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Sample records for high-power rf amplifiers

  1. RF System High Power Amplifier Software Conversion at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    G. Lahti; H. Dong; T. Seegerger

    2006-10-31

    Jefferson Lab is in the process of converting the RF system from analog RF modules and non-smart high power amplifiers (HPAs) to digital RF modules and smart HPAs. The present analog RF module controls both the RF signal and the non-smart HPA hardware. The new digital RF module will only control the RF signal, so the new HPA must include embedded software. This paper will describe the conversion from a software perspective, including the initial testing, the intermediate mixed system of old and new units, and finally the totally new RF system.

  2. High power RF solid state power amplifier system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, III, William Herbert (Inventor); Chavers, Donald Gregory (Inventor); Richeson, James J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A high power, high frequency, solid state power amplifier system includes a plurality of input multiple port splitters for receiving a high-frequency input and for dividing the input into a plurality of outputs and a plurality of solid state amplifier units. Each amplifier unit includes a plurality of amplifiers, and each amplifier is individually connected to one of the outputs of multiport splitters and produces a corresponding amplified output. A plurality of multiport combiners combine the amplified outputs of the amplifiers of each of the amplifier units to a combined output. Automatic level control protection circuitry protects the amplifiers and maintains a substantial constant amplifier power output.

  3. Thermal management of space-based, high-power solid-state RF amplifiers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, M.F.; Chow, L.C.; Johnson, J.H.

    1990-08-01

    The advanced weapons concepts envisioned by the SDIO employed a wide array of highly energetic devices, which due to inefficiencies, generate large quantities of waste heat. Power and thermal management are integrally related. In the vacuum of space, disposing of waste energy is a major problem which can contribute as much as 50% to the overall spacecraft mass and volume. The problem becomes more acute as the temperature at which the energy must be rejected is lowered. In an earlier study, thermal management issues associated with megawatt class RF microwave tubes were explored to determine if there were simple, approximately mass neutral schemes which might be adapted to dispose of the waste energy generated within a tube collector operating in space. The assumptions for that study were: (1) Tubes were in the megawatt class-70% efficient for single simple collector and 90% efficient for depressed collectors, (2) On-board, super critical hydrogen was available at a pressure of 35 bars and a temperature of 35 K. (3) The largest single event run time was 500 seconds. (4) The device would be dormant for long periods of time, be required to become active in tens of seconds followed by long periods of dormancy. (5) The only allowable effluent is hydrogen. (6) System impact must be minimal.

  4. High power gas laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Leland, Wallace T.; Stratton, Thomas F.

    1981-01-01

    A high power output CO.sub.2 gas laser amplifier having a number of sections, each comprising a plurality of annular pumping chambers spaced around the circumference of a vacuum chamber containing a cold cathode, gridded electron gun. The electron beam from the electron gun ionizes the gas lasing medium in the sections. An input laser beam is split into a plurality of annular beams, each passing through the sections comprising one pumping chamber.

  5. High power regenerative laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Miller, John L.; Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, Clifford B.; Zapata, Luis E.

    1994-01-01

    A regenerative amplifier design capable of operating at high energy per pulse, for instance, from 20-100 Joules, at moderate repetition rates, for instance from 5-20 Hertz is provided. The laser amplifier comprises a gain medium and source of pump energy coupled with the gain medium; a Pockels cell, which rotates an incident beam in response to application of a control signal; an optical relay system defining a first relay plane near the gain medium and a second relay plane near the rotator; and a plurality of reflectors configured to define an optical path through the gain medium, optical relay and Pockels cell, such that each transit of the optical path includes at least one pass through the gain medium and only one pass through the Pockels cell. An input coupler, and an output coupler are provided, implemented by a single polarizer. A control circuit coupled to the Pockels cell generates the control signal in timed relationship with the input pulse so that the input pulse is captured by the input coupler and proceeds through at least one transit of the optical path, and then the control signal is applied to cause rotation of the pulse to a polarization reflected by the polarizer, after which the captured pulse passes through the gain medium at least once more and is reflected out of the optical path by the polarizer before passing through the rotator again to provide an amplified pulse.

  6. High power regenerative laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Miller, J.L.; Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.; Zapata, L.E.

    1994-02-08

    A regenerative amplifier design capable of operating at high energy per pulse, for instance, from 20-100 Joules, at moderate repetition rates, for instance from 5-20 Hertz is provided. The laser amplifier comprises a gain medium and source of pump energy coupled with the gain medium; a Pockels cell, which rotates an incident beam in response to application of a control signal; an optical relay system defining a first relay plane near the gain medium and a second relay plane near the rotator; and a plurality of reflectors configured to define an optical path through the gain medium, optical relay and Pockels cell, such that each transit of the optical path includes at least one pass through the gain medium and only one pass through the Pockels cell. An input coupler, and an output coupler are provided, implemented by a single polarizer. A control circuit coupled to the Pockels cell generates the control signal in timed relationship with the input pulse so that the input pulse is captured by the input coupler and proceeds through at least one transit of the optical path, and then the control signal is applied to cause rotation of the pulse to a polarization reflected by the polarizer, after which the captured pulse passes through the gain medium at least once more and is reflected out of the optical path by the polarizer before passing through the rotator again to provide an amplified pulse. 7 figures.

  7. Design and performance of high voltage power supply with crowbar protection for 3-Φ high power rf amplifier system of cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, S. K.

    2016-07-01

    The superconducting cyclotron at VECC consists of three rf cavities separated at 120° and each cavity is fed power from an individual rf amplifier, based on a tetrode tube, in the frequency range of 9-27 MHz. All the three tetrode tubes are powered by individual power supplies for their biasing which are fabricated and commissioned with the rf system of the cyclotron. The dc power to the anodes of all three tubes is fed from a high voltage power supply rated at 20 kV dc, 22 A along with suitable interlocks and crowbar protection. The tubes are protected by a single ignitron based crowbar system against an internal arc fault by diverting the stored energy very fast, minimizing the deposited amount of energy at load and allowing the fault to clear. The performance and protective capability of the crowbar system is demonstrated by using wire survivability test. The design criteria of anode power supply along with the crowbar protection system, in-house development, testing and performance is presented in this paper.

  8. High power Ka band TWT amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Golkowski, C.; Ivers, J.D.; Nation, J.A.; Wang, P.; Schachter, L.

    1999-07-01

    Two high power 35 GHz TWT amplifiers driven by a relativistic pencil, 850 kV, 200A electron beam have been assembled and tested. The first had a dielectric slow wave structure and was primarily used to develop diagnostics, and to gain experience in working with high power systems in Ka band. The source of the input power for the amplifier was a magnetron producing a 30 kW, 200ns long pulse of which 10 kW as delivered to the experiment. The 30 cm long dielectric (Teflon) amplifier produced output power levels of about 1 MW with a gain of about 23 dB. These results are consistent with expectations from PIC code simulations for this arrangement. The second amplifier, which is a single stage disk loaded slow wave structure, has been designed. It consists of one hundred uniform cells with two sets of ten tapered calls at the ends to lower the reflection coefficient. The phase advance per cell is {pi}/2. The amplifier passband extends from 28 to 40 GHz. It is designed to increase the output power to about 20 MW. The amplifier is in construction and will be tested in the near future. Details of the design of both systems will be provided and initial results from the new amplifier presented.

  9. High power RF systems for the BNL ERL project

    SciTech Connect

    Zaltsman, A.; Lambiase, R.

    2011-03-28

    The Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) project, now under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, requires two high power RF systems. The first RF system is for the 703.75 MHz superconducting electron gun. The RF power from this system is used to drive nearly half an Ampere of beam current to 2 MeV. There is no provision to recover any of this energy so the minimum amplifier power is 1 MW. It consists of 1 MW CW klystron, transmitter and power supplies, 1 MW circulator, 1 MW dummy load and a two-way power splitter. The second RF system is for the 703.75 MHz superconducting cavity. The system accelerates the beam to 54.7 MeV and recovers this energy. It will provide up to 50 kW of CW RF power to the cavity. It consists of 50 kW transmitter, circulator, and dummy load. This paper describes the two high power RF systems and presents the test data for both.

  10. R&D ERL: High power RF systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zaltsman, A.

    2010-01-15

    The Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) project, now under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, requires two high power RF systems. The first RF system is for the 703.75 MHz superconducting electron gun. The RF power from this system is used to drive nearly half an Ampere of beam current to 2.5 MeV. There is no provision to recover any of this energy so the minimum amplifier power is 1 MW. It consists of 1 MW CW klystron, transmitter and power supplies, 1 MW circulator, 1 MW dummy load and a two-way power splitter. The second RF system is for the 703.75 MHz superconducting cavity. The system accelerates the beam to 54.7 MeV and recovers this energy. It will provide up to 50 kW of CW RF power to the cavity. It consists of 50 kW transmitter, circulator, and dummy load. This paper describes the two high power RF systems and presents the test data for both.

  11. CLIC RF High Power Production Testing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Syratchev, I.; Riddone, G.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2011-11-02

    The CLIC Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS) is a passive microwave device in which bunches of the drive beam interact with the impedance of the periodically loaded waveguide and generate RF power for the main linac accelerating structure. The demands on the high power production ({approx} 150 MW) and the needs to transport the 100 A drive beam for about 1 km without losses, makes the PETS design rather unique and the operation very challenging. In the coming year, an intense PETS testing program will be implemented. The target is to demonstrate the full performance of the PETS operation. The testing program overview and test results available to date are presented.

  12. Modulation instability in high power laser amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Rubenchik, Alexander M; Turitsyn, Sergey K; Fedoruk, Michail P

    2010-01-18

    The modulation instability (MI) is one of the main factors responsible for the degradation of beam quality in high-power laser systems. The so-called B-integral restriction is commonly used as the criteria for MI control in passive optics devices. For amplifiers the adiabatic model, assuming locally the Bespalov-Talanov expression for MI growth, is commonly used to estimate the destructive impact of the instability. We present here the exact solution of MI development in amplifiers. We determine the parameters which control the effect of MI in amplifiers and calculate the MI growth rate as a function of those parameters. The safety range of operational parameters is presented. The results of the exact calculations are compared with the adiabatic model, and the range of validity of the latest is determined. We demonstrate that for practical situations the adiabatic approximation noticeably overestimates MI. The additional margin of laser system design is quantified.

  13. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, Clifford B.

    1993-01-01

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  14. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.

    1993-08-24

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  15. The design of a linear L-band high power amplifier for mobile communication satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittaker, N.; Brassard, G.; Li, E.; Goux, P.

    1990-01-01

    A linear L-band solid state high power amplifier designed for the space segment of the Mobile Satellite (MSAT) mobile communication system is described. The amplifier is capable of producing 35 watts of RF power with multitone signal at an efficiency of 25 percent and with intermodulation products better than 16 dB below carrier.

  16. Low Cost RF Amplifier for Community TV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ch, Syafaruddin; Sasongko, Sudi Mariyanto Al; Made Budi Suksmadana, I.; Mustiko Okta Muvianto, Cahyo; Ariessaputra, Suthami

    2016-01-01

    he capability of television to deliver audio video makes this media become the most effective method to spread information. This paper presents an experiment of RF amplifier design having low-cost design and providing sufficient RF power particularly for community television. The RF amplifier consists of two stages of amplifier. The first stage amplifier was used to leverage output of TV modulator from 11dBm to enable to drive next stage amplifier. CAD simulation and fabrication were run to reach optimum RF amplifier design circuit. The associated circuit was made by determining stability circle, stability gain, and matching impedance. Hence, the average power of first stage RF amplifier was 24.68dBm achieved. The second stage used RF modules which was ready match to 50 ohm for both input and output port. The experiment results show that the RF amplifier may operate at frequency ranging from 174 to 230MHz. The average output power of the 2nd stage amplifier was 33.38 Watt with the overall gain of 20.54dB. The proposed RF amplifier is a cheap way to have a stable RF amplifier for community TV. The total budget for the designed RF amplifier is only a 1/5 compared to local design of final TV amplifier.

  17. Overview of High Power Vacuum Dry RF Load Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, Anatoly

    2015-08-27

    A specific feature of RF linacs based on the pulsed traveling wave (TW) mode of operation is that only a portion of the RF energy is used for the beam acceleration. The residual RF energy has to be terminated into an RF load. Higher accelerating gradients require higher RF sources and RF loads, which can stably terminate the residual RF power. RF feeders (from the RF source though the accelerating section to the load) are vacuumed to transmit multi-megawatt high power RF. This overview will outline vacuumed RF loads only. A common method to terminate multi-MW RF power is to use circulated water (or other liquid) as an absorbing medium. A solid dielectric interface (a high quality ceramic) is required to separate vacuum and liquid RF absorber mediums. Using such RF load approaches in TW linacs is troubling because there is a fragile ceramic window barrier and a failure could become catastrophic for linac vacuum and RF systems. Traditional loads comprising of a ceramic disk have limited peak and average power handling capability and are therefore not suitable for high gradient TW linacs. This overview will focus on ''vacuum dry'' or ''all-metal'' loads that do not employ any dielectric interface between vacuum and absorber. The first prototype is an original design of RF loads for the Stanford Two-Mile Accelerator.

  18. LCLS-II high power RF system overview and progress

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, Anahid Dian

    2015-10-07

    A second X-ray free electron laser facility, LCLS-II, will be constructed at SLAC. LCLS-II is based on a 1.3 GHz, 4 GeV, continuous-wave (CW) superconducting linear accelerator, to be installed in the first kilometer of the SLAC tunnel. Multiple types of high power RF (HPRF) sources will be used to power different systems on LCLS-II. The main 1.3 GHz linac will be powered by 280 1.3 GHz, 3.8 kW solid state amplifier (SSA) sources. The normal conducting buncher in the injector will use four more SSAs identical to the linac SSAs but run at 2 kW. Two 185.7 MHz, 60 kW sources will power the photocathode dual-feed RF gun. A third harmonic linac section, included for linearizing the bunch energy spread before the first bunch compressor, will require sixteen 3.9 GHz sources at about 1 kW CW. A description and an update on all the HPRF sources of LCLS-II and their implementation is the subject of this paper.

  19. High power rf klystrons for linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Konrad, G.T.

    1984-04-01

    Recent klystron developments at SLAC are described. The standard 40 MW klyston, which typically operates at 35 MW on the SLAC linac, is the starting point for the push to higher peak and average power. The standard tube is capable of a 2.5 ..mu..s rf pulse width at 360 pps. For the SLC a 50 MW klystron capable of 5 ..mu..s pulse width at 180 pps is under development. Another tube currently being worked on is a 150 MW klystron capable of 1 ..mu..s rf and 180 pps. Design criteria and actual operating experience for both developmental tubes are described. 10 references, 11 figures, 3 tables.

  20. Active high-power RF switch and pulse compression system

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Ruth, Ronald D.; Zolotorev, Max

    1998-01-01

    A high-power RF switching device employs a semiconductor wafer positioned in the third port of a three-port RF device. A controllable source of directed energy, such as a suitable laser or electron beam, is aimed at the semiconductor material. When the source is turned on, the energy incident on the wafer induces an electron-hole plasma layer on the wafer, changing the wafer's dielectric constant, turning the third port into a termination for incident RF signals, and. causing all incident RF signals to be reflected from the surface of the wafer. The propagation constant of RF signals through port 3, therefore, can be changed by controlling the beam. By making the RF coupling to the third port as small as necessary, one can reduce the peak electric field on the unexcited silicon surface for any level of input power from port 1, thereby reducing risk of damaging the wafer by RF with high peak power. The switch is useful to the construction of an improved pulse compression system to boost the peak power of microwave tubes driving linear accelerators. In this application, the high-power RF switch is placed at the coupling iris between the charging waveguide and the resonant storage line of a pulse compression system. This optically controlled high power RF pulse compression system can handle hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band.

  1. High power single-frequency Innoslab amplifier.

    PubMed

    Han, Ke-Zhen; Ning, Jian; Zhang, Bai-Tao; Wang, Yi-Ran; Zhang, Hai-Kun; Nie, Hong-Kun; Sun, Xiao-Li; He, Jing-Liang

    2016-07-10

    A laser diode array (LDA) end-pumped continuous-wave single-frequency Innoslab amplifier has been demonstrated. The Gaussian ray bundle method was used to model the light propagation in the Innoslab amplifier for the first time to the best of our knowledge. With discrete reflectors, the maximum output of 60 W with a linewidth of 44 MHz was achieved under the pump power of 245 W, corresponding to the optical-optical efficiency of 24.5%. The beam quality factor M2 at the output power of 51 W in the horizontal and vertical direction was measured to be 1.4 and 1.3, respectively. The long-term power instability in 2 h was less than 0.25%. PMID:27409308

  2. High-power Ka-band amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, R.

    1993-01-01

    Development of a high-power tube suitable to power a Ka-band (34.5-GHz) antenna transmitter located at the Goldstone, California, tracking station is continuing. The University of Maryland Laboratory for Plasma Research and JPL are conducting a joint effort to test the feasibility of phase locking a second-harmonic gyrotron both by direct injection at the output cavity and by using a priming cavity to bunch the electrons in the beam. This article describes several design options and the results of computer simulation testing.

  3. High power RF klystrons for linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, G. T.

    1984-05-01

    Design criteria and operating experience for two klystrons of differing power are described. A one-dimensional large signal code was used to design the tubes. Calculated operating parameters obtained from this code are presented. Based on standard klystron experience at SLAC high voltage breakdown, instabilities and RF window breakdown were expected to be problem areas. Current experience in these areas on the tube designs are summarized. In the case of the SLC klystron 50 MW at rated average power has been obtained at 315 kV with an efficiency of 45%. The fault rate has been found to be as low as one fault per 8 hour shift. The first 150 MW klystron had a conventional output cavity and produced 105 MW at the design beam voltage of 450 kV. At 475 kV a power of 122 MW with an efficiency of 43% were obtained. Design changes to obtain higher power and efficiency are incorporated in the second 150 MW tube and projections are made for future tubes.

  4. High-power MUTC photodetectors for RF photonic links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrella, Steven; Johansson, Leif A.; Mashanovitch, Milan L.; Beling, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    High power photodiodes are needed for a range of applications. The high available power conversion efficiency makes these ideal for antenna remoting applications, including high power, low duty-cycle RF pulse generation. The compact footprint and fiber optic input allow densely packed RF aperture arrays with low cross-talk for phased high directionality emitters. Other applications include linear RF photonic links and other high dynamic range optical systems. Freedom Photonics has developed packaged modified uni-traveling carrier (MUTC) photodetectors for high-power applications. Both single and balanced photodetector pairs are mounted on a ceramic carrier, and packaged in a compact module optimized for high power operation. Representative results include greater than 100 mA photocurrent, >100m W generated RF power and >20 GHz bandwidth. In this paper, we evaluate the saturation and bandwidth of these single ended and balanced photodetectors for detector diameter in the 16 μm to 34 μm range. Packaged performance is compared to chip performance. Further new development towards the realization of <100GHz packaged photodetector modules with optimized high power performance is described. Finally, incorporation of these photodetector structures in novel photonic integrated circuits (PICs) for high optical power application areas is outlined.

  5. High-power, solid-state rf source for accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, D.R.; Mols, G.E.; Reid, D.W.; Potter, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    During the past few years the Defense and Electronics Center of Westinghouse Electric Corporation has developed a solid-state, 250-kW peak, rf amplifier for use with the SPS-40 radar system. This system has a pulse length of 60 ..mu..s and operates across the frequency band from 400 to 450 MHz. Because of the potential use of such a system as an rf source for accelerator applications, a collaborative experiment was initiated between Los Alamos National Laboratory and Westinghouse to simulate the resonant load conditions of an accelerator cavity. This paper describes the positive results of that experiment as well as the solid-state amplifier architecture. It also explores the future of high-power, solid-state amplifiers as rf sources for accelerator structures.

  6. Possible high power limitations from RF pulsed heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritzkau, David P.; Bowden, Gordon B.; Menegat, Al; Siemann, Robert H.

    1999-05-01

    One of the possible limitations to achieving high power in RF structures is damage to metal surfaces due to RF pulsed heating. Such damage may lead to degradation of RF performance. An experiment to study RF pulsed heating on copper has been developed at SLAC. The experiment consists of operating two pillbox cavities in the TE011 mode using a 50 MW X-Band klystron. The estimated temperature rise of the surface of copper is 350 °C for a power input of 20 MW to each cavity with a pulse length of 1.5 μs. Preliminary results from an experiment performed earlier are presented. A revised design for continued experiments is also presented along with relevant theory and calculations.

  7. High power testing of a 17 GHz photocathode RF gun

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.C.; Danly, B.G.; Gonichon, J.

    1995-12-31

    The physics and technological issues involved in high gradient particle acceleration at high microwave (RF) frequencies are under study at MIT. The 17 GHz photocathode RF gun has a 1 1/2 cell ({pi} mode) room temperature cooper cavity. High power tests have been conducted at 5-10 MW levels with 100 ns pulses. A maximum surface electric field of 250 MV/m was achieved. This corresponds to an average on-axis gradient of 150 MeV/m. The gradient was also verified by a preliminary electron beam energy measurement. Even high gradients are expected in our next cavity design.

  8. Amplified spontaneous emission in high power KrF lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Akira; Kasuya, Koichi; Ueda, Ken-Ichi; Takuma, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a three-dimensional simulation code for amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) for a high-power KrF laser amplifier. The results of parametric calculation show that the maximum transverse gain-length product of the amplifier without efficiency depletion is three, and the longitudinal gain-length product should be limited to ten. From a device of 10 m in length and 3 m in diameter, operated with 1-percent/cm small signal gain and 1-microsec duration, the corresponding maximum output will be 500 kJ.

  9. High Power RF Test Facility at the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Y.W. Kang; D.E. Anderson; I.E. Campisi; M. Champion; M.T. Crofford; R.E. Fuja; P.A. Gurd; S. Hasan; K.-U. Kasemir; M.P. McCarthy; D. Stout; J.Y. Tang; A.V. Vassioutchenko; M. Wezensky; G.K. Davis; M. A. Drury; T. Powers; M. Stirbet

    2005-05-16

    RF Test Facility has been completed in the SNS project at ORNL to support test and conditioning operation of RF subsystems and components. The system consists of two transmitters for two klystrons powered by a common high voltage pulsed converter modulator that can provide power to two independent RF systems. The waveguides are configured with WR2100 and WR1150 sizes for presently used frequencies: 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz. Both 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz systems have circulator protected klystrons that can be powered by the modulator capable of delivering 11 MW peak and 1 MW average power. The facility has been equipped with computer control for various RF processing and complete dual frequency operation. More than forty 805 MHz fundamental power couplers for the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) cavities have been RF conditioned in this facility. The facility provides more than 1000 ft2 floor area for various test setups. The facility also has a shielded cave area that can support high power tests of normal conducting and superconducting accelerating cavities and components.

  10. High power diode laser Master Oscillator-Power Amplifier (MOPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, John R.; Mouroulis, P.; Wicks, G.

    1994-01-01

    High power multiple quantum well AlGaAs diode laser master oscillator - power amplifier (MOPA) systems were examined both experimentally and theoretically. For two pass operation, it was found that powers in excess of 0.3 W per 100 micrometers of facet length were achievable while maintaining diffraction-limited beam quality. Internal electrical-to-optical conversion efficiencies as high as 25 percent were observed at an internal amplifier gain of 9 dB. Theoretical modeling of multiple quantum well amplifiers was done using appropriate rate equations and a heuristic model of the carrier density dependent gain. The model gave a qualitative agreement with the experimental results. In addition, the model allowed exploration of a wider design space for the amplifiers. The model predicted that internal electrical-to-optical conversion efficiencies in excess of 50 percent should be achievable with careful system design. The model predicted that no global optimum design exists, but gain, efficiency, and optical confinement (coupling efficiency) can be mutually adjusted to meet a specific system requirement. A three quantum well, low optical confinement amplifier was fabricated using molecular beam epitaxial growth. Coherent beam combining of two high power amplifiers injected from a common master oscillator was also examined. Coherent beam combining with an efficiency of 93 percent resulted in a single beam having diffraction-limited characteristics. This beam combining efficiency is a world record result for such a system. Interferometric observations of the output of the amplifier indicated that spatial mode matching was a significant factor in the less than perfect beam combining. Finally, the system issues of arrays of amplifiers in a coherent beam combining system were investigated. Based upon experimentally observed parameters coherent beam combining could result in a megawatt-scale coherent beam with a 10 percent electrical-to-optical conversion efficiency.

  11. New high power 200 MHz RF system for the LANSCE drift tube linac

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, J.; Friedrichs, C.; Lynch, M.

    1998-12-31

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) linac provides an 800 MeV direct H{sup +} proton beam, and injects H{sup {minus}} to the upgraded proton storage ring for charge accumulation for the Short Pulse Spallation Source. Accelerating these interlaced beams requires high average power from the 201.25 MHz drift tube linac (DTL) RF system. Three power amplifiers have operated at up to three Megawatts with 12% duty factor. The total number of electron power tubes in the RF amplifiers and their modulators has been reduced from fifty-two to twenty-four. The plant continues to utilize the original design of a tetrode driving a super power triode. Further increases in the linac duty factor are limited, in part, by the maximum dissipation ratings of the triodes. A description of the system modifications proposed to overcome these limitations includes new power amplifiers using low-level RF modulation for tank field control. The first high power Diacrode{reg_sign} is being delivered and a new amplifier cavity is being designed. With only eight power tubes, the new system will deliver both peak power and high duty factor, with lower mains power and cooling requirements. The remaining components needed for the new RF system will be discussed.

  12. High-power phase locking of a fiber amplifier array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, T. M.; Baker, J. T.; Sanchez, A. D.; Robin, C. A.; Vergien, C. L.; Zeringue, C.; Gallant, D.; Lu, Chunte A.; Pulford, Benjamin; Bronder, T. J.; Lucero, Arthur

    2009-02-01

    We report high power phase locked fiber amplifier array using the Self-Synchronous Locking of Optical Coherence by Single-detector Electronic-frequency Tagging technique. We report the first experimental results for a five element amplifier array with a total locked power of more than 725-W. We will report on experimental measurements of the phase fluctuations versus time when the control loop is closed. The rms phase error was measured to be λ/60. Recent results will be reported. To the best of the authors' knowledge this is the highest fiber laser power to be coherently combined.

  13. RF coupler for high-power CW FEL photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S.; Young, L. M.

    2003-01-01

    A high-current emittance-compensated RF photoinjector is a key enabling technology for a high-power CW FEL. The design presently under way is a 100-mA 2.5-cell {pi}-mode, 700-MHz, normal conducting demonstration CW RF photoinjector. This photoinjector will be capable of accelerating 3 nC per bunch with an emittance at the wiggler less than 10 mm-mrad. The paper presents results for the RF coupling from ridged wave guides to hte photoinjector RF cavity. The LEDA and SNS couplers inspired this 'dog-bone' design. Electromagnetic modeling of the coupler-cavity system has been performed using both 2-D and 3-D frequency-domain calculations, and a novel time-domain approach with MicroWave Studio. These simulations were used to adjust the coupling coefficient and calculate the power-loss distribution on the coupling slot. The cooling of this slot is a rather challenging thermal management project.

  14. High Power and Efficiency Space Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifiers With Reduced Size and Mass for NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Force, Dale A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in high power and efficiency space traveling-wave tube amplifiers (TWTAs) for NASA s space-to-Earth communications are presented in this paper. The RF power and efficiency of a new K-Band amplifier are 40 W and 50 percent and that of a new Ka-Band amplifier are 200 W and 60 percent. An important figure-of-merit, which is defined as the ratio of the RF power output to the mass (W/kg) of a TWT has improved by a factor of ten over the previous generation Ka-Band devices.

  15. 94 GHz pulsed coherent radar for high power amplifier evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Duncan A.; Hunter, Robert I.; Gallacher, Thomas F.

    2016-05-01

    We present the design and characterization of a 94 GHz pulsed coherent radar to be used for the evaluation and demonstration of novel wideband, high power vacuum tube amplifier technology. The radar is designed to be fully coherent and exploits a low phase noise architecture to maximize Doppler performance. We selected to use horn-fed Fresnel zone plate lens antennas (FZPs) with 4-level phase quantization as a low cost method of realizing large aperture (0.5 m) antennas. The measured performance of these FZPs agrees closely with the design predictions and exceeds that obtainable with a Cassegrain of an equivalent size.

  16. Results of a preliminary, high power RF thruster test

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, L.; Karras, T.; Frind, G.; Holmes, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this program was to demonstrate a high power electrodeless, RF electric propulsion concept. This was successfully accomplished. No attempt was made to optimize the design of the thruster with regard to physical dimensions, mass flow, nozzle shape, operational frequency, or power level. Measurements made were chamber pressure, total and static pressures at the nozzle exit plane and exhaust tank pressure. Mass flows range from about 0.4 to 1 gm/sec and, assuming perfect gas relationships, specific impulses up to 580 sec were obtained. Typical chamber pressure was 300 torr exhausting to a tank pressure of about 10 torr. Working fluids used were argon, helium and mixtures of the two. No degration of the device was detected after 12 start/stop cycles, about three hours of total run time, and a maximum input power of 70 kW. 10 refs.

  17. Phase noise in RF and microwave amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Boudot, Rodolphe; Rubiola, Enrico

    2012-12-01

    Understanding amplifier phase noise is a critical issue in many fields of engineering and physics, such as oscillators, frequency synthesis, telecommunication, radar, and spectroscopy; in the emerging domain of microwave photonics; and in exotic fields, such as radio astronomy, particle accelerators, etc. Focusing on the two main types of base noise in amplifiers, white and flicker, the power spectral density of the random phase φ(t) is Sφ(f) = b(0) + b(-1)/f. White phase noise results from adding white noise to the RF spectrum in the carrier region. For a given RF noise level, b(0) is proportional to the reciprocal of the carrier power P(0). By contrast, flicker results from a near-dc 1/f noise-present in all electronic devices-which modulates the carrier through some parametric effect in the semiconductor. Thus, b(-1) is a parameter of the amplifier, constant in a wide range of P(0). The consequences are the following: Connecting m equal amplifiers in parallel, b(-1) is 1/m times that of one device. Cascading m equal amplifiers, b(-1) is m times that of one amplifier. Recirculating the signal in an amplifier so that the gain increases by a power of m (a factor of m in decibels) as a result of positive feedback (regeneration), we find that b(-1) is m(2) times that of the amplifier alone. The feedforward amplifier exhibits extremely low b(-1) because the carrier is ideally nulled at the input of its internal error amplifier. Starting with an extensive review of the literature, this article introduces a system-oriented model which describes the phase flickering. Several amplifier architectures (cascaded, parallel, etc.) are analyzed systematically, deriving the phase noise from the general model. There follow numerous measurements of amplifiers using different technologies, including some old samples, and in a wide frequency range (HF to microwaves), which validate the theory. In turn, theory and results provide design guidelines and give suggestions for CAD and

  18. An 8-18 GHz broadband high power amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifa, Wang; Ruixia, Yang; Jingfeng, Wu; Yanlei, Li

    2011-11-01

    An 8-18 GHz broadband high power amplifier (HPA) with a hybrid integrated circuit (HIC) is designed and fabricated. This HPA is achieved with the use of a 4-fingered micro-strip Lange coupler in a GaAs MMIC process. In order to decrease electromagnetic interference, a multilayer AlN material with good heat dissipation is adopted as the carrier of the power amplifier. When the input power is 25 dBm, the saturated power of the continuous wave (CW) outputted by the power amplifier is more than 39 dBm within the frequency range of 8-13 GHz, while it is more than 38.6 dBm within other frequency ranges. We obtain the peak power output, 39.4 dBm, at the frequency of 11.9 GHz. In the whole frequency band, the power-added efficiency is more than 18%. When the input power is 18 dBm, the small signal gain is 15.7 ± 0.7 dB. The dimensions of the HPA are 25 × 15 × 1.5 mm3.

  19. Silicon on Insulator MESFETs for RF Amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Seth J; Balijepalli, Asha; Ervin, Joseph; Lepkowski, William; Thornton, Trevor J

    2010-03-01

    CMOS compatible, high voltage SOI MESFETs have been fabricated using a standard 3.3V CMOS process without any changes to the process flow. A 0.6μm gate length device operates with a cut-off frequency of 7.3GHz and a maximum oscillation frequency of 21GHz. There is no degradation in device performance up to its breakdown voltage, which greatly exceeds that of CMOS devices on the same process. Other figures of merit of relevance to RF front-end design are presented, including the maximum stable gain and noise figure. An accurate representation of the device in SPICE has been developed using the commercially available TOM3 model. Using the SOI MESFET model, a source degenerated low noise RF amplifier targeting operation near 1GHz has been designed. The amplifier was fabricated on a PCB board and operates at 940MHz with a minimum NF of 3.8dB and RF gain of 9.9dB while only consuming 5mW of DC power. PMID:20657816

  20. Silicon on Insulator MESFETs for RF Amplifiers

    PubMed Central

    Balijepalli, Asha; Ervin, Joseph; Lepkowski, William; Thornton, Trevor J.

    2010-01-01

    CMOS compatible, high voltage SOI MESFETs have been fabricated using a standard 3.3V CMOS process without any changes to the process flow. A 0.6μm gate length device operates with a cut-off frequency of 7.3GHz and a maximum oscillation frequency of 21GHz. There is no degradation in device performance up to its breakdown voltage, which greatly exceeds that of CMOS devices on the same process. Other figures of merit of relevance to RF front-end design are presented, including the maximum stable gain and noise figure. An accurate representation of the device in SPICE has been developed using the commercially available TOM3 model. Using the SOI MESFET model, a source degenerated low noise RF amplifier targeting operation near 1GHz has been designed. The amplifier was fabricated on a PCB board and operates at 940MHz with a minimum NF of 3.8dB and RF gain of 9.9dB while only consuming 5mW of DC power. PMID:20657816

  1. Publications of Proceedings for the RF 2005 7th Workshop on High Energy Density and High Power RF

    SciTech Connect

    Luhmann, Jr, N C

    2006-01-01

    The University of California, Davis hosted the High Energy Density and High Power RF 7th Workshop on High Energy Density and High Power RF in Kalamata, Greece, 13-17 June, 2005. The Proceedings cost was supported by these funds from the U.S. Department of Energy. The Proceedings was published through the American Institute of Physics.

  2. Klystron Cluster Scheme for ILC High Power RF Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, Christopher; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2009-07-06

    We present a concept for powering the main linacs of the International Linear Collider (ILC) by delivering high power RF from the surface via overmoded, low-loss waveguides at widely spaced intervals. The baseline design employs a two-tunnel layout, with klystrons and modulators evenly distributed along a service tunnel running parallel to the accelerator tunnel. This new idea eliminates the need for the service tunnel. It also brings most of the warm heat load to the surface, dramatically reducing the tunnel water cooling and HVAC requirements. In the envisioned configuration, groups of 70 klystrons and modulators are clustered in surface buildings every 2.5 km. Their outputs are combined into two half-meter diameter circular TE{sub 01} mode evacuated waveguides. These are directed via special bends through a deep shaft and along the tunnel, one upstream and one downstream. Each feeds approximately 1.25 km of linac with power tapped off in 10 MW portions at 38 m intervals. The power is extracted through a novel coaxial tap-off (CTO), after which the local distribution is as it would be from a klystron. The tap-off design is also employed in reverse for the initial combining.

  3. Normal conducting RF cavity of high current photoinjector for high power CW FEL.

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S.; Schrage, D. L.; Wood R. L.; Schultheiss, T.; Rathke, J.; Christina, V.; Young, L. M.

    2004-01-01

    An RF photoinjector capable of producing high continuous average current with low emittance and energy spread is a key enabling technology for high power CW FEL. The design of a 2.5-cell {pi}-mode 700-MHz normal-conducting RF photoinjector cavity with magnetic emittance compensation is completed. With the electric field gradients of 7, 7, and 5 MV/m in the three cells, the photoinjector will produce a 2.5-MeV electron beam with 3-nC charge per bunch and 7 mm-mrad transverse rms emittance. Electromagnetic modeling was used extensively to optimize ridge-loaded tapered waveguides and RF couplers, which led to a new improved coupler-iris design. The results, combined with a thermal/stress analysis, show that the challenging problem of cavity cooling can be successfully solved. A demo 100-mA (at 35-MHz bunch-repetition rate) photoinjector is being manufactured. The design is scalable to higher power levels by increasing the bunch repetition rate, and provides a path to a MW-class amplifier FEL. The cavity design and details of RF coupler modeling are presented.

  4. Normal-conducting RF cavity of high current photoinjector for high power CW FEL.

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S.; Schrage, D. L.; Wood R. L.; Schultheiss, T.; Rathke, J.; Young, L. M.

    2004-01-01

    An RF photoinjector capable of producing high continuous average current with low emittance and energy spread is a key enabling technology for high power CW FEL. The design of a 2.5-cell, {pi}-mode, 700-MHz normal-conducting RF photoinjector cavity with magnetic emittance compensation is completed. With the electric field gradients of 7.7, and 5 MV/m in the three cells, the photoinjector will produce a 2.5-MeV electron beam with 3-nC charge per bunch and the transverse rms emittance 7 mm-mrad. Electromagnetic modeling was used extensively to optimize ridge-loaded tapered waveguides and RF couplers, which led to a new, improved coupler iris design. The results, combined with a thermal and stress analysis, show that the challenging problem of cavity cooling can be successfully solved. The manufacturing of a demo 100-mA (at 35 MHz bunch repetition rate) photoinjector is underway. The design is scalable to higher power levels by increasing the electron bunch repetition rate, and provides a path to a MW-class amplifier FEL. This paper presents the cavity design and details of RF coupler modeling.

  5. Low power RF amplifier circuit for ion trap applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega, J. R.; García-Delgado, L. A.; Gómez-Fuentes, R.; García-Juárez, A.

    2016-09-01

    A low power RF amplifier circuit for ion trap applications is presented and described. The amplifier is based on a class-D half-bridge amplifier with a voltage mirror driver. The RF amplifier is composed of an RF class-D amplifier, an envelope modulator to ramp up the RF voltage during the ion analysis stage, a detector or amplitude demodulation circuit for sensing the output signal amplitude, and a feedback amplifier that linearizes the steady state output of the amplifier. The RF frequency is set by a crystal oscillator and the series resonant circuit is tuned to the oscillator frequency. The resonant circuit components have been chosen, in this case, to operate at 1 MHz. In testings, the class-D stage operated at a maximum of 78 mW at 1.1356 MHz producing 225 V peak.

  6. High-power testing of PEP-II RF cavity windows

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, M.; Allen, M.; Fant, K.; Hill, A.; Hoyt, M.; Judkins, J.; Schwarz, H.; Rimmer, R.A.

    1996-06-01

    We describe the high power testing of RF cavity windows for the PEP-II B factory. The window is designed for continuous operation at 476 MHz with up to 500 kW throughput and has been tested to full power using a modified PEP Klystron. The windows use an anti-multipactor coating on the vacuum side and the application and processing of this layer is discussed. The high power test configuration, RF processing history and high power performance are described.

  7. Multi-pass amplifier architecture for high power laser systems

    DOEpatents

    Manes, Kenneth R; Spaeth, Mary L; Erlandson, Alvin C

    2014-04-01

    A main amplifier system includes a first reflector operable to receive input light through a first aperture and direct the input light along an optical path. The input light is characterized by a first polarization. The main amplifier system also includes a first polarizer operable to reflect light characterized by the first polarization state. The main amplifier system further includes a first and second set of amplifier modules. Each of the first and second set of amplifier modules includes an entrance window, a quarter wave plate, a plurality of amplifier slablets arrayed substantially parallel to each other, and an exit window. The main amplifier system additionally includes a set of mirrors operable to reflect light exiting the first set of amplifier modules to enter the second set of amplifier modules and a second polarizer operable to reflect light characterized by a second polarization state.

  8. Coaxial extraction of RF power from a traveling wave amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.; Kerslick, G.S.; Nation, J.A.; Schaecter, L.

    1996-12-31

    The authors present new results from a high-power relativistic traveling wave tube amplifier experiment in which the RF power is extracted in a coaxial output section. The amplifier consists of two slow-wave structures separated by a resistive sever. The first stage imparts a small modulation to the beam. The second stage consists of an iris-loaded circular waveguide which is tapered from both ends by an adiabatic increase in the iris aperture with each successive period. The periodic length and the external cavity radius are kept constant. This provides a low-reflection transition from the slow-wave structure to the empty circular waveguide. A coaxial inner conductor is inserted into the output tapered section of the slow-wave structure and its` position and radius chosen to minimize reflections and maximize extracted RF power. It is shown both experimentally and through MAGIC simulations that a fairly low reflection circular TM{sub 01} to coaxial TEM mode transition can be made this way. Any small reflections form the output end travel backwards and are absorbed in the sever. In contrast to the traditional transverse extraction of power into a rectangular waveguide, the coaxial extraction is fairly broadband and exhibits much lower sensitivity to dimensions. The beam is dumped through an aperture in the inner conductor. Presently, the power is extracted into the coaxial waveguide and absorbed into a tapered resistive load. This will be later converted to the TE{sub 10} mode of a rectangular waveguide.

  9. Theory, Design and Operation of a High-Power Second - Gyro-Twt Amplifier.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qinsong

    1995-01-01

    Based on the cyclotron resonance maser (CRM) instability, the gyrotron traveling wave tube (gyro-TWT) amplifier is an efficient high power microwave and millimeter wave coherent radiation source. As evidenced in previous experiments, gyro-TWTs, however, can be very susceptible to spontaneous oscillations, and their output powers have thus been limited to relatively low levels. In this dissertation work, thorough theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted to demonstrate and confirm a novel "marginal stability design" (MSD) concept that a harmonic gyro-TWT amplifier is more stable to spontaneous oscillation than a fundamental harmonic gyro-TWT amplifier. Since their interactions are, in general, weaker and allow higher levels of electron beam current, harmonic gyro-TWTs can yield, in principle, a significantly higher RF output power than a fundamental gyro-TWT. The study results also show that a magnetron injection gun (MIG) type electron beam is applicable to harmonic gyro-TWTs. A complete analytic linear theory employing Laplace transforms and a three dimensional nonlinear theory using a slow time-scale formalism are developed in Chapt. 2 for the general CRM interaction to address the issue of stability. Two designs were developed to demonstrate the MSD procedure. The design and development of the proof -of-principle experiment are discussed in Chapt. 3. The accompanying cold test results indicate that all the components have met their respective design goals. The RF diagnostic circuit employed to characterize the gyro-TWT amplifier is also described. Chapter 4 presents the hot-test results of the second-harmonic TE_{21} gyro-TWT amplifier experiment in which an 80 kV, 20 A MIG beam with alpha(equivupsilon _|/upsilon_|) = 1 was used to generate a peak RF output power of 207 kW in Ku-band with an efficiency of 12.9%. In addition, the saturated gain is 16 dB, the small signal gain is 22 dB, the measured bandwidth is 2.1%, and the amplifier was zero

  10. Design of a high power cross field amplifier at X band with an internally coupled waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.; Ko, Kwok.

    1991-01-01

    Cross field amplifiers (CFA) have been used in many applications where high power, high frequency microwaves are needed. Although these tubes have been manufactured for decades, theoretical analysis of their properties is not as highly developed as for other microwave devices such as klystrons. We have developed a simulation model for CFAs using the PIC code CONDOR. Our simulations indicate that there are limits to the maximum RF field strength that a CEA can sustain. When the fields become too high, efficiency becomes very poor, and the currents drawn may become so large that secondary emission cannot be maintained. It is therefore desirable to reduce the circuit impedance of a very high power tube. One method for doing this, proposed by Feinstein, involves periodically coupling a standard CFA circuit to an internal waveguide. Most of the power flows in the waveguide, so the overall impedance is much reduced. By adjusting the guide dimensions one can vary the impedance. Thus one can retain high impedance at the low power end but low impedance at the high power end. In principle one can maintain constant RF voltage throughout the tube. CONDOR simulations have identified a good operating point at X band, with power generation of over 5 MW per cm and total efficiency of over 60 percent. ARGUS simulations have modelled the cold test properties of the coupled structure. The nominal design specifications are 300 MW output, 17 db gain, frequency 11.4 GHz, dc voltage 142 kV, magnetic field 5 kG, anode cathode gap 3.6 mm, total interaction length about 60 cm. We will discuss the results of code simulations and report on the status of the experimental effort.

  11. Development of photoinjector RF cavity for high-power CW FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, S. S.; Schrage, D. L.; Wood, R. L.; Young, L. M.; Schultheiss, T.; Christina, V.; Rathke, J.

    2004-08-01

    An RF photoinjector capable of producing high continuous average current with low emittance and energy spread is a key enabling technology for high-power CW FEL. A preliminary design of the first, and the most challenging, section of a 700-MHz CW RF normal-conducting photoinjector—a 2.5-cell, pi-mode cavity with solenoidal magnetic field for emittance compensation—is completed. Beam dynamics simulations demonstrate that this cavity with an electric field gradient of 7 MV/m will produce an electron beam at 2.7 MeV with the transverse rms emittance 7 mm mrad at 3 nC of charge per bunch. Electromagnetic field computations combined with a thermal and stress analysis show that the challenging problem of cavity cooling can be successfully resolved. We are in the process of building a 100-mA (3 nC of bunch charge at 33.3 MHz bunch repetition rate) photoinjector for demonstration purposes. Its performance parameters will enable a robust 100-kW-class FEL operation with electron beam energy below 100 MeV. The design is scalable to higher power levels by increasing the electron bunch repetition rate and provides a path to a MW-class amplifier FEL.

  12. Theoretical studies of high-power Cerenkov amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Schaechter, L.; Nation, J.A.; Shiffler, D.A. )

    1991-07-01

    The main theoretical aspects of the experiments performed and reported recently are discussed here. First the one stage amplifier is considered. As a preliminary step the behavior of the electrons is followed in the phase space at different points along the interaction region. This analysis reveals that about 30% of the interaction region is utilized for construction of the electron bunches. It is shown that although the average energy of the electrons remains unchanged along most of the amplifier, their energy spread increases substantially. Since the system consists of two long tapered sections, it is suggested that the effective length of the interaction region might be significantly longer than the physical length of the uniform structure. It is further suggested that the electrostatic periodic potential induced by the beam may also improve the interaction process. The next subject addressed here is the bandwidth of a single stage amplifier. It is shown that the reason for the narrow measured bandwidth is the gain of the system. In fact the output signal from a short amplifier is narrowed by exactly the same amount the amplitude of the electromagnetic wave is increased. This result is general as long as part of the radiation field is reflected from both ends of the amplifier. In the second part of this paper the two stage amplifier is analyzed. As in the case of the single stage amplifier the behavior of the electrons is followed in phase space at various locations along the system. This discussion leads to an analysis of the development of sidebands'' which are not symmetrically located around the initial frequency at power levels that do not correspond to a nonlinear process. It is suggested that these sidebands are amplified noise{minus}produced basically in the first stage.

  13. A high power cross-field amplifier at X-Band

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.; Feinstein, J.; Ko, K.; Kroll, N.; Lee, T.; Nelson, E.

    1991-05-01

    A high power cross-field amplifier is under development at SLAC with the objective of providing sufficient peak power to feed a section of an X-Band (11.424 GHz) accelerator without the need for pulse compression. The CFA being designed employs a conventional distributed secondary emission cathode but a novel anode structure which consists of an array of vane resonators alternatively coupled to a rectangular waveguide. The waveguide impedance (width) is tapered linearly from input to output so as to provide a constant RF voltage at the vane tips, leading to uniform power generation along the structure. Nominal design for this tube calls for 300 MW output power, 20 dB gain, DC voltage 142 KV, magnetic field 5 KG, anode-cathode gap 3.6 mm and total interaction length of about 60 cm. These specifications have been supported by computer simulations of both the RF slow wave structure as well as the electron space charge wave interaction. We have used ARGUS to model the cold circuit properties and CONDOR to model the electronic power conversion. An efficiency of 60 percent can be expected. We will discuss the details of the design effort. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  14. High power metallic halide laser. [amplifying a copper chloride laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pivirotto, T. J. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A laser amplification system is disclosed whereby a metallic halide vapor such as copper chloride is caused to flow through a laser amplifier and a heat exchanger in a closed loop system so that the flow rate is altered to control the temperature rise across the length of the laser amplifier. The copper atoms within the laser amplifier should not exceed a temperature of 3000 K, so that the number of copper atoms in the metastable state will not be high enough to prevent amplification in the amplifier. A molecular dissociation apparatus is provided at the input to the laser amplifier for dissociating the copper chloride into copper atoms and ions and chlorine atoms and ions. The dissociation apparatus includes a hollow cathode tube and an annular ring spaced apart from the tube end. A voltage differential is applied between the annular ring and the hollow cathode tube so that as the copper chloride flows through, it is dissociated into copper and chlorine ions and atoms.

  15. High-Power, Annular-Beam Klystron Amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasour, John; Smithe, David; Ludeking, Larry; Friedman, Moshe

    2002-08-01

    Annular beam klystron amplifiers are being developed at L-band and at X-band. These devices are designed to operate at power levels of hundreds of MW to approx1 GW, with pulse durations up to 800 nsec. The L-band amplifier uses an 11-cm-diameter, 3-mm-thick annular beam (450 kV, 4.5 kA) inside an open beam tube with large-gap cavities. The X-band amplifier employs a 12-cm-diameter annular beam that propagates between inner and outer grounded cylinders and cavity structures. At higher frequencies or power levels, this so-called triaxial configuration provides a significant advantage over the open-cylinder configuration. In effect, it is a sheet-beam klystron bent into a full circle, thereby avoiding the edge effects. Alternatively, it can be thought of as the continuum limit of the multi-beam klystron.

  16. High power 938 nanometer fiber laser and amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, Jay W.; Liao, Zhi Ming; Beach, Raymond J.; Drobshoff, Alexander D.; Payne, Stephen A.; Pennington, Deanna M.; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Calia, Domenico Bonaccini; Taylor, Luke

    2006-05-02

    An optical fiber amplifier includes a length of silica optical fiber having a core doped with neodymium, a first cladding and a second cladding each with succeeding lower refractive indices, where the first cladding diameter is less than 10 times the diameter of the core. The doping concentration of the neodymium is chosen so that the small signal absorption for 816 nm light traveling within the core is less than 15 dB/m above the other fiber losses. The amplifier is optically pumped with one laser into the fiber core and with another laser into the first cladding.

  17. A brief history of high power RF proton linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    The first mention of linear acceleration was in a paper by G. Ising in 1924 in which he postulated the acceleration of positive ions induced by spark discharges which produced electric fields in gaps between a series of {open_quotes}drift tubes{close_quotes}. Ising apparently was not able to demonstrate his concept, most likely due to the limited state of electronic devices. Ising`s work was followed by a seminal paper by R. Wideroe in 1928 in which he demonstrated the first linear accelerator. Wideroe was able to accelerate sodium or potassium ions to 50 keV of energy using drift tubes connected alternately to high frequency waves and to ground. Nuclear physics during this period was interested in accelerating protons, deuterons, electrons and alpha particles and not heavy ions like sodium or potassium. To accelerate the light ions required much higher frequencies than available at that time. So linear accelerators were not pursued heavily at that time. Research continued during the 1930s but the development of high frequency RF tubes for radar applications in World War 2 opened the potential for RF linear accelerators after the war. The Berkeley laboratory of E. 0. Lawrence under the leadership of Luis Alvarez developed a new linear proton accelerator concept that utilized drift tubes that required a full RF period to pass through as compared to the earlier concepts. This development resulted in the historic Berkeley 32 MeV proton linear accelerator which incorporated the {open_quotes}Alvarez drift tube{close_quotes} as the basic acceleration scheme using surplus 200 MHz radar components.

  18. Neutral particle dynamics in a high-power RF source

    SciTech Connect

    Todorov, D. Paunska, Ts.; Shivarova, A.; Tarnev, Kh.

    2015-04-08

    Previous studies on the spatial discharge structure in the SPIDER source of negative hydrogen/deuterium ions carried out at low applied power are extended towards description of the discharge maintenance under the conditions of the actual rf power deposition of 100 kW planned for a single driver of the source. In addition to the expected higher electron density, the results show strong increase of the electron temperature and of the temperatures of the neutral species (hydrogen atoms and molecules). In the discussions, not only the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters but also that of the fluxes in the discharge (particle and energy fluxes) is involved. The obtained results come in confirmation of basic concepts for low-pressure discharge maintenance: (i) mutually related electron density and temperature as a display of the generalized Schottky condition, (ii) discharge behavior governed by the fluxes, i.e. strong nonlocality in the discharge, and (iii) a non-ambipolarity in the discharge regime, which originates from shifted maxima of the electron density and temperature and shows evidence in a vortex electron flux and in a dc current in a rf discharge, the latter resulting from a shift in the positions of the maxima of the electron density and plasma potential.

  19. A high power microwave triggered RF opening switch.

    PubMed

    Beeson, S; Dickens, J; Neuber, A

    2015-03-01

    A 4-port S-band waveguide structure was designed and fabricated such that a signal of any amplitude (less than 1 MW) can be switched from a normally closed state, <0.5 dB insertion loss (IL), to an open state >30 dB IL by initiating plasma in a gas cell situated at the junction of this waveguide and one propagating a megawatt level magnetron pulse. The 90/10 switching time is as low as 20 ns with a delay of ∼30 ns between the onset of the high power microwave pulse and the initial drop of the signal. Two ports of this device are for the high power triggering pulse while the other two ports are for the triggered signal in a Moreno-like coupler configuration. In order to maintain high isolation, these two sets of waveguides are rotated 90° from each other with a TE111 resonator/plasma cell located at the intersection. This manuscript describes the design and optimization of this structure using COMSOL 4.4 at the design frequency of 2.85 GHz, comparison of simulated scattering parameters with measured "cold tests" (testing without plasma), and finally the temporal waveforms of this device being used to successfully switch a low power CW signal from 2 W to <5 mW on a sub-microsecond timescale. PMID:25832255

  20. A high power microwave triggered RF opening switch.

    PubMed

    Beeson, S; Dickens, J; Neuber, A

    2015-03-01

    A 4-port S-band waveguide structure was designed and fabricated such that a signal of any amplitude (less than 1 MW) can be switched from a normally closed state, <0.5 dB insertion loss (IL), to an open state >30 dB IL by initiating plasma in a gas cell situated at the junction of this waveguide and one propagating a megawatt level magnetron pulse. The 90/10 switching time is as low as 20 ns with a delay of ∼30 ns between the onset of the high power microwave pulse and the initial drop of the signal. Two ports of this device are for the high power triggering pulse while the other two ports are for the triggered signal in a Moreno-like coupler configuration. In order to maintain high isolation, these two sets of waveguides are rotated 90° from each other with a TE111 resonator/plasma cell located at the intersection. This manuscript describes the design and optimization of this structure using COMSOL 4.4 at the design frequency of 2.85 GHz, comparison of simulated scattering parameters with measured "cold tests" (testing without plasma), and finally the temporal waveforms of this device being used to successfully switch a low power CW signal from 2 W to <5 mW on a sub-microsecond timescale.

