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Sample records for high-level gentamicin-resistant enterococci

  1. In vitro antibacterial activity of seven Indian spices against high level gentamicin resistant strains of enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Bipin, Chapagain; Chitra, Pai (Bhat); Minakshi, Bhattacharjee

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to explore the in vitro antibacterial activity of seven ethanolic extracts of spices against high level gentamicin resistant (HLGR) enterococci isolated from human clinical samples. Material and methods Two hundred and fifteen enterococcal strains were isolated from clinical samples. High level gentamicin resistance in ethanolic extracts of cumin (Cuminum cyminum), cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum), ginger (Zingiber officinale), fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum), cloves (Syzygium aromaticum), cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum Maton) and black pepper (Piper nigrum) were prepared using Soxhlet apparatus. The antibacterial effect of the extracts was studied using the well diffusion method. Statistical analysis was carried out by χ2 test using SPSS 17 software. Results Only cinnamon and ginger were found to have activity against all the isolates, whereas cumin and cloves had a variable effect on the strains. Fenugreek, black pepper and cardamom did not show any effect on the isolates. The zone diameter of inhibition obtained for cinnamon, ginger, cloves and cumin was in the range 31–34 mm, 27–30 mm, 25–26 mm and 19–20 mm respectively. Conclusions Cinnamomum zeylanicum and Z. officinale showed the maximum antibacterial activity against the enterococcal isolates followed by S. aromaticum and C. cyminum. The findings of the study show that spices used in the study can contribute to the development of potential antimicrobial agents for inclusion in the anti-enterococcal treatment regimen. PMID:26322099

  2. High-level gentamicin resistance and vancomycin resistance in clinical isolates of enterococci in a tertiary care hospital in eastern Nepal.

    PubMed

    Nepal, H P; Khanal, B; Acharya, A; Gyawali, N; Jha, P K; Paudel, R

    2012-03-01

    High-level gentamicin resistance and vancomycin resistance in enterococci, a family of important opportunistic pathogens, have emerged as a significant clinical problem over recent years. The present study was conducted to determine the high-level gentamicin and vancomycin resistance among the clinical isolates of enterococci. A total of 110 phenotypically identified enterococcal isolates were subjected to determination of high-level gentamicin resistance (by disk diffusion and agar dilution methods) and vancomycin resistance (by agar screening and agar dilution methods). About 36% of the isolates were found to have high-level gentamicin resistance, which indicates that gentamicin no longer remains an appropriate choice for inclusion in combination therapy with cell wall-active agents. Ten percent isolates exhibited resisance to vancomycin during screening. However, agar dilution confirmed that the isolates did not have resistance to vancomycin but had reduced susceptibility to it, which indicates their impending emergence of resistance to vancomycin.

  3. Genetic diversity of enterococci harboring the high-level gentamicin resistance gene aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia or aph(2'')-Ie in a Japanese hospital.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shojiro; Kobayashi, Nobumichi; Quiñones, Dianelys; Nagashima, Shigeo; Uehara, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Naoki

    2009-09-01

    Prevalence of high-level gentamicin resistance genes aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia and aph(2'')-Ie, which encode distinct aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, was analyzed for a total of 1128 clinical isolates of enterococci obtained in a Japanese hospital during a period between 1997 and 2007. The aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia was detected in 40.1%, 12.9%, and 3.6% of Enterococcus faecalis, E. faecium, and other enterococcal species, respectively, and aph(2'')-Ie was detected in 3.3% of E. faecium. During the study period, detection rate of aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia in E. faecium increased from 4% (1997-1998) to 28% (2006-2007), whereas generally constant in E. faecalis. By the analysis of IS256-flanking patterns of aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia, truncated forms of Tn5281 lacking IS256 at the 3'-end, 5'-end, and both ends of aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia were identified in 4.6%, 32.4%, and 34.2% of E. faecalis strains, respectively, while the composite Tn5281-like element with IS256 at both sides was detected in 28.7% of the strains. A truncated form of Tn5281 lacking IS256 at the 5'-end was predominant in other enterococcal species. Among 14 E. faecalis and 10 E. faecium strains harboring aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia, 8 and 6 different sequence types (STs) were identified by multilocus sequence typing, respectively. Some E. faecalis STs (ST4, ST16, ST64, and ST223) were found in more than one strain, and ST4 and ST64 were associated with different IS256-flanking patterns. STs of five among six E. faecium strains with aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia (ST78, ST203, and ST418) belonged to the clonal complex (CC)17, which is known as globally emerging lineage of vancomycin- or ampicillin-resistant E. faecium clones. E. faecium strains with aph(2'')-Ie were classified into newly assigned STs, ST426, and its single locus variant ST427, which also belonged to CC17. Therefore, it was suggested that E. faecium of CC17 is prone to acquire high-level gentamicin resistance genes, and aph(2'')-Ie is distributed to specific E

  4. Genetic relatedness and risk factor analysis of ampicillin-resistant and high-level gentamicin-resistant enterococci causing bloodstream infections in Tanzanian children.

    PubMed

    Aamodt, Håvard; Mohn, Stein Christian; Maselle, Samuel; Manji, Karim P; Willems, Rob; Jureen, Roland; Langeland, Nina; Blomberg, Bjørn

    2015-02-28

    While enterococci resistant to multiple antimicrobials are spreading in hospitals worldwide, causing urinary tract, wound and bloodstream infections, there is little published data on these infections from Africa. We assessed the prevalence, susceptibility patterns, clinical outcome and genetic relatedness of enterococcal isolates causing bloodstream infections in children in a tertiary hospital in Tanzania, as part of a prospective cohort study of bloodstream infections among 1828 febrile children admitted consecutively from August 2001 to August 2002. Enterococcal bacteraemia was identified in 2.1% (39/1828) of admissions, and in 15.3% (39/255) of cases of culture-confirmed bloodstream infections. The case-fatality rate in children with Enterococcus faecalis septicaemia (28.6%, 4/14) was not significantly different from those with Enterococcus faecium septicaemia (6.7%, 1/15, p = 0.12). E. faecium isolates commonly had combined ampicillin-resistance and high-level gentamicin resistance (HLGR), (9/17), while E. faecalis frequently displayed HLGR (6/15), but were ampicillin susceptible. None of the tested enterococcal isolates displayed vancomycin resistance by Etest or PCR for vanA and vanB genes. Multi-locus sequence-typing (MLST) showed that the majority of E. faecium (7/12) belonged to the hospital associated Bayesian Analysis of Population Structure (BAPS) group 3-3. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) indicated close genetic relationship particularly among E. faecium isolates, but also among E. faecalis isolates. There was also correlation between BAPS group and PFGE results. Risk factors for enterococcal bloodstream infection in univariate analysis were hospital-acquired infection and clinical diagnosis of sepsis with unknown focus. In multivariate analysis, neonates in general were relatively protected from enterococcal infection, while both prematurity and clinical sepsis were risk factors. Malnutrition was a risk factor for enterococcal

  5. A New High-Level Gentamicin Resistance Gene, aph(2")-Id, in Enterococcus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shane F.; Zervos, Marcus J.; Clewell, Don B.; Donabedian, Susan M.; Sahm, Daniel F.; Chow, Joseph W.

    1998-01-01

    Enterococcus casseliflavus UC73 is a clinical blood isolate with high-level resistance to gentamicin. DNA preparations from UC73 failed to hybridize with intragenic probes for aac(6′)-Ie-aph(2")-Ia and aph(2")-Ic. A 4-kb fragment from UC73 was cloned and found to confer resistance to gentamicin in Escherichia coli DH5α transformants. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed the presence of a 906-bp open reading frame whose deduced amino acid sequence had a region with homology to the aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme APH(2")-Ic and to the C-terminal domain of the bifunctional enzyme AAC(6′)-APH(2"). The gene is designated aph(2")-Id, and its observed phosphotransferase activity is designated APH(2")-Id. A PCR-generated intragenic probe hybridized to the genomic DNA from 17 of 118 enterococcal clinical isolates (108 with high-level gentamicin resistance) from five hospitals. All 17 were vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates, and pulsed-field typing revealed three distinct clones. The combination of ampicillin plus either amikacin or neomycin exhibited synergistic killing against E. casseliflavus UC73. Screening and interpretation of high-level aminoglycoside resistance in enterococci may need to be modified to include detection of APH(2")-Id. PMID:9593155

  6. Detection of a novel aph(2") allele (aph[2"]-Ie) conferring high-level gentamicin resistance and a spectinomycin resistance gene ant(9)-Ia (aad 9) in clinical isolates of enterococci.

    PubMed

    Mahbub Alam, Mohammed; Kobayashi, Nobumichi; Ishino, Masaho; Sumi, Ayako; Kobayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Uehara, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Naoki

    2005-01-01

    Aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) are major factors that confer aminoglycoside resistance to enterococci. In an epidemiologic study on distribution of 12 AME genes in 534 recent clinical strains isolated from a Japanese hospital, two uncommon AME genes, ant(9)-Ia and a novel aph(2") allele, aph(2")-Ie, were detected. ant(9)-Ia had been reported only in Staphylococcus aureus and encodes spectinomycin adenylyltransferase ANT(9)-I, which confers resistance to spectinomycin. The ant(9)-Ia gene was detected in three strains, a single strain each of Enterococcus faecalis, E. faecium, and E. avium. Nucleotide sequences of ant(9)-Ia from these three enterococcal species were identical to that reported for S. aureus and considered to be located on Tn 554. The new aph(2") allele, designated aph(2")-Ie, was identified in three E. faecium strains. The aph(2")-Ie allele was genetically close to aph(2")-Id reported in E. casseliflavus (93.7% amino acid sequence identity; 96.3% similarity), while distant from aph(2")-Ia, aph(2")-Ib, or aph(2")-Ic (26.3-29.5% amino acid sequence identity). Sequence divergence between APH(2")-Id and APH(2")-Ie was mostly located in amino-terminal half. In contrast, sequences corresponding to the three motifs required for aminoglycoside phosphotransferase were conserved except for a single amino acid. Three E. faecium strains having aph(2")-Ie showed high-level resistance to gentamicin and streptomycin, but not to kanamycin, dibekacin, and tobramycin, unlike enzyme specificity described for aph(2")-Id in E. casseliflavus. Such a difference in resistance phenotype was suggested to be related to amino acid sequence divergence between APH(2")-Id and APH(2")-Ie.

  7. Assessment of pheromone response in biofilm forming clinical isolates of high level gentamicin resistant Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Jayanthi, S; Ananthasubramanian, M; Appalaraju, B

    2008-01-01

    Twenty five clinical isolates of high level gentamicin resistant Enterococcus faecalis were tested for their biofilm formation and pheromone responsiveness. The biofilm assay was carried out using microtiter plate method. Two isolates out of the 25 (8%) were high biofilm formers and 19 (76%) and four (16%) isolates were moderate and weak biofilm formers respectively. All the isolates responded to pheromones of E. faecalis FA2-2 strain. On addition of pheromone producing E. faecalis FA2-2 strain to these isolates, seven of 19 (37%) moderate biofilm formers developed into high biofilm formers. Similarly one of the 4 (25%) weak biofilm formers developed into high level biofilm former. Twelve (48%) of the 25 isolates were transconjugated by cross streak method using gentamicin as selective marker. This proves that the genetic factor for gentamicin resistance is present in the pheromone responsive plasmid. Among these twelve transaconjugants, seven isolates and one isolate were high biofilm formers on addition of E. faecalis FA2-2 and prior to its addition respectively. Out of the total 25 isolates, eight transconjugants for gentamicin resistance could turn to high biofilm formers on addition of the pheromone producing strain. All the isolates were resistant to more than two antibiotics tested. All the isolates were sensitive to vancomycin. The results indicate the significance of this nosocomial pathogen in biofilm formation and the role of pheromone responding clinical isolates of E. faecalis in spread of multidrug resistance genes.

  8. Evaluation of the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion test as a screening test for high-level aminoglycoside resistance in enterococci.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Niles, A C; Murray, P R

    1984-10-01

    The Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion test was evaluated as a test to detect high-level aminoglycoside (streptomycin, kanamycin, tobramycin, and gentamicin) resistance in isolates of enterococci. The authors found that high-level resistance could not be predicted accurately with the diffusion test.

  9. Glycyrrhizic Acid Decreases Gentamicin-Resistance in Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Sebastian; Heymann, Kerstin; Melzig, Matthias F; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M

    2016-12-01

    The resistance of commensal bacteria against first and second line antibiotics has reached an alarming level in many parts of the world and endangers the effective treatment of infectious diseases. Particularly vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium represents an increasing clinical problem in the treatment of infectious diseases and hinders adequate antibiotic stewardship. In consideration of the lack of novel antibiotic compounds, the development of resistance-modifying agents, however, can mitigate the spread of bacterial drug resistance and might possibly extend the useful application indices of an existing licensed antibiotic. Given that saponins modify the local chemical environment at cell membranes and might modify the uptake or mode of action of antibiotics in bacteria, we investigated the influence of the triterpenoid saponin glycyrrhizic acid of Glycyrrhiza glabra on the susceptibility of vancomycin-resistant enterococci against the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin in 47 clinical isolates by applying the checkerboard method. The fractional inhibitory concentration indices values were determined between 0.016 and ≤ 0.5 (synergy is accepted with values ≤ 0.5). Glycyrrhizic acid at the subinhibitory concentration of 2.4 mM was found to reduce the minimal inhibitory concentration of gentamicin in intrinsically resistant E. faecium strains down to 6.25 % of the minimal inhibitory concentration of gentamicin alone, whereas relatively low concentrations of glycyrrhizic acid (18 µM) resulted in increased susceptibilities for some E. faecium isolates to gentamicin. In conclusion, our study points towards a therapeutic potential of glycyrrhizic acid in co-application with gentamicin for defined local bacterial infections caused by vancomycin resistant Enterococcus strains. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Detection of the esp gene in high-level gentamicin resistant Enterococcus faecalis strains from pet animals in Japan.

    PubMed

    Harada, Tetsuya; Tsuji, Noboru; Otsuki, Koichi; Murase, Toshiyuki

    2005-03-20

    We investigated the prevalence of the esp gene and the susceptibility to gentamicin in Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium strains obtained from pet animals. Nine of 30 E. faecalis and 2 of 38 E. faecium strains from the pet animals had the esp gene. Three esp-positive E. faecalis strains, which were isolated from two dogs and a cat, showed gentamicin MICs of > or =256 microg/ml and harbored the high-level gentamicin resistance (HLGR) gene, aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia. Of the nine esp-positive E. faecalis strains, five, including the three strains with the HLGR gene, were closely related by numerical analysis of PFGE patterns. Longitudinal investigation needs to elucidate whether the HLGR gene was incorporated into a subpopulation of the esp-positive E. faecalis.

  11. Enterococci from Bangkok, Thailand, with high-level resistance to currently available aminoglycosides.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, B E; Tsao, J; Panida, J

    1983-01-01

    Enterococcal endocarditis is usually treated with a combination of a penicillin and an aminoglycoside. Recent reports have documented the emergence of enterococci in France with high-level resistance to gentamicin, tobramycin, and kanamycin and the emergence of strains in Houston, Tex. with high-level resistance to all of these drugs and streptomycin. In this study, we examined strains from a geographic area where newer aminoglycosides have been less commonly used. Of 125 distinct patient isolates, 18 (14%) were resistant to greater than 2,000 micrograms of gentamicin and most other aminoglycosides per ml. Four of these strains transferred gentamicin resistance to a laboratory recipient. One strain, chosen for further study, was resistant to synergism between penicillin and gentamicin, tobramycin, kanamycin, streptomycin, and amikacin and demonstrated the following enzymatic activities: 3'- and 2"-aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, 6'-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase, and adenylylation of streptomycin. Optimal therapy for endocarditis caused by such highly resistant strains is currently unknown. PMID:6614889

  12. High-level aminoglycoside resistant enterococci isolated from swine.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, C. R.; Fedorka-Cray, P. J.; Barrett, J. B.; Ladely, S. R.

    2005-01-01

    Approximately 42% (187/444) of swine enterococci collected between the years 1999 and 2000 exhibited high-level resistance to gentamicin (MIC > or =500 microg/ml), kanamycin (MIC > or =500 microg/ml), or streptomycin (MIC > or =1000 microg/ml). Eight aminoglycoside resistance genes were detected using PCR, most frequently ant(6)-Ia and aac(6')-Ii from Enterococcus faecium. Twenty-four per cent (45/187) of total high-level aminoglycoside-resistant isolates and 26% (4/15) of isolates resistant to high levels of all three antimicrobials were negative for all genes tested. These data suggest that enterococci isolated from swine contain diverse and possibly unidentified aminoglycoside resistance genes. PMID:15816164

  13. High-level aminoglycoside resistant enterococci isolated from swine.

    PubMed

    Jackson, C R; Fedorka-Cray, P J; Barrett, J B; Ladely, S R

    2005-04-01

    Approximately 42% (187/444) of swine enterococci collected between the years 1999 and 2000 exhibited high-level resistance to gentamicin (MIC > or =500 microg/ml), kanamycin (MIC > or =500 microg/ml), or streptomycin (MIC > or =1000 microg/ml). Eight aminoglycoside resistance genes were detected using PCR, most frequently ant(6)-Ia and aac(6')-Ii from Enterococcus faecium. Twenty-four per cent (45/187) of total high-level aminoglycoside-resistant isolates and 26% (4/15) of isolates resistant to high levels of all three antimicrobials were negative for all genes tested. These data suggest that enterococci isolated from swine contain diverse and possibly unidentified aminoglycoside resistance genes.

  14. Prevalence of high-level gentamicin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium in an Iranian hospital.

    PubMed

    Emaneini, M; Khoramian, B; Jabalameli, F; Beigverdi, R; Asadollahi, K; Taherikalani, M; Lari, A R

    2016-12-01

    This study was designed to determine the molecular characteristics and antimicrobial resistance of enterococcal strains isolated from patients admitted to an Iranian Hospital. Enterococcal strains were isolated from the burn patients. All strains were screened for genes encoding resistance to aminoglycoside [aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia, aph (3'), ant (4')], resistance to vancomycin (vanA, vanB), resistance to tetracycline (tetK, tetL, tetM, tetO), and resistance to erythromycin (ermA, ermB, ermC) by PCR and multiplex PCR-based methods. Genetic diversity was evaluated via Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR. All enterococcal isolates showed complete sensitivity to vancomycin with MIC ≤ 0.5μg/ml. Resistance to gentamicin, tetracycline, erythromycin, ciprofloxacin or quinopristin-dalfopristin was detected, whilst more than 96.2% of isolates were high-level gentamicinresistant (HLGR) and multiple drug resistant. The most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance gene was aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia, that was found in 96.2% (26/27) of the isolates. The most prevalent tetracycline resistance genes were tetM, found in 85.1% (23/27) followed by tetL and tetO found in 7.4% (2/27) of the isolates. The ermA and ermB genes were detected in 33.3% (9/27) and 44.4% (12/27) of the isolates respectively. RAPD-PCR analysis yielded 17 distinct profiles among 27 investigated isolates. One cluster of isolates shared the same RAPD pattern, while 16 isolates had unique RAPD pattern. Our study showed that during the examination time period one RAPD genotype was the common type and was disseminated among patients in the burn unit. Interestingly, most of these strains had an identical or very similar antibiotic and gene resistance pattern.

  15. High level resistance to aminoglycosides in enterococci from Riyadh.

    PubMed

    Al-Ballaa, S R; Qadri, S M; Al-Ballaa, S R; Kambal, A M; Saldin, H; Al-Qatary, K

    1994-07-01

    Enterococci with high level of aminoglycosides resistance are being reported from different parts of the world with increasing frequency. Treatment of infections caused by such isolates is associated with a high incidence of failure or relapse. This is attributed to the loss of the synergetic effect of aminoglycosides and cell wall active agents against isolates exhibiting this type of resistance. To determine the prevalence of enterococci with high level resistance to aminoglycosides in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, 241 distinct clinical isolates were examined by disk diffusion method using high content aminoglycosides disks. Seventy-four isolates (30%) were resistant to one or more of the aminoglycosides tested. The most common pattern of resistance was that to streptomycin and kanamycin. Of the 241 isolates tested, 29 (12%) were resistant to high levels of gentamicin, 35 (15%) to tobramycin, 65 (27%) to kanamycin and 53 (22%) to streptomycin. The highest rate of resistance to a high level of gentamicin was found among enterococcal blood isolates (30%). Eighteen of the isolates were identified as Enterococcus faecium, 13 (72%) of these showed high level resistance to two or more of the aminoglycosides tested.

  16. Absence of high-level vancomycin resistance in enterococci isolated from meat-processing facilities.

    PubMed

    Bodnaruk, P W; Krakar, P J; Tompkin, R B

    2001-01-01

    Enterococci isolated from packaging areas of meat-processing facilities that produce ready-to-eat meat products were examined for high-level vancomycin resistance. A total of 406 enterococci isolates from the plants' packaging areas were examined for vancomycin resistance. High-level vancomycin resistance was not demonstrated in any enterococci isolated from 12 meat-processing plants.

  17. Absence of high-level vancomycin resistance in enterococci isolated from meat-processing facilities.

    PubMed Central

    Bodnaruk, P. W.; Krakar, P. J.; Tompkin, R. B.

    2001-01-01

    Enterococci isolated from packaging areas of meat-processing facilities that produce ready-to-eat meat products were examined for high-level vancomycin resistance. A total of 406 enterococci isolates from the plants' packaging areas were examined for vancomycin resistance. High-level vancomycin resistance was not demonstrated in any enterococci isolated from 12 meat-processing plants. PMID:11747735

  18. Diversity of enterococcal species and characterization of high-level aminoglycoside resistant enterococci of samples of wastewater and surface water in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Ben Said, Leila; Klibi, Naouel; Lozano, Carmen; Dziri, Raoudha; Ben Slama, Karim; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Torres, Carmen

    2015-10-15

    One hundred-fourteen samples of wastewater (n=64) and surface-water (n=50) were inoculated in Slanetz-Bartley agar plates supplemented or not with gentamicin (SB-Gen and SB plates, respectively) for enterococci recovery. Enterococci were obtained from 75% of tested samples in SB media (72% in wastewater; 78% in surface-water), and 85 enterococcal isolates (one/positive-sample) were obtained. Enterococcus faecium was the most prevalent species (63.5%), followed by Enterococcus faecalis (20%), Enterococcus hirae (9.4%), Enterococcus casseliflavus (4.7%), and Enterococcus gallinarum/Enterococcus durans (2.4%). Antibiotic resistance detected among these enterococci was as follows [percentage/detected gene (number isolates)]: kanamycin [29%/aph(3')-IIIa (n=22)], streptomycin [8%/ant(6)-Ia (n=4)], erythromycin [44%/erm(B) (n=34)], tetracycline [18%/tet(M) (n=6)/tet(M)-tet(L) (n=9)], chloramphenicol [2%/cat(A) (n=1)], ciprofloxacin [7%] and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole [94%]. High-level-gentamicin resistant (HLR-G) enterococci were recovered from 15 samples in SB-Gen or SB plates [12/64 samples of wastewater (19%) and 3/50 samples of surface-water (6%)]; HLR-G isolates were identified as E. faecium (n=7), E. faecalis (n=6), and E. casseliflavus (n=2). These HLR-G enterococci carried the aac(6')-Ie-aph(2")-Ia and erm(B) genes, in addition to aph(3')-IIIa (n=10), ant(6)-Ia (n=9), tet(M) (n=13), tet(L) (n=8) and cat(A) genes (n=2). Three HLR-G enterococci carried the esp virulence gene. Sequence-types detected among HLR-G enterococci were as follows: E. faecalis (ST480, ST314, ST202, ST55, and the new ones ST531 and ST532) and E. faecium (ST327, ST12, ST296, and the new ones ST985 and ST986). Thirty-two different PFGE patterns were detected among 36 high-level-aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci recovered in water samples. Diverse genetic lineages of HLR-G enterococci were detected in wastewater and surface-water in Tunisia. Water can represent an important source for the

  19. OCCURRENCE OF HIGH-LEVEL AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL ISOLATES OF ENTEROCOCCI

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-level resistance fo aminoglycosides was observed in environmental isolates of enterococci. Various aquatic habitats, including agricultural runoff, creeks, rivers, wastewater, and wells, were analyzed. Strains of Enterococcus faecalis, e.faecium, E. gallinarum, and other Ent...

  20. OCCURRENCE OF HIGH-LEVEL AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL ISOLATES OF ENTEROCOCCI

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-level resistance fo aminoglycosides was observed in environmental isolates of enterococci. Various aquatic habitats, including agricultural runoff, creeks, rivers, wastewater, and wells, were analyzed. Strains of Enterococcus faecalis, e.faecium, E. gallinarum, and other Ent...

  1. High-level aminoglycoside resistance and virulence characteristics among Enterococci isolated from recreational beaches in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Dada, Ayokunle Christopher; Ahmad, Asmat; Usup, Gires; Heng, Lee Yook; Hamid, Rahimi

    2013-09-01

    We report the first study on the occurrence of high-level aminoglycoside-resistant (HLAR) Enterococci in coastal bathing waters and beach sand in Malaysia. None of the encountered isolates were resistant to high levels of gentamicin (500 μg/mL). However, high-level resistance to kanamycin (2,000 μg/mL) was observed in 14.2 % of tested isolates, the highest proportions observed being among beach sand isolates. High-level resistance to kanamycin was higher among Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium than Enterococcus spp. Chi-square analysis showed no significant association between responses to tested antibiotics and the species allocation or source of isolation of all tested Enterococci. The species classification of encountered Enterococci resistance to vancomycin was highest among Enterococcus spp. (5.89 %) followed by E. faecium (4.785) and least among E. faecalis. A total of 160 isolates were also tested for virulence characteristics. On the whole, caseinase production was profoundly highest (15.01 %) while the least prevalent virulence characteristic observed among tested beach Enterococci was haemolysis of rabbit blood (3.65 %). A strong association was observed between the source of isolation and responses for each of caseinase (C = 0.47, V = 0.53) and slime (C = 0.50, V = 0.58) assays. Analysis of obtained spearman's coefficient showed a strong correlation between caseinase and each of the slime production (p = 0.04), gelatinase (p = 0.0035) and haemolytic activity on horse blood (p = 0.004), respectively. Suggestively, these are the main virulent characteristics of the studied beach Enterococci. Our findings suggest that recreational beaches may contribute to the dissemination of Enterococci with HLAR and virulence characteristics.

  2. Increased high-level gentamicin resistance in invasive Enterococcus faecium is associated with aac(6')Ie-aph(2″)Ia-encoding transferable megaplasmids hosted by major hospital-adapted lineages.

    PubMed

    Rosvoll, Torill C S; Lindstad, Belinda L; Lunde, Tracy M; Hegstad, Kristin; Aasnaes, Bettina; Hammerum, Anette M; Lester, Camilla H; Simonsen, Gunnar S; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn; Pedersen, Torunn

    2012-11-01

    Gentamicin is important in synergistic bactericidal therapy with cell wall agents for severe enterococcal infections. During 2003-2008, a 10-fold increase in the prevalence of high-level gentamicin resistance (HLGR), to above 50%, in blood culture isolates of Enterococcus faecium, was reported by the Norwegian Surveillance System for Antimicrobial Resistance. A representative national collection of invasive E. faecium isolates (n = 99) from 2008 was examined by a multilevel approach. Genotyping revealed a polyclonal population dominated by major hospital-associated lineages (mainly ST203, ST17, ST18, ST202 and ST192). The presence of aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia, encoding the bi-functional aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme, was found in 98% of HLGR isolates (56/57). Furthermore, a significantly higher prevalence of potential virulence genes, toxin-antitoxin loci as well as pRE25 and pRUM type replicons was demonstrated in isolates belonging to major hospital-associated lineages compared to other sequence types. Megaplasmids of pLG1 replicon type (200-330 kb) were present in 90% of the isolates. Co-hybridization analyses revealed genetic linkage of aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia to this replicon type. Transfer of HLGR-encoding plasmids was restricted to E. faecium. In conclusion, the increased prevalence of HLGR in invasive E. faecium in Norway is associated with hospital-adapted genetic lineages carrying aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia-encoding transferable megaplasmids of the pLG1 replicon type. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of high level ampicillin- and aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci isolated from non-hospital sources.

    PubMed

    Ngbede, Emmanuel O; Raji, Mashood A; Kwanashie, Clara N; Kwaga, Jacob K P; Adikwu, Alex A; Maurice, Nanven A; Adamu, Andrew M

    2017-07-01

    High level ampicillin- and aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci are being increasingly reported from non-hospital sources. This study was carried out to characterize these strains from non-hospital sources in Nigeria. A collection of Enterococcus faecium isolated from vegetables, soil, farm animals and manure and observed to be resistant to ampicillin (n=63) and gentamicin (n=37) discs, were screened for resistance to high levels of ampicillin and aminoglycoside using E-test strips. Putative high level ampicillin- and aminoglycoside-resistant strains were screened for pbp5 and aminoglycoside modifying enzyme genes, respectively, by PCR. The C-terminal region of the amplified pbp5 gene was also sequenced. Five (5/63) and thirty-five (35/37) of the ampicillin- and aminoglycoside-resistant strains were identified as high level ampicillin- and aminoglycoside-resistant E. faecium strains, respectively, based on the MIC results. The amplified pbp5 gene from the high level ampicillin-resistant isolates displayed 96-99 % nucleotide sequence similarity with the reference strains and three novel insertions (500Glu→Leu, 502Asp→Arg and 614Ile→Phe) in the amino acid sequence. Aminoglycoside modifying enzyme genes aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″) (100 %), aph(2')-Ic (88.8 %), aph(3')-IIIa (90 %) and ant(4')-Ia (40 %) were detected among the high level aminoglycoside-resistant isolates. This is the first report on the characterization of high level ampicillin- and aminoglycoside-resistant Enterococcus faecium among animals and vegetables in Nigeria. The results show that non-hospital sources can constitute a reservoir for potential dissemination of these strains and genes to humans via the food chain or by direct contact.

  4. Investigation of the reformulated Remel Synergy Quad plate for detection of high-level aminoglycoside and vancomycin resistance among enterococci.

    PubMed

    Free, L; Sahm, D F

    1995-06-01

    We investigated the accuracy of the recently released Remel Synergy Quad plate, a commercially available agar screening method for detecting high-level aminoglycoside and vancomycin resistance among enterococci that is based on the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards recommended guidelines (National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards, M7-A3, 1993). The Synergy Quad correctly determined the gentamicin and streptomycin resistance status for > or = 97% of 147 Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolates tested. Detection of vancomycin resistance also was reliable, as no false susceptibility occurred with 36 vancomycin-resistant E. faecalis and E. faecium strains and false resistance occurred only once with the 47 susceptible strains tested. One strain each of Enterococcus gallinarum and Enterococcus casseliflavus failed to grow on the screen, but because the true nature and significance of resistance in such isolates is unknown the implication of their screen negativity is uncertain. In summary, the Remel Synergy Quad provides a highly accurate and convenient method for susceptibility testing of enterococci against gentamicin, streptomycin, and vancomycin.

  5. Gentamicin resistance among Escherichia coli strains isolated in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Hasvold, J; Bradford, L; Nelson, C; Harrison, C; Attar, M; Stillwell, T

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among term and preterm infants. Ampicillin and gentamicin are standard empiric therapy for early onset sepsis. Four cases of neonatal sepsis secondary to Escherichia coli (E. coli) found to be gentamicin resistant occurred within a five week period in one neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). To determine whether these cases could be tied to a single vector of transmission, and to more broadly evaluate the incidence of gentamicin resistant strains of E. coli in the neonatal population at our institution compared to other centers, we reviewed the charts of the four neonates (Infants A through D) and their mothers. The E. coli isolates were sent for Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) to evaluate for genetic similarity between strains. We also reviewed all positive E. coli cultures from one NICU over a two year period. Infants A and B had genetically indistinguishable strains which matched that of urine and placental cultures of Infant B's mother. Infant C had a genetically distinct organism. Infant D, the identical twin of Infant C, did not have typing performed. Review of all cultures positive for E. coli at our institution showed a 12.9 percent incidence of gentamicin-resistance. A review of other studies showed that rates of resistance vary considerably by institution. We conclude that gentamicin-resistant E. coli is a relatively uncommon cause of neonatal sepsis, but should remain a consideration in patients who deteriorate despite initiation of empiric antibiotics.

  6. Identification and control of a gentamicin resistant, meticillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus outbreak on a neonatal unit

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Bethany; Menson, Esse; Klein, John L; Watts, Timothy L; Kearns, Angela M; Pichon, Bruno; Edgeworth, Jonathan D; French, Gary L

    2014-01-01

    We describe the identification and control of an outbreak of gentamicin resistant, meticillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (GR-MSSA) on a 36-bed neonatal unit (NNU) in London. Control measures included admission and weekly screening for GR-MSSA, cohorting affected babies, environmental and staff screening, hydrogen peroxide vapour (HPV) for terminal disinfection of cohort rooms, and reinforcement of hand hygiene. Seventeen babies were affected by the outbreak strain over ten months; seven were infected and ten were asymptomatic carriers. The outbreak strain was gentamicin resistant and all isolates were indistinguishable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The outbreak strains spread rapidly and were associated with a high rate of bacteraemia (35% of 17 affected patients had bacteraemia vs. 10% of 284 patients with MSSA prior to the outbreak, p=0.007). None of 113 staff members tested were colonised with GR-MSSA. GR-MSSA was recovered from 11.5% of 87 environmental surfaces in cohort rooms, 7.1% of 28 communal surfaces and 4.1% of 74 surfaces after conventional terminal disinfection. None of 64 surfaces sampled after HPV decontamination yielded GR-MSSA. Recovery of GR-MSSA from two high level sites suggested that the organism could have been transmitted via air. Occasional breakdown in hand hygiene compliance and contaminated environmental surfaces probably contributed to transmission.

  7. Evaluation of a New System, VITEK 2, for Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garrote, Fernando; Cercenado, Emilia; Bouza, Emilio

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the new automated VITEK 2 system (bioMérieux) for the identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of enterococci. The results obtained with the VITEK 2 system were compared to those obtained by reference methods: standard identification by the scheme of Facklam and Sahm [R. R. Facklam and D. F. Sahm, p. 308–314, in P. R. Murray et al., ed., Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 6th ed., 1995] and with the API 20 STREP system and, for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, broth microdilution and agar dilution methods by the procedures of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The presence of vanA and vanB genes was determined by PCR. A total of 150 clinical isolates were studied, corresponding to 60 Enterococcus faecalis, 55 Enterococcus faecium, 26 Enterococcus gallinarum, 5 Enterococcus avium, 2 Enterococcus durans, and 2 Enterococcus raffinosus isolates. Among those isolates, 131 (87%) were correctly identified to the species level with the VITEK 2 system. Approximately half of the misidentifications were for E. faecium with low-level resistance to vancomycin, identified as E. gallinarum or E. casseliflavus; however, a motility test solved the discrepancies and increased the agreement to 94%. Among the strains studied, 66% were vancomycin resistant (57 VanA, 16 VanB, and 26 VanC strains), 23% were ampicillin resistant (MICs, ≥16 μg/ml), 31% were high-level gentamicin resistant, and 45% were high-level streptomycin resistant. Percentages of agreement for susceptibility and resistance to ampicillin, vancomycin, and teicoplanin and for high-level gentamicin resistance and high-level streptomycin resistance were 93, 95, 97, 97, and 96%, respectively. The accuracy of identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of enterococci with the VITEK 2 system, together with the significant reduction in handling time, will have a positive impact on the work flow of the clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:10834961

  8. Evaluation of a new system, VITEK 2, for identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of enterococci.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garrote, F; Cercenado, E; Bouza, E

    2000-06-01

    We evaluated the new automated VITEK 2 system (bioMérieux) for the identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of enterococci. The results obtained with the VITEK 2 system were compared to those obtained by reference methods: standard identification by the scheme of Facklam and Sahm [R. R. Facklam and D. F. Sahm, p. 308-314, in P. R. Murray et al., ed., Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 6th ed., 1995] and with the API 20 STREP system and, for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, broth microdilution and agar dilution methods by the procedures of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The presence of vanA and vanB genes was determined by PCR. A total of 150 clinical isolates were studied, corresponding to 60 Enterococcus faecalis, 55 Enterococcus faecium, 26 Enterococcus gallinarum, 5 Enterococcus avium, 2 Enterococcus durans, and 2 Enterococcus raffinosus isolates. Among those isolates, 131 (87%) were correctly identified to the species level with the VITEK 2 system. Approximately half of the misidentifications were for E. faecium with low-level resistance to vancomycin, identified as E. gallinarum or E. casseliflavus; however, a motility test solved the discrepancies and increased the agreement to 94%. Among the strains studied, 66% were vancomycin resistant (57 VanA, 16 VanB, and 26 VanC strains), 23% were ampicillin resistant (MICs, >/=16 microgram/ml), 31% were high-level gentamicin resistant, and 45% were high-level streptomycin resistant. Percentages of agreement for susceptibility and resistance to ampicillin, vancomycin, and teicoplanin and for high-level gentamicin resistance and high-level streptomycin resistance were 93, 95, 97, 97, and 96%, respectively. The accuracy of identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of enterococci with the VITEK 2 system, together with the significant reduction in handling time, will have a positive impact on the work flow of the clinical microbiology laboratory.

  9. Inhibition of vancomycin and high-level aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci strains and Listeria monocytogenes by bacteriocin-like substance produced by Enterococcus faecium E86.

    PubMed

    Lemos Miguel, Marco Antônio; Dias de Castro, Angela Cristina; Ferreira Gomes Leite, Selma

    2008-11-01

    Three hundred and thirty nine lactic bacteria strains isolated from food samples were screened for antimicrobial activity. Only one strain isolated from meat pie and identified as Enterococcus faecium produced a bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) showing activity against Enterococcus, Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus, Listeria, Corynebacterium and Staphylococcus aureus. The BLIS produced was resistant to acid and alkali treatment and 121 masculineC for 15 min. The addition of BLIS in BHI contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes decreased the contamination in 4.8 log cycles in 24 h. The inhibition of listeria was also obtained in milk. Forty multiresistant enterococci strains were inhibited in the well-diffusion test. Two vancomycin resistant strains tested in liquid with BLIS were also inhibited. The BLIS producer showed no pathogenicity marker.

  10. Antibiotic resistance and mechanisms implicated in clinical enterococci in a Tunisian hospital.

    PubMed

    Klibi, N; Gharbi, S; Masmoudi, A; Ben Slama, K; Poeta, P; Zarazaga, M; Fendri, C; Boudabous, A; Torres, C

    2006-02-01

    Susceptibility testing for 15 antibiotics was performed in a series of 191 clinical enterococci recovered in a Tunisian Hospital during 2000-2003. Species detected were the following ones (number of isolates): E. faecalis (139), E. faecium (41), E. casseliflavus (5), E. gallinarum (3), E. avium (2) and E. hirae (1). The percentages of antibiotic resistance detected were as follows (E. faecalis/ E. faecium/ other species) : penicillin (0/ 73/ 9%), tetracycline (78/ 44/ 54%), chloramphenicol (52/ 29/ 27%), erythromycin (66/ 100/ 82%), spiramycin (84/ 83/ 64%), pristinamycin (100/ 0/ 73%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (88/ 78/ 91%), rifampicin (72/ 41/ 0%), vancomycin (0/ 0/ 36%), teicoplanin (0/ 0/ 0%), high-level-resistance for gentamicin (24/ 29/ 45%), streptomycin (34/ 56/ 55%) and kanamycin (41/ 68/ 55%). Increased vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were only detected in E. casseliflavus and E. gallinarum isolates (MIC range 8-24 microg/ml). The erm(B), catA, tet(M), aac(6')-aph(2''), aph(3')-IIIa, and ant(6)-Ia genes were detected in 91%, 32%, 86%, 98%, 100%, and 72% of the E. faecium and E. faecalis isolates resistant to erythromycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline and high-level-resistant to gentamicin, kanamycin and streptomycin, respectively. A total of 20 unrelated pulsed-field-gel-electrophoresis patterns were found in the series of 46 high-level gentamicin-resistant E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates of this study.

  11. Antibiotic resistance pattern of Enterococci isolates from nosocomial infections in a tertiary care hospital in Eastern India.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Atreyi; Pal, Nishith K; Sarkar, Soma; Gupta, Manideepa Sen

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to commonly used antibiotics by Enterococci causing nosocomial infections is of concern, which necessitates judicious, responsible and evidence-based use of antibiotics. The present study was conducted to review the prevalence and identify therapeutic options for nosocomial Enterococcal infections in our tertiary care hospital. Isolates identified by morphological and biochemical characteristics were tested for antibiotic susceptibility using Kirby-Bauer method. 153 of 2096 culture positive clinical samples comprised of 101 urine, 30 wound swab/pus, 13 blood and 09 high vaginal swab isolates were identified as Enterococcus faecalis (90.85%), Enterococcus faecium (8.50%) and Enterococcus gallinarum (0.65%). Enterococci accounted for 8.45%, 4.53%, 4.23%, 4.43% of urinary, wound swab or pus, blood, high vaginal swab isolates respectively, causing 7.3% of all nosocomial infections. Significant number of Enterococci isolated from nosocomial urinary tract infection (66.01%) and wound infections (19.6%) were multidrug resistant (MDR). Although all isolates were sensitive to vancomycin and linezolid, resistance to erythromycin (71.24%) and ciprofloxacin (49.67%) was frequently observed. High-level gentamicin resistance was observed in 43.88%, and 61.53% of E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates respectively. Minimal inhibitory concentration of vancomycin of all the isolates were ≤1 μg/ml. 7% of the Enterococcal isolates were MDR strains and vancomycin or linezolid were the only effective antibiotics. A combination of vancomycin and/or linezolid were effective against Enterococci causing nosocomial infections in our tertiary care facility, nevertheless continuous and frequent surveillance for resistance patterns are necessary for judicious and evidence based use of antibiotics.

  12. Prevalence of Virulence Factors and Drug Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Enterococci: A Study from North India

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Tuhina; Anupurba, Shampa

    2015-01-01

    Along with emergence of multidrug resistance, presence of several virulence factors in enterococci is an emerging concept. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of various virulence factors phenotypically and genotypically in enterococci and study their association with multidrug resistance. A total of 310 enterococcal isolates were studied, comprising 155 E. faecium and 155 E. faecalis. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done by disc diffusion and agar dilution method. Hemolysin, gelatinase, biofilm production, and haemagglutination were detected phenotypically and presence of virulence genes, namely, asa1, gelE, cylA, esp, and hyl, was detected by multiplex PCR. Of the total, 47.41% isolates were high level gentamicin resistant (HLGRE) and 7.09% were vancomycin resistant (VRE). All the virulence traits studied were found in varying proportions, with majority in E. faecalis (p > 0.05). Strong biofilm producers possessed either asa1 or gelE gene. gelE silent gene was detected in 41.37% (12/29). However, increase in resistance was associated with significant decrease in expression or acquisition of virulence genes. Further, acquisition of vancomycin resistance was the significant factor responsible for the loss of virulence traits. Though it is presumed that increased drug resistance correlates with increased virulence, acquisition of vancomycin resistance might be responsible for reduced expression of virulence traits to meet the “biological cost” relating to VRE. PMID:26366302

  13. Identification of Novel Conjugative Plasmids with Multiple Copies of fosB that Confer High-Level Fosfomycin Resistance to Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lingyan; Zhang, Ping; Qu, Tingting; Chen, Yan; Hua, Xiaoting; Shi, Keren; Yu, Yunsong

    2017-01-01

    To further characterize the fosB-carrying plasmids of 19 vancomycin-resistant enterococci, the complete sequences of the fosB- and vanA-containing plasmids of Enterococcus faecium (pEMA120) and E. avium (pEA19081) were obtained by single-molecule, real-time sequencing. We found that these two plasmids are essentially identical (99.99% nucleotide sequence identity), which proved the possibility of interspecies transmission. Comparative analysis of the plasmids revealed that the backbone of pEMA120 is 99% similar to a conjugative fosB-negative E. faecium plasmid, pZB18. There is a traE disrupted in the transfer region of pEMA120, in comparison to pZB18 with an intact traE. The difference of their transfer frequencies between pEMA120 and pZB18 suggests this interruption of traE might affect conjugative transfer. Two copies of the fosB gene linked to a tnpA gene, forming an ISL3-like transposon, were found at separate locations within pEMA120, which had not been reported previously. These two fosB-carrying transposons were confirmed to form circular intermediates by inverse PCR. The hybridization of plasmid DNA digested by BsaI, having restriction site within the fosB sequence, demonstrated that the presence of multiple copies of fosB per plasmid is common. The total copy number of the fosB gene as revealed by qRT-PCR did not correlate with fosfomycin MICs or growth rates at sub-MICs of fosfomycin in different transconjugants. From susceptibility tests, the fosB gene, regardless of the copy number, conferred high fosfomycin MICs that ranged from 16384 to 65536 μg/ml. This first complete nucleotide sequence of a plasmid carrying two copies of fosB in VRE suggests that the fosB gene can transfer to multiple loci of plasmids by the ISL3 family transposase TnpA, possibly in the form of circular intermediates, leading to the dissemination of high fosfomycin resistance in VRE.

  14. Novel gentamicin resistance genes in Campylobacter isolated from humans and retail meats in the USA.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shaohua; Mukherjee, Sampa; Chen, Yuansha; Li, Cong; Young, Shenia; Warren, Melissa; Abbott, Jason; Friedman, Sharon; Kabera, Claudine; Karlsson, Maria; McDermott, Patrick F

    2015-05-01

    To understand the molecular epidemiology of gentamicin-resistant Campylobacter and investigate aminoglycoside resistance mechanisms. One-hundred-and-fifty-one gentamicin-resistant Campylobacter isolates from humans (n = 38 Campylobacter jejuni; n = 41, Campylobacter coli) and retail chickens (n = 72 C. coli), were screened for the presence of gentamicin resistance genes by PCR and subtyped using PFGE. A subset of the isolates (n = 41) was analysed using WGS. Nine variants of gentamicin resistance genes were identified: aph(2″)-Ib, Ic, Ig, If, If1, If3, Ih, aac(6')-Ie/aph(2″)-Ia and aac(6')-Ie/aph(2″)-If2. The aph(2″)-Ib, Ic, If1, If3, Ih and aac(6')-Ie/aph(2″)-If2 variants were identified for the first time in Campylobacter. Human isolates showed more diverse aminoglycoside resistance genes than did retail chicken isolates, in which only aph(2″)-Ic and -Ig were identified. The aph(2″)-Ig gene was only gene shared by C. coli isolates from human (n = 27) and retail chicken (n = 69). These isolates displayed the same resistance profile and similar PFGE patterns, suggesting that contaminated retail chicken was probably the source of human C. coli infections. Human isolates were genetically diverse and generally more resistant than the retail chicken isolates. The most frequent co-resistance was to tetracycline (78/79, 98.7%), followed by ciprofloxacin/nalidixic acid (46/79, 58.2%), erythromycin and azithromycin (36/79, 45.6%), telithromycin (32/79, 40.5%) and clindamycin (18/79, 22.8%). All human and retail meat isolates were susceptible to florfenicol. This study demonstrated that several new aminoglycoside resistance genes underlie the recent emergence of gentamicin-resistant Campylobacter, and that, in addition to contaminated retail chicken, other sources have also contributed to gentamicin-resistant Campylobacter infections in humans. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial

  15. Epidemiology of gentamicin-resistant, gram-negative bacillary colonization in a spinal cord injury unit.

    PubMed Central

    Shlaes, D M; Currie, C A; Rotter, G; Eanes, M; Floyd, R

    1983-01-01

    A prospective epidemiological survey of a spinal cord injury unit for gentamicin-resistant, gram-negative bacilli was undertaken. The initial survey of the unit suggested a low level of cross-infection involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Providencia stuartii. However, a longitudinal study of new admissions revealed that only 13 of 52 nosocomial acquisitions could be considered to be due to cross colonization. Comparison of data on antibiotic use did not suggest selective pressure for resistant endogenous flora. Nosocomial acquisition was directly related to the length of the hospital stay. Antibiotic susceptibility testing of gentamicin-resistant, gram-negative bacilli showed only minor differences between nosocomial isolates and those present during the initial survey. Of the usual antimicrobial agents, amikacin, carbenicillin, and cefoxitin were the most active against all organisms, with the exception of Serratia spp. Of the new beta-lactams, ceftazidime and imipemide (N-formimidoyl thienamycin) were most active. PMID:6619279

  16. Effective control of a gentamicin-resistant Salmonella arizonae infection in turkey poults.

    PubMed

    Ekperigin, H E; Jang, S; McCapes, R H

    1983-01-01

    A gentamicin-resistant Salmonella arizonae isolate was identified as the cause of an unusually high early mortality rate in several flocks of poults produced by a primary turkey breeder. The company routinely dipped its hatching eggs in 500 ppm gentamicin before incubation and injected each poult at 1 day of age with 1 mg gentamicin. Mortality was reduced to normal, but S. arizonae was not eliminated by injecting the day-old poults with higher doses of gentamicin. S. arizonae was not isolated from sample normal-sized poults in treated groups when tetracyclines were used for antibiotic inoculation of day-old poults. Tetracyclines seemed to be completely effective only when a 5-mg subcutaneous injection per day-old poult was combined with an approximately equal dose in drinking water daily for 4 days, and therapy was accompanied by the culling of runts and other debilitated poults.

  17. Novel Pathways for Ameliorating the Fitness Cost of Gentamicin Resistant Small Colony Variants

    PubMed Central

    Vestergaard, Martin; Paulander, Wilhelm; Leng, Bingfeng; Nielsen, Jesper B.; Westh, Henrik T.; Ingmer, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Small colony variants (SCVs) of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus are associated with persistent infections. Phenotypically, SCVs are characterized by slow growth and they can arise upon interruption of the electron transport chain that consequently reduce membrane potential and thereby limit uptake of aminoglycosides (e.g., gentamicin). In this study, we have examined the pathways by which the fitness cost of SCVs can be ameliorated. Five gentamicin resistant SCVs derived from S. aureus JE2 were independently selected on agar plates supplemented with gentamicin. The SCVs carried mutations in the menaquinone and hemin biosynthesis pathways, which caused a significant reduction in exponential growth rates relative to wild type (WT; 0.59–0.72) and reduced membrane potentials. Fifty independent lineages of the low-fitness, resistant mutants were serially passaged for up to 500 generations with or without sub-lethal concentrations of gentamicin. Amelioration of the fitness cost followed three evolutionary trajectories and was dependent on the initial mutation type (point mutation vs. deletion) and the passage condition (absence or presence of gentamicin). For SCVs evolved in the absence of gentamicin, 12 out of 15 lineages derived from SCVs with point mutations acquired intra-codonic suppressor mutations restoring membrane potential, growth rate, gentamicin susceptibility and colony size to WT levels. For the SCVs carrying deletions, all lineages enhanced fitness independent of membrane potential restoration without alterations in gentamicin resistance levels. By whole genome sequencing, we identified compensatory mutations in genes related to the σB stress response (7 out of 10 lineages). Inactivation of rpoF that encode for the alternative sigma factor SigB (σB) partially restored fitness of SCVs. For all lineages passaged in the presence of gentamicin, fitness compensation via membrane potential restoration was suppressed, however, selected for secondary

  18. Expression of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Gentamicin Resistance Gene aacC3 in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    van Boxtel, Renée A. J.; van de Klundert, Jos A. M.

    1998-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa aacC3 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli after cloning of the single gene behind the strong tac promoter. In the original Pseudomonas strain, aacC3 is preceded by cysC; together they form a single transcription unit. The ribosome-binding site and start codon of aacC3 are involved in a putative intercistronic hairpin, the stability of which interfered with the aminoglycoside resistance level. In Northern blots, full-length transcripts comprising both cysC and aacC3 could not be detected either in the original Pseudomonas strain or in E. coli harboring a plasmid with the cloned operon. In contrast, cysC transcripts were abundant. Cloning of the operon between the tac promoter and a transcription termination signal resulted in higher mRNA levels and phenotypic expression in E. coli. The absence of a transcription termination signal in the wild-type cysC-aacC3 sequence is associated with transcripts of heterogeneous size that were undetected in Northern blots. Our results shed more light on the expression of this gentamicin resistance determinant, although the discrepancies between its expression in E. coli and Pseudomonas are not fully solved. PMID:9835511

  19. The effect of alginate lyase on the gentamicin resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in mucoid biofilms.

    PubMed

    Germoni, L A P; Bremer, P J; Lamont, I L

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can secrete large amounts of alginate during chronic infections and this has been associated with high resistance to antibiotics. The major aim of this study was to investigate whether degradation of extracellular alginate by alginate lyase would increase the sensitivity of Ps. aeruginosa to gentamicin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic. Degradation of alginate from Ps. aeruginosa was monitored using a spectrometric assay. Alginate lyase depolymerized alginate, but calcium and zinc cations at concentrations found in the cystic fibrosis lung reduced enzyme activity. Biofilms formed on agar were partially degraded by alginate lyase, but staining with crystal violet showed that the biomass of biofilms grown in liquid was not significantly affected by the enzyme. Viability testing showed that the sensitivity to gentamicin of biofilm bacteria and of bacteria released from biofilms was unaffected by alginate lyase. Our results show that at least under the conditions used here alginate lyase does not affect gentamicin resistance of Ps. aeruginosa. Our study indicates that alginate does not contribute to resistance to gentamicin and so does not provide support for the concept of treating patients with alginate lyase in order to increase the antibiotic sensitivity of Ps. aeruginosa. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Elevated Risk of Carrying Gentamicin-Resistant Escherichia coli among U.S. Poultry Workers

    PubMed Central

    Price, Lance B.; Graham, Jay P.; Lackey, Leila G.; Roess, Amira; Vailes, Rocio; Silbergeld, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial use in food-animal production is an issue of growing concern. The application of antimicrobials for therapy, prophylaxis, and growth promotion in broiler chicken production has been associated with the emergence and dissemination of antimicrobial-resistant enteric bacteria. Although human exposure to antimicrobial-resistant bacteria through food has been examined extensively, little attention has been paid to occupational and environmental pathways of exposure. Objective Our objective was to measure the relative risk for colonization with antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli among poultry workers compared with community referents. Methods We collected stool samples and health surveys from 16 poultry workers and 33 community referents in the Delmarva region of Maryland and Virginia. E. coli was cultured from stool samples, and susceptibility to ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, gentamicin, nitrofurantoin, and tetracycline was determined for each E. coli isolate. We estimated the relative risk for carrying antimicrobial-resistant E. coli among poultry workers compared with community referents. Results Poultry workers had 32 times the odds of carrying gentamicin-resistant E. coli compared with community referents. The poultry workers were also at significantly increased risk of carrying multidrug-resistant E. coli. Conclusions Occupational exposure to antimicrobial-resistant E. coli from live-animal contact in the broiler chicken industry may be an important route of entry for antimicrobial-resistant E. coli into the community. PMID:18087592

  1. Frequency of Resistance to Kanamycin, Tobramycin, Netilmicin, and Amikacin in Gentamicin-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, Stephen J.

    1978-01-01

    In vitro evaluation of 66 epidemiologically distinct, gentamicin-resistant, gram-negative isolates from four hospitals revealed that 92% were kanamycin resistant, 44% were netilmicin resistant, 41% were tobramycin resistant, and 6% were amikacin resistant. Combined resistance to gentamicin, tobramycin, and netilmicin occurred in 30% of the strains. Although the resistance percentage to amikacin was the lowest of the three newer agents, two strains were resistant to all of the aminoglycosides tested. PMID:626492

  2. Wild birds as biological indicators of environmental pollution: antimicrobial resistance patterns of Escherichia coli and enterococci isolated from common buzzards (Buteo buteo).

    PubMed

    Radhouani, Hajer; Poeta, Patrícia; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Pacheco, Rui; Sargo, Roberto; Igrejas, Gilberto

    2012-06-01

    A total of 36 Escherichia coli and 31 enterococci isolates were recovered from 42 common buzzard faecal samples. The E. coli isolates showed high levels of resistance to streptomycin and tetracycline. The following resistance genes were detected: bla(TEM) (20 of 22 ampicillin-resistant isolates), tet(A) and/or tet(B) (16 of 27 tetracycline-resistant isolates), aadA1 (eight of 27 streptomycin-resistant isolates), cmlA (three of 15 chloramphenicol-resistant isolates), aac(3)-II with/without aac(3)-IV (all seven gentamicin-resistant isolates) and sul1 and/or sul2 and/or sul3 [all eight sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim-resistant (SXT) isolates]. intI1 and intI2 genes were detected in four SXT-resistant isolates. The virulence-associated genes fimA (type 1 fimbriae), papC (P fimbriae) and aer (aerobactin) were detected in 61.1, 13.8 and 11.1% of the isolates, respectively. The isolates belonged to phylogroups A (47.2%), B1 (8.3%), B2 (13.9%) and D (30.5%). For the enterococci isolates, Enterococcus faecium was the most prevalent species (48.4%). High levels of tetracycline and erythromycin resistance were found among our isolates (87 and 81%, respectively). Most of the tetracycline-resistant strains carried the tet(M) and/or tet(L) genes. The erm(B) gene was detected in 80% of erythromycin-resistant isolates. The vat(D) and/or vat(E) genes were found in nine of the 17 quinupristin-dalfopristin-resistant isolates. The enterococcal isolates showing high-level resistance for kanamycin, gentamicin and streptomycin contained the aph(3')-IIIa, aac(6')-aph(2″) and ant(6)-Ia genes, respectively. This report reveals that common buzzards seem to represent an important reservoir, or at least a source, of multi-resistant E. coli and enterococci isolates, and consequently may represent a considerable hazard to human and animal health by transmission of these isolates to waterways and other environmental sources via their faecal deposits.

  3. A Cassette Containing Thiostrepton, Gentamicin Resistance Genes, and dif sequences Is Effective in Construction of Recombinant Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mugweru, Julius; Makafe, Gaelle; Cao, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Bangxing; Huang, Shaobo; Njire, Moses; Chhotaray, Chiranjibi; Tan, Yaoju; Li, Xinjie; Liu, Jianxiong; Tan, Shouyong; Deng, Jiaoyu; Zhang, Tianyu

    2017-01-01

    The genetic manipulation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome is limited by the availability of selection markers. Spontaneous resistance mutation rate of M. tuberculosis to the widely used kanamycin is relatively high which often leads to some false positive transformants. Due to the few available markers, we have created a cassette containing thiostrepton resistance gene (tsr) for selection in M. tuberculosis and M. bovis BCG, and gentamicin resistance gene (aacC1) for Escherichia coli and M. smegmatis mc2155, flanked with dif sequences recognized by the Xer system of mycobacteria. This cassette adds to the limited available selection markers for mycobacteria. PMID:28392781

  4. Novel Glycoconjugate of 8-Fluoro Norfloxacin Derivatives as Gentamicin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Inhibitors: Synthesis and Molecular Modelling Studies.

    PubMed

    Azad, Chandra S; Bhunia, Shome S; Krishna, Atul; Shukla, Praveen K; Saxena, Anil K

    2015-10-01

    Antibiotic resistance has been the subject of interest in clinical practice due to high prevalence of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic organisms. In view of the prevalence of lesser resistance in antibiotics belonging to aminoglycoside class of compounds viz. Food and Drug Administration-approved gentamicin for the treatment of Staphylococcus infections, which also has instances of resistance in the clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, a series of novel glycoconjugates of 8-fluoro norfloxacin analogues with high regio-selectivity by employing copper (I)-catalyzed 1, 3-dipolar cycloaddition of 1-O-propargyl monosaccharides has been synthesized and evaluated for the antibacterial activity against gentamicin resistance Staphylococcus aureus. Among these compounds, the compound 10g showed better antibacterial activity (MIC = 3.12 μg/ml) than gentamicin (Escherichia coli (12.5 μg/ml), Staphylococcus aureus (6.25 μg/ml) and Klebsiella pneumonia (6.25 μg/ml), including gentamicin resistant (>50 μg/ml) strain in vitro). The docking studies suggest DNA gyrase of Staphylococcus aureus as a probable target for the antibacterial action of compound 10g. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Detection of a Gentamicin-Resistant Burn Wound Strain of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa but Sensitive to Honey and Garcinia Kola (Heckel) Seed Extract

    PubMed Central

    Adeleke, O.E.; Coker, M.E.; Oke, O.B.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Studies on Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus intermedius from dog and cat, and also on Staphylococcus aureus from wound and pyoderma infections, have shown a correlation between the site of microbial infection and antimicrobial susceptibility. Both the methanolic extract concentrate of Garcinia kola (Heckel) seeds and natural honey have been associated with activity on bacterial isolates from respiratory tract infections. In this study, selected bacteria belonging to genera from burn wound infection sites were treated with natural honey and methanolic extract concentrate of Garcinia kola in antimicrobial susceptibility tests separately and in combined form, and also with gentamicin and methanol as controls. The two natural products were found to be active on the bacterial isolates, excluding Klebsiella pneumoniae strains, all of which showed resistance to honey. Combination forms of the two natural products were active only on the strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. At 4 and 8 µg/ml, gentamicin was ineffective on the three strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae while 8 µg/ml was moderately active on only two strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. One strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, UCH002, was resistant to gentamicin beyond 1,000 µ/ml. Gentamicin at 4 µ/ml was inhibitory to one strain of Escherichia coli and two strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Though the antimicrobial activity of the two natural products tested had been previously reported against microbial agents of respiratory tract infection, it was also recorded in this study. The lack of activity of each of the three honey types used in this study against the Klebsiella pneumoniae strains tested underscores the need to exclude this organism from burn wound infections before embarking on treatment with honey. The sensitivity of one high-level gentamicin-resistant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to honey and Garcinia kola seed extract was noteworthy considering the therapeutic failures of gentamicin

  6. Investigation of antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli and enterococci isolated from Tibetan pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Wu, Dongfang; Liu, Kunyao; Suolang, Sizhu; He, Tao; Liu, Xuan; Wu, Congming; Wang, Yang; Lin, Degui

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli and enterococci isolated from free-ranging Tibetan pigs in Tibet, China, and analyzed the influence of free-ranging husbandry on antimicrobial resistance. A total of 232 fecal samples were collected from Tibetan pigs, and the disk diffusion method was used to examine their antimicrobial resistance. Broth microdilution and agar dilution methods were used to determine minimum inhibitory concentrations for antimicrobial agents for which disks were not commercially available. A total of 129 E. coli isolates and 84 Enterococcus isolates were recovered from the fecal samples. All E. coli isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, and 40.4% were resistant to tetracycline. A small number of isolates were resistant to florfenicol (27.9%), ampicillin (27.9%), sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (19.4%), nalidixic acid (19.4%), streptomycin (16.2%) and ceftiofur (10.9%), and very low resistance rates to ciprofloxacin (7.8%), gentamicin (6.9%), and spectinomycin (2.3%) were observed in E. coli. All Enterococcus isolates, including E. faecium, E. faecalis, E. hirae, and E. mundtii, were susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and vancomycin, but showed high frequencies of resistance to oxacillin (92.8%), clindamycin (82.1%), tetracycline (64.3%), and erythromycin (48.8%). Resistance rates to florfenicol (17.9%), penicillin (6.0%), ciprofloxacin (3.6%), levofloxacin (1.2%), and ampicillin (1.2%) were low. Only one high-level streptomycin resistant E. faecium isolate and one high-level gentamicin resistant E. faecium isolate were observed. Approximately 20% and 70% of E. coli and Enterococcus isolates, respectively, were defined as multidrug-resistant. In this study, E. coli and Enterococcus isolated from free-ranging Tibetan pigs showed relatively lower resistance rates than those in other areas of China, where more intensive farming practices are used. These results also revealed that free

  7. Enterococci in the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Nevers, Meredith B.; Korajkic, Asja; Staley, Zachery R.; Harwood, Valerie J.

    2012-01-01

    Enterococci are common, commensal members of gut communities in mammals and birds, yet they are also opportunistic pathogens that cause millions of human and animal infections annually. Because they are shed in human and animal feces, are readily culturable, and predict human health risks from exposure to polluted recreational waters, they are used as surrogates for waterborne pathogens and as fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in research and in water quality testing throughout the world. Evidence from several decades of research demonstrates, however, that enterococci may be present in high densities in the absence of obvious fecal sources and that environmental reservoirs of these FIB are important sources and sinks, with the potential to impact water quality. This review focuses on the distribution and microbial ecology of enterococci in environmental (secondary) habitats, including the effect of environmental stressors; an outline of their known and apparent sources, sinks, and fluxes; and an overview of the use of enterococci as FIB. Finally, the significance of emerging methodologies, such as microbial source tracking (MST) and empirical predictive models, as tools in water quality monitoring is addressed. The mounting evidence for widespread extraenteric sources and reservoirs of enterococci demonstrates the versatility of the genus Enterococcus and argues for the necessity of a better understanding of their ecology in natural environments, as well as their roles as opportunistic pathogens and indicators of human pathogens.

  8. Enterococci in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Nevers, Meredith B.; Korajkic, Asja; Staley, Zachery R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Enterococci are common, commensal members of gut communities in mammals and birds, yet they are also opportunistic pathogens that cause millions of human and animal infections annually. Because they are shed in human and animal feces, are readily culturable, and predict human health risks from exposure to polluted recreational waters, they are used as surrogates for waterborne pathogens and as fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in research and in water quality testing throughout the world. Evidence from several decades of research demonstrates, however, that enterococci may be present in high densities in the absence of obvious fecal sources and that environmental reservoirs of these FIB are important sources and sinks, with the potential to impact water quality. This review focuses on the distribution and microbial ecology of enterococci in environmental (secondary) habitats, including the effect of environmental stressors; an outline of their known and apparent sources, sinks, and fluxes; and an overview of the use of enterococci as FIB. Finally, the significance of emerging methodologies, such as microbial source tracking (MST) and empirical predictive models, as tools in water quality monitoring is addressed. The mounting evidence for widespread extraenteric sources and reservoirs of enterococci demonstrates the versatility of the genus Enterococcus and argues for the necessity of a better understanding of their ecology in natural environments, as well as their roles as opportunistic pathogens and indicators of human pathogens. PMID:23204362

  9. Enterococci in the environment.

    PubMed

    Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N; Nevers, Meredith B; Korajkic, Asja; Staley, Zachery R; Harwood, Valerie J

    2012-12-01

    Enterococci are common, commensal members of gut communities in mammals and birds, yet they are also opportunistic pathogens that cause millions of human and animal infections annually. Because they are shed in human and animal feces, are readily culturable, and predict human health risks from exposure to polluted recreational waters, they are used as surrogates for waterborne pathogens and as fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in research and in water quality testing throughout the world. Evidence from several decades of research demonstrates, however, that enterococci may be present in high densities in the absence of obvious fecal sources and that environmental reservoirs of these FIB are important sources and sinks, with the potential to impact water quality. This review focuses on the distribution and microbial ecology of enterococci in environmental (secondary) habitats, including the effect of environmental stressors; an outline of their known and apparent sources, sinks, and fluxes; and an overview of the use of enterococci as FIB. Finally, the significance of emerging methodologies, such as microbial source tracking (MST) and empirical predictive models, as tools in water quality monitoring is addressed. The mounting evidence for widespread extraenteric sources and reservoirs of enterococci demonstrates the versatility of the genus Enterococcus and argues for the necessity of a better understanding of their ecology in natural environments, as well as their roles as opportunistic pathogens and indicators of human pathogens.

  10. Lettuce for Human Consumption Collected in Costa Rica Contains Complex Communities of Culturable Oxytetracycline- and Gentamicin-Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, César; Lang, Lore; Wang, Amy; Altendorf, Karlheinz; García, Fernando; Lipski, André

    2006-01-01

    The present widespread use of antimicrobials in crop farming is based upon their successful application in human medicine. However, recent evidence suggests that the massive anthropogenic release of antimicrobials into the biosphere has selected for resistant bacteria and facilitated the transfer of resistance genes among them. This work deals with the examination of iceberg lettuce collected at 10 farms from two regions in Costa Rica. Farmers from nine sampling sites regularly apply commercial formulations containing gentamicin, oxytetracycline, streptomycin, or a combination of them without being able to indicate how often and how much of these products have been sprayed onto the crops. One organic farm was also investigated for comparative purposes. Oxytetracycline- and gentamicin-resistant bacteria were abundantly detected using selective enrichment cultures. Furthermore, colony mixtures from selective plates were characterized by chemotaxonomical and molecular fingerprinting methods. Both types of resistant communities accounted for a significant fraction of all culturable bacteria and included several resistance genes as well as factors for their potential horizontal transfer. Given the fact that lettuce is eaten raw, it may contribute to the dissemination of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and/or their resistance genes from the environment to the microbial biota of the human intestine. PMID:16957206

  11. Genome Shuffling and Gentamicin-Resistance to Improve ε-Poly-L-Lysine Productivity of Streptomyces albulus W-156.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Chen, Xusheng; Wu, Guangyao; Zeng, Xin; Ren, Xidong; Li, Shu; Tang, Lei; Mao, Zhonggui

    2016-12-01

    Genome shuffling has been a recently effective method for screening the desirable phenotypes of industrial strains. Here, we combined genome shuffling and gentamicin resistance to improve the production of ε-poly-L-lysine in Streptomyces albulus W-156. Five starting mutants with higher ε-poly-L-lysine (ε-PL) productivities were firstly obtained by atmospheric and room temperature plasma (ARTP) mutagenesis. After three rounds of genome shuffling with increasing concentration of gentamicin for selection, S. albulus AG3-28, was finally got with a production of 3.43 g/L in shaking flask. In a 5-L fermenter, AG3-28 exhibited a higher ε-PL productivity (56.5 g/L) than the initial strain W-156 (37.5 g/L). Key enzyme activities in primary and secondary metabolic pathways were analyzed, and the transcription levels of hrdD and pls were determined by quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Increase of key enzyme activities and the upregulation of the gene transcriptional levels demonstrated that ε-PL synthetic pathway in AG3-28 was obviously strengthened, which might be responsible for the high productivity. Moreover, hyper-yield strain AG3-28 was found to produce a slightly lower ε-PL polymerization degree than the parent strain. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis reflects the genetic diversity among the derivates after genome shuffling.

