so the beam losses will be acceptably low, and because large aperture size is generally accompanied by an economic penalty resulting from reduced power efficiency, an optimized choice of the aperture will be desirable.

  9. Nitrate supplementation and high-intensity performance in competitive cyclists.

    PubMed

    Hoon, Matthew W; Hopkins, William G; Jones, Andrew M; Martin, David T; Halson, Shona L; West, Nicholas P; Johnson, Nathan A; Burke, Louise M

    2014-09-01

    Consumption of inorganic nitrate (NO3(-)) is known to enhance endurance exercise performance in recreationally trained subjects. Here we report the effect on a high-intensity performance task in national-level cyclists. The performance test consisted of 2 cycle ergometer time trials of 4 min duration with 75 min between trials. In a randomized crossover design, 26 cyclists performed the test under the following 4 conditions (each separated by a 6-day washout): consumption of 70 mL of nitrate-rich beetroot juice at 150 min or 75 min before the first time trial, addition of a 35 mL "top-up dose" following the first time trial in the 150 min condition, and consumption of a placebo. A linear mixed model with adjustments for learning effects and athlete fitness (peak incremental power) was used to estimate effects on mean power, with probabilistic inferences based on a smallest important effect of 1.0%. Peak plasma nitrite (NO2(-)) concentration was greatest when nitrate was taken 75 min before the first time trial. Relative to placebo, the mean effect of all 3 nitrate treatments was unclear in the first time trial (1.3%, 90% confidence limits: ±1.7%), but possibly harmful in the second time trial (-0.3%, ±1.6%). Differences between nitrate treatments were unclear, as was the estimate of any consistent individual response to the treatments. Allowing for sampling uncertainty, the effect of nitrate on performance was less than previous studies. Under the conditions of our experiment, nitrate supplementation may be ineffective in facilitating high-intensity exercise in competitive athletes.

  10. GPU-Accelerated PIC/MCC Simulation of Laser-Plasma Interaction Using BUMBLEBEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiaolin; Huang, Tao; Chen, Wenlong; Wu, Huidong; Tang, Maowen; Li, Bin

    2015-11-01

    The research of laser-plasma interaction in its wide applications relies on the use of advanced numerical simulation tools to achieve high performance operation while reducing computational time and cost. BUMBLEBEE has been developed to be a fast simulation tool used in the research of laser-plasma interactions. BUMBLEBEE uses a 1D3V electromagnetic PIC/MCC algorithm that is accelerated by using high performance Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) hardware. BUMBLEBEE includes a friendly user-interface module and four physics simulators. The user-interface provides a powerful solid-modeling front end and graphical and computational post processing functionality. The solver of BUMBLEBEE has four modules for now, which are used to simulate the field ionization, electron collisional ionization, binary coulomb collision and laser-plasma interaction processes. The ionization characteristics of laser-neutral interaction and the generation of high-energy electrons have been analyzed by using BUMBLEBEE for validation.

  11. High Harmonic Inverse Free-Electron-Laser Interaction at 800nm

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, Christopher M.S.; Colby, Eric; Cowan, Ben; Siemann, Robert H.; Spencer, James; Byer, Robert L.; Plettner, Tomas; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2005-05-13

    The inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) interaction has recently been proposed and used as a short wavelength modulator for micro bunching of beams for laser acceleration experiments [1,2]. These experiments utilized the fundamental of the interaction between the laser field and electron bunch. In the current experiment, we explore the higher order resonances of the IFEL interaction from a 3 period, 1.8 centimeter wavelength undulator with a picosecond, 0.5 mJ/pulse laser at 800nm. The resonances are observed by adjusting the gap of the undulator while keeping the beam energy constant. We also compare the experimental results to a simple analytic model that describes coupling to high order harmonics of the interaction.