  1. NASA satellite communications application research. Phase 2: Efficient high power, solid state amplifier for EFH communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benet, James

    1993-01-01

    The final report describes the work performed from 9 Jun. 1992 to 31 Jul. 1993 on the NASA Satellite Communications Application Research (SCAR) Phase 2 program, Efficient High Power, Solid State Amplifier for EHF Communications. The purpose of the program was to demonstrate the feasibility of high-efficiency, high-power, EHF solid state amplifiers that are smaller, lighter, more efficient, and less costly than existing traveling wave tube (TWT) amplifiers by combining the output power from up to several hundred solid state amplifiers using a unique orthomode spatial power combiner (OSPC).

  2. An RF amplifier for ICRF studies in the LAPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, M. J.; Pribyl, P.; Gekelman, W.; Lucky, Z.

    2015-12-01

    An RF amplifier system was designed and is under construction at the UCLA Basic Plasma Science Facility. The system is designed to output 200 kW peak RMS power at 1% duty cycle with a 1 Hz rep rate at frequencies of 2-6 MHz. This paper describes the RF amplifier system with preliminary benchmarks. Current design challenges and future work are discussed.

  3. Active and Passive RF Components for High-Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Nantista, Christopher D.

    2002-08-01

    In recent years, R&D for pulse compression and power distribution systems for the Next Linear Collider has led to the invention of many novel rf components, some of which must handle up to 600 MW of pulsed power at X-band. These include passive waveguide components, active switch designs, and non-reciprocal devices. Among the former is a class of multi-moded, highly efficient rf components based on planar geometries with overmoded rectangular ports. Multi-moding allows us, by means of input phasing, to direct power to different locations through the same waveguide. Planar symmetry allows the height to be increased to improve power handling capacity. Features that invite breakdown, such as coupling slots, irises and H-plane septa, are avoided. This class includes hybrids, directional couplers, an eight-port superhybrid/dual-mode launcher, a mode-selective extractor, mode-preserving bends, a rectangular mode converter, and mode-mixers. We are able to utilize such rectangular waveguide components in systems incorporating low-loss, circular waveguide delay lines by means of specially designed tapers that efficiently transform multiple rectangular waveguide modes into their corresponding circular waveguide modes, specifically TE10 and TE20 into circular TE11 and TE01. These extremely compact tapers can replace well-known mode converters such as the Marie type. Another component, a reflective TE01-TE02 mode converter in circular waveguide, allows us to double the delay in reflective or resonant delay lines. Ideas for multi-megawatt active components, such as switches, have also been pursued. Power-handling capacity for these is increased by making them also highly overmoded. We present a design methodology for active rf magnetic components which are suitable for pulse compression systems of future X-band linear colliders. We also present an active switch based on a PIN diode array. This component comprises an array of active elements arranged so that the electric fields

  4. The Construction and Preliminary High Power Test Results of an X-Band RF Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, C. H.; Lau, W. K.; Yang, T. T.; Hwang, J. Y.; Liu, Y. C.; Le Sage, G. P.; Hartemann, F. V.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.

    1997-05-01

    The collaboration between UC Davis and SRRC for developing a high brightness, high repetition rate, multibunch photoinjector has reached the high power rf processing stage. The X-band (8.548 GHz) photocathode rf gun consists of a 1-1/2 cell, side wall coupled, standing wave cavity, driven by a 20 MW SLAC Klystron, and a GHz repetition rate laser system. A solenoid is installed at the exit of the rf gun for focusing the diverging electron beam. A train of one hundred, 0.1 - 1 nC electron bunches will be accelerated to an energy in the range of 5 MeV. The construction of the gun structure and the solenoid will be described, and the preliminary high power rf conditioning results will be presented.

  5. High power 1018 nm monolithic Yb3+-doped fiber laser and amplifier High power 1018 nm monolithic Yb3+-doped fiber laser and amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, H.; Zhou, P.; Wang, X. L.; Guo, S. F.; Xu, X. J.

    2012-10-01

    In this letter high power monolithic 1018 nm fiber laser and amplifier are presented. The output characteristics of 1018 nm laser with amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) feedback, fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) reflectivity, gain fiber length and other parameters are experimentally investigated. The difference between 1018 and 1064 nm amplification are also compared in experiment. Based on these experimental results, we find viable approaches to improve the laser and amplifier's performances. 85 W 1018 nm fiber laser with a slope efficiency of 71% and 110 W 1018 nm fiber amplifier with the slope efficiency of 77% are achieved, both of which we believe are the highest output at this wavelength that ever reported in open detail.

  6. Effects of high power R.F. fields in the atmosphere and the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Suman

    1990-04-01

    The effects of high-power RF fields generated in the context of a strategic defense system on the atmosphere and ionosphere are discussed. The significance of density perturbations, electron accelerations, IR emissions, optical emissions, UV emissions, generation of RF noise field, and air breakdown due to the fields are discussed. The impact of these physical changes on communication, jamming, surveillance, and tracking are noted.

  7. The development of the electrically controlled high power RF switch and its application to active RF pulse compression systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiquan

    In the past decades, there has been increasing interest in pulsed high power RF sources for building high-gradient high-energy particle accelerators. Passive RF pulse compression systems have been used in many applications to match the available RF sources to the loads requiring higher RF power but a shorter pulse. Theoretically, an active RF pulse compression system has the advantage of higher efficiency and compactness over the passive system. However, the key component for such a system---an element capable of switching hundreds of megawatts of RF power in a short time compared to the compressed pulse width---is still an open problem. In this dissertation, we present a switch module composed of an active window based on the bulk effects in semiconductor, a circular waveguide three-port network and a movable short plane, with the capability to adjust the S-parameters before and after switching. The RF properties of the switch module were analyzed. We give the scaling laws of the multiple-element switch systems, which allow the expansion of the system to a higher power level. We present a novel overmoded design for the circular waveguide three-port network and the associated circular-to-rectangular mode-converter. We also detail the design and synthesis process of this novel mode-converter. We demonstrate an electrically controlled ultra-fast high power X-band RF active window built with PIN diodes on high resistivity silicon. The window is capable of handling multi-megawatt RF power and can switch in 2-300ns with a 1000A current driver. A low power active pulse compression experiment was carried out with the switch module and a 375ns resonant delay line, obtaining 8 times compression gain with a compression ratio of 20.

  8. The Development of the Electrically Controlled High Power RF Switch and Its Application to Active RF Pulse Compression Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jiquan

    2008-12-01

    In the past decades, there has been increasing interest in pulsed high power RF sources for building high-gradient high-energy particle accelerators. Passive RF pulse compression systems have been used in many applications to match the available RF sources to the loads requiring higher RF power but a shorter pulse. Theoretically, an active RF pulse compression system has the advantage of higher efficiency and compactness over the passive system. However, the key component for such a system an element capable of switching hundreds of megawatts of RF power in a short time compared to the compressed pulse width is still an open problem. In this dissertation, we present a switch module composed of an active window based on the bulk effects in semiconductor, a circular waveguide three-port network and a movable short plane, with the capability to adjust the S-parameters before and after switching. The RF properties of the switch module were analyzed. We give the scaling laws of the multiple-element switch systems, which allow the expansion of the system to a higher power level. We present a novel overmoded design for the circular waveguide three-port network and the associated circular-to-rectangular mode-converter. We also detail the design and synthesis process of this novel mode-converter. We demonstrate an electrically controlled ultra-fast high power X-band RF active window built with PIN diodes on high resistivity silicon. The window is capable of handling multi-megawatt RF power and can switch in 2-300ns with a 1000A current driver. A low power active pulse compression experiment was carried out with the switch module and a 375ns resonant delay line, obtaining 8 times compression gain with a compression ratio of 20.

  9. High-Power Multimode X-Band RF Pulse Compression System for Future Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Pearson, C.; Nelson, J.; Jobe, K.; Chan, J.; Fant, K.; Frisch, J.; Atkinson, D.; /LLNL, Livermore

    2005-08-10

    We present a multimode X-band rf pulse compression system suitable for a TeV-scale electron-positron linear collider such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The NLC main linac operating frequency is 11.424 GHz. A single NLC rf unit is required to produce 400 ns pulses with 475 MW of peak power. Each rf unit should power approximately 5 m of accelerator structures. The rf unit design consists of two 75 MW klystrons and a dual-moded resonant-delay-line pulse compression system that produces a flat output pulse. The pulse compression system components are all overmoded, and most components are designed to operate with two modes. This approach allows high-power-handling capability while maintaining a compact, inexpensive system. We detail the design of this system and present experimental cold test results. We describe the design and performance of various components. The high-power testing of the system is verified using four 50 MW solenoid-focused klystrons run off a common 400 kV solid-state modulator. The system has produced 400 ns rf pulses of greater than 500 MW. We present the layout of our system, which includes a dual-moded transmission waveguide system and a dual-moded resonant line (SLED-II) pulse compression system. We also present data on the processing and operation of this system, which has set high-power records in coherent and phase controlled pulsed rf.

  10. High-power multimode X-band rf pulse compression system for future linear colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Nantista, Christopher D.; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Pearson, Chris; Nelson, Janice; Jobe, Keith; Chan, Jose; Fant, Karen; Frisch, Josef; Atkinson, Dennis

    2005-04-01

    We present a multimode X-band rf pulse compression system suitable for a TeV-scale electron-positron linear collider such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The NLC main linac operating frequency is 11.424 GHz. A single NLC rf unit is required to produce 400 ns pulses with 475 MW of peak power. Each rf unit should power approximately 5 m of accelerator structures. The rf unit design consists of two 75 MW klystrons and a dual-moded resonant-delay-line pulse compression system that produces a flat output pulse. The pulse compression system components are all overmoded, and most components are designed to operate with two modes. This approach allows high-power-handling capability while maintaining a compact, inexpensive system. We detail the design of this system and present experimental cold test results. We describe the design and performance of various components. The high-power testing of the system is verified using four 50 MW solenoid-focused klystrons run off a common 400 kV solid-state modulator. The system has produced 400 ns rf pulses of greater than 500 MW. We present the layout of our system, which includes a dual-moded transmission waveguide system and a dual-moded resonant line (SLED-II) pulse compression system. We also present data on the processing and operation of this system, which has set high-power records in coherent and phase controlled pulsed rf.

  11. A new RF window designed for high-power operation in an S-band LINAC RF system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Youngdo; Kim, Seung-Hwan; Hwang, Woonha; Ryu, Jiwan; Roh, Sungjoo

    2016-09-01

    A new RF window is designed for high-power operation at the Pohang Light Source-II (PLSII) S-band linear accelerator (LINAC) RF system. In order to reduce the strength of the electric field component perpendicular to the ceramic disk, which is commonly known as the main cause of most discharge breakdowns in ceramic disk, we replace the pill-box type cavity in the conventional RF window with an overmoded cavity. The overmoded cavity is coupled with input and output waveguides through dual side-wall coupling irises to reduce the electric field strength at the iris and the number of possible mode competitions. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation, CST MWS, was used in the design process. The simulated maximum electric field component perpendicular to the ceramic for the new RF window is reduced by an order of magnitude compared with taht for the conventional RF window, which holds promise for stable high-power operation.

  12. Self-similar propagation of high-power parabolic pulses in optical fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Kruglov, V I; Peacock, A C; Dudley, J M; Harvey, J D

    2000-12-15

    Self-similarity techniques are used to study pulse propagation in a normal-dispersion optical fiber amplifier with an arbitrary longitudinal gain profile. Analysis of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation that describes such an amplifier leads to an exact solution in the high-power limit that corresponds to a linearly chirped parabolic pulse. The self-similar scaling of the propagating pulse in the amplifier is found to be determined by the functional form of the gain profile, and the solution is confirmed by numerical simulations. The implications for achieving chirp-free pulses after compression of the amplifier output are discussed.

  13. Materials and Device Optimization for High Power SiGe HBT Amplifiers at X-Band Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, C. H.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Croke, E. T.

    1999-01-01

    The driving force behind SiGe development is the potential for high frequency and high power devices that provide comparable functionality as more expensive semiconductors such as InP and GaAs, but at a much lower cost. Additional advantages are the potential for incorporating SiGe devices onto monolithic Si chips and fabricating entire systems, such as receiver front-ends or RF power amplifiers, on a single chip. The work reported in this paper summarizes the materials and simulation aspects of a much larger project, which will eventually lead to SiGe HBT amplifiers with output powers greater than 1 W and over 35 dB gain at X-band frequencies. To achieve these goals, accurate analysis of the materials properties, especially in the base region, and highly refined amplifier design procedures must be established. In this paper we report the precision that may be obtained using optical ellipsometry to monitor the base and emitter thicknesses and Ge content of the base. We also report the extent of crystalline degradation in state-of-the-art SiGe films with high Ge contents. The objective of this work is to access the materials quality of HBT structures, and then use this data to model how various defects impact device performance, and which defects are most likely to limit high power and/or high frequency performance.

  14. High-power microwave amplifier based on overcritical relativistic electron beam without external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkin, S. A. Koronovskii, A. A.; Frolov, N. S.; Hramov, A. E.; Rak, A. O.; Kuraev, A. A.

    2015-04-13

    The high-power scheme for the amplification of powerful microwave signals based on the overcritical electron beam with a virtual cathode (virtual cathode amplifier) has been proposed and investigated numerically. General output characteristics of the virtual cathode amplifier including the dependencies of the power gain on the input signal frequency and amplitude have been obtained and analyzed. The possibility of the geometrical working frequency tuning over the range about 8%–10% has been shown. The obtained results demonstrate that the proposed virtual cathode amplifier scheme may be considered as the perspective high-power microwave amplifier with gain up to 18 dB, and with the following important advantages: the absence of external magnetic field, the simplicity of construction, the possibility of geometrical frequency tuning, and the amplification of relatively powerful microwave signals.

  15. Possibility of a high-power, high-gain amplifier FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D. C.; Freund, H. P.

    2002-01-01

    High-gain amplifier FEL offer many unique advantages such as robust operation without a high-Q optical cavity and potentially high extraction eaciencies with the use of tapered wigglers. Although a high average power, cw amplifier FEL has not been demonstrated, many key physics issues such as electron beam brightness requirements, single-pass gains, saturation, etc. have been resolved. In this paper, we study the feasibility of a high-power FEL based on the high-gain amplifier concept. We show that with suitable electron beam parameters, i.e. high peak current, low emittance, low energy spread, and sufficient tapered wiggler length, peak output power of 1 QW and optical pulse energy of 8 mJ can be achieved. We also outline a possible configuration of a high-power, high-gain amplifier FEL with energy recovery.

  16. High power RF system for transverse deflecting structure XFEL TDS INJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volobuev, E. N.; Zavadtsev, A. A.; Zavadtsev, D. A.; Smirnov, A. J.; Sobenin, N. P.; Churanov, D. V.

    2016-09-01

    The high power RF system (HPRF) is designed for RF feeding of the transverse deflecting structure of the transverse deflecting system XFEL TDS System INJ of the European X-ray Free Electron Laser. The HPRF system includes klystron, waveguide ceramic windows, directional couplers, waveguide vacuum units, spark detector and waveguide line. Operating frequency is 2997.2 MHz. Peak input power is up to 3 MW. The HPRF system has been developed, manufactured and assembled in the XFEL Injector building. The total length of the waveguide line is 55 m from the klystron at the -5 floor to the transverse deflecting structure at the -7 floor. All designed RF parameters have been obtained experimentally at low RF power level.

  17. Mode controlling study on narrow-linewidth and high power all-fiber amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Min; Qi, Yunfeng; Liu, Chi; Yang, Yifeng; Zheng, Ye; Zhou, Jun

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate an ytterbium-doped all-fiber master-oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) system which uses a narrow-linewidth seed source, generating narrow-linewidth and high power continuous-wave output power at 1064nm. Our MOPA configuration system consist of three amplifier stages. We use single-mode Yb-doped fiber as the gain fiber in the first and second pre-amplifier stages, so it can keep good beam quality before entering the main amplifier stage. In order to raise the threshold of nonlinear effects, such as SBS and SRS, and to relieve heat effect, our high power system choose large mode area (LMA) fiber as the gain fiber in the main amplifier stage. For the sake of suppressing high-order modes in LMA fiber, we design novel watering cooling plates of different sizes, and using them in our main amplifier stage. By optimizing its structure, we get very good laser beam pattern on CCD at high power output. The beam quality factor (M2) was about 1.4 at 1.31 kW.

  18. Design of a new VHF RF power amplifier system for LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, John T M

    2010-01-01

    A major upgrade is replacing much of the 40 year-old proton drift tube linac RF system with new components at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). When installed, the new system will reduce the total number of electron power tubes from twenty-four to eight in the RF powerplant. A new 200 MHz high power cavity amplifier has being developed at LANSCE. This 3.2 MW final power amplifier (FPA) uses a Thales TH628 Diacrode{reg_sign}, a state-of-the-art tetrode that eliminates the large anode modulator of the triode-based FPA that has been in use for four decades. Drive power for the FPA is provided by a new tetrode intermediate power amplifier (and a solid-state driver stage). The new system has sufficient duty-factor capability to allow LANSCE to return to 1 MW beam operation. Prototype RF power amplifiers have been designed, fabricated, and assembled, and are being tested. High voltage DC power became available through innovative re-engineering of an installed system. Details of the electrical and mechanical design of the FPA and ancillary systems are discussed.

  19. Development of deflector cavity and RF amplifier for bunch length detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, H. K.; Bhattacharya, T. K.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2016-02-01

    A minimally-interceptive bunch length detector system is being developed for measurement of longitudinal dimension of the bunch beam from RFQ of the radioactive ion beam (RIB) facility at VECC. This detector system is based on secondary electrons emission produced by the primary ion beam hitting a thin tungsten wire placed in the beam path. In this paper we report the design, development and off line testing results of deflector cavity together with its RF sysytem. The deflector cavity is a capacitive loaded helical type λ/2 resonator driven by RF source of 500 W at 37.8 MHz solid state amplifier, realized by combining two amplifier modules of 300 W each. The measured RF characteristics of the resonator, such as frequency, Q value and shunt impedance have been found to be reasonably good and close to the analytical estimation and results of simulation. The design philosophy and test results of individual components of the amplifier are discussed. The test result upto full power shows a good harmonic separation at the individual module level and this is found to improve further when modules are combined together.The results of high power performance test of the deflector cavity together with amplifier are also reported.

  20. Integration of LHCD system with SST1 machine and its high power rf performance in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, P. K.; Ambulkar, K. K.; Dalakoti, S.; Parmar, P. R.; Virani, C. G.; Thakur, A. L.

    2014-02-01

    A 2.0 MW CW lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system based on 3.7 GHz klystron sources, is in advanced stage of commissioning, which would drive and sustain plasma current, non-inductively, in superconducting steadystate tokamak (SST1) for long pulse operation. Four klystrons, each rated for 0.5 MW CW rf power, delivers 2.0 MW of rf power to four layer of the LHCD system, which finally feeds the rf power to grill antenna. The antenna system along with vacuum window and vacuum transmission line is successfully integrated on the machine. Its vacuum and pressurization compatibility has been successfully established. To validate the high power performance of LHCD system for SST1 machine, stage-wise commissioning of LHCD system in staggered manner is planned. It has been envisaged that LHCD power may be gradually increased initially, since full power may not be required during the initial phases of SST1 plasma operation. Also if the system is integrated in steps or in phases, then integration issues, as well as high power operational issues, if any, can be addressed, attended and handled in a simpler way before integrating all the layers to the grill antenna. To begin with, one klystron is connected to one layer, out of four layers, which energizes a quarter of the grill antenna. Gradually, the rf power and its pulse length is increased to validate high power performance of the system. Arcing and reflections are observed as rf power is gradually increased. The problems are analysed and after taking appropriate remedial action the system performance is improved for operation up to 160kW. Several trains of short pulses are launched in SST1 vacuum vessel for rf conditioning of the LHCD system. Normally, reflections are high when power is launched in vacuum; therefore the pulse length is restricted up to 100 milliseconds. The high power performance of this layer, connected with grill antenna is validated by launching high power microwaves in vacuum vessel of SST1 machine

  1. High-power RF window and coupler development for the PEP-II B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, M.; Fant, K.; Hodgson, J.; Judkins, J.; Schwarz, H.; Rimmer, R.A.

    1995-05-01

    We describe the fabrication and testing of the RF windows designed to transmit power to the PEP-II 476 MHz cavities. Design choices to maximize the reliability of the window are discussed. Fabrication technologies for the window are described and finite-element analysis of the assembly process is presented. Conditioning and high-power testing of the window are discussed. Design of the coupler assembly including the integration of the window and other components is reported.

  2. RF breakdown experiments in "cold" slow wave structures under experimental circumstances of high power microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dian; Zhang, Jun; Jin, Zhenxing; Yang, Jianhua; Zhong, Huihuang; Zhou, Shengyue

    2015-07-01

    RF breakdown tests in "cold" slow wave structures (SWSs) are executed under experimental circumstance of high power microwave (HPM). All the SWSs under tests are made of stainless steel and are designed as traveling wave structures, which operate at π/2 mode of TM01 wave. The "cold" SWSs are fed by an X-band overmoded relativistic backward wave oscillator, which generates TM01 mode at 9.46 GHz with power around 1.8 GW, pulse duration about 100 ns, and repetition rate of 30 Hz. In the tests, the variances of peak surface electric field (Es-max, 0.53 MV/cm-1.79 MV/cm), number of periods (2-6 periods) of SWSs, and external magnetic field (Bext, 0-2.5 T) versus RF breakdown effects are recorded. The tests results indicate that the input microwave energy is mainly absorbed, not reflected by the RF breakdown process in traveling wave SWSs. Both larger magnitude of Es-max and more numbers of periods of SWSs aggravate the microwave absorption in the breakdown process and bring about shorter transmission pulse width. However, little correlation between RF breakdown effects and Bext is observed in the tests. Further theoretical and experimental studies would be helpful for understanding of the effects of Bext on RF breakdown and breakdown mechanisms under the experimental circumstances of HPM sources.

  3. A novel technique for electronic phasing of high power fiber amplifier arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, T. M.; Baker, J. T.; Sanchez, Anthony D.; Robin, C. A.; Vergien, C. L.; Zeringue, C.; Gallant, D.; Lu, Chunte A.; Pulford, Benjamin; Bronder, T. J.; Lucero, Arthur

    2009-06-01

    We report high power phase locked fiber amplifier array using the Self-Synchronous Locking of Optical Coherence by Single-detector Electronic-frequency Tagging technique. We report the first experimental results for a five element amplifier array with a total locked power of more than 725-W. We will report on experimental measurements of the phase fluctuations versus time when the control loop is closed. The rms phase error was measured to be λ/60. Recent results will be reported. To the best of the authors' knowledge this is the highest fiber laser power to be coherently combined.

  4. Design and 3D simulation of a two-cavity wide-gap relativistic klystron amplifier with high power injection

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Xianchen; Yang Jianhua; Zhang Jiande

    2012-08-15

    By using an electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code, an S-band two-cavity wide-gap klystron amplifier (WKA) loaded with washers/rods structure is designed and investigated for high power injection application. Influences of the washers/rods structure on the high frequency characteristics and the basic operation of the amplifier are presented. Generally, the rod structure has great impacts on the space-charge potential depression and the resonant frequency of the cavities. Nevertheless, if only the resonant frequency is tuned to the desired operation frequency, effects of the rod size on the basic operation of the amplifier are expected to be very weak. The 3-dimension (3-D) PIC simulation results show an output power of 0.98 GW corresponding to an efficiency of 33% for the WKA, with a 594 keV, 5 kA electron beam guided by an external magnetic field of 1.5 Tesla. Moreover, if a conductive plane is placed near the output gap, such as the electron collector, the beam potential energy can be further released, and the RF power can be increased to about 1.07 GW with the conversion efficiency of about 36%.

  5. Design and 3D simulation of a two-cavity wide-gap relativistic klystron amplifier with high power injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xianchen; Yang, Jianhua; Zhang, Jiande

    2012-08-01

    By using an electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code, an S-band two-cavity wide-gap klystron amplifier (WKA) loaded with washers/rods structure is designed and investigated for high power injection application. Influences of the washers/rods structure on the high frequency characteristics and the basic operation of the amplifier are presented. Generally, the rod structure has great impacts on the space-charge potential depression and the resonant frequency of the cavities. Nevertheless, if only the resonant frequency is tuned to the desired operation frequency, effects of the rod size on the basic operation of the amplifier are expected to be very weak. The 3-dimension (3-D) PIC simulation results show an output power of 0.98 GW corresponding to an efficiency of 33% for the WKA, with a 594 keV, 5 kA electron beam guided by an external magnetic field of 1.5 Tesla. Moreover, if a conductive plane is placed near the output gap, such as the electron collector, the beam potential energy can be further released, and the RF power can be increased to about 1.07 GW with the conversion efficiency of about 36%.

  6. Radar Waveform Pulse Analysis Measurement System for High-Power GaN Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thrivikraman, Tushar; Perkovic-Martin, Dragana; Jenabi, Masud; Hoffman, James

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a measurement system to characterize the pulsed response of high-power GaN amplifiers for use in space-based SAR platforms that require very strict amplitude and phase stability. The measurement system is able to record and analyze data on three different time scales: fast, slow, and long, which allows for greater detail of the mechanisms that impact amplitude and phase stability. The system is fully automated through MATLAB, which offers both instrument control capability and in-situ data processing. To validate this system, a high-power GaN HEMT amplifier operated in saturation was characterized. The fast time results show that variations to the amplitude and phase are correlated to DC supply transients, while long time characteristics are correlated to temperature changes.

  7. Results of the SLAC LCLS Gun High-Power RF Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Jongewaard, E.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Schmerge, J.F.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; Wang, J.; Lewandowski, J.; Vlieks, A.; /SLAC

    2007-11-02

    The beam quality and operational requirements for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) currently being constructed at SLAC are exceptional, requiring the design of a new RF photocathode gun for the electron source. Based on operational experience at SLAC's GTF and SDL and ATF at BNL as well as other laboratories, the 1.6cell s-band (2856MHz) gun was chosen to be the best electron source for the LCLS, however a significant redesign was necessary to achieve the challenging parameters. Detailed 3-D analysis and design was used to produce near-perfect rotationally symmetric rf fields to achieve the emittance requirement. In addition, the thermo-mechanical design allows the gun to operate at 120Hz and a 140MV/m cathode field, or to an average power dissipation of 4kW. Both average and pulsed heating issues are addressed in the LCLS gun design. The first LCLS gun is now fabricated and has been operated with high-power RF. The results of these high-power tests are presented and discussed.

  8. 47 CFR 97.315 - Certification of external RF power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Certification of external RF power amplifiers... power amplifiers. (a) Any external RF power amplifier (see § 2.815 of the FCC Rules) manufactured or... accordance with subpart J of part 2 of the FCC Rules. No amplifier capable of operation below 144 MHz may...

  9. 47 CFR 97.315 - Certification of external RF power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Certification of external RF power amplifiers... power amplifiers. (a) Any external RF power amplifier (see § 2.815 of the FCC Rules) manufactured or... accordance with subpart J of part 2 of the FCC Rules. No amplifier capable of operation below 144 MHz may...

  10. 47 CFR 97.315 - Certification of external RF power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Certification of external RF power amplifiers... power amplifiers. (a) Any external RF power amplifier (see § 2.815 of the FCC Rules) manufactured or... accordance with subpart J of part 2 of the FCC Rules. No amplifier capable of operation below 144 MHz may...

  11. 47 CFR 97.315 - Certification of external RF power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Certification of external RF power amplifiers... power amplifiers. (a) Any external RF power amplifier (see § 2.815 of the FCC Rules) manufactured or... accordance with subpart J of part 2 of the FCC Rules. No amplifier capable of operation below 144 MHz may...

  12. 47 CFR 97.315 - Certification of external RF power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Certification of external RF power amplifiers... power amplifiers. (a) Any external RF power amplifier (see § 2.815 of the FCC Rules) manufactured or... accordance with subpart J of part 2 of the FCC Rules. No amplifier capable of operation below 144 MHz may...

  13. Experimental observations of the threshold-like onset of mode instabilities in high power fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Eidam, Tino; Wirth, Christian; Jauregui, Cesar; Stutzki, Fabian; Jansen, Florian; Otto, Hans-Jürgen; Schmidt, Oliver; Schreiber, Thomas; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2011-07-01

    We report on the observation and experimental characterization of a threshold-like onset of mode instabilities, i.e. an apparently random relative power content change of different transverse modes, occurring in originally single-mode high-power fiber amplifiers. Although the physical origin of this effect is not yet fully understood, we discuss possible explanations. Accordingly, several solutions are proposed in this paper to raise the threshold of this effect.

  14. High power single frequency solid state master oscillator power amplifier for gravitational wave detection.

    PubMed

    Basu, Chandrajit; Wessels, Peter; Neumann, Jörg; Kracht, Dietmar

    2012-07-15

    High power single frequency, single mode, linearly polarized laser output at the 1 μm regime is in demand for the interferometric gravitational wave detectors (GWDs). A robust single frequency solid state master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) is a promising candidate for such applications. We present a single frequency solid state multistage MOPA system delivering 177 W of linearly polarized output power at 1 μm with 83.5% TEM(00) mode content.

  15. High Power SiGe X-Band (8-10 GHz) Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors and Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Zhenqiang; Jiang, Ningyue; Ponchak, George E.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    2005-01-01

    Limited by increased parasitics and thermal effects as the device size becomes large, current commercial SiGe power HBTs are difficult to operate at X-band (8-12 GHz) with adequate power added efficiencies at high power levels. We found that, by changing the heterostructure and doping profile of SiGe HBTs, their power gain can be significantly improved without resorting to substantial lateral scaling. Furthermore, employing a common-base configuration with proper doping profile instead of a common-emitter configuration improves the power gain characteristics of SiGe HBTs, which thus permits these devices to be efficiently operated at X-band. In this paper, we report the results of SiGe power HBTs and MMIC power amplifiers operating at 8-10 GHz. At 10 GHz, 22.5 dBm (178 mW) RF output power with concurrent gain of 7.32 dB is measured at the peak power-added efficiency of 20.0% and the maximum RF output power of 24.0 dBm (250 mW) is achieved from a 20 emitter finger SiGe power HBT. Demonstration of single-stage X-band medium-power linear MMIC power amplifier is also realized at 8 GHz. Employing a 10-emitter finger SiGe HBT and on-chip input and output matching passive components, a linear gain of 9.7 dB, a maximum output power of 23.4 dBm and peak power added efficiency of 16% is achieved from the power amplifier. The MMIC exhibits very low distortion with third order intermodulation (IM) suppression C/I of -13 dBc at output power of 21.2 dBm and over 20dBm third order output intercept point (OIP3).

  16. RF Distribution System for High Power Test of the SNS Cryomodule

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung-Woo; Kang, Yoon W; Broyles, Michael R; Crofford, Mark T; Geng, Xiaosong; Kim, Sang-Ho; Phibbs, Curtis L; Strong, William Herb; Peglow, Robert C; Vassioutchenko, Alexandre V

    2012-01-01

    A four-way waveguide RF power distribution system for testing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) multi-cavity cryomodule to investigate the collective behavior has been developed. A single klystron operating at 805MHz for 1.3 msec at 60Hz powers the 4-way waveguide splitter to deliver up to 400 kW to individual cavities. Each cavity is fed through a combination of waveguide splitters and vector modulators (VM) to provide independent magnitude and phase controls. The waveguide vector modulator consists of two quadrature hybrids and two motorized waveguide phase shifters. The phase shifters and the assembled waveguide vector modulators were individually tested and characterized for low power and high RF power in the SNS RF test facility. Precise calibrations of magnitude and phase were performed to generate the look up tables (LUTs) to provide operational references during the cryomodule test. An I-Q demodulator module was developed and utilized to measure relative phases in pulsed high RF power operation. PLC units were developed for mechanical control of the phase shifters. Initial low/high power measurements were made using LabVIEW. An operation algorithm has been implemented into EPICS control for the cryomodule test stand.

  17. RF couplers for normal-conducting photoinjector of high-power CW FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S.

    2004-01-01

    A high-current emittance-compensated RF photoinjector is a key enabling technology for a high-power CW FEL. A preliminary design of a normal-conducting, 2.5-cell pi-mode, 700-MHz CW RF photoinjector that will be built for demonstration purposes, is completed. This photoinjector will be capable of accelerating a 100-mA electron beam (3 nC per bunch at 35 MHz bunch repetition rate) to 2.7 MeV while providing an emittance below 7 mm-mrad at the wiggler. More than 1 MW of RF power will be fed into the photoinjector cavity through two ridge-loaded tapered waveguides. The waveguides are coupled to the cavity by 'dog-bone' irises cut in a thick wall. Due to CW operation of the photoinjector, the cooling of the coupler irises is a rather challenging thermal management project. This paper presents results of a detailed electromagnetic modeling of the coupler-cavity system, which has been performed to select the coupler design that minimizes the iris heating due to RF power loss in its walls.

  18. RF Couplers for Normal-Conducting Photoinjector of High-Power CW FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey; Schrage, Dale; Wood, Richard; Schultheiss, Tom; Rathke, John; Young, Lloyd

    2004-05-01

    A high-current emittance-compensated RF photoinjector is a key enabling technology for a high-power CW FEL. A preliminary design of a normal-conducting, 2.5-cell pi-mode, 700-MHz CW RF photoinjector that will be build for demonstration purposes, is completed. This photoinjector will be capable of accelerating a 100-mA electron beam (3 nC per bunch at 35 MHz bunch repetition rate) to 2.7 MeV while providing an emittance below 7 mm-mrad at the wiggler. More than 1 MW of RF power will be fed into the photoinjector cavity through two ridge-loaded tapered waveguides. The waveguides are coupled to the cavity by "dog-bone" irises cut in a thick wall. Due to CW operation of the photoinjector, the cooling of the coupler irises is a rather challenging thermal management project. This paper presents results of a detailed electromagnetic modeling of the coupler-cavity system, which has been performed to select the coupler design that minimizes the iris heating due to RF power loss in its walls.

  19. Investigation of stimulated Raman scattering effect in high-power fiber amplifiers seeded by narrow-band filtered superfluorescent source.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Ma, Pengfei; Lv, Haibin; Xu, Jiangming; Zhou, Pu; Jiang, Zongfu

    2016-04-18

    In this paper the stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) effect in high-power fiber amplifiers seeded by the narrow-band filtered superfluorescent source (SFS) is firstly analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. Spectral models for the formation of the SFS and the spectral evolution in high-power fiber amplifiers seeded by filtered SFS are proposed. It is found that the SRS effect in high-power fiber amplifiers depends on the spectral width of the filtered SFS seed. The theoretical predictions are in qualitative agreements with the experimental results. PMID:27137305

  20. Investigation of stimulated Raman scattering effect in high-power fiber amplifiers seeded by narrow-band filtered superfluorescent source.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Ma, Pengfei; Lv, Haibin; Xu, Jiangming; Zhou, Pu; Jiang, Zongfu

    2016-04-18

    In this paper the stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) effect in high-power fiber amplifiers seeded by the narrow-band filtered superfluorescent source (SFS) is firstly analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. Spectral models for the formation of the SFS and the spectral evolution in high-power fiber amplifiers seeded by filtered SFS are proposed. It is found that the SRS effect in high-power fiber amplifiers depends on the spectral width of the filtered SFS seed. The theoretical predictions are in qualitative agreements with the experimental results.

  1. HIGH POWER TEST OF RF SEPARATOR FOR 12 GEV UPGRADE OF CEBAF AT JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ahmed, M. Wissmann, J. Mammosser, C. Hovater, M. Spata, G. Krafft, J. Delayen

    2012-07-01

    CEBAF at JLab is in the process of an energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV. The existing setup of the RF separator cavities in the 5th pass will not be adequate to extract the highest energy (11 GeV) beam to any two existing halls (A, B or C) while simultaneously delivering to the new hall D in the case of the proposed 12 GeV upgrade of the machine. To restore this capability, we are exploring the possibility of extension of existing normal conducting 499 MHz TEM-type rf separator cavities. Detailed numerical studies suggest that six 2-cell normal conducting structures meet the requirements; each 2-cell structure will require up to 4 kW RF input power in contrast with the current nominal operating power of 1.0 to 2.0 kW. A high power test of 4 kW confirms that the cavity meet the requirement.

  2. 47 CFR 97.317 - Standards for certification of external RF power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... power amplifiers. 97.317 Section 97.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED... certification of external RF power amplifiers. (a) To receive a grant of certification, the amplifier must: (1... amplifier is operated at the lesser of 1.5 kW PEP or its full output power and when the amplifier is...

  3. 47 CFR 97.317 - Standards for certification of external RF power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... power amplifiers. 97.317 Section 97.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED... certification of external RF power amplifiers. (a) To receive a grant of certification, the amplifier must: (1... amplifier is operated at the lesser of 1.5 kW PEP or its full output power and when the amplifier is...

  4. 47 CFR 97.317 - Standards for certification of external RF power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... power amplifiers. 97.317 Section 97.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED... certification of external RF power amplifiers. (a) To receive a grant of certification, the amplifier must: (1... amplifier is operated at the lesser of 1.5 kW PEP or its full output power and when the amplifier is...

  5. 47 CFR 97.317 - Standards for certification of external RF power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... power amplifiers. 97.317 Section 97.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED... certification of external RF power amplifiers. (a) To receive a grant of certification, the amplifier must: (1... amplifier is operated at the lesser of 1.5 kW PEP or its full output power and when the amplifier is...

  6. 47 CFR 97.317 - Standards for certification of external RF power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... power amplifiers. 97.317 Section 97.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED... certification of external RF power amplifiers. (a) To receive a grant of certification, the amplifier must: (1... amplifier is operated at the lesser of 1.5 kW PEP or its full output power and when the amplifier is...

  7. Thermo-optical effects in high-power ytterbium-doped fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Kristian Rymann; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Broeng, Jes; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2011-11-21

    We investigate the effect of temperature gradients in high-power Yb-doped fiber amplifiers by a numerical beam propagation model, which takes thermal effects into account in a self-consistent way. The thermally induced change in the refractive index of the fiber leads to a thermal lensing effect, which decreases the effective mode area. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the thermal lensing effect may lead to effective multi-mode behavior, even in single-mode designs, which could possibly lead to degradation of the output beam quality.

  8. Note: efficient generation of optical sidebands at GHz with a high-power tapered amplifier.

    PubMed

    Zappala, J C; Bailey, K; Lu, Z-T; O'Connor, T P; Jiang, W

    2014-04-01

    Two methods using a laser-diode tapered amplifier to produce high-power, high-efficiency optical frequency sidebands over a wide tunable frequency range are studied and compared. For a total output of 500 mW at 811 nm, 20% of the power can be placed in each of the first-order sidebands. Functionality and characterization are presented within the sideband frequency region of 0.8-2.3 GHz, and it is shown that both methods can be applied beyond this frequency range. These methods provide a versatile and effective tool for atomic physics experiments. PMID:24784682

  9. Note: Efficient generation of optical sidebands at GHz with a high-power tapered amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappala, J. C.; Bailey, K.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Jiang, W.

    2014-04-01

    Two methods using a laser-diode tapered amplifier to produce high-power, high-efficiency optical frequency sidebands over a wide tunable frequency range are studied and compared. For a total output of 500 mW at 811 nm, 20% of the power can be placed in each of the first-order sidebands. Functionality and characterization are presented within the sideband frequency region of 0.8-2.3 GHz, and it is shown that both methods can be applied beyond this frequency range. These methods provide a versatile and effective tool for atomic physics experiments.

  10. Note: Efficient generation of optical sidebands at GHz with a high-power tapered amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Zappala, J. C.; Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; O’Connor, T. P.; Jiang, W.

    2014-04-15

    Two methods using a laser-diode tapered amplifier to produce high-power, high-efficiency optical frequency sidebands over a wide tunable frequency range are studied and compared. For a total output of 500 mW at 811 nm, 20% of the power can be placed in each of the first-order sidebands. Functionality and characterization are presented within the sideband frequency region of 0.8–2.3 GHz, and it is shown that both methods can be applied beyond this frequency range. These methods provide a versatile and effective tool for atomic physics experiments.

  11. Theoretical treatment of modal instability in high-power cladding-pumped Raman amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, Shadi; Dajani, Iyad; Grosek, Jacob; Madden, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Cladding-pumped Raman fiber amplifiers (RFA) have been proposed as gain media to achieve power scaling. It is well-known that the onset of the modal instability (MI) phenomenon is a limiting factor for achieving higher output powers in Yb-doped fiber amplifiers with good beam quality. In this paper, we present an analytical approach to the investigation of the MI phenomenon in high-power, cladding-pumped RFAs. By utilizing the conservation of the number of photons and the conservation of energy in the absence of loss, the nonlinear equations for the propagation of the pump power and the total signal power can be decoupled from one another. Decoupling lead to exact solutions for the pump power and transverse modes signal powers. Further we investigate various MI suppression techniques including increasing the seed power and gain-tailored design.

  12. Design of an Ultra-High Efficiency GaN High-Power Amplifier for SAR Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thrivikraman, Tushar; Hoffman, James

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the development of a high-power amplifier for use with a remote sensing SAR system. The amplifier is intended to meet the requirements for the Sweep-SAR technique for use in the proposed DESDynI SAR instrument. In order to optimize the amplifier design, active load-pull technique is employed to provide harmonic tuning to provide efficiency improvements. In addition, some of the techniques to overcome the challenges of load-pulling high power devices are presented. The design amplifier was measured to have 49 dBm of output power with 75% PAE, which is suitable to meet the proposed system requirements.

  13. Ultra High Power and Efficiency Space Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Power Combiner with Reduced Size and Mass for NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Force, Dale A.

    2009-01-01

    In the 2008 International Microwave Symposium (IMS) Digest version of our paper, recent advances in high power and efficiency space traveling-wave tube amplifiers (TWTAs) for NASA s space-to-Earth communications are presented. The RF power and efficiency of a new K-Band amplifier are 40 W and 50 percent and that of a new Ka-Band amplifier are 200 W and 60 percent. An important figure-of-merit, which is defined as the ratio of the RF power output to the mass (W/kg) of a TWT, has improved by a factor of ten over the previous generation Ka-Band devices. In this extended paper, a high power, high efficiency Ka-band combiner for multiple TWTs, based on a novel hybrid magic-T waveguide circuit design, is presented. The measured combiner efficiency is as high as 90 percent. In addition, at the design frequency of 32.05 GHz, error-free uncoded BPSK/QPSK data transmission at 8 megabits per second (Mbps), which is typical for deep space communications is demonstrated. Furthermore, QPSK data transmission at 622 Mbps is demonstrated with a low bit error rate of 2.4x10(exp -8), which exceeds the deep space state-of-the-art data rate transmission capability by more than two orders of magnitude. A potential application of the TWT combiner is in deep space communication systems for planetary exploration requiring transmitter power on the order of a kilowatt or higher.

  14. Impedance matched, high-power, rf antenna for ion cyclotron resonance heating of a plasma

    DOEpatents

    Baity, Jr., Frederick W.; Hoffman, Daniel J.; Owens, Thomas L.

    1988-01-01

    A resonant double loop radio frequency (rf) antenna for radiating high-power rf energy into a magnetically confined plasma. An inductive element in the form of a large current strap, forming the radiating element, is connected between two variable capacitors to form a resonant circuit. A real input impedance results from tapping into the resonant circuit along the inductive element, generally near the midpoint thereof. The impedance can be matched to the source impedance by adjusting the separate capacitors for a given tap arrangement or by keeping the two capacitances fixed and adjustng the tap position. This results in a substantial reduction in the voltage and current in the transmission system to the antenna compared to unmatched antennas. Because the complete circuit loop consisting of the two capacitors and the inductive element is resonant, current flows in the same direction along the entire length of the radiating element and is approximately equal in each branch of the circuit. Unidirectional current flow permits excitation of low order poloidal modes which penetrate more deeply into the plasma.

  15. Pulse compression of a high-power thin disk laser using rod-type fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Saraceno, C J; Heckl, O H; Baer, C R E; Südmeyer, T; Keller, U

    2011-01-17

    We report on two pulse compressors for a high-power thin disk laser oscillator using rod-type fiber amplifiers. Both systems are seeded by a standard SESAM modelocked thin disk laser that delivers 16 W of average power at a repetition rate of 10.6 MHz with a pulse energy of 1.5 μJ and a pulse duration of 1 ps. We discuss two results with different fiber parameters with different trade-offs in pulse duration, average power, damage and complexity. The first amplifier setup consists of a Yb-doped fiber amplifier with a 2200 μm2 core area and a length of 55 cm, resulting in a compressed average power of 55 W with 98-fs pulses at a repetition rate of 10.6 MHz. The second system uses a shorter 36-cm fiber with a larger core area of 4500 μm2. In a stretcher-free configuration we obtained 34 W of compressed average power and 65-fs pulses. In both cases peak powers of > 30 MW were demonstrated at several μJ pulse energies. The power scaling limitations due to damage and self-focusing are discussed.

  16. RF power amplifier: pushing the boundaries of performance versus cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Souza, M. M.; Chevaux, N.; Rasheduzzaman, M.

    2012-10-01

    The Radio Frequency Power Amplifier lies at the heart of all modern day communication systems ranging from the cellular infrastructure market to broadcast, radar, medical, automotive and military to name a few. Transmission systems not only require substantial power at high frequencies, but they are also one of the most demanding of semiconductor applications on account of their requirements for efficiency and linearity, which inherently introduces a tradeoff during design. Three types of device technologies have been in typical use for RF power amplification: the VDMOS (at frequencies upto 1 GHz), the LDMOS (at frequencies upto 3.5 GHz), and more recently the Gallium Nitride HEMT, which extends the frequency range upto 5-7 GHz. As an emerging technology, GaN has huge potential, but its widespread use is still currently limited by the level of experience, absence of reliable device models and prices which are roughly (6-10 times that of silicon). This overview highlights the distinct features of the RF Power devices and touches upon the performance metrics of the above technologies (in silicon and GaN).

  17. Theoretical analysis of mode instability in high-power fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Kristian Rymann; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Broeng, Jes; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2013-01-28

    We present a simple theoretical model of transverse mode instability in high-power rare-earth doped fiber amplifiers. The model shows that efficient power transfer between the fundamental and higher-order modes of the fiber can be induced by a nonlinear interaction mediated through the thermo-optic effect, leading to transverse mode instability. The temporal and spectral characteristics of the instability dynamics are investigated, and it is shown that the instability can be seeded by both quantum noise and signal intensity noise, while pure phase noise of the signal does not induce instability. It is also shown that the presence of a small harmonic amplitude modulation of the signal can lead to generation of higher harmonics in the output intensity when operating near the instability threshold.

  18. Study of dopant concentrations on thermally induced mode instability in high-power fiber amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Rumao; Ma, Pengfei; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Liu, Zejin

    2016-06-01

    The dependence of mode instabilities (MIs) on ytterbium dopant concentrations in high-power fiber amplifiers has been investigated. It is theoretically shown that, by only varying the fiber length to maintain the same total small-signal pump absorption, the MI threshold is independent of dopant concentration. MI thresholds of gain fibers with ytterbium dopant concentrations of 5.93  ×  1025 m‑3 and 1.02  ×  1026 m‑3 have been measured which exhibit similar MI thresholds and agree with the theoretical results. The result indicates that heavy doping of active fiber can be adopted to suppress nonlinear effects without decreasing the MI threshold. This provides a method of maximizing the power output of fiber laser, taking into account the stimulated Brillouin scattering, stimulated Raman Scattering, and MI thresholds simultaneously.

  19. New High Power Test Facility for VHF Power Amplifiers at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, John T.; Archuletta, Steve; Baca, David M.; Bratton, Ray E.; Brennan, Nicholas W.; Davis, Jerry L.; Lopez, Luis J.; Rees, Daniel E.; Rodriguez, Manuelita B.; Sandoval, Gilbert M. Jr.; Steck, Andy I.; Summers, Richard D.; Vigil, Danny J.

    2011-01-01

    A new test facility was designed and constructed at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) for testing the Thales TH628 Diacrode{sup R} and TH781 tetrode power amplifiers. Anode power requirements for the TH628 are 28 kV DC, with peak currents of 190 Amperes in long pulses. A charging power supply was obtained by reconfiguring a 2 MW beam power supply remaining from another project. A traditional ignitron crowbar was designed to rapidly discharge the 88 kJ stored energy. The anode power supply was extensively tested using a pulsed tetrode switch and resistor load. A new Fast Protect and Monitor System (FPMS) was designed to take samples of RF reflected power, anode HV, and various tube currents, with outputs to quench the HV charging supply, remove RF drive and disable the conduction bias pulse to the grid of each tube during fault events. The entire test stand is controlled with a programmable logic controller (PLC), for normal startup sequencing and timing, protection against loss of cooling, and provision for operator GUI.

  20. An overview of the VASIMR engine: High power space propulsion with RF plasma generation and heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, F. R. Chang

    2001-10-01

    The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) is a high power, radio frequency-driven magnetoplasma rocket, capable of exhaust modulation at constant power. While the plasma is produced by a helicon discharge, the bulk of the energy is added in a separate downstream stage by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). Axial momentum is obtained by the adiabatic expansion of the plasma in a magnetic nozzle. Exhaust variation in the VASIMR is primarily achieved by the selective partitioning of the RF power to the helicon and ICRH systems, with the proper adjustment of the propellant flow. However, other complementary techniques are also being studied. Operational and performance considerations favor the light gases. The physics and engineering of this device have been under study since the late 1970s. A NASA-led, research effort, involving several terms in the United States, continues to explore the scientific and technological foundations of this concept. The research involves theory, experiment, engineering design, mission analysis, and technology development. Experimentally, high density, stable plasma discharges have been generated in Helium, Hydrogen and Deuterium, as well as mixtures of these gases. Key issues involve the optimization of the helicon discharge for high-density operation and the efficient coupling of ICRH to the plasma, prior to acceleration by the magnetic nozzle. Theoretically, the dynamics of the magnetized plasma are being studied from kinetic and fluid perspectives. Plasma acceleration by the magnetic nozzle and subsequent detachment has been demonstrated in numerical simulations. These results are presently undergoing experimental verification. A brisk technology development effort for space-qualified, compact, solid-state RF equipment, and high temperature superconducting magnets is under way in support of this project. A conceptual point design for an early space demonstrator on the International Space Station has been defined

  1. ADX: a high field, high power density, advanced divertor and RF tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Terry, J. L.; Vieira, R.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; Baek, S.; Beck, W.; Bonoli, P.; Brunner, D.; Doody, J.; Ellis, R.; Ernst, D.; Fiore, C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Kessel, C.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Leccacorvi, R.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Mahajan, S.; Minervini, J.; Mumgaard, R.; Nygren, R.; Parker, R.; Poli, F.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J.; Rognlien, T.; Rowan, W.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, D.; Theiler, C.; Titus, P.; Umansky, M.; Valanju, P.; Walk, J.; White, A.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, G.; Zweben, S. J.

    2015-05-01

    The MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and collaborators are proposing a high-performance Advanced Divertor and RF tokamak eXperiment (ADX)—a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research programme on the pathway to next-step devices: fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF), fusion pilot plant (FPP) and/or demonstration power plant (DEMO). This high-field (⩾6.5 T, 1.5 MA), high power density facility (P/S ˜ 1.5 MW m-2) will test innovative divertor ideas, including an ‘X-point target divertor’ concept, at the required performance parameters—reactor-level boundary plasma pressures, magnetic field strengths and parallel heat flux densities entering into the divertor region—while simultaneously producing high-performance core plasma conditions that are prototypical of a reactor: equilibrated and strongly coupled electrons and ions, regimes with low or no torque, and no fuelling from external heating and current drive systems. Equally important, the experimental platform will test innovative concepts for lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequency actuators with the unprecedented ability to deploy launch structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-magnetic-field side—the latter being a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and favourable RF wave physics leads to efficient current drive, current profile control, heating and flow drive. This triple combination—advanced divertors, advanced RF actuators, reactor-prototypical core plasma conditions—will enable ADX to explore enhanced core confinement physics, such as made possible by reversed central shear, using only the types of external drive systems that are considered viable for a fusion power plant. Such an integrated demonstration of high-performance core-divertor operation with steady-state sustainment would pave the way towards an attractive pilot plant, as envisioned in the ARC concept

  2. NASA satellite communications application research, phase 2 addendum. Efficient high power, solid state amplifier for EHF communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benet, James

    1994-01-01

    This document is an addendum to the NASA Satellite Communications Application Research (SCAR) Phase 2 Final Report, 'Efficient High Power, Solid State Amplifier for EHF Communications.' This report describes the work performed from 1 August 1993 to 11 March 1994, under contract number NASW-4513. During this reporting period an array of transistor amplifiers was repaired by replacing all MMIC amplifier chips. The amplifier array was then tested using three different feedhorn configurations. Descriptions, procedures, and results of this testing are presented in this report, and conclusions are drawn based on the test results obtained.

  3. High power test results of the first SRRC/ANL high current L-band RF gun.

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C. H.