  12. Enterococci in the Environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enterococci are common, commensal members of gut communities in mammals and birds, yet they are also opportunistic pathogens that cause millions of human and animal infections annually. Because they are shed in human and animal feces, are readily culturable, and predict human hea...

  13. Enterococci in the Environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enterococci are common, commensal members of gut communities in mammals and birds, yet they are also opportunistic pathogens that cause millions of human and animal infections annually. Because they are shed in human and animal feces, are readily culturable, and predict human hea...

  14. Virulence of enterococci.

    PubMed Central

    Jett, B D; Huycke, M M; Gilmore, M S

    1994-01-01

    Enterococci are commensal organisms well suited to survival in intestinal and vaginal tracts and the oral cavity. However, as for most bacteria described as causing human disease, enterococci also possess properties that can be ascribed roles in pathogenesis. The natural ability of enterococci to readily acquire, accumulate, and share extrachromosomal elements encoding virulence traits or antibiotic resistance genes lends advantages to their survival under unusual environmental stresses and in part explains their increasing importance as nosocomial pathogens. This review discusses the current understanding of enterococcal virulence relating to (i) adherence to host tissues, (ii) invasion and abscess formation, (iii) factors potentially relevant to modulation of host inflammatory responses, and (iv) potentially toxic secreted products. Aggregation substance, surface carbohydrates, or fibronectin-binding moieties may facilitate adherence to host tissues. Enterococcus faecalis appears to have the capacity to translocate across intact intestinal mucosa in models of antibiotic-induced superinfection. Extracellular toxins such as cytolysin can induce tissue damage as shown in an endophthalmitis model, increase mortality in combination with aggregation substance in an endocarditis model, and cause systemic toxicity in a murine peritonitis model. Finally, lipoteichoic acid, superoxide production, or pheromones and corresponding peptide inhibitors each may modulate local inflammatory reactions. Images PMID:7834601

  15. [Vancomycin and high-level aminoglycoside resistant Enterococcus carriage and the risk factors related to resistance in hospitalized patients].

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Mustafa; Sencan, Irfan; Ozdemir, Davut; Oksüz, Sükrü; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Sahin, Idris

    2007-04-01

    The aims of this study were to detect the prevalence of fecal vancomycin resistant Enterococcus (VRE) colonization with high-level resistance to aminoglycoside and other antibiotics and, the risk factors related to resistance in hospitalized patients in Düzce Medical Faculty Hospital, Turkey. A total of 105 patients (61 from internal medicine, 44 from surgery clinics; 54.3% female, mean age: 47.2 +/- 24.54 years) were included to the study and a single stool sample was collected from each of the patients. Specimens were cultivated in Enterococcus selective media (BioMerieux, France), and the isolates were identified by conventional microbiological methods together with the API 20 Strep test. Beta-lactamase activities of the isolates were tested with nitrocefin disk, and antibiotic susceptibilities were determined by the disk diffusion method. Enterococcus spp. were isolated from 81 (77%) of the patients' samples and 60.5% were identified as E. faecium, 13.6% as E. faecalis, 11.1% as E. gallinarum, 7.4% as E. durans, 2.5% as E. raffinosus, 2.5% as E. mundtii, 1.2% as E. casseliflavus, and 1.2% as E. avium. High-level streptomycin and gentamicin resistance rates were found in 19.8% and 9.9% of the isolates, respectively. The resistance rates for the other antibiotics were found as follows; 18.5% to ampicillin, 27.2% to penicilin, 34.6% to nitrofurantoin, 65.4% to norfloxacin, and 70.4% to both tetracycline and ciprofloxacin. No vancomycin resistance was detected, and none of the enterococci had beta-lactamase activity. Long hospitalization period, antibiotic usage and experience of intra-abdominal operation were found as the significant risk factors for colonization of the resistant bacteria. Our results demonstrated that there was no fecal VRE carriage in our hospital during the study period, however, it was concluded that the screening tests should be done periodically in order to detect resistant strains as soon as possible.

  16. Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Cetinkaya, Yesim; Falk, Pamela; Mayhall, C. Glen

    2000-01-01

    After they were first identified in the mid-1980s, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) spread rapidly and became a major problem in many institutions both in Europe and the United States. Since VRE have intrinsic resistance to most of the commonly used antibiotics and the ability to acquire resistance to most of the current available antibiotics, either by mutation or by receipt of foreign genetic material, they have a selective advantage over other microorganisms in the intestinal flora and pose a major therapeutic challenge. The possibility of transfer of vancomycin resistance genes to other gram-positive organisms raises significant concerns about the emergence of vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. We review VRE, including their history, mechanisms of resistance, epidemiology, control measures, and treatment. PMID:11023964

  17. Complete Genome Sequences of Multidrug-Resistant Campylobacter jejuni Strain 14980A (Turkey Feces) and Campylobacter coli Strain 14983A (Housefly from a Turkey Farm), Harboring a Novel Gentamicin Resistance Mobile Element

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Steven; Parker, Craig T.; Niedermeyer, Jeffrey A.; Kathariou, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in foodborne pathogens is a major food safety and public health issue. Here we describe whole-genome sequences of two MDR strains of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli from turkey feces and a housefly from a turkey farm. Both strains harbor a novel chromosomal gentamicin resistance mobile element. PMID:27795285

  18. Computational approaches to the in vitro antibacterial activity of Allium hirtifolium Boiss against gentamicin-resistant Escherichia coli: focus on ribosome recycling factor.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sakar Emad; Chehri, Khosrow; Karimi, Nasser; Karimi, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Persian shallot, Allium hirtifolium Boiss. (AH), is an Iranian native medicinal plant belongs to Alliaceae family. Here, we investigated in vitro antibacterial activity of hydro-alcoholic extract derived from bulbs of AH. We also employed in silico molecular docking to decipher mechanisms of its antibacterial effects. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) against E. coli ATCC 25922 were determined. Molecular docking was performed for major phytochemicals of AH against ribosome recycling factor (RRF). E. coli ATCC 25922 was gentamicin-resistant while AH showed MIC (42 ± 18 μg/ml) and MBC (106 ± 36 μg/ml) against E. coli. In silico results reported all phytochemicals of AH shown acceptable negative binding affinity (kcal/mol) with RRF. In essence, the binding affinities of alliogenin (-11.6), gitogenin (-11.6), kaempferol (-10.2), linoleic acid (-8.4), oleic acid (-8.0), palmitic acid (-7.4), palmitoleic acid (-8.4), quercetin (-10.8), and shallomin (-13.4) with RRF were comparable to that of gentamicin (-12.6). In sum, hydro-alcoholic extract of bulbs of AH could be considered as a commercial phytobiotics if in-depth antibacterial assays employed in future studies. More interestingly, shallomin showed more promising binding affinity with RRF and can be considered as lead molecule for future drug discovery.

  19. Characterisation of Phenotypic and Genotypic Antibiotic Resistance Profile of Enterococci from Cheeses in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Yipel, Mustafa; Aslantaş, Özkan; Gündoğdu, Aycan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of enterococci in cheese samples and to characterize their antimicrobial resistance profiles as well as the associated resistance genes. A total of 139 enterococci were isolated from 99 cheese samples, the isolates were identified as E. faecalis (61.2%), E. faecium (15.1%), E. gallinarum (12.9%), E. durans (5.0%), E. casseliflavis (2.9%) and E. avium (2.9%). The most frequent antimicrobial resistance observed in enterococci isolates was to lincomycin (88.5%), followed by kanamycin (84.2%), gentamycin (low level, 51.1%), rifampin (46.8%) and tetracycline (33.8%). Among the isolates, the frequencies of high level gentamycin and streptomycin resistant enterococci strains were 2.2% and 5.8%, respectively. Apart from the mentioned antibiotics, low levels of resistance to ciprofloxacin, erythromycin and chloramphenicol were found. Moreover no resistance was observed against penicillin and ampicillin. The antimicrobial resistance genes including tetM, tetL, ermB, cat, aph(3’)-IIIa, ant(6)-Ia and aac(6’)-Ieaph(2”)-Ia were found in enterococci from Turkish cheese samples. In the current study, we provided data for antibiotic resistance and the occurrence of resistance genes among enterococci. Regulatory and quality control programs for milk and other dairy products from farms to retail outlets has to be established and strengthened to monitor trends in antimicrobial resistance among emerging food borne pathogens in Turkey. PMID:27433106

  20. Susceptibility Pattern of Enterococci at Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Sachan, Sadhana; Rawat, Vinita; Umesh; Kumar, Mukesh; Kaur, Tripta; Chaturvedi, Preeti

    2017-01-01

    The study was aimed to characterize enterococci from various clinical specimens, to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern, and to explore the association between virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance. A total of 283 clinical enterococcal isolates were speciated and subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Virulence factors (hemolysin, gelatinase, and biofilm production) were detected phenotypically. Of the 283 enterococci isolated, 12 species were identified; predominant species were Enterococcus faecalis (82.33%). High-level gentamicin (HLG) and vancomycin resistance were observed among 55.57% and 6.01% of enteroccal isolates, respectively. All vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VREs) were E. faecalis and had VanA phenotype and genotype. Hemolysin, gelatinase, and biofilm production were seen in 15.90%, 12.36%, and 13.43% of enterococcal isolates, respectively. Vancomycin and HLG resistance were observed in 0.35% and 61.86% of the enterococcal isolates producing virulence factors. Isolates resistant to HLG but susceptible to vancomycin expressed more virulent factors. Further research is required to reveal the complex interplay between drug resistance and virulence factors. PMID:28584459

  1. Characterization of Enterococci from Food and Food-Related Settings.

    PubMed

    Soares-Santos, Verónica; Barreto, António Salvador; Semedo-Lemsaddek, Teresa

    2015-07-01

    Enterococcus species are ubiquitous in nature, exist at high levels in food, and can cause severe diseases in humans. Thus, surveillance of enterococci harboring antibiotic resistance and virulence factors in food and food-related environments is needed. In the present study, 89 samples from food and food processing surfaces were collected in a cheese factory, a swine slaughterhouse, and a supermarket, and 132 Enterococcus isolates were recovered. Most isolates were identified as E. faecalis, which is considered the most pathogenic member of this genus. Safety analysis covering antibiotic resistance revealed that all isolates were resistant to sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim and sensitive to amoxicillin-clavulanate, ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, levofloxacin, linezolid, nitrofurantoin, or teicoplanin. More than half of the isolates were resistant to quinupristin-dalfopristin, tetracycline, and bacitracin, and less than half were resistant to the other antibiotics evaluated. Regarding virulence factors, 52% the isolates were beta-hemolytic, 39% were gelatinase producers, and 45% contained the gelE gene. For the remaining genes evaluated, efaAfs was detected in more than half of the isolates, and agg, esp, and efaAfm were found in less than half of the isolates. The present investigation revealed that food-related enterococci obtained from very different settings have multidrug resistance and virulence factors, highlighting the importance of effective surveillance networks to avoid the spread of putative pathogenic enterococci.

  2. Functionality of enterococci in dairy products.

    PubMed

    Giraffa, Giorgio

    2003-12-01

    Enterococci have important implications in the dairy industry. They occur as nonstarter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) in a variety of cheeses, especially artisan cheeses produced in southern Europe from raw or pasteurised milk, and in natural milk or whey starter cultures. They play an acknowledged role in the development of sensory characteristics during ripening of many cheeses and have been also used as components of cheese starter cultures. The positive influence of enterococci on cheese seems due to specific biochemical traits such as lipolytic activity, citrate utilisation, and production of aromatic volatile compounds. Some enterococci of dairy origin have also been reported to produce bacteriocins (enterocins) inhibitory against food spoilage or pathogenic bacteria, such as Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio cholerae, Clostridium spp., and Bacillus spp. The technological application of enterocins, shown to be produced during cheese manufacture, led to propose enterococci as adjunct starter or protective cultures in cheeses. There is evidence that enterococci, either added as adjunct starters or present as nonstarter NSLAB, could find potential application in the processing of some fermented dairy products. Literature suggest that the complex biochemical and ecological phenomena explaining the technological functionality of the enterococci in dairy products, are still to be fully understood. Clearly, the clinical research on enterococci underlines also that the safety of dairy products containing enterococci is an issue that the industry must carefully address before proceeding to their application.

  3. Antimicrobial resistance profiles of dairy and clinical isolates and type strains of enterococci.

    PubMed

    de Fátima Silva Lopes, Maria; Ribeiro, Tânia; Abrantes, Marta; Figueiredo Marques, José Joaquim; Tenreiro, Rogério; Crespo, Maria Teresa Barreto

    2005-08-25

    The susceptibility to 30 antimicrobial agents was determined by the disk diffusion method for a collection of 172 enterococcal strains, including 96 isolates from dairy sources, 50 isolates of human and veterinary origin, and 26 reference strains from 24 different enterococcal species. Results were analysed by hierarchic numerical methods to cluster strains and to group antimicrobials according to similarity profiles. Resistance to 17 of the 30 antimicrobials showed to be correlated, leading to four groups reflecting the mode of action: quinolones (ofloxacin, enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin); macrolides (erythromycin, spiramycin), phenicols (cloramphenicol) and tetracyclins (tetracycline, oxytetracyclin); aminoglycosides (gentamicin, kanamycin) and lincosamides (clindamycin); penicillins (amoxicillin, ampicillin, penicillin G, piperacillin) and carbapenems (imipenem). Overall, the genus Enterococcus behaved as resistant to lincomycin, colistin, polimixin B and, with a few exceptions in dairy isolates, to methicillin. In general, all isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, cloramphenicol and fusidic acid. Clusters containing only dairy isolates were susceptible to the majority of antimicrobials tested, as opposed to clusters constituted only by clinical enterococcal isolates. Among the clinical isolates, 62% were highly multiresistant. Low level gentamicin resistance was found to be associated with clinical enterococci. Among dairy isolates, those that clustered with clinical isolates were both resistant to gentamicin and identified as Enterococcus faecalis. Resistance to macrolides, quinolones, penicillins and imipenem was found to be associated also with clinical environments, mainly with multiresistant isolates, contrary to what is generally agreed as a characteristic of the genus. Veterinary clinical isolates were mainly grouped with the multiresistant clinical human isolates. The 26 reference enterococcal strains were distributed in clusters with

  4. Optimizing therapy for vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE).

    PubMed

    Linden, Peter K

    2007-12-01

    Enterococci are gram-positive, facultative bacteria with low intrinsic virulence but capable of causing a diverse variety of infections such as bacteremia with or without endocarditis, and intra-abdominal, wound, and genitourinary infection. During the past 2 decades the incidence of hospital-acquired enterococcal infection has significantly risen and is increasingly due to multidrug-resistant strains, primarily to the coacquisition of genetic determinants that encode for the stable expression of high-level beta-lactam, aminoglycoside, and glycopeptide resistance. Because enterococci constitute part of the normal colonizing flora, careful clinical interpretation of cultures that grow enterococci is paramount to avoid unnecessary and potentially deleterious antimicrobial therapy. Traditional antimicrobial treatment for ampicillin- and glycopeptide-susceptible enterococcal infection remains a penicillin-, ampicillin-, semisynthetic penicillin-based regimen, or vancomycin in a penicillin-intolerant individual. The need for a bactericidal combination with a cell-wall active agent combined with an aminoglycoside is most supported for native- or prosthetic valve endocarditis but is unproven for the majority of infections due to enterococci. The emergence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci prompted the clinical development of several novel and modified antimicrobial compounds approved for VRE infection (quinupristin-dalfopristin, linezolid) and several approved for non-VRE indications (daptomycin, tigecycline). There is a paucity of comparative clinical trial data with these new agents, although linezolid, based upon its efficacy and tolerability, appears to be the cornerstone of current treatment approaches. Despite a relatively short period of clinical use, enterococcal resistance has now been described for quinupristin-dalfopristin and linezolid and more recently even for daptomycin and tigecycline. Moreover, the optimal treatment of endocarditis due to VRE strains is

  5. Antibiotic resistant enterococci-tales of a drug resistance gene trafficker.

    PubMed

    Werner, Guido; Coque, Teresa M; Franz, Charles M A P; Grohmann, Elisabeth; Hegstad, Kristin; Jensen, Lars; van Schaik, Willem; Weaver, Keith

    2013-08-01

    Enterococci have been recognized as important hospital-acquired pathogens in recent years, and isolates of E. faecalis and E. faecium are the third- to fourth-most prevalent nosocomial pathogen worldwide. Acquired resistances, especially against penicilin/ampicillin, aminoglycosides (high-level) and glycopeptides are therapeutically important and reported in increasing numbers. On the other hand, isolates of E. faecalis and E. faecium are commensals of the intestines of humans, many vertebrate and invertebrate animals and may also constitute an active part of the plant flora. Certain enterococcal isolates are used as starter cultures or supplements in food fermentation and food preservation. Due to their preferred intestinal habitat, their wide occurrence, robustness and ease of cultivation, enterococci are used as indicators for fecal pollution assessing hygiene standards for fresh- and bathing water and they serve as important key indicator bacteria for various veterinary and human resistance surveillance systems. Enterococci are widely prevalent and genetically capable of acquiring, conserving and disseminating genetic traits including resistance determinants among enterococci and related Gram-positive bacteria. In the present review we aimed at summarizing recent advances in the current understanding of the population biology of enterococci, the role mobile genetic elements including plasmids play in shaping the population structure and spreading resistance. We explain how these elements could be classified and discuss mechanisms of plasmid transfer and regulation and the role and cross-talk of enterococcal isolates from food and food animals to humans.

  6. High level nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, J L

    1980-01-01

    The DOE Division of Waste Products through a lead office at Savannah River is developing a program to immobilize all US high-level nuclear waste for terminal disposal. DOE high-level wastes include those at the Hanford Plant, the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, and the Savannah River Plant. Commercial high-level wastes, for which DOE is also developing immobilization technology, include those at the Nuclear Fuel Services Plant and any future commercial fuels reprocessing plants. The first immobilization plant is to be the Defense Waste Processing Facility at Savannah River, scheduled for 1983 project submission to Congress and 1989 operation. Waste forms are still being selected for this plant. Borosilicate glass is currently the reference form, but alternate candidates include concretes, calcines, other glasses, ceramics, and matrix forms.

  7. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Miller, William R; Munita, Jose M; Arias, Cesar A

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) enterococci are important nosocomial pathogens and a growing clinical challenge. These organisms have developed resistance to virtually all antimicrobials currently used in clinical practice using a diverse number of genetic strategies. Due to this ability to recruit antibiotic resistance determinants, MDR enterococci display a wide repertoire of antibiotic resistance mechanisms including modification of drug targets, inactivation of therapeutic agents, overexpression of efflux pumps and a sophisticated cell envelope adaptive response that promotes survival in the human host and the nosocomial environment. MDR enterococci are well adapted to survive in the gastrointestinal tract and can become the dominant flora under antibiotic pressure, predisposing the severely ill and immunocompromised patient to invasive infections. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying antibiotic resistance in enterococci is the first step for devising strategies to control the spread of these organisms and potentially establish novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25199988

  8. [Antibiotic resistance and siderophore production in enterococci].

    PubMed

    Lisiecki, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Enterococci belong to the normal bacterial flora of the gastrointensinal tract of humans. Enterococci are regarded as harmless commensal, and are even believed to have probiotic characteristics. However, they can cause variety of infections, including endocarditis, bloodstream infections and urinary tract infections. During the past several decades, enterococci, and particularly Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium, have been identified as an important cause of nosocomial infections. Enterococci are intrinsically resistant to a broad range of antimicrobials. Infection caused by resistant strains are difficult to treat. Iron is an essential element for bacteria, but is not easily available in host organisms. Enterococci are iron dependent bacteria. Competition for iron between the host and bacteria is an important factor determining the course of bacterial infections. A common strategy among bacteria living in iron-limited environments is the secretion of siderophores, which can bind poorly soluble iron and make it available to cells via active transport mechanisms. The aim of the presented study was to evaluate the correlation between antibiotic resistance and siderophore production of bacteria of the genus Enterococcus. The study included 55 bacterial strains from genus Enterococcus belonging to two species--Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were carried out using disc diffusion methods with guidelines of European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). Total siderophore activity in the culture supernatants was measured using chrome azurol S. Hydroxamate siderophores were assayed using a chemical-specific assay. Antibacterial susceptibility pattern reveals that E. faecium is more resistant than E. faecalis. A significant correlation was found between resistance to fluoroquinolnes and siderophores production. Ciprofloxacin- and norfloxacin-resistant enterococal strains produced siderophores in large

  9. Ecological impact of ciprofloxacin on commensal enterococci in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    de Lastours, Victoire; Maugy, Elena; Mathy, Vincent; Chau, Françoise; Rossi, Benjamin; Guérin, François; Cattoir, Vincent; Fantin, Bruno

    2017-06-01

    The ecological impact of ciprofloxacin on commensal enterococci is unknown. Forty-eight healthy volunteers received ciprofloxacin from day (D) 0 to D14; stools were collected on D7, D14 and D42. Fluoroquinolone-susceptible and -resistant enterococci (FQ-SE and FQ-RE) were detected and quantified by culture, and identified by MALDI-TOF MS. The relative abundance of FQ-RE over FQ-SE was determined. The genetic basis of fluoroquinolone resistance was deciphered by partial sequencing of gyrA and parC genes. Clonal relatedness was determined by random amplification of polymorphic DNA PCR. Clinical trial no.: NCT00190151. Enterococci were carried by 47/48 (98%) subjects. Total counts were reduced during ciprofloxacin therapy (4.0 and 3.9 log cfu/g on D7 and D14 versus 5.9 log cfu/g before and 6.9 log cfu/g after treatment; P  < 0.05). Twenty-one out of 48 (44%) carried FQ-RE; among them, 21/21 carried Enterococcus faecium , 19 carried Enterococcus faecalis and 11 carried other species. Five out of 48 (10%) harboured FQ-RE (ciprofloxacin MIC >4 mg/L) before treatment (all E. faecium ), 6 on D7 (3 E. faecium and 3 E. faecalis ), 8 on D14 (4 E. faecium and 4 E. faecalis ) and 10 (21%) on D42 (9 E. faecium and 1 E. faecalis ). The relative abundance of FQ-RE increased from 44% on D0 to 73% and 75% on D7 and D14, respectively. No acquisition of fluoroquinolone resistance among endogenous D0 strains was evidenced. All (14/14) distinct Fluoroquinolone-resistant E. faecalis clones were gyrA / parC double mutants with high-level resistance (ciprofloxacin MIC >64 mg/L). In contrast, 34/35 E. faecium exhibited low-level resistance (ciprofloxacin MIC 4-32 mg/L) with no gyrA / parC mutation, but overexpressed the chromosomal Efm qnr gene. As compared with Fluoroquinolone-susceptible strains, Fluoroquinolone-resistant E. faecium were more frequently ampicillin resistant and Fluoroquinolone-resistant E. faecalis were more highly resistant to gentamicin. Although

  10. LIGHT-INDUCED PROCESSES AFFECTING ENTEROCOCCI IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fecal indicator bacteria such as enterococci have been used to assess contamination of freshwater and marine environments by pathogenic microorganisms. Various past studies have shown that sunlight plays an important role in reducing concentrations of culturable enterococci and ...

  11. LIGHT-INDUCED PROCESSES AFFECTING ENTEROCOCCI IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fecal indicator bacteria such as enterococci have been used to assess contamination of freshwater and marine environments by pathogenic microorganisms. Various past studies have shown that sunlight plays an important role in reducing concentrations of culturable enterococci and ...

  12. An Optimized Mouse Thigh Infection Model for Enterococci and Its Impact on Antimicrobial Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Carlos A.; Agudelo, Maria; Gonzalez, Javier M.; Vesga, Omar

    2014-01-01

    Negligible in vivo growth of enterococci and high-level dispersion of data have led to inaccurate estimations of antibiotic pharmacodynamics (PD). Here we improved an in vivo model apt for PD studies by optimizing the in vitro culture conditions for enterococci. The PD of vancomycin (VAN), ampicillin-sulbactam (SAM), and piperacillin-tazobactam (TZP) against enterococci were determined in vivo, comparing the following different conditions of inoculum preparation: aerobiosis, aerobiosis plus mucin, and anaerobiosis plus mucin. Drug exposure was expressed as the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve for the free, unbound fraction of the drug to the MIC (fAUC/MIC) (VAN) or the time in a 24-h period that the drug concentration for the free, unbound fraction exceeded the MIC under steady-state pharmacokinetic conditions (fT>MIC) (SAM and TZP) and linked to the change in log10 CFU/thigh. Only anaerobiosis plus mucin enhanced the in vivo growth, yielding significant PD parameters with all antibiotics. In conclusion, robust in vivo growth of enterococci was crucial for better determining the PD of tested antibacterial agents, and this was achieved by optimizing the procedure for preparing the inoculum. PMID:25348523

  13. Abundance and characteristics of the recreational water quality indicator bacteria Escherichia coli and enterococci in gull faeces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fogarty, L.R.; Haack, S.K.; Wolcott, M.J.; Whitman, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the numbers and selected phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of the faecal indicator bacteria Escherichia coli and enterococci in gull faeces at representative Great Lakes swimming beaches in the United States. Methods and Results: E. coli and enterococci were enumerated in gull faeces by membrane filtration. E. coli genotypes (rep-PCR genomic profiles) and E. coli (Vitek?? GNI+) and enterococci (API?? rapid ID 32 Strep and resistance to streptomycin, gentamicin, vancomycin, tetracycline and ampicillin) phenotypes were determined for isolates obtained from gull faeces both early and late in the swimming season. Identical E. coli genotypes were obtained only from single gull faecal samples but most faecal samples yielded more than one genotype (median of eight genotypes for samples with 10 isolates). E. coli isolates from the same site that clustered at ???85% similarity were from the same sampling date and shared phenotypic characteristics, and at this similarity level there was population overlap between the two geographically isolated beach sites. Enterococcus API?? profiles varied with sampling date. Gull enterococci displayed wide variation in antibiotic resistance patterns, and high-level resistance to some antibiotics. Conclusions: Gull faeces could be a major contributor of E. coli (105-109 CFU g-1) and enterococci (104-108 CFU g-1) to Great Lakes recreational waters. E. coli and enterococci in gull faeces are highly variable with respect to their genotypic and phenotypic characteristics and may exhibit temporal or geographic trends in these features. Significance and Impact of the Study: The high degree of variation in genotypic or phenotypic characteristics of E. coli or enterococci populations within gull hosts will require extensive sampling for adequate characterization, and will influence methods that use these characteristics to determine faecal contamination sources for recreational waters.

  14. Multicentre surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in enterococci and staphylococci from Colombian hospitals, 2001-2002.

    PubMed

    Arias, C A; Reyes, J; Zúñiga, M; Cortés, L; Cruz, C; Rico, C L; Panesso, D

    2003-01-01

    Invasive isolates of staphylococci and enterococci were collected from 15 tertiary care centres in five Colombian cities from 2001 to 2002. A total of 597 isolates were available for analysis. Identification was confirmed by both automated methods and multiplex PCR assays in a central laboratory. Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) corresponded to 49.6% and 29.6% of isolates, respectively, and 20.8% were identified as enterococci. MICs of ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, gentamicin, linezolid, oxacillin, rifampicin, teicoplanin, tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (SXT) and vancomycin were determined using an agar dilution method as appropriate. Screening for vancomycin-resistant S. aureus was also carried out on brain-heart infusion agar plates supplemented with vancomycin. The presence of mecA and van genes was investigated in methicillin-resistant staphylococci and glycopeptide-resistant enterococci (GRE), respectively. All staphylococci were susceptible to vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid. No VISA isolates were found. In S. aureus and CoNS, the lowest rates of resistance were found for SXT (7.4%) and chloramphenicol (10.7%), respectively. Resistance to oxacillin in S. aureus and CoNS was 52% and 73%, respectively. The mecA gene was detected in 97.5% of methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates. In enterococci, resistance to glycopeptides was 9.7%: vanA (58.3%) and vanB (41.7%) genes were found. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis indicated that the GRE isolates were closely related. Rates of resistance to ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, rifampicin and high levels of gentamicin and streptomycin were 9.7%, 27.4%, 8.9%, 43%, 17% and 28.2%, respectively. All enterococci were susceptible to linezolid.

  15. Synergy between penicillin and gentamicin against enterococci.

    PubMed

    Winstanley, T G; Hastings, J G

    1990-04-01

    The role of active uptake in aminoglycoside activity against penicillin-treated enterococci was studied by viable counts and ATP determinations. Penicillin and gentamicin gave synergistic bactericidal and post-antibiotic effects (PAEs) which were partially reduced by sodium azide, an electron transport inhibitor, and totally blocked in the presence of both sodium azide and EDTA, which chelates divalent cations. EDTA and gentamicin showed marked synergy in both 'killing curve' and PAE experiments. This synergy was completely inhibited by sodium azide. The data indicate that the activity of gentamicin against enterococci that have been damaged by penicillin or EDTA is energy-dependent. This is consistent with present theories of gentamicin uptake via transportation drive by a protonmotive force.

  16. [Vancomycin resistant enterococci in the Netherlands].

    PubMed

    Leavis, H L; Willems, R J; Mascini, E M; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C M; Bonten, M J

    2004-05-01

    Enterococci (Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium) are relatively avirulent enteric bacteria that usually only cause infections in immunocompromised patients. Antimicrobial treatment, however, is hampered as enterococci are intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. For years, vancomycin was considered the last available antibiotic. Plasmid-mediated resistance against vancomycin among enterococci was first described in the nineteen-eighties and since then incidences of infection caused by vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have increased dramatically, especially in the United States. In 2000, three outbreaks of VRE occurred in hospitals in the Netherlands and a set of infection-control measures was proposed to limit further transmission. These measures were based on the simultaneous isolation of VRE from multiple patients. All three outbreaks were controlled by these measures and no new outbreaks in Dutch hospitals have been reported since then. Epidemiological studies have shown that hospital outbreaks on three continents were caused by a subpopulation of E. faecium, which is characterized by the presence of a potential virulence gene (variant esp) and resistance to amoxicillin. This 'hospital strain' of E. faecium has probably been prevalent within hospital settings for some time, but only became clinically relevant when it had acquired vancomycin-resistance. Current advice is to implement the set of infection control measures formulated in 2000, only in those patients colonized by amoxicillin-resistant VRE. The potential dangers of VRE were recently underlined by the proven transmission of the vancomycin-resistance gene from VRE to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in two patients in the United States. It is in the interest of the patients that prevalence of VRE and MRSA in Dutch hospitals should be kept as low as possible.

  17. Selective isolation of vancomycin-resistant enterococci.

    PubMed Central

    van Horn, K G; Gedris, C A; Rodney, K M

    1996-01-01

    Broth formulations of two media selective for enterococci, Enterococcel, M-Enterococcosel broths were supplemented with 6 micrograms of vancomycin per ml and evaluated for isolation of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Each broth was challenged with various concentrations of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and vancomycin-susceptible and vancomycin-resistant enterococci and with 193 perianal specimens obtained from patients at risk in our institution for VRE colonization. Both the Enterococcosel and M-Enterococcus broths with vancomycin detected as few as 1 to 9 CFU of VRE while inhibiting growth of the other organisms tested. Enterococcus faecium organisms (MIC, > 256 micrograms/ml) were recovered from 66 perianal swab cultures in the enterococcosel-vancomycin broth, and VRE were recovered from 62 perianal swab cultures in the M-Enterococcus-vancomycin broth. Enterococcosel-vancomycin broth detected VRE in perianal specimens 48 h earlier than did M-Enterococcus-vancomycin broth. Enterococcosel broth with 6 micrograms of vancomycin per ml can be used for the rapid and selective isolation of VRE from surveillance specimens. PMID:8815109

  18. Diversity among multidrug-resistant enterococci.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    Enterococci are associated with both community- and hospital-acquired infections. Even though they do not cause severe systemic inflammatory responses, such as septic shock, enterococci present a therapeutic challenge because of their resistance to a vast array of antimicrobial drugs, including cell-wall active agents, all commercially available aminoglycosides, penicillin and ampicillin, and vancomycin. The combination of the latter two occurs disproportionately in strains resistant to many other antimicrobial drugs. The propensity of enterococci to acquire resistance may relate to their ability to participate in various forms of conjugation, which can result in the spread of genes as part of conjugative transposons, pheromone-responsive plasmids, or broad host-range plasmids. Enterococcal hardiness likely adds to resistance by facilitating survival in the environment (and thus enhancing potential spread from person to person) of a multidrug-resistant clone. The combination of these attributes within the genus Enterococcus suggests that these bacteria and their resistance to antimicrobial drugs will continue to pose a challenge. PMID:9452397

  19. Genome Sequencing Reveals the Environmental Origin of Enterococci and Potential Biomarkers for Water Quality Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enterococci are common members of the gut microbiome and frequent causative agents of nosocomial infection. Because of their enteric lifestyle and ease of culturing, enterococci have been used worldwide as indicators of fecal pollution of waters. However, enterococci were recentl...

  20. Genome Sequencing Reveals the Environmental Origin of Enterococci and Potential Biomarkers for Water Quality Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enterococci are common members of the gut microbiome and frequent causative agents of nosocomial infection. Because of their enteric lifestyle and ease of culturing, enterococci have been used worldwide as indicators of fecal pollution of waters. However, enterococci were recentl...

  1. Vancomycin resistant enterococci: from the hospital effluent to the urban wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Varela, Ana Rita; Ferro, Giovanna; Vredenburg, Jana; Yanık, Melike; Vieira, Lucas; Rizzo, Luigi; Lameiras, Catarina; Manaia, Célia M

    2013-04-15

    Vancomycin is an important antibiotic to treat serious nosocomial enterococci infections. Human activities, in particular those related with clinical practices performed in hospitals, can potentiate the transfer and selection of clinically-relevant resistant bacteria such as vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE). Indeed, previous studies demonstrated the occurrence of VRE in urban wastewater treatment plants and related environments (e.g. sewage, rivers). In this study, the occurrence of VRE in a hospital effluent and in the receiving urban wastewater treatment plant was investigated. Vancomycin and ciprofloxacin resistant bacteria occurred in the hospital effluent and in raw municipal inflow at densities of 10(3) to 10(2) CFU mL(-1), being significantly more prevalent in the hospital effluent than in the urban wastewater. Most of the VRE isolated from the hospital effluent belonged to the species Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium and presented multidrug-resistance phenotypes to ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, erythromycin, and high-level gentamicin. The same pattern was observed in clinical isolates and in enterococci isolated from the final effluent of the urban wastewater treatment plant. These results show that hospital effluents discharged into urban wastewater treatment plants may be a relevant source of resistance spread to the environment.

  2. OCCURRENCE OF INTRINSIC VANCOMYCIN RESISTANT ENTEROCOCCI IN ANIMAL FECES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A survey was conducted to determine the occurrence of vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) in animal and human fecal samples. Fecal samples from 14 animal species and humans were analyzed by quantitative culture for enterococci and VRE. Over 800 VRE isolates were characterize...

  3. OCCURRENCE OF INTRINSIC VANCOMYCIN RESISTANT ENTEROCOCCI IN ANIMAL FECES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A survey was conducted to determine the occurrence of vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) in animal and human fecal samples. Fecal samples from 14 animal species and humans were analyzed by quantitative culture for enterococci and VRE. Over 800 VRE isolates were characterize...

  4. Characterization of yellow-pigmented enterococci from severe human infections.

    PubMed Central

    Pompei, R; Lampis, G; Berlutti, F; Thaller, M C

    1991-01-01

    Four strains of yellow-pigmented enterococci that resembled the species Enterococcus casseliflavus were isolated from patients who had undergone surgical treatment. They were substantially homologous in terms of biochemical properties, antibiotic susceptibilities, and plasmid DNA profiles. Yellow-pigmented enterococci could be another potentially important cause of nosocomial infection in surgical units. Images PMID:1757566

  5. Pore Water Transport of Enterococci out of Beach Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Matthew C.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Reniers, Adrianus J. H. M.; Wang, John D.; Kiger, Russell T.; Abdel-Mottaleb, Noha

    2011-01-01

    Enterococci are used to evaluate the safety of beach waters and studies have identified beach sands as a source of these bacteria. In order to study and quantify the release of microbes from beach sediments, flow column systems were built to evaluate flow of pore water out of beach sediments. Results show a peak in enterococci (average of 10% of the total microbes in core) released from the sand core within one pore water volume followed by a marked decline to below detection. These results indicate that few enterococci are easily removed and that factors other than simple pore water flow control the release of the majority of enterococci within beach sediments. A significantly larger quantity and release of enterococci were observed in cores collected after a significant rain event suggesting the influx of fresh water can alter the release pattern as compared to cores with no antecedent rainfall. PMID:21945015

  6. High-level vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium related to humans and pigs found in dust from pig breeding facilities.

    PubMed

    Braga, Teresa M; Pomba, Constança; Lopes, M Fátima Silva

    2013-01-25

    Environmental dust from animal breeding facilities was never screened for the presence of enterococci, nor of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), despite the possibility of being a vehicle of transmission of strains and antibiotic resistance genes between food-producing animals and man. Bio-security measures in pig facilities include disinfection with biocides to avoid the dissemination of opportunistic pathogenic bacteria, namely enterococci and in particular VRE. We thus undertook collection of enterococci and VRE in a representative number of breeding pig facilities in Portugal (n=171) and analyzed their susceptibility to benzalkonium chloride (BC) and chlorhexidine (CHX). A prevalence of 15% of VRE was found, with 6% high-level resistance found, and MIC values for CHX and BC were similar to those commonly found among enterococcal isolates from related environments, 8 μg/ml and 4 μg/ml, respectively. Among the isolated high-level vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium carrying the vanA genotype, we found multilocus sequence types closely related to pig and human isolates from European countries and Brazil. These results strongly advise constant surveillance of this environment and its inclusion in future epidemiologic studies on VRE.

  7. Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci and Bacterial Community Structure following a Sewage Spill into an Aquatic Environment

    PubMed Central

    Young, Suzanne; Nayak, Bina; Sun, Shan; Badgley, Brian D.; Rohr, Jason R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sewage spills can release antibiotic-resistant bacteria into surface waters, contributing to environmental reservoirs and potentially impacting human health. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are nosocomial pathogens that have been detected in environmental habitats, including soil, water, and beach sands, as well as wildlife feces. However, VRE harboring vanA genes that confer high-level resistance have infrequently been found outside clinical settings in the United States. This study found culturable Enterococcus faecium harboring the vanA gene in water and sediment for up to 3 days after a sewage spill, and the quantitative PCR (qPCR) signal for vanA persisted for an additional week. Culturable levels of enterococci in water exceeded recreational water guidelines for 2 weeks following the spill, declining about five orders of magnitude in sediments and two orders of magnitude in the water column over 6 weeks. Analysis of bacterial taxa via 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed changes in community structure through time following the sewage spill in sediment and water. The spread of opportunistic pathogens harboring high-level vancomycin resistance genes beyond hospitals and into the broader community and associated habitats is a potential threat to public health, requiring further studies that examine the persistence, occurrence, and survival of VRE in different environmental matrices. IMPORTANCE Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are harmful bacteria that are resistant to the powerful antibiotic vancomycin, which is used as a last resort against many infections. This study followed the release of VRE in a major sewage spill and their persistence over time. Such events can act as a means of spreading vancomycin-resistant bacteria in the environment, which can eventually impact human health. PMID:27422829

  8. Studies on Media for Enumerating Enterococci in Frozen Vegetables.

    PubMed

    Splittstoesser, D F; Wright, R; Hucker, G J

    1961-07-01

    A study was made of the relative sensitivity and specificity of presumptive and confirmatory media for the most probable number enumeration of enterococci in frozen vegetables. Azide dextrose broth yielded the highest numbers of confirmable enterococci and its sensitivity was shown to be comparable to nonselective media. The use of ethyl violet azide broth as a confirmatory medium resulted in a significant number of false positive tests. Growth in broth containing 6.5% sodium chloride incubated at 45 C for 2 days was found to be a more specific confirmatory test for enterococci.

  9. High-Level Radioactive Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Howard C.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a method to calculate the amount of high-level radioactive waste by taking into consideration the following factors: the fission process that yields the waste, identification of the waste, the energy required to run a 1-GWe plant for one year, and the uranium mass required to produce that energy. Briefly discusses waste disposal and…

  10. High-Level Radioactive Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Howard C.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a method to calculate the amount of high-level radioactive waste by taking into consideration the following factors: the fission process that yields the waste, identification of the waste, the energy required to run a 1-GWe plant for one year, and the uranium mass required to produce that energy. Briefly discusses waste disposal and…

  11. Evaluation of antimicrobial resistance and virulence of enterococci from equipment surfaces, raw materials, and traditional cheeses.

    PubMed

    Gaglio, Raimondo; Couto, Natacha; Marques, Cátia; de Fatima Silva Lopes, Maria; Moschetti, Giancarlo; Pomba, Constança; Settanni, Luca

    2016-11-07

    Forty enterococci isolated along the production chains of three traditional cheeses (PDO Pecorino Siciliano, PDO Vastedda della Valle del Belìce, and Caciocavallo Palermitano) made in Sicily (southern Italy) were studied for the assessment of their antibiotic resistance and virulence by a combined phenotypic/genotypic approach. A total of 31 Enterococcus displayed resistance to at least one or more of the antimicrobials tested. The strains exhibited high percentages of resistance to erythromycin (52.5%), ciprofloxacin (35.0%), quinupristin-dalfopristin (20.0%), tetracycline (17.5%), and high-level streptomycin (5.0%). The presence of tet(M), cat(pC221), and aadE genes for resistance to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and streptomycin, respectively, was registered in all strains with resistance phenotype. The erm(B) gene was not detected in any erythromycin-resistant strain. The Enterococcus strains were further tested by PCR for the presence of virulence genes, namely, gelE, asa1, efaA, ace, and esp. Twenty strains were positive for all virulence genes tested. Among the enterococci isolated from final cheeses, three strains (representing 33.3% of total cheese strains) were sensible to all antimicrobials tested and did not carry any virulence factor. Although this study confirmed that the majority of dairy enterococci are vectors for the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes, only two strains showed a high resistance to aminoglycosides, commonly administered to combat enterococci responsible for human infections. Furthermore, the presence of the strains E. casseliflavus FMAC163, E. durans FMAC134B, and E. faecium PON94 without risk determinants, found at dominating levels over the Enterococcus populations in the processed products, stimulates further investigations for their future applications in cheese making. All strains devoid of the undesired traits were isolated from stretched cheeses. Thus, this cheese typology represents an

  12. Tracing the Enterococci from Paleozoic Origins to the Hospital.

    PubMed

    Lebreton, François; Manson, Abigail L; Saavedra, Jose T; Straub, Timothy J; Earl, Ashlee M; Gilmore, Michael S

    2017-05-18

    We examined the evolutionary history of leading multidrug resistant hospital pathogens, the enterococci, to their origin hundreds of millions of years ago. Our goal was to understand why, among the vast diversity of gut flora, enterococci are so well adapted to the modern hospital environment. Molecular clock estimation, together with analysis of their environmental distribution, phenotypic diversity, and concordance with host fossil records, place the origins of the enterococci around the time of animal terrestrialization, 425-500 mya. Speciation appears to parallel the diversification of hosts, including the rapid emergence of new enterococcal species following the End Permian Extinction. Major drivers of speciation include changing carbohydrate availability in the host gut. Life on land would have selected for the precise traits that now allow pathogenic enterococci to survive desiccation, starvation, and disinfection in the modern hospital, foreordaining their emergence as leading hospital pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The ALICE high level trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alt, T.; Grastveit, G.; Helstrup, H.; Lindenstruth, V.; Loizides, C.; Röhrich, D.; Skaali, B.; Steinbeck, T.; Stock, R.; Tilsner, H.; Ullaland, K.; Vestbø, A.; Vik, T.; Wiebalck, A.; the ALICE Collaboration

    2004-08-01

    The ALICE experiment at LHC will implement a high-level trigger system for online event selection and/or data compression. The largest computing challenge is posed by the TPC detector, which requires real-time pattern recognition. The system entails a very large processing farm that is designed for an anticipated input data stream of 25 GB s-1. In this paper, we present the architecture of the system and the current state of the tracking methods and data compression applications.

  14. High-Level Connectionist Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    Artficial Intelligence Research Computer and Information Science Department The Ohio State Universiy Columbus, Ohio 43210 pja@ci.ohio-state.edu saunders...Peter J. Angeline, Gregory M. Saunders and Jordan B. Pollack Laboratory for Artficial Intelligence Research Computer and 1i4ormadon Science Deparment...AD-A273 638 OHIOi High-Level Connectionist Models 5LPJE UNIVERSITY Jordan B. Pollack Laboratory for Artificial Intelligence Research Department of

  15. RPython high-level synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieszewski, Radoslaw; Linczuk, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    The development of FPGA technology and the increasing complexity of applications in recent decades have forced compilers to move to higher abstraction levels. Compilers interprets an algorithmic description of a desired behavior written in High-Level Languages (HLLs) and translate it to Hardware Description Languages (HDLs). This paper presents a RPython based High-Level synthesis (HLS) compiler. The compiler get the configuration parameters and map RPython program to VHDL. Then, VHDL code can be used to program FPGA chips. In comparison of other technologies usage, FPGAs have the potential to achieve far greater performance than software as a result of omitting the fetch-decode-execute operations of General Purpose Processors (GPUs), and introduce more parallel computation. This can be exploited by utilizing many resources at the same time. Creating parallel algorithms computed with FPGAs in pure HDL is difficult and time consuming. Implementation time can be greatly reduced with High-Level Synthesis compiler. This article describes design methodologies and tools, implementation and first results of created VHDL backend for RPython compiler.

  16. Prevalence of virulence and resistance to antibiotics in pathogenic enterococci isolated from mastitic cows

    PubMed Central

    WU, Xiaohu; HOU, Shubao; ZHANG, Quanwei; MA, Youji; ZHANG, Yong; KAN, Wei; ZHAO, Xingxu

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of enterococci was examined in 280 milk samples collected from dairy cattle diagnosed with mastitis in three provinces of western China. Sixty strains of enterococci were isolated, and the species were determined based on their biochemical characters and 16S rRNA sequences. Resistance to seven antibiotic agents, frequency of seven virulence genes and pathogenicity in Kunming mice were tested to evaluate biological risks. The correlation between the number of virulence genes and pathogenicity in Kunming mice was also evaluated. The 60 isolates were allocated to Enterococcus hirae (68.3%), E. faecium (25.0%), E. mundtii (3.3%) and E. durans (3.3%). A total of 83.3% of the isolates were resistant to penicillin, whereas 15.0% were resistant to ampicillin, 15.0% to vancomycin, 6.7% to tetracycline and 25.0% to ciprofloxacin. Moreover, isolates exhibited 50.0% and 21.7% resistance to high levels of gentamycin and streptomycin, respectively. The gene asa1 was detected in all enterococcal isolates, whereas 66.7% of strains harbored three or more virulence factors and 56.7% were asa1-ccf-gelE-positive. In pathogenicity tests, isolates harboring numerous virulence factors did not show greater invasiveness than isolates harboring fewer virulence traits against Kunming mice. In conclusion, the number of virulence factors does not appear to predict the risk of enterococcal infection. Isolates were commonly resistant to penicillin and sporadically to ampicillin and vancomycin. These results suggest that the use of gentamycin, streptomycin and ciprofloxacin against enterococci should be avoided in mastitic cows. Additionally, the results demonstrate that the majority of isolates are sensitive to tetracycline. PMID:27476730

  17. The CMS High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trocino, Daniele

    2014-06-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system: the Level-1 Trigger, implemented in custom-designed electronics, and the High-Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a tradeoff between the complexity of the algorithms running with the available computing power, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. We present the performance of the main triggers used during the 2012 data taking, ranging from simple single-object selections to more complex algorithms combining different objects, and applying analysis-level reconstruction and selection. We discuss the optimisation of the trigger and the specific techniques to cope with the increasing LHC pile-up, reducing its impact on the physics performance.

  18. Emergence and nosocomial transmission of ampicillin-resistant enterococci.

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, J M; Opal, S M; Potter-Bynoe, G; LaForge, R G; Zervos, M J; Furtado, G; Victor, G; Medeiros, A A

    1992-01-01

    Between 1986 and 1988, the incidence of ampicillin-resistant enterococci increased sevenfold at a university-affiliated hospital. Forty-three patients acquired nosocomial infections with ampicillin-resistant enterococci, most of which were also resistant to mezlocillin, piperacillin, and imipenem. An analysis of plasmid and chromosomal DNAs of isolates revealed that the increase was due to an epidemic of 19 nosocomial infections that yielded closely related strains of Enterococcus faecium and to a significant increase in the incidence of nonepidemic, largely unrelated strains of ampicillin-resistant enterococci. The nonepidemic strains were identified as E. faecium, E. raffinosus, E. durans, and E. gallinarum. A logistic regression analysis revealed that patients with nonepidemic resistant strains were 16 times more likely than controls to have received preceding therapy with imipenem. In our institution, the increase in the incidence of ampicillin-resistant enterococci appears to be due to the selection of various strains of resistant enterococci by the use of imipenem and to the nosocomial transmission of E. faecium and E. raffinosus. Images PMID:1510390

  19. Virulence factors and bacteriocins in faecal enterococci of wild boars.

    PubMed

    Poeta, Patricia; Igrejas, Gilberto; Costa, Daniela; Sargo, Roberto; Rodrigues, Jorge; Torres, Carmen

    2008-10-01

    The production of antimicrobial, haemolytic and gelatinase activities was tested in 67 enterococci (39 E. faecium, 24 E. hirae, 2 E. faecalis, and 2 Enterococcus spp.), recovered from faecal samples of wild boars. In addition, the presence of genes encoding bacteriocin and virulence factors was also analysed by PCR and sequencing. Production of antimicrobial activity was checked in all enterococci against 9 indicator bacteria and it was detected in 11 E. faecium isolates (16.5%); eight and two of them harboured the genes encoding enterocin A + enterocin B and enterocin L50A/B, respectively. Sixty-seven per cent of our enterococci harboured different combinations of genes of the cyl operon, but none of them contained the complete cyl L(L)L(S)ABM operon, necessary for cytolysin expression. The presence of gel E gene, associated with the fsr ABC locus, was identified in 4 E. faecium and two E. faecalis isolates, exhibiting all of them gelatinase activity. beta -hemolytic activity was not found in our isolates. Both cpd and ace genes, encoding respectively the accessory colonisation factor and pheromone, were detected in two E. faecalis isolates, and the hyl gene, encoding hyalorunidase, in two E. faecium isolates, one of them gelatinase-positive. Genes encoding bacteriocins and virulence factors are widely disseminated among faecal enterococci of wild boars and more studies should be carried out to know the global distribution of these determinants in enterococci of different ecosystems.

  20. Evaluation of Chromogenic Media in Detection of Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    S., Vijaya; S.T., Santhya; M.K., Yashaswini; S., Megha

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Vancomycin resistant Enterococci have become important nosocomial pathogens. So it is necessary to monitor continuously such infections in the hospitals. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 Enterococci isolated from 4489 various clinical samples were speciated and antibiogram was done according to standard laboratory methods. The efficacy of CHROMagarTM VRE (France) and Hicrome VRE (Himedia) in detecting VRE was evaluated using E- test (Himedia). Results: Hicrome VRE and CHROMagarTM VRE showed sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 99% as compared to E-test. Conclusion: In the present study VRE was not isolated. Prudent use of vancomycin and continuous surveillance for VRE will prevent the emergence of vancomycin resistant Enterococci in the locality in future. Identification of VRE by chromogenic media is rapid, easy to perform, cost effective compared to technically demanding, time consuming and costly conventional method. PMID:25584221

  1. Optimizing High Level Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Dirk Gombert

    2005-09-01

    If society is ever to reap the potential benefits of nuclear energy, technologists must close the fuel-cycle completely. A closed cycle equates to a continued supply of fuel and safe reactors, but also reliable and comprehensive closure of waste issues. High level waste (HLW) disposal in borosilicate glass (BSG) is based on 1970s era evaluations. This host matrix is very adaptable to sequestering a wide variety of radionuclides found in raffinates from spent fuel reprocessing. However, it is now known that the current system is far from optimal for disposal of the diverse HLW streams, and proven alternatives are available to reduce costs by billions of dollars. The basis for HLW disposal should be reassessed to consider extensive waste form and process technology research and development efforts, which have been conducted by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), international agencies and the private sector. Matching the waste form to the waste chemistry and using currently available technology could increase the waste content in waste forms to 50% or more and double processing rates. Optimization of the HLW disposal system would accelerate HLW disposition and increase repository capacity. This does not necessarily require developing new waste forms, the emphasis should be on qualifying existing matrices to demonstrate protection equal to or better than the baseline glass performance. Also, this proposed effort does not necessarily require developing new technology concepts. The emphasis is on demonstrating existing technology that is clearly better (reliability, productivity, cost) than current technology, and justifying its use in future facilities or retrofitted facilities. Higher waste processing and disposal efficiency can be realized by performing the engineering analyses and trade-studies necessary to select the most efficient methods for processing the full spectrum of wastes across the nuclear complex. This paper will describe technologies being

  2. Roles of antibodies and complement in phagocytic killing of enterococci.

    PubMed Central

    Arduino, R C; Murray, B E; Rakita, R M

    1994-01-01

    The contributions of complement and antibodies to polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN)-mediated killing of enterococci were investigated with pooled normal human serum (PNHS) or immune human sera (IHS) from patients with serious enterococcal infections. Each IHS containing antienterococcal antibodies demonstrated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting (immunoblotting) was examined with the enterococcus strain isolated from the same patient. PNHS promoted PMN-mediated killing of enterococci similar to that for IHS. PMN-mediated killing was consistently abrogated after preopsonization with heat-inactivated PNHS, but some heat-inactivated IHS supported neutrophil bactericidal activity. Inhibition of the classical pathway of complement by chelation of either PNHS or IHS with Mg-EGTA [Mg-ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid] did not alter PMN-mediated killing, suggesting that activation of the alternative pathway of complement is sufficient to promote killing of enterococci by PMNs. PMN-mediated killing assays were also performed with normal rabbit serum and immune rabbit serum against enterococci. Preopsonization with heat-inactivated immune rabbit serum resulted in PMN-mediated killing of enterococci, which was ablated after adsorption of the serum with the same isolate used for immunization. The influence of different phenotypic enterococcal traits on neutrophil-mediated killing was also investigated. Similar kinetics of killing were observed for derivatives of Enterococcus faecalis strains regardless of resistance to antimicrobial agents or production of beta-lactamase, hemolysin, gelatinase, or surface proteins involved in the aggregative response to pheromones. In summary, PMN-mediated killing of enterococci appears to depend primarily on complement activation by either the classical or the alternative pathway. Human antienterococcal antibodies generated during infection variably promoted neutrophil bactericidal

  3. Source of enterococci in a farmhouse raw-milk cheese.

    PubMed

    Gelsomino, Robert; Vancanneyt, M; Cogan, T M; Condon, S; Swings, J

    2002-07-01

    Enterococci are widely distributed in raw-milk cheeses and are generally thought to positively affect flavor development. Their natural habitats are the human and animal intestinal tracts, but they are also found in soil, on plants, and in the intestines of insects and birds. The source of enterococci in raw-milk cheese is unknown. In the present study, an epidemiological approach with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to type 646 Enterococcus strains which were isolated from a Cheddar-type cheese, the milk it was made from, the feces of cows and humans associated with the cheese-making unit, and the environment, including the milking equipment, the water used on the farm, and the cows' teats. Nine different PFGE patterns, three of Enterococcus casseliflavus, five of Enterococcus faecalis, and one of Enterococcus durans, were found. The same three clones, one of E. faecalis and two of E. casseliflavus, dominated almost all of the milk, cheese, and human fecal samples. The two E. casseliflavus clones were also found in the bulk tank and the milking machine even after chlorination, suggesting that a niche where enterococci could grow was present and that contamination with enterococci begins with the milking equipment. It is likely but unproven that the enterococci present in the human feces are due to consumption of the cheese. Cow feces were not considered the source of enterococci in the cheese, as Enterococcus faecium and Streptococcus bovis, which largely dominated the cows' intestinal tracts, were not found in either the milk or the cheese.

  4. High Level Aminoglycoside Resistance and Distribution of Aminoglycoside Resistant Genes among Clinical Isolates of Enterococcus Species in Chennai, India

    PubMed Central

    Padmasini, Elango; Padmaraj, R.; Ramesh, S. Srivani

    2014-01-01

    Enterococci are nosocomial pathogen with multiple-drug resistance by intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms. Aminoglycosides along with cell wall inhibitors are given clinically for treating enterococcal infections. 178 enterococcal isolates were analyzed in this study. E. faecalis is identified to be the predominant Enterococcus species, along with E. faecium, E. avium, E. hirae, E. durans, E. dispar and E. gallinarum. High level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR) by MIC for gentamicin (GM), streptomycin (SM) and both (GM + SM) antibiotics was found to be 42.7%, 29.8%, and 21.9%, respectively. Detection of aminoglycoside modifying enzyme encoding genes (AME) in enterococci was identified by multiplex PCR for aac(6′)-Ie-aph(2′′)-Ia; aph(2′′)-Ib; aph(2′′)-Ic; aph(2′′)-Id and aph(3′)-IIIa genes. 38.2% isolates carried aac(6′)-Ie-aph(2′′)-Ia gene and 40.4% isolates carried aph(3′)-IIIa gene. aph(2′′)-Ib; aph(2′′)-Ic; aph(2′′)-Id were not detected among our study isolates. aac(6′)-Ie-aph(2′′)-Ia and aph(3′)-IIIa genes were also observed in HLAR E. durans, E. avium, E. hirae, and E. gallinarum isolates. This indicates that high level aminoglycoside resistance genes are widely disseminated among isolates of enterococci from Chennai. PMID:24672306

  5. Vancomycin-resistance transferability from VanA enterococci to Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    de Niederhäusern, Simona; Bondi, Moreno; Messi, Patrizia; Iseppi, Ramona; Sabia, Carla; Manicardi, Giuliano; Anacarso, Immacolata

    2011-05-01

    In last decade methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with high level of vancomycin-resistance (VRSA) have been reported and generally the patients with VRSA infection were also infected with a vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE). Considering that the high level of vancomycin-resistance in VRSA isolates seems to involve the horizontal transfer of Tn1546 transposon containing vanA gene from coinfecting VRE strains, the authors have studied the "in vitro" conjugative transfer of this resistance from VanA enterococci to S. aureus. Out of 25 matings performed combining five vancomycin-resistant enterococci as donors (three Enterococcus faecalis and two Enterococcus faecium), and five S. aureus as recipients, all clinical isolates, two have been successful using E. faecalis as donor. The transfer of vancomycin-resistance was confirmed by vanA gene amplification in both transconjugants and the resistance was expressed at lower levels (MIC 32 μg/ml) in comparison with the respective VRE donors (MIC > 128 μg/ml). The vancomycin-resistance of trasconjugants was maintained even after subsequent overnight passages on MSA plates containing subinhibitory levels of vancomycin. This study shows that the vanA gene transfer can be achieved through techniques "in vitro" without the use of laboratory animals employed, in the only similar experiment previously carried out by other authors, as substrate for the trasconjugant growth. Moreover, in that previous experiment, contrary to this study, the vancomycin resistant S. aureus trasconjugants were selected on erythromycin agar and not by direct vancomycin agar selection.

  6. Development of a rapid, one-step screening method for the isolation of presumptive proteolytic enterococci.

    PubMed

    Graham, Ken; Rea, Rosemary; Simpson, Paul; Stack, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Enterococci show higher proteolytic activities than other lactic acid bacteria and thus have received considerable attention in scientific literature in recent years. Proteolytic enzymes of enterococci have warranted the use of some species as starter, adjuncts or protective cultures and as probiotics, while in some strains they have also been linked with virulence. Consequently, the isolation and identification of proteolytic enterococci is becoming of increasing interest and importance. However, current screening methods for proteolytic enterococci can be time consuming, requiring a two-step procedure which may take up to 96h. This study describes a method, utilising Kanamycin Skim Milk Aesculin Azide (KSMEA) agar, for the isolation of proteolytic enterococci in one-step, thereby significantly reducing screening time. KSMEA combines the selective properties of Kanamycin Aesculin Azide Agar (KAA) with skim milk powder for the detection of proteolytic enterococci. Enterococci produced colonies with a black halo on KSMEA which were accompanied by a zone of clearing in the media when enterococci were proteolytic. KSMEA medium retained the selectivity of KAA, while proteolytic enterococci were easily distinguished from non-proteolytic enterococci when two known strains were propagated on KSMEA. KSMEA also proved effective at isolating and detecting enterococci in raw milk, faeces and soil. Isolates recovered from the screen were confirmed as enterococci using genus-specific primers. Proteolytic enterococci were present in the raw milk sample only and were easily distinguishable from non-proteolytic enterococci and other microorganisms. Therefore, KSMEA provides a rapid, one-step screening method for the isolation of presumptive proteolytic enterococci.

  7. DETECTION OF FECAL ENTEROCOCCI USING A REAL TIME PCR METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    In spite of their importance in public health, the detection of fecal enterococci is performed via culturing methods that are time consuming and that are subject to inaccuracies that relate to their culturable status. In order to address these problems, a real time PCR (TaqMan) ...

  8. Prevalence of enterococci from dogs and cats in the US.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The contribution of dogs and cats as reservoirs of antimicrobial resistant enterococci remains largely undefined. This is increasingly important considering the possibility of transfer of bacteria from companion animals to the human host. In this study, dogs and cats from veterinary clinics were s...

  9. DETECTION OF FECAL ENTEROCOCCI USING A REAL TIME PCR METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    In spite of their importance in public health, the detection of fecal enterococci is performed via culturing methods that are time consuming and that are subject to inaccuracies that relate to their culturable status. In order to address these problems, a real time PCR (TaqMan) ...

  10. OCCURRENCE OF VANCOMYCIN RESISTANT ENTEROCOCCI IN ANIMAL FECES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A survey was conducted to determine the occurrence of vancomycin resistant Enterococci (VRE) in animal and human fecal samples. A selective agar mEI, and mEI supplemented with 4 micrograms/ml vancomycin was used in a membrane filtration procedure to determine quantitative levels ...

  11. Occurrence of Enterococci in Animals in a Wild Environment1

    PubMed Central

    Mundt, J. Orvin

    1963-01-01

    Enterococci were obtained from the feces of 71% of 216 mammals, 86% of 70 reptiles, and 32% of 22 birds sampled in a truly wild environment, the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Patterns of food dependence and also of species dependence were observed. Among the lower classes of the primarily herbivorous mammals, the enterococci occurred sporadically; however, of the six species of Sciuridae, the gray squirrel, and of four species of Cricetidae, the red-backed mouse, the enterococci appear to be natural hosts. The enterococci were not obtained from most specimens of moles, shrews, or rabbits but they were obtained from most specimens of bats and from the carnivorous mammals, such as fox, bear, raccon, skunk, and boar. Streptococcus faecalis was obtained from 12 reptiles, and a caseolytic variant was obtained from 37 specimens of the reptiles. The strongly reducing, tellurite-tolerant species, S. faecalis, its caseolytic variant, and S. faecalis var. zymogenes were isolated from 127 or 41% of 308 specimens cultured. S. faecium was recovered from 87 or 28% of the animals, chiefly from the wild boar (60 of 64 trials) and the black bear. S. zymogenes was obtained from 1 of 31 bats, 3 of 12 raccoons, and 1 of 3 owls. PMID:13936610

  12. OCCURRENCE OF VANCOMYCIN RESISTANT ENTEROCOCCI IN ANIMAL FECES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A survey was conducted to determine the occurrence of vancomycin resistant Enterococci (VRE) in animal and human fecal samples. A selective agar mEI, and mEI supplemented with 4 micrograms/ml vancomycin was used in a membrane filtration procedure to determine quantitative levels ...

  13. Molecular characterization of antimicrobial resistance in enterococci and Escherichia coli isolates from European wild rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Silva, Nuno; Igrejas, Gilberto; Figueiredo, Nicholas; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Radhouani, Hajer; Rodrigues, Jorge; Poeta, Patrícia

    2010-09-15

    A total of 44 Escherichia coli and 64 enterococci recovered from 77 intestinal samples of wild European rabbits in Portugal were analyzed for resistance to antimicrobial agents. Resistance in E. coli isolates was observed for ampicillin, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, streptomycin, gentamicin, tobramycin, nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin and chloramphenicol. None of the E. coli isolates produced extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs). The bla(TEM), aadA, aac(3)-II, tet(A) and/or tet(B), and the catA genes were demonstrated in all ampicillin, streptomycin, gentamicin, tetracycline, and chloramphenicol-resistant isolates respectively, and the sul1 and/or sul2 and/or sul3 genes in 4 of 5 sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim resistant isolates. Of the enterococcal isolates, Enterococcus faecalis was the most prevalent detected species (39 isolates), followed by E. faecium (21 isolates) and E. hirae (4 isolates). More than one-fourth (29.7%) of the isolates were resistant to tetracycline; 20.3% were resistant to erythromycin, 14.1% were resistant to ciprofloxacin and 10.9% were resistant to high-level-kanamycin. Lower level of resistance (<10%) was detected for ampicillin, quinupristin/dalfopristin and high-level-gentamicin, -streptomycin. No vancomycin-resistance was detected in the enterococci isolates. Resistance genes detected included aac(6')-aph(2''), ant(6)-Ia, tet(M) and/or tet(L) in all gentamicin, streptomycin and tetracycline-resistant isolates respectively. The aph(3')-IIIa gene was detected in 6 of 7 kanamycin-resistant isolates, the erm(B) gene in 11 of 13 erythromycin-resistant isolates and the vat(D) gene in the quinupristin/dalfopristin-resistant E. faecium isolate. This survey showed that faecal bacteria such as E. coli and enterococci of wild rabbits could be a reservoir of antimicrobial resistance genes.

  14. Modeling system for predicting enterococci levels at Holly Beach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zaihong; Deng, Zhiqiang; Rusch, Kelly A; Walker, Nan D

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a new modeling system for nowcasting and forecasting enterococci levels in coastal recreation waters at any time during the day. The modeling system consists of (1) an artificial neural network (ANN) model for predicting the enterococci level at sunrise time, (2) a clear-sky solar radiation and turbidity correction to the ANN model, (3) remote sensing algorithms for turbidity, and (4) nowcasting/forecasting data. The first three components are also unique features of the new modeling system. While the component (1) is useful to beach monitoring programs requiring enterococci levels in early morning, the component (2) in combination with the component (1) makes it possible to predict the bacterial level in beach waters at any time during the day if the data from the components (3) and (4) are available. Therefore, predictions from the component (2) are of primary interest to beachgoers. The modeling system was developed using three years of swimming season data and validated using additional four years of independent data. Testing results showed that (1) the sunrise-time model correctly reproduced 82.63% of the advisories issued in seven years with a false positive rate of 2.65% and a false negative rate of 14.72%, and (2) the new modeling system was capable of predicting the temporal variability in enterococci levels in beach waters, ranging from hourly changes to daily cycles. The results demonstrate the efficacy of the new modeling system in predicting enterococci levels in coastal beach waters. Applications of the modeling system will improve the management of recreational beaches and protection of public health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Detection of glycopeptide resistance genes in enterococci by multiplex PCR

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Puneet; Sahni, A.K.; Praharaj, A.K.; Grover, Naveen; Kumar, Mahadevan; Chaudhari, C.N.; Khajuria, Atul

    2014-01-01

    Background Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci (VRE) are a major cause of nosocomial infections. There are various phenotypic and genotypic methods of detection of glycopeptide resistance in enterococci. This study utilizes multiplex PCR for reliable detection of various glycopeptides resistance genes in VRE. Method This study was conducted to detect and to assess the prevalence of vancomycin resistance among enterococci isolates. From October 2011 to June 2013, a total of 96 non-repetitive isolates of enterococci from various clinical samples were analyzed. VRE were identified by Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of all isolates for vancomycin and teicoplanin was determined by E-test. Multiplex PCR was carried out for all enterococci isolates using six sets of primers. Results Out of 96 isolates, 14 (14.6%) were found to be resistant to vancomycin by vancomycin E-test method (MIC ≥32 μg/ml). Out of these 14 isolates, 13 were also resistant to teicoplanin (MIC ≥16 μg/ml). VanA gene was detected in all the 14 isolates by Multiplex PCR. One of the PCR amplicons was sent for sequencing and the sequence received was submitted in the GenBank (GenBank accession no. KF181100). Conclusion Prevalence of VRE in this study was 14.6%. Multiplex PCR is a robust, sensitive and specific technique, which can be used for rapid detection of various glycopeptide resistance genes. Rapid identification of patients infected or colonized with VRE is essential for implementation of appropriate control measures to prevent their spread. PMID:25609863

  16. Antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes in enterococci from wild game meat in Spain.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Ramos, Emilia; Cordero, Jorge; Molina-González, Diana; Poeta, Patrícia; Igrejas, Gilberto; Alonso-Calleja, Carlos; Capita, Rosa

    2016-02-01

    A total of 55 enterococci (45 Enterococcus faecium, 7 Enterococcus faecalis, and three Enterococcus durans) isolated from the meat of wild game animals (roe deer, boar, rabbit, pheasant, and pigeon) in North-Western Spain were tested for susceptibility to 14 antimicrobials by the disc diffusion method. All strains showed a multi-resistant phenotype (resistance to between three and 10 antimicrobials). The strains exhibited high percentages of resistance to erythromycin (89.1%), tetracycline (67.3%), ciprofloxacin (92.7%), nitrofurantoin (67.3%), and quinupristin-dalfopristin (81.8%). The lowest values (9.1%) were observed for high-level resistance to gentamicin, kanamycin, and streptomycin. The average number of resistances per strain was 5.8 for E. faecium isolates, 7.9 for E. faecalis, and 5.7 for E. durans. Genes encoding antimicrobial resistance and virulence were studied by polymerase chain reaction. A total of 15 (57.7%) of the 26 vancomycin-resistant isolates harboured the vanA gene. Other resistance genes detected included vanB, erm(B) and/or erm(C), tet(L) and/or tet(M), acc(6')-aph(2″), and aph(3')-IIIa in strains resistant to vancomycin, erythromycin, tetracycline, gentamicin, and kanamycin, respectively. Specific genes of the Tn5397 transposon were detected in 54.8% of the tet(M)-positive enterococci. Nine virulence factors (gelE, agg, ace, cpd, frs, esp, hyl, efaAfs and efaAfm) were studied. All virulence genes, with the exception of the frs gene, were found to be present in the enterococcal isolates. At least one virulence gene was detected in 20.0% of E. faecium, 71.4% of E. faecalis and 33.3% of E. durans isolates, with ace and cpd being the most frequently detected genes (6 isolates each). This suggests that wild game meat might play a role in the spreading through the food chain of enterococci with antimicrobial resistance and virulence determinants to humans.