  12. High-Harmonic Inverse Free-Electron-Laser Interaction at 800nm

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, C

    2006-02-17

    The inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) interaction has recently been proposed and used as a short wavelength modulator for micro bunching of beams for laser acceleration experiments [1,2]. These experiments utilized the fundamental of the interaction between the laser field and electron bunch. In the current experiment, we explore the higher order resonances of the IFEL interaction from a 3 period, 1.8 centimeter wavelength undulator with a picosecond, 0.5 mJ/pulse laser at 800nm. The resonances are observed by adjusting the gap of the undulator while keeping the beam energy constant. We also compare the experimental results to a simple analytic model that describes coupling to high order harmonics of the interaction.

  13. Interstitial laser phototherapy assisted by magnetic resonance imaging: A new technique for monitoring laser-tissue interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, D.J.; Saxton, R.E.; Layfield, L.J.; Fetterman, H.R.; Castro, D.J.; Tartell, P.B.; Robinson, J.D.; To, S.Y.; Nishimura, E.; Lufkin, R.B. )

    1990-05-01

    The rapid technological advances of magnetic resonance imaging, laser fiberoptics, and compatible probes may allow treatment of deep and sometimes surgically unreachable tumors of the head and neck with minimal morbidity through interstitial laser phototherapy. In this study, a new application of magnetic resonance imaging was developed to monitor and quantify laser-induced tissue damages. Pig skin was exposed to increased levels of argon laser (514.5 nm) at energy densities between 62.5 and 375 J/cm2 as determined by an accurate and reproducible method of dosimetry. Thermal profiles were recorded using an infrared sensor and T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance images were taken; afterward, biopsies were performed to quantitate the level of tissue damage. Our results demonstrate that above a certain threshold of laser energy, the magnetic resonance imaging findings are temperature dependent. Appropriate development of a scale matching laser energies, temperature profiles, T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance images, and histological quantitation of tissue destruction will allow us to optimize the three-dimensional control and monitoring of laser-tissue interactions.

  14. CFRP bonding pre-treatment with laser radiation of 3 μm wavelength: laser/material interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blass, David; Kreling, Stefan; Nyga, Sebastian; Westphalen, Thomas; Jungbluth, Bernd; Hoffman, Hans-Dieter; Dilger, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Laser radiation of 3 μm wavelength was generated by frequency conversion of an industrial IR laser and applied in the context of CFRP bonding pre-treatment. Reinforced and non-reinforced epoxy resins were treated with this radiation varying the relevant parameters such as laser power or treatment time. The interaction between laser radiation of 3012 nm and 1064 nm wavelength and matrix resin was analyzed mechanically (e.g. ablation depth), optically (such as fiber exposure) and chemically (e.g. contamination removal). The results gathered show that, even with the small achievable pulse fluences, a sufficient treatment of the specimens and a sensitive removing of the contaminated layers are possible.

  15. A scalable high-energy diode-pumped solid state laser for laser-plasma interaction science and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vido, M.; Ertel, K.; Mason, P. D.; Banerjee, S.; Phillips, P. J.; Butcher, T. J.; Smith, J. M.; Shaikh, W.; Hernandez-Gomes, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Collier, J. L.

    2016-05-01

    Laser systems efficiently generating nanosecond pules at kJ energy levels and at multi-Hz repetition rates are required in order to translate laser-plasma interactions into practical applications. We have developed a scalable, actively-cooled diode-pumped solid state laser amplifier design based on a multi-slab ceramic Yb:YAG architecture called DiPOLE (Diode-Pumped Optical Laser for Experiments) capable of meeting such requirements. We demonstrated 10.8 J, 10 Hz operation at 1030 nm using a scaled-down prototype, reaching an optical-to-optical efficiency of 22.5%. Preliminary results from a larger scale version, delivering 100 J pulse energy at 10 Hz, are also presented.

  16. Interaction of laser radiation with a low-density structured absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, V. B.; Barishpol'tsev, D. V.; Vergunova, G. A.; Demchenko, N. N.; Ivanov, E. M.; Aristova, E. N.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Limpouch, I.; Ulschmidt, I.