    1998-09-11

    A joint program is underway between the SRRC (Synchrotrons Radiation Research Center, Taiwan) and ANL (Argonne National Laboratory, USA) for developing a high current L-band photocathode rf guns. We have constructed an L-Band (1.3 Ghz), single cell rf photocathode gun and conducted low power tests at SRRC. High power rf conditioning of the cavity has been completed at ANL. In this paper we report on the construction and high power test results. So far we have been able to achieve > 120 MV/m axial electric field with minimal dark current. This gun will be used to replace the AWA (Argonne Wakefield Accelerator)[l] high current gun.

  4. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES: Large signal RF power transmission characterization of InGaP HBT for RF power amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lixin, Zhao; Zhi, Jin; Xinyu, Liu

    2010-01-01

    The large signal RF power transmission characteristics of an advanced InGaP HBT in an RF power amplifier are investigated and analyzed experimentally. The realistic RF powers reflected by the transistor, transmitted from the transistor and reflected by the load are investigated at small signal and large signal levels. The RF power multiple frequency components at the input and output ports are investigated at small signal and large signal levels, including their effects on RF power gain compression and nonlinearity. The results show that the RF power reflections are different between the output and input ports. At the input port the reflected power is not always proportional to input power level; at large power levels the reflected power becomes more serious than that at small signal levels, and there is a knee point at large power levels. The results also show the effects of the power multiple frequency components on RF amplification.

  5. Peak power tunable mid-infrared oscillator pumped by a high power picosecond pulsed fiber amplifier with bunch output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Kaihua; Guo, Yan; Lai, Xiaomin; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-07-01

    A high power mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator (OPO) with picosecond pulse bunch output is experimentally demonstrated. The pump source was a high power master oscillation power amplifier (MOPA) picosecond pulsed fiber amplifier. The seed of the MOPA was a gain-switched distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser diode (LD) with picosecond pulse operation at a high repetition rate. The seed laser was amplified to 50 W by two-stage pre-amplifiers and a large mode area (LMA) Yb fiber based power-amplifier. A fiber-pigtailed acousto-optic modulator with the first order diffraction transmission was inserted into the second pre-amplifier to form a picosecond pulse bunch train and to change the peak power simultaneously. The power-amplified pulse bunches were focused to pump a wavelength-tunable OPO for emitting high power mid-infrared laser. By adjusting the OPO cavity length, the maximum average idler powers obtained at 3.1, 3.3 and 3.5 μm were 7, 6.6 and 6.4 W respectively.

  6. High-efficiency (6+1)x1 combiner for high power fiber lasers and amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugroschl, Dan; Park, Jongchul; Wlodawski, Mitchell; Singer, Jonathan; Kopp, Victor I.

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a (6+1)x1 combiner for fiber lasers and amplifiers based on a glass fusion technology. We have combined a conventional fiber fusion technology for pump channels with a new design for a single mode signal channel, which utilizes a vanishing core technology. The approach has been developed for single channel spot size converters and pitch reducing optical fiber arrays (PROFAs). Flexibility of this technology allows a custom design to match both a single or large mode area fiber at the input and a required active fiber at the output. The technology allows two parameters, mode field diameter (MFD) and taper diameter or channel spacing to be adjusted independently resulting in low loss coupling for signal channel at input and output. Utilizing this approach we have obtained better than 0.3 dB coupling for a signal channel at 1550 nm with a standard SMF28 fiber at the input and an active fiber at the output, while using six conventional 105/125 micron fibers as pump channels operating at 974 nm efficiently coupled to a double-clad fiber. Low signal loss results in high efficiency lasing or amplification suitable for high power applications. This unique technology allows excellent coupling for the signal channel as well as for the pump channels and is amenable to even more pump channels if desired.

  7. High power testing of the 402.5 MHZ and 805 MHZ RF windows for the spallation neutron source accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, K. A.; De Baca, J. M.; Harrison, J. S.; Rodriguez, M. B.; Torrez, P. A.; Warner, D. K.

    2003-01-01

    Hisorically, Radio Frequency (RF) windows have been a common point of failure in input power couplers; therefore, reliable RF windows are critical to the success of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project. The normal conducting part of the SNS accelerator requires six RF windows at 402.5 MHz and eight RF windows at 805 MHz[l]. Each RF window will transmit up to 180 kW of average power and 2.5 MW peak power at 60 Hz with 1.2 millisecond pulses. The RF windows, designed and manufactured by Thales, were tested at the full average power for 4 hours to ensure no problems with the high average power and then tested to an effective forward power level of 10 MW by testing at 2.5 MW forward power into a short and varying the phase of the standing wave. The sliding short was moved from 0 to 180 degrees to ensure no arcing or breakdown problems occur in any part of the window. This paper discusses the results of the high power testing of both the 402.5 MHz and the 805 MHz RF windows. Problems encountered during testing and the solutions for these problems are discussed.

  8. Spallation Neutron Source high-power Rf transmitter design for high availablility, ease of installation and cost containment

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J. T. , III; Rees, D. E.; Hardek, T. W.; Lynch, M. T.; Roybal, W. T.; Tallerico, P. J.

    2003-01-01

    The availability goals and installation schedule for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have driven the availability and installation of the SNS linac's high-power RF systems. This paper discusses how the high-power RF systems' availability and installation goals have been addressed in the RF transmitter design and procurement. Design features that allow R1; component failures to be quickly diagnosed and repaired are also presented. Special attention has been given lo interlocks, PLC fault logging and real-time interfaces to thc accelerator's Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) archive system. The availability and cost motivations for the use of different RF transmitter designs in the normalconducting and super-conducting sections of the linac are reviewed. Factory iicceptance tests used to insure fully functional equipment and thereby reduce the time spent on installation and cotnmissioning of the RF transmitters are discussed. Transmitter installation experience and klystron conditioning experience is used to show how these design features have helped and will continue to help the SNS linac to meet its availability and schedule goals.

  9. Low-timing-jitter high-power mode-locked 1063 nm Nd:GdVO₄ master oscillator power amplifier.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-min; Zhang, Feng-feng; Zuo, Jun-wei; Yang, Jing; Yuan, Lei; Peng, Qin-jun; Cui, Da-fu; Xu, Zu-yan

    2015-10-01

    A low-timing-jitter high-power semiconductor saturable absorber mirror mode-locked picosecond (ps) 1063 nm Nd:GdVO4 master oscillator power amplifier is presented. Using a single-pass Nd:GdVO4 amplifier, an amplified laser with 21.5 W output power and 8.3 ps pulsewidth was achieved at 250 MHz repetition rate. Employing a servo control, an average RMS timing jitter of ∼222  fs was realized. This laser can be used as a drive laser for photocathode injectors in free-electron lasers. PMID:26479619

  10. Measurement of SFDR and noise in EDF amplified analog RF links using all-optical down-conversion and balanced receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Charles; Borbath, Michael; Wyatt, Jeff; DeSalvo, Richard

    2008-04-01

    Optical down-conversion techniques have become an increasingly popular architecture to realize Multi-band Enterprise Terminals (MET), Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), Optical Arbitrary Waveform Generation (OAWG), RF Channelizers and other technologies that need rapid frequency agile tunability in the microwave and millimeter RF bands. We describe recent SFDR, NF, Gain, and Noise modeling and measurements of Erbium-doped-fiber amplified analog RF optical links implementing all-optical down-conversion and balanced photodiode receivers. We describe measurements made on our newly designed extensive test-bed utilizing a wide array of high powered single and balanced photodiodes, polarization preserving output LN modulators, EAMs, LIMs, tunable lasers, EDFAs, RF Amplifiers, and other components to fully characterize direct and coherent detection techniques. Additionally, we compare these experimental results to our comprehensive MATLAB system modeling and optimization software tools.

  11. An Optimized 2.4GHz RF Power Amplifier Performance for WLAN System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mohammed H.; Chakrabarty, C. K.; Abdalla, Ahmed N.; Hock, Goh C.

    2013-06-01

    Recently, the design of RF power amplifiers (PAs) for modern wireless systems are faced with a difficult tradeoff for example, cellphone; battery lifetime is largely determined by the power efficiency of the PA and high spectral efficiency which have ability to transmit data at the highest possible rate for a given channel bandwidth. This paper presents the design a multi stage class AB power Amplifier with high power added efficiency (PAE) and acceptable linearity for the WLAN applications. The open-circuited third harmonic control circuit enhances the efficiency of the PA without deteriorating the linearity of class-AB mode of the PA. The voltage and current waveforms are simulated to evaluate the appropriate operation for the modes. The effectiveness of the proposed controller has been verified by comparing proposed method with another methods using simulation study under a variety of conditions. The proposed circuit operation for a WLAN signals delivers a power-added efficiency (PAE) of 37.6% is measured at 31.6-dBm output power while dissipating 34.61 mA from a 1.8V supply. Finally, the proposed PA is show a good and acceptable result for the WLAN system.

  12. Time-reversal duality of high-efficiency RF power amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Reveyrand, T; Ramos, I; Popovic, Z

    2012-12-06

    The similarity between RF power amplifiers and rectifiers is discussed. It is shown that the same high-efficiency harmonically-terminated power amplifier can be operated in a dual rectifier mode. Nonlinear simulations with a GaN HEMT transistor model show the time-reversal intrinsic voltage and current waveform relationship between a class-F amplifier and rectifier. Measurements on a class-F-1 amplifier and rectifier at 2.14 GHz demonstrate over 80% efficiency in both cases.

  13. Steady-state operation of a large-area high-power RF ion source for the neutral beam injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Doo-Hee; Park, Min; Jeong, Seung Ho; Kim, Tae-Seong; Lee, Kwang Won; In, Sang Ryul

    2014-10-01

    A large-area high-power RF-driven ion source is being developed in Germany for the heating and current drive (H&CD) of an ITER device. Negative hydrogen ion sources are the major components of neutral beam injection systems in future large-scale fusion devices such as an the ITER and the DEMO. The first and the second long-pulse ion sources (LPIS-1 and LPIS-2) have been successfully developed with a magnetic-bucket plasma generator, including a filament heating structure for the first NBI (NBI-1) system of the KSTAR tokamak. A development plan exists for a large-area high-power RF ion source for steady-state operation (more than 300 seconds) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) to extract positive ions, which can be used for the NBI heating and current drive systems, and to extract negative ions for future fusion devices such as a Fusion Neutron Source and Korea — DEMO. The RF ion source consists of a driver region, including a helical antenna and a discharge chamber, and an expansion region (magnetic bucket of the prototype LPIS-1). RF power can be transferred at up to 10 kW with a fixed frequency of 2 MHz through an optimized RF matching system. An actively water-cooled Faraday shield is located inside the driver region of the ion source for stable and steady-state operation of the RF discharge. The uniformities of the plasma parameters are measured at the lowest area of the expansion bucket by using two RF-compensated electrostatic probes along the directions of the short and the long dimensions of the expansion region.

  14. Design of an RF Antenna for a Large0Bore, High Power, Steady State Plasma Processing Chamber for Material Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, D.A.; Freeman, R.L.

    2001-11-07

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC, (Contractor), and Archimedes Technology Group, (Participant) is to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure. The project objectives are to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure.

  15. Demonstration of Multi-Gbps Data Rates at Ka-Band Using Software-Defined Modem and Broadband High Power Amplifier for Space Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Landon, David G.; Sun, Jun Y.; Winn, James S.; Laraway, Stephen; McIntire, William K.; Metz, John L.; Smith, Francis J.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the first ever research and experimental results regarding the combination of a software-defined multi-Gbps modem and a broadband high power space amplifier when tested with an extended form of the industry standard DVB-S2 and LDPC rate 9/10 FEC codec. The modem supports waveforms including QPSK, 8-PSK, 16-APSK, 32-APSK, 64-APSK, and 128-QAM. The broadband high power amplifier is a space qualified traveling-wave tube (TWT), which has a passband greater than 3 GHz at 33 GHz, output power of 200 W and efficiency greater than 60 percent. The modem and the TWTA together enabled an unprecedented data rate at 20 Gbps with low BER of 10(exp -9). The presented results include a plot of the received waveform constellation, BER vs. E(sub b)/N(sub 0) and implementation loss for each of the modulation types tested. The above results when included in an RF link budget analysis show that NASA s payload data rate can be increased by at least an order of magnitude (greater than 10X) over current state-of-practice, limited only by the spacecraft EIRP, ground receiver G/T, range, and available spectrum or bandwidth.

  16. A 15 MHz bandwidth, 60 V{sub pp}, low distortion power amplifier for driving high power piezoelectric transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Capineri, Lorenzo

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents the design and the realization of a linear power amplifier with large bandwidth (15 MHz) capable of driving low impedance ultrasonic transducers. The output current driving capability (up to 5 A) and low distortion makes it suitable for new research applications using high power ultrasound in the medical and industrial fields. The electronic design approach is modular so that the characteristics can be scaled according to specific applications and implementation details for the circuit layout are reported. Finally the characterization of the power amplifier module is presented.

  17. High Power Passive Phase Locking of Four Yb-Doped Fiber Amplifiers by an All-Optical Feedback Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yu-Hao; He, Bing; Zhou, Jun; Li, Zhen; Fan, Yuan-Yuan; Qi, Yun-Feng; Liu, Chi; Yuan, Zhi-Jun; Zhang, Hai-Bo; Lou, Qi-Hong

    2011-05-01

    We report the passive phase locking of four high power Yb-doped fiber amplifiers with ring cavity. The interference patterns at different output power are observed and the Strehl ratios are measured. The maximum coherent output power of the fiber array is up to 1062 W by multi-stage amplification. The stable beam profiles of various phase relationships are observed by controlling the position of the feedback fiber, in good agreement with the calculated results. By using master oscillator power-amplifier (MOPA) architecture and broadband operation of passively phased systems, higher power scaling with high beam quality appears to be feasible.

  18. High power operation of an X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhenbang; Huang, Hua; Jin, Xiao; Zhao, Yucong; He, Hu; Lei, Lurong; Chen, Zhaofu

    2013-11-15

    An X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier is designed in order to increase output microwave power and operating frequency of the amplifier tube. The experiment is performed on a Tesla-type accelerator. The amplifier is driven by an electron beam of 2.8 kA at 720 kV, and a microwave power of 30 kW and frequency of 9.384 GHz is injected into an input cavity by means of an external source, then a microwave power of over 800 MW is extracted, the amplifier gain is about 44 dB, and conversion efficiency is 40%. The experiment proves that output power of nearly GWs can be generated with the X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier driven by a kW-level input power.

  19. High power operation of an X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenbang; Huang, Hua; Jin, Xiao; Zhao, Yucong; He, Hu; Lei, Lurong; Chen, Zhaofu

    2013-11-01

    An X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier is designed in order to increase output microwave power and operating frequency of the amplifier tube. The experiment is performed on a Tesla-type accelerator. The amplifier is driven by an electron beam of 2.8 kA at 720 kV, and a microwave power of 30 kW and frequency of 9.384 GHz is injected into an input cavity by means of an external source, then a microwave power of over 800 MW is extracted, the amplifier gain is about 44 dB, and conversion efficiency is 40%. The experiment proves that output power of nearly GWs can be generated with the X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier driven by a kW-level input power.

  20. High-power RF window design for the PEP-II B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, M.; Hodgson, J.; Ng, C.; Schwarz, H.; Skarpaas, K.; Kroll, N. |; Rimmer, R.

    1994-06-01

    We describe the design of RF windows to transmit up to 500 kW CW to the PEP-II 476 MHz cavities. RF analysis of the windows using high-frequency simulation codes are described. These provide information about the power loss distribution in the ceramic and tim matching properties of the structure. Finite-element analyses of the resulting temperature distribution and thermal stresses are presented. Fabrication methods including a proposed scheme to compensate for thermal expansion s are discussed and hardware tests to validate this approach are described. The effects of surface coatings (intentional and otherwise) and the application of air cooling are considered.

  1. Full characterization of the amplified spontaneous emission from a diode-pumped high-power laser system.

    PubMed

    Keppler, S; Hornung, M; Bödefeld, R; Sävert, A; Liebetrau, H; Hein, J; Kaluza, M C

    2014-05-01

    We present the first complete temporal and spatial characterization of the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) of laser radiation generated by a diode-pumped high-power laser system. The ASE of the different amplifiers was measured independently from the main pulse and was characterized within a time window of -10ms ≤ t ≤ 10ms and an accuracy of up to 15fs around the main pulse. Furthermore, the focusability and the energy of the ASE from each amplifier was measured after recompression. Using our analysis method, the laser components, which need to be optimized for a further improvement of the laser contrast, can be identified. This will be essential for laser-matter interaction experiments requiring a minimized ASE intensity or fluence.

  2. Low pressure and high power rf sources for negative hydrogen ions for fusion applications (ITER neutral beam injection).

    PubMed

    Fantz, U; Franzen, P; Kraus, W; Falter, H D; Berger, M; Christ-Koch, S; Fröschle, M; Gutser, R; Heinemann, B; Martens, C; McNeely, P; Riedl, R; Speth, E; Wünderlich, D

    2008-02-01

    The international fusion experiment ITER requires for the plasma heating and current drive a neutral beam injection system based on negative hydrogen ion sources at 0.3 Pa. The ion source must deliver a current of 40 A D(-) for up to 1 h with an accelerated current density of 200 Am/(2) and a ratio of coextracted electrons to ions below 1. The extraction area is 0.2 m(2) from an aperture array with an envelope of 1.5 x 0.6 m(2). A high power rf-driven negative ion source has been successfully developed at the Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP) at three test facilities in parallel. Current densities of 330 and 230 Am/(2) have been achieved for hydrogen and deuterium, respectively, at a pressure of 0.3 Pa and an electron/ion ratio below 1 for a small extraction area (0.007 m(2)) and short pulses (<4 s). In the long pulse experiment, equipped with an extraction area of 0.02 m(2), the pulse length has been extended to 3600 s. A large rf source, with the width and half the height of the ITER source but without extraction system, is intended to demonstrate the size scaling and plasma homogeneity of rf ion sources. The source operates routinely now. First results on plasma homogeneity obtained from optical emission spectroscopy and Langmuir probes are very promising. Based on the success of the IPP development program, the high power rf-driven negative ion source has been chosen recently for the ITER beam systems in the ITER design review process.

  3. High-power pulsed-current-mode operation of an overdriven tapered amplifier.

    PubMed

    Takase, Ken; Stockton, John K; Kasevich, Mark A

    2007-09-01

    We experimentally investigate the performance of a commercial tapered amplifier diode operating in a pulsed-current mode with a peak current that is significantly higher than the specified maximum continuous current. For a tapered amplifier rated at 500 mW of continuous power, we demonstrate 2.6 W of peak optical output power with 15 mW of injection light for 200 micros, 7 A current pulses. Different failure mechanisms for the tapered amplifier, including thermal and optical damage, are identified under these conditions. PMID:17767324

  4. High Power RF Tests on WR650 Pre-Stressed Planar Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Stirbet, Mircea; Davis, G. Kirk; Elliott, Thomas S.; King, Larry; Powers, Thomas J.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Walker, Richard L.

    2009-11-01

    A new planar, ceramic window intended to be used with WR650 waveguide fundamental power couplers at 1300 MHz or 1500 MHz has been developed. It is based on the pre-stressed planar window concept tested in PEP II and LEDA. A test stand that made use of the 100kW CW 1500 MHz RF system in the JLAB FEL was commissioned and used to apply up to 80 kW traveling wave (TW)to the windows. Two different types of RF windows (brazed and diffusion bonded ceramics) with design specification of 50 kW CW in TW mode were successfully tested both as a gas barrier (intended to operate up to 2 psi) and as a vacuum barrier. The vacuum windows were able to maintain UHV quality vacuum and were successfully operated in the 10{sup -9} mbar range. An overview of the pre-stressed power windows, RF test stand, procedures and RF power testing results will be presented.

  5. High-power, 1-ps, all-Yb:YAG thin-disk regenerative amplifier.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, Hanieh; Alismail, Ayman; Wang, Haochuan; Brons, Jonathan; Pronin, Oleg; Buberl, Theresa; Vámos, Lénárd; Arisholm, Gunnar; Azzeer, Abdallah M; Krausz, Ferenc

    2016-03-15

    We report a 100 W, 20 mJ, 1-ps, all-Yb:YAG thin-disk regenerative amplifier seeded by a microjoule-level Yb:YAG thin-disk Kerr-lens mode-locked oscillator. The regenerative amplifier is implemented in a chirped pulse amplification system and operates at an ambient temperature in air, delivering ultrastable output pulses at a 5 kHz repetition rate and with a root mean square power noise value of less than 0.5%. Second harmonic generation of the amplifier's output in a 1.5 mm-thick BBO crystal results in more than 70 W at 515 nm, making the system an attractive source for pumping optical parametric chirped pulse amplifiers in the visible and near-infrared spectral ranges.

  6. High-power, 1-ps, all-Yb:YAG thin-disk regenerative amplifier.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, Hanieh; Alismail, Ayman; Wang, Haochuan; Brons, Jonathan; Pronin, Oleg; Buberl, Theresa; Vámos, Lénárd; Arisholm, Gunnar; Azzeer, Abdallah M; Krausz, Ferenc

    2016-03-15

    We report a 100 W, 20 mJ, 1-ps, all-Yb:YAG thin-disk regenerative amplifier seeded by a microjoule-level Yb:YAG thin-disk Kerr-lens mode-locked oscillator. The regenerative amplifier is implemented in a chirped pulse amplification system and operates at an ambient temperature in air, delivering ultrastable output pulses at a 5 kHz repetition rate and with a root mean square power noise value of less than 0.5%. Second harmonic generation of the amplifier's output in a 1.5 mm-thick BBO crystal results in more than 70 W at 515 nm, making the system an attractive source for pumping optical parametric chirped pulse amplifiers in the visible and near-infrared spectral ranges. PMID:26977650

  7. Generation of sub-50 fs pulses from a high-power Yb-doped fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yujun; Chien, Ching-Yuan; Fidric, Bernard G; Kafka, James D

    2009-11-15

    We demonstrate the generation of 48 fs pulses with 18 W average power and 226 nJ of pulse energy from a Yb-doped fiber amplifier. The system uses a simple stretcher-free single-stage amplifier configuration operating in the parabolic pulse regime. The gain fiber length and pump wavelength are chosen in order to reduce the gain per unit length and generate both shorter pulses and higher pulse energy.

  8. Suppression of beam induced pulse shortening modes in high power RF generator TW output structures

    SciTech Connect

    Haimson, J.; Mecklenburg, B.

    1992-12-31

    Several different style 11.4 GHz relativistic klystrons, operating with beam pulse widths of 50 ns and using large aperture, tapered phase-velocity TW structures,` have recently demonstrated output RF power levels in the range of 100 to 300 MW without breakdown or pulse shortening. To extend this performance into the long pulse regime (1 {mu}s) or to demonstrate a threefold increase in output power by using higher currents, the existing TW circuit designs must be modified (a) to reduce the cavity maximum surface E-fields by a factor of 2 to 3, and (b) to elevate the current threshold values of the beam induced higher order modes (HOM) to ensure avoidance of RF pulse shortening and associated instabilities. A technique for substantially elevating this threshold current is described, and microwave data and photographs are presented showing the degree of HOM damping achieved in a recently constructed 11.4 GHz TW structure.

  9. Modulation characteristics of a high-power semiconductor Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornwell, Donald Mitchell, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A semiconductor master oscillator-power amplifier was demonstrated using an anti-reflection (AR) coated broad area laser as the amplifier. Under CW operation, diffraction-limited single-longitudinal-mode powers up to 340 mW were demonstrated. The characteristics of the far-field pattern were measured and compared to a two-dimensional reflective Fabry-Perot amplifier model of the device. The MOPA configuration was modulated by the master oscillator. Prior to injection into the amplifier, the amplitude and frequency modulation properties of the master oscillator were characterized. The frequency response of the MOPA configuration was characterized for an AM/FM modulated injection beam, and was found to be a function of the frequency detuning between the master oscillator and the resonant amplifier. A shift in the phase was also observed as a function of frequency detuning; this phase shift is attributed to the optical phase shift imparted to a wave reflected from a Fabry-Perot cavity. Square-wave optical pulses were generated at 10 MHz and 250 MHz with diffraction-limited peak powers of 200 mW and 250 mW. The peak power for a given modulation frequency is found to be limited by the injected power and the FM modulation at that frequency. The modulation results make the MOPA attractive for use as a transmitter source in applications such as free-space communications and ranging/altimetry.

  10. Investigation of fringe plasma parameters on a high power rf driven ion source

    SciTech Connect

    McNeely, P.; Schiesko, L.

    2010-02-15

    It has been observed that there are differences between the uncompensated Langmuir probes installed in the upper and lower areas of the rf driven H{sup -} sources at IPP Garching. The two probes often had substantially different floating potentials or ion saturation currents. In an effort to understand the reasons for these differences a Langmuir probe analysis system was used on the probes to collect the full current voltage characteristic. The results show what is likely the formation of an ion-ion plasma. The paper shows the effect of beam extraction and the presence of caesium on the probe characteristics.

  11. Study of high power, two-stage, TWT X-band amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.; Golkowski, C.; Hayashi, Y.; Ivers, J.D.; Nation, J.A.; Schachter, L.

    1999-07-01

    A disk loaded slow wave structure with a cold wave phase (without electron beam) velocity of the TM{sub 01} wave greater than the speed of light (1.05c) is used as the electron bunching stage of a two stage X-band amplifier. The high phase velocity section produces well defined electron bunches. The second section, where the cold wave phase velocity is (0.84c), i.e., less than beam velocity of 0.91c, is used to generate the high output power microwave radiation. The tightly bunched beam from the high phase velocity section enhances the beam energy conversion into microwave radiation compared to that obtained with a synchronous electron-wave bunches. The amplifier is driven by a 7mm diameter 750 kV, 500A pencil electron beam. The structure, which has a 4 GHz bandwidth, produces an amplified output with a power in the range of 20--60 MW. At higher output powers (>60MW) pulse shortening develops. The authors suspect that the pulse shortening is a result of excitation of the hybrid mode, HEM{sub 11}, which overlaps (about 0.5 GHz separation) with the frequency domain of the desired TM{sub 0.1} mode. A new amplifier with similar phase velocity characteristics but with a 1 GHz bandwidth and an HEM{sub 11}, TM{sub 01} mode frequency separation of 3.3 GHz has been designed and constructed. The interaction frequency for the HEM mode is above the passband of the TM mode. Testing is in progress. The performance of the new amplifier will be compared with results obtained using the earlier configuration.

  12. Tunable high-power narrow-spectrum external-cavity diode laser based on tapered amplifier at 668 nm.

    PubMed

    Chi, Mingjun; Erbert, G; Sumpf, B; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2010-05-15

    A 668 nm tunable high-power narrow-spectrum diode laser system based on a tapered semiconductor optical amplifier in external cavity is demonstrated. The laser system is tunable from 659to675 nm. As high as 1.38 W output power is obtained at 668.35 nm. The emission spectral bandwidth is less than 0.07 nm throughout the tuning range, and the beam quality factor M(2) is 2.0 with the output power of 1.27 W. PMID:20479803

  13. An rf system using all-solid-state amplifiers for the JAERI FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawamura, M.; Ohkubo, M.; Minehara, E.; Nagai, R.; Takao, M.; Kikuzawa, N.; Sugimoto, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Kawarasaki, Y.; Nagatsuka, K.; Sato, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Kashiwagi, A.

    1993-07-01

    The JAERI FEL linac is energized with four kinds of all-solid-state amplifiers having 5, 1.5, 4, and 50 kW of peak power with a 1-2 ms pulse length. Amplitude and phase stabilities of the 50 kW amplifiers are ˜ 1% and ˜1°, respectively. A feed-forward loop circuit is effective when a feedback loop circuit is not able to stabilize the output of rf power.

  14. High power master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) AlGaAs laser for intersatellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornwell, Donald M., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration has been developed using an anti-reflection-coated AlGaAs semiconductor broad area laser in a reflective amplifier mode. For CW injection, the MOPA produced 340 mW of diffraction-limited power. The semiconductor MOPA configuration also produced peak diffraction-limited powers of 360 mW and 320 mW for quaternary pulse position Q-PPM modulation rates of 50 Mbps and 325 Mbps, respectively, for a peak injected power of 100 mW. Angular beamsteering during modulation was minimized by collimating the injected beam. The diffraction-limited peak power was limited by the frequency chirp of the master oscillator and also by the coupling losses of the injected beam.

  15. High-power operation of silica-based Raman fiber amplifier at 2147 nm.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Tan, Fangzhou; Shi, Hongxing; Wang, Pu

    2014-11-17

    We demonstrated a 2147 nm silica-based Raman fiber amplifier with output power of 14.3 W directly pumped with a 1963 nm CW thulium-doped all-fiber MOPA. The 1963 nm thulium-doped all-fiber MOPA is seeded with a 2147 nm thulium-doped all-fiber laser at the same time. The Raman Stokes power shift from 1963 nm to 2147 nm is accomplished in a piece of 50 m silica-based highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF). The conversion efficiency was 38.5% from 1963 nm to 2147 nm in the HNLF. The output power achieved was only currently limited by available 1963 nm input power and the architecture has significant scaling potential. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest power operation of a Raman fiber amplifier at >2 µm wavelength region. PMID:25402080

  16. High power continuous operation of a widely tunable quantum cascade laser with an integrated amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Slivken, S.; Sengupta, S.; Razeghi, M.

    2015-12-21

    Wide electrical tuning and high continuous output power is demonstrated from a single mode quantum cascade laser emitting at a wavelength near 4.8 μm. This is achieved in a space efficient manner by integrating an asymmetric sampled grating distributed feedback tunable laser with an optical amplifier. An initial demonstration of high peak power operation in pulsed mode is demonstrated first, with >5 W output over a 270 nm (113 cm{sup −1}) spectral range. Refinement of the geometry leads to continuous operation with a single mode spectral coverage of 300 nm (120 cm{sup −1}) and a maximum continuous power of 1.25 W. The output beam is shown to be nearly diffraction-limited, even at high amplifier current.

  17. High-power, stable Ka/V dual-band gyrotron traveling-wave tube amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chien-Lun

    2012-05-01

    A dual-band amplifier can reduce the size, cost, and weight of a transmitter in dual-band radar and communication systems. This study proposes and theoretically investigates a gyrotron traveling-wave tube (gyro-TWT) amplifier capable of dual-band operation. Possible oscillations in the coaxial interaction waveguide are stabilized by the lossy inner cylinder. Under stable operating conditions, the gyro-TWT is predicted to provide a peak power of 375 kW with 71 dB saturated gain and 3.8 GHz bandwidth in the Ka-band and a peak power of 150 kW with 35 dB saturated gain and 1.7 GHz bandwidth in the V-band.

  18. High power gain-switched diode laser master oscillator and amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Poelker, M.

    1995-11-06

    A tapered-stripe, traveling-wave semiconductor optical amplifier was seeded with 3.3 mW of gain-switched diode laser light to obtain over 200 mW average power with pulse widths{approx}105 ps full width at half-maximum (FWHM) and a pulse repetition rate of 499 MHz corresponding to a peak power of 3.8 W. Shorter pulse widths were obtained when the amplifier was driven with less current at the expense of reduced output power. Pulse widths as short as 31 ps FWHM and an average power of 98 mW corresponding to a peak power of 6.3 W were obtained when a different, lower power seed laser was used. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  19. Materials physics and device development for improved efficiency of GaN HEMT high power amplifiers.

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Steven Ross; Follstaedt, David Martin; Wright, Alan Francis; Baca, Albert G.; Briggs, Ronald D.; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Missert, Nancy A.; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Marsh, Phil F.; Koleske, Daniel David; Lee, Stephen Roger; Shul, Randy John; Seager, Carleton Hoover; Tigges, Christopher P.

    2005-12-01

    GaN-based microwave power amplifiers have been identified as critical components in Sandia's next generation micro-Synthetic-Aperture-Radar (SAR) operating at X-band and Ku-band (10-18 GHz). To miniaturize SAR, GaN-based amplifiers are necessary to replace bulky traveling wave tubes. Specifically, for micro-SAR development, highly reliable GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), which have delivered a factor of 10 times improvement in power performance compared to GaAs, need to be developed. Despite the great promise of GaN HEMTs, problems associated with nitride materials growth currently limit gain, linearity, power-added-efficiency, reproducibility, and reliability. These material quality issues are primarily due to heteroepitaxial growth of GaN on lattice mismatched substrates. Because SiC provides the best lattice match and thermal conductivity, SiC is currently the substrate of choice for GaN-based microwave amplifiers. Obviously for GaN-based HEMTs to fully realize their tremendous promise, several challenges related to GaN heteroepitaxy on SiC must be solved. For this LDRD, we conducted a concerted effort to resolve materials issues through in-depth research on GaN/AlGaN growth on SiC. Repeatable growth processes were developed which enabled basic studies of these device layers as well as full fabrication of microwave amplifiers. Detailed studies of the GaN and AlGaN growth of SiC were conducted and techniques to measure the structural and electrical properties of the layers were developed. Problems that limit device performance were investigated, including electron traps, dislocations, the quality of semi-insulating GaN, the GaN/AlGaN interface roughness, and surface pinning of the AlGaN gate. Surface charge was reduced by developing silicon nitride passivation. Constant feedback between material properties, physical understanding, and device performance enabled rapid progress which eventually led to the successful fabrication of state of the art

  20. High-power arrays of quantum cascade laser master-oscillator power-amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Rauter, Patrick; Menzel, Stefan; Goyal, Anish K; Wang, Christine A; Sanchez, Antonio; Turner, George; Capasso, Federico

    2013-02-25

    We report on multi-wavelength arrays of master-oscillator power-amplifier quantum cascade lasers operating at wavelengths between 9.2 and 9.8 μm. All elements of the high-performance array feature longitudinal (spectral) as well as transverse single-mode emission at peak powers between 2.7 and 10 W at room temperature. The performance of two arrays that are based on different seed-section designs is thoroughly studied and compared. High output power and excellent beam quality render the arrays highly suitable for stand-off spectroscopy applications.

  1. Method and apparatus for reducing diffraction-induced damage in high power laser amplifier systems

    DOEpatents

    Campillo, Anthony J.; Newnam, Brian E.; Shapiro, Stanley L.; Terrell, Jr., N. James

    1976-01-01

    Self-focusing damage caused by diffraction in laser amplifier systems may be minimized by appropriately tailoring the input optical beam profile by passing the beam through an aperture having a uniform high optical transmission within a particular radius r.sub.o and a transmission which drops gradually to a low value at greater radii. Apertures having the desired transmission characteristics may readily be manufactured by exposing high resolution photographic films and plates to a diffuse, disk-shaped light source and mask arrangement.

  2. The application of saturable magnetics in the EMP protection of high power, RF transmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Tasca, D.M.; Swant, D.H.

    1987-12-01

    A unique and innovative all solid state, self recovery HESA design concept was developed for Kilowatt RMS level, RF transmitters using existing metal oxide varistor and saturable magnetic device technologies. This design concept, which is based on a two element hybrid protective device approach, has the dual capability to provide high voltage/fast rise time and long pulse/high current threat protection. The first element provides delay-free protection against the fast rise time HEMP threat and was implemented using metal oxide varistor technology which General Electric developed. The second element provides the high energy relief for the first element, and was implemented using saturable magnetics. Detailed magnetic device and varistor models and analytical design equations were derived and extensive material characteristics were experimentally obtained in support of this development. Much of this work involved the generation of singular information which was required to support the solutions to the design problems encountered in meeting the design challenge using existing materials technology. This paper addresses the saturable magnetics portion of this work.

  3. High-power monolithic fiber amplifiers based on advanced photonic crystal fiber designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipes, Donald L.; Tafoya, Jason D.; Schulz, Daniel S.; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Weirich, Johannes; Olausson, Christina B.

    2014-03-01

    We report on the development and performance of a fully monolithic PCF amplifier that has achieved over 400 W with near diffraction limited beam quality with an approximately 1GHz phase modulated input. The key components for these amplifiers are an advanced PCF fiber design that combines segmented acoustically tailored (SAT) fiber that is gain tailored, a novel multi fiber-coupled laser diode stack and a monolithic 6+1x1 large fiber pump/signal multiplexer. The precisely aligned 2-D laser diode emitter array found in laser diode stacks is utilized by way of a simple in-line imaging process with no mirror reflections to process a 2-D array of 380-450 elements into 3 400/440μm 0.22NA pump delivery fibers. The fiber combiner is an etched air taper design that transforms low numerical aperture (NA), large diameter pump radiation into a high NA, small diameter format for pump injection into an air-clad large mode area PCF, while maintaining a constant core size through the taper for efficient signal coupling and throughput. The fiber combiner has 6 400/440/0.22 core/clad/NA pump delivery fibers and a 25/440 PM step-index signal delivery fiber on the input side and a 40/525 PM undoped PCF on the output side. The etched air taper transforms the six 400/440 μm 0.22 NA pump fibers to the 525 μm 0.55 NA core of the PCF fiber with a measured pump combining efficiency of over 95% with a low brightness drop. The combiner also operates as a stepwise mode converter via a 30 μm intermediate core region in the combiner between the 20 μm core of the input fiber and the 40 μm fiber core of the PCF with a measured signal efficiency of 60% to 70% while maintaining polarization with a measured PER of 20 dB. These devices were integrated in to a monolithic fiber amplifier with high efficiency and near diffraction limited beam quality.

  4. Study of a high power sine waveguide traveling wave tube amplifier centered at 8 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Brad W.; Simon, David S.; French, David M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Wong, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Performance of a 20-stage X-band sine waveguide amplifier, driven by a 40 A, 100 kV, cylindrical electron beam, is studied using numerical simulation and interpreted using Pierce's classical traveling wave tube theory. For an input signal power level of 1.8 kW, particle-in-cell simulations predict gain and bandwidth values exceeding 14 dB and 13%, respectively. For an input signal power level of 7.2 kW, particle-in-cell simulations predict gain and bandwidth values exceeding 12 dB and 15%, respectively, with output power levels exceeding 110 kW at peak gain. Also given are: an assessment of the space charge factor (Pierce's QC parameter) for the complex circuit using simulation data, and an evaluation of the harmonic contents in the beam current.

  5. A Compact Two-Stage 120 W GaN High Power Amplifier for SweepSAR Radar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thrivikraman, Tushar; Horst, Stephen; Price, Douglas; Hoffman, James; Veilleux, Louise

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the design and measured results of a fully integrated switched power two-stage GaN HEMT high-power amplifier (HPA) achieving 60% power-added efficiency at over 120Woutput power. This high-efficiency GaN HEMT HPA is an enabling technology for L-band SweepSAR interferometric instruments that enable frequent repeat intervals and high-resolution imagery. The L-band HPA was designed using space-qualified state-of-the-art GaN HEMT technology. The amplifier exhibits over 34 dB of power gain at 51 dBm of output power across an 80 MHz bandwidth. The HPA is divided into two stages, an 8 W driver stage and 120 W output stage. The amplifier is designed for pulsed operation, with a high-speed DC drain switch operating at the pulsed-repetition interval and settles within 200 ns. In addition to the electrical design, a thermally optimized package was designed, that allows for direct thermal radiation to maintain low-junction temperatures for the GaN parts maximizing long-term reliability. Lastly, real radar waveforms are characterized and analysis of amplitude and phase stability over temperature demonstrate ultra-stable operation over temperature using integrated bias compensation circuitry allowing less than 0.2 dB amplitude variation and 2 deg phase variation over a 70 C range.

  6. Results of tests of the X2274 high power tetrode in a JT-60 110 to 130 MHz ICRH amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Remsen, D.B. ); Loring, C.M.; McNees, S.G. . EIMAC Div.); Moriyama, S.; Ogawa, Y.; Anno, K.; Fujii, T.; Terakado, M.; Kogure, S.; Nagashima, T.; Ohta, M. . Naka Fusion Research Establishment)

    1990-09-01

    This paper reports the results of tests of the newly developed Varian EIMAC X2274 in the JAERI JT-60 ICRH system at pulse lengths up to 6 seconds at 131 MHz. It is our belief that these tests achieved the highest long pulse, or CW, power that has ever been delivered by a single power grid tube at frequencies above 100 MHz. Varian's EIMAC X2274, developed in conjunction with General Atomics and the US Department of Energy, uses an improved pyrolytic graphite grid configuration which provides significantly better vhf performance than the grids of the X2242 tetrode which was tested in this system in 1989. The EIMAC X2274 combines the improved grids with a new anode design which reduces the required water flow approximately 50% and increases the maximum anode dissipation 80%. All tests were performed at 131 MHz, the system's highest operating frequency. Tests of both prototype EIMAC X2274s produced essentially identical results. The basic objectives of these tests were: to demonstrate that the system with the EIMAC X2274 can reliably produce 1.5 MW at 130 MHz at 5 second pulse lengths for the JT-60U tokamak and to collect data for use in the design of future high power ICRH systems. In these tests the tube and system produced up to 1.7 MW at pulse lengths up to 5.4 seconds: i.e, the EIMAC X2274 in this system can easily meet Objective 1. The remainder of this paper shows that Objective 2 has been fulfilled. In addition to the high power tests, operational range tests were performed under variable VSWR conditions. Unlike the EIMAC X2242 tests were rf current heating of the screen grid limited output power, system parameters, rather than tube parameters, limited the output power in the high power tests. Operational range tests were conducted at output power levels chosen to be well within the system's anode cooling capability.

  7. High-power narrow-linewidth large mode area photonic bandgap fiber amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulford, Benjamin; Dajani, Iyad; Ehrenreich, Thomas; Holten, Roger; Vergien, Christopher; Naderi, Nader; Mart, Cody; Gu, Guancheng; Kong, Fanting; Hawkins, Thomas; Dong, Liang

    2015-03-01

    Ytterbium-doped large mode area all-solid photonic bandgap fiber amplifiers were used to demonstrate <400 W of output power at 1064 nm. In an initial set of experiments, a fiber with a core diameter of ~50 μm, and a calculated effective area of 1450 μm2 in a straight fiber, was used to generate approximately 600 W. In this case, the input seed was modulated using a sinusoidal format at a frequency of 400 MHz. The output, however, was multimode as the fiber design did not allow for single-mode operation at this wavelength. A second fiber was then fabricated to operate predominantly in single mode at 1064 nm by having the seed closer to the short wavelength edge of the bandgap. This fiber was used to demonstrate 400 W of single-frequency output with excellent beam quality. As the signal power exceeded 450 W, there was significant degradation in the beam quality due to the modal instability. Nevertheless, to the best of our knowledge, the power scaling results obtained in this work far exceed results from prior state of the art all-solid photonic bandgap fiber lasers.

  8. High power, high beam quality laser source with narrow, stable spectra based on truncated-tapered semiconductor amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Erbert, G.; Wenzel, H.; Crump, P.; Eppich, B.; Knigge, S.; Ressel, P.; Ginolas, A.; Maaßdorf, A.; Tränkle, G.

    2013-02-01

    High power diode lasers are increasingly important in many industrial applications. However, an ongoing challenge is to simultaneously obtain high output power, diffraction-limited beam quality and narrow spectral width. One approach to fulfill these requirements is to use a "master oscillator - power amplifier (MOPA)" system. We present recent data on MOPAs using PA designs that have low confinement factor (1%), leading to low modal gain, and low optical loss (<0.5cm-1). Quantum barriers with low refractive index are used to reduce the optical waveguiding due to the active region, which should decrease susceptibility to filament formation. A truncated tapered lateral design was used. Conventional tapered designs have a ridge waveguide (RW) at the entrance of the devices with etched cavity- spoiling grooves at the transition to the tapered gain region. Our amplifier used a truncated tapered design with no RW entrance section. We show that for this approach cavity-spoiling grooves are not necessary, and achieve improved performance when they are omitted, which we attribute to the filament insensitivity of our structure. High beam quality was achieved from a 970nm amplifier with M2 (1/e2) = 1.9, with efficiency of <48% in QCW condition, and <17W diffraction-limited beam maintained in the central lobe. The impact of the in-plane geometrical design was assessed and we show that large surface area is advantageous for device performance. The spectral properties of the amplifier replicated that of the DBRtapered laser, which is used as the master oscillator, with a spectral width of <30pm (FWHM). Design options for further increases in power are presented.

  9. RF Design and Operating Results for a New 201.25 MHz RF Power Amplifier for LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, John T.; Baca, David M.; Bratton, Ray E.; Brennan, Nicholas W.; Bultman, Nathan K.; Chen, Zukun; Davis, Jerry L.; Naranjo, Angela C.; Rees, Daniel E.; Sandoval, Gilbert M. Jr.; Summers, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    A prototype VHF RF Final Power Amplifier (FPA) for Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has been designed, fabricated, and tested. The cavity amplifier has met the goals of generating 2.5 MW peak and 260 kW of average power, at an elevation of 2.1 km. It was designed to use a Thales TH628 Diacrode{sup R}, a state-of-art tetrode power tube that is double-ended, providing roughly twice the power of a conventional tetrode. The amplifier is designed with tunable input and output transmission line cavity circuits, a grid decoupling circuit, an adjustable output coupler, TE mode suppressors, blocking, bypassing and decoupling capacitors, and a cooling system. The tube is connected in a full wavelength output circuit, with the lower main tuner situated 3/4{lambda} from the central electron beam region in the tube and the upper slave tuner 1/4{lambda} from the same point. We summarize the design processes and features of the FPA along with significant test results. A pair of production amplifiers are planned to be power-combined and installed at the LANSCE DTL to return operation to full beam duty factor.

  10. Concentric Parallel Combining Balun for Millimeter-Wave Power Amplifier in Low-Power CMOS with High-Power Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jiang-An; Kong, Zhi-Hui; Ma, Kaixue; Yeo, Kiat Seng; Lim, Wei Meng

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a novel balun for a millimeter-wave power amplifier (PA) design to achieve high-power density in a 65-nm low-power (LP) CMOS process. By using a concentric winding technique, the proposed parallel combining balun with compact size accomplishes power combining and unbalance-balance conversion concurrently. For calculating its power combination efficiency in the condition of various amplitude and phase wave components, a method basing on S-parameters is derived. Based on the proposed parallel combining balun, a fabricated 60-GHz industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) band PA with single-ended I/O achieves an 18.9-dB gain and an 8.8-dBm output power at 1-dB compression and 14.3-dBm saturated output power ( P sat) at 62 GHz. This PA occupying only a 0.10-mm2 core area has demonstrated a high-power density of 269.15 mW/mm2 in 65 nm LP CMOS.

  11. Concentric Parallel Combining Balun for Millimeter-Wave Power Amplifier in Low-Power CMOS with High-Power Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jiang-An; Kong, Zhi-Hui; Ma, Kaixue; Yeo, Kiat Seng; Lim, Wei Meng

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a novel balun for a millimeter-wave power amplifier (PA) design to achieve high-power density in a 65-nm low-power (LP) CMOS process. By using a concentric winding technique, the proposed parallel combining balun with compact size accomplishes power combining and unbalance-balance conversion concurrently. For calculating its power combination efficiency in the condition of various amplitude and phase wave components, a method basing on S-parameters is derived. Based on the proposed parallel combining balun, a fabricated 60-GHz industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) band PA with single-ended I/O achieves an 18.9-dB gain and an 8.8-dBm output power at 1-dB compression and 14.3-dBm saturated output power (P sat) at 62 GHz. This PA occupying only a 0.10-mm2 core area has demonstrated a high-power density of 269.15 mW/mm2 in 65 nm LP CMOS.

  12. (6+1) x1 fiber combiner based on thermally expanded core technique for high power amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ke; Chen, Zilun; Zhou, Xuanfeng; Wang, Zefeng; Jiang, Houman

    2015-07-01

    A high-efficiency pump-signal combiner for high power fiber amplifiers based on thermally expanded core (TEC) technique is reported in this paper. TEC technique is used to fabricate mode-field adapter which allows optimization of signal fibers in a monolithic (6+1) ×1 fiber combiner. The combiner is fabricated by connecting a tapered fiber bundle (TFB) to a passive 25/250 (NA=0.06/0.46) double-clad fiber (DCF). By this method, the coupling efficiency of SMF-28 signal fiber at 1064nm improves from 54% to 92.7%. The average pump coupling efficiencies of six 105/125 (NA=0.15) fibers are measured to be 96.7% at 976nm. Furthermore, the average signal transmission efficiency is around 93.3%. The fabricated fiber combiner is spliced to an Yb-doped DCF for use as an all-fiber amplifier. The slope efficiency is measured to be 71.6%.

  13. Tunable high-power narrow-linewidth semiconductor laser based on an external-cavity tapered amplifier.

    PubMed

    Chi, Mingjun; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Holm, Jesper; Pedersen, Christian; Andersen, Peter Eskil; Erbert, Götz; Sumpf, Bernd; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2005-12-26

    A high-power narrow-linewidth laser system based on a tapered semiconductor optical amplifier in external cavity is demonstrated. The external cavity laser system uses a new tapered amplifier with a super-large optical-cavity (SLOC) design that leads to improved performance of the external cavity diode lasers. The laser system is tunable over a 29 nm range centered at 802 nm. As high as 1.95 W output power is obtained at 803.84 nm, and an output power above 1.5 W is achieved from 793 to 812 nm at operating current of 3.0 A. The emission linewidth is below 0.004 nm and the beam quality factor M2 is below 1.3 over the 29 nm tunable range. As an example of application, the laser system is used as a pump source for the generation of 405 nm blue light by single-pass frequency doubling in a periodically poled KTiOPO4. An output power of 24 mW at 405 nm, corresponding to a conversion efficiency of 0.83%/W is attained. PMID:19503273

  14. A high power, continuous-wave, single-frequency fiber amplifier at 1091 nm and frequency doubling to 545.5 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stappel, M.; Steinborn, R.; Kolbe, D.; Walz, J.

    2013-07-01

    We present a high power single-frequency ytterbium fiber amplifier system with an output power of 30 W at 1091 nm. The amplifier system consists of two stages, a preamplifier stage in which amplified spontaneous emission is efficiently suppressed (>40 dB) and a high power amplifier with an efficiency of 52%. Two different approaches to frequency doubling are compared. We achieve 8.6 W at 545.5 nm by single-pass frequency doubling in a MgO-doped periodically poled stoichiometric LiTaO3 crystal and up to 19.3 W at 545.5 nm by frequency doubling with a lithium-triborate crystal in an external enhancement cavity.

  15. Theoretical and experimental analysis of high-power frequency-stabilized semiconductor master oscillator power-amplifier system.

    PubMed

    Ji, Encai; Liu, Qiang; Nie, Mingming; Fu, Xing; Gong, Mali

    2016-04-10

    We present a compact high-power 780 nm frequency-stabilized diode laser with a power of as high as 2.825 W, corresponding to an estimated overall efficiency of 38.5%. The tapered amplifier (TPA) gain was about 24.5 dB, which was basically consistent with the simulation results. The beam quality factor was M2<1.72. The core feature of the system was stabilizing the frequency of the narrowband semiconductor TPA system with the matured saturated absorption spectrum technique. The laser frequency was stabilized against mode hops for a period of >4200  s with a frequency fluctuation around 6.7×10-10 within 1 s of the observation period, and the linewidth was no more than 0.95 MHz. The laser performance indicates that the current frequency-stabilized semiconductor laser has great potential in certain conditions that require several watts of output power. PMID:27139853

  16. Mechanical Design and Fabrication of a New RF Power Amplifier for LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zukun

    2011-01-01

    A Full-scale prototype of a new 201.25 MHz RF Final Power Amplifier (FPA) for Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has been designed, fabricated, assembled and installed in the test facility. This prototype was successfully tested and met the physics and electronics design criteria. The team faced design and manufacturing challenges, having a goal to produce 2 MW peak power at 13% duty factor, at the elevation of over 2 km in Los Alamos. The mechanical design of the final power amplifier was built around a Thales TH628 Diacrode{sup R}, a state-of-art tetrode power tube. The main structure includes Input circuit, Output circuit, Grid decoupling circuit, Output coupler, Tuning pistons, and a cooling system. Many types of material were utilized to make this new RF amplifier. The fabrication processes of the key components were completed in the Prototype Fabrication Division shop at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The critical plating procedures were achieved by private industry. The FPA mass is nearly 600 kg and installed in a beam structural support stand. In this paper, we summarize the FPA design basis and fabrication, plating, and assembly process steps with necessary lifting and handling fixtures. In addition, to ensure the quality of the FPA support structure a finite element analysis with seismic design forces has also been carried out.

  17. Note: Characterization and test of a high input impedance RF amplifier for series nanowire detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Chao; Pei, Yufeng; Jiang, Zhou; Kang, Lin; Wu, Peiheng

    2016-09-01

    We designed a high input impedance RF amplifier based on Tower Jazz's 0.18 μm SiGe BiCMOS process for series nanowire detector. The characterization of its gain and input impedance with a vector network analyzer is described in detail for its specificity. The actual 15 dB gain should be the measured value subtracts 6 dB, which is easy to be ignored. Its input impedance can be equivalent to 6.7 kΩ ∥ 3.4 pF though fitting the measurement, whose accuracy is verified. The process of measurement provides a good reference to characterize the similar special amplifier with unmatched impedance.

  18. Development toward high-power sub-1-ohm DC-67 GHz RF switches using phase change materials for reconfigurable RF front-end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Jeong-sun; Seo, Hwa-chang; Le, Duc

    2014-06-01

    We report GeTe-based phase change material RF switches with on-state resistance of 0.07 ohm*mm and off-state capacitance of 20 fF/mm. The RF switch figure-of-merit, Ron*Coff is comparable to RF MEMS ohmic switches. The PCM RF shunt and series switches were fabricated for the first time in a lateral FET configuration to reduce parasitics, different from the vertical via switches. In a shunt switch configuration, isolation of 30 dB was achieved up to 67 GHz with return loss of 15 dB. RF power handling was tested with ~10 W for series and 3 W for shunt configurations. Harmonic powers were suppressed more than 100 dBc at fundamental power of 1 W, for future tunable and reconfigurable RF technology.