  17. Contribution of sand-associated enterococci to dry weather water quality.

    PubMed

    Halliday, Elizabeth; Ralston, David K; Gast, Rebecca J

    2015-01-06

    Culturable enterococci and a suite of environmental variables were collected during a predominantly dry summer at a beach impacted by nonpoint source pollution. These data were used to evaluate sands as a source of enterococci to nearshore waters, and to assess the relationship between environmental factors and dry-weather enterococci abundance. Best-fit multiple linear regressions used environmental variables to explain more than half of the observed variation in enterococci in water and dry sands. Notably, during dry weather the abundance of enterococci in dry sands at the mean high-tide line was significantly positively related to sand moisture content (ranging from <1-4%), and the daily mean ENT in water could be predicted by a linear regression with turbidity alone. Temperature was also positively correlated with ENT abundance in this study, which may indicate an important role of seasonal warming in temperate regions. Inundation by spring tides was the primary rewetting mechanism that sustained culturable enterococci populations in high-tide sands. Tidal forcing modulated the abundance of enterococci in the water, as both turbidity and enterococci were elevated during ebb and flood tides. The probability of samples violating the single-sample maximum was significantly greater when collected during periods with increased tidal range: spring ebb and flood tides. Tidal forcing also affected groundwater mixing zones, mobilizing enterococci from sand to water. These data show that routine monitoring programs using discrete enterococci measurements may be biased by tides and other environmental factors, providing a flawed basis for beach closure decisions.

  18. Environmental contamination by vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) in Swedish broiler production.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Oskar; Greko, Christina; Bengtsson, Björn

    2009-12-02

    Vancomycin resistant enterococci are a frequent cause of nosocomial infections and their presence among farm animals is unwanted. Using media supplemented with vancomycin an increase in the proportion of samples from Swedish broilers positive for vancomycin resistant enterococci has been detected. The situation at farm level is largely unknown. The aims of this study were to obtain baseline knowledge about environmental contamination with vancomycin resistant enterococci in Swedish broiler production and the association between environmental contamination and colonisation of birds. Environmental samples were taken before, during and after a batch of broilers at three farms. Samples were cultured both qualitatively and semi-quantitatively for vancomycin resistant enterococci. In addition, caecal content from birds in the batch following at each farm was cultured qualitatively for vancomycin resistant enterococci. The number of samples positive for vancomycin resistant enterococci varied among the farms. Also the amount of vancomycin resistant enterococci in the positive samples and the proportion of caecal samples containing vancomycin resistant enterococci varied among the farms. Still, the temporal changes in environmental contamination followed a similar pattern in all farms. Vancomycin resistant enterococci persist in the compartments even after cleaning and the temporal changes in environmental contamination were similar among farms. There were however differences among farms regarding both degree of contamination and proportion of birds colonized with vancomycin resistant enterococci. The proportion of colonized birds and the amount of vancomycin resistant enterococci in the compartments seems to be associated. If the factor(s) causing the differences among farms could be identified, it might be possible to reduce both the risk for colonisation by vancomycin resistant enterococci of the subsequent flock and the risk for spread of vancomycin resistant

  19. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci colonizing the intestinal tracts of hospitalized patients.

    PubMed Central

    Gordts, B; Van Landuyt, H; Ieven, M; Vandamme, P; Goossens, H

    1995-01-01

    A point prevalence culture survey was carried out to investigate the prevalence of fecal carriage of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) among patients admitted to an 800-bed general hospital where no VRE had been isolated previously. Twenty-two of 636 patients (3.5%) were found to be VRE carriers. Eighteen strains were identified as Enterococcus faecium, three were identified as Enterococcus gallinarum, and one was identified as Enterococcus faecalis. The susceptibilities of the enterococci to ampicillin, vancomycin, and teicoplanin were determined by the disk diffusion and the agar dilution methods. High-level resistance (HLR) to gentamicin and streptomycin was determined by the agar screening method. Eighteen strains (82%) were highly resistant to vancomycin, and four strains (18%) were moderately resistant to vancomycin. Five strains were susceptible to teicoplanin (23%; MICs, < or = 8 micrograms/ml). Only one strain (4.5%, E. faecium) showed HLR to gentamicin, and six strains (27%) showed HLR to streptomycin (one E. faecalis and five E. faecium strains). All 18 E. faecium and 1 E. faecalis strain carried the vanA gene, and 3 E. gallinarum strains carried the vanC gene. An epidemiological investigation revealed several risk factors for VRE colonization: hospitalization and duration of stay in the hematology department and prior vancomycin treatment. The study demonstrates that the patient's gastrointestinal tract is a possible reservoir for VRE, even in hospitals where VRE infections have not yet been observed. Therefore, we conclude that infection control precautions and restriction of glycopeptide usage may be key issues in limiting the emergence and spread of nosocomial VRE infections. PMID:8576330

  20. [In vitro susceptibility of Enterococcus strains to high level aminoglycosides and heavy metals].

    PubMed

    Nakipoğlu, Yaşar; Gümüş, Defne; Sertel Selale, Deniz; Küçüker, Mine Ang

    2009-10-01

    The widespread use of antimicrobial agents in the hospitals and environmental contamination with heavy metals are increasingly related to resistance progression in microorganisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the resistance of enterococci to high level aminoglycosides and some heavy metals [lead (Pb+2), cadmium (Cd+2), mercury (Hg+2), arsenic (As+5)]. A total of 39 Enterococcus strains, isolated from stool and rectal swabs of hospitalized patients were included to the study. Twenty of the strains were resistant to glycopeptides (11 were resistant to vancomycin + teicoplanin and 9 were resistant to only vancomycin). Disk diffusion method was performed to determine the high level resistance to aminoglycosides (gentamicin 120 microg and streptomycin 300 microg), and agar dilution method was used to detect the sensitivities of the strains against different concentrations (0.005-20 mM) of heavy metals. Since there is no specified minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) breakpoints for heavy metals, resistance criteria described in previous studies were used. Accordingly, enterococci which exhibited MIC > or = 1 mM for lead and cadmium, MIC > or = 0.1 mM for mercury, and MIC > or = 10 mM for arsenic were accepted as resistant. High level aminoglycoside (HLAG) resistance rates were found as 91% (10/11) for vancomycin (V) + teicoplanin (T) resistant and 42% (8/19) for glycopeptide susceptible strains. While all of the isolates were resistant to lead (100%), arsenic (2.6%) and mercury (2.6%) resistance was detected in one isolate for each metal. No cadmium resistance has been detected. In our study, enterococci have exhibited seven different resistance profiles (10 strains were resistant to V + T + HLAG + Pb; 1 was resistant to V + T + Pb; 1 was resistant to V + As + Pb; 1 was resistant to HLAG + Hg + Pb; 8 were resistant to V + Pb; 7 were resistant to HLAG + Pb; 11 were only resistant to Pb). Resistance to antibiotics (aminoglycosides and/or vancomycin and

  1. Characterization of multidrug-resistant diabetic foot ulcer enterococci.

    PubMed

    Semedo-Lemsaddek, Teresa; Mottola, Carla; Alves-Barroco, Cynthia; Cavaco-Silva, Patrícia; Tavares, Luís; Oliveira, Manuela

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent chronic progressive disease with complications that include diabetic-foot ulcers. Enterococci isolated from diabetic-foot infections were identified, evaluated by macro-restriction analysis, and screened for virulence traits and antimicrobial resistance. All isolates were considered multidrug-resistant, cytolysin and gelatinase producers, and the majority also demonstrated the ability to produce biofilms. These results indicate the importance of enterococci in diabetic-foot infection development and persistence, especially regarding their biofilm-forming ability and resistance to clinically relevant antibiotics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  2. Antibiotic sensitivities of enterococci isolated from treated root canals.

    PubMed

    Heintz, C E; Deblinger, R; Oliet, S

    1975-11-01

    Enterococci that persisted in debrided, medicated root canals were tested by the Kirby-Bauer procedure for sensitivity to various antibiotics. The 50 strains tested were uniformly sensitive to ampicillin and vancomycin. More than 90% were also sensitive to erythromycin. Varying degrees of sensitivity and resistance were noted to bacitracin, cephaloridine, cephalothin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, and tetracycline. All organisms were either partly or wholly resistant to clindamycin; penicillin; streptomycin; and sulfadiazine, sulfamerazine, and sulfamethazine (triple sulfas).

  3. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in meat and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Messi, Patrizia; Guerrieri, Elisa; de Niederhäusern, Simona; Sabia, Carla; Bondi, Moreno

    2006-03-15

    We investigated the spread of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in strains from meat and environmental samples and the location of glycopeptide-resistance determinants in VanA isolates. VRE and VSE (vancomycin-sensitive enterococci) resistance patterns to six antimicrobials were also evaluated. A total of 59 meat isolates (35%) and 119 environmental isolates (26.5%) were glycopeptide resistant enterococci. In particular, 10.7% meat isolates belonged to the VanA, 8.3% to VanB and 16% to VanC phenotypes. Environmental samples presented 0.7% VanA, 14.5% VanB, and 11.4% VanC strains. Evident differences were not observed among the resistance patterns of VRE and VSE isolates. Neither an important difference was observed comparing the resistance patterns in enterococci from meat and environment. In particular a low incidence of beta-lactamic resistant strains was found, whereas high rates of resistance were observed for streptomycin (85.7% and 92.8%), kanamycin (79.7% and 96%) and gentamycin (85.1% and 91.7%). An intermediate rate of resistant bacteria emerged for erythromycin (35.1% and 10.5%). All VanA isolates independent of origin had more plasmids with different molecular weights. PCR amplification of the 732 bp fragment in plasmids from the VanA strains confirmed affiliation to the vanA gene cluster and the extrachromosomal location of the glycopeptide-resistance determinants. Our study suggests that food and environment play a potential role as reservoirs of resistance determinants, prompting the need to undertake epidemiological and molecular studies to evaluate the mobility of these genes.

  4. Culture media for enterococci and group D-streptococci.

    PubMed

    Reuter, G

    1992-10-01

    Lancefield group D-streptococci are contaminants of various food commodities, especially those of animal origin. They encompass the new genus Enterococcus comprising 13 known species and some species of streptococci which have their habitat in the intestine of animals, e.g. Streptococcus bovis, suis and equinus. The serologically based grouping may no longer constitute the best definition for streptococci from the food chain. Food hygiene monitoring systems using enterococci as indicators need reliable methods for selective cultivation and identification of marker strains. Up to now more than 100 modifications of selective media have been described for isolating streptococci or enterococci from various specimens. The selection of a medium requires either experience or consultation. It depends on the kind of specimen, the method of cultivation (plate count or membrane filter) and whether or not the habitat is heavily contaminated with other organisms. The choice of media is made more difficult as commercial versions of the same culture medium may vary in recipe and/or performance from producer to producer. Therefore, reviewing the literature may help in the choice of medium and confirmation tests. The selectivity and productivity of some commonly used or cited media are reported here, partly based on our own experience: citrate azide tween carbonate agar (CATC), kanamycin aesculin azide agar (KAA) and M-enterococcus agar (ME) including earlier results with aesculin bile azide agar (ABA), and thallous acetate tetrazolium glucose agar (TITG). No medium was completely selective for all group D-streptococci or for all enterococci but some media were highly selective for a single Enterococcus species, e.g., for E. faecalis which serves as indicator of human pollution. Confirmatory tests must be carried out when experience in the evaluation procedure is limited. Selective media for enterococci should be used only after or while checking in parallel their selectivity and

  5. Genetic Basis for Daptomycin Resistance in Enterococci ▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Kelli L.; Daniel, Anu; Hardy, Crystal; Silverman, Jared; Gilmore, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant enterococci as a leading cause of hospital-acquired infection is an important public health concern. Little is known about the genetic mechanisms by which enterococci adapt to strong selective pressures, including the use of antibiotics. The lipopeptide antibiotic daptomycin is approved to treat Gram-positive bacterial infections, including those caused by enterococci. Since its introduction, resistance to daptomycin by strains of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium has been reported but is still rare. We evolved daptomycin-resistant strains of the multidrug-resistant E. faecalis strain V583. Based on the availability of a fully closed genome sequence for V583, we used whole-genome resequencing to identify the mutations that became fixed over short time scales (∼2 weeks) upon serial passage in the presence of daptomycin. By comparison of the genome sequences of the three adapted strains to that of parental V583, we identified seven candidate daptomycin resistance genes and three different mutational paths to daptomycin resistance in E. faecalis. Mutations in one of the seven candidate genes (EF0631), encoding a putative cardiolipin synthase, were found in each of the adapted E. faecalis V583 strains as well as in daptomycin-resistant E. faecalis and E. faecium clinical isolates. Alleles of EF0631 from daptomycin-resistant strains are dominant in trans and confer daptomycin resistance upon a susceptible host. These results demonstrate a mechanism of enterococcal daptomycin resistance that is genetically distinct from that occurring in staphylococci and indicate that enterococci possessing alternate EF0631 alleles are selected for during daptomycin therapy. However, our analysis of E. faecalis clinical isolates indicates that resistance pathways independent from mutant forms of EF0631 also exist. PMID:21502617

  6. Vancomycin resistant enterococci in farm animals – occurrence and importance

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Oskar

    2012-01-01

    The view on enterococci has over the years shifted from harmless commensals to opportunistic but important pathogens mainly causing nosocomial infections. One important part of this development is the emergence of vancomycin resistance enterococci (VRE). The term VRE includes several combinations of bacterial species and resistance genes of which the most clinically important is Enterococcus faecium with vanA type vancomycin resistance. This variant is also the most common VRE among farm animals. The reason for VRE being present among farm animals is selection by extensive use of the vancomycin analog avoparcin for growth promotion. Once the use of avoparcin was discontinued, the prevalence of VRE among farm animals decreased. However, VRE are still present among farm animals and by spread via food products they could potentially have a negative impact on public health. This review is based on the PhD thesis Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci in Swedish Broilers – Emergence, Epidemiology and Elimination and makes a short summary of VRE in humans and food producing animals. The specific situation regarding VRE in Swedish broiler production is also mentioned. PMID:22957131

  7. Blood culture contamination with Enterococci and skin organisms: implications for surveillance definitions of primary bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Joshua T; Chen, Luke Francis; Sexton, Daniel J; Anderson, Deverick J

    2011-06-01

    Enterococci are a common cause of bacteremia but are also common contaminants. In our institution, approximately 17% of positive blood cultures with enterococci are mixed with skin organisms. Such isolates are probable contaminants. The specificity of the current definition of primary bloodstream infection could be increased by excluding enterococci mixed with skin organisms. Copyright © 2011 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) at four U.S. wastewater treatment plants that provide effluent for reuse.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg Goldstein, Rachel E; Micallef, Shirley A; Gibbs, Shawn G; George, Ashish; Claye, Emma; Sapkota, Amir; Joseph, Sam W; Sapkota, Amy R

    2014-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), a leading cause of hospital-acquired infections, can occur in wastewater. However, to date, no previous studies have evaluated the occurrence of VRE at wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) that send their treated effluent to reuse sites. We evaluated the occurrence, concentration, and antimicrobial resistance patterns of VRE at U.S. WWTPs associated with reuse sites. We collected 44 wastewater samples, representing treatment steps from influent to effluent, from two Mid-Atlantic and two Midwest WWTPs between October 2009 and October 2010. Samples were analyzed for total enterococci and VRE using membrane filtration. Isolates were confirmed using biochemical tests and PCR. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Sensititre microbroth dilution. Data were analyzed by two-sample proportion tests and analysis of variance. We detected VRE in 27% (12/44) of all wastewater samples collected and VRE represented 3% of total enterococci detected at all WWTPs. More samples were VRE-positive from the Mid-Atlantic compared to the Midwest WWTPs (p=0.008). VRE concentrations decreased as treatment progressed at all WWTPs, except at Mid-Atlantic WWTP1 where there was an increase in VRE concentrations in activated sludge reactor samples. VRE were not detected in chlorinated effluent, but were detected in one un-chlorinated effluent sample. All unique VRE isolates were multidrug resistant. Fifty-five percent (12/22) of the isolates displayed high-level aminoglycoside resistance. Our findings show that chlorination reduces the occurrence of VRE in wastewater. However, WWTP workers could be exposed to VRE during wastewater treatment. Our data also raise potential concerns about VRE exposure among individuals who come into contact with un-chlorinated reclaimed water. © 2013.

  9. Evidence for growth of enterococci in municipal oxidation ponds, obtained using antibiotic resistance analysis.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, Elaine; Nourozi, Fariba; Robson, Beth; Wood, David; Gilpin, Brent

    2008-12-01

    The Christchurch wastewater treatment plant uses a series of six oxidation ponds to reduce the bacterial load of treated effluent before it is discharged into the local estuary. To ensure that this discharge does not adversely affect water quality in the receiving environment, local regulations specify maximum levels in the discharge for a number of parameters, including enterococci. Between 2001 and 2006, regulations required fewer than 300 enterococci per 100 ml in summer. During this period, the discharge intermittently exceeded this limit, with unexplained levels of enterococci of up to 180,000/100 ml. Characterization of these enterococci by antibiotic resistance analysis showed that enterococci sampled over 4 months had almost identical resistance profiles. In contrast, enterococci from raw sewage and wildfowl from around the oxidation ponds had a diverse range of antibiotic resistance profiles that could be distinguished from each other and also from those of enterococci from the discharge. The hypothesis of a clonal nature of the enterococci in the discharge was supported by molecular genotype analysis, suggesting that these bacteria may have replicated in the pond environment rather than being reflective of breakthrough in the sewage treatment process or the result of recent wildfowl inputs to the ponds. This study highlights the usefulness of antibiotic resistance analysis in identifying this phenomenon and is the first report of apparent replication of a specific type of enterococci in an oxidation pond environment.

  10. Evidence for Growth of Enterococci in Municipal Oxidation Ponds, Obtained Using Antibiotic Resistance Analysis▿

    PubMed Central

    Moriarty, Elaine; Nourozi, Fariba; Robson, Beth; Wood, David; Gilpin, Brent

    2008-01-01

    The Christchurch wastewater treatment plant uses a series of six oxidation ponds to reduce the bacterial load of treated effluent before it is discharged into the local estuary. To ensure that this discharge does not adversely affect water quality in the receiving environment, local regulations specify maximum levels in the discharge for a number of parameters, including enterococci. Between 2001 and 2006, regulations required fewer than 300 enterococci per 100 ml in summer. During this period, the discharge intermittently exceeded this limit, with unexplained levels of enterococci of up to 180,000/100 ml. Characterization of these enterococci by antibiotic resistance analysis showed that enterococci sampled over 4 months had almost identical resistance profiles. In contrast, enterococci from raw sewage and wildfowl from around the oxidation ponds had a diverse range of antibiotic resistance profiles that could be distinguished from each other and also from those of enterococci from the discharge. The hypothesis of a clonal nature of the enterococci in the discharge was supported by molecular genotype analysis, suggesting that these bacteria may have replicated in the pond environment rather than being reflective of breakthrough in the sewage treatment process or the result of recent wildfowl inputs to the ponds. This study highlights the usefulness of antibiotic resistance analysis in identifying this phenomenon and is the first report of apparent replication of a specific type of enterococci in an oxidation pond environment. PMID:18836001

  11. Mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance and genetic relatedness among enterococci isolated from dogs and cats in the United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aims: In this study, mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance and genetic relatedness among resistant enterococci from dogs and cats in the United States were determined. Methods and Results: Enterococci resistant to chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, gentamicin, kanamycin, streptomycin,...

  12. Colonization Rate and Risk Factors of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci among Patients Received Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Shiraz, Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Kaveh, M.; Bazargani, A.; Ramzi, M.; Sedigh Ebrahim-Saraie, H.; Heidari, H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infections caused by antimicrobial-resistant bacteria are associated with increased mortality and health care costs. Enterococci have been recognized as a clinically important pathogen in hospitalized patients. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) infections cause significant morbidity and mortality among patients undergoing transplantation. Objective: To identify epidemiology of VRE colonization and related risk factors among patients with hematological malignancies after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 42 patients who underwent bone-marrow transplantation between July 2013 and March 2014. A stool sample was taken from each patient 3–5 days after transplantation and cultured on appropriate media. Suspected colonies of enterococci were detected to species level by their culture characteristics, biochemical reactions and molecular features. VRE were confirmed via phenotypic and genotypic methods. Results: VRE were detected in 14 (33%) of studied samples. 10 (71%) of the detected VRE isolates were identified as high level vancomycin-resistant E. faecium with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ≥256 μg/mL of vancomycin; 3 isolates were E. galinarum and 1 was E. casseliflavus with an MIC of 8–16 μg/mL. VanA was dominant phenotype and all VRE isolates with high-level of vancomycin resistance had vanA gene. VRE isolation was mostly observed in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) than other diseases. Moreover, antibiotic prophylaxis and hospitalization were independent risk factors for acquisition of VRE after transplantation. Conclusion: We found high level of vancomycin-resistance in E. faecium isolates obtained from HSCT patients. The vancomycin-resistant isolates of E. faecium had vanA and/or simultaneously vanB genes. PMID:28078058

  13. The zoonotic potential of daptomycin non-susceptible enterococci.

    PubMed

    Kelesidis, T

    2015-02-01

    Daptomycin non-susceptible Enterococcus (DNSE) is an emerging clinical problem. Little is known about how de novo DNSE infections develop or the risk factors associated with them. Determining risk factors associated with de novo DNSE infections will aid in understanding the mechanisms of daptomycin non-susceptibility. Humans in contact with animals worldwide are at risk of carriage of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Herein, I review the scientific evidence that supports the hypothesis that transport of daptomycin non-susceptibility genes between animals and humans may be a possible mechanism for development of de novo daptomycin non-susceptibility in enterococci.

  14. Evaluation of Enterolert for enumeration of enterococci in recreational waters.

    PubMed Central

    Budnick, G E; Howard, R T; Mayo, D R

    1996-01-01

    Enterolert (IDEXX Laboratories Inc., Westbrook, Maine), a semiautomated, most probable number method for enumeration of enterococci, was compared with the standard membrane filter method by parallel testing of 138 marine and freshwater recreational bathing water samples. No statistically significant difference and a strong linear correlation were found between methods. Culturing of 501 Enterolert test wells resulted in false-positive and false-negative rates of 5.1 and 0.4%, respectively. Less time for setup, incubation (24 versus 48 h), and reading of Enterolert permits more efficient monitoring of recreational bathing areas. PMID:8837446

  15. Antimicrobial Resistance in Enterococci Isolated from Turkey Flocks Fed Virginiamycin

    PubMed Central

    Welton, L. A.; Thal, L. A.; Perri, M. B.; Donabedian, S.; McMahon, J.; Chow, J. W.; Zervos, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    From 125 separate cloacal cultures from three turkey flocks fed virginiamycin, 104 Enterococcus faecium and 186 Enterococcus faecalis isolates were obtained. As the turkeys aged, there was a higher percentage of quinupristin-dalfopristin-resistant E. faecium isolates, with isolates from the oldest flock being 100% resistant. There were no vancomycin-resistant enterococci. Results of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) indicated there were 11 PFGE types of E. faecalis and 7 PFGE types of E. faecium that were in more than one group of flock cultures. PMID:9517958

  16. A RAPID, SPECIFIC MEMBRANE FILTRATION PROCEDURE FOR ENUMERATION OF ENTEROCOCCI IN RECREATIONAL WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A two-step membrane filter (MP) method with mE medium, upon which the membrane must be incubated for 48 h and then transferred to a substrate medium to differentiate enterococci, is recommended by the U.S.Environmental Protection Agency to measure enterococci in fresh and marine ...

  17. DETECTION OF INTRINSIC VANCOMYCIN RESISTANT ENTEROCOCCI IN ANIMAL AND HUMAN FECES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A survey was conducted to determine the occurrence of vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) in animal and human fecal samples. Fecal samples from 14 animal species and humans were analyzed by quantitative culture for enterococci and VRE. Over 800 VRE isolates were characterize...

  18. Occurrence of putative pathogenicity islands in enterococci from distinct species and of differing origins.

    PubMed

    Semedo-Lemsaddek, Teresa; Barreto-Crespo, Maria Teresa; Tenreiro, Rogério

    2009-11-01

    Enterococci isolated from ewe's milk and cheese, clinical isolates of human and veterinary origins, and reference strains obtained from culture collections were screened for the occurrence of putative pathogenicity island (PAIs). Results obtained after PCR amplification and hybridization point toward PAI dissemination among enterococci of diverse origins (food/clinical) and species (Enterococcus faecalis/non-E. faecalis).

  19. DETECTION OF INTRINSIC VANCOMYCIN RESISTANT ENTEROCOCCI IN ANIMAL AND HUMAN FECES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A survey was conducted to determine the occurrence of vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) in animal and human fecal samples. Fecal samples from 14 animal species and humans were analyzed by quantitative culture for enterococci and VRE. Over 800 VRE isolates were characterize...

  20. FINGERPRINTING OF FECAL ENTEROCOCCI BY MATRIX ASSISTED LASER DESORPTION IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fecal enterococci group has been suggested as an indicator of fecal contamination in freshwater and marine water systems and as a potential target for bacterial source tracking of fecal pollution. While many studies have described the diversity of enterococci in environmenta...

  1. A Software Architecture for High Level Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shen,G.

    2009-05-04

    A modular software platform for high level applications is under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source II project. This platform is based on client-server architecture, and the components of high level applications on this platform will be modular and distributed, and therefore reusable. An online model server is indispensable for model based control. Different accelerator facilities have different requirements for the online simulation. To supply various accelerator simulators, a set of narrow and general application programming interfaces is developed based on Tracy-3 and Elegant. This paper describes the system architecture for the modular high level applications, the design of narrow and general application programming interface for an online model server, and the prototype of online model server.

  2. Contribution of Sand-Associated Enterococci to Dry Weather Water Quality

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Culturable enterococci and a suite of environmental variables were collected during a predominantly dry summer at a beach impacted by nonpoint source pollution. These data were used to evaluate sands as a source of enterococci to nearshore waters, and to assess the relationship between environmental factors and dry-weather enterococci abundance. Best-fit multiple linear regressions used environmental variables to explain more than half of the observed variation in enterococci in water and dry sands. Notably, during dry weather the abundance of enterococci in dry sands at the mean high-tide line was significantly positively related to sand moisture content (ranging from <1–4%), and the daily mean ENT in water could be predicted by a linear regression with turbidity alone. Temperature was also positively correlated with ENT abundance in this study, which may indicate an important role of seasonal warming in temperate regions. Inundation by spring tides was the primary rewetting mechanism that sustained culturable enterococci populations in high-tide sands. Tidal forcing modulated the abundance of enterococci in the water, as both turbidity and enterococci were elevated during ebb and flood tides. The probability of samples violating the single-sample maximum was significantly greater when collected during periods with increased tidal range: spring ebb and flood tides. Tidal forcing also affected groundwater mixing zones, mobilizing enterococci from sand to water. These data show that routine monitoring programs using discrete enterococci measurements may be biased by tides and other environmental factors, providing a flawed basis for beach closure decisions. PMID:25479559

  3. Linking non-culturable (qPCR) and culturable enterococci densities with hydrometeorological conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Whitman, Richard L.; Shively, Dawn A.; Nevers, Meredith B.

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) measurement of enterococci has been proposed as a rapid technique for assessment of beach water quality, but the response of qPCR results to environmental conditions has not been fully explored. Culture-based E. coli and enterococci have been used in empirical predictive models to characterize their responses to environmental conditions and to increase monitoring frequency and efficiency. This approach has been attempted with qPCR results only in few studies. During the summer of 2006, water samples were collected from two southern Lake Michigan beaches and the nearby river outfall (Burns Ditch) and were analyzed for enterococci by culture-based and non-culture-based (i.e., qPCR) methods, as well as culture-based E. coli. Culturable enterococci densities (log CFU/100 ml) for the beaches were significantly correlated with enterococci qPCR cell equivalents (CE) (R = 0.650, P N = 32). Enterococci CE and CFU densities were highest in Burns Ditch relative to the beach sites; however, only CFUs were significantly higher (P R = 0.565, P N = 32). Culturable E. coli and enterococci densities were significantly correlated (R = 0.682, P N = 32). Regression analyses suggested that enterococci CFU could be predicted by lake turbidity, Burns Ditch discharge, and wind direction (adjusted R2 = 0.608); enterococci CE was best predicted by Burns Ditch discharge and log-transformed lake turbidity × wave height (adjusted R2 = 0.40). In summary, our results show that analytically, the qPCR method compares well to the non-culture-based method for measuring enterococci densities in beach water and that both these approaches can be predicted by hydrometeorological conditions. Selected predictors and model results highlight the differences between the environmental responses of the two method endpoints and the potentially high variance in qPCR results

  4. Performance of Vitek 2 for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Staphylococcus spp. and Enterococcus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Bobenchik, April M.; Hindler, Janet A.; Giltner, Carmen L.; Saeki, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Vitek 2 (bioMérieux, Inc., Durham, NC) is a widely used commercial antimicrobial susceptibility testing system. We compared MIC results obtained by Vitek 2 to those obtained by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) broth microdilution (BMD) reference method for 134 staphylococcal and 84 enterococcal clinical isolates. Nineteen agents were evaluated, including all those available on Vitek 2 for testing staphylococci and enterococci. The resistance phenotypes tested included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (n = 58), S. aureus with inducible clindamycin resistance (ICR) (n = 30), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-resistant MRSA (n = 10), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (n = 37), high-level gentamicin-resistant Enterococcus (n = 15), linezolid-resistant Enterococcus (n = 5), and daptomycin-nonsusceptible Enterococcus faecalis (n = 6). For the staphylococci, there was 98.9% categorical agreement (CA). There was one very major error (VME) for gentamicin in a Staphylococcus hominis isolate, six VMEs for inducible clindamycin in S. aureus isolates, and two major errors (ME) for daptomycin in an S. aureus and a Staphylococcus epidermidis isolate. For enterococci, there was 97.3% CA. Two VMEs were observed for daptomycin in isolates of E. faecalis and 2 ME, 1 for high-level gentamicin resistance and 1 for nitrofurantoin, in E. faecium isolates. Overall, there was 98.3% CA and 99% essential agreement for the testing of staphylococci and enterococci by the Vitek 2. With the exception of detecting ICR in S. aureus, Vitek 2 performed reliably for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of staphylococci and enterococci. PMID:24478467

  5. Performance of Vitek 2 for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus spp. and Enterococcus spp.

    PubMed

    Bobenchik, April M; Hindler, Janet A; Giltner, Carmen L; Saeki, Sandra; Humphries, Romney M

    2014-02-01

    Vitek 2 (bioMérieux, Inc., Durham, NC) is a widely used commercial antimicrobial susceptibility testing system. We compared MIC results obtained by Vitek 2 to those obtained by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) broth microdilution (BMD) reference method for 134 staphylococcal and 84 enterococcal clinical isolates. Nineteen agents were evaluated, including all those available on Vitek 2 for testing staphylococci and enterococci. The resistance phenotypes tested included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (n = 58), S. aureus with inducible clindamycin resistance (ICR) (n = 30), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-resistant MRSA (n = 10), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (n = 37), high-level gentamicin-resistant Enterococcus (n = 15), linezolid-resistant Enterococcus (n = 5), and daptomycin-nonsusceptible Enterococcus faecalis (n = 6). For the staphylococci, there was 98.9% categorical agreement (CA). There was one very major error (VME) for gentamicin in a Staphylococcus hominis isolate, six VMEs for inducible clindamycin in S. aureus isolates, and two major errors (ME) for daptomycin in an S. aureus and a Staphylococcus epidermidis isolate. For enterococci, there was 97.3% CA. Two VMEs were observed for daptomycin in isolates of E. faecalis and 2 ME, 1 for high-level gentamicin resistance and 1 for nitrofurantoin, in E. faecium isolates. Overall, there was 98.3% CA and 99% essential agreement for the testing of staphylococci and enterococci by the Vitek 2. With the exception of detecting ICR in S. aureus, Vitek 2 performed reliably for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of staphylococci and enterococci.

  6. High-Level Application Framework for LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, P; Chevtsov, S.; Fairley, D.; Larrieu, C.; Rock, J.; Rogind, D.; White, G.; Zalazny, M.; /SLAC

    2008-04-22

    A framework for high level accelerator application software is being developed for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The framework is based on plug-in technology developed by an open source project, Eclipse. Many existing functionalities provided by Eclipse are available to high-level applications written within this framework. The framework also contains static data storage configuration and dynamic data connectivity. Because the framework is Eclipse-based, it is highly compatible with any other Eclipse plug-ins. The entire infrastructure of the software framework will be presented. Planned applications and plug-ins based on the framework are also presented.

  7. Modified Lactic Acid Bacteria Detect and Inhibit Multiresistant Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We designed Lactococcus lactis to detect Enterococcus faecalis. Upon detection, L. lactis produce and secrete antienterococcal peptides. The peptides inhibit enterococcal growth and reduce viability of enterococci in the vicinity of L. lactis. The enterococcal sex pheromone cCF10 serves as the signal for detection. Expression vectors derived from pCF10, a cCF10-responsive E. faecalis sex-pheromone conjugative plasmid, were engineered in L. lactis for the detection system. Recombinant host strains were engineered to express genes for three bacteriocins, enterocin A, hiracin JM79 and enterocin P, each with potent antimicrobial activity against E. faecalis. Sensitive detection and specific inhibition occur both in agar and liquid media. The engineered L. lactis also inhibited growth of multidrug-resistant E. faecium strains, when induced by cCF10. The presented vectors and strains can be components of a toolbox for the development of alternative antibiotic technologies targeting enterococci at the site of infection. PMID:24896372

  8. Safety and technological properties of bacteriocinogenic enterococci isolates from Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Jaouani, I; Abbassi, M S; Ribeiro, S C; Khemiri, M; Mansouri, R; Messadi, L; Silva, C C G

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the safety and technological traits of previously isolated bacteriocinogenic enterococci strains for potential use as starter/adjunct cultures in foods. Fifty-five bacteriocinogenic enterococci strains previously isolated from different origins in Tunisia were screened for safety. Twenty-two strains did not harbour the genes coding for virulence traits, were susceptible to relevant antibiotics such as vancomycin, and tested negative for haemolysis, histamine production, gelatinase activity and DNase activity. These strains were further assessed for some technological properties, demonstrating low milk-acidifying ability, low proteolytic activity, high peptidolytic activity and diacetyl production in milk. This study revealed that 22 bacteriocinogenic enteroccoci strains did not present virulence features and could be safely applied in food preservation. Some strains also showed good technological potential as adjunct/protective cultures in milk fermentation and cheese production. This is one of very few studies that identified safe Enterococcus strains capable of producing a wide variety of enterocins against different spoilage and pathogenic micro-organisms that have good potential for application as adjunct/protective cultures in foods. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Prevalence, diversity and characterization of enterococci from three coraciiform birds.

    PubMed

    Splichalova, Petra; Svec, Pavel; Ghosh, Anuradha; Zurek, Ludek; Oravcova, Veronika; Radimersky, Tomas; Bohus, Mirko; Literak, Ivan

    2015-05-01

    Coraciiform birds hoopoe (Upupa epops), common kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) and European roller (Coracius garrulus) were examined for enterococci in their cloacae and uropygial glands. The enterococcal isolates were identified at the species level using several genomic and proteomic methods, screened for antibiotic susceptibility and genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Clonality of isolates from the common kingfisher was also assessed by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Using selective media, putative enterococcal isolates (n = 117) were recovered from 74% (32 out of a total of 43) of the bird samples and 114 isolates were confirmed as enterococci. Overall, among the total of 6 different species detected, Enterococcus faecalis was dominant (59%) in all three bird species. The second most frequently isolated species was Enterococcus casseliflavus (32%). PFGE revealed great diversity of strains from different bird species and anatomic location. Closely related strains were found only from nestlings from the same nest. No genes conferring resistance to vancomycin (vanA, vanB, vanC1 and van C2/C3) or erythromycin (erm A, ermB and mefA/E) were detected. MLST analysis and eBURST clustering revealed that sequence types of E. faecalis from the common kingfisher were identical to those of isolates found previously in water, chickens, and humans.

  10. High-level radioactive wastes. Supplement 1

    SciTech Connect

    McLaren, L.H.

    1984-09-01

    This bibliography contains information on high-level radioactive wastes included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base from August 1982 through December 1983. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number. 1452 citations.

  11. PAIRWISE BLENDING OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW)

    SciTech Connect

    CERTA, P.J.

    2006-02-22

    The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate a mission scenario that uses pairwise and incidental blending of high level waste (HLW) to reduce the total mass of HLW glass. Secondary objectives include understanding how recent refinements to the tank waste inventory and solubility assumptions affect the mass of HLW glass and how logistical constraints may affect the efficacy of HLW blending.

  12. Do we understand high-level vision?

    PubMed

    Cox, David Daniel

    2014-04-01

    'High-level' vision lacks a single, agreed upon definition, but it might usefully be defined as those stages of visual processing that transition from analyzing local image structure to analyzing structure of the external world that produced those images. Much work in the last several decades has focused on object recognition as a framing problem for the study of high-level visual cortex, and much progress has been made in this direction. This approach presumes that the operational goal of the visual system is to read-out the identity of an object (or objects) in a scene, in spite of variation in the position, size, lighting and the presence of other nearby objects. However, while object recognition as a operational framing of high-level is intuitive appealing, it is by no means the only task that visual cortex might do, and the study of object recognition is beset by challenges in building stimulus sets that adequately sample the infinite space of possible stimuli. Here I review the successes and limitations of this work, and ask whether we should reframe our approaches to understanding high-level vision. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. High-Level Binocular Rivalry Effects

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Michal; Hochstein, Shaul

    2011-01-01

    Binocular rivalry (BR) occurs when the brain cannot fuse percepts from the two eyes because they are different. We review results relating to an ongoing controversy regarding the cortical site of the BR mechanism. Some BR qualities suggest it is low-level: (1) BR, as its name implies, is usually between eyes and only low-levels have access to utrocular information. (2) All input to one eye is suppressed: blurring doesn’t stimulate accommodation; pupilary constrictions are reduced; probe detection is reduced. (3) Rivalry is affected by low-level attributes, contrast, spatial frequency, brightness, motion. (4) There is limited priming due to suppressed words or pictures. On the other hand, recent studies favor a high-level mechanism: (1) Rivalry occurs between patterns, not eyes, as in patchwork rivalry or a swapping paradigm. (2) Attention affects alternations. (3) Context affects dominance. There is conflicting evidence from physiological studies (single cell and fMRI) regarding cortical level(s) of conscious perception. We discuss the possibility of multiple BR sites and theoretical considerations that rule out this solution. We present new data regarding the locus of the BR switch by manipulating stimulus semantic content or high-level characteristics. Since these variations are represented at higher cortical levels, their affecting rivalry supports high-level BR intervention. In Experiment I, we measure rivalry when one eye views words and the other non-words and find significantly longer dominance durations for non-words. In Experiment II, we find longer dominance times for line drawings of simple, structurally impossible figures than for similar, possible objects. In Experiment III, we test the influence of idiomatic context on rivalry between words. Results show that generally words within their idiomatic context have longer mean dominance durations. We conclude that BR has high-level cortical influences, and may be controlled by a high-level mechanism

  14. High-level binocular rivalry effects.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Michal; Hochstein, Shaul

    2011-01-01

    Binocular rivalry (BR) occurs when the brain cannot fuse percepts from the two eyes because they are different. We review results relating to an ongoing controversy regarding the cortical site of the BR mechanism. Some BR qualities suggest it is low-level: (1) BR, as its name implies, is usually between eyes and only low-levels have access to utrocular information. (2) All input to one eye is suppressed: blurring doesn't stimulate accommodation; pupilary constrictions are reduced; probe detection is reduced. (3) Rivalry is affected by low-level attributes, contrast, spatial frequency, brightness, motion. (4) There is limited priming due to suppressed words or pictures. On the other hand, recent studies favor a high-level mechanism: (1) Rivalry occurs between patterns, not eyes, as in patchwork rivalry or a swapping paradigm. (2) Attention affects alternations. (3) Context affects dominance. There is conflicting evidence from physiological studies (single cell and fMRI) regarding cortical level(s) of conscious perception. We discuss the possibility of multiple BR sites and theoretical considerations that rule out this solution. We present new data regarding the locus of the BR switch by manipulating stimulus semantic content or high-level characteristics. Since these variations are represented at higher cortical levels, their affecting rivalry supports high-level BR intervention. In Experiment I, we measure rivalry when one eye views words and the other non-words and find significantly longer dominance durations for non-words. In Experiment II, we find longer dominance times for line drawings of simple, structurally impossible figures than for similar, possible objects. In Experiment III, we test the influence of idiomatic context on rivalry between words. Results show that generally words within their idiomatic context have longer mean dominance durations. We conclude that BR has high-level cortical influences, and may be controlled by a high-level mechanism.

  15. Are clinical laboratories in California accurately reporting vancomycin-resistant enterococci?

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, J; Tenover, F C; Wong, J; Jarvis, W; Vugia, D J

    1997-10-01

    In order to determine whether hospital-based clinical laboratories conducting active surveillance for vancomycin-resistant enterococci in three San Francisco Bay area counties (San Francisco, Alameda, and Contra Costa counties) were accurately reporting vancomycin resistance, five vancomycin-resistant enterococcal strains and one vancomycin-susceptible beta-lactamase-producing enterococcus were sent to 31 of 32 (97%) laboratories conducting surveillance. Each strain was tested by the laboratory's routine antimicrobial susceptibility testing method. An Enterococcus faecium strain with high-level resistance to vancomycin (MIC, 512 microg/ml) was correctly reported as resistant by 100% of laboratories; an E. faecium strain with moderate-level resistance (MIC, 64 microg/ml) was correctly reported as resistant by 91% of laboratories; two Enterococcus faecalis strains with low-level resistance (MICs, 32 microg/ml) were correctly reported as resistant by 97 and 56% of laboratories, respectively. An Enterococcus gallinarum strain with intrinsic low-level resistance (MIC, 8 microg/ml) was correctly reported as intermediate by 50% of laboratories. A beta-lactamase-producing E. faecalis isolate was correctly identified as susceptible to vancomycin by 100% of laboratories and as resistant to penicillin and ampicillin by 68 and 44% of laboratories, respectively; all 23 (74%) laboratories that tested for beta-lactamase recognized that it was a beta-lactamase producer. This survey indicated that for clinically significant enterococcal isolates, laboratories in the San Francisco Bay area have problems in detecting low- to moderate-level but not high-level vancomycin resistance. Increasing accuracy of detection and prompt reporting of these isolates and investigation of cases are the next steps in the battle for control of the spread of vancomycin resistance.

  16. Enterococci as indicator of potential growth of Salmonella in fresh minced meat at retail.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Tina Beck; Nielsen, Niels L; Christensen, Bjarke Bak; Aabo, Søren

    2016-10-01

    The present study had the purpose of demonstrating a positive correlation between enterococci and Salmonella in minced pork and beef. Data from 2001 to 2002 from retail minced pork and beef in Denmark were used and the association between concentration of enterococci and prevalence and concentration of Salmonella was examined. A total of 2187 and 2747 samples of minced pork and beef, respectively, were collected from butcher shops and supermarkets throughout the country. In pork, 2.1% of all samples were positive for Salmonella whereas 1.5% of beef samples were positive. Among samples with ≥100 CFU/g of enterococci, prevalence of Salmonella positive samples was 3.4%, which was significantly higher than 1.2% observed in minced meat with less than 100 CFU/g of enterococci (P < 0.001). A positive association between occurrence of enterococci and presence of Salmonella in retail minced meat was supported as both prevalence and concentration of Salmonella in positive samples increased with increasing concentrations of enterococci in minced meat. From our data, we suggest that minced meat containing more than 500 enterococci per gram is suspected of having been exposed to temperatures allowing growth of Salmonella. This is to our knowledge the first report, which links presence of an indicator to potential growth of Salmonella. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Enterococci as probiotics and their implications in food safety.

    PubMed

    Franz, Charles M A P; Huch, Melanie; Abriouel, Hikmate; Holzapfel, Wilhelm; Gálvez, Antonio

    2011-12-02

    Enterococci belong to the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and they are of importance in foods due to their involvement in food spoilage and fermentations, as well as their utilisation as probiotics in humans and slaughter animals. However, they are also important nosocomial pathogens that cause bacteraemia, endocarditis and other infections. Some strains are resistant to many antibiotics and possess virulence factors such as adhesins, invasins, pili and haemolysin. The role of enterococci in disease has raised questions on their safety for use in foods or as probiotics. Studies on the incidence of virulence traits among enterococcal strains isolated from food showed that some can harbour virulence traits, but it is also thought that virulence is not the result of the presence of specific virulence determinants alone, but is rather a more intricate process. Specific genetic lineages of hospital-adapted strains have emerged, such as E. faecium clonal complex (CC) 17 and E. faecalis CC2, CC9, CC28 and CC40, which are high risk enterococcal clonal complexes. These are characterised by the presence of antibiotic resistance determinants and/or virulence factors, often located on pathogenicity islands or plasmids. Mobile genetic elements thus are considered to play a major role in the establishment of problematic lineages. Although enterococci occur in high numbers in certain types of fermented cheeses and sausages, they are not deliberately added as starter cultures. Some E. faecium and E. faecalis strains are used as probiotics and are ingested in high numbers, generally in the form of pharmaceutical preparations. Such probiotics are administered to treat diarrhoea, antibiotic-associated diarrhoea or irritable bowel syndrome, to lower cholesterol levels or to improve host immunity. In animals, enterococcal probiotics are mainly used to treat or prevent diarrhoea, for immune stimulation or to improve growth. From a food microbiological point of view, the safety of the

  18. High-Level Waste Melter Study Report

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Joseph M.; Bickford, Dennis F.; Day, Delbert E.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lambert, Steven L.; Marra, Sharon L.; Peeler, David K.; Strachan, Denis M.; Triplett, Mark B.; Vienna, John D.; Wittman, Richard S.

    2001-07-13

    At the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the path to site cleanup involves vitrification of the majority of the wastes that currently reside in large underground tanks. A Joule-heated glass melter is the equipment of choice for vitrifying the high-level fraction of these wastes. Even though this technology has general national and international acceptance, opportunities may exist to improve or change the technology to reduce the enormous cost of accomplishing the mission of site cleanup. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy requested the staff of the Tanks Focus Area to review immobilization technologies, waste forms, and modifications to requirements for solidification of the high-level waste fraction at Hanford to determine what aspects could affect cost reductions with reasonable long-term risk. The results of this study are summarized in this report.

  19. High-Level Waste Melter Study Report

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Jr, Joseph M; Bickford, Dennis F; Day, Delbert E; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lambert, Steven L; Marra, Sharon L; Peeler, David K; Strachan, Denis M; Triplett, Mark B; Vienna, John D; Wittman, Richard S

    2001-07-13

    At the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the path to site cleanup involves vitrification of the majority of the wastes that currently reside in large underground tanks. A Joule-heated glass melter is the equipment of choice for vitrifying the high-level fraction of these wastes. Even though this technology has general national and international acceptance, opportunities may exist to improve or change the technology to reduce the enormous cost of accomplishing the mission of site cleanup. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy requested the staff of the Tanks Focus Area to review immobilization technologies, waste forms, and modifications to requirements for solidification of the high-level waste fraction at Hanford to determine what aspects could affect cost reductions with reasonable long-term risk. The results of this study are summarized in this report.

  20. Prevalence, seasonality, and growth of enterococci in raw and pasteurized milk in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    McAuley, Catherine M; Britz, Margaret L; Gobius, Kari S; Craven, Heather M

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the prevalence, seasonality, and species variety of enterococci present in raw milk factory silos and pasteurized milk in 3 dairying regions in Victoria, Australia, over a 1-yr period. Additionally, the growth ability of thermoduric enterococci isolated in this study (Enterococcus faecalis, E. faecium, E. hirae, and E. durans) was determined in milk at temperatures likely to occur during storage, transport, and distribution, and before domestic consumption (4 and 7°C). Enterococci were detected in 96% of 211 raw milk samples, with an average count of 2.48 log10 cfu/mL. Counts were significantly lower in winter than summer (average 1.84 log10 cfu/mL) and were different between factories but not regions. Enterococcus faecalis was the most prevalent species isolated from raw milk in every factory, comprising between 61.5 and 83.5% of enterococcal species across each season. Enterococci were detected in lower numbers in pasteurized milk than in raw milk and were below the limit of detection on spread plates (<10 cfu/mL) after factory pasteurization. Residual viable cells were only detected following enrichment using 100-mL samples of milk, with 20.8% of the samples testing positive; this equated to a decrease in the average raw milk enterococci count of >4 log10 cfu/mL following pasteurization. Although E. faecalis predominated in raw milk and E. durans was found in only 2.9% of raw milk samples, E. durans was the most prevalent species detected in pasteurized milk. The detection of enterococci in the pasteurized milk did not correlate with higher enterococci counts in the raw milk. This suggested that the main enterococci populations in raw milk were heat-sensitive and that thermoduric enterococci survived pasteurization in a small numbers of instances. All of the thermoduric enterococci that were assessed for growth at likely refrigeration temperatures were able to grow at both 4 and 7°C in sterile milk, with generation times of 35 to 41h

  1. Sodium chloride-esculin hydrolysis test for rapid identification of enterococci.

    PubMed

    Qadri, S M; Flournoy, D J; Qadri, S G

    1987-06-01

    The ability of enterococci to cause severe disease in humans and their relative resistance to chemotherapeutic agents make it desirable to rapidly differentiate these organisms from other streptococci. We developed and evaluated a test that within 2 h distinguishes enterococci from other alpha-, beta-, or nonhemolytic streptococci in a buffered solution containing 0.2% esculin and 5% sodium chloride. All 239 strains of enterococci tested gave a positive reaction within 2 h, whereas 95 of 96 isolates of other streptococci remained negative at 4 h.

  2. Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci: Epidemiology, Infection Prevention, and Control.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Katherine; Bardossy, Ana Cecilia; Zervos, Marcus

    2016-12-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) infections have acquired prominence as a leading cause of health care-associated infections. Understanding VRE epidemiology, transmission modes in health care settings, risk factors for colonization, and infection is essential to prevention and control of VRE infections. Infection control strategies are pivotal in management of VRE infections and should be based on patient characteristics, hospital needs, and available resources. Hand hygiene is basic to decrease acquisition of VRE. The effectiveness of surveillance and contact precautions is variable and controversial in endemic settings, but important during VRE outbreak investigations and control. Environmental cleaning, chlorhexidine bathing, and antimicrobial stewardship are vital in VRE prevention and control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Action and interaction of penicillin and gentamicin on enterococci.

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, F; Greenwood, D

    1979-01-01

    The action and interaction of benzylpenicillin and gentamicin on Streptococcus faecalis was studied using mainly turbidimetric methods. The minimum antibacterial concentration (MAC) of each antibiotic lay considerably below the conventionally determined minimum inhibitory concentration, and levels of the two agents exceeding the MAC were necessary in order to obtain a synergic interaction. Evidence was obtained that gentamicin interfered with bacterial lysis induced by penicillin, and this suggests that the aminoglycoside is responsible for the bactericidal activity of the combination, the role of the penicillin being solely to facilitate access of the aminoglycoside to its target site. Our findings do not, however, fully support the generally held view that the increased permeability of enterococci to aminoglycosides is due to penicillin-induced cell wall damage. 'Persisters'--cells surviving prolonged exposure to the optimum lethal concentration of penicillin--were not killed by subsequent exposure to gentamicin if the penicillin was removed but were killed if the penicillin remained present. PMID:117025

  4. Virulence factors genes in enterococci isolated from beavers (Castor fiber).

    PubMed

    Lauková, Andrea; Strompfová, Viola; Kandričáková, Anna; Ščerbová, Jana; Semedo-Lemsaddek, Teresa; Miltko, Renata; Belzecki, Grzegorz

    2015-03-01

    Only limited information exists concerning the microbiota in beaver (Castor fiber). This study has been focused on the virulence factors genes detection in enterococci from beavers. In general, animals are not affected by enterococcal infections, but they can be a reservoir of, e.g. pathogenic strains. Moreover, detection of virulence factors genes in enterococci from beavers was never tested before. Free-living beavers (12), male and female (age 4-5 years) were caught in the north-east part of Poland. Sampling of lower gut and faeces was provided according to all ethical rules for animal handling. Samples were treated using a standard microbiological method. Pure bacterial colonies were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) identification system. Virulence factors genes-gelE (gelatinase), agg (aggregation), cylA (cytolysin A), efaAfs (adhesin Enterococcus faecalis), efaAfm (adhesin Enterococcus faecium) and esp (surface protein) were tested by PCR. Moreover, gelatinase and antibiotic phenotypes were tested. Species detected were Enterococcus thailandicus, E. faecium, E. faecalis and Enterococcus durans. In literature, enterococcal species distribution was never reported yet up to now. Strains were mostly sensitive to antibiotics. Vancomycin-resistant E. faecalis EE9Tr1 possess cylA, efaAfs, esp and gelE genes. Strains were aggregation substance genes absent. Adhesin E. faecium (efaAfm) gene was detected in two of three E. faecium strains, but it was present also in E. thailandicus. Esp gene was present in EE9Tr1 and E. durans EDTr92. The most detected were gelE, efaAfm genes; in EF 4Hc1 also gelatinase phenotype was found. Strains with virulence factors genes will be tested for their sensitivity to antimicrobial enterocins.

  5. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Bacteriocinogenic Enterococci Against Clostridium botulinum.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Awad A; Tarabees, Reda; Basiouni, Shereen; Gamil, Mahmoud; Kamal, Ahmed S; Krüger, Monika

    2016-12-02

    The present study aimed to characterize Enterococcus faecalis (n = -6) and Enterococcus faecium (n = 1) isolated from healthy chickens to find a novel perspective probiotic candidate that antagonize Clostridium botulinum types A, B, D, and E. The isolated enterococci were characterized based on phenotypic properties, PCR, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF). The virulence determinants including hemolytic activity on blood agar, gelatinase activity, sensitivity to vancomycin, and presence of gelatinase (gelE) and enterococcal surface protein (esp) virulence genes were investigated. Also, the presence of enterocin structural genes enterocin A, enterocin B, enterocin P, enterocin L50A/B, bacteriocin 31, enterocin AS48, enterocin 1071A/1071B, and enterocin 96 were assessed using PCR. Lastly, the antagonistic effect of the selected Enterococcus spp. on the growth of C. botulinum types A, B, D, and E was studied. The obtained results showed that four out of six E. faecalis and one E. faecium proved to be free from the tested virulence markers. All tested enterococci strains exhibited more than one of the tested enterocin. Interestingly, E. faecalis and E. faecium significantly restrained the growth of C. botulinum types A, B, D, and E. In conclusion, although, the data presented showed that bacteriocinogenic Enterococcus strains lacking of virulence determinants could be potentially used as a probiotic candidate against C. botulinum in vitro; however, further investigations are still urgently required to verify the beneficial effects of the tested Enterococcus spp. in vivo.

  6. EAP high-level product architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudlaugsson, T. V.; Mortensen, N. H.; Sarban, R.

    2013-04-01

    EAP technology has the potential to be used in a wide range of applications. This poses the challenge to the EAP component manufacturers to develop components for a wide variety of products. Danfoss Polypower A/S is developing an EAP technology platform, which can form the basis for a variety of EAP technology products while keeping complexity under control. High level product architecture has been developed for the mechanical part of EAP transducers, as the foundation for platform development. A generic description of an EAP transducer forms the core of the high level product architecture. This description breaks down the EAP transducer into organs that perform the functions that may be present in an EAP transducer. A physical instance of an EAP transducer contains a combination of the organs needed to fulfill the task of actuator, sensor, and generation. Alternative principles for each organ allow the function of the EAP transducers to be changed, by basing the EAP transducers on a different combination of organ alternatives. A model providing an overview of the high level product architecture has been developed to support daily development and cooperation across development teams. The platform approach has resulted in the first version of an EAP technology platform, on which multiple EAP products can be based. The contents of the platform have been the result of multi-disciplinary development work at Danfoss PolyPower, as well as collaboration with potential customers and research institutions. Initial results from applying the platform on demonstrator design for potential applications are promising. The scope of the article does not include technical details.

  7. High-level waste qualification: Managing uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Pulsipher, B.A.

    1993-09-01

    A vitrification facility is being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the West Valley Demonstration Plant (WVDP) near Buffalo, New York, where approximately 300 canisters of high-level nuclear waste glass will be produced. To assure that the produced waste form is acceptable, uncertainty must be managed. Statistical issues arise due to sampling, waste variations, processing uncertainties, and analytical variations. This paper presents elements of a strategy to characterize and manage the uncertainties associated with demonstrating that an acceptable waste form product is achieved. Specific examples are provided within the context of statistical work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL).

  8. Python based high-level synthesis compiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieszewski, Radosław; Pozniak, Krzysztof; Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a python based High-Level synthesis (HLS) compiler. The compiler interprets an algorithmic description of a desired behavior written in Python and map it to VHDL. FPGA combines many benefits of both software and ASIC implementations. Like software, the mapped circuit is flexible, and can be reconfigured over the lifetime of the system. FPGAs therefore have the potential to achieve far greater performance than software as a result of bypassing the fetch-decode-execute operations of traditional processors, and possibly exploiting a greater level of parallelism. Creating parallel programs implemented in FPGAs is not trivial. This article describes design, implementation and first results of created Python based compiler.

  9. The effects of high level infrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.L.

    1980-02-01

    This paper will attempt to survey the current knowledge on the effects of relative high levels of infrasound on humans. While this conference is concerned mainly about hearing, some discussion of other physiological effects is appropriate. Such discussion also serves to highlight a basic question, 'Is hearing the main concern of infrasound and low frequency exposure, or is there a more sensitive mechanism'. It would be comforting to know that the focal point of this conference is indeed the most important concern. Therefore, besides hearing loss and auditory threshold of infrasonic and low frequency exposure, four other effects will be provided. These are performance, respiration, annoyance, and vibration.

  10. Service Oriented Architecture for High Level Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Chungming; Chevtsov, Sergei; Wu, Juhao; Shen, Guobao; /Brookhaven

    2012-06-28

    Standalone high level applications often suffer from poor performance and reliability due to lengthy initialization, heavy computation and rapid graphical update. Service-oriented architecture (SOA) is trying to separate the initialization and computation from applications and to distribute such work to various service providers. Heavy computation such as beam tracking will be done periodically on a dedicated server and data will be available to client applications at all time. Industrial standard service architecture can help to improve the performance, reliability and maintainability of the service. Robustness will also be improved by reducing the complexity of individual client applications.

  11. Thymidylate Limitation Potentiates Cephalosporin Activity toward Enterococci via an Exopolysaccharide-Based Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Jessica S; Kristich, Christopher J

    2016-06-17

    Multidrug resistant enterococci are major causes of nosocomial infections. Prior therapy with cephalosporins increases the risk of developing an enterococcal infection due to the intrinsic resistance of enterococci to these antibiotics. While progress has been made toward understanding the genetic and biochemical mechanisms of cephalosporin resistance, available data indicate that as-yet-unidentified resistance factors must exist. Here, we describe results of a screen to identify small molecules capable of sensitizing enterococci to broad-spectrum cephalosporins. We found that both Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were sensitized to broad and expanded-spectrum cephalosporins when thymidylate production was impaired, whether by direct inhibition of thymidylate synthase, or by limiting production of cofactors required for its activity. Cephalosporin potentiation is the result of altered exopolysaccharide production due to reduced dTDP-glucose synthesis. Hence, exopolysaccharide production is a previously undescribed contributor to the intrinsic cephalosporin resistance of enterococci and serves as a new target for antienterococcal therapeutics.

  12. Estimation of Enterococci Input from Bathers and Animals on A Recreational Beach Using Camera Images

    PubMed Central

    D, Wang John; M, Solo-Gabriele Helena; M, Abdelzaher Amir; E, Fleming Lora

    2010-01-01

    Enterococci, are used nationwide as a water quality indicator of marine recreational beaches. Prior research has demonstrated that enterococci inputs to the study beach site (located in Miami, FL) are dominated by non-point sources (including humans and animals). We have estimated their respective source functions by developing a counting methodology for individuals to better understand their non-point source load impacts. The method utilizes camera images of the beach taken at regular time intervals to determine the number of people and animal visitors. The developed method translates raw image counts for weekdays and weekend days into daily and monthly visitation rates. Enterococci source functions were computed from the observed number of unique individuals for average days of each month of the year, and from average load contributions for humans and for animals. Results indicate that dogs represent the larger source of enterococci relative to humans and birds. PMID:20381094

  13. NEW TARGET AND CONTROL ASSAYS FOR QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (QPCR) ANALYSIS OF ENTEROCOCCI IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enterococci are frequently monitored in water samples as indicators of fecal pollution. Attention is now shifting from culture based methods for enumerating these organisms to more rapid molecular methods such as QPCR. Accurate quantitative analyses by this method requires highly...

  14. FACTORS INFLUENCING LIGHT-INDUCED MORTALITY OF ENTEROCOCCI IN SEDIMENT SUSPENSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contamination of recreational waters by pathogenic microorganisms occurs through complex, poorly understood interactions involving variable microbial sources, hydrodynamic transport, arid microbial fate processes. Fecal indicator bacteria such as enterococci have been used to ass...

  15. NEW TARGET AND CONTROL ASSAYS FOR QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (QPCR) ANALYSIS OF ENTEROCOCCI IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enterococci are frequently monitored in water samples as indicators of fecal pollution. Attention is now shifting from culture based methods for enumerating these organisms to more rapid molecular methods such as QPCR. Accurate quantitative analyses by this method requires highly...

  16. The effect of sodium azide concentration on the recovery of enterococci from water.

    PubMed

    Fricker, C R; Eldred, B J

    2014-06-01

    The ability of Slanetz and Bartley medium to recover chlorine-stressed enterococci has been studied. Results showed that chlorine injury significantly affected the ability of Slanetz and Bartley medium to recover enterococci while lower concentrations of sodium azide in the same basal medium allowed their recovery. However, reducing the concentration of sodium azide considerably reduced the specificity making it unsuitable for use in the routine examination of water. A non-azide-containing medium, Enterolert(®)-DW appeared to be able to recover injured and non-injured enterococci with similar efficiency. The data presented here suggest that further work is required to improve the recovery of chlorine-injured enterococci by Slanetz and Bartley medium.

  17. Differential decay of Enterococci and Escherichia coli originating from two fecal pollution sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using in situ subtropical aquatic mesocosms, fecal source (cattle manure versus sewage) was shown to be the most important contributor to differential loss in viability of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), specifically enterococci in freshwater and Escherichia coli in marine habita...

  18. FACTORS INFLUENCING LIGHT-INDUCED MORTALITY OF ENTEROCOCCI IN SEDIMENT SUSPENSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contamination of recreational waters by pathogenic microorganisms occurs through complex, poorly understood interactions involving variable microbial sources, hydrodynamic transport, arid microbial fate processes. Fecal indicator bacteria such as enterococci have been used to ass...

  19. Differential decay of Enterococci and Escherichia coli originating from two fecal pollution sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using in situ subtropical aquatic mesocosms, fecal source (cattle manure versus sewage) was shown to be the most important contributor to differential loss in viability of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), specifically enterococci in freshwater and Escherichia coli in marine habita...

  20. High Level Waste Disposal System Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Dirk Gombert; M. Connolly; J. Roach; W. Holtzscheiter

    2005-02-01

    The high level waste (HLW) disposal system consists of the Yucca Mountain Facility (YMF) and waste product (e.g. glass) generation facilities. Responsibility for management is shared between the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offices of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (DOE-RW) and Environmental Management (DOE-EM). The DOE-RW license application and the Waste Acceptance System Requirements Document (WASRD), as well as the DOE-EM Waste Acceptance Product Specification for Vitrified High Level Waste Forms (WAPS) govern the overall performance of the system. This basis for HLW disposal should be reassessed to consider waste form and process technology research and development (R&D), which have been conducted by DOE-EM, international agencies (i.e. ANSTO, CEA), and the private sector; as well as the technical bases for including additional waste forms in the final license application. This will yield a more optimized HLW disposal system to accelerate HLW disposition, more efficient utilization of the YMF, and overall system cost reduction.

  1. Commissioning of the CMS High Level Trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Agostino, Lorenzo; et al.

    2009-08-01

    The CMS experiment will collect data from the proton-proton collisions delivered by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a centre-of-mass energy up to 14 TeV. The CMS trigger system is designed to cope with unprecedented luminosities and LHC bunch-crossing rates up to 40 MHz. The unique CMS trigger architecture only employs two trigger levels. The Level-1 trigger is implemented using custom electronics, while the High Level Trigger (HLT) is based on software algorithms running on a large cluster of commercial processors, the Event Filter Farm. We present the major functionalities of the CMS High Level Trigger system as of the starting of LHC beams operations in September 2008. The validation of the HLT system in the online environment with Monte Carlo simulated data and its commissioning during cosmic rays data taking campaigns are discussed in detail. We conclude with the description of the HLT operations with the first circulating LHC beams before the incident occurred the 19th September 2008.

  2. Vancomycin-Resistance Enterococci Infections in the Department of the Defense: Annual Report 2014

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-22

    VRE) are Gram - positive cocci that are resistant to vancomycin and most commonly infect seriously ill patients that have prolonged hospital stays or...Department Abstract Vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) are Gram - positive cocci that are resistant to vancomycin and most commonly infect...EpiData Center Department Introduction Enterococci are Gram - positive cocci that are normal inhabitants of the human gut, and typically do not cause

  3. Multidrug-resistant enterococci: the dawn of a new era in resistant pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Antony, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    Resistant enterococci, especially vancomycin-resistant enterococci, have rapidly become an important nosocomial pathogen. They are increasingly prevalent among hospitalized patients, patients with serious chronic illnesses, and immunosuppressed patients. Risk factors identified include previous antibiotics, exposure to contaminated equipment, and close proximity to infected patients. Treatment of multidrug-resistant pathogens has become increasingly difficult, with increased morbidity and mortality in these patients. Strict infection control measures remain the mainstay in the management of these infections. PMID:9770953

  4. Growth of Enterococci in Unaltered, Unseeded Beach Sands Subjected to Tidal Wetting▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Yamahara, Kevan M.; Walters, Sarah P.; Boehm, Alexandria B.

    2009-01-01

    Enterococci are indicator bacteria used to assess the risk of acquiring enteric disease from swimming in marine waters. Previous work identified beach sands as reservoirs of enterococci which can be transported from the sand to the sea, where they may instigate beach advisories. The present study establishes that naturally occurring enterococci can replicate in beach sands under environmentally relevant conditions. In unseeded, nonsterile microcosm experiments, it was shown that intermittent wetting of sands by seawater, like that which would occur at the high tide line, stimulates the transient replication of enterococci at rates of 0.20 to 0.63 per day (equivalent to doubling times of 1.1 to 3.5 days). Replication was not observed in control microcosms that were not subjected to wetting. Enterococci were enumerated using both culture-dependent (membrane filtration and mEI media) and culture-independent (quantitative PCR [QPCR], 23S rRNA gene based) techniques, which allowed tracking of both culturable and total enterococcus populations. Inhibition of QPCR and DNA extraction efficiencies were accounted for in the interpretation of the QPCR results. The results provide evidence that enterococci may not be an appropriate indicator of enteric disease risk at recreational beaches subject to nonpoint sources of pollution. PMID:19151188

  5. Umbra's High Level Architecture (HLA) Interface

    SciTech Connect

    GOTTLIEB, ERIC JOSEPH; MCDONALD, MICHAEL J.; OPPEL III, FRED J.

    2002-04-01

    This report describes Umbra's High Level Architecture HLA library. This library serves as an interface to the Defense Simulation and Modeling Office's (DMSO) Run Time Infrastructure Next Generation Version 1.3 (RTI NG1.3) software library and enables Umbra-based models to be federated into HLA environments. The Umbra library was built to enable the modeling of robots for military and security system concept evaluation. A first application provides component technologies that ideally fit the US Army JPSD's Joint Virtual Battlespace (JVB) simulation framework for Objective Force concept analysis. In addition to describing the Umbra HLA library, the report describes general issues of integrating Umbra with RTI code and outlines ways of building models to support particular HLA simulation frameworks like the JVB.