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical model is proposed for computing simulations of laser radiation interaction with inhomogeneous foam materials doped with heavy elements and undoped materials. The model satisfactorily describes many experiments on the interaction of the first and third harmonics of a 200 J pulsed PALS iodine laser with low-density porous cellulose triacetate targets. The model can be used to analyze experimental data and estimate the reality of experimental results.

  17. Relativistic intensity laser interactions with low-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willingale, L.; Nilson, P. M.; Zulick, C.; Chen, H.; Craxton, R. S.; Cobble, J.; Maksimchuk, A.; Norreys, P. A.; Sangster, T. C.; Scott, R. H. H.; Stoeckl, C.

    2016-03-01

    We perform relativistic-intensity laser experiments using the Omega EP laser to investigate channeling phenomena and particle acceleration in underdense plasmas. A fundamental understanding of these processes is of importance to the hole-boring fast ignition scheme for inertial confinement fusion. Proton probing was used to image the electromagnetic fields formed as the Omega EP laser pulse generated a channel through underdense plasma. Filamentation of the channel was observed, followed by self-correction into a single channel. The channel radius as a function of time was found to be in reasonable agreement with momentum- conserving snowplough models.

  18. Polarization dependence of laser interaction with carbon fibers and CFRP.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Christian; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas

    2014-01-27

    A key factor for laser materials processing is the absorptivity of the material at the laser wavelength, which determines the fraction of the laser energy that is coupled into the material. Based on the Fresnel equations, a theoretical model is used to determine the absorptivity for carbon fiber fabrics and carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). The surface of each carbon fiber is considered as multiple layers of concentric cylinders of graphite. With this the optical properties of carbon fibers and their composites can be estimated from the well-known optical properties of graphite.

  19. Examination of femtosecond laser matter interaction in multipulse regime for surface nanopatterning of vitreous substrates.

    PubMed

    Varkentina, Nadezda; Cardinal, Thierry; Moroté, Fabien; Mounaix, Patrick; André, Pascal; Deshayes, Yannick; Canioni, Lionel

    2013-12-01

    The paper presents our results on laser micro- and nanostructuring of sodium aluminosilicate glass for the permanent storage purposes and photonics applications. Surface structuring is realized by fs laser irradiation followed by the subsequent etching in a potassium hydroxide (10M@80 °C) for 1 to 10 minutes. As the energy deposited is lower than the damage and/or ablation threshold, the chemical etching permits to produce small craters in the laser modified region. The laser parameters dependent interaction regimes are revealed by microscopic analysis (SEM and AFM). The influence of etching time on craters formation is investigated under different incident energies, number of pulses and polarization states. PMID:24514460

  20. Simulation of the interaction of single-pulsed optical lasers with targets in a vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, S.R.; Canavan, G.H.; Dingus, R.S.; Mahaffy, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    We present computer simulations of the interaction of a perturbed laser beam on an aluminum target at pulse widths from .05 to 2.0 ..mu..sec, and intensities from 5 x 10/sup 7/ to 10/sup 13/ W/cm/sup 2/, at laser wavelengths varying from 0.25 ..mu..m (KrF laser) to 10.6 ..mu..m (CO/sub 2/ laser). We focus on impulse coupling, identify the critical processes for momentum generation, and discuss the uncertainties in modeling.

  1. High flux, narrow bandwidth compton light sources via extended laser-electron interactions

    DOEpatents

    Barty, V P

    2015-01-13

    New configurations of lasers and electron beams efficiently and robustly produce high flux beams of bright, tunable, polarized quasi-monoenergetic x-rays and gamma-rays via laser-Compton scattering. Specifically, the use of long-duration, pulsed lasers and closely-spaced, low-charge and low emittance bunches of electron beams increase the spectral flux of the Compton-scattered x-rays and gamma rays, increase efficiency of the laser-electron interaction and significantly reduce the overall complexity of Compton based light sources.