  19. Design of an Ultra-Efficient GaN High Power Amplifier for Radar Front-Ends Using Active Harmonic Load-Pull

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thrivikraman, Tushar; Hoffman, James

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a new measurement technique, mixed-signal active harmonic load-pull (MSALP) developed by Anterverta-mw in partnership with Maury Microwave, that allows for wide-band ultra-high efficiency amplifiers to be designed using GaN technology. An overview of the theory behind active load-pull is presented and why load-pull is important for high-power device characterization. In addition, an example procedure is presented that outlines a methodology for amplifier design using this measurement system. Lastly, measured results of a 10W GaN amplifier are presented. This work aims to highlight the benefit of using this sophisticated measurement systems for to optimize amplifier design for real radar waveforms that in turn will simplify implementation of space-based radar systems

  20. Development of a Movable Plunger Tuner for the High Power RF Cavity for the PEP II B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, H.D.; Fant, K.; Neubauer, Mark Stephen; Rimmer, R.A.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-08-26

    A 10 cm diameter by 5 cm travel plunger tuner was developed for the PEP-II RF copper cavity system. The single cell cavity including the tuner is designed to operate up to 150 kW of dissipated RF power. Spring finger contacts to protect the bellows from RF power are specially placed 8.5 cm away from the inside wall of the cavity to avoid fundamental and higher order mode resonances. The spring fingers are made of dispersion-strengthened copper to accommodate relatively high heating. The design, alignment, testing and performance of the tuner is described.

  1. Difference-frequency mixing in AgGaS(2) by use of a high-power GaAlAs tapered semiconductor amplifier at 860 nm.

    PubMed

    Simon, U; Tittel, F K; Goldberg, L

    1993-11-15

    As much as 47 microW of cw infrared radiation and 89 microW of pulsed infrared radiation, tunable near 4.3 microm, have been generated by mixing the outputs of a high-power tapered semiconductor amplifier at 858 nm (signal wave) and a Ti:Al(2)O(3) laser at 715 nm (pump wave) in AgGaS(2). The GaAlAs tapered traveling-wave amplifier delivered as much as 1.5 W of diffraction-limited cw power into the nonlinear crystal. Output powers, conversion efficiencies, and spectral characteristics of this novel midinfrared source are discussed. PMID:19829451

  2. High Power Experiment of X-Band Thermionic Cathode RF Gun for Compton Scattering X-ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Fumito; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Dobashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Meng, De; Urakawa, Junji; Higo, Toshiyasu; Akemoto, Mitsuo; Matsuo, Kenichi; Sakae, Hisaharu; Yamamoto, Masashi

    2006-11-27

    We are currently developing a compact monochromatic X-ray source based on laser-electron collision. To realize remarkably compact-, high-intensity- and highly-stable-system, we adopt an X-band multi-bunch liner accelerator (linac) and reliable Q-switch laser. The X-ray yields by the multi-bunch electron beam and Q-switch Nd: YAG laser of 1.4 J/10 ns (FWHM) (532 nm, second harmonic) is 107 photons/RF-pulse (108 photons/sec for 10 Hz operation). The injector of the system consists of a 3.5-cell X-band thermionic cathode RF gun and an alpha magnet. So far we have achieved beam generation from the X-band thermionic cathode RF gun. The peak beam energy is 2 MeV. This experimental high energy ({approx}2 MeV) beam generation from the X-band thermionic cathode RF gun is the first in the world. In this paper, we describe the system of the Compton scattering X-ray source based on the X-band linac, experimental results of X-band thermionic cathode RF gun and the details of the experimental setup for Compton scattering X-ray generation that are under construction.

  3. Development of high-power and high-energy 2μm bulk solid-state lasers and amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koen, Wayne; Jacobs, Cobus; Wu, Lorinda; Strauss, Hencharl

    2016-05-01

    A selection of 2 μm lasers and amplifiers developed at the CSIR National Laser Centre in South Africa is presented. A diverse range of near diffraction-limited 2 μm lasers and amplifiers were developed which varied from high-energy, single-frequency oscillators and amplifiers, to compact and efficient MOPA systems delivering high average powers. This was made possible by exploiting various advantageous properties of holmium-doped YLF while mitigating its detrimental properties through the use of novel pump and laser design approaches.

  4. High-power, low-pressure, inductively coupled RF plasma source using a FET-based inverter power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komizunai, Shota; Oikawa, Kohei; Saito, Yuta; Takahashi, Kazunori; Ando, Akira

    2015-01-01

    A high-density plasma of density greater than 1019 m-3 is successfully produced in 1.5 Pa argon by an inductively coupled RF discharge with a 70-mm-diameter source cavity, where a 10-turn water-cooled RF loop antenna is wound onto the source tube and an axial magnetic field of ˜70 G is applied by two solenoids to reduce plasma loss onto the source cavity. The RF antenna is powered from a frequency-tunable field-effect-transistor-based inverter power supply, which does not require variable capacitors to match the impedance, at a frequency of ˜350 kHz and the RF power can be increased up to ˜8 kW. It is also demonstrated that the source is operational with an axial magnetic field provided by permanent magnet (PM) arrays; then the density in the case of the PM arrays is higher than that in the case of the solenoids. The role of the magnetic filter downstream of the source tube is demonstrated; a radially uniform plasma density exceeding 1018 m-3 and an electron temperature of ˜1-2 eV are obtained at ˜100 mm downstream of the open exit of the source tube.

  5. Dual-core ytterbium fiber amplifier for high-power 1060 nm swept source multichannel optical coherence tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Harduar, Mark K; Mariampillai, Adrian; Vuong, Barry; Gu, Xijia; Standish, Beau A; Yang, Victor X D

    2011-08-01

    A novel (to our knowledge) dual-core ytterbium (Yb(3+)) doped fiber, as an optically pumped amplifier, boosts the output power from a 1060 nm swept source laser beyond 250 mW, while providing a wavelength tuning range of 93 nm, for optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. The design of the dual-core Yb-doped fiber amplifier and its multiple wavelength optical pumping scheme to optimize output bandwidth are discussed. Use of the dual-core fiber amplifier showed no appreciable degradation to the coherence length of the seed laser. The signal intensity improvement of this amplifier is demonstrated on a multichannel in vivo OCT imaging system at 1060 nm.

  6. RF Single Electron Transistor Readout Amplifiers for Superconducting Astronomical Detectors for X-Ray to Sub-mm Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Thomas; Aassime, Abdelhanin; Delsing, Per; Frunzio, Luigi; Li, Li-Qun; Prober, Daniel; Schoelkopf, Robert; Segall, Ken; Wilson, Chris; Stahle, Carl

    2000-01-01

    We report progress on using a new type of amplifier, the Radio-Frequency Single-Electron Transistor (RF-SET), to develop multi-channel sensor readout systems for fast and sensitive readout of high impedance cryogenic photodetectors such as Superconducting Tunnel Junctions and Single Quasiparticle Photon Counters. Although cryogenic, these detectors are desirable because of capabilities not other-wise attainable. However, high impedances and low output levels make low-noise, high-speed readouts challenging, and large format arrays would be facilitated by compact, low-power, on-chip integrated amplifiers. Well-suited for this application are RF-SETs, very high performance electrometers which use an rf readout technique to provide 100 MHz bandwidth. Small size, low power, and cryogenic operation allow direct integration with detectors, and using multiple rf carrier frequencies permits simultaneous readout of 20-50 amplifiers with a common electrical connection. We describe both the first 2-channel demonstration of this wavelength division multiplexing technique for RF-SETs, and Charge-Locked-Loop operation with 100 kHz of closed-loop bandwidth.

  7. Intensity noise reduction of a high-power nonlinear femtosecond fiber amplifier based on spectral-breathing self-similar parabolic pulse evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sijia; Liu, Bowen; Song, Youjian; Hu, Minglie

    2016-04-01

    We report on a simple passive scheme to reduce the intensity noise of high-power nonlinear fiber amplifiers by use of the spectral-breathing parabolic evolution of the pulse amplification with an optimized negative initial chirp. In this way, the influences of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) on the amplifier intensity noise can be efficiently suppressed, owing to the lower overall pulse chirp, shorter spectral broadening distance, as well as the asymptotic attractive nature of self-similar pulse amplification. Systematic characterizations of the relative intensity noise (RIN) of a free-running nonlinear Yb-doped fiber amplifier are performed over a series of initial pulse parameters. Experiments show that the measured amplifier RIN increases respect to the decreased input pulse energy, due to the increased amount of ASE noise. For pulse amplification with a proper negative initial chirp, the increase of RIN is found to be smaller than with a positive initial chirp, confirming the ASE noise tolerance of the proposed spectral-breathing parabolic amplification scheme. At the maximum output average power of 27W (25-dB amplification gain), the incorporation of an optimum negative initial chirp (-0.84 chirp parameter) leads to a considerable amplifier root-mean-square (rms) RIN reduction of ~20.5% (integrated from 10 Hz to 10 MHz Fourier frequency). The minimum amplifier rms RIN of 0.025% (integrated from 1 kHz to 5 MHz Fourier frequency) is obtained along with the transform-limited compressed pulse duration of 55fs. To our knowledge, the demonstrated intensity noise performance is the lowest RIN level measured from highpower free-running femtosecond fiber amplifiers.

  8. Optimizing high-power Yb-doped fiber amplifier systems in the presence of transverse mode instabilities.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, Cesar; Otto, Hans-Jürgen; Breitkopf, Sven; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A

    2016-04-18

    The average output power of Yb-doped fiber amplifier systems is currently limited by the onset of transverse mode instabilities. Besides, it has been recently shown that the transverse mode instability threshold can be significantly reduced by the presence of photodarkening in the fiber. Therefore, reducing the photodarkening level of the core material composition is the most straightforward way to increase the output average power of fiber amplifier systems but, unfortunately, this is not always easy or possible. In this paper we present guidelines to optimize the output average power of fiber amplifiers affected by transverse mode instabilities and photodarkening. The guidelines derived from the simulations do not involve changes in the composition of the active material (except for its doping concentration), but can still lead to a significant increase of the transverse mode instability threshold. The dependence of this parameter on the active ion concentration and the core conformation, among others, will be studied and discussed. PMID:27137230

  9. High-power test of a new Bethe-hole directional coupler for the PAL XFEL S-band linac RF system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Youngdo; Park, Yongjung; Heo, Hoon; Hu, Jinyul; Park, Sung-Soo; Kim, Sang-Hee; Hwang, Woonha; Moon, Gun-Young; Lee, Sosung; Lee, Heung-Soo; Noh, Sungju; Oh, Kyoungmin

    2013-11-01

    The directional coupler to be used in the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray free electron laser (PAL XFEL) under construction since 2011 must satisfy the conditions for operating at a peak power of 400 MW and a repetition rate of 120 Hz. In these operational conditions of the PAL XFEL, the old Bethe-hole directional coupler that was originally designed to be used in the Pohang Light Source linac is more likely to inflict damages on the ceramic window that cause vacuum leaks. Therefore, for the new Bethe-hole directional coupler, the original design has been modified to use a conventional N-type RF vacuum feedthrough for vacuum sealing instead of the ceramic window. The new Bethe-hole directional coupler is designed by using a finite-difference time-domain simulation. We have fabricated a prototype, and the result of a high-power test indicates that the RF performance of the new DC satisfies the specifications of the PAL XFEL S-band Linac RF system.

  10. High-power test of the new 3-dB power splitter for the PAL XFEL S-band LINAC RF system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Youngdo; Park, Yongjung; Heo, Hoon; Hu, Jinyul; Park, Sung-Soo; Kim, Sang-Hee; Hwang, Woonha; Moon, Gun-Young; Lee, Sosung; Lee, Heung-Soo; Noh, Sungju; Oh, Kyoungmin

    2014-04-01

    The 3-dB power splitter to be used in the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ay Free-electron Laser (PAL XFEL), which have been under construction since 2011, must operate at a peak power of 400 MW and a repetition rate of 120 Hz. For these operational conditions of the PAL XFEL, the old 3-dB power splitter that was originally designed to be used in the PLS LINAC will most suffer from RF breakdown. Therefore, for the new 3-dB power splitter, the original design has been modified to reduce the field gradient and the surface current. The new 3-dB power splitter is designed by using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation. We have fabricated a prototype, and the result of a high-power test indicates that the RF performance of the new 3-dB power splitter satisfies the specifications of the PAL XFEL S-band LINAC RF system.

  11. 10W ASE-free single-mode high-power double-cladding Er 3+-Yb 3+ amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morasse, Bertrand; Agger, Søren; Hovington, Carl; Chatigny, Stéphane; Gagnon, Éric; de Sandro, Jean-Philippe; Poulsen, Christian

    2007-02-01

    We designed a high output power double cladding erbium-ytterbium fibre amplifier that showed no amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) at 1.0 μm using a quasi singlemode fibre. The reduction of the amplified stimulated emission (ASE) at 1.0 μm was found to be the combination of fibre design and temperature effect in the core. A 10W output double cladding Er-Yb amplifier with a core/cladding fibre diameter of 10/125 μm was realized with a seed signal of 1.4 W at 1563 nm and with counter-propagating pump power of 35 W at 976 nm without any significant ASE generation at 1.0 μm. The fibre also exhibits singlemode behaviour with M2 <1.1 and a high slope efficiency of 30%. The fibre was designed to minimize ASE at 1.0 μm by heavily doping the fibre and using the appropriate ratio between Yb 3+ and Er 3+ ions. By incorporating into our model the core temperature increase coming from the quantum defect of the Er-Yb system, we can also predict a raise in the absorption cross-section of the ytterbium ions around 1060 nm yielding to an increase of the 1 μm ASE threshold from 14 W to 35 W pump power, which allowed us to reach a 10 W output power at 1563 nm instead of 5 W normally predicted by the theory. These results show potential power scaling of the output power or double cladding erbium ytterbium amplifier using quasi singlemode core erbium ytterbium fibre avoiding the need of large core dimension that degrades the beam quality.

  12. HASEonGPU-An adaptive, load-balanced MPI/GPU-code for calculating the amplified spontaneous emission in high power laser media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, C. H. J.; Zenker, E.; Bussmann, M.; Albach, D.

    2016-10-01

    We present an adaptive Monte Carlo algorithm for computing the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) flux in laser gain media pumped by pulsed lasers. With the design of high power lasers in mind, which require large size gain media, we have developed the open source code HASEonGPU that is capable of utilizing multiple graphic processing units (GPUs). With HASEonGPU, time to solution is reduced to minutes on a medium size GPU cluster of 64 NVIDIA Tesla K20m GPUs and excellent speedup is achieved when scaling to multiple GPUs. Comparison of simulation results to measurements of ASE in Y b 3 + : Y AG ceramics show perfect agreement.

  13. Performance of the Yb:Lu2O3 laser crystal in diode-pumped femtosecond oscillators and high-power regenerative amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracciolo, E.; Pirzio, F.; Kemnitzer, M.; Guandalini, A.; Kienle, F.; Agnesi, A.; Aus der Au, J.

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the performance of the laser gain medium Yb:Lu2O3 in a low-power oscillator and a high-power regenerative amplifier. Almost Fourier transform limited 78-fs pulses were demonstrated in the low-power, SESAM mode-locked oscillator pumped with a single-mode fiber-coupled laser diode. Exploiting the excellent thermomechanical properties of Yb:Lu2O3, we were able to achieve up to 22.2 W of average output power at a repetition rate of 500 kHz and 670-fs long pulses with the regenerative bulk amplifier. Experiments on further power up-scaling and pulse duration shortening are in progress. Up to 65 W were already proved in preliminary tests in cw regime.

  14. Broadband high-power mid-IR femtosecond pulse generation from an ytterbium-doped fiber laser pumped optical parametric amplifier.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chengzhi; Chen, Tao; Jiang, PeiPei; Wu, Bo; Su, Jianjia; Shen, Yonghang

    2015-12-15

    We report on a high-power periodically poled MgO-doped lithium niobate (MgO:PPLN)-based femtosecond optical parametric amplifier (OPA), featuring a spectral seamless broadband mid-infrared (MIR) output. By modifying the initial chirp and spectrum of the mode-locked seed laser, the Yb fiber pump laser exhibits a final output power of 14 W with sub-200-fs pulse duration after power amplification and compression. When the OPA was seeded with a broadband amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) source, a damage-limited 0.6 W broadband MIR radiation was experimentally obtained under the pump power of 10.15 W at 82 MHz repetition rate, corresponding to an overall OPA conversion efficiency of 32.7%. The 3 dB bandwidth of the mid-IR idler was 291.9 nm, centering at 3.34 μm. PMID:26670509

  15. High-field actively detuneable transverse electromagnetic (TEM) coil with low-bias voltage for high-power RF transmission.

    PubMed

    Avdievich, Nikolai I; Bradshaw, Ken; Kuznetsov, Andrey M; Hetherington, Hoby P

    2007-06-01

    The design and construction of a 4T (170 MHz) transverse electromagnetic (TEM) actively detuneable quadrature head coil is described. Conventional schemes for active detuning require high negative bias voltages (>300 V) to prevent leakage of RF pulses with amplitudes of 1-2 kW. To extend the power handling capacity and avoid the use of high DC bias voltages, we developed an alternate method of detuning the volume coil. In this method the PIN diodes in the detuning circuits are shorted when the RF volume coil is tuned, and negatively biased with -12 V when the coil is detuned. To preserve the high Q(U)/Q(L) ratio of the TEM coil, we modified the method of Nabetani and Watkins (Proceedings of the 13th Annual Meeting of ISMRM, Kyoto, Japan, 2004, abstract 1574) by utilizing a high-impedance (approximately 200 Omega), lumped-element, quarter-wavelength transformer. A Q(U) of 500 was achieved for the detuneable TEM, such that incorporation of the detuning network had minimal effect (<1 dB) on the performance of the coil in vivo. PMID:17534919

  16. High power mid-infrared supercontinuum generation in a single-mode ZBLAN fiber pumped by amplified picosecond pulses at 2 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Liu, Jiang; Shi, Hongxing; Tan, Fangzhou; Jiang, Yijian; Wang, Pu

    2015-03-01

    We report high power all fiber mid-infrared (mid-IR) supercontinuum (SC) generation in a single-mode ZBLAN (ZrF4- BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF) fiber with up to 21.8 W average output power from 1.9 to beyond 3.8 μm pumped by amplified picosecond pulses from a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) based on small-core single-mode thulium-doped fiber (TDF) with injected seed pulse width of 24 ps and repetition of 93.6 MHz at 1963 nm. The optical-optical conversion efficiency from the 793 nm pump laser of the last stage thulium-doped fiber amplifier (TDFA) to mid-IR SC output is 17%. It is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest average power mid-IR SC generation in a ZBLAN fiber to date. In addition, a noise-like fiber oscillator based on a nonlinear loop mirror (NOLM) with wavepacket width of ~1.4 ns and repetition rate of 3.36 MHz at 1966 nm is also used as a seed of the MOPA for mid-IR SC generation in the ZBLAN fiber. At last, a mid-IR SC from 1.9 to beyond 3.6 μm with average output power of 14.3W, which is limited by injected noise-like pulses power, is generated. The optical-optical conversion efficiency from the 793 nm pump laser of the last stage TDFA to mid-IR SC output is 14.9%. This proves the amplified noise-like pulses are also appropriate for high power mid-IR SC generation in the ZBLAN fiber.

  17. High power resonant pumping of Tm-doped fiber amplifiers in core- and cladding-pumped configurations.

    PubMed

    Creeden, Daniel; Johnson, Benjamin R; Rines, Glen A; Setzler, Scott D

    2014-11-17

    We have demonstrated ultra-high efficiency amplification in Tm-doped fiber with both core- and cladding-pumped configurations using a resonant tandem-pumping approach. These Tm-doped fiber amplifiers are pumped in-band with a 1908 nm Tm-doped fiber laser and operate at 1993 nm with >90% slope efficiency. In a core-pumped configuration, we have achieved 92.1% slope efficiency and 88.4% optical efficiency at 41 W output power. In a cladding-pumped configuration, we have achieved 123.1 W of output power with 90.4% optical efficiency and a 91.6% slope efficiency. We believe these are the highest optical efficiencies achieved in a Tm-doped fiber amplifier operating in the 2-micron spectral region. PMID:25402145

  18. High power resonant pumping of Tm-doped fiber amplifiers in core- and cladding-pumped configurations.

    PubMed

    Creeden, Daniel; Johnson, Benjamin R; Rines, Glen A; Setzler, Scott D

    2014-11-17

    We have demonstrated ultra-high efficiency amplification in Tm-doped fiber with both core- and cladding-pumped configurations using a resonant tandem-pumping approach. These Tm-doped fiber amplifiers are pumped in-band with a 1908 nm Tm-doped fiber laser and operate at 1993 nm with >90% slope efficiency. In a core-pumped configuration, we have achieved 92.1% slope efficiency and 88.4% optical efficiency at 41 W output power. In a cladding-pumped configuration, we have achieved 123.1 W of output power with 90.4% optical efficiency and a 91.6% slope efficiency. We believe these are the highest optical efficiencies achieved in a Tm-doped fiber amplifier operating in the 2-micron spectral region.

  19. High-power linearly-polarized picosecond thulium-doped all-fiber master-oscillator power-amplifier.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Liu, Chen; Shi, Hongxing; Wang, Pu

    2016-06-27

    We demonstrated a linearly-polarized picosecond thulium-doped all-fiber-integrated master-oscillator power-amplifier system, which yielded 240 W of average output power at 127 MHz repetition rate. The seed source is a passively mode-locked polarization-maintaining thulium-doped all-fiber oscillator with a nearly transform-limited pulse duration of 10 ps. In combination with a pre-chirp fiber having a positive group velocity dispersion and a three stage polarization-maintaining thulium-doped all-fiber amplifier, output pulse energies up to 1.89 µJ with 42 kW pulse peak power are obtained without the need of complex free-space stretcher or compressor setups. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest average output power ever reported for a picosecond all-fiber-integrated laser at 2 µm wavelength region.

  20. High-power linearly-polarized picosecond thulium-doped all-fiber master-oscillator power-amplifier.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Liu, Chen; Shi, Hongxing; Wang, Pu

    2016-06-27

    We demonstrated a linearly-polarized picosecond thulium-doped all-fiber-integrated master-oscillator power-amplifier system, which yielded 240 W of average output power at 127 MHz repetition rate. The seed source is a passively mode-locked polarization-maintaining thulium-doped all-fiber oscillator with a nearly transform-limited pulse duration of 10 ps. In combination with a pre-chirp fiber having a positive group velocity dispersion and a three stage polarization-maintaining thulium-doped all-fiber amplifier, output pulse energies up to 1.89 µJ with 42 kW pulse peak power are obtained without the need of complex free-space stretcher or compressor setups. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest average output power ever reported for a picosecond all-fiber-integrated laser at 2 µm wavelength region. PMID:27410651

  1. High-power dual-wavelength external-cavity diode laser based on tapered amplifier with tunable terahertz frequency difference.

    PubMed

    Chi, Mingjun; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2011-07-15

    Tunable dual-wavelength operation of a diode laser system based on a tapered diode amplifier with double-Littrow external-cavity feedback is demonstrated around 800 nm. The two wavelengths can be tuned individually, and the frequency difference of the two wavelengths is tunable from 0.5 to 5.0 THz. An output power of 1.54 W is achieved with a frequency difference of 0.86 THz, the output power is higher than 1.3 W in the 5.0 THz range of frequency difference, and the amplified spontaneous emission intensity is more than 20 dB suppressed in the range of frequency difference. To our knowledge, this is the highest output power from a dual-wavelength diode laser system operating with tunable terahertz frequency difference. PMID:21765489

  2. Theoretical and numerical treatment of modal instability in high-power core and cladding-pumped Raman fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Shadi; Dajani, Iyad; Grosek, Jacob; Madden, Timothy

    2016-07-25

    Raman fiber lasers have been proposed as potential candidates for scaling beyond the power limitations imposed on near diffraction-limited rare-earth doped fiber lasers. One limitation is the modal instability (MI) and we explore the physics of this phenomenon in Raman fiber amplifiers (RFAs). By utilizing the conservation of number of photons and conservation of energy in the absence of loss, the 3 × 3 governing system of nonlinear equations describing the pump and the signal modal content are decoupled and solved analytically for cladding-pumped RFAs. By comparing the extracted signal at MI threshold for the same step index-fiber, it is found that the MI threshold is independent of the length of the amplifier or whether the amplifier is co-pumped or counter-pumped; dictated by the integrated heat load along the length of fiber. We extend our treatment to gain-tailored RFAs and show that this approach is of limited utility in suppressing MI. Finally, we formulate the physics of MI in core-pumped RFAs where both pump and signal interferences participate in writing the time-dependent index of refraction grating.

  3. Theoretical and numerical treatment of modal instability in high-power core and cladding-pumped Raman fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Shadi; Dajani, Iyad; Grosek, Jacob; Madden, Timothy

    2016-07-25

    Raman fiber lasers have been proposed as potential candidates for scaling beyond the power limitations imposed on near diffraction-limited rare-earth doped fiber lasers. One limitation is the modal instability (MI) and we explore the physics of this phenomenon in Raman fiber amplifiers (RFAs). By utilizing the conservation of number of photons and conservation of energy in the absence of loss, the 3 × 3 governing system of nonlinear equations describing the pump and the signal modal content are decoupled and solved analytically for cladding-pumped RFAs. By comparing the extracted signal at MI threshold for the same step index-fiber, it is found that the MI threshold is independent of the length of the amplifier or whether the amplifier is co-pumped or counter-pumped; dictated by the integrated heat load along the length of fiber. We extend our treatment to gain-tailored RFAs and show that this approach is of limited utility in suppressing MI. Finally, we formulate the physics of MI in core-pumped RFAs where both pump and signal interferences participate in writing the time-dependent index of refraction grating. PMID:27464110

  4. High power coaxial ubitron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balkcum, Adam J.

    In the ubitron, also known as the free electron laser, high power coherent radiation is generated from the interaction of an undulating electron beam with an electromagnetic signal and a static periodic magnetic wiggler field. These devices have experimentally produced high power spanning the microwave to x-ray regimes. Potential applications range from microwave radar to the study of solid state material properties. In this dissertation, the efficient production of high power microwaves (HPM) is investigated for a ubitron employing a coaxial circuit and wiggler. Designs for the particular applications of an advanced high gradient linear accelerator driver and a directed energy source are presented. The coaxial ubitron is inherently suited for the production of HPM. It utilizes an annular electron beam to drive the low loss, RF breakdown resistant TE01 mode of a large coaxial circuit. The device's large cross-sectional area greatly reduces RF wall heat loading and the current density loading at the cathode required to produce the moderate energy (500 keV) but high current (1-10 kA) annular electron beam. Focusing and wiggling of the beam is achieved using coaxial annular periodic permanent magnet (PPM) stacks without a solenoidal guide magnetic field. This wiggler configuration is compact, efficient and can propagate the multi-kiloampere electron beams required for many HPM applications. The coaxial PPM ubitron in a traveling wave amplifier, cavity oscillator and klystron configuration is investigated using linear theory and simulation codes. A condition for the dc electron beam stability in the coaxial wiggler is derived and verified using the 2-1/2 dimensional particle-in-cell code, MAGIC. New linear theories for the cavity start-oscillation current and gain in a klystron are derived. A self-consistent nonlinear theory for the ubitron-TWT and a new nonlinear theory for the ubitron oscillator are presented. These form the basis for simulation codes which, along

  5. High-power Yb:YAG single-crystal fiber amplifiers for femtosecond lasers in cylindrical polarization.

    PubMed

    Lesparre, Fabien; Gomes, Jean Thomas; Délen, Xavier; Martial, Igor; Didierjean, Julien; Pallmann, Wolfgang; Resan, Bojan; Eckerle, Michael; Graf, Thomas; Abdou Ahmed, Marwan; Druon, Frederic; Balembois, François; Georges, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate a three-stage diode-pumped Yb:YAG single-crystal-fiber amplifier to generate femtosecond pulses at high average powers with linear or cylindrical (i.e., radial or azimuthal) polarization. At a repetition rate of 20 MHz, 750-fs pulses were obtained at an average power of 85 W in cylindrical polarization and at 100 W in linear polarization. The report includes investigations on the use of Yb:YAG single-crystal fibers with different length/doping ratio and the zero-phonon pumping at a wavelength of 969 nm in order to optimize the performance. PMID:26030546

  6. High-power multiple-frequency narrow-linewidth laser source based on a semiconductor tapered amplifier.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, G; Mewes, M O; Schreck, F; Salomon, C

    1999-02-01

    The output of two grating-stabilized external-cavity diode lasers was injected into a semiconductor tapered amplif ier in a master oscillator-power amplif ier (MOPA) configuration. At a wavelength of 671 nm this configuration produced 210 mW of power in a diffraction-limited mode with two frequency components of narrow linewidth. The frequency difference delta was varied from 20 MHz to 12 GHz, while the power ratio of the two components was freely adjustable. For delta < 2 GHz additional frequency sidebands appear in the output of the MOPA. This configuration is a f lexible and simple high-power cw laser source for light with multiple narrow-linewidth frequency components. PMID:18071437

  7. High-power, narrow linewidth 1.5-μm fiber amplifier lidar transmitter for atmospheric CO2 detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei; Engin, Doruk; Storm, Mark; Gupta, Shantanu

    2014-03-01

    This paper demonstrates a next-generation high-energy, eye-safe light detection and ranging (LIDAR) transmitter for the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. The system design is based on an advanced eye-safe, polarization-maintaining (PM) master oscillator-power amplifier (MOPA) LIDAR transmitter platform currently under development at Fibertek. This platform consists of a narrow linewidth (400 Hz - 1MHz) and highly stable seed laser, a flexible and reconfigurable pulse generator, and multiple stages of PM Erbium (Er)-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) with increasing mode-field area. Using this architecture, we have demonstrated more than 20W continuous wave (CW) at 1571nm, up to 475 μJ energy per pulse at 1572 nm, and up to 250 μJ energy per pulse at 1529 nm wavelength with 1.5 μs pulsewidth and 10 kHz repetition rate. The output beams at the highest energy levels are diffraction limited, and the polarization extinction ratio (PER) is ~17dB. The optical efficiency is about 36% at CW operation and the optical-to-optical conversion efficiency is ~17% with respect to total pump power when the laser is in pulse operation mode. We also demonstrate a comparable optical efficiency (30%) with CW operation using radiationharden Er-doped gain fiber.

  8. A high-power diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 slab amplifier with a hybrid resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Y. F.; Zhang, H. L.; Yuan, J. H.; Hao, X. L.; Xing, J. C.; Xin, J. G.; Jiang, Y.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrated a compact and efficient in-band diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 partially end-pumped slab (Innoslab) nanosecond amplifier based on a hybrid resonator. For the seeder source, a-6 W, 5 ns Q-switched laser with a repetition rate of 30 kHz was obtained with beam quality factors M 2  <  1.3 . A beam-shaping system consisting of cylindrical lenses was designed according to the different sizes of the active medium in two orthogonal directions. A maximum average output power of 77 W was obtained. The optical-to-optical efficiency was 27.9%. The beam quality factors M 2 in the unstable and stable directions were 1.52 and 1.36, respectively.

  9. Analyses of advanced concepts in multi-stage gyro-amplifiers and startup in high power gyro-oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyn, Oleksandr V.

    Gyrotrons are well recognized sources of high-power coherent electromagnetic radiation. The power that gyrotrons can radiate in the millimeter- and submillimeter-wavelength regions exceeds the power of classical microwave tubes by many orders of magnitude. In this work, the author considers some problems related to the operation of gyro-devices and methods of their solution. In particular, the self-excitation conditions for parasitic backward waves and effect of distributed losses on the small-signal gain of gyro-TWTs are analyzed. The corresponding small-signal theory describing two-stage gyro-traveling-wave tubes (gyro-TWTs) with the first stage having distributed losses is presented. The theory is illustrated by using it for the description of operation of a Ka-band gyro-TWT designed at the Naval Research Laboratory. Also, the results of nonlinear studies of this tube are presented and compared with the ones obtained by the use of MAGY, a multi-frequency, self-consistent code developed at the University of Maryland. An attempt to build a large signal theory of gyro-TWTs with tapered geometry and magnetic field profile is made and first results are obtained for a 250 GHz gyro-TWT. A comparative small-signal analysis of conventional four-cavity and three-stage clustered-cavity gyroklystrons is performed. The corresponding point-gap models for these devices are presented. The efficiency, gain, bandwidth and gain-bandwidth product are analyzed for each scheme. Advantages of the clustered-cavity over the conventional design are discussed. The startup scenarios in high-power gyrotrons and the most important physical effects associated with them are considered. The work presents the results of startup simulations for a 140 GHz, MW-class gyrotron developed by Communications and Power Industries (CPI) for electron-cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and current drive experiments on the "Wendelstein 7-X" stellarator plasma. Also presented are the results for a 110 GHz, 1

  10. Experimental results of a sheet-beam, high power, FEL amplifier with application to magnetic fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.

    1995-12-31

    The experimental study of sheet-beam FELs as candidate millimeter-wave sources for heating magnetic fusion plasmas has achieved a major milestone. In a proof-of-principle, pulsed experiment, saturated FEL amplifier operation was achieved with 250 kW of output power at 86 GHz. Input microwave power was 1 kW, beam voltage was 450 kV and beam current was 17 A. The planar wiggler had a peak value of 3.8 kG, a period of 0.96 cm and was 71 cm long. The linear gain of 30 dB, saturated gain of 24 dB and saturated efficiency of 3% all are in good agreement with theoretical prediction. Follow-on work would include development of a thermionic sheet-beam electron-gun compatible with CW FEL operation, adding a section of tapered wiggler to increase the output power to levels in excess of 1 megawatt, and increasing the FEL frequency.

  11. Towards coherent combining of X-band high power microwaves: phase-locked long pulse radiations by a relativistic triaxial klystron amplifier.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jinchuan; Zhang, Jun; Qi, Zumin; Yang, Jianhua; Shu, Ting; Zhang, Jiande; Zhong, Huihuang

    2016-01-01

    The radio-frequency breakdown due to ultrahigh electric field strength essentially limits power handling capability of an individual high power microwave (HPM) generator, and this issue becomes more challenging for high frequency bands. Coherent power combining therefore provides an alternative approach to achieve an equivalent peak power of the order of ∼100 GW, which consequently provides opportunities to explore microwave related physics at extremes. The triaxial klystron amplifier (TKA) is a promising candidate for coherent power combing in high frequency bands owing to its intrinsic merit of high power capacity, nevertheless phase-locked long pulse radiation from TKA has not yet been obtained experimentally as the coaxial structure of TKA can easily lead to self-excitation of parasitic modes. In this paper, we present investigations into an X-band TKA capable of producing 1.1 GW HPMs with pulse duration of about 103 ns at the frequency of 9.375 GHz in experiment. Furthermore, the shot-to-shot fluctuation standard deviation of the phase shifts between the input and output microwaves is demonstrated to be less than 10°. The reported achievements open up prospects for accomplishing coherent power combining of X-band HPMs in the near future, and might also excite new development interests concerning high frequency TKAs. PMID:27481661

  12. Towards coherent combining of X-band high power microwaves: phase-locked long pulse radiations by a relativistic triaxial klystron amplifier.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jinchuan; Zhang, Jun; Qi, Zumin; Yang, Jianhua; Shu, Ting; Zhang, Jiande; Zhong, Huihuang

    2016-01-01

    The radio-frequency breakdown due to ultrahigh electric field strength essentially limits power handling capability of an individual high power microwave (HPM) generator, and this issue becomes more challenging for high frequency bands. Coherent power combining therefore provides an alternative approach to achieve an equivalent peak power of the order of ∼100 GW, which consequently provides opportunities to explore microwave related physics at extremes. The triaxial klystron amplifier (TKA) is a promising candidate for coherent power combing in high frequency bands owing to its intrinsic merit of high power capacity, nevertheless phase-locked long pulse radiation from TKA has not yet been obtained experimentally as the coaxial structure of TKA can easily lead to self-excitation of parasitic modes. In this paper, we present investigations into an X-band TKA capable of producing 1.1 GW HPMs with pulse duration of about 103 ns at the frequency of 9.375 GHz in experiment. Furthermore, the shot-to-shot fluctuation standard deviation of the phase shifts between the input and output microwaves is demonstrated to be less than 10°. The reported achievements open up prospects for accomplishing coherent power combining of X-band HPMs in the near future, and might also excite new development interests concerning high frequency TKAs.

  13. Towards coherent combining of X-band high power microwaves: phase-locked long pulse radiations by a relativistic triaxial klystron amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Jinchuan; Zhang, Jun; Qi, Zumin; Yang, Jianhua; Shu, Ting; Zhang, Jiande; Zhong, Huihuang

    2016-01-01

    The radio-frequency breakdown due to ultrahigh electric field strength essentially limits power handling capability of an individual high power microwave (HPM) generator, and this issue becomes more challenging for high frequency bands. Coherent power combining therefore provides an alternative approach to achieve an equivalent peak power of the order of ∼100 GW, which consequently provides opportunities to explore microwave related physics at extremes. The triaxial klystron amplifier (TKA) is a promising candidate for coherent power combing in high frequency bands owing to its intrinsic merit of high power capacity, nevertheless phase-locked long pulse radiation from TKA has not yet been obtained experimentally as the coaxial structure of TKA can easily lead to self-excitation of parasitic modes. In this paper, we present investigations into an X-band TKA capable of producing 1.1 GW HPMs with pulse duration of about 103 ns at the frequency of 9.375 GHz in experiment. Furthermore, the shot-to-shot fluctuation standard deviation of the phase shifts between the input and output microwaves is demonstrated to be less than 10°. The reported achievements open up prospects for accomplishing coherent power combining of X-band HPMs in the near future, and might also excite new development interests concerning high frequency TKAs. PMID:27481661

  14. Towards coherent combining of X-band high power microwaves: phase-locked long pulse radiations by a relativistic triaxial klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Jinchuan; Zhang, Jun; Qi, Zumin; Yang, Jianhua; Shu, Ting; Zhang, Jiande; Zhong, Huihuang

    2016-08-01

    The radio-frequency breakdown due to ultrahigh electric field strength essentially limits power handling capability of an individual high power microwave (HPM) generator, and this issue becomes more challenging for high frequency bands. Coherent power combining therefore provides an alternative approach to achieve an equivalent peak power of the order of ∼100 GW, which consequently provides opportunities to explore microwave related physics at extremes. The triaxial klystron amplifier (TKA) is a promising candidate for coherent power combing in high frequency bands owing to its intrinsic merit of high power capacity, nevertheless phase-locked long pulse radiation from TKA has not yet been obtained experimentally as the coaxial structure of TKA can easily lead to self-excitation of parasitic modes. In this paper, we present investigations into an X-band TKA capable of producing 1.1 GW HPMs with pulse duration of about 103 ns at the frequency of 9.375 GHz in experiment. Furthermore, the shot-to-shot fluctuation standard deviation of the phase shifts between the input and output microwaves is demonstrated to be less than 10°. The reported achievements open up prospects for accomplishing coherent power combining of X-band HPMs in the near future, and might also excite new development interests concerning high frequency TKAs.

  15. High-power SiC MESFET using a dual p-buffer layer for an S-band power amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiao-Chuan; Sun, He; Rao, Cheng-Yuan; Zhang, Bo

    2013-01-01

    A silicon carbide (SiC) based metal semiconductor field effect transistor (MESFET) is fabricated by using a standard SiC MESFET structure with the application of a dual p-buffer layer and a multi-recessed gate to the process for an S-band power amplifier. The lower doped upper-buffer layer serves to maintain the channel current, while the higher doped lower-buffer layer is used to provide excellent electron confinement in the channel layer. A 20-mm gate periphery SiC MESFET biased at a drain voltage of 85 V demonstrates a pulsed wave saturated output power of 94 W, a linear gain of 11.7 dB, and a maximum power added efficiency of 24.3% at 3.4 GHz. These results are improved compared with those of the conventional single p-buffer MESFET fabricated in this work using the same process. A radio-frequency power output greater than 4.7 W/mm is achieved, showing the potential as a high-voltage operation device for high-power solid-state amplifier applications.

  16. Phase locking of an S-band wide-gap klystron amplifier with high power injection driven by a relativistic backward wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Xianchen; Zhang Jiande; Yang Jianhua; Jin Zhenxing

    2012-12-15

    Theoretical analyses and preliminary experiments on the phase-locking characteristics of an inductively loaded 2-cavity wide-gap klystron amplifier (WKA) with high power injection driven by a GW-class relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) are presented. Electric power of the amplifier and oscillator is supplied by a single accelerator being capable of producing dual electron beams. The well phase-locking effect of the RBWO-WKA system requires the oscillator have good frequency reproducibility and stability from pulse to pulse. Thus, the main switch of the accelerator is externally triggered to stabilize the diode voltage and then the working frequency. In the experiment, frequency of the WKA is linearly locked by the RBWO. With a diode voltage of 530 kV and an input power of {approx}22 MW, an output power of {approx}230 MW with the power gain of {approx}10.2 dB is obtained from the WKA. As the main switch is triggered, the relative phase difference between the RBWO and the WKA is less than {+-}15 Degree-Sign in a single shot, and phase jitter of {+-}11 Degree-Sign is obtained within a series of shots with duration of about 40 ns.

  17. Measurements of the temporal and spatial phase variations of a 33 GHz pulsed free electron laser amplifier and application to high gradient RF acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Volfbeyn, P.; Bekefi, G.

    1995-12-31

    We report the results of temporal and spatial measurements of phase of a pulsed free electron laser amplifier (FEL) operating in combined wiggler and axial guide magnetic fields. The 33 GHz FEL is driven by a mildly relativistic electron beam (750 kV, 90-300 A, 30 ns) and generates 61 MW of radiation with a high power magnetron as the input source. The phase is measured by an interferometric technique from which frequency shifting is determined. The results are simulated with a computer code. Experimental studies on a CERN-CLIC 32.98 GHz 26-cell high gradient accelerating section (HGA) were carried out for input powers from 0.1 MW to 35 MW. The FEL served as the r.f. power source for the HGA. The maximum power in the transmitted pulse was measured to be 15 MW for an input pulse of 35 MW. The theoretically calculated shunt impedance of 116 M{Omega}/m predicts a field gradient of 65 MeV/m inside the HGA. For power levels >3MW the pulse transmitted through the HGA was observed to be shorter than the input pulse and pulse shortening became more serious with increasing power input. At the highest power levels the output pulse length (about 5 nsec) was about one quarter of the input pulse length. Various tests suggest that these undesirable effects occur in the input coupler to the HGA. Light and X-ray production inside the HGA have been observed.

  18. High-Speed, high-power, switching transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnahan, D.; Ohu, C. K.; Hower, P. L.

    1979-01-01

    Silicon transistor rate for 200 angstroms at 400 to 600 volts combines switching speed of transistors with ruggedness, power capacity of thyristor. Transistor introduces unique combination of increased power-handling capability, unusally low saturation and switching losses, and submicrosecond switching speeds. Potential applications include high power switching regulators, linear amplifiers, chopper controls for high frequency electrical vehicle drives, VLF transmitters, RF induction heaters, kitchen cooking ranges, and electronic scalpels for medical surgery.

  19. THE DESIGN OF AN RF ANTENNA FOR A LARGE-BORE, HIGH POWER, STEADY STATE PLASMA PROCESSING CHAMBER FOR MATERIAL SEPARATION - CRADA FINAL REPORT for CRADA Number ORNL00-0585

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, D. A.; Freeman, R. L.

    2001-11-07

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC, (Contractor), and Archimedes Technology Group, (Participant) is to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure. The project objectives are to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure.

  20. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Basic Electricity and Electronics. CANTRAC A-100-0010. Module 31: RF, IF, and Video Amplifiers. Study Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chief of Naval Education and Training Support, Pensacola, FL.

    This individualized learning module on radio frequency (RF), intermediate frequency (IF), and video amplifiers is one in a series of modules for a course in basic electricity and electronics. The course is one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instructional and curriculum development in a…

  1. An analytical model for floating probes in AC plasma and its application to double probes for high density, high power RF discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caneses, Juan Francisco; Blackwell, Boyd; Plasma Research Laboratory Team

    2013-10-01

    In this work we provide an analytical model that allows one to quantitatively assess the RF compensation performance and suitability of the double probe technique for use in RF generated plasma. The model is based in the theory of the self-bias effect as described in Braithwaite's work, which we extend to include the time resolved behavior of floating probes. We provide experimental verification for this model and show that the theory of transient RF self-bias probes and harmonic current detection probes are limiting cases of this extended model. Furthermore, the model shows that the RF compensation is solely dependent on the sheath impedance, the probe's stray capacitance to ground and RF frequency. In addition, we use these results to implement a double probe system for use in high density helicon plasma where heat loads could potentially damage the intricate components in an RF compensating circuit. Finally we use this model to (1) recommend ways to extend the operational regime of double probes where the plasma conditions would render them unsuitable and to (2) comment on the use of this model to aid design of RF compensated Langmuir probes.

  2. Generation of high-energy sub-20 fs pulses tunable in the 250-310 nm region by frequency doubling of a high-power noncollinear optical parametric amplifier.

    PubMed

    Beutler, Marcus; Ghotbi, Masood; Noack, Frank; Brida, Daniele; Manzoni, Cristian; Cerullo, Giulio

    2009-03-15

    We report on the generation of powerful sub-20 fs deep UV pulses with 10 microJ level energy and broadly tunable in the 250-310 nm range. These pulses are produced by frequency doubling a high-power noncollinear optical parametric amplifier and compressed by a pair of MgF2 prisms to an almost transform-limited duration. Our results provide a power scaling by an order of magnitude with respect to previous works.

  3. High Power Beam Test and Measurement of Emittance Evolution of a 1.6-Cell Photocathode RF Gun at Pohang Accelerator Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jang-Ho; Park, Sung-Ju; Kim, Changbum; Parc, Yong-Woon; Hong, Ju-Ho; Huang, Jung-Yun; Xiang, Dao; Wang, Xijie; Ko, In Soo

    2007-04-01

    A Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) GUN-IV type photocathode rf gun has been fabricated to use in femtosecond electron diffraction (FED), femtosecond far infrared radiation (fs-FIR) facility, and X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facilities at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL). The gun consists of a 1.6-cell cavity with a copper cathode, a solenoid magnet, beam diagnostic components and auxiliary systems. We report here the measurement of the basic beam parameters which confirm a successful fabrication of the photocathode RF gun system. The emittance evolution is measured by an emittance meter and compared with the PARMELA simulation, which shows a good agreement.

  4. High Power Microwaves for Accelerator Applications*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshfield, J. L.

    2004-05-01

    Realization of a future high-energy electron-positron collider rests upon many technological advancements, among which are high-power microwave amplifiers, and rf pulse compressors. In one scenario for the 0.5 TeV NLC, each linac requires about 1000, 75 MW, 11.4 GHz amplifiers furnishing peak powers of 75 MW in 1.6 mcs pulses at 120 Hz pps. Pulse compression to 0.4 mcs would result in a total rf peak power of over 400 GW. After a decade of intense development, SLAC has evidently reached the amplifier goal with the XP3 PPM klystron. Dual-mode double-delay-line pulse compression has demonstrated 4:1 compression to a peak output of 500 MW. These achievements help provide technological justification for NLC. Further justification rests with NLC's capability for a subsequent energy upgrade to 1.0-1.5 TeV. Nascent microwave technologies for the energy upgrade are discussed. These include an X-band magnicon, with double the output of a SLAC klystron: peak and average powers are predicted to reach 155 MW and 60 kW. Each magnicon could replace two SLAC klystrons, and operate with twice the pulse width. Therefore, an 8:1 pulse compressor is required. Active, efficient, rf pulse compression, with switching during the rf pulse could be provided by an externally-varied semiconductor, plasma, or ferroelectric switching element. Demonstration of an X-band magnicon, and of 10:1 X-band pulse compression using plasma switches is described. Prospects for higher efficiency rf pulse compression using ferroelectric switching elements is also described. A scenario for obtaining an energy upgrade to 2.0 TeV is outlined, based on use of 34-GHz technology in the inner halves of each linac. This option rests upon development of a 34-GHz magnicon amplifier, first results with which are described. *Sponsored by DoE, Division of High Energy Physics.

  5. CARM and harmonic gyro-amplifier experiments at 17 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Menninger, W.L.; Danly, B.G.; Alberti, S.; Chen, C.; Rullier, J.L.; Temkin, R.J.; Giguet, E. |

    1993-11-01

    Cyclotron resonance maser amplifiers are possible sources for applications such as electron cyclotron resonance heating of fusion plasmas and driving high-gradient rf linear accelerators. For accelerator drivers, amplifiers or phase locked-oscillators are required. A 17 GHz cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM) amplifier experiment and a 17 GHz third harmonic gyro-amplifier experiment are presently underway at the MIT Plasma Fusion Center. Using the SRL/MIT SNOMAD II introduction accelerator to provide a 380 kV, 180 A, 30 ns flat top electron beam, the gyro-amplifier experiment has produced 5 MW of rf power with over 50 dB of gain at 17 GHz. The gyro-amplifier operates in the TE{sub 31} mode using a third harmonic interaction. Because of its high power output, the gyro-amplifier will be used as the rf source for a photocathode rf electron gun experiment also taking place at MIT. Preliminary gyro-amplifier results are presented, including measurement of rf power, gain versus interaction length, and the far-field pattern. A CARM experiment designed to operate in the TE{sub 11} mode is also discussed.

  6. High-power near-infrared linearly-polarized supercontinuum generation in a polarization-maintaining Yb-doped fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Jin, Aijun; Ma, Pengfei; Chen, Shengping; Hou, Jing

    2015-11-01

    We report an all-fiber linearly-polarized (LP) supercontinuum (SC) source with high average power generated in a polarization-maintaining (PM) master-oscillation power-amplifier (MOPA). The experimental configuration comprises an LP picosecond pulsed laser and three PM Yd-doped fiber amplifiers (YDFA). The output has the average power of 124.8 W with the spectrum covering from 850 to 1900 nm. The measured polarization extinction ratio (PER) of the whole SC source is about 85% which verifies the SC an LP source. This work is, to our best knowledge, the highest output average power of an LP SC source that ever reported. The influence of PM fiber splicing method on the LP SC property is investigated by splicing the PM fibers with slow axis parallel or perpendicularly aligned, and also an LP SC with low output power is demonstrated.

  7. High-power near-infrared linearly-polarized supercontinuum generation in a polarization-maintaining Yb-doped fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Jin, Aijun; Ma, Pengfei; Chen, Shengping; Hou, Jing

    2015-11-01

    We report an all-fiber linearly-polarized (LP) supercontinuum (SC) source with high average power generated in a polarization-maintaining (PM) master-oscillation power-amplifier (MOPA). The experimental configuration comprises an LP picosecond pulsed laser and three PM Yd-doped fiber amplifiers (YDFA). The output has the average power of 124.8 W with the spectrum covering from 850 to 1900 nm. The measured polarization extinction ratio (PER) of the whole SC source is about 85% which verifies the SC an LP source. This work is, to our best knowledge, the highest output average power of an LP SC source that ever reported. The influence of PM fiber splicing method on the LP SC property is investigated by splicing the PM fibers with slow axis parallel or perpendicularly aligned, and also an LP SC with low output power is demonstrated. PMID:26561136

  8. Characterization of a High-SpeedHigh-Power Semiconductor Master-Oscillator Power-Amplifier (MOPA) Laser as a Free-Space Transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, M. W.

    2000-04-01

    Semiconductor lasers offer promise as high-speed transmitters for free-space optical communication systems. This article examines the performance of a semiconductor laser system in a master-oscillator power-amplifier (MOPA) geometry developed through a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with SDL, Inc. The compact thermo-electric cooler (TEC) packaged device is capable of 1-W output optical power at greater than 2-Gb/s data rates and a wavelength of 960 nm. In particular, we have investigated the effects of amplified spontaneous emission on the modulation extinction ratio and bit-error rate (BER) performance. BERs of up to 10^(-9) were possible at 1.4 Gb/s; however, the modulation extinction ratio was limited to 6 dB. Other key parameters for a free-space optical transmitter, such as the electrical-optical efficiency (24 percent) and beam quality, also were measured.

  9. High-power continuous-wave tunable 544- and 272-nm beams based on a diode-oscillator fiber-amplifier for calcium spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Kwang-Hoon; Kim, Yonghee; Park, Hyunmin; Cha, Yong-Ho; Kim, Taek-Soo; Lee, Lim; Lim, Gwon; Han, Jaemin; Ko, Kwang-Hee; Jeong, Do-Young

    2015-08-01

    Continuous-wave single-frequency tunable 544- and 272-nm beams have been demonstrated by the second- and fourth-harmonic conversions of a 1088-nm fundamental beam from a diode-oscillator fiber-amplifier. The single-pass second-harmonic generation with a MgO-doped periodically poled stoichiometric LiTaO3 crystal and the external-cavity frequency-doubling technique with a bulk BBO crystal were employed to achieve an approximately 6-W 544-nm beam and a 1.5-W 272-nm beam, respectively. We characterized the second- and fourth-harmonic generations and discussed their applications to calcium spectroscopy.

  10. High power microwave simulator development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, James

    1987-12-01

    Emerging applications for high power microwaves in defense necessitate the development of reliable GW level sources for simulation of effects. For broadband variable frequency survey work, the vircator (virtual cathode oscillator) was developed; this is a tunable RF source operating from the upper X band to below the L band range. For narrowband fixed frequency studies, a special magnetron was developed.

  11. High-power single-element pseudomorphic InGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs single quantum well lasers for pumping Er-doped fiber amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsson, A.; Forouhar, S.; Cody, J.; Lang, R. J.; Andrekson, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    A 980-nm-ridge waveguide pseudomorphic InGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs single-quantum-well laser with a maximum single-ended output power of 240 mW from a facet-coated device is fabricated from a graded-index separate-confinement heterostructure grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The laser oscillates in the fundamental spatial mode, allowing 22 percent coupling efficiency into a 1.55-micron single-mode optical fiber. Life testing at an output power of 30 mW per facet from uncoated devices reveals a superior reliability to GaAs/AlGaAs quantum-well lasers but also the need for protective facet coatings for long term reliability at power levels required for pumping Er-doped fiber amplifiers.