  6. The High Level Data Reduction Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballester, P.; Gabasch, A.; Jung, Y.; Modigliani, A.; Taylor, J.; Coccato, L.; Freudling, W.; Neeser, M.; Marchetti, E.

    2015-09-01

    The European Southern Observatory (ESO) provides pipelines to reduce data for most of the instruments at its Very Large telescope (VLT). These pipelines are written as part of the development of VLT instruments, and are used both in the ESO's operational environment and by science users who receive VLT data. All the pipelines are highly specific geared toward instruments. However, experience showed that the independently developed pipelines include significant overlap, duplication and slight variations of similar algorithms. In order to reduce the cost of development, verification and maintenance of ESO pipelines, and at the same time improve the scientific quality of pipelines data products, ESO decided to develop a limited set of versatile high-level scientific functions that are to be used in all future pipelines. The routines are provided by the High-level Data Reduction Library (HDRL). To reach this goal, we first compare several candidate algorithms and verify them during a prototype phase using data sets from several instruments. Once the best algorithm and error model have been chosen, we start a design and implementation phase. The coding of HDRL is done in plain C and using the Common Pipeline Library (CPL) functionality. HDRL adopts consistent function naming conventions and a well defined API to minimise future maintenance costs, implements error propagation, uses pixel quality information, employs OpenMP to take advantage of multi-core processors, and is verified with extensive unit and regression tests. This poster describes the status of the project and the lesson learned during the development of reusable code implementing algorithms of high scientific quality.

  7. Molecular Characterization of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci from Hospitalized Patients and Poultry Products in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    van den Braak, Nicole; van Belkum, Alex; van Keulen, Marrit; Vliegenthart, John; Verbrugh, Henri A.; Endtz, Hubert P.

    1998-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) pose an emerging health risk, but little is known about the precise epidemiology of the genes coding for vancomycin resistance. To determine whether the bacterial flora of consumer poultry serves as a gene reservoir, the level of contamination of poultry products with VRE was determined. VRE were genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and transposon structure mapping was done by PCR. The vanX-vanY intergenic regions of several strains were further analyzed by sequencing. A total of 242 of 305 (79%) poultry products were found to be contaminated with VRE. Of these VRE, 142 (59%) were high-level-vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium strains (VREF). PFGE revealed extensive VREF heterogeneity. Two genotypes were found nationwide on multiple occasions: type A (22 of 142 VREF [15%]) and type B (14 of 142 VREF [10%]). No PFGE-deduced genetic overlap was found when VREF from humans were compared with VREF from poultry. Two vanA transposon types were identified among poultry strains. In 59 of 142 (42%) of the poultry VREF, the size of the intergenic region between vanX and vanY was ∼1,300 bp. This transposon type was not found in human VREF. In contrast, all human strains and 83 of 142 (58%) of the poultry VREF contained an intergenic region 543 bp in size. Sequencing of this 543-bp intergenic vanX-vanY region demonstrated full sequence conservation. Though preliminary, these data suggest that dissemination of the resistance genes carried on transposable elements may be of greater importance than clonal dissemination of resistant strains. This observation is important for developing strategies to control the spread of glycopeptide resistance. PMID:9650938

  8. Molecular characterization of vancomycin-resistant enterococci from hospitalized patients and poultry products in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van den Braak, N; van Belkum, A; van Keulen, M; Vliegenthart, J; Verbrugh, H A; Endtz, H P

    1998-07-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) pose an emerging health risk, but little is known about the precise epidemiology of the genes coding for vancomycin resistance. To determine whether the bacterial flora of consumer poultry serves as a gene reservoir, the level of contamination of poultry products with VRE was determined. VRE were genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and transposon structure mapping was done by PCR. The vanX-vanY intergenic regions of several strains were further analyzed by sequencing. A total of 242 of 305 (79%) poultry products were found to be contaminated with VRE. Of these VRE, 142 (59%) were high-level-vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium strains (VREF). PFGE revealed extensive VREF heterogeneity. Two genotypes were found nationwide on multiple occasions: type A (22 of 142 VREF [15%]) and type B (14 of 142 VREF [10%]). No PFGE-deduced genetic overlap was found when VREF from humans were compared with VREF from poultry. Two vanA transposon types were identified among poultry strains. In 59 of 142 (42%) of the poultry VREF, the size of the intergenic region between vanX and vanY was approximately 1,300 bp. This transposon type was not found in human VREF. In contrast, all human strains and 83 of 142 (58%) of the poultry VREF contained an intergenic region 543 bp in size. Sequencing of this 543-bp intergenic vanX-vanY region demonstrated full sequence conservation. Though preliminary, these data suggest that dissemination of the resistance genes carried on transposable elements may be of greater importance than clonal dissemination of resistant strains. This observation is important for developing strategies to control the spread of glycopeptide resistance.

  9. Distribution and persistence of Escherichia coli and Enterococci in stream bed and bank sediments from two urban streams in Houston, TX.

    PubMed

    Brinkmeyer, Robin; Amon, Rainer M W; Schwarz, John R; Saxton, Tara; Roberts, Dustin; Harrison, Sarah; Ellis, Nicholas; Fox, Jessica; DiGuardi, Katherine; Hochman, Mona; Duan, Shuiwang; Stein, Ron; Elliott, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine if Escherichia coli and enterococci in streambed and bank sediments from two urban bayous, Buffalo Bayou and White Oak Bayou, in Houston, TX, USA are a significant source of the chronically high levels of these bacteria in the overlying water. The watersheds of the bayous lie within highly urbanized areas of Greater Houston and there is primary recreational contact with the public. Extensive sampling of the watersheds was conducted from 2008 to 2010. Both fecal indicator bacteria were found at ≥ 10(4)MPNgdry wt.(-1) concentrations in the upper 1cm of sediment cores with declines by orders of magnitude at 15 and 30 cm sediment horizons and in some cases 60 cm, but, nonetheless, indicating that they can remain viable even at depth. No interannual variation was observed. And, there was no correlation with percent organic matter, however there was moderate correlation (R(2)=0.12; p=0.001) of E. coli with sediment moisture. In sediments, most E. coli and enterococci in Buffalo Bayou (76%) and White Oak Bayou (87.5%) were associated with fine sand grains (60 to 250 μm). In the water column, E. coli was associated, in roughly equal percentages, with particle sizes <10, 10-25, 25-63, and ≥ 63 μm (21.9, 25.6, 30.4, and 32.9%, respectively). Enterococci were mostly attached to particle sizes in the ranges of 10-25μm (36.0%) and 25-63 μm (31.1%) as well as ≥ 63 μm (37.7%) (p=0.0001). Fingerprinting of E. coli isolates from both bayous with Rep-PCR and the BOX A1R primer was used to demonstrate translocation of sediments from the upper to lower watersheds.

  10. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE): transmission and control.

    PubMed

    Tacconelli, Evelina; Cataldo, Maria A

    2008-02-01

    Transmission of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) can occur through direct contact with colonised or infected patients or through indirect contact via the hands of health-care workers (HCWs), or via contaminated patient care equipment or environmental surfaces. Antibiotic exposure plays an important role in the transmission dynamic of VRE. Until now, the control measures aimed at reducing the incidence of VRE colonisation and infection in hospitals have included: education of HCWs with implementation of hand-washing practices and compliance; wide and targeted surveillance cultures; isolation of VRE-positive patients; pre-emptive isolation of high-risk patients; and restriction of antibiotic use. However, despite these, VRE is still endemic in many hospitals. The causes of this could be non-compliance with infection control interventions, overuse of antibiotics, and insensitive microbiological methods for detecting VRE in stool. A scoring system using point values has been demonstrated to be useful in reducing rates of nosocomial VRE colonisation. Future prospective comparative studies of infection control approaches in different epidemiological situations might be useful.

  11. Vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) in Swedish sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Sahlström, Leena; Rehbinder, Verena; Albihn, Ann; Aspan, Anna; Bengtsson, Björn

    2009-05-29

    Antimicrobial resistance is a serious threat in veterinary medicine and human healthcare. Resistance genes can spread from animals, through the food-chain, and back to humans. Sewage sludge may act as the link back from humans to animals. The main aims of this study were to investigate the occurrence of vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) in treated sewage sludge, in a Swedish waste water treatment plant (WWTP), and to compare VRE isolates from sewage sludge with isolates from humans and chickens. During a four month long study, sewage sludge was collected weekly and cultured for VRE. The VRE isolates from sewage sludge were analysed and compared to each other and to human and chicken VRE isolates by biochemical typing (PhenePlate), PFGE and antibiograms. Biochemical typing (PhenePlate-FS) and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) revealed prevalence of specific VRE strains in sewage sludge for up to 16 weeks. No connection was found between the VRE strains isolated from sludge, chickens and humans, indicating that human VRE did not originate from Swedish chicken. This study demonstrated widespread occurrence of VRE in sewage sludge in the studied WWTP. This implies a risk of antimicrobial resistance being spread to new farms and to the society via the environment if the sewage sludge is used on arable land.

  12. Vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) in Swedish sewage sludge

    PubMed Central

    Sahlström, Leena; Rehbinder, Verena; Albihn, Ann; Aspan, Anna; Bengtsson, Björn

    2009-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial resistance is a serious threat in veterinary medicine and human healthcare. Resistance genes can spread from animals, through the food-chain, and back to humans. Sewage sludge may act as the link back from humans to animals. The main aims of this study were to investigate the occurrence of vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) in treated sewage sludge, in a Swedish waste water treatment plant (WWTP), and to compare VRE isolates from sewage sludge with isolates from humans and chickens. Methods During a four month long study, sewage sludge was collected weekly and cultured for VRE. The VRE isolates from sewage sludge were analysed and compared to each other and to human and chicken VRE isolates by biochemical typing (PhenePlate), PFGE and antibiograms. Results Biochemical typing (PhenePlate-FS) and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) revealed prevalence of specific VRE strains in sewage sludge for up to 16 weeks. No connection was found between the VRE strains isolated from sludge, chickens and humans, indicating that human VRE did not originate from Swedish chicken. Conclusion This study demonstrated widespread occurrence of VRE in sewage sludge in the studied WWTP. This implies a risk of antimicrobial resistance being spread to new farms and to the society via the environment if the sewage sludge is used on arable land. PMID:19480649

  13. Proton Affinity Calculations with High Level Methods.

    PubMed

    Kolboe, Stein

    2014-08-12

    Proton affinities, stretching from small reference compounds, up to the methylbenzenes and naphthalene and anthracene, have been calculated with high accuracy computational methods, viz. W1BD, G4, G3B3, CBS-QB3, and M06-2X. Computed and the currently accepted reference proton affinities are generally in excellent accord, but there are deviations. The literature value for propene appears to be 6-7 kJ/mol too high. Reported proton affinities for the methylbenzenes seem 4-5 kJ/mol too high. G4 and G3 computations generally give results in good accord with the high level W1BD. Proton affinity values computed with the CBS-QB3 scheme are too low, and the error increases with increasing molecule size, reaching nearly 10 kJ/mol for the xylenes. The functional M06-2X fails markedly for some of the small reference compounds, in particular, for CO and ketene, but calculates methylbenzene proton affinities with high accuracy.

  14. Decontamination of high-level waste canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, J.F.; Slate, S.C.; Fetrow, L.K.

    1980-12-01

    This report presents evaluations of several methods for the in-process decontamination of metallic canisters containing any one of a number of solidified high-level waste (HLW) forms. The use of steam-water, steam, abrasive blasting, electropolishing, liquid honing, vibratory finishing and soaking have been tested or evaluated as potential techniques to decontaminate the outer surfaces of HLW canisters. Either these techniques have been tested or available literature has been examined to assess their applicability to the decontamination of HLW canisters. Electropolishing has been found to be the most thorough method to remove radionuclides and other foreign material that may be deposited on or in the outer surface of a canister during any of the HLW processes. Steam or steam-water spraying techniques may be adequate for some applications but fail to remove all contaminated forms that could be present in some of the HLW processes. Liquid honing and abrasive blasting remove contamination and foreign material very quickly and effectively from small areas and components although these blasting techniques tend to disperse the material removed from the cleaned surfaces. Vibratory finishing is very capable of removing the bulk of contamination and foreign matter from a variety of materials. However, special vibratory finishing equipment would have to be designed and adapted for a remote process. Soaking techniques take long periods of time and may not remove all of the smearable contamination. If soaking involves pickling baths that use corrosive agents, these agents may cause erosion of grain boundaries that results in rough surfaces.

  15. The ALICE electromagnetic calorimeter high level triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronchetti, F.; Blanco, F.; Figueredo, M.; Knospe, A. G.; Xaplanteris, L.

    2012-12-01

    The ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) detector yields a huge sample of data from different sub-detectors. On-line data processing is applied to select and reduce the volume of the stored data. ALICE applies a multi-level hardware trigger scheme where fast detectors are used to feed a three-level (L0, L1, and L2) deep chain. The High-Level Trigger (HLT) is a fourth filtering stage sitting logically between the L2 trigger and the data acquisition event building. The EMCal detector comprises a large area electromagnetic calorimeter that extends the momentum measurement of photons and neutral mesons up to pT = 250 GeV/c, which improves the ALICE capability to perform jet reconstruction with measurement of the neutral energy component of jets. An online reconstruction and trigger chain has been developed within the HLT framework to sharpen the EMCal hardware triggers, by combining the central barrel tracking information with the shower reconstruction (clusters) in the calorimeter. In the present report the status and the functionality of the software components developed for the EMCal HLT online reconstruction and trigger chain will be discussed, as well as preliminary results from their commissioning performed during the 2011 LHC running period.

  16. HIGH LEVEL RF FOR THE SNS RING.

    SciTech Connect

    ZALTSMAN,A.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRENNAN,J.; BRODOWSKI,J.; METH,M.; SPITZ,R.; SEVERINO,F.

    2002-06-03

    A high level RF system (HLRF) consisting of power amplifiers (PA's) and ferrite loaded cavities is being designed and built by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project. It is a fixed frequency, two harmonic system whose main function is to maintain a gap for the kicker rise time. Three cavities running at the fundamental harmonic (h=l) will provide 40 kV and one cavity at the second harmonic (h=2) will provide 20 kV. Each cavity has two gaps with a design voltage of 10 kV per gap and will be driven by a power amplifier (PA) directly adjacent to it. The PA uses a 600kW tetrode to provide the necessary drive current. The anode of the tetrode is magnetically coupled to the downstream cell of the cavity. Drive to the PA will be provided by a wide band, solid state amplifier located remotely. A dynamic tuning scheme will be implemented to help compensate for the effect of beam loading.

  17. Performance of the CMS High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrotta, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system. The first level is implemented using custom-designed electronics. The second level is the so-called High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. For Run II of the Large Hadron Collider, the increases in center-of-mass energy and luminosity will raise the event rate to a level challenging for the HLT algorithms. The increase in the number of interactions per bunch crossing, on average 25 in 2012, and expected to be around 40 in Run II, will be an additional complication. We present here the expected performance of the main triggers that will be used during the 2015 data taking campaign, paying particular attention to the new approaches that have been developed to cope with the challenges of the new run. This includes improvements in HLT electron and photon reconstruction as well as better performing muon triggers. We will also present the performance of the improved tracking and vertexing algorithms, discussing their impact on the b-tagging performance as well as on the jet and missing energy reconstruction.

  18. DEFENSE HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS DEGRADATION

    SciTech Connect

    W. Ebert

    2001-09-20

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the analyses that were done to develop models for radionuclide release from high-level waste (HLW) glass dissolution that can be integrated into performance assessment (PA) calculations conducted to support site recommendation and license application for the Yucca Mountain site. This report was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR'' (CRWMS M&O 2000a). It specifically addresses the item, ''Defense High Level Waste Glass Degradation'', of the product technical work plan. The AP-3.15Q Attachment 1 screening criteria determines the importance for its intended use of the HLW glass model derived herein to be in the category ''Other Factors for the Postclosure Safety Case-Waste Form Performance'', and thus indicates that this factor does not contribute significantly to the postclosure safety strategy. Because the release of radionuclides from the glass will depend on the prior dissolution of the glass, the dissolution rate of the glass imposes an upper bound on the radionuclide release rate. The approach taken to provide a bound for the radionuclide release is to develop models that can be used to calculate the dissolution rate of waste glass when contacted by water in the disposal site. The release rate of a particular radionuclide can then be calculated by multiplying the glass dissolution rate by the mass fraction of that radionuclide in the glass and by the surface area of glass contacted by water. The scope includes consideration of the three modes by which water may contact waste glass in the disposal system: contact by humid air, dripping water, and immersion. The models for glass dissolution under these contact modes are all based on the rate expression for aqueous dissolution of borosilicate glasses. The mechanism and rate expression for aqueous dissolution are adequately understood; the analyses in this AMR were conducted to

  19. The high-level trigger of ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilsner, H.; Alt, T.; Aurbakken, K.; Grastveit, G.; Helstrup, H.; Lindenstruth, V.; Loizides, C.; Nystrand, J.; Roehrich, D.; Skaali, B.; Steinbeck, T.; Ullaland, K.; Vestbo, A.; Vik, T.

    One of the main tracking detectors of the forthcoming ALICE Experiment at the LHC is a cylindrical Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with an expected data volume of about 75 MByte per event. This data volume, in combination with the presumed maximum bandwidth of 1.2 GByte/s to the mass storage system, would limit the maximum event rate to 20 Hz. In order to achieve higher event rates, online data processing has to be applied. This implies either the detection and read-out of only those events which contain interesting physical signatures or an efficient compression of the data by modeling techniques. In order to cope with the anticipated data rate, massive parallel computing power is required. It will be provided in form of a clustered farm of SMP-nodes, based on off-the-shelf PCs, which are connected with a high bandwidth low overhead network. This High-Level Trigger (HLT) will be able to process a data rate of 25 GByte/s online. The front-end electronics of the individual sub-detectors is connected to the HLT via an optical link and a custom PCI card which is mounted in the clustered PCs. The PCI card is equipped with an FPGA necessary for the implementation of the PCI-bus protocol. Therefore, this FPGA can also be used to assist the host processor with first-level processing. The first-level processing done on the FPGA includes conventional cluster-finding for low multiplicity events and local track finding based on the Hough Transformation of the raw data for high multiplicity events. PACS: 07.05.-t Computers in experimental physics - 07.05.Hd Data acquisition: hardware and software - 29.85.+c Computer data analysis

  20. Biofilm Formation by Drug Resistant Enterococci Isolates Obtained from Chronic Periodontitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Manjula; Sood, Shaveta; Sharma, Jyoti

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Enterococci are an important cause of opportunistic nosocomial infections and several multidrug resistant strains have emerged. The severity of periodontal diseases is managed by reduction in the pathogenic bacteria. There is a need to assess the prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of enterococci colonizing the periodontal pocket and correlate its biofilm formation ability because oral biofilms provide a protective environment and are a reservoir of bacterial colonization of the gingival crevice. Aim To investigate possible association between antibiotic susceptibility and biofilm formation in enterococci isolates from chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was conducted at Dr. Harvansh Singh Judge Institute of Dental Sciences and Hospital, Punjab University, Chandigarh from January 2015 to October 2015. Sterile paper points were inserted in the periodontal pocket of 100 subjects and put in a transport media. Forty -six isolates were identified as enterococci. The isolates were further examined for their ability to form biofilm by microtitre plate assay and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done by disc diffusion method for clinically relevant antibiotics. Results Significant relationship (p<0.001) was found between biofilm production with antibiotic resistance to Vancomycin, Erythromycin, Ciprofloxacin, Tiecoplanin, Amoxycillin and Gentamycin. Conclusion The study demonstrates a high propensity among the isolates of Enterococci to form biofilm and a significant association of biofilm with multiple drug resistance. PMID:28273964

  1. Occurrence, genetic diversity, and persistence of enterococci in a Lake Superior watershed.

    PubMed

    Ran, Qinghong; Badgley, Brian D; Dillon, Nicholas; Dunny, Gary M; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    In 2012, the U.S. EPA suggested that coastal and Great Lakes states adopt enterococci as an alternative indicator for the monitoring of recreational water quality. Limited information, however, is available about the presence and persistence of enterococci in Lake Superior. In this study, the density, species composition, and persistence of enterococci in sand, sediment, water, and soil samples were examined at two sites in a Lake Superior watershed from May to September over a 2-year period. The genetic diversity of Enterococcus faecalis isolates collected from environmental samples was also studied by using the horizontal, fluorophore-enhanced repetitive PCR DNA fingerprinting technique. Results obtained by most-probable-number analyses indicated that enterococci were present in 149 (94%) of 159 samples and their densities were generally higher in the summer than in the other months examined. The Enterococcus species composition displayed spatial and temporal changes, with the dominant species being E. hirae, E. faecalis, E. faecium, E. mundtii, and E. casseliflavus. DNA fingerprint analyses indicated that the E. faecalis population in the watershed was genetically diverse and changed spatially and temporally. Moreover, some DNA fingerprints reoccurred over multiple sampling events. Taken together, these results suggest that some enterococci are able to persist and grow in the Lake Superior watershed, especially in soil, for a prolonged time after being introduced.

  2. A critical evaluation of a flow cytometer used for detecting enterococci in recreational waters.

    PubMed

    King, Dawn N; Brenner, Kristen P; Rodgers, Mark R

    2007-06-01

    The current U. S. Environmental Protection Agency-approved method for enterococci (Method 1600) in recreational water is a membrane filter (MF) method that takes 24 hours to obtain results. If the recreational water is not in compliance with the standard, the risk of exposure to enteric pathogens may occur before the water is identified as hazardous. Because flow cytometry combined with specific fluorescent antibodies has the potential to be used as a rapid detection method for microorganisms, this technology was evaluated as a rapid, same-day method to detect enterococci in bathing beach waters. The flow cytometer chosen for this study was a laser microbial detection system designed to detect labeled antibodies. A comparison of MF counts with flow cytometry counts of enterococci in phosphate buffer and sterile-filtered recreational water showed good agreement between the two methods. However, when flow cytometry was used, the counts were several orders of magnitude higher than the MF counts with no correlation to Enterococcus spike concentrations. The unspiked sample controls frequently had higher counts than the samples spiked with enterococci. Particles within the spiked water samples were probably counted as target cells by the flow cytometer because of autofluorescence or non-specific adsorption of antibody and carryover to subsequent samples. For these reasons, this technology may not be suitable for enterococci detection in recreational waters. Improvements in research and instrument design that will eliminate high background and carryover may make this a viable technology in the

  3. Biofilm formation, gel and esp gene carriage among recreational beach Enterococci.

    PubMed

    Asmat, Ahmad; Dada, Ayokunle Christopher; Gires, Usup

    2014-06-12

    Biofilm production, gel and esp gene carriage was enumerated among forty six vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) and vancomycin susceptible enterococci (VSE) beach isolates. A higher proportion (61.54%) of biofilm producers was observed among beach sand as compared to beach water enterococci isolates (30%) indicating that enterococci within the sand column may be more dependent on biofilm production for survival than their beach water counterparts. Correlation analysis revealed strongly negative correlation (r=-0.535, p=0.015) between vancomycin resistance and biofilm formation. Given the observation of high prevalence of biofilm production among beach sand and the concomitant absence of esp gene carriage in any of the isolate, esp gene carriage may not be necessary for the production of biofilms among beach sand isolates. On the whole beach sand and water isolates demonstrated clearly different prevalence levels of vancomycin resistance, biofilm formation, esp and gel gene carriage. Application of these differences may be found useful in beach microbial source tracking studies. Tested starved cells still produced biofilm albeit at lower efficiencies. Non-dividing enterococci in beach sand can survive extended periods of environmental hardship and can resume growth or biofilm production in appropriate conditions thus making them infectious agents with potential health risk to recreational beach users.

  4. Biofilm Formation, gel and esp Gene Carriage among Recreational Beach Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Asmat, Ahmad; Dada, Ayokunle Christopher; Gires, Usup

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm production, gel and esp gene carriage was enumerated among forty six vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) and vancomycin susceptible enterococci (VSE) beach isolates. A higher proportion (61.54%) of biofilm producers was observed among beach sand as compared to beach water enterococci isolates (30%) indicating that enterococci within the sand column may be more dependent on biofilm production for survival than their beach water counterparts. Correlation analysis revealed strongly negative correlation (r=-0.535, p=0.015) between vancomycin resistance and biofilm formation. Given the observation of high prevalence of biofilm production among beach sand and the concomitant absence of esp gene carriage in any of the isolate, esp gene carriage may not be necessary for the production of biofilms among beach sand isolates. On the whole beach sand and water isolates demonstrated clearly different prevalence levels of vancomycin resistance, biofilm formation, esp and gel gene carriage. Application of these differences may be found useful in beach microbial source tracking studies. Tested starved cells still produced biofilm albeit at lower efficiencies. Non-dividing enterococci in beach sand can survive extended periods of environmental hardship and can resume growth or biofilm production in appropriate conditions thus making them infectious agents with potential health risk to recreational beach users. PMID:25168975

  5. Enterococci vs coliforms as a possible fecal contamination indicator: baseline data for Karachi.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mushtaq; Rasool, Sheikh Ajaz; Khan, Muhammad Tanweer; Wajid, Abdul

    2007-04-01

    Fecal contamination of drinking water is the major cause of water borne illnesses. For long time coliforms are exploited as fecal contamination indicator. However, recent studies indicate low survival rate of coliforms in stress conditions, hence it's use as indicator of fecal pollution is being abandoned in many parts of the developed world. Implementation of such strategy demands availability of local data in the cities like Karachi. The present study provides a comparison between coliforms and enterococcal load and its variation in sewage samples collected (June, August and November, 2006) from eighteen towns of Karachi. All the diluted samples were selective media to obtain colony-forming units (CFU) mainly for coliforms and enterococci. The bacteria isolated were identified on the basis of conventional microbiological methods. Observations thus obtained were subjected to rigorous statistical analysis. The total load of enterococci was found in range of 1.27-8.47 X 10(7) as compared to coliforms (3.03-13.9 X 10(7)). However, segregation of data reveals greater inter town variability in CFU/ml both in coliforms and enterococci as suggested by their cumulative standard deviation +/-1.5 X 107. Furthermore, CFU/ml of both coliforms and enterococci also varies to variable scale when collected at different time intervals and at intra town level. Conclusively, the studies suggest high survival rate and lower variability of Enterococci compared to escherichia hence indicating its potential advantage to be used as fecal contamination indicator.

  6. Prevalence and characterization of antibiotic resistant Enterococcus faecalis in French cheeses.

    PubMed

    Jamet, Emmanuel; Akary, Elodie; Poisson, Marie-Ange; Chamba, Jean-François; Bertrand, Xavier; Serror, Pascale

    2012-09-01

    Prevalence of enterococci and antibiotic resistance profiles of Enterococcus faecalis was analyzed in 126 French cheeses from retail stores. Forty-four percent of pasteurized or thermised-milk cheeses, and up to 92% of raw-milk cheeses contained detectable enterococci. A total of 337 antibiotic resistant enterococci were isolated in 29% and 60% of pasteurized-milk and raw-milk cheeses, respectively. E. faecalis was the predominant antibiotic resistant species recovered (81%), followed by Enterococcus faecium (13%), and Enterococcus durans (6%). The most prevalent antibiotic resistances were tetracycline (Tet) and minocycline (Min), followed by erythromycin (Ery), kanamycin (Kan) and chloramphenicol (Cm). The most common multiple antibiotic resistance phenotype was Cm Ery Kan Min Tet. The occurrence of antibiotic genes, as searched by PCR, was 100 % for aph3'IIIa, 96 % for ermB, 90 % for tetM and 80 % for catA in isolates resistant to Kan, Ery, Tet or Cm, respectively. MLST analysis of 30 multidrug resistant E. faecalis revealed that ST19, CC21, CC25 and CC55 isolates were the most common in cheeses. In conclusion, as in many other European countries, French cheeses do contain enterococci with multiple antibiotics resistances. However, low occurrence of high-level gentamicin resistant or sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim-resistant enterococci and absence of vancomycin- or ampicillin- resistant enterococci indicate that cheeses cannot be considered as a major reservoir for nosocomial multi-drug resistant enterococci. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Association between vancomycin-resistant Enterococci bacteremia and ceftriaxone usage.

    PubMed

    McKinnell, James A; Kunz, Danielle F; Chamot, Eric; Patel, Mukesh; Shirley, Rhett M; Moser, Stephen A; Baddley, John W; Pappas, Peter G; Miller, Loren G

    2012-07-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have become a public health concern with implications for patient mortality and costs. Hospital antibiotic usage may impact VRE incidence, but the relationship is poorly understood. Animal investigations suggest that ceftriaxone may be associated with VRE proliferation. We measured antimicrobial usage and VRE bloodstream infection (VRE-BSI) incidence to test our hypothesis that increased ceftriaxone usage would be associated with a higher incidence of VRE-BSI. Retrospective cohort study. University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center, a 900-bed urban tertiary care hospital. All patients admitted during the study period contributed data. We conducted a retrospective analysis of antimicrobial usage and VRE-BSI from 2005 to 2008 (43 months). Antimicrobial usage was quantified as days of therapy (DOTs) per 1,000 patient-days. VRE-BSI incidence was calculated as cases per 1,000 patient-days. Negative binomial regression with adjustment for correlation between consecutive observations was used to measure the association between antimicrobial usage and VRE-BSI incidence at the hospital- and care-unit levels. VRE-BSI incidence increased from 0.06 to 0.17 infections per 1,000 patient-days. Hospital VRE-BSI incidence was associated with prior-month ceftriaxone DOTs (incidence rate ratio, 1.38 per 10 DOTs; P = .005). After controlling for ceftriaxone, prior-month cephalosporin usage (class) was not predictive of VRE-BSI (P = .70). Similarly, prior-month usage of piperacillin-tazobactam, ceftazidime, cefepime, cefazolin, or vancomycin was not predictive of VRE-BSI when considered individually (P≥ .4 for all comparisons). The final model suggests that type of intensive care unit was related to VRE-BSI incidence. Ceftriaxone usage in the prior month, but not cephalosporin (class) or vancomycin usage, was related to VRE-BSI incidence. These findings suggest that an antimicrobial stewardship program that limits ceftriaxone may reduce

  8. Detection of vancomycin resistances in enterococci within 3 1/2 hours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, U. -Ch.; Beleites, C.; Assmann, C.; Glaser, U.; Hübner, U.; Pfister, W.; Fritzsche, W.; Popp, J.; Neugebauer, U.

    2015-02-01

    Vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) constitute a challenging problem in health care institutions worldwide. Novel methods to rapidly identify resistances are highly required to ensure an early start of tailored therapy and to prevent further spread of the bacteria. Here, a spectroscopy-based rapid test is presented that reveals resistances of enterococci towards vancomycin within 3.5 hours. Without any specific knowledge on the strain, VRE can be recognized with high accuracy in two different enterococci species. By means of dielectrophoresis, bacteria are directly captured from dilute suspensions, making sample preparation very easy. Raman spectroscopic analysis of the trapped bacteria over a time span of two hours in absence and presence of antibiotics reveals characteristic differences in the molecular response of sensitive as well as resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium. Furthermore, the spectroscopic fingerprints provide an indication on the mechanisms of induced resistance in VRE.

  9. Application of multiplex PCR, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and BOX-PCR for molecular analysis of enterococci

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of the study was to use band-based molecular methods including BOX-PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) to determine if genetically related enterococci were found among different stores, food types, or years. Enterococci were also characterized f...

  10. Prevalence and distribution of VRE (vancomycin resistant enterococci) and VSE (vancomycin susceptible enterococci) strains in the breeding environment.

    PubMed

    Skowron, Krzysztof; Jeleńska, Alicja; Paluszak, Zbigniew; Szala, Beata

    2016-06-02

    Intensive animal production causes numerous problems. Facilities connected with animal maintenance not only cause environmental pollution, but also pose a great sanitary and epidemiological threat. Long-term use of antibiotics in animal production lead animal-borne microorganisms to develop multiple resistance mechanisms, transferred to the typical environmental bacteria. The aim of this study was assessment of E. faecalis, E. faecium, E. durans and E. hirae prevalence in samples gathered from swine production sectors, and determination of the contribution of VRE (vancomycin resistant enterococci) strains and their resistance. The degree of relationship between isolates of each species from genus Enterococcus was also determined. 195 isolates were obtained, from which DNA was isolated. Genus identification was conducted with the primers specific to the 16S rRNA region, and identification of the species with primers specific to sequence of gene sodA in Multiplex PCR reaction. Resistance to vancomycin (6 μg×ml -1 ) was tested using a screening method on Muller Hinton Agar. To assess resistance type Multiplex PCR, amplifying products corresponding to genes VanA, VanB and VanC, was conducted. Genotyping was conducted using the PCR-RAPD method. Among the 195 isolates, 133 (68%) belonged to E. hirae. The other species contributions were respectively: E. faecalis - 21%, E. durans - 8% and E. faecium - 3%. Only 2 isolates of E. hirae, being different strains, were resistant to vancomycin. Both were representing phenotype VanC1. 60 genetically different strains were defined. The possible contamination paths involved animal feed and spreading of excrements by slaughtered individuals or on personnel's footwear. The obtained results indicate a very low percentage of VRE strains in the tested piggery, resulting in a low health risk to piggery, slaughterhouse or abattoir employees.

  11. Use of a methylene blue azide medium for isolation of enterococci.

    PubMed

    Smith, R F; Bodily, H L

    1967-09-01

    A methylene blue azide medium (MBA), developed by Schaedler, Dubos, and Costello to isolate enterococci from the gastrointestinal tract of animals, was evaluated. This was done by comparing the isolation of enterococci from feces and saliva on the medium. Fifty-two catalase-negative, gram-positive cocci from human feces isolated from MBA were classified as enterococci. All strains grew in S F, 6.5% NaCl, and streptomycin broths, and all fermented mannitol. The isolates were provisionally subdivided into Streptococcus faecalis and S. faecium groups. S. faecalis-like strains fermented glycerol and pyruvate aerobically and produced acid in Snyder's medium (initial pH, 4.8). The S. faecium group fermented raffinose. Among all strains, several tests were variable. These included growth at 45 C, in 0.1% tellurite and in methylene blue milk. Three methods were employed to isolate and identify enterococci from the oral cavity. Direct streaking of MBA with saliva failed to produce any growth on the medium. Two other methods, with the use of various selective broths to promote the recovery of oral enterococci, failed to produce any bacteria capable of growing on MBA. The MBA-isolated fecal strains and oral viridans streptococci were generally indistinguishable on Mitis-Salivarius and K F agars. In experiments with fecal material, no gram-negative bacilli were found among the isolates selected. The MBA medium was judged as a high selectivity-low yield medium, and may provide a means of separating fecal and nonfecal enterococci.

  12. Persistence and Growth of the Fecal Indicator Bacteria Enterococci in Detritus and Natural Estuarine Plankton Communities

    PubMed Central

    Mote, Beth L.; Turner, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    Enterococci are used to evaluate recreational-water quality and health risks in marine environments. In addition to their occurrence in feces of warm blooded animals, they are also common epiphytes. We investigated the contribution of plankton- or particle-associated enterococci in estuarine and coastal water. Seven water and size-fractionated plankton samples were collected monthly between April 2008 and January 2009 in the tidal reaches of the Skidaway River (Georgia, USA). Each size fraction, along with filtered (<30 μm) and bulk estuarine water, was processed according to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency method 1600. Presumptive enterococci were selected and species were identified using carbon substrate utilization patterns. The highest average densities occurred within the 30-, 63-, 105-, and 150-μm size fractions, which also represented the majority (>99%) of the particles within the sampled water. Particle-associated enterococci accounted for as little as 1% of enterococci in bulk water in April to as much as 95% in July. Enterococcus faecalis was the most commonly isolated species from both water and plankton and represented 31% (16/51) and 35% (6/17) of the identified Enterococcus species from water and plankton, respectively. Enterococcus casseliflavus represented 29% of the selected isolates from plankton and 16% from water. Both E. faecalis and E. casseliflavus were able to survive and grow in plankton suspensions significantly longer than in artificial seawater. Enterococcus spp. may be highly concentrated in plankton and associated particles, especially during summer and fall months. These findings could have implications for the effectiveness of enterococci as an indicator of coastal water quality, especially in particle-rich environments. PMID:22327586

  13. Isolation of enterococci, their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and associated factors among patients attending at the University of Gondar Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Yilema, Amelework; Moges, Feleke; Tadele, Sisay; Endris, Mengistu; Kassu, Afework; Abebe, Wondwossen; Ayalew, Getnet

    2017-04-17

    Enterococci become clinically important especially in immune compromised patients and important causes of nosocomial infections. Data on the prevalence, antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and associated factors of enterococci are scarce in Ethiopia. A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted at the University of Gondar Teaching Hospital from February 28, 2014 to May 1, 2014. Pretested structured questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic data and possible associated factors of enterococci infections. Clinical samples including urine, blood, wound swabs and other body fluids from patients requested by physician for culture and antimicrobial susceptibility test during the study period were included. A total of 385 patients were included in the study. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS Version 20. P values <0.05 were considered as statistically significant. The overall prevalence of enterococci infection was 6.2% (24/385). The commonest sites of infections were urinary tract followed by wound and blood. Among the 24 isolates, 33.3% (8/24) were resistant to all tested antimicrobial agents. Forty one point 7 % (10/24) of the enterococci isolates were vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE). Moreover, two third of the isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR) enterococci. In multivariate analysis, duration of hospital stay for two days and more than two days with infection rate 17/32 (53.1%), previous history of any antibiotics (AOR = 9.13; [95% CI; 2.01-41.51] P = 0.00) and history of urinary catheterization (AOR = 8.80; [95% CI; 1.70-45.64] P = 0.01) were associated with presence of higher enterococci infections than their respective groups. The prevalence of enterococci infections among patients with UTIs, wound infections and sepsis were higher than the other infections. Multi drug resistant enterococci including VRE were isolated from clinical samples in the study area. Being hospitalized for ≥48 h, having history of any

  14. Generation of enterococci bacteria in a coastal saltwater marsh and its impact on surf zone water quality.

    PubMed

    Grant, S B; Sanders, B F; Boehm, A B; Redman, J A; Kim, J H; Mrse, R D; Chu, A K; Gouldin, M; McGee, C D; Gardiner, N A; Jones, B H; Svejkovsky, J; Leipzig, G V; Brown, A

    2001-06-15

    Elevated levels of enterococci bacteria, an indicator of fecal pollution, are routinely detected in the surf zone at Huntington State and City Beaches in southern California. A multidisciplinary study was carried out to identify sources of enterococci bacteria landward of the coastline. We find that enterococci bacteria are present at high concentrations in urban runoff, bird feces, marsh sediments, and on marine vegetation. Surprisingly, urban runoff appears to have relatively little impact on surf zone water quality because of the long time required for this water to travel from its source to the ocean. On the other hand, enterococci bacteria generated in a tidal saltwater marsh located near the beach significantly impact surf zone water quality. This study identifies a potential tradeoff between restoring coastal wetlands and protecting beach water quality and calls into question the use of ocean bathing water standards based on enterococci at locations near coastal wetlands.

  15. Coliforms, Enterococci, Thermodurics, Thermophiles, and Psychrophiles in Untreated Farm Pond Waters

    PubMed Central

    Malaney, G. W.; Weiser, H. H.; Turner, R. O.; Van Horn, Marilyn

    1962-01-01

    Untreated waters from ten farm ponds located in central, north central, southeastern, and southwestern Ohio were examined for numbers of coliforms, enterococci, thermodurics, thermophiles, and psychrophiles. The median population densities per 100 ml water for all ponds were: coliforms, 23; enterococci, 3.6; thermodurics, 6,000; thermophiles, 450; psychrophiles, 1,000. The results indicate that these farm pond waters were only lightly polluted and suggest that farm ponds, properly maintained, are a source of raw water of high bacteriological quality, requiring a minimum of treatment to be made suitable for domestic and livestock purposes. PMID:14468809

  16. Gastrointestinal Colonization with Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci In Hospitalized and Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Trajkovska-Dokic, Elena; Kaftandzieva, Ana; Stojkovska, Snezana; Kuzmanovska, Aneta; Panovski, Nikola

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of infection and intestinal colonization with vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) is increasing in many countries in the last decade. Concerning the difficult antimicrobial treatment of infections caused by VRE, decreasing the incidence and prevalence of these infections is an important factor in VRE-induced morbidity and mortality control. AIM: To determine the prevalence of gastrointestinal colonization with vancomycin resistant enterococci in hospitalized and outpatients, and to determine the genetic base of the vancomycin resistance in VRE isolates. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Seven hundred and eighty stool specimens were investigated for the gastrointestinal carriage of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Susceptibility to vancomycin was tested in all isolates by disk-diffusion test and E-test (AB Biodisk, Sweden). Determined vancomycin resistant enterococci were than tested for detection of vanA, vanB and vanC genes by PCR. RESULTS: Vancomycin resistant strains of enterococci were isolated from 46 (16.1 %) of the 285 hospitalized patients and 5 (7.7 %) of the 65 patients living in the community (p < 0.05). The most of the highly resistant enterococci strains to vancomycin (95.2 %), were identified as E. faecium. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) to vancomycin in all 39 vanA genotypes of E. faecium and two vanA genotypes of E. fecalis were > 256 μg/ml. Three vanB genotypes of E. faecium and one vanB genotype of E. faecalis had MICs of 32 μg/ml. All six vanC genotypes of E. gallinarum had MICs of 8 μg/ml. All vanA genotypes of VRE were highly resistant to vancomycin, with MICs above 256 μg/ml. Three vanB genotypes of VR E. faecium and one VR E. fecalis were resistant, with MICs 32 μg/ml. vanC genotypes of VR E. gallinarum were intermediate resistant to vancomycin with MICs of 8 μg/ml. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of vancomycin resistant enterococci in Republic of Macedonia was 2-fold higher in hospitalized than in

  17. Escherichia coli and enterococci at beaches in the Grand Traverse Bay, Lake Michigan: Sources, characteristics, and environmental pathways

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haack, S.K.; Fogarty, L.R.; Wright, C.

    2003-01-01

    This study quantified Escherichia coli(EC) and enterococci (ENT) in beach waters and dominant source materials, correlated these with ambient conditions, and determined selected EC genotypes and ENT phenotypes. Bathing-water ENT criteria were exceeded more frequently than EC criteria, providing conflicting interpretations of water quality. Dominant sources of EC and ENT were bird feces (108/d/bird), storm drains (107/d), and river water (1011/d); beach sands, shallow groundwater and detritus were additional sources. Beach-water EC genotypes and ENT phenotypes formed clusters with those from all source types, reflecting diffuse inputs. Some ENT isolates had phenotypes similar to those of human pathogens and/or exhibited high-level resistance to human-use antibiotics. EC and ENT concentrations were influenced by collection time and wind direction. There was a 48-72-h lag between rainfall and elevated EC concentrations at three southern shoreline beaches, but no such lag at western and eastern shoreline beaches, reflecting the influence of beach orientation with respect to cyclic (3-5 d) summer weather patterns. In addition to local contamination sources and processes, conceptual or predictive models of Great Lakes beach water quality should consider regional weather patterns, lake hydrodynamics, and the influence of monitoring method variables (time of day, frequency).

  18. Prevalence and molecular epidemiology of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) strains isolated from animals and humans in Korea.

    PubMed

    Song, Joon Young; Hwang, In Sook; Eom, Joong Sik; Cheong, Hee Jin; Bae, Won Ki; Park, Yong Ho; Kim, Woo Joo

    2005-03-01

    To assess the possibility of VRE transmission from animals to humans, we studied the prevalence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in farm animals, raw chicken meat, and healthy people. We then determined the molecular relatedness of VRE isolates between animals and humans in Korea. We aimed to isolate VRE from 150 enterococci specimens of farm animals, 15 raw chicken meat samples, and stools from 200 healthy people. Species differentiation was done with conventional biochemical tests. Vancomycin resistance genotyping was done by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Using the agar dilution method, antimicrobial susceptibility was tested for 8 antimicrobials and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was done to evaluate the molecular relatedness of VRE isolates. The prevalence of VRE was 14.7% (22/150) in farm animal specimens, 1% (2/200) in healthy people, and 60% (9/15) in raw chicken meat. Of 22 animal VRE isolates, 1 vanA E. faecium, 15 vanC1 E. gallinarum, and 6 vanC2 E. casseliflavus were identified. All of the 9 VRE from raw chicken meat and all of the 20 clinical VRE strains were vanA E. faecium. However, in healthy people, only 2 vanC2 E. casseliflavus were isolated. These showed low-level resistance to vancomycin and susceptibility to teicoplanin. However, 9 VRE strains from raw chicken meat had high-level resistance to vancomycin (MIC(50,90): >128 microg/mL), teicoplanin (MIC(50,90): >128 microg/mL), ampicillin (MIC(50,90): >128 nicrog/mL), erythromycin (MIC(50.90): >128 microg/mL), and tetracycline (MIC(50/90): 128/>128 microg/mL). This study demonstrated little evidence of VRE colonization in healthy people despite high recovery of VRE among raw chicken meat. It is suggested that there is little evidence of VRE transmission from animals to healthy people. However, we assumed that there exists the possibility of VRE contamination during the processing of chicken meat.

  19. Prevalence and Molecular Epidemiology of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Strains Isolated from Animals and Humans in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Song, Joon Young; Hwang, In Sook; Eom, Joong Sik; Cheong, Hee Jin; Bae, Won Ki; Park, Yong Ho

    2005-01-01

    Background To assess the possibility of VRE transmission from animals to humans, we studied the prevalence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in farm animals, raw chicken meat, and healthy people. We then determined the molecular relatedness of VRE isolates between animals and humans in Korea. Methods We aimed to isolate VRE from 150 enterococci specimens of farm animals, 15 raw chicken meat samples, and stools from 200 healthy people. Species differentiation was done with conventional biochemical tests. Vancomycin resistance genotyping was done by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Using the agar dilution method, antimicrobial susceptibility was tested for 8 antimicrobials and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was done to evaluate the molecular relatedness of VRE isolates. Results The prevalence of VRE was 14.7% (22/150) in farm animal specimens, 1% (2/200) in healthy people, and 60% (9/15) in raw chicken meat. Of 22 animal VRE isolates, 1 vanA E. faecium, 15 vanC1 E. gallinarum, and 6 vanC2 E. casseliflavus were identified. All of the 9 VRE from raw chicken meat and all of the 20 clinical VRE strains were vanA E. faecium. However, in healthy people, only 2 vanC2 E. casseliflavus were isolated. These showed low-level resistance to vancomycin and susceptibility to teicoplanin. However, 9 VRE strains from raw chicken meat had high-level resistance to vancomycin (MIC50,90: >128 µg/mL), teicoplanin (MIC50,90: >128 µg/mL), ampicillin (MIC50,90: >128 µg/mL), erythromycin (MIC50,90: >128 µg/mL), and tetracycline (MIC50,90: 128/>128 µg/mL). Conclusion This study demonstrated little evidence of VRE colonization in healthy people despite high recovery of VRE among raw chicken meat. It is suggested that there is little evidence of VRE transmission from animals to healthy people. However, we assumed that there exists the possibility of VRE contamination during the processing of chicken meat. PMID:15906954

  20. Effect of growth promotant usage on enterococci species on a poultry farm.

    PubMed

    Debnam, Antoinette L; Jackson, Charlene R; Avellaneda, Gloria E; Barrett, John B; Hofacre, Charles L

    2005-09-01

    The species population of enterococci isolated from four poultry houses for six grow-outs on one farm was determined. Two houses on the farm were control houses and did not use any antimicrobials, while two other houses on the farm used flavomycin, virginiamycin, and bacitracin during different poultry grow-outs. Litter, chick boxliners, feed, and poultry carcass rinses were obtained from each house and cultured for the presence of enterococci. Nine species of enterococci (Enterococcusfaecalis, E. faecium, E. avium, E. casselifiavus, E. cecorum, E. durans, E. gallinarum, E. hirae, and E. malodoratus) were identified from the study. Enterococcus faecalis was isolated more frequently from chick boxliners (n=176; 92%) and carcass rinses (n=491; 69%), whereas E. faecium was found more frequently in litter (n=361; 77%) and feed (n=67; 64%). Enterococcus faecalis (n=763; 52%) and E. faecium (n=578; 39%) were isolated most often from the farm and houses, regardless of antimicrobial treatment. Fifty-two percent of E. faecalis and 39% of E. faecium were isolated from both control (n=389 and 295, respectively) and treatment (n=374 and 283, respectively) samples. This study indicates that antimicrobial usage on this farm did not alter the resident population of enterococci.

  1. Efficient Inactivation of Multi-Antibiotics Resistant Nosocomial Enterococci by Purified Hiracin Bacteriocin

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Maryam; Brede, Dag Anders; Diep, Dzung B.; Nes, Ingolf F.; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Hojabri, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Because of the emergence of multi-antibiotic resistant bacteria, a number of infectious diseases have become a major concern to treat in health care services worldwide. This situation is worsened by the fact that very limited progress has been made in developing new and potent antibiotics in recent years. In this context antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) represent new potential therapeutic compounds with bactericidal or bacteriostatic activity against closely related bacterial strains. Methods: In this study, a collection of enterococci (n=170) from clinical sources were investigated for their potential to inhibit multiresistant nosocomial enterococci from Iranian hospitals. Results: Four isolates produced antimicrobial peptides that inhibited all the antibiotic resistant enterococci. This included three Enterococcus faecium isolates producing combinations of enterocin A, B and L50 AB. The most potent antagonism was produced by E. faecalis HO91. Purification and subsequent characterization by MALDI-TOF MS, Edman degradation and DNA-sequencing revealed that the antimicrobial compound was Hiracin. The purified Hiracin was evaluated for antibacterial activity against 12 multiresistant enterococcal isolates from clinical samples. The results demonstrated that Hiracin is highly effective towards enterococci which were resistant even to antibiotics from four distinct classes. Conclusion: The present research addresses Hiracin as a promising alternative to conventional antibiotics in treatment of multiresistant enterococcal infections. PMID:26504762

  2. Genome sequencing reveals the environmental origin of enterococci and potential biomarkers for water quality monitoring.

    PubMed

    Weigand, Michael R; Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T; Santo Domingo, Jorge W

    2014-04-01

    Enterococci are common members of the gut microbiome and their ease of culturing has facilitated worldwide use as indicators of fecal pollution of waters. However, enterococci were recently shown to persist in environmental habitats, often in the absence of fecal input, potentially confounding water quality assays. Toward resolving this issue and providing a more complete picture of natural enterococci diversity, 11 isolates of Enterococcus faecalis recovered from freshwater watersheds (environmental) were sequenced and compared to 59 available enteric genomes. Phenotypically and phylogenetically the environmental E. faecalis were indistinguishable from their enteric counterparts. However, distinct environmental- and enteric-associated gene signatures, encoding mostly accessory nutrient utilization pathways, were detected among the variable genes. Specifically, a nickel uptake operon was over-represented in environmental genomes, while genes for utilization of sugars thought to be abundant in the gut such as xylose were over-represented in enteric genomes. The distribution and phylogeny of these identified signatures suggest that ancestors of E. faecalis resided in extra-enteric habitats, challenging the prevailing commensal view of enterococci ecology. Thus, habitat-associated gene content changes faster than core genome phylogeny and may include biomarkers for reliably detecting fecal contaminants for improved microbial water quality monitoring.

  3. Effects of Tylosin Use on Erythromycin Resistance in Enterococci Isolated from Swine

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Charlene R.; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J.; Barrett, John B.; Ladely, Scott R.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of tylosin on erythromycin-resistant enterococci was examined on three farms; farm A used tylosin for growth promotion, farm B used tylosin for treatment of disease, and farm C did not use tylosin for either growth promotion or disease treatment. A total of 1,187 enterococci were isolated from gestation, farrowing, suckling, nursery, and finishing swine from the farms. From a subset of those isolates (n = 662), 59% (124 out of 208), 28% (80 out of 281), and 2% (4 out of 170) were resistant to erythromycin (MIC ≥ 8 μg/ml) from farms A, B, and C, respectively. PCR analysis and Southern blotting revealed that 95% (65 out of 68) of isolates chosen from all three farms for further study were positive for ermB, but all were negative for ermA and ermC. By using Southern blotting, ermB was localized to the chromosome in 56 of the isolates while 9 isolates from farms A and B contained ermB on two similar-sized plasmid bands (12 to 16 kb). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that the isolates were genetically diverse and represented a heterogeneous population of enterococci. This study suggests that although there was resistance to a greater number of enterococcal isolates on a farm where tylosin was used as a growth promotant, resistant enterococci also existed on a farm where no antimicrobial agents were used. PMID:15240302

  4. Effect of Environmental Parameters on the qPCR Signal of Enterococci in Tropical Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fecal contamination is the major source of pathogens in recreational waters. The need for quick public notifications has expanded the interest in the use of a rapid, quantitative polymerase chain reaction method (qPCR) to determine enterococci density. However, very little info...

  5. Application of a plasmid classification system to determine prevalence of replicon families among multidrug resistant enterococci

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The presence and transfer of plasmids from commensal bacteria to more pathogenic bacteria may contribute to dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. However, prevalence of plasmids from commensal bacteria in food animals such as the enterococci remains largely unknown. In this study, the prevale...

  6. Evaluation of photoreactivation of Escherichia coli and Enterococci after UV disinfection of municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Locas, Annie; Demers, Josée; Payment, Pierre

    2008-11-01

    Because chlorine disinfection is not permitted in the province of Quebec, wastewater disinfection by ultraviolet (UV) light has been used for years in wastewater treatment plants. Thermotolerant coliforms discharge criteria are set for each plant and are adjusted by a factor of 1 log to compensate for photoreactivation in UV-disinfected effluents. The current study evaluated levels of Escherichia coli and enterococci photoreactivation from disinfected wastewater under varying temperature, visible light, and type of UV lamps. Escherichia coli photoreactivation increased significantly after exposure to 5600 lx compared with 1600 lx of visible light. This increase was significantly higher in warm water (25 degrees C) than cold water (4 degrees C). The level of photoreactivation of E. coli was also higher after wastewater disinfection by low-pressure UV lamps as opposed to medium-pressure UV lamps. Enterococci, however, were not photoreactivated under any test conditions. This result suggests that enterococci could be a better indicator than thermotolerant coliforms or E. coli. The use of enterococci would also eliminate the requirement to set different discharge criteria based on disinfection type (UV or chemical) and would also provide a better assessment of treatment efficiency for more resistant microorganisms.

  7. [Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Recent results and trends in development of antibiotic resistance].

    PubMed

    Klare, I; Witte, W; Wendt, C; Werner, G

    2012-11-01

    Enterococci (mainly E. faecalis, E. faecium) are important nosocomial pathogens predominantly affecting older and/or immunocompromised patients. The bacteria possess a broad spectrum of intrinsic and acquired antibiotic resistance properties. Among these, the transferrable glycopeptide resistance of the vanA and vanB genotypes in vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE; reservoir: E. faecium) as well as resistance to last resort antibiotics (e.g. linezolid and tigecycline) are of special concern. Enterococci (including VRE) are easily transferred in hospitals; however, colonizations are far more frequent than infections. Resistance frequencies for vancomycin in clinical E. faecium isolates have remained at a relatively constant level of 8-15% (but with local or regional variations) in recent years whereas frequencies for teicoplanin resistance have shown a slight decrease. Glycopeptide resistance trends correlate with a spread of hospital-associated E. faecium strains carrying the vanA and, with rising frequency in recent years, the vanB gene cluster, the latter being associated with teicoplanin susceptibility. This increased occurrence of vanB-positive E. faecium strains may be caused by an increased use of antibiotics selecting enterococci and VRE as well as due to methodological reasons (e.g. reduced EUCAST MIC-breakpoints for glycopeptides; increased use and sensitive performance of chromogenic VRE agars, increased use of molecular diagnostic assays).

  8. A CRITICAL EVALUATION OF A FLOW CYTOMETER USED FOR DETECTING ENTEROCOCCI IN RECREATIONAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current U. S. Environmental Protection Agency-approved method for enterococci (Method 1600) in recreational water is a membrane filter (MF) method that takes 24 hours to obtain results. If the recreational water is not in compliance with the standard, the risk of exposure to...

  9. Comparison of enterococci and coliform microorganisms in commercially produced pecan nut meats.

    PubMed

    HYNDMAN, J B

    1963-05-01

    Pecan nut meats in the unbroken shell are sterile for enteric microorganisms. Recovery of coliform microorganisms or enterococci from finished pecan nut meats indicated contact contamination, assuming the tempering procedures to be satisfactory. Results of specific studies, designed toward developing background data on the sanitary significance of enterococci and coliform microorganisms in the production of pecan meats are reported. Unbroken pecan nuts or nut meats from various stages of shelling operations were diluted with a phosphate-buffered diluent. Serial dilutions were inoculated into Lactose Broth and Azide Dextrose Broth. The lactose fermentors were carried through indole, methyl red, Voges-Proskauer, and citrate reactions; the positive Azide Dextrose cultures were confirmed in Ethyl Violet Azide Broth and microscopically. Viable plate counts were obtained. Enterococci were found resistant to many deterrent factors affecting coliforms. Recoveries of enterococci were detected long after pollution had occurred. Little correlation was found between enterococcal recovery and observed insanitary practices in commercial shelling operations. Using the coliaerogenes group and, specifically, Escherichia coli as a sanitation index, microorganisms allowed accurate appraisal of tempering, personnel practices, and contact surface contaminating factors. It is felt this was due, in part, to the more delicate growth characteristics of E. coli. The fact that other pathogenic microorganisms, capable of causing gastrointestinal upsets, are associated with the presence of E. coli introduces a health factor which is important to regulatory agencies concerned with consumer protection.

  10. Evaluation of thallium acetate-citrate medium for isolation of enterococci.

    PubMed

    Bulich, A A; Hartman, P A

    1969-11-01

    Thallous acetate-citrate (TAC) agar, a selective medium for isolating enterococci from frozen foods, was evaluated. Two types of bacteria, micrococci and group N streptococci, were responsible for erroneously high enterococcus counts on TAC agar. Selectivity of the medium was improved by the addition of 0.01% sodium azide.

  11. Immunochemical characterization of polysaccharide antigens from six clinical strains of Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Carolyn T; Ganong, Amanda L; Reinap, Barbara; Mourelatos, Zafiria; Huebner, Johannes; Wang, Julia Y

    2006-01-01

    Background Enterococci have become major nosocomial pathogens due to their intrinsic and acquired resistance to a broad spectrum of antibiotics. Their increasing drug resistance prompts us to search for prominent antigens to develop vaccines against enterococci. Given the success of polysaccharide-based vaccines against various bacterial pathogens, we isolated and characterized the immunochemical properties of polysaccharide antigens from five strains of Enterococcus faecalis and one strain of vancomycin-resistant E. faecium. Results We cultured large batches of each strain, isolated sufficient quantities of polysaccharides, analyzed their chemical structures, and compared their antigenic specificity. Three classes of polysaccharides were isolated from each strain, including a polyglucan, a teichoic acid, and a heteroglycan composed of rhamnose, glucose, galactose, mannosamine, and glucosamine. The polyglucans from all six strains are identical and appear to be dextran. Yields of the teichoic acids were generally low. The most abundant polysaccharides are the heteroglycans. The six heteroglycans are structurally different as evidenced by NMR spectroscopy. They also differ in their antigenic specificities as revealed by competitive ELISA. The heteroglycans are not immunogenic by themselves but conjugation to protein carriers significantly enhanced their ability to induce antibodies. Conclusion The six clinical strains of enterococci express abundant, strain-specific cell-surface heteroglycans. These polysaccharides may provide a molecular basis for serological typing of enterococcal strains and antigens for the development of vaccines against multi-drug resistant enterococci. PMID:16836754

  12. Immunochemical characterization of polysaccharide antigens from six clinical strains of Enterococci.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Carolyn T; Ganong, Amanda L; Reinap, Barbara; Mourelatos, Zafiria; Huebner, Johannes; Wang, Julia Y

    2006-07-12

    Enterococci have become major nosocomial pathogens due to their intrinsic and acquired resistance to a broad spectrum of antibiotics. Their increasing drug resistance prompts us to search for prominent antigens to develop vaccines against enterococci. Given the success of polysaccharide-based vaccines against various bacterial pathogens, we isolated and characterized the immunochemical properties of polysaccharide antigens from five strains of Enterococcus faecalis and one strain of vancomycin-resistant E. faecium. We cultured large batches of each strain, isolated sufficient quantities of polysaccharides, analyzed their chemical structures, and compared their antigenic specificity. Three classes of polysaccharides were isolated from each strain, including a polyglucan, a teichoic acid, and a heteroglycan composed of rhamnose, glucose, galactose, mannosamine, and glucosamine. The polyglucans from all six strains are identical and appear to be dextran. Yields of the teichoic acids were generally low. The most abundant polysaccharides are the heteroglycans. The six heteroglycans are structurally different as evidenced by NMR spectroscopy. They also differ in their antigenic specificities as revealed by competitive ELISA. The heteroglycans are not immunogenic by themselves but conjugation to protein carriers significantly enhanced their ability to induce antibodies. The six clinical strains of enterococci express abundant, strain-specific cell-surface heteroglycans. These polysaccharides may provide a molecular basis for serological typing of enterococcal strains and antigens for the development of vaccines against multi-drug resistant enterococci.

  13. Comparison of several laboratory media for presumptive identification of enterococci and group D streptococci.

    PubMed

    Facklam, R R

    1973-08-01

    Bile-esculin (Difco), modified bile-esculin (Difco), selective enterococcus (Pfizer Co.), and eosin-methylene blue agar media were evaluated for accuracy in identifying group D streptococci. The regular and modified bile-esculin media performed equally well, but the selective enterococcus and eosin-methylene blue agars did not accurately differentiate the group D from non-group D streptococci. A modified 6.5% NaCl broth was compared with unmodified 6.5% NaCl broth and Streptococcus faecalis (SF; Difco) broth for accuracy in differentiating enterococci from non-enterococci. The modified and unmodified broths worked equally well in the salt tolerance test, but the lot-to-lot variability of SF broth made this medium unusable as an indicator for enterococci. With all seven media, the number of strains giving positive tests decreased when the tests were incubated at 45 C as compared with 35 C, and the number of strains giving negative tests increased. Thus, the number of false-positive identifications decreased, but the number of false-negative identifications increased. Variability in the susceptibility of group D non-enterococcal streptococci to oxacillin and methicillin sensitivity disks limited the usefulness of these tests for presumptive identification of either enterococci or group D streptococci.

  14. A CRITICAL EVALUATION OF A FLOW CYTOMETER USED FOR DETECTING ENTEROCOCCI IN RECREATIONAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current U. S. Environmental Protection Agency-approved method for enterococci (Method 1600) in recreational water is a membrane filter (MF) method that takes 24 hours to obtain results. If the recreational water is not in compliance with the standard, the risk of exposure to...

  15. Effect of Environmental Parameters on the qPCR Signal of Enterococci in Tropical Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fecal contamination is the major source of pathogens in recreational waters. The need for quick public notifications has expanded the interest in the use of a rapid, quantitative polymerase chain reaction method (qPCR) to determine enterococci density. However, very little info...

  16. High-Level Vancomycin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates Associated with a Polymicrobial Biofilm▿

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, Linda M.; Donlan, Rodney M.; Shin, Dong Hyeon; Jensen, Bette; Clark, Nancye C.; McDougal, Linda K.; Zhu, Wenming; Musser, Kimberlee A.; Thompson, Jill; Kohlerschmidt, Donna; Dumas, Nellie; Limberger, Ronald J.; Patel, Jean B.

    2007-01-01

    Glycopeptides such as vancomycin are the treatment of choice for infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. This study describes the identification of high-level vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) isolates in a polymicrobial biofilm within an indwelling nephrostomy tube in a patient in New York. S. aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Micrococcus species, Morganella morganii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated from the biofilm. For VRSA isolates, vancomycin MICs ranged from 32 to >128 μg/ml. VRSA isolates were also resistant to aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, penicillin, and tetracycline but remained susceptible to chloramphenicol, linezolid, rifampin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The vanA gene was localized to a plasmid of ∼100 kb in VRSA and E. faecium isolates from the biofilm. Plasmid analysis revealed that the VRSA isolate acquired the 100-kb E. faecium plasmid, which was then maintained without integration into the MRSA plasmid. The tetracycline resistance genes tet(U) and tet(S), not previously detected in S. aureus isolates, were identified in the VRSA isolates. Additional resistance elements in the VRSA isolate included a multiresistance gene cluster, ermB-aadE-sat4-aphA-3, msrA (macrolide efflux), and the bifunctional aminoglycoside resistance gene aac(6′)-aph(2")-Ia. Multiple combinations of resistance genes among the various isolates of staphylococci and enterococci, including vanA, tet(S), and tet(U), illustrate the dynamic nature of gene acquisition and loss within and between bacterial species throughout the course of infection. The potential for interspecies transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes, including resistance to vancomycin, may be enhanced by the microenvironment of a biofilm. PMID:17074796

  17. Comparison of fluorescent gentamicin-thallous-carbonate and KF streptococcal agars to enumerate enterococci and fecal streptococci in meats.

    PubMed Central

    Knudtson, L M; Hartman, P A

    1993-01-01

    Two selective and differential media were compared for their abilities to enumerate enterococci and fecal streptococci in pork, beef, and poultry products. Counts obtained on KF streptococcal (KF) agar were compared with counts obtained on fluorescent gentamicin-thallous-carbonate (fGTC) agar. Reactions of 13 known enterococcal species were also observed. All 13 species of enterococci as well as Streptococcus bovis and Streptococcus equinus grew equally well on fGTC agar. KF streptococcal medium allowed growth of most species of enterococci but not S. bovis and S. equinus. Quantitative comparisons between the two media inoculated with pure cultures of known species of enterococci revealed equivalent plate counts following incubation. However, when meat samples were plated, counts on fGTC agar were consistently and significantly higher than counts on KF agar for all sample sources. PMID:8481014

  18. Potential use of presumptive enterococci and staphylococci as indicators of sanitary condition in plants making hard Italian-type cheese.

    PubMed

    Ingham, S C; Reyes, J C; Schoeller, N P; Lang, M M

    2000-12-01

    Raw milk, pasteurized milk, unripened cheese (1 day old), and partially ripened cheese (3 months) from 42 milk lots at a plant making hard Italian-type cheese were analyzed for presumptive enterococci using kanamycin esculin azide agar pour plates. Fully ripened (> or =10 months) cheeses, derived from other milk lots, were also tested. Numbers of presumptive staphylococci (Baird-Parker agar [B-P]) were determined in the partially and fully ripened cheeses. Presumptive enterococci were ubiquitous in raw milk, usually at levels of 2.1 to 3.0 log CFU/ml. Enterococci were detected in 11 (26%) of 42 pasteurized milk samples. Enterococci and staphylococci were detected in 39 (93%) and 6 (14%) of unripened cheeses and in 33 (80%) and 4 (10%) of partially ripened cheeses, respectively. Only eight and five samples of enterococci-positive unripened and partially ripened cheese, respectively, were made from pasteurized milk in which presumptive enterococci were detected. Of 42 samples of fully ripened cheese, 35 (83%) and 8 (19%), respectively, contained presumptive enterococci and staphylococci. Results suggest either that low numbers of presumptive enterococci survive pasteurization and cheese ripening or that contamination of cheese by enterococci occurs after pasteurization. Biochemical testing confirmed 63% of presumptive enterococci isolates. None of the 20 presumptive staphylococci isolates produced colonies typical of Staphylococcus aureus on B-P agar; the isolates were identified as 1 Staphylococcus epidermidis, 1 Staphylococcus xylosus, 2 Staphylococcus saprophyticus, 1 Staphylococcus warneri, 5 Kocuria spp., and 10 unidentified gram-positive, catalase-positive cocci. Three staphylococci isolates decreased in numbers by more than 3.0 log CFU/ml in 9.9 ml of skim milk heated 30 min in a 62.8 degrees C water bath. This finding suggests that most presumptive staphylococci detected may have been prepasteurization contaminants. Unless specificity of the kanamycin esculin

  19. 40 CFR 227.30 - High-level radioactive waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false High-level radioactive waste. 227.30 Section 227.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING...-level radioactive waste. High-level radioactive waste means the aqueous waste resulting from the...

  20. 40 CFR 227.30 - High-level radioactive waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false High-level radioactive waste. 227.30 Section 227.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING...-level radioactive waste. High-level radioactive waste means the aqueous waste resulting from the...

  1. 46 CFR 119.530 - Bilge high level alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bilge high level alarms. 119.530 Section 119.530... Bilge and Ballast Systems § 119.530 Bilge high level alarms. (a) Each vessel must be provided with a visual and audible alarm at the operating station to indicate a high water level in each of the...

  2. 46 CFR 182.530 - Bilge high level alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bilge high level alarms. 182.530 Section 182.530... TONS) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Bilge and Ballast Systems § 182.530 Bilge high level alarms. (a) On a... operating station to indicate a high water level in each of the following normally unmanned spaces: (1)...

  3. 40 CFR 227.30 - High-level radioactive waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false High-level radioactive waste. 227.30...-level radioactive waste. High-level radioactive waste means the aqueous waste resulting from the operation of the first cycle solvent extraction system, or equivalent, and the concentrated waste...

  4. 40 CFR 227.30 - High-level radioactive waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true High-level radioactive waste. 227.30...-level radioactive waste. High-level radioactive waste means the aqueous waste resulting from the operation of the first cycle solvent extraction system, or equivalent, and the concentrated waste...

  5. 40 CFR 227.30 - High-level radioactive waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false High-level radioactive waste. 227.30...-level radioactive waste. High-level radioactive waste means the aqueous waste resulting from the operation of the first cycle solvent extraction system, or equivalent, and the concentrated waste...