  2. Nanoparticles based laser-induced surface structures formation on mesoporous silicon by picosecond laser beam interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbi, A.; Petit, A.; Melhem, A.; Stolz, A.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Gautier, G.; Defforge, T.; Semmar, N.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, laser induced periodic surface structures were formed on mesoporous silicon by irradiation of Nd:YAG picosecond pulsed laser beam at 266 nm wavelength at 1 Hz repetition rate and with 42 ps pulse duration. The effects of laser processing parameters as laser beam fluence and laser pulse number on the formation of ripples were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to image the surface morphologies and the cross section of samples after laser irradiation. At relatively low fluence ∼20 mJ/cm2, ripples with period close to the laser beam wavelength (266 nm) and with an always controlled orientation (perpendicular to the polarization of ps laser beam) appeared after a large laser pulse number of 12,000. It has been found that an initial random distribution of SiOx nanoparticles is periodically structured with an increase of the laser pulse number. Finally, it is experimentally demonstrated that we formed a 100 nm liquid phase under the protusion zones including the pores in the picosecond regime.

  3. Emittance of positron beams produced in intense laser plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hui; Hazi, A.; Link, A.; Anderson, S.; Gronberg, J.; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Wilks, S.; Sheppard, J. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Baldis, H. A.; Marley, E.; Park, J.; Williams, G. J.; Fedosejev, R.; Kerr, S.

    2013-01-15

    The first measurement of the emittance of intense laser-produced positron beams has been made. The emittance values were derived through measurements of positron beam divergence and source size for different peak positron energies under various laser conditions. For one of these laser conditions, we used a one dimensional pepper-pot technique to refine the emittance value. The laser-produced positrons have a geometric emittance between 100 and 500 mm{center_dot}mrad, comparable to the positron sources used at existing accelerators. With 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} positrons per bunch, this low emittance beam, which is quasi-monoenergetic in the energy range of 5-20 MeV, may be useful as an alternative positron source for future accelerators.

  4. Radiation reaction in the interaction of ultraintense laser with matter and gamma ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, J. F.; Teo, W. R.; Moritaka, Toseo; Takabe, H.

    2016-05-01

    Radiation reaction (RR) force plays an important role in gamma ray production in the interaction of ultraintense laser with relativistic counterpropagating electron at intensity 1022 W/cm2 and beyond. The relationship between emission spectrum and initial kinetic energy of electron at such intensities is yet to be clear experimentally. On the other hand, the energy from both the relativistic electron beam and laser pulse may be converted into the gamma rays. Therefore, the conversion efficiency of energy purely from laser pulse into gamma rays is of great interest. We present simulation results of an electron dynamics in strong laser field by taking into account the RR effects. We investigated how the RR effects influence the emission spectrum and photon number distribution for different laser condition. We showed that the peaks of emission spectra are suppressed if higher initial kinetic energy of electron interacts with long laser pulse duration. We then list the conversion efficiencies of laser pulse energy into gamma ray. We note that an electron with energy of 40 MeV would convert up to 80% of the total of electromagnetic work and initial kinetic energy of electron when interacting with 10 fs laser pulse at intensity 2 ×1023 W/cm2. For a bunch of electron with charge 1 nC would emit around 0.1 J of energy into gamma ray emission.

  5. Final Report: Laser-Material Interactions Relevant to Analytic Spectroscopy of Wide Band Gap Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, J. T.

    2014-04-05

    We summarize our studies aimed at developing an understanding of the underlying physics and chemistry in terms of laser materials interactions relevant to laser-based sampling and chemical analysis of wide bandgap materials. This work focused on the determination of mechanisms for the emission of electrons, ions, atoms, and molecules from laser irradiation of surfaces. We determined the important role of defects on these emissions, the thermal, chemical, and physical interactions responsible for matrix effects and mass-dependent transport/detection. This work supported development of new techniques and technology for the determination of trace elements contained such as nuclear waste materials.

  6. A laser-heterodyne bunch length monitor for the SLC interaction point

    SciTech Connect

    Kotseroglou, T.; Alley, R.; Jobe, K.