  12. High-power LD side-pump Nd: YAG regenerative amplifier at 1 kHz repetition rate with volume Bragg gratings (VBG) for broadening and compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Ming-Liang; Chen, Li-Yuan; Chen, Meng; Li, Gang

    2016-05-01

    Pulse width of 8.7 ps was broadened to 102.2, 198 ps with single and double pass the VBG respectively. When the 102.2 ps pulse was injected into 1 kHz repetition rate of LD side-pump Nd: YAG regenerative amplifier (RA), pulse width of 87.5 ps at 1 kHz was obtained with the pulse energy of 9.4 mJ, the beam quality of M^2 factor was 1.2. The pulse width was compressed to 32.7 ps with a single pass VBG and the pulse energy reduced to 8.8 mJ, and the power density was up to 15.2 GW/cm2, the stability for pulse to pulse rms is about 0.6 %, beam pointing was about 35 μrad. In addition, when 198 ps pulse was injected into RA, pulse width of 156 ps was obtained which energy was 9.6 mJ, the pulse width was compressed to 38 ps by double passing the VBG, the pulse energy decreased to 8.5 mJ. Chirped VBG is a new way to obtain high-intensity picosecond pulse laser system simple and smaller.

  13. The Electron Beam Semiconductor (EBS) amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    True, R. M.; Baxendale, J. F.

    1980-07-01

    The Electron Beam Semiconductor (EBS) concept has existed for three decades; but only within the last decade has an active, well-defined program been underway to develop devices that can operate as high-power radio frequency(RF) amplifiers, fast risetime switches, and current and voltage pulse amplifiers. This report discusses the test procedures, data and results of reliability testing of RF and video pulse EBS amplifiers at Electronics Research and Development Command (ERADCOM), Fort Monmouth, New Jersey. Also, the experimental analysis of the series connected diode EBS device is described in detail. Finally, the report concludes with a discussion of the state-of-the-art of EBS and future trends of the technology.

  14. A prototype 7.5 MHz Finemet(Trademark) loaded RF cavity and 200kW amplifier for the Fermilab proton driver

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Wildman et al.

    2001-07-09

    A 7.5 MHz RF cavity and power amplifier have been built and tested at Fermilab as part of the proton Driver Design Study. The project goal was to achieve the highest possible 7.5 MHz accelerating gradient at 15 Hz with a 50% duty cycle. To reduce beam loading effects, a low shunt impedance (500{Omega}) design was chosen. The 46 cm long single gap cavity uses 5 inductive cores, consisting of the nanocrystalline soft magnetic alloy Finemet, to achieve a peak accelerating voltage of 15 kV. The 95 cm OD tape wound cores have been cut in half to increase the cavity Q and are cooled from both sides using large water-cooled copper heat sinks. The prototype cavity has a shunt impedance of 550{Omega}, Q = 11, and is powered by a 200 kW cw cathode driven tetrode amplifier. Both cavity and amplifier designs are described. Results from recent cavity tests coalescing beam in the Fermilab Main Injector is also presented.

  15. High Power Amplifier and Power Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Johnny; Stride, Scot; Harvey, Wayne; Haque, Inam; Packard, Newton; Ng, Quintin; Ispirian, Julie Y.; Waian, Christopher; Janes, Drew

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses the creation of a high-voltage power supply (HVPS) that is able to contain voltages up to -20 kV, keep electrical field strengths to below 200 V/mil (approximately equal to 7.87 kV/mm), and can provide a 200-nanosecond rise/fall time focus modulator swinging between cathode potential of 16.3 kV and -19.3 kV. This HVPS can protect the 95-GHz, pulsed extended interaction klystron (EIK) from arcs/discharges from all sources, including those from within the EIK fs vacuum envelope. This innovation has a multi-winding pulse transformer design, which uses new winding techniques to provide the same delays and rise/fall times (less than 10 nanoseconds) at different potential levels ranging from -20 kV to -16 kV. Another feature involves a high-voltage printed-wiring board that was corona-free at -20 kV DC with a 3- kV AC swing. The corona-free multilayer high-voltage board is used to simulate fields of less than 200 V/mil (approximately equal to 7.87 kV/mm) at 20 kV DC. Drive techniques for the modulator FETs (field-effect transistors) (four to 10 in a series) were created to change states (3,000-V swing) without abrupt steps, while still maintaining required delays and transition times. The packing scheme includes a potting mold to house a ten-stage modulator in the space that, in the past, only housed a four-stage modulator. Problems keeping heat down were solved using aluminum oxide substrate in the high-voltage section to limit temperature rise to less than 10 while withstanding -20 kV DC voltage and remaining corona-free.

  16. High-power frequency comb in the range of 2-2.15  μm based on a holmium fiber amplifier seeded by wavelength-shifted Raman solitons from an erbium-fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Coluccelli, Nicola; Cassinerio, Marco; Gambetta, Alessio; Laporta, Paolo; Galzerano, Gianluca

    2014-03-15

    We demonstrate a room-temperature high-power frequency comb source covering the spectral region from 2 to 2.15 μm. The source is based on a femtosecond erbium-fiber laser operating at 1.55 μm with a repetition rate of 250 MHz, wavelength-shifted up to 2.06 μm by the solitonic Raman effect, seeding a large-mode-area holmium (Ho) fiber amplifier pumped by a thulium (Tm) fiber laser emitting at 1.94 μm. The frequency comb has an integrated power of 2 W, with overall power fluctuations as low as 0.3%. The beatnote between the comb and a high-spectral-purity, single-frequency Tm-Ho laser has a linewidth of 32 kHz over 1 ms observation time, with a signal-to-noise ratio in excess of 30 dB.

  17. High-power PPMgLN-based optical parametric oscillator pumped by a linearly polarized, semi-fiber-coupled acousto-optic Q-switched fiber master oscillator power amplifier.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Jiang, Peipei; Yang, Dingzhong; Hu, Chengzhi; Wu, Bo; Shen, Yonghang

    2013-09-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated a periodically poled magnesium-oxide-doped lithium niobate (PPMgLN)-based, fiber-laser-pumped optical parametric oscillator (OPO) generating idler wavelength of 3.82 μm. The pump fiber laser was constructed with a linearly polarized, semi-fiber-coupled acousto-optic Q-switched fiber oscillator and a polarization-maintaining fiber amplifier with pulse duration of 190 ns at the highest output power. The OPO was specifically configured in single-pass, singly resonant linear cavity structure to avoid the damage risk of the pump fiber laser, which is always a serious issue in the fiber-laser-pumped, double-pass, singly oscillating structured OPOs. Under the highest pump power of 25 W, an idler average output power of 3.27 W with one-hour peak-to-peak instability of 5.2% was obtained. The measured M2 factors were 1.98 and 1.44 for horizontal and vertical axis, respectively. The high power stability and good beam quality demonstrated the suitability of such technology for practical application. PMID:24085093

  18. Design and simulation of a gyroklystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, M. S. Swati, M. V.; Jain, P. K.

    2015-03-15

    In the present paper, a design methodology of the gyroklystron amplifier has been described and subsequently used for the design of a typically selected 200 kW, Ka-band, four-cavity gyroklystron amplifier. This conceptual device design has been validated through the 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation and nonlinear analysis. Commercially available PIC simulation code “MAGIC” has been used for the electromagnetic study at the different location of the device RF interaction structure for the beam-absent case, i.e., eigenmode study as well as for the electron beam and RF wave interaction behaviour study in the beam present case of the gyroklystron. In addition, a practical problem of misalignment of the RF cavities with drift tubes within the tube has been also investigated and its effect on device performance studied. The analytical and simulation results confirmed the validity of the gyroklystron device design. The PIC simulation results of the present gyroklystron produced a stable RF output power of ∼218 kW for 0% velocity spread at 35 GHz, with ∼45 dB gain, 37% efficiency, and a bandwidth of 0.3% for a 70 kV, 8.2 A gyrating electron beam. The simulated values of RF output power have been found in agreement with the nonlinear analysis results within ∼5%. Further, the PIC simulation has been extended to study a practical problem of misalignment of the cavities axis and drift tube axis of the gyroklystron amplifier and found that the RF output power is more sensitive to misalignments in comparison to the device bandwidth. The present paper, gyroklystron device design, nonlinear analysis, and 3D PIC simulation using commercially available code had been systematically described would be of use to the high-power gyro-amplifier tube designers and research scientists.

  19. Precision 0.5 GW X-band rf system for advanced Compton scattering source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, T. S.; Anderson, G.; Gibson, D.; Hartemann, F. V.; Barty, C. P. J.; Vlieks, A.; Tantawi, S.; Jongewaard, E.; Anderson, S. G.

    2009-11-01

    A Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering light source is being developed at LLNL. The electron beam for the Compton scattering interaction will be generated by a X-band RF gun and a X-band LINAC at the frequency of 11.424 GHz. High power RF in excess of 500 MW is needed to accelerate the electrons to energy of 250 MeV or greater for the interaction. Two high power klystron amplifiers, each capable of generating 50 MW, 1.5 msec pulses, will be the main high power RF sources for the system. These klystrons will be powered by state of the art solid-state high voltage modulators. A RF pulse compressor, similar to the SLED II pulse compressor, will compress the klystron output pulse with a power gain factor of five. This will give us 500 MW (0.5 GW) at output of the compressor. The compressed pulse will then be distributed to the RF gun and to the LINAC with specific phase and amplitude control points to allow for parameter control during operation. This high power RF system is being designed and constructed. In this paper, we will present the design, layout, and status of this RF system.

  20. High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier: From the Lab to Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert, III; Bell, Joseph L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the beginnings of space travel, various microwave power amplifier designs have been employed. These included Class-A, -B, and -C bias arrangements. However, shared limitation of these topologies is the inherent high total consumption of input power associated with the generation of radio frequency (RF)/microwave power. The power amplifier has always been the largest drain for the limited available power on the spacecraft. Typically, the conversion efficiency of a microwave power amplifier is 10 to 20%. For a typical microwave power amplifier of 20 watts, input DC power of at least 100 watts is required. Such a large demand for input power suggests that a better method of RF/microwave power generation is required. The price paid for using a linear amplifier where high linearity is unnecessary includes higher initial and operating costs, lower DC-to-RF conversion efficiency, high power consumption, higher power dissipation and the accompanying need for higher capacity heat removal means, and an amplifier that is more prone to parasitic oscillation. The first use of a higher efficiency mode of power generation was described by Baxandall in 1959. This higher efficiency mode, Class-D, is achieved through distinct switching techniques to reduce the power losses associated with switching, conduction, and gate drive losses of a given transistor.

  1. Gyromagnetron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Y.-Y.; Barnett, L. R.

    1985-10-29

    A gyromagnetron amplifier for radiation at millimeter wavelengths comprising a tapered waveguide tube with longitudinally running vanes in the walls of the tube with the number of vanes chosen to coincide with a desired cyclotron harmonic frequency to be amplified. A beam of spiralling mildly relativistic electrons with an energy of 100 keV or less is directed into the small end of the tapered waveguide tube. A tapered axial magnetic field is set up within the waveguide tube with a low value appropriate to the amplification of a cyclotron harmonic frequency. An electromagnetic wave to be amplified is launched into the waveguide tube to co-propagate and be amplified by the spiralling electron beam. This device is characterized by a wide bandwidth, a low operating magnetic field, a relatively low operating beam voltage, with high power, and the capability of continuous wave operation.

  2. Free-electron masers vs. gyrotrons: prospects for high-power sources at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumm, Manfred

    2002-05-01

    The possible applications of high-power millimeter (mm) and sub-mm waves from free-electron masers (FEMs) and gyro-devices span a wide range of technologies. The plasma physics community has already taken advantage of recent advances in applying high-power mm waves generated by long pulse or continuous wave (CW) gyrotron oscillators and short pulse very high-power FEMs in the areas of RF-plasma production, heating, non-inductive current drive, plasma stabilization and active plasma diagnostics for magnetic confinement thermonuclear fusion research, such as electron cyclotron resonance heating (28-170 GHz), electron cyclotron current drive , collective Thomson scattering , microwave transmission and heat-wave propagation experiments. Continuously frequency tunable FEMs could widen these fields of applications. Another important application of CW gyrotrons is industrial materials processing, e.g. sintering of high-performance functional and structural nanostructured ceramics. Sub-mm wave sources are employed in high-frequency broadband electron paramagnetic resonance and other types of spectroscopy. Future applications which await the development of novel high-power FEM amplifiers and gyro-amplifiers include high-resolution radar ranging and imaging in atmospheric and planetary science as well as deep-space and specialized satellite communications and RF drivers for next-generation high-gradient linear accelerators (supercolliders). The present paper reviews the state-of-the-art and future prospects of these recent applications of gyro-devices and FEMs and compares their specific advantages.

  3. An improved RF circuit for Overhauser magnetometer excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Di; Zhang, Shuang; Guo, Xin; Fu, Haoyang

    2015-08-01

    Overhauser magnetometer is a high-precision device for magnetostatic field measurement, which can be used in a wide variety of purposes: UXO detection, pipeline mapping and other engineering and environmental applications. Traditional proton magnetometer adopts DC polarization, suffering from low polarization efficiency, high power consumption and low signal noise ratio (SNR). Compared with the traditional proton magnetometer, nitroxide free radicals are used for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). RF excitation is very important for electron resonance in nitrogen oxygen free radical solution, and it is primarily significant for the obtention of high SNR signal and high sensitive field observation. Therefore, RF excitation source plays a crucial role in the development of Overhauser magnetometer. In this paper, an improved design of a RF circuit is discussed. The new RF excitation circuit consists of two parts: Quartz crystal oscillator circuit and RF power amplifier circuit. Simulation and optimization designs for power amplifier circuit based on software ADS are presented. Finally we achieve a continuous and stable sine wave of 60MHz with 1-2.5 W output power, and the second harmonic suppression is close to -20dBc. The improved RF circuit has many merits such as small size, low-power consumption and high efficiency, and it can be applied to Overhauser magnetometer to obtain high sensitive field observation.

  4. 500 MW X-Band RF System of a 0.25 GeV Electron LINAC for Advanced Compton Scattering Source Application

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Tak Sum; Anderson, Scott; Barty, Christopher; Gibson, David; Hartemann, Fred; Marsh, Roark; Siders, Craig; Adolphsen, Chris; Jongewaard, Erik; Raubenheimer, Tor; Tantawi, Sami; Vlieks, Arnold; Wang, Juwen; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    A Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering light source is being developed at LLNL in collaboration with the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The electron beam for the Compton scattering interaction will be generated by a X-band RF gun and a X-band LINAC at the frequency of 11.424 GHz. High power RF in excess of 500 MW is needed to accelerate the electrons to energy of 250 MeV or greater for the interaction. Two high power klystron amplifiers, each capable of generating 50 MW, 1.5 msec pulses, will be the main high power RF sources for the system. These klystrons will be powered by state of the art solid-state high voltage modulators. A RF pulse compressor, similar to the SLED II pulse compressor, will compress the klystron output pulse with a power gain factor of five. For compactness consideration, we are looking at a folded waveguide setup. This will give us 500 MW at output of the compressor. The compressed pulse will then be distributed to the RF gun and to six traveling wave accelerator sections. Phase and amplitude control are located at the RF gun input and additional control points along the LINAC to allow for parameter control during operation. This high power RF system is being designed and constructed. In this paper, we will present the design, layout, and status of this RF system.

  5. 500 MW X-BAND RF SYSTEM OF A 0.25 GEV ELECTRON LINAC FOR ADVANCED COMPTON SCATTERING SOURCE APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T S; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Marsh, R A; Siders, C; Barty, C P; Adolphsen, C; Jongewaard, E; Tantawi, S; Vlieks, A; Wang, J W; Raubenheimer, T

    2010-05-12

    A Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering light source is being developed at LLNL in collaboration with SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The electron beam for the Compton scattering interaction will be generated by a X-band RF gun and a X-band LINAC at the frequency of 11.424 GHz. High power RF in excess of 500 MW is needed to accelerate the electrons to energy of 250 MeV or greater for the interaction. Two high power klystron amplifiers, each capable of generating 50 MW, 1.5 msec pulses, will be the main high power RF sources for the system. These klystrons will be powered by state of the art solid-state high voltage modulators. A RF pulse compressor, similar to the SLED II pulse compressor, will compress the klystron output pulse with a power gain factor of five. For compactness consideration, we are looking at a folded waveguide setup. This will give us 500 MW at output of the compressor. The compressed pulse will then be distributed to the RF gun and to six traveling wave accelerator sections. Phase and amplitude control are located at the RF gun input and additional control points along the LINAC to allow for parameter control during operation. This high power RF system is being designed and constructed. In this paper, we will present the design, layout, and status of this RF system.

  6. High-power, high-frequency, annular-beam free-electron maser

    SciTech Connect

    Fazio, M.V.; Carlsten, B.E.; Earley, L.M.; Fortgang, C.M.; Haynes, W.B.; Haddock, P.C.

    1998-11-01

    The authors have developed a 15--17 GHz free electron maser (FEM) capable of producing high power pulses with a phase stability appropriate for linear collider applications. The electron beam source is a 1 {micro}s, 800 kV, 5 kA, 6-cm-dia annular electron beam machine called BANSHEE. The beam interacts with the TM{sub 02} mode Raman FEM amplifier in a corrugated cylindrical waveguide where the beam runs close to the interaction device walls to reduce the power density in the fields. They studied the phase stability by analyzing the dispersion relation for an axial FEL, in which the rf field was transversely wiggled and the electron trajectories were purely longitudinal. Detailed particle-in-cell simulations demonstrated the transverse wiggling of the rf mode and the axial FEL interaction and explicit calculations of the growing root of the dispersion relation are included to verify the phase stability.

  7. Automatic calorimetry system monitors RF power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harness, B. W.; Heiberger, E. C.

    1969-01-01

    Calorimetry system monitors the average power dissipated in a high power RF transmitter. Sensors measure the change in temperature and the flow rate of the coolant, while a multiplier computes the power dissipated in the RF load.

  8. Klystron 'efficiency loop' for the ALS storage ring RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Julian, Jim; Baptiste, Kenneth

    2002-05-20

    The recent energy crisis in California has led us to investigate the high power RF systems at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in order to decrease the energy consumption and power costs. We found the Storage Ring Klystron Power Amplifier system operating as designed but with significant power waste. A simple proportional-integrator (PI) analog loop, which controls the klystron collector beam current, as a function of the output RF power, has been designed and installed. The design considerations, besides efficiency improvement, were to interface to the existing system without major expense. They were to also avoid the klystron cathode power supply filter's resonance in the loop's dynamics, and prevent a conflict with the existing Cavity RF Amplitude Loop dynamics. This efficiency loop will allow us to save up to 700 MW-hours of electrical energy per year and increase the lifetime of the klystron.

  9. Segmented amplifier configurations for laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hagen, Wilhelm F.

    1979-01-01

    An amplifier system for high power lasers, the system comprising a compact array of segments which (1) preserves high, large signal gain with improved pumping efficiency and (2) allows the total amplifier length to be shortened by as much as one order of magnitude. The system uses a three dimensional array of segments, with the plane of each segment being oriented at substantially the amplifier medium Brewster angle relative to the incident laser beam and with one or more linear arrays of flashlamps positioned between adjacent rows of amplifier segments, with the plane of the linear array of flashlamps being substantially parallel to the beam propagation direction.

  10. High-power continuous-wave mid-infrared radiation generated by difference frequency mixing of diode-laser-seeded fiber amplifiers and its application to dual-beam spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, D. G.; Richter, D.; Curl, R. F.; Tittel, F. K.; Goldberg, L.; Koplow, J.

    1999-01-01

    We report the generation of up to 0.7 mW of narrow-linewidth (<60-MHz) radiation at 3.3 micrometers by difference frequency mixing of a Nd:YAG-seeded 1.6-W Yb fiber amplifier and a 1.5-micrometers diode-laser-seeded 0.6-W Er/Yb fiber amplifier in periodically poled LiNbO3. A conversion efficiency of 0.09%/W (0.47 mWW-2 cm-1) was achieved. A room-air CH4 spectrum acquired with a compact 80-m multipass cell and a dual-beam spectroscopic configuration indicates an absorption sensitivity of +/-2.8 x 10(-5) (+/-1 sigma), corresponding to a sub-parts-in-10(9) (ppb) CH4 sensitivity (0.8 ppb).

  11. High Power Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert; Tverdokhlebov, Sergery; Manzella, David

    1999-01-01

    The development of Hall thrusters with powers ranging from tens of kilowatts to in excess of one hundred kilowatts is considered based on renewed interest in high power. high thrust electric propulsion applications. An approach to develop such thrusters based on previous experience is discussed. It is shown that the previous experimental data taken with thrusters of 10 kW input power and less can be used. Potential mass savings due to the design of high power Hall thrusters are discussed. Both xenon and alternate thruster propellant are considered, as are technological issues that will challenge the design of high power Hall thrusters. Finally, the implications of such a development effort with regard to ground testing and spacecraft intecrati'on issues are discussed.

  12. High-power klystrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siambis, John G.; True, Richard B.; Symons, R. S.

    1994-05-01

    Novel emerging applications in advanced linear collider accelerators, ionospheric and atmospheric sensing and modification and a wide spectrum of industrial processing applications, have resulted in microwave tube requirements that call for further development of high power klystrons in the range from S-band to X-band. In the present paper we review recent progress in high power klystron development and discuss some of the issues and scaling laws for successful design. We also discuss recent progress in electron guns with potential grading electrodes for high voltage with short and long pulse operation via computer simulations obtained from the code DEMEOS, as well as preliminary experimental results. We present designs for high power beam collectors.

  13. High Power Co-Axial Coupler

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, M.; Dudas, A.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Guo, Jiquan; Williams, R. Scott

    2013-12-01

    A very high power Coax RF Coupler (MW-Level) is very desirable for a number of accelerator and commercial applications. For example, the development of such a coupler operating at 1.5 GHz may permit the construction of a higher-luminosity version of the Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) being planned at JLab. Muons, Inc. is currently funded by a DOE STTR grant to develop a 1.5-GHz high-power doublewindowcoax coupler with JLab (about 150 kW). Excellent progress has been made on this R&D project, so we propose an extension of this development to build a very high power coax coupler (MW level peak power and a max duty factor of about 4%). The dimensions of the current coax coupler will be scaled up to provide higher power capability.

  14. High-Power Millimeter- and Centimeter-Wave Magnicons for Particle Accelerator Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezhevenko, O. A.; Yakovlev, V. P.; Hirshfield, J. L.; LaPointe, M. A.; Kozyrev, E. V.; Gold, S. H.; Fliflet, A. W.; Kinkead, A. K.; Shchelkunov, S. V.

    2006-01-01

    Two high power, high frequency magnicons have recently been developed by Omega-P, Inc. The first tube, a frequency-doubling amplifier at 11.424 GHz, was designed and built in collaboration with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), to be the prototype of an alternative to the klystron for the Next Linear Collider (NLC); its current use is to furnish RF power for tests of high power components, active pulse compressors, and accelerating structures. The tube is designed to produce ˜60 MW, in ˜1.2 μsec pulses at 58% efficiency and 59 dB gain using a 470 kV, 220 A, 2-mm-diameter beam. Operation of this magnicon has established a research facility at NRL which is only the second laboratory in the USA where high-power microwave R&D at X-band can take place. The second tube is a third harmonic amplifier at 34.272 GHz, with a design power of ˜45 MW in ˜1 μsec pulses at >40% efficiency and 54 dB gain. Its beam voltage is 500 kV, beam current is ˜220 A, and beam diameter is ˜1 mm. This tube, which is now in operation at Yale University, is designed for developing RF technology in the millimeter wavelength domain for a future high-gradient multi-TeV electron-positron linear collider. Design features and latest experimental results for these two magnicons are presented in this paper.

  15. High Power Cryogenic Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Smith

    2011-08-01

    The development of high power cryogenic targets for use in parity violating electron scattering has been a crucial ingredient in the success of those experiments. As we chase the precision frontier, the demands and requirements for these targets have grown accordingly. We discuss the state of the art, and describe recent developments and strategies in the design of the next generation of these targets.

  16. High power density targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellemoine, Frederique

    2013-12-01

    In the context of new generation rare isotope beam facilities based on high-power heavy-ion accelerators and in-flight separation of the reaction products, the design of the rare isotope production targets is a major challenge. In order to provide high-purity beams for science, high resolution is required in the rare isotope separation. This demands a small beam spot on the production target which, together with the short range of heavy ions in matter, leads to very high power densities inside the target material. This paper gives an overview of the challenges associated with this high power density, discusses radiation damage issues in targets exposed to heavy ion beams, and presents recent developments to meet some of these challenges through different projects: FAIR, RIBF and FRIB which is the most challenging. Extensive use of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been made at all facilities to specify critical target parameters and R&D work at FRIB successfully retired two major risks related to high-power density and heavy-ion induced radiation damage.

  17. Shielding for thermoacoustic tomography with RF excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, M.; Becker, G.; Dey, P.; Generotzky, J.; Patch, S. K.

    2008-02-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) pulses used to generate thermoacoustic computerized tomography (TCT) signal couple directly into the pulser-receiver and oscilloscope, swamping true TCT signal. We use a standard RF enclosure housing both RF amplifier and object being imaged. This is similar to RF shielding of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suites and protects electronics outside from stray RF. Unlike MRI, TCT receivers are ultrasound transducers, which must also be shielded from RF. A transducer housing that simultaneously shields RF and permits acoustic transmission was developed specifically for TCT. We compare TCT signals measured with and without RF shielding.

  18. LANSCE 201.25 MHz drift tube linac RF power status

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, J.T.M.; Friedrichs, C.C., Jr.

    1996-09-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center linac provides high power proton beams for neutron science, tritium target development, nuclear physics, material science, isotope production, and weapons research. Number of simultaneous beam users places heavy demands on the RF powerplant, espcially the 201.25 MHz power amplifiers (PA) driving four drift tube linac cavities. Designed nearly 30 years ago, these amplifiers have operated at up to 3 Megawatts with duty factors of 12%. The number of power tubes, age of cooling and control subsystems, tube manufacturing problems, and operation near maximum PA tube ratings have all affected system reliability. By monitoring final power amplifier plate dissipation and tube vcauum, improved operating procedures have raised RF system reliability above 95% for operation periods in 1993-95. Higher beam current for a proposed Long Pulse Spallation Source (LPSS) cannot be delivered simultaneously with other beams at high duty factor, however. Plans are underway to develop a new final power amplifier which can use low-level RF modulations for amplitude control. With only a few power tubes, the system will deliver high peak power and duty factor, with improved DC to RF efficiency, and a simplified cooling system.

  19. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, C.A.

    1983-12-29

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  20. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, Carl A.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  1. Plasma Switch for High-Power Active Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-11-04

    Results are presented from experiments carried out at the Naval Research Laboratory X-band magnicon facility on a two-channel X-band active RF pulse compressor that employed plasma switches. Experimental evidence is shown to validate the basic goals of the project, which include: simultaneous firing of plasma switches in both channels of the RF circuit, operation of quasi-optical 3-dB hybrid directional coupler coherent superposition of RF compressed pulses from both channels, and operation of the X-band magnicon directly in the RF pulse compressor. For incident 1.2 ?s pulses in the range 0.63 ? 1.35 MW, compressed pulses of peak powers 5.7 ? 11.3 MW were obtained, corresponding to peak power gain ratios of 8.3 ? 9.3. Insufficient bakeout and conditioning of the high-power RF circuit prevented experiments from being conducted at higher RF input power levels.

  2. Solid State Power Amplifier for 805 MegaHertz at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.L.; Lyles, J.T.M.

    1998-10-19

    Particle accelerators for protons, electrons, and other ion species often use high-power vacuum tubes for RF amplification, due to the high RF power requirements to accelerate these particles with high beam currents. The final power amplifier stages driving large accelerators are unable to be converted to solid-state devices with the present technology. In some instances, radiation levels preclude the use of transistors near beamlines. Work is being done worldwide to replace the RF power stages under about ten kilowatts CW with transistor amplifiers, due to the lower maintenance costs and obsolescence of power tubes in these ranges. This is especially practical where the stages drive fifty Ohm impedance and are not located in high radiation zones. The authors are doing this at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) proton linear accelerator (linac) in New Mexico. They replaced a physically-large air-cooled UHF power amplifier using a tetrode electron tube with a compact water-cooled unit based on modular amplifier pallets developed at LANSCE. Each module uses eight push-pull bipolar power transistor pairs operated in class AB. Four pallets can easily provide up to 2,800 watts of continuous RF at 805 MHz. A radial splitter and combiner parallels the modules. This amplifier has proven to be completely reliable after over 10,000 hours of operation without failure. A second unit was constructed and installed for redundancy, and the old tetrode system was removed in 1998. The compact packaging for cooling, DC power, impedance matching, RF interconnection, and power combining met the electrical and mechanical requirements. CRT display of individual collector currents and RF levels is made possible with built-in samplers and a VXI data acquisition unit.

  3. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Minich, Roger W.

    1988-01-01

    A device (10) for producing high-powered and coherent microwaves is described. The device comprises an evacuated, cylindrical, and hollow real cathode (20) that is driven to inwardly field emit relativistic electrons. The electrons pass through an internally disposed cylindrical and substantially electron-transparent cylindrical anode (24), proceed toward a cylindrical electron collector electrode (26), and form a cylindrical virtual cathode (32). Microwaves are produced by spatial and temporal oscillations of the cylindrical virtual cathode (32), and by electrons that reflex back and forth between the cylindrical virtual cathode (32) and the cylindrical real cathode (20).

  4. Science opportunities at high power accelerators like APT

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents applications of high power RF proton linear accelerators to several fields. Radioisotope production is an area in which linacs have already provided new isotopes for use in medical and industrial applications. A new type of spallation neutron source, called a long-pulse spallation source (LPSS), is discussed for application to neutron scattering and to the production and use of ultra-cold neutrons (UCN). The concept of an accelerator-driven, transmutation of nuclear waste system, based on high power RF linac technology, is presented along with its impact on spent nuclear fuels.

  5. High Power Coax Window

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, M. L.; Dudas, A.; Sah, R.; Elliott, T. S.; Rimmer, R. A.; Stirbet, M. S.

    2010-05-23

    A su­per­con­duct­ing RF (SRF) power cou­pler ca­pa­ble of han­dling 500 kW CW RF power is re­quired for pre­sent and fu­ture stor­age rings and linacs. There are over 35 cou­pler de­signs for SRF cav­i­ties rang­ing in fre­quen­cy from 325 to 1500 MHz. Cou­pler win­dows vary from cylin­ders to cones to disks, and RF power cou­plers are lim­it­ed by the abil­i­ty of ce­ram­ic win­dows to with­stand the stress­es due to heat­ing and me­chan­i­cal flex­ure. We pro­pose a novel ro­bust co-ax­i­al SRF cou­pler de­sign which uses com­pressed win­dow tech­nol­o­gy. This tech­nol­o­gy will allow the use of high­ly ther­mal­ly con­duc­tive ma­te­ri­als for cryo­genic win­dows. Using com­pressed win­dow tech­niques on disk co-ax­i­al win­dows will make sig­nif­i­cant im­prove­ments in the power han­dling of SRF cou­plers. We pre­sent the bench test re­sults of two win­dow as­sem­blies back to back, as well as in­di­vid­u­al win­dow VSWR in EIA3.125 coax. A vac­u­um test as­sem­bly was made and the win­dows baked out at 155C. The pro­cess­es used to build win­dows is scal­able to larg­er di­am­e­ter coax and to high­er power lev­els.

  6. High power phase shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, B.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Makarov, A.; Solyak, N.; Terechkine, I.; Wildman, D.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    One of the approaches to power distribution system of a superconducting proton linac under discussion at FNAL requires development of a fast-action, megawatt-range phase shifter. Using a couple of this kind of devices with a waveguide hybrid junction can allow independent control of phase and amplitude of RF power at the input of each superconducting cavity, which will result in significant saving in number of klystrons and modulators required for the accelerator. A prototype of a waveguide version of the shifter that uses Yttrium-Iron Garnet (YIG) blocks was developed and tested. This report presents design concept of the device, and main results of simulation and proof-of-principle tests.

  7. HIGH POWER PULSED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Singer, S.; Neher, L.K.

    1957-09-24

    A high powered, radio frequency pulse oscillator is described for generating trains of oscillations at the instant an input direct voltage is impressed, or immediately upon application of a light pulse. In one embodiment, the pulse oscillator comprises a photo-multiplier tube with the cathode connected to the first dynode by means of a resistor, and adjacent dynodes are connected to each other through adjustable resistors. The ohmage of the resistors progressively increases from a very low value for resistors adjacent the cathode to a high value adjacent the plate, the last dynode. Oscillation occurs with this circuit when a high negative voltage pulse is applied to the cathode and the photo cathode is bombarded. Another embodiment adds capacitors at the resistor connection points of the above circuit to increase the duration of the oscillator train.

  8. High power arcjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goelz, T. M.; Auweter-Kurtz, M.; Kurtz, H. L.; Schrade, H. O.

    1992-01-01

    In this period a new mass flow controller was brought into the gas supply system, so that the upper limit for the mass flow rate could be increased up to 500 mg/s with hydrogen. A maximum specific impulse of 1500 s could be achieved with the high powered arcjet (HIPARC) at an efficiency of slightly better than 20 percent. Different nozzle throat diameters had been tested. The 100 kilo-watt input power limit was reached with the 4 mm nozzle throat diameter at a mass flow rate of 400 mg/s. Tests were carried out with different cathode gaps and with three different cathodes. In addition measurements of pressure and gas temperature were taken in the feed line in order to determine the pressure drop in the propellant injectors.

  9. Applications of Kinetic Inductance: Parametric Amplifier & Phase Shifter, 2DEG Coupled Co-planar Structures & Microstrip to Slotline Transition at RF Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surdi, Harshad

    Kinetic inductance springs from the inertia of charged mobile carriers in alternating electric fields and it is fundamentally different from the magnetic inductance which is only a geometry dependent property. The magnetic inductance is proportional to the volume occupied by the electric and magnetic fields and is often limited by the number of turns of the coil. Kinetic inductance on the other hand is inversely proportional to the density of electrons or holes that exert inertia, the unit mass of the charge carriers and the momentum relaxation time of these charge carriers, all of which can be varied merely by modifying the material properties. Highly sensitive and broadband signal amplifiers often broaden the field of study in astrophysics. Quantum-noise limited travelling wave kinetic inductance parametric amplifiers offer a noise figure of around 0.5 K +/- 0.3 K as compared to 20 K in HEMT signal amplifiers and can be designed to operate to cover the entire W-band (75 GHz -- 115 GHz). The research cumulating to this thesis involves applying and exploiting kinetic inductance properties in designing a W-band orthogonal mode transducer, quadratic gain phase shifter with a gain of ~49 dB over a meter of microstrip transmission line. The phase shifter will help in measuring the maximum amount of phase shift Deltaφmax(I) that can be obtained from half a meter transmission line which helps in predicting the gain of a travelling wave parametric amplifier. In another project, a microstrip to slot line transition is designed and optimized to operate at 150 GHz and 220 GHz frequencies, that is used as a part of horn antenna coupled microwave kinetic inductance detector proposed to operate from 138 GHz to 250 GHz. In the final project, kinetic inductance in a 2D electron gas (2DEG) is explored by design, simulation, fabrication and experimentation. A transmission line model of a 2DEG proposed by Burke (1999), is simulated and verified experimentally by fabricating a

  10. An S-band high gain relativistic klystron amplifier with high phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Xu, Z.; Ma, Q. S.; Xie, H. Q.

    2014-11-15

    For the purpose of coherent high power microwave combining, an S-band high gain relativistic klystron amplifier with high phase stability is presented and studied. By the aid of 3D particle-in-cell code and circuit simulation software, the mechanism of parasitic oscillation in the device is investigated. And the RF lossy material is adopted in the simulation and experiment to suppress the oscillation. The experimental results show that with an input RF power of 10 kW, a microwave pulse with power of 1.8 GW is generated with a gain of 52.6 dB. And the relative phase difference fluctuation between output microwave and input RF signal is less than ±10° in 90 ns.

  11. Present developments and status of electron sources for high power gyrotron tubes and free electron masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumm, M.

    1997-02-01

    Gyrotron oscillators are mainly used as high power mm-wave sources for start-up, electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and diagnostics of magnetically confined plasmas for controlled thermonuclear fusion research. 140 GHz (110 GHz) gyrotrons with output power Pout = 0.55 MW (0.93 MW), pulse length τ = 3.0 s (2.0 s) and efficiency η = 40% (38%) are commercially available. Total efficiencies around 50% have been achieved using single-stage depressed collectors. Diagnostic gyrotrons deliver Pout = 40 kW with τ = 40 μs at frequencies up to 650 GHz ( η≥4%). Recently, gyrotron oscillators have also been successfully used in materials processing, for example sintering of high performance, structural and functional ceramics. Such technological applications require gyrotrons with f≥24 GHz, Pout = 10-100 kW, CW, η≥30%. This paper reports on recent achievements in the development of very high power mm-wave gyrotron oscillators for long pulse or CW operation. In addition a short overview of the present development status of gyrotrons for technological applications, gyroklystron amplifiers, gyro-TWT amplifiers, cyclotron autoresonance masers (CARMs) and free electron masers (FEMs) is given. The most impressive FEM output parameters are: Pout = 2GW, τ = 20 ns, η = 13% at 140 GHz (LLNL) and Pout = 15 kW, τ = 20 μs, η = 5% in the range from 120 to 900 GHz (UCSB). In gyro-devices, magnetron injection guns (MIGs) operating in the temperature limited current regime have thus far been used most successfully. Diode guns as well as triode guns with a modulating anode are employed. Tests of a MIG operated under space-charge limited conditions have been not very successful. Electrostatic CW FEMs are driven by thermionic Pierce guns whereas pulsed high power devices employ many types of accelerators as drivers for example pulse-line accelerators, microtrons and induction or rf linacs, using field and photo emission cathodes.

  12. Design Features and Initial RF Performance of a Gradient Hardened 17 GHz TW Linac Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Haimson, J.; Mecklenburg, B.

    2009-01-22

    To avoid surface erosion damage and to assist in studying RF breakdown thresholds in 17 GHz TW linac structures, a gradient hardened structure has been fabricated with high temperature brazed and machined stainless steel surfaces located in the peak E-field region of the beam apertures and the peak H-field regions of the input coupler cavity. The microwave design parameters and physical dimensions of this 22 cavity, 120 degree phase advance structure were chosen to allow the high gradient performance to be compared against a similar design all-copper structure that has been tested in a dual ring, power recirculating amplifier system. The final design parameters of the gradient hardened structure are discussed; the influence of stainless steel RF losses on the power buildup of the resonant ring and on the structure gradient distribution are described; waveforms are shown of the unique ability of the power amplifier to rapidly quench RF breakdown discharges in the linac structure by automatically sensing and redirecting the RF source power to a matched load; and preliminary test results during high power RF processing of the gradient hardened linac structure are presented.

  13. High power connection system

    DOEpatents

    Schaefer, Christopher E.; Beer, Robert C.; McCall, Mark D.

    2000-01-01

    A high power connection system adapted for automotive environments which provides environmental and EMI shielding includes a female connector, a male connector, and a panel mount. The female connector includes a female connector base and a snap fitted female connector cover. The male connector includes a male connector base and a snap fitted male connector cover. The female connector base has at least one female power terminal cavity for seatably receiving a respective female power terminal. The male connector base has at least one male power terminal cavity for seatably receiving a respective male power terminal. The female connector is covered by a cover seal and a conductive shroud. A pair of lock arms protrude outward from the front end of the male connector base, pass through the panel mount and interface with a lever of a lever rotatably connected to the shroud to thereby mechanically assist mating of the male and female connectors. Safety terminals in the male and female connectors provide a last-to-connect-first-to-break connection with an HVIL circuit.

  14. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE HIGH-POWER PROTECTION MODULE TEST STAND

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung-Woo; Ball, Jeffrey Allen; Crofford, Mark T; Davidson Jr, Taylor L; Jones, Stacey L; Hardek, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) High-Power Protection Module (HPM) provides interlocks and fast shutdown for the radio frequency (RF) system to protect the accelerating structures and high power RF (HPRF) Distribution System. The HPM has required some functional upgrades since the start of beam operations and an upgrade to the HPM test stand was required to support these added features. The HPM test stand currently verifies functionality, RF channel calibration, and measurement of the speed of shutdown to ensure the specifications are met. The upgraded test stand was implemented in a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) to allow for future growth and flexibility. Work is currently progressing on automation of the test stand to better perform the required module calibration schedule.

  15. Tapered fiber bundle couplers for high-power fiber amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliwinska, Dorota; Kaczmarek, Pawel; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we would like to demonstrate our results on performing (6+1)x1 tapered fiber bundle combiners using a trielectrode fiber splicing system. In our combiners we have used 9/80 μm (core/clad) diameter fibers as single-mode signal input ports. Using this fiber, instead of a conventional 9/125 μm single-mode fiber allowed us to reduce the taper ratio and therefore significantly increase the signal transmission. We have also performed power combiner which is based on the LMA fibers: input signal fiber 20/125μm and passive double clad fiber 25/300 μm at the output.

  16. RF breakdown experiments at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, L.; Scheitrum, G.; Vlieks, A.; Pearson, C.; Caryotakis, G.; Luhmann, N. C.

    1999-05-01

    RF breakdown is a critical issue in the conditioning of klystrons, accelerator sections, and rf components for the next linear collider (NLC), as well as other high gradient accelerators and high power microwave sources. SLAC is conducting a series of experiments using an X-band traveling wave ring to characterize the processes and trigger mechanisms associated with rf breakdown. The goal of the research is to identify materials, processes, and manufacturing methods that will increase the breakdown threshold and minimize the time required for conditioning.

  17. High power rapidly tunable system for laser cooling.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, V M; Hernández, L; Gomez, E

    2012-01-01

    We present a laser configuration capable of fast frequency changes with a high power output and a large tuning range. The system integrates frequency tuning with an acousto-optic modulator with a double pass tapered amplifier. A compensation circuit keeps the seed power constant and prevents damage to the amplifier. A single mode fiber decouples the modulation and amplification sections and keeps the alignment fixed. The small power required to saturate the amplifier makes the system very reliable. We use the system to obtain a dipole trap that we image using a beam derived from the same configuration. PMID:22299990

  18. RF pulsed heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritzkau, David Peace

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic fields on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic field on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE011 mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1.5 μs pulses. The test pieces of the cavity are designed to be removable to allow testing of different materials with different surface preparations. A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE012 mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in reflected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 × 106 pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86 × 106 pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  19. RF Pulsed Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritzkau, D. P.

    2002-01-01

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic elds on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic eld on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE011 mode at a resonant frequency of 11:424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1:5 s perent surface preparations.he cavity are designed to A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE012 mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in re ected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 106 pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86106 pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  20. High-Power Options for LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Garnett, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    The LANSCE linear accelerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory has a long history of successful beam operations at 800 kW. We have recently studied options for restoration of high-power operations including approaches for increasing the performance to multi-MW levels. In this paper we will discuss the results of this study including the present limitations of the existing accelerating structures at LANSCE, and the high-voltage and RF systems that drive them. Several options will be discussed and a preferred option will be presented that will enable the first in a new generation of scientific facilities for the materials community. The emphasis of this new facility is 'Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes' (MaRIE) which will be used to discover and design the advanced materials needed to meet 21st century national security and energy security challenges.

  1. Single foreplane high power rectenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alden, A.; Ohno, T.

    1992-05-01

    A dual polarization rectenna capable of high power handling is described. It consists of contiguous dipoles and rectification units on a single substrate. High efficiencies comparable to previous linear and multiplane dual polarization devices have been achieved.

  2. Hybrid high power femtosecond laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trunov, V. I.; Petrov, V. V.; Pestryakov, E. V.; Kirpichnikov, A. V.

    2006-01-01

    Design of a high-power femtosecond laser system based on hybrid chirped pulse amplification (CPA) technique developed by us is presented. The goal of the hybrid principle is the use of the parametric and laser amplification methods in chirped pulse amplifiers. It makes it possible to amplify the low-cycle pulses with a duration of <= fs to terawatt power with a high contrast and high conversion efficiency of the pump radiation. In a created system the Ti:Sapphire laser with 10 fs pulses at 810 nm and output energy about 1-3 nJ will be used like seed source. The oscillator pulses were stretched to duration of about 500 ps by an all-reflective grating stretcher. Then the stretched pulses are injected into a nondegenerate noncollinear optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) on the two BBO crystals. After amplification in NOPA the residual pump was used in a bow-tie four pass amplifier with hybrid active medium (based on Al II0 3:Ti 3+ and BeAl IIO 4:Ti 3+ crystals). The final stage of the amplification system consists of two channels, namely NIR (820 nm) and short-VIS (410 nm). Numerical simulation has shown that the terawatt level of output power can be achieved also in a short-VIS channel at the pumping of the double-crystal BBO NOPA by the radiation of the fourth harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm. Experimentally parametric amplification in BBO crystals of 30-50 fs pulses were investigated and optimized using SPIDER technique and single-shot autocomelator for the realization of shortest duration 40 fs.

  3. High power microwave components for space communications satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankowski, H.; Geia, A.

    1972-01-01

    Analyzed, developed, and tested were high power microwave components for communications satellites systems. Included were waveguide and flange configurations with venting, a harmonic filter, forward and reverse power monitors, electrical fault sensors, and a diplexer for two channel simultaneous transmission. The assembly of 8.36 GHz components was bench tested, and then operated for 60 hours at 3.5 kW CW in a high vacuum. The diplexer was omitted from this test pending a modification of its end irises. An RF leakage test showed only that care is required at flange junctions; all other components were RF tight. Designs were extrapolated for 12 GHz and 2.64 GHz high power satellite systems.

  4. High-Power Ka-Band Window and Resonant Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2006-11-29

    A stand-alone 200 MW rf test station is needed for carrying out development of accelerator structures and components for a future high-gradient multi-TeV collider, such as CLIC. A high-power rf window is needed to isolate the test station from a structure element under test. This project aimed to develop such a window for use at a frequency in the range 30-35 GHz, and to also develop a high-power resonant ring for testing the window. During Phase I, successful conceptual designs were completed for the window and the resonant ring, and cold tests of each were carried out that confirmed the designs.

  5. PULSE AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, C.W.

    1958-06-17

    The improvement of pulse amplifiers used with scintillation detectors is described. The pulse amplifier circuit has the advantage of reducing the harmful effects of overloading cause by large signal inputs. In general the pulse amplifier circuit comprises two amplifier tubes with the input pulses applied to one amplifier grid and coupled to the second amplifier tube through a common cathode load. The output of the second amplifier is coupled from the plate circuit to a cathode follower tube grid and a diode tube in connected from grid to cathode of the cathode follower tube. Degenerative feedback is provided in the second amplifier by coupling a signal from the cathode follower cathode to the second amplifier grid. The circuit proqides moderate gain stability, and overload protection for subsequent pulse circuits.

  6. High Power Operation of the JLab IR FEL Driver Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Beard; Stephen Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; Donald Bullard; James Coleman; David Douglas; H. Dylla; Richard Evans; Pavel Evtushenko; Christopher Gould; Albert Grippo; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; J. Hovater; Kevin Jordan; John Klopf; Rui Li; Steven Moore; George Neil; Benard Poelker; Thomas Powers; Joseph Preble; Robert Rimmer; Daniel Sexton; Michelle D. Shinn; Christopher Tennant; Richard Walker; Gwyn Williams; Shukui Zhang

    2007-08-01

    Operation of the JLab IR Upgrade FEL at CW powers in excess of 10 kW requires sustained production of high electron beam powers by the driver ERL. This in turn demands attention to numerous issues and effects, including: cathode lifetime; control of beamline and RF system vacuum during high current operation; longitudinal space charge; longitudinal and transverse matching of irregular/large volume phase space distributions; halo management; management of remnant dispersive effects; resistive wall, wake-field, and RF heating of beam vacuum chambers; the beam break up instability; the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (both on beam quality and the performance of laser optics); magnetic component stability and reproducibility; and RF stability and reproducibility. We discuss our experience with these issues and describe the modus vivendi that has evolved during prolonged high current, high power beam and laser operation.

  7. High power ferrite microwave switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardash, I.; Roschak, N. K.

    1975-01-01

    A high power ferrite microwave switch was developed along with associated electronic driver circuits for operation in a spaceborne high power microwave transmitter in geostationary orbit. Three units were built and tested in a space environment to demonstrate conformance to the required performance characteristics. Each unit consisted of an input magic-tee hybrid, two non-reciprocal latching ferrite phase shifters, an out short-slot 3 db quadrature coupler, a dual driver electronic circuit, and input logic interface circuitry. The basic mode of operation of the high power ferrite microwave switch is identical to that of a four-port, differential phase shift, switchable circulator. By appropriately designing the phase shifters and electronic driver circuits to operate in the flux-transfer magnetization mode, power and temperature insensitive operation was achieved. A list of the realized characteristics of the developed units is given.

  8. Integrated high power VCSEL systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moench, Holger; Conrads, Ralf; Gronenborn, Stephan; Gu, Xi; Miller, Michael; Pekarski, Pavel; Pollmann-Retsch, Jens; Pruijmboom, Armand; Weichmann, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    High power VCSEL systems are a novel laser source used for thermal treatment in industrial manufacturing. These systems will be applied in many applications, which have not used a laser source before. This is enabled by the unique combination of efficiency, compactness and robustness. High power VCSEL system technology encompasses elements far beyond the VCSEL chip itself: i.e. heat sinks, bonding technology and integrated optics. This paper discusses the optimization of these components and processes specifically for building high-power laser systems with VCSEL arrays. New approaches help to eliminate components and process steps and make the system more robust and easier to manufacture. New cooler concepts with integrated electrical and mechanical interfaces have been investigated and offer advantages for high power system design. The bonding process of chips on sub-mounts and coolers has been studied extensively and for a variety of solder materials. High quality of the interfaces as well as good reliability under normal operation and thermal cycling have been realized. A viable alternative to soldering is silver sintering. The very positive results which have been achieved with a variety of technologies indicate the robustness of the VCSEL chips and their suitability for high power systems. Beam shaping micro-optics can be integrated on the VCSEL chip in a wafer scale process by replication of lenses in a polymer layer. The performance of VCSEL arrays with integrated collimation lenses has been positively evaluated and the integrated chips are fully compatible with all further assembly steps. The integrated high power systems make the application even easier and more robust. New examples in laser material processing and pumping of solid state lasers are presented.

  9. Numerical simulation of cross field amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.

    1990-01-01

    Cross field amplifiers (CFA) have been used in many applications where high power, high frequency microwaves are needed. Although these tubes have been manufactured for decades, theoretical analysis of their properties is not as highly developed as for other microwave devices such as klystrons. One feature distinguishing cross field amplifiers is that the operating current is produced by secondary emission from a cold cathode. This removes the need for a heater and enables the device to act as a switch tube, drawing no power until the rf drive is applied. However, this method of generating the current does complicate the simulation. We are developing a simulation model of cross field amplifiers using the PIC code CONDOR. We simulate an interaction region, one traveling wavelength long, with periodic boundary conditions. An electric field with the appropriate phase velocity is imposed on the upper boundary of the problem. Evaluation of the integral of E{center dot}J gives the power interchanged between the wave and the beam. Given the impedance of the structure, we then calculate the change in the traveling wave field. Thus we simulate the growth of the wave through the device. The main advance of our model over previous CFA simulations is the realistic tracking of absorption and secondary emission. The code uses experimental curves to calculate secondary production as a function of absorbed energy, with a theoretical expression for the angular dependence. We have used this code to model the 100 MW X-band CFA under construction at SLAC, as designed by Joseph Feinstein and Terry Lee. We are examining several questions of practical interest, such as the power and spectrum of absorbed electrons, the minimum traveling wave field needed to initiate spoke formation, and the variation of output power with dc voltage, anode-cathode gap, and magnetic field. 5 refs., 8 figs.

  10. High power neutron production targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wender, S.

    1996-06-01

    The author describes issues of concern in the design of targets and associated systems for high power neutron production facilities. The facilities include uses for neutron scattering, accelerator driven transmutation, accelerator production of tritium, short pulse spallation sources, and long pulse spallation sources. Each of these applications requires a source with different design needs and consequently different implementation in practise.

  11. Generation of high-power laser light with Gigahertz splitting.

    PubMed

    Unks, B E; Proite, N A; Yavuz, D D

    2007-08-01

    We demonstrate the generation of two high-power laser beams whose frequencies are separated by the ground state hyperfine transition frequency in (87)Rb. The system uses a single master diode laser appropriately shifted by high frequency acousto-optic modulators and amplified by semiconductor tapered amplifiers. This produces two 1 W laser beams with a frequency spacing of 6.834 GHz and a relative frequency stability of 1 Hz. We discuss possible applications of this apparatus, including electromagnetically induced transparency-like effects and ultrafast qubit rotations. PMID:17764314

  12. Hybrid high power femtosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resan, Bojan

    2016-03-01

    There is a growing demand for ultrafast laser systems with high average power and repetition rate. We present two hybrid master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) architectures employing variety of available technologies to achieve 100 W average power femtosecond pulses. We achieved 120 W 820 fs pulses using solid-state oscillator and fiber amplifiers and chirped pulse amplification (CPA) technique (10 μJ pulse energy at 10 MHz and 100 μJ at 400 kHz). In the second experiment, we achieved 160 W 800 fs pulses in a compact system without the standard CPA using solidstate oscillator and single crystal fiber amplifiers. As currently every component experiences some limitations, it is a challenge to choose the optimal architecture with associated components to achieve a desired combination of laser output parameters.