  6. 46 CFR 182.530 - Bilge high level alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bilge high level alarms. 182.530 Section 182.530 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Bilge and Ballast Systems § 182.530 Bilge high level alarms. (a) On a...

  7. 46 CFR 119.530 - Bilge high level alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bilge high level alarms. 119.530 Section 119.530 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE... Bilge and Ballast Systems § 119.530 Bilge high level alarms. (a) Each vessel must be provided with a...

  8. 46 CFR 119.530 - Bilge high level alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bilge high level alarms. 119.530 Section 119.530 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE... Bilge and Ballast Systems § 119.530 Bilge high level alarms. (a) Each vessel must be provided with a...

  9. 46 CFR 119.530 - Bilge high level alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bilge high level alarms. 119.530 Section 119.530 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE... Bilge and Ballast Systems § 119.530 Bilge high level alarms. (a) Each vessel must be provided with a...

  10. 46 CFR 182.530 - Bilge high level alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bilge high level alarms. 182.530 Section 182.530 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Bilge and Ballast Systems § 182.530 Bilge high level alarms. (a) On a...

  11. 46 CFR 182.530 - Bilge high level alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bilge high level alarms. 182.530 Section 182.530 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Bilge and Ballast Systems § 182.530 Bilge high level alarms. (a) On a...

  12. Process for solidifying high-level nuclear waste

    DOEpatents

    Ross, Wayne A.

    1978-01-01

    The addition of a small amount of reducing agent to a mixture of a high-level radioactive waste calcine and glass frit before the mixture is melted will produce a more homogeneous glass which is leach-resistant and suitable for long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste products.

  13. Linezolid-resistant clinical isolates of enterococci and Staphylococcus cohnii from a multicentre study in China: molecular epidemiology and resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongbin; Wu, Weiyuan; Ni, Ming; Liu, Yingmei; Zhang, Jixia; Xia, Fei; He, Wenqiang; Wang, Qi; Wang, Zhanwei; Cao, Bin; Wang, Hui

    2013-10-01

    Genetic characterisation of linezolid-resistant Gram-positive cocci in a multicentre study in China has not been reported previously. To study the mechanism underlying the resistance of linezolid-resistant isolates, nine Enterococcus faecalis, one Enterococcus faecium and three Staphylococcus cohnii isolates with various levels of resistance were collected from five hospitals across China in 2009-2012. The nine E. faecalis isolates were classified into seven sequence types, indicating that these linezolid-resistant E. faecalis isolates were polyclonal. Enterococci isolates had reduced susceptibility to linezolid (MICs of 4-8 mg/L) and had mutation of ribosomal protein L3, with three also having mutation of L4, but without the multidrug resistance gene cfr or the 23S rRNA mutation G2576T. The three S. cohnii isolates were highly resistant to linezolid (MICs of 64 mg/L to >256 mg/L), harboured the cfr gene and had the 23S rRNA mutation G2576T. Southern blotting indicated that the cfr gene of these three isolates resided on different plasmids (pHK01, pRM01 and pRA01). In plasmid pHK01, IS21-558 and the cfr gene were integrated into transposon Tn558. In plasmids pRM01 and pRA01, the cfr gene was flanked by two copies of an IS256-like insertion sequence, indicating that the transferable form of linezolid resistance is conferred by the cfr gene. In conclusion, the emergence of linezolid-resistant Gram-positive cocci in different regions of China is of concern. The cfr gene and the 23S rRNA mutation contribute to high-level linezolid resistance in S. cohnii, and the L3 and L4 mutations are associated with low-level linezolid resistance in enterococci.

  14. Evidence for Occurrence, Persistence, and Growth Potential of Escherichia coli and Enterococci in Hawaii’s Soil Environments

    PubMed Central

    Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Roll, Bruce M.; Fujioka, Roger S.

    2012-01-01

    High densities of Escherichia coli and enterococci are common in freshwaters on Oahu and other Hawaiian Islands. Soil along stream banks has long been suspected as the likely source of these bacteria; however, the extent of their occurrence and distribution in a wide range of soils remained unknown until the current investigation. Soil samples representing the seven major soil associations were collected on the island of Oahu and analyzed for fecal coliforms, E. coli, and enterococci by the most probable number method. Fecal coliforms, E. coli, and enterococci were found in most of the samples analyzed; log mean densities (MPN ± SE g soil−1) were 1.96±0.18, n=61; 1.21±0.17, n=57; and 2.99±0.12, n=62, respectively. Representative, presumptive cultures of E. coli and enterococci collected from the various soils were identified and further speciated using the API scheme; at least six species of Enterococcus, including Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, were identified. In mesocosm studies, E. coli and enterococci increased by 100-fold in 4 days, after mixing sewage-spiked soil (one part) with autoclaved soil (nine parts). E. coli remained metabolically active in the soil and readily responded to nutrients, as evidenced by increased dehydrogenase activity. Collectively, these findings indicate that populations of E. coli and enterococci are part of the natural soil microflora, potentially influencing the quality of nearby water bodies. PMID:22791049

  15. Evidence for occurrence, persistence, and growth potential of Escherichia coli and enterococci in Hawaii’s soil environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Roll, Bruce M.; Fujioka, Roger S.

    2012-01-01

    High densities of Escherichia coli and enterococci are common in freshwaters on Oahu and other Hawaiian Islands. Soil along stream banks has long been suspected as the likely source of these bacteria; however, the extent of their occurrence and distribution in a wide range of soils remained unknown until the current investigation. Soil samples representing the seven major soil associations were collected on the island of Oahu and analyzed for fecal coliforms, E. coli, and enterococci by the most probable number method. Fecal coliforms, E. coli, and enterococci were found in most of the samples analyzed; log mean densities (MPN ± SE g soil−1) were 1.96±0.18, n=61; 1.21±0.17, n=57; and 2.99±0.12, n=62, respectively. Representative, presumptive cultures of E. coli and enterococci collected from the various soils were identified and further speciated using the API scheme; at least six species of Enterococcus, including Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, were identified. In mesocosm studies, E. coli and enterococci increased by 100-fold in 4 days, after mixing sewage-spiked soil (one part) with autoclaved soil (nine parts). E. coli remained metabolically active in the soil and readily responded to nutrients, as evidenced by increased dehydrogenase activity. Collectively, these findings indicate that populations of E. coli and enterococci are part of the natural soil microflora, potentially influencing the quality of nearby water bodies.

  16. Accuracy of the VITEK 2 System To Detect Glycopeptide Resistance in Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    van den Braak, Nicole; Goessens, Wil; van Belkum, Alex; Verbrugh, Henri A.; Endtz, Hubert P.

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated the accuracy of the VITEK 2 fully automated system to detect and identify glycopeptide-resistant enterococci (GRE) compared to a reference agar dilution method. The sensitivity of vancomycin susceptibility testing with VITEK 2 for the detection of vanA, vanB, and vanC1 strains was 100%. The sensitivity of vancomycin susceptibility testing of vanC2 strains was 77%. The sensitivity of teicoplanin susceptibility testing of vanA strains was 90%. Of 80 vanC enterococci, 78 (98%) were correctly identified by VITEK 2 as Enterococcus gallinarum/Enterococcus casseliflavus. Since the identification and susceptibility data are produced within 3 and 8 h, respectively, VITEK 2 appears a fast and reliable method for detection of GRE in microbiology laboratories. PMID:11136798

  17. Genotypic Diversity, Antibiotic Resistance and Bacteriocin Production of Enterococci Isolated from Rhizospheres

    PubMed Central

    Klibi, Naouel; Ben Slimen, Naouel; Fhoula, Imen; López, Maria; Ben Slama, Karim; Daffonchio, Daniele; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Torres, Carmen; Ouzari, Hadda

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to identify and to characterize rhizospheric-derived enterococci. The results showed the prevalence of Enterococcus faecium species (97%) vs. Enterococcus durans (3%). Susceptibility testing for antibiotics showed a low percentage of resistance to erythromycin (3.2%) and tetracycline (11.2%), and intermediate resistance to vancomycin (6.5%). Nevertheless, a high proportion of bacteriocin production was recorded. Furthermore, PCR detection of antibiotic resistance and bacteriocin production-encoding genes was investigated. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing (PFGE) showed a great variability of enterococci in the rhizosphere. Moreover, mutilocus-sequence-typing analysis (MLST) revealed the identification of three new sequence types (STs), which were registered as ST613, ST614 and ST615. PMID:23124764

  18. Routine Molecular Identification of Enterococci by Gene-Specific PCR and 16S Ribosomal DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Angeletti, Silvia; Lorino, Giulia; Gherardi, Giovanni; Battistoni, Fabrizio; De Cesaris, Marina; Dicuonzo, Giordano

    2001-01-01

    For 279 clinically isolated specimens identified by commercial kits as enterococci, genotypic identification was performed by two multiplex PCRs, one with ddlE. faecalis and ddlE. faecium primers and another with vanC-1 and vanC-2/3 primers, and by 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing. For 253 strains, phenotypic and genotypic results were the same. Multiplex PCR allowed for the identification of 13 discordant results. Six strains were not enterococci and were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing. For 5 discordant and 10 concordant enterococcal strains, 16S rDNA sequencing was needed. Because many supplementary tests are frequently necessary for phenotypic identification, the molecular approach is a good alternative. PMID:11158155

  19. Effect of Protein Binding on the Activity of Penicillins in Combination with Gentamicin Against Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Glew, Richard H.; Moellering, Robert C.

    1979-01-01

    To assess the effect of protein binding by human serum on the synergistic interaction of penicillins with gentamicin, time-kill curves were determined for four penicillins alone and in combination with gentamicin against 10 blood isolates of enterococci. Killing curves demonstrated synergism with penicillin G plus gentamicin against all 10 strains in either broth or 50% human serum. In broth the combinations of nafcillin plus gentamicin and oxacillin plus gentamicin were synergistic against 10 of 10 strains and 4 of 10 strains, respectively. However, in serum, nafcillin plus gentamicin was synergistically bactericidal against only two strains and oxacillin plus gentamicin against none. Methicillin plus gentamicin was synergistic against none of the enterococci in either medium. Thus, the semisynthetic, penicillinase-resistant penicillins are unlikely to be effective in the therapy of patients with enterococcal endocarditis. PMID:426508

  20. Comparison of the Action of Ampicillin and Benzylpenicillin on Enterococci In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sonne, Minetta; Jawetz, Ernest

    1968-01-01

    The bactericidal activity of benzylpenicillin and ampicillin on 21 strains of enterococci was evaluated and compared to the activity of these drugs in combination with streptomycin (20 μg/ml). On a weight basis, ampicillin was about twice as effective as benzylpenicillin. Neither of the drugs was rapidly and completely bactericidal for any of the 21 strains of enterococci when used alone. The addition of streptomycin greatly enhanced the early bactericidal rate achieved with any given amount of either penicillin and permitted the elimination of viable organisms in vitro. These results suggest that, for the time being, combined antibiotic therapy might be desirable in enterococcus endocarditis and that ampicillin, although more effective than benzylpenicillin, should not be relied upon as a single drug in that disease. Images Fig. 1 PMID:5647524

  1. Occurrence and antimicrobial resistance of enterococci isolated from organic and conventional retail chicken.

    PubMed

    Kilonzo-Nthenge, A; Brown, A; Nahashon, S N; Long, D

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria existing in agricultural environments may be transferred to humans through food consumption or more multifaceted environmental paths of exposure. Notably, enterococcal infections are becoming more challenging to treat as their resistance to antibiotics intensifies. In this study, the prevalence and antibiotic resistance profiles of enterococci in organic and conventional chicken from retail stores were analyzed. Of the total 343 retail chicken samples evaluated, 282 (82.2%) were contaminated with Enterococcus spp. The prevalence was higher in organic chicken (62.5%) than conventional chicken (37.5%). Enterococcus isolates were submitted to susceptibility tests against 12 antimicrobial agents. Among the isolates tested, streptomycin had the highest frequencies of resistance (69.1 and 100%) followed by erythromycin (38.5 and 80.0%), penicillin (14.1 and 88.5%), and kanamycin (11.3 and 76.9%) for organic and conventional isolates, respectively. Chloramphenicol had the lowest frequency (0.0 and 6.6%, respectively). The predominant species in raw chicken was E. faecium (27.3%), followed by E. gallinarum (6.0%), E. casseliflavus (2.1%), and E. durans (1.4%). These species were also found to be resistant to three or more antibiotics. The data indicated that antibiotic-resistant enterococci isolates were found in chicken whether it was organic or conventional. However, enterococci isolates that were resistant to antibiotics were less common in organic chicken (31.0%) when compared with those isolated from conventional chicken (43.6%). The results of this study suggest that raw retail organic and conventional chickens could be a source of antibiotic-resistant enterococci.

  2. Selective media for detecting gastrointestinal carriage of vancomycin-resistant enterococci.

    PubMed

    Barton, A L; Doern, G V

    1995-11-01

    Nosocomial infection with vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) has become a significant problem. Effective institution of infection control measures depends on rapid identification of carriage of the organism, especially in asymptomatic individuals. We compared two selective media for use in screening for the presence of VRE and found that an agar medium containing bile esculin azide supplemented with 8 mu g/ml of vancomycin was a useful and cost-effective means for primary screening for asymptomatic gastrointestinal carriage of VRE.

  3. Quantitative assessment of faecal shedding of β-lactam-resistant Escherichia coli and enterococci in dogs.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Shah, Syed Qaswar Ali; Jessen, Lisbeth Rem; Bortolaia, Valeria; Langebæk, Rikke; Bjørnvad, Charlotte Reinhard; Guardabassi, Luca

    2015-12-31

    Quantitative data on faecal shedding of antimicrobial resistant bacteria are crucial to assess the risk of transmission from dogs to other animals as well as humans. In this study we investigated prevalence and concentrations of β-lactam-resistant Escherichia coli and enterococci in the faeces of 108 dogs presenting at a veterinary hospital in Denmark. The dogs had not been treated with antimicrobials for 4 weeks prior to the study. Total E. coli and enterococci were quantified by counts on MacConkey and Slanetz-Bartley, respectively. Resistant E. coli and enterococci were counted on the same media containing relevant antibiotic concentrations, followed by species identification using MALDI-TOF. Ampicillin- and cefotaxime-resistant E. coli were detected in 40% and 8% of the dogs, respectively, whereas approximately 15% carried ampicillin-resistant enterococci, mainly Enterococcus faecium. In the faeces of the carriers, the proportion of resistant strains in the total bacterial species population was on average 15% for both ampicillin-resistant E. coli (median faecal load 3.2×10(4)cfu/g) and E. faecium (5.8×10(2) cfu/g), and 4.6% for cefotaxime-resistant E. coli (8.6×10(3) cfu/g). Cefotaxime resistance was associated with the presence of blaCTX-M-1 (n=4), blaCMY-2 (n=4) or multiple mutations in the promoter and coding region of chromosomal ampC (n=1). Altogether the results indicate that the risks of zoonotic transmission of β-lactam-resistant bacteria via human exposure to canine faeces greatly vary amongst individual dogs and are influenced by unidentified factors other than recent antimicrobial use.

  4. [Vancomycin-resistant enterococci - the nature of resistance and risk of transmission from animals to humans].

    PubMed

    Hermanovská, Lýdia; Bardoň, Jan; Čermák, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    Enterococci are part of the normal intestinal flora of humans and animals. Under certain circumstances, they are capable of extraintestinal conversion to opportunistic pathogens. They cause endogenous as well as exogenous community and nosocomial infections. The gastrointestinal tract of mammals provides them with favorable conditions for acquisition and spread of resistance genes, for example to vancomycin (van), from other symbiotic bacteria. Thus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) become potential reservoirs and vectors of the van genes. Their occurrence in the population of the Czech Republic was first reported by Kolář et al. in 1997. Some variants of the vanA gene cluster carried on Tn1546 which encode resistance to vancomycin are identical in humans and in animals. It means that animals, especially cattle, poultry and pigs, could be an important reservoir of VRE for humans. Kolář and Bardoň detected VRE in animals in the Czech Republic for the first time in 2000. In Europe, the glycopeptide antibiotic avoparcin, used as a growth stimulator, is responsible for selection of VRE strains in animals. Strains of Enterococcus faecium from animals may offer genes of antimicrobial resistance to other enterococci or they can be directly dangerous to human. This is demonstrated by finding isolates of E. faecalis from human patients and from pigs having very similar profiles of resistance and virulence genes. The goal of the paper was to point out the similarity between isolates of human and animal strains of enterococci resistant to vancomycin, and the possibility of their bilateral transfer between humans and animals.

  5. In vitro antimicrobial activity of linezolid tested against vancomycin-resistant enterococci isolated in Brazilian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Reis, A O; Cordeiro, J C; Machado, A M; Sader, H S

    2001-10-01

    The emergence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) has been described recently in Brazil. This is in contrast to the USA and Europe, where the VRE appeared in the late 1980s. The progressive increase in VRE isolation poses important problems in the antimicrobial therapy of nosocomial infections. Treatment options and effective antimicrobial agents for VRE are often limited and the possibility of transfer of vancomycin genes to other Gram-positive microorganisms continues. In the search for antimicrobial agents for multiresistant Gram-positive cocci, compounds such as linezolid and quinupristin/dalfopristin have been evaluated. The present study was conducted to evaluate the in vitro activity of the oxazolidinone linezolid and 10 other antimicrobial agents, including quinupristin-dalfopristin, against multiresistant enterococci isolated in Brazilian hospitals. Thirty-three vancomycin resistant isolates (17 Enterococcus faecium and 16 E. faecalis), were analyzed. Strains were isolated from patients at São Paulo Hospital, Oswaldo Cruz Hospital, Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual, Santa Marcelina Hospital, Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo, and Hospital de Clínicas do Paraná. The samples were tested by a broth microdilution method following the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) recommendations. All isolates were molecular typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Linezolid was the most active compound against these multiresistant enterococci, showing 100% inhibition at the susceptible breakpoints. Quinupristin/dalfopristin and teicoplanin showed poor activity against both species. The molecular typing results suggest that there has been interhospital spread of vancomycin resistant E. faecium and E. faecalis among Brazilian hospitals. The results of this study indicate that linezolid is an appropriate therapeutic option for the treatment of vancomycin-resistant enterococci infections in Brazil.

  6. Virulence traits and antibiotic resistance among enterococci isolated from dogs with periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Manuela; Tavares, Marta; Gomes, Diana; Touret, Tiago; São Braz, Berta; Tavares, Luís; Semedo-Lemsaddek, Teresa

    2016-06-01

    Periodontal disease - PD - is one of the most widespread diseases in dogs, but the role of this odontogenic infection in the dissemination of pathogenic bacteria present in the oral mucosa to other animals or pet owners is understudied. Trying to unveil the putative pathogenicity of enterococci present in the gums of dogs diagnosed with PD, thirty-two animals were investigated during routine visits to a private veterinary clinic. Seventy-one enterococci were recovered and characterized regarding species, genomic variability, virulence traits, antimicrobial resistance and biofilm-forming ability. Isolates were mainly identified as Enterococcus faecalis, with the large majority (95%) being able to produce biofilm. Regarding antibiotic resistance, all dog-enterococci were susceptible to ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, gentamicin-120, imipenem and vancomycin; while distinct levels of resistance were observed for chloramphenicol (10%), erythromycin (20%), streptomycin-300 (35%) and tetracycline (95%). For virulence traits incidence levels of 35% were observed for β-hemolysis and 25% for cylA, 25% for gelatinase and 35% for gelE; 85% harbor efaAfs and ebpABC; while ace, agg and esp are present respectively in 50, 30 and 10% of the dog-enterococci; efaAfm and acm were detected in all the Enterococcus faecium. Overall, the widespread prevalence of PD in dogs, associated with the close contact between companion animals, other animals and humans, may act as source for the dissemination of opportunistic pathogenic bacteria. Hence, aforementioned data on virulence and resistance features, emphasizes the need for active surveillance measures, such as the diagnose of PD in companion animals during routine visits to the veterinary clinic.

  7. Characterization and risk factors of vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) among animal-affiliated workers in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Getachew, Y; Hassan, L; Zakaria, Z; Zaid, C Z M; Yardi, A; Shukor, R A; Marawin, L T; Embong, F; Aziz, S A

    2012-11-01

    This study determined the risk factors and characteristics of vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) among individuals working with animals in Malaysia. Targeted cross-sectional studies accompanied with laboratory analysis for the identification and characterization of resistance and virulence genes and with genotype of VRE were performed. VRE were detected in 9·4% (95% CI: 6·46-13·12) of the sampled populations. Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus gallinarum were isolated, and vanA was detected in 70% of the isolates. Enterococcus faecalis with vanB was obtained from one foreign poultry worker. At least one virulence gene was detected in >50% of Ent. faecium and Ent. faecalis isolates. The esp and gelE genes were common among Ent. faecium (58·3%) and Ent. faecalis (78%), respectively. The VRE species showed diverse RAPD profiles with some clustering of strains based on the individual's background. However, the risk factors found to be significantly associated with the prevalence of VRE were age (OR: 5·39, 95% CI: 1·98-14·61) and previous hospitalization (OR: 4·06, 95% CI: 1·33-12·35). VRE species isolated from individuals in this study have high level of vancomycin resistance, were genetically diverse and possessed the virulence traits. Age of individuals and history of hospitalization rather than occupational background determined VRE colonization. This study provides comprehensive findings on the epidemiological and molecular features of VRE among healthy individuals working with animals. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Safety and potential risks of enterococci isolated from traditional fermented capers.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pulido, R; Abriouel, H; Ben Omar, N; Lucas, R; Martínez-Cañamero, M; Gálvez, A

    2006-12-01

    A collection of 17 enterococci isolates obtained from fermentations of capers (the fruits of Capparis sp.) were investigated for incidence of known virulence determinants, antibiotic resistance and production of biogenic amines. Molecular identification revealed the presence of Enterococcus faecium (nine isolates), Enterococcus faecalis (4), E. avium (3) and Enterococcus casseliflavus/flavescens (1). Alpha-haemolytic activity was detected in two E. avium and one E. faecalis isolates, and beta-haemolytic activity was detected in E. casseliflavus/flavescens. The haemolytic component cylB was detected by PCR amplification in three non-haemolytic isolates and in E. casseliflavus/flavescens. The collagen adhesin ace gene and the endocarditis associated antigen gene efaA(fm) were detected in two isolates each. Genes encoding sex pheromone precursors (cpd, cob, ccf) were detected in E. faecalis and E. casseliflavus/flavescens. Other presumed virulence genes (agg, gelE, cylM, cylA and efaA(fs)) were not detected. All isolates were resistant to rifampicin, erythromycin and ciprofloxacin, and some were also resistant to quinupristin/dalfopristin, tetracycline, levofloxacin, gentamicin and streptomycin. Vancomycin resistance was not detected. Tyrosine decarboxylation was detected in all E. faecium isolates. Given the high resistance of enterococci to environmental conditions, and their implication in opportunistic infections, the incidence of potential virulent enterococci in foods (especially those of a higher risk-like home-made foods) should be carefully studied.

  9. Antibiotic resistant enterococci and staphylococci isolated from flies collected near confined poultry feeding operations.

    PubMed

    Graham, Jay P; Price, Lance B; Evans, Sean L; Graczyk, Thaddeus K; Silbergeld, Ellen K

    2009-04-01

    Use of antibiotics as feed additives in poultry production has been linked to the presence of antibiotic resistant bacteria in farm workers, consumer poultry products and the environs of confined poultry operations. There are concerns that these resistant bacteria may be transferred to communities near these operations; however, environmental pathways of exposure are not well documented. We assessed the prevalence of antibiotic resistant enterococci and staphylococci in stored poultry litter and flies collected near broiler chicken houses. Drug resistant enterococci and staphylococci were isolated from flies caught near confined poultry feeding operations in the summer of 2006. Susceptibility testing was conducted on isolates using antibiotics selected on the basis of their importance to human medicine and use in poultry production. Resistant isolates were then screened for genetic determinants of antibiotic resistance. A total of 142 enterococcal isolates and 144 staphylococcal isolates from both fly and poultry litter samples were identified. Resistance genes erm(B), erm(A), msr(C), msr(A/B) and mobile genetic elements associated with the conjugative transposon Tn916, were found in isolates recovered from both poultry litter and flies. Erm(B) was the most common resistance gene in enterococci, while erm(A) was the most common in staphylococci. We report that flies collected near broiler poultry operations may be involved in the spread of drug resistant bacteria from these operations and may increase the potential for human exposure to drug resistant bacteria.

  10. Multiple-drug resistant enterococci: the nature of the problem and an agenda for the future.

    PubMed Central

    Huycke, M. M.; Sahm, D. F.; Gilmore, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Enterococci, leading causes of nosocomial bacteremia, surgical wound infection, and urinary tract infection, are becoming resistant to many and sometimes all standard therapies. New rapid surveillance methods are highlighting the importance of examining enterococcal isolates at the species level. Most enterococcal infections are caused by Enterococcus faecalis, which are more likely to express traits related to overt virulence but--for the moment--also more likely to retain sensitivity to at least one effective antibiotic. The remaining infections are mostly caused by E. faecium, a species virtually devoid of known overt pathogenic traits but more likely to be resistant to even antibiotics of last resort. Effective control of multiple-drug resistant enterococci will require 1) better understanding of the interaction between enterococci, the hospital environment, and humans, 2) prudent antibiotic use, 3) better contact isolation in hospitals and other patient care environments, and 4) improved surveillance. Equally important is renewed vigor in the search for additional drugs, accompanied by the evolution of new therapeutic paradigms less vulnerable to the cycle of drug introduction and drug resistance. PMID:9621194

  11. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci: why are they here, and where do they come from?

    PubMed

    Bonten, M J; Willems, R; Weinstein, R A

    2001-12-01

    Vancomcyin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have emerged as nosocomial pathogens in the past 10 years, causing epidemiological controversy. In the USA, colonisation with VRE is endemic in many hospitals and increasingly causes infection, but colonisation is absent in healthy people. In Europe, outbreaks still happen sporadically, usually with few serious infections, but colonisation seems to be endemic in healthy people and farm animals. Vancomycin use has been much higher in the USA, where emergence of ampicillin-resistant enterococci preceded emergence of VRE, making them very susceptible to the selective effects of antibiotics. In Europe, avoparcin, a vancomycin-like glycopeptide, has been widely used in the agricultural industry, explaining the community reservoir in European animals. Avoparcin has not been used in the USA, which is consistent with the absence of colonisation in healthy people. From the European animal reservoir, VRE and resistance genes have spread to healthy human beings and hospitalised patients. However, certain genogroups of enterococci in both continents seem to be more capable of causing hospital outbreaks, perhaps because of the presence of a specific virulence factor, the variant esp gene. By contrast with the evidence of a direct link between European animal and human reservoirs, the origin of American resistance genes remains to be established. Considering the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and resistance genes, the emergence of VRE has emphasised the non-existence of boundaries between hospitals, between people and animals, between countries, and probably between continents.

  12. Detection and enumeration of fecal indicator organisms in frozen sea foods. II. Enterococci.

    PubMed

    RAJ, H; WIEBE, W J; LISTON, J

    1961-07-01

    Consistently high recoveries of enterococci as compared to the low numbers of coliforms obtained from the same samples of frozen sea foods are indirect evidence that enterococci are better indicators of contamination in such foods. The use of azide dextrose broth, modified by the incorporation of bromthymol blue, and of ethyl violet azide broth as presumptive and confirmation tests, respectively, were found to be highly specific for the detection and enumeration of enterococci in these samples. Tetrazolium agar medium, when used as a third step after the confirmation test, provides a reliable differentiation of Streplococcus faecalis types from other group D streptococci. A simple procedure is described for further identification of S. faecalis varieties and other enterococcal species. Incidence of biotypes within certain species is noted and relationships of these subgroups to the organisms described by other workers is discussed. The striking resistance of all group D streptococci to dihydrostreptomycin and polymyxin B seems to offer promise for evolving a new selective medium for these organisms.

  13. Comparison of agar-based media for primary isolation of glycopeptide-resistant enterococci.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, P. R.; Brown, D. F. J.; Wilcox, M. H.; Collyns, T. A.; Walpole, E.; Dillon, J.; Smith, R.; Gopal Rao, G.; Oppenheim, B. A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare four vancomycin-containing agar media for the isolation of glycopeptide-resistant enterococci (GRE) from clinical fecal specimens: kanamycin---aesculin---azide (KAA) agar; bile---aesculin---polymixin (BAP) agar; aztreonam---amphotericin blood (CBAA) agar; and neomycin blood (CBN) agar. METHODS: Fecal specimens from 125 patients were inoculated onto each medium. Media were examined for enterococci after incubation for up to 48 h. Enterococci were identified to species level, and glycopeptide phenotypes were determined by measuring minimum inhibitory concentrations of vancomycin and teicoplanin. RESULTS: GRE were isolated from 44/125 samples. Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolates, expressing glycopeptide resistance of the VanA or VanB phenotypes, were recovered from 27/33 (82%) specimens on BAP medium, 26/33 (79%) on KAA medium, and 21/33 (64%) on CBN and CBAA media. Enterococcus gallinarum and Enterococcus casseliflavus isolates expressing low-level glycopeptide resistance (VanC phenotype) were recovered from 14/15 (93%) specimens on CBAA medium, 7/15 (47%) on KAA and CBN media, and 6/15 (40%) on BAP medium. CONCLUSIONS: The media tested in this study, with the exception of CBN medium, detected at least 75% of patients colonized by GRE. Further development of BAP, CBAA and KAA media is warranted to improve growth and selectivity.

  14. Vancomycin-variable enterococci can give rise to constitutive resistance during antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Thaker, Maulik N; Kalan, Lindsay; Waglechner, Nicholas; Eshaghi, Alireza; Patel, Samir N; Poutanen, Susan; Willey, Barbara; Coburn, Bryan; McGeer, Allison; Low, Donald E; Wright, Gerard D

    2015-03-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are notorious clinical pathogens restricting the use of glycopeptide antibiotics in the clinic setting. Routine surveillance to detect VRE isolated from patients relies on PCR bioassays and chromogenic agar-based test methods. In recent years, we and others have reported the emergence of enterococcal strains harboring a "silent" copy of vancomycin resistance genes that confer a vancomycin-susceptible phenotype (vancomycin-susceptible enterococci [VSE]) and thus escape detection using drug sensitivity screening tests. Alarmingly, these strains are able to convert to a resistance phenotype (VSE→VRE) during antibiotic treatment, severely compromising the success of therapy. Such strains have been termed vancomycin-variable enterococci (VVE). We have investigated the molecular mechanisms leading to the restoration of resistance in VVE isolates through the whole-genome sequencing of resistant isolates, measurement of resistance gene expression, and quantification of the accumulation of drug-resistant peptidoglycan precursors. The results demonstrate that VVE strains can revert to a VRE phenotype through the constitutive expression of the vancomycin resistance cassette. This is accomplished through a variety of changes in the DNA region upstream of the resistance genes that includes both a deletion of a likely transcription inhibitory secondary structure and the introduction of a new unregulated promoter. The VSE→VRE transition of VVE can occur in patients during the course of antibiotic therapy, resulting in treatment failure. These VVE strains therefore pose a new challenge to the current regimen of diagnostic tests used for VRE detection in the clinic setting.

  15. Antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes in Escherichia coli and enterococci from red foxes (Vulpes vulpes).

    PubMed

    Radhouani, Hajer; Igrejas, Gilberto; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Pacheco, Rui; Monteiro, Ricardo; Sargo, Roberto; Brito, Francisco; Torres, Carmen; Poeta, Patrícia

    2013-10-01

    The aims of the study were to analyse the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance and the mechanisms implicated, as well as the virulence factors, in faecal Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. from red foxes. From 52 faecal samples, 22 E. coli (42.3%) and 50 enterococci (96.2%) isolates were recovered (one/sample). A high percentage of E. coli isolates exhibited resistance to streptomycin, tetracycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or ampicillin (54-27%), and they harboured the aadA, tet(A) and/or tet(B), sul1 and blaTEM resistance genes, respectively. The E. coli isolates were ascribed to the 4 major phylogroups, D (41% of isolates), A (31.8%), B1 (18.2%) and B2 (9.1%), and carried the fimA (63.3%) or aer (13.6%) virulence genes. Among enterococcal isolates, Enterococcus faecium was the most prevalent species (50%). A high percentage of enterococcal isolates showed tetracycline resistance (88%) harbouring different combinations of tet(M) and tet(L) genes. The erm(B) or the aph(3')-IIIa gene were identified in most of our erythromycin- or kanamycin-resistant enterococci, respectively. This report suggests the role of red foxes from rural areas in the cycle of transmission and spread of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli and enterococci into the environment, representing a reservoir of these antimicrobial-resistant microorganisms.

  16. Removal kinetic of Escherichia coli and enterococci in a laboratory pilot scale wastewater maturation pond.

    PubMed

    Ouali, A; Jupsin, H; Ghrabi, A; Vasel, J L

    2014-01-01

    During the last 15 years several authors studied the disinfection in waste stabilisation pond (WSP) and several empirical models were developed. There are huge differences between the models describing this process and there is really a need to improve the design of ponds for better disinfection. This paper addresses the Escherichia coli and enterococci disinfection in a laboratory pilot scale maturation pond (1.5 l) with light intensity (0, 12 and 25 W/m(2)) under controlled pH, temperature and dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions. The aim of this study is to improve modelling for a better design of disinfection in maturation ponds (MP) and to identify the key parameters influencing the process. It was found that kinetic coefficients K values for E. coli and enterococci are closely dependent on physicochemical parameters. K values increase with increasing pH, I, T and DO. E. coli disinfection depends closely on the pH and the DO and increases strongly when the pH is above 8.5. The enterococci disinfection depends essentially on DO. Two equations are suggested to calculate the kinetic coefficient K related to the environmental average state variables.

  17. PFGE analysis of enterococci isolates from recreational and drinking water in Greece.

    PubMed

    Grammenou, Panagiota; Spiliopoulou, Iris; Sazakli, Eleni; Papapetropoulou, Maria

    2006-06-01

    Biotyping and DNA fingerprinting by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were applied to a collection of enterococci recovered from recreational and drinking water, in order to identify possible genetic relationships. Clinical strains of hospital origin were compared to the environmental isolates. A total of 104 enterococci were isolated from 128 recreational water (94 marine and 34 river water) and 470 drinking water supplies (440 municipal and 30 natural spring water samples). Sixty-two isolates were characterised as Enterococcus faecium recovered from all sources, 32 E. faecalis (from all sources), 4 E. durans (from marine, river and municipal water), 4 E. gallinarum (from marine water) and 2 E. avium (from marine and municipal water). Biotypes, determined with API20Strep, among E. faecium were correlated with certain environmental sources, while antibiotypes, determined with Etest, did not reveal any relationship to the sample origin. Even though genetic diversity was observed among the studied strains, common clonal types were also identified in different sources, suggesting a possible common origin of the enterococci. Cluster analysis revealed a genetic relationship between certain environmental E. faecium and clinical strains.

  18. Decarboxylation activity of enterococci isolated from rabbit meat and staphylococci isolated from trout intestines.

    PubMed

    Pleva, Pavel; Buňková, Leona; Lauková, Andrea; Lorencová, Eva; Kubáň, Vlastimil; Buňka, František

    2012-10-12

    The aim of the study was to explore production of seven biogenic amines (phenylethylamine, histamine, cadaverine, tyramine, putrescine, spermine and/or spermidine) by selected staphylococci and enterococci. Thirty three enterococcal strains isolated from rabbit meat (Oryctolagus cuniculus f. domesticus) and 21 staphylococcal strains isolated from intestinal content of trout (Salmo trutta morpha fario) were tested. Production of biogenic amines was evaluated after cultivation of the tested microorganisms in the de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe Broth (enterococci) or in the Brain Heart Infusion Broth (staphylococci). Both the above cultivation media were enriched with selected amino acids (histidine, tyrosine, arginine, ornithine and lysine; 2g/L each) serving as precursors of biogenic amines. After cultivation, levels of the monitored biogenic amines in broths were analysed by a high performance liquid chromatography equipped with a UV/VIS DAD detector. Among 21 staphylococci, 18 strains produced tyramine or cadaverine, 13 strains formed putrescine or phenylethylamine and only one strain generated histamine. Two staphylococcal strains produced cadaverine levels above 1000 mg/L. Among 33 enterococcal strains, 27 formed cadaverine, 18 strains produced tyramine, 10 strains generated phenylethylamine, and 2 strains gave putrescine. Most of the tyramine producing enterococci generated more than 1000 mg/L of this biogenic amine. Production of spermine or spermidine by the studied strains was not proved.

  19. Reference commercial high-level waste glass and canister definition.

    SciTech Connect

    Slate, S.C.; Ross, W.A.; Partain, W.L.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents technical data and performance characteristics of a high-level waste glass and canister intended for use in the design of a complete waste encapsulation package suitable for disposal in a geologic repository. The borosilicate glass contained in the stainless steel canister represents the probable type of high-level waste product that will be produced in a commercial nuclear-fuel reprocessing plant. Development history is summarized for high-level liquid waste compositions, waste glass composition and characteristics, and canister design. The decay histories of the fission products and actinides (plus daughters) calculated by the ORIGEN-II code are presented.

  20. Reference commercial high-level waste glass and canister definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slate, S. C.; Ross, W. A.; Partain, W. L.

    1981-09-01

    Technical data and performance characteristics of a high level waste glass and canister intended for use in the design of a complete waste encapsulation package suitable for disposal in a geologic repository are presented. The borosilicate glass contained in the stainless steel canister represents the probable type of high level waste product that is produced in a commercial nuclear-fuel reprocessing plant. Development history is summarized for high level liquid waste compositions, waste glass composition and characteristics, and canister design. The decay histories of the fission products and actinides (plus daughters) calculated by the ORIGEN-II code are presented.

  1. A risk modelling approach for setting microbiological limits using enterococci as indicator for growth potential of Salmonella in pork.

    PubMed

    Bollerslev, Anne Mette; Nauta, Maarten; Hansen, Tina Beck; Aabo, Søren

    2017-01-02

    Microbiological limits are widely used in food processing as an aid to reduce the exposure to hazardous microorganisms for the consumers. However, in pork, the prevalence and concentrations of Salmonella are generally low and microbiological limits are not considered an efficient tool to support hygiene interventions. The objective of the present study was to develop an approach which could make it possible to define potential risk-based microbiological limits for an indicator, enterococci, in order to evaluate the risk from potential growth of Salmonella. A positive correlation between the concentration of enterococci and the prevalence and concentration of Salmonella was shown for 6640 pork samples taken at Danish cutting plants and retail butchers. The samples were collected in five different studies in 2001, 2002, 2010, 2011 and 2013. The observations that both Salmonella and enterococci are carried in the intestinal tract, contaminate pork by the same mechanisms and share similar growth characteristics (lag phase and maximum specific growth rate) at temperatures around 5-10°C, suggest a potential of enterococci to be used as an indicator of potential growth of Salmonella in pork. Elevated temperatures during processing will lead to growth of both enterococci and, if present, also Salmonella. By combining the correlation between enterococci and Salmonella with risk modelling, it is possible to predict the risk of salmonellosis based on the level of enterococci. The risk model used for this purpose includes the dose-response relationship for Salmonella and a reduction factor to account for preparation of the fresh pork. By use of the risk model, it was estimated that the majority of salmonellosis cases, caused by the consumption of pork in Denmark, is caused by the small fraction of pork products that has enterococci concentrations above 5logCFU/g. This illustrates that our approach can be used to evaluate the potential effect of different microbiological

  2. Holism and High Level Wellness in the Treatment of Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartha, Robert; Davis, Tom

    1982-01-01

    Discusses how a holistic and wellness philosophy is a viable alternative in the treatment of alcoholism. Describes five major dimensions of high-level wellness: nutritional awareness, physical fitness, stress management, environmental sensitivity, and self-responsibility. (RC)

  3. Neptunium estimation in dissolver and high-level-waste solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, P.N.; Prabhu, D.R.; Kanekar, A.S.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2008-07-01

    This papers deals with the optimization of the experimental conditions for the estimation of {sup 237}Np in spent-fuel dissolver/high-level waste solutions using thenoyltrifluoroacetone as the extractant. (authors)

  4. High-Level Waste System Process Interface Description

    SciTech Connect

    d'Entremont, P.D.

    1999-01-14

    The High-Level Waste System is a set of six different processes interconnected by pipelines. These processes function as one large treatment plant that receives, stores, and treats high-level wastes from various generators at SRS and converts them into forms suitable for final disposal. The three major forms are borosilicate glass, which will be eventually disposed of in a Federal Repository, Saltstone to be buried on site, and treated water effluent that is released to the environment.

  5. Comparative Study of Bacteremias Caused by Enterococcus spp. with and without High-Level Resistance to Gentamicin

    PubMed Central

    Caballero-Granado, Francisco Javier; Cisneros, J. M.; Luque, R.; Torres-Tortosa, M.; Gamboa, F.; Díez, F.; Villanueva, J. L.; Pérez-Cano, R.; Pasquau, J.; Merino, D.; Menchero, A.; Mora, D.; López-Ruz, M. A.; Vergara, A.; Infecciosas, for the Grupo Andaluz Para El Estudio De Las Enfermedades

    1998-01-01

    A prospective, multicenter study was carried out over a period of 10 months. All patients with clinically significant bacteremia caused by Enterococcus spp. were included. The epidemiological, microbiological, clinical, and prognostic features and the relationship of these features to the presence of high-level resistance to gentamicin (HLRG) were studied. Ninety-three patients with enterococcal bacteremia were included, and 31 of these cases were caused by HLRG (33%). The multivariate analysis selected chronic renal failure, intensive care unit stay, previous use of antimicrobial agents, and Enterococcus faecalis species as the independent risk factors that influenced the development of HLRG. The strains with HLRG showed lower levels of susceptibility to penicillin and ciprofloxacin. Clinical features (except for chronic renal failure) were similar in both groups of patients. HLRG did not influence the prognosis for patients with enterococcal bacteremia in terms of either the crude mortality rate (29% for patients with bacteremia caused by enterococci with HLRG and 28% for patients not infected with strains with HLRG) or the hospital stay after the acquisition of enterococcal bacteremia. Hemodynamic compromise, inappropriate antimicrobial therapy, and mechanical ventilation were revealed in the multivariate analysis to be the independent risk factors for mortality. Prolonged hospitalization was associated with the nosocomial acquisition of bacteremia and polymicrobial infections. PMID:9466769

  6. Effect of in-feed administration and withdrawal of tylosin phosphate on antibiotic resistance in enterococci isolated from feedlot steers

    PubMed Central

    Beukers, Alicia G.; Zaheer, Rahat; Cook, Shaun R.; Stanford, Kim; Chaves, Alexandre V.; Ward, Michael P.; McAllister, Tim A.

    2015-01-01

    Tylosin phosphate is a macrolide commonly administered to cattle in North America for the control of liver abscesses. This study investigated the effect of in-feed administration of tylosin phosphate to cattle at subtherapeutic levels and its subsequent withdrawal on macrolide resistance using enterococci as an indicator bacterium. Fecal samples were collected from steers that received no antibiotics and steers administered tylosin phosphate (11 ppm) in-feed for 197 days and withdrawn 28 days before slaughter. Enterococcus species isolated from fecal samples were identified through sequencing the groES-EL intergenic spacer region and subject to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, identification of resistance determinants and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiling. Tylosin increased (P < 0.05) the proportion of eryR and tylR enterococci within the population. Just prior to its removal, the proportion of eryR and tylR resistant enterococci began decreasing and continued to decrease after tylosin was withdrawn from the diet until there was no difference (P > 0.05) between treatments on d 225. This suggests that antibiotic withdrawal prior to slaughter contributes to a reduction in the proportion of macrolide resistant enterococci entering the food chain. Among the 504 enterococci isolates characterized, Enterococcus hirae was found to predominate (n = 431), followed by Enterococcus villorum (n = 32), Enterococcus faecium (n = 21), Enterococcus durans (n = 7), Enterococcus casseliflavus (n = 4), Enterococcus mundtii (n = 4), Enterococcus gallinarum (n = 3), Enterococcus faecalis (n = 1), and Enterococcus thailandicus (n = 1). The diversity of enterococci was greater in steers at arrival than at exit from the feedlot. Erythromycin resistant isolates harbored the erm(B) and/or msrC gene. Similar PFGE profiles of eryR E. hirae pre- and post-antibiotic treatment suggest that increased abundance of eryR enterococci after administration of tylosin phosphate reflects

  7. Effect of in-feed administration and withdrawal of tylosin phosphate on antibiotic resistance in enterococci isolated from feedlot steers.

    PubMed

    Beukers, Alicia G; Zaheer, Rahat; Cook, Shaun R; Stanford, Kim; Chaves, Alexandre V; Ward, Michael P; McAllister, Tim A

    2015-01-01

    Tylosin phosphate is a macrolide commonly administered to cattle in North America for the control of liver abscesses. This study investigated the effect of in-feed administration of tylosin phosphate to cattle at subtherapeutic levels and its subsequent withdrawal on macrolide resistance using enterococci as an indicator bacterium. Fecal samples were collected from steers that received no antibiotics and steers administered tylosin phosphate (11 ppm) in-feed for 197 days and withdrawn 28 days before slaughter. Enterococcus species isolated from fecal samples were identified through sequencing the groES-EL intergenic spacer region and subject to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, identification of resistance determinants and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiling. Tylosin increased (P < 0.05) the proportion of ery(R) and tyl(R) enterococci within the population. Just prior to its removal, the proportion of ery(R) and tyl(R) resistant enterococci began decreasing and continued to decrease after tylosin was withdrawn from the diet until there was no difference (P > 0.05) between treatments on d 225. This suggests that antibiotic withdrawal prior to slaughter contributes to a reduction in the proportion of macrolide resistant enterococci entering the food chain. Among the 504 enterococci isolates characterized, Enterococcus hirae was found to predominate (n = 431), followed by Enterococcus villorum (n = 32), Enterococcus faecium (n = 21), Enterococcus durans (n = 7), Enterococcus casseliflavus (n = 4), Enterococcus mundtii (n = 4), Enterococcus gallinarum (n = 3), Enterococcus faecalis (n = 1), and Enterococcus thailandicus (n = 1). The diversity of enterococci was greater in steers at arrival than at exit from the feedlot. Erythromycin resistant isolates harbored the erm(B) and/or msrC gene. Similar PFGE profiles of ery(R) E. hirae pre- and post-antibiotic treatment suggest that increased abundance of ery(R) enterococci after administration of tylosin phosphate

  8. Antibiotic-Resistant Enterococci and Fecal Indicators in Surface Water and Groundwater Impacted by a Concentrated Swine Feeding Operation

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Amy R.; Curriero, Frank C.; Gibson, Kristen E.; Schwab, Kellogg J.

    2007-01-01

    Background The nontherapeutic use of antibiotics in swine feed can select for antibiotic resistance in swine enteric bacteria. Leaking swine waste storage pits and the land-application of swine manure can result in the dispersion of resistant bacteria to water sources. However, there are few data comparing levels of resistant bacteria in swine manure–impacted water sources versus unaffected sources. Objectives The goal of this study was to analyze surface water and groundwater situated up and down gradient from a swine facility for antibiotic-resistant enterococci and other fecal indicators. Methods Surface water and groundwater samples (n = 28) were collected up and down gradient from a swine facility from 2002 to 2004. Fecal indicators were isolated by membrane filtration, and enterococci (n = 200) were tested for susceptibility to erythromycin, tetracycline, clindamycin, virginiamycin, and vancomycin. Results Median concentrations of enterococci, fecal coliforms, and Escherichia coli were 4- to 33-fold higher in down-gradient versus up-gradient surface water and groundwater. We observed higher minimal inhibitory concentrations for four antibiotics in enterococci isolated from down-gradient versus up-gradient surface water and groundwater. Elevated percentages of erythromycin- (p = 0.02) and tetracycline-resistant (p = 0.06) enterococci were detected in down-gradient surface waters, and higher percentages of tetracycline- (p = 0.07) and clindamycin-resistant (p < 0.001) enterococci were detected in down-gradient groundwater. Conclusions We detected elevated levels of fecal indicators and antibiotic-resistant enterococci in water sources situated down gradient from a swine facility compared with up-gradient sources. These findings provide additional evidence that water contaminated with swine manure could contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance. PMID:17637920

  9. Near Absence of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci but High Carriage Rates of Quinolone-Resistant Ampicillin-Resistant Enterococci among Hospitalized Patients and Nonhospitalized Individuals in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Torell, Erik; Cars, Otto; Olsson-Liljequist, Barbro; Hoffman, Britt-Marie; Lindbäck, Johan; Burman, Lars G.

    1999-01-01

    Rates of colonization with enterococci with acquired resistance to vancomycin (vancomycin-resistant enterococci [VRE]) and ampicillin (ampicillin-resistant enterococci [ARE]) were determined by using fecal samples from 670 nonhospitalized individuals and 841 patients in 27 major hospitals. Of the hospitalized patients, 181 (21.5%) were carriers of ARE and 9 (1.1%) were carriers of VRE. In univariate analyses, length of hospital stay (odds ratio [OR], 4.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.5 to 8.9) and antimicrobial therapy (OR, 4.7; 95% CI, 3.3 to 6.7) were associated with ARE colonization, as were prior treatment with penicillins (OR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.8 to 5.5), cephalosporins (OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.7 to 5.0), or quinolones (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.5 to 4.7). In logistic regression analysis, antimicrobial therapy for at least 5 days was independently associated with ARE carriage (adjusted OR, 3.8; 95% CI, 2.6 to 5.4). Over 90% of the ARE isolates were fluoroquinolone resistant, whereas 14% of the ampicillin-susceptible Enterococcus faecium isolates were fluoroquinolone resistant. ARE carriage rates correlated with the use of fluoroquinolones (P = 0.04) but not with the use of ampicillin (P = 0.68) or cephalosporins (P = 0.40). All nine VRE isolates were E. faecium vanB and were found in one hospital. Seven of these isolates were related according to their types as determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Among the nonhospitalized individuals, the ARE carriage rate was lower (6%; P < 0.05), and only one person, who had recently returned from Africa, harbored VRE (E. faecium vanA). The absence of VRE colonization in nonhospitalized individuals reflects an epidemiological situation in Sweden radically different from that in countries in continental Europe where glycopeptides have been widely used for nonmedical purposes. PMID:10523543

  10. Antibiotics and heavy metals resistance and other biological characters in enterococci isolated from surface water of Monte Cotugno Lake (Italy).

    PubMed

    De Niederhäusern, Simona; Bondi, Moreno; Anacarso, Immacolata; Iseppi, Ramona; Sabia, Carla; Bitonte, Fabiano; Messi, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    Considering the limited knowledge about the biological characters in enterococci isolated from surface waters, we investigated antibiotic and heavy-metal resistance, bacteriocin production, and some important virulence traits of 165 enterococci collected in water samples from Monte Cotugno Lake, the largest artificial basin built with earth in Europe. The species distribution of isolates was as follows: Enterococcus faecium (80%), Enterococcus faecalis (12.7%), Enterococcus casseliflavus (3%), Enterococcus mundtii (1.8%), Enterococcus hirae (1.8%), Enterococcus durans (0.6%). All enterococci showed heavy metal resistance toward Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn, were susceptible to Ag and Hg, and at the same time exhibited in large percentage (83.7%) resistance to one or more of the antibiotics tested. Relatively to virulence factor genes, 50.9% enterococci were positive for gelatinase (gelE), 10.9% for aggregation substance (agg), 12.7% and 66.6% for the cell wall adhesins (efaAfs and efaAfm), respectively. No amplicons were detected after PCR for cytolysin production (cylA, cylB and cylM) and enterococcal surface protein (esp) genes. Bacteriocin production was found in most of the isolates. Given that the waters of the Monte Cotugno Lake are used for different purposes, among which farming and recreational activities, they can contribute to spread enterococci endowed with virulence factors, and antibiotics and heavy metals resistance to humans.

  11. An overview of very high level software design methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asdjodi, Maryam; Hooper, James W.

    1988-01-01

    Very High Level design methods emphasize automatic transfer of requirements to formal design specifications, and/or may concentrate on automatic transformation of formal design specifications that include some semantic information of the system into machine executable form. Very high level design methods range from general domain independent methods to approaches implementable for specific applications or domains. Applying AI techniques, abstract programming methods, domain heuristics, software engineering tools, library-based programming and other methods different approaches for higher level software design are being developed. Though one finds that a given approach does not always fall exactly in any specific class, this paper provides a classification for very high level design methods including examples for each class. These methods are analyzed and compared based on their basic approaches, strengths and feasibility for future expansion toward automatic development of software systems.

  12. High-level trigger system for the LHC ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramm, R.; Helstrup, H.; Lien, J.; Lindenstruth, V.; Loizides, C.; Röhrich, D.; Skaali, B.; Steinbeck, T.; Stock, R.; Ullaland, K.; Vestbø, A.; Wiebalck, A.; ALICE Colloboration

    2003-04-01

    The central detectors of the ALICE experiment at LHC will produce a data size of up to 75 MB/ event at an event rate ⩽200 Hz resulting in a data rate of ˜15 GB/ s. Online processing of the data is necessary in order to select interesting (sub)events ("High Level Trigger"), or to compress data efficiently by modeling techniques. Processing this data requires a massive parallel computing system (High Level Trigger System). The system will consist of a farm of clustered SMP-nodes based on off-the-shelf PCs connected with a high bandwidth low latency network.

  13. High level radioactive waste management facility design criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sheikh, N.A.; Salaymeh, S.R.

    1993-10-01

    This paper discusses the engineering systems for the structural design of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). At the DWPF, high level radioactive liquids will be mixed with glass particles and heated in a melter. This molten glass will then be poured into stainless steel canisters where it will harden. This process will transform the high level waste into a more stable, manageable substance. This paper discuss the structural design requirements for this unique one of a kind facility. A special emphasis will be concentrated on the design criteria pertaining to earthquake, wind and tornado, and flooding.

  14. Final report on cermet high-level waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Kobisk, E.H.; Quinby, T.C.; Aaron, W.S.

    1981-08-01

    Cermets are being developed as an alternate method for the fixation of defense and commercial high level radioactive waste in a terminal disposal form. Following initial feasibility assessments of this waste form, consisting of ceramic particles dispersed in an iron-nickel base alloy, significantly improved processing methods were developed. The characterization of cermets has continued through property determinations on samples prepared by various methods from a variety of simulated and actual high-level wastes. This report describes the status of development of the cermet waste form as it has evolved since 1977. 6 tables, 18 figures.

  15. High Level Waste (HLW) Feed Process Control Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    STAEHR, T.W.

    2000-06-14

    The primary purpose of this document is to describe the overall process control strategy for monitoring and controlling the functions associated with the Phase 1B high-level waste feed delivery. This document provides the basis for process monitoring and control functions and requirements needed throughput the double-shell tank system during Phase 1 high-level waste feed delivery. This document is intended to be used by (1) the developers of the future Process Control Plan and (2) the developers of the monitoring and control system.

  16. Identification and prevalence of tetracycline resistance in enterococci isolated from poultry in Ilishan, Ogun State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ayeni, Funmilola A.; Odumosu, Bamidele Tolulope; Oluseyi, Adekola E.; Ruppitsch, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tetracycline is one of the most frequently used antibiotics in Nigeria both for human and animal infections because of its cheapness and ready availability. The use of tetracycline in animal husbandry could lead to horizontal transfer of tet genes from poultry to human through the gut microbiota, especially enterococci. Therefore, this study is designed to identify different enterococcal species from poultry feces in selected farms in Ilishan, Ogun State, Nigeria, determine the prevalence of tetracycline resistance/genes and presence of IS256 in enterococcal strains. Materials and Methods: Enterococci strains were isolated from 100 fresh chicken fecal samples collected from seven local poultry farms in Ilishan, Ogun State, Nigeria. The strains were identified by partial sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Antibiotic susceptibility of the isolates to vancomycin, erythromycin, tetracycline, gentamicin, amoxycillin/claulanate, and of loxacin were performed by disc diffusion method. Detection of tet, erm, and van genes and IS256 insertion element were done by polymerase chain reaction amplification. Results: Sixty enterococci spp. were identified comprising of Enterococcus faecalis 33 (55%), Enterococcus casseliflavus 21 (35%), and Enterococcus gallinarium 6 (10%). All the isolates were resistant to erythromycin (100%), followed by tetracycline (81.67%), amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (73.33%), ofloxacin (68.33%), vancomycin (65%), and gentamicin (20%). None of the enterococcal spp. harbored the van and erm genes while tet(M) was detected among 23% isolates and is distributed mostly among E. casseliflavus. IS256 elements were detected only in 33% of E. casseliflavus that were also positive for tet(M) gene. Conclusion: This study provides evidence that tetracycline resistance gene is present in the studied poultry farms in Ilishan, Ogun State, Nigeria and underscores the need for strict regulation on tetracycline usage in poultry farming in the studied location and

  17. Clinical epidemiology in Italian Registry of Infective Endocarditis (RIEI): Focus on age, intravascular devices and enterococci.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, Enrico; Chirillo, Fabio; Castiglione, Anna; Faggiano, Pompilio; Cecconi, Moreno; Moreo, Antonella; Cialfi, Alessandro; Rinaldi, Mauro; Del Ponte, Stefano; Squeri, Angelo; Corcione, Silvia; Canta, Francesca; Gaddi, Oscar; Enia, Francesco; Forno, Davide; Costanzo, Piera; Zuppiroli, Alfredo; Ronzani, Giuliana; Bologna, Flavio; Patrignani, Anna; Belli, Riccardo; Ciccone, Giovannino; De Rosa, Francesco Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The epidemiology of infective endocarditis (IE) is changing due to a number of factors, including aging and health related comorbidities and medical procedures. The aim of this study is to describe the main clinical, epidemiologic and etiologic changes of IE from a large database in Italy. We prospectively collected episodes of IE in 17 Italian centers from July 2007 to December 2010. We enrolled 677 patients with definite IE, of which 24% health-care associated. Patients were male (73%) with a median age of 62 years (IQR: 49-74) and 61% had several comorbidities. One hundred and twenty-eight (19%) patients had prosthetic left side IE, 391 (58%) native left side IE, 94 (14%) device-related IE and 54 (8%) right side IE. A predisposing cardiopathy was present in 50%, while odontoiatric and non odontoiatric procedures were reported in 5% and 21% of patients respectively. Symptoms were usually atypical and precocious. The prevalent etiology was represented by Staphylococcus aureus (27%) followed by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS, 21%), Streptococcus viridans (15%) and enterococci (14%). CNS and enterococci were relatively more frequent in patients with intravascular devices and prosthesis and S. viridans in left native valve. Diagnosis was made by transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography in 62% and 94% of cases, respectively. The in-hospital mortality was 14% and 1-year mortality was 21%. The epidemiology is changing in Italy, where IE more often affects older patients with comorbidities and intravascular devices, with an acute onset and including a high frequency of enterococci. There were few preceding odontoiatric procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Emergence of Vancomycin-resistant Enterococci at a Teaching Hospital, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alotaibi, Fawzia E; Bukhari, Elham E

    2017-01-01

    Background: Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are a major and emerging hospital-acquired pathogen associated with high mortality, particularly among the critically ill and Intensive Care Units (ICUs) patients. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and demographic and clinical characteristics of VRE among patients admitted to a university hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Methods: A study was conducted during the period from September 2014 to November 2015 at King Khalid University Hospital, a tertiary care hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, including in-patients with VRE infection. Data were collected using laboratory results and the medical records of admitted patients and were analyzed using SPSS version 19.0 statistical software. Results: In a one-year period, 231 enterococci were isolated from blood, urine, exudates, sputum, stool, and body fluid. There were 191 (82.7%) vancomycin-sensitive enterococci (VSE) and 40 (17.3%) isolates were VRE. The Enterococcus species included E. faecalis 168 (72.7%), E. faecium, 53 (22.8%) E. gallinarum 5 (2.2%), and E. avium 5 (2.2%). VRE were more significant from blood specimens (P < 0.0001) while VSE were significantly more predominant from urine specimens (P < 0.0001). VRE were more commonly isolated from patients in ICUs and oncology unit (P = 0.0151 and P < 0.001, respectively) while VSE were more predominant in the medical and surgical areas (P = 0.0178 and P = 0.0178, respectively). Conclusions: This study highlights the high prevalence of VRE in the hospital and the association of enterococcal infections with high-risk areas and oncology units, which warrant more studies looking for better management of these infections. PMID:28139519

  19. Speciation and antimicrobial resistance of Enterococci isolated from recreational beaches in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Dada, Ayokunle Christopher; Ahmad, Asmat; Usup, Gires; Heng, Lee Yook

    2013-02-01

    We report the first study on the occurrence of antibiotic-resistant enterococci in coastal bathing waters in Malaysia. One hundred and sixty-five enterococci isolates recovered from two popular recreational beaches in Malaysia were speciated and screened for antibiotic resistance to a total of eight antibiotics. Prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium was highest in both beaches. E. faecalis/E. faecium ratio was 0.384:1 and 0.375:1, respectively, for isolates from Port Dickson (PD) and Bagan Lalang (BL). Analysis of Fisher's exact test showed that association of prevalence of E. faecalis and E. faecium with considered locations was not statistically significant (p < 0.05). Chi-square test revealed significant differences (χ(2) = 82.630, df = 20, p < 0.001) in the frequency of occurrence of enterococci isolates from the considered sites. Resistance was highest to nalidixic acid (94.84 %) and least for chloramphenicol (8.38 %). One-way ANOVA using Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison test showed that resistance to ampicillin was higher in PD beach isolates than BL isolates and the difference was extremely statistically significant (p < 0.0001). Frequency of occurrence of multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) isolates were higher for PD beach water (64.29 %) as compared to BL beach water (13.51 %), while MAR indices ranged between 0.198 and 0.48. The results suggest that samples from Port Dickson may contain MAR bacteria and that this could be due to high-risk faecal contamination from sewage discharge pipes that drain into the sea water.

  20. Ecology of Antibiotic Resistance Genes: Characterization of Enterococci from Houseflies Collected in Food Settings†

    PubMed Central

    Macovei, Lilia; Zurek, Ludek

    2006-01-01

    In this project, enterococci from the digestive tracts of 260 houseflies (Musca domestica L.) collected from five restaurants were characterized. Houseflies frequently (97% of the flies were positive) carried enterococci (mean, 3.1 × 103 CFU/fly). Using multiplex PCR, 205 of 355 randomly selected enterococcal isolates were identified and characterized. The majority of these isolates were Enterococcus faecalis (88.2%); in addition, 6.8% were E. faecium, and 4.9% were E. casseliflavus. E. faecalis isolates were phenotypically resistant to tetracycline (66.3%), erythromycin (23.8%), streptomycin (11.6%), ciprofloxacin (9.9%), and kanamycin (8.3%). Tetracycline resistance in E. faecalis was encoded by tet(M) (65.8%), tet(O) (1.7%), and tet(W) (0.8%). The majority (78.3%) of the erythromycin-resistant E. faecalis isolates carried erm(B). The conjugative transposon Tn916 and members of the Tn916/Tn1545 family were detected in 30.2% and 34.6% of the identified isolates, respectively. E. faecalis carried virulence genes, including a gelatinase gene (gelE; 70.7%), an aggregation substance gene (asa1; 33.2%), an enterococcus surface protein gene (esp; 8.8%), and a cytolysin gene (cylA; 8.8%). Phenotypic assays showed that 91.4% of the isolates with the gelE gene were gelatinolytic and that 46.7% of the isolates with the asa1 gene aggregated. All isolates with the cylA gene were hemolytic on human blood. This study showed that houseflies in food-handling and -serving facilities carry antibiotic-resistant and potentially virulent enterococci that have the capacity for horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes to other bacteria. PMID:16751512

  1. Different Genetic Supports for the tet(S) Gene in Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Ana R.; Silveira, Eduarda; Baquero, Fernando; Peixe, Luísa; Roberts, Adam P.; Coque, Teresa M.

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of tet(S) genetic contexts of 13 enterococci from human, animal, and environmental samples from different geographical areas is reported. The tet(S) gene was linked to either CTn6000 variants of chromosomal location or composite platforms flanked by IS1216 located on plasmids (∼40 to 115 kb). The comparative analysis of all tet(S) genetic elements available in the GenBank databases suggests that CTn6000 might be the origin of a variety of tet(S)-carrying platforms that were mobilized to different plasmids. PMID:22908170

  2. Epidemiology of vancomycin-resistant enterococci with reduced susceptibility to daptomycin.

    PubMed

    Judge, Theresa; Pogue, Jason M; Marchaim, Dror; Ho, Kevin; Kamatam, Srinivasa; Parveen, Shakila; Tiwari, Namita; Nanjireddy, Priyanka; Bheemreddy, Suchitha; Biedron, Caitlin; Reddy, Sagar Mallikethi Lepakshi; Khammam, Vijaykumar; Chalana, Indu K; Tumma, Rajachendra Shekher; Collins, Vicki; Yousuf, Adnan; Lephart, Paul R; Martin, Emily T; Rybak, Michael J; Kaye, Keith S; Hayakawa, Kayoko

    2012-12-01

    A retrospective case-case control study was conducted, including 60 cases with daptomycin-nonsusceptible vancomycin-resistant enterococci (DNS-VRE) matched to cases with daptomycin-susceptible VRE and to uninfected controls (1∶1∶3 ratio). Immunosuppression, presence of comorbid conditions, and prior exposure to antimicrobials were independent predictors of DNS-VRE, although prior daptomycin exposure occurred rarely. In summary, a case-case control study identified independent risk factors for the isolation of DNS-VRE: immunosuppression, multiple comorbid conditions, and prior exposures to cephalosporines and metronidazole.

  3. Temporal Variabilities in Genetic Patterns and Antibiotic Resistance Profiles of Enterococci Isolated from Human Feces.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Masateru; Shimauchi, Hidetaka; Suzuki, Yoshihiro

    2016-06-25

    Temporal variabilities in the genetic patterns and antibiotic resistance profiles of enterococci were monitored over a 7-month period. Enterococcus faecalis isolates (103 strains) collected from feces showed only one genetic pattern and antibiotic resistance profile within 0 d and 30 d. In contrast, after 60 d and 90 d, the genetic patterns and antibiotic resistance profiles of all E. faecalis isolates (8 strains) clearly differed within 30 d. These results indicate that the genetic patterns and antibiotic resistance profiles of E. faecalis in human feces changed to completely dissimilar patterns between 1 and 2 months.

  4. Nursing care for patients infected or colonized with vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE).

    PubMed

    Szczypta, Anna; Talaga, Katarzyna; Bulanda, Małgorzata

    Advances in medicine enable many patients to regain their health. But, at the same time, they become susceptible to hospital-acquired infections. The occurrence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci is a considerable problem in the modern health system. In order to limit the risk of VRE infection, proper patient care is vital, which is focused on compliance with relevant procedures (isolation, decontamination, education). Mutual cooperation between charge nurses and the ward sister and epidemiological nurse plays a major role in nursing surveillance of patients with VRE.

  5. Comparison of Five Chromogenic Media for Recovery of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci from Fecal Samples

    PubMed Central

    Suwantarat, Nuntra; Roberts, Ava; Prestridge, Jamie; Seeley, Renee; Speser, Sharon; Harmon, Christopher; Zhang, Chi; Henciak, Susan; Stamper, Paul D.; Ross, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Five chromogenic agars, evaluated using 400 stool specimens, were found to be superior in sensitivity (range, 89.9 to 93.9%) to bile esculin azide agar with vancomycin (BEAV) agar (84.8%) for detecting vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and the results were available 24 to 48 h sooner. The time to detection, need for supplemental testing, color distinction, and breakthrough of non-VRE organisms vary among the chromogenic media tested and may factor into the decision to use a particular medium. PMID:25143571

  6. Comparison of five chromogenic media for recovery of vancomycin-resistant enterococci from fecal samples.

    PubMed

    Suwantarat, Nuntra; Roberts, Ava; Prestridge, Jamie; Seeley, Renee; Speser, Sharon; Harmon, Christopher; Zhang, Chi; Henciak, Susan; Stamper, Paul D; Ross, Tracy; Carroll, Karen C

    2014-11-01

    Five chromogenic agars, evaluated using 400 stool specimens, were found to be superior in sensitivity (range, 89.9 to 93.9%) to bile esculin azide agar with vancomycin (BEAV) agar (84.8%) for detecting vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and the results were available 24 to 48 h sooner. The time to detection, need for supplemental testing, color distinction, and breakthrough of non-VRE organisms vary among the chromogenic media tested and may factor into the decision to use a particular medium.