    1997-05-01

    Since 1996, the transverse beam sizes at the SLC interaction point (IP) can be determined with a `laser wire`, by detecting the rate of Compton-scattered photons as a function of the beam-laser separation in space. Nominal laser parameters are: 350 nm wavelength, 2 mJ energy per pulse, 40 Hz repetition rate, and 150 ps FWHM pulse length. The laser system is presently being modified to enable measurements of the longitudinal beam profile. For this purpose, two laser pulses of slightly different frequency are superimposed, which creates a travelling fringe pattern and, thereby, introduces a bunch-to-bunch variation of the Compton rate. The magnitude of this variation depends on the beat wavelength and on the Fourier transform of the longitudinal distribution. This laser heterodyne technique is implemented by adding a 1-km long optical fibre at the laser oscillator output, which produces a linearly chirped laser pulse with 4.5-A linewidth and 60-ps FWHM pulse length. Also, the pulse is amplified in a regenerative amplifier and tripled with two nonlinear crystals. Then a Michelson interferometer spatially overlaps two split chirped pulses, which are temporally shifted with respect to each other, generating a quasi-sinusoidal adjustable fringe pattern. This laser pulse is then transported to the Interaction Point.

  7. Study of laser plasma interactions in the relativistic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Umstadter, D.

    1997-08-13

    We discuss the first experimental demonstration of electron acceleration by a laser wakefield over instances greater than a Rayleigh range (or the distance a laser normally propagates in vacuum). A self-modulated laser wakefield plasma wave is shown to have a field gradient that exceeds that of an RF linac by four orders of magnitude (E => 200 GV/m) and accelerates electrons with over 1-nC of charge per bunch in a beam with space-charge-limited emittance (1 mm-mrad). Above a laser power threshold, a plasma channel, created by the intense ultrashort laser pulse (I approx. 4 x1018 W/CM2, gamma = 1 micron, r = 400 fs), was found to increase the laser propagation distance, decrease the electron beam divergence, and increase the electron energy. The plasma wave, directly measured with coherent Thomson scattering is shown to damp-due to beam loading-in a duration of 1.5 ps or approx. 100 plasma periods. These results may have important implications for the proposed fast ignitor concept.

  8. First Laser-Plasma Interaction and Hohlraum Experiments on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E L; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Suter, L J; Jones, O S; Schein, J; Froula, D; Divol, L; Campbell, K; Schneider, M S; McDonald, J W; Niemann, C; Mackinnon, A J

    2005-06-17

    Recently the first hohlraum experiments have been performed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) designs. The effects of laser beam smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) and polarization smoothing (PS) on the beam propagation in long scale gas-filled pipes has been studied at plasma scales as found in indirect drive gas filled ignition hohlraum designs. The long scale gas-filled target experiments have shown propagation over 7 mm of dense plasma without filamentation and beam break up when using full laser smoothing. Vacuum hohlraums have been irradiated with laser powers up to 6 TW, 1-9 ns pulse lengths and energies up to 17 kJ to activate several diagnostics, to study the hohlraum radiation temperature scaling with the laser power and hohlraum size, and to make contact with hohlraum experiments performed at the NOVA and Omega laser facilities. Subsequently, novel long laser pulse hohlraum experiments have tested models of hohlraum plasma filling and long pulse hohlraum radiation production. The validity of the plasma filling assessment in analytical models and in LASNEX calculations has been proven for the first time. The comparison of these results with modeling will be discussed.

  9. Laser plasma interaction physics in the context of fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, C.; Fuchs, J.; Depierreux, S.; Baldis, H. A.; Pesme, D.; Myatt, J.; Hüller, S.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Laval, G.