  13. Design and analysis of a radio frequency extractor in an S-band relativistic klystron amplifier.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zehai; Zhang, Jun; Shu, Ting; Qi, Zumin

    2012-09-01

    A radio frequency (RF) extractor converts the energy of a strongly modulated intense relativistic electron beam (IREB) into the energy of high power microwave in relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA). In the aim of efficiently extracting the energy of the modulated IREB, a RF extractor with all round coupling structure is proposed. Due to the all round structure, the operating transverse magnetic mode can be established easily and its resonant property can be investigated with an approach of group delay time. Furthermore, the external quality factor can be low enough. The design and analysis of the extractor applied in an S-band RKA are carried out, and the performance of the extractor is validated with three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell simulations. The extraction efficiency reaches 27% in the simulation with a totally 3D model of the whole RKA. The primary experiments are also carried out and the results show that the RF extractor with the external quality factor of 7.9 extracted 22% of the beam power and transformed it into the high power microwave. Better results are expected after the parasitic mode between the input and middle cavities is suppressed.

  14. Design and analysis of a radio frequency extractor in an S-band relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zehai; Zhang Jun; Shu Ting; Qi Zumin

    2012-09-15

    A radio frequency (RF) extractor converts the energy of a strongly modulated intense relativistic electron beam (IREB) into the energy of high power microwave in relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA). In the aim of efficiently extracting the energy of the modulated IREB, a RF extractor with all round coupling structure is proposed. Due to the all round structure, the operating transverse magnetic mode can be established easily and its resonant property can be investigated with an approach of group delay time. Furthermore, the external quality factor can be low enough. The design and analysis of the extractor applied in an S-band RKA are carried out, and the performance of the extractor is validated with three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell simulations. The extraction efficiency reaches 27% in the simulation with a totally 3D model of the whole RKA. The primary experiments are also carried out and the results show that the RF extractor with the external quality factor of 7.9 extracted 22% of the beam power and transformed it into the high power microwave. Better results are expected after the parasitic mode between the input and middle cavities is suppressed.

  15. Development of adaptive resonator techniques for high-power lasers

    SciTech Connect

    An, J; Brase, J; Carrano, C; Dane, C B; Flath, L; Fochs, S; Hurd, R; Kartz, M; Sawvel, R

    1999-07-12

    The design of an adaptive wavefront control system for a high-power Nd:Glass laser will be presented. Features of this system include: an unstable resonator in confocal configuration, a multi-module slab amplifier, and real-time intracavity adaptive phase control using deformable mirrors and high-speed wavefront sensors. Experimental results demonstrate the adaptive correction of an aberrated passive resonator (no gain).

  16. Double rf system for bunch shortening

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Yong Ho.

    1990-11-01

    It was suggested by Zisman that the combination of the two systems (double rf system) may be more effective to shorten a bunch, compromising between the desirable and the undesirable effects mentioned above. In this paper, we demonstrate that a double rf system is, in fact, quite effective in optimizing the rf performance. The parameters used are explained, and some handy formulae for bunch parameters are derived. We consider an example of bunch shortening by adding a higher-harmonic rf system to the main rf system. The parameters of the main rf system are unchanged. The double rf system, however, can be used for another purpose. Namely, the original bunch length can be obtained with a main rf voltage substantially lower than for a single rf system without necessitating a high-power source for the higher-harmonic cavities. Using a double rf system, the momentum acceptance remains large enough for ample beam lifetime. Moreover, the increase in nonlinearity of the rf waveform increases the synchrotron tune spread, which potentially helps a beam to be stabilized against longitudinal coupled-bunch instabilities. We will show some examples of this application. We discuss the choice of the higher-harmonic frequency.

  17. High power solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, H.

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings discuss the following subjects: trends in materials processing with laser radiation; slabs and high power systems; glasses and new crystals; solid state lasers at HOYA Corp.; lamps, resonators and transmission; glasses as active materials for high average power solid state lasers; flashlamp pumped GGG-crystals; alexandrite lasers; designing telescope resonators; mode operation of neodymium: YAG lasers; intracavity frequency doubling with KTP crystal and thermal effects in cylinder lasers.

  18. RF Sources for the ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J.; Brunkhorst, C.; Fredd, E.; Goulding, R. H.; Goulding, R. H.; Greenough, N.; Kung, C.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Swain, D. W.; Wilson, J. R.

    2005-10-04

    The RF source requirements for the ITER ion cyclotron (IC) heating and current drive system are very challenging ? 20 MW CW power into an antenna load with a VSWR of up to 2 over the frequency range of 35-65 MHz. For the two present antenna designs under consideration, 8 sources providing 2.5 MW each are to be employed. For these sources, the outputs of two final power amplifiers (FPAs), using the high power CPI 4CM2500KG tube, are combined with a 180? hybrid combiner to easily meet the ITER IC source requirements ? 2.5 MW is supplied at a VSWR of 2 at ? 70% of the maximum tube power available in class B operation. The cylindrical cavity configuration for the FPAs is quite compact so that the 8 combined sources fit into the space allocated at the ITER site with room to spare. The source configuration is described in detail and its projected operating power curves are presented. Although the CPI tube has been shown to be stable under high power operating conditions on many facilities, a test of the combined FPA source arrangement is in preparation using existing high power 30 MHz amplifiers to assure that this configuration can be made robustly stable for all phases at a VSWR up to 2. The possibility of using 12 sources to feed a suitably modified antenna design is also discussed in the context of providing flexibility for specifying the final IC antenna design.

  19. LOGARITHMIC AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    De Shong, J.A. Jr.

    1957-12-31

    A logarithmic current amplifier circuit having a high sensitivity and fast response is described. The inventor discovered the time constant of the input circuit of a system utilizing a feedback amplifier, ionization chamber, and a diode, is inversely proportional to the input current, and that the amplifier becomes unstable in amplifying signals in the upper frequency range when the amplifier's forward gain time constant equals the input circuit time constant. The described device incorporates impedance networks having low frequency response characteristic at various points in the circuit to change the forward gain of the amplifler at a rate of 0.7 of the gain magnitude for every two times increased in frequency. As a result of this improvement, the time constant of the input circuit is greatly reduced at high frequencies, and the amplifier response is increased.

  20. High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier (HEMPA) Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, W. Herbert

    2004-01-01

    This paper will focus on developing an exotic switching technique that enhances the DC-to-RF conversion efficiency of microwave power amplifiers. For years, switching techniques implemented in the 10 kHz to 30 MHz region have resulted in DC-to-RF conversion efficiencies of 90-95-percent. Currently amplifier conversion efficiency, in the 2-3 GHz region approaches, 10-20-percent. Using a combination of analytical modeling and hardware testing, a High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier was built that demonstrated conversion efficiencies four to five times higher than current state of the art.

  1. High power switching and other high power devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundersen, Martin

    1992-09-01

    High power thyratrons and devices such as high power microwave sources have cathode-related performance limits. Research is described of a simple, robust 'super-emissive' cathode that produces greater than 10,000 A/sq cm from a macroscopic area (approx. 1 sq cm), and operates with a low pressure (approx. 0.1 torr), spatially uniform glow plasma (density greater than 1015 cu cm). The cathode also can operate as a hollow cathode, and is at the heart of the operation of the pseudospark and back-lighted thyratron. The physics of this hollow and super-emissive cathode is very rich. The hollow cathode geometry traps electrons in the hollow cathode backspace. The lifetime of these electrons enables them to ionize a spatially homogeneous high density glow, and this hollow cathode mode of operation is responsible for certain types of electron and ion beam behavior. A plasma cathode sheath that is formed during this phase leads to super-emissive behavior, which is responsible for high current emission. Super-emissive cathode thyratron-type switches (with higher peak current, voltage, di/dt) being developed for pulsed power switching of lasers, accelerators, high current and high coulomb transfer, Marx bank operation, transfer of technology to commercial applications, high current electron beams, and millimeter wave generation (1 to 100 GHz) are described.

  2. Development of fundamental power coupler for high-current superconducting RF cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Jain P.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Xu, W.

    2012-05-20

    Brookhaven National Laboratory took a project of developing a 704 MHz five-cell superconducting RF cavity for high-current linacs, including Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) for planned electron-hadron collider eRHIC. The cavity will be fed by a high-power RF amplifier using a coaxial Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC), which delivers 20 kW of CW RF power to the cavity. The design of FPC is one of the important aspects as one has to take into account the heat losses dissipated on the surface of the conductor by RF fields along with that of the static heat load. Using a simple simulation model we show the temperature profile and the heat load dissipated along the coupler length. To minimize the heat load on FPC near the cavity end, a thermal intercept is required at an appropriate location on FPC. A 10 K intercept was chosen and its location optimized with our simulation code. The requirement on the helium gas flow rate for the effective heat removal from the thermal intercept is also discussed.

  3. Operational Amplifiers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foxcroft, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the introduction of low cost equipment into high school and college physical science classes. Examines the properties of an "ideal" operational amplifier and discusses how it might be used under saturated and non-saturated conditions. Notes the action of a "real" operational amplifier. (TW)

  4. A no-load RF calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    The described device can be used to measure the output of any dc powered RF source. No dummy load is required for the measurements. The device is, therefore, called the 'no-load calorimeter' (NLC). The NLC measures the power actually fed to the antenna or another useful load. It is believed that the NLC can compete successfully with directional coupler type systems in measuring the output of high-power RF sources.

  5. Binary rf pulse compression experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Lavine, T.L.; Spalek, G.; Farkas, Z.D.; Menegat, A.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.; Wilson, P.B.

    1990-06-01

    Using rf pulse compression it will be possible to boost the 50- to 100-MW output expected from high-power microwave tubes operating in the 10- to 20-GHz frequency range, to the 300- to 1000-MW level required by the next generation of high-gradient linacs for linear for linear colliders. A high-power X-band three-stage binary rf pulse compressor has been implemented and operated at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). In each of three successive stages, the rf pulse-length is compressed by half, and the peak power is approximately doubled. The experimental results presented here have been obtained at low-power (1-kW) and high-power (15-MW) input levels in initial testing with a TWT and a klystron. Rf pulses initially 770 nsec long have been compressed to 60 nsec. Peak power gains of 1.8 per stage, and 5.5 for three stages, have been measured. This corresponds to a peak power compression efficiency of about 90% per stage, or about 70% for three stages, consistent with the individual component losses. The principle of operation of a binary pulse compressor (BPC) is described in detail elsewhere. We recently have implemented and operated at SLAC a high-power (high-vacuum) three-stage X-band BPC. First results from the high-power three-stage BPC experiment are reported here.

  6. High-power pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1980-04-02

    The ideas that led to the successful construction and operation of large multibeam fusion lasers at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are reviewed. These lasers are based on the use of Nd:glass laser materials. However, most of the concepts are applicable to any laser being designed for fusion experimentation. This report is a summary of lectures given by the author at the 20th Scottish University Summer School in Physics, on Laser Plasma Interaction. This report includes basic concepts of the laser plasma system, a discussion of lasers that are useful for short-pulse, high-power operation, laser design constraints, optical diagnostics, and system organization.

  7. Amplifier Distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeports, David

    2006-12-01

    By definition, a high fidelity amplifier's instantaneous output voltage is directly proportional to its instantaneous input voltage. While high fidelity is generally valued in the amplification of recorded music, nonlinearity, also known as distortion, is desirable in the amplification of some musical instruments. In particular, guitar amplifiers exploit nonlinearity to increase both the harmonic content and sustain of a guitar's sound. I will discuss how both modifications in sound result from saturation of triode tubes and transistors. Additionally, I will describe the difference in the symmetry of saturation curves for transistors and tubes and the reason why tube guitar amplifiers are generally considered to be superior to solid-state amplifiers. Finally, I will discuss attempts to use solid-state electronics to replicate the sound of tube amplifiers.

  8. The CEBAF RF Separator System Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hovater; Mark Augustine; Al Guerra; Richard Nelson; Robert Terrell; Mark Wissmann

    2004-08-01

    The CEBAF accelerator uses RF deflecting cavities operating at the third sub-harmonic (499 MHz) of the accelerating frequency (1497 MHz) to ''kick'' the electron beam to the experimental halls. The cavities operate in a TEM dipole mode incorporating mode enhancing rods to increase the cavity's transverse shunt impedance [1]. As the accelerators energy has increased from 4 GeV to 6 GeV the RF system, specifically the 1 kW solid-state amplifiers, have become problematic, operating in saturation because of the increased beam energy demands. Two years ago we began a study to look into replacement for the RF amplifiers and decided to use a commercial broadcast Inductive Output Tube (IOT) capable of 30 kW. The new RF system uses one IOT amplifier on multiple cavities as opposed to one amplifier per cavity as was originally used. In addition, the new RF system supports a proposed 12 GeV energy upgrade to CEBAF. We are currently halfway through the upgrade with three IOTs in operation and the remaining one nearly installed. This paper reports on the new RF system and the IOT performance.

  9. Analog Pre-Distortion Linearizer Using Self Base Bias Controlled Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinjo, Shintaro; Mori, Kazutomi; Yamada, Keiki; Suematsu, Noriharu; Shimozawa, Mitsuhiro

    An analog pre-distortion linearizer employing a radio frequency (RF) transistor with a self base bias control circuit is proposed. The self base bias control circuit extracts the envelope from the modulated input RF signal of the RF transistor and automatically controls its base current according to the extracted envelope. As a result, the proposed linearizer realizes positive gain deviation at high input power level. By adding a resistor between the RF transistor and the self base bias control circuit, the negative gain deviation can be derived. The design of the proposed lineaizer is described with taking the envelope frequency response of the self base bias control circuit into consideration. The fabricated linearizer achieves the adjacent channel power leakage ratio (ACLR) improvement of 8.1dB for a 2GHz-band, 10W-class GaAs FET high-power amplifier (HPA) with negative gain deviation for W-CDMA base stations. It also achieves the ACLR improvement of 8.3dB for a LDMOS HPA with positive gain deviation for the same application.

  10. Autonomous portable pulsed-periodical generator of high-power radiofrequency-pulses based on gas discharge with hollow cathode.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Sergey V; Dubinov, Alexander E; L'vov, Igor L; Popolev, Vyacheslav L; Sadovoy, Sergey A; Sadchikov, Eugeny A; Selemir, Victor D; Valiulina, Valeria K; Vyalykh, Dmitry V; Zhdanov, Victor S

    2016-05-01

    Portable autonomous generator of high-power RF-pulses based on the gas discharge with hollow cathode has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Input and output characteristics are the following: discharge current amplitude is 800 A, duration of generated RF-pulses is 350 ns, carrier frequency is ∼90 MHz, power in RF-pulse is 0.5 MW, pulse repetition rate is 0.5 kHz, and device efficiency is ∼25%.

  11. Autonomous portable pulsed-periodical generator of high-power radiofrequency-pulses based on gas discharge with hollow cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulychev, Sergey V.; Dubinov, Alexander E.; L'vov, Igor L.; Popolev, Vyacheslav L.; Sadovoy, Sergey A.; Sadchikov, Eugeny A.; Selemir, Victor D.; Valiulina, Valeria K.; Vyalykh, Dmitry V.; Zhdanov, Victor S.

    2016-05-01

    Portable autonomous generator of high-power RF-pulses based on the gas discharge with hollow cathode has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Input and output characteristics are the following: discharge current amplitude is 800 A, duration of generated RF-pulses is 350 ns, carrier frequency is ˜90 MHz, power in RF-pulse is 0.5 MW, pulse repetition rate is 0.5 kHz, and device efficiency is ˜25%.

  12. High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Single-Cell Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Higashi, Y.; Higo, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2007-11-07

    We report the results of the first high power tests of single-cell traveling-wave and standing-wave structures. These tests are part of an experimental and theoretical study of rf breakdown in normal conducting structures at 11.4 GHz. The goal of this study is to determine the gradient potential of normal-conducting rf-powered particle beam accelerators. The test setup consists of reusable mode converters and short test structures and is powered by SLAC's XL-4 klystron. This setup was created for economical testing of different cell geometries, cell materials and preparation techniques with short turn-around time. The mode launchers and structures were manufactured at SLAC and KEK and tested in the SLAC Klystron Test Lab.

  13. HIGH POWER OPERATIONS AT THE LOW ENERGY DEMONSTRATION ACCELERATOR (LEDA)

    SciTech Connect

    M. DURAN; V. R. HARRIS

    2001-01-01

    Recently, the Low-Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) portion of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project reached its 100-mA, 8-hr continuous wave (CW) beam operation milestone. The LEDA accelerator is a prototype of the low-energy front-end of the linear accelerator (linac) that would have been used in an APT plant. LEDA consists of a 75-keV proton injector, 6.7-MeV, 350-MHz CW radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) with associated high-power and low-level RF systems, a short high-energy beam transport (HEBT) and high-power (670-kW CW) beam dump. Details of the LEDA design features will be discussed along with the operational health physics experiences that occurred during the LEDA commissioning phase.

  14. High power l-band fast phase shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Terechkine, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    Following successful testing of a concept prototype of a waveguide-based high power phase shifter, a design of a fast, high power device has been developed. The shifter uses two magnetically biased blocks of Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) positioned along the side walls of a rectangular waveguide. The cross-section of the waveguide is chosen to suppress unwanted RF modes that could otherwise compromise performance of the phase shifter. Static bias field in the YIG blocks is created by employing permanent magnets. Low inductance coils in the same magnetic circuit excite fast component of the bias field. Design of the device ensures effective heat extraction from the YIG blocks and penetration of the fast magnetic field inside the waveguide with minimum delay. This paper summarizes main steps in this development and gives brief description of the system.

  15. The Jefferson Lab High Power Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Boyce

    2006-01-01

    Jefferson Lab has designed, built and operated two high average power free-electron lasers (FEL) using superconducting RF (SRF) technology and energy recovery techniques. Between 1999-2001 Jefferson Lab operated the IR Demo FEL. This device produced over 2 kW in the mid-infrared, in addition to producing world record average powers in the visible (50 W), ultraviolet (10 W) and terahertz range (50 W) for tunable, short-pulse (< ps) light. This FEL was the first high power demonstration of an accelerator configuration that is being exploited for a number of new accelerator-driven light source facilities that are currently under design or construction. The driver accelerator for the IR Demo FEL uses an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) configuration that improves the energy efficiency and lowers both the capital and operating cost of such devices by recovering most of the power in the spent electron beam after optical power is extracted from the beam. The IR Demo FEL was de-commissioned in late 2001 for an upgraded FEL for extending the IR power to over 10 kW and the ultraviolet power to over 1 kW. The FEL Upgrade achieved 10 kW of average power in the mid-IR (6 microns) in July of 2004, and its IR operation currently is being extended down to 1 micron. In addition, we have demonstrated the capability of on/off cycling and recovering over a megawatt of electron beam power without diminishing machine performance. A complementary UV FEL will come on-line within the next year. This paper presents a summary of the FEL characteristics, user community accomplishments with the IR Demo, and planned user experiments.

  16. High power 325 MHz vector modulators for the Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS)

    SciTech Connect

    Madrak, Robyn Leigh; Wildman, David; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    One of the goals of the low energy 60 MeV section of the HINS H{sup -} linac [1] is to demonstrate that a total of {approx}40 RF cavities can be powered by a single 2.5 MW, 325 MHz klystron. This requires individual vector modulators at the input of each RF cavity to independently adjust the amplitude and phase of the RF input signal during the 3.5 ms RF pulse. Two versions of vector modulators have been developed; a 500 kW device for the radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a 75 kW modulator for the RF cavities. High power tests showing the vector modulator phase and amplitude responses will be presented.

  17. Optics assembly for high power laser tools

    DOEpatents

    Fraze, Jason D.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2016-06-07

    There is provided a high power laser rotational optical assembly for use with, or in high power laser tools for performing high power laser operations. In particular, the optical assembly finds applications in performing high power laser operations on, and in, remote and difficult to access locations. The optical assembly has rotational seals and bearing configurations to avoid contamination of the laser beam path and optics.

  18. RF transformer

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James L.; Helenberg, Harold W.; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.

    1979-01-01

    There is provided an improved RF transformer having a single-turn secondary of cylindrical shape and a coiled encapsulated primary contained within the secondary. The coil is tapered so that the narrowest separation between the primary and the secondary is at one end of the coil. The encapsulated primary is removable from the secondary so that a variety of different capacity primaries can be utilized with one secondary.

  19. Radio-frequency spectroscopy of the active fiber heating under condition of high-power lasing generation.

    PubMed

    Ryabushkin, O A; Shaidullin, R I; Zaytsev, I A

    2015-05-01

    A novel method for the precise temperature measurement of active fibers in high-power fiber lasers and amplifiers is introduced. This method allows the determination of active fiber longitudinal temperature distribution at different optical pump powers. PMID:25927761

  20. High power ion thruster performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, Vincent K.; Patterson, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    The ion thruster is one of several forms of space electric propulsion being considered for use on future SP-100-based missions. One possible major mission ground rule is the use of a single Space Shuttle launch. Thus, the mass in orbit at the reactor activation altitude would be limited by the Shuttle mass constraints. When the spacecraft subsystem masses are subtracted from this available mass limit, a maximum propellant mass may be calculated. Knowing the characteristics of each type of electric thruster allows maximum values of total impulse, mission velocity increment, and thrusting time to be calculated. Because ion thrusters easily operate at high values of efficiency (60 to 70%) and specific impulse (3000 to 5000 sec), they can impart large values of total impulse to a spacecraft. They also can be operated with separate control of the propellant flow rate and exhaust velocity. This paper presents values of demonstrated and projected performance of high power ion thrusters used in an analysis of electric propulsion for an SP-100 based mission.

  1. The design and fabrication of an X-Band RF gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, C. H.; Lau, W. K.; Yang, T. T.; Hwang, J. Y.; Hsu, S. Y.; Liu, Y. C.; Le Sage, G. P.; Hartemann, F. V.; Luhmann, N. C.

    1997-03-01

    A recently proposed 1 high brightness, high repetition rate, multibunch photoinjector project has reached the high power construction stage. The accelerator structure consists of a 1-1/2 cell, side wall coupled, X-Band (8.548 GHz) standing wave cavity, driven by a 20 MW SLAC Klystron, and a GHz repetition rate (burst mode) rf modelocked AlGaAs laser diode oscillator and Chirped Pulse Amplification (CPA) Ti:Al2O3 multipass amplifier. The photocathode gun will be used to accelerate a train of one hundred, 0.1-1 nC electron bunches to an energy in the range of 5 MeV. A joint collaboration between the UC Davis Department of Applied Science (DAS), and the Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (SRRC) has been established to expedite the construction and characterization of the accelerator structure. A prototype copper cavity has been fabricated and characterized. The results of the low power rf measurements are presented, as well as a description of the high power cavity design. The solenoid focusing system design and construction is also described.

  2. LOGARITHMIC AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Wade, E.J.; Stone, R.S.

    1959-03-10

    Electronic,amplifier circuits, especially a logai-ithmic amplifier characterizxed by its greatly improved strability are discussed. According to the in ention, means are provided to feed bach the output valtagee to a diode in the amplifier input circuit, the diode being utilized to produce the logarithmic characteristics. The diode is tics, The diode isition therewith and having its filament operated from thc same source s the filament of the logarithmic diode. A bias current of relatively large value compareii with the signal current is continuously passed through the compiting dioie to render the diode insensitivy to variations in the signal current. by this odes kdu to variaelled, so that the stability of the amlifier will be unimpaired.

  3. Optical design of a high power fiber optic coupler

    SciTech Connect

    English, R.E. Jr.; Halpin, J.M.; House, F.A.; Paris, R.D.

    1991-06-19

    Fiber optic beam delivery systems are replacing conventional mirror delivery systems for many reasons (e.g., system flexibility and redundancy, stability, and ease of alignment). Commercial products are available that use of fiber optic delivery for laser surgery and materials processing. Also, pump light of dye lasers can be delivered by optical fibers. Many laser wavelengths have been transported via optical fibers; high power delivery has been reported for argon, Nd:YAG, and excimer. We have been developing fiber optic beam delivery systems for copper vapor laser light; many of the fundamental properties of these systems are applicable to other high power delivery applications. A key element of fiber optic beam delivery systems is the coupling of laser light into the optical fiber. For our application this optical coupler must be robust to a range of operating parameters and laser characteristics. We have access to a high power copper vapor laser beam that is generated by a master oscillator/power amplifier (MOPA) chain comprised of three amplifiers. The light has a pulse width of 40--50 nsec with a repetition rate of about 4 kHz. The average power (nominal) to be injected into a fiber is 200 W. (We will refer to average power in this paper.) In practice, the laser beam's direction and collimation change with time. These characteristics plus other mechanical and operational constraints make it difficult for our coupler to be opto-mechanically referenced to the laser beam. We describe specifications, design, and operation of an optical system that couples a high-power copper vapor laser beam into a large core, multimode fiber. The approach used and observations reported are applicable to fiber optic delivery applications. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Matching network for RF plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Pickard, Daniel S.; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2007-11-20

    A compact matching network couples an RF power supply to an RF antenna in a plasma generator. The simple and compact impedance matching network matches the plasma load to the impedance of a coaxial transmission line and the output impedance of an RF amplifier at radio frequencies. The matching network is formed of a resonantly tuned circuit formed of a variable capacitor and an inductor in a series resonance configuration, and a ferrite core transformer coupled to the resonantly tuned circuit. This matching network is compact enough to fit in existing compact focused ion beam systems.

  5. Bidirectional amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Wright, James T.

    1986-01-01

    A bilateral circuit is operable for transmitting signals in two directions without generation of ringing due to feedback caused by the insertion of the circuit. The circuit may include gain for each of the signals to provide a bidirectional amplifier. The signals are passed through two separate paths, with a unidirectional amplifier in each path. A controlled sampling device is provided in each path for sampling the two signals. Any feedback loop between the two signals is disrupted by providing a phase displacement between the control signals for the two sampling devices.

  6. Bidirectional amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Wright, J.T.

    1984-02-02

    A bilateral circuit is operable for transmitting signals in two directions without generation of ringing due to feedback caused by the insertion of the circuit. The circuit may include gain for each of the signals to provide a bidirectional amplifier. The signals are passed through two separate paths, with a unidirectional amplifier in each path. A controlled sampling device is provided in each path for sampling the two signals. Any feedback loop between the two signals is disrupted by providing a phase displacement between the control signals for the two sampling devices.

  7. Resonantly pumped high power flat L-band erbium-doped superfluorescent fiber source.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Ping; Liu, Ze-Jin; Li, Yi-Gang; Lu, Ke-Cheng; Zhou, Shou-Huan

    2008-01-01

    An all-single-mode-fiber L-band superfluorescent fiber source (SFS) with 1 W output power, 34.3 nm bandwidth (FWHM) and 54% optical conversion efficiency is constructed by seeding a high power erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) with a low power L-band ASE seed source to avoid parasitic lasing. The source is resonantly pumped by a high power C-band SFS peaked at 1545 nm.

  8. NASA developments in solid state power amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Regis F.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last ten years, NASA has undertaken an extensive program aimed at development of solid state power amplifiers for space applications. Historically, the program may be divided into three phases. The first efforts were carried out in support of the advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) program, which is developing an experimental version of a Ka-band commercial communications system. These first amplifiers attempted to use hybrid technology. The second phase was still targeted at ACTS frequencies, but concentrated on monolithic implementations, while the current, third phase, is a monolithic effort that focusses on frequencies appropriate for other NASA programs and stresses amplifier efficiency. The topics covered include: (1) 20 GHz hybrid amplifiers; (2) 20 GHz monolithic MESFET power amplifiers; (3) Texas Instruments' (TI) 20 GHz variable power amplifier; (4) TI 20 GHz high power amplifier; (5) high efficiency monolithic power amplifiers; (6) GHz high efficiency variable power amplifier; (7) TI 32 GHz monolithic power amplifier performance; (8) design goals for Hughes' 32 GHz variable power amplifier; and (9) performance goals for Hughes' pseudomorphic 60 GHz power amplifier.

  9. K-band high power latching switch. [communication satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlinar, M. J.; Piotrowski, W. S.; Raue, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    A 19 GHz waveguide latching switch with a bandwidth of 1400 MHz and an exceptionally low insertion loss of 0.25 dB was demonstrated. The RF and driver ferrites are separate structures and can be optimized individually. This analysis for each structure is separately detailed. Basically, the RF section features a dual turnstile junction. The circulator consists of a dielectric tube which contains two ferrite rods, and a dielectric spacer separating the ferrite parts along the center of symmetry of the waveguide to form two turnstiles. This subassembly is indexed and locked in the center of symmetry of a uniform junction of three waveguides by the metallic transformers installed in the top and bottom walls of the housing. The switching junction and its actuating circuitry met all RF performance objectives and all shock and vibration requirements with no physical damage or performance degradation. It exceeds thermal requirements by operating over a 100 C temperature range (-44 C to +56 C) and has a high power handling capability allowing up to 100 W of CW input power.

  10. Amplified Policymaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Katherine; Woempner, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    This brief examines the policy implications of two drivers of change presented in the "2020 Forecast: Creating the Future of Learning"-- Pattern Recognition and Amplified Organization. These drivers point toward a series of cultural shifts and illuminate how we are developing new ways of organizing, constructing, and managing knowledge.…

  11. High-Power Electromagnetic Thruster Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Michael R.; Mikellides, Pavlos G.

    2001-01-01

    High-power electromagnetic thrusters have been proposed as primary in-space propulsion options for several bold new interplanetary and deep-space missions. As the lead center for electric propulsion, the NASA Glenn Research Center designs, develops, and tests high-power electromagnetic technologies to meet these demanding mission requirements. Two high-power thruster concepts currently under investigation by Glenn are the magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster and the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT).

  12. Controlling satellite communication system unwanted emissions in congested RF spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Donald; Heymann, Roger

    2007-09-01

    , developed by the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI). In the USA, the Advanced Television Systems Committee (ATSC) has adopted Europe's DVB-S and DVB-S2 standards for satellite digital transmission. With today's digital modulations, RF spectral side lobes can extend out many times the modulating frequency on either side of the carrier at excessive power levels unless filtered. Higher-order digital modulations include quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK), 8 PSK (8-ary phase shift keying), 16 APSK (also called 12-4 APSK (amplitude phase shift keying)), and 16 QAM (quadrature amplitude modulation); they are key for higher spectrum efficiency to enable higher data rate transmissions in limited available bandwidths. Nonlinear high-power amplifiers (HPAs) can regenerate frequency spectral side lobes on input-filtered digital modulations. The paper discusses technologies and techniques for controlling these spectral side lobes, such as the use of square root raised cosine (SRRC) filtering before or during the modulation process, HPA output power back-off (OPBO), and RF filters after the HPA. Spectral mask specifications are a common method of the NTIA and ITU to define spectral occupancy power limits. They are intended to reduce interference among RF spectrum users by limiting excessive radiation at frequencies beyond the regulatory allocated bandwidth.The focus here is on the communication systems of U.S. government satellites used for space research, space operations, Earth exploration satellite services (EESS), meteorological satellite services (METSATS), and other government services. The 8025 to 8400 megahertz (MHz) X band can be used to illustrate the "unwanted emissions" issue. 8025 to 8400 MHz abuts the 8400 to 8450 MHz band allocated by the NTIA and ITU to space research for space-to-Earth transmissions such as receiving very weak Deep Space Network signals. The views and ideas expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily

  13. High power compatible internally sensed optical phased array.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lyle E; Ward, Robert L; Francis, Samuel P; Sibley, Paul G; Fleddermann, Roland; Sutton, Andrew J; Smith, Craig; McClelland, David E; Shaddock, Daniel A

    2016-06-13

    The technical embodiment of the Huygens-Fresnel principle, an optical phased array (OPA) is an arrangement of optical emitters with relative phases controlled to create a desired beam profile after propagation. One important application of an OPA is coherent beam combining (CBC), which can be used to create beams of higher power than is possible with a single laser source, especially for narrow linewidth sources. Here we present an all-fiber architecture that stabilizes the relative output phase by inferring the relative path length differences between lasers using the small fraction of light that is back-reflected into the fiber at the OPA's glass-air interface, without the need for any external sampling optics. This architecture is compatible with high power continuous wave laser sources (e.g., fiber amplifiers) up to 100 W per channel. The high-power compatible internally sensed OPA was implemented experimentally using commercial 15 W fiber amplifiers, demonstrating an output RMS phase stability of λ/194, and the ability to steer the beam at up to 10 kHz. PMID:27410363

  14. High power compatible internally sensed optical phased array.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lyle E; Ward, Robert L; Francis, Samuel P; Sibley, Paul G; Fleddermann, Roland; Sutton, Andrew J; Smith, Craig; McClelland, David E; Shaddock, Daniel A

    2016-06-13

    The technical embodiment of the Huygens-Fresnel principle, an optical phased array (OPA) is an arrangement of optical emitters with relative phases controlled to create a desired beam profile after propagation. One important application of an OPA is coherent beam combining (CBC), which can be used to create beams of higher power than is possible with a single laser source, especially for narrow linewidth sources. Here we present an all-fiber architecture that stabilizes the relative output phase by inferring the relative path length differences between lasers using the small fraction of light that is back-reflected into the fiber at the OPA's glass-air interface, without the need for any external sampling optics. This architecture is compatible with high power continuous wave laser sources (e.g., fiber amplifiers) up to 100 W per channel. The high-power compatible internally sensed OPA was implemented experimentally using commercial 15 W fiber amplifiers, demonstrating an output RMS phase stability of λ/194, and the ability to steer the beam at up to 10 kHz.

  15. RF pulse compression in the NLC test accelerator at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavine, T. L.

    At the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), the authors are designing a Next Linear Collider (NLC) with linacs powered by x-band klystrons with RF pulse compression. The design of the linac RF system is based on x-band prototypes which have been tested at high power, and on a systems-integration test - the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) - which is currently under construction at SLAC. This paper discusses some of the systems implications of RF pulse compression, and the use of pulse compression in the NLCTA, both for peak power multiplication and for controlling, by RF phase modulation, intrapulse variations in the linac beam energy.

  16. Unstable-Resonator Oscillator/Amplifier Diode Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J.; Mittelstein, Michael; Tiberio, Richard C.; Forouhar, Siamak; Crawford, Deborah

    1994-01-01

    Fabricated as single-chip integrated circuit. Device based partly on concept proved in commercial solid-state lasers: using unstable-resonator oscillator to define electromagnetic mode and, following oscillator, traveling-wave amplifier to generate high power. Mode-definition and power-amplification functions optimized separately. Hyperbolic-grating, unstable-resonator oscillator/amplifier diode laser produces single-longitudinal-mode, broad, laterally coherent, diffraction-limited, high-power beam.

  17. BOOK REVIEW: Generation and Application of High Power Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshfield, J. L.

    1998-08-01

    A question often posed upon publication of a summer school proceedings is whether the contents are of lasting value, or are only an archive or diary of the gathering. This issue is exacerbated by the year's delay (or more) that is all too customary between the school itself and publication; and of course the attendees have had the contents in note form all along. Only occasionally, in this reviewer's experience, are the contents worth the purchase price of the book; and even less often is the book a useful reference for course work in a teaching context. It is thus gratifying to report that the present volume should be of lasting value, and should be a useful reference for students in high power microwave physics and related fields to have and to hold during their formative years. The editors, Professor Alan Cairns of the University of St Andrews, and Professor Alan Phelps of the University of Strathclyde, have assembled some 14 essays in the book on a range of topics on microwave source physics and the uses of high power microwaves for fusion plasma heating. Amongst the essays are several tutorials, including Alan Phelps' own 8 page introduction; Michael Petelin's elegant overview of a range of classical spontaneous and stimulated radiation processes for free electrons; Rodolfo Bonifacio's exposition on free electron waveguide lasers; James Eastwood's overview of computer modelling methods; Georges Faillon's review of klystrons; Alan Cairns's and Nat Fisch's lucid descriptions of the physical basis of plasma heating with intense microwaves; and Manfred Thumm's two thorough contributions on microwave mode converters and on applications. The other essays are less tutorial, but more topical, with expositions on new results on gyro-amplifiers by Monica Blank; on vacuum microelectronics issues for microwave power amplifiers by Morag Garven and Robert Parker; John Vomvoridis's theory of cyclotron resonance interactions for generation of high power microwaves using a

  18. Photoconductive switching for high power microwave generation

    SciTech Connect

    Pocha, M.D.; Hofer, W.W.

    1990-10-01

    Photoconductive switching is a technology that is being increasingly applied to generation of high power microwaves. Two primary semiconductors used for these devices are silicon and gallium arsenide. Diamond is a promising future candidate material. This paper discusses the important material parameters and switching modes, critical issues for microwave generation, and future directions for this high power, photoconductive switching technology.

  19. High power laser perforating tools and systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zediker, Mark S; Rinzler, Charles C; Faircloth, Brian O; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F

    2014-04-22

    ystems devices and methods for the transmission of 1 kW or more of laser energy deep into the earth and for the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena. Systems, devices and methods for the laser perforation of a borehole in the earth. These systems can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to perforate such boreholes.

  20. High-power direct-diode laser successes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haake, John M.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2004-06-01

    Direct diode laser will become much more prevalent in the solar system of manufacturing due to their high efficiency, small portable size, unique beam profiles, and low ownership costs. There has been many novel applications described for high power direct diode laser [HPDDL] systems but few have been implemented in extreme production environments due to diode and diode system reliability. We discuss several novel applications in which the HPDDL have been implemented and proven reliable and cost-effective in production environments. These applications are laser hardening/surface modification, laser wire feed welding and laser paint stripping. Each of these applications uniquely tests the direct diode laser systems capabilities and confirms their reliability in production environments. A comparison of the advantages direct diode laser versus traditional industrial lasers such as CO2 and Nd:YAG and non-laser technologies such a RF induction, and MIG welders for each of these production applications is presented.

  1. Diode amplifier of modulated optical beam power

    SciTech Connect

    D'yachkov, N V; Bogatov, A P; Gushchik, T I; Drakin, A E

    2014-11-30

    Analytical relations are obtained between characteristics of modulated light at the output and input of an optical diode power amplifier operating in the highly saturated gain regime. It is shown that a diode amplifier may act as an amplitude-to-phase modulation converter with a rather large bandwidth (∼10 GHz). The low sensitivity of the output power of the amplifier to the input beam power and its high energy efficiency allow it to be used as a building block of a high-power multielement laser system with coherent summation of a large number of optical beams. (lasers)

  2. High power industrial picosecond laser from IR to UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saby, Julien; Sangla, Damien; Pierrot, Simonette; Deslandes, Pierre; Salin, François

    2013-02-01

    Many industrial applications such as glass cutting, ceramic micro-machining or photovoltaic processes require high average and high peak power Picosecond pulses. The main limitation for the expansion of the picosecond market is the cost of high power picosecond laser sources, which is due to the complexity of the architecture used for picosecond pulse amplification, and the difficulty to keep an excellent beam quality at high average power. Amplification with fibers is a good technology to achieve high power in picosecond regime but, because of its tight confinement over long distances, light undergoes dramatic non linearities while propagating in fibers. One way to avoid strong non linearities is to increase fiber's mode area. Nineteen missing holes fibers offering core diameter larger than 80μm have been used over the past few years [1-3] but it has been shown that mode instabilities occur at approximately 100W average output power in these fibers [4]. Recently a new fiber design has been introduced, in which HOMs are delocalized from the core to the clad, preventing from HOMs amplification [5]. In these so-called Large Pitch Fibers, threshold for mode instabilities is increased to 294W offering robust single-mode operation below this power level [6]. We have demonstrated a high power-high efficiency industrial picosecond source using single-mode Large Pitch rod-type fibers doped with Ytterbium. Large Pitch Rod type fibers can offer a unique combination of single-mode output with a very large mode area from 40 μm up to 100μm and very high gain. This enables to directly amplify a low power-low energy Mode Locked Fiber laser with a simple amplification architecture, achieving very high power together with singlemode output independent of power level or repetition rate.

  3. Simulations of the LANL regenerative amplifier FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Kesselring, M.; Colson, W.B.; Wong, R.K.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1997-08-01

    The LANL regenerative amplifier FEL is designed to produce an average output power of 1 kW. Simulations study the transverse effects due to guiding by the intense electron beam and feedback. These simulations coupled with experimental measurements can be used to improve future high-power FEL designs.

  4. New rf power system for SuperHILAC

    SciTech Connect

    Fugitt, J.; Lancaster, H.; Sorensen, R.

    1985-05-01

    The upgraded rf system for the SuperHILAC is now operational using 9 new tetrode amplifiers. Each amplifier can produce in excess of 1MW of 70 Mhz pulsed rf power. Ferrite is used to decouple the screen grid circuit and to absorb parasitic oscillations. This results in a very stable amplifier with reasonable gain. This system uses a common 8 MW anode power supply and crowbar system. Overall system efficiency has been increased significantly. We project a 3 year payback on the equipment cost, realized from the power savings alone. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Reflex ring laser amplifier system

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, M.A.

    1983-08-31

    The invention is a method and apparatus for providing a reflex ring laser system for amplifying an input laser pulse. The invention is particularly useful in laser fusion experiments where efficient production of high-energy and high power laser pulses is required. The invention comprises a large aperture laser amplifier in an unstable ring resonator which includes a combination spatial filter and beam expander having a magnification greater than unity. An input pulse is injected into the resonator, e.g., through an aperture in an input mirror. The injected pulse passes through the amplifier and spatial filter/expander components on each pass around the ring. The unstable resonator is designed to permit only a predetermined number of passes before the amplified pulse exits the resonator. On the first pass through the amplifier, the beam fills only a small central region of the gain medium. On each successive pass, the beam has been expanded to fill the next concentric non-overlapping region of the gain medium.

  6. Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Single-Cell Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Higashi, Y.; Higo, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2011-11-04

    We report the results of ongoing high power tests of single-cell standing wave structures. These tests are part of an experimental and theoretical study of rf breakdown in normal conducting structures at 11.4 GHz. The goal of this study is to determine the maximum gradient possibilities for normal-conducting rf powered particle beam accelerators. The test setup consists of reusable mode launchers and short test structures powered by SLACs XL-4 klystron. The mode launchers and structures were manufactured at SLAC and KEK and tested at the SLAC klystron test laboratory.

  7. NASA GRC High Power Electromagnetic Thruster Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Michael R.; Pensil, Eric J.

    2004-01-01

    High-power electromagnetic thrusters have been proposed as primary in-space propulsion options for several bold new interplanetary and deep-space missions. As the lead center for electric propulsion, the NASA Glenn Research Center designs, develops, and tests high-power electromagnetic technologies to meet these demanding mission requirements. Two high-power thruster concepts currently under investigation by Glenn are the magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster and the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT). This paper describes the MPD thruster and the test facility.

  8. A Cerenkov source of high-power picosecond pulsed microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T.B.; Marshall, T.C.; Hirshfield, J.L. |

    1998-06-01

    One or more electron bunches passing along the axis of a dielectric-lined cylindrical waveguide are shown to emit picosecond pulses of high-power broad-band microwave radiation. The bunches can be generated by an S-band RF gun, and thus spaced from one another by 10.5 cm in a macropulse sequence, or a single more intense bunch can be generated using a laser-illuminated photocathode in the RF gun. Theory is developed for the excitation of TM{sub 0m} modes of this waveguide which propagate at the bunch velocity from Cerenkov radiation emitted by a single intense bunch. A train of picosecond coherent wakefield pulses is shown to follow the bunch, when the waveguide modes have nearly constant spacing in frequency. An example is shown for an alumina-lined waveguide with 10-nC 3--15-ps bunches having an initial energy of 6 MeV. Computations are presented of the mode spectrum of the radiation and its time structure. It is also shown that measurements of the mode spectrum, or of the energy loss of the bunch, can be used to infer the axial density profile of the bunch. Certain features of the theory are compared with the results of a preliminary experiment.

  9. 2250-MHz High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier (HEMPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, W. Herbert; Bell, Joseph L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Tnis paper will focus on developing an exotic switching technique that enhances the DC-to-RF conversion efficiency of microwave power amplifiers. For years, switching techniques implemented in the 10 kHz to 30 MHz region have resulted in DC-to-RF conversion efficiencies of 90-95-percent. Currently amplifier conversion efficiency, in the 2-3 GHz region approaches, 10-20-percent. Using a combination of analytical modeling and hardware testing, a High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier was built that demonstrated conversion efficiencies four to five times higher than current state of the art.

  10. High-power room-temperature-operated CO laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kouki; Taniwaki, Manabu; Sato, Shunichi; Kumagai, Mikio; Takashima, Yoich; Naito, Yasuhiro; Nagano, Hiroshi; Hasuike, Toru

    2000-04-01

    The objectives of this study are to achieve high-power, efficient operation of a room-temperature CO laser and to collect data for designing the CO laser system for nuclear reactor decommissioning. The influence of the H2O concentration in the laser gas on the output performance was investigated, and it was found that the H2O concentration should be kept as low as possible (less than 260 ppm) to obtain stable, high-power outputs. To improve output performance, the rf frequency was increased from 13.56 MHz to 27.12 MHz. The output power for the 27.12 MHz excitation was increased by 10 to 20% compared with that for the 13.56 MHz excitation. The laser output was scaled by extending the discharge tube inner diameter from 19 mm to 30 mm. By optimizing the air gap length and the curvature radius of the outer metallic electrode, the operating gas conditions, and the reflectivity of the output coupler, a maximum output of 830 W was obtained at a laser efficiency of 12.2% with adding neither Kr nor Xe. The addition of Kr was more effective for increasing the output than the addition of Xe. A maximum output of 910 W was obtained at a laser efficiency of 14.8% with Kr addition, and a maximum output of 810 W was obtained at a laser efficiency of 16.2% with Xe addition.

  11. Coupling output of multichannel high power microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guolin; Shu Ting; Yuan Chengwei; Zhang Jun; Yang Jianhua; Jin Zhenxing; Yin Yi; Wu Dapeng; Zhu Jun; Ren Heming; Yang Jie

    2010-12-15

    The coupling output of multichannel high power microwaves is a promising technique for the development of high power microwave technologies, as it can enhance the output capacities of presently studied devices. According to the investigations on the spatial filtering method and waveguide filtering method, the hybrid filtering method is proposed for the coupling output of multichannel high power microwaves. As an example, a specific structure is designed for the coupling output of S/X/X band three-channel high power microwaves and investigated with the hybrid filtering method. In the experiments, a pulse of 4 GW X band beat waves and a pulse of 1.8 GW S band microwave are obtained.

  12. High power, high frequency component test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen; Krawczonek, Walter

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has available a high frequency, high power laboratory facility for testing various components of aerospace and/or terrestrial power systems. This facility is described here. All of its capabilities and potential applications are detailed.

  13. High Power Photodetectors for Space Communications Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, Narayan R.

    1995-01-01

    High power photodetectors in coplanar waveguide and distributed traveling-wave structures have been under development for communications applications. The distributed photodetectors demonstrated 70percent efficiency with a linear response up to 25 mW of optical power input.

  14. Coupling output of multichannel high power microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guolin; Shu, Ting; Yuan, Chengwei; Zhang, Jun; Yang, Jianhua; Jin, Zhenxing; Yin, Yi; Wu, Dapeng; Zhu, Jun; Ren, Heming; Yang, Jie

    2010-12-01

    The coupling output of multichannel high power microwaves is a promising technique for the development of high power microwave technologies, as it can enhance the output capacities of presently studied devices. According to the investigations on the spatial filtering method and waveguide filtering method, the hybrid filtering method is proposed for the coupling output of multichannel high power microwaves. As an example, a specific structure is designed for the coupling output of S/X/X band three-channel high power microwaves and investigated with the hybrid filtering method. In the experiments, a pulse of 4 GW X band beat waves and a pulse of 1.8 GW S band microwave are obtained.

  15. High power millimeter wave source development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T. V.

    1989-01-01

    High power millimeter wave sources for fusion program; ECH source development program strategy; and 1 MW, 140 GHz gyrotron experiment design philosophy are briefly outlined. This presentation is represented by viewgraphs only.

  16. High power laser apparatus and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A high-power, continuous-wave laser was designed for use in power transmission and energy-collecting systems, and for producing incoherent light for pumping a laser material. The laser has a high repetitive pulsing rate per unit time, resulting in a high-power density beam. The laser is composed of xenon flash tubes powered by fast-charging capacitors flashed in succession by a high-speed motor connected to an automobile-type distributor.

  17. Test facilities for high power electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Vetrone, Robert H.; Grisnik, Stanley P.; Myers, Roger M.; Parkes, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Electric propulsion has applications for orbit raising, maneuvering of large space systems, and interplanetary missions. These missions involve propulsion power levels from tenths to tens of megawatts, depending upon the application. General facility requirements for testing high power electric propulsion at the component and thrust systems level are defined. The characteristics and pumping capabilities of many large vacuum chambers in the United States are reviewed and compared with the requirements for high power electric propulsion testing.

  18. Baseband pulse shaping techniques for nonlinearly amplified pi/4-QPSK and QAM systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feher, Kamilo

    1991-01-01

    A new generation of multi-stage pi/4-shifted QPSK and of superposed quadrature-amplitude-modulated (SQAM) modulators-coherent demodulators (modems) and of continuous phase modulated (CPM)-gaussian premodulation filtered minimum-shift-keying (MGMSK) systems is proposed and studied. These modems will lead to bandwidth and power efficient satellite communications systems designs. As an illustrative application, a baseband processing technique pi/4-controlled transition PSK (pi/4-CTPSK) is described. To develop a cost and power efficient design strategy, we assume that nonlinear, fully saturated high power amplifiers (HPA) are utilized in the satellite earth station transmitter and in the satellite transponder. Modem structures which could lead to application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) satellite on-board processing universal modem applications are also considered. Multistate GMSK (i.e., MGMSK) signal generation methods by means of two or more RF combined nonlinearly amplified SQAM modems and by one multistate (in-phase and quadrature-baseband premodulation filtered-superposed) SQAM architecture and one RF nonlinear amplifier are studied. During the SQAM modem development phase we investigate the potential system advantages of the pi/4-shifted logic. The bandwidth efficiency of the proposed multistate GMSK and baseband filtered PAM-FM modulator (a new class in the CPM family) will be significantly higher than that of conventional G-MSK systems. To optimize the practical P(sub e) = f((E sub b)/(N sub o)) performance we consider improved coherent demodulation MGMSK structures such as deviated-frequency locking coherent demodulators. For relative low bit rate SATCOM applications, e.g., bit rates less than 300 kb/s, phase noise tracking cancellation (for fixed site earth station) and phase noise cancellation as well as Doppler compensation (for satellite to mobile earth station) applications may be required. We study digital channel sounding methods which could

  19. Power scaling of passively phased fiber amplifier arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakir, Sami A.; Culver, Bill; Nelson, Burke; Starcher, Yuji; Bates, George M.; Hedrick, Jerry W., Jr.

    2008-08-01

    Passive phasing of fiber amplifier arrays are promising for the power scaling of high power fiber laser systems. The broadband operation of passively phased systems mitigates nonlinear effects such as Stimulated Brillouin Scattering. This leads to the possibility of scaling the individual fiber amplifiers in the passively phased arrays to multi-kilowatt power levels. In effect, a smaller number of fiber amplifiers can be used compared to other methods of fiber amplifiers combining. We report the passive phasing of 16 Yb-doped fiber amplifiers at 5W each for a total of 80W.

  20. High-Power Plasma Switch for 11.4 GHz Microwave Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2010-03-04

    Results obtained in several experiments on active RF pulse compression at X-band using a magnicon as the high-power RF source are presented. In these experiments, microwave energy was stored in high-Q TE01 and TE02 modes of two parallel-fed resonators, and then discharged using switches activated with rapidly fired plasma discharge tubes. Designs and high-power tests of several versions of the compressor are described. In these experiments, coherent pulse superposition was demonstrated at a 5–9 MW level of incident power. The compressed pulses observed had powers of 50–70 MW and durations of 40–70 ns. Peak power gains were measured to be in the range of 7:1–11:1 with efficiency in the range of 50–63%.

  1. Characteristics of high gradient insulators for accelerator and high power flow applications

    SciTech Connect

    Elizondo, J.M.; Krogh, M.L.; Smith, D.

    1997-07-01

    The high gradient insulator has been demonstrated to operate at levels comparable or better than special geometry or coated insulators. Some patented insulator configurations allow for sophisticated accelerator structures, high power flow interfaces, and microwave applications not previously possible. Sophisticated manufacturing techniques available at AlliedSignal FM and T made this development possible. Bipolar and high power flow applications are specially suited for present insulator designs. The insulator shows a beneficial effect when used under RF fields or RF structures. These insulators can be designed, to a first approximation, from simple electron flight path equations. With a recently developed model of surface flashover physics the authors completed a set of design calculations that include effects such as layer density and dielectric/metal thickness. Experimental data, obtained in the last few years of development, is presented and reviewed. Several insulator fabrication characteristics, indicating critical design parameters, are also presented.

  2. Simulations of dielectric Cerenkov masers at moderate to high power

    SciTech Connect

    Mardahl, P.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1996-12-31

    A dielectric Cerenkov maser amplifier is simulated with XOOPIC and results are compared to experiment and theory. The device examined is azimuthally symmetric with a circular crossection. The dispersion has been obtained and agrees well with the experiment. The efficiency, power and gain will be compared for the parameters of the Dartmouth experiment. Other configurations of interest include devices of higher beam energy and current such as the experiment of Main. This device generated a peak microwave power of 280 MW for 3ns before experiencing RF quenching, possibly due to the formation of a plasma at the wall, which they intend to investigate further. The authors also examine various techniques of reducing the field stresses which may cause breakdown in this class of device. Also, increasing microwave power and efficiency via grading the dielectric constant to match the beam velocity will be examined.

  3. New Developments on PBG RF Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. V.; Yu, D.

    2004-12-01

    Performance and design features of metal PBG and rod-loaded cavities for single-beam and multi-beam acceleration and rf power generation devices are considered. Fundamental differences of the performance between single-defect and multi-defect structures are identified. Rod-loaded cavity designs are considered for a 6-beam klystron. Preliminary design of the X-band MBK demonstrates feasibility of generating high power with high efficiency in a very compact construction.