  7. Temporal Variabilities in Genetic Patterns and Antibiotic Resistance Profiles of Enterococci Isolated from Human Feces

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Masateru; Shimauchi, Hidetaka; Suzuki, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Temporal variabilities in the genetic patterns and antibiotic resistance profiles of enterococci were monitored over a 7-month period. Enterococcus faecalis isolates (103 strains) collected from feces showed only one genetic pattern and antibiotic resistance profile within 0 d and 30 d. In contrast, after 60 d and 90 d, the genetic patterns and antibiotic resistance profiles of all E. faecalis isolates (8 strains) clearly differed within 30 d. These results indicate that the genetic patterns and antibiotic resistance profiles of E. faecalis in human feces changed to completely dissimilar patterns between 1 and 2 months. PMID:27265342

  8. Frequency of antiseptic resistance genes in clinical staphycocci and enterococci isolates in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ignak, Seyda; Nakipoglu, Yasar; Gurler, Bulent

    2017-01-01

    Disinfectants and antiseptics are biocides widely used in hospitals to prevent spread of pathogens. It has been reported that antiseptic resistance genes, qac's, caused tolerance to a variety of biocidal agents, such as benzalkonium chloride (BAC) and chlorhexidine digluconate (CHDG) in Staphylococcus spp. isolates. We aimed to search the frequency of antiseptic resistance genes in clinical Staphylococcus spp. and Enterococcus spp. isolates to investigate the possible association with antiseptic tolerance and antibiotic resistance. Antiseptic resistance genes (qacA/B, smr, qacG, qacH, and qacJ) isolated from Gram-positive cocci (69 Staphylococcus spp. and 69 Enterococcus spp.) were analyzed by PCR method. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of BAC and CHDG were determined by agar dilution method, whereas antibiotic susceptibility was analyzed by disk diffusion method according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) criteria. The frequency of antiseptic resistance genes was found to be high (49/69; 71.0%) in our clinical staphylococci isolates but absent (0/69; 0%) in enterococci isolates. The frequency of qacA/B and smr genes was higher (25/40; 62.5% and 7/40; 17.5%, respectively) in coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS) when compared to Staphylococcus aureus strains (3/29; 10.3%, and 4/29; 13.8%, respectively). In contrast, the frequency of qacG and qacJ genes was higher (11/29; 37.9% and 8/29; 27.5%, respectively) in S. aureus than those of CNS (5/40; 12.5%, 10/40; 25.0%) strains. qacH was not identified in none of the strains. We found an association between presence of antiseptic resistance genes and increased MIC values of BAC (>4 μg/mL) in staphylococci and it was found to be statistically statistically significant (p < 0.01). We also showed that MICs of BAC and CHDG of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) isolates were significantly higher than those of vancomycin-susceptible enterococci (VSE) isolates (p < 0.01). For our

  9. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci. The 'superbug' scourge that's coming your way.

    PubMed

    Hagman, H M; Strausbaugh, L J

    1996-05-01

    Strains of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have emerged and spread widely throughout the United States during the last few years. Multiply-resistant strains of Enterococcus faecium are especially troublesome because they are often resistant to all commercially available antimicrobial agents. At present, VRE infections occur most often in hospitalized patients with severe underlying disease who have undergone invasive procedures and received prolonged courses of broad-spectrum antimicrobial therapy. Because therapeutic options are limited, prevention of spread from patients with known cases to other vulnerable patients is essential.

  10. High-Level Overview of Data Needs for RE Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Anthony

    2016-12-22

    This presentation provides a high level overview of analysis topics and associated data needs. Types of renewable energy analysis are grouped into two buckets: First, analysis for renewable energy potential, and second, analysis for other goals. Data requirements are similar but and they build upon one another.

  11. High-level manpower movement and Japan's foreign aid.

    PubMed

    Furuya, K

    1992-01-01

    "Japan's technical assistance programs to Asian countries are summarized. Movements of high-level manpower accompanying direct foreign investments by private enterprise are also reviewed. Proposals for increased human resources development include education and training of foreigners in Japan as well as the training of Japanese aid experts and the development of networks for information exchange."

  12. Typewriter Modifications for Persons Who Are High-Level Quadriplegics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reagan, James R.; And Others

    Standard, common electric typewriters are not completely suited to the needs of a high-level quadriplegic typing with a mouthstick. Experiences show that for complete control of a typewriter a mouthstick user needs the combined features of one-button correction, electric forward and reverse indexing, and easy character viewing. To modify a…

  13. Structuring Peer Interaction To Promote High-Level Cognitive Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Alison

    2002-01-01

    Examines the kind of peer learning that demands high-level cognitive processing, discussing how peer interaction influences cognitive processes (structuring peer interaction and using guided reciprocal peer questioning); how to promote cognitive processing (knowledge construction and integration and socio- cognitive conflict); metacognition; and…

  14. Typewriter Modifications for Persons Who Are High-Level Quadriplegics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reagan, James R.; And Others

    Standard, common electric typewriters are not completely suited to the needs of a high-level quadriplegic typing with a mouthstick. Experiences show that for complete control of a typewriter a mouthstick user needs the combined features of one-button correction, electric forward and reverse indexing, and easy character viewing. To modify a…

  15. THE XAL INFRASTRUCTURE FOR HIGH LEVEL CONTROL ROOM APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P; Allen, Christopher K; Chu, Paul; Galambos, John D; Pelaia II, Tom

    2009-01-01

    XAL is a Java programming framework for building high-level control applications related to accelerator physics. The structure, details of implementation, and interaction between components, auxiliary XAL packages, and the latest modifications are discussed. A general overview of XAL applications created for the SNS project is presented.

  16. A comparison of high-level waste form characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, R.; Notz, K.J.

    1991-01-01

    There are currently about 1055 million curies of high-level waste with a thermal output of about 2950 kilowatts (KW) at four sites in the United States: West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), Savannah River Site (SRS), Hanford Site (HANF), and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These quantities are expected to increase to about 1200 million curies and 3570 kw by the end of year 2020. Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, this high-level waste must ultimately be disposed of in a geologic repository. Accordingly, canisters of high-level waste immobilized in borosilicate glass or glass-ceramic mixtures are to be produced at the four sites and stored there until a repository becomes available. Data on the estimated production schedules and on the physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics of the canisters of immobilized high-level waste have been collected in OCRWM's Waste Characteristics Data Base, including recent updates an revisions. Comparisons of some of these data for the four sites are presented in this report. 14 refs., 3 tabs.

  17. Effect of pH and Human Serum on the Susceptibility of Group D Streptococci (Enterococci) to Ampicillin In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, D. N.; Eubanks, N.

    1975-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibility of group D streptococci (enterococci) to ampicillin was studied comparing the results obtained in Mueller-Hinton broth (MHB) with those obtained in normal human serum (NHS). The rate of enterococcal killing was consistently faster in NHS than in MHB at equivalent ampicillin concentrations. Whereas an increasing media pH appeared to decrease the susceptibility of enterococci to ampicillin by determinations of the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of ampicillin, an opposite increase in susceptibility was observed when the rate of bactericidal activity was studied. This difference may be explainable by the instability of ampicillin at higher pH values. In both MHB and NHS a paradoxical decrease in the rate and extent of enterococcal killing occurred as the ampicillin concentration was increased above the minimally effective concentration. These results demonstrate the inadequacies of the MBC test system and the need for standardizing test media used for determining the susceptibility of enterococci to ampicillin. PMID:238465

  18. In vitro activity of dalbavancin against enterococci isolates from wild animals, pets, poultry and humans in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Poeta, Patricia; Radhouani, Hajer; Sargo, Roberto; Igrejas, Gilberto

    2008-12-01

    Dalbavancin is a new new semisynthetic teicoplanin-related lipoglycopeptide with activity against gram-positive organisms. We investigated the activity of dalbavancin against faecal enterococci isolates from wild animals, pets, poultry and healthy humans in Portugal. The in vitro activity of dalbavancin was determined by the microbroth dilution method according to the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines in 589 enterococci of different species and origins. All vancomycin-susceptible Enterococcus spp. were inhibited by < or =0.25 mg/l dalbavancin. Although vancomycin-resistant-enterococci (VRE) showed higher dalbavancin MIC values (16 mg/l), the isolates that exhibited the VanC resistance phenotype were inhibited at dalbavancin concentrations < or =0.125 mg/l. Only van A isolates were not inhibited by low concentrations of dalbavancin since van A strains showed higher dalbavancin MIC values (16 mg/l).

  19. Transport and persistence of tylosin-resistant enterococci, erm genes, and tylosin in soil and drainage water from fields receiving swine manure

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Land application of manure from tylosin-treated swine introduces tylosin-resistant enterococci, erm genes, which confer resistance to tylosin, and tylosin. This study documents the occurrence and transport of tylosin-resistant enterococci, erm genes, and tylosin in tile-drained chisel plow and no-ti...

  20. A comparison of BOX-PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to determine genetic relatedness of enterococci from different environments

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aims: The genetic relatedness of enterococci from poultry litter to enterococci from nearby surface water and groundwater in the Lower Fraser Valley regions of British Columbia, Canada was determined. Methods and Results: BOX-PCR and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) were used to subtype en...

  1. High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    D. A. Lopez

    1999-08-01

    A ''Settlement Agreement'' between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho mandates that all radioactive high-level waste now stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center will be treated so that it is ready to be moved out of Idaho for disposal by a compliance date of 2035. This report investigates vitrification treatment of the high-level waste in a High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility based on the assumption that no more New Waste Calcining Facility campaigns will be conducted after June 2000. Under this option, the sodium-bearing waste remaining in the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Tank Farm, and newly generated liquid waste produced between now and the start of 2013, will be processed using a different option, such as a Cesium Ion Exchange Facility. The cesium-saturated waste from this other option will be sent to the Calcine Solids Storage Facilities to be mixed with existing calcine. The calcine and cesium-saturated waste will be processed in the High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility by the end of calendar year 2035. In addition, the High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility will process all newly-generated liquid waste produced between 2013 and the end of 2035. Vitrification of this waste is an acceptable treatment method for complying with the Settlement Agreement. This method involves vitrifying the waste and pouring it into stainless-steel canisters that will be ready for shipment out of Idaho to a disposal facility by 2035. These canisters will be stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory until they are sent to a national geologic repository. The operating period for vitrification treatment will be from the end of 2015 through 2035.

  2. Antibiotic resistance, virulence determinants and production of biogenic amines among enterococci from ovine, feline, canine, porcine and human milk.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Esther; Ladero, Victor; Chico, Irene; Maldonado-Barragán, Antonio; López, María; Martín, Virginia; Fernández, Leonides; Fernández, María; Álvarez, Miguel A; Torres, Carmen; Rodríguez, Juan M

    2013-12-10

    Recent studies have shown that mammalian milk represents a continuous supply of commensal bacteria, including enterococci. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the presence of enterococci in milk of different species and to screen them for several genetic and phenotypic traits of clinical significance among enterococci. Samples were obtained from, at least, nine porcine, canine, ovine, feline and human healthy hosts. Enterococci could be isolated, at a concentration of 1.00 × 10(2) -1.16 × 10(3) CFU/ml, from all the porcine samples and, also from 85, 50, 25 and 25% of the human, canine, feline and ovine ones, respectively. They were identified as Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus hirae, Enterococcus casseliflavus and Enterococcus durans. Among the 120 initial enterococcal isolates, 36 were selected on the basis of their different PFGE profiles and further characterized. MLST analysis revealed a wide diversity of STs among the E. faecalis and E. faecium strains, including some frequently associated to hospital infections and novel STs. All the E. faecalis strains possessed some of the potential virulence determinants (cad, ccf, cob, cpd, efaA(fs), agg2, gelE, cylA, esp(fs)) assayed while the E. faecium ones only harboured the efaA(fm) gene. All the tested strains were susceptible to tigecycline, linezolid and vancomycin, and produced tyramine. Their susceptibility to the rest of the antimicrobials and their ability to produce other biogenic amines varied depending on the strain. Enterococci strains isolated from porcine samples showed the widest spectrum of antibiotic resistance. Enterococci isolated from milk of different mammals showed a great genetic diversity. The wide distribution of virulence genes and/or antibiotic resistance among the E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates indicates that they can constitute a reservoir of such traits and a risk to animal and human health.

  3. Antibiotic resistance, virulence determinants and production of biogenic amines among enterococci from ovine, feline, canine, porcine and human milk

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that mammalian milk represents a continuous supply of commensal bacteria, including enterococci. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the presence of enterococci in milk of different species and to screen them for several genetic and phenotypic traits of clinical significance among enterococci. Results Samples were obtained from, at least, nine porcine, canine, ovine, feline and human healthy hosts. Enterococci could be isolated, at a concentration of 1.00 × 102 -1.16 × 103 CFU/ml, from all the porcine samples and, also from 85, 50, 25 and 25% of the human, canine, feline and ovine ones, respectively. They were identified as Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus hirae, Enterococcus casseliflavus and Enterococcus durans. Among the 120 initial enterococcal isolates, 36 were selected on the basis of their different PFGE profiles and further characterized. MLST analysis revealed a wide diversity of STs among the E. faecalis and E. faecium strains, including some frequently associated to hospital infections and novel STs. All the E. faecalis strains possessed some of the potential virulence determinants (cad, ccf, cob, cpd, efaAfs, agg2, gelE, cylA, espfs) assayed while the E. faecium ones only harboured the efaAfm gene. All the tested strains were susceptible to tigecycline, linezolid and vancomycin, and produced tyramine. Their susceptibility to the rest of the antimicrobials and their ability to produce other biogenic amines varied depending on the strain. Enterococci strains isolated from porcine samples showed the widest spectrum of antibiotic resistance. Conclusions Enterococci isolated from milk of different mammals showed a great genetic diversity. The wide distribution of virulence genes and/or antibiotic resistance among the E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates indicates that they can constitute a reservoir of such traits and a risk to animal and human health. PMID:24325647

  4. Occurrence of Escherichia coli and Enterococci in Cladophora (Chlorophyta) in Nearshore Water and Beach Sand of Lake Michigan†

    PubMed Central

    Whitman, Richard L.; Shively, Dawn A.; Pawlik, Heather; Nevers, Meredith B.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.

    2003-01-01

    Each summer, the nuisance green alga Cladophora (mostly Cladophora glomerata) amasses along Lake Michigan beaches, creating nearshore anoxia and unsightly, malodorous mats that can attract problem animals and detract from visitor enjoyment. Traditionally, elevated counts of Escherichia coli are presumed to indicate the presence of sewage, mostly derived from nearby point sources. The relationship between fecal indicator bacteria and Cladophora remains essentially unstudied. This investigation describes the local and regional density of Escherichia coli and enterococci in Cladophora mats along beaches in the four states (Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan) bordering Lake Michigan. Samples of Cladophora strands collected from 10 beaches (n = 41) were assayed for concentrations of E. coli and enterococci during the summer of 2002. Both E. coli and enterococci were ubiquitous (up to 97% occurrence), with overall log mean densities (± standard errors) of 5.3 (± 4.8) and 4.8 (± 4.5) per g (dry weight). E. coli and enterococci were strongly correlated in southern Lake Michigan beaches (P < 0.001, R2 = 0.73, n = 17) but not in northern beaches (P = 0.892, n = 16). Both E. coli and enterococci survived for over 6 months in sun-dried Cladophora mats stored at 4°C; the residual bacteria in the dried alga readily grew upon rehydration. These findings suggest that Cladophora amassing along the beaches of Lake Michigan may be an important environmental source of indicator bacteria and call into question the reliability of E. coli and enterococci as indicators of water quality for freshwater recreational beaches. PMID:12902262

  5. Occurrence of Escherichia coli and enterococci in Cladophora (Chlorophyta) in nearshore water and beach sand of Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitman, Richard L.; Shively, Dawn A.; Pawlik, Heather; Nevers, Meredith; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.

    2003-01-01

    Each summer, the nuisance green alga Cladophora (mostly Cladophora glomerata) amasses along Lake Michigan beaches, creating nearshore anoxia and unsightly, malodorous mats that can attract problem animals and detract from visitor enjoyment. Traditionally, elevated counts of Escherichia coli are presumed to indicate the presence of sewage, mostly derived from nearby point sources. The relationship between fecal indicator bacteria and Cladophora remains essentially unstudied. This investigation describes the local and regional density ofEscherichia coli and enterococci in Cladophora mats along beaches in the four states (Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan) bordering Lake Michigan. Samples of Cladophora strands collected from 10 beaches (n = 41) were assayed for concentrations of E. coli and enterococci during the summer of 2002. Both E. coli and enterococci were ubiquitous (up to 97% occurrence), with overall log mean densities (± standard errors) of 5.3 (± 4.8) and 4.8 (± 4.5) per g (dry weight). E. coli and enterococci were strongly correlated in southern Lake Michigan beaches (P< 0.001, R2 = 0.73, n = 17) but not in northern beaches (P = 0.892, n = 16). BothE. coli and enterococci survived for over 6 months in sun-dried Cladophora mats stored at 4°C; the residual bacteria in the dried alga readily grew upon rehydration. These findings suggest that Cladophora amassing along the beaches of Lake Michigan may be an important environmental source of indicator bacteria and call into question the reliability of E. coli and enterococci as indicators of water quality for freshwater recreational beaches.

  6. Occurrence of Escherichia coli and enterococci in Cladophora (Clorophyta) in nearshore water and beach sand of Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitman, Richard L.; Shively, Dawn A.; Pawlik, Heather; Nevers, Meredith B.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.

    2003-01-01

    Each summer, the nuisance green alga Cladophora (mostly Cladophora glomerata) amasses along Lake Michigan beaches, creating nearshore anoxia and unsightly, malodorous mats that can attract problem animals and detract from visitor enjoyment. Traditionally, elevated counts of Escherichia coli are presumed to indicate the presence of sewage, mostly derived from nearby point sources. The relationship between fecal indicator bacteria and Cladophora remains essentially unstudied. This investigation describes the local and regional density of Escherichia coli and enterococci in Cladophora mats along beaches in the four states (Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan) bordering Lake Michigan. Samples of Cladophora strands collected from 10 beaches (n = 41) were assayed for concentrations of E. coli and enterococci during the summer of 2002. Both E. coli and enterococci were ubiquitous (up to 97% occurrence), with overall log mean densities (± standard errors) of 5.3 (± 4.8) and 4.8 (± 4.5) per g (dry weight). E. coli and enterococci were strongly correlated in southern Lake Michigan beaches (P R2 = 0.73, n = 17) but not in northern beaches (P = 0.892, n = 16). Both E. coli and enterococci survived for over 6 months in sun-dried Cladophora mats stored at 4°C; the residual bacteria in the dried alga readily grew upon rehydration. These findings suggest that Cladophora amassing along the beaches of Lake Michigan may be an important environmental source of indicator bacteria and call into question the reliability of E. coli and enterococci as indicators of water quality for freshwater recreational beaches.

  7. Relationship of human-associated microbial source tracking markers with Enterococci in Gulf of Mexico waters.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Katrina V; Brownell, Miriam; Wang, Shiao Y; Lepo, Joe Eugene; Mott, Joanna; Nathaniel, Rajkumar; Kilgen, Marilyn; Hellein, Kristen N; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Harwood, Valerie J

    2013-03-01

    Human and ecosystem health can be damaged by fecal contamination of recreational waters. Microbial source tracking (MST) can be used to specifically detect domestic sewage containing human waste, thereby informing both risk assessment and remediation strategies. Previously, an inter-laboratory collaboration developed standardized PCR methods for a bacterial, an archaeal, and a viral indicator of human sewage. Here we present results for two subsequent years of field testing in fresh and salt water by five laboratories across the U.S. Gulf Coast (two in Florida and one each in Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas) using common standard operating procedures (SOPs) developed previously. Culturable enterococci were enumerated by membrane filtration, and PCR was used to detect three MST markers targeting domestic sewage: human-associated Bacteroides (HF183), Methanobrevibacter smithii and human polyomaviruses BK and JC (HPyVs). Detection of sewage markers in surface waters was significantly associated with higher enterococci levels and with exceedance of the recreational water quality standard in four or three regions, respectively. Sewage markers were frequently co-detected in single samples, e.g., M. smithii and HF183 were co-detected in 81% of Louisiana samples, and HPyVs and M. smithii were co-detected in over 40% of southwest Florida and Mississippi samples. This study demonstrates the robustness and inter-laboratory transferability of these three markers for the detection of pollution from domestic sewage in the waters impacting the Gulf of Mexico over a coastal range of over 1000 miles.

  8. Multi-laboratory survey of qPCR enterococci analysis method performance

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) has become a frequently used technique for quantifying enterococci in recreational surface waters, but there are several methodological options. Here we evaluated how three method permutations, type of mastermix, sample extract dilution and use of controls in results calculation, affect method reliability among multiple laboratories with respect to sample interference. Multiple samples from each of 22 sites representing an array of habitat types were analyzed using EPA Method 1611 and 1609 reagents with full strength and five-fold diluted extracts. The presence of interference was assessed three ways: using sample processing and PCR amplifications controls; consistency of results across extract dilutions; and relative recovery of target genes from spiked enterococci in water sample compared to control matrices with acceptable recovery defined as 50 to 200%. Method 1609, which is based on an environmental mastermix, was found to be superior to Method 1611, which is based on a universal mastermix. Method 1611 had over a 40% control assay failure rate with undiluted extracts and a 6% failure rate with diluted extracts. Method 1609 failed in only 11% and 3% of undiluted and diluted extracts analyses. Use of sample processing control assay results in the delta-delta Ct method for calculating relative target gene recoveries increased the number of acceptable recovery results. Delta-delta tended to bias recoveries fr

  9. Chemical trapping of vancomycin: a potential strategy for preventing selection of vancomycin-resistant Enterococci.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Ehud; Tal-Gan, Yftah; Temper, Violetta; Shapiro, Mervyn; Gilon, Chaim; Hoffman, Amnon

    2012-04-01

    Emergence of antimicrobial resistance is among the most worrisome issues in public health worldwide. Vancomycin resistance is rapidly spreading, resulting in increased morbidity, mortality, and healthcare-associated costs. Multiple strategies are required to preserve the effectiveness of this essential antibiotic. It has been recently shown that biliary excretion of vancomycin following parenteral administration results in significant fecal concentrations of vancomycin that may lead to selection of vancomycin-resistant strains within the colon. In this study we present a novel strategy for preventing this undesired effect and its consequences, using chemical trapping of vancomycin by a tripeptide analog that mimics the natural bacterial vancomycin binding-site. Initially, we demonstrated that a tripeptide analog can neutralize vancomycin activity against Enterococci at a molar excess of 28. In the second phase, two chemical modifications, designed to attach the tripeptide to vancomycin covalently, were explored. Attachment of a 4-flurosulfonyl-benzoic acid (FSBA) moiety to the parent tripeptide resulted in vancomycin neutralization at a molar ratio of less than 4:1. Finally it was shown that the FSBA-bound tripeptide analog can prevent in-vitro selection of vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) from a mixed vancomycin susceptible/resistant population following exposure to vancomycin. These findings demonstrate the ability of the proposed strategy to prevent selection of VRE. The present proof-of-concept study provides the basis for further development of the proposed strategy. Further, this strategy may be implemented for combating resistance to other antimicrobials.

  10. Antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter spp., Escherichia coli and enterococci associated with pigs in Australia.

    PubMed

    Hart, W S; Heuzenroeder, M W; Barton, M D

    2004-06-01

    The major influences on the amplification and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are the therapeutic use of antibiotics in human medicine and their use in livestock for therapy, prophylaxis and growth promotion. The use of veterinary antibiotics has many benefits to the livestock industries ensuring animal health and welfare, but use at subtherapeutic levels also exerts great selective pressure on emergence of resistant bacteria. The possible effect on human health is a problem of current debate. This study involved sampling pig carcasses, pig meat and assessing the level of resistance in zoonotic enteric bacteria of concern to human health. In South Australian pigs, thermophilic Campylobacter species showed widespread resistance (60-100%) to tylosin, erythromycin, lincomycin, ampicillin and tetracycline. No resistance was seen to ciprofloxacin. The enterococci demonstrated little resistance (0-30%) to vancomycin or virginiamycin, but the overall results from the antibiotic sensitivity testing of the enterococci have demonstrated how widespread their resistance has become. Escherichia coli strains showed widespread resistance to tetracycline and moderately common resistance (30-60%) to ampicillin and sulphadiazine. Resistance to more than one antibiotic was common. Pigs from New South Wales were also sampled and differences in resistance patterns were noted, perhaps reflecting different antibiotic use regimens in that state.

  11. Enterococci from Tolminc cheese: population structure, antibiotic susceptibility and incidence of virulence determinants.

    PubMed

    Canzek Majhenic, Andreja; Rogelj, Irena; Perko, Bogdan

    2005-07-15

    Microbiological analysis of ripened artisanal Tolminc cheese revealed the presence of an enterococcal population in numbers of up to 10(6) per g. All colonies, isolated from the citrate azide tween carbonate (CATC) enterococcal selective medium were Gram positive and coccal-shaped and were analysed with PhenePlate FS system. This system discriminated 10 PhP clusters among the 90 enterococcal isolates. From each cluster the most representative isolate for that particular type was selected for further study. The 10 representative enterococci were catalase negative and grew in the presence of NaCl (2%, 4% and 6.5%) and bile salts (0.06%). Genus specific primers confirmed all 10 enterococcal representatives as Enterococcus members, while species specific primers determined them further as strains of Enterococcus faecalis species. PCR for vanA and vanB genes detection, respectively, amplified no PCR products. The absence of van genes was confirmed with both disc and E-test, as isolates were susceptible to vancomycin according to the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS). The results of disc tests with other antimicrobial agents (ampicillin, vancomycin, kanamycin, penicillin, erythromycin, neomycin, chloramphenicol, clindamycin, rifampin) did not differ much among the tested enterococci: they were all very resistant to clindamycin only. The incidence of enterococcus virulence determinants was as expected: all of the 10 E. faecalis strains tested possessed multiple determinants (between 7 and 11).

  12. Growth and survival of Escherichia coli and enterococci populations in the macro-alga Cladophora (Chlorophyta)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, M.N.; Shively, D.A.; Nevers, M.B.; Sadowsky, M.J.; Whitman, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    The macro-alga Cladophora glomerata is found in streams and lakes worldwide. High concentrations of Escherichia coli and enterococci have been reported in Cladophora along the Lake Michigan shore. The objective of this study was to determine if Cladophora supported growth of these indicator bacteria. Algal leachate readily supported in vitro multiplication of E. coli and enterococci, suggesting that leachates contain necessary growth-promoting substances. Growth was directly related to the concentration of algal leachate. E. coli survived for over 6 months in dried Cladophora stored at 4°C; residual E. coli grew after mat rehydration, reaching a carrying capacity of 8 log CFU g-1 in 48 h. Results of this study also show that the E. coli strains associated with Cladophora are highly related; in most instances they are genetically different from each other, suggesting that the relationship between E. coli and Cladophora may be casual. These findings indicate that Cladophora provides a suitable environment for indicator bacteria to persist for extended periods and to grow under natural conditions.

  13. Synergistic effect of [10]-gingerol and aminoglycosides against vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE).

    PubMed

    Nagoshi, Chihiro; Shiota, Sumiko; Kuroda, Teruo; Hatano, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Takashi; Kariyama, Reiko; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa

    2006-03-01

    An extract from ginger (root of Zingiber officinale) reduced the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of aminoglycosides in vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). The effective compound was isolated and identified as [10]-gingerol. In the presence of [10]-gingerol at 1/10 concentration of its own MIC, the MIC of arbekacin was lowered by 1/32 to 1/16. [10]-Gingerol also reduced the MICs of other aminoglycosides, and of bacitracin and polymixin B, but not of other antimicrobial agents tested. Because [10]-gingerol reduced the MICs of several aminoglycosides both in strains possessing or lacking aminoglycoside-modification enzymes, it seems that the effect of [10]-gingerol is not related to these enzymes, which mainly confer bacterial resistance against aminoglycosides. It seemed that a detergent-like effect of [10]-gingerol potentiated the antimicrobial activity of the aminoglycosides. In fact, some detergents such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and Triton X-100 reduced the MICs of aminoglycosides, bacitracin and polymixin B in VRE. Since the intrinsic resistance to aminoglycosides in enterococci is due to low level of entry of the drugs into the cells, increase in the membrane permeability caused by [10]-gingerol will enhance the influx of aminoglycosides into enterococcal cells.

  14. Quantification of vancomycin-resistant enterococci and corresponding resistance genes in a sewage treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Takashi; Hashimoto, Reina; Mekata, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and their resistance genes, vanA and vanB, to examine their presence in sewage treatment systems. Water samples were collected from primary sedimentation tank inlet, aeration tank, final sedimentation tank overflow outlet, and disinfection tank. Enterococcal strains were determined their vancomycin susceptibility by the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) test. Vancomycin-resistance genes (vanA and vanB) were quantified by real-time PCR. The sewage treatment process indeed decreased the number of most enterococci contained in the entering sewage, with a removal rate of ≥ 5 log. The MIC test showed that two enterococcal strains resistant to a high concentration of vancomycin (>128 μg mL(-1)). However, most of the enterococcal strains exhibited sensitivity to vancomycin, indicating that VRE were virtually absent in the sewage treatment systems. On the other hand, vancomycin-resistance genes were detected in all the sewage samples, including those collected from the chlorination disinfection tank. The highest copy numbers of vanA (1.5 × 10(3) copies mL(-1)) and vanB (1.0 × 10(3) copies mL(-1)) were detected from the water sample of effluent water and chlorinated water, respectively. Therefore, antibiotic resistance genes remain in the sewage treatment plant and might discharged into water environments such as rivers and coastal areas.

  15. Antibiotic resistance and adhesion properties of oral Enterococci associated to dental caries

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Enterococci are increasingly associated with opportunistic infections in Humans but the role of the oral cavity as a reservoir for this species is unclear. This study aimed to explore the carriage rate of Enterococci in the oral cavity of Tunisian children and their antimicrobial susceptibility to a broad range of antibiotics together with their adherence ability to abiotic and biotic surfaces. Results In this study, 17 E. faecalis (27.5%) and 4 E. faecium (6.5%) were detected. The identified strains showed resistance to commonly used antibiotics. Among the 17 isolated E. faecalis, 12 strains (71%) were slime producers and 5 strains were non-producers. Among the 4 E. faecium, 2 strains were slime producers. All the tested strains were able to adhere to at least one of the two tested cell lines. Our result showed that 11 E. faecalis and 2 E. faecium strains adhered strongly to Hep-2 as well as to A549 cells. Conclusions Drugs resistance and strong biofilm production abilities together with a high phenotypic adhesion to host cells are important equipment in E. faecalis and E. faecium which lead to their oral cavity colonization and focal infections. PMID:21714920

  16. Identification of bacteriocin genes in enterococci isolated from game animals and saltwater fish.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Tereza; Brandão, Andreia; Muñoz-Atienza, Estefanía; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Torres, Carmen; Igrejas, Gilberto; Hernández, Pablo E; Herranz, Carmen; Cintas, Luis M; Poeta, Patrícia

    2011-08-01

    Bacteriocins produced by enterococci, referred to as enterocins, possess great interest for their potential use as biopreservatives in food and feed, as well as alternative antimicrobials in humans and animals. In this context, the aim of the present study was to determine the antimicrobial activity and the presence of bacteriocin structural genes in fecal enterococcal isolates from animal origins. Evaluation of the direct antimicrobial activity of 253 isolates from wild boars (Sus scrofa, n = 69), mullets (Liza ramada, n = 117), and partridges (Perdix perdix, n = 67) against eight indicator bacterial strains (including Listeria monocytogenes, Pediococcus pentosaceus, and Enterococcus spp.) showed that 177 (70%) exerted antimicrobial activity against at least one indicator microorganism. From these isolates, 123 were further selected on the basis of their inhibition group, and 81 were found to be producers of bacteriocins active against Listeria monocytogenes. Analysis of the presence of enterocin structural genes in a subset of 36 isolates showed that 70% harbored one or more of the evaluated genes, those of enterocin P and hiracin JM79 being the most prevalent. These results show that wild animals constitute an appropriate source for the isolation of bacteriocinogenic enterococci.

  17. Removal improvement of bacteria (Escherichia coli and enterococci) in maturation ponds using baffles.

    PubMed

    Ouali, A; Jupsin, H; Vasel, J L; Marouani, L; Ghrabi, A

    2012-01-01

    Korba wastewater treatment plant is a conventional activated sludge followed by three maturation ponds (MP1, MP2, MP3) in series acting as a tertiary treatment. The first study of wastewater treatment plants showed that the effluent concentration of Escherichia coli and enterococci at the outlet of the (MP3) varies between 10(3) and 10(4)CFU/100 ml. After the hydrodynamic study conducted by Rhodamine WT which showed short-circuiting in the MP1, two baffles were introduced in the first maturation pond (MP1) to improve the hydrodynamic and the sanitary performances. The second hydraulic study showed that the dispersion number 'd' was reduced from 1.45 to 0.43 by this engineering intervention and the Peclet number was raised from 0.69 to 2.32. The hydraulic retention time was increased by 14 h. Because of well-designed baffles, the removal efficiency of E. coli and enterococci was raised between 0.2 and 0.7 log units for the first maturation pond.

  18. RETENTION OF SULFATE IN HIGH LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE GLASS

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.

    2010-09-07

    High level radioactive wastes are being vitrified at the Savannah River Site for long term disposal. Many of the wastes contain sulfate at concentrations that can be difficult to retain in borosilicate glass. This study involves efforts to optimize the composition of a glass frit for combination with the waste to improve sulfate retention while meeting other process and product performance constraints. The fabrication and characterization of several series of simulated waste glasses are described. The experiments are detailed chronologically, to provide insight into part of the engineering studies used in developing frit compositions for an operating high level waste vitrification facility. The results lead to the recommendation of a specific frit composition and a concentration limit for sulfate in the glass for the next batch of sludge to be processed at Savannah River.

  19. Nondestructive examination of DOE high-level waste storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, S.; Bandyopadhyay, K.; Kassir, M.; Mather, B.; Shewmon, P.; Streicher, M.; Thompson, B.; van Rooyen, D.; Weeks, J.

    1995-05-01

    A number of DOE sites have buried tanks containing high-level waste. Tanks of particular interest am double-shell inside concrete cylinders. A program has been developed for the inservice inspection of the primary tank containing high-level waste (HLW), for testing of transfer lines and for the inspection of the concrete containment where possible. Emphasis is placed on the ultrasonic examination of selected areas of the primary tank, coupled with a leak-detection system capable of detecting small leaks through the wall of the primary tank. The NDE program is modelled after ASME Section XI in many respects, particularly with respects to the sampling protocol. Selected testing of concrete is planned to determine if there has been any significant degradation. The most probable failure mechanisms are corrosion-related so that the examination program gives major emphasis to possible locations for corrosion attack.

  20. Life Extension of Aging High-Level Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Bryson, D.; Callahan, V.; Ostrom, M.; Bryan, W.; Berman, H.

    2002-02-26

    The Double Shell Tanks (DSTs) play a critical role in the Hanford High-Level Waste Treatment Complex, and therefore activities are underway to protect and better understand these tanks. The DST Life Extension Program is focused on both tank life extension and on evaluation of tank integrity. Tank life extension activities focus on understanding tank failure modes and have produced key chemistry and operations controls to minimize tank corrosion and extend useful tank life. Tank integrity program activities have developed and applied key technologies to evaluate the condition of the tank structure and predict useful tank life. Program results to date indicate that DST useful life can be extended well beyond the original design life and allow the existing tanks to fill a critical function within the Hanford High-Level Waste Treatment Complex. In addition the tank life may now be more reliably predicted, facilitating improved planning for the use and possible future replacement of these tanks.

  1. Evaluation and selection of candidate high-level waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Bernadzikowski, T. A.; Allender, J. S.; Butler, J. L.; Gordon, D. E.; Gould, Jr., T. H.; Stone, J. A.

    1982-03-01

    Seven candidate waste forms being developed under the direction of the Department of Energy's National High-Level Waste (HLW) Technology Program, were evaluated as potential media for the immobilization and geologic disposal of high-level nuclear wastes. The evaluation combined preliminary waste form evaluations conducted at DOE defense waste-sites and independent laboratories, peer review assessments, a product performance evaluation, and a processability analysis. Based on the combined results of these four inputs, two of the seven forms, borosilicate glass and a titanate based ceramic, SYNROC, were selected as the reference and alternative forms for continued development and evaluation in the National HLW Program. Both the glass and ceramic forms are viable candidates for use at each of the DOE defense waste-sites; they are also potential candidates for immobilization of commercial reprocessing wastes. This report describes the waste form screening process, and discusses each of the four major inputs considered in the selection of the two forms.

  2. Long-term high-level waste technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corman, W. R.

    1981-08-01

    Work performed at sites to immobilize high-level radioactive wastes is described. Program management and support with subtasks of management and budget, environmental and safety assessments, waste preparation, storage or disposal; waste retrieval, separation and concentration are discussed. Waste fixation and characterization, process and equipment development, final handling, canister development and characterization and onsite storage or disposal are also reported. Event trees defining possible accidents were completed in a safety assessment of continued in-tank storage of high-level waste. Two low-cost waste forms (tailored concrete and bitumen) were investigated as candidate immobilization forms. Comparative impact tests and leaching tests were also conducted on glasses, ceramics, and concretes. A process design description was written for the tailored ceramic process.

  3. Multipurpose optimization models for high level waste vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Hoza, M.

    1994-08-01

    Optimal Waste Loading (OWL) models have been developed as multipurpose tools for high-level waste studies for the Tank Waste Remediation Program at Hanford. Using nonlinear programming techniques, these models maximize the waste loading of the vitrified waste and optimize the glass formers composition such that the glass produced has the appropriate properties within the melter, and the resultant vitrified waste form meets the requirements for disposal. The OWL model can be used for a single waste stream or for blended streams. The models can determine optimal continuous blends or optimal discrete blends of a number of different wastes. The OWL models have been used to identify the most restrictive constraints, to evaluate prospective waste pretreatment methods, to formulate and evaluate blending strategies, and to determine the impacts of variability in the wastes. The OWL models will be used to aid in the design of frits and the maximize the waste in the glass for High-Level Waste (HLW) vitrification.

  4. FPGA based compute nodes for high level triggering in PANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, W.; Gilardi, C.; Kirschner, D.; Lang, J.; Lange, S.; Liu, M.; Perez, T.; Yang, S.; Schmitt, L.; Jin, D.; Li, L.; Liu, Z.; Lu, Y.; Wang, Q.; Wei, S.; Xu, H.; Zhao, D.; Korcyl, K.; Otwinowski, J. T.; Salabura, P.; Konorov, I.; Mann, A.

    2008-07-01

    PANDA is a new universal detector for antiproton physics at the HESR facility at FAIR/GSI. The PANDA data acquisition system has to handle interaction rates of the order of 107/s and data rates of several 100 Gb/s. FPGA based compute nodes with multi-Gb/s bandwidth capability using the ATCA architecture are designed to handle tasks such as event building, feature extraction and high level trigger processing. Data connectivity is provided via optical links as well as multiple Gb Ethernet ports. The boards will support trigger algorithms such us pattern recognition for RICH detectors, EM shower analysis, fast tracking algorithms and global event characterization. Besides VHDL, high level C-like hardware description languages will be considered to implement the firmware.

  5. Management of data quality of high level waste characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.I., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-12

    Over the past 10 years, the Hanford Site has been transitioning from nuclear materials production to Site cleanup operations. High-level waste characterization at the Hanford Site provides data to support present waste processing operations, tank safety programs, and future waste disposal programs. Quality elements in the high-level waste characterization program will be presented by following a sample through the data quality objective, sampling, laboratory analysis and data review process. Transition from production to cleanup has resulted in changes in quality systems and program; the changes, as well as other issues in these quality programs, will be described. Laboratory assessment through quality control and performance evaluation programs will be described, and data assessments in the laboratory and final reporting in the tank characterization reports will be discussed.

  6. Life Extension of Aging High Level Waste (HLW) Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    BRYSON, D.

    2002-02-04

    The Double Shell Tanks (DSTs) play a critical role in the Hanford High-Level Waste Treatment Complex, and therefore activities are underway to protect and better understand these tanks. The DST Life Extension Program is focused on both tank life extension and on evaluation of tank integrity. Tank life extension activities focus on understanding tank failure modes and have produced key chemistry and operations controls to minimize tank corrosion and extend useful tank life. Tank integrity program activities have developed and applied key technologies to evaluate the condition of the tank structure and predict useful tank life. Program results to date indicate that DST useful life can be extended well beyond the original design life and allow the existing tanks to fill a critical function within the Hanford High-Level Waste Treatment Complex. In addition the tank life may now be more reliably predicted, facilitating improved planning for the use and possible future replacement of these tanks.

  7. Long-term high-level waste technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornman, W. R.

    1980-07-01

    This series of reports summarizes research and development studies on the immobilization of high level wastes from the chemical reprocessing of nuclear reactor fuels. Immobilization of the wastes (defense and commercial) consists of placing them in a high integrity form with a very low potential for radionuclide release. Immobilization of commercial wastes is being considered on a contingency basis in the event that reprocessing is resumed. The basic plan for meeting the goal of immobilization of the DOE high level wastes is: (1) to develop technology to support a realistic choice of waste form alternatives for each of the three DOE sites; (2) to develop product and processing technology with sufficient scaleup to provide design data for full scale facilities; and (3) to construct and operate the facilities.

  8. Characterization of fecal vancomycin-resistant enterococci with acquired and intrinsic resistance mechanisms in wild animals, Spain.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Carmen; Gonzalez-Barrio, David; Camacho, Maria Cruz; Lima-Barbero, Jose Francisco; de la Puente, Javier; Höfle, Ursula; Torres, Carmen

    2016-11-01

    The objectives were to evaluate the presence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci with acquired (VRE-a) and intrinsic (VRE-i) resistance mechanisms in fecal samples from different wild animals, and analyze their phenotypes and genotypes of antimicrobial resistance. A total of 348 cloacal/rectal samples from red-legged partridges (127), white storks (81), red kites (59), and wild boars (81) (June 2014/February 2015) were inoculated in Slanetz-Bartley agar supplemented with vancomycin (4 μg/mL). We investigated the susceptibility to 12 antimicrobials and the presence of 19 antimicrobial resistance and five virulence genes. In addition, we performed multilocus sequence typing, detection of IS16 and studied Tn1546 structure. One VRE-a isolate was identified in one wild boar. This isolate was identified as Enterococcus faecium, harbored vanA gene included into Tn1546 (truncated with IS1542/IS1216), and belonged to the new ST993. This isolate contained the erm(A), erm(B), tet(M), dfrG, and dfrK genes. Neither element IS16 nor the studied virulence genes were detected. Ninety-six VRE-i isolates were identified (89 Enterococcus gallinarum and seven Enterococcus casseliflavus), with the following prevalence: red kites (71.2 %), white storks (46.9 %), red-legged partridges (7.9 %), and wild boars (4.9 %). Most E. gallinarum isolates showed resistance to tetracycline (66.3 %) and/or erythromycin (46.1 %). High-level resistance to aminoglycosides was present among our VRE-i isolates: kanamycin (22.9 %), streptomycin (11.5 %), and gentamicin (9.4 %). In general, VRE-i isolates of red kites showed higher rates of resistance for non-glycopeptide agents than those of other animal species. The dissemination of acquired resistance mechanisms in natural environments could have implications in the global spread of resistance with public health implications.

  9. Major globally disseminated clonal complexes of antimicrobial resistant enterococci associated with infections in cancer patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, Barbara A; Oliveira, Jéssica S; Cardoso, Nayara T; Barbosa, André V; Superti, Silvana V; Teixeira, Lúcia M; Neves, Felipe P G

    2017-09-01

    Cancer and hematological malignancies constitute major comorbidities in enterococcal infections, but little is known about the characteristics of enterococci affecting cancer patients. The aim of this study was to characterize 132 enterococcal clinical isolates obtained from cancer patients attending a Cancer Reference Center in Brazil between April 2013 and March 2014. Susceptibility to 17 antimicrobial agents was assessed by disk diffusion method. Resistance and virulence genes were investigated by PCR. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was performed for selected Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolates. The predominant species was E. faecalis (108 isolates), followed by E. faecium (18), Enterococcus gallinarum (3), Enterococcus avium (2) and Enterococcus durans (1). Multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates made up 44.7%, but all isolates were susceptible to fosfomycin, linezolid and glycopeptides. The most prevalent genes associated with erythromycin- and tetracycline-non susceptible isolates were erm(B) (47/71; 66.2%) and tet(M) (24/68; 35.3%), respectively. High-level resistance (HLR) to gentamicin was found in 22 (16.7%) isolates and 13 (59.1%) of them carried the aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia gene. HLR to streptomycin was detected in 34 (25.8%) isolates, of which 15 (44.1%) isolates had the ant(6')-Ia gene. The most common virulence genes were gelE (48.9%), esp (30.5%) and asa1 (29.8%). MLST performed for 26 E. faecalis isolates revealed 18 different sequence-types (STs), with seven corresponding to novel STs (625, 626, 627, 628, 629, 630, and 635). On the other hand, nine of 10 E. faecium isolates analyzed by MLST belonged to a single clonal complex, comprised of mostly ST412, which emerged worldwide after mid-2000s, but also two novel STs (963 and 964). We detected major globally disseminated E. faecalis and E. faecium clonal complexes along with novel closely related STs, indicating the fitness and continuous evolution of these hospital

  10. Online pattern recognition for the ALICE high level trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramm, R.; Helstrup, H.; Lien, J.; Lindenstruth, V.; Loizides, C.; Rohrich, D.; Skaali, B.; Steinbeck, T.; Stock, R.; Ullaland, K.; Vestbø, A.; Wiebalck, A.; Alice Collaboration

    2003-04-01

    The ALICE High Level Trigger system needs to reconstruct events online at high data rates. Focusing on the Time Projection Chamber we present two pattern recognition methods under investigation: the sequential approach (cluster finding, track follower) and the iterative approach (Hough Transform, cluster assignment, re-fitting). The implementation of the former in hardware indicates that we can reach the designed inspection rate for p-p collisions of 1 kHz with 98% efficiency.

  11. Mixing Processes in High-Level Waste Tanks - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F.

    1999-05-24

    The mixing processes in large, complex enclosures using one-dimensional differential equations, with transport in free and wall jets is modeled using standard integral techniques. With this goal in mind, we have constructed a simple, computationally efficient numerical tool, the Berkeley Mechanistic Mixing Model, which can be used to predict the transient evolution of fuel and oxygen concentrations in DOE high-level waste tanks following loss of ventilation, and validate the model against a series of experiments.

  12. Case for retrievable high-level nuclear waste disposal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roseboom, Eugene H.

    1994-01-01

    Plans for the nation's first high-level nuclear waste repository have called for permanently closing and sealing the repository soon after it is filled. However, the hydrologic environment of the proposed site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, should allow the repository to be kept open and the waste retrievable indefinitely. This would allow direct monitoring of the repository and maintain the options for future generations to improve upon the disposal methods or use the uranium in the spent fuel as an energy resource.

  13. Cake: Enabling High-level SLOs on Shared Storage Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-07

    Cake : Enabling High-level SLOs on Shared Storage Systems Andrew Wang Shivaram Venkataraman Sara Alspaugh Randy H. Katz Ion Stoica Electrical...control number. 1. REPORT DATE 07 NOV 2012 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Cake : Enabling High...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Cake is a coordinated, multi-resource scheduler for shared distributed storage environments with the goal of

  14. Automatic rule generation for high-level vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhee, Frank Chung-Hoon; Krishnapuram, Raghu

    1992-01-01

    Many high-level vision systems use rule-based approaches to solving problems such as autonomous navigation and image understanding. The rules are usually elaborated by experts. However, this procedure may be rather tedious. In this paper, we propose a method to generate such rules automatically from training data. The proposed method is also capable of filtering out irrelevant features and criteria from the rules.

  15. The tracking of high level waste shipments-TRANSCOM system

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.E.; Joy, D.S.; Pope, R.B.

    1995-12-31

    The TRANSCOM (transportation tracking and communication) system is the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) real-time system for tracking shipments of spent fuel, high-level wastes, and other high-visibility shipments of radioactive material. The TRANSCOM system has been operational since 1988. The system was used during FY1993 to track almost 100 shipments within the US.DOE complex, and it is accessed weekly by 10 to 20 users.

  16. High level cognitive information processing in neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnden, John A.; Fields, Christopher A.

    1992-01-01

    Two related research efforts were addressed: (1) high-level connectionist cognitive modeling; and (2) local neural circuit modeling. The goals of the first effort were to develop connectionist models of high-level cognitive processes such as problem solving or natural language understanding, and to understand the computational requirements of such models. The goals of the second effort were to develop biologically-realistic model of local neural circuits, and to understand the computational behavior of such models. In keeping with the nature of NASA's Innovative Research Program, all the work conducted under the grant was highly innovative. For instance, the following ideas, all summarized, are contributions to the study of connectionist/neural networks: (1) the temporal-winner-take-all, relative-position encoding, and pattern-similarity association techniques; (2) the importation of logical combinators into connection; (3) the use of analogy-based reasoning as a bridge across the gap between the traditional symbolic paradigm and the connectionist paradigm; and (4) the application of connectionism to the domain of belief representation/reasoning. The work on local neural circuit modeling also departs significantly from the work of related researchers. In particular, its concentration on low-level neural phenomena that could support high-level cognitive processing is unusual within the area of biological local circuit modeling, and also serves to expand the horizons of the artificial neural net field.

  17. High-Level Visual Object Representations Are Constrained by Position

    PubMed Central

    Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus; Baker, Chris I.

    2010-01-01

    It is widely assumed that high-level visual object representations are position-independent (or invariant). While there is sensitivity to position in high-level object-selective cortex, position and object identity are thought to be encoded independently in the population response such that position information is available across objects and object information is available across positions. Contrary to this view, we show, with both behavior and neuroimaging, that visual object representations are position-dependent (tied to limited portions of the visual field). Behaviorally, we show that the effect of priming an object was greatly reduced with any change in position (within- or between-hemifields), indicating nonoverlapping representations of the same object across different positions. Furthermore, using neuroimaging, we show that object-selective cortex is not only highly sensitive to object position but also the ability to differentiate objects based on its response is greatly reduced across different positions, consistent with the observed behavior and the receptive field properties observed in macaque object-selective neurons. Thus, even at the population level, the object information available in response of object-selective cortex is constrained by position. We conclude that even high-level visual object representations are position-dependent. PMID:20351021

  18. High-level visual object representations are constrained by position.

    PubMed

    Kravitz, Dwight J; Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus; Baker, Chris I

    2010-12-01

    It is widely assumed that high-level visual object representations are position-independent (or invariant). While there is sensitivity to position in high-level object-selective cortex, position and object identity are thought to be encoded independently in the population response such that position information is available across objects and object information is available across positions. Contrary to this view, we show, with both behavior and neuroimaging, that visual object representations are position-dependent (tied to limited portions of the visual field). Behaviorally, we show that the effect of priming an object was greatly reduced with any change in position (within- or between-hemifields), indicating nonoverlapping representations of the same object across different positions. Furthermore, using neuroimaging, we show that object-selective cortex is not only highly sensitive to object position but also the ability to differentiate objects based on its response is greatly reduced across different positions, consistent with the observed behavior and the receptive field properties observed in macaque object-selective neurons. Thus, even at the population level, the object information available in response of object-selective cortex is constrained by position. We conclude that even high-level visual object representations are position-dependent.

  19. Handbook of high-level radioactive waste transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Sattler, L.R.

    1992-10-01

    The High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Handbook serves as a reference to which state officials and members of the general public may turn for information on radioactive waste transportation and on the federal government`s system for transporting this waste under the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The Handbook condenses and updates information contained in the Midwestern High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer. It is intended primarily to assist legislators who, in the future, may be called upon to enact legislation pertaining to the transportation of radioactive waste through their jurisdictions. The Handbook is divided into two sections. The first section places the federal government`s program for transporting radioactive waste in context. It provides background information on nuclear waste production in the United States and traces the emergence of federal policy for disposing of radioactive waste. The second section covers the history of radioactive waste transportation; summarizes major pieces of legislation pertaining to the transportation of radioactive waste; and provides an overview of the radioactive waste transportation program developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). To supplement this information, a summary of pertinent federal and state legislation and a glossary of terms are included as appendices, as is a list of publications produced by the Midwestern Office of The Council of State Governments (CSG-MW) as part of the Midwestern High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Project.

  20. Materials Science of High-Level Nuclear Waste Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, William J.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Stefanovsky, S. V.; Vance, E. R.; Vernaz, Etienne Y.

    2009-01-09

    With the increasing demand for the development of more nuclear power comes the responsibility to address the technical challenges of immobilizing high-level nuclear wastes in stable solid forms for interim storage or disposition in geologic repositories. The immobilization of high-level nuclear wastes has been an active area of research and development for over 50 years. Borosilicate glasses and complex ceramic composites have been developed to meet many technical challenges and current needs, although regulatory issues, which vary widely from country to country, have yet to be resolved. Cooperative international programs to develop advanced proliferation-resistant nuclear technologies to close the nuclear fuel cycle and increase the efficiency of nuclear energy production might create new separation waste streams that could demand new concepts and materials for nuclear waste immobilization. This article reviews the current state-of-the-art understanding regarding the materials science of glasses and ceramics for the immobilization of high-level nuclear waste and excess nuclear materials and discusses approaches to address new waste streams.

  1. Bacteriologic testing of endoscopes after high-level disinfection.

    PubMed

    Rejchrt, Stanislav; Cermák, Pavel; Pavlatová, Ludmila; McKová, Eva; Bures, Jan

    2004-07-01

    There are no definitive data available concerning microbiologic safety of prolonged endoscope storage after reprocessing and disinfection. This study evaluated the durability of high-level disinfection of endoscopes stored in a dust-proof cabinet for 5 days. Three different types of endoscopes (upper endoscopes, duodenoscopes, colonoscopes) were tested. After completion of the endoscopic procedure, endoscopes were subjected to an initial decontamination, followed by manual cleaning with the endoscope immersed in detergent. The endoscopes then were placed in an automatic reprocessor that provides high-level disinfection. They then were stored by hanging in a dust-proof cabinet. Bacteriologic samples were obtained from the surface of the endoscopes, the openings for the piston valves, and the accessory channel daily for 5 days, and by flush-through (combined with brushing) from the accessory channels after 5 days of storage. Samples were cultured for all types of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, including bacterial spores, and for Candida species. For all assays, all endoscopes were bacteria-free immediately after high-level disinfection. Only 4 assays (of 135) were positive during the subsequent 5-day assessment (skin bacteria cultured from endoscope surfaces). All flush-through samples were sterile. When endoscope reprocessing guidelines are strictly observed and endoscopes are stored in appropriate cabinets for up to 5 days, reprocessing before use may not be necessary.

  2. Rapid detection of Escherichia coli and enterococci in recreational water using an immunomagnetic separation/adenosine triphosphate technique.

    PubMed

    Bushon, R N; Brady, A M; Likirdopulos, C A; Cireddu, J V

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine a rapid method for detecting Escherichia coli and enterococci in recreational water. Water samples were assayed for E. coli and enterococci by traditional and immunomagnetic separation/adenosine triphosphate (IMS/ATP) methods. Three sample treatments were evaluated for the IMS/ATP method: double filtration, single filtration, and direct analysis. Pearson's correlation analysis showed strong, significant, linear relations between IMS/ATP and traditional methods for all sample treatments; strongest linear correlations were with the direct analysis (r = 0.62 and 0.77 for E. coli and enterococci, respectively). Additionally, simple linear regression was used to estimate bacteria concentrations as a function of IMS/ATP results. The correct classification of water-quality criteria was 67% for E. coli and 80% for enterococci. The IMS/ATP method is a viable alternative to traditional methods for faecal-indicator bacteria. The IMS/ATP method addresses critical public health needs for the rapid detection of faecal-indicator contamination and has potential for satisfying US legislative mandates requiring methods to detect bathing water contamination in 2 h or less. Moreover, IMS/ATP equipment is considerably less costly and more portable than that for molecular methods, making the method suitable for field applications.

  3. Analysis of Enterococci and Bacteriodales Fecal Indicator Bacteria in a Lake Michigan Tributary by Real-Time Quantitative PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Salt Creek watershed in northwest Indiana drains into Lake Michigan near several heavily used recreational beaches. This study aimed to investigate the levels of fecal indicator bacteria, enterococci and Bacteroidales, in Salt Creek using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) an...

  4. Rapid detection of Escherichia coli and enterococci in recreational water using an immunomagnetic separation/adenosine triphosphate technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bushon, R.N.; Brady, A.M.; Likirdopulos, C.A.; Cireddu, J.V.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to examine a rapid method for detecting Escherichia coli and enterococci in recreational water. Methods and Results: Water samples were assayed for E. coli and enterococci by traditional and immunomagnetic separation/adenosine triphosphate (IMS/ATP) methods. Three sample treatments were evaluated for the IMS/ATP method: double filtration, single filtration, and direct analysis. Pearson's correlation analysis showed strong, significant, linear relations between IMS/ATP and traditional methods for all sample treatments; strongest linear correlations were with the direct analysis (r = 0.62 and 0.77 for E. coli and enterococci, respectively). Additionally, simple linear regression was used to estimate bacteria concentrations as a function of IMS/ATP results. The correct classification of water-quality criteria was 67% for E. coli and 80% for enterococci. Conclusions: The IMS/ATP method is a viable alternative to traditional methods for faecal-indicator bacteria. Significance and Impact of the Study: The IMS/ATP method addresses critical public health needs for the rapid detection of faecal-indicator contamination and has potential for satisfying US legislative mandates requiring methods to detect bathing water contamination in 2 h or less. Moreover, IMS/ATP equipment is considerably less costly and more portable than that for molecular methods, making the method suitable for field applications. ?? 2009 The Authors.

  5. Prevalence, species distribution and antimicrobial resistance of enterococci isolated from dogs and cats in the United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The contribution of dogs and cats as reservoirs of antimicrobial resistant enterococci remains largely undefined. This is increasingly important considering the possibility of transfer of bacteria from companion animals to the human host. In this study, dogs and cats from veterinary clinics were s...

  6. COMPARISON OF MENTEROCOCCUS AGAR AND THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY-RECOMENDED ENTEROCOCCI METHODS, ME AND MEI AGAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    To maintain waters that are "fishable and swimmable", mandated by the Clean Water Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing a list of approved methods for use in enumerating enterococci and E. coli in ambient waters. As part of this effort, we compared mEn...

  7. Analysis of Enterococci and Bacteriodales Fecal Indicator Bacteria in a Lake Michigan Tributary by Real-Time Quantitative PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Salt Creek watershed in northwest Indiana drains into Lake Michigan near several heavily used recreational beaches. This study aimed to investigate the levels of fecal indicator bacteria, enterococci and Bacteroidales, in Salt Creek using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) an...

  8. Diversity and antibiotic susceptibility of autochthonous dairy enterococci isolates: are they safe candidates for autochthonous starter cultures?

    PubMed Central

    Terzić-Vidojević, Amarela; Veljović, Katarina; Begović, Jelena; Filipić, Brankica; Popović, Dušanka; Tolinački, Maja; Miljković, Marija; Kojić, Milan; Golić, Nataša

    2015-01-01

    Enterococci represent the most controversial group of dairy bacteria. They are found to be the main constituent of many traditional Mediterranean dairy products and contribute to their characteristic taste and flavor. On the other hand, during the last 50 years antibiotic-resistant enterococci have emerged as leading causes of nosocomial infections worldwide. The aim of this study was to determine the diversity, technological properties, antibiotic susceptibility and virulence traits of 636 enterococci previously isolated from 55 artisan dairy products from 12 locations in the Western Balkan countries (WBC) of Serbia, Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. All strains were identified both by microbiological and molecular methods. The predominant species was Enterococcus durans, followed by Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium. Over 44% of the isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin, while 26.2% of the isolates were multi-resistant to three or more antibiotics belonging to different families. 185 isolates (29.1%) were susceptible to all 13 of the antibiotics tested. The antibiotic-susceptible isolates were further tested for possible virulence genes and the production of biogenic amines. Finally, five enterococci isolates were found to be antibiotic susceptible with good technological characteristics and without virulence traits or the ability to produce biogenic amines, making them possible candidates for biotechnological application as starter cultures in the dairy industry. PMID:26441888

  9. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in faecal enterococci from vet-visiting pets and assessment of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Leite-Martins, L; Mahú, M I; Costa, A L; Bessa, L J; Vaz-Pires, P; Loureiro, L; Niza-Ribeiro, J; de Matos, A J F; Martins da Costa, P

    2015-06-27

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) exhibited by enterococci isolated from faeces of pets and its underlying risk factors. From September 2009 to May 2012, rectal swabs were collected from 74 dogs and 17 cats, selected from the population of animals visiting the Veterinary Hospital of University of Porto, UPVet, through a systematic random procedure. Animal owners answered a questionnaire about the risk factors that could influence the presence of AMR in faecal enterococci. Enterococci isolation, identification and antimicrobial (AM) susceptibility testing were performed. Data analyses of multilevel, univariable and multivariable generalised linear mixed models were conducted. From all enterococci isolated (n=315), 61 per cent were considered multidrug-resistant, whereas only 9.2 per cent were susceptible to all AMs tested. Highest resistance was found to tetracycline (67.0 per cent), rifampicin (60.3 per cent), azithromycin (58.4 per cent), quinupristin/dalfopristin (54.0 per cent) and erythromycin (53.0 per cent). Previous fluoroquinolone treatments and coprophagic habits were the features more consistently associated with the presence of AMR for three (chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin and azithromycin) and seven (tetracycline, rifampicin, gentamicin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin and azithromycin), respectively, out of nine AMs assessed. Evaluating risk factors that determine the presence of drug-resistant bacteria in pets, a possible source of resistance determinants to human beings, is crucial for the selection of appropriate treatment guidelines by veterinary practitioners. British Veterinary Association.

  10. Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    N. E. Pettit

    2001-07-13

    The Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers are loaded and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the accesses using a rail mounted transporter, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The defense high level waste (HLW) disposal container provides long-term confinement of the commercial HLW and defense HLW (including immobilized plutonium waste forms [IPWF]) placed within disposable canisters, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in disposable canisters may also be placed in a defense HLW disposal container along with commercial HLW waste forms, which is known as co-disposal. The Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limits radionuclide release. The disposal container/waste package maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum handling and rockfall loads, limits the individual canister temperatures after emplacement, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident. Defense HLW disposal containers for HLW disposal will hold up to five HLW canisters. Defense HLW disposal containers for co-disposal will hold up to five HLW canisters arranged in a ring and one DOE SNF canister inserted in the center and/or one or more DOE SNF canisters displacing a HLW canister in the ring. Defense HLW disposal containers also will hold two Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs) and two HLW canisters in one disposal container. The disposal container will include outer and inner cylinders, outer and inner cylinder lids, and may include a canister guide. An exterior label will provide a means by

  11. Development of a High Level Waste Tank Inspection System

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, D.K.; Loibl, M.W.; Meese, D.C.

    1995-03-21

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Technology Center was requested by it`s sister site, West Valley Nuclear Service (WVNS), to develop a remote inspection system to gather wall thickness readings of their High Level Waste Tanks. WVNS management chose to take a proactive approach to gain current information on two tanks t hat had been in service since the early 70`s. The tanks contain high level waste, are buried underground, and have only two access ports to an annular space between the tank and the secondary concrete vault. A specialized remote system was proposed to provide both a visual surveillance and ultrasonic thickness measurements of the tank walls. A magnetic wheeled crawler was the basis for the remote delivery system integrated with an off-the-shelf Ultrasonic Data Acquisition System. A development program was initiated for Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) to design, fabricate, and test a remote system based on the Crawler. The system was completed and involved three crawlers to perform the needed tasks, an Ultrasonic Crawler, a Camera Crawler, and a Surface Prep Crawler. The crawlers were computer controlled so that their operation could be done remotely and their position on the wall could be tracked. The Ultrasonic Crawler controls were interfaced with ABB Amdata`s I-PC, Ultrasonic Data Acquisition System so that thickness mapping of the wall could be obtained. A second system was requested by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), to perform just ultrasonic mapping on their similar Waste Storage Tanks; however, the system needed to be interfaced with the P-scan Ultrasonic Data Acquisition System. Both remote inspection systems were completed 9/94. Qualifications tests were conducted by WVNS prior to implementation on the actual tank and tank development was achieved 10/94. The second inspection system was deployed at WSRC 11/94 with success, and the system is now in continuous service inspecting the remaining high level waste tanks at WSRC.

  12. High-level waste management technology program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, H.D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this plan is to document the integrated technology program plan for the Savannah River Site (SRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) Management System. The mission of the SRS HLW System is to receive and store SRS high-level wastes in a see and environmentally sound, and to convert these wastes into forms suitable for final disposal. These final disposal forms are borosilicate glass to be sent to the Federal Repository, Saltstone grout to be disposed of on site, and treated waste water to be released to the environment via a permitted outfall. Thus, the technology development activities described herein are those activities required to enable successful accomplishment of this mission. The technology program is based on specific needs of the SRS HLW System and organized following the systems engineering level 3 functions. Technology needs for each level 3 function are listed as reference, enhancements, and alternatives. Finally, FY-95 funding, deliverables, and schedules are s in Chapter IV with details on the specific tasks that are funded in FY-95 provided in Appendix A. The information in this report represents the vision of activities as defined at the beginning of the fiscal year. Depending on emergent issues, funding changes, and other factors, programs and milestones may be adjusted during the fiscal year. The FY-95 SRS HLW technology program strongly emphasizes startup support for the Defense Waste Processing Facility and In-Tank Precipitation. Closure of technical issues associated with these operations has been given highest priority. Consequently, efforts on longer term enhancements and alternatives are receiving minimal funding. However, High-Level Waste Management is committed to participation in the national Radioactive Waste Tank Remediation Technology Focus Area. 4 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

  13. Modern Alchemy: Solidifying high-level nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, C.C.

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is putting a modern version of alchemy to work to produce an answer to a decades-old problem. It is taking place at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) near Buffalo, New York. At both locations, contractor Westinghouse Electric Corporation is applying technology that is turning liquid high-level radioactive waste (HLW) into a stabilized, durable glass for safer and easier management. The process is called vitrification. SRS and WVDP are now operating the nation`s first full-scale HLW vitrification plants.

  14. Corrosion and failure processes in high-level waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Mahidhara, R.K.; Elleman, T.S.; Murty, K.L.

    1992-11-01

    A large amount of radioactive waste has been stored safely at the Savannah River and Hanford sites over the past 46 years. The aim of this report is to review the experimental corrosion studies at Savannah River and Hanford with the intention of identifying the types and rates of corrosion encountered and indicate how these data contribute to tank failure predictions. The compositions of the High-Level Wastes, mild steels used in the construction of the waste tanks and degradation-modes particularly stress corrosion cracking and pitting are discussed. Current concerns at the Hanford Site are highlighted.

  15. Very-high-level neutral-beam control system

    SciTech Connect

    Elischer, V.; Jacobson, V.; Theil, E.

    1981-10-01

    As increasing numbers of neutral beams are added to fusion machines, their operation can consume a significant fraction of a facility's total resources. LBL has developed a very high level control system that allows a neutral beam injector to be treated as a black box with just 2 controls: one to set the beam power and one to set the pulse duration. This 2 knob view allows simple operation and provides a natural base for implementing even higher level controls such as automatic source conditioning.

  16. High level trigger online calibration framework in ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bablok, S. R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Kanaki, K.; Nystrand, J.; Richter, M.; Röhrich, D.; Skjerdal, K.; Ullaland, K.; Øvrebekk, G.; Larsen, D.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Lindenstruth, V.; Steinbeck, T. M.; Thäder, J.; Kebschull, U.; Böttger, S.; Kalcher, S.; Lara, C.; Panse, R.; Appelshäuser, H.; Ploskon, M.; Helstrup, H.; Hetland, K. F.; Haaland, Ø.; Roed, K.; Thingnæs, T.; Aamodt, K.; Hille, P. T.; Lovhoiden, G.; Skaali, B.; Tveter, T.; Das, I.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Becker, B.; Cicalo, C.; Marras, D.; Siddhanta, S.; Cleymans, J.; Szostak, A.; Fearick, R.; Vaux, G. d.; Vilakazi, Z.

    2008-07-01

    The ALICE High Level Trigger (HLT) is designed to perform event analysis of heavy ion and proton-proton collisions as well as calibration calculations online. A large PC farm, currently under installation, enables analysis algorithms to process these computationally intensive tasks. The HLT receives event data from all major detectors in ALICE. Interfaces to the various other systems provide the analysis software with required additional information. Processed results are sent back to the corresponding systems. To allow online performance monitoring of the detectors an interface for visualizing these results has been developed.

  17. Ionization chamber for measurements of high-level tritium gas

    SciTech Connect

    Carstens, D.H.W.; David, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    The construction and calibration of a simple ionization-chamber apparatus for measurement of high level tritium gas is described. The apparatus uses an easily constructed but rugged chamber containing the unknown gas and an inexpensive digital multimeter for measuring the ion current. The equipment after calibration is suitable for measuring 0.01 to 100% tritium gas in hydrogen-helium mixes with an accuracy of a few percent. At both the high and low limits of measurements deviations from the predicted theoretical current are observed. These are briefly discussed.

  18. High-level neutron coincidence counter maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect

    Swansen, J.; Collinsworth, P.

    1983-05-01

    High-level neutron coincidence counter operational (field) calibration and usage is well known. This manual makes explicit basic (shop) check-out, calibration, and testing of new units and is a guide for repair of failed in-service units. Operational criteria for the major electronic functions are detailed, as are adjustments and calibration procedures, and recurrent mechanical/electromechanical problems are addressed. Some system tests are included for quality assurance. Data on nonstandard large-scale integrated (circuit) components and a schematic set are also included.

  19. Market Designs for High Levels of Variable Generation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, M.; Holttinen, H.; Kiviluoma, J.; Orths, A.; Lynch, M.; Soder, L.

    2014-10-01

    Variable renewable generation is increasing in penetration in modern power systems, leading to higher variability in the supply and price of electricity as well as lower average spot prices. This raises new challenges, particularly in ensuring sufficient capacity and flexibility from conventional technologies. Because the fixed costs and lifetimes of electricity generation investments are significant, designing markets and regulations that ensure the efficient integration of renewable generation is a significant challenge. This papers reviews the state of play of market designs for high levels of variable generation in the United States and Europe and considers new developments in both regions.

  20. High-level wastes: DOE names three sites for characterization

    SciTech Connect

    1986-07-01

    DOE announced in May 1986 that there will be there site characterization studies made to determine suitability for a high-level radioactive waste repository. The studies will include several test drillings to the proposed disposal depths. Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Deaf Smith Country, Texas, and Hanford, Washington were identified as the study sites, and further studies for a second repository site in the East were postponed. The affected states all filed suits in federal circuit courts because they were given no advance warning of the announcement of their selection or the decision to suspend work on a second repository. Criticisms of the selection process include the narrowing or DOE options.