    2000-08-01

    Of vital importance for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) are the understanding and control of the nonlinear processes which can occur during the propagation of the laser pulses through the underdense plasma surrounding the fusion capsule. The control of parametric instabilities has been studied experimentally, using the LULI six-beam laser facility, and also theoretically and numerically. New results based on the direct observation of plasma waves with Thomson scattering of a short wavelength probe beam have revealed the occurence of the Langmuir decay instability. This secondary instability may play an imporant role in the saturation of stimulated Raman scattering. Another mechanism for reducing the growth of the scattering instabilities is the so-called `plasma-induced incoherence'. Namely, recent theoretical studies have shown that the propagation of laser beams through the underdense plasma can increase their spatial and temporal incoherence. This plasma-induced beam smoothing can reduce the levels of parametric instabilities. One signature of this process is a large increase of the spectral width of the laser light after propagation through the plasma. Comparison of the experimental results with numerical simulations shows an excellent agreement between the observed and calculated time-resolved spectra of the transmitted laser light at various laser intensities.

  10. Time-Space Position of Warm Dense Matter in Laser Plasma Interaction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, L F; Uschmann, I; Forster, E; Zamponi, F; Kampfer, T; Fuhrmann, A; Holl, A; Redmer, R; Toleikis, S; Tschentscher, T; Landen, O L; Glenzer, S H

    2006-09-25

    Laser plasma interaction experiments have been perform performed using an fs Titanium Sapphire laser. Plasmas have been generated from planar PMMA targets using single laser pulses with 3.3 mJ pulse energy, 50 fs pulse duration at 800 nm wavelength. Electron density distributions of the plasmas in different delay times have been characterized by means of Nomarski Interferometry. Experimental data were cautiously compared with relevant 1D numerical simulation. Finally these results provide a first experience of searching for the time-space position of the so-called warm dense plasma in an ultra fast laser target interaction process. These experiments aim to prepare near solid-density plasmas for Thomson scattering experiments using the short wavelength free-electron laser FLASH, DESY Hamburg.

  11. Space-Time Characterization of Laser Plasma Interactions in the Warm Dense Matter Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, L F; Uschmann, I; Forster, E; Zamponi, F; Kampfer, T; Fuhrmann, A; Holl, A; Redmer, R; Toleikis, S; Tschentsher, T; Glenzer, S H

    2008-04-30

    Laser plasma interaction experiments have been performed using a fs Titanium Sapphire laser. Plasmas have been generated from planar PMMA targets using single laser pulses with 3.3 mJ pulse energy, 50 fs pulse duration at 800 nm wavelength. The electron density distributions of the plasmas in different delay times have been characterized by means of Nomarski Interferometry. Experimental data were compared with hydrodynamic simulation. First results to characterize the plasma density and temperature as a function of space and time are obtained. This work aims to generate plasmas in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime at near solid-density in an ultra-fast laser target interaction process. Plasmas under these conditions can serve as targets to develop x-ray Thomson scattering as a plasma diagnostic tool, e.g., using the VUV free-electron laser (FLASH) at DESY Hamburg.

  12. Interaction of a pulsed alexandrite laser with hard and soft biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, Lorna M.; Dickinson, Mark R.; King, Terence A.; Watts, David C.

    1994-02-01

    An alexandrite laser has been used in the fixed-Q and Q-switched modes, at the fundamental and frequency doubled wavelengths on a selection of hard and soft tissue. In an investigation into the potential use of the laser for the removal of deep lying lesions such as cutaneous vascular lesions and tatoos, studies have been carried out to characterize the depth and extent of the laser/tissue interaction in samples of tissue which greatly absorb the 750 nm radiation. The interaction of the laser radiation with extracted teeth was investigated looking at healthy enamel and dentine, and caries. Surface profile measurements of the enamel and dentine before and after irradiation show little physical effect of the laser irradiation, whereas caries appear to be ablated.