  4. Matched wideband low-noise amplifiers for radio astronomy.

    PubMed

    Weinreb, S; Bardin, J; Mani, H; Jones, G

    2009-04-01

    Two packaged low noise amplifiers for the 0.3-4 GHz frequency range are described. The amplifiers can be operated at temperatures of 300-4 K and achieve noise temperatures in the 5 K range (<0.1 dB noise figure) at 15 K physical temperature. One amplifier utilizes commercially available, plastic-packaged SiGe transistors for first and second stages; the second amplifier is identical except it utilizes an experimental chip transistor as the first stage. Both amplifiers use resistive feedback to provide input reflection coefficient S11<-10 dB over a decade bandwidth with gain over 30 dB. The amplifiers can be used as rf amplifiers in very low noise radio astronomy systems or as i.f. amplifiers following superconducting mixers operating in the millimeter and submillimeter frequency range.

  5. A temperature-jump NMR probe setup using rf heating optimized for the analysis of temperature-induced biomacromolecular kinetic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinnenthal, Jörg; Wagner, Dominic; Marquardsen, Thorsten; Krahn, Alexander; Engelke, Frank; Schwalbe, Harald

    2015-02-01

    A novel temperature jump (T-jump) probe operational at B0 fields of 600 MHz (14.1 Tesla) with an integrated cage radio-frequency (rf) coil for rapid (<1 s) heating in high-resolution (HR) liquid-state NMR-spectroscopy is presented and its performance investigated. The probe consists of an inner 2.5 mm "heating coil" designed for generating rf-electric fields of 190-220 MHz across a lossy dielectric sample and an outer two coil assembly for 1H-, 2H- and 15N-nuclei. High B0 field homogeneities (0.7 Hz at 600 MHz) are combined with high heating rates (20-25 K/s) and only small temperature gradients (<±1.5 K, 3 s after 20 K T-jump). The heating coil is under control of a high power rf-amplifier within the NMR console and can therefore easily be accessed by the pulse programmer. Furthermore, implementation of a real-time setup including synchronization of the NMR spectrometer's air flow heater with the rf-heater used to maintain the temperature of the sample is described. Finally, the applicability of the real-time T-jump setup for the investigation of biomolecular kinetic processes in the second-to-minute timescale is demonstrated for samples of a model 14mer DNA hairpin and a 15N-selectively labeled 40nt hsp17-RNA thermometer.

  6. High power narrowband 589 nm frequency doubled fibre laser source.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Luke; Feng, Yan; Calia, Domenico Bonaccini

    2009-08-17

    We demonstrate high-power high-efficiency cavity-enhanced second harmonic generation of an in-house built ultra-high spectral density (SBS-suppressed) 1178 nm narrowband Raman fibre amplifier. Up to 14.5 W 589 nm CW emission is achieved with linewidth Delta nu(589) < 7 MHz in a diffraction-limited beam, with peak external conversion efficiency of 86%. The inherently high spectral and spatial qualities of the 589 nm source are particularly suited to both spectroscopic and Laser Guide Star applications, given the seed laser can be easily frequency-locked to the Na D(2a) emission line. Further, we expect the technology to be extendable, at similar or higher powers, to wavelengths limited only by the seed-pump-pair availability. PMID:19687946

  7. Design considerations on a high-power VUV FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ciocci, F.; Dattoli, G.; Angelis, A. De; Garosi, F.; Giannessi, L.; Torre, A.; Faatz, B.; Ottaviani, P.L.

    1995-07-01

    The authors explore the feasibility conditions of a high-power FEL operating in the VUV region (below 100 nm) and exploiting a coupled oscillator triplicator configuration. A high quality beam from a linac is passed through a FEL oscillator and produces laser radiation at 240 nm. The same beam is extracted and then injected into a second undulator tuned at the third harmonic of the first. The bunching produced in the oscillator allows the start up of the laser signal in the second section which operates as an amplifier. The authors discuss the dynamical behavior of the system and the dependence of the output power on the characteristics of the e-beam and of the oscillator. The possibility of enhancing the output power, adding a tapered section to the second undulator, is finally analyzed.

  8. High power narrowband 589 nm frequency doubled fibre laser source.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Luke; Feng, Yan; Calia, Domenico Bonaccini

    2009-08-17

    We demonstrate high-power high-efficiency cavity-enhanced second harmonic generation of an in-house built ultra-high spectral density (SBS-suppressed) 1178 nm narrowband Raman fibre amplifier. Up to 14.5 W 589 nm CW emission is achieved with linewidth Delta nu(589) < 7 MHz in a diffraction-limited beam, with peak external conversion efficiency of 86%. The inherently high spectral and spatial qualities of the 589 nm source are particularly suited to both spectroscopic and Laser Guide Star applications, given the seed laser can be easily frequency-locked to the Na D(2a) emission line. Further, we expect the technology to be extendable, at similar or higher powers, to wavelengths limited only by the seed-pump-pair availability.

  9. PASOTRON{trademark} amplifier experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ponti, E.S.; Goebel, D.M.; Feicht, J.R.; Santoru, J.; Eisenhart, R.L.

    1995-11-01

    Preliminary experimental studies are reported of an L-Band amplifier based on Hughes` Plasma-Assisted, Slow-Wave Oscillator (PASOTRON) technology. The amplifier system utilizes a hollow-cathode-plasma electron-gun, and a plasma-filled Slow-Wave Structure (SWS) to produce {>=} 100-{micro}sec-long, 50 to 75-kV, 30 to 100-A electron-beam pulses that propagate in a plasma channel without the use of any externally applied axial magnetic field. The electron-beam pulse coincides with a 100-{micro}sec-long RF drive signal provided by a 2.6-kW TWT, which is coupled into the amplifier upstream of the SWS. The SWS consists of a ring-bar design which is novel to the PASOTRON family of devices and is used for its short length compared to a helix. Simulations on HP`s High Frequency Structure Simulator were used to optimize the ring-bar SWS. Preliminary data are reported showing the new L-Band amplifiers gain, power, efficiency, and bandwidth. Methods of eliminating a Backward Wave Oscillation (BWO), which was found to limit the performance of the tube, are also presented.

  10. Experimental research of a chain of diode pumped rubidium amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfei; Hua, Weihong; Li, Lei; Wang, Hongyan; Yang, Zining; Xu, Xiaojun

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we have set up a diode pumped rubidium MOPA system with a chain of two amplifiers. The experimental results show an amplified laser power of 26W with amplification factor of 16.3 and power extraction efficiency of 53% for a single amplifier, and an amplified laser power of 11W with amplification factor of 7.9 and power extraction efficiency of 26% for a chain of two amplifiers. The reason for lower performance of cascade amplification is mainly due to the limited total pump power, which will be not sufficient for efficient pumping when assigned from a single amplifier into two amplifiers. The situation could be well improved by increasing the seed laser power as well as the pump power for each amplifier to realize high efficient saturated amplification. Such MOPA configuration has the potential for scaling high beam quality alkali laser into high powers. PMID:26480105

  11. Experimental research of a chain of diode pumped rubidium amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfei; Hua, Weihong; Li, Lei; Wang, Hongyan; Yang, Zining; Xu, Xiaojun

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we have set up a diode pumped rubidium MOPA system with a chain of two amplifiers. The experimental results show an amplified laser power of 26W with amplification factor of 16.3 and power extraction efficiency of 53% for a single amplifier, and an amplified laser power of 11W with amplification factor of 7.9 and power extraction efficiency of 26% for a chain of two amplifiers. The reason for lower performance of cascade amplification is mainly due to the limited total pump power, which will be not sufficient for efficient pumping when assigned from a single amplifier into two amplifiers. The situation could be well improved by increasing the seed laser power as well as the pump power for each amplifier to realize high efficient saturated amplification. Such MOPA configuration has the potential for scaling high beam quality alkali laser into high powers.

  12. V-band IMPATT power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schell, S. W.

    1985-01-01

    This program is the result of the continuing demand and future requirement for a high data rate 60-GHz communications link. A reliable solid-state transmitter which delivers the necessary power over a wide bandwidth using the present IMPATT diode technology required the development of combining techniques. The development of a 60-GHz IMPATT power combiner amplifier is detailed. The results form a basis from which future wideband, high-power IMPATT amplifiers may be developed. As a result, several state-of-the-art advancements in millimeter-wave components technology were achieved. Specific achievements for the amplifier integration were: development of a nonresonant divider/combiner circuit; reproducible multiple junction circulator assemblies; and reliable high power 60-GHz IMPATT diodes. The various design approaches and tradeoffs which lead to the final amplifier configuration are discussed. A detailed circuit design is presented for the various amplifier components, and the conical line combiner, radial line combiner, and circulator development are discussed. The performance of the amplifier, the overall achievement of the program, the implications of the results, and an assessment of future development needs and recommendations are examined.

  13. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  14. Recent developments in superconducting cavity RF control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simrock, Stefan

    2005-02-01

    Presently a large number of superconducting accelerators under construction or proposed impose stringent requirements on the rf control of the accelerating fields, operability, and reliability. The accelerator application range from linear colliders, UV-FELs and X-FELs, ERL based light sources, high power proton accelerators to heavy ion accelerators. Examples are TESLA and NLC, the European XFEL and Lux, the Cornell ERL based light source, the high power ERL based IR-FEL at JLAB, the neutron spallation source SNS, the heavy ion accelerator RIA, and the energy upgrade of the CEBAF accelerator at JLAB. The requirements on the rf systems range from low to high current, medium to high gradient, and relativistic to non-relativistics beam. With the technology in analog and digital electronics developing rapidly, the technology for rf feedback system is changing more and more from analog or hybrid systems towards fully digital systems. Todays DSPs and FPGAs can process sophisticated feedback algorithms on a time scale of some 100 ns to a few us with ADCs and DACs with about 100 MHz bandwidth at 14 bit and latencies less than 100 ns available to inter-face to the field detectors and field control actuators. Also fast analog multiplier technology allows for field detection and actuators for rf control with high linearity, measurement and control bandwidth while maintaining low noise levels.

  15. 47 CFR 95.411 - (CB Rule 11) May I use power amplifiers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false (CB Rule 11) May I use power amplifiers? 95.411... Rule 11) May I use power amplifiers? (a) You may not attach the following items (power amplifiers) to your certificated CB transmitter in any way: (1) External radio frequency (RF) power...

  16. 47 CFR 95.411 - (CB Rule 11) May I use power amplifiers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false (CB Rule 11) May I use power amplifiers? 95.411... Rule 11) May I use power amplifiers? (a) You may not attach the following items (power amplifiers) to your certificated CB transmitter in any way: (1) External radio frequency (RF) power...

  17. 47 CFR 95.411 - (CB Rule 11) May I use power amplifiers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false (CB Rule 11) May I use power amplifiers? 95.411... Rule 11) May I use power amplifiers? (a) You may not attach the following items (power amplifiers) to your certificated CB transmitter in any way: (1) External radio frequency (RF) power...

  18. 47 CFR 95.411 - (CB Rule 11) May I use power amplifiers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false (CB Rule 11) May I use power amplifiers? 95.411... Rule 11) May I use power amplifiers? (a) You may not attach the following items (power amplifiers) to your certificated CB transmitter in any way: (1) External radio frequency (RF) power...

  19. 47 CFR 95.411 - (CB Rule 11) May I use power amplifiers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false (CB Rule 11) May I use power amplifiers? 95.411... Rule 11) May I use power amplifiers? (a) You may not attach the following items (power amplifiers) to your certificated CB transmitter in any way: (1) External radio frequency (RF) power...

  20. A High Power Frequency Doubled Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert J.; Tu, Meirong; Aveline, Dave; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reports on the development of a high power 780 nm laser suitable for space applications of laser cooling. A possible solution is to use frequency doubling of high power 1560 nm telecom lasers. The presentation shows a diagram of the frequency conversion, and a graph of the second harmonic generation in one crystal, and the use of the cascading crystals. Graphs show the second harmonic power as a function of distance between crystals, second harmonic power vs. pump power, tunability of laser systems.

  1. Spectral characteristics of high-power 1. 5. mu. m broad-band superluminescent fiber sources

    SciTech Connect

    Wysocki, P.F.; Digonnet, M.J.F.; Kim, B.Y. . Edward L. Ginzton Lab.)

    1990-03-01

    The authors study the spectral variation of spontaneous emission from erbium-doped single-mode fibers with the aim of producing high-power (more than 5 mW), broad-band (in excess of 10 nm) amplified spontaneous emission sources for fiber gyroscope applications. In particular, they demonstrate the evolution of spectral shape and center wavelength with fiber length and output power in the previously unstudied high-power regime where saturation effects dominate. Also presented is a visibility curve for a potential twin-peaked nonresonant erbium-doped fiber gyroscope source with a short (210 {mu}m) coherence length.

  2. Test results for 20-GHz GaAs FET spacecraft power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalkhauser, K. A.

    1985-01-01

    Test were conducted to measure the performance of the 20-GHz solid state, proof-of-concept amplifier. The amplifier operates over the 17.7 to 20.2-GHz frequency range and uses high power gallium arsenide field effect transistors. The amplifier design and test methods are briefly described. NASA and contractor performance data are compared.

  3. Low cost instrumentation amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturman, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Amplifier can be used for many applications requiring high input impedance and common mode rejection, low drift, and gain accuracy on order of one percent. Performance of inexpensive amplifier approaches that of some commercial instrumentation amplifiers in many specifications.

  4. Development of a dual-pulse RF driver for an S-band (= 2856 MHz) RF electron linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Sungsu; Kim, Yujong; Lee, Byeong-No; Lee, Byung Cheol; Cha, Hyungki; Ha, Jang Ho; Park, Hyung Dal; Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Hui Su; Buaphad, Pikad

    2016-04-01

    The radiation equipment research division of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has developed a Container Inspection System (CIS) using a Radio Frequency (RF) electron linear accelerator for port security. The primary purpose of the CIS is to detect nuclear materials and explosives, as well country-specific prohibited substances, e.g., smuggled. The CIS consists of a 9/6 MeV dualenergy electron linear accelerator for distinguishing between organic and inorganic materials. The accelerator consists of an electron gun, an RF accelerating structure, an RF driver, a modulator, electromagnets, a cooling system, a X-ray generating target, X-ray collimator, a detector, and a container moving system. The RF driver is an important part of the configuration because it is the RF power source: it supplies the RF power to the accelerating structure. A unique aspect of the RF driver is that it generates dual RF power to generate dual energy (9/6 MeV). The advantage of this RF driver is that it can allow the pulse width to vary and can be used to obtain a wide range of energy output, and pulse repetition rates up to 300 Hz. For this reason, 140 W (5 MW - 9 MeV) and 37 W (3.4 MW - 6 MeV) power outputs are available independently. A high power test for 20 minutes demonstrate that stable dual output powers can be generated. Moreover, the dual power can be applied to the accelerator which has stable accelerator operation. In this paper, the design, fabrication and high power test of the RF driver for the RF electron linear accelerator (linac) are presented.

  5. Latest development of high-power fiber lasers in SPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Stephen; Zervas, Mikhail N.; Appleyard, Andrew; Durkin, Michael K.; Horley, Ray; Varnham, Malcolm P.; Nilsson, Johan; Jeong, Yoonchan

    2004-06-01

    High Power Fiber Lasers (HPFLs) and High Power Fiber Amplifiers (HPFAs) promise a number of benefits in terms of their high optical efficiency, degree of integration, beam quality, reliability, spatial compactness and thermal management. These benefits are driving the rapid adoption of HPFLs in an increasingly wide range of applications and power levels ranging from a few Watts, in for example analytical applications, to high-power >1kW materials processing (machining and welding) applications. This paper describes SPI"s innovative technologies, HPFL products and their performance capabilities. The paper highlights key aspects of the design basis and provides an overview of the applications space in both the industrial and aerospace domains. Single-fiber CW lasers delivering 1kW output power at 1080nm have been demonstrated and are being commercialized for aerospace and industrial applications with wall-plug efficiencies in the range 20 to 25%, and with beam parameter products in the range 0.5 to 100 mm.mrad (corresponding to M2 = 1.5 to 300) tailored to application requirements. At power levels in the 1 - 200 W range, SPI"s proprietary cladding-pumping technology, GTWaveTM, has been employed to produce completely fiber-integrated systems using single-emitter broad-stripe multimode pump diodes. This modular construction enables an agile and flexible approach to the configuration of a range of fiber laser / amplifier systems for operation in the 1080nm and 1550nm wavelength ranges. Reliability modeling is applied to determine Systems martins such that performance specifications are robustly met throughout the designed product lifetime. An extensive Qualification and Reliability-proving programme is underway to qualify the technology building blocks that are utilized for the fiber laser cavity, pump modules, pump-driver systems and thermo-mechanical management. In addition to the CW products, pulsed fiber lasers with pulse energies exceeding 1mJ with peak pulse

  6. Upgrade of the SLAC SLED II Pulse Compression System Based on Recent High Power Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, A.E.; Fowkes, W.R.; Loewen, R.J.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2011-09-06

    In the Next Linear Collider (NLC) it is expected that the high power rf components be able to handle peak power levels in excess of 400 MW. We present recent results of high power tests designed to investigate the RF breakdown limits of the X-band pulse compression system used at SLAC. (SLED-II). Results of these tests show that both the TE{sub 01}-TE{sub 10} mode converter and the 4-port hybrid have a maximum useful power limit of 220-250 MW. Based on these tests, modifications of these components have been undertaken to improve their peak field handling capability. Results of these modifications will be presented. As part of an international effort to develop a new 0.5-1.5 TeV electron-positron linear collider for the 21st century, SLAC has been working towards a design, referred to as 'The Next Linear Collider' (NLC), which will operate at 11.424 GHz and utilize 50-75 MW klystrons as rf power sources. One of the major challenges in this design, or any other design, is how to generate and efficiently transport extremely high rf power from a source to an accelerator structure. SLAC has been investigating various methods of 'pulse compressing' a relatively wide rf pulse ({ge} 1 {mu}s) from a klystron into a narrower, but more intense, pulse. Currently a SLED-II pulse compression scheme is being used at SLAC in the NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) and in the Accelerator Structures Test Area (ASTA) to provide high rf power for accelerator and component testing. In ASTA, a 1.05 {mu}s pulse from a 50 MW klystron was successfully pulse compressed to 205 MW with a pulse width of 150 ns. Since operation in NLC will require generating and transporting rf power in excess of 400 MW it was decided to test the breakdown limits of the SLED-II rf components in ASTA with rf power up to the maximum available of 400 MW. This required the combining of power from two 50 MW klystrons and feeding the summed power into the SLED-II pulse compressor. Results from this experiment demonstrated

  7. Continuous high-power gas lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, A.

    1979-01-01

    High power gas laser concepts are discussed with emphasis on the role that fluid mechanics has played in their development. Consideration is given to three types of systems: gasdynamic lasers, HF supersonic diffusion lasers, and electric discharge lasers. Flow effects and aerodynamic windows in such lasers are briefly described. Future directions of research are outlined.

  8. CHALLENGES FACING HIGH POWER PROTON ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the challenges of high power proton accelerators such as SNS, J-PARC, etc., and what we have learned from recent experiences. Beam loss mechanisms and methods to mitigate beam loss will also be discussed.

  9. Review of High Power Pulse Transformer Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao; Tan, Xiaohua

    Vacuum devices generally work under high power pulse voltage of order 103 V to 106 V, and this pulse voltage could be generated by high power pulse transformer. Relatively, pulse transformer has the advantages of compact structure and excellent repetitiveness. It is expected of short rise-time, wide pulse-width and high energy transferring efficiency in most applications. Aiming at this purpose, it is feasible to select magnetic core with high permeability and high saturation magnetic flux density, use closed core and take some special measures to diminish leakage inductance in the making-process. This paper is a brief summary of high power pulse transformer design. In this paper, the principle, types and characteristics specification of high power pulse transformer are presented, and the design methods of electrical, magnetic and structure parameters are summarized. The methods of shortening rise time, diminishing droop and expanding output pulse-width (electrical parameter design), testing magnetic core materials (magnetic parameter design) and minimizing leakage inductance (structure parameter design) are emphasized.

  10. Targets for high power neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.

    1980-01-01

    Stopping high-power, long-pulse beams is fast becoming an engineering challenge, particularly in neutral beam injectors for heating magnetically confined plasmas. A brief review of neutral beam target technology is presented along with heat transfer calculations for some selected target designs.

  11. BEAM INSTRUMENTATION FOR HIGH POWER HADRON BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will describe developments in the beam diagnostics which support the understanding and operation of high power hadron accelerators. These include the measurement of large dynamic range transverse and longitudinal beam profiles, beam loss detection, and non-interceptive diagnostics.

  12. Waveform agile high-power fiber laser illuminators for directed-energy weapon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engin, Doruk; Lu, Wei; Kimpel, Frank; Gupta, Shantanu

    2012-06-01

    A kW-class fiber-amplifier based laser illuminator system at 1030nm is demonstrated. At 125 kHz pulse repetition rate, 1.9mJ energy per pulse (235W average power) is achieved for 100nsec pulses with >72% optical conversion efficiency, and at 250kHz repetition, >350W average power is demonstrated, limited by the available pumps. Excellent agreement is established between the experimental results and dynamic fiber amplifier simulation, for predicting the pulse shape, spectrum and ASE accumulation throughout the fiber-amplifier chain. High pulse-energy, high power fiber-amplifier operation requires careful engineering - minimize ASE content throughout the pre-amplifier stages, use of large mode area gain fiber in the final power stage for effective pulse energy extraction, and pulse pre-shaping to compensate for the laser gain-saturation induced intra-pulse and pulse-pattern dependent distortion. Such optimization using commercially available (VLMA) fibers with core size in the 30-40μm range is estimated to lead to >4mJ pulse energy for 100nsec pulse at 50kHz repetition rate. Such waveform agile high-power, high-energy pulsed fiber laser illuminators at λ=1030nm satisfies requirements for active-tracking/ranging in high-energy laser (HEL) weapon systems, and in uplink laser beacon for deep space communication.

  13. Investigation and Prediction of RF Window Performance in APT Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Humphries, S. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    The work described in this report was performed between November 1996 and May 1997 in support of the APT (Accelerator Production of Tritium) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The goal was to write and to test computer programs for charged particle orbits in RF fields. The well-documented programs were written in portable form and compiled for standard personal computers for easy distribution to LANL researchers. They will be used in several APT applications including the following. Minimization of multipactor effects in the moderate {beta} superconducting linac cavities under design for the APT accelerator. Investigation of suppression techniques for electron multipactoring in high-power RF feedthroughs. Modeling of the response of electron detectors for the protection of high power RF vacuum windows. In the contract period two new codes, Trak{_}RF and WaveSim, were completed and several critical benchmark etests were carried out. Trak{_}RF numerically tracks charged particle orbits in combined electrostatic, magnetostatic and electromagnetic fields. WaveSim determines frequency-domain RF field solutions and provides a key input to Trak{_}RF. The two-dimensional programs handle planar or cylindrical geometries. They have several unique characteristics.

  14. RF system considerations for large high-duty-factor linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, M.T.; Ziomek, C.D.; Tallerico, P.J.; Regan, A.H.; Eaton, L.; Lawrence, G.

    1994-09-01

    RF systems are often a major cost item for linacs, but this is especially true for large high-duty-factor linacs (up to and including CW) such as the Accelerator for Production of Tritium (APT) or the Accelerator for Transmutation of nuclear Waste (ATW). In addition, the high energy and high average beam current of these machines (approximately 1 GeV, 100--200 mA) leads to a need for excellent control of the accelerating fields in order to minimize the possibility of beam loss in the accelerator and the resulting activation. This paper will address the key considerations and limitations in the design of the RF system. These considerations impact the design of both the high power RF components and the RF controls. As might be expected, the two concerns sometimes lead to conflicting design requirements. For example minimum RF operating costs lead to a desire for operation near saturation of the high power RF generators in order to maximize the operating efficiency. Optimal control of the RF fields leads to a desire for maximum overdrive capability in those same generators in order to respond quickly to disturbances of the accelerator fields.

  15. Investigation of the phase stability of an X-band long pulse multibeam relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenbang; Huang, Hua; Jin, Xiao; Lei, Lurong; Zhu, Lei; Li, Lele; Li, Shifeng; Yan, Wenkang; He, Hu

    2016-09-01

    To realize coherent high power microwave combining, an X-band long pulse multibeam relativistic klystron amplifier is designed, and the relative phase stability is investigated by three dimensions particle in cell simulation and high power microwave experiment. The simulation shows that the relative phase difference can be stabilized at gigawatt level radiation power. But the relative phase jitter increases in the experiment, then some measures are proposed to improve the stability of relative phase difference and avoid pulse shortening. A 0.98 GW radiation power with pulse duration of 160 ns is obtained in the experiment, the pulse shortening is avoided. The relative phase difference fluctuation between output microwave and input RF signal is less than ±25° in a single shot with duration of 100 ns. Then, the experiment of pulse repetition is carried out, and an output microwave with 0.98 GW radiation power at 25 Hz repetition rate is obtained. The power conversion efficiency is about 35% with pulse duration of 160 ns. The relative phase difference is less than ±30° at 25 Hz repetition rate in 100 ns.

  16. Cold Test Measurements on the GTF Prototype RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Gierman, S.M.

    2010-12-03

    The SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) was built to develop a high brightness electron injector for the LCLS and has been operational since 1996. Based on longitudinal phase space measurements showing a correlated energy spread the gun was removed and re-characterized in 2002. The low power RF measurements performed on the gun are described below. Perturbative bead measurements were performed to determine the field ratio in the two-cell gun, and network analyzer measurements were made to characterize the mode structure. A second probe was installed to monitor the RF field in the first cell, and a diagnostic was developed to monitor the high-power field ratio. Calibration of the RF probes, a model for analyzing RF measurements, and Superfish simulations of bead and RF measurements are described.

  17. Ultrafast laser and amplifier sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundquist, A.; Durfee, C.; Chang, Z.; Taft, G.; Zeek, E.; Backus, S.; Murnane, M. M.; Kapteyn, H. C.; Christov, I.; Stoev, V.

    1997-08-01

    There has been remarkable progress in the development of high peak-power ultrafast lasers in recent years. Lasers capable of generating terawatt peak powers with unprecedented short pulse durations can now be built on a single optical table in a small laboratory. The rapid technological progress has made possible a host of new scientific advances in high-field science, such as the generation of coherent femtosecond X-ray pulses, and the generation of MeV-energy electron beams and high-energy ions. In this paper, we review progress in the development and design of ultrafast high-power lasers based on Ti:sapphire, including the ultrafast laser oscillators that are a very important enabling technology for high-power ultrafast systems, and ultrafast amplified laser systems that generate 20 fs duration pulses with several watts average power at kilohertz repetition-rates. Ultrafast waveform measurements of these pulses demonstrate that such short pulses can be generated with high fidelity. Finally, we discuss applications of ultrafast high-power pulses, including the generation of femtosecond to attosecond X-ray pulses.

  18. High-power 1018 nm ytterbium-doped fiber laser and its application in tandem pump.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hu; Leng, Jinyong; Zhang, Hanwei; Huang, Liangjin; Xu, Jiangming; Zhou, Pu

    2015-09-20

    In this paper, we present our experimental results of a high-power 1018 nm fiber laser and its usage in tandem pump. A record output power of 476 W 1018 nm fiber laser is obtained with an efficiency of 78.2%. Utilizing a specially designed gain fiber, a one-stage high-power monolithic fiber amplifier tandem pumped by six 1018 nm fiber lasers is assembled. A 110 W 1090 nm seed is amplified to 2140 W, and the efficiency is as high as 86.9%. The beam quality factor M2 is measured to be 1.9. Limitations and possible solutions for purchasing higher output power are discussed. PMID:26406520

  19. High power pumped mid-IR wavelength systems using nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM) devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Lang, Robert J. (Inventor); Waarts, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Laser diode pumped mid-IR wavelength systems include at least one high power, near-IR wavelength, injection and/or sources wherein one or both of such sources may be tunable providing a pump wave output beam to a quasi-phase matched (QPM) nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM) device. The NFM device may be a difference frequency mixing (DFM) device or an optical parametric oscillation (OPO) device. Wavelength tuning of at least one of the sources advantageously provides the ability for optimizing pump or injection wavelengths to match the QPM properties of the NFM device enabling a broad range of mid-IR wavelength selectivity. Also, pump powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  20. High power pumped MID-IR wavelength devices using nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Lang, Robert J. (Inventor); Waarts, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Laser diode pumped mid-IR wavelength sources include at least one high power, near-IR wavelength, injection and/or sources wherein one or both of such sources may be tunable providing a pump wave output beam to a quasi-phase matched (QPM) nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM) device. The NFM device may be a difference frequency mixing (DFM) device or an optical parametric oscillation (OPO) device. Wavelength tuning of at least one of the sources advantageously provides the ability for optimizing pump or injection wavelengths to match the QPM properties of the NFM device enabling a broad range of mid-IR wavelength selectivity. Also, pump powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  1. High power microwave beam steering based on gyromagnetic nonlinear transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Romanchenko, I. V. Rostov, V. V.; Gunin, A. V.; Konev, V. Yu.

    2015-06-07

    We demonstrate electronically controlled beam steering by high power RF pulses produced by two gyromagnetic nonlinear transmission lines (NLTLs) connected to a one high voltage driver. Each NLTL is capable of producing several ns RF pulses with peak power from 50 to 700 MW (6% standard deviation) at frequencies from 0.5 to 1.7 GHz (1% standard deviation) with 100 Hz repetition rate. Using a helix antenna allows irradiating of RF pulses with almost circular polarization and 350 MW maximum peak power, which corresponds to 350 kV effective potential of radiation. At the installation of two identical channels, we demonstrate the possibility of beam steering within ±15° in the horizontal plane by coherent RF pulses with circular polarization at 1.0 GHz center frequency. Fourfold increase in the power flux density for in-phase irradiation of RF pulses is confirmed by comparison with one-channel operation.

  2. High power tests of an electroforming cavity operating at 11.424 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgashev, V. A.; Gatti, G.; Higashi, Y.; Leonardi, O.; Lewandowski, J. R.; Marcelli, A.; Rosenzweig, J.; Spataro, B.; Tantawi, S. G.; Yeremian, D. A.

    2016-03-01

    The achievement of ultra high accelerating gradients is mandatory in order to fabricate compact accelerators at 11.424 GHz for scientific and industrial applications. An extensive experimental and theoretical program to determine a reliable ultra high gradient operation of the future linear accelerators is under way in many laboratories. In particular, systematic studies on the 11.424 GHz frequency accelerator structures, R&D on new materials and the associated microwave technology are in progress to achieve accelerating gradients well above 120 MeV/m. Among the many, the electroforming procedure is a promising approach to manufacture high performance RF devices in order to avoid the high temperature brazing and to produce precise RF structures. We report here the characterization of a hard high gradient RF accelerating structure at 11.424 GHz fabricated using the electroforming technique. Low-level RF measurements and high power RF tests carried out at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory on this prototype are presented and discussed. In addition, we present also a possible layout where the water-cooling of irises based on the electroforming process has been considered for the first time.

  3. RF Processing Experience with the GTF Prototype RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerge, J.F.

    2010-11-24

    The SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) was built to develop a high brightness electron injector for the LCLS and has been operational since 1996. A total of five different metal cathodes (4 Cu and 1 Mg) have been installed on the GTF gun. The rf processing history with the different cathodes will be presented including peak field achieved at the cathode. The LCLS gun is intended to operate at 120 MV/m and fields up to 140 MV/m have been achieved in the GTF gun. After installing a new cathode the number of rf pulses required to reach 120 MV/m is approximately 5-10 million. Total emitted dark current and Fowler Nordheim plots are also shown over the life of the cathode. The GTF photo-injector gun is an S-band standing-wave structure, with two resonant cavities and an intervening thick washer (Figure 1). The flat, back wall of the first cavity is a copper plate that serves as photocathode when illuminated with ultraviolet light from a pulsed, high-power laser. RF power enters the gun through an iris on the outer wall of the second cavity, and is coupled to the first through the axial opening of the washer. The first cavity is often referred to as a half cell, because its full-cell length has been truncated by the cathode plate and the second cavity is called the full cell. The gun is designed to operate in a {pi} mode, with the peak field on axis in each cell approximately equal. The maximum in the half cell occurs at the cathode, and in the full cell near the center of the cavity. The field profile and tuning procedures are discussed in a separate tech note [1].

  4. Master-Oscillator/Power-Amplifier Laser System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Krainak, Michael A.; Unger, Glenn L.

    1994-01-01

    Master-oscillator/power-amplifier (MOPA) laser system operates in continuous-wave mode or in amplitude-modulation (e.g., pulse) mode by modulation of oscillator current. Power amplifier is laser-diode-pumped neodymium:yttrium lithium fluoride (Nd:YLF) laser; oscillator is laser diode. Offers relatively high efficiency and power. Because drive current to oscillator modulated, external electro-optical modulator not needed. Potential uses include free-space optical communications, coded laser ranging, and generation of high-power, mode-locked pulses.

  5. Progress on diamond amplified photo-cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Kewisch, J.; Chang, X.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wu, Q.; Muller, E.; Xin, T.

    2011-03-28

    Two years ago, we obtained an emission gain of 40 from the Diamond Amplifier Cathode (DAC) in our test system. In our current systematic study of hydrogenation, the highest gain we registered in emission scanning was 178. We proved that our treatments for improving the diamond amplifiers are reproducible. Upcoming tests planned include testing DAC in a RF cavity. Already, we have designed a system for these tests using our 112 MHz superconducting cavity, wherein we will measure DAC parameters, such as the limit, if any, on emission current density, the bunch charge, and the bunch length. The diamond-amplified photocathode, that promises to support a high average current, low emittance, and a highly stable electron beam with a long lifetime, is under development for an electron source. The diamond, functioning as a secondary emitter amplifies the primary current, with a few KeV energy, that comes from the traditional cathode. Earlier, our group recorded a maximum gain of 40 in the secondary electron emission from a diamond amplifier. In this article, we detail our optimization of the hydrogenation process for a diamond amplifier that resulted in a stable emission gain of 140. We proved that these characteristics are reproducible. We now are designing a system to test the diamond amplifier cathode using an 112MHz SRF gun to measure the limits of the emission current's density, and on the bunch charge and bunch length.

  6. IMPATT power building blocks for 20 GHz spaceborne transmit amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmus, J.; Cho, Y.; Degruyl, J.; Ng, E.; Giannakopoulos, A.; Okean, H. C.

    1982-01-01

    Single-stage circulator coupled IMPATT building block constituents of a 20-GHz solid state power amplifier (SSPA) currently under development for spaceborne downlink transmitter usage have been demonstrated as providing 1.5 to 2.0W RF power output at 4 to 5 dB operating gain over a 1 GHz bandwidth. Using either commercially available or recently developed in-house GaAs Schottky Read-profile IMPATT diodes, DC/RF power added efficiencies of 14 to 15% were achieved in these amplifier stages. A two stage IMPATT driver amplifier with similar RF output power capability exhibited 13 + or - 0.5 dB operating gain over a 1 GHz bandwidth.

  7. Compensation of pulse-distortion in saturated laser amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Schimpf, Damian N; Ruchert, Clemens; Nodop, Dirk; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas; Salin, Francois

    2008-10-27

    We derive an expression describing pre-compensation of pulse-distortion due to saturation effects in short pulse laser-amplifiers. The analytical solution determines the optimum input pulse-shape required to obtain any arbitrary target pulse-shape at the output of the saturated laser-amplifier. The relation is experimentally verified using an all-fiber amplifier chain that is seeded by a directly modulated laser-diode. The method will prove useful in applications of high power, high energy laser-amplifier systems that need particular pulse-shapes to be efficient, e.g. micromachining and scientific laser-matter-interactions. PMID:18958044

  8. High-Power Linac for the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, D. J.

    2002-04-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be the world’s most intense source of neutrons for fundamental science and industrial applications. Design and construction of this facility, located at Oak Ridge, is a joint venture between six DOE laboratories. Construction began in 1999 and is currently ahead of the scheduled 2006 completion date. Injecting a high-power, pulsed proton beam into a mercury target produces neutrons. In this talk, we review the physics requirements, design, and status of the construction of the 1-GeV, 1.4-MW average power RF linac for SNS. The accelerator consists of a drift tube linac (DTL), a coupled-cavity linac (CCL), and a superconducting rf (SRF) linac. The phase and quadrupole settings are set to avoid structure and parametric resonances, with coherent resonances posing minimal risk for emittance growth. The DTL is 37 m long and accelerates the ions to 87 MeV. The CCL is 55 m long and accelerates the ions to 186 MeV. The rf structure design and stability for both the DTL and CCL have been validated with scale models. The SRF linac has a modular design to accelerate ions to 1000 MeV, with a straightforward upgrade to 1.3 GeV at a later date. 3D particle-in-cell simulations of beam dynamics are performed to validate performance. The accelerator utilizes 93 MW of pulsed power operating continuously at 60-Hz with an 8factor. Approximately one hundred 402.5 or 805-MHz klystrons, with outputs between 0.55 and 5 MW, are used. The klystrons are powered by a novel converter-modulator that takes advantage of recent advances in IGBT switch plate assemblies and low-loss material cores for boost transformer. Beam diagnostics include position, phase, profile, and current monitors. They are designed to enable accurate beam steering and matching, and to minimize beam loss that would lead to activation and prevent hands-on maintenance.

  9. Industrial Applications of High Power Ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patist, Alex; Bates, Darren

    Since the change of the millennium, high-power ultrasound has become an alternative food processing technology applicable to large-scale commercial applications such as emulsification, homogenization, extraction, crystallization, dewatering, low-temperature pasteurization, degassing, defoaming, activation and inactivation of enzymes, particle size reduction, extrusion, and viscosity alteration. This new focus can be attributed to significant improvements in equipment design and efficiency during the late 1990 s. Like most innovative food processing technologies, high-power ultrasonics is not an off-the-shelf technology, and thus requires careful development and scale-up for each and every application. The objective of this chapter is to present examples of ultrasonic applications that have been successful at the commercialization stage, advantages, and limitations, as well as key learnings from scaling up an innovative food technology in general.

  10. Ionospheric Stimulation By High Power Radio Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, S.; Nishino, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Sato, S.; Tanikawa, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Wong, A. Y.

    1999-01-01

    We have performed an experiment to artificially stimulate the ionosphere using higher power radio waves at the HIPAS (High Power Auroral Stimulation) facility in Alaska. A radio transmission of 2.85 MHz was made at 80 MW (ERP). Diagnostics were made at the other site located 35 km from the transmission site. The results of cross-correlating the excited HF wave and observed with an 8 channel, 30 MHz scanning cosmic radio noise absorption records revealed the excited height of 90 km. Also atmospheric pressure waves observed on the ground show evident propagation of pressure waves which are generated in the ionosphere by the high-power HF wave. The results determine the excitation height of 90 km in the ionosphere and show evidence of the pressure wave coupling between the ionosphere and the lower atmosphere for periods of 10 min

  11. New high power linacs and beam physics

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Gray, E.R.; Nath, S.; Crandall, K.R.; Hasegawa, K.

    1997-08-01

    New high-power proton linacs must be designed to control beam loss, which can lead to radioactivation of the accelerator. The threat of beam loss is increased significantly by the formation of beam halo. Numerical simulation studies have identified the space-charge interactions, especially those that occur in rms mismatched beams, as a major concern for halo growth. The maximum-amplitude predictions of the simulation codes must be subjected to independent tests to confirm the validity of the results. Consequently, the authors compare predictions from the particle-core halo models with computer simulations to test their understanding of the halo mechanisms that are incorporated in the computer codes. They present and discuss scaling laws that provide guidance for high-power linac design.

  12. SQUARE WAVE AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Leavitt, M.A.; Lutz, I.C.

    1958-08-01

    An amplifier circuit is described for amplifying sigmals having an alternating current component superimposed upon a direct current component, without loss of any segnnent of the alternating current component. The general circuit arrangement includes a vibrator, two square wave amplifiers, and recombination means. The amplifier input is connected to the vibrating element of the vibrator and is thereby alternately applied to the input of each square wave amplifier. The detailed circuitry of the recombination means constitutes the novelty of the annplifier and consists of a separate, dual triode amplifier coupled to the output of each square wave amplifier with a recombination connection from the plate of one amplifier section to a grid of one section of the other amplifier. The recombination circuit has provisions for correcting distortion caused by overlapping of the two square wave voltages from the square wave amplifiers.

  13. High Power Picosecond Laser Pulse Recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P

    2010-04-12

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering based light sources. We demonstrate up to 36x average power enhancement of frequency doubled sub-millijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  14. Crystal fibers for high power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Florea, C.; Gibson, D.; Peele, J.; Askins, C.; Shaw, B.; Bowman, S.; O'Connor, S.; Bayya, S.; Aggarwal, I.; Sanghera, J. S.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we present our recent progress in developing single crystal fibers for high power single frequency fiber lasers. The optical, spectral and morphological properties as well as the loss and gain measured from these crystal fibers drawn by Laser Heated Pedestal Growth (LHPG) system are also discussed. Results on application of various cladding materials on the crystal core and the methods of fiber end-face polishing are also presented.

  15. High-power picosecond laser pulse recirculation.

    PubMed

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high-power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering-based light sources. We demonstrate up to 40x average power enhancement of frequency-doubled submillijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  16. High-power picosecond laser pulse recirculation.

    PubMed

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high-power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering-based light sources. We demonstrate up to 40x average power enhancement of frequency-doubled submillijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses. PMID:20596201

  17. High temperature, high power piezoelectric composite transducers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2014-08-08

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined.

  18. High Temperature, High Power Piezoelectric Composite Transducers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, StewarT.

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  19. High Power MPD Thruster Performance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Michael R.; Strzempkowski, Eugene; Pencil, Eric

    2004-01-01

    High power magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters are being developed as cost effective propulsion systems for cargo transport to lunar and Mars bases, crewed missions to Mars and the outer planets, and robotic deep space exploration missions. Electromagnetic MPD thrusters have demonstrated, at the laboratory level, the ability to process megawatts of electrical power while providing significantly higher thrust densities than electrostatic electric propulsion systems. The ability to generate higher thrust densities permits a reduction in the number of thrusters required to perform a given mission, and alleviates the system complexity associated with multiple thruster arrays. The specific impulse of an MPD thruster can be optimized to meet given mission requirements, from a few thousand seconds with heavier gas propellants up to 10,000 seconds with hydrogen propellant. In support of programs envisioned by the NASA Office of Exploration Systems, Glenn Research Center is developing and testing quasi-steady MW-class MPD thrusters as a prelude to steady state high power thruster tests. This paper provides an overview of the GRC high power pulsed thruster test facility, and presents preliminary performance data for a quasi-steady baseline MPD thruster geometry.

  20. High temperature, high power piezoelectric composite transducers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  1. High Power UV LED Industrial Curing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karlicek, Robert, F., Jr; Sargent, Robert

    2012-05-14

    UV curing is a green technology that is largely underutilized because UV radiation sources like Hg Lamps are unreliable and difficult to use. High Power UV LEDs are now efficient enough to replace Hg Lamps, and offer significantly improved performance relative to Hg Lamps. In this study, a modular, scalable high power UV LED curing system was designed and tested, performing well in industrial coating evaluations. In order to achieve mechanical form factors similar to commercial Hg Lamp systems, a new patent pending design was employed enabling high irradiance at long working distances. While high power UV LEDs are currently only available at longer UVA wavelengths, rapid progress on UVC LEDs and the development of new formulations designed specifically for use with UV LED sources will converge to drive more rapid adoption of UV curing technology. An assessment of the environmental impact of replacing Hg Lamp systems with UV LED systems was performed. Since UV curing is used in only a small portion of the industrial printing, painting and coating markets, the ease of use of UV LED systems should increase the use of UV curing technology. Even a small penetration of the significant number of industrial applications still using oven curing and drying will lead to significant reductions in energy consumption and reductions in the emission of green house gases and solvent emissions.

  2. Self-biased circulators for high power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Alexander S.

    Self-biased circulators exploit the properties of high anisotropy magnetic field in hexagonal ferrites, thus allowing operation without biasing magnets and a significant size and weight reduction. Although first self-biased circulators were demonstrated more than 20 years ago, all the prototypes constructed so far are unsuitable for practical applications. An attempt to design a self-biased circulator from scratch was made. Novel exceptionally low dielectric loss and high heat conductivity ceramic materials were developed and innovative substrate synthesis techniques were employed. Low temperature cofiring of green body ferrite compacts and dielectric ceramic slurries were mastered, resulting in solid composite substrates. Original device design was developed. Key features (including wide coupling angles, wide microstriplines, thick substrate, and absence of impedance transformers) enable low insertion loss, broadband operation, high power handling, and compact size. Fabrication and testing of Ka band Y-junction self-biased circulator are reported herein. Furthermore, design approach and fabrication techniques developed here can be readily applied for the construction of X-band self-biased circulators, provided that suitable ferrite materials are available. Low temperature cofiring of ferrite and dielectric materials is especially beneficial for various RF and high-frequency applications. Multiple devices can be readily fabricated on a single wafer using conventional lithographic techniques, resulting in true microwave monolithic integrated circuit.

  3. Rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

    1979-11-02

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser are provided which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  4. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1981-01-01

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  5. Control of the shape of laser pulses amplified in the strong saturation regime

    SciTech Connect

    Shaykin, A A

    2014-05-30

    A new criterion for estimating the distortions of quasirectangular pulses in high-power amplifiers is proposed together with a method that allows generation of quasi-rectangular pulses at the output of a high-efficiency amplifier, i. e., in the regime of strong saturation. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by the example of calculating the neodymium glass amplifier, used for pumping the petawatt parametric amplifier. (lasers)

  6. Nonlinear resonances in a multi-stage free-electron laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, S.; Takayama, K.

    1995-12-31

    A two-beam accelerator (TBA) is a possible candidate of future linear colliders, in which the demanded rf power is provided by a multi-stage free-electron laser (MFEL). After if amplification in each stage, a driving beam is re-accelerated by an induction unit and propagates into the next stage. Recently it has been recognized that the multi-stage character of the MFEL causes resonances between its periodicity and the synchrotron motion in an rf bucket. Since the synchrotron oscillation is strongly modulated by the resonance and at the worst a large fraction of particles is trapped in the resonance islands, the nonlinear resonances in the FEL longitudinal beam dynamics can lead to notable degradation of the MFEL performance, such as output fluctuation and phase modulation which have been big concerns in the accelerator society. The overall efficiency of the MFEL and the quality of the amplified microwave power are key issues for realizing the TBA/FEL Particularly the rf phase and amplitude errors must be maintained within tolerance. One of significant obstacles is an amplification of undesired modes. If a small-size waveguide is employed, the FEL resonance energies for undesired higher order modes shift very far from that for a fundamental mode; so it is possible to prevent higher order modes from evolving. Such a small-size waveguide, however, gives a high power density in the FEL. Simulation results have demonstrated that the nonlinear resonances occur in die FEL longitudinal motion when the power density exceeds some threshold. An analytical method for studying the nonlinear resonance in the TBA/FEL is developed based on the macroparticle model which can describe analytically the drastic behaviors in the evolutions of the phase and amplitude. In the theory the basic 1D-FEL equations are reduced to a nonlinear pendulum equation with respect to the ponderomotive phase.

  7. Outgassing of lower hybrid antenna modules during high-power long-pulse transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Goniche, M.; Kazarian, F.; Bibet, P.; Maebara, S.; Seki, M.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, T.

    2005-01-01

    During high-power, long-pulse transmission from lower-hybrid-range-of-frequency (LHRF) antennas, the waveguide walls outgas as a result of rf-loss-induced heating. If the resulting pressure rise is too high, power transmission will be adversely affected and additional pumping may be required to maintain the pressure at a low enough value. The outgassing rates of waveguides made of various materials (oxygen-free high-conductivity copper, dispersoid copper, copper-coated carbon fiber composite, copper-coated graphite) were measured during rf injection at high power density (50-200 MW/m{sup 2}) for a duration in the range 100-4700 s. The experiments were performed on a test-bed facility equipped with a 3.7 GHz klystron on multiwaveguide (2 to 18) mock-ups. The effect of the main parameters, namely, the waveguide surface temperature and the initial wall gas loading ('conditioning'), are analyzed in detail. It is concluded that an outgassing rate of 1x10{sup -5} (5x10{sup -5}) Pa m{sup 3} s{sup -1} m{sup -2} at 300 deg. C (400 deg. C) can be considered for most materials. The requirement, in terms of additional pumping, for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor LHRF antenna is finally discussed.

  8. Simulation of traveling-wave output structures for high power rf tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.

    1993-04-01

    Travelling wave output structures can in principle provide higher efficiency and lower surface gradients than a single output cavity. We discuss simulations of TW structures designed for X-band klystrons to be used in the SLAC NLC. The PIC Code CONDOR calculated efficiency over 50 percent for one such circuit. When the circuit was built in the SLAC XC7 klystron, the match was so poor that it had to be modified. When tested, the tube produced less than half the efficiency calculated. We subsequently found significant differences between the field distribution calculated by CONDOR versus that from the 3-D code MAFIA. We have now developed a procedure which gives much better agreement between the 2D and 3-D models. We use a {pi}/2 disk-loaded structure, with the waveguide coupling to an output cavity through an iris, rather than directly to the drift tube as in the XC7. The disk radii are tapered to produce an approximately constant gradient. The output coupling is adjusted to match to a uniform structure replicating the cell before the waveguide. The simulations predict 75 MW, 49 percent efficiency, with peak surface fields of 73 MV/m. from a 440 kV, 350 amp beam at 11.424 GHz.

  9. ADX: A high Power Density, Advanced RF-Driven Divertor Test Tokamak for PMI studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whyte, Dennis; ADX Team

    2015-11-01

    The MIT PSFC and collaborators are proposing an advanced divertor experiment, ADX; a divertor test tokamak dedicated to address critical gaps in plasma-material interactions (PMI) science, and the world fusion research program, on the pathway to FNSF/DEMO. Basic ADX design features are motivated and discussed. In order to assess the widest range of advanced divertor concepts, a large fraction (>50%) of the toroidal field volume is purpose-built with innovative magnetic topology control and flexibility for assessing different surfaces, including liquids. ADX features high B-field (>6 Tesla) and high global power density (P/S ~ 1.5 MW/m2) in order to access the full range of parallel heat flux and divertor plasma pressures foreseen for reactors, while simultaneously assessing the effect of highly dissipative divertors on core plasma/pedestal. Various options for efficiently achieving high field are being assessed including the use of Alcator technology (cryogenic cooled copper) and high-temperature superconductors. The experimental platform would also explore advanced lower hybrid current drive and ion-cyclotron range of frequency actuators located at the high-field side; a location which is predicted to greatly reduce the PMI effects on the launcher while minimally perturbing the core plasma. The synergistic effects of high-field launchers with high total B on current and flow drive can thus be studied in reactor-relevant boundary plasmas.

  10. High Current Density, Long Life Cathodes for High Power RF Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, Robert Lawrence; Collins, George; Falce, Lou; Schwartzkopf, Steve; Busbaher, Daniel

    2014-01-22

    This program was tasked with improving the quality and expanding applications for Controlled Porosity Reservoir (CPR) cathodes. Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. (CCR) initially developed CPR cathodes on a DOE-funded SBIR program to improve cathodes for magnetron injection guns. Subsequent funding was received from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The program developed design requirements for implementation of the technology into high current density cathodes for high frequency applications. During Phase I of this program, CCR was awarded the prestigious 2011 R&D100 award for this technology. Subsequently, the technology was presented at numerous technical conferences. A patent was issued for the technology in 2009. These cathodes are now marketed by Semicon Associates, Inc. in Lexington, KY. They are the world’s largest producer of cathodes for vacuum electron devices. During this program, CCR teamed with Semicon Associates, Inc. and Ron Witherspoon, Inc. to improve the fabrication processes and expand applications for the cathodes. Specific fabrications issues included the quality of the wire winding that provides the basic structure and the sintering to bond the wires into a robust, cohesive structure. The program also developed improved techniques for integrating the resulting material into cathodes for electron guns.

  11. High Power Co-Axial Coupler

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland; Neubauer, Michael

    2013-08-14

    A superconducting RF (SRF) power coupler capable of handling 500 kW CW RF power at 750 MHz is required for present and future storage rings and linacs. There are over 35 coupler designs for SRF cavities ranging in frequency from 325 to 1500 MHz. Coupler windows vary from cylinders to cones to disks and RF power couplers will always be limited by the ability of ceramic windows and their matching systems to withstand the stresses due to non-uniform heating from dielectric and wall losses, multipactor, and mechanical flexure. In the Phase II project, we built a double window coaxial system with materials that would not otherwise be useable due to individual VSWRs. Double window systems can be operated such that one is cold (LN2) and one is warm. They can have different materials and still have a good match without using matching elements that create problematic multipactor bands. The match of the two windows will always result from the cancellation of the two window’s reflections when they are located approximately a quarter wavelength apart or multiples of a quarter wavelength. The window assemblies were carefully constructed to put the window material and its braze joint in compression at all times. This was done using explosion bonding techniques which allow for inexpensive fabrication of the vacuum / compression ring out of stainless steel with copper plating applied to the inner surface. The EIA 3-1/8” double window assembly was then successfully baked out and tested to 12 kW in a 3-1/8” co-axial system. The thermal gradient across the window was measured to be 90 C which represents about 15 ksi tensile stress in an uncompressed window. In our design the compression was calculated to be about 25 ksi, so the net compressive force was 5 ksi at full power.

  12. High power couplers for Project X

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, S.; Champion, M.S.; Yakovlev, V.P.; Kramp, M.; Pronitchev, O.; Orlov, Y.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Project X, a multi-megawatt proton source under development at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The key element of the project is a superconducting (SC) 3GV continuous wave (CW) proton linac. The linac includes 5 types of SC accelerating cavities of two frequencies.(325 and 650MHz) The cavities consume up to 30 kW average RF power and need proper main couplers. Requirements and approach to the coupler design are discussed in the report. New cost effective schemes are described. Results of electrodynamics and thermal simulations are presented.