  1. Efficacy of hand disinfectants against vancomycin-resistant enterococci in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kampf, G; Höfer, M; Wendt, C

    1999-06-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) may be spread within a hospital via the contaminated hands of the healthcare worker. Effective hand disinfectants are necessary to break chains of transmission. We determined the bactericidal activity of 1-propanol, chlorhexidine digluconate (0.5 and 4%). Sterillium (45% 2-propanol, 30% 1-propanol and 0.2% mecetronium etilsulphate), Skinsept F (70% 2-propanol, 0.5% chlorhexidine digluconate and 0.45% hydrogen peroxide) and Hibisol (70% 2-propanol and 0.5% chlorhexidine gluconate) against 11 clonally distinct enterococcal isolates in a quantitative suspension test. Four isolates were vancomycin susceptible, four were vanA and the remainder vanB positive. Eight isolates were identified as Enterococcus faecium, two as Enterococcus faecalis and one as Enterococcus gallinarum. The investigator was blinded to the species and the genotype. Four parallel experiments were carried out for each isolate, each preparation, each dilution and each reaction time. 1-Propanol (60%), Sterillium, Skinsept F and Hibisol were all highly bactericidal after 15 and 30 s against VRE and vancomycin-susceptible enterococci (VSE) with reduction factors (RF) > 6.4, even in dilution of 50% (v/v). No significant difference was observed between vanA isolates, vanB isolates and VSE. Chlorhexidine digluconate (0.5% and 4%) was found to be less bactericidal after 30, 60 and 300 sec (RF < or = 2.5). The vanB genotype isolates were found to be significantly more susceptible to chlorhexidine (0.5%) than the vanA isolates (60 sec; one-way ANOVA model; P = 0.05). After 300 sec the vanB genotype isolates were found to be significantly more susceptible to chlorhexidine (0.5%) than the other two genotype isolates (P = 0.016). The vanA isolates were found to be significantly more susceptible to chlorhexidine (4%) than the vanB isolates (300 s; P = 0.024). E. faecium was found to be less susceptible to chlorhexidine than E. faecalis at all concentrations and reaction

  2. Validation of VITEK 2 version 4.01 software for detection, identification, and classification of glycopeptide-resistant enterococci.

    PubMed

    Abele-Horn, Marianne; Hommers, Leif; Trabold, René; Frosch, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of the new VITEK 2 version 4.01 software to identify and detect glycopeptide-resistant enterococci compared to that of the reference broth microdilution method and to classify them into the vanA, vanB, vanC1, and vanC2 genotypes. Moreover, the accuracy of antimicrobial susceptibility testing with agents with improved potencies against glycopeptide-resistant enterococci was determined. A total of 121 enterococci were investigated. The new VITEK 2 software was able to identify 114 (94.2%) enterococcal strains correctly to the species level and to classify 119 (98.3%) enterococci correctly to the glycopeptide resistance genotype level. One Enterococcus casseliflavus strain and six Enterococcus faecium vanA strains with low-level resistance to vancomycin were identified with low discrimination, requiring additional tests. One of the vanA strains was misclassified as the vanB type, and one glycopeptide-susceptible E. facium wild type was misclassified as the vanA type. The overall essential agreements for antimicrobial susceptibility testing results were 94.2% for vancomycin, 95.9% for teicoplanin, 100% for quinupristin-dalfopristin and moxifloxacin, and 97.5% for linezolid. The rates of minor errors were 9% for teicoplanin and 5% for the other antibiotic agents. The identification and susceptibility data were produced within 4 h to 6 h 30 min and 8 h 15 min to 12 h 15 min. In conclusion, use of VITEK 2 version 4.01 software appears to be a reliable method for the identification and detection of glycopeptide-resistant enterococci as well as an improvement over the use of the former VITEK 2 database. However, a significant reduction in the detection time would be desirable.

  3. Validation of VITEK 2 Version 4.01 Software for Detection, Identification, and Classification of Glycopeptide-Resistant Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Abele-Horn, Marianne; Hommers, Leif; Trabold, René; Frosch, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of the new VITEK 2 version 4.01 software to identify and detect glycopeptide-resistant enterococci compared to that of the reference broth microdilution method and to classify them into the vanA, vanB, vanC1, and vanC2 genotypes. Moreover, the accuracy of antimicrobial susceptibility testing with agents with improved potencies against glycopeptide-resistant enterococci was determined. A total of 121 enterococci were investigated. The new VITEK 2 software was able to identify 114 (94.2%) enterococcal strains correctly to the species level and to classify 119 (98.3%) enterococci correctly to the glycopeptide resistance genotype level. One Enterococcus casseliflavus strain and six Enterococcus faecium vanA strains with low-level resistance to vancomycin were identified with low discrimination, requiring additional tests. One of the vanA strains was misclassified as the vanB type, and one glycopeptide-susceptible E. facium wild type was misclassified as the vanA type. The overall essential agreements for antimicrobial susceptibility testing results were 94.2% for vancomycin, 95.9% for teicoplanin, 100% for quinupristin-dalfopristin and moxifloxacin, and 97.5% for linezolid. The rates of minor errors were 9% for teicoplanin and 5% for the other antibiotic agents. The identification and susceptibility data were produced within 4 h to 6 h 30 min and 8 h 15 min to 12 h 15 min. In conclusion, use of VITEK 2 version 4.01 software appears to be a reliable method for the identification and detection of glycopeptide-resistant enterococci as well as an improvement over the use of the former VITEK 2 database. However, a significant reduction in the detection time would be desirable. PMID:16390951

  4. Evaluation of marine bacteriocinogenic enterococci strains with inhibitory activity against fish-pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ghomrassi, Hamdi; ben Braiek, Olfa; Choiset, Yvan; Haertlé, Thomas; Hani, Khaled; Chobert, Jean-Marc; Ghrairi, Taoufik

    2016-02-11

    Use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as probiotics may provide an alternative to the use of antibiotics in aquaculture. LAB strains isolated from wild fish viscera and skin were evaluated for bacteriocin production and safety aspects (lack of antibiotic resistance, production of virulence factors). 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed the presence of Enterococcus faecium (13 isolates) and Lactococcus lactis (3 isolates) from fish samples. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analyses of the 13 enterococci isolates showed that they were all clustered, with greater than 95% similarity. However, RAPD analysis revealed significant molecular diversity between enterococci strains. Six enterococci strains were chosen and evaluated for their antibacterial activities. These strains produced a bacteriocin-like substance and exhibited a broad spectrum of inhibition against pathogenic bacteria isolated from diseased fish, including Streptococcus parauberis, Vagococcus spp., and Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, and in particular against the Gram-negative bacteria Flavobacterium frigidarium, Vibrio pectenicida, V. penaeicida, and Photobacterium damselae. The inhibition activity towards bacterial indicator strains was at a maximum when bacteria were grown at 37°C. However, bacteriocin production was observed at 15°C after 12 h of incubation. Only structural genes of enterocins A and B were detected by PCR in the 6 enterococci strains, suggesting the production of these enterocins. In addition, these strains did not harbor any virulence factors or any significant antibiotic resistance, and they tolerated bile. Our results suggest that enterococci are an important part of the bacterial flora of fish and that some strains have the potential to be used as probiotics.

  5. Space augmentation of military high-level waste disposal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, T.; Lees, L.; Divita, E.

    1979-01-01

    Space disposal of selected components of military high-level waste (HLW) is considered. This disposal option offers the promise of eliminating the long-lived radionuclides in military HLW from the earth. A space mission which meets the dual requirements of long-term orbital stability and a maximum of one space shuttle launch per week over a period of 20-40 years, is a heliocentric orbit about halfway between the orbits of earth and Venus. Space disposal of high-level radioactive waste is characterized by long-term predictability and short-term uncertainties which must be reduced to acceptably low levels. For example, failure of either the Orbit Transfer Vehicle after leaving low earth orbit, or the storable propellant stage failure at perihelion would leave the nuclear waste package in an unplanned and potentially unstable orbit. Since potential earth reencounter and subsequent burn-up in the earth's atmosphere is unacceptable, a deep space rendezvous, docking, and retrieval capability must be developed.

  6. High-level expressing YAC vector for transgenic animal bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Y; Miwa, M; Takahashi, R; Kodaira, K; Hirabayashi, M; Suzuki, T; Ueda, M

    1999-04-01

    The position effect is one major problem in the production of transgenic animals as mammary gland bioreactors. In the present study, we introduced the human growth hormone (hGH) gene into 210-kb human alpha-lactalbumin position-independent YAC vectors using homologous recombination and produced transgenic rats via microinjection of YAC DNA into rat embryos. The efficiency of producing transgenic rats with the YAC vector DNA was the same as that using plasmid constructs. All analyzed transgenic rats had one copy of the transgene and produced milk containing a high level of hGH (0.25-8.9 mg/ml). In transgenic rats with the YAC vector in which the human alpha-lactalbumin gene was replaced with the hGH gene, tissue specificity of hGH mRNA was the same as that of the endogenous rat alpha-lactalbumin gene. Thus, the 210-kb human alpha-lactalbumin YAC is a useful vector for high-level expression of foreign genes in the milk of transgenic animals.

  7. Learning high-level features for chord recognition using Autoencoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phongthongloa, Vilailukkana; Kamonsantiroj, Suwatchai; Pipanmaekaporn, Luepol

    2016-07-01

    Chord transcription is valuable to do by itself. It is known that the manual transcription of chords is very tiresome, time-consuming. It requires, moreover, musical knowledge. Automatic chord recognition has recently attracted a number of researches in the Music Information Retrieval field. It has known that a pitch class profile (PCP) is the commonly signal representation of musical harmonic analysis. However, the PCP may contain additional non-harmonic noise such as harmonic overtones and transient noise. The problem of non-harmonic might be generating the sound energy in term of frequency more than the actual notes of the respective chord. Autoencoder neural network may be trained to learn a mapping from low level feature to one or more higher-level representation. These high-level representations can explain dependencies of the inputs and reduce the effect of non-harmonic noise. Then these improve features are fed into neural network classifier. The proposed high-level musical features show 80.90% of accuracy. The experimental results have shown that the proposed approach can achieve better performance in comparison with other based method.

  8. High level language-based robotic control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Guillermo (Inventor); Kreutz, Kenneth K. (Inventor); Jain, Abhinandan (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    This invention is a robot control system based on a high level language implementing a spatial operator algebra. There are two high level languages included within the system. At the highest level, applications programs can be written in a robot-oriented applications language including broad operators such as MOVE and GRASP. The robot-oriented applications language statements are translated into statements in the spatial operator algebra language. Programming can also take place using the spatial operator algebra language. The statements in the spatial operator algebra language from either source are then translated into machine language statements for execution by a digital control computer. The system also includes the capability of executing the control code sequences in a simulation mode before actual execution to assure proper action at execution time. The robot's environment is checked as part of the process and dynamic reconfiguration is also possible. The languages and system allow the programming and control of multiple arms and the use of inward/outward spatial recursions in which every computational step can be related to a transformation from one point in the mechanical robot to another point to name two major advantages.

  9. High level language-based robotic control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Guillermo (Inventor); Kruetz, Kenneth K. (Inventor); Jain, Abhinandan (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention is a robot control system based on a high level language implementing a spatial operator algebra. There are two high level languages included within the system. At the highest level, applications programs can be written in a robot-oriented applications language including broad operators such as MOVE and GRASP. The robot-oriented applications language statements are translated into statements in the spatial operator algebra language. Programming can also take place using the spatial operator algebra language. The statements in the spatial operator algebra language from either source are then translated into machine language statements for execution by a digital control computer. The system also includes the capability of executing the control code sequences in a simulation mode before actual execution to assure proper action at execution time. The robot's environment is checked as part of the process and dynamic reconfiguration is also possible. The languages and system allow the programming and control of multiple arms and the use of inward/outward spatial recursions in which every computational step can be related to a transformation from one point in the mechanical robot to another point to name two major advantages.

  10. High level radioactive waste glass production and product description

    SciTech Connect

    Sproull, J.F.; Marra, S.L.; Jantzen, C.M.

    1993-12-01

    This report examines borosilicate glass as a means of immobilizing high-level radioactive wastes. Borosilicate glass will encapsulate most of the defense and some of the commercial HLW in the US. The resulting waste forms must meet the requirements of the WA-SRD and the WAPS, which include a short term PCT durability test. The waste form producer must report the composition(s) of the borosilicate waste glass(es) produced but can choose the composition(s) to meet site-specific requirements. Although the waste form composition is the primary determinant of durability, the redox state of the glass; the existence, content, and composition of crystals; and the presence of glass-in-glass phase separation can affect durability. The waste glass should be formulated to avoid phase separation regions. The ultimate result of this effort will be a waste form which is much more stable and potentially less mobile than the liquid high level radioactive waste is currently.

  11. Burning high-level TRU waste in fusion fission reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yaosong

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the concept of actinide burning instead of a once-through fuel cycle for disposing spent nuclear fuel seems to get much more attention. A new method of burning high-level transuranic (TRU) waste combined with Thorium-Uranium (Th-U) fuel in the subcritical reactors driven by external fusion neutron sources is proposed in this paper. The thorium-based TRU fuel burns all of the long-lived actinides via a hard neutron spectrum while outputting power. A one-dimensional model of the reactor concept was built by means of the ONESN_BURN code with new data libraries. The numerical results included actinide radioactivity, biological hazard potential, and much higher burnup rate of high-level transuranic waste. The comparison of the fusion-fission reactor with the thermal reactor shows that the harder neutron spectrum is more efficient than the soft. The Th-U cycle produces less TRU, less radiotoxicity and fewer long-lived actinides. The Th-U cycle provides breeding of 233U with a long operation time (>20 years), hence significantly reducing the reactivity swing while improving safety and burnup.

  12. Spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste transportation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-01

    This publication is intended to provide its readers with an introduction to the issues surrounding the subject of transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, especially as those issues impact the southern region of the United States. It was originally issued by the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) in July 1987 as the Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer, a document patterned on work performed by the Western Interstate Energy Board and designed as a ``comprehensive overview of the issues.`` This work differs from that earlier effort in that it is designed for the educated layman with little or no background in nuclear waste issues. In addition, this document is not a comprehensive examination of nuclear waste issues but should instead serve as a general introduction to the subject. Owing to changes in the nuclear waste management system, program activities by the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies and developing technologies, much of this information is dated quickly. While this report uses the most recent data available, readers should keep in mind that some of the material is subject to rapid change. SSEB plans periodic updates in the future to account for changes in the program. Replacement pages sew be supplied to all parties in receipt of this publication provided they remain on the SSEB mailing list.

  13. How to achieve high-level expression of microbial enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Yang, Haiquan; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R.; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Microbial enzymes have been used in a large number of fields, such as chemical, agricultural and biopharmaceutical industries. The enzyme production rate and yield are the main factors to consider when choosing the appropriate expression system for the production of recombinant proteins. Recombinant enzymes have been expressed in bacteria (e.g., Escherichia coli, Bacillus and lactic acid bacteria), filamentous fungi (e.g., Aspergillus) and yeasts (e.g., Pichia pastoris). The favorable and very advantageous characteristics of these species have resulted in an increasing number of biotechnological applications. Bacterial hosts (e.g., E. coli) can be used to quickly and easily overexpress recombinant enzymes; however, bacterial systems cannot express very large proteins and proteins that require post-translational modifications. The main bacterial expression hosts, with the exception of lactic acid bacteria and filamentous fungi, can produce several toxins which are not compatible with the expression of recombinant enzymes in food and drugs. However, due to the multiplicity of the physiological impacts arising from high-level expression of genes encoding the enzymes and expression hosts, the goal of overproduction can hardly be achieved, and therefore, the yield of recombinant enzymes is limited. In this review, the recent strategies used for the high-level expression of microbial enzymes in the hosts mentioned above are summarized and the prospects are also discussed. We hope this review will contribute to the development of the enzyme-related research field. PMID:23686280

  14. Spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste transportation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    This publication is intended to provide its readers with an introduction to the issues surrounding the subject of transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, especially as those issues impact the southern region of the United States. It was originally issued by the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) in July 1987 as the Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer, a document patterned on work performed by the Western Interstate Energy Board and designed as a ``comprehensive overview of the issues.`` This work differs from that earlier effort in that it is designed for the educated layman with little or no background in nuclear waste issues. In addition, this document is not a comprehensive examination of nuclear waste issues but should instead serve as a general introduction to the subject. Owing to changes in the nuclear waste management system, program activities by the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies and developing technologies, much of this information is dated quickly. While this report uses the most recent data available, readers should keep in mind that some of the material is subject to rapid change. SSEB plans periodic updates in the future to account for changes in the program. Replacement pages will be supplied to all parties in receipt of this publication provided they remain on the SSEB mailing list.

  15. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING ENABLING ORGANIC HIGH LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M

    2008-05-09

    Waste streams planned for generation by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and existing radioactive High Level Waste (HLW) streams containing organic compounds such as the Tank 48H waste stream at Savannah River Site have completed simulant and radioactive testing, respectfully, by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). GNEP waste streams will include up to 53 wt% organic compounds and nitrates up to 56 wt%. Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. provided by organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce NOX in the off-gas to N2 to meet Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during the waste form stabilization process regardless of the GNEP processes utilized and exists in some of the high level radioactive waste tanks at Savannah River Site and Hanford Tank Farms, e.g. organics in the feed or organics used for nitrate destruction. Waste streams containing high organic concentrations cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by pretreatment. The alternative waste stabilization pretreatment process of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operates at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). The FBSR process has been demonstrated on GNEP simulated waste and radioactive waste containing high organics from Tank 48H to convert organics to CAA compliant gases, create no secondary liquid waste streams and create a stable mineral waste form.

  16. Local acceptance of a high-level nuclear waste repository.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Lennart

    2004-06-01

    The siting of nuclear waste facilities has been very difficult in all countries. Recent experience in Sweden indicates, however, that it may be possible, under certain circumstances, to gain local support for the siting of a high-level nuclear waste (HLNW) repository. The article reports on a study of attitudes and risk perceptions of people living in four municipalities in Sweden where HLNW siting was being intensely discussed at the political level, in media, and among the public. Data showed a relatively high level of consensus on acceptability of at least further investigation of the issue; in two cases local councils have since voted in favor of a go-ahead, and in one case only a very small majority defeated the issue. Models of policy attitudes showed that these were related to attitude to nuclear power, attributes of the perceived HLNW risk, and trust. Factors responsible for acceptance are discussed at several levels. One is the attitude to nuclear power, which is becoming more positive, probably because no viable alternatives are in sight. Other factors have to do with the extensive information programs conducted in these municipalities, and with the logical nature of the conclusion that they would be good candidates for hosting the national HLNW repository.

  17. Spent Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This publication is intended to provide its readers with an introduction to the issues surrounding the subject of transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, especially as those issues impact the southern region of the United States. It was originally issued by SSEB in July 1987 as the Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer, a document patterned on work performed by the Western Interstate Energy Board and designed as a ``comprehensive overview of the issues.`` This work differs from that earlier effort in that it is designed for the educated layman with little or no background in nuclear waste Issues. In addition. this document is not a comprehensive examination of nuclear waste issues but should instead serve as a general introduction to the subject. Owing to changes in the nuclear waste management system, program activities by the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies and developing technologies, much of this information is dated quickly. While this report uses the most recent data available, readers should keep in mind that some of the material is subject to rapid change. SSEB plans periodic updates in the future to account for changes in the program. Replacement pages will be supplied to all parties in receipt of this publication provided they remain on the SSEB mailing list.

  18. VITRIFICATION OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Peeler, D.

    2009-06-17

    The objective of this study was to experimentally measure the properties and performance of a series of glasses with compositions that could represent high level waste Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) as vitrified at the Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility. These data were used to guide frit optimization efforts as the SB5 composition was finalized. Glass compositions for this study were developed by combining a series of SB5 composition projections with a group of candidate frits. The study glasses were fabricated using depleted uranium and their chemical compositions, crystalline contents and chemical durabilities were characterized. Trevorite was the only crystalline phase that was identified in a few of the study glasses after slow cooling, and is not of concern as spinels have been shown to have little impact on the durability of high level waste glasses. Chemical durability was quantified using the Product Consistency Test (PCT). All of the glasses had very acceptable durability performance. The results of this study indicate that a frit composition can be identified that will provide a processable and durable glass when combined with SB5.

  19. Permitting plan for the high-level waste interim storage

    SciTech Connect

    Deffenbaugh, M.L.

    1997-04-23

    This document addresses the environmental permitting requirements for the transportation and interim storage of solidified high-level waste (HLW) produced during Phase 1 of the Hanford Site privatization effort. Solidified HLW consists of canisters containing vitrified HLW (glass) and containers that hold cesium separated during low-level waste pretreatment. The glass canisters and cesium containers will be transported to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) in a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-provided transportation cask via diesel-powered tractor trailer. Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Milestone M-90 establishes a new major milestone, and associated interim milestones and target dates, governing acquisition and/or modification of facilities necessary for: (1) interim storage of Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) immobilized HLW (IHLW) and other canistered high-level waste forms; and (2) interim storage and disposal of TWRS immobilized low-activity tank waste (ILAW). An environmental requirements checklist and narrative was developed to identify the permitting path forward for the HLW interim storage (HLWIS) project (See Appendix B). This permitting plan will follow the permitting logic developed in that checklist.

  20. Status of high-level waste processing at West Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, A.J.; Baker, M.N. )

    1991-11-01

    The US Department of Energy is charged with the solidification of high-level liquid waste remaining from nuclear fuel reprocessing activities that were conducted at West Valley, New York, between 1966 and 1972. The 2.27 million liters (600,000 gal) of waste in an underground storage tank has separated into a sludge layer, {approximately}10% of the original volume, and a liquid layer. Prior to the high-level waste (HLW) vitrification, volume reduction of the waste is necessary. Sine May 1988, West Valley has successfully processed >1.59 million liters (420,000 gal) of HLW. Processing to date has involved the removal of {sup 139}Cs from the HLW effluent by ion exchange, evaporation to concentrate the effluent to a predetermined salt concentration, and finally cementation. This process has removed {approximately}80% of the {sup 137}Cs from the HLW liquid phase. Modifications are currently being made to begin the second phase of the HLW processing at West Valley. The second phase of HLW processing will include the removal of plutonium as well as cesium from the HLW sludge. This paper describes the progress made to date and the modifications being made to the process and to the feed stream to begin the second phase of HLW processing.

  1. High-level power analysis and optimization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, Anand

    1997-12-01

    This thesis combines two ubiquitous trends in the VLSI design world--the move towards designing at higher levels of design abstraction, and the increasing importance of power consumption as a design metric. Power estimation and optimization tools are becoming an increasingly important part of design flows, driven by a variety of requirements such as prolonging battery life in portable computing and communication devices, thermal considerations and system cooling and packaging costs, reliability issues (e.g. electromigration, ground bounce, and I-R drops in the power network), and environmental concerns. This thesis presents a suite of techniques to automatically perform power analysis and optimization for designs at the architecture or register-transfer, and behavior or algorithm levels of the design hierarchy. High-level synthesis refers to the process of synthesizing, from an abstract behavioral description, a register-transfer implementation that satisfies the desired constraints. High-level synthesis tools typically perform one or more of the following tasks: transformations, module selection, clock selection, scheduling, and resource allocation and assignment (also called resource sharing or hardware sharing). High-level synthesis techniques for minimizing the area, maximizing the performance, and enhancing the testability of the synthesized designs have been investigated. This thesis presents high-level synthesis techniques that minimize power consumption in the synthesized data paths. This thesis investigates the effects of resource sharing on the power consumption in the data path, provides techniques to efficiently estimate power consumption during resource sharing, and resource sharing algorithms to minimize power consumption. The RTL circuit that is obtained from the high-level synthesis process can be further optimized for power by applying power-reducing RTL transformations. This thesis presents macro-modeling and estimation techniques for switching

  2. [Vancomycin-resistant enterococci in pediatric hematology: don't panic!].

    PubMed

    Barbé, G; Ploton, C; Pondarré, C; Bertrand, Y; Souillet, G; Philippe, N

    1998-06-01

    Do immunocompromised children, carrying vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) need to be treated? For 3 years, 230 children with chemotherapy and/or bone-marrow transplantation (BMT) received amikacin for gut decontamination and rinsed their mouth with solutions including vancomycin or not, according to the duration and severity of neutropenia. Some patients were isolated, others were at home with ambulatory treatment. The first-line antibio-therapy was piperacillin-amikacin-vancomycin in the chemotherapy unit, imipenem-vancomycin in the BMT unit. Once-a-week, the laboratory used to check the efficiency of decontamination procedures and look for emerging resistant bacteria. Four patients were identified as VRE carriers in their gut flora. The fecal carriage was long-lasting in a single patient, for whom attempts of eradication failed. No patient underwent VRE bacteremia. From our experience, it seems reasonable to neglect enterococcal eradication, provided that hygienic measures are strictly applied.

  3. Group Q streptococci. I. Ecology, serology, physiology, and relationship to established enterococci.

    PubMed

    Nowlan, S S; Deibel, R H

    1967-08-01

    The group Q streptococci possess unique serological and physiological characteristics which differentiate them from established enterococci. The group Q antigen was not demonstrable in all strains; however, all possessed the group D antigen. All group Q strains were physiologically similar regardless of whether or not they possessed the group Q antigen. These strains differed from the established enterococcal species, as they neither hydrolyzed arginine nor initiated growth in 1.0% methylene blue-milk. They also differed radically in the fermentation of various carbohydrates, especially the polyhydric sugar alcohols. The results indicate that the group Q streptococci constitute a unique taxonomic entity; the species designation Streptococcus avium sp. n. is suggested, owing to their characteristic occurrence in chicken fecal specimens.

  4. Isolation of patients with vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE): efficacy of an electronic alert system.

    PubMed

    Borbolla, Damian; Taliercio, Vanina; Schachner, Bibiana; Gomez Saldano, Ana Maria; Salazar, Estela; Luna, Daniel; Gonzalez Bernaldo de Quiros, Fernan

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the implementation of an alert system for the isolation of vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) colonized patients. Given the risk of admitting a patient colonized by VRE it is necessary to implement efficient isolation measures. An electronic alert system integrated into a health information system (HIS) could help with the detection of these patients and their isolation in proper units. Determine the efficacy of an electronic alert system in improving the rate of properly isolation of patients colonized with VRE. two consecutive series of admission in adults units of 67 patients that were infected or colonized with VRE were compared. The time period of the study was six months before the implementation of the alert system and six months post-implementation of the system. The proportion of admission with proper isolation of the patient in correct units increased 44% after the alert system implementation. The implementation of an alert system improved the proportion of properly isolated patients with VRE.

  5. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and the role of the healthcare worker.

    PubMed

    Ott, Marilyn; Wirick, Heather

    2008-03-01

    Antibiotic resistance has increased dramatically within the last decade. The spread of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria has become a threat within hospitals. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) has emerged as one of these strains. VRE is a robust microorganism and can survive for long periods of time on environmental surfaces. VRE spreads quickly from patient to patient through contact with health care workers. This strain can increase the mortality rate in immuno-compromised patients. Hospital health care workers have an important role to play in the prevention and control of VRE. Proper, and frequent, hand-washing significantly contribute to preventing and controlling the spread of VRE. Providing health care workers with education and resources is also a key factor. The health belief model helps to explain how to approach and implement changes to practice.

  6. COMPARISON OF DIRECT PLATING MEDIA FOR THE ISOLATION AND ENUMERATION OF ENTEROCOCCI IN CERTAIN FROZEN FOODS.

    PubMed

    BURKWALL, M K; HARTMAN, P A

    1964-01-01

    A total of 15 agar media were examined for their yield, selectivity, readability, and simplicity of preparation and use. A thallium medium of Barnes was selected as the better of the high yield-fair selectivity type of medium and an azide-citrate medium of Reinbold appeared to be the better of the low yield-high selectivity type of medium. Sodium carbonate (optimal concentration, 0.20%) was found to increase recovery substantially when added to certain media, especially in the presence of 0.05% Tween 80. When these two ingredients were incorporated into a medium modified after Slanetz and Bartley, the resultant medium was superior to other media for the isolation and enumeration of enterococci in certain frozen foods, such as peas and hamburger, by the direct plating method.

  7. In Vitro Activity of Ampicillin or Vancomycin Combined with Gentamicin or Streptomycin Against Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Harwick, Herbert J.; Kalmanson, George M.; Guze, Lucien B.

    1973-01-01

    Minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations of four antibiotics and their combinations were determined for 38 strains of enterococci by a microtitration tube dilution technique. The drugs were ampicillin, vancomycin, gentamicin, and streptomycin; the combinations were ampicillin-gentamicin, ampicillin-streptomycin, vancomycin-gentamicin, and vancomycin-streptomycin. At achievable serum concentrations, ampicillin alone killed 60% of strains, whereas combination with streptomycin increased this to 90% and with gentamicin to 100%. Vancomycin alone showed striking inhibitory activity, but very poor bactericidal activity at achievable concentrations. Combination with one of the aminoglycosides increased the bactericidal activity substantially. When combined with ampicillin, gentamicin was both more active and showed synergistic bactericidal activity significantly more often (P < 0.01) than streptomycin. PMID:4791300

  8. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci outside the health-care setting: prevalence, sources, and public health implications.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, L. C.; Kuehnert, M. J.; Tenover, F. C.; Jarvis, W. R.

    1997-01-01

    Although nosocomial acquisition and subsequent colonization of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), an emerging international threat to public health, has been emphasized in the United States, colonization among nonhospitalized persons has been infrequently documented. In contrast, in Europe, colonization appears to occur frequently in persons outside the health-care setting. An important factor associated with VRE in the community in Europe has been avoparcin, a glycopeptide antimicrobial drug used for years in many European nations at subtherapeutic doses as a growth promoter in food-producing animals. In Europe, evidence suggests that foodborne VRE may cause human colonization. Although avoparcin has never been approved for use in the United States, undetected community VRE transmission may be occurring at low levels. Further studies of community transmission of VRE in the United States are urgently needed. If transmission with VRE from unrecognized community sources can be identified and controlled, increased incidence of colonization and infection among hospitalized patients may be prevented. PMID:9284375

  9. In vitro interactions between different beta-lactam antibiotics and fosfomycin against bloodstream isolates of enterococci.

    PubMed Central

    Pestel, M; Martin, E; Aucouturier, C; Lemeland, J F; Caron, F

    1995-01-01

    The effects of 16 different beta-lactam-fosfomycin combinations against 50 bloodstream enterococci were compared by a disk diffusion technique. Cefotaxime exhibited the best interaction. By checkerboard studies, the cefotaxime-fosfomycin combination provided a synergistic bacteriostatic effect against 45 of the 50 isolates (MIC of cefotaxime at which 90% of the isolates were inhibited, >2,048 micrograms/ml; MIC of fosfomycin at which 90% of the isolates were inhibited, 128 micrograms/ml; mean of fractional inhibitory concentration indexes, 0.195). By killing curves, cefotaxime (at 64 micrograms/ml) combined with fosfomycin (at > or = 64 micrograms/ml) was bactericidal against 6 of 10 strains tested. PMID:8619593

  10. Group Q Streptococci I. Ecology, Serology, Physiology, and Relationship to Established Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Nowlan, Sandra Simpson; Deibel, R. H.

    1967-01-01

    The group Q streptococci possess unique serological and physiological characteristics which differentiate them from established enterococci. The group Q antigen was not demonstrable in all strains; however, all possessed the group D antigen. All group Q strains were physiologically similar regardless of whether or not they possessed the group Q antigen. These strains differed from the established enterococcal species, as they neither hydrolyzed arginine nor initiated growth in 1.0% methylene blue-milk. They also differed radically in the fermentation of various carbohydrates, especially the polyhydric sugar alcohols. The results indicate that the group Q streptococci constitute a unique taxonomic entity; the species designation Streptococcus avium sp. n. is suggested, owing to their characteristic occurrence in chicken fecal specimens. PMID:4962699

  11. Detection of clinically relevant genotypes of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in nosocomial surveillance specimens by PCR.

    PubMed

    Jayaratne, P; Rutherford, C

    1999-06-01

    This study evaluated a PCR method for the rapid detection of clinically significant genotypes of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in nosocomial surveillance specimens. Detection of the vanA and vanB genes by multiplex PCR using 657 specimens that showed presumptive growth of VRE on bile esculin azide agar containing 6 mg of vancomycin/liter was compared to the conventional method. The diagnostic values for the PCR compared to the phenotypic method were as follows: 99.8% specificity, 95.4% sensitivity, 98.8% positive predictive value, and 99.3% negative predictive value. The average cost per test for PCR is $8.26, compared to $9.45 for the phenotypic method. The average turnaround time for detecting a VRE is 48 h for PCR, compared to 96 h for the conventional method.

  12. Comparison of simple and rapid methods for identifying enterococci intrinsically resistant to vancomycin.

    PubMed

    Hanson, K L; Cartwright, C P

    1999-03-01

    Three different methodologies, reduction of litmus milk (LM) and acidification of arabinose (ARA), acidification of methyl-alpha-D-glucopyranoside (MGP), and rapid motility (RM), for differentiating isolates of Enterococcus casseliflavus and Enterococcus gallinarum (intrinsically vancomycin-resistant enterococci [IVRE]) from Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were evaluated. All 33 isolates of E. faecalis tested reduced LM within 4 h and were negative in all other tests, while the 53 isolates of E. faecium were ARA positive only. In contrast, 45 of 46 (98%) IVRE isolates examined (26 E. casseliflavus and 20 E. gallinarum isolates) acidified MGP, 41 of 46 (89%) were LM and ARA positive, and 45 of 46 (98%) were RM positive. Acidification of MGP was therefore the single most useful test for differentiating IVRE from vancomycin-resistant E. faecium and E. faecalis; however, a combination of LM-ARA and RM testing enabled the correct designation of organisms without the need for overnight incubation.

  13. Molecular typing, pathogenicity factor genes and antimicrobial susceptibility of vancomycin resistant enterococci in Belgrade, Serbia.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Milica; Milošević, Branko; Tošić, Tanja; Stevanović, Goran; Mioljević, Vesna; Inđić, Nikola; Velebit, Branko; Zervos, Marcus

    2015-06-01

    In this study the distribution of species and antimicrobial resistance among vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) recovered from clinical specimens obtained from five hospitals in Belgrade was analyzed. Strains were further characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to investigate the presence of vanA and vanB genes and pathogenicity factor genes. Identification of 194 VRE isolates revealed 154 Enterococcus faecium, 21 Enterococcus faecalis, 10 Enterococcus raffinosus and 9 Enterococcus gallinarum. This study revealed existence of 8 major clones of VRE. PCR determined vanA gene to be present in all of the VRE studied. Esp and hyl genes were present in 29.22% and 27.92% of E. faecium, respectively, and in 76.19% and 0 of E. faecalis, respectively. Esp and hyl genes were not found more frequently in members of predominant clones of E. faecium than in single isolates; nor was their presence connected to invasiveness.

  14. Inducible expression eliminates the fitness cost of vancomycin resistance in enterococci.

    PubMed

    Foucault, Marie-Laure; Depardieu, Florence; Courvalin, Patrice; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2010-09-28

    Inducible vancomycin resistance in enterococci is due to a sophisticated mechanism that combines synthesis of cell wall peptidoglycan precursors with low affinity for glycopeptides and elimination of the normal target precursors. Although this dual mechanism, which involves seven genes organized in two operons, is predicted to have a high fitness cost, resistant enterococci have disseminated worldwide. We have evaluated the biological cost of VanB-type resistance due to acquisition of conjugative transposon Tn1549 in Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis. Because fitness was dependent on the integration site of Tn1549, an isogenic set of E. faecalis was constructed to determine the cost of inducible or constitutive expression of resistance or of carriage of Tn1549. A luciferase gene was inserted in the integrase gene of the transposon to allow differential quantification of the strains in cocultures and in the digestive tract of gnotobiotic mice. Both in vitro and in vivo, carriage of inactivated or inducible Tn1549 had no cost for the host in the absence of induction by vancomycin. In contrast, induced or constitutively resistant strains not only had reduced fitness but were severely impaired in colonization ability and dissemination among mice. These data indicate that tight regulation of resistance expression drastically reduces the biological cost associated with vancomycin resistance in Enterococcus spp. and accounts for the widespread dissemination of these strains. Our findings are in agreement with the observation that regulation of expression is common in horizontally acquired resistance and represents an efficient evolutionary pathway for resistance determinants to become selectively neutral.

  15. Biocidal Efficacy of Copper Alloys against Pathogenic Enterococci Involves Degradation of Genomic and Plasmid DNAs ▿

    PubMed Central

    Warnes, S. L.; Green, S. M.; Michels, H. T.; Keevil, C. W.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing incidence of nosocomial infections caused by glycopeptide-resistant enterococci is a global concern. Enterococcal species are also difficult to eradicate with existing cleaning regimens; they can survive for long periods on surfaces, thus contributing to cases of reinfection and spread of antibiotic-resistant strains. We have investigated the potential use of copper alloys as bactericidal surfaces. Clinical isolates of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were inoculated onto copper alloy and stainless steel surfaces. Samples were assessed for the presence of viable cells by conventional culture, detection of actively respiring cells, and assessment of cell membrane integrity. Both species survived for up to several weeks on stainless steel. However, no viable cells were detected on any alloys following exposure for 1 h at an inoculum concentration of ≤104 CFU/cm2. Analysis of genomic and plasmid DNA from bacterial cells recovered from metal surfaces indicates substantial disintegration of the DNA following exposure to copper surfaces that is not evident in cells recovered from stainless steel. The DNA fragmentation is so extensive, and coupled with the rapid cell death which occurs on copper surfaces, that it suggests that mutation is less likely to occur. It is therefore highly unlikely that genetic information can be transferred to receptive organisms recontaminating the same area. A combination of effective cleaning regimens and contact surfaces containing copper could be useful not only to prevent the spread of viable pathogenic enterococci but also to mitigate against the occurrence of potential resistance to copper, biocides, or antibiotics and the spread of genetic determinants of resistance to other species. PMID:20581191

  16. Inducible expression eliminates the fitness cost of vancomycin resistance in enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Foucault, Marie-Laure; Depardieu, Florence; Courvalin, Patrice; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Inducible vancomycin resistance in enterococci is due to a sophisticated mechanism that combines synthesis of cell wall peptidoglycan precursors with low affinity for glycopeptides and elimination of the normal target precursors. Although this dual mechanism, which involves seven genes organized in two operons, is predicted to have a high fitness cost, resistant enterococci have disseminated worldwide. We have evaluated the biological cost of VanB-type resistance due to acquisition of conjugative transposon Tn1549 in Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis. Because fitness was dependent on the integration site of Tn1549, an isogenic set of E. faecalis was constructed to determine the cost of inducible or constitutive expression of resistance or of carriage of Tn1549. A luciferase gene was inserted in the integrase gene of the transposon to allow differential quantification of the strains in cocultures and in the digestive tract of gnotobiotic mice. Both in vitro and in vivo, carriage of inactivated or inducible Tn1549 had no cost for the host in the absence of induction by vancomycin. In contrast, induced or constitutively resistant strains not only had reduced fitness but were severely impaired in colonization ability and dissemination among mice. These data indicate that tight regulation of resistance expression drastically reduces the biological cost associated with vancomycin resistance in Enterococcus spp. and accounts for the widespread dissemination of these strains. Our findings are in agreement with the observation that regulation of expression is common in horizontally acquired resistance and represents an efficient evolutionary pathway for resistance determinants to become selectively neutral. PMID:20833818

  17. Detection of antibiotic resistant enterococci and Escherichia coli in free range Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus).

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Alexandre; Igrejas, Gilberto; Radhouani, Hajer; Santos, Tiago; Monteiro, Ricardo; Pacheco, Rui; Alcaide, Eva; Zorrilla, Irene; Serra, Rodrigo; Torres, Carmen; Poeta, Patrícia

    2013-07-01

    Thirty fecal samples from wild specimens of Iberian lynx were collected and analyzed for Enterococcus spp. (27 isolates) and Escherichia coli (18 isolates) recovery. The 45 isolates obtained were tested for antimicrobial resistance, molecular mechanisms of resistance, and presence of virulence genes. Among the enterococci, Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus hirae were the most prevalent species (11 isolates each), followed by Enterococcus faecalis (5 isolates). High percentages of resistance to tetracycline and erythromycin (33% and 30%, respectively) were detected among enterococcal isolates. The tet(M) and/or tet(L), erm(B), aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia, ant(6)-Ia, or aph(3')-IIIa genes were detected among resistant enterococci. Virulence genes were detected in one E. faecalis isolate (cpd, cylB, and cylL) and one E. hirae isolate (cylL). High percentages of resistance were detected in E. coli isolates to tetracycline (33%), streptomycin (28%), nalidixic acid (28%), and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (SXT, 22%). Additionally, the blaTEM, tet(A), aadA, cmlA, and different combinations of sul genes were detected among most ampicillin, tetracycline, streptomycin, chloramphenicol and SXT-resistant isolates, respectively. Two isolates contained a class 1 integron with the gene cassette arrays dfrA1 + aadA1 and dfrA12 + aadA2. The E. coli isolates were ascribed to phylo-groups A (n=5); B1 (n=4); B2 (n=6), and D (n=3), with the virulence gene fimA present in all E. coli isolates. This study found resistance genes in wild specimens of Iberian lynx. Thus, it is important to notice that multiresistant bacteria have reached species as rare and completely non-synanthropic as the Iberian lynx. Furthermore, the susceptibility of this endangered species to bacterial infection may be affected by the presence of these virulence and resistance genes.

  18. [Glycopeptide-resistant enterococci carriage: Are actual isolation and identification techniques sufficient?].

    PubMed

    Surcouf, C; Fabre, M; Enouf, V; Cadé, S; Soler, C; Mac Nab, C; Samson, T; Foissaud, V

    2011-06-01

    The monitoring of infection by glycopeptide-resistant enterococci (GRE) is one of the main elements of hospital hygiene policy. It involves systematic rectal swabs in clinics at risk (asymptomatic carriage). We compare two GRE screening methods and evaluate a new kit associating multiplex PCR and hybridization (Génotype(®) Enterococcus, Hain Lifescience) on a panel of 448 samples collected over a 4-month period. The first method is based on direct inoculation of the sample; the second one involves a preliminary enrichment phase followed by molecular diagnosis allowing the identification of species of enterococci as well as glycopeptide resistance genes. All the resistant strains were isolated using the enrichment technique. The incidence of GRE (VanA) carriage was 0,55% (two out of 362 patients, two out of 448 isolates) with two Enterococcus faecium VanA. Six Enterococcus gallinarum VanC1 and two Enterococcus casseliflavus VanC2/C3 were also isolated and identified. The main clinics concerned are intensive care and hematology. The two patients with E. faecium VanA had been previously given glycopeptides for 10 days. For three strains, the molecular method allowed to correct prior erroneous results based on rapid identification (RapidID32Strep V2.0). The method using direct samples inoculation underestimates real incidence of GRE carriage. The performances of Génotype(®) Enterococcus molecular method, evaluated for other parameters using reference strains and DNA sequencing, offer new possibilities applicable to routine laboratory. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. American crows as carriers of vancomycin-resistant enterococci with vanA gene.

    PubMed

    Oravcova, Veronika; Zurek, Ludek; Townsend, Andrea; Clark, Anne B; Ellis, Julie C; Cizek, Alois; Literak, Ivan

    2014-04-01

    We studied the vanA-carrying vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) isolated from American crows in the United States during the winter 2011/2012. Faecal samples from crows were cultured selectively for VRE and characterized. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were used to examine epidemiological relationships of vanA-containing VRE. Isolates were tested in vitro for their ability to horizontally transfer the vancomycin resistance trait. VRE with the vanA gene were found in 15 (2.5%) of 590 crows samples, from which we obtained 22 different isolates. Enterococcal species were Enterococcus faecium (14) and E. faecalis (8). One, two and 19 isolates originated from Kansas, New York State and Massachusetts, respectively. Based on MLST analysis, E. faecium isolates were grouped as ST18 (6 isolates), ST555 (2), and novel types ST749 (1), ST750 (3), ST751 (1), ST752 (1). Enterococcus faecalis isolates belonged to ST6 (1), ST16 (3) and ST179 (4). All isolates were able to transfer the vancomycin resistance trait via filter mating with very high transfer range. Clinically important enterococci with the vanA gene occur in faeces of wild American crows throughout the United States. These migrating birds may contribute to the dissemination of VRE in environment over large distances. [Correction added after first online publication on 06 August 2013: The number of E. faecium ST752 isolate is now amended to '1', consistent with that shown in the 'Results' section and Figure 2.]. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Human health risks associated with antimicrobial-resistant enterococci and Staphylococcus aureus on poultry meat.

    PubMed

    Bortolaia, V; Espinosa-Gongora, C; Guardabassi, L

    2016-02-01

    Enterococci and staphylococci are frequent contaminants on poultry meat. Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium and Staphylococcus aureus are also well-known aetiological agents of a wide variety of infections resulting in major healthcare costs. This review provides an overview of the human health risks associated with the occurrence of these opportunistic human pathogens on poultry meat with particular focus on the risk of food-borne transmission of antimicrobial resistance. In the absence of conclusive evidence of transmission, this risk was inferred using data from scientific articles and national reports on prevalence, bacterial load, antimicrobial resistance and clonal distribution of these three species on poultry meat. The risks associated with ingestion of antimicrobial-resistant enterococci of poultry origin comprise horizontal transfer of resistance genes and transmission of multidrug-resistant E. faecalis lineages such as sequence type ST16. Enterococcus faecium lineages occurring in poultry meat products are distantly related to those causing hospital-acquired infections but may act as donors of quinupristin/dalfopristin resistance and other resistance determinants of clinical interest to the human gut microbiota. Ingestion of poultry meat contaminated with S. aureus may lead to food poisoning. However, antimicrobial resistance in the toxin-producing strains does not have clinical implications because food poisoning is not managed by antimicrobial therapy. Recently methicillin-resistant S. aureus of livestock origin has been reported on poultry meat. In theory handling or ingestion of contaminated meat is a potential risk factor for colonization by methicillin-resistant S. aureus. However, this risk is presently regarded as negligible by public health authorities. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Clonal Diversity in Multi Drug Resistant (MDR) Enterococci Isolated from Fecal Normal Flora

    PubMed Central

    Hasannejad Bibalan, Meysam; Eshaghi, Morteza; Sadeghi, Javad; Asadian, Mahla; Narimani, Tahmineh; Talebi, Malihe

    2015-01-01

    Enterococci are Gram positive and catalase- negative cocci that are found in the gastrointestinal tract of mammals and birds, and are readily isolated from soil, surface and waters. The aim of this study was to discriminate between Enterococcus isolates based on repetitive element sequence based –PCR (Rep-PCR) with the BOXA2R primer and their antibiotics profile. Enterococci isolates were obtained from 180 fecal samples. The isolates were identified by biochemical reaction and specific identification was confirmed by PCR with species specific primers. All isolates were subjected to Rep typing and antimicrobial susceptibility tests. Rep-PCR analysis of 180 isolates revealed 93 REP types with forty-five single types (ST1 to ST45) and forty-eight common types (CT1 to 48). Antibiotic susceptibility tests exhibited that 53 (29.4%), 43 (23.8%), 11 (6.1%) and 9 (5%) were resistant to erythromycin, tetracycline, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin respectively but among the isolates, sixteen were multi drug resistant (MDR). These MDR isolates showed 11 Rep types with seven single types and four common types. In addition, 81.2% of MDR isolates were from male subjects and the average age of these persons was more than fifty years. This study showed that 56.2% of MDR isolates were homogeneous with 95 % similarity, and high rate of resistance to tetracycline and erythromycin (81.2%) were observed in these isolates. The concern about these normal flora isolates are the pathogenic potential of these bacteria through the horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance and virulence genes. PMID:27014649

  2. Clonal Diversity in Multi Drug Resistant (MDR) Enterococci Isolated from Fecal Normal Flora.

    PubMed

    Hasannejad Bibalan, Meysam; Eshaghi, Morteza; Sadeghi, Javad; Asadian, Mahla; Narimani, Tahmineh; Talebi, Malihe

    2015-01-01

    Enterococci are Gram positive and catalase- negative cocci that are found in the gastrointestinal tract of mammals and birds, and are readily isolated from soil, surface and waters. The aim of this study was to discriminate between Enterococcus isolates based on repetitive element sequence based -PCR (Rep-PCR) with the BOXA2R primer and their antibiotics profile. Enterococci isolates were obtained from 180 fecal samples. The isolates were identified by biochemical reaction and specific identification was confirmed by PCR with species specific primers. All isolates were subjected to Rep typing and antimicrobial susceptibility tests. Rep-PCR analysis of 180 isolates revealed 93 REP types with forty-five single types (ST1 to ST45) and forty-eight common types (CT1 to 48). Antibiotic susceptibility tests exhibited that 53 (29.4%), 43 (23.8%), 11 (6.1%) and 9 (5%) were resistant to erythromycin, tetracycline, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin respectively but among the isolates, sixteen were multi drug resistant (MDR). These MDR isolates showed 11 Rep types with seven single types and four common types. In addition, 81.2% of MDR isolates were from male subjects and the average age of these persons was more than fifty years. This study showed that 56.2% of MDR isolates were homogeneous with 95 % similarity, and high rate of resistance to tetracycline and erythromycin (81.2%) were observed in these isolates. The concern about these normal flora isolates are the pathogenic potential of these bacteria through the horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance and virulence genes.

  3. Persistence and diversity of faecal coliform and enterococci populations in faecally polluted waters.

    PubMed

    Bonjoch, X; García-Aljaro, C; Blanch, A R

    2011-07-01

    To assess the persistence and diversity of faecal bacterial populations (faecal coliforms and enterococci) that have recently been included in microbial source tracking (MST) predictive models. The analysed bacterial populations included members of the enterococci group (ENT) [Enterococcus faecium (FM), Enterococcus faecalis (FS) and Enterococcus hirae (HIR)] and the faecal coliform group (FC) [diverse Escherichia coli phenotypes (ECP) and cellobiose-negative faecal coliforms (CNFC)]. The inactivation of these distinct groups was monitored over time on-site in river by biochemical fingerprinting, and diversity indices were calculated. Among the different analysed species belonging to the ENT group, HIR persisted longer and was able to replicate in the environment at a higher rate. On the other hand, ECP and NCFC showed a similar persistence throughout the different seasons. The diversity index (Di) for FC increased substantially in the summer after 96 h to a maximum value of 0·96. On the other hand, the Di for ENT diminished over the same period to a value of 0·86, suggesting a different persistence for the different species integrating this group. The persistence of ECP, CNFC, FM and FS in the aquatic environment is high, particularly for the members of the FC and in the summer season. On the contrary, HIR is able to replicate in the environment at a high rate even in winter, and therefore, its inclusion in MST predictive models is discouraged. ECP, CNFC, FMFS and HIR have been proposed as additional variables in MST predictive models. However, the different persistence of HIR compared with the other variables should be taken into account for the development of such models. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Mechanism of copper surface toxicity in vancomycin-resistant enterococci following wet or dry surface contact.

    PubMed

    Warnes, S L; Keevil, C W

    2011-09-01

    Contaminated touch surfaces have been implicated in the spread of hospital-acquired infections, and the use of biocidal surfaces could help to reduce this cross-contamination. In a previous study we reported the death of aqueous inocula of pathogenic Enterococcus faecalis or Enterococcus faecium isolates, simulating fomite surface contamination, in 1 h on copper alloys, compared to survival for months on stainless steel. In our current study we observed an even faster kill of over a 6-log reduction of viable enterococci in less than 10 min on copper alloys with a "dry" inoculum equivalent to touch contamination. We investigated the effect of copper(I) and copper(II) chelation and the quenching of reactive oxygen species on cell viability assessed by culture and their effects on genomic DNA, membrane potential, and respiration in situ on metal surfaces. We propose that copper surface toxicity for enterococci involves the direct or indirect action of released copper ionic species and the generation of superoxide, resulting in arrested respiration and DNA breakdown as the first stages of cell death. The generation of hydroxyl radicals by the Fenton reaction does not appear to be the dominant instrument of DNA damage. The bacterial membrane potential is unaffected in the early stages of wet and dry surface contact, suggesting that the membrane is not compromised until after cell death. These results also highlight the importance of correct surface cleaning protocols to perpetuate copper ion release and prevent the chelation of ions by contaminants, which could reduce the efficacy of the surface.

  5. ALICE: Project Overview and High Level Science Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soummer, Remi; Choquet, Elodie; Pueyo, Laurent; Brendan Hagan, J.; Gofas-Salas, Elena; Rajan, Abhijith; Perrin, Marshall D.; Chen, Christine; Debes, John H.; Golimowski, David A.; Hines, Dean C.; Schneider, Glenn; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Mawet, Dimitri; Marois, Christian; Barman, Travis

    2015-01-01

    We report on the status of the ALICE project (Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments), which consists in a consistent reanalysis of the entire HST-NICMOS coronagraphic archive. Over the last two years, we have developed a sophisticated pipeline able to handle the data of the 400 stars of the archive. This pipeline builds on the Karhunen-Loeve Image Projection (KLIP) algorithm, and was completed in the fall of 2014. We discuss the first processing and analysis results of the overall reduction campaign. As we will deliver high-level science products to the STScI MAST archive, we are defining a new standard format for high-contrast science products, which will be compatible with every new high-contrast imaging instrument (GPI, SPHERE, P1640, CHARIS, etc.) and used by the JWST coronagraphs. We present here the specifications of this standard.

  6. Review of High Level Waste Tanks Ultrasonic Inspection Data

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B

    2006-03-09

    A review of the data collected during ultrasonic inspection of the Type I high level waste tanks has been completed. The data was analyzed for relevance to the possibility of vapor space corrosion and liquid/air interface corrosion. The review of the Type I tank UT inspection data has confirmed that the vapor space general corrosion is not an unusually aggressive phenomena and correlates well with predicted corrosion rates for steel exposed to bulk solution. The corrosion rates are seen to decrease with time as expected. The review of the temperature data did not reveal any obvious correlations between high temperatures and the occurrences of leaks. The complex nature of temperature-humidity interaction, particularly with respect to vapor corrosion requires further understanding to infer any correlation. The review of the waste level data also did not reveal any obvious correlations.

  7. High Level Waste System Impacts from Acid Dissolution of Sludge

    SciTech Connect

    KETUSKY, EDWARD

    2006-04-20

    This research evaluates the ability of OLI{copyright} equilibrium based software to forecast Savannah River Site High Level Waste system impacts from oxalic acid dissolution of Tank 1-15 sludge heels. Without further laboratory and field testing, only the use of oxalic acid can be considered plausible to support sludge heel dissolution on multiple tanks. Using OLI{copyright} and available test results, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Material and energy balances, coupled with the model, identify potential safety concerns. Overpressurization and overheating are shown to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen could, however, overwhelm the tank ventilation. While pH adjustment can restore the minimal hydrogen generation, resultant precipitates will notably increase the sludge volume. OLI{copyright} is used to develop a flowsheet such that additional sludge vitrification canisters and other negative system impacts are minimized. Sensitivity analyses are used to assess the processability impacts from variations in the sludge/quantities of acids.

  8. Mammut: High-level management of system knobs and sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Sensi, Daniele; Torquati, Massimo; Danelutto, Marco

    Managing low-level architectural features for controlling performance and power consumption is a growing demand in the parallel computing community. Such features include, but are not limited to: energy profiling, platform topology analysis, CPU cores disabling and frequency scaling. However, these low-level mechanisms are usually managed by specific tools, without any interaction between each other, thus hampering their usability. More important, most existing tools can only be used through a command line interface and they do not provide any API. Moreover, in most cases, they only allow monitoring and managing the same machine on which the tools are used. MAMMUT provides and integrates architectural management utilities through a high-level and easy-to-use object-oriented interface. By using MAMMUT, is possible to link together different collected information and to exploit them on both local and remote systems, to build architecture-aware applications.

  9. Online Pattern Recognition for the ALICE High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindenstruth, V.; Loizides, C.; Rohrich, D.; Skaali, B.; Steinbeck, T.; Stock, R.; Tilsner, H.; Ullaland, K.; Vestbo, A.; Vik, T.

    2004-06-01

    The ALICE high level trigger has to process data online, in order to select interesting (sub)events, or to compress data efficiently by modeling techniques. Focusing on the main data source, the time projection chamber (TPC), we present two pattern recognition methods under investigation: a sequential approach (cluster finder and track follower) and an iterative approach (track candidate finder and cluster deconvoluter). We show, that the former is suited for pp and low multiplicity PbPb collisions, whereas the latter might be applicable for high multiplicity PbPb collisions of dN/dy>3000. Based on the developed tracking schemes we show that using modeling techniques, a compression factor of around 10 might be achievable.

  10. Socioeconomic studies of high-level nuclear waste disposal.

    PubMed Central

    White, G F; Bronzini, M S; Colglazier, E W; Dohrenwend, B; Erikson, K; Hansen, R; Kneese, A V; Moore, R; Page, E B; Rappaport, R A

    1994-01-01

    The socioeconomic investigations of possible impacts of the proposed repository for high-level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, have been unprecedented in several respects. They bear on the public decision that sooner or later will be made as to where and how to dispose permanently of the waste presently at military weapons installations and that continues to accumulate at nuclear power stations. No final decision has yet been made. There is no clear precedent from other countries. The organization of state and federal studies is unique. The state studies involve more disciplines than any previous efforts. They have been carried out in parallel to federal studies and have pioneered in defining some problems and appropriate research methods. A recent annotated bibliography provides interested scientists with a compact guide to the 178 published reports, as well as to relevant journal articles and related documents. PMID:7971963

  11. National high-level waste systems analysis plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kristofferson, K.; Oholleran, T.P.; Powell, R.H.; Thiel, E.C.

    1995-05-01

    This document details the development of modeling capabilities that can provide a system-wide view of all US Department of Energy (DOE) high-level waste (HLW) treatment and storage systems. This model can assess the impact of budget constraints on storage and treatment system schedules and throughput. These impacts can then be assessed against existing and pending milestones to determine the impact to the overall HLW system. A nation-wide view of waste treatment availability will help project the time required to prepare HLW for disposal. The impacts of the availability of various treatment systems and throughput can be compared to repository readiness to determine the prudent application of resources or the need to renegotiate milestones.

  12. Exceptionally high levels of multiple mating in an army ant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, A. Jay; Franks, Nigel R.; Powell, Scott; Edwards, Keith J.

    Most species of social insects have singly mated queens, although there are notable exceptions. Competing hypotheses have been proposed to explain the evolution of high levels of multiple mating, but this issue is far from resolved. Here we use microsatellites to investigate mating frequency in the army ant Eciton burchellii and show that queens mate with an exceptionally large number of males, eclipsing all but one other social insect species for which data are available. In addition we present evidence that suggests that mating is serial, continuing throughout the lifetime of the queen. This is the first demonstration of serial mating among social hymenoptera. We propose that high paternity within colonies is most likely to have evolved to increase genetic diversity and to counter high pathogen and parasite loads.

  13. High-level theoretical rovibrational spectroscopy of HCS+ isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, B.; Sebald, P.

    2016-12-01

    In this work the rovibrational spectrum of the HCS+ molecular cation is revisited through high-level electronic structure and variational rovibrational calculations. A local potential energy function is built from explicitly correlated coupled-cluster results, incorporating corrections for core-valence, scalar relativistic and higher-order excitation effects. The computed spectroscopic parameters, based on variational calculations with Watson's isomorphic Hamiltonian for linear molecules lead to a nearly perfect agreement with experimentally reported values (Rosenbaum et al., 1989). Furthermore, the documented Fermi resonance within the (0,00, 1) / (0,20, 0) and (1,00, 1) / (1,20, 0) pairs of states is clarified. Based on a newly developed electric dipole moment function transition dipole moments of fundamental transitions are predicted for the most important isotopologues.

  14. High-level waste tank farm set point document

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, J.A. III

    1995-01-15

    Setpoints for nuclear safety-related instrumentation are required for actions determined by the design authorization basis. Minimum requirements need to be established for assuring that setpoints are established and held within specified limits. This document establishes the controlling methodology for changing setpoints of all classifications. The instrumentation under consideration involve the transfer, storage, and volume reduction of radioactive liquid waste in the F- and H-Area High-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Farms. The setpoint document will encompass the PROCESS AREA listed in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) (DPSTSA-200-10 Sup 18) which includes the diversion box HDB-8 facility. In addition to the PROCESS AREAS listed in the SAR, Building 299-H and the Effluent Transfer Facility (ETF) are also included in the scope.

  15. High-level tetracycline resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolated in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, E; Louro, D; Gomes, J P; Catry, M A; Pato, M V

    1997-05-01

    The first high-level tetracycline resistance (MIC > or = 16 mg/l) isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (TRNG) were reported in 1990 from patients attending a Sexual Transmitted Disease (STD) Center in Lisbon. The TRNG prevalence was 4% in 1991, 5.3% in 1992 and 10,8% in 1994, exploding to 52.2% in 1995. The tet M determinant was evaluated by PCR. The digests of PCRP using HpaII produced the restriction pattern 2 for all the strains, except one (pattern 3). 78.3% of the TRNG strains were beta-lactamase producers and the 4.5 MDa penicillinase plasmid was the dominant (83%), 90% and 93.3% of the TRNG strains belonged to the auxotype NR and to the serogroup IA, respectively. The IA-8/NR class represented 58.3% of the TRNG isolates, suggesting a clonal spreading.

  16. Remote ignitability analysis of high-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Lundholm, C.W.; Morgan, J.M.; Shurtliff, R.M.; Trejo, L.E.

    1992-09-01

    The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), was used to reprocess nuclear fuel from government owned reactors to recover the unused uranium-235. These processes generated highly radioactive liquid wastes which are stored in large underground tanks prior to being calcined into a granular solid. The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and state/federal clean air statutes require waste characterization of these high level radioactive wastes for regulatory permitting and waste treatment purposes. The determination of the characteristic of ignitability is part of the required analyses prior to calcination and waste treatment. To perform this analysis in a radiologically safe manner, a remoted instrument was needed. The remote ignitability Method and Instrument will meet the 60 deg. C. requirement as prescribed for the ignitability in method 1020 of SW-846. The method for remote use will be equivalent to method 1020 of SW-846.

  17. SIMULANT DEVELOPMENT FOR SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M; Russell Eibling, R; David Koopman, D; Dan Lambert, D; Paul Burket, P

    2007-09-04

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site vitrifies High Level Waste (HLW) for repository internment. The process consists of three major steps: waste pretreatment, vitrification, and canister decontamination/sealing. The HLW consists of insoluble metal hydroxides (primarily iron, aluminum, magnesium, manganese, and uranium) and soluble sodium salts (carbonate, hydroxide, nitrite, nitrate, and sulfate). The HLW is processed in large batches through DWPF; DWPF has recently completed processing Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) and is currently processing Sludge Batch 4 (SB4). The composition of metal species in SB4 is shown in Table 1 as a function of the ratio of a metal to iron. Simulants remove radioactive species and renormalize the remaining species. Supernate composition is shown in Table 2.

  18. 4.5 Meter high level waste canister study

    SciTech Connect

    Calmus, R. B.

    1997-10-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Storage and Disposal Project has established the Immobilized High-Level Waste (IBLW) Storage Sub-Project to provide the capability to store Phase I and II BLW products generated by private vendors. A design/construction project, Project W-464, was established under the Sub-Project to provide the Phase I capability. Project W-464 will retrofit the Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB) to accommodate the Phase I I-ILW products. Project W-464 conceptual design is currently being performed to interim store 3.0 m-long BLW stainless steel canisters with a 0.61 in diameter, DOE is considering using a 4.5 in canister of the same diameter to reduce permanent disposal costs. This study was performed to assess the impact of replacing the 3.0 in canister with the 4.5 in canister. The summary cost and schedule impacts are described.

  19. The SEISMED High Level Security Policy for Health Care.

    PubMed

    Katsikas, S K

    1996-01-01

    The proliferation of the use of automated Health Information Systems in the everyday practice of health professionals has brought a number of issues related to the security of health information to a critical point. The preservation of security of health-related information can only be achieved through a concerted approach, comprising legal, organisational, technical and educational actions. These classes of actions constitute a complete "security framework", a key aspect of which is the set of rules, laws and regulations that govern the usage of information within a Health Care Establishment. This set is commonly referred to as "Security Policy". In this paper, the SEISMED High Level Security Policy for Health Care Establishments is presented.

  20. Midwestern High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Dantoin, T.S.

    1990-12-01

    For more than half a century, the Council of State Governments has served as a common ground for the states of the nation. The Council is a nonprofit, state-supported and -directed service organization that provides research and resources, identifies trends, supplies answers and creates a network for legislative, executive and judicial branch representatives. This List of Available Resources was prepared with the support of the US Department of Energy, Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC02-89CH10402. However, any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of DOE. The purpose of the agreement, and reports issued pursuant to it, is to identify and analyze regional issues pertaining to the transportation of high-level radioactive waste and to inform Midwestern state officials with respect to technical issues and regulatory concerns related to waste transportation.

  1. A High-Level Language for Rule-Based Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Michael; Phillips, Andrew; Plotkin, Gordon D.

    2015-01-01

    Rule-based languages such as Kappa excel in their support for handling the combinatorial complexities prevalent in many biological systems, including signalling pathways. But Kappa provides little structure for organising rules, and large models can therefore be hard to read and maintain. This paper introduces a high-level, modular extension of Kappa called LBS-κ. We demonstrate the constructs of the language through examples and three case studies: a chemotaxis switch ring, a MAPK cascade, and an insulin signalling pathway. We then provide a formal definition of LBS-κ through an abstract syntax and a translation to plain Kappa. The translation is implemented in a compiler tool which is available as a web application. We finally demonstrate how to increase the expressivity of LBS-κ through embedded scripts in a general-purpose programming language, a technique which we view as generally applicable to other domain specific languages. PMID:26043208

  2. High-Level Language Production in Parkinson's Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, Lori J. P.; Troche, Michelle S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses impairments of high-level, complex language production in Parkinson's disease (PD), defined as sentence and discourse production, and situates these impairments within the framework of current psycholinguistic theories of language production. The paper comprises three major sections, an overview of the effects of PD on the brain and cognition, a review of the literature on language production in PD, and a discussion of the stages of the language production process that are impaired in PD. Overall, the literature converges on a few common characteristics of language production in PD: reduced information content, impaired grammaticality, disrupted fluency, and reduced syntactic complexity. Many studies also document the strong impact of differences in cognitive ability on language production. Based on the data, PD affects all stages of language production including conceptualization and functional and positional processing. Furthermore, impairments at all stages appear to be exacerbated by impairments in cognitive abilities. PMID:21860777

  3. High level radioactive waste vitrification process equipment component testing

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens, D.H.; Heath, W.O.; Larson, D.E.; Craig, S.N.; Berger, D.N.; Goles, R.W.

    1985-04-01

    Remote operability and maintainability of vitrification equipment were assessed under shielded-cell conditions. The equipment tested will be applied to immobilize high-level and transuranic liquid waste slurries that resulted from plutonium production for defense weapons. Equipment tested included: a turntable for handling waste canisters under the melter; a removable discharge cone in the melter overflow section; a thermocouple jumper that extends into a shielded cell; remote instrument and electrical connectors; remote, mechanical, and heat transfer aspects of the melter glass overflow section; a reamer to clean out plugged nozzles in the melter top; a closed circuit camera to view the melter interior; and a device to retrieve samples of the glass product. A test was also conducted to evaluate liquid metals for use in a liquid metal sealing system.

  4. A high-level language for rule-based modelling.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Michael; Phillips, Andrew; Plotkin, Gordon D

    2015-01-01

    Rule-based languages such as Kappa excel in their support for handling the combinatorial complexities prevalent in many biological systems, including signalling pathways. But Kappa provides little structure for organising rules, and large models can therefore be hard to read and maintain. This paper introduces a high-level, modular extension of Kappa called LBS-κ. We demonstrate the constructs of the language through examples and three case studies: a chemotaxis switch ring, a MAPK cascade, and an insulin signalling pathway. We then provide a formal definition of LBS-κ through an abstract syntax and a translation to plain Kappa. The translation is implemented in a compiler tool which is available as a web application. We finally demonstrate how to increase the expressivity of LBS-κ through embedded scripts in a general-purpose programming language, a technique which we view as generally applicable to other domain specific languages.

  5. Electrophysiological correlates of high-level perception during spatial navigation

    PubMed Central

    Weidemann, Christoph T.; Mollison, Matthew V.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the electrophysiological basis o object recognition by recording scalp EEG while participants played a virtual reality taxi driver game. Participants searched for passengers and stores during virtual navigation in simulated towns. We compared oscillatory brain activity for store views that were targets or non-targets (during store search) or neutral (during passenger search). Even though store category was solely defined by task context (rather than sensory cues), frontal electrophysiological activity in low frequency bands (primarily in the theta [4–8 Hz] band) reliably distinguished between target, non-target, and neutral store views. These results implicate low frequency oscillatory brain activity in frontal regions as an important variable in the study of cognitive processes involved in object recognition, categorization, and other forms of high-level perception. PMID:19293100

  6. Reinforcement learning for high-level fuzzy Petri nets.

    PubMed

    Shen, V L

    2003-01-01

    The author has developed a reinforcement learning algorithm for the high-level fuzzy Petri net (HLFPN) models in order to perform structure and parameter learning simultaneously. In addition to the HLFPN itself, the difference and similarity among a variety of subclasses concerning Petri nets are also discussed. As compared with the fuzzy adaptive learning control network (FALCON), the HLFPN model preserves the advantages that: 1) it offers more flexible learning capability because it is able to model both IF-THEN and IF-THEN-ELSE rules; 2) it allows multiple heterogeneous outputs to be drawn if they exist; 3) it offers a more compact data structure for fuzzy production rules so as to save information storage; and 4) it is able to learn faster due to its structural reduction. Finally, main results are presented in the form of seven propositions and supported by some experiments.