  13. An exploration of laser-sustained plasma interactions with titanium substrates during nitriding without direct irradiation by the laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Amber Nalani

    Laser-sustained plasma (LSP) is plasma which can be sustained indefinitely by a laser beam away from any potentially interacting surfaces. LSPs can be sustained at steady state by balancing power input through inverse bremsstrahlung absorption with loss through radiation (continuous and line), convection, and conduction. For many years, plasma has been considered a negative influence in laser materials processing, disrupting the beam path and distorting radiation prior to the beam reaching the surface. New research indicates that LSP can be an opportunity for metallurgical surface treatments and the deposition of coatings with an improvement in properties over conventional coating methods. For the first time, the LSP was used to nitride surfaces independently of the associated laser beam and the resulting specimens were examined to gain new insights into the effects of laser plasmas on surface modification processes. A titanium plate was placed parallel to and at a radial distance from an LSP, rather than perpendicular to it, as is the typical geometry for laser processing. During the exposure of the substrate to the LSP, the process was observed via a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The processed substrates were then examined visually, by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, focused ion beam, transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction to elucidate the morphological and microstructural features that are characteristic of this processing method. Results indicated that an LSP is a powerful tool for heating surfaces and simultaneously introducing activated gas species into the melt. The nitrided surfaces exhibited complex and uncommon morphologies, including faceted titanium nitride crystals, which had not been produced by conventional laser nitriding. The underlying microstructure demonstrated that LSP can generate layers similar to those produced by conventional laser nitriding, but to a much greater depth. This

  14. Side effects of laser-tissue interaction studied by laser Doppler vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foth, Hans-Jochen; Meyer, Dirk H.; Stoeckel, Thomas

    2000-05-01

    Mechanical effects that amy damage tissue were measured by laser doppler vibrometry. The results on the recoil momentum illustrate the laser parameters under which laser survey of organs with delicate structures becomes dangerous. One example is the acceleration of the tiny middle ear bones. In the case of an intact ossicular chain, the motion of a middle ear bone is transferred to the inner ear. The second topic is related to eye surgery. Removing or cutting of membranes, the lens or the vitreous body by pulsed lasers is often associated with the formation of laser induced cavitation bubbles. The collapse of these bubbles generates pressure shock waves propagation through the eye. Laser Doppler vibrometry was used to monitor the shock wave induced velocity of the sclera.

  15. Characteristics of laser ultrasound interaction with multi-layered dissimilar metals adhesive interface by numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kuanshuang; Zhou, Zhenggan; Zhou, Jianghua; Sun, Guangkai

    2015-10-01

    The characteristics of laser-generated ultrasonic wave interaction with multi-layered dissimilar metals adhesive interface are investigated by finite element method (FEM). The physical model of laser-generated ultrasonic wave in the multi-layered dissimilar metals adhesive structure is built. The surface temperature evolution with different laser power densities is analyzed to obtain the parameters of pulsed laser with thermoelastic regime. The differences of laser ultrasonic waves with different center frequencies measured at the center of laser irradiation would verify the interfacial features of adhesive structures. The optimum frequency range and probe point would be beneficial for the detection of the small void defect. The numerical results indicate that the different frequency range and probe points would evidently influence the identification and quantitative characterization of the small void defect. The research findings would lay a foundation for testing interfacial integrity.

  16. On specular reflectivity measurements in high and low-contrast relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, G. E.; Link, A.; Ping, Y.; McLean, H. S.; Patel, P. K.; Freeman, R. R.; Schumacher, D. W.; Tiedje, H. F.; Tsui, Y. Y.; Ramis, R.; Fedosejevs, R.