  13. RF sources for future colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Robert M.

    1997-02-01

    As we push particle colliders to 1-TeV center-of-mass collision energy and beyond, we require much more from our RF energy sources, both in terms of the RF performance and the number required for a given machine. In order to conserve real estate, the operating frequency of future colliders is apt to be higher than the S-band used for the SLAC SLC. It is this inevitable trend toward higher frequencies which presents the source designer with the greatest challenge. This paper is about that challenge. For reasons which will become clear, as we go to frequencies substantially above X-band, we will require sources other than klystrons, probably of the type referred to as "fast-wave devices," such as FEL or gyro-based amplifiers, or two-beam accelerators. Because these are discussed elsewhere in this conference, I will stick to the klystron as my model in describing the challenges to be overcome, as well as the criteria which must be met by alternative sources for new accelerators.

  14. Gain media edge treatment to suppress amplified spontaneous emission in a high power laser

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Soules, Thomas F.; Fochs, Scott N.; Rotter, Mark D.; Letts, Stephan A.

    2011-02-22

    A novel method and apparatus for suppressing ASE and/or parasitic oscillation modes in a laser is introduced. By roughening one or more peripheral edges of a solid-state crystal or ceramic laser gain media and by bonding such edges to a predetermined electromagnetic absorbing material arranged adjacent to the entire outer surface of the peripheral edges of the roughened laser gain media, ASE, parasitic oscillation modes and/or residual pump energy can be effectively suppressed.

  15. Gain media edge treatment to suppress amplified spontaneous emission in a high power laser

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Soules, Thomas F.; Fochs, Scott N.; Rotter, Mark D.; Letts, Stephan A.

    2008-12-09

    A novel method and apparatus for suppressing ASE and parasitic oscillation modes in a high average power laser is introduced. By roughening one or more peripheral edges of a solid-state crystal or ceramic laser gain media and by bonding such edges using a substantially high index bonding elastomer or epoxy to a predetermined electromagnetic absorbing arranged adjacent to the entire outer surface of the peripheral edges of the roughened laser gain media, ASE and parasitic oscillation modes can be effectively suppressed.

  16. Relay telescope including baffle, and high power laser amplifier utilizing the same

    DOEpatents

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd; Harris, Fritz B.

    2006-09-19

    A laser system includes an optical path having an intracavity relay telescope with a telescope focal point for imaging an output of the gain medium between an image location at or near the gain medium and an image location at or near an output coupler for the laser system. A kinematic mount is provided within a vacuum chamber, and adapted to secure beam baffles near the telescope focal point. An access port on the vacuum chamber is adapted for allowing insertion and removal of the beam baffles. A first baffle formed using an alignment pinhole aperture is used during alignment of the laser system. A second tapered baffle replaces the alignment aperture during operation and acts as a far-field baffle in which off angle beams strike the baffle a grazing angle of incidence, reducing fluence levels at the impact areas.

  17. High-power LEDs for plant cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Duchovskis, Pavelas; Bliznikas, Zenius; Breive, Kestutis; Ulinskaite, Raimonda; Brazaityte, Ausra; Novickovas, Algirdas; Zukauskas, Arturas; Shur, Michael S.

    2004-10-01

    We report on high-power solid-state lighting facility for cultivation of greenhouse vegetables and on the results of the study of control of photosynthetic activity and growth morphology of radish and lettuce imposed by variation of the spectral composition of illumination. Experimental lighting modules (useful area of 0.22 m2) were designed based on 4 types of high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with emission peaked in red at the wavelengths of 660 nm and 640 nm (predominantly absorbed by chlorophyll a and b for photosynthesis, respectively), in blue at 455 nm (phototropic function), and in far-red at 735 nm (important for photomorphology). Morphological characteristics, chlorophyll and phytohormone concentrations in radish and lettuce grown in phytotron chambers under lighting with different spectral composition of the LED-based illuminator and under illumination by high pressure sodium lamps with an equivalent photosynthetic photon flux density were compared. A well-balanced solid-state lighting was found to enhance production of green mass and to ensure healthy morphogenesis of plants compared to those grown using conventional lighting. We observed that the plant morphology and concentrations of morphologically active phytohormones is strongly affected by the spectral composition of light in the red region. Commercial application of the LED-based illumination for large-scale plant cultivation is discussed. This technology is favorable from the point of view of energy consumption, controllable growth, and food safety but is hindered by high cost of the LEDs. Large scale manufacturing of high-power red AlInGaP-based LEDs emitting at 650 nm and a further decrease of the photon price for the LEDs emitting in the vicinity of the absorption peak of chlorophylls have to be achieved to promote horticulture applications.

  18. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  19. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  20. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  1. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  2. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A.

    1995-01-03

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N[times]M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise. 6 figures.

  3. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Plut, Thomas A.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N.times.M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise.

  4. Scaling blackbody laser to high powers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Lasers pumped by solar heated blackbody cavities have potential for multimegawatt power beaming in space. There are two basic types of blackbody lasers; cavity pumped and transfer system. The transfer system is judged to be more readily scalable to high power. In this system, either N2 or CO is heated by the blackbody cavity then transferred into the laser cavity where CO2 is injected. The N2-CO2 system was demonstrated, but probably has lower efficiency than the CO-CO system. The characteristics of potential transfer laser systems are outlined.

  5. High power, high frequency, vacuum flange

    DOEpatents

    Felker, B.; McDaniel, M.R.

    1993-03-23

    An improved waveguide flange is disclosed for high power operation that helps prevent arcs from being initiated at the junctions between waveguide sections. The flanges at the end of the waveguide sections have counter bores surrounding the waveguide tubes. When the sections are bolted together the counter bores form a groove that holds a fully annealed copper gasket. Each counterbore has a beveled step that is specially configured to insure the gasket forms a metal-to-metal vacuum seal without gaps or sharp edges. The resultant inner surface of the waveguide is smooth across the junctions between waveguide sections, and arcing is prevented.

  6. High power, high frequency, vacuum flange

    DOEpatents

    Felker, Brian; McDaniel, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    An improved waveguide flange is disclosed for high power operation that helps prevent arcs from being initiated at the junctions between waveguide sections. The flanges at the end of the waveguide sections have counterbores surrounding the waveguide tubes. When the sections are bolted together the counterbores form a groove that holds a fully annealed copper gasket. Each counterbore has a beveled step that is specially configured to insure the gasket forms a metal-to-metal vacuum seal without gaps or sharp edges. The resultant inner surface of the waveguide is smooth across the junctions between waveguide sections, and arcing is prevented.

  7. Operation of high power converters in parallel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, D. K.; Inouye, L. Y.

    1993-01-01

    High power converters that are used in space power subsystems are limited in power handling capability due to component and thermal limitations. For applications, such as Space Station Freedom, where multi-kilowatts of power must be delivered to user loads, parallel operation of converters becomes an attractive option when considering overall power subsystem topologies. TRW developed three different unequal power sharing approaches for parallel operation of converters. These approaches, known as droop, master-slave, and proportional adjustment, are discussed and test results are presented.

  8. High power diode pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.

    2008-05-01

    Diode pumped alkali lasers have developed rapidly since their first demonstration. These lasers offer a path to convert highly efficient, but relatively low brightness, laser diodes into a single high power, high brightness beam. General Atomics has been engaged in the development of DPALs with scalable architectures. We have examined different species and pump characteristics. We show that high absorption can be achieved even when the pump source bandwidth is several times the absorption bandwidth. In addition, we present experimental results for both potassium and rubidium systems pumped with a 0.2 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser. These data show slope efficiencies of 67% and 72% respectively.

  9. A high-power xenon dimer excilamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomaev, M. I.; Skakun, V. S.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Shitts, D. V.

    2006-06-01

    A high-power sealed-off excilamp operating on xenon dimers excited by a barrier discharge and emitting in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral range (λ ˜ 172 nm) has been designed, constructed, and tested. The lamp comprises six quartz tubes (emitters) and has a total radiating surface area of 20 × 20 = 400 cm2. The average output power density radiated from the surface of each emitter exceeds 120 mW/cm2. The total output power of the excilamp immediately upon discharge ignition exceeds 50 W.

  10. Multi-nanosecond high power pulse generation at 7.8GHz with a dielectric-loaded power extractor.

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, M..; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Liu, W.; Power, J. G.; Gao, F.; Jing, C.; Wong, T.; Yusof, Z.; High Energy Physics; Illinois Inst. of Tech.; Euclid Techlabs LLC; IEEE

    2009-06-01

    Power extraction from charged particle beams is a prospective way to develop future high power radio frequency (RF) sources. We have designed and tested a 7.8 GHz power extractor based on a dielectric-loaded waveguide. Building upon earlier work on single electron bunch tests, 10 ns and 22 ns megawatt-level RF pulses have been generated with trains consisting of 16 electron bunches each, by using a laser splitting-recombination scheme. In addition, 44 MW of peak power has been generated with a train consisting 4 electron bunches. Behaviors of higher-order-modes are also explored.

  11. RUGGED CERAMIC WINDOW FOR RF APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    MIKE NEUBAUER

    2012-11-01

    High-current RF cavities that are needed for many accelerator applications are often limited by the power transmission capability of the pressure barriers (windows) that separate the cavity from the power source. Most efforts to improve RF window design have focused on alumina ceramic, the most popular historical choice, and have not taken advantage of new materials. Alternative window materials have been investigated using a novel Merit Factor comparison and likely candidates have been tested for the material properties which will enable construction in the self-matched window configuration. Window assemblies have also been modeled and fabricated using compressed window techniques which have proven to increase the power handling capability of waveguide windows. Candidate materials have been chosen to be used in fabricating a window for high power testing at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  12. Rugged Ceramic Window for RF Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, Michael; Johnson, Rolland P.; Rimmer, Robert; Elliot, Tom; Stirbet, Mircea

    2009-05-04

    High-current RF cavities that are needed for many accelerator applications are often limited by the power transmission capability of the pressure barriers (windows) that separate the cavity from the power source. Most efforts to improve RF window design have focused on alumina ceramic, the most popular historical choice, and have not taken advantage of new materials. Alternative window materials have been investigated using a novel Merit Factor comparison and likely candidates have been tested for the material properties which will enable construction in the self-matched window configuration. Window assemblies have also been modeled and fabricated using compressed window techniques which have proven to increase the power handling capability of waveguide windows. Candidate materials have been chosen to be used in fabricating a window for high power testing at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  13. Advances in industrial high-power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlueter, Holger

    2005-03-01

    Four major types of laser sources are used for material processing. Excluding Excimer lasers, this paper focuses on advances in High Power CO2 lasers, Solid State Lasers and Diode Lasers. Because of their unrivaled cost to brightness relationship the fast axial flow CO2 laser remains unrivaled for flat-sheet laser cutting. Adding approximately a kW of output power ever four years, this laser type has been propelling the entire sheet metal fabrication industry for the last two decades. Very robust, diffusion cooled annular discharge CO2 lasers with 2kW output power have enabled robot mounted lasers for 3D applications. Solid State Lasers are chosen mainly because of the option of fiber delivery. Industrial applications still rely on lamp-pumped Nd:YAG lasers with guaranteed output powers of 4.5 kW at the workpiece. The introduction of the diode pumped Thin Disc Laser 4.5 kW laser enables new applications such as the Programmable Focus Optics. Pumping the Thin Disc Laser requires highly reliable High Power Diode Lasers. The necessary reliability can only be achieved in a modern, automated semiconductor manufacturing facility. For Diode Lasers, electro-optical efficiencies above 65% are as important as the passivation of the facets to avoid Burn-In power degradation.

  14. Early history of high-power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, George W.

    2002-02-01

    This paper gives the history of the invention and development of early high power lasers, to which the author contributed and had personal knowledge. The earliest hint that a high power laser could be built came from the electric CO2-N2-He laser of Javan. It happened that the director of the Avco-Everett Research Laboratory had written his Ph.D. dissertation on the deactivation of the vibrational excitation of N2 in an expanding flow under Edward Teller, then at Columbia Univ. The director then started an in-house project to determine if gain could be achieved in a mixture similar to Javan's by means of a shock tunnel where a shock heated mixture of N2, CO2, and He gas was expanded through a supersonic nozzle into a cavity. This concept was named by the author as the gasdynamic laser (GDL). The paper traces the history of the initial gain measurements, the Mark II laser, the RASTA laser, the Tri-Service laser, its troubles and solutions, the United Technology's XLD gasdynamic laser, and their ALL laser. The history of the coastal Crusader will also be mentioned. Also discussed are the early experiments on a combustion-driven chemical laser, and its subsequent rejection by the director.

  15. Optimized VCSELs for high-power arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moench, Holger; Kolb, Johanna S.; Engelhardt, Andreas P.; Gerlach, Philipp; Jaeger, Roland; Pollmann-Retsch, Jens; Weichmann, Ulrich; Witzigmann, Bernd

    2014-02-01

    High-power VCSEL systems with multi kilowatt output power require a good electro-optical efficiency at the point of operation i.e. at elevated temperature. The large number of optimization parameters can be structured in a way that separates system and assembly considerations from the minimization of electrical and optical losses in the epitaxially grown structure. Temperature dependent functions for gain parameters, internal losses and injection efficiency are derived from a fit to experimental data. The empirical description takes into account diameter dependent effects like current spreading or temperature dependent ones like voltage drops over hetero-interfaces in the DBR mirrors. By evaluating experimental measurements of the light output and voltage characteristics over a large range of temperature and diameter, wafer-characteristic parameters are extracted allowing to predict the performance of VCSELs made from this material in any array and assembly configuration. This approach has several beneficial outcomes: Firstly, it gives a general description of a VCSEL independent of its geometry, mounting and detuning, secondly, insights into the structure and the underlying physics can be gained that lead to the improvement potential of the structure and thirdly the performance of the structure in arrays and modules can be predicted. Experimental results validate the approach and demonstrate the significantly improved VCSEL efficiency and the benefit in high power systems.

  16. A frequency-locked, high-power, X-band dielectric Cerenkov maser

    SciTech Connect

    Weatherall, J.C. )

    1992-06-01

    Most research on the dielectric Cerenkov maser (DCM) has focused only on free running oscillators. Presented in this paper, is a high-power frequency-locked oscillator. The device consists of an annular electron beam traveling down a dielectric-lined waveguide (wall radius 1.74 cm, liner thickness 2-3 mm, liner {epsilon} = 10). A 100 kW input signal is injected into the drift tube between the diode and liner, through a rectangular TE{sub 10} to cylindrical TM{sub 01} mode converter. When operated with a beam current of 500 A and a total output power of 13 MW, the device displays no RF quenching through the full width of the 100 ns beam pulse. Two higher current cases are presented with power as high as 280 MW but severe RF quenching. The results are compared with linear theory, and quenching mechanisms are discussed.

  17. The future of high power laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poprawe, Reinhart; Loosen, Peter; Hoffmann, Hans-Dieter

    2007-05-01

    High Power Lasers have been used for years in corresponding applications. Constantly new areas and new processes have been demonstrated, developed and transferred to fruitful use in industry. With the advent of diode pumped solid state lasers in the multi-kW-power regime at beam qualities not far away from the diffraction limit, a new area of applicability has opened. In welding applications speeds could be increased and systems could be developed with higher efficiently leading also to new perspectives for increased productivity, e.g. in combined processing. Quality control is increasingly demanded by the applying industries, however applications still are rare. Higher resolution of coaxial process control systems in time and space combined with new strategies in signal processing could give rise to new applications. The general approach described in this paper emphasizes the fact, that laser applications can be developed more efficiently, more precisely and with higher quality, if the laser radiation is tailored properly to the corresponding application. In applying laser sources, the parameter ranges applicable are by far wider and more flexible compared to heat, mechanical or even electrical energy. The time frame ranges from several fs to continuous wave and this spans approximately 15 orders of magnitude. Spacewise, the foci range from several µm to cm and the resulting intensities suitable for materials processing span eight orders of magnitude from 10 3 to 10 11 W/cm2. In addition to space (power, intensity) and time (pulse) the wavelength can be chosen as a further parameter of optimization. As a consequence, the resulting new applications are vast and can be utilized in almost every market segment of our global economy (Fig. 1). In the past and only partly today, however, this flexibility of laser technology is not exploited in full in materials processing, basically because in the high power regime the lasers with tailored beam properties are not

  18. Portable musical instrument amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Christian, David E.

    1990-07-24

    The present invention relates to a musical instrument amplifier which is particularly useful for electric guitars. The amplifier has a rigid body for housing both the electronic system for amplifying and processing signals from the guitar and the system's power supply. An input plug connected to and projecting from the body is electrically coupled to the signal amplifying and processing system. When the plug is inserted into an output jack for an electric guitar, the body is rigidly carried by the guitar, and the guitar is operatively connected to the electrical amplifying and signal processing system without use of a loose interconnection cable. The amplifier is provided with an output jack, into which headphones are plugged to receive amplified signals from the guitar. By eliminating the conventional interconnection cable, the amplifier of the present invention can be used by musicians with increased flexibility and greater freedom of movement.

  19. High power testing of a fused quartz-based dielectric-loaded accelerating structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Power, J. G.; Konecny, R.; Gai, W.; Yusof, Z.; Gold, S. H.; Kinkead, A.; Dolgashev, V.; Tantawi, S. G.; Jing, C.; High Energy Physics; Euclid techlabs, LLC; LET Corp.; SLAC; NRL

    2008-01-01

    We report on the most recent results from a series of high power tests being carried out on rf-driven dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures. The purpose of these tests is to determine the viability of the DLA as a traveling-wave accelerator and is a collaborative effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). In this paper, we report on the recent high power tests of a fused quartz-based DLA structure that was carried out at incident powers of up to 12 MW at NRL and 37 MW at SLAC. We also report on test results of a TiN coated quartz structure, that exhibits good multipactor suppression.

  20. High Power Testing of A Fused Quartz-based Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Power, J.G.; Konecny, R.; Gai, W.; Yusof, Z.; Gold, S.H.; Kinkead, A.K.; Dolgashev, V.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2007-11-07

    We report on the most recent results from a series of high power tests being carried out on rf-driven dielectric loaded accelerating (DLA) structures. The purpose of these tests is to determine the viability of the DLA as a traveling-wave accelerator and is a collaborative effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). In this paper, we report on the recent high power tests of a fused quartz-based DLA structure that was carried out at incident powers of up to 12 MW at NRL and 37 MW at SLAC. We also report on test results of a TiN coated quartz structure, that exhibits good multipactor suppression.

  1. A Dual-Moded Cavity for RF Breakdown Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, Christopher; Adolphsen, Chris; Wang, Faya; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    The phenomenon of rf breakdown presents a technological limitation in the application of high-gradient particle acceleration in normal conducting rf structures. Attempts to understand the onset of this phenomenon and to study its limits with different materials, cell shapes, and pulse widths has been driven in recent years by linear collider development. One question of interest is the role magnetic field plays relative to electric field. A design is presented for a single, nonaccelerating, rf cavity resonant in two modes, which, driven independently, allow the rf magnetic field to be increased on the region of highest electric field without affecting the latter. The design allows for the potential reuse of the cavity with different samples in the high-field region. High power data is not yet available.

  2. RF pulse compression in the NLC test accelerator at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavine, Theodore L.

    1995-07-01

    At the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), we are designing a Next Linear Collider (NLC) with linacs powered by X-band klystrons with rf pulse compression. The design of the linac rf system is based on X-band prototypes which have been tested at high power, and on a systems-integration test—the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA)—which is currently under construction at SLAC. This paper discusses some of the systems implications of rf pulse compression, and the use of pulse compression in the NLCTA, both for peak power multiplication and for controlling, by rf phase modulation, intra-pulse variations in the linac beam energy.

  3. Some Aspects of the Moscow Meson Factory DTL RF System Tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvasha, A. I.

    1997-05-01

    In this paper the consideration of RF system tuning is ot limited by problems of getting of the demanded level of the RF power in a RF load only as it is supposed that the RF system includes in its the full equipment which provides an acceleration of charge particles i.e. a tank, a coupling loop, a feeder line and RF channel with RF amplifiers and power supply. The simple connection of separate parts of this equipment with each other (after their prelemenary autonomous tuning) can sometimes lead to undesirable results such as: -tank detuning due to an interaction between a fast automatic phase control system (APCS) and automatic frequency control system; - a deterioration of an accelerating field stabilization due to an interaction between a fast APCS and a fast automatic amplitude control system; - an overvoltage in the network of the output RF amplifier H/V supply; - an overvoltage in the anode-grid cavity of the RF output amplifier because of "discharge" of an energy, stored in the tank during an RF pulse. Some proposals verified at the MMF DTL which partly exclude above- mentioned undesirable effects are discussed.

  4. A project of accelerator-recuperator for Novosibirsk high-power FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotin, V. P.; Vinokurov, N. A.; Kayran, D. A.; Knyazev, B. A.; Kolobanov, E. I.; Kotenkov, V. V.; Kubarev, V. V.; Kulipanov, G. N.; Matveenko, A. N.; Medvedev, L. E.; Miginsky, S. V.; Mironenko, L. A.; Oreshkov, A. D.; Ovchar, V. K.; Popik, V. M.; Salikova, T. V.; Serednyakov, S. S.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Tcheskidov, V. G.; Shevchenko, O. A.; Scheglov, M. A.

    2006-12-01

    The first stage of the Novosibirsk high-power free-electron laser (FEL) was commissioned in 2003. It is driven by a CW energy recovery linac. The next step will be the full-scale machine, a four-track accelerator-recuperator based on the same RF accelerating structure. This upgrade will permit to get shorter wavelengths in the infrared region and increase the average power of the FEL by several times. The scheme and some technical details of the project are set out. The installation will be a prototype for future multiturn accelerator-recuperators.

  5. High-Power Fiber Lasers Using Photonic Band Gap Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiDomenico, Leo; Dowling, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers (HPFLs) would be made from photonic band gap (PBG) materials, according to the proposal. Such lasers would be scalable in the sense that a large number of fiber lasers could be arranged in an array or bundle and then operated in phase-locked condition to generate a superposition and highly directed high-power laser beam. It has been estimated that an average power level as high as 1,000 W per fiber could be achieved in such an array. Examples of potential applications for the proposed single-fiber lasers include welding and laser surgery. Additionally, the bundled fibers have applications in beaming power through free space for autonomous vehicles, laser weapons, free-space communications, and inducing photochemical reactions in large-scale industrial processes. The proposal has been inspired in part by recent improvements in the capabilities of single-mode fiber amplifiers and lasers to produce continuous high-power radiation. In particular, it has been found that the average output power of a single strand of a fiber laser can be increased by suitably changing the doping profile of active ions in its gain medium to optimize the spatial overlap of the electromagnetic field with the distribution of active ions. Such optimization minimizes pump power losses and increases the gain in the fiber laser system. The proposal would expand the basic concept of this type of optimization to incorporate exploitation of the properties (including, in some cases, nonlinearities) of PBG materials to obtain power levels and efficiencies higher than are now possible. Another element of the proposal is to enable pumping by concentrated sunlight. Somewhat more specifically, the proposal calls for exploitation of the properties of PBG materials to overcome a number of stubborn adverse phenomena that have impeded prior efforts to perfect HPFLs. The most relevant of those phenomena is amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), which causes saturation of gain and power

  6. Beam shaping in high-power laser systems with using refractive beam shapers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim

    2012-06-01

    Beam Shaping of the spatial (transverse) profile of laser beams is highly desirable by building optical systems of high-power lasers as well in various applications with these lasers. Pumping of the crystals of Ti:Sapphire lasers by the laser radiation with uniform (flattop) intensity profile improves performance of these ultrashort pulse high-power lasers in terms of achievable efficiency, peak-power and stability, output beam profile. Specifications of the solid-state lasers built according to MOPA configuration can be also improved when radiation of the master oscillator is homogenized and then is amplified by the power amplifier. Features of building these high power lasers require that a beam shaping solution should be capable to work with single mode and multimode beams, provide flattop and super-Gauss intensity distributions, the consistency and divergence of a beam after the intensity re-distribution should be conserved and low absorption provided. These specific conditions are perfectly fulfilled by the refractive field mapping beam shapers due to their unique features: almost lossless intensity profile transformation, low output divergence, high transmittance and flatness of output beam profile, extended depth of field, adaptability to real intensity profiles of TEM00 and multimode laser sources. Combining of the refractive field mapping beam shapers with other optical components, like beam-expanders, relay imaging lenses, anamorphic optics makes it possible to generate the laser spots of necessary shape, size and intensity distribution. There are plenty of applications of high-power lasers where beam shaping bring benefits: irradiating photocathode of Free Electron Lasers (FEL), material ablation, micromachining, annealing in display making techniques, cladding, heat treating and others. This paper will describe some design basics of refractive beam shapers of the field mapping type, with emphasis on the features important for building and applications

  7. High power time domain terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graber, Benjamin

    Terahertz (THz) has become a strong area for scientific research and commercial application in recent years. This research group has redesigned and optimized a THz photoconductive antenna, which currently operates with approximately 10x the power of a commercial antenna. It has been determined by this research that the THz signal emitted from a photoconductive antenna consists of coherent and incoherent signals. In addition to the improvement of the THz photoconductive antenna, I have optimized an electro optic THz detection system by characterizing the field dependency of an electro optic crystal, which enabled me to estimate the THz electric field strength. The high power THz source and optimized detection system were combined into a high power, high resolution time domain THz spectrometer. This spectrometer was used to conduct original measurements of the THz spectrum of water vapor, ionized air, and various chemical vapor including explosives. Most of these measurements were only possible with our improved THz spectrometer. In order to understand ionized air, an additional study was carried out to explore the ionization of several gases (e.g. N2, O2, Ar, CO2, and water vapor) which were ionized by radioactive isotopes. This unique study found that in addition to dose rate, the gamma energy of the radioactive isotopes and the sequential ionization levels of gases affect the equilibrium ion densities of these gases. This effect was especially pronounced for argon gas. The study of ion dynamics in gases has lead to the development of a prototype for stand-off detection and identification of radioactive isotopes. This prototype, despite being simple in design, can detect isotopes faster and more cheaply than a conventional gamma ray spectrometer. Throughout this thesis research I have successfully developed a high power, high resolution terahertz spectrometer and demonstrated that with the spectrometer I could identify characteristic resonances of water vapor, some

  8. Versatile Low Level RF System For Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, James M.

    2011-06-01

    The Low Level RF (LLRF) system is the source of all of the rf signals required for an rf linear accelerator. These signals are amplified to drive accelerator and buncher cavities. It can even provide the synchronizing signal for the rf power for a synchrotron. The use of Direct Digital Synthesis (DDS) techniques results in a versatile system that can provide multiple coherent signals at the same or different frequencies with adjustable amplitudes and phase relations. Pulsing the DDS allows rf switching with an essentially infinite on/off ratio. The LLRF system includes a versatile phase detector that allows phase-locking the rf frequency to a cavity at any phase angle over the full 360 deg. range. With the use of stepper motor driven slug tuners multiple cavity resonant frequencies can be phase locked to the rf source frequency. No external phase shifters are required and there is no feedback loop phase setup required. All that is needed is to turn the frequency feedback on. The use of Digital Signal Processing (DSP) allows amplitude and phase control over the entire rf pulse. This paper describes the basic principles of a LLRF system that has been used for both proton accelerators and electron accelerators, including multiple tank accelerators, sub-harmonic and fundamental bunchers, and synchrotrons.

  9. Versatile Low Level RF System For Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, James M.

    2011-06-01

    The Low Level RF (LLRF) system is the source of all of the rf signals required for an rf linear accelerator. These signals are amplified to drive accelerator and buncher cavities. It can even provide the synchronizing signal for the rf power for a synchrotron. The use of Direct Digital Synthesis (DDS) techniques results in a versatile system that can provide multiple coherent signals at the same or different frequencies with adjustable amplitudes and phase relations. Pulsing the DDS allows rf switching with an essentially infinite on/off ratio. The LLRF system includes a versatile phase detector that allows phase-locking the rf frequency to a cavity at any phase angle over the full 360° range. With the use of stepper motor driven slug tuners multiple cavity resonant frequencies can be phase locked to the rf source frequency. No external phase shifters are required and there is no feedback loop phase setup required. All that is needed is to turn the frequency feedback on. The use of Digital Signal Processing (DSP) allows amplitude and phase control over the entire rf pulse. This paper describes the basic principles of a LLRF system that has been used for both proton accelerators and electron accelerators, including multiple tank accelerators, sub-harmonic and fundamental bunchers, and synchrotrons.

  10. E3000 High Power SADM development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamford, Steve G.; McMahon, Paul

    2003-09-01

    Astrium UK has been actively involved in the study, design, development, manufacture and test of Solar Array Drive Mechanisms (SADMs) and Bearing and Power Transfer Assemblies (BAPTAs) since the early 1970s having delivered 105 of these mechanisms to 22 spacecraft programs. As a result Astrium UK has accumulated in excess of 700 years of failure free SADM operation in-orbit. During that period power transfer requirements have grown steadily from below 1kW to 9.9kW and beyond. With this increase in power handling capability comes the associated problem of handling and dissipating the heat being generated within the SADM. The Eurostar 2000 family of SADMs were designed to handle up to 5.6kW for the E2000 family of spacecraft but the High Power SADM was conceived to meet the needs of the much bigger Eurostar 3000 family of spacecraft that could potentially grow to 15kW.

  11. High power density solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-10-12

    A method for producing ultra-high power density solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The method involves the formation of a multilayer structure cells wherein a buffer layer of doped-ceria is deposited intermediate a zirconia electrolyte and a cobalt iron based electrode using a colloidal spray deposition (CSD) technique. For example, a cobalt iron based cathode composed of (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O (LSCF) may be deposited on a zirconia electrolyte via a buffer layer of doped-ceria deposited by the CSD technique. The thus formed SOFC have a power density of 1400 mW/cm.sup.2 at 600.degree. C. and 900 mW/cm.sup.2 at 700.degree. C. which constitutes a 2-3 times increased in power density over conventionally produced SOFCs.

  12. High power performance limits of fiber components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holehouse, Nigel; Magné, Julien; Auger, Mathieu

    2015-03-01

    High power combiners are essential for practical fiber lasers, recent developments in pump technology has increased the available brightness and power of pumps significantly, enabling multi kW lasers and pushing combiner designs to new limits. I will present the challenges, measurements and some solutions to these issues. Traditional calculations for combiners underestimate the issues associated with the `tails' of the pump NA distribution, losses in fully filled combiners increase rapidly as pump NA blooms, and subsequent heating effects dominate the combiner's power handling. Acrylate coated pump fibers are reaching their limits and devices and measurements on double clad pump combiners with losses <0.05dB, will be presented enabling multi kW operation, The use of triple clad fibers in the gain section will discussed as a solution for multi kW applications. Results on ultra-low background loss FBG's will be presented, along with developed measurement techniques.

  13. Deformable mirror for high power laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrň; a, Libor; Sarbort, Martin; Hola, Miroslava

    2015-01-01

    The modern trend in high power laser applications such as welding, cutting and surface hardening lies in the use of solid-state lasers. The output beam of these lasers is characterized by a Gaussian intensity distribution. However, the laser beams with different intensity distributions, e.g. top-hat, are preferable in various applications. In this paper we present a new type of deformable mirror suitable for the corresponding laser beam shaping. The deformation of the mirror is achieved by an underlying array of actuators and a pressurized coolant that also provides the necessary cooling. We describe the results of the surface shape measurement using a 3D scanner for different settings of actuators. Further, we show the achieved intensity distributions measured by a beam profiler for a low power laser beam reflected from the mirror.

  14. Feedthrough terminal for high-power cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1982-05-28

    A feedthrough terminal for a high power electrochemical storage cell providing low resistance coupling to the conductive elements therein while isolating the terminal electrode from the highly corrosive environment within the cell is disclosed. A large diameter, cylindrical copper electrode is enclosed in a stainless steel tube with a BN powder feedthrough seal maintained around the stainless steel tube by means of facing insulative bushings and an outer sleeve. One end of the copper conductor is silver-brazed directly to a flat, butterfly bus bar within the cell, with the adjacent end of the surrounding outer feedthrough sleeve welded to the bus bar. A threaded seal is fixedly positioned on a distal portion of the stainless steel tube immediately adjacent the distal insulative bushing so as to compress the feedthrough seal in tight fitting relation around the stainless steel tube in providing a rugged, leak-proof electrical feedthrough terminal for the power cell.

  15. Tapered fiber based high power random laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanwei; Du, Xueyuan; Zhou, Pu; Wang, Xiaolin; Xu, Xiaojun

    2016-04-18

    We propose a novel high power random fiber laser (RFL) based on tapered fiber. It can overcome the power scaling limitation of RFL while maintaining good beam quality to a certain extent. An output power of 26.5 W has been achieved in a half-open cavity with one kilometer long tapered fiber whose core diameter gradually changes from 8 μm to 20 μm. The steady-state light propagation equations have been modified by taking into account the effective core area to demonstrate the tapered RFL through numerical calculations. The numerical model effectively describes the power characteristics of the tapered fiber based RFL, and both the calculating and experimental results show higher power exporting potential compared with the conventional single mode RFL. PMID:27137338

  16. Silver based batteries for high power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpinski, A. P.; Russell, S. J.; Serenyi, J. R.; Murphy, J. P.

    The present status of silver oxide-zinc technology and applications has been described by Karpinski et al. [A.P. Karpinski, B. Makovetski, S.J. Russell, J.R. Serenyi, D.C. Williams, Silver-Zinc: status of technology and applications, Journal of Power Sources, 80 (1999) 53-60], where the silver-zinc couple is still the preferred choice where high specific energy/energy density, coupled with high specific power/power density are important for high-rate, weight or size/configuration sensitive applications. Perhaps the silver oxide cathode can be considered one of the most versatile electrode materials. When coupled with other anodes and corresponding electrolyte management system, the silver electrode provides for a wide array of electrochemical systems that can be tailored to meet the most demanding, high power requirements. Besides zinc, the most notable include cadmium, iron, metal hydride, and hydrogen electrode for secondary systems, while primary systems include lithium and aluminum. Alloys including silver are also available, such as silver chloride, which when coupled with magnesium or aluminum are primarily used in many seawater applications. The selection and use of these couples is normally the result of a trade-off of many factors. These include performance, safety, risk, reliability, and cost. When high power is required, silver oxide-zinc, silver oxide-aluminum, and silver oxide-lithium are the most energetic. For moderate performance (i.e., lower power), silver oxide-zinc or silver-cadmium would be the system of choice. This paper summarizes the suitability of the silver-based couples, with an emphasis on the silver-zinc system, as primary or rechargeable power sources for high energy/power applications.

  17. Microstructured fibers for high power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, J. C.; Petrovich, M. N.; Hayes, J. R.; Finazzi, V.; Poletti, F.; Amezcua, R.; Broderick, N. G. R.; Richardson, D. J.; Monro, T. M.; Salter, P. L.; Proudley, G.; O'Driscoll, E. J.

    2005-10-01

    Fiber delivery of intense laser radiation is important for a broad range of application sectors, from medicine through to industrial laser processing of materials, and offers many practical system design and usage benefits relative to free space solutions. Optical fibers for high power transmission applications need to offer low optical nonlinearity and high damage thresholds. Single-mode guidance is also often a fundamental requirement for the many applications in which good beam quality is critical. In recent years, microstructured fiber technology has revolutionized the dynamic field of optical fibers, bringing with them a wide range of novel optical properties. These fibers, in which the cladding region is peppered with many small air holes, are separated into two distinct categories, defined by the way in which they guide light: (1) index-guiding holey fibers (HFs), in which the core is solid and light is guided by a modified form of total internal reflection, and (2) photonic band-gap fibers (PBGFs) in which guidance in a hollow core can be achieved via photonic band-gap effects. Both of these microstructured fiber types offer attractive qualities for beam delivery applications. For example, using HF technology, large-mode-area, pure silica fibers with robust single-mode guidance over broad wavelength ranges can be routinely fabricated. In addition, the ability to guide light in an air-core within PBGFs presents obvious power handling advantages. In this paper we review the fundamentals and current status of high power, high brightness, beam delivery in HFs and PBGFs, and speculate as to future prospects.

  18. Amplified spontaneous emission in Cassegrainian amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eimerl, David

    1987-05-01

    The paper considers all possible paths for amplifed spontaneous emission (ASE) in multipass laser amplifiers using a Cassegranian telescope geometry. In particular, ASE which is reflected back into the medium off the telescope mirrors themselves is studied. These ASE components are unavoidable in this amplifier geometry. It is shown that there is a component of the ASE which makes approximately double the number of passes through the amplifier as the laser signal makes. It is also shown that these high-order ASE components are also present in amplifiers which are almost Cassegrainian. They cannot be eliminated by changing the ratio of the scraper and hole radii or the separation of the mirrors. It is likely that these ASE components will be more significant in pulsed lasers than CW lasers.

  19. Laser amplifier chain

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.

    1992-10-20

    A laser amplifier chain has a plurality of laser amplifiers arranged in a chain to sequentially amplify a low-power signal beam to produce a significantly higher-power output beam. Overall efficiency of such a chain is improved if high-gain, low efficiency amplifiers are placed on the upstream side of the chain where only a very small fraction of the total pumped power is received by the chain and low-gain, high-efficiency amplifiers are placed on the downstream side where a majority of pumping energy is received by the chain. 6 figs.

  20. Laser amplifier chain

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    A laser amplifier chain has a plurality of laser amplifiers arranged in a chain to sequentially amplify a low-power signal beam to produce a significantly higher-power output beam. Overall efficiency of such a chain is improved if high-gain, low efficiency amplifiers are placed on the upstream side of the chain where only a very small fraction of the total pumped power is received by the chain and low-gain, high-efficiency amplifiers are placed on the downstream side where a majority of pumping energy is received by the chain.

  1. Microfluidic stretchable RF electronics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2010-12-01

    Stretchable electronics is a revolutionary technology that will potentially create a world of radically different electronic devices and systems that open up an entirely new spectrum of possibilities. This article proposes a microfluidic based solution for stretchable radio frequency (RF) electronics, using hybrid integration of active circuits assembled on flex foils and liquid alloy passive structures embedded in elastic substrates, e.g. polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This concept was employed to implement a 900 MHz stretchable RF radiation sensor, consisting of a large area elastic antenna and a cluster of conventional rigid components for RF power detection. The integrated radiation sensor except the power supply was fully embedded in a thin elastomeric substrate. Good electrical performance of the standalone stretchable antenna as well as the RF power detection sub-module was verified by experiments. The sensor successfully detected the RF radiation over 5 m distance in the system demonstration. Experiments on two-dimensional (2D) stretching up to 15%, folding and twisting of the demonstrated sensor were also carried out. Despite the integrated device was severely deformed, no failure in RF radiation sensing was observed in the tests. This technique illuminates a promising route of realizing stretchable and foldable large area integrated RF electronics that are of great interest to a variety of applications like wearable computing, health monitoring, medical diagnostics, and curvilinear electronics.

  2. Advanced RF power sources for linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1996-10-01

    In order to maintain a reasonable over-all length at high center-of-mass energy, the main linac of an electron-positron linear collider must operate at a high accelerating gradient. For copper (non-superconducting) accelerator structures, this implies a high peak power per unit length and a high peak power per RF source, assuming a limited number of discrete sources are used. To provide this power, a number of devices are currently under active development or conceptual consideration: conventional klystrons with multi-cavity output structures, gyroklystrons, magnicons, sheet-beam klystrons, multiple-beam klystrons and amplifiers based on the FEL principle. To enhance the peak power produced by an rf source, the SLED rf pulse compression scheme is currently in use on existing linacs, and new compression methods that produce a flatter output pulse are being considered for future linear colliders. This paper covers the present status and future outlook for the more important rf power sources and pulse compression systems. It should be noted that high gradient electron linacs have applications in addition to high-energy linear colliders; they can, for example, serve as compact injectors for FEL`s and storage rings.

  3. The IPNS second harmonic RF upgrade.

    SciTech Connect

    Middendorf, M. E.; Brumwell, F. R.; Dooling, J. C.; Horan, D.; Kustom, R. L.; Lien, M. K.; McMichael, G. E.; Moser, M. R.; Nassiri, A.; Wang, S.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2008-01-01

    The intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS) rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) is used to accelerate protons from 50 MeV to 450 MeV, at a repetition rate of 30 Hz. The original ring design included two identical rf systems, each consisting of an accelerating cavity, cavity bias supply, power amplifiers and low-level analog electronics. The original cavities are located 180 degrees apart in the ring and provide a total peak accelerating voltage of {approx}21 kV over the 2.21-MHz to 5.14-MHz revolution frequency sweep. A third rf system has been constructed and installed in the RCS. The third rf system is capable of operating at the fundamental revolution frequency for the entire acceleration cycle, providing an additional peak accelerating voltage of up to {approx}11 kV, or at the second harmonic of the revolution frequency for the first {approx}4 ms of the acceleration cycle, providing an additional peak voltage of up to {approx}11 kV for bunch shape control. We describe here the hardware implementation and operation to date of the third rf cavity in the second harmonic mode.

  4. Phase stable RF transport system

    DOEpatents

    Curtin, Michael T.; Natter, Eckard F.; Denney, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    An RF transport system delivers a phase-stable RF signal to a load, such as an RF cavity of a charged particle accelerator. A circuit generates a calibration signal at an odd multiple frequency of the RF signal where the calibration signal is superimposed with the RF signal on a common cable that connects the RF signal with the load. Signal isolating diplexers are located at both the RF signal source end and load end of the common cable to enable the calibration to be inserted and extracted from the cable signals without any affect on the RF signal. Any phase shift in the calibration signal during traverse of the common cable is then functionally related to the phase shift in the RF signal. The calibration phase shift is used to control a phase shifter for the RF signal to maintain a stable RF signal at the load.

  5. Controlling satellite communication system unwanted emissions in congested RF spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Donald; Heymann, Roger

    2007-09-01

    , developed by the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI). In the USA, the Advanced Television Systems Committee (ATSC) has adopted Europe's DVB-S and DVB-S2 standards for satellite digital transmission. With today's digital modulations, RF spectral side lobes can extend out many times the modulating frequency on either side of the carrier at excessive power levels unless filtered. Higher-order digital modulations include quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK), 8 PSK (8-ary phase shift keying), 16 APSK (also called 12-4 APSK (amplitude phase shift keying)), and 16 QAM (quadrature amplitude modulation); they are key for higher spectrum efficiency to enable higher data rate transmissions in limited available bandwidths. Nonlinear high-power amplifiers (HPAs) can regenerate frequency spectral side lobes on input-filtered digital modulations. The paper discusses technologies and techniques for controlling these spectral side lobes, such as the use of square root raised cosine (SRRC) filtering before or during the modulation process, HPA output power back-off (OPBO), and RF filters after the HPA. Spectral mask specifications are a common method of the NTIA and ITU to define spectral occupancy power limits. They are intended to reduce interference among RF spectrum users by limiting excessive radiation at frequencies beyond the regulatory allocated bandwidth.The focus here is on the communication systems of U.S. government satellites used for space research, space operations, Earth exploration satellite services (EESS), meteorological satellite services (METSATS), and other government services. The 8025 to 8400 megahertz (MHz) X band can be used to illustrate the "unwanted emissions" issue. 8025 to 8400 MHz abuts the 8400 to 8450 MHz band allocated by the NTIA and ITU to space research for space-to-Earth transmissions such as receiving very weak Deep Space Network signals. The views and ideas expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily

  6. Compact rf polarizer and its application to pulse compression systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzi, Matthew; Wang, Juwen; Dolgashev, Valery; Tantawi, Sami

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel method of reducing the footprint and increasing the efficiency of the modern multi-MW rf pulse compressor. This system utilizes a high power rf polarizer to couple two circular waveguide modes in quadrature to a single resonant cavity in order to replicate the response of a traditional two cavity configuration using a 4-port hybrid. The 11.424 GHz, high-Q, spherical cavity has a 5.875 cm radius and is fed by the circularly polarized signal to simultaneously excite the degenerate T E114 modes. The overcoupled spherical cavity has a Q0 of 9.4 ×104 and coupling factor (β ) of 7.69 thus providing a loaded quality factor QL of 1.06 ×104 with a fill time of 150 ns. Cold tests of the polarizer demonstrated good agreement with the numerical design, showing transmission of -0.05 dB and reflection back to the input rectangular WR 90 waveguide less than -40 dB over a 100 MHz bandwidth. This novel rf pulse compressor was tested at SLAC using XL-4 Klystron that provided rf power up to 32 MW and generated peak output power of 205 MW and an average of 135 MW over the discharged signal. A general network analysis of the polarizer is discussed as well as the design and high power test of the rf pulse compressor.

  7. An Efficient RF Source for Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, M.; Dudas, A.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Haipeng

    2013-12-01

    We propose the development of a highly reliable high efficiency RF source for JLAB with a lower lifetime cost operating at 80% efficiency with system operating costs of about 0.7M$/year for the 6 GeV machine. The design of the RF source will be based upon two injection locked magnetrons in a novel combining architecture for amplitude modulation and a cross field amplifier (CFA) as an output tube for the 12 GeV upgrade. A cost analysis including efficiency and reliability will be performed to determine the optimum system architecture. Several different system architectures will be designed and evaluated for a dual injection locked magnetron source using novel combining techniques and possibly a CFA as the output tube. A paper design for the 1497 MHz magnetron system will be completed. The optimum system architecture with all relevant specifications will be completed so that a prototype can be built.

  8. K-Band Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Force, Dale A.; Simons, Rainee N.; Peterson, Todd T.; Spitsen, Paul C.

    2010-01-01

    A new space-qualified, high-power, high-efficiency, K-band traveling-wave tube amplifier (TWTA) will provide high-rate, high-capacity, direct-to-Earth communications for science data and video gathered by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) during its mission. Several technological advances were responsible for the successful demonstration of the K-band TWTA.

  9. High-Power Magnetoplasmadynamic Thruster Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Michael R.

    2001-01-01

    High-power electromagnetic thrusters have been proposed as primary in-space propulsion options for several of the bold new interplanetary and deep space missions envisioned by the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Strategic Enterprise. As the lead center for electric propulsion, the NASA Glenn Research Center is actively involved in the design, development, and testing of high-power electromagnetic technologies to meet these demanding mission requirements. One concept of particular interest is the magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster, shown schematically in the preceding figure. In its basic form, the MPD thruster consists of a central cathode surrounded by a concentric cylindrical anode. A high-current arc is struck between the anode and cathode, which ionizes and accelerates a gas (plasma) propellant. In the self-field version of the thruster, an azimuthal magnetic field generated by the current returning through the cathode interacts with the radial discharge current flowing through the plasma to produce an axial electromagnetic body force, providing thrust. In applied field-versions of the thruster, a magnetic field coil surrounding the anode is used to provide additional radial and axial magnetic fields that can help stabilize and accelerate the plasma propellant. The following figure shows an experimental megawatt-class MPD thruster developed at Glenn. The MPD thruster is fitted inside a magnetic field coil, which in turn is mounted on a thrust stand supported by thin metal flexures. A calibrated position transducer is used to determine the force provided by the thruster as a function of thrust stand displacement. Power to the thruster is supplied by a 250-kJ capacitor bank, which provides up to 30- MW to the thruster for a period of 2 msec. This short period of time is sufficient to establish thruster performance similar to steady-state operation, and it allows a number of thruster designs to be quickly and economically evaluated. In concert

  10. Rheumatoid factor (RF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections Leukemia , multiple myeloma , and other cancers Chronic lung disease Chronic liver disease In some cases, people who are healthy and have no other medical problem will have a higher-than-normal RF level.

  11. Rf power sources

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.

    1988-05-01

    This paper covers RF power sources for accelerator applications. The approach has been with particular customers in mind. These customers are high energy physicists who use accelerators as experimental tools in the study of the nucleus of the atom, and synchrotron light sources derived from electron or positron storage rings. This paper is confined to electron-positron linear accelerators since the RF sources have always defined what is possible to achieve with these accelerators. 11 refs., 13 figs.

  12. Microbunching and RF Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-05-23

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  13. Rf power sources for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Caryotakis, G.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Farkas, Z.D.; Fowkes, W.R.; Hoag, H.A.; Feinstein, J.; Ko, K.; Koontz, R.F.; Kroll, N.M.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Nelson, E.M.; Ruth, R.D.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B. ); Boyd, J.K.; Houk, T.; Ryne, R.D.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S. (Lawrence Live

    1990-06-01

    The next generation of linear colliders requires peak power sources of over 200 MW per meter at frequencies above 10 GHz at pulse widths of less than 100 nsec. Several power sources are under active development, including a conventional klystron with rf pulse compression, a relativistic klystron (RK) and a crossed-field amplifier. Power from one of these has energized a 0.5 meter two- section High Gradient Accelerator (HGA) and accelerated a beam at over 80 MeV meter. Results of tests with these experimental devices are presented here.

  14. Anode arc motion in high power arcjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, W. J.; O'Hair, E. A.; Hatfield, L. L.; Kristiansen, M.; Mankins, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    The long-term operational lifetime of most medium to high power arcjets is currently limited by the rapid deterioration of the arcjet electrodes. To a large extent, the rate of this deterioration is related to the motion of the arc discharge on the electrode surfaces. This paper details a series of experiments aimed at studying the temporal behavior of dc arcs on a water-cooled radially-segmented 30 kW class arcjet anode. The experimental anode used for these tests was made of copper, and was divided into four equivalent radial segments which were electrically isolated with aluminum oxide gaskets. The current carried by each segment was measured independently using four calibrated resistive shunts, and was analyzed by digital computer. The tests were limited to nitrogen propellant over a current range of 100-250 A dc. Results show that for the range of total currents considered here, the current distribution in the segmented arcjet anode is generally asymmetric, exhibiting random fluctuations over a wide range of frequencies.

  15. Improved Collectors for High Power Gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Singh, Amarjit; Read, Michael; Borchard, Phillipp; Neilson, Jeff

    2009-05-20

    High power gyrotrons are used for electron cyclotron heating, current drive and parasitic mode suppression in tokamaks for fusion energy research. These devices are crucial for successful operation of many research programs around the world, including the ITER program currently being constructed in France. Recent gyrotron failures resulted from cyclic fatigue of the copper material used to fabricated the collectors. The techniques used to collect the spent beam power is common in many gyrotrons produced around the world. There is serious concern that these tubes may also be at risk from cyclic fatigue. This program addresses the cause of the collector failure. The Phase I program successfully demonstrated feasibility of a mode of operation that eliminates the cyclic operation that caused the failure. It also demonstrated that new material can provide increased lifetime under cyclic operation that could increase the lifetime by more than on order of magnitude. The Phase II program will complete that research and develop a collector that eliminates the fatigue failures. Such a design would find application around the world.

  16. Fibrous zinc anodes for high power batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. Gregory

    This paper introduces newly developed solid zinc anodes using fibrous material for high power applications in alkaline and large size zinc-air battery systems. The improved performance of the anodes in these two battery systems is demonstrated. The possibilities for control of electrode porosity and for anode/battery design using fibrous materials are discussed in light of experimental data. Because of its mechanical integrity and connectivity, the fibrous solid anode has good electrical conductivity, mechanical stability, and design flexibility for controlling mass distribution, porosity and effective surface area. Experimental data indicated that alkaline cells made of such anodes can have a larger capacity at high discharging currents than commercially available cells. It showed even greater improvement over commercial cells with a non-conventional cell design. Large capacity anodes for a zinc-air battery have also been made and have shown excellent material utilization at various discharge rates. The zinc-air battery was used to power an electric bicycle and demonstrated good results.

  17. On reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, J. T.

    2016-01-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is an ionized physical vapor deposition (IPVD) technique that is particularly promising for reactive sputtering applications. However, there are few issues that have to be resolved before the full potential of this technique can be realized. Here we give an overview of the key experimental findings for the reactive HiPIMS discharge. An increase in the discharge current is commonly observed with increased partial pressure of the reactive gas or decreased repetition pulse frequency. There are somewhat conflicting claims regarding the hysteresis effect in the reactive HiPIMS discharge as some report reduction or elimination of the hysteresis effect while others claim a feedback control is essential. The ion energy distribution of the metal ion and the atomic ion of the reactive gas are similar and extend to very high energies while the ion energy distribution of the working gas and the molecular ion of the reactive gas are similar and are much less energetic.

  18. Anode arc motion in high power arcjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, W. J.; O'Hair, E. A.; Hatfield, L. L.; Kristiansen, M.; Mankins, J. S.

    1992-07-01

    The long-term operational lifetime of most medium to high power arcjets is currently limited by the rapid deterioration of the arcjet electrodes. To a large extent, the rate of this deterioration is related to the motion of the arc discharge on the electrode surfaces. This paper details a series of experiments aimed at studying the temporal behavior of dc arcs on a water-cooled radially-segmented 30 kW class arcjet anode. The experimental anode used for these tests was made of copper, and was divided into four equivalent radial segments which were electrically isolated with aluminum oxide gaskets. The current carried by each segment was measured independently using four calibrated resistive shunts, and was analyzed by digital computer. The tests were limited to nitrogen propellant over a current range of 100-250 A dc. Results show that for the range of total currents considered here, the current distribution in the segmented arcjet anode is generally asymmetric, exhibiting random fluctuations over a wide range of frequencies.

  19. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-01-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  20. High power linear pulsed beam annealer

    DOEpatents

    Strathman, Michael D.; Sadana, Devendra K.; True, Richard B.

    1983-01-01

    A high power pulsed electron beam is produced in a system comprised of an electron gun having a heated cathode, control grid, focus ring, and a curved drift tube. The drift tube is maintained at a high positive voltage with respect to the cathode to accelerate electrons passing through the focus ring and to thereby eliminate space charge. A coil surrounding the curved drift tube provides a magnetic field which maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the tube and imparts motion on electrons in a spiral path for shallow penetration of the electrons into a target. The curvature of the tube is selected so there is no line of sight between the cathode and a target holder positioned within a second drift tube spaced coaxially from the curved tube. The second tube and the target holder are maintained at a reference voltage that decelerates the electrons. A second coil surrounding the second drift tube maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the second drift tube and compresses the electron beam to the area of the target. The target holder can be adjusted to position the target where the cross section of the beam matches the area of the target.