  7. High-level waste melter alternatives assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Calmus, R.B.

    1995-02-01

    This document describes the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) Program`s (hereafter referred to as HLW Program) Melter Candidate Assessment Activity performed in fiscal year (FY) 1994. The mission of the TWRS Program is to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford Site waste (current and future tank waste and encapsulated strontium and cesium isotopic sources) in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The goal of the HLW Program is to immobilize the HLW fraction of pretreated tank waste into a vitrified product suitable for interim onsite storage and eventual offsite disposal at a geologic repository. Preparation of the encapsulated strontium and cesium isotopic sources for final disposal is also included in the HLW Program. As a result of trade studies performed in 1992 and 1993, processes planned for pretreatment of tank wastes were modified substantially because of increasing estimates of the quantity of high-level and transuranic tank waste remaining after pretreatment. This resulted in substantial increases in needed vitrification plant capacity compared to the capacity of original Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). The required capacity has not been finalized, but is expected to be four to eight times that of the HWVP design. The increased capacity requirements for the HLW vitrification plant`s melter prompted the assessment of candidate high-capacity HLW melter technologies to determine the most viable candidates and the required development and testing (D and T) focus required to select the Hanford Site HLW vitrification plant melter system. An assessment process was developed in early 1994. This document describes the assessment team, roles of team members, the phased assessment process and results, resulting recommendations, and the implementation strategy.

  8. Hip Arthroscopy in High-Level Baseball Players.

    PubMed

    Byrd, J W Thomas; Jones, Kay S

    2015-08-01

    To report the results of hip arthroscopy among high-level baseball players as recorded by outcome scores and return to baseball. All patients undergoing hip arthroscopy were prospectively assessed with the modified Harris Hip Score. On review of all procedures performed over a 12-year period, 44 hips were identified among 41 intercollegiate or professional baseball players who had achieved 2-year follow-up. Among the 41 players, follow-up averaged 45 months (range, 24 to 120 months), with a mean age of 23 years (range, 18 to 34 years). There were 23 collegiate (1 bilateral) and 18 professional (2 bilateral) baseball players, including 10 Major League Baseball players. Of the 8 Major League Baseball pitchers, 6 (75%) also underwent ulnar collateral ligament elbow surgery. Improvement in the modified Harris Hip Score averaged 13 points (from 81 points preoperatively to 94 points postoperatively); a paired-samples t test determined that this mean improvement of 13 points was statistically significant (P < .001). Players returned to baseball after 42 of 44 procedures (95%) at a mean of 4.3 months (range, 3 to 8 months), with 90% regaining the ability to participate at their previous level of competition. There were no complications. Three players (1 bilateral) underwent repeat arthroscopy. This study supports the idea that arthroscopic treatment for a variety of hip pathologies in high-level baseball players provides a successful return to sport and improvement in functional outcome scores. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. High Level Information Fusion (HLIF) with nested fusion loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodley, Robert; Gosnell, Michael; Fischer, Amber

    2013-05-01

    Situation modeling and threat prediction require higher levels of data fusion in order to provide actionable information. Beyond the sensor data and sources the analyst has access to, the use of out-sourced and re-sourced data is becoming common. Through the years, some common frameworks have emerged for dealing with information fusion—perhaps the most ubiquitous being the JDL Data Fusion Group and their initial 4-level data fusion model. Since these initial developments, numerous models of information fusion have emerged, hoping to better capture the human-centric process of data analyses within a machine-centric framework. 21st Century Systems, Inc. has developed Fusion with Uncertainty Reasoning using Nested Assessment Characterizer Elements (FURNACE) to address challenges of high level information fusion and handle bias, ambiguity, and uncertainty (BAU) for Situation Modeling, Threat Modeling, and Threat Prediction. It combines JDL fusion levels with nested fusion loops and state-of-the-art data reasoning. Initial research has shown that FURNACE is able to reduce BAU and improve the fusion process by allowing high level information fusion (HLIF) to affect lower levels without the double counting of information or other biasing issues. The initial FURNACE project was focused on the underlying algorithms to produce a fusion system able to handle BAU and repurposed data in a cohesive manner. FURNACE supports analyst's efforts to develop situation models, threat models, and threat predictions to increase situational awareness of the battlespace. FURNACE will not only revolutionize the military intelligence realm, but also benefit the larger homeland defense, law enforcement, and business intelligence markets.

  10. High-level waste program integration within the DOE complex

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, J.H.; Davis, N.R.; Malone, K.; Schaus, P.S.

    1998-03-01

    Eleven major Department of Energy (DOE) site contractors were chartered by the Assistant Secretary to use a systems engineering approach to develop and evaluate technically defensible cost savings opportunities across the complex. Known as the complex-wide Environmental Management Integration (EMI), this process evaluated all the major DOE waste streams including high level waste (HLW). Across the DOE complex, this waste stream has the highest life cycle cost and is scheduled to take until at least 2035 before all HLW is processed for disposal. Technical contract experts from the four DOE sites that manage high level waste participated in the integration analysis: Hanford, Savannah River Site (SRS), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), and West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). In addition, subject matter experts from the Yucca Mountain Project and the Tanks Focus Area participated in the analysis. Also, departmental representatives from the US Department of Energy Headquarters (DOE-HQ) monitored the analysis and results. Workouts were held throughout the year to develop recommendations to achieve a complex-wide integrated program. From this effort, the HLW Environmental Management (EM) Team identified a set of programmatic and technical opportunities that could result in potential cost savings and avoidance in excess of $18 billion and an accelerated completion of the HLW mission by seven years. The cost savings, schedule improvements, and volume reduction are attributed to a multifaceted HLW treatment disposal strategy which involves waste pretreatment, standardized waste matrices, risk-based retrieval, early development and deployment of a shipping system for glass canisters, and reasonable, low cost tank closure.

  11. Antibiotic activity against urinary tract infection (UTI) isolates of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE): results from the 2002 North American Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci Susceptibility Study (NAVRESS).

    PubMed

    Zhanel, George G; Laing, Nancy M; Nichol, Kim A; Palatnick, Lorraine P; Noreddin, Ayman; Hisanaga, Tamiko; Johnson, Jack L; Hoban, Daryl J

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in urinary isolates in North America, and the activity of various antibiotics against VRE. Twenty-eight medical centres in the United States and 10 centres in Canada assessed the prevalence of VRE in urinary isolates in 2002. Each study site was asked to collect up to a maximum of 50 consecutive VRE (Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis only) urinary isolates. Susceptibility was determined by NCCLS broth microdilution. The prevalence of vanA and vanB resistance genotypes was determined by multiplex PCR. From the 28 US medical centres, a total of 697 VRE (616 [88.4%] E. faecium and 81 [11.6%] E. faecalis) were received. Approximately 75% of all VRE (E. faecium and E. faecalis) isolates demonstrated a VanA phenotype (resistance to both vancomycin and teicoplanin). PCR detection of vanA and vanB resistance determinants showed that the vanA genotype was present in 584 of 697 (83.8%) VRE isolates, whereas 113 (16.2%) isolates possessed the vanB gene. The most active agents were linezolid, nitrofurantoin and chloramphenicol, with 0.3%, 0.6% and 2.4% resistance, respectively. The majority (77.8%) of vancomycin-resistant E. faecium isolates displayed the VanA phenotype, and 538 of these 616 (87.3%) isolates were PCR-positive for vanA; the vanB genotype was detected in 78 (12.7%) isolates. Resistance was lowest with linezolid, chloramphenicol and nitrofurantoin at 0.3%, 0.3% and 0.5%, respectively. Only three genetically indistinguishable vanA-positive E. faecium were isolated from the 10 Canadian medical centres. VRE urinary isolates are common in the United States, are primarily of the vanA genotype and are very susceptible to linezolid, nitrofurantoin and chloramphenicol. In Canada, VRE urinary isolates remain uncommon.

  12. Process Relationships for Evaluating the Role of Light-induced Inactivation of Enterococci at Selected Beaches and Nearby Tributaries of the Great Lakes

    EPA Science Inventory

    One approach to predictive modeling of biological contamination of recreational waters and drinking water sources involves applying process-based models that consider microbial sources, hydrodynamic transport, and microbial fate. Fecal indicator bacteria such as enterococci have ...

  13. Process Relationships for Evaluating the Role of Light-induced Inactivation of Enterococci at Selected Beaches and Nearby Tributaries of the Great Lakes

    EPA Science Inventory

    One approach to predictive modeling of biological contamination of recreational waters and drinking water sources involves applying process-based models that consider microbial sources, hydrodynamic transport, and microbial fate. Fecal indicator bacteria such as enterococci have ...

  14. Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System Description

    SciTech Connect

    2000-10-12

    The Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers are loaded and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the accesses using a rail mounted transporter, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The defense high level waste (HLW) disposal container provides long-term confinement of the commercial HLW and defense HLW (including immobilized plutonium waste forms (IPWF)) placed within disposable canisters, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in disposable canisters may also be placed in a defense HLW disposal container along with commercial HLW waste forms, which is known as 'co-disposal'. The Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limits radionuclide release. The disposal container/waste package maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum handling and rockfall loads, limits the individual canister temperatures after emplacement, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident. Defense HLW disposal containers for HLW disposal will hold up to five HLW canisters. Defense HLW disposal containers for co-disposal will hold up to five HLW canisters arranged in a ring and one DOE SNF canister in the ring. Defense HLW disposal containers also will hold two Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs) and two HLW canisters in one disposal container. The disposal container will include outer and inner cylinders, outer and inner cylinder lids, and may include a canister guide. An exterior label will provide a means by which to identify the disposal container and its contents. Different materials

  15. Interventions for Individuals With High Levels of Needle Fear

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Melanie; Taddio, Anna; Antony, Martin M.; Asmundson, Gordon J.G.; Riddell, Rebecca Pillai; Chambers, Christine T.; Shah, Vibhuti

    2015-01-01

    Background: This systematic review evaluated the effectiveness of exposure-based psychological and physical interventions for the management of high levels of needle fear and/or phobia and fainting in children and adults. Design/Methods: A systematic review identified relevant randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials of children, adults, or both with high levels of needle fear, including phobia (if not available, then populations with other specific phobias were included). Critically important outcomes were self-reported fear specific to the feared situation and stimulus (psychological interventions) or fainting (applied muscle tension). Data were pooled using standardized mean difference (SMD) or relative risk with 95% confidence intervals. Results: The systematic review included 11 trials. In vivo exposure-based therapy for children 7 years and above showed benefit on specific fear (n=234; SMD: −1.71 [95% CI: −2.72, −0.7]). In vivo exposure-based therapy with adults reduced fear of needles posttreatment (n=20; SMD: −1.09 [−2.04, −0.14]) but not at 1-year follow-up (n=20; SMD: −0.28 [−1.16, 0.6]). Compared with single session, a benefit was observed for multiple sessions of exposure-based therapy posttreatment (n=93; SMD: −0.66 [−1.08, −0.24]) but not after 1 year (n=83; SMD: −0.37 [−0.87, 0.13]). Non in vivo e.g., imaginal exposure-based therapy in children reduced specific fear posttreatment (n=41; SMD: −0.88 [−1.7, −0.05]) and at 3 months (n=24; SMD: −0.89 [−1.73, −0.04]). Non in vivo exposure-based therapy for adults showed benefit on specific fear (n=68; SMD: −0.62 [−1.11, −0.14]) but not procedural fear (n=17; SMD: 0.18 [−0.87, 1.23]). Applied tension showed benefit on fainting posttreatment (n=20; SMD: −1.16 [−2.12, −0.19]) and after 1 year (n=20; SMD: −0.97 [−1.91, −0.03]) compared with exposure alone. Conclusions: Exposure-based psychological interventions and applied muscle tension show

  16. Spent nuclear fuel project high-level information management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Main, G.C.

    1996-09-13

    This document presents the results of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) Information Management Planning Project (IMPP), a short-term project that identified information management (IM) issues and opportunities within the SNFP and outlined a high-level plan to address them. This high-level plan for the SNMFP IM focuses on specific examples from within the SNFP. The plan`s recommendations can be characterized in several ways. Some recommendations address specific challenges that the SNFP faces. Others form the basis for making smooth transitions in several important IM areas. Still others identify areas where further study and planning are indicated. The team`s knowledge of developments in the IM industry and at the Hanford Site were crucial in deciding where to recommend that the SNFP act and where they should wait for Site plans to be made. Because of the fast pace of the SNFP and demands on SNFP staff, input and interaction were primarily between the IMPP team and members of the SNFP Information Management Steering Committee (IMSC). Key input to the IMPP came from a workshop where IMSC members and their delegates developed a set of draft IM principles. These principles, described in Section 2, became the foundation for the recommendations found in the transition plan outlined in Section 5. Availability of SNFP staff was limited, so project documents were used as a basis for much of the work. The team, realizing that the status of the project and the environment are continually changing, tried to keep abreast of major developments since those documents were generated. To the extent possible, the information contained in this document is current as of the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. Programs and organizations on the Hanford Site as a whole are trying to maximize their return on IM investments. They are coordinating IM activities and trying to leverage existing capabilities. However, the SNFP cannot just rely on Sitewide activities to meet its IM requirements

  17. CEMENTITIOUS GROUT FOR CLOSING SRS HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS - #12315

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.; Burns, H.; Stefanko, D.

    2012-01-10

    In 1997, the first two United States Department of Energy (US DOE) high level waste tanks (Tanks 17-F and 20-F: Type IV, single shell tanks) were taken out of service (permanently closed) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In 2012, the DOE plans to remove from service two additional Savannah River Site (SRS) Type IV high-level waste tanks, Tanks 18-F and 19-F. These tanks were constructed in the late 1950's and received low-heat waste and do not contain cooling coils. Operational closure of Tanks 18-F and 19-F is intended to be consistent with the applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and will be performed in accordance with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The closure will physically stabilize two 4.92E+04 cubic meter (1.3 E+06 gallon) carbon steel tanks and isolate and stabilize any residual contaminants left in the tanks. The closure will also fill, physically stabilize and isolate ancillary equipment abandoned in the tanks. A Performance Assessment (PA) has been developed to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment resulting from the operational closure of the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) waste tanks. Next generation flowable, zero-bleed cementitious grouts were designed, tested, and specified for closing Tanks 18-F and 19-F and for filling the abandoned equipment. Fill requirements were developed for both the tank and equipment grouts. All grout formulations were required to be alkaline with a pH of 12.4 and chemically reduction potential (Eh) of -200 to -400 to stabilize selected potential contaminants of concern. This was achieved by including Portland cement and Grade 100 slag in the mixes, respectively. Ingredients and proportions of cementitious reagents were selected and adjusted, respectively, to support the mass placement strategy developed by closure

  18. ATW system impact on high-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, E.D.

    1992-12-01

    This report discusses the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) concept which aims at destruction of key long-lived radionuclides in high-level nuclear waste (HLW), both fission products and actinides. This focus makes it different from most other transmutation concepts which concentrate primarily on actinide burning. The ATW system uses an accelerator-driven, sub-critical assembly to create an intense thermal neutron environment for radionuclide transmutation. This feature allows rapid transmutation under low-inventory system conditions, which in turn, has a direct impact on the size of chemical separations and materials handling components of the system. Inventories in ATW are factors of eight to thirty times smaller than reactor systems of equivalent thermal power. Chemical separations systems are relatively small in scale and can be optimized to achieve high decontamination factors and minimized waste streams. The low-inventory feature also directly impacts material amounts remaining in the system at its end of life. In addition to its low-inventory operation, the accelerator-driven neutron source features of ATW are key to providing a sufficient level of neutrons to allow transmutation of long-lived fission products.

  19. Why consider subseabed disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, G. R.; Hollister, C. D.; Anderson, D. R.; Leinen, M.

    1980-01-01

    Large areas of the deep seabed warrant assessment as potential disposal sites for high-level radioactive waste because: (1) they are far from seismically and tectonically active lithospheric plate boundaries; (2) they are far from active or young volcanos; (3) they contain thick layers of very uniform fine-grained clays; (4) they are devoid of natural resources likely to be exploited in the forseeable future; (5) the geologic and oceanographic processes governing the deposition of sediments in such areas are well understood, and are remarkably insensitive to past oceanographic and climatic changes; and (6) sedmentary records of tens of millions of years of slow, uninterrupted deposition of fine grained clay support predictions of the future stability of such sites. Data accumulated to date on the permeability, ion-retardation properties, and mechanical strength of pelagic clay sediments indicate that they can act as a primary barrier to the escape of buried nuclides. Work in progress should determine within the current decade whether subseabed disposal is environmentally acceptable and technically feasible, as well as address the legal, political and social issues raised by this new concept.

  20. The ALICE High Level Trigger: status and plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Rohr, David; Gorbunov, Sergey; Breitner, Timo; Lehrbach, Johannes; Lindenstruth, Volker; Berzano, Dario

    2015-12-01

    The ALICE High Level Trigger (HLT) is an online reconstruction, triggering and data compression system used in the ALICE experiment at CERN. Unique among the LHC experiments, it extensively uses modern coprocessor technologies like general purpose graphic processing units (GPGPU) and field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) in the data flow. Realtime data compression is performed using a cluster finder algorithm implemented on FPGA boards. These data, instead of raw clusters, are used in the subsequent processing and storage, resulting in a compression factor of around 4. Track finding is performed using a cellular automaton and a Kalman filter algorithm on GPGPU hardware, where both CUDA and OpenCL technologies can be used interchangeably. The ALICE upgrade requires further development of online concepts to include detector calibration and stronger data compression. The current HLT farm will be used as a test bed for online calibration and both synchronous and asynchronous processing frameworks already before the upgrade, during Run 2. For opportunistic use as a Grid computing site during periods of inactivity of the experiment a virtualisation based setup is deployed.

  1. High level bacterial contamination of secondary school students’ mobile phones

    PubMed Central

    Kõljalg, Siiri; Mändar, Rando; Sõber, Tiina; Rööp, Tiiu; Mändar, Reet

    2017-01-01

    Introduction While contamination of mobile phones in the hospital has been found to be common in several studies, little information about bacterial abundance on phones used in the community is available. Our aim was to quantitatively determine the bacterial contamination of secondary school students’ mobile phones. Methods Altogether 27 mobile phones were studied. The contact plate method and microbial identification using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer were used for culture studies. Quantitative PCR reaction for detection of universal 16S rRNA, Enterococcus faecalis 16S rRNA and Escherichia coli allantoin permease were performed, and the presence of tetracycline (tetA, tetB, tetM), erythromycin (ermB) and sulphonamide (sul1) resistance genes was assessed. Results We found a high median bacterial count on secondary school students’ mobile phones (10.5 CFU/cm2) and a median of 17,032 bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies per phone. Potentially pathogenic microbes (Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter spp., Pseudomonas spp., Bacillus cereus and Neisseria flavescens) were found among dominant microbes more often on phones with higher percentage of E. faecalis in total bacterial 16S rRNA. No differences in contamination level or dominating bacterial species between phone owner’s gender and between phone types (touch screen/keypad) were found. No antibiotic resistance genes were detected on mobile phone surfaces. Conclusion Quantitative study methods revealed high level bacterial contamination of secondary school students’ mobile phones. PMID:28626737

  2. High-level fluorescence labeling of gram-positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Aymanns, Simone; Mauerer, Stefanie; van Zandbergen, Ger; Wolz, Christiane; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence labeling of bacterial pathogens has a broad range of interesting applications including the observation of living bacteria within host cells. We constructed a novel vector based on the E. coli streptococcal shuttle plasmid pAT28 that can propagate in numerous bacterial species from different genera. The plasmid harbors a promoterless copy of the green fluorescent variant gene egfp under the control of the CAMP-factor gene (cfb) promoter of Streptococcus agalactiae and was designated pBSU101. Upon transfer of the plasmid into streptococci, the bacteria show a distinct and easily detectable fluorescence using a standard fluorescence microscope and quantification by FACS-analysis demonstrated values that were 10-50 times increased over the respective controls. To assess the suitability of the construct for high efficiency fluorescence labeling in different gram-positive pathogens, numerous species were transformed. We successfully labeled Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus anginosus and Staphylococcus aureus strains utilizing the EGFP reporter plasmid pBSU101. In all of these species the presence of the cfb promoter construct resulted in high-level EGFP expression that could be further increased by growing the streptococcal and enterococcal cultures under high oxygen conditions through continuous aeration.

  3. Wind resource quality affected by high levels of renewables

    DOE PAGES

    Diakov, Victor

    2015-06-17

    For solar photovoltaic (PV) and wind resources, the capacity factor is an important parameter describing the quality of the resource. As the share of variable renewable resources (such as PV and wind) on the electric system is increasing, so does curtailment (and the fraction of time when it cannot be avoided). At high levels of renewable generation, curtailments effectively change the practical measure of resource quality from capacity factor to the incremental capacity factor. The latter accounts only for generation during hours of no curtailment and is directly connected with the marginal capital cost of renewable generators for a givenmore » level of renewable generation during the year. The Western U.S. wind generation is analyzed hourly for a system with 75% of annual generation from wind, and it is found that the value for the system of resources with equal capacity factors can vary by a factor of 2, which highlights the importance of using the incremental capacity factor instead. Finally, the effect is expected to be more pronounced in smaller geographic areas (or when transmission limitations imposed) and less pronounced at lower levels of renewable energy in the system with less curtailment.« less

  4. High-level simulation of JWST event-driven operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, R.; Kinzel, W.

    2012-09-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has an event-driven architecture: an onboard Observation Plan Executive (OPE) executes an Observation Plan (OP) consisting of a sequence of observing units (visits). During normal operations, ground action to update the OP is only expected to be necessary about once a week. This architecture is designed to tolerate uncertainty in visit duration, and occasional visit failures due to inability to acquire guide stars, without creating gaps in the observing timeline. The operations concept is complicated by the need for occasional scheduling of timecritical science and engineering visits that cannot tolerate much slippage without inducing gaps, and also by onboard momentum management. A prototype Python tool called the JWST Observation Plan Execution Simulator (JOPES) has recently been developed to simulate OP execution at a high level and analyze the response of the Observatory and OPE to both nominal and contingency scenarios. Incorporating both deterministic and stochastic behavior, JOPES has potential to be a powerful tool for several purposes: requirements analysis, system verification, systems engineering studies, and test data generation. It has already been successfully applied to a study of overhead estimation bias: whether to use conservative or average-case estimates for timing components that are inherently uncertain, such as those involving guide-star acquisition. JOPES is being enhanced to support interfaces to the operational Proposal Planning Subsystem (PPS) now being developed, with the objective of "closing the loop" between testing and simulation by feeding simulated event logs back into the PPS.

  5. Metrics associated with NIH funding: a high-level view

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objective To introduce the availability of grant-to-article linkage data associated with National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants and to perform a high-level analysis of the publication outputs and impacts associated with those grants. Design Articles were linked to the grants they acknowledge using the grant acknowledgment strings in PubMed using a parsing and matching process as embodied in the NIH Scientific Publication Information Retrieval & Evaluation System system. Additional data from PubMed and citation counts from Scopus were added to the linkage data. The data comprise 2 572 576 records from 1980 to 2009. Results The data show that synergies between NIH institutes are increasing over time; 29% of current articles acknowledge grants from multiple institutes. The median time lag to publication for a new grant is 3 years. Each grant contributes to approximately 1.7 articles per year, averaged over all grant types. Articles acknowledging US Public Health Service (PHS, which includes NIH) funding are cited twice as much as US-authored articles acknowledging no funding source. Articles acknowledging both PHS funding and a non-US government funding source receive on average 40% more citations that those acknowledging PHS funding sources alone. Conclusion The US PHS is effective at funding research with a higher-than-average impact. The data are amenable to further and much more detailed analysis. PMID:21527408

  6. Commissioning and first experiences of the ALICE High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbeck, Timm M.; Alice Hlt Collaboration

    2010-04-01

    For the ALICE heavy-ion experiment a large computing cluster will be used to perform the last triggering stages in the High Level Trigger (HLT). For the first year of operation the cluster consisted of about 100 multi-processing nodes with 4 or 8 CPU cores each, to be increased to more than 1000 nodes for the coming years of operation. During the commissioning phases of the detector, the preparations for first LHC beam, as well as during the periods of first LHC beam, the HLT has been used extensively already to reconstruct, compress, and display data from the different detectors. For example the HLT has been used to compress Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) data by a factor of 15, lossless, on the fly at a rate of more than 800 Hz. For ALICE's Time Projection Chamber (TPC) detector the HLT has been used to reconstruct tracks online and show the reconstructed tracks in an online event display. The event display can also display online reconstructed data from the Dimuon and Photon Spectrometer (PHOS) detectors. For the latter detector a first selection mechanism has also been put into place to select only events for forwarding to the online display in which data has passed through the PHOS detector. In this contribution we will present experiences and results from these commissioning phases.

  7. High Level Trigger Applications for the ALICE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, M.; Aamodt, K.; Alt, T.; Bablok, S.; Cheshkov, C.; Hille, P. T.; Lindenstruth, V.; Ovrebekk, G.; Ploskon, M.; Popescu, S.; Rohrich, D.; Steinbeck, T. M.; Thader, J.

    2008-02-01

    For the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN/Geneva, a high level trigger system (HLT) for online event selection and data compression has been developed and a computing cluster of several hundred dual-processor nodes is being installed. A major system integration test was carried out during the commissioning of the time projection chamber (TPC), where the HLT also provides a monitoring system. All major parts like a small computing cluster, hardware input devices, the online data transportation framework, and the HLT analysis could be tested successfully. A common interface for HLT processing components has been designed to run the components from either the online or offline analysis framework without changes. The interface adapts the component to the needs of the online processing and allows the developer to use the offline framework for easy development, debugging, and benchmarking. Following this approach, results can be compared directly. For the upcoming commissioning of the whole detector, the HLT is currently prepared to run online data analysis for the main detectors, e.g., the inner tracking system (ITS), the TPC, and the transition radiation detector (TRD). The HLT processing capability is indispensable for the photon spectrometer (PHOS), where the online pulse shape analysis reduces the data volume by a factor 20. A common monitoring framework is in place and detector calibration algorithms have been ported to the HLT. The paper describes briefly the architecture of the HLT system. It focuses on typical applications and component development.

  8. Hemipelvectomy: high-level amputation surgery and prosthetic rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Houdek, Matthew T; Kralovec, Michael E; Andrews, Karen L

    2014-07-01

    The hemipelvectomy, most commonly performed for pelvic tumor resection, is one of the most technically demanding and invasive surgical procedures performed today. Adequate soft tissue coverage and wound complications after hemipelvectomy are important considerations. Rehabilitation after hemipelvectomy is optimally managed by a multidisciplinary integrated team. Understanding the functional outcomes for this population assists the rehabilitation team to counsel patients, plan goals, and determine discharge needs. The most important rehabilitation goal is the optimal restoration of the patient's functional independence. Factors such as age, sex, etiology, level of amputation, and general health play important roles in determining prosthetic use. The three main criteria for successful prosthetic rehabilitation of patients with high-level amputation are comfort, function, and cosmesis. Recent advances in hip and knee joints have contributed to increased function. Prosthetic use after hemipelvectomy improves balance and decreases the need for a gait aid. Using a prosthesis helps maintain muscle strength and tone, cardiovascular health, and functional mobility. With new advances in prosthetic components, patients are choosing to use their prostheses for primary mobility.

  9. High Level Waste Feed Certification in Hanford Double Shell Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Thien, Micheal G.; Wells, Beric E.; Adamson, Duane J.

    2010-03-01

    The ability to effectively mix, sample, certify, and deliver consistent batches of High Level Waste (HLW) feed from the Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST) to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) presents a significant mission risk with potential to impact mission length and the quantity of HLW glass produced. DOE’s River Protection Project (RPP) mission modeling and WTP facility modeling assume that individual 3785 cubic meter (1 million gallon) HLW feed tanks are homogenously mixed, representatively sampled, and consistently delivered to the WTP. It has been demonstrated that homogenous mixing of HLW sludge in Hanford DSTs is not likely achievable with the baseline design thereby causing representative sampling and consistent feed delivery to be more difficult. Inconsistent feed to the WTP could cause additional batch to batch operational adjustments that reduces operating efficiency and has the potential to increase the overall mission length. The Hanford mixing and sampling demonstration program will identify DST mixing performance capability, will evaluate representative sampling techniques, and will estimate feed batch consistency. An evaluation of demonstration program results will identify potential mission improvement considerations that will help ensure successful mission completion. This paper will discuss the history, progress, and future activities that will define and mitigate the mission risk.

  10. Wind resource quality affected by high levels of renewables

    SciTech Connect

    Diakov, Victor

    2015-06-17

    For solar photovoltaic (PV) and wind resources, the capacity factor is an important parameter describing the quality of the resource. As the share of variable renewable resources (such as PV and wind) on the electric system is increasing, so does curtailment (and the fraction of time when it cannot be avoided). At high levels of renewable generation, curtailments effectively change the practical measure of resource quality from capacity factor to the incremental capacity factor. The latter accounts only for generation during hours of no curtailment and is directly connected with the marginal capital cost of renewable generators for a given level of renewable generation during the year. The Western U.S. wind generation is analyzed hourly for a system with 75% of annual generation from wind, and it is found that the value for the system of resources with equal capacity factors can vary by a factor of 2, which highlights the importance of using the incremental capacity factor instead. Finally, the effect is expected to be more pronounced in smaller geographic areas (or when transmission limitations imposed) and less pronounced at lower levels of renewable energy in the system with less curtailment.

  11. Ultrafilter Conditions for High Level Waste Sludge Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Geeting, John GH; Hallen, Richard T.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2006-08-28

    An evaluation of the optimal filtration conditions was performed based on test data obtained from filtration of a High Level Waste Sludge sample from the Hanford tank farms. This evaluation was performed using the anticipated configuration for the Waste Treatment Plant at the Hanford site. Testing was performed to identify the optimal pressure drop and cross flow velocity for filtration at both high and low solids loading. However, this analysis indicates that the actual filtration rate achieved is relatively insensitive to these conditions under anticipated operating conditions. The maximum filter flux was obtained by adjusting the system control valve pressure from 400 to 650 kPa while the filter feed concentration increased from 5 to 20 wt%. However, operating the system with a constant control valve pressure drop of 500 kPa resulted in a less than 1% reduction in the average filter flux. Also note that allowing the control valve pressure to swing as much as +/- 20% resulted in less than a 5% decrease in filter flux.

  12. Vestibular contributions to high-level sensorimotor functions.

    PubMed

    Medendorp, W Pieter; Selen, Luc J P

    2017-02-02

    The vestibular system, which detects motion and orientation of the head in space, is known to be important in controlling gaze to stabilize vision, to ensure postural stability and to provide our sense of self-motion. While the brain's computations underlying these functions are extensively studied, the role of the vestibular system in higher level sensorimotor functions is less clear. This review covers new research on the vestibular influence on perceptual judgments, motor decisions, and the ability to learn multiple motor actions. Guided by concepts such as optimization, inference, estimation and control, we focus on how the brain determines causal relationships between memorized and visual representations in the updating of visual space, and how vestibular, visual and efferent motor information are integrated in the estimation of body motion. We also discuss evidence that these computations involve multiple coordinate representations, some of which can be probed in parietal cortex using neuronal oscillations derived from EEG. In addition, we describe work on decision making during self-motion, showing a clear modulation of bottom-up acceleration signals on decisions in the saccadic system. Finally, we consider the importance of vestibular signals as contextual cues in motor learning and recall. Taken together, these results emphasize the impact of vestibular information on high-level sensorimotor functions, and identify future directions for theoretical, behavioral, and neurophysiological investigations.

  13. Pupil responses to high-level image content.

    PubMed

    Naber, Marnix; Nakayama, Ken

    2013-05-17

    The link between arousal and pupil dilation is well studied, but it is less known that other cognitive processes can trigger pupil responses. Here we present evidence that pupil responses can be induced by high-level scene processing, independent of changes in low-level features or arousal. In Experiment 1, we recorded changes in pupil diameter of observers while they viewed a variety of natural scenes with or without a sun that were presented either upright or inverted. Image inversion had the strongest effect on the pupil responses. The pupil constricted more to the onset of upright images as compared to inverted images. Furthermore, the amplitudes of pupil constrictions to viewing images containing a sun were larger relative to control images. In Experiment 2, we presented cartoon versions of upright and inverted pictures that included either a sun or a moon. The image backgrounds were kept identical across conditions. Similar to Experiment 1, upright images triggered pupil constrictions with larger amplitudes than inverted images and images of the sun evoked greater pupil contraction than images of the moon. We suggest that the modulations of pupil responses were due to higher-level interpretations of image content.

  14. Potential for erosion corrosion of SRS high level waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    SRS high-level radioactive waste tanks will not experience erosion corrosion to any significant degree during slurry pump operations. Erosion corrosion in carbon steel structures at reported pump discharge velocities is dominated by electrochemical (corrosion) processes. Interruption of those processes, as by the addition of corrosion inhibitors, sharply reduces the rate of metal loss from erosion corrosion. The well-inhibited SRS waste tanks have a near-zero general corrosion rate, and therefore will be essentially immune to erosion corrosion. The experimental data on carbon steel erosion corrosion most relevant to SRS operations was obtained at the Hanford Site on simulated Purex waste. A metal loss rate of 2.4 mils per year was measured at a temperature of 102 C and a slurry velocity comparable to calculated SRS slurry velocities on ground specimens of the same carbon steel used in SRS waste tanks. Based on these data and the much lower expected temperatures, the metal loss rate of SRS tanks under waste removal and processing conditions should be insignificant, i.e. less than 1 mil per year.

  15. Control of high level radioactive waste-glass melters

    SciTech Connect

    Bickford, D.F.; Choi, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    Slurry Fed Melters (SFM) are being developed in the United States, Europe and Japan for the conversion of high-level radioactive waste to borosilicate glass for permanent disposal. The high transition metal, noble metal, nitrate, organic, and sulfate contents of these wastes lead to unique melter redox control requirements. Pilot waste-glass melter operations have indicated the possibility of nickel sulfide or noble-metal fission-product accumulation on melter floors, which can lead to distortion of electric heating patterns, and decrease melter life. Sulfide formation is prevented by control of the redox chemistry of the melter feed. The redox state of waste-glass melters is determined by balance between the reducing potential of organic compounds in the feed, and the oxidizing potential of gases above the melt, and nitrates and polyvalent elements in the waste. Semiquantitative models predicting limitations of organic content have been developed based on crucible testing. Computerized thermodynamic computations are being developed to predict the sequence and products of redox reactions and is assessing process variations. Continuous melter test results have been compared to improved computer staged-thermodynamic-models of redox behavior. Feed chemistry control to prevent sulfide and moderate noble metal accumulations are discussed. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Identification of areas with high levels of untreated dental caries.

    PubMed

    Ellwood, R P; O'Mullane, D M

    1996-02-01

    In order to examine the geographical variation of dental health within 10 county districts in North Wales, 3538 children were examined. The associations between three demographic indicators, based on the 1981 OPCS census, and dental health outcomes were assessed for electoral wards within the county districts. The Townsend and Jarman indices were the first two indicators employed and the third was based on a mathematical model representing the variation in the mean number of untreated decayed surfaces per person for the wards. This model was developed using the children examined in the five most westerly county districts. Using the data derived from the five most easterly county districts, the three indicators were assessed. All three showed strong correlations (r > or = 0.88) with dental health. These results indicate that measures of dental health based on large administrative units may obscure variation within them. It is concluded that geographical methods of this type may be useful for targeting dental resources at small areas with high levels of need.

  17. High-Level Performance Modeling of SAR Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Curtis

    2006-01-01

    SAUSAGE (Still Another Utility for SAR Analysis that s General and Extensible) is a computer program for modeling (see figure) the performance of synthetic- aperture radar (SAR) or interferometric synthetic-aperture radar (InSAR or IFSAR) systems. The user is assumed to be familiar with the basic principles of SAR imaging and interferometry. Given design parameters (e.g., altitude, power, and bandwidth) that characterize a radar system, the software predicts various performance metrics (e.g., signal-to-noise ratio and resolution). SAUSAGE is intended to be a general software tool for quick, high-level evaluation of radar designs; it is not meant to capture all the subtleties, nuances, and particulars of specific systems. SAUSAGE was written to facilitate the exploration of engineering tradeoffs within the multidimensional space of design parameters. Typically, this space is examined through an iterative process of adjusting the values of the design parameters and examining the effects of the adjustments on the overall performance of the system at each iteration. The software is designed to be modular and extensible to enable consideration of a variety of operating modes and antenna beam patterns, including, for example, strip-map and spotlight SAR acquisitions, polarimetry, burst modes, and squinted geometries.

  18. Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, J.E.

    1984-08-01

    The Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program brought six major US laboratories together for three years of cooperative research. The participants reached a consensus that solubility of the leached glass species, particularly solubility in the altered surface layer, is the dominant factor controlling the leaching behavior of defense waste glass in a system in which the flow of leachant is constrained, as it will be in a deep geologic repository. Also, once the surface of waste glass is contacted by ground water, the kinetics of establishing solubility control are relatively rapid. The concentrations of leached species reach saturation, or steady-state concentrations, within a few months to a year at 70 to 90/sup 0/C. Thus, reaction kinetics, which were the main subject of earlier leaching mechanisms studies, are now shown to assume much less importance. The dominance of solubility means that the leach rate is, in fact, directly proportional to ground water flow rate. Doubling the flow rate doubles the effective leach rate. This relationship is expected to obtain in most, if not all, repository situations.

  19. The GRAVITY instrument software/high-level software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtscher, Leonard; Wieprecht, Ekkehard; Ott, Thomas; Kok, Yitping; Yazici, Senol; Anugu, Narsireddy; Dembet, Roderick; Fedou, Pierre; Lacour, Sylvestre; Ott, Jürgen; Paumard, Thibaut; Lapeyrere, Vincent; Kervella, Pierre; Abuter, Roberto; Pozna, Eszter; Eisenhauer, Frank; Blind, Nicolas; Genzel, Reinhard; Gillessen, Stefan; Hans, Oliver; Haug, Marcus; Haussmann, Frank; Kellner, Stefan; Lippa, Magdalena; Pfuhl, Oliver; Sturm, Eckhard; Weber, Johannes; Amorim, Antonio; Brandner, Wolfgang; Rousselet-Perraut, Karine; Perrin, Guy S.; Straubmeier, Christian; Schöller, Markus

    2014-07-01

    GRAVITY is the four-beam, near-infrared, AO-assisted, fringe tracking, astrometric and imaging instrument for the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). It is requiring the development of one of the most complex instrument software systems ever built for an ESO instrument. Apart from its many interfaces and interdependencies, one of the most challenging aspects is the overall performance and stability of this complex system. The three infrared detectors and the fast reflective memory network (RMN) recorder contribute a total data rate of up to 20 MiB/s accumulating to a maximum of 250 GiB of data per night. The detectors, the two instrument Local Control Units (LCUs) as well as the five LCUs running applications under TAC (Tools for Advanced Control) architecture, are interconnected with fast Ethernet, RMN fibers and dedicated fiber connections as well as signals for the time synchronization. Here we give a simplified overview of all subsystems of GRAVITY and their interfaces and discuss two examples of high-level applications during observations: the acquisition procedure and the gathering and merging of data to the final FITS file.

  20. The LHCb Data Acquisition and High Level Trigger Processing Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, M.; Gaspar, C.; Jost, B.; Neufeld, N.

    2015-12-01

    The LHCb experiment at the LHC accelerator at CERN collects collisions of particle bunches at 40 MHz. After a first level of hardware trigger with an output rate of 1 MHz, the physically interesting collisions are selected by running dedicated trigger algorithms in the High Level Trigger (HLT) computing farm. This farm consists of up to roughly 25000 CPU cores in roughly 1750 physical nodes each equipped with up to 4 TB local storage space. This work describes the LHCb online system with an emphasis on the developments implemented during the current long shutdown (LS1). We will elaborate the architecture to treble the available CPU power of the HLT farm and the technicalities to determine and verify precise calibration and alignment constants which are fed to the HLT event selection procedure. We will describe how the constants are fed into a two stage HLT event selection facility using extensively the local disk buffering capabilities on the worker nodes. With the installed disk buffers, the CPU resources can be used during periods of up to ten days without beams. These periods in the past accounted to more than 70% of the total time.

  1. Cytotoxicity assessment of residual high-level disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Mizuyuki; Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Kawamukai, Emiko; Quan, Glenlelyn; Furuta, Taro

    2013-01-01

    Some studies show the uptake of disinfectants on medical devices but no studies on their cytotoxicity have been reported. This study aimed to assess that cytotoxicity in a 3-dimensional culture system using HeLa cells grown in matrices composed of collagen. Plastic materials were soaked in the use solutions of the widely used high-level disinfectants, glutaraldehyde (GA), ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA) and peracetic acid (PAA). After being rinsed, they were allowed to dry and were embedded into the cell medium to investigate the cytotoxicity of the residual disinfectants. Cytotoxicity was observed with the polyvinyl chloride, polyurethane and silicon tubes soaked in GA and OPA, indicating that both disinfectants were absorbed in the test pieces, whereas for PAA, none was observed. As for the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tubes, no disinfectant displayed cytotoxicity. GA and OPA are primary irritants, having a potential to cause anaphylaxis and other forms of allergic reactions. There should be consideration not only about the toxicity of the residual disinfectant from poor rinsing, but also about the toxicity that would result from the disinfectants that were absorbed and consequently released from the medical devices or materials.

  2. The IFR pyroprocessing for high-level waste minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Laidler, J.J. )

    1993-01-01

    The process developed for the recycle of integral fast reactor (IFR) spent fuel utilizes a combination of pyrometallurgical and electrochemical methods and has been termed pyroprocessing. The process has been operated at full scale with simulated spent fuel using nonradioactive fission product elements. A comprehensive demonstration of the pyroprocessing of irradiated IFR fuel will begin later this year. Pyroprocessing involves the anodic dissolution of all the constituent elements of the IFR spent fuel and controlled electrotransport (electrorefining) to separate the actinide elements from the fission products present in the spent fuel. The process be applied to the processing of spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel as well, requiring only the addition of a reduction step to convert the LWR fuel as well, requiring only the addition of a reduction step to convert the LWR oxide fuel to metallic form and a separation step to separate uranium from the transuranic (TRU) elements. The TRU elements are then recovered by electroefining in the same manner as the actinides from the IFR high-level wastes arising from pyroprocessing are virtually free of actinides, and the volume of the wastes is minimized by the intrinsic characteristics of the processing of the processing method.

  3. Detection of vanA and vanB genes in vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) from groundwater using multiplex PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Ateba, Collins Njie; Lekoma, Kgothatso Pontsho; Kawadza, David Tonderai

    2013-12-01

    A total of 22 groundwater samples were randomly collected from three rural communities in the Mafikeng area. Bile esculin agar was used for selective isolation of enterococci. Standard preliminary tests (Gram staining, oxidase test, catalase test) and confirmatory tests (Prolex™ Streptococcal Grouping Rapid Latex Agglutination test kit) were used to determine the identities of presumptive enterococci. The antibiotic sensitivity test was performed on all positively identified enterococci; percentage resistance and multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) phenotypes were generated. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to detect vanA and vanB genes vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). A total of 179 enterococci were positively identified and the proportion of isolates from Dibate (62.5%) was higher compared to those from Majemantsho and Motlhabeng (22.3 and 15.0, respectively). A large proportion (81.5 to 100%) of the isolates from Dibate, Motlhabeng and Majemantsho were resistant to ampicillin, vancomycin and penicillin G. Two main MAR phenotypes, PG-VA-Ap-A-OX and PG-VA-Ap-OX, were identified. Multiplex PCR analysis of 50 VRE indicated that 17 (34%) were positive for vanA and vanB genes. This highlights the need to determine the cause of vancomycin resistance in enterococci in the sampled sites and suggests that sequence analysis be used to confirm the identities of these amplicons.

  4. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci among haemodialysis patients in Portugal: prevalence and molecular characterization of resistance, virulence and clonality.

    PubMed

    Correia, Susana; Ponce, Pedro; Jones-Dias, Daniela; Caniça, Manuela; Igrejas, Gilberto; Poeta, Patrícia

    2014-03-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) among haemodialysis patients has increased rapidly and, to date, there is no report of this incidence in Portugal. A total of 121 faecal samples were collected from haemodialysis patients, and then tested for VRE. Antimicrobial resistance, virulence and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were studied. VRE prevalence was 3.3%. Three VRE isolates, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus raffinosus, were multi-resistant and vanA-positive. E. faecium and E. faecalis belonged to CC17 and CC2, respectively. Haemodialysis patients in Portugal are colonized with virulent, multi-resistant enterococci from high-risk clonal complexes, representing a public health concern. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of in-feed copper and tylosin supplementations on copper and antimicrobial resistance in faecal enterococci of feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Amachawadi, R G; Scott, H M; Aperce, C; Vinasco, J; Drouillard, J S; Nagaraja, T G

    2015-06-01

    The objective was to investigate whether in-feed supplementation of copper, at elevated level, co-selects for macrolide resistance in faecal enterococci. The study was conducted in cattle (n = 80) with a 2 × 2 factorial design of copper (10 or 100 mg kg(-1) of feed) and tylosin (0 or 10 mg kg(-1) of feed). Thirty-seven isolates (4·6%; 37/800) of faecal enterococci were positive for the tcrB and all were Enterococcus faecium. The prevalence was higher among cattle fed diets with copper and tylosin (8·5%) compared to control (2·0%), copper (4·5%) and tylosin (3·5%) alone. All tcrB-positive isolates were positive for erm(B) and tet(M) genes. Median copper minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for tcrB-positive and tcrB-negative enterococci were 20 and 4 mmol l(-1) , respectively. Feeding of elevated dietary copper and tylosin alone or in combination resulted in an increased prevalence of tcrB and erm(B)-mediated copper and tylosin-resistant faecal enterococci in feedlot cattle. In-feed supplementation of elevated dietary copper has the potential to co-select for macrolide resistance. Further studies are warranted to investigate the factors involved in maintenance and dissemination of the resistance determinants and their co-selection mechanism in relation to feed-grade antimicrobials' usage in feedlot cattle. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Selection of Fecal Enterococci Exhibiting tcrB-Mediated Copper Resistance in Pigs Fed Diets Supplemented with Copper † ▿

    PubMed Central

    Amachawadi, R. G.; Shelton, N. W.; Shi, X.; Vinasco, J.; Dritz, S. S.; Tokach, M. D.; Nelssen, J. L.; Scott, H. M.; Nagaraja, T. G.

    2011-01-01

    Copper, as copper sulfate, is increasingly used as an alternative to in-feed antibiotics for growth promotion in weaned piglets. Acquired copper resistance, conferred by a plasmid-borne, transferable copper resistance (tcrB) gene, has been reported in Enterococcus faecium and E. faecalis. A longitudinal field study was undertaken to determine the relationship between copper supplementation and the prevalence of tcrB-positive enterococci in piglets. The study was done with weaned piglets, housed in 10 pens with 6 piglets per pen, fed diets supplemented with a normal (16.5 ppm; control) or an elevated (125 ppm) level of copper. Fecal samples were randomly collected from three piglets per pen on days 0, 14, 28, and 42 and plated on M-Enterococcus agar, and three enterococcal isolates were obtained from each sample. The overall prevalence of tcrB-positive enterococci was 21.1% (38/180) in piglets fed elevated copper and 2.8% (5/180) in the control. Among the 43 tcrB-positive isolates, 35 were E. faecium and 8 were E. faecalis. The mean MICs of copper for tcrB-negative and tcrB-positive enterococci were 6.2 and 22.2 mM, respectively. The restriction digestion of the genomic DNA of E. faecium or E. faecalis with S1 nuclease yielded a band of ∼194-kbp size to which both tcrB and the erm(B) gene probes hybridized. A conjugation assay demonstrated cotransfer of tcrB and erm(B) genes between E. faecium and E. faecalis strains. The higher prevalence of tcrB-positive enterococci in piglets fed elevated copper compared to that in piglets fed normal copper suggests that supplementation of copper in swine diets selected for resistance. PMID:21705534

  7. Historical Associations of Molecular Measurements of Escherichia coli and Enterococci to Anthropogenic Activities and Climate Variables in Freshwater Sediment Cores.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Yolanda M; Baustian, Melissa M; Baskaran, Mark; Ostrom, Nathaniel E; Rose, Joan B

    2016-07-05

    This study investigated the long-term associations of anthropogenic (sedimentary P, C, and N concentrations, and human population in the watershed), and climatic variables (air temperature, and river discharge) with Escherichia coli uidA and enterococci 23S rRNA concentrations in sediment cores from Anchor Bay (AB) in Lake St. Clair, and near the mouth of the Clinton River (CR), Michigan. Calendar year was estimated from vertical abundances of (137)Cs. The AB and CR cores spanned c.1760-2012 and c.1895-2012, respectively. There were steady state concentrations of enterococci in AB during c.1760-c.1860 and c.1910-c.2003 at ∼0.1 × 10(5) and ∼2.0 × 10(5) cell equivalents (CE) per g-dry wt, respectively. Enterococci concentrations in CR increased toward present day, and ranged from ∼0.03 × 10(5) to 9.9 × 10(5) CE/g-dry wt. The E. coli concentrations in CR and AB increased toward present day, and ranged from 0.14 × 10(7) to 1.7 × 10(7) CE/g-dry wt, and 1.8 × 10(6) to 8.5 × 10(6) CE/g-dry wt, respectively. Enterococci was associated with population and river discharge, while E. coli was associated with population, air temperature, and N and C concentrations (p < 0.05). Sediments retain records of the abundance of fecal indicator bacteria, and offer a way to evaluate responses to increased population, nutrient loading, and environmental policies.

  8. Prevalence of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci in Fecal Samples from Hospitalized Patients and Nonhospitalized Controls in a Cattle-Rearing Area of France

    PubMed Central

    Gambarotto, Karine; Ploy, Marie-Cécile; Turlure, Pascal; Grélaud, Carole; Martin, Christian; Bordessoule, Dominique; Denis, Francois

    2000-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have emerged as nosocomial pathogens over the last decade, but little is known about their epidemiology. We report on the prevalence of VRE fecal colonization on the basis of a prospective study among patients hospitalized in a hematology intensive care unit and among nonhospitalized subjects living in the local community. A total of 243 rectal swabs from hematology patients and 169 stool samples from the control group were inoculated onto bile-esculin agar plates with and without 6 mg of vancomycin per liter and into an enrichment bile-esculin broth supplemented with 4 mg of vancomycin per liter. A total of 37% of the hospitalized patients and 11.8% of the subjects from the community were found to be VRE carriers. A total of 65 VRE strains were isolated: 12 (18.5%) E. faecium, 46 (70.7%) E. gallinarum, and 7 (10.8%) E. casseliflavus strains. No E. faecalis strains were detected. All the E. faecium strains were of the vanA genotype. Molecular typing by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed a different pattern for each vanA VRE strain that originated from an individual subject. To our knowledge, this is the first study to be carried out in a cattle-rearing region of France. It reports a higher VRE prevalence than that reported in previous European or U.S. studies. A partial explanation is the use of an enrichment broth step which enabled detection of strains which would otherwise have been missed, but the fact that subjects and patients were recruited from a predominantly agricultural area where vancomycin-related antibiotics have recently been used in animal husbandry could also contribute to the high levels of VRE in patients and subjects alike. PMID:10655356

  9. Qualification of Innovative High Level Waste Pipeline Unplugging Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, D.; Gokaltun, S.; Varona, J.; Awwad, A.; Roelant, D.; Srivastava, R.

    2008-07-01

    In the past, some of the pipelines have plugged during high level waste (HLW) transfers resulting in schedule delays and increased costs. Furthermore, pipeline plugging has been cited by the 'best and brightest' technical review as one of the major issues that can result in unplanned outages at the Waste Treatment Plant causing inconsistent operation. As the DOE moves toward a more active high level waste retrieval, the site engineers will be faced with increasing cross-site pipeline waste slurry transfers that will result in increased probability of a pipeline getting plugged. Hence, availability of a pipeline unplugging tool/technology is crucial to ensure smooth operation of the waste transfers and in ensuring tank farm cleanup milestones are met. FIU had earlier tested and evaluated various unplugging technologies through an industry call. Based on mockup testing, two technologies were identified that could withstand the rigors of operation in a radioactive environment and with the ability to handle sharp 90 elbows. We present results of the second phase of detailed testing and evaluation of pipeline unplugging technologies and the objective is to qualify these pipeline unplugging technologies for subsequent deployment at a DOE facility. The current phase of testing and qualification comprises of a heavily instrumented 3-inch diameter (full-scale) pipeline facilitating extensive data acquisition for design optimization and performance evaluation, as it applies to three types of plugs atypical of the DOE HLW waste. Furthermore, the data from testing at three different lengths of pipe in conjunction with the physics of the process will assist in modeling the unplugging phenomenon that will then be used to scale-up process parameters and system variables for longer and site typical pipe lengths, which can extend as much as up to 19,000 ft. Detailed information resulting from the testing will provide the DOE end-user with sufficient data and understanding of the

  10. Stability of High-Level Radioactive Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.

    2001-06-22

    High-level waste (HLW) glass compositions, processing schemes, limits on waste content, and corrosion/dissolution release models are dependent on an accurate knowledge of melting temperatures and thermochemical values. Unfortunately, existing models for predicting these temperatures are empirically-based, depending on extrapolations of experimental information. In addition, present models of leaching behavior of glass waste forms use simplistic assumptions or experimentally measured values obtained under non-realistic conditions. There is thus a critical need for both more accurate and more widely applicable models for HLW glass behavior, which this project addressed. Significant progress was made in this project on modeling HLW glass. Borosilicate glass was accurately represented along with the additional important components that contain iron, lithium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium. The formation of crystalline inclusions in the glass, an issue in Hanford HLW formulations, was modeled and shown to be predictive. Thus the results of this work have already demonstrated practical benefits with the ability to map compositional regions where crystalline material forms, and therefore avoid that detrimental effect. With regard to a fundamental understanding, added insights on the behavior of the components of glass have been obtained, including the potential formation of molecular clusters. The EMSP project had very significant effects beyond the confines of Environmental Management. The models developed for glass have been used to solve a very costly problem in the corrosion of refractories for glass production. The effort resulted in another laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories-Livermore, to become conversant in the techniques and to apply those through a DOE Office of Industrial Technologies project joint with PPG Industries. The glass industry as a whole is now cognizant of these capabilities, and there is a Glass Manufacturer's Research Institute proposal

  11. Seasonal changes in stress indicators in high level football.

    PubMed

    Faude, O; Kellmann, M; Ammann, T; Schnittker, R; Meyer, T

    2011-04-01

    This study aimed at describing changes in stress and performance indicators throughout a competitive season in high level football. 15 players (19.5±3.0 years, 181±5 cm, 75.7±9.0 kg) competing under professional circumstances were tested at baseline and 3 times during the season 2008/09 (in-season 1, 2, 3). Testing consisted of the Recovery-Stress Questionnaire for Athletes (Total Stress and Recovery score), vertical jump tests (counter movement and drop jump (DJ)), and a maximal ramp-like running test. Average match exposure was higher during a 3-weeks period prior to in-season 3 compared to in-season 1 and 2 (1.5 vs. 1 h/week, p=0.05). Total Stress score was elevated at in-season 1 and 2 compared to baseline (p<0.01) with a further increase at in-season 3 (p<0.03; generalized eta squared (η(2)(g))=0.37). Total Recovery score was decreased at in-season 1 and 3 compared to baseline (p<0.05; η(2)(g)=0.21). Maximal running velocity (V(max)) and jumping heights were not significantly affected (η(2)(g)≤0.04). Changes in DJ height and V (max) between baseline and in-season 3 were correlated with the corresponding changes in Total Stress score (r=-0.55 and r=-0.61, p<0.03). Usual match exposure during a professional football season does not induce relevant changes in performance indicators. Accumulated stress and a lack of recovery towards the end of a season might be indicated by psychometric deteriorations. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. High-level disinfection of gastrointestinal endoscope reprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, King-Wah; Lu, Lung-Sheng; Chiou, Shue-Shian

    2015-01-01

    High level disinfection (HLD) of the gastrointestinal (GI) endoscope is not simply a slogan, but rather is a form of experimental monitoring-based medicine. By definition, GI endoscopy is a semicritical medical device. Hence, such medical devices require major quality assurance for disinfection. And because many of these items are temperature sensitive, low-temperature chemical methods, such as liquid chemical germicide, must be used rather than steam sterilization. In summarizing guidelines for infection prevention and control for GI endoscopy, there are three important steps that must be highlighted: manual washing, HLD with automated endoscope reprocessor, and drying. Strict adherence to current guidelines is required because compared to any other medical device, the GI endoscope is associated with more outbreaks linked to inadequate cleaning or disinfecting during HLD. Both experimental evaluation on the surveillance bacterial cultures and in-use clinical results have shown that, the monitoring of the stringent processes to prevent and control infection is an essential component of the broader strategy to ensure the delivery of safe endoscopy services, because endoscope reprocessing is a multistep procedure involving numerous factors that can interfere with its efficacy. Based on our years of experience in the surveillance of culture monitoring of endoscopic reprocessing, we aim in this study to carefully describe what details require attention in the GI endoscopy disinfection and to share our experience so that patients can be provided with high quality and safe medical practices. Quality management encompasses all aspects of pre- and post-procedural care including the efficiency of the endoscopy unit and reprocessing area, as well as the endoscopic procedure itself. PMID:25699232

  13. High-Level Waste Systems Plan. Revision 7

    SciTech Connect

    Brooke, J.N.; Gregory, M.V.; Paul, P.; Taylor, G.; Wise, F.E.; Davis, N.R.; Wells, M.N.

    1996-10-01

    This revision of the High-Level Waste (HLW) System Plan aligns SRS HLW program planning with the DOE Savannah River (DOE-SR) Ten Year Plan (QC-96-0005, Draft 8/6), which was issued in July 1996. The objective of the Ten Year Plan is to complete cleanup at most nuclear sites within the next ten years. The two key principles of the Ten Year Plan are to accelerate the reduction of the most urgent risks to human health and the environment and to reduce mortgage costs. Accordingly, this System Plan describes the HLW program that will remove HLW from all 24 old-style tanks, and close 20 of those tanks, by 2006 with vitrification of all HLW by 2018. To achieve these goals, the DWPF canister production rate is projected to climb to 300 canisters per year starting in FY06, and remain at that rate through the end of the program in FY18, (Compare that to past System Plans, in which DWPF production peaked at 200 canisters per year, and the program did not complete until 2026.) An additional $247M (FY98 dollars) must be made available as requested over the ten year planning period, including a one-time $10M to enhance Late Wash attainment. If appropriate resources are made available, facility attainment issues are resolved and regulatory support is sufficient, then completion of the HLW program in 2018 would achieve a $3.3 billion cost savings to DOE, versus the cost of completing the program in 2026. Facility status information is current as of October 31, 1996.

  14. High-level waste issues and resolutions document

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The High-Level Waste (HLW) Issues and Resolutions Document recognizes US Department of Energy (DOE) complex-wide HLW issues and offers potential corrective actions for resolving these issues. Westinghouse Management and Operations (M&O) Contractors are effectively managing HLW for the Department of Energy at four sites: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Savannah River Site (SRS), West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), and Hanford Reservation. Each site is at varying stages of processing HLW into a more manageable form. This HLW Issues and Resolutions Document identifies five primary issues that must be resolved in order to reach the long-term objective of HLW repository disposal. As the current M&O contractor at DOE`s most difficult waste problem sites, Westinghouse recognizes that they have the responsibility to help solve some of the complexes` HLW problems in a cost effective manner by encouraging the M&Os to work together by sharing expertise, eliminating duplicate efforts, and sharing best practices. Pending an action plan, Westinghouse M&Os will take the initiative on those corrective actions identified as the responsibility of an M&O. This document captures issues important to the management of HLW. The proposed resolutions contained within this document set the framework for the M&Os and DOE work cooperatively to develop an action plan to solve some of the major complex-wide problems. Dialogue will continue between the M&Os, DOE, and other regulatory agencies to work jointly toward the goal of storing, treating, and immobilizing HLW for disposal in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost effective manner.

  15. Engineering neural systems for high-level problem solving.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Jared; Reggia, James

    2016-07-01

    There is a long-standing, sometimes contentious debate in AI concerning the relative merits of a symbolic, top-down approach vs. a neural, bottom-up approach to engineering intelligent machine behaviors. While neurocomputational methods excel at lower-level cognitive tasks (incremental learning for pattern classification, low-level sensorimotor control, fault tolerance and processing of noisy data, etc.), they are largely non-competitive with top-down symbolic methods for tasks involving high-level cognitive problem solving (goal-directed reasoning, metacognition, planning, etc.). Here we take a step towards addressing this limitation by developing a purely neural framework named galis. Our goal in this work is to integrate top-down (non-symbolic) control of a neural network system with more traditional bottom-up neural computations. galis is based on attractor networks that can be "programmed" with temporal sequences of hand-crafted instructions that control problem solving by gating the activity retention of, communication between, and learning done by other neural networks. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach by showing that it can be applied successfully to solve sequential card matching problems, using both human performance and a top-down symbolic algorithm as experimental controls. Solving this kind of problem makes use of top-down attention control and the binding together of visual features in ways that are easy for symbolic AI systems but not for neural networks to achieve. Our model can not only be instructed on how to solve card matching problems successfully, but its performance also qualitatively (and sometimes quantitatively) matches the performance of both human subjects that we had perform the same task and the top-down symbolic algorithm that we used as an experimental control. We conclude that the core principles underlying the galis framework provide a promising approach to engineering purely neurocomputational systems for problem

  16. High Levels of Molecular Chlorine found in the Arctic Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, J.; Huey, L. G.; Liu, Z.; Tanner, D.; Cantrell, C. A.; Orlando, J. J.; Flocke, F. M.; Shepson, P. B.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Hall, S. R.; Beine, H.; Wang, Y.; Ingall, E. D.; Thompson, C. R.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Apel, E. C.; Fried, A.; Mauldin, L.; Smith, J. N.; Staebler, R. M.; Neuman, J. A.; Nowak, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Chlorine radicals are a strong atmospheric oxidant, particularly in polar regions where levels of hydroxyl radicals can be quite low. In the atmosphere, chlorine radicals expedite the degradation of methane and tropospheric ozone and the oxidation of mercury to more toxic forms. Here, we present direct measurements of molecular chlorine levels in the Arctic marine boundary layer in Barrow, Alaska, collected in the spring of 2009 over a six-week period using chemical ionization mass spectrometry. We detected high levels of molecular chlorine of up to 400 pptv. Concentrations peaked in the early morning and late afternoon and fell to near-zero levels at night. Average daytime molecular chlorine levels were correlated with ozone concentrations, suggesting that sunlight and ozone are required for molecular chlorine formation. Using a time-dependent box model, we estimated that the chlorine radicals produced from the photolysis of molecular chlorine on average oxidized more methane than hydroxyl radicals and enhanced the abundance of short-lived peroxy radicals. Elevated hydroperoxyl radical levels, in turn, promoted the formation of hypobromous acid, which catalyzed mercury oxidation and the breakdown of tropospheric ozone. Therefore, we propose that molecular chlorine exerts a significant effect on the atmospheric chemistry in the Arctic. While the formation mechanisms of molecular chlorine are not yet understood, the main potential sources of chlorine include snowpack, sea salt, and sea ice. There is recent evidence of molecular halogen (Br2 and Cl2) formation in the Arctic snowpack. The coverage and composition of the snow may control halogen chemistry in the Arctic. Changes of sea ice and snow cover in the changing climate may affect air-snow-ice interaction and have a significant impact on the levels of radicals, ozone, mercury and methane in the Arctic troposphere.

  17. PLUTONIUM/HIGH-LEVEL VITRIFIED WASTE BDBE DOSE CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    D.C. Richardson

    2003-03-19

    In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, Yucca Mountain was designated as the site to be investigated as a potential repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The Yucca Mountain site is an undeveloped area located on the southwestern edge of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), about 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The site currently lacks rail service or an existing right-of-way. If the Yucca Mountain site is found suitable for the repository, rail service is desirable to the Office of Civilian Waste Management (OCRWM) Program because of the potential of rail transportation to reduce costs and to reduce the number of shipments relative to highway transportation. A Preliminary Rail Access Study evaluated 13 potential rail spur options. Alternative routes within the major options were also developed. Each of these options was then evaluated for potential land use conflicts and access to regional rail carriers. Three potential routes having few land use conflicts and having access to regional carriers were recommended for further investigation. Figure 1-1 shows these three routes. The Jean route is estimated to be about 120 miles long, the Carlin route to be about 365 miles long, and Caliente route to be about 365 miles long. The remaining ten routes continue to be monitored and should any of the present conflicts change, a re-evaluation of that route will be made. Complete details of the evaluation of the 13 routes can be found in the previous study. The DOE has not identified any preferred route and recognizes that the transportation issues need a full and open treatment under the National Environmental Policy Act. The issue of transportation will be included in public hearings to support development of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) proceedings for either the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility or the Yucca Mountain Project or both.

  18. Review of high-level waste form properties. [146 bibliographies

    SciTech Connect

    Rusin, J.M.

    1980-12-01

    This report is a review of waste form options for the immobilization of high-level-liquid wastes from the nuclear fuel cycle. This review covers the status of international research and development on waste forms as of May 1979. Although the emphasis in this report is on waste form properties, process parameters are discussed where they may affect final waste form properties. A summary table is provided listing properties of various nuclear waste form options. It is concluded that proposed waste forms have properties falling within a relatively narrow range. In regard to crystalline versus glass waste forms, the conclusion is that either glass of crystalline materials can be shown to have some advantage when a single property is considered; however, at this date no single waste form offers optimum properties over the entire range of characteristics investigated. A long-term effort has been applied to the development of glass and calcine waste forms. Several additional waste forms have enough promise to warrant continued research and development to bring their state of development up to that of glass and calcine. Synthetic minerals, the multibarrier approach with coated particles in a metal matrix, and high pressure-high temperature ceramics offer potential advantages and need further study. Although this report discusses waste form properties, the total waste management system should be considered in the final selection of a waste form option. Canister design, canister materials, overpacks, engineered barriers, and repository characteristics, as well as the waste form, affect the overall performance of a waste management system. These parameters were not considered in this comparison.

  19. Activity profile of high-level Australian lacrosse players.

    PubMed

    Polley, Chris S; Cormack, Stuart J; Gabbett, Tim J; Polglaze, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Despite lacrosse being one of the fastest growing team sports in the world, there is a paucity of information detailing the activity profile of high-level players. Microtechnology systems (global positioning systems and accelerometers) provide the opportunity to obtain detailed information on the activity profile in lacrosse. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the activity profile of lacrosse match-play using microtechnology. Activity profile variables assessed relative to minutes of playing time included relative distance (meter per minute), distance spent standing (0-0.1 m·min), walking (0.2-1.7 m·min), jogging (1.8-3.2 m·min), running (3.3-5.6 m·min), sprinting (≥5.7 m·min), number of high, moderate, low accelerations and decelerations, and player load (PL per minute), calculated as the square root of the sum of the squared instantaneous rate of change in acceleration in 3 vectors (medio-lateral, anterior-posterior, and vertical). Activity was recorded from 14 lacrosse players over 4 matches during a national tournament. Players were separated into positions of attack, midfield, or defense. Differences (effect size [ES] ± 90% confidence interval) between positions and periods of play were considered likely positive when there was ≥75% likelihood of the difference exceeding an ES threshold of 0.2. Midfielders had likely covered higher (mean ± SD) meters per minute (100 ± 11) compared with attackers (87 ± 14; ES = 0.89 ± 1.04) and defenders (79 ± 14; ES = 1.54 ± 0.94) and more moderate and high accelerations and decelerations. Almost all variables across positions were reduced in quarter 4 compared with quarter 1. Coaches should accommodate for positional differences when preparing lacrosse players for competition.

  20. High-level disinfection of gastrointestinal endoscope reprocessing.

    PubMed

    Chiu, King-Wah; Lu, Lung-Sheng; Chiou, Shue-Shian

    2015-02-20

    High level disinfection (HLD) of the gastrointestinal (GI) endoscope is not simply a slogan, but rather is a form of experimental monitoring-based medicine. By definition, GI endoscopy is a semicritical medical device. Hence, such medical devices require major quality assurance for disinfection. And because many of these items are temperature sensitive, low-temperature chemical methods, such as liquid chemical germicide, must be used rather than steam sterilization. In summarizing guidelines for infection prevention and control for GI endoscopy, there are three important steps that must be highlighted: manual washing, HLD with automated endoscope reprocessor, and drying. Strict adherence to current guidelines is required because compared to any other medical device, the GI endoscope is associated with more outbreaks linked to inadequate cleaning or disinfecting during HLD. Both experimental evaluation on the surveillance bacterial cultures and in-use clinical results have shown that, the monitoring of the stringent processes to prevent and control infection is an essential component of the broader strategy to ensure the delivery of safe endoscopy services, because endoscope reprocessing is a multistep procedure involving numerous factors that can interfere with its efficacy. Based on our years of experience in the surveillance of culture monitoring of endoscopic reprocessing, we aim in this study to carefully describe what details require attention in the GI endoscopy disinfection and to share our experience so that patients can be provided with high quality and safe medical practices. Quality management encompasses all aspects of pre- and post-procedural care including the efficiency of the endoscopy unit and reprocessing area, as well as the endoscopic procedure itself.