    2015-01-01

    Using both experiment and 2D3V particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we describe the use of specular reflectivity measurements to study relativistic (Iλ2 > 1018 W/cm2ṡμm2) laser-plasma interactions for both high and low-contrast 527 nm laser pulses on initially solid density aluminum targets. In the context of hot-electron generation, studies typically rely on diagnostics which, more-often-than-not, represent indirect processes driven by fast electrons transiting through solid density materials. Specular reflectivity measurements, however, can provide a direct measure of the interaction that is highly sensitive to how the EM fields and plasma profiles, critical input parameters for modeling of hot-electron generation, evolve near the interaction region. While the fields of interest occur near the relativistic critical electron density, experimental reflectivity measurements are obtained centimeters away from the interaction region, well after diffraction has fully manifested itself. Using a combination of PIC simulations with experimentally inspired conditions and an analytic, non-paraxial, pulse propagation algorithm, we calculate reflected pulse properties, both near and far from the interaction region, and compare with specular reflectivity measurements. The experiment results and PIC simulations demonstrate that specular reflectivity measurements are an extremely sensitive qualitative, and partially quantitative, indicator of initial laser/target conditions, ionization effects, and other details of intense laser-matter interactions. The techniques described can provide strong constraints on many systems of importance in ultra-intense laser interactions with matter.

  17. Generation of coherent terahertz radiation in ultrafast laser-gas interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ki-Yong

    2009-05-15

    The generation of intense terahertz radiation in ultrafast laser-gas interactions is studied on a basis of transient electron current model. When an ultrashort pulse laser's fundamental and its second harmonic fields are mixed to ionize a gas, a nonvanishing, directional photoelectron current can be produced, which simultaneously emits terahertz radiation in the far field. Here, the generation mechanism is examined with an analytic derivation and numerical simulations, in which tunneling ionization and subsequent electron motion in the combined laser field play a key role. In the simulations, three types of laser-gas interactions are considered: (i) mixing the fundamental and its second harmonic fields, (ii) mixing nonharmonic, two-color fields, and (iii) focusing single-color, few-cycle pulses. In these interactions, terahertz generation and other nonlinear effects driven by the transient current are investigated. In particular, anticorrelation between terahertz and second (or third) harmonic generation is observed and analyzed.

  18. Ultrasonic detection of photothermal interaction of lasers with tissue using a pulsed Doppler system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Hao; Azeemi, Aamer; Hartley, Craig J.; Motamedi, Massoud; Bell, Brent A.; Rastegar, Sohi; Sheppard, L. C.

    1995-05-01

    laser, high intensity focused ultrasound, microwaves, or radio frequency waves.

  19. Study of laser interaction with aluminum contaminant on fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmier, S.; Tovena, I.; Lamaignère, L.; Rullier, J. L.; Capoulade, J.; Bertussi, B.; Natoli, J. Y.; Servant, L.

    2005-12-01

    One of the major issues met in the operating of high power lasers concerns the cleanliness of laser components. In this context, in order to assess laser-induced damage in presence of metallic particulate contamination, we study the behaviour of aluminum on a silica substrate. Model samples containing calibrated aluminum square dots of 50 x 50 μ2 have been deposited by photolithography on a silica substrate. The sample was irradiated by a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm with different fluences and also different numbers of shots on each dot. Then the initial aluminum dot zone and the surrounding silica were analyzed using Nomarski microscopy, profilometry and photothermal microscopy. Laser fluence is revealed to be a very important parameter for the behaviour of aluminum dots. For example, it is possible to find a fluence of irradiation where aluminum dots are blown off the substrate and only small modifications occur to silica. In this case, increasing the number of shots doesn't significantly affect the silica surface.

  20. Free-field propagation of high intensity noise. [supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdaniel, O. H.; Roth, S. D.; Welz, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Research on high intensity (finite amplitude) acoustic waves shows that nonlinear distortion effects generally result in a shift of energy to higher frequencies. The higher intensities associated with supersonic jets would therefore indicate that high frequency enhancement of the spectrum should occur, resulting in the differences observed between subsonic and supersonic jets. A 10,000 acoustic watt source installed in an anechoic chamber generates sound levels such that acoustic shocks are readily observable. Dual frequency excitation of the source produces a strong parametric effect with a difference frequency comparable in level to the primary frequency. The test set up and recording equipment being used to determine the finite amplitude noise representative of an actual supersonic jet are described as well as the development of a computer program based on Burger's equation. The spectra of 1/2 octave band, 1 kHz sine wave, and dual frequency input and output are presented in graphs along with waveforms at Z = .025, 0.1, and 1.